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Sample records for nevada community services

  1. Socioeconomic profile of Clark County, Nevada: Community services inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project is preparing socioeconomic profiles of Clark County, Nevada, and communities in Clark County that could be affected by siting, construction, operation, and decommissioning of a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, located in Nye County. These profiles serve as a data base for evaluating local community service impacts; store existing socioeconomic data in a uniform, readily accessible format; identify the need for additional data; and assist in developing a plan for monitoring and mitigating any significant adverse impacts that may be associated with site characterization and potential repository development. This element of the socioeconomic profiles contains an inventory of community services provided by local, county, and state agencies and volunteer organizations to residents of Las Vegas, North Las Vegas, Henderson, Boulder City, Indian Springs, and unincorporated areas of the county. Services inventoried include housing, growth management, general government, education, police protection, transportation networks, public clinics, private health personnel, parks and recreation, social services, libraries, ambulances, electric power, natural gas, water, sewers and wastewater treatment, solid waste, and fire protection. The report includes a summary overview of service providers in Clark County, discussions of the services provided to residents of communities in Clark County that may be affected by Project activities, and a description of service providers whose service areas are not limited to the incorporated areas of Clark County. Data presented in this profile were collected through March of 1985. Data collection efforts are ongoing and this profile will be updated periodically

  2. Socioeconomic profile of Nye County, Nevada: Community services inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project is preparing socioeconomic profiles of Nye County, Nevada, and communities in Nye County that could be affected by siting, construction, operation, and decommissioning of a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, located in Nye County. These profiles serve as a data base for evaluating local community service impacts; store existing socioeconomic data in a uniform, readily accessible format; identify the need for additional data; and assist in developing a plan for monitoring and mitigating any significant adverse impacts that may be associated with site characterization and potential repository development. This element of the socioeconomic profiles contains an inventory of community services provided by local, county, and state agencies and volunteer organizations to residents of Amargosa Valley, Beatty, and Pahrump. Services inventoried for each community include housing, growth management, general government, education, police protection, transportation networks, public clinics, private health personnel, parks and recreation, social services, libraries, ambulances, electric power, heating fuel, water, sewers and wastewater treatment, solid waste, and fire protection. The report includes a summary overview of service providers in Nye County, discussions of services provided to residents of the three communities, and summary tables. Data presented in this profile were collected through early 1985. Data collection efforts are ongoing and this profile will be updated periodically

  3. Science, engineering and technical service capabilities of Nevada higher education organizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The objective of this document is to increase the current dialogue between members of Nevada`s higher education system and the leadership of the federal scientific community in Nevada in order to start and expand collaborative relationships. This section provides introductory material on Nevada institutions of higher education and research together with background information on the need for increased federal collaboration with Nevada higher education institutions.

  4. 75 FR 44942 - 2015 Resource Pool-Sierra Nevada Customer Service Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-30

    ... the Sierra Nevada Customer Service Region (SNR) in the Federal Register on June 25, 1999. The... Anderson, Power Marketing Manager, Sierra Nevada Customer Service Region, Western Area Power Administration... INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Sonja Anderson, Power Marketing Manager, Sierra Nevada Customer Service Region...

  5. Inside externalities: The failure of Nevada Public Service general order 65

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, T.; Haberle, J. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1995-12-31

    {open_quotes}On January 27, 1991, the five Nevada Public Service Commissioners unanimously adopted a new rule designed to give appropriate preference to electricity generation which utilizes Nevada`s many sources of renewable energy and which provides a cleaner environment. The new rule should result in the expansion of indigenous geothermal electricity generation, the introduction of solar and wind generation in Nevada, and an evolution away from reliance on fossil fuels.{close_quotes}

  6. Community earthquake education in Nevada: The Great Nevada ShakeOut and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kell, A. M.; DePolo, D. M.; Rennie, T.; Kent, G.; Louie, J. N.; Smith, K. D.

    2011-12-01

    In the Nevada Seismological Laboratory, we have numerous opportunities to engage our community across all ages and particularly K-12 students in earth science. Our outreach includes seismic hazard awareness and earth science education, which is facilitated through a variety of means including facility tours, on-camera presentations (lab, in-the-field and in-studio), teacher workshops, installations at schools, and newspaper opportunities. During on-site visits, we describe the relationship between plate tectonics and earthquakes in our region, and how we record earthquake events within the Nevada Seismic Network. Depending on age levels, we describe how seismic waves travel through the Earth and how they are recorded by our network of seismometers and displayed by our bank of helicorders. During the Mar.-June 2008 Mogul earthquake swarm, several elementary schools hosted temporary seismometers. Their installation gave us opportunities for classroom presentations, and students could observe the installations. Beginning in 2010, we joined California a comprehensive statewide program, the Great Nevada ShakeOut, for earthquake education applied to all levels of educational institutions, government, businesses and interested community members. This is run in sync with the Great California ShakeOut, which is slated for the 3rd Thursday in October every year (e.g., 10:20 AM on 10/20/2011). In this program, we provide educators with information on how to react in the first moments of a significant earthquake. The teachers then rehearse the drill at the same time across the state while playing a recording of sounds one would expect to hear during such an event. With providing education to students on what hazards may exist in their own homes and the simple reaction of "Drop, Cover, Hold On", we hope to have the message carried outside of the classroom into their homes. We understand that by engaging the interest and encouraging excitement of our younger population, we can

  7. Community-monitoring program surrounding the Nevada Test Site: one year of experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, G.S.

    1983-05-01

    Since 1954, the US Public Health Service and later the US Environmental Protection Agency Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada, have been responsible for conducting a program of environmental radiation monitoring and public radiation safety associated with nuclear weapons tests conducted by the United States. A recent major innovation in this long-term program has been the establishment of a network of Community Monitoring Stations in 15 offsite communities. The new network supplements existing networks operated for nearly three decades in these and other offsite communities. It differs from other networks in the continuing offsite radiation monitoring and public safety program in that it incorporates Federal, State, and local Government participation. This report reviews the history of offsite radiation surveillance leading to institution of the new network and describes the first year of experience with its equipment, methodology, and management as well as its impact on citizens of the communities involved

  8. Service Station for the Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulk, Margaret E.; Blank, Gordon C.

    1977-01-01

    Western Piedmont Community College adopted the concept of a people-oriented Learning Resources Center with services offered to the entire college community through a learning laboratory, audiovisual center and library. (JG)

  9. Using epiphytic macrolichen communities for biomonitoring ammonia in forests of the greater Sierra Nevada, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarah Jovan; Bruce. Mccune

    2006-01-01

    Chronic, excessive nitrogen deposition is potentially an important ecological threat to forests of the greater Sierra Nevada in California. We developed a model for ammonia bioindication, a major nitrogen pollutant in the region, using epiphytic macrolichens. We used non-metric multidimensional scaling to extract gradients in lichen community composition from surveys...

  10. Final base case community analysis: Indian Springs, Nevada for the Clark County socioeconomic impact assessment of the proposed high- level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-06-18

    This document provides a base case description of the rural Clark County community of Indian Springs in anticipation of change associated with the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. As the community closest to the proposed site, Indian Springs may be seen by site characterization workers, as well as workers associated with later repository phases, as a logical place to live. This report develops and updates information relating to a broad spectrum of socioeconomic variables, thereby providing a `snapshot` or `base case` look at Indian Springs in early 1992. With this as a background, future repository-related developments may be analytically separated from changes brought about by other factors, thus allowing for the assessment of the magnitude of local changes associated with the proposed repository. Given the size of the community, changes that may be considered small in an absolute sense may have relatively large impacts at the local level. Indian Springs is, in many respects, a unique community and a community of contrasts. An unincorporated town, it is a small yet important enclave of workers on large federal projects and home to employees of small- scale businesses and services. It is a rural community, but it is also close to the urbanized Las Vega Valley. It is a desert community, but has good water resources. It is on flat terrain, but it is located within 20 miles of the tallest mountains in Nevada. It is a town in which various interest groups diverge on issues of local importance, but in a sense of community remains an important feature of life. Finally, it has a sociodemographic history of both surface transience and underlying stability. If local land becomes available, Indian Springs has some room for growth but must first consider the historical effects of growth on the town and its desired direction for the future.

  11. Final base case community analysis: Indian Springs, Nevada for the Clark County socioeconomic impact assessment of the proposed high- level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This document provides a base case description of the rural Clark County community of Indian Springs in anticipation of change associated with the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. As the community closest to the proposed site, Indian Springs may be seen by site characterization workers, as well as workers associated with later repository phases, as a logical place to live. This report develops and updates information relating to a broad spectrum of socioeconomic variables, thereby providing a 'snapshot' or 'base case' look at Indian Springs in early 1992. With this as a background, future repository-related developments may be analytically separated from changes brought about by other factors, thus allowing for the assessment of the magnitude of local changes associated with the proposed repository. Given the size of the community, changes that may be considered small in an absolute sense may have relatively large impacts at the local level. Indian Springs is, in many respects, a unique community and a community of contrasts. An unincorporated town, it is a small yet important enclave of workers on large federal projects and home to employees of small- scale businesses and services. It is a rural community, but it is also close to the urbanized Las Vega Valley. It is a desert community, but has good water resources. It is on flat terrain, but it is located within 20 miles of the tallest mountains in Nevada. It is a town in which various interest groups diverge on issues of local importance, but in a sense of community remains an important feature of life. Finally, it has a sociodemographic history of both surface transience and underlying stability. If local land becomes available, Indian Springs has some room for growth but must first consider the historical effects of growth on the town and its desired direction for the future

  12. Dataset of Passerine bird communities in a Mediterranean high mountain (Sierra Nevada, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Luque, Antonio Jesús; Barea-Azcón, José Miguel; Álvarez-Ruiz, Lola; Bonet-García, Francisco Javier; Zamora, Regino

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this data paper, a dataset of passerine bird communities is described in Sierra Nevada, a Mediterranean high mountain located in southern Spain. The dataset includes occurrence data from bird surveys conducted in four representative ecosystem types of Sierra Nevada from 2008 to 2015. For each visit, bird species numbers as well as distance to the transect line were recorded. A total of 27847 occurrence records were compiled with accompanying measurements on distance to the transect and animal counts. All records are of species in the order Passeriformes. Records of 16 different families and 44 genera were collected. Some of the taxa in the dataset are included in the European Red List. This dataset belongs to the Sierra Nevada Global-Change Observatory (OBSNEV), a long-term research project designed to compile socio-ecological information on the major ecosystem types in order to identify the impacts of global change in this area. PMID:26865820

  13. Dataset of Passerine bird communities in a Mediterranean high mountain (Sierra Nevada, Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Luque, Antonio Jesús; Barea-Azcón, José Miguel; Álvarez-Ruiz, Lola; Bonet-García, Francisco Javier; Zamora, Regino

    2016-01-01

    In this data paper, a dataset of passerine bird communities is described in Sierra Nevada, a Mediterranean high mountain located in southern Spain. The dataset includes occurrence data from bird surveys conducted in four representative ecosystem types of Sierra Nevada from 2008 to 2015. For each visit, bird species numbers as well as distance to the transect line were recorded. A total of 27847 occurrence records were compiled with accompanying measurements on distance to the transect and animal counts. All records are of species in the order Passeriformes. Records of 16 different families and 44 genera were collected. Some of the taxa in the dataset are included in the European Red List. This dataset belongs to the Sierra Nevada Global-Change Observatory (OBSNEV), a long-term research project designed to compile socio-ecological information on the major ecosystem types in order to identify the impacts of global change in this area.

  14. Health Hazards in the Home: An Assessment of a Southern Nevada Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowsky, Amanda; Marquez, Erika; Sheehy, Erin; Barber, Casey; Gerstenberger, Shawn

    2017-08-01

    As a sub-grantee of a Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes Program, the University of Nevada, Las Vegas' Department of Environmental and Occupational Health performed lead and Healthy Homes investigations and collected data regarding conditions in the home environment in Henderson, Nevada. The purpose of this research is to characterize housing conditions in southern Nevada, compare data to census data, and to highlight the health outcomes associated with adverse housing conditions. Visual home assessments were conducted in 106 homes in southern Nevada, and specific hazards were characterized using the Healthy Homes Rating System. The results were then compared, when possible, to American Housing Survey (AHS) data for the Las Vegas metropolitan area. Lead, domestic hygiene, carbon monoxide, damp and mold, excess cold and heat, and structural collapse were the most frequently identified hazards, found in at least 101 (90%) of participant households. Median household income of program participants was half (50%) that of the surrounding zip code, which was expected, as classification as "low-income" by HUD standards was a requirement for participation. Our data indicated that the AHS data may not be representative of very low income housing in southern Nevada and may underreport actual conditions. In-home inspections performed by trained personnel provide a more accurate picture of conditions than the self-report method used by the AHS. In addition, we recommend the development of a standardized Healthy Homes visual assessment tool to allow for the comparison of housing conditions between communities.

  15. The community service in Romania. The first community service workshop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şimon, M.

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at a topical and of great interest issue for the specialists working in the Reinstatement Service and also for those who are dealing with criminally sanctioned citizens. The current system of non-custodial sanctions existing in Romania is still in its beginning, providing few alternatives for obeying this type of punishments in a non-custodial framework but which is yet well organized and supervised. The intimation of this aspect and the desire to promote the non-custodial sanctions among the persons who have violated the criminal law, in 2009, led to the establishment of the first workshop of unpaid work in Romania. The interviews, with the specialists directly involved in this project, show that a sustained effort from the public and private community institutions, the community service workshops can be efficient and viable methods of social reintegration for the criminally sanctioned citizens.

  16. Dynamic provisioning for community services

    CERN Document Server

    Qi, Li

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic Provisioning for Community Services outlines a dynamic provisioning and maintenance mechanism in a running distributed system, e.g. the grid, which can be used to maximize the utilization of computing resources and user demands. The book includes a complete and reliable maintenance system solution for the large-scale distributed system and an interoperation mechanism for the grid middleware deployed in the United States, Europe, and China. The experiments and evaluations have all been practically implemented for ChinaGrid, and the best practices established can help readers to construc

  17. The assessment of radiation exposures in native American communities from nuclear weapons testing in Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frohmberg, E.; Goble, R.; Sanchez, V.; Quigley, D.

    2000-01-01

    Native Americans residing in a broad region downwind from the Nevada Test Site during the 1950s and 1960s received significant radiation exposures from nuclear weapons testing. Because of differences in diet, activities, and housing, their radiation exposures are only very imperfectly represented in the Department of Energy dose reconstructions. There are important missing pathways, including exposures to radioactive iodine from eating small game. The dose reconstruction model assumptions about cattle feeding practices across a year are unlikely to apply to the native communities as are other model assumptions about diet. Thus exposures from drinking milk and eating vegetables have not yet been properly estimated for these communities. Through consultations with members of the affected communities, these deficiencies could be corrected and the dose reconstruction extended to Native Americans. An illustration of the feasibility of extending the dose reconstruction is provided by a sample calculation to estimate radiation exposures to the thyroid from eating radio-iodine-contaminated rabbit thyroids after the Dedan test. The illustration is continued with a discussion of how the calculation results may be used to make estimates for other tests and other locations

  18. Bilingual professionals in community mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, P; Malak, A; Small, D

    1998-06-01

    This paper presents results from research that explored the roles of bilingual professionals in community mental health services in the Sydney metropolitan area of New South Wales. There were two main objectives to the research: (i) to identify and describe the roles of bilingual professionals that are important in improving the quality of community mental health services for clients from non-English-speaking backgrounds (NESB); and (ii) to identify and describe the factors that facilitate and inhibit the conduct of these roles. Data collection involved indepth interviews with bilingual professionals and team leaders in community mental health services and various other community health services; and various staff responsible for policy and service development with regard to cultural diversity. Bilingual mental health workers were found to have at least four critical roles. These were (i) direct clinical service provision to NESB clients; (ii) mental health promotion and community development; (iii) cultural consultancy; and (iv) service development. Respondents reported that the latter three roles were seriously underdeveloped compared to the clinical service provision role. It is critical that service managers implement strategies to make better use of the linguistic and cultural skills of bilingual professionals. In addition to their role in clinical service provision ways must be found to facilitate the community-focused, cultural consultancy and service development roles of bilingual professionals employed in mental health services.

  19. Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities. Volume Thirty. Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.

    1981-01-01

    A detailed description is given of the laws and programs of the State of Nevada governing the regulation of public energy utilities, the siting of energy generating and transmission facilities, the municipal franchising of public energy utilities, and the prescription of rates to be charged by utilities including attendant problems of cost allocations, rate base and operating expense determinations, and rate of return allowances. These laws and programs are analyzed to identify impediments which they may present to the implementation of Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). This report is one of fifty-one separate volumes which describe such regulatory programs at the Federal level and in each state as background to the report entitled Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities - Volume One: An Overview. This report also contains a summary of a strategy described in Volume One - An Overview for overcoming these impediments by working within the existing regulatory framework and by making changes in the regulatory programs to enhance the likelihood of ICES implementation.

  20. Student perceptions and attitudes about Community Service ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    findings indicated that students with prior knowledge of and/or participation in a community service project showed greater willingness to enrol for a course/ module in Community Service-Learning, especially if it would add value to their career development, bear credits, and enhance their personal and social development.

  1. Marketing Student Services in a Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culp, Marguerite McGann

    This paper applies business marketing principles to college student services, introduces a model for measuring the life cycle of a service, outlines strategic planning procedures, and describes the implementation of a comprehensive student service marketing program at Seminole Community College in Florida. An overview of marketing defines…

  2. Service delivery, community development, and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, John W

    2010-01-01

    Service delivery has traditionally been based on market forces. When this is the case, the community becomes a silent partner in this process. Services, accordingly, are directed mostly to correcting personal ills and have little to do with community uplift. Another model, based on the work of Amartya Sen, is available that conceptualizes interventions in a very different way. If understood in the context of community development, the focus of services is social change, rather than merely personal rehabilitation. This reorientation is discussed in this article.

  3. Managing Community Services in a Multicollege District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ray

    1976-01-01

    Describes the conflict between the pull toward greater centralization due to the increase in multi-institutional governance systems in community colleges, and the pull toward decentralization in order to make community services responsive to local needs. Presents a management model designed to resolve this conflict. (NHM)

  4. service-learning for sustainable community development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The article explores the necessary conditions for service-learning to make a viable and effective contribution to sustainable community development by critically analyzing a number of service-learning projects at the University of the Free State. From this analysis certain conclusions are drawn on necessary prerequisites for ...

  5. Pragmatism, Pedagogy, and Community Service Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Scot D.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper I explore Goodwin Liu's proposal to ground the pedagogy of service-learning in the epistemology of pragmatism from the perspective of a reflective practitioner. I review Liu's epistemology and his claim that from within it three features common to service-learning--community, diversity, and engagement--become pedagogical virtues. I…

  6. Community Service: Lessons from the Corporate World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porterfield, Kitty

    2003-01-01

    Describes several corporation-derived client-satisfaction and customer-service standards that principals can use to strengthen relationships with their parents and community. For example, only our clients can judge the quality of our service; our first job is to understand and manage our client's expectations; no matter what we do, some people…

  7. Enhancing Community Service Learning Via Practical Learning Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilana Ronen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The advantages of learning communities focused on analyzing social issues and educational repercussions in the field are presented in this study. The research examines the contribution of a learning community to enhancing student teachers' responsibility and their social involvement. The assumption was that participating in learning community would further implement student teachers' community social involvement while enhancing responsibility in their field of action. A questionnaire aimed to present the student teachers' attitudes involving all aspects of studying in the learning community and their social activity in the community was conducted. The findings pinpointed that there were positive contributions of the learning communities from a personal aspect such as developing self-learning, and learning about “me”, as well as broaden their teaching skills, through methodology for teacher training, and developing reflective thought. These insights can also be implemented in various educational frameworks and during service learning as part of teacher training.

  8. Utilization of a Technical Peer Review to Support the Mission of the Nevada Test Site Community Advisory Board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, Earle C.; Peterson, Kathleen

    2003-01-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) Environmental Management (EM) Underground Test Area (UGTA) project addresses the characterization and needs for long-term monitoring of the subsurface contamination resulting from 828 underground nuclear weapon tests at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). EM promotes, and is required, to include stakeholders in its program. However, UGTA is a very complex program not easily understood by members of the public. The NTS Community Advisory Board (CAB), a federally chartered Site Specific Advisory Board (SSAB), has studied the UGTA project since 1996, and has found it a challenge to completely comprehend and provide NNSA/NV meaningful citizen input. The CAB realized the benefit of a technical peer review and in 2000 recommended to NNSA/NV that a peer review of the UGTA strategy would provide valuable feedback to the program to address underground contamination at the NTS. N NSA agreed to the CAB's recommendation, and moved forward with a scope of work to have the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) perform the peer review of the UGTA strategy. The ASME began the peer review in June 2001, and their final report was published in November 2001. In January 2002, the CAB devoted their monthly meeting in Las Vegas, Nevada to reporting the results of the peer review of the UGTA strategy to the public. Two public workshops were later held in the community of Amargosa, Nevada during the month of January to help educate and build interest in the CAB February 2002 monthly meeting which was also held in Amargosa. The CAB recommendation to NNSA to utilize a technical peer review has provided valuable information to NNSA, the State of Nevada, and the CAB. At other DOE sites SSABs are challenged by a number of complex, technical programs requiring considerable time and resources for the board to comprehend. It is worth considering the utilization of an independent

  9. Millennials, Technology and Perceived Relevance of Community Service Organizations: Is Social Media Replacing Community Service Activities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, August John

    2017-01-01

    This mixed-methods qualitative study examined the relationship between perceptions of the importance of social media (i.e., Facebook, Twitter) with community service projects and volunteerism. Participants (n = 80) were interviewed and surveyed regarding their experiences in participating in a variety of community service work (CSW) projects…

  10. Troubleshooting Assistance Services in Community Wireless Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kriz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have identified new services intended for users and administrators of community wireless networks. Troubleshooting assistance services will assist the users during solution of communication problems, gathering data for expert analysis, informing the user about the state of the network (including outages, and so forth. Network administrators will be provided with a unique tool supporting the network analysis, operation, and development. We have mainly focused on the use cases and prerequirements—the problem of topology discovery.

  11. Opinions of Pre-Service Teachers towards Community Service ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examines the opinions of 41 teacher candidates taking a community service learning (CSL) course. The implementation of this course and its contributions to participants' personal, social and academic development were examined using qualitative methods. Data was collected using semi-structured interview ...

  12. Facilitating community information service for national development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Community information comprises of services offered by libraries and information centers to provide the people with information that is relevant to their daily life. The information helps the poor and marginalized groups to improve their standard of living and contribute in decisions that affect their lives. This paper highlights ...

  13. The Community Service, A Theoretical Look

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol del Carmen Terán González

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation had as fundamental aim generate a theoretical construct under the approach ontoepistémico in the practice of the community service for the students the study rested on the theories of: Learning Service. Community service. The same one adopted a look inside the qualitative paradigm in the essence of the phenomenon to describe it, to understand it and to interpret it in all his extension departing from an approach fenomenológico. Once interviewed five key informants obtained like proved the contributions across judgments enunciations from his speech, the same ones generated six theoretical beaks that helped to enrich the study. Finally there were realized the final reflections that give response to the intentions of the study.

  14. Experiences of community service environmental health practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusha Karamchand

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The community service initiative, a 1-year placement of health graduates, significantly improved human resource availability in the South African public health sector, even though the process was fraught with challenges. Although experiences in the curative health sector were assessed, the experiences of environmental health practitioners were yet to be studied. Research purpose: This study assessed the experiences of environmental health practitioners during their community service year. Motivation for the study: Anecdotal evidence suggested problems with the process. This study endeavoured to identify the challenges whilst taking cognisance of its effectiveness. Method: A total of n = 40 environmental health graduates from the Durban University of Technology who had concluded community service completed questionnaires in this crosssectional quantitative study. Descriptive statistics, means and standard deviations were used to analyse the data. Main findings: The timing of community service placements was critical as 58% of respondents had to repay study loans. The placement of married respondents (10% outside KwaZuluNatal, however, could have had impacts on family structures. Only 68% felt stimulated by their job functions, and there arose challenges with accommodation and overtime duties. Respondents felt that their tertiary education did equip them and that engagement with senior personnel helped in their professional development. Even though most of the review of the community service year appeared to be positive, a majority of respondents did not intend to continue working or recommending their workplaces. Future career pathing showed that 79% would prefer to be employed outside the public sector. Practical and managerial implications: The process needs to be reviewed to strengthen human resource management and enhance retention in the often overloaded and under-resourced South African public health sector. Contribution

  15. Community Service for Community Building: The School-Based Service Corps as Border Crossers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Novella Z.

    1998-01-01

    Describes an externally funded program that enabled twelve urban elementary schools to expand community outreach by hiring community residents and a program coordinator who worked with service agencies and teachers to develop a wide variety of activities catering to students and neighborhood members. One school's program is profiled. (Author/MSE)

  16. Municipal service provision in rural communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Helle

    EU policies for rural development stress the importance of investments rather than subsidies and aim at integrating different sectoral policies in order to improve the coherence and effectiveness of public expenditure. Policies also emphasize a place-based approach for rural development and thereby...... hierarchies and considering local resources and place bound potentials.  This paper draws on a study of rural municipalities in Denmark examining how service adjustments e.g. closing of local schools are managed by rural municipalities and local communities. The paper further discusses whether rural...... municipalities can plan strategically, manage service provision and support place bound potential in rural communities in light of a competitive framework for local development....

  17. Developing a community matron service:a neighbourhood model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downes, Claire

    2009-07-07

    NHS Blackburn with Darwen Provider Services Unit has adopted an innovative team approach to improve patient access to its community matron service. This article reviews the national picture and local development of the community matrons role.

  18. Volume of Home and Community Based Services and...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Volume of Home- and Community-Based Services and Time to Nursing-Home Placement The purpose of this study was to determine whether the volume of Home and Community...

  19. Pharmacy Student Learning Through Community Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobota, Kristen Finley; Barnes, Jeremiah; Fitzpatrick, Alyse; Sobota, Micah J

    2015-07-01

    The Ohio Northern University American Society of Consultant Pharmacists chapter provides students the opportunity to apply classroom knowledge with learning through community service. One such program took place at the Lima Towers Apartment Community from September 18, 2014, to October 2, 2014, in Lima, Ohio. Three evening educational sessions focused on a different health topic: 1) mental health, 2) medication adherence/brown bag, and 3) healthy lifestyle choices/nutrition/smoking cessation. All three programs were structured identically, starting with dinner, followed by educational intervention, survey, blood pressure checks, and medication reviews. Two pharmacists and 16 pharmacy students implemented the program. Participants completed a total of 76 satisfaction surveys for the three programs, which were included in the data analysis. The average age of the participants was 65 years; 82% (n = 63) were female. Data demonstrated that 94% (n = 72) "learned something new," while 96% (n = 74) would "recommend the program to a friend/family member." The collected data showed the vast majority of participants from the surrounding community found value in the presentations performed by students, especially with regard to the new information they received and its perceived benefits. In light of such successes, we encourage other student chapters to implement similar community outreach events. ASCP student members can make a strong, positive impact in the community while learning in a nontraditional environment.

  20. The Effect of Service Learning on Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sass, Margaret S.; Coll, Ken

    2015-01-01

    This study discusses the implementation of a service learning component in community college communication 101 level courses. Through the execution of a service learning component in communication classes at a community college, students' communicative competency and attitude toward community service is assessed. Using two different delivery…

  1. Community Service Learning with Unemployed Young Nova Scotians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Schiffart, Clarence

    2000-01-01

    Discusses Community Service Learning for Unemployed Youth, a program that uses service learning, career development, and community development principles with unemployed youth. The program actively engages young people in their own learning by giving them the opportunity to perform services that directly benefit their community. (Author/MKA)

  2. Building Community and Fostering Success in STEM Through the Women in Science & Engineering (WiSE) Program at the University of Nevada, Reno

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langus, T. C.; Tempel, R. N.

    2017-12-01

    The Women in Science & Engineering (WiSE) program at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) aims to recruit and retain a diverse population of women in STEM fields. During the WiSE Program's 10 years in service, we have primarily functioned as a resource for 364 young women to expand their pre-professional network by building valuable relationships with like-minded women. More recently, we have introduced key changes to better benefit our WiSE scholars, establishing a new residence hall, the Living Learning Community (LLC). The introduction of the LLC, resident assistants, and academic mentors helped to provide support to a diverse culture of women with varying thoughts, values, attitudes, and identities. To evaluate the progress of our program, demographic data was statistically analyzed using SPSS to identify correlations between math preparation, performance in foundational courses, average time to graduation, and retention in STEM majors. Initial programmatic assessment indicates that students participating in WiSE are provided a more well-rounded experience while pursuing higher education. We have maintained a 90% retention rate of females graduating with bachelor's degrees in STEM disciplines (n=187), with many graduates completing advanced masters and doctoral degrees and seamlessly entering into post-graduate internships, professional, and industry careers. The success of the WiSE program is attributed to a focused initiative in fostering supportive classroom environments through common course enrollment, professional development, and engaging women in their community through service learning. As a continued focus, we aim to increase the inclusivity and representation of women at UNR in underrepresented fields such as physics, math, and the geosciences. Further program improvements will be based on ongoing research, including a qualitative approach to explore how providing gender equitable resources influences the persistence of women in STEM.

  3. Characterization of Microbial Communities in Subsurface Nuclear Blast Cavities of the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moser, Duane P.; Bruckner, Jim; Fisher, Jen; Czerwinski, Ken; Russell, Charles E.; Zavarin, Mavrik

    2010-09-01

    This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Remediation Sciences Project (ERSP) was designed to test fundamental hypotheses concerning the existence and nature of indigenous microbial populations of Nevada Test Site subsurface nuclear test/detonation cavities. Now called Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR), this program’s Exploratory Research (ER) element, which funded this research, is designed to support high risk, high potential reward projects. Here, five cavities (GASCON, CHANCELLOR, NASH, ALEMAN, and ALMENDRO) and one tunnel (U12N) were sampled using bailers or pumps. Molecular and cultivation-based techniques revealed bacterial signatures at five sites (CHANCELLOR may be lifeless). SSU rRNA gene libraries contained diverse and divergent microbial sequences affiliated with known metal- and sulfur-cycling microorganisms, organic compound degraders, microorganisms from deep mines, and bacteria involved in selenate reduction and arsenite oxidation. Close relatives of Desulforudis audaxviator, a microorganism thought to subsist in the terrestrial deep subsurface on H2 and SO42- produced by radiochemical reactions, was detected in the tunnel waters. NTS-specific media formulations were used to culture and quantify nitrate-, sulfate-, iron-reducing, fermentative, and methanogenic microorganisms. Given that redox manipulations mediated by microorganisms can impact the mobility of DOE contaminants, our results should have implications for management strategies at this and other DOE sites.

  4. Characterization of microbial communities in subsurface nuclear blast cavities of the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moser, Duane P; Czerwinski, Ken; Russell, Charles E; Zavarin, Mavrik

    2010-07-13

    This US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Remediation Sciences Project (ERSP) was designed to test fundamental hypotheses concerning the existence and nature of indigenous microbial populations of Nevada Test Site subsurface nuclear test/detonation cavities. Now called Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR), this program's Exploratory Research (ER) element, which funded this research, is designed to support high risk, high potential reward projects. Here, five cavities (GASCON, CHANCELLOR, NASH, ALEMAN, and ALMENDRO) and one tunnel (U12N) were sampled using bailers or pumps. Molecular and cultivation-based techniques revealed bacterial signatures at five sites (CHANCELLOR may be lifeless). SSU rRNA gene libraries contained diverse and divergent microbial sequences affiliated with known metal- and sulfur-cycling microorganisms, organic compound degraders, microorganisms from deep mines, and bacteria involved in selenate reduction and arsenite oxidation. Close relatives of Desulforudis audaxviator, a microorganism thought to subsist in the terrestrial deep subsurface on H2 and SO42- produced by radiochemical reactions, was detected in the tunnel waters. NTS-specific media formulations were used to culture and quantify nitrate-, sulfate-, iron-reducing, fermentative, and methanogenic microorganisms. Given that redox manipulations mediated by microorganisms can impact the mobility of DOE contaminants, our results should have implications for management strategies at this and other DOE sites.

  5. Characterization of Microbial Communities in Subsurface Nuclear Blast Cavities of the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, Duane P.; Bruckner, Jim; Fisher, Jen; Czerwinski, Ken; Russell, Charles E.; Zavarin, Mavrik

    2010-01-01

    This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Remediation Sciences Project (ERSP) was designed to test fundamental hypotheses concerning the existence and nature of indigenous microbial populations of Nevada Test Site subsurface nuclear test/detonation cavities. Now called Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR), this program's Exploratory Research (ER) element, which funded this research, is designed to support high risk, high potential reward projects. Here, five cavities (GASCON, CHANCELLOR, NASH, ALEMAN, and ALMENDRO) and one tunnel (U12N) were sampled using bailers or pumps. Molecular and cultivation-based techniques revealed bacterial signatures at five sites (CHANCELLOR may be lifeless). SSU rRNA gene libraries contained diverse and divergent microbial sequences affiliated with known metal- and sulfur-cycling microorganisms, organic compound degraders, microorganisms from deep mines, and bacteria involved in selenate reduction and arsenite oxidation. Close relatives of Desulforudis audaxviator, a microorganism thought to subsist in the terrestrial deep subsurface on H 2 and SO 4 2- produced by radiochemical reactions, was detected in the tunnel waters. NTS-specific media formulations were used to culture and quantify nitrate-, sulfate-, iron-reducing, fermentative, and methanogenic microorganisms. Given that redox manipulations mediated by microorganisms can impact the mobility of DOE contaminants, our results should have implications for management strategies at this and other DOE sites.

  6. Community participation in health services and the experience of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayıhan Pala

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important components of health promotion is community participation. The importance of community participation in health care was raised by the Alma-Ata Declaration in 1978. According to the Alma-Ata Declaration community participation should be ensured by planning, organization, implementation and supervision of health services at the highest levels. Nowadays, community participation is distanced from the definition in the Alma-Ata Declaration. Citizens cannot take part in the decision making process and community financing has been mentioned as a part of the community participation in health services. Community participation in the health sector in Turkey was initially regulated by the Law on the Socialization of Health Services (No. 224 published in 1961. Unfortunately, this regulation has not been put widely into practice. Community participation is regulated as a contribution to the financing of health services (prescription fee, surcharge, inpatient bed fee, etc. by the Health Transformation Program (HTP. With HTP, the user fee for health services applies only for medical examinations provided by the Social Security Institution has increased to 2.132 billion TL in 2012 from 466 million TL in 2009. User fees in the health services only for medical examinations increased over the years and in the ratio of household health expenditures exceeded 18% for 2012. The Health Transformation Program should be discussed because of a structure that does not allow for community participation.Keywords: Community participation, health services, community financing, Turkey 

  7. Ecology and primary productivity of the eulittoral epilithon community: Lake Tahoe, California-Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aloi, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    This dissertation is an investigation into the factors affecting the community dynamics of an epilithic diatom community in Lake Tahoe. Although Lake Tahoe is characterized by extremely low phytoplankton primary productivity, the productivity of the eulittoral (0-2 m) periphyton community is much higher than would be expected in this extremely oligotrophic lake. The eulittoral periphyton community is structured by as stalked diatom, Gomphoneis herculeana, and rosettes of Synedra ulna, with small diatoms living within this matrix. The seasonal cycle of the eulittoral epilithon was monitored through three growing seasons. Biomass was measured once or twice per month at 12-17 sites. Eulittoral primary productivity was also measured monthly at one site, using in situ C 14 methodology. Field measurements were combined with laboratory experiments to determine the physical and chemical parameters responsible for both the seasonal periodicity and the site-to-site differences in epilithon biomass and primary productivity

  8. Characterization of Microbial Communities in Subsurface Nuclear Blast Cavities of the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moser, Duane; Russell, Chuck; Marshall, Matthew; Czerwinski, Ken; Daly, Michael J; Zavarin, Mavrik

    2008-02-08

    This exploratory research project is designed to test fundamental hypotheses concerning the possible existence and nature of indigenous microbial populations in Nevada Test Site (NTS) subsurface nuclear blast cavities. Although subsurface microbiological studies have been performed at the NTS in the past, radioactive zones have yet to be addressed. Nuclear blast zone microbiology is a completely new field and our team is well-positioned to collect and analyze samples that have never before been available to microbiologists. Relevant samples are now being obtained by incorporating microbiological collections into an ongoing annual hot well sampling program being conducted by other agencies. A combination of cultivation-based and molecular microbial detection protocols is being utilized at multiple locations to survey for uncultivable microorganisms and to develop a culture collection which will be characterized for radionuclide- and metal-reduction capabilities. Given that redox manipulations mediated by microorganisms can impact the mobility of DOE contaminants, a positive outcome from this work would have significant implications for management strategies at this and other DOE sites. A primary objective of the project has been the establishment of the regulatory and technical framework necessary to enable our acquisition of samples. Thus, much of our activity in the first phase of this work has involved the development an approved Field Area Work Plan (FAWP), Radiological Work Permit (RWP), and other documentation required for radiological work at the NTS. We have also invested significant time into ensuring that all personnel possess the required training (e.g. Radworker II and 40 hr. HAZWOPER) for access to the hot well sampling sites. Laboratory facilities, required for field processing of radioactive samples as well as DNA extraction and other manipulations, have been secured both the NTS (Mercury, NV) and UNLV. Although our year-1 field work was delayed due

  9. Two Key Strategies for Enhancing Community Service Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seider, Scott

    2013-01-01

    A growing body of research has found community service learning to have a positive effect upon participating college students' civic development; however, far less scholarship has considered the impact of particular components of a community service learning program. This article presents two preliminary but promising strategies for enhancing the…

  10. 75 FR 53786 - Senior Community Service Employment Program; Final Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ... Part IV Department of Labor Employment and Training Administration 20 CFR Part 641 Senior... Administration 20 CFR Part 641 RIN 1205-AB48 and RIN 1205-AB47 Senior Community Service Employment Program; Final... implement changes in the Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP) resulting from the 2006...

  11. EPISTEMIC COMMUNITIES AND SERVICE DELIVERY CHOICES IN SPANISH MUNICIPAL ADMINISTRATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miquel SALVADOR

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article contributes to the debate on the use of alternative formulas for public service provision with arguments related to epistemic communities’ influence. Drawing on the literature on models of local public service delivery, the role of internal epistemic communities is discussed and tested through the consideration of two different communities related to specific municipal areas such as personal and urban services. The results demonstrate that the association of urban services’ epistemic communities with alternative formulas for direct provision to deliver services is greater than in the case of personal services’ epistemic community. Those findings contribute to the academic debate not only with arguments and evidence that reinforces the role of variables included in previous research but also by introducing the role of epistemic communities in determining some policy options (as the use of local public-service delivery formulas.

  12. Leisure services and infrastructure: Transforming communities and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leisure, a multi-dimensional construct, is a force for transforming communities and economies ~ promoting meaning, value and assisting in securing a higher quality of life. Difficult to define, leisure is essential in building a sense of community. This paper will explore a mix of elements that promote community livability.

  13. Towards an Africanisation of community engagement and service ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article argues that the South African research community could benefit by engaging in more collaborative partnerships within the African continent in relation to community engagement. This argument relates to literature in South Africa concerning an Africanised notion of service learning (SL) and community ...

  14. Quality Is Key--The Impact of Community Service, Community Service Quality, and Reflection on Adolescents' Volunteering Intentions

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Goethem, Anne A. J.; van Hoof, Anne; Orobio de Castro, Bram; van Aken, Marcel A. G.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effect of community service program-quality on changes in adolescents' intentions to volunteer. Based on the literature, volunteering intentions were expected to increase by programs with high quality community service activities (e.g., instructive activities) and educational activities including reflection. Adolescents (N=…

  15. Community-Academic Partnerships: Developing a Service-Learning Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Heather C; Mathews, Launa Rae; Fossen, Traci; Scott, Ginger; Schaefer, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Academic partnerships with hospitals and health care agencies for authentic clinical learning have become a major focus of schools of nursing and professional nursing organizations. Formal academic partnerships in community settings are less common despite evolving models of care delivery outside of inpatient settings. Community-Academic partnerships are commonly developed as a means to engage nursing students in service-learning experiences with an emphasis on student outcomes. The benefit of service-learning projects on community partners and populations receiving the service is largely unknown primarily due to the lack of structure for identifying and measuring outcomes specific to service-learning. Nursing students and their faculty engaged in service-learning have a unique opportunity to collaborate with community partners to evaluate benefits of service-learning projects on those receiving the service. This article describes the development of a service-learning framework as a first step toward successful measurement of the benefits of undergraduate nursing students' service-learning projects on community agencies and the people they serve through a collaborative community-academic partnership. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Compulsory community service for dietitians – monitoring and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, only after completion of the compulsory community service are such graduates legally entitled to register with ... in ensuring improved provision of health services and sustainability of services to those who need them. Mentoring can .... Indus Train 1996; 20(4): 23-29. The SAJCN wishes to apologise for omitting to ...

  17. Enhancing Community Service Learning via Practical Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronen, Ilana; Shemer-Elkiyam, Tal

    2015-01-01

    The advantages of learning communities focused on analyzing social issues and educational repercussions in the field are presented in this study. The research examines the contribution of a learning community to enhancing student teachers' responsibility and their social involvement. The assumption was that participating in learning community…

  18. Measurement of patient satisfaction with community pharmacy services: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik Panvelkar, Pradnya; Saini, Bandana; Armour, Carol

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this review is to conduct an in-depth analysis of the available literature in order to identify and evaluate studies measuring patient satisfaction with pharmacy services delivered by pharmacists in a community setting. An extensive literature search was conducted in five databases (Medline, Scopus, Embase, Psychinfo, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts) using the search terms "patient/client/consumer satisfaction" AND "community pharmacy/pharmacies" AND "pharmacy service/pharmaceutical services/pharmacy program/intervention/intervention studies". Only those articles where the main focus was measuring patient satisfaction with services delivered in community pharmacies were included in the review. Patient satisfaction was explored with three different levels of pharmacy services -- general services, intervention services and cognitive services. Twenty-four articles measuring patient satisfaction with community pharmacy services were retrieved. Of these, eleven measured patient satisfaction with general services, six measured satisfaction with intervention services and seven measured satisfaction with cognitive services. The majority of studies reviewed had adopted and measured satisfaction as a multidimensional construct. None of the studies reviewed tested any theoretical models of satisfaction. Further a lack of consistent instruments measuring patient satisfaction was observed, with most of the reviewed studies using self developed, non-validated or ad hoc instruments with items from various previously published papers. The review also observed high levels of patient satisfaction with pharmacy services be they general, intervention or cognitive services. This review found that patient satisfaction has been measured within the community pharmacy context to a certain degree. Further research is needed to develop and test instruments based on theoretical frameworks, to test satisfaction pre and post hoc and in well designed randomized controlled

  19. Locating Servitization within the Wider Services Communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilkington, Alan; Raja, Jawwad; Hsuan, Juliana

    analysing the citation patterns in service research, and none has focused on the emergence of servitization, associated terms, and its strong crossdisciplinary nature. We use bibliometric analysis to uncover the literature development in service research and identify the changing dominant research themes...... the emergence of servitization, at the centre stage of strategy and value creation....

  20. EnviroAtlas Community Boundaries Web Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the boundaries of all EnviroAtlas Communities. It represents the outside edge of all the block groups included in each EnviroAtlas...

  1. LYNX community advocacy & service engagement (CASE) project final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-14

    This report is a final assessment of the Community Advocacy & Service Engagement (CASE) project, a LYNX-FTA research project designed : to study transit education and public engagement methods in Central Florida. In the Orlando area, as in other part...

  2. Service-learning’s Impact on Dental Students’ Attitude toward Community Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, J. M.; Best, A. M.; Warren, J. J.; McQuistan, M. R.; Kolker, J. L.; Isringhausen, K. T.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction This study evaluated service-learning program’s impact on senior dental students’ attitude toward community service at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) School of Dentistry. Experience gained through service-learning in dental school may positively impact dental students’ attitude toward community service that will eventually lead into providing care to the underserved. Materials and methods Two surveys (pre and post-test) were administered to 105 senior dental students. For the first survey (post-test), seventy six students out of 105 responded and reported their attitude toward community service immediately after the service-learning program completion. Three weeks later, fifty six students out of the 76 responded to the second survey (retrospective pre-test) and reported their recalled attitude prior to the program retrospectively. Results A repeated-measure mixed-model analysis indicated that overall there was improvement between pre-test and post-test. Scales of connectedness, normative helping behavior, benefits1, career benefits, and intention showed a significant pre-test and post-test difference. An association between attitude toward community service and student characteristics such as age, gender, ethnicity, and volunteer activity was also examined. Only ethnicity showed an overall significant difference. White dental students appear to have a differing perception of the costs of community service. Conclusions The service-learning program at VCU School of Dentistry has positively impacted senior dental students’ attitude toward community service. PMID:25142286

  3. Service-learning's impact on dental students' attitude towards community service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, J M; Best, A M; Warren, J J; McQuistan, M R; Kolker, J L; Isringhausen, K T

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluated service-learning programme's impact on senior dental students' attitude towards community service at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) School of Dentistry. Experience gained through service-learning in dental school may positively impact dental students' attitude towards community service that will eventually lead into providing care to the underserved. Two surveys (pre- and post-test) were administered to 105 senior dental students. For the first survey (post-test), seventy-six students of 105 responded and reported their attitude towards community service immediately after the service-learning programme completion. Three weeks later, 56 students of the 76 responded to the second survey (retrospective pre-test) and reported their recalled attitude prior to the programme retrospectively. A repeated-measure mixed-model analysis indicated that overall there was improvement between pre-test and post-test. Scales of connectedness, normative helping behaviour, benefits, career benefits and intention showed a significant pre-test and post-test difference. An association between attitude towards community service and student characteristics such as age, gender, ethnicity and volunteer activity was also examined. Only ethnicity showed an overall significant difference. White dental students appear to have a differing perception of the costs of community service. The service-learning programme at VCU School of Dentistry has positively impacted senior dental students' attitude towards community service. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Soil microbial abundance, activity and diversity response in two different altitude-adapted plant communities affected by wildfire in Sierra Nevada National Park (Granada, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bárcenas-Moreno, Gema; Zavala, Lorena; Jordan, Antonio; Bååth, Erland; Mataix-Beneyto, Jorge

    2013-04-01

    Plant communities can play an important role in fire severity and post-fire ecosystem recovery due to their role as combustible and different plant-soil microorganisms interactions. Possible differences induced by plant and microorganisms response after fire could affect the general ecosystem short and long-term response and its sustainability. The main objective of this work was the evaluation of the effect of wildfire on soil microbial abundance, activity and diversity in two different plant communities associated to different altitudes in Sierra Nevada National Park (Granada, Spain). Samples were collected in two areas located on the Sierra Nevada Mountain between 1700 and 2000 m above sea level which were affected by a large wildfire in 2005. Two samplings were carried out 8 and 20 months after fire and samples were collected in both burned and unburned (control) zones in each plant community area. Area A is located at 1700m and it is formed by Quercus rotundifolia forest while area B is located at 2000 m altitude and is composed of alpine vegetation formed by creeping bearing shrubs. Microbial biomass measured by Fumigation-Extraction method followed the same trend in both areas showing slight and no significant differences between burned and unburned area during the study period while viable and cultivable bacteria abundance were markedly higher in fire affected samples than in the control ones in both samplings. Viable and cultivable filamentous fungi had different behavior depending of plant vegetation community studied showing no differences between burned and unburned area in area A while was significantly higher in burned samples than in the control ones in area B. Microbial activity monitoring with soil microbial respiration appears to had been affected immediately after fire since microbial respiration was lower in burned samples from area A than in unburned one only 8 months after fire and no significant differences were observed between burned and

  5. A community partnership to explore mental health services in First Nations communities in Nova Scotia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukic, Adele; Rudderham, Sharon; Misener, Ruth Martin

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying the gaps, barriers and successes/solutions associated with mental health services in Mi'kmaq communities in Nova Scotia. Community-based participatory research, which is consistent with Ownership, Control, Access and Possession principles of research with Aboriginal communities, was employed for this work. Health directors of the 13 Mi'kmaq communities in Nova Scotia were involved with the research question, design and write-up of the study. This qualitative descriptive study consisted of open-ended structured interviews with consumers, family members and health care providers. Systematic data collection and analysis of interviews present an understanding of issues of mental health services in the communities. The findings identified barriers and successes/solutions in mental health services in First Nations communities, where services and resources are different from those in more urban communities. Core programs, covering aspects of education, collaboration and culturally relevant community-based services, were identified as solutions to problems identified by participants. Service providers specified core funding for services as essential for continuity and sustainability. While efforts have been made in the past to address mental illness in Mi'kmaq communities, many of these efforts have been proposal driven or crisis oriented. The need for community-based, culturally appropriate, coordinated and sustainable services is evident on the basis of the study's findings. The final report has been disseminated to local community members, participants, Atlantic First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, the Provincial Department of Health and the Atlantic Policy Congress to provide evidence that can inform policy and practice related to mental health in Mi'kmaq communities in Nova Scotia.

  6. Promoting Community Renewal through Civic Literacy and Service Learning. New Directions for Community Colleges, Number 93.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Michael H., Ed.; Lisman, C. David, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    Based on the idea that community colleges have a critical role in enhancing civic literacy through community-based programming and service learning, this volume provides descriptions of theoretical frameworks and practical models for incorporating community renewal into the college mission. The following articles are provided: (1) "Service…

  7. Integrating family planning and HIV services at the community level ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Little is known on integrating HIV and family planning (FP) services in community settings. Using a cluster randomized controlled design, we conducted a formative assessment in two districts in Uganda where community health workers, called VHTs, already offered FP. Thirty-six trained VHTs also provided HIV testing and ...

  8. Integrating Family Planning and HIV Services at the Community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    Little is known on integrating HIV and family planning (FP) services in community settings. Using a cluster randomized controlled design, we conducted a formative assessment in two districts in Uganda where community health workers, called. VHTs, already offered FP. Thirty-six trained VHTs also provided HIV testing and ...

  9. Community psychiatry: An audit of the services in southern Gauteng ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim. To audit the community psychiatric services in southern Gauteng with a view to determining whether the objectives of the country\\'s mental health legislation and policies are being achieved. Results. Although southern Gauteng\\'s community psychiatric clinics are situated in a primary health setting, primary health ...

  10. School to community: service learning in hospitaliy and tourism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimberly Monk; Jessica Bourdeau; Michele Capra

    2007-01-01

    In the effort to augment hospitality and tourism education beyond classroom instruction and internships, the added instructional methodology of community service learning is suggested. Service learning is an instructional method where students learn and develop through active participation in organized experiences that meet actual needs, increasing their sense of...

  11. Community placement and reintegration of service users from long ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To ascertain community placement and reintegration of service users from long-term mental health care facilities. Method: This study reviewed the progress during 2003 with the alternative placement of a selected candidate group of 27 service users in some of Lifecare's long-term mental health care facilities in ...

  12. Writing Together, Learning Together: Teacher Development through Community Service Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ye; Prater, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    In this study, community service learning is incorporated into a graduate-level English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) teacher preparation course. Focusing on a writing project participants completed with English Learners (ELs) as part of the service-learning project, we explored the impact of the project on: (1) teachers' understanding of ESL…

  13. Community mental health services in Southern Gauteng: An audit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Community mental health services (CMHS) are a central objective of the National Mental Health Policy Framework and Strategic Plan. Three core components are described: residential facilities, day care and outpatient services. Primary mental health care with specialist support is required according to an ...

  14. Improving Public Library Services for Rural Community Development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper canvasses the use of information communication technology to improve public library services in the rural areas. Recommendations were put forward for the overall transformation of public library services culminating in the socio-political development of rural communities. Introduction. Librarianship as a science ...

  15. Service quality in community pharmacy: an exploration of determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Lesley; Klinner, Christiane

    2012-01-01

    Although various instruments have been developed to measure customer satisfaction with community pharmacy services, there is limited research regarding pharmacy staffs' understanding of service quality and its determinants. This study aimed to explore the perceptions of pharmacy staff regarding the factors that constitute a high level of service quality using the service quality determinants proposed by the Conceptual Model of Service Quality. Structured interviews were conducted with 27 pharmacy assistants and 6 pharmacists in 3 community pharmacies in Sydney. The interview questions focused on the participants' perceptions of consumer expectations, the translation of these perceptions into service quality specifications, the actual service delivery, and the communication to customers. From the pharmacy staff perspective, service quality is significantly limited by insufficient internal communication and control processes that impede role clarity and the resolution of conflicting role expectations among customer service personnel. Participants indicated that these problems could be alleviated through the implementation of more transparent, realistic, measurable, and accepted quality specifications by pharmacy management. The study indicates that the extent to which pharmacy management sets, maintains, and communicates service quality specifications to staff directly affects role clarity, role conflict, and organizational commitment among customer service staff, which in turn directly influence the level of service quality provided to the customers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Locating Servitization within the Wider Services Communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilkington, Alan; Raja, Jawwad; Hsuan, Juliana

    . Specifically, we present the outputs of the co-citation networks for three periods:1990s (early period), 2000s (middle), and 2010s (recent) and see a shift in orientation from a narrowly focused Operations Research tradition to a more managerial and strategic emphasis that places services, and specifically...

  17. Innovations in service learning: a novel program for community service at NYU School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlihy, Nola Seta; Brown, Christina

    2015-01-01

    As NYU medical students, the authors determined that there was no structured form of service learning in their curriculum. They sought to establish a service program that recognizes students for their dedication to community service in both the NYU and NYC communities. In 2012, with the support of the Office of Student Affairs (OSA), the authors created the NYU School of Medicine Community Service Program (CSP). The program tracks and verifies students' participation in service projects. It sets a goal for students to complete 100 service hours through at least five unique service initiatives. Two reflective essays at the completion of pre-clinical and core clerkship curricula challenge students to express how their service experiences will inform their future careers in medicine. The authors developed an innovative online portal for students to track their service involvement and allow the committee to easily approve hours. They created the Community Service Committee, made up of two representatives from each class year, to be in charge of regulating the program together with the OSA. The class of 2015 is the first class to participate; thus far, 13 students have met program requirements. In the classes of 2016 and 2017, 20 and 41 students, respectively, are expected to receive the award. Total participation has significantly increased in successive class years. The authors seek to gather data on CSP participants' changing perspectives and hope the program can serve as a model for other schools to build service learning into their curricula.

  18. 50 CFR 32.47 - Nevada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nevada. 32.47 Section 32.47 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL... Nevada. The following refuge units have been opened for hunting and/or fishing, and are listed in...

  19. Time to invest in developing community mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Halloran, Paul; O'Connor, Nick

    2016-06-01

    To report on the evaluation of publicly funded community mental health services in two New South Wales health districts. Qualitative and quantitative data from 28 publicly funded adult community mental health teams in two NSW health districts were gathered using structured interviews, benchmarking surveys, focus groups and online questionnaires. The community mental health services studied lacked a coherent strategic and recovery oriented framework or model of care for service delivery. There was evidence of poor role definition at the team level, resulting in duplication and inefficiency. There were inadequate staffing levels for stated objectives, a lack of training and continuing education in evidence based intervention, poor consumer and family participation in service design, and no development and monitoring of meaningful outcome measures. This review and benchmarking study highlights the need for mental health policy implementation to be further supported with: development of a service delivery framework outlining essential components of a specialist community mental health system; operational guidance to enable effective team specialisation in accordance with research; investment in practitioner training to support the development of evidence based practice; and processes to ensure effective consumer and carer participation in developing recovery oriented services. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  20. The Lwazi Community Communication Service: design and piloting of a voice-based information service

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sharma Grover, A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available in the eleven official South African languages. They analyze the usage pattern from the pilot call logs and thereafter discuss the implications of these findings for future projects that design similar automated services for serving rural communities...

  1. The Chinese community patient’s life satisfaction, assessment of community medical service, and trust in community health delivery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Although the Chinese government put a lot of effort into promoting the community patient’s life satisfaction, there still lacked the holistic and systematic approaches to promote the community patient’s life satisfaction in various regions of China. On the basis of the literature, it was found that both the community patient’s assessment of community medical service and trust in community health delivery system were important considerations when the community patient comprehensively evaluated community medical service to generate life satisfaction. So this study was set up to test whether and to what extent the community patient’s assessments of various major aspects of community medical service/various major aspects of the community patient’s trust in community health delivery system influenced life satisfaction in whole China/in various regions of China. Methods In order to explore the situation of China’s community health delivery system before 2009 and provide a reference for China’s community health delivery system reform, the data that could comprehensively and accurately reflect the community patient’s life satisfaction, assessment of community medical service, and trust in community health delivery system in various regions of China was needed, so this study collaborated with the National Bureau of Statistics of China to carry out a large-scale 2008 national community resident household survey (N = 3,306) for the first time in China. And the specified ordered probit models were established to analyze the dataset from this household survey. Results Among major aspects of community medical service, the medical cost (particularly in developed regions), the doctor-patient communication (particularly in developed regions), the medical facility and hospital environment (particularly in developed regions), and the medical treatment process (particularly in underdeveloped regions) were all key considerations (ppatient’s life

  2. Comparing the effects of community service and imprisonment on reconviction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klement, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study compares reconviction rates for Danish offenders sentenced to community service and imprisonment. A large general sample of offenders (n=1602) is examined. Methods The study relies on a quasi-experimental design and uses propensity score matching as well as logistic regression...... models to analyze the data. Models are differentiated in terms of length of observation period and control variable combinations. The study stands out as compared to previous studies due to the unprecedented assortment of individual background data available. These data, obtained from community service...... eligibility assessments and registry databases, provide powerful controls over potential selection mechanisms in the multivariate analyses. Furthermore, contrary to previous studies, the current study limits itself to subjects officially assessed and deemed eligible for community service sentences. Results...

  3. The Chinese community patient's life satisfaction, assessment of community medical service, and trust in community health delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Liyang

    2013-02-13

    Although the Chinese government put a lot of effort into promoting the community patient's life satisfaction, there still lacked the holistic and systematic approaches to promote the community patient's life satisfaction in various regions of China. On the basis of the literature, it was found that both the community patient's assessment of community medical service and trust in community health delivery system were important considerations when the community patient comprehensively evaluated community medical service to generate life satisfaction. So this study was set up to test whether and to what extent the community patient's assessments of various major aspects of community medical service/various major aspects of the community patient's trust in community health delivery system influenced life satisfaction in whole China/in various regions of China. In order to explore the situation of China's community health delivery system before 2009 and provide a reference for China's community health delivery system reform, the data that could comprehensively and accurately reflect the community patient's life satisfaction, assessment of community medical service, and trust in community health delivery system in various regions of China was needed, so this study collaborated with the National Bureau of Statistics of China to carry out a large-scale 2008 national community resident household survey (N = 3,306) for the first time in China. And the specified ordered probit models were established to analyze the dataset from this household survey. Among major aspects of community medical service, the medical cost (particularly in developed regions), the doctor-patient communication (particularly in developed regions), the medical facility and hospital environment (particularly in developed regions), and the medical treatment process (particularly in underdeveloped regions) were all key considerations (psystem, trust in doctor (particularly in underdeveloped regions), trust

  4. Impact of community-based immunization services.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sing K

    1986-07-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge, attitude and practice of mothers toward childhood immunization was surveyed in 2 neighborhoods in greater Bombay, India. The areas were a slum of 75,000 called Malavani, and a nearby area called Kharodi. Measles and triple (DPT or DPV vaccines were available at local health centers, 1.5 km away at the most; oral polio vaccines were given by field workers to the Malavani community to children in their homes, but only in the center for those in Kharodi. BCG tuberculosis vaccinations were available to all, but from a center 5 km away. Malavani mothers had significantly better knowledge of triple and measles vaccines, but knowledge about BCG was similar in the 2 groups. Slightly more women from Kharodi expressed negative attitudes toward immunization. Coverage of children, established from clinic records, was significantly better in the Malavani area: 91% vs. 58% for polio; 71% vs 61% for BCG (n.s.; 85% vs. 55% for triple vaccine; and 21% vs 1% for measles. Evidently, visitation by field teams with polio vaccinations affected mothers′ knowledge and practice for other immunizations available only at the center.

  5. Implementation of a pharmacogenomics service in a community pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreri, Stefanie P; Greco, Angelo J; Michaels, Natasha M; O'Connor, Shanna K; Chater, Rebecca W; Viera, Anthony J; Faruki, Hawazin; McLeod, Howard L; Roederer, Mary W

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the feasibility of implementing a pharmacogenomics service in a community pharmacy. SETTING A single community pharmacy that is part of a regional chain known for offering innovative pharmacy services. PRACTICE DESCRIPTION Community pharmacists at the project site routinely provide clinical pharmacy services, including medication therapy management, immunizations, point-of-care testing, blood pressure monitoring, and diabetes education. PRACTICE INNOVATION The implementation of a pharmacogenomic testing and interpretation service for the liver isoenzyme cytochrome P450 2C19. PARTICIPANTS 18 patients taking clopidogrel, a drug metabolized by CYP2C19. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Rate of patient participation, rate of prescriber acceptance of pharmacist recommendation, time to perform genetic testing service, and number of claims submitted to and paid by insurance. RESULTS Of 41 patients taking clopidogrel and meeting project criteria, 18 (43.9%) enrolled and completed testing and interpretation of pharmacogenomic results. The mean time pharmacists spent completing all stages of the project with each participant was 76.6 minutes. The mean time to complete participation in the project (time between person's first and second visit) was 30.1 days. Nine patients had wild-type alleles, and pharmacists recommended continuation of therapy as ordered. Genetic variants were found in the other nine patients, and all pharmacist recommendations for modifications in therapy were ultimately accepted by prescribers. Overall, 17 patients consented to filing of reimbursement claims with their insurers. Five were not able to be billed due to submission difficulties. Of the remaining 12, none was paid. CONCLUSION A pharmacogenomics service can be an extension of medication therapy management services in a community pharmacy. Prescribers are receptive to having community pharmacists conduct pharmacogenomics testing, but reimbursement is a challenge.

  6. Health status, service use, and costs among veterans receiving outreach services in jail or community settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, James; Rosenheck, Robert A; Kasprow, Wesley J

    2003-02-01

    This study compared client characteristics, service use, and health care costs of two groups of veterans who were contacted by outreach workers: a group of veterans who were contacted while incarcerated at the Los Angeles jail and a group of homeless veterans who were contacted in community settings. Between May 1, 1997, and October 1, 1999, a total of 1,676 veterans who were in jail and 6,560 community homeless veterans were assessed through a structured intake procedure that documented their demographic, clinical, and social adjustment characteristics. Data on the use and costs of health services during the year after outreach contact were obtained from national databases of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). Chi square and t tests were used for statistical comparisons. The veterans who were contacted in jail obtained higher scores on several measures of social stability (marital status and homelessness status) but had higher rates of unemployment. They had fewer medical problems but higher levels of psychiatric and substance use problems, although the rate of current substance use was lower among these veterans than among the community homeless veterans. One-year service access for the jailed veterans was half that of the community homeless veterans. No differences were observed in the intensity of use of mental health services among those who used services, but the jailed outreach clients used fewer residential, medical, and surgical services. Total health care expenditures for the veterans who received outreach contact in jail were $2,318 less, or 30 percent less, than for those who were contacted through community outreach. Specialized outreach services appear to be modestly effective in linking veterans who become incarcerated with VA health care services. Although it is clinically challenging to link this group with services, the fact that the rate of current substance use is lower during incarceration may provide a window of opportunity for

  7. Exploring Intercollegiate Athletic Department-Community Partnerships through the Lens of Community Service Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Per G.; Huml, Matthew R.; Hancock, Meg G.

    2014-01-01

    Institutions of higher education are increasingly engaging in partnerships with local communities. Within a sport context, the creation of the NCAA CHAMPS/Life Skills Program has emphasized partnerships between athletic departments and local community service organizations (CSOs). Prior studies, however, have used student-athletes rather than the…

  8. Enhancing the Social Capital of Learning Communities by Using an Ad Hoc Transient Communities Service

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fetter, Sibren

    2009-01-01

    Fetter, S. (2009). Enhancing the Social Capital of Learning Communities by Using an Ad Hoc Transient Communities Service. Presentation at the 8th International Conference Advances in Web based Learning - ICWL 2009. August, 19-21, 2009, Aachen, Germany: RWTH Aachen University.

  9. Engineering a plant community to deliver multiple ecosystem services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storkey, Jonathan; Döring, Thomas; Baddeley, John; Collins, Rosemary; Roderick, Stephen; Jones, Hannah; Watson, Christine

    2015-06-01

    The sustainable delivery of multiple ecosystem services requires the management of functionally diverse biological communities. In an agricultural context, an emphasis on food production has often led to a loss of biodiversity to the detriment of other ecosystem services such as the maintenance of soil health and pest regulation. In scenarios where multiple species can be grown together, it may be possible to better balance environmental and agronomic services through the targeted selection of companion species. We used the case study of legume-based cover crops to engineer a plant community that delivered the optimal balance of six ecosystem services: early productivity, regrowth following mowing, weed suppression, support of invertebrates, soil fertility building (measured as yield of following crop), and conservation of nutrients in the soil. An experimental species pool of 12 cultivated legume species was screened for a range of functional traits and ecosystem services at five sites across a geographical gradient in the United Kingdom. All possible species combinations were then analyzed, using a process-based model of plant competition, to identify the community that delivered the best balance of services at each site. In our system, low to intermediate levels of species richness (one to four species) that exploited functional contrasts in growth habit and phenology were identified as being optimal. The optimal solution was determined largely by the number of species and functional diversity represented by the starting species pool, emphasizing the importance of the initial selection of species for the screening experiments. The approach of using relationships between functional traits and ecosystem services to design multifunctional biological communities has the potential to inform the design of agricultural systems that better balance agronomic and environmental services and meet the current objective of European agricultural policy to maintain viable food

  10. An Internet Dialogue: Mandatory Student Community Service, Court-Ordered Volunteering, and Service-Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Susan; And Others

    1998-01-01

    Excerpts from an Internet debate identify issues and opinions on mandatory community service as a graduation requirement and court-ordered volunteering. The debate ranges over such topics as quality of the service experience, freedom of choice, intended outcomes, and values conflicts. (SK)

  11. Relationships between Motivations for Community Service Participation and Desire to Continue Service Following College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Krista M.; Thomas-Card, Traci

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we explored whether college students' motivations for participating in community service were associated with their perceptions that service enhanced their desire to continue participating in communityfocused activities after graduation, after statistically controlling for demographic variables and other variables of interest.…

  12. Dementia and the Deaf community: knowledge and service access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson-Coleman, Emma; Keady, John; Young, Alys

    2014-01-01

    This study concerns culturally Deaf people in the United Kingdom who use British Sign Language (BSL). Its objective was to explore how Deaf people's knowledge about dementia and access to services is mediated by their minoritised cultural-linguistic status. Twenty-six members of the Deaf community participated in one of three Deaf-led focus groups in BSL corresponding with the sample of: Deaf people over the age of 60 without dementia; Deaf people aged 18-60 working professional roles unconnected with dementia services; ordinary members of the Deaf community aged 18-60. Data were subjected to a thematic content analysis. Participants' concerns about their poor levels of knowledge and understanding of dementia were augmented by their awareness that without sustained social contact in BSL opportunities for earlier recognition of dementia would be lost. Although primary care services were identified as the first port of call for dementia-related concerns, there was widespread mistrust of their effectiveness because of failures in communication and cultural competence. Confirmed diagnosis of dementia was not viewed as a gateway to services and support because Deaf organisations, dementia-related organisations and mainstream adult services were perceived to be ill-equipped to respond to the needs of Deaf people with dementia. Locating problems of late diagnosis within the Deaf community's poor awareness and knowledge of dementia fails to recognise the structural barriers Deaf people face in timely access to services and accurate recognition of dementia-related changes.

  13. An overview of the Southern Nevada Agency Partnership science and research synthesis: Chapter 1 in The Southern Nevada Agency Partnership science and research synthesis: science to support land management in southern Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Jeanne C.; Brooks, Matthew L.; Turner, Kent; Raish, Carol B.; Ostoja, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining and restoring the diverse ecosystems and resources that occur in southern Nevada in the face of rapid socio-economic and ecological change presents numerous challenged to Federal land managers. Rapid population growth since the 1980s, the land uses associated with that growth, and the interactions of those uses with the generally dry and highly variable climate result in numerous stresses to ecosystems, species, and cultural resource. In addition, climate models predict that the rate of temperature increase and, thus, changes in ecological processes, will be highest for ecosystems like the Mojave Desert. The Southern Nevada Agency Partnership (SNAP; http:www.SNAP.gov) was established in 1999 to address common issues pertaining to public lands in southern Nevada. Partners include the Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and USDA Forest Service and they work with each other, the local community, and other partners. SNAP agencies manage more than seven million acres of public lands in southern Nevada (95% of the land area). Federal land includes two national recreation areas, two national conservation area, four national wildlife refuges, 18 congressionally designated wilderness areas, five wilderness study areas, and 22 areas of critical environmental concern. The partnership's activities are mainly centered in Southern Nevada's Clark County (fig. 1.1), but lands managed by SNAP partner agencies also include portions of Lake Mead National Recreation Area in Mohave County, Arizona, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and USDA Forest Service-managed lands in Lincoln and Nye Counties, Nevada, and all lands and activities managed by the Southern Nevada District Office of the Bureau of Land Management. These lands encompass nine distinct ecosystem types (fig. 1.2), support multiple species of management concern an 17 listed species, and are rich in cultural and historic resource. This introductory executive summary

  14. Community psychiatry: An audit of the services in southern Gauteng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Y H Moosa

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To audit the community psychiatric services in southern Gauteng with a view to determining whether the objectives of the country’s mental health legislation and policies are being achieved. Results. Although southern Gauteng’s community psychiatric clinics are situated in a primary health setting, primary health clinicians play no active role in the management of mentally ill patients. Care is supplied mainly by specialist psychiatrists, psychiatric registrars (in training and psychiatric nurses. For first appointments, a mean of 2 patients are seen per doctor per clinic day for a mean duration of 30 minutes. For follow- up appointments, a mean of 17 patients are seen per doctor per clinic day for a mean duration of 8 minutes. The waiting time for new patient appointments is a mean of 6 months. Follow-up patients are seen once a month by nursing staff and approximately once every 4 months by doctors. An average of 1 in 5 patients is treated with oral atypical antipsychotics; in the majority of clinics, this is the total extent of care. However, where psychologists, social workers and occupational therapists are present, only 0.2% of all users have access to them. Conclusion. The community psychiatric services, although better than those in some other countries, fall short of what is required by South African legislation and policies. General community health services ought to play an active role in the structure and delivery of psychiatric services by developing and strengthening the current limited services, with an emphasis on cost-effective and preventive approaches. Existing community psychiatric services, if so transformed, could serve as a model for other countries in Africa.

  15. Predictors of maternal health service utilization: a community based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: Provision of skilled health care during pregnancy, childbirth and the early postpartum period is an effective strategy to reduce maternal mortality. This study was done to determine and compare the utilization of antenatal and delivery services in an urban and rural area of Lagos State. Methods: A community ...

  16. 75 FR 6188 - Full-Service Community Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-08

    ... outcomes through their promotion of strong school-community partnerships that support effective resource... services through partnerships between (1) public elementary and secondary schools; (2) the schools' local... and fail to adequately educate our Nation's youth. Persistently lowest- achieving schools can be...

  17. Forest ecosystem services and livelihood of communities around ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study on the potential of forest ecosystem services to the livelihood of communities around Shume-Magamba Forest Reserve in Lushoto District, Tanzania was conducted. Questionnaire survey, focus group discussion and participant's observation were used. Qualitatively and quantitatively data were analysed using the ...

  18. Service Learning and Community Engagement for English Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Aïda Koçi

    2017-01-01

    Service learning--sometimes known as community engagement--is a well-documented pedagogical approach with a long history, a strong theoretical basis, a specific ethos, and many passionate advocates. Yet it is conspicuously underused as a teaching method in the worldwide field of English language teaching. In this article, I argue that English…

  19. Institutional Logics and Community Service-Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Alison; Kahlke, Renate

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores how community service-learning (CSL) participants negotiate competing institutional logics in Canadian higher education. Drawing theoretically from new institutionalism and work on institutional logics, we consider how CSL has developed in Canadian universities and how participants discuss CSL in relation to other dominant…

  20. Practice of community-service doctors in the assessment and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    L Fouché

    Background: In South Africa, allegations of physical assault are managed primarily at the primary healthcare level, where they are attended to by medical officers or community service doctors (CSDs). However, reports that the knowledge and skills provided at undergraduate level are not sufficient to equip these CSDs to ...

  1. Service learning as a response to community/school engagement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The promulgation of the White Paper on Higher Education (1997) necessitated Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) in South Africa to avail their expertise in their human resources and physical infrastructure for service learning and community engagement initiatives, in the interest of demonstrating social responsibility, ...

  2. Service Learning and Building Community with the World Wide Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longan, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    The geography education literature touts the World Wide Web (Web) as a revolutionary educational tool, yet most accounts ignore its uses for public communication and creative expression. This article argues that students can be producers of content that is of service to local audiences. Drawing inspiration from the community networking movement,…

  3. Community Service, Educational Performance and Social Responsibility in Northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Renfu; Shi, Yaojiang; Zhang, Linxiu; Liu, Chengfang; Li, Hongbin; Rozelle, Scott; Sharbono, Brian

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of this paper is to analyse the effect of high school scholarships tied to community service on the development of secondary school students in Northwest China. Using data from three rounds of surveys of thousands of students in 298 classes in 75 high schools in Shaanxi province, the paper documents the implementation of the…

  4. Improving Financial Service Delivery to Communities through Micro ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the design of a target Enterprise Architecture (EA) that can enable Micro-finance Institutions (MFIs) in Uganda improve financial service delivery to communities through use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs). Pride Micro-finance Limited (PML) was investigated with specific focus on ...

  5. Perception of community health extension services among women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Rural women in developing countries, including Nigeria are faced with a number of health problems with very limited access to health care facilities. This study assessed the perception of women in rural areas on community health extension services in Ilorin, Kwara State. Methods: One hundred and twenty ...

  6. Service-Learning Pedagogy: Benefits of a Learning Community Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinders, Brooke A.

    2013-01-01

    Service-learning is, by nature, continually evolving. Seifer (1996) stressed the importance of partnerships between communities and schools, and stated that reflection should facilitate the connection between practice and theory, and lead to critical thinking. Before these reflective activities occur, however, much can be done to maximize…

  7. 45 CFR 2515.10 - What are the service-learning programs of the Corporation for National and Community Service?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE SERVICE-LEARNING PROGRAM PURPOSES § 2515.10 What are the service-learning programs of the Corporation for National and Community... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What are the service-learning programs of the...

  8. Hospitality: transformative service to children, families, and communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, Gary B

    2014-11-01

    Hospitality is an ancient moral practice that was deeply embedded in early Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Hospitality requires acceptance of, service to, and respect for people who lack a place in the community. The contemporary importance of this practice reflects the social disconnection and economic disadvantage of many young parents and the high frequency of separation of young people, including many young parents, from their communities. Such social deterioration substantially increases the risk of child maltreatment. Building on the proposals of the U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect, Strong Communities for Children demonstrated the effectiveness of community building in reducing such risk. It further suggested the importance of both relying on and learning from hospitable people in strengthening support for children and their parents. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  9. Societal perceptions of community pharmaceutical services in Malta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordina, M; McElnay, J C; Hughes, C M

    1998-04-01

    To assess the views of the Maltese general public on services provided by community pharmacies in Malta and their opinions on the proposed extended role for pharmacies. An interviewer-administered structured questionnaire was used to interview 912 members of the public (395 males, 517 females). The majority of respondents (70.8%) visited a pharmacy at least once a month, with females visiting more frequently than males (Ployalty to a particular pharmacy increased with age. When treating minor ailments, respondents were more likely to consult their doctor or self-treat rather than seek advice from the pharmacist. The proposed extended role of the community pharmacist found support with the public, e.g. 90.2% felt that the pharmacist should promote health education, with the preferred method suggested being through individual advice; 85-7% were in favour of screening and monitoring services and 85.6% felt that the keeping of patient medication records would be useful. Almost three-quarters (74.6%) of respondents said that they would be willing to participate in pharmaceutical care programmes. When asked to suggest new activities for community pharmacy, respondents were most in favour of the pharmacist offering more advice on the treatment of minor ailments. Overall, the results obtained are encouraging and Maltese pharmacists should plan to provide new services to the community in the future.

  10. The Multiple Functions and Services of Community Seedbanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronnie Vernooy

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Although community-level seed-saving initiatives have existed in many countries around the world for about 30 years, they have rarely been the subject of systematic scientific enquiry. Based on a combination of a literature review and field research, we present a novel comprehensive conceptual framework that focuses on the multiple functions and services provided by community-based seed-saving efforts, in particular community seed banks. This framework is output oriented and complements an input oriented typology of community seed banks presented in 1997. The framework identifies three core functions: conserving genetic resources; enhancing access to and availability of diverse local crops; and ensuring seed and food sovereignty. The framework can be used for analysis of existing seed-saving initiatives and serve as a guide for the establishment of new community seed banks. In addition, it can inform the development or revision of national policies or strategies to support community seed banks. The framework’s utility is illustrated by three case studies of community seed banks in Bangladesh, Guatemala and Nepal.

  11. Pharmacy specialists' attitudes toward pharmaceutical service quality at community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbonas, Gvidas; Jakušovaitė, Irayda; Savickas, Arūnas

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to analyze pharmacy specialists' attitudes toward the quality of pharmaceutical services at Lithuanian community pharmacies. Between April and June 2009, a total of 471 Lithuanian community pharmacy specialists completed a questionnaire designed to evaluate their attitudes toward the quality of pharmaceutical services at community pharmacies. The main dimensions of pharmaceutical service quality were extracted by principal component analysis. Two main dimensions of pharmaceutical service quality were extracted: pharmacotherapeutic aspects (provision of information about drug therapy, possible side effects, health promotion, the amount of time spent with a patient, and the ascertainment that a patient understood the provided information) and socioeconomic aspects (considering patient's needs and financial capabilities, making a patient confident with the services provided). Pharmacy specialists evaluated the quality of both dimensions positively, but the quality of the first dimension was rated significantly worse than that of the second dimension. The attitudes of pharmacy specialists working at independent pharmacies were more positive toward pharmacotherapeutic aspects as compared to the specialists working at chain or state pharmacies. Pharmacotherapeutic aspects were rated better by pharmacy specialists, aged ≥ 55 years, than those younger than 45 years. Moreover, the attitudes of 45-54-year-old pharmacy specialists toward the socioeconomic aspects were more positive as compared with those of 35-44-year olds. Pharmacists rated the socioeconomic aspects of pharmaceutical service quality worse as compared with pharmacy technicians. The attitudes of pharmacy specialists working at pharmacies with 6-9 specialists were more negative toward pharmacotherapeutic aspects than those of the pharmacies with 1-2 specialists. Pharmacy specialists working at pharmacies with ≥ 10 specialists reported lower scores of socioeconomic

  12. Do Medicaid home and community based service waivers save money?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Charlene; Ng, Terence; Kitchener, Martin

    2011-10-01

    This article estimates the potential savings to the Medicaid program of using 1915c Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) waivers rather than institutional care. For Medicaid HCBS waiver expenditures of $25 billion in 2006, we estimate the national savings to be over $57 billion, or $57,338 per waiver participant in 2006 compared with the cost of Medicaid institutional care (for which all waiver participants are eligible). When taking into account a potential 50% "woodwork effect" (for people who might have refused institutional services), the saving would be $21 billion. This analysis demonstrates that HCBS waiver programs present significant direct financial savings to Medicaid long-term care (LTC) programs.

  13. Ethics reflection groups in community health services: an evaluation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillemoen, Lillian; Pedersen, Reidar

    2015-04-17

    Systematic ethics support in community health services in Norway is in the initial phase. There are few evaluation studies about the significance of ethics reflection on care. The aim of this study was to evaluate systematic ethics reflection in groups in community health (including nursing homes and residency), - from the perspectives of employees participating in the groups, the group facilitators and the service managers. The reflection groups were implemented as part of a research and development project. A mixed-methods design with qualitative focus group interviews, observations and written reports were used to evaluate. The study was conducted at two nursing homes, two home care districts and a residence for people with learning disabilities. Participants were employees, facilitators and service managers. The study was guided by ethical standard principles and was approved by the Norwegian Social Science Data Services. We found support for ethics reflection as a valuable measure to strengthen clinical practice. New and improved solutions, more cooperation between employees, and improved collaboration with patients and their families are some of the results. No negative experiences were found. Instead, the ethics reflection based on experiences and challenges in the workplace, was described as a win-win situation. The evaluation also revealed what is needed to succeed and useful tips for further development of ethics support in community health services. Ethics reflection groups focusing on ethical challenges from the participants' daily work were found to be significant for improved practice, collegial support and cooperation, personal and professional development among staff, facilitators and managers. Resources needed to succeed were managerial support, and anchoring ethics sessions in the routine of daily work.

  14. 75 FR 76975 - 2015 Resource Pool-Sierra Nevada Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Western Area Power Administration 2015 Resource Pool--Sierra Nevada Region...) for the Sierra Nevada Customer Service Region (SNR). This notice includes a summary of the comments... Customer Service Region, 114 Parkshore Drive, Folsom, CA 95630-4710, (916) 353- 4421, [email protected

  15. Sense of community, organizational commitment and quality of services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampinen, Mai-Stiina; Suutala, ElinaAnnikki; Konu, Anne Irmeli

    2017-10-02

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine how factors associated with a sense of community in the workplace are connected with organizational commitment and the quality of services among frontline managers and middle managers in social and health care services in Finland. Design/methodology/approach A questionnaire designed specifically for this research was sent to 241 lower-level and middle-level managers in social and health care services in central Finland. A total of 136 managers completed the questionnaire (response rate 56 per cent). The results were analyzed using descriptive statistics, exploratory factor analysis, Spearman's rank-order correlation coefficient and multiple linear regression analyses. Findings The study showed that feeling a sense of belonging, mutual trust and appreciation, and open interaction among colleagues were connected to organizational commitment for frontline managers and middle managers in social and health care services in Finland. Correspondingly, an open flow of information in the organization, job meaningfulness and appreciation received from managers' superiors were connected to the quality of services. Originality/value This study provides information on the factors that influence social and health care managers' organizational commitment and on items connected to their experience of the quality of services.

  16. Developing community-based services for youth with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardoff, D; Chigier, E

    1991-01-01

    Five community-based services in Israel for disabled adolescents are described. Three of them are day centers and two are afternoon clubs. They provide rehabilitation resources for teenagers with various kinds of disabilities including cerebral palsy, mental retardation, blindness, deafness and emotional handicaps. These services are analyzed and discussed with regard to addressing the major needs of adolescents with disabilities, with the aim of achieving an optimal degree of independence and preparation for normalized life. The programs include resources such as vocational rehabilitation, independent living education, recreational activities, social skills training, sexuality education in addition to creating opportunities to mix and socialize with nondisabled youth. The function of pediatric and adolescent medicine physicians in such services is emphasized as imperative in providing a comprehensive rehabilitation program for youth with disabilities.

  17. Adults with Learning Disabilities Experiences of Using Community Dental Services: Service User and Carer Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, Carolyn; Poole, Helen; Brennan, Michelle; Irvine, Fiona

    2017-01-01

    Background: The government alongside other health and social care organisation have identified the need to improve the care provided for people with learning disabilities. Materials and Methods: This service evaluation aimed to explore the experiences of people with learning disabilities and their carers who accessed community dental services…

  18. Identifying key hospital service quality factors in online health communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yuchul; Hur, Cinyoung; Jung, Dain; Kim, Minki

    2015-04-07

    The volume of health-related user-created content, especially hospital-related questions and answers in online health communities, has rapidly increased. Patients and caregivers participate in online community activities to share their experiences, exchange information, and ask about recommended or discredited hospitals. However, there is little research on how to identify hospital service quality automatically from the online communities. In the past, in-depth analysis of hospitals has used random sampling surveys. However, such surveys are becoming impractical owing to the rapidly increasing volume of online data and the diverse analysis requirements of related stakeholders. As a solution for utilizing large-scale health-related information, we propose a novel approach to identify hospital service quality factors and overtime trends automatically from online health communities, especially hospital-related questions and answers. We defined social media-based key quality factors for hospitals. In addition, we developed text mining techniques to detect such factors that frequently occur in online health communities. After detecting these factors that represent qualitative aspects of hospitals, we applied a sentiment analysis to recognize the types of recommendations in messages posted within online health communities. Korea's two biggest online portals were used to test the effectiveness of detection of social media-based key quality factors for hospitals. To evaluate the proposed text mining techniques, we performed manual evaluations on the extraction and classification results, such as hospital name, service quality factors, and recommendation types using a random sample of messages (ie, 5.44% (9450/173,748) of the total messages). Service quality factor detection and hospital name extraction achieved average F1 scores of 91% and 78%, respectively. In terms of recommendation classification, performance (ie, precision) is 78% on average. Extraction and

  19. Partnerships and Learning Communities in Work-Integrated Learning: Designing a Community Services Student Placement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Lisa; Jones, Martyn; Coutts, Sally

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes and analyses the design and implementation of a higher education student placement program in the community services sector. Principally ideas about partnerships and social learning informed the design. The placement program represents a significant innovation in work-integrated learning, achieved through collaboration between…

  20. Data Report: Meteorological and Evapotranspiration Data from Sagebrush and Pinyon Pine/Juniper Communities at Pahute Mesa, Nevada National Security Site, 2011-2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasoni, Richard L [DRI; Larsen, Jessica D [DRI; Lyles, Brad F. [DRI; Healey, John M [DRI; Cooper, Clay A [DRI; Hershey, Ronald L [DRI; Lefebre, Karen J [DRI

    2013-04-01

    Pahute Mesa is a groundwater recharge area at the Nevada National Security Site. Because underground nuclear testing was conducted at Pahute Mesa, groundwater recharge may transport radionuclides from underground test sites downward to the water table; the amount of groundwater recharge is also an important component of contaminant transport models. To estimate the amount of groundwater recharge at Pahute Mesa, an INFIL3.0 recharge-runoff model is being developed. Two eddy covariance (EC) stations were installed on Pahute Mesa to estimate evapotranspiration (ET) to support the groundwater recharge modeling project. This data report describes the methods that were used to estimate ET and collect meteorological data. Evapotranspiration was estimated for two predominant plant communities on Pahute Mesa; one site was located in a sagebrush plant community, the other site in a pinyon pine/juniper community. Annual ET was estimated to be 310±13.9 mm for the sagebrush site and 347±15.9 mm for the pinyon pine/juniper site (March 26, 2011 to March 26, 2012). Annual precipitation measured with unheated tipping bucket rain gauges was 179 mm at the sagebrush site and 159 mm at the pinyon pine/juniper site. Annual precipitation measured with bulk precipitation gauges was 222 mm at the sagebrush site and 227 mm at the pinyon pine/juniper site (March 21, 2011 to March 28, 2012). A comparison of tipping bucket versus bulk precipitation data showed that total precipitation measured by the tipping bucket rain gauges was 17 to 20 percent lower than the bulk precipitation gauges. These differences were most likely the result of the unheated tipping bucket precipitation gauges not measuring frozen precipitation as accurately as the bulk precipitation gauges. In this one-year study, ET exceeded precipitation at both study sites because estimates of ET included precipitation that fell during the winter of 2010-2011 prior to EC instrumentation and the precipitation gauges started

  1. Email medication counseling services provided by Finnish community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohjanoksa-Mäntylä, Marika K; Kulovaara, Heidi; Bell, J Simon; Enäkoski, Marianne; Airaksinen, Marja S

    2008-12-01

    The importance of email as a mode of communication between medication users and pharmacists is likely to increase. However, little is known about the email medication counseling practices of community pharmacies. To determine the prevalence of email medication counseling services in Finland and to assess the accuracy and comprehensiveness of responses by pharmacies providing the opportunity for email medication counseling to inquiries related to use of antidepressants. An inventory was made of all Finnish community pharmacies that provided the opportunity for email medication counseling. Data related to the accuracy and comprehensiveness of responses were collected, using a virtual pseudo-customer method with 3 scenarios related to common concerns of patients on antidepressants. Two inquiries were emailed to each pharmacy that provided the opportunity for email medication counseling in January and February 2005. The responses were content analyzed by 2 researchers, using a prestructured scoring system. Almost one-third (30%, n = 182) of Finnish community pharmacies maintained a working Web site, and 94% of those provided the opportunity for email medication counseling. An online "ask-the-pharmacist" service was offered by 13% (n = 23) of the pharmacies with a Web site. Pharmacies responded to 54% of the email inquiries sent by the virtual pseudo-customers. The response rate and the content score ratio between mean and maximum scores varied among the scenarios. The content score ratio was highest for the scenarios concerning the adverse effects of fluoxetine (0.53, n = 55) and interactions with mirtazapine (0.52, n = 63) and lowest for the scenario related to sexual dysfunction and weight gain associated with citalopram (0.38, n = 52). Community pharmacies are potential providers of email medication counseling services. However, more attention should be directed to responding to consumer inquiries and to the content of these responses.

  2. Diatom community structure on in-service cruise ship hulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsucker, Kelli Zargiel; Koka, Abhishek; Lund, Geir; Swain, Geoffrey

    2014-10-01

    Diatoms are an important component of marine biofilms found on ship hulls. However, there are only a few published studies that describe the presence and abundance of diatoms on ships, and none that relate to modern ship hull coatings. This study investigated the diatom community structure on two in-service cruise ships with the same cruise cycles, one coated with an antifouling (AF) system (copper self-polishing copolymer) and the other coated with a silicone fouling-release (FR) system. Biofilm samples were collected during dry docking from representative areas of the ship and these provided information on the horizontal and vertical zonation of the hull, and intact and damaged coating and niche areas. Diatoms from the genera Achnanthes, Amphora and Navicula were the most common, regardless of horizontal ship zonation and coating type. Other genera were abundant, but their presence was more dependent on the ship zonation and coating type. Samples collected from damaged areas of the hull coating had a similar community composition to undamaged areas, but with higher diatom abundance. Diatom fouling on the niche areas differed from that of the surrounding ship hull and paralleled previous studies that investigated differences in diatom community structure on static and dynamically exposed coatings; niche areas were similar to static immersion and the hull to dynamic immersion. Additionally, diatom richness was greater on the ship with the FR coating, including the identification of several new genera to the biofouling literature, viz. Lampriscus and Thalassiophysa. These results are the first to describe diatom community composition on in-service ship hulls coated with a FR system. This class of coatings appears to have a larger diatom community compared to copper-based AF systems, with new diatom genera that have the ability to stick to ship hulls and withstand hydrodynamic forces, thus creating the potential for new problematic species in the biofilm.

  3. Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning. Volume 13, Number 1, Fall 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Jeffrey, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    The "Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning" ("MJCSL") is a national, peer-reviewed journal consisting of articles written by faculty and service-learning educators on research, theory, pedagogy, and issues pertinent to the service-learning community. The "MJCSL" aims to: (1) widen the community of…

  4. Service quality and perceived customer value in community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guhl, Dennis; Blankart, Katharina E; Stargardt, Tom

    2018-01-01

    A patient's perception of the service provided by a health care provider is essential for the successful delivery of health care. This study examines the value created by community pharmacies-defined as perceived customer value-in the prescription drug market through varying elements of service quality. We develop a path model that describes the relationship between service elements and perceived customer value. We then analyze the effect of perceived customer value on customer satisfaction and loyalty. We use data obtained from 289 standardized interviews on respondents' prescription fill in the last six months in Germany. The service elements personal interaction (path coefficient: 0.31), physical aspect (0.12), store policy (0.24), and availability (0.1) have a positive significant effect on perceived customer value. Consultation and reliability have no significant influence. We further find a strong positive interdependency between perceived customer value, customer satisfaction (0.75), and customer loyalty (0.71). Thus, pharmacies may enhance customer satisfaction and loyalty if they consider the customer perspective and focus on the relevant service elements. To enhance benefit, personal interaction appears to be most important to address appropriately.

  5. Challenges to the provision of community aged care services across rural Australia: perceptions of service managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savy, Pauline; Warburton, Jeni; Hodgkin, Suzanne

    2017-01-01

    The Australian community aged care sector is facing a growing workforce crisis, particularly in rural and regional areas. Its predominantly female workforce is ageing, and recruiting younger, skilled workers is proving difficult. The service sector, too, is proving highly complex and diverse as a result of contemporary aged care service reforms as well as ongoing difficulties in providing services to the growing numbers of older people living in Australia's rural areas. Despite these multiple challenges, there is a gap in research that explores how rural aged care services manage their day-to-day requirements for skilled workers across the diverse service sector. To address this gap, this article reports on the experiences and perceptions of a small sample of service managers whose organisations represent this diversity, and who are accountable for care provision in regional and rural locations. In such areas, recruitment and skill needs are contoured by disproportionate aged populations, distance and reduced service availability. Eleven service managers were interviewed as part of a larger project that examined the skill and training needs of community aged care workers within the Riverina, a rural region in New South Wales. Qualitative data drawn from semi-structured interviews were thematically analysed to identify the managers' individual needs for workers and skills in the context of location, service parameters and availability of other health and community services. Thematic analysis of the interview data elicited three themes: services, roles and skill deployment; older workers and gendered roles; and barriers to recruitment. The findings illustrate the complexities that characterise the community aged care sector as a whole and the impact of these on individual services located in regional and rural parts of Australia. The participants reported diverse needs for worker skills in keeping with the particular level of service they provide. Significantly

  6. Nevada NPDES Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    In Nevada, EPA’s Pacific Southwest (Region 9) issues all NPDES permits for any discharges on tribal lands. All other NPDES permits are issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP).

  7. Inpatient service providers' perspectives on service user involvement in Norwegian community mental health centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Marianne; Hausken, Kjell; Knudsen, Knud

    2011-11-01

    For two decades, mental health services in Norway have focused on service user involvement. Despite this, there is little knowledge about how inpatient mental health services have promoted user involvement. To examine service providers' reports of service user involvement at the individual and departmental levels in Norwegian community mental health centres (CMHCs). One hundred and eighty six (186) inpatient service providers in five CMHCs filled out a questionnaire. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that service provider perceptions and awareness of service user involvement can be measured by three subscales: organizational user involvement; patient collaboration; and assisted patient involvement. Little user involvement was reported at the departmental level. Providers more often reported user involvement at the individual level. Providers in two of the CMHCs reported a somewhat higher degree of departmental-level user involvement. There were no significant differences across gender, age, leader position, profession and job tenure, though evening/night shift workers reported a lesser degree of user involvement. The results suggest that user involvement at the departmental level needs to be addressed in future efforts to promote user involvement in CMHCs.

  8. Beyond NIMBYism: understanding community antipathy toward needle distribution services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Peter J; Howe, Mary

    2014-05-01

    In late 2007 the Homeless Youth Alliance (HYA), a small non-profit serving homeless youth in the Haight-Ashbury neighbourhood of San Francisco, USA, attempted to move its needle exchange service from a site on the Haight street commercial strip to a community centre approximately 150m away. The reaction of the housed community in the area was vocal and organized, and attracted considerable regional media attention. Ultimately, the plan to move the service had to be cancelled. The authors were, respectively, board chair and executive director of HYA at the time, and collected extensive field notes and media records as events unfolded. In this paper, we re-examine these events through literatures on contested spaces and on 'Not In My Backyard' (NIMBY) resistance to social services. We found that opposition to the service relocation had little to do with opposition to needle exchange itself, but rather was symptomatic of broader contestation over the identity and character of the neighbourhood. On the one hand, the neighbourhood had experienced skyrocketing housing prices over the past 40 years, making home ownership almost exclusively the province of the wealthy. On the other, the neighbourhood retains historic connections to the 1968 'Summer of Love', and the main commercial strip forms the centre of an active injecting drug use scene. As a consequence, many home owners who felt they had made considerable sacrifices to afford to live in the area expressed a sense of being "under siege" from drug users, and also believed that the City government pursues a deliberate policy of "keeping the Haight weird" by supporting ongoing service provision to drug users in the area. Housed residents responded to this situation in a variety of ways. One response was to engage in what we term 'defensive place making', in which a small part of a broader neighbourhood is reimagined as "a different neighbourhood". HYA's attempt to move from its current location to this 'different

  9. Responses of Plant Community Composition to Long-term Changes in Snow Depth at the Great Basin Desert - Sierra Nevada ecotone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loik, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    Snowfall is the dominant hydrologic input for many high-elevation ecosystems of the western United States. Many climate models envision changes in California's Sierra Nevada snow pack characteristics, which would severely impact the storage and release of water for one of the world's largest economies. Given the importance of snowfall for future carbon cycling in high elevation ecosystems, how will these changes affect seedling recruitment, plant mortality, and community composition? To address this question, experiments utilize snow fences to manipulate snow depth and melt timing at a desert-montane ecotone in eastern California, USA. Long-term April 1 snow pack depth averages 1344 mm (1928-2015) but is highly variable from year to year. Snow fences increased equilibrium drift snow depth by 100%. Long-term changes in snow depth and melt timing are associated with s shift from shurbs to graminoids where snow depth was increased for >50 years. Changes in snow have impacted growth for only three plant species. Moreover, annual growth ring increments of the conifers Pinus jeffreyi and Pi. contorta were not equally sensitive to snow depth. There were over 8000 seedlings of the shrubs Artemisia tridentata and Purshia tridentata found in 6300 m2 in summer 2009, following about 1400 mm of winter snow and spring rain. The frequency of seedlings of A. tridentata and P. tridentata were much lower on increased-depth plots compared to ambient-depth, and reduced-depth plots. Survival of the first year was lowest for A. tridentata. Survival of seedlings from the 2008 cohort was much higher for P. tridentata than A. tridentata during the 2011-2015 drought. Results indicate complex interactions between snow depth and plant community characteristics, and that responses of plants at this ecotone may not respond similarly to increases vs. decreases in snow depth. These changes portend altered carbon uptake in this region under future snowfall scenarios.

  10. Nurse leadership: making the most of community service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Susan; Freed, Patricia E

    2008-06-01

    Nurses are expected to demonstrate professionalism through service leadership, but it is unlikely they have been prepared to understand the responsibilities associated with taking leadership roles in the community. The authors have had a variety of experiences serving on nonprofit health care boards and have obtained information about board roles and responsibilities that would be helpful for practicing nurses who want to be board members. Nurses can make vital contributions to the nonprofit sector of the nation's health care, but must know how to make wise choices to maintain their commitments. This article provides nurses with basic information about the roles and responsibilities of nonprofit board members and some lessons about board service from the authors' experiences.

  11. Data Citation Services in the High-Energy Physics Community

    CERN Document Server

    Herterich, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    A paradigm change in scholarly communication is underway. Supporting Open Science, an effort to make scientific research data accessible to all interested parties by openly publishing research and encouraging others to do the same thereby making it easier to communicate scientific knowledge, is a part of the change that has become increasingly important for (digital) libraries. Digital libraries are able to play a significant role in enabling Open Science by facilitating data sharing, discovery and re-use. Because data citation is often mentioned as one incentive for data sharing, enabling data citation is a crucial feature of research data services. In this article we present a case study of data citation services for the High-Energy Physics (HEP) community using digital library technology. Our example shows how the concept of data citation is implemented for the complete research workflow, covering data production, publishing, citation and tracking of data reuse. We also describe challenges faced and distil...

  12. AN ANALYSIS OF PHARMACY SERVICES BY PHARMACIST IN COMMUNITY PHARMACY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Joseph Herman

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: Up to now there are more than 60 schools of pharmacy with a variety of accreditation level in lndonesia. Previous study found that the standard of pharmaceutical services at various service facilities (hospitals, primary health care and community pharmacy can not be fully implemented because of the limited competency of pharmacist. This study was conducted to identify the qualification of pharmacist who delivers services in community pharmacy in compliance with the Indonesian Health Law No. 36 of 2009. As mandated in the Health Law No. 36 of 2009, the government is obliged to establish minimum requirements that must be possessed. Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted in 2010 at 2 community pharmacies in each of 3 cities, i.e. Bandung, DI Yogyakarta and Surabaya. Other than ten pharmacists delivering services in community pharmacies, there were pharmacists as informants from 4 institutions in each city selected, i.e. six pharmacists from two Schools of Pharmacy, three pharmacists from three Regional Indonesian Pharmacists Association,six pharmacists from three District Health Offices and three Provincial Health Offices. Primary data collection through in-depth interviews and observation as well as secondary data collection concerning standard operating procedures, monitoring documentation and academic curricula has been used. Descriptive data were analysed qualitatively Results: The findings indicate that pharmacists' qualification to deliver services in a community pharmacy in accordance with the Government Regulation No. 51 of 2009, Standards of Pharmacy Services in Community Pharmacy and Good Pharmaceutical Practices (GPP was varied. Most pharmacists have already understood their roles in pharmacy service, but to practice it in accordance with the standards or guidelines they are still having problems. It is also acknowledged by pharmacists in other institutions, including School of Pharmacy, Regional

  13. Disaster planning for vulnerable populations: leveraging Community Human Service Organizations direct service delivery personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Karen L; Berliner, Maegan; Merdjanoff, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    Given the variability, complexities, and available resources for local vulnerable populations, it is clear that preparing effectively for catastrophic events cannot be accomplished with a single, simple template. Inclusion of Community Human Service Organizations' (CHSO's) direct service delivery personnel ensures that emergency disaster planning efforts for vulnerable populations are effective and responsive to unique needs and constraints. By leveraging existing local resources, it extends the preparedness system's reach to the whole community. CHSO personnel already perform community-based services and directly engage with vulnerable and special needs populations; typically they are on the front lines during an emergency event. Generally, however, the CHSOs, staff, and clients are neither adequately prepared for disasters nor well integrated into emergency systems. To address preparedness gaps identified during Hurricane Sandy, regional CHSO and local health department partners requested that the Columbia Regional Learning Center provide preparedness trainings for their agencies and staff responsible for vulnerable clients. Evaluation of this initiative was begun with a mixed-methods approach consisting of collaborative learning activities, a function-based assessment tool, and a 5 Steps to Preparedness module. Results from a survey were inclusive because of a low response rate but suggested satisfaction with the training format and content; increases in awareness of a client preparedness role; and steps toward improved personal, agency, and client preparedness. Direct service delivery personnel can leverage routine client interactions for preparedness planning and thus can contribute significantly to vulnerable population and community disaster readiness. Trainings that provide preparedness tools can help support this role. CHSO personnel are knowledgeable and have the expertise to assist clients in personal preparedness planning; yet, there are challenges

  14. Community Student Service Online: The Experience of the ULA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayana Beatriz Carrillo Mejia

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the university education is in the middle of a transformation, as an answer to a Knowledge Society emerging from globalization, originated by Information and Communications Technology (ICT's. Backed  in those tools with the main objective of achieving a pertinent education to needs of the society, such as flexible in time and space, equitative, without frontiers,  new models of teaching; virtual education, interactive distance education, on line education,  among others have been included. The present article exhibits the results of a qualitative investigation, which allowed documenting the experience of designing, implementing and developing the first induction courses over the online community service, at the University of Los Andes-Trujillo. A virtual learning environment (VLE   was used, to instruct the students over their functions as community service providers. The study was based on a data narrative design, provided by the participants, and complemented with the observations of the investigator. Finally, the students' efficiency and the performance with reference to the results are shown. Thus, among other things, it was found that a good efficiency was obtained and that the course was assessed in a satisfactory manner, however, some findings are orientated to improve practices in the future.

  15. Bridging Services: Drug Abuse, Human Services and the Therapeutic Community. Proceedings of the World Conference of Therapeutic Communities (9th, San Francisco, California, September 1-6, 1985).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acampora, Alfonso P., Ed.; Nebelkopf, Ethan, Ed.

    The World Federation of Therapeutic Communities is an international association of drug treatment centers that use the "Therapeutic Community" (TC) to combat chemical dependency and drug addiction. Their 1985 conference focused on bridging services between the TC and the traditional human service systems. A total of 85 separate papers were…

  16. Health workforce equity in urban community health service of China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Chen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To reveal the equity of health workforce distribution in urban community health service (CHS, and to provide evidence for further development of community health service in China. METHODS: A community-based, cross-sectional study was conducted in China from September to December 2011. In the study, 190 CHS centers were selected from 10 provinces of China via stratified multistage cluster sampling. Human resources profiles and basic characteristics of each CHS centers were collected. Lorenz curves and Gini Coefficient were used to measure the inequality in the distribution of health workforce in community health service centers by population size and geographical area. Wilcoxon rank test for paired samples was used to analyze the differences in equity between different health indicators. RESULTS: On average, there were 7.37 health workers, including 3.25 doctors and 2.32 nurses per 10,000 population ratio. Significant differences were found in all indicators across the samples, while Beijing, Shandong and Zhejiang ranked the highest among these provinces. The Gini coefficients for health workers, doctors and nurses per 10,000 population ratio were 0.39, 0.44, and 0.48, respectively. The equity of doctors per 10,000 population ratio (G = 0.39 was better than that of doctors per square kilometer (G = 0.44 (P = 0.005. Among the total 6,573 health workers, 1,755(26.7% had undergraduate degree or above, 2,722(41.4%had junior college degree and 215(3.3% had high school education. Significant inequity was found in the distribution of workers with undergraduate degree or above (G = 0.52, which was worse than that of health works per 10000 population (P<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Health workforce inequity was found in this study, especially in quality and geographic distribution. These findings suggest a need for more innovative policies to improve health equity in Chinese urban CHS centers.

  17. Social dilemmas and public range management in Nevada

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooten, van G.C.; Thomsen, P.; Hobby, T.; Eagle, A.J.

    2006-01-01

    Increasing tension in the Nevada ranch community may have had a negative impact on social capital. Social capital is important because it facilitates cooperation in resolving social dilemmas related to public range management. In this paper, we use a survey of public grazing permit holders in Nevada

  18. Crisis Services. Volume II. Series on Community-Based Services for Children and Adolescents Who Are Severely Emotionally Disturbed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Sybil K.

    This document is part of a series of monographs on community-based services for children and adolescents who are severely emotionally disturbed. The series is the product of a national study of community-based service approaches which identified over 200 programs serving emotionally disturbed children and included visits to several programs…

  19. Community health nurses' perceptions, knowledge, and involvement in abortion services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, I; Swanson, J; Oakley, D

    1994-01-01

    To learn more about the abortion-related experiences and value orientation of nurses, questionnaires were mailed to 1900 randomly selected community health nurses in the US; 844 (45%) responded. Although only 7% worked in settings where abortions are performed, half provide abortion counseling or referral. Their knowledge about the epidemiology of abortion in the US and recent abortion-related legislation was inadequate, and only 28.6% had received training about the clinical aspects of abortion in nursing school. Respondents' attitudes toward induced abortion were generally supportive; 82.0% believed federal funds should be provided for the procedure, 81.6% agreed women in the first trimester of pregnancy should have the right to choose abortion, and 70.3% supported abortion on demand. However, 27.8% indicated that abortion services in their communities were being negatively impacted by anti-abortion groups; only 9.7% felt that pro-choice groups were having a significant impact in their area. 56.0% reported they had been involved in some political activity relating to abortion, largely voting for a pro-abortion rights candidate or writing letters to legislators. 56.4& indicated they would vote against a candidate they otherwise supported if his or her views on abortion were unacceptable. 21.9% and 16.8% of nurses were involved with local or national Planned Parenthood; under 3% were members of anti-abortion groups. In-service training programs on the abortion issue are recommended to enable community health nurses to expand their counseling and political advocacy skills.

  20. Smoking-cessation services in Iowa community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilino, Mary L; Farris, Karen B; Zillich, Alan J; Lowe, John B

    2003-05-01

    To examine community pharmacy practice with regard to providing smoking-cessation counseling. Mailed survey. Iowa community pharmacies. A stratified random sample of pharmacists statewide. Descriptive statistics were computed for all study variables. Fisher exact test or chi2 analysis was performed on selected variables to determine the relationship of each item with pharmacists routinely offering smokers suggestions for quitting. Responses from 129 (38.2%) of 338 pharmacists indicated that although most felt it is important to offer smoking-cessation counseling, about half actually offer this service. Most pharmacists indicated they are prepared to provide counseling, but fewer than 25% had received formal training or were aware of national clinical practice guidelines. Those who had received specific training (p=0.020) or recently attended an educational program (p=0.014) on smoking cessation were more likely to counsel smokers. Primary barriers to providing counseling were lack of time, inability to identify smokers, low patient demand, and lack of reimbursement. Our findings suggest that opportunities exist for improving pharmacist education and reducing practice barriers in order to bridge the gap between pharmacists' knowledge and attitudes related to smoking-cessation counseling and their provision of patient counseling in community pharmacy practice.

  1. Developing a sustainable child and family service system after a community tragedy: Lessons from Sandy Hook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoagwood, Kimberly Eaton; Olin, Su-Chin Serene; Wang, Nicole M; Pollock, Michele; Acri, Mary; Glaeser, Elizabeth; Whitmyre, Emma D; Storfer-Isser, Amy; Horwitz, Sarah McCue

    2017-08-01

    This paper describes a systematic approach to assessing community services post-Sandy Hook shooting. An evaluation team was invited to develop a sustainability plan for community services in Newtown. Service organizations, providers and families were interviewed. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the range of services; respondent perspectives were coded using content analysis. We found that Newtown has a broad array of community services, but respondent groups varied in their perceptions of service adequacy. Consensus existed about core components of an ideal service system, including centralizing access; coordinating care; personalizing and tailoring services for families; and providing evidence-based care. The strategic community assessment approach developed here may inform how communities examine their service capacity and develop sustainability plans post-disaster.

  2. Organizational capacity for service integration in community-based addiction health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Erick G; Aarons, Gregory A; Palinkas, Lawrence A

    2014-04-01

    We examined factors associated with readiness to coordinate mental health, public health, and HIV testing among community-based addiction health services programs. We analyzed client and program data collected in 2011 from publicly funded addiction health services treatment programs in Los Angeles County, California. We analyzed a sample of 14 379 clients nested in 104 programs by using logistic regressions examining odds of service coordination with mental health and public health providers. We conducted a separate analysis to examine the percentage of clients receiving HIV testing in each program. Motivational readiness and organizational climate for change were associated with higher odds of coordination with mental health and public health services. Programs with professional accreditation had higher odds of coordinating with mental health services, whereas programs receiving public funding and methadone and residential programs (compared with outpatient) had a higher percentage of clients receiving coordinated HIV testing. These findings provide an evidentiary base for the role of motivational readiness, organizational climate, and external regulation and funding in improving the capacity of addiction health services programs to develop integrated care.

  3. The effect of service delivery in public ‘community service centres’: A case of an emerging economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndabazinhle Ngobese

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated public perceptions of the service delivery provided by the Community Service Centres (CSC of the South African Police Service (SAPS Durban, South Africa. The study focuses on measuring service quality and service delivery. SERVQUAL was used to compare clients’ perceptions against expectations of service quality. Four hundred respondents were surveyed at three community service centres (previously known as ‘police stations’, with expectations and perceptions being assessed via the dimensions of tangibility, reliability, responsiveness, assurance and empathy. The results indicate that in all five dimensions there is a significant negative quality gap, implying that the quality of service received is below what is expected by clients. Improvements are required in all five dimensions if service delivery is to be improved. Actions needed to improve service quality include regular assessment and monitoring of clients’ experiences, as well as employees’ behaviour

  4. A theory of how rural health services contribute to community sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Jane; Prior, Maria; Taylor, Judy

    2012-11-01

    Study and opinion suggest that health services play a significant role in supporting the social fabric of fragile rural communities. We draw on empirical evidence about the added-value contributions of health services to communities and unite it with theory of capitals to propose a theoretical model depicting how rural health services contribute to community sustainability. While providing an analytical framework, the paper also points to construction of a measurement tool for enabling planners to measure the contributions of diverse sectors to community sustainability and predict or measure the impact of changes to models of service delivery on the future of rural communities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Private Schools, Nevada, 2009, Nevada Department of Education

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Nevada private schools locations. Nevada Department of Education Nevada private schools list for school year 2008-2009. Locations furnishe by the US EPA Region 9.

  6. Emergency Medical Services Professionals’ Attitudes About Community Paramedic Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Steeps

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The number of community paramedic (CP programs has expanded to mitigate the impact of increased patient usage on emergency services. However, it has not been determined to what extent emergency medical services (EMS professionals would be willing to participate in this model of care. With this project, we sought to evaluate the perceptions of EMS professionals toward the concept of a CP program. Methods: We used a cross-sectional study method to evaluate the perceptions of participating EMS professionals with regard to their understanding of and willingness to participate in a CP program. Approximately 350 licensed EMS professionals currently working for an EMS service that provides coverage to four states (Missouri, Arkansas, Kansas, and Oklahoma were invited to participate in an electronic survey regarding their perceptions toward a CP program. We analyzed interval data using the Mann-Whitney U test, Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance, and Pearson correlation as appropriate. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to examine the impact of participant characteristics on their willingness to perform CP duties. Statistical significance was established at p ≤ 0.05. Results: Of the 350 EMS professionals receiving an invitation, 283 (81% participated. Of those participants, 165 (70% indicated that they understood what a CP program entails. One hundred thirty-five (58% stated they were likely to attend additional education in order to become a CP, 152 (66% were willing to perform CP duties, and 175 (75% felt that their respective communities would be in favor of a local CP program. Using logistic regression with regard to willingness to perform CP duties, we found that females were more willing than males (OR = 4.65; p = 0.03 and that those participants without any perceived time on shift to commit to CP duties were less willing than those who believed their work shifts could accommodate additional duties (OR = 0.20; p

  7. Community services' involvement in the discharge of older adults from hospital into the community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Guerin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Community services are playing an increasing role in supporting older adults who are discharged from hospital with ongoing non-acute care needs.  However, there is a paucity of information regarding how community services are involved in the discharge process of older individuals from hospital into the community.  Methods: 29 databases were searched from 1980 to 2012 (inclusive for relevant primary published research, of any study design, as well as relevant unpublished work (e.g. clinical guidelines which investigated community services’ involvement in the discharge of older individuals from hospital into the community. Data analysis and quality appraisal (using McMaster critical appraisal tools was undertaken predominately by the lead author.  Data was synthesised qualitatively. Results: 12 papers were eligible for inclusion (five randomised controlled trials, four before and after studies and three controlled trials, involving a total of 8440 older adults (> 65 years.  These papers reported on a range of interventions.  During data synthesis, descriptors were assigned to four emergent discharge methods: Virtual Interface Model, In-reach Interface Model, Out-reach Interface Model, and Independent Interface Model.   In each model, the findings were mixed in terms of healthcare and patient and carer outcomes.  Conclusions: It is plausible that each model identified in this systematic review has a role to play in successfully discharging different cohorts of older adults from hospital.  Further research is required to identify appropriate population groups for various discharge models, and to select suitable outcomes measures to determine the effectiveness of these models, considering all stakeholders' involved.

  8. Addams, Day, and Dewey: The Emergence of Community Service in American Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Keith; Saltmarsh, John

    1997-01-01

    Chronicles the emergence of community service in the United States, beginning with the turn-of-the-century collision of capitalism and democracy which generated a crisis of community and profound rethinking of the meaning and practice of charity. Three service "paths" are identified: nonprofit human services organizations; active…

  9. Tests of the Validity and Reliability of the Community Service Attitudes Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Brian; Osbaldiston, Richard; Henning, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Community service is deeply rooted in American culture. There have been repeated calls for the necessity of evaluating these programs, especially for service-learning. The purpose of this research was to validate an easy-to-use scale that measures 10 components of students' attitudes toward community service. The sample was drawn from two…

  10. [Fifty years of public service for Quebec community psychiatry services. Part I].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesage, Alain

    2015-01-01

    This essay comprises 2 parts. It aims to recognize the public service of psychiatrists of the Département de psychiatrie de l'Université de Montréal who served at the provincial level of the Ministry of Health and Social Services for deinstitutionalisation of policies and organisation of services, at the service of people with severe mental disorders. First with Dr. Camille Laurin post-face of the 1962 book Les fous crient au secours! (Mentally ill patients cry for help); then the insight on the latest phase of differentiated specialised clinics by Dr. Denis Lazure, who participated in 1962 to the Bédard, Lazure, Roberts commission that launched community psychiatry, but who will also be Social Affairs Minister in the late '70 s; Dr. Arthur Amyot will sail through the budgetary issues when in the beginning of the '80s the mental health directorate was under Social Affairs; Dr. Luc Blanchet will be associated to a rich production of interdisciplinary reports by the advisory Mental Health Committee until its dismissal in 2003; and finally, Dr. André Delorme, who probably has the record of longevity at the head of the mental health directorate, transferred in 2003 under the deputy minister for medical and university affairs.The essay will propose since the beginning a grid or referential of four health services analysis. First; the arguments for community care by British and Italian psychiatrists and researchers, Thornicroft and Tansella. Second; system issues of mental health reforms proposed by Canadian psychiatric nurse and researcher Paula Goering. Third; the model of socio-political regulation of health system proposed by the Université de Montréal' health administration researcher Dr. André-Pierre Contandriopoulos; and Fourth; the structural tension between the medical and social sector signaled by the American medical sociologist, Leutz.The same phases of deinstitutionalization in other countries as UK, took place as followed: a) the asylum phase

  11. Exploring Service Providers' Perspectives in Improving Childhood Obesity Prevention among CALD Communities in Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyril, Sheila; Green, Julie; Nicholson, Jan M; Agho, Kingsley; Renzaho, Andre M N

    2016-01-01

    Childhood obesity rates have been increasing disproportionately among disadvantaged communities including culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) migrant groups in Australia due to their poor participation in the available obesity prevention initiatives. We sought to explore service providers' perceptions of the key factors influencing the participation of CALD communities in the existing obesity prevention services and the service requirements needed to improve CALD communities' participation in these services. We conducted a qualitative study using focus group discussions involving fifty-nine service providers from a range of services, who are involved in the health and wellbeing of children from CALD groups living in four socioeconomically disadvantaged areas in Victoria, Australia. Thematic analysis of the data showed three major themes including community-level barriers to CALD engagement in childhood obesity prevention services; service-level barriers to the delivery of these services; and proposed changes to current childhood obesity prevention approaches. Integrating obesity prevention messages within existing programs, better coordination between prevention and treatment services and the establishment of a childhood obesity surveillance system, were some of the important changes suggested by service providers. This study has found that low CALD health literacy, lack of knowledge of cultural barriers among service providers and co-existing deficiencies in the structure and delivery of obesity prevention services negatively impacted the participation of CALD communities in obesity prevention services. Cultural competency training of service providers would improve their understanding of the cultural influences of childhood obesity and incorporate them into the design and development of obesity prevention initiatives. Service providers need to be educated on the pre-migratory health service experiences and health conditions of CALD communities to ensure

  12. Youth services in Vanuatu. Wan Smolbag -- more than community theatre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, P

    1998-01-01

    In Vanuatu, for 9 years Wan Smolbag (WSB) has been using various dramatic techniques to produce plays that target different audiences to raise awareness about reproductive health. This work has made the group question what happens after they have raised awareness and what people can do if a local chief has ordered a clinic not to distribute contraceptives to unmarried people or if the nearest services are far away. To deal with problems like these, WSB created a new drop-in center at its warehouse base in Port Vila. The idea for the center originated when WSB worked with a cast of 80 residents of Blacksands settlement to produce a 2-hour play and learned about the needs of the residents. To create the center, WSB gained the support of international agencies and the promise of the Vanuatu Health Department to provide contraceptives and antibiotics to treat sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). When WSB held small group discussions to find out how the Blacksands people wanted the center to operate, the people told them that they wanted nurses who were not local (for privacy) but were friendly and approachable. In addition, the women involved wanted to charge nominal membership fees so that members would have a real sense of ownership. The people asked that the center provide family planning services, STD treatment, prenatal care, and counseling for young people. The center will also conduct health promotion activities in the community, and WSB will create new plays to highlight the program.

  13. 45 CFR 2517.300 - Who may participate in a community-based service-learning program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE COMMUNITY-BASED SERVICE-LEARNING PROGRAMS Eligibility To Participate § 2517.300 Who may participate in a community-based service-learning program... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Who may participate in a community-based service...

  14. 45 CFR 2517.600 - How are funds for community-based service-learning programs distributed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How are funds for community-based service-learning... (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE COMMUNITY-BASED SERVICE-LEARNING PROGRAMS Distribution of Funds § 2517.600 How are funds for community-based service-learning programs distributed? All...

  15. Community action research track: Community-based participatory research and service-learning experiences for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimpel, Nora; Kindratt, Tiffany; Dawson, Alvin; Pagels, Patti

    2018-04-01

    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) and service-learning are unique experiential approaches designed to train medical students how to provide individualized patient care from a population perspective. Medical schools in the US are required to provide support for service-learning and community projects. Despite this requirement, few medical schools offer structured service-learning. We developed the Community Action Research Track (CART) to integrate population medicine, health promotion/disease prevention and the social determinants of health into the medical school curriculum through CBPR and service-learning experiences. This article provides an overview of CART and reports the program impact based on students' participation, preliminary evaluations and accomplishments. CART is an optional 4‑year service-learning experience for medical students interested in community health. The curriculum includes a coordinated longitudinal program of electives, community service-learning and lecture-based instruction. From 2009-2015, 146 CART students participated. Interests in public health (93%), community service (73%), primary care (73%), CBPR (60%) and community medicine (60%) were the top reasons for enrolment. Significant improvements in mean knowledge were found when measuring the principles of CBPR, levels of prevention, determining health literacy and patient communication strategies (all p's learning track in an urban metropolitan setting.

  16. Variable-Resolution Ensemble Climatology Modeling of Sierra Nevada Snowpack within the Community Earth System Model (CESM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoades, A.; Ullrich, P. A.; Zarzycki, C. M.; Levy, M.; Taylor, M.

    2014-12-01

    Snowpack is crucial for the western USA, providing around 75% of the total fresh water supply (Cayan et al., 1996) and buffering against seasonal aridity impacts on agricultural, ecosystem, and urban water demands. The resilience of the California water system is largely dependent on natural stores provided by snowpack. This resilience has shown vulnerabilities due to anthropogenic global climate change. Historically, the northern Sierras showed a net decline of 50-75% in snow water equivalent (SWE) while the southern Sierras showed a net accumulation of 30% (Mote et al., 2005). Future trends of SWE highlight that western USA SWE may decline by 40-70% (Pierce and Cayan, 2013), snowfall may decrease by 25-40% (Pierce and Cayan, 2013), and more winter storms may tend towards rain rather than snow (Bales et al., 2006). The volatility of Sierran snowpack presents a need for scientific tools to help water managers and policy makers assess current and future trends. A burgeoning tool to analyze these trends comes in the form of variable-resolution global climate modeling (VRGCM). VRGCMs serve as a bridge between regional and global models and provide added resolution in areas of need, eliminate lateral boundary forcings, provide model runtime speed up, and utilize a common dynamical core, physics scheme and sub-grid scale parameterization package. A cubed-sphere variable-resolution grid with 25 km horizontal resolution over the western USA was developed for use in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) within the Community Earth System Model (CESM). A 25-year three-member ensemble climatology (1980-2005) is presented and major snowpack metrics such as SWE, snow depth, snow cover, and two-meter surface temperature are assessed. The ensemble simulation is also compared to observational, reanalysis, and WRF model datasets. The variable-resolution model provides a mechanism for reaching towards non-hydrostatic scales and simulations are currently being developed with refined

  17. Empowering Students through Service-Learning in a Community Psychology Course: A Case in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kevin; Ng, Eddie; Chan, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    This article chronicles a service-learning (SL) subject on community psychology in Hong Kong (n = 26) and elaborates on how students experience concepts, frameworks, and values in community psychology and put them into practice at servicelearning settings. Upon acquiring basic concepts in community psychology, including sense of community,…

  18. Service functions of private community health stations in China: A comparison analysis with government-sponsored community health stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Wanli; Fan, Hong; Xu, Jing; Wang, Fang; Chai, Yun; Xu, Hancheng; Li, Yongbin; Liu, Liqun; Wang, Bin; Jin, Jianqiang; Lu, Zuxun

    2012-04-01

    In China, with the restructuring of health care system moving forward, private community health facilities have been playing a complementary but increasingly important role in providing public health and basic medical care services in urban areas. However, only limited evidence is available concerning the service functions of private community health facilities in China. The aim of this study was to explore the functions of private community health stations (PCHSs) to provide evidence-based recommendations for policy-making and practice in the development of urban community health services systems. A total of 818 PCHSs and 4320 government-sponsored community health stations (GCHSs) located in 28 cities of China were investigated in 2008. The percentages of stations that provided health services and the annual workload per community health worker (CHW) were compared between the two types of institutions. The results showed that the percentages of PCHSs providing public health services were significantly higher than those of GCHSs (P0.05). The annual workloads of all the public health services and basic medical services per CHW in PCHSs were lighter than those in GCHSs (P0.05). At present, the GCHSs are still the mainstream in urban China, which will last for a long period in future. However, our findings showed that the annual workloads of CHWs in PCHSs were no heavier than those in GCHSs, and the PCHSs were willing to provide public health services. In view of current inadequacy of health resources in China, it is feasible to further develop PCHSs under the guidance of the government, given that PCHSs can perform the basic functions of community health services, which is useful for the formation of public-private partnerships (PPP) and the improvement of community health services.

  19. Community engagement, graduate students, and "naive complicity": Service in the university

    OpenAIRE

    Isaac, Jonathan S

    2016-01-01

    This thesis takes issue with current models of community engagement and service learning that do not take into consideration the constraints imposed upon graduate students or short-term instructors who teach a service learning course or who undertake community-oriented research. Bound up in the long history of academic needs overshadowing or entirely neglecting community concerns, campus-community partnerships involving graduate students are much more likely to maintain, to quote Linda Flower...

  20. Community-Centered Service Learning: A Transformative Lens for Teaching-Learning in Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yancey, Nan Russell

    2016-04-01

    Although service learning has been proposed as a teaching-learning modality in response to an ongoing challenge to transform nursing education, there is a risk to community and student when service learning is poorly conceived. A community-centered service learning approach founded on a nursing theoretical perspective and community model is explored as a way to honor the wisdom and perspective of the community in changing while illuminating a new way of being a nurse in community for the nursing student. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Exploring Service Providers' Perspectives in Improving Childhood Obesity Prevention among CALD Communities in Victoria, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyril, Sheila; Green, Julie; Nicholson, Jan M.; Agho, Kingsley; Renzaho, Andre M. N.

    2016-01-01

    Background Childhood obesity rates have been increasing disproportionately among disadvantaged communities including culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) migrant groups in Australia due to their poor participation in the available obesity prevention initiatives. We sought to explore service providers’ perceptions of the key factors influencing the participation of CALD communities in the existing obesity prevention services and the service requirements needed to improve CALD communities’ participation in these services. Methods We conducted a qualitative study using focus group discussions involving fifty-nine service providers from a range of services, who are involved in the health and wellbeing of children from CALD groups living in four socioeconomically disadvantaged areas in Victoria, Australia. Results Thematic analysis of the data showed three major themes including community-level barriers to CALD engagement in childhood obesity prevention services; service-level barriers to the delivery of these services; and proposed changes to current childhood obesity prevention approaches. Integrating obesity prevention messages within existing programs, better coordination between prevention and treatment services and the establishment of a childhood obesity surveillance system, were some of the important changes suggested by service providers. Conclusion This study has found that low CALD health literacy, lack of knowledge of cultural barriers among service providers and co-existing deficiencies in the structure and delivery of obesity prevention services negatively impacted the participation of CALD communities in obesity prevention services. Cultural competency training of service providers would improve their understanding of the cultural influences of childhood obesity and incorporate them into the design and development of obesity prevention initiatives. Service providers need to be educated on the pre-migratory health service experiences and health

  2. Universal Health Coverage through Community Nursing Services: China vs. Hong Kong

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Wai Yee; Fung, Ita M; Chan, Eric

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: this article looks at how the development of community nursing services in China and Hong Kong can enhance universal health coverage. Methods: literature and data review have been utilized in this study. Results: nursing services have evolved much since the beginning of the nursing profession. The development of community nursing services has expanded the scope of nursing services to those in need of, not just hospital-level nursing care, but more holistic care to impro...

  3. Investigating Urban Community Needs: Service Learning from a Social Justice Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maybach, Carol Wiechman

    1996-01-01

    Provides a critical perspective on service learning, and raises issues about focusing on the growth of students, which often ignores the service recipients and fails to ask how service is affecting the communities in which it is being performed. A new service-learning paradigm is offered to overcome some perceived inconsistencies in the existing…

  4. Improving paediatric outreach services for urban Aboriginal children through partnerships: views of community-based service providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, S L; Williams, K; Ritchie, J; Zwi, K

    2015-11-01

    In Australia, Aboriginal children experience significantly poorer health outcomes compared with non-Aboriginal children. Health policies aimed at improving Aboriginal health outcomes include interventions in the early childhood period. There is a need for government health services to work in partnership with Aboriginal people and other services to achieve the highest level of health possible for Aboriginal children, who often require a range of services to meet complex needs. This paper describes the views of service providers on how paediatric outreach services work in partnership with other services, Aboriginal families and the community and how those partnerships could be improved to maximize health outcomes for children. In-depth, semi-structured interviews and focus groups were conducted with managers and service providers over a 6-week period in 2010. The views and suggestions of participants were documented and a thematic analysis was undertaken. Analysis of two focus groups with seven service providers and five individual interviews with service managers resulted in the identification of four themes: (i) using informal and formal ways of working; (ii) cultivating effective relationships; (iii) demonstrating cultural sensitivity; and (iv) forging strong leadership. Use of formal and informal approaches facilitated effective relationships between service providers and Aboriginal families and communities. Partnerships with the community were founded on a culturally appropriate model of care that recognized a holistic approach to health and wellness. Leadership emerged as an essential component of effective partnerships, cultivating the ethos of the workplace and creating an environment where collaboration is supported. Culturally appropriate child health services, which utilize effective relationships and employ a range of informal and formal collaboration with other services and community members, are well positioned to implement health policy and improve

  5. 75 FR 78939 - Senior Community Service Employment Program; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, Additional Indicator...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-17

    ... Community Service Employment Program; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, Additional Indicator on Volunteer Work... Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP), Additional Indicator on Volunteer Work that was... number of exiting participants who enter volunteer work. The relevant Office of Management and Budget...

  6. High School Community Service as a Predictor of Adult Voting and Volunteering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Daniel; Donnelly, Thomas M.; Youniss, James; Atkins, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The influences of high school community service participation, extracurricular involvement, and civic knowledge on voting and volunteering in early adulthood were examined using the National Educational Longitudinal Study. The major finding in this study is that both voluntary and school-required community service in high school were strong…

  7. Effects of Community Service-Learning on Heritage Language Learners' Attitudes toward Their Language and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual y Cabo, Diego; Prada, Josh; Lowther Pereira, Kelly

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effects of participation in a community service-learning experience on Spanish heritage language learners' attitudes toward their heritage language and culture. Quantitative and qualitative data from heritage language learners demonstrated that engagement in community service-learning activities as part of the Spanish…

  8. The Community Relations Service: Public Sector Mediation and Conciliation of Racial Disputes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompa, Gilbert R.

    1981-01-01

    The Community Relations Service of the United States Department of Justice assists in the voluntary settlement of race-related disputes. The service is provided for prison administrators, private agencies, community groups, law enforcement agencies, school officials and parents organizations, business and industry leaders, and federal, state, and…

  9. Helping Nevada School Children Become Sun Smart

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-11-28

    This podcast features Christine Thompson, Community Programs Manager at the Nevada Cancer Coalition, and author of a recent study detailing a school-based program to help Nevada school children establish healthy sun safety habits and decrease UV exposure. Christine answers questions about her research and what impact her what impact the program had on children’s skin health.  Created: 11/28/2017 by Preventing Chronic Disease (PCD), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 11/28/2017.

  10. Implementing Community-based Health Planning and Services in impoverished urban communities: health workers' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwameme, Adanna Uloaku; Tabong, Philip Teg-Nefaah; Adongo, Philip Baba

    2018-03-20

    Three-quarters of sub-Saharan Africa's urban population currently live under slum conditions making them susceptible to ill health and diseases. Ghana characterizes the situation in many developing countries where the urban poor have become a group much afflicted by complex health problems associated with their living conditions, and the intra-city inequity between them and the more privileged urban dwellers with respect to health care accessibility. Adopting Ghana's rural Community-Based Health Planning and Service (CHPS) programme in urban areas is challenging due to the differences in social networks and health challenges thus making modifications necessary. The Community Health Officers (CHOs) and their supervisors are the frontline providers of health in the community and there is a need to analyze and document the health sector response to urban CHPS. The study was solely qualitative and 19 in-depth interviews were conducted with all the CHOs and key health sector individuals in supervisory/coordinating positions working in urban CHPS zones to elicit relevant issues concerning urban CHPS implementation. Thematic content data analysis was done using the NVivo 7 software. Findings from this appraisal suggest that the implementation of this urban concept of the CHPS programme has been well undertaken by the health personnel involved in the process despite the challenges that they face in executing their duties. Several issues came to light including the lack of first aid drugs, as well as the need for the Integrated Management of Neonatal and Childhood Illnesses (IMNCI) programme and more indepth training for CHOs. In addition, the need to provide incentives for the volunteers and Community Health Committee members to sustain their motivation and the CHOs' apprehensions with regards to furthering their education and progression in their careers were key concerns raised. The establishment of the CHPS concept in the urban environment albeit challenging has been

  11. Patients' reasons for accepting a free community pharmacy asthma service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaae, Susanne; Sporrong, Sofia Kälvemark

    2015-01-01

    ’ perceived needs of an inhalation counseling service as well as their motivation for accepting the service, including their accounts of how the service was orally offered by staff. Results The majority of participants were used to using inhaler devices. The participants felt, for several reasons, little need...... of an inhaler service and seldom noticed the precise way the service was offered. Patients did not seem to accept the service expecting personal benefits. First timers appeared to accept the service to learn how to use the device correctly, whereas experienced users appeared to accept the ITAS to be helpful...... to staff or to learn more about health issues in general or were convinced by individual employees who showed a special interest in the participant receiving the service. Privacy problems were felt by several participants. Conclusion The patients felt little need for the inhaler counseling service...

  12. How Should Community Mental Health of Intellectual Disability Services Evolve?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmings, Colin; Bouras, Nick; Craig, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Services for people with Intellectual Disability (ID) and coexisting mental health problems remain undeveloped; research into their effectiveness has been lacking. Three linked recent studies in the UK have provided evidence on essential service provision from staff, service users and carers. Interfaces with mainstream mental health services were seen as problematic: the area of crisis response was seen as a particular problem. Further services’ research is needed, focusing on service components rather than whole service configurations. There was not support for establishing more intensive mental health services for people with ID only. The way forward is in developing new ways of co-working with staff in “mainstream” mental health services. Mental health of ID staff might often be best situated directly within these services. PMID:25158137

  13. Nevada`s energy research strategy. Progress report, September 30, 1991--September 29, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNelis, D.N.

    1992-10-01

    This document was produced by the University and Community College System of Nevada (UCCSN) under a grant from the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Research as part of the DOE-Experimental Program for the Simulation of Competitive Research (DOE-EPSCoR). The document develops Nevada`s strategies for the UCCSN to broaden and deepen energy-related research over the next five years in hydrology sciences, environmental biology and chemistry, chemical physics, and global change. A strategy was also developed to support energy-related research with education and human resources in science, math and engineering. A key concept of these strategies is continued success under the DOE-EPSCOR program. Participation in the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Basic Energy Science and Global Climate Change programs in collaboration with the Nevada Test Site and DOE multi-program laboratories is also part of Nevada`s strategy for success in energy-related research.

  14. A changing landscape: mapping provider organisations for community nursing services in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilsbury, Karen; Pender, Sue

    2015-01-01

    To scope the provision of community nursing services in England after implementation of the Transforming Community Services Programme. Over the past decade, significant UK policy initiatives have shaped the structure, organisation and responsibilities of community nursing services. Understanding these organisational changes is important in the context of organisations seeking to deliver 'care closer to home'. A systematic mapping exercise to scope and categorise community nursing service organisation provider models. There are 102 provider organisations representing a range of organisational models. Two-thirds of these organisations have structurally integrated with another NHS Trust. Smaller numbers reorganised to form community trusts or community interest companies. Only a few services have been tendered to an accredited willing provider while a small number have yet to establish their new service model. Local discretion appears to have dominated the choice of organisational form. National policies have driven the reorganisation of community nursing services and we have been able to describe, for the first time, these 'transformed' structures and organisations. Providing detail of these 'new' models of service provision, and where these have been introduced, is new information for nurse managers, policy makers and organisational leaders, as well as researchers. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The Effect of Community on Distributed Bio-inspired Service Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Raymond; Balasubramaniam, Sasitharan; Botvich, Dmitri; Donnelly, William

    The Future Internet is expected to cater for both a larger number and variety of services, which in turn will make basic tasks such as service lifecycle management increasingly important and difficult. At the same time, the ability for users to efficiently discover and compose these services will become a key factor for service providers to differentiate themselves in a competitive market. In previous work, we examined the effect adding biological mechanisms to services had on service management and discovery. In this paper we examine the effects of community on services, specifically in terms of composing services in a distributed fashion. By introducing aspects of community we aim to demonstrate that services can further improve their sustainability and indeed their efficiency.

  16. A Counselor's Guide to Community Services for Rape Victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Bruce D.; Shachar, Sandra A.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the typical chronology and basic functions of health, legal, and social services encountered by rape victims. Suggests ways in which counselors can effectively participate in the delivery of rape-related services. (Author)

  17. EnviroAtlas Community Block Group Metrics Web Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). This web service includes...

  18. How Outpatient Substance Abuse Treatment Unit Director Activities May Affect Provision of Community Outreach Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Emmeline; Wells, Rebecca; Alexander, Jeffrey; Green, Sherri

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Community outreach services play an important role in infectious disease prevention and engaging drug users not currently in treatment. However, fewer than half of US substance abuse treatment units provide these services and many have little financial incentive to do so. Unit directors generally have latitude about scope of services,…

  19. Service-Learning's Flaw: What's Community Got To Do With It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelick, Risa P.

    "Writing the Community: Concepts and Models for Service-Learning in Composition" (1997, Adler-Kassner, et. al.) begins with calling the inclusion of service-learning curricula into college-level composition a "microrevolution" rather than a trend. However, a review of the service-learning composition literature illustrates that…

  20. The Impact of Community Service Involvement on Three Measures of Undergraduate Self-Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Joseph B.; Milem, Jeff F.

    2002-01-01

    The central purpose of this study is to increase our understanding of how community service involvement affects the development of undergraduate self-concept. The findings from this study suggest that the quality of service involvement is more important than the amount of service performed by students. (Contains 23 references and 2 tables.)…

  1. Users' Continuance Intention of Virtual Learning Community Services: The Moderating Role of Usage Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Liu, Yupei; Yan, Weiwei; Zhang, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Users' continuance intention plays a significant role in the process of information system (IS) service, especially virtual learning community (VLC) services. Following the IS success model and IS post-acceptance model, this study explores the determinants of users' intention to continue using VLCs' service from the perspective of quality,…

  2. The Community Grant Writing Project: A Flexible Service-Learning Model for Writing-Intensive Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Courtney

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the Community Grant Writing Project (CGWP), a flexible service-learning framework designed for use in writing-intensive courses. The CGWP incorporates best-practice recommendations from the service-learning literature and addresses recent challenges identified for successful service-learning partnerships. In the CGWP,…

  3. Balancing Social Responsibility and Personal Autonomy: Adolescents' Reasoning About Community Service Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Justin; Helwig, Charles C

    2015-01-01

    Many jurisdictions in North America have implemented mandatory community service programs in high schools. However, little research exists examining the reasoning of youth themselves about such programs. This study examined how youth reason about community service programs, and how they balance the prosocial goals of these programs against their personal autonomy. Seventy-two participants between 10 and 18 years old evaluated voluntary community service along with 4 hypothetical mandatory programs that varied according to whether students or the government decided the areas in which students would serve, and whether a structured reflection component was included. The findings reveal that youth are not simply self-focused but rather balance and coordinate considerations of autonomy and community in their judgments and reasoning about community service.

  4. Assessing community perspectives of the community based education and service model at Makerere University, Uganda: a qualitative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbalinda, Scovia N; Plover, Colin M; Burnham, Gilbert; Kaye, Dan; Mwanika, Andrew; Oria, Hussein; Okullo, Isaac; Muhwezi, Wilson; Groves, Sara

    2011-03-09

    Community partnerships are defined as groups working together with shared goals, responsibilities, and power to improve the community. There is growing evidence that these partnerships contribute to the success and sustainability of community-based education and service programs (COBES), facilitating change in community actions and attitudes. Makerere University College of Health Sciences (MakCHS) is forging itself as a transformational institution in Uganda and the region. The College is motivated to improve the health of Ugandans through innovative responsive teaching, provision of service, and community partnerships. Evaluating the COBES program from the community perspective can assist the College in refining an innovative and useful model that has potential to improve the health of Ugandans. A stratified random sample of 11 COBES sites was selected to examine the community's perception of the program. Key Informant Interviews of 11 site tutors and 33 community members were completed. The data was manually analyzed and themes developed. Communities stated the students consistently engaged with them with culturally appropriate behaviour. They rated the student's communication as very good even though translators were frequently needed. Half the community stated they received some feedback from the students, but some communities interpreted any contact after the initial visit as feedback. Communities confirmed and appreciated that the students provided a number of interventions and saw positive changes in health and health seeking behaviours. The community reflected that some programs were more sustainable than others; the projects that needed money to implement were least sustainable. The major challenges from the community included community fatigue, and poor motivation of community leaders to continue to take students without compensation. Communities hosting Makerere students valued the students' interventions and the COBES model. They reported witnessing

  5. Housing preferences of Irish forensic mental health service users on moving into the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Patricia; Rani Shetty, Shobha

    2013-01-01

    Housing is one of the important services required by forensic mental health service users on reintegration into the community. In the Republic of Ireland, a recent amendment to Section 13 of the Criminal Law Insanity Act (2006) has given the prospect of conditional discharge, which has increased the need for housing among Irish forensic mental health service users. This article reports findings of a qualitative descriptive study aimed to explore the housing preferences of these service users. While identifying and capturing their views, the study also identified the strengths and weaknesses of current housing services from a service user perspective. Data were collected from nine service users using semistructured interviews. Colaizzi's (1978) approach was used to analyze the data. Three themes that emerged from the analysis are as follows: (a) living choices; (b) future considerations; and (c) service users' expectations. Although concerns were raised regarding legislation and policy, service users strongly preferred normal independent living and recommended continued community support, gradual discharge, and community hostels. Findings suggest that service users' expectations may be fulfilled with effective collaboration between forensic mental health service and housing services. This is the first study to be carried out in Ireland that adds a new dimension to the literature on housing policy and service users' perspectives.

  6. School-Community Alliances Enhance Mental Health Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vailancourt, Kelly; Amador, Andria

    2015-01-01

    Building effective school community partnerships requires recognition of barriers along with time and commitment from both the school district and community agencies to overcome those barriers. It may seem overwhelming to fully address each of the challenges while attempting to implement each element of effective school partnerships all at once,…

  7. The Development of Community Mental Health Services in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Max W.

    This paper documents the development of community mental health (CMH) in New Zealand and makes comparisons with the United States. It is argued that the present New Zealand situation bears some similarity to that existing in the United States during the 1960's. The ideology of 'community mental health' is gaining popularity among professional and…

  8. Community Exemption from Payment for Health Services (Burkina ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The project will be carried out in coordination with local communities and with endogenous funds. Researchers will examine the feasibility, efficacy and sustainability of the intervention by means of case studies in 10 health centres in the same district. The results will be fed back to the communities via workshops, and a final ...

  9. Improving public library services for rural community development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The public library is an institution of inestimable value supported by public fund for the benefit of the society. The use of public libraries is not restricted to any class of persons in the community but it is freely available to all. This article reviews the purpose and role of public libraries in any community. The problems bedeviling ...

  10. Community Service and Social Transformation: The Contribution of Religious Education to the Health of the American Polis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falbo, Mark C.

    1998-01-01

    Provides a description of the growing public policy of national and community service as a solution to the declining health of the United States. Addresses how religious education and community service can enrich each other. (CMK)

  11. Finding the community in sustainable online community engagement: Not-for-profit organisation websites, service-learning and research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Dodd

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the use of action research (2008–2014 based on a case study of the Sustainable Online Community Engagement (SOCE Project, a service-learning project in which University of South Australia students build websites for not-for-profit (NFP organisations, to demonstrate that effective teaching, public service and research are interdependent. A significant problem experienced in the SOCE project was that, despite some training and ongoing assistance, the community organisations reported that they found it difficult to make effective use of their websites. One of the proposed solutions was to develop an online community of the participating organisations that would be self-supporting, member-driven and collaborative, and enable the organisations to share information about web-based technology. The research reported here explored the usefulness of developing such an online community for the organisations involved and sought alternative ways to assist the organisations to maintain an effective and sustainable web presence. The research used a three-phase ethnographic action research approach. The first phase was a content analysis and review of the editing records of 135 organisational websites hosted by the SOCE project. The second phase was an online survey sent to 145 community organisation members responsible for the management of these websites, resulting in 48 responses. The third phase consisted of semi-structured, in-depth interviews with 18 of the website managers from 12 of these organisations. The research revealed the extent to which organisations were unable to manage their websites and found that the proposed solution of an online community would not be useful. More importantly, it suggested other useful strategies which have been implemented. In Furco’s (2010 model of the engaged campus, public engagement can be used to advance the public service, teaching and research components of higher education’s tripartite

  12. School health services and community nutrition: a historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezola, J G; Santolaya, J; Orduna, J; Dehesa, F

    2001-12-01

    The Bilbao School Health Service was created at the beginning of the century with the aim of preventing transmittable diseases among children as well as improving nutrition. At that time such services were established in many other countries. Since then, according to evolving societal changes and emerging needs, the Service has reoriented its scope and structure towards the Health Promotion scheme. Current tasks include health screening examinations and hygiene surveillance as well as preventive and health education programmes.

  13. Assessing community perspectives of the community based education and service model at Makerere University, Uganda: a qualitative evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okullo Isaac

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community partnerships are defined as groups working together with shared goals, responsibilities, and power to improve the community. There is growing evidence that these partnerships contribute to the success and sustainability of community-based education and service programs (COBES, facilitating change in community actions and attitudes. Makerere University College of Health Sciences (MakCHS is forging itself as a transformational institution in Uganda and the region. The College is motivated to improve the health of Ugandans through innovative responsive teaching, provision of service, and community partnerships. Evaluating the COBES program from the community perspective can assist the College in refining an innovative and useful model that has potential to improve the health of Ugandans. Methods A stratified random sample of 11 COBES sites was selected to examine the community’s perception of the program. Key Informant Interviews of 11 site tutors and 33 community members were completed. The data was manually analyzed and themes developed. Results Communities stated the students consistently engaged with them with culturally appropriate behaviour. They rated the student’s communication as very good even though translators were frequently needed. Half the community stated they received some feedback from the students, but some communities interpreted any contact after the initial visit as feedback. Communities confirmed and appreciated that the students provided a number of interventions and saw positive changes in health and health seeking behaviours. The community reflected that some programs were more sustainable than others; the projects that needed money to implement were least sustainable. The major challenges from the community included community fatigue, and poor motivation of community leaders to continue to take students without compensation. Conclusions Communities hosting Makerere students valued the

  14. Geography of Service Delivery: On the Role of Mental Health Service Structure in Community Senior Services for Puerto Rican Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez Ortiz, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to examine the role of mental health services structure in community senior centers and how it interacts with Puerto Rican older adults' historical, social, and cultural experiences to relate to their perceptions, awareness, and utilization of mental health services. The study was carried out within a concurrent…

  15. Online learning management systems (LMS) and sense of community: A pre-service practicum perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Glenn Rideout; Robert Bruinsma; John Hull; Jacob Modayil

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of the implementation of an online learning management system (LMS) on pre-service teachers during their major pre-service practicum. The LMS enabled students to remain connected to peers, professors, and supervisors while new relationships were formed with in-school personnel such as mentor teachers, principals, and students. The quantitative data analysis revealed that pre-service teachers perceived a higher sense of community when it included pre-service teac...

  16. Special Nevada report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-09-23

    This report is submitted to Congress by the Secretary of the Air Force, the Secretary of the Navy, and the Secretary of the Interior pursuant to Section 6 of the Military Lands Withdrawal Act of 1986. It contains an analysis and evaluation of the effects on public health and safety resulting from DOD and Department of Energy (DOE) military and defense-related uses on withdrawn public lands in the State of Nevada and in airspace overlying the State. This report describes the cumulative impacts of those activities on public and private property in Nevada and on plants, fish and wildlife, cultural, historic, scientific, recreational, wilderness and other resources of the public lands of Nevada. An analysis and evaluation of possible measures to mitigate the cumulative effects of the withdrawal of lands and the use of airspace in Nevada for defense-related purposes was conducted, and those considered practical are listed.

  17. Nevada Operations overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Church, B.W.

    1981-01-01

    A brief overview is given of weapon test site decontamination activities carried out by Nevada Operations Office. Tabulated data is given of event name, date, location, year of cleanup, and radioisotopes that were present, activity levels, and cost of cleanup

  18. Quality service delivery for the community, by the community: an innovative Eastern Cape infrastructure and job creation success

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wall, K

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available of Municipal Engineering of Southern Africa Annual (IMIESA) Conference, Port Elizabeth, October 2013 Quality service delivery for the community, by the community: an innovative Eastern Cape infrastructure and job creation success Wall K, Ive O, Bhagwan J..., particularly: job creation- and it creates there at the lowest economic levels of the pyramid, where unemployment is the highest and possession of the workplace skills lowest, transfer of workplace skills; micro-business creation and nurturing; BBBEE...

  19. Nevada state revenues analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    This report analyzes the major sources of revenue to the Nevada State General Fund for purposes of estimating impacts associated with the siting of a nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada. Each major revenue source is analyzed to identify relationships among the economic or demographic base, the revenue base, and the revenues generated. Trends and changes in the rates and/or base are highlighted. A model is developed for each revenue source to allow impact estimation

  20. Accessibility of occupational therapy community services: a legal, ethical, and clinical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Annie; Levasseur, Mélanie; Mullins, Gary

    2010-10-01

    ABSTRACT Accessibility of health care services is a major concern in many countries. This paper examines the impact of limited access to occupational therapy community services on the right to services, distributive justice (resource distribution based on social solidarity), and service quality. Legal documents and relevant scientific papers were analyzed from three standpoints: legal, ethical, and clinical. Random use of criteria to prioritize requests, partial response to complex needs, task delegation, and long waiting times, all affect distributive justice and compromise the right to and quality of services. Various alternatives are suggested to ensure a balance between the distribution and quality of occupational therapy services.

  1. Rape on Campus: Community Education and Services for Victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estabrook, Barbara; And Others

    1978-01-01

    A rape task force at the University of Massachusetts (Amherst) is described with priorities including interagency coordination, a multiple entry system for victims, support for the development of a counselor-advocate program, and community education. (JMF)

  2. Salt Lake Community College Veterans Services: A Model of Serving Veterans in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Aaron; Foster, Michael; Head, Darlene

    2015-01-01

    This chapter outlines the birth and growth of a veterans' program in Salt Lake City, Utah, and discusses next steps in spurring additional innovations and advancements to improve service for student veterans in community colleges.

  3. 42 CFR 436.217 - Individuals receiving home and community-based services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Children and Aged, Blind, and Disabled Individuals, Including Pregnant Women § 436.217 Individuals... if institutionalized. (b) In the absence of home and community-based services under a waiver granted...

  4. Child Community Mental Health Services in Asia Pacific and Singapore’s REACH Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choon Guan Lim

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, there have been concerted efforts to improve mental health services for youths alongside the challenges of rising healthcare costs and increasing demand for mental health needs. One important phenomenon is the shift from traditional clinic-based care to community-based mental health services to improve accessibility to services and provide patient-centred care. In this article, we discuss the child and adolescent community mental health efforts within the Asia-Pacific region. We also discuss Singapore’s community and school-based mental health service, known as the Response, Early Intervention and Assessment in Community Mental Health (REACH. This article discusses how REACH has evolved over the years in response to the changing needs of youths in Singapore. Finally, we discuss the current challenges and future directions for youth mental health care.

  5. Child Community Mental Health Services in Asia Pacific and Singapore's REACH Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Choon Guan; Loh, Hannah; Renjan, Vidhya; Tan, Jason; Fung, Daniel

    2017-10-06

    In recent decades, there have been concerted efforts to improve mental health services for youths alongside the challenges of rising healthcare costs and increasing demand for mental health needs. One important phenomenon is the shift from traditional clinic-based care to community-based mental health services to improve accessibility to services and provide patient-centred care. In this article, we discuss the child and adolescent community mental health efforts within the Asia-Pacific region. We also discuss Singapore's community and school-based mental health service, known as the Response, Early Intervention and Assessment in Community Mental Health (REACH). This article discusses how REACH has evolved over the years in response to the changing needs of youths in Singapore. Finally, we discuss the current challenges and future directions for youth mental health care.

  6. Predicting initial client engagement with community mental health services by routinely measured data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeg, D.P.K.; van de Goor, L.A.M.; Garretsen, H.F.L.

    2015-01-01

    Engagement is a determinant of how well a person will respond to professional input. This study investigates whether, in practice, routinely measured data predict initial client engagement with community mental health services. Engagement, problem severity, client characteristics, and duration

  7. Community Broadband Networks and the Opportunity for E-Government Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Idongesit

    2017-01-01

    Community Broadband Networks (CBN) facilitate Broadband connectivity in underserved areas in many countries. The lack of Broadband connectivity is one of the reasons for the slow diffusion of e-government services in many countries.This article explains how CBNs can be enabled by governments...... to facilitate the delivery of e–government services in underserved areas in the developed and developing countries.The Community Based Broadband Mobilization (CBNM) models are used as explanatory tools....

  8. Community service provider perceptions of implementing older adult fall prevention in Ontario, Canada: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykeman, Catherine S; Markle-Reid, Maureen F; Boratto, Lorna J; Bowes, Chris; Gagné, Hélène; McGugan, Jennifer L; Orr-Shaw, Sarah

    2018-02-01

    Despite evidence for effective fall prevention interventions, measurable reductions in older adult (≥ 65 years) fall rates remain unrealized. This study aimed to describe the perceived barriers to and effective strategies for the implementation of evidence-based fall prevention practices within and across diverse community organizations. This study is unique in that it included community service providers who are not generally thought to provide fall prevention services to older adults, such as retail business, community support, volunteer services, community foundations, recreation centres, and various emergency services. Interviews and focus groups were conducted with a purposive sampling of providers (n = 84) in varied roles within diverse community-based organizations across disparate geographical settings. Community service providers experience significant multi-level barriers to fall prevention within and across organizations and settings. The overall challenge of serving dispersed populations in adverse environmental conditions was heightened in northern rural areas. Barriers across the system, within organizations and among providers themselves emerged along themes of Limited Coordination of Communication, Restrictive Organizational Mandates and Policies, Insufficient Resources, and Beliefs about Aging and Falls. Participants perceived that Educating Providers, Working Together, and Changing Policies and Legislation were strategies that have worked or would work well in implementing fall prevention. An unintentional observation was made that several participants in this extremely varied sample identified expanded roles in fall prevention for themselves during the interview process. Community service providers experience disabling contexts for implementing fall prevention on many levels: their specific geography, their service systems, their organizations and themselves. A systemic lack of fit between the older adult and fall prevention services

  9. Characterizing the Use of Research-Community Partnerships in Studies of Evidence-Based Interventions in Children's Community Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookman-Frazee, Lauren; Stahmer, Aubyn; Stadnick, Nicole; Chlebowski, Colby; Herschell, Amy; Garland, Ann F

    2016-01-01

    This study characterized the use of research community partnerships (RCPs) to tailor evidence-based intervention, training, and implementation models for delivery across different childhood problems and service contexts using a survey completed by project principal investigators and community partners. To build on previous RCP research and to explicate the tacit knowledge gained through collaborative efforts, the following were examined: (1) characteristics of studies using RCP models; (2) RCP functioning, processes, and products; (3) processes of tailoring evidence-based practices for community implementation; and (4) perceptions of the benefits and challenges of collaborating with community providers and consumers. Results indicated that researchers were solely or jointly involved in the formation of almost all of the RCPs; interpersonal and operational processes were perceived as primary challenges; community partners' roles included greater involvement in implementation and participant recruitment than more traditional research activities; and the partnership process was perceived to increase the relevance and "fit" of interventions and research.

  10. Universal Health Coverage through Community Nursing Services: China vs. Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai Yee Chan

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: this article looks at how the development of community nursing services in China and Hong Kong can enhance universal health coverage. Methods: literature and data review have been utilized in this study. Results: nursing services have evolved much since the beginning of the nursing profession. The development of community nursing services has expanded the scope of nursing services to those in need of, not just hospital-level nursing care, but more holistic care to improve health and quality of life. Conclusion: despite the one-country-two-systems governance and the difference in population and geography, Hong Kong and China both face the aging population and its complications. Community nursing services help to pave the road to Universal Health Coverage.

  11. Assessing, mapping and quantifying cultural ecosystem services at community level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plieninger, T.; Dijks, S.; Oteros Rozas, E.; Bieling, C.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies underline the importance of immaterial benefits provided by ecosystems and especially by cultural landscapes, which are shaped by intimate human–nature interactions. However, due to methodological challenges, cultural ecosystem services are rarely fully considered in ecosystem

  12. Communication and Community in Digital Entertainment Services. Prestudy Research Report

    OpenAIRE

    Järvinen, Aki; Heliö, Satu; Mäyrä, Frans

    2002-01-01

    CC-DES is a future-orientated research and development project where new forms of communication and interaction in digital entertainment services are analysed. The project carries out user-focused research into communication forms and design solutions encouraging communality and gameplay in digital entertainment products and services. The prestudy focuses on analysing existing commercial media products and defining crucial concepts, such as gameplay and playability. A theoretical model for...

  13. Towards improving service delivery in screening and intervention services in community pharmacies: a case study of an alcohol IBA service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackridge, A J; Krska, J; Stokes, E C; Heim, D

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated positive outcomes from a range of pharmacy public health services, but barriers to delivery remain. This paper explores the processes of delivering an alcohol screening and intervention service, with a view to improving service delivery. A mixed-methods, multi-perspective approach was used, comprising in-pharmacy observations and recording of service provision, follow-up interviews with service users and interactive feedback sessions with service providers. Observations and recordings indicate that staff missed opportunities to offer the service and that both availability and delivery of the service were inconsistent, partly owing to unavailability of trained staff and service restrictions. Most service users gave positive accounts of the service and considered pharmacies to be appropriate places for this service. Respondents also described positive impacts, ranging from thinking more about alcohol consumption generally to substantial reductions in consumption. Key facilitators to service provision included building staff confidence and service champions. Barriers included commissioning issues and staff perception of alcohol as a sensitive topic. Findings support expansion of pharmacies' role in delivering public health services and highlight benefits of providing feedback to pharmacy staff on their service provision as a possible avenue for service improvement. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Social support and responsiveness in online patient communities: impact on service quality perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambisan, Priya; Gustafson, David H; Hawkins, Robert; Pingree, Suzanne

    2016-02-01

    Hospitals frequently evaluate their service quality based on the care and services provided to patients by their clinical and non-clinical staff.(1,2) However, such evaluations do not take into consideration the many interactions that patients have in online patient communities with the health-care organization (HCO) as well as with peer patients. Patients' interactions in these online communities could impact their perceptions regarding the HCO's service quality. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the impact of social support and responsiveness that patients experience in an HCO's online community on patients' perceptions regarding the HCO's service quality. The study data are collected from CHESS, a health-care programme (Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System) run by the Centre for Health Enhancement System Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Findings show that the social support and the responsiveness received from peer patients in the online patient communities will impact patients' perceptions regarding the service quality of the HCO even when the organizational members themselves do not participate in the online discussions. The results indicate that interactions in such HCO-provided online patient communities should not be ignored as they could translate into patients' perceptions regarding HCOs' service quality. Ways to improve responsiveness and social support in an HCO's online patient community are discussed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Characteristics of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders Who Received Services through Community Mental Health Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, Stephanie A.; Corrigan, Susan K.; McDonald, Thomas P.; Holmes, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    Despite the presence of significant psychiatric comorbidity among children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), little research exists on those who receive community-based mental health services. This project examined one year (2004) of data from the database maintained by 26 community mental health centers (CMHCs) in the Midwestern US state of…

  16. The Effects of Online Communities of Practice on Pre-Service Teachers' Critical Thinking Dispositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekici, Didem Inel

    2017-01-01

    This empirical study attempted to investigate the effect of using online communities of practice in teacher education on pre-service teachers' critical thinking dispositions. California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory and the comments posted to the online community of practice were used as the data collection tools. Results showed that…

  17. Service-Learning and Emergent Communities of Practice: A Teacher Education Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaschak, Jennifer Cutsforth; Letwinsky, Karim Medico

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the unexpected emergence of a community of practice in a middle level mathematics and science methods course. The authors describe how preservice teacher participation in a collaborative, project-based service-learning experience resulted in the formation of a community of practice characterized by teamwork, meaningful…

  18. An Analysis of Career Services Usage and Satisfaction at Delaware Technical Community College Terry Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strusowski, Lisa June

    2013-01-01

    Career centers at community colleges across America are utilizing technology in a variety of ways to efficiently and effectively deliver their services to students. Therefore, identifying and understanding the technology-related preferences and needs of community college students is fundamental for planning and establishing relevant online career…

  19. Negotiating Service Learning through Community Engagement: Adaptive Leadership, Knowledge, Dialogue and Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preece, Julia

    2016-01-01

    This article builds on two recent publications (Preece 2013; 2013a) concerning the application of asset-based community development and adaptive leadership theories when negotiating university service learning placements with community organisations in one South African province. The first publication introduced the concept of 'adaptive…

  20. The Culture of Experiential Community Based Learning: Developing Cultural Awareness in Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droppert, Alida J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the culture of experiential community based learning at Central College, a rural liberal arts college in Midwestern, USA. Pre-service teachers use experiential community based learning to reflect on their personal growth in understanding the needs of diverse learners. Reflections demonstrate how the program contributes to the…

  1. Effects of urban development on ant communities: implications for ecosystem services and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Monte P; Manley, Patricia N; Murphy, Dennis D

    2009-02-01

    Research that connects the effects of urbanization on biodiversity and ecosystem services is lacking. Ants perform multifarious ecological functions that stabilize ecosystems and contribute to a number of ecosystem services. We studied responses of ant communities to urbanization in the Lake Tahoe basin by sampling sites along a gradient of urban land development. We sampled ant communities, measured vegetation characteristics, quantified human activities, and evaluated ant-community responses by grouping ants into service-providing units (SPUs), defined as a group of organisms and their populations that perform specific ecosystem services, to provide an understanding of urbanization impacts on biodiversity and their delivery of ecosystem services. Species richness and abundance peaked at intermediate levels of urban development, as did the richness of 3 types of ant SPUs (aerators, decomposers, and compilers). With increasing land development aerator and decomposer ants significantly declined in abundance, whereas compiler ants significantly increased in abundance. Competing models demonstrated that precipitation was frequently among the strongest influences on ant community structure; however, urban development and human activities also had a strong, negative influence on ants, appearing in most models with DeltaAIC(c) ecosystem services were maintained until development reached 30-40%. Our data provide evidence that ecosystem functions, such as water infiltration and soil productivity, may be diminished at sites subject to greater levels of urbanization and that conserving ant communities and the ecosystem services they provide could be an important target in land-use planning and conservation efforts.

  2. Dental students and faculty members' attitudes towards care for underserved patients and community service: do community-based dental education and voluntary service-learning matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volvovsky, Mariya; Vodopyanov, Dmitry; Inglehart, Marita R

    2014-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to explore 1) how students across the four years of a dental curriculum differed in attitudes towards underserved patients and community service at the beginning and end of each school year; 2) how these attitudes changed as a function of participating in required vs. voluntary community-based activities; and 3) what attitudes faculty members held about the effects of community service-learning on students. Surveys were distributed to 440 students at one dental school at the beginning and end of the school year. The overall response rate for those surveys was 75 percent, with variations among classes: first year, 94 percent; second year, 92 percent; third year, 69 percent; and fourth year, 43 percent. Survey data were also collected from twenty-two students (out of a possible forty-seven) who participated in voluntary service-learning and from fifty-four faculty members (out of approximately 150). The results showed that, at the beginning of the year, the first-year students' attitudes were more positive than the responses of students in all other cohorts. However, at the end of the year, their attitudes were less positive. Participating in voluntary service-learning improved students' attitudes towards treating underserved patients only in the short run, and experiencing ten weeks of community-based dental education did not improve their attitudes. The faculty respondents' attitudes, however, were quite positive. The decrease in students' positive attitudes towards treating underserved patients and participating in community service should raise questions about why this loss of idealism occurred.

  3. Behavioral health services "Don't work for us": cultural incongruities in human service systems for Alaska Native communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexler, Lisa

    2011-03-01

    Community psychology emphasizes the importance of context in the study of people's lives, and culture influences this in profound ways. To develop programs that effectively address diverse communities' problems, it is essential to recognize how Euro-American human service systems are understood and responded to by the many different people being served by them. The article describes how some broadly defined social services-conceptualized and implemented within a Euro-American framework-are ill suited for the everyday realities of Alaska Native villages. The cultural discontinuities are illustrated through ethnographic vignettes. The article concludes with suggestions for developing more culturally-responsive ways to conceive of and do programming for Alaska Native and possibly other Indigenous and minority communities.

  4. The Caring Community as a Context for Joining Youth Needs and Program Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianni, Francis A. J.

    1996-01-01

    Argues that many of the needs youth have are determined by where and how they live. Suggests youth services providers should take a constructivist approach by helping communities and organizations create services that provide and nurture caring attitudes and behaviors. Presents recommendations for modifying cultures and organizing caring…

  5. 42 CFR 435.217 - Individuals receiving home and community-based services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Options for Coverage of Families and Children and the Aged, Blind, and Disabled § 435.217 Individuals... if institutionalized. (b) In the absence of home and community-based services under a waiver granted... services. Options for Coverage of Families and Children ...

  6. 77 FR 56845 - Meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-14

    ...: Matters to be discussed: Tobacco, oral health and cardiovascular disease. Meeting Accessibility: This... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health...

  7. Collaboration with Community Mental Health Service Providers: A Necessity in Contemporary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Victor; Castro-Villarreal, Felicia

    2016-01-01

    Schools have played an increasingly central role in providing mental health services to youth, but there are limitations to the services that are available through school-based mental health professionals. Thus, collaboration with non-school-based community mental health providers is oftentimes necessary. As collaboration can address limitations…

  8. Community Based Social Audit of Health Services in Two Districts of ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    CIET has developed a methodology for rapidly canvassing communities on health needs and health service performance. This methodology has proven valid in a number of contexts. This grant will support a baseline social audit of health service performance in two districts in Afghanistan. The audit will include a baseline ...

  9. Consumer perspectives about weight management services in a community pharmacy setting in NSW, Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Um, Irene S.; Armour, Carol; Krass, Ines; Gill, Timothy; Chaar, Betty B.

    2012-01-01

    Background  Obesity is a public health challenge faced worldwide. Community pharmacists may be well placed to manage Australia’s obesity problem owing to their training, accessibility and trustworthiness. However, determining consumers’ needs is vital to the development of any new services or the evaluation of existing services.

  10. Microbial Community Profile of a Lead Service Line Removed from a Drinking Water Distribution System▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Colin; Tancos, Matthew; Lytle, Darren A.

    2011-01-01

    A corroded lead service line was removed from a drinking water distribution system, and the microbial community was profiled using 16S rRNA gene techniques. This is the first report of the characterization of a biofilm on the surface of a corroded lead drinking water service line. The majority of phylotypes have been linked to heavy-metal-contaminated environments. PMID:21652741

  11. How Does Community Service Promote Prosocial Behavior? Examining the Role of Agency and Ideology Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoph, Gabriela; Gniewosz, Burkhard; Reinders, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    This study examines community service effects on adolescents' prosocial behaviors as mediated through experiences made during service. Based on theoretical assumptions by Youniss and Yates, we suggest that personal agency experiences and being confronted with situations that can challenge the own world views (ideology experiences) serve as…

  12. Outcomes of an Academic Service-Learning Project on Four Urban Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Debra Abston

    2015-01-01

    Service-learning has a rich history in higher education, with a multitude of studies indicating positive learning, community engagement, and moral development outcomes of student participants. The majority of the research findings, however, have represented four-year colleges. And while there are limited outcome studies of service-learning in…

  13. Creating International Community Service Learning Experiences in a Capstone Marketing-Projects Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, Lynn E.

    2010-01-01

    This article outlines the development of a project-based capstone marketing course, specifically designed to provide marketing students with an international community service learning experience. It differs significantly from previous studies, which focus on integrating service learning into existing marketing courses and on helping local…

  14. Applying Customer Satisfaction Theory to Community College Planning of Counseling Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hom, Willard C.

    2002-01-01

    This article discusses a framework in which a researcher may apply a customer satisfaction model to the planning of counseling services at the community college level. It also reviews some historical work on satisfaction research with the unique environment of student services in two-year colleges. The article suggests that readers could benefit…

  15. Social Entrepreneurship and Community Leadership: A Service-Learning Model for Management Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litzky, Barrie E.; Godshalk, Veronica M.; Walton-Bongers, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a "how to" guide for developing and teaching a service-learning course in social entrepreneurship and community leadership. As the framework of the course, service-learning operates through faculty to student, student to student, and student to client interactions. The discussion articulates the planning and faculty…

  16. The impact of a Naturally Occurring Retirement Communities service program in Maryland, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Dakheel-Ali, Maha; Frank, Julia K

    2010-06-01

    Most older adults prefer to age in place and it is therefore vital to support them in maintaining a high quality of life in their place of residence. Many Naturally Occurring Retirement Communities (NORCs) have implemented services to fulfill a range of needs of their residents. Community Partners (CP) provided 58 NORC residents in six apartment buildings within two suburban neighborhoods in Maryland with health and social work services, activities and transportation services. Participants were compared with 70 residents who did not receive these services. Residents were assessed prior to initiation of services (e.g. transportation, social work and recreation) and after service usage through a membership program. Members had significantly increased satisfaction with recreational activities and social life in the community as well as significant decreases in depressed affect. Members' self-reports showed that they were more likely to get out of the house, felt less isolated, and were happier since joining CP activities. This study is unique in examining the impact of utilization of a variety of services for older persons, while comparing these individuals to a local group of community-dwelling older persons who are without NORC services.

  17. College Teaching and Community Outreaching: Service Learning in an Obesity Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himelein, Melissa; Passman, Liz; Phillips, Jessica M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Service learning can enrich students' knowledge, skills and commitment to occupational goals while positively affecting communities. Undergraduate students in a course on obesity engaged in service learning by assisting with a family-based obesity prevention program, Getting Into Fitness Together (GIFT). Purpose: The impact of GIFT on…

  18. Service-Learning Enriches Advertising Knowledge, Builds Students' Portfolios, and Promotes Community Engagement after Graduation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucciarone, Krista

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of a service-learning component in an advertising course, specifically examining its ability to enrich advertising knowledge, build students' portfolios, and influence students' community engagement after graduation. The research revealed that service-learning positively affects students' understanding of…

  19. "Librarian's Anxiety"? How Community College Librarians Feel about Their Reference Desk Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Anne

    2010-01-01

    A survey of community college librarians in California reveals that the nature of reference service required of them, limitations on budget, staffing, technical support, resources, decision-making ability, and professional development opportunities, affect their professional attitudes. Librarians see reference service as primarily a teaching role.…

  20. Effects of urban development on ant communities: implications for ecosystem services and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.P. Sanford; Patricia N. Manley; Dennis D. Murphy

    2009-01-01

    Research that connects the effects of urbanization on biodiversity and ecosystem services is lacking. Ants perform multifarious ecological functions that stabilize ecosystems and contribute to a number of ecosystem services. We studied responses of ant communities to urbanization in the Lake Tahoe basin by sampling sites along a gradient...

  1. Service-Learning in the Financial Planning Curriculum: Expanding Access to the Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annis, Paul M.; Palmer, Lance; Goetz, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Service-learning projects are a cornerstone of student experiential learning. Such programs have proven to be mutually beneficial to communities and students within a variety of family and consumer sciences courses. However, there is a paucity of literature addressing service-learning efforts within the field of financial planning. There is an…

  2. Howard Community College 1986 Staff Services Evaluation: Internal Marketing Survey, Spring 1986. Research Report Number 45.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radcliffe, Susan; Novak, Virginia E.

    As part of an internal marketing effort, a study was conducted at Howard Community College (HCC) to determine employees' evaluation of key educational services provided by the college. All full-time faculty, administrators, and support staff were asked to evaluate 13 areas of service on a scale of 1 (poor) to 5 (excellent) and to identify HCC's…

  3. Community Survey Q4: Public safety - Fire & emergency management services

    Data.gov (United States)

    Town of Chapel Hill, North Carolina — This question is from the 2015 Chapel Hill Community Survey. Using a scale of 1 to 5 where 5 means “Very Satisfied” and 1 means “Very Dissatisfied,” residents were...

  4. Knowledge and attitude of nurses to Community Psychiatry services ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Community Psychiatry involves support and treatment of people with mental disorder in a domiciliary setting instead of mental hospital. The attitude of the public towards mental illness and mentally ill person is generally negative. Knowledge and attitude of nurses towards this topic is important because they ...

  5. Home/community-based services: a two-tier approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aponte, H J; Zarski, J J; Bixenstine, C; Cibik, P

    1991-07-01

    A two-tier model for work with high-risk families is presented. It combines multiple-family groups in the community with home-based family therapy for individual families. The ecostructural conceptual framework of the model is discussed, and its application is illustrated by a case vignette.

  6. Community Survey Q5: Public safety - Police services

    Data.gov (United States)

    Town of Chapel Hill, North Carolina — This question is from the 2015 Chapel Hill Community Survey.Using a scale of 1 to 5 where 5 means “Very Satisfied” and 1 means “Very Dissatisfied,” residents were...

  7. Community-based management of water supply services

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mogane-Ramahotswa, B

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important aspects of suitability of water supply is the ability of the community to manage its own scheme. Unlike in urban settlement institutional arrangements for rural water supply are rudimentary. Over the past decade...

  8. Women Empower Women: Volunteers and Their Clients in Community Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, Liat; Megidna, Hofit

    2011-01-01

    The study is aimed at examining the relationship between psychological empowerment of women volunteers and their clients in community volunteer projects in Israel. Based on an ecological approach, the study also aimed at examining whether the variables that explain empowerment of women who volunteer also explain empowerment of their clients. The…

  9. Knowledge and attitude of nurses to Community Psychiatry services ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    McRoy

    2014-07-26

    Jul 26, 2014 ... The attitude of the public towards mental illness and mentally ill person is generally negative. Knowledge and attitude of nurses towards this topic is important because they deal directly patients, families and the community as ... developed structured questionnaire design in line with the variables to be.

  10. Developing an Online Community of In-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodes, Carol; Pritz, Sandra; Kelley, Patricia; Foster, John

    2011-01-01

    Establishing an online community of professional learners was one component of a multi-year professional development project with an overall goal of improving the ability of career and technical educators to use and interpret technical assessment data. Educators from five states and nine different schools participated in a research-based workshop…

  11. Community Exemption from Payment for Health Services (Burkina ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Researchers will examine the feasibility, efficacy and sustainability of the intervention by means of case studies in 10 health centres in the same district. The results will be fed back to the communities ... Special journal issue highlights IDRC-supported findings on women's paid work. Policy in Focus publishes a special issue ...

  12. Diffusion of Innovation: A Roadmap for Inclusive Community Recreation Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleien, Stuart J.; Miller, Kimberly D.

    2010-01-01

    Inclusive community recreation is an optimal environment for the development of recreation and sports skills and social relationships between people with and without disabilities. Although we know much about best practices for inclusion, little systemic change in recreation agencies has transpired. Diffusion of Innovation Theory is proposed as a…

  13. COORDINATING HOSPITAL AND COMMUNITY WORK ADJUSTMENT SERVICES. FINAL REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GOERTZEL, VICTOR; AND OTHERS

    THE GOALS OF THIS STUDY WERE TO USE WORK TO HELP PATIENTS LEAVE THE CAMARILLO STATE HOSPITAL SOONER, BECOME A PART OF THE COMMUNITY, AND BECOME SELF-SUPPORTING. THE PROJECT SELECTED 146 SCHIZOPHRENIC MALES WHO HAD A HISTORY OF POOR WORK ADJUSTMENT. AS PART OF THE TREATMENT, THE MEN WERE PLACED IN THE HOSPITAL BAKERY. AFTER ADJUSTMENT TO THE WORK…

  14. A decade of experience evolving visiting dental services in partnership with rural remote Aboriginal communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, K; Kruger, E; Tennant, M

    2014-06-01

    Embedding research capabilities and workforce development activities with clinical service entities promotes the development of sustainable, innovative, quality-focused oral health care services. Clinical and strategic governance is an important area of consideration for rural and remote dental services, posing particular challenges for smaller service structures. Sustaining remote area dental services has some significant complexities beyond those involved in urban service models. This study describes the sustaining structure of a remote area dental service with a decade of history. In the current climate, chief among these challenges may be those associated with dental workforce shortages as these impact most heavily in the public sector, and most particularly, in remote areas. As sustained workforce solutions come from developing a future workforce, an essential element of the workforce governance framework for remote dental service provision should be the inclusion of a student participation programme. Collaborative partnership approaches with Aboriginal health services promote the development and maintenance of effective, culturally sensitive dental services within rural and remote Aboriginal communities. Having sustained care for 10 years, this collaborative model of integrated research, education and service has demonstrated its effectiveness as a service model for Aboriginal communities in Western Australia. This descriptive study finds the core values for this success have been communication, clinical leadership, mentorship within effective governance systems all linked to an integrated education and research agenda. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  15. Review of community pharmacy services: what is being performed, and where are the opportunities for improvement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melton BL

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Brittany L Melton, Zoe Lai Department of Pharmacy Practice, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, USA Objective: The aim of this review was to assess pharmacist and pharmacy services being provided and identify opportunities to improve patient satisfaction.Methods: Studies published between January 2006 and July 2016 examining patient satisfaction with pharmacy and pharmacist services, which were written in English, were identified in PubMed. Studies were excluded if they only looked at pharmacy student-provided services.Key findings: A total of 50 studies were ultimately included in the review. Of these studies, 28 examined services traditionally provided by community pharmacists such as dispensing and counseling, while 16 examined a new in-person service being offered by a pharmacy, and the remaining six involved a new technology-assisted service. While study findings were generally positive for patient satisfaction of pharmacy services, several opportunities were identified for pharmacies to improve.Conclusion: Overall, patient satisfaction is high across pharmacy services; however, this satisfaction is related to prior patient exposure to services and their level of expectation. Pharmacists have multiple opportunities to improve the services they provide, and there are additional services pharmacists may consider offering to expand their role within the health care system. Keywords: pharmacy, services, community, patient satisfaction

  16. Evaluation of a Community Reintegration Outpatient Program Service for Community-Dwelling Persons with Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alana Zinman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the effectiveness of a community reintegration outpatient (CROP service for promoting well-being and community participation following spinal cord injury (SCI. Participants. Community-dwelling adults (N=14 with traumatic and nontraumatic SCI. Interventions. The CROP service is a 12-week (1 × week; 120 minutes interprofessional closed therapeutic education service. Main Outcome Measure(s. Moorong Self-Efficacy Scale (MSES; Impact on Participation and Autonomy (IPA; Positive Affect and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS; Coping Inventory of Stressful Situations (CISS; World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL-BREF; semistructured qualitative interviews. Methods. Twenty-one participants were recruited from two subsequent CROP services, with only 14 persons completing all data assessments. Data were collected at baseline (week 0, at exit (week 12, and at a three-month follow-up. Semistructured interviews were conducted at exit. Results. Self-efficacy (MSES and positive affect (PANAS improved from baseline to exit (P<.05, but the changes were not maintained at follow-up. Qualitative analysis identified four major themes related to therapeutic benefits: (1 role of self; (2 knowledge acquisition; (3 skill application; and (4 group processes. Conclusions. Participation in a therapeutic education service has the potential to improve well-being in persons with SCI, but there is a need to identify strategies to maintain long-term gains.

  17. Extension and Higher Education Service-Learning: Toward a Community Development Service-Learning Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoecker, Randy

    2014-01-01

    This article explores how on-the-ground Extension educators interface with higher education service-learning. Most service-learning in Extension has focused on precollege youth and 4-H. When we look at higher education service-learning and Extension in Wisconsin, we see that there is not as much connection as might be expected. County-based…

  18. The oral health care experiences of NSW Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Megan A; Hunt, Jennifer; Walker, David; Williams, Rodger

    2015-02-01

    Aboriginal people continue to experience a disproportionately heavy burden of oral disease. A range of oral health services may be available to Aboriginal communities, including those provided by Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs). This study explored the oral health care experiences and activities of ACCHSs to inform policy and program decision making. Mixed methods, including an online survey and semi-structured interviews with senior ACCHS staff, were used. Areas of inquiry included perceived community need for oral health care, oral health care models, accessibility of other oral health services and barriers to providing oral health care. Twenty-nine NSW ACCHSs participated in the study. The activities of NSW ACCHSs in oral health care are diverse and reflect the localised approaches they take to delivering primary health care. ACCHSs commonly face barriers in delivering oral health care, as do Aboriginal communities in accessing other oral health services. NSW ACCHSs are important but under-acknowledged providers of a range of oral health services to Aboriginal communities and are well placed to provide this care as part of their comprehensive primary health care model. ACCHS roles in improving Aboriginal oral health would be strengthened by greater acknowledgement of their contributions and expertise and the development of transparent, long-term funding policies that respond to community need. © 2014 Public Health Association of Australia.

  19. A Service Oriented Framework for Mobile Business Virtual Communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Subercaze, J.; Maret, P.; Calmet, J.; Pawar, P.

    The rise of the availability of a variety of mobile devices in the personal and professional domains leads to an increased need of middleware and organizational structures. Due to the recent improvement of the computing power of mobile devices, mobile users may now also act as service providers. We

  20. Challenges in Designing and Scaling-up Community Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morelli, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    This paper is based on two EU funded projects: one recently completed, Life 2.0 and an on- going project, MyNeighborhood (MyN). The former was aimed at creating location based and socially networked services to support elderly people independent life. The latter is developing a platform to activa...

  1. Community placement and reintegration of service users from long ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    2005-01-31

    Jan 31, 2005 ... 18 of 1973). However, continued detention of involuntary service users following an initial period of 42 days had to be justified by subsequent annual, bi-annual and later tri-annual periodi- cal reports on a user's mental state by the psychiatrist and medical superintendent to the Department of Health (DOH).

  2. Water service delivery in Pietermaritzburg: A community perspective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Municipalities face a significant challenge of reducing apartheid backlogs, raising the level of service delivery and maintaining working systems whilst concurrently undergoing a period of painful re-demarcation and facing financial and capacity crises. Municipalities, forced to recover costs, transfer pressures of payment to ...

  3. Community-oriented services in a psychiatric hospital. Effort to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    “Yaba apa osi” (Yaba to the left side). Consequently, in the year 2000 the hospital stepped up its efforts on destigmatization through public enlightenment programmes and provision of commercial /social as well as general health care services in the institution that would bring or attract the citizenry to its facilities. We carried ...

  4. Examining The Comparative Use, Experience And Outcomes Of Community Service Orders As Alternatives To Short Prison Sentences in Ireland.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Hara, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Background: In Ireland, under the Criminal Justice (Community Service) 1983 Act, a community service order (CSO) must only be imposed if a custodial sentence has first been considered. In 2011, an amendment to the 1983 Act was made, requiring courts to consider imposing CSOs as alternatives to prison sentences of less than one year. This amendment sought to address the underutilisation of community service, decrease the number of short-term committals, and benefit offenders and communities. M...

  5. What does dependency on community mental health services mean? A conceptual review with a systematic search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonavigo, Tommaso; Sandhu, Sima; Pascolo-Fabrici, Elisabetta; Priebe, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Although community mental health services aim to support patients' autonomy and independence, they have repeatedly been criticised for making patients dependent. Yet, it remains often unclear what exactly is meant with dependency in this context. This review aimed to identify the meaning of the term dependency on community services in the literature. A systematic search and conceptual review of papers where dependency is used in the context of community mental health services. Narrative synthesis was used to identify thematic concepts linked to dependency in these settings. Fifteen papers met the inclusion criteria. The analysis identified five different concepts of dependency on community mental health services: dislocation from the outside world; inflexibility and lack of freedom; obligation as resentment or appreciation; living with or without meaningful activities; and security. The findings suggest that, distinct from the exclusively negative connotation of the term dependency in a conventional medical context, dependency on community mental health services contains both negative and positive aspects. The different aspects might guide the future evaluation of the care provided in such services.

  6. Modelling of volunteer satisfaction and intention to remain in community service: A stepwise approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Hazlin; Wahid, Sharifah Norhuda Syed; Jais, Mohammad; Ridzuan, Arifi

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to obtain the most significant model of volunteer satisfaction and intention to remain in community service by using a stepwise approach. Currently, Malaysians, young and old are showing more interests in involving themselves in community service projects, either locally or internationally. This positive movement of serving the needy is somehow being halted by the lack of human and financial resources. Therefore, the trend today sees organizers of such projects depend heavily on voluntary supports as they enable project managers to add and to expand the quantity and diversity of services offered without exhausting the minimal budget available. Volunteers are considered a valuable commodity as the available pool of volunteers may be declining due to various reasons which include the volunteer satisfaction. In tandem with the existing situation, a selected sample of 215 diploma students from one of the public universities in Malaysia, who have been involved in at least one community service project, agreed that everybody should have a volunteering intention in helping others. The findings revealed that the most significant model obtained contains two factors that contributed towards intention to remain in community service; work assignment and organizational support, with work assignment becoming the most significant factor. Further research on the differences of intention to remain in community service between students' stream and gender would be conducted to contribute to the body of knowledge.

  7. Sentencing, community penalties and the role of the probation service

    OpenAIRE

    Canton, Robert; Mair, G.

    2007-01-01

    Willan has become a major publisher in criminology and criminal justice and this Handbook joins an impressive and influential series. Many leading academics in the field have contributed to this volume and Canton’s chapter, co-written with Professor George Mair (Liverpool John Moore’s), is an important part of the collection. Canton’s contribution is to apply the insights of ‘compliance’ to specific challenges of implementing community sentences.

  8. Community Structure, Biodiversity, and Ecosystem Services in Treeline Whitebark Pine Communities: Potential Impacts from a Non-Native Pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana F. Tomback

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis has the largest and most northerly distribution of any white pine (Subgenus Strobus in North America, encompassing 18° latitude and 21° longitude in western mountains. Within this broad range, however, whitebark pine occurs within a narrow elevational zone, including upper subalpine and treeline forests, and functions generally as an important keystone and foundation species. In the Rocky Mountains, whitebark pine facilitates the development of krummholz conifer communities in the alpine-treeline ecotone (ATE, and thus potentially provides capacity for critical ecosystem services such as snow retention and soil stabilization. The invasive, exotic pathogen Cronartium ribicola, which causes white pine blister rust, now occurs nearly rangewide in whitebark pine communities, to their northern limits. Here, we synthesize data from 10 studies to document geographic variation in structure, conifer species, and understory plants in whitebark pine treeline communities, and examine the potential role of these communities in snow retention and regulating downstream flows. Whitebark pine mortality is predicted to alter treeline community composition, structure, and function. Whitebark pine losses in the ATE may also alter response to climate warming. Efforts to restore whitebark pine have thus far been limited to subalpine communities, particularly through planting seedlings with potential blister rust resistance. We discuss whether restoration strategies might be appropriate for treeline communities.

  9. Water and water use in southern Nevada [Chapter 3] (Executive Summary)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne R. Belcher; Michael J. Moran; Megan E.. Rogers

    2013-01-01

    Water and water use in southern Nevada is an important issue. The scarcity of water resources for both human and biologic communities often leads to intense competition for both surface and ground waters. Anthropogenic and climate change impacts on scarce water resources need to be understood to assess human and ecosystem health for southern Nevada. Chapter 3 outlines...

  10. Knowledge exchange and integrated services: experiences from an integrated community intellectual (learning) disability service for adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrington, C; Clare, I C H; Holland, A J; Barrett, M; Oborn, E

    2015-03-01

    This paper examines knowledge exchange dynamics in a specialist integrated intellectual (learning) disability service, comprising specialist healthcare provision with social care commissioning and management, and considers their significance in terms of integrated service delivery. A qualitative study focusing on knowledge exchange and integrated services. Semi-structured interviews (n = 25) were conducted with members of an integrated intellectual disability service in England regarding their perceptions of knowledge exchange within the service and the way in which knowledge exchange impinges on the operation of the integrated service. Exchange of 'explicit' (codifiable) knowledge between health and care management components of the service is problematic because of a lack of integrated clinical governance and related factors such as IT and care record systems and office arrangements. Team meetings and workplace interactions allowed for informal exchange of explicit and 'tacit' (non-codifiable) knowledge, but presented challenges in terms of knowledge exchange completeness and sustainability. Knowledge exchange processes play an important role in the functioning of integrated services incorporating health and care management components. Managers need to ensure that knowledge exchange processes facilitate both explicit and tacit knowledge exchange and do not rely excessively on informal, 'ad hoc' interactions. Research on integrated services should take account of micro-scale knowledge exchange dynamics and relationships between social dynamics and physical factors. © 2014 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Attitudes of employees toward offenders sentenced to community service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurđević Sanja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Whether alternative penalties served by offenders in the community will be successful can also largely depend on the general attitudes in the workplace where the offender will be serving his penalty. This study, conducted in Belgrade, Serbia, was aimed to determine the inclination and factor structure of attitudes towards offenders and ex-offenders, and their correlation with the respondents' age and education. The sample consisted of men from the general population (N=78, employed in companies where offenders serve community sentence. The study also considers the association between attitudes and the age and education of the respondents. The Scale for Attitudes toward Prisoners and Ex-Prisoners was used in the study. Research results showed that the respondents in general had positive attitude toward offenders. On the Scale of Attitudes, a statement 'I would socialize with a person who is on parole from prison' had the highest frequency, with which 44.90% of respondents 'mostly agree' (MOD=4. With most negatively formulated statements, the frequency of statements 'I strongly agree' is low, ranging from 7,70% to 15.60%. Factor analysis of the attitude scale indicated three respectable factors which were named: Rejection, Trust, and Perception of Penalty. The correlation between the demographic variables of age and education, and the expressed attitudes shows there was no significant correlation (p=0.93; p=0.86. The findings of the study have an important impact on practical psychosocial issues, such as that of preparing the community to accept offenders serving alternative punishments, as well as theoretical questions regarding the understanding of the structure, cause, origin, function, and form of attitudes toward offenders.

  12. Exploring the value of a design for service approach to develop public services in the Community Voluntary Sector: a comparative analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Warwick, Laura; Young, Robert; Lievesley, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the findings from two action research case studies that explore the value of using a ‘design for service’ approach to develop public services in the community voluntary sector (CVS). Each case study was conducted within a CVS organisation that was developing or offering public services. Both were local charities that are part of UK federations; the first offering mental health and wellbeing services, the second providing community education services. \\ud \\ud The paper will...

  13. Trajectories of Community-Based Service Use: The Importance of Poverty and Living Arrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sojung; Kim, BoRin; Kwon, Eunsun; Lee, Hyunjoo

    2017-07-01

    This study examined how older adults' living arrangements and poverty status affected their use of in-home health, functional, and out-of-home services over time. Using eight waves of data from the Korea Welfare Panel Study, we employed a logistic mixed-effect model to analyze how poverty and living arrangements affect community-based service use. Living-alone older adults and elder-only couples were more likely than co-residing households to use services. Elder-only couples, when poor, were more likely to use in-home and out-of-home services over time. Understanding predictors of community-based service use over time enables researchers and policymakers to better understand the process of aging-in-place.

  14. Abortion services in a high-needs district: a community-based model of care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snook S

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In 2009, a high-deprivation district health board in New Zealand set up a community-based abortion clinic in order to provide a local service and to avoid out-of-region referrals. The service offers medical abortions for women with pregnancies of up to 63 days' gestation, and surgical abortion with local anaesthetic for women with pregnancies of up to 14 weeks' gestation. AIM: To describe the services developed and assess safety and timeliness for the first year of community-based services. METHODS: An audit of clinical records for patients seen in 2010 was performed in order to obtain data on location of services, timeliness, safety and complications. RESULTS: Eighty-two percent of locally provided abortions in 2010 were medical abortions, completed on average less than two days after referral to the service. One percent of patients experienced haemorrhaging post abortion, and 4% had retained products. These rates are within accepted standards for an abortion service. DISCUSSION: This report illustrates that a community-based model of care can be both clinically and culturally safe, while providing a much-needed service to a high-needs population.

  15. Avoiding "culture rejection" in healthcare mergers and acquisitions: how New Heights Community Health Centres and York Community Services minimized the culture risk when forming Unison Health and Community Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Among the requirements for a successful merger or acquisition are strategic rationale, rigorous due diligence, the right price and revenue and cost synergies. However, bridging the culture gap between organizations is frequently overlooked. The leaders of New Heights Community Health Centres and York Community Services explicitly considered culture in their merger to form Unison Health and Community Services, and they used employee engagement surveys to assess culture in their merger planning and post-merger integration. How Unison Health leaders avoided the risk of culture rejection to achieve a successful merger, and the lessons learned from their experience, is the focus of this article.

  16. JPSS Science Data Services for the Direct Readout Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chander, Gyanesh; Lutz, Bob

    2014-01-01

    The Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) and Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) High Rate Data (HRD) link provides Direct Broadcast data to users in real-time, utilizing their own remote field terminals. The Field Terminal Support (FTS) provides the resources needed to support the Direct Readout communities by providing software, documentation, and periodic updates to enable them to produce data products from SNPP and JPSS. The FTS distribution server will also provide the necessary ancillary and auxiliary data needed for processing the broadcasts, as well as making orbital data available to assist in locating the satellites of interest. In addition, the FTS provides development support for the algorithm and software through GSFC Direct Readout Laboratory (DRL) International Polar Orbiter Processing Package (IPOPP) and University of Wisconsin (UWISC) Community Satellite Processing Package (CSPP), to enable users to integrate the algorithms into their remote terminals. The support the JPSS Program provides to the institutions developing and maintaining these two software packages, will demonstrate the ability to produce ready-to-use products from the HRD link and provide risk reduction effort at a minimal cost. This paper discusses the key functions and system architecture of FTS.

  17. Preference and willingness to pay for traditional medicine services in rural ethnic minority community in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Bach Xuan; Nguyen, Ngan Kim; Nguyen, Lan Phuong; Nguyen, Cuong Tat; Nong, Vuong Minh; Nguyen, Long Hoang

    2016-02-03

    Traditional medicine (TM) still plays an important role in a number of health care systems around the world, especially across Asian and African countries. In Vietnam, however, little is known about preference for traditional medicine use. This study assessed the prevalence of use, preference, satisfaction, and willingness to pay for TM services amongst rural ethnic minority community. A cross-sectional survey in three provinces in the North and South of Vietnam. The results showed a high level of satisfaction with TM services, with more than 90 % of respondents reporting improved health status given the use of TM. Indicators for preference of TM over modern medicine are a longer distance to health station; being in an ethnic minority; being female; and having had higher service satisfaction. Although we did not have a comparison group, the high level of satisfaction with TM services is likely the result of a project targeting community health workers and the public regarding TM education and access promotion. Indeed, the community health workers are credited with relaying the information about TM more than any other sources. This suggests the importance of community health workers and community health centers in the promotion of TM use. Ethnic minority people prefer the use of traditional medicine services that supports the expansion of national programs and promotion of traditional medications.

  18. Assessment of patient perceptions concerning a community pharmacy-based warfarin monitoring service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Ferreri, PharmD, CDE, BCACP, FAPhA1

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess patient perceptions of a North Carolina community pharmacy-based warfarin monitoring service. Methods: Prospective study of patients 18 years of age and older, who filled a prescription for warfarin, in one of five Raleigh area community pharmacies, between May 1, 2010 and October 31, 2010. A 14 item survey, along with a self-addressed stamped envelope, was mailed to 330 identified patients. The survey inquired about details of current anticoagulation monitoring services, interest in utilizing a local community pharmacy for this service, and confidence in a pharmacist-managed program. Results: 26% of surveys were returned. 48% of surveyed individuals responded that they would be interested in having their warfarin monitoring performed by a trained pharmacist in a community pharmacy setting. Conclusion: Many participants responded that the community pharmacy would be more convenient than or as convenient as their current location. This may be a new clinical service that could be offered in certain community pharmacies.

  19. Assessment of patient perceptions concerning a community pharmacy-based warfarin monitoring service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Waitzman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess patient perceptions of a North Carolina community pharmacy-based warfarin monitoring service. Methods: Prospective study of patients 18 years of age and older, who filled a prescription for warfarin, in one of five Raleigh area community pharmacies, between May 1, 2010 and October 31, 2010. A 14 item survey, along with a self-addressed stamped envelope, was mailed to 330 identified patients. The survey inquired about details of current anticoagulation monitoring services, interest in utilizing a local community pharmacy for this service, and confidence in a pharmacist-managed program. Results: 26% of surveys were returned. 48% of surveyed individuals responded that they would be interested in having their warfarin monitoring performed by a trained pharmacist in a community pharmacy setting. Conclusion: Many participants responded that the community pharmacy would be more convenient than or as convenient as their current location. This may be a new clinical service that could be offered in certain community pharmacies.   Type: Original Research

  20. Barriers and facilitators to partnership working between Early Intervention Services and the voluntary and community sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Helen; Birchwood, Max; Tait, Lynda; Shah, Sonal; England, Elizabeth; Smith, Jo

    2008-09-01

    Partnership working between health and the voluntary and community sector has become an increasing political priority. This paper describes and explores the extent and patterns of partnership working between health and the voluntary and community sector in the context of Early Intervention Services for young people with a first episode of psychosis. Data were collected from 12 Early Intervention Services and through semistructured interviews with 47 voluntary and community sector leads and 42 commissioners across the West Midlands of England. Most partnerships were described as ad hoc and informal in nature although four formal partnerships between Early Intervention Services and voluntary and community sector organizations had been established. Shared agendas, the ability to refer clients onto an organization that could provide a service they could not and shared training facilitated partnership working in this context. Barriers to closer working included differences in culture such as managing risk, the time required to make and maintain relationships and recognition of the advantages of remaining a small and autonomous organization. The four more formal partnerships were also built on the organizations' experience of working together informally, in one case through a specific pilot project. The voluntary and community organizations involved were also branches of larger national organizations for whom finding sustainable funding was less of an issue. In theoretical terms, eight Early Intervention Service: voluntary and community sector partnerships were at a stage of 'pre-partnership collaboration', three at 'partnership creation and consolidation' and one at 'partnership programme delivery'. The empirical data viewed through the lens of the partnership life-cycle model could help early intervention services, and voluntary and community sector professionals better understand where they are, why they are there and the conditions needed to realise the full

  1. Randomized trial of intensive housing placement and community transition services for episodic and recidivist homeless families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Aaron J; Mitchell, Kristen; Pareti, Lauren; DeGenova, Joe; Heller, Anne; Hannigan, Anthony; Gholston, Jennifer

    2013-12-01

    We compared Home to Stay, a pilot of intensive housing placement and community transition services for episodic and recidivist homeless families, with a standard services approach. Using intention-to-treat analyses, we conducted a modified randomized trial of 138 Home to Stay client families and a control group of 192 client families receiving standard shelter services. Home to Stay clients exited shelter more quickly than clients in the control group (Cox regression, P homeless families. Standard shelter services may be able to narrow this performance gap by incentivizing work with all episodic and recidivist homeless families.

  2. Sidestepping questions of legitimacy: how community representatives manoeuvre to effect change in a health service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Sally; Stephenson, Niamh; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Empirical studies of community participation in health services commonly tie effectiveness to the perceived legitimacy of community representatives among health staff. This article examines the underlying assumption that legitimacy is the major pathway to influence for community representatives. It takes a different vantage point from previous research in its examination of data (primarily through 34 in-depth interviews, observation and recording of 26 meetings and other interactions documented in field notes) from a 3-year study of community representatives' action in a large health region in Australia. The analysis primarily deploys Michel de Certeau's ideas of Strategy and Tactic to understand the action and effects of the generally 'weaker players' in the spaces and places dominated by powerful institutions. Through this lens, we can see the points where community representatives are active participants following their own agenda, tactically capitalising on cracks in the armour of the health service to seize opportunities that present themselves in time to effect change. Being able to see community representatives as active producers of change, not simply passengers following the path of the health service, challenges how we view the success of community participation in health.

  3. Use of a service evaluation and lean thinking transformation to redesign an NHS 111 refer to community Pharmacy for Emergency Repeat Medication Supply Service (PERMSS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazar, Hamde; Nazar, Zachariah; Simpson, Jill; Yeung, Andre; Whittlesea, Cate

    2016-08-26

    To demonstrate the contribution of community pharmacy from NHS 111 referrals out of hours (OOH) for emergency supply repeat medication requests via presentation of service activity, community pharmacist feedback and lean thinking transformation. Descriptive service evaluation using routine service activity data over the pilot period; survey of community pharmacists, and service redesign through lean thinking transformation. North East of England NHS 111 provider and accredited community pharmacies across the North East of England. Patients calling the North East of England NHS 111 provider during OOH with emergency repeat medication supply requests. NHS 111 referral to community pharmacies for assessment and if appropriate, supply of emergency repeat medication. Number of emergency repeat medication supply referrals, completion rates, reasons for rejections, time of request, reason for access, medication(s), pharmaceutical advice and services provided. Secondary outcomes were community pharmacist feedback and lean thinking transformation of the patient pathway. NHS 111 referred 1468 patients to 114 community pharmacies (15/12/2014-7/4/2015). Most patients presented on Saturdays, with increased activity over national holidays. Community pharmacists completed 951 (64.8%) referrals providing 2297 medications; 412 were high risk. The most common reason for rejecting referrals was no medication in stock. Community pharmacists were positive about the provision of this service. The lean thinking transformation reduced the number of non-added value steps, waits and bottlenecks in the patient pathway. NHS 111 can redirect callers OOH from urgent and emergency care services to community pharmacy for management of emergency repeat medication supply. Existing IT and community pharmacy regulations allowed patients to receive a medication supply and pharmaceutical advice. Community pharmacists supported integration into the NHS OOH services. Adopting lean thinking provided a

  4. Effectiveness of the Community Treatment Order in streamlining psychiatric services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awara, Mahmoud A; Jaffar, Khalid; Roberts, Pauline

    2013-04-01

    The implementation of the Community Treatment Order (CTO) has created controversy surrounding its beneficence. The study aims at examining the effectiveness of the CTO in reducing the rate and duration of revolving door admissions for patients who were made subject to this Order. All patients who were made subject to CTO between November 2008 and August 2009 in South Essex were involved in the study where patients acted as their own control through comparing their pre-CTO, during CTO and post-CTO's admission rate and duration. There was a significant reduction in the rate and duration of admissions in the period during and post-CTO state. The CTO proved to be effective in reducing revolving door admissions and it has a beneficial carryover effect in the post-CTO state.

  5. The role of community mental health services in supporting oral health outcomes among consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meldrum, Rebecca; Ho, Hillary; Satur, Julie

    2018-04-16

    People with a lived experience of mental illness are at a higher risk for developing oral diseases and having poorer oral health than the broader population. This paper explores the role of Australian community mental health services in supporting the prevention and management of poor oral health among people living with mental illness. Through focus groups and semi-structured interviews, participants identified the value of receiving oral health support within a community mental health setting, in particular the delivery of basic education, preventive strategies, assistance with making or attending appointments and obtaining priority access to oral health services. Engagement with Community Health Services and referrals generated through the priority access system were identified as key enablers to addressing oral health issues. This study provides new insight into the importance of undertaking an integrated approach to reducing the oral health disparities experienced by those living with mental illness.

  6. The feasibility of providing community pharmacy-based services for alcohol misuse: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Margaret C; Blenkinsopp, Alison

    2009-08-01

    Excessive consumption of alcohol is a major public health concern. The use of community pharmacies and pharmacists as sources of public health information and services is gaining greater recognition. The objective of this review was to provide an overview of the evidence on the feasibility, effectiveness and acceptability of providing community pharmacy-based services to address the excessive consumption of alcohol. Electronic databases were searched for the period 1996-2007 to identify relevant evidence. Searches were also conducted of relevant pharmacy and addiction journals. Information was sought from key contacts in pharmacy and alcohol research. Studies were included if they were conducted in a community pharmacy setting. The review comprised three feasibility studies which included 14 pharmacies and 500 customers. Non-significant reductions in alcohol consumption were reported with two studies following brief interventions by pharmacists. Between 30% and 53% of pharmacy customers were identified as having hazardous or harmful drinking behaviour. Customer opinion of the pharmacy-based alcohol services was not reported. There has been little empirical evaluation of the effectiveness of community pharmacy-based services for alcohol misuse. The evidence presented in this review suggests that community pharmacy-based screening is feasible. Organisations and individuals involved with tackling excessive alcohol consumption should consider the inclusion of community pharmacies and pharmacists as part of their strategies to address this problem. Large-scale studies are needed to evaluate the short- and long-term effects and cost-effectiveness of community pharmacy-based interventions to reduce excessive alcohol consumption, as well as to explore the acceptability of the service to

  7. Nevada Roundabout Implementation Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    In 1990 Nevada constructed the first modern roundabout in the U.S. and since then several roundabouts have been constructed with most operating successfully; the U.S. currently has over forty-five states with at least one modern roundabouts. Due to t...

  8. Sierra Nevada (Granada, Spain)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilgado, José D.; Enghoff, Henrik; Tinaut, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Millipedes (Diplopoda), with a few notable exceptions, are poor dispersers, showing a very high degree of endemicity, not the least in mountains. The first samplings of the Mesovoid Shallow Substratum (MSS) of the higher altitudes of the Sierra Nevada Mountains (Baetic System, Southern Spain) have...

  9. Nevada Bouguer Gravity Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A 2 kilometer Bouguer anomaly grid for the state of Nevada. Number of columns is 282 and number of rows is 397. The order of the data is from the lower left to the...

  10. The role of 'hidden' community volunteers in community-based health service delivery platforms: examples from sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Natalie; Sanders, David; Van Damme, Wim; Besada, Donela; Daviaud, Emmanuelle; Oliphant, Nicholas P; Berzal, Rocio; Mason, John; Doherty, Tanya

    2015-01-01

    Community-based research on child survival in sub-Saharan Africa has focussed on the increased provision of curative health services by a formalised cadre of lay community health workers (CHWs), but we have identified a particular configuration, that deserves closer scrutiny. We identified a two-tiered CHW system, with the first tier being the lessor known or 'hidden' community/village level volunteers and the second tier being formal, paid CHWs, in Ethiopia, Mali, and Niger. Whilst the disease-focussed tasks of the formal CHW tier may be more amenable to classic epidemiological surveillance, we postulate that understanding the relationship between formalised CHWs and volunteer cadres, in terms of scope, location of practice and ratio to population, would be important for a comprehensive evaluation of child survival in these countries. We report on the findings from our joint qualitative and quantitative investigations, highlighting the need to recognise the 'hidden' contribution of volunteers. We need to better characterize the volunteers' interaction with community-based and primary care services and to better understand ways to improve the volunteer systems with the right type of investments. This is particularly important for considering the models for scale-up of CHWs in sub-Saharan Africa.

  11. An academic-community cardiovascular service line affiliation: design, implementation, and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Charles R; Bunker, Steve; Garrison, Larry F; Means, Michael D; Pepine, Carl J; Conti, C Richard; Dewar, Marvin A; Goldfarb, Timothy

    2006-01-01

    Both affiliation with an academic medical center and implementation of service line management may be effective management strategies for community health care organizations. The authors describe the design, implementation, and performance of a unique combination of these two distinct strategies for cardiovascular program development in the affiliation of the University of Florida Health Science Center with Health First, a regional community-based integrated delivery system.

  12. Learning affordances and participation enablers within a primary mathematics in-service community of practice

    OpenAIRE

    Mellony Graven; Peter Pausigere

    2017-01-01

    This article investigates the participation enablers and learning affordances identified by teachers through participation within an in-service community of practice (CoP) of primary teachers called the Numeracy Inquiry Community of Leader Educators (NICLE) in the Eastern Cape. The article draws on three qualitative sources of data: the annual teacher questionnaires of 42 participating teachers, interview data from 8 of the 42 sampled teachers and reflective journal entries of these 8 teacher...

  13. Patient satisfaction with a chronic kidney disease risk assessment service in community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheewala, Pankti A; Peterson, Gregory M; Zaidi, Syed Tabish R; Jose, Matthew D; Castelino, Ronald L

    2018-04-01

    Patient satisfaction is an important determinant of the feasibility and sustainability of community pharmacy screening services. However, few studies have evaluated this, with no such study performed for a chronic kidney disease risk assessment service. The aim was to determine patient satisfaction with a chronic kidney disease risk assessment service performed in community pharmacies. Community pharmacies in the state of Tasmania, Australia. An anonymous nine-item satisfaction survey, with Likert-type scales, was developed following a literature review of existing surveys. Reliability of the nine-item scale was determined using Cronbach's alpha. Patients were asked an additional question on willingness to pay, with choices of amount from $5 to $25. The satisfaction survey was mailed to 389 patients who participated in the chronic kidney disease risk assessment study. Patient level of satisfaction with and willingness to pay for the chronic kidney disease service. Responses from 143 participants were included in the final analysis. Cronbach's alpha for the nine-item satisfaction scale was 0.87. The majority of participants agreed that the time required to undergo the risk assessment process was justified (90.2%); overall, they were satisfied with the chronic kidney disease risk assessment service (90.0%) and they felt comfortable with the pharmacist referring their results to their doctor (88.9%). Of 136 participants who answered the question on willingness to pay, 62.9% indicated that they would pay for the chronic kidney disease service. Of these, 29.2, 25.8 and 19.1% were willing to pay $20, $10 and $5, respectively. Patient satisfaction with the community pharmacy-based chronic kidney disease risk assessment was high. These findings provide support for the implementation of the service within community pharmacy practice.

  14. Urban Studies, Students, and Communities: An Ideal Partnership A Case Study of Urban Studies Service Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Cherrington

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the implementation and results of a service learning based Urban Studies program course, the student expectations at the beginning of the course, and the student feedback at the end of the course. Through detailed explanation and examples of the live community needs, in multiple communities, addressed in this course and the resulting student projects, this article presents the case for service learning as a vibrant, efficient, and effective pedagogy for use within Urban Studies programs. Specifically, this article explores service learning pedagogy as, perhaps, a uniquely effective and satisfying tool that enhances the educative process for students and communities alike. Additionally, this article explores the enhanced project effectiveness and external outreach realized by partnering not only with communities, but also with multiple institutions of higher education, simultaneously, in order to achieve project(s success. This article also includes, and explores, the results of the pre and post course student experience surveys, as well as community feedback, and presents comparative data in which multiple curriculum formats, including lecture and workshops, are weighed against service learning curriculum prepared and presented in the course examined in this article. KEYWORDSService Learning, Higher Education, Urban Studies, Outreach

  15. Pharmacist and physician perspectives on diabetes service delivery within community pharmacies in Indonesia: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Yosi; Sunderland, Bruce; Hughes, Jeffery

    2016-05-01

    To explore perspectives of physicians and pharmacists on diabetes service delivery within community pharmacies in Indonesia. In depth interviews were conducted with 10 physicians and 10 community pharmacists in Surabaya, Indonesia, using a semi-structured interview guide. Nvivo version 9 was used to facilitate thematic content analysis to identify barriers/facilitators for community pharmacists to provide diabetes services. The identified themes indicating barriers/facilitators for diabetes service delivery within Indonesian community pharmacies included: (1) pharmacist factors - i.e. positive views (facilitator) and perceived lack of competence (barrier); (2) pharmacist-physician relationships - i.e. physicians' lack of support and accessibility (barriers); (3) pharmacist-patient relationships - i.e. perceived patients' lack of support and accessibility (barriers); (4) pharmacy environment - i.e. business orientation (barrier), lack of staff and poor pharmacist availability (barriers), and availability of supporting resources, such as counselling areas/rooms, procedures/protocols and IT systems for labelling and patient records (facilitators); and (5) external environment - i.e. a health system to support pharmacist roles, remuneration, marketing and professional assistance (facilitators). Issues related to the pharmacist-physician-patient relationships, pharmacy environment and external environment need to be addressed before Indonesian community pharmacists can provide additional pharmacy services for type 2 diabetes patients. Collaboration between the Government, Ikatan Apoteker Indonesia (Indonesian Pharmacists Association) and Ikatan Dokter Indonesia (Indonesian Medical Association) is required to improve the pharmacy professional environment and facilities. © 2015 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  16. National community pharmacy NHS influenza vaccination service in Wales: a primary care mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Andrew M; Wood, Fiona C; Carter, Ben

    2016-04-01

    Influenza is a significant cause of morbidity and excess mortality, yet vaccine coverage in the UK remains below target. Community pharmacies are increasingly being promoted as an alternative to vaccination by GPs. To explore and verify the factors that influence the relative performance of pharmacies providing NHS influenza vaccinations. A mixed methods study utilising qualitative, semi-structured interviews and quantitative analysis of predictors of vaccination numbers in community pharmacies in Wales. Interviews were conducted with 16 pharmacists who participated in the Welsh national pharmacy influenza service in 2013-2014. A purposive sampling strategy was used. Qualitative findings were analysed using framework analysis. Potential predictors of vaccination numbers were identified from interviews and a literature review, and included in a multivariable regression model. The contribution of community pharmacies towards vaccination in Wales is small. Findings suggest that community pharmacies reach younger at-risk individuals, in whom vaccine uptake is low, in greater proportion than influenza vaccination programmes as a whole. Extended opening hours and urban locations were positively associated with the number of vaccinations given, although pharmacists reported that workload, vaccine costs, unforeseen delays, lack of public awareness, and GPs' views of the service limited their contribution. Pharmacists, aware of the potential for conflict with GPs, moderated their behaviour to mitigate such risk. Before community pharmacies take greater responsibility for delivering healthcare services, obstacles including increasing pharmacist capacity, vaccine procurement, health service delays, managing GP-pharmacy relationships, and improving public awareness must be overcome. © British Journal of General Practice 2016.

  17. The acces system: a procedure for evaluating children's services at community mental health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiester, A R

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes the efforts made by one community mental health center to develop a system of program evaluation for children's treatment services. The approach described has the capability of objectively assessing (1) patterns of utilization of children's services; (2) satisfaction with services as well as the availability, accessibility, and acceptability of services; and (3) the quality of children's mental health services as measured by the attainment of individualized treatment goals. A rationale for the development of this system as well as a description of the modifications and automatization of the procedure are included. By way of illustration, initial results are presented which pertain to 500 goals written for 208 child clients receiving treatment within any one of three of the center's child direct-service programs.

  18. Evaluation of community-based palliative care services: Perspectives from various stakeholders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venugopal Vinayagamoorthy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: As a part of Memorandum of Understanding with Tamil Nadu Institute of Palliative Medicine, community-based palliative care services have been initiated 2 years back in our urban field practice areas. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the home care service, a major component of our community-based palliative care, with a view to identify the unmet needs of the services rendered for decision-making about the program. Materials and Methods: It was a descriptive qualitative design carried out by the authors trained in qualitative research methods. In-depth interviews were done among four patients, seven caregivers, two social workers, six nursing staffs, and six medical interns for a minimum of 20 min. Interviews were audiorecorded, transcribed verbatim, and content analysis was done manually. Ethical principles were adhered throughout the study. Results: Descriptive coding of the text information was done; later, similar codes were merged together to form the categories. Five categories under the theme of strengths and five codes under the theme of challenges of the home care services emerged out. Categories under strengths were physical management, psychological care, social support, efficient teamwork, and acceptance by the community. Codes for felt challenges were interdisciplinary collaboration, volunteer involvement, training enhancement, widening the services, and enhancing the community support. Conclusions: This review revealed the concerns of various stakeholders. There is a need for more interprofessional collaborations, where team members understand each other's roles for effective teamwork, as evident from the framework analysis.

  19. Clean Air Act Permitting in Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information on Clean Air Act permitting in Nevada in Nevada and EPA's oversight. Clean Air Act permitting in Nevada is the shared responsibility of one state and two local agencies, along with EPA Region 9.

  20. Libraries in Nevada: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/nevada.html Libraries in Nevada To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Carson City Western Nevada College Library 2201 W. College Parkway Carson City, ...

  1. Information needs related to extension service and community outreach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottcher, Robert W

    2003-06-01

    Air quality affects everyone. Some people are affected by air quality impacts, regulations, and technological developments in several ways. Stakeholders include the medical community, ecologists, government regulators, industries, technology providers, academic professionals, concerned citizens, the news media, and elected officials. Each of these groups may perceive problems and opportunities differently, but all need access to information as it is developed. The diversity and complexity of air quality problems contribute to the challenges faced by extension and outreach professionals who must communicate with stakeholders having diverse backgrounds. Gases, particulates, biological aerosols, pathogens, and odors all require expensive and relatively complex technology to measure and control. Economic constraints affect the ability of regulators and others to measure air quality, and industry and others to control it. To address these challenges, while communicating air quality research results and concepts to stakeholders, three areas of information needs are evident. (1) A basic understanding of the fundamental concepts regarding air pollutants and their measurement and control is needed by all stakeholders; the Extension Specialist, to be effective, must help people move some distance up the learning curve. (2) Each problem or set of problems must be reasonably well defined since comprehensive solution of all problems simultaneously may not be feasible; for instance, the solution of an odor problem associated with animal production may not address atmospheric effects due to ammonia emissions. (3) The integrity of the communication process must be preserved by avoiding prejudice and protectionism; although stakeholders may seek to modify information to enhance their interests, extension and outreach professionals must be willing to present unwelcome information or admit to a lack of information. A solid grounding in fundamental concepts, careful and fair problem

  2. Mobile banking services in the East African community (EAC): challenges to the existing legislative and regulatory frameworks in the EAC

    OpenAIRE

    Nyaga, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Principal research question: What are the effective legislative and regulatory responses to mobile banking services in the East African Community (EAC)? Keywords: Convergence, legislation, regulation, Mobile banking services, East African Community. Hypothesis: There is a lack of effective and robust legislative and regulatory framework in the EAC that addresses the mobile banking services. Purpose – This paper addresses issues affecting mobile money in the East African Community (EA...

  3. Consumer perspectives about weight management services in a community pharmacy setting in NSW, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, Irene S.; Armour, Carol; Krass, Ines; Gill, Timothy; Chaar, Betty B.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background  Obesity is a public health challenge faced worldwide. Community pharmacists may be well placed to manage Australia’s obesity problem owing to their training, accessibility and trustworthiness. However, determining consumers’ needs is vital to the development of any new services or the evaluation of existing services. Objective  To explore Australian consumers’ perspectives regarding weight management services in the community pharmacy setting, including their past experiences and willingness to pay for a specific pharmacy‐based service. Design  An online cross‐sectional consumer survey was distributed through a marketing research company. The survey instrument comprised open‐ended and closed questions exploring consumers’ experiences of and preferences for weight management services in pharmacy. It also included an attitudinal measure, the Consumer Attitude to Pharmacy Weight Management Services (CAPWMS) scale. Setting and participants  A total of 403 consumers from New South Wales, Australia, completed the survey. Results  The majority of respondents had previously not sought a pharmacist’s advice regarding weight management. Those who had previously consulted a pharmacist were more willing to pay for and support pharmacy‐based services in the future. Most consumers considered pharmacists’ motivations to provide advice related to gaining profit from selling a product and expressed concerns about the perceived conflicts of interest. Participants also perceived pharmacists as lacking expertise and time. Conclusion  Although Australian consumers were willing to seek pharmacists’ advice about weight management, they perceived several barriers to the provision of weight management services in community pharmacy. If barriers are addressed, community pharmacies could be a viable and accessible setting to manage obesity. PMID:22646843

  4. Consumer perspectives about weight management services in a community pharmacy setting in NSW, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, Irene S; Armour, Carol; Krass, Ines; Gill, Timothy; Chaar, Betty B

    2014-08-01

    Obesity is a public health challenge faced worldwide. Community pharmacists may be well placed to manage Australia's obesity problem owing to their training, accessibility and trustworthiness. However, determining consumers' needs is vital to the development of any new services or the evaluation of existing services. To explore Australian consumers' perspectives regarding weight management services in the community pharmacy setting, including their past experiences and willingness to pay for a specific pharmacy-based service. An online cross-sectional consumer survey was distributed through a marketing research company. The survey instrument comprised open-ended and closed questions exploring consumers' experiences of and preferences for weight management services in pharmacy. It also included an attitudinal measure, the Consumer Attitude to Pharmacy Weight Management Services (CAPWMS) scale. A total of 403 consumers from New South Wales, Australia, completed the survey. The majority of respondents had previously not sought a pharmacist's advice regarding weight management. Those who had previously consulted a pharmacist were more willing to pay for and support pharmacy-based services in the future. Most consumers considered pharmacists' motivations to provide advice related to gaining profit from selling a product and expressed concerns about the perceived conflicts of interest. Participants also perceived pharmacists as lacking expertise and time. Although Australian consumers were willing to seek pharmacists' advice about weight management, they perceived several barriers to the provision of weight management services in community pharmacy. If barriers are addressed, community pharmacies could be a viable and accessible setting to manage obesity. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Determinants of Attitude toward Proposed Good and Services Tax among Business Communities in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Bidin, Zainol; Marimuthu, Munusamy; Derashid, Chek; Idris, Kamil Md; Ahmad, Norsiah

    2016-01-01

    Goods and Services Tax (GST) is an indirect tax reform. The decision to implement GST was made on 1 April 2015. The Malaysian business communities are concerned that Goods and Service Tax (GST) would affect their business. In order to comply with the new system, GST, Malaysian citizen need to have a positive attitude toward the GST. The rational is that taxpayers need to be positive in attitude for voluntarily compliance. By determining what factors could possibly influence attitude towards ...

  6. Experience Modularization for New Value of Evanescent Cultural Communities: Developing Creative Tourism Services in Bangkok

    OpenAIRE

    Wuttigrai Ngamsirijit

    2014-01-01

    Creative tourism is an ongoing development in many countries as an attempt to moving away from serial reproduction of culture and reviving the culture. Despite, in the destinations with diverse and potential cultural resources, creating new tourism services can be vague. This paper presents how tourism experiences are modularized and consolidated in order to form new creative tourism service offerings in evanescent cultural communities of Bangkok, Thailand. The benefits from data mining in ac...

  7. Are wait lists inevitable in subacute ambulatory and community health services? A qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Katherine E; Robertson, Nicole; Snowdon, David A; Watts, Jennifer J; Karimi, Leila; O'Reilly, Mary; Kotis, Michelle; Taylor, Nicholas F

    2018-02-01

    Objectives Wait lists are common in ambulatory and community-based services. The aim of the present study was to explore managers' perceptions of factors that contribute to wait times. Methods A qualitative study was conducted using semi-structured interviews with managers and team leaders of ambulatory and community health services within a large health network. Interviews were transcribed and coded, and the codes were then grouped into themes and subthemes. Results Representatives from 26 services participated in the project. Four major themes were identified. Three themes related to reasons and factors contributing to increased wait time for services (inefficient intake and scheduling processes; service disruptions due to human resource issues; and high service demand). A fourth theme related to staff attitudes towards wait times and acceptance and acknowledgement of wait lists. Conclusions Service providers perceive high demand to be a key driver of wait times, but a range of other factors also contributes and may represent opportunities for improving access to care. These other factors include improving process efficiencies, greater consistency of service delivery through more efficient management of human resources and shifting to more consumer-centred approaches in measuring wait times in order to drive improvements in patient flow. What is known about the topic? Wait times are common in out-patient and ambulatory services. These services experience high demand, which is likely to continue to grow as health service delivery shifts from hospital to community settings. What does this paper add? Although demand is an important driver of wait times, there are other modifiable factors that also contribute, including process inefficiencies and service disruption related to human resource issues. An underlying staff attitude of acceptance of wait times appears to be an additional barrier to improving access. What are the implications for practitioners? The findings

  8. Service development of a nurse-led community-based PICC insertion service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedford, Eva; Waterhouse, Dee

    2017-01-26

    Patients receiving intravenous therapy require reliable venous access. Typically patients with poor peripheral access or requiring long-term treatment from an outpatient antibiotic therapy (OPAT) service need to receive secondary care input for safe central line placement, and radiological confirmation of the correct line tip placement where necessary, if treatment is to proceed as planned. Technological developments that enable accurate ultrasound-guided vein selection and electrocardiograph (ECG)-guided central line tip placement have eliminated the need for radiological or fluoroscopic confirmation of correct tip placement for peripherally placed central catheters (PICCs). This article outlines the development of an out-of-hospital nurse-led PICC insertion service using the Sherlock 3CG ® Tip Confirmation System (C.R Bard) to meet the needs of patients requiring long-term intravenous treatment from an OPAT service, and its impact on reducing treatment delays and the need for secondary care intervention.

  9. Predicting the decisions of hospital based child protection teams to report to child protective services, police and community welfare services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbenishty, Rami; Jedwab, Merav; Chen, Wendy; Glasser, Saralee; Slutzky, Hanna; Siegal, Gil; Lavi-Sahar, Zohar; Lerner-Geva, Liat

    2014-01-01

    This study examines judgments made by hospital-based child protection teams (CPTs) when determining if there is reasonable suspicion that a child has been maltreated, and whether to report the case to a community welfare agency, to child protective services (CPS) and/or to the police. A prospective multi-center study of all 968 consecutive cases referred to CPTs during 2010-2011 in six medical centers in Israel. Centers were purposefully selected to represent the heterogeneity of medical centers in Israel in terms of size, geographical location and population characteristics. A structured questionnaire was designed to capture relevant information and judgments on each child referred to the team. Bivariate associations and multivariate multinomial logistic regressions were conducted to predict whether the decisions would be (a) to close the case, (b) to refer the case to community welfare services, or (c) to report it to CPS and/or the police. Bivariate and multivariate analyses identified a large number of case characteristics associated with higher probability of reporting to CPS/police or of referral to community welfare services. Case characteristics associated with the decisions include socio-demographic (e.g., ethnicity and financial status), parental functioning (e.g., mental health), previous contacts with authorities and hospital, current referral characteristics (e.g., parental referral vs. child referral), physical findings, and suspicious behaviors of child and parent. Most of the findings suggest that decisions of CPTs are based on indices that have strong support in the professional literature. Existing heterogeneity between cases, practitioners and medical centers had an impact on the overall predictability of the decision to report. Attending to collaboration between hospitals and community agencies is suggested to support learning and quality improvement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. An evaluation of the implementation of integrated community home-based care services in Vhembe District, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gandi J Moetlo

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: Community home-based caregivers are largely able to implement home-based care services but would need more support (training, financial, career structure, and health system to improve on their services.

  11. Community Reintegration Problems Among Veterans and Active Duty Service Members With Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarity, Suzanne; Barnett, Scott D; Lamberty, Greg; Kretzmer, Tracy; Powell-Cope, Gail; Patel, Nitin; Nakase-Richardson, Risa

    To examine community reintegration problems among Veterans and military service members with mild or moderate/severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) at 1 year postinjury and to identify unique predictors that may contribute to these difficulties. VA Polytrauma Rehabilitation Centers. Participants were 154 inpatients enrolled in the VA TBI Model Systems Program with available injury severity data (mild = 28.6%; moderate/severe = 71.4%) and 1-year postinjury outcome data. Prospective, longitudinal cohort. Community reintegration outcomes included independent driving, employability, and general community participation. Additional measures assessed depression, posttraumatic stress, and cognitive and motor functioning. In the mild TBI (mTBI) group, posttraumatic stress disorder and depressive symptoms were associated with lower levels of various community reintegration outcomes. In the moderate/severe TBI group, cognition and motor skills were significantly associated with lower levels of community participation, independent driving, and employability. Community reintegration is problematic for Veterans and active duty service members with a history of TBI. Unique comorbidities across injury severity groups inhibit full reintegration into the community. These findings highlight the ongoing rehabilitation needs of persons with TBI, specifically evidence-based mental healthcare, in comprehensive rehabilitation programs consistent with a chronic disease management model.

  12. Teaching social responsibility through community service-learning in predoctoral dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondani, Mario A

    2012-05-01

    Social responsibility refers to one's sense of duty to the society in which he or she lives. The Professionalism and Community Service (PACS) dental module at the University of British Columbia is based upon community service-learning and helps dental students to understand the challenges faced by vulnerable segments of the population as they actively reflect on experiences gathered from didactic and experiential activities. This article aims to illustrate the extent to which PACS has fostered awareness of social responsibility through the British Columbia Ministry of Education's Performance Standards Framework for Social Responsibility. Reflections were gathered from students in all four years of the D.M.D. program and were analyzed thematically in three categories of the framework: Contribution to the Classroom and Community, Value of Diversity in the Community, and Exercise of Responsibilities. The constant comparison analysis of the reflective qualitative data revealed that the students directly or indirectly addressed these three categories in their reflections as they synthesized their understanding of community issues and their collaborative roles as socially responsible members of the dental profession. Follow-up studies are needed to explore the impact of community-based dental education upon students' perceptions and understanding of social responsibility and professionalism regarding underserved communities.

  13. The Unity Council at 40: a pioneering community development and service organization (1967-2007).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco, Gabriel; Schwartz, Sara L; Austin, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    The Spanish Speaking Unity Council (Unity Council) is a community development nonprofit organization that was established in 1964, during the civil rights movement, by a group of community members who wanted to ensure the political representation of the Latino community. Over its 45-year history, the Unity Council has grown into a $12 million community development organization that delivers a range of programming, including social services and employment training as well as facilitating the development and support of local businesses, low-income housing, and neighborhood improvement activities. The history of the agency presents the multiple challenges and rewards associated with development in an underserved community and an example of the important role that leadership plays in the growth of a nonprofit.

  14. A structured patient identification model for medication therapy management services in a community pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Gina M; Groves, Brigid K; Kuhn, Catherine H; Porter, Kyle; Mehta, Bella H

    To describe the development and implementation of a structured patient identification model for medication therapy management (MTM) services within traditional dispensing activities of a community pharmacy to facilitate pharmacist-provided completion of MTM services. A daily clinical opportunity report was developed as a structured model to identify MTM opportunities daily for all MTM-eligible patients expecting to pick up a prescription. Pharmacy staff was trained and the standardized model was implemented at study sites. One hundred nineteen grocery store-based community pharmacies throughout Ohio, West Virginia, and Michigan. A structured patient identification model in a community pharmacy consists of reviewing a clinical opportunity report, identifying interventions for MTM-eligible patients, and possibly collaborating with an interdisciplinary team. This model allows pharmacists to increase MTM cases performed by providing a structured process for identifying MTM-eligible patients and completing MTM services. The development and implementation of a structured patient identification model in the community pharmacy was completed and consists of pharmacists reviewing a clinical opportunity report to identify MTM opportunities and perform clinical interventions for patients. In a 3-month pre- and post-implementation comparison, there was a 49% increase in the number of MTM services provided by pharmacists (P < 0.001). A structured patient identification model in the community pharmacy was associated with an increase in the amount of MTM services provided by pharmacists. This method could be a useful tool at a variety of community pharmacies to solve challenges associated with MTM completion. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Promoting weight management services in community pharmacy: perspectives of the pharmacy team in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidmann, Anita Elaine; MacLure, Katie; Marshall, Sarah; Gray, Gwen; Stewart, Derek

    2015-08-01

    Obesity has reached pandemic levels with more than 1.4 billion adults affected worldwide. While there is a need to systematically develop and evaluate community pharmacy based models of weight management, it is imperative to describe and understand the perspectives of pharmacy staff. In the UK, trained and accredited community pharmacy medicines counter assistants (MCAs) are commonly the front line staff involved in patient consultations and sale of over-the-counter medicines. To explore the beliefs and experiences of pharmacists and MCAs in the North-East of Scotland on community pharmacy weight management. All 135 community pharmacies in the North-East of Scotland. A qualitative approach of semi-structured telephone interviews with 31 pharmacists and 20 MCAs in the North-East of Scotland. The semi-structured interview schedule was developed with reference to key domains describing professional practice (i.e. awareness and knowledge, skills, practicalities, motivation, acceptance and beliefs) and contextualised with policy documents and published research on community pharmacy based weight management. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and analysed thematically. Pharmacists' and MCAs' beliefs and experiences with delivering weight management services in community pharmacy. There were mixed responses from pharmacists and MCAs around pharmacy based weight management services from positive views of providing the service in community pharmacy to those more reticent who would always favour patients visiting their physician. While all described similar services e.g. measurement of weight, healthy eating advice, supply of products, they acknowledged that support was often opportunistic at the request of customers, with little integration of other providers. Roles described varied from pharmacist only functions to any staff member. While pharmacists generally felt comfortable and confident, MCAs gave more diverse responses. Both Pharmacist and MCAs highlighted

  16. Nevada Monitoring System to Assess Climate Variability and Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devitt, D. A.; Arnone, J.; Biondi, F.; Fenstermaker, L. F.; Saito, L.; Young, M.; Riddle, B.; Strachan, S. D.; Bird, B.; McCurdy, G.; Lyles, B. F.

    2010-12-01

    The Nevada System of Higher Education (University of Nevada Las Vegas, University of Nevada Reno and the Desert Research Institute) was awarded a multiyear NSF EPSCoR grant to support infrastructure associated with regional climate change research. The overall project is comprised of 5 components: education, cyberinfrastructure, policy, climate modeling and water/ecology. The water and ecology components are using their infrastructure funding for the assessment of climate variability and change on ecosystem function and hydrologic services. A series of 10 m tall towers are under construction and are being equipped with a wide array of sensors to monitor atmospheric, soil and plant parameters over time. The towers are located within the Mojave and Great Basin Deserts in two transects; the Mojave Desert transect is located in the southern Nevada Sheep Mountain Range and the Great Basin transect is located in the east central Nevada Snake Mountain Range. The towers are centrally positioned in well-defined vegetation zones. In southern Nevada these zones are represented by the following plant species: Creosote/Bursage (Creosotebush scrub zone); Blackbrush/Joshua Tree (Blackbrush zone); Pinyon/ Juniper (pygmy conifer zone), Ponderosa Pine (montane zone) and Bristlecone Pine (subalpine zone). The Snake Mountain transect incorporates the eastern and western valleys on both sides of the mountain range. The vegetation zones are represented by: Greasewood and mixed shrub (salt desert zone); Big Sage (sagebrush zone); Pinyon/Juniper (pygmy conifer zone); White/Douglas Fir, Ponderosa Pine and Aspen (montane zone); and Bristlecone/Limber Pine and Engelmann Spruce (subalpine zone). We are currently in the third year of funding with a goal of having the majority of towers fully operational by winter 2010. In close collaboration with our cyberinfrastructure component team, all data acquired from the transect monitoring stations will be made available to other researchers and the

  17. Postdischarge community pharmacist-provided home services for patients after hospitalization for heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalista, Tom; Lemay, Virginia; Cohen, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    To establish a community pharmacist-provided home health service to improve medication adherence and reduce 30-day heart failure-related hospital readmissions. Visiting Nurse Services of Newport and Bristol Counties located in Portsmouth, RI, from December 2013 to April 2014. Each patient received one in-home visit provided by a Postgraduate Year 1 community pharmacy resident within 1 week of admission to visiting nurse services followed by two follow-up telephone calls, 1 week and 4 weeks after the visit. The in-home visit consisted of a baseline assessment of medication adherence using the Morisky 8-Item Medication Adherence Questionnaire as well as pharmacist-provided education regarding chronic heart failure management. The follow-up telephone calls were used to reassess patient adherence and to monitor for hospital readmission within 30 days of the initial in-home visit. Community pharmacist-provided in-home medication reconciliation and medication teaching has not been described in the literature previously. In addition, pharmacists are often not included on home health care teams placing patients undergoing transitions in care at risk for potential medication-related errors. Improvement in medication adherence and reduction in 30-day heart failure-related hospital readmission rates. Ten patients were enrolled from December 2013 through April 2014. Following intervention, all patients saw improvements in adherence questionnaire scores during follow-up. Hospital readmission rates for patients seen by the pharmacist were lower compared with agencywide figures over a similar time period. A community pharmacist-provided in-home medication teaching service for patients following recent hospital discharge helps facilitate successful transitions of care from an inpatient to outpatient setting, improves medication adherence and has produced lower observed 30-day heart failure-related hospital readmission rates. Expansion of this or a similar service within the

  18. Clients with chronic and complex conditions: their experiences of community nursing services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, Lesley; Cioffi, Jane; Warne, Bronwyn; Harrison, Kathleen; Vonu-Boriceanu, Oana

    2008-04-01

    This qualitative study aimed to explore and describes clients' experiences of receiving care from community nurses. Understanding of the experiences of clients with chronic and complex conditions receiving community nursing care can provide insight into their needs. International studies have identified experiences clients have had of receiving care from community nurses. However, no Australian study was found that had specifically explored with clients who had chronic and complex conditions and their experiences of receiving care from community nurses in an area health service. A qualitative descriptive study conducted during 2005 explored and described clients' experiences of the nursing care provided by community nurses. A purposive sample of 13 volunteer participants with chronic and complex conditions was interviewed and the transcripts analysed. Three main categories were identified that clients used to describe their experiences. These were: the client's relationship with the nurse, care process and being able to stay out of hospital. Clients strongly indicated their satisfaction with care provided by experienced community nurses and acknowledged that nurses are playing a key role in fostering their self-management and avoiding their readmission to hospital. Areas that require further attention are the professional development of less-experienced community nurses, services at the weekend, the scope of nursing management of clients with chronic conditions and the education needs of community nurses to meet the goals of these clients. This study highlights the need for nurses who work in strong autonomous clinical roles in the community to have experience in assessment, education, planning and delivery of client care before they can be competent community nurses. The possibility of adverse occurrences during weekends provides the opportunity for managers to review and plan weekday and weekend workloads and staffing.

  19. Social determinants and health service use among racial and ethnic minorities: findings from a community sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duy D; Ho, Kiu H; Williams, James Herbert

    2011-01-01

    Multiple models conceptualizing the relationship between social determinants and health exist, but little research has examined the relationship between social determinants and health service use. Using previously collected survey data from racial and linguistic minorities from high-crime communities in a Midwestern urban area, this study uses the Commission on Social Determinants of Health framework to test the structural and intermediary determinants of health service use. The results indicate that perceived discrimination and neighborhood cohesion increase the likelihood of a person using health services. Implications for social work practice, advocacy, and research to address intermediary social determinants are discussed.

  20. They're Doing What? A Brief Paper on Service Use and Attitudes in ASD Community-Based Agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickard, Katherine; Meza, Rosemary; Drahota, Amy; Brikho, Brigitte

    2018-01-01

    This brief article examines the community services delivered to youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in a Southern Californian city as a way to better understand ASD service provision and service attitudes. Specific goals of the study were to identify the services being delivered within the area, and how the use, perceived evidence, and value…

  1. From Service to Action? Students, Volunteering and Community Action in Mid Twentieth-Century Britain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewis, Georgina

    2010-01-01

    Volunteering by higher education students in the UK has a long history which remains largely unexplored despite recent research and policy attention. This article offers a brief overview of the development of student volunteering before the 1960s and then discusses a shift from student social service to Student Community Action in the late 1960s…

  2. Self-Driven Service Learning: Community-Student-Faculty Collaboratives Outside of the Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica A. Segarra

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Service learning is a community engagement pedagogy often used in the context of the undergraduate classroom to synergize course-learning objectives with community needs.  We find that an effective way to catalyze student engagement in service learning is for student participation to occur outside the context of a graded course, driven by students’ own interests and initiative.  In this paper, we describe the creation and implementation of a self-driven service learning program and discuss its benefits from the community, student, and faculty points of view.  This experience allows students to explore careers in the sciences as well as identify skill strengths and weaknesses in an environment where mentoring is available but where student initiative and self-motivation are the driving forces behind the project’s success.  Self-driven service learning introduces young scientists to the idea that their careers serve a larger community that benefits not only from their discoveries but also from effective communication about how these discoveries are relevant to everyday life.

  3. New Practices of Farm-Based Community-Oriented Social Care Services in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassink, Jan; Grin, John; Hulsink, Willem

    2015-01-01

    Social care services provided by farmers provide a community-based collaboration that can empower people and improve their quality of life. The objective of this study was to increase understanding of the collaboration between care organizations and farmers. The study involves 4 cases, and all

  4. Pharmacy Characteristics Associated with the Provision of Drug Therapy Services in Nonmetropolitan Community Pharmacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadkari, Abhijit S.; Mott, David A.; Kreling, David H.; Bonnarens, Joseph K.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Higher prevalence of chronic diseases and reduced access to other health professionals in rural areas suggest that rural Medicare enrollees will benefit from pharmacist-provided drug therapy services (DTS). Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe non-metropolitan community pharmacy sites in Wisconsin, the provision of DTS at…

  5. The retention of community service officers for an additional year at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The retention of community service officers for an additional year at district hospitals in KwaZulu-Natal and the Eastern Cape and Limpopo provinces. ... Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study design was employed using qualitative methods with the cohort of CS officers who had completed their compulsory CS year in ...

  6. Differential Outcomes for American College Students Engaged in Community Service-Learning Involving Youth and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seider, Scott; Rabinowicz, Samantha; Gillmor, Susan

    2012-01-01

    The Serve Program at Ignatius University is a community service-learning program that combines academic study of philosophy with a yearlong field-based project at one of approximately 50 different sites. Half of these projects entail working with youth, while the other half entail working with adults. This mixed methods analysis found that college…

  7. Medicaid 1915(c) Home- and Community-Based Services Waivers for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velott, Diana L.; Agbese, Edeanya; Mandell, David; Stein, Bradley D.; Dick, Andrew W.; Yu, Hao; Leslie, Douglas L.

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to describe the characteristics of 1915(c) Home- and Community-Based Services waivers for children with autism spectrum disorder across states and over time. While increasingly popular, little is known about these Medicaid waivers. Understanding the characteristics of these programs is important to clinicians and policymakers in…

  8. Research in the Service of Co-Learning: Sustainability and Community Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanWynsberghe, Rob; Andruske, Cynthia Lee

    2007-01-01

    This research, conducted with an introductory sociology class at the University of British Columbia during the 2001-2002 academic year, explored community service-learning as a pedagogy and philosophy. The theoretical focus of this paper is Nancy Fraser's (1997) criticisms of Jurgen Habermas' (1992) bourgeois liberal model of the public sphere. We…

  9. Deepening College Students' Engagement with Religion and Theology through Community Service Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seider, Scott

    2011-01-01

    The Serve Program at Ignatius University combines academic study of theology with a year-long community service project focused on combating poverty. An analysis of the Serve Program during the 2008-09 academic year revealed that participating students demonstrated a significant increase in their interest in theology; a greater desire to enroll in…

  10. Community Service Learning as Critical Curriculum: Promoting International Students' Second Language Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Grounded in the whole person perspective of language learners and the concepts of investment and L2 socialization, this qualitative study explores how community service learning (CSL) contributes to international students' L2 practices and identity development. This study finds that CSL creates "a pedagogical contact zone" outside the…

  11. Preparing Pre-Service Teachers for Professional Engagement through Place/Community Pedagogies and Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Monica M.

    2016-01-01

    There is an expectation that Australian teachers engage professionally in all aspects of teaching and learning, including engagement with teaching networks and broader communities. This paper reports on a partnership between a teacher educator and an environmental educator who set out to expand pre-service teachers' professional knowledge,…

  12. Psychometric properties of the consumer quality index to assess shelter and community care services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijersbergen, M.D.; Asmoredjo, J.K.; Christians, M.G.M.; Wolf, J.R.L.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Our aim was to design a valid and reliable consumer quality index (CQI) specifically suited to assess the experiences that homeless people, homeless youth, and abused women have with shelter and community care services. METHODS: A pilot CQI questionnaire was constructed on the basis of

  13. Access to primary health care services by community-based asylum seekers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spike, Erin A; Smith, Mitchell M; Harris, Mark F

    2011-08-15

    To determine whether community-based asylum seekers experience difficulty in gaining access to primary health care services, and to determine the impact of any difficulties described. Qualitative study using semi-structured interviews between September and November 2010. Participants were community-based asylum seekers who attended the Asylum Seekers Centre of New South Wales, and health care practitioners and staff from the Asylum Seekers Centre and the NSW Refugee Health Service. We interviewed 12 asylum seekers, three nurses, one general practitioner and one manager. Asylum seekers' responses revealed that their access to primary health care was limited by a range of barriers including Medicare ineligibility, health care costs and the effects of social, financial and psychological stress. Limited access contributed to physical suffering and stress in affected asylum seekers. Participants providing care noted some improvement in access after recent government policy changes. However, they noted inadequate access to general practitioners, and dental, mental health and maternity care, and had difficulty negotiating pro-bono services. Both groups commented on the low availability of interpreters. Access to primary health care in Australia for community-based asylum seekers remains limited, and this has a negative effect on their physical and mental health. Further action is needed to improve the affordability of health care and to increase the provision of support services to community-based asylum seekers; extending Medicare eligibility would be one way of achieving this.

  14. The Agatston Urban Nutrition Initiative: Working to Reverse the Obesity Epidemic through Academically Based Community Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Francis E.

    2009-01-01

    The Agatston Urban Nutrition Initiative (AUNI) presents a fruitful partnership between faculty and students at a premier research university and members of the surrounding community aimed at addressing the problem of childhood obesity. AUNI uses a problem-solving approach to learning by focusing course activities, including service-learning, on…

  15. Satisfaction with virtual communities in B2B financial services: social dynamics, content and technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chompis, E.; Bons, R.W.H.; van den Hooff, B.J.; Feldberg, J.F.M.; Horn, H.

    2014-01-01

    This study explores satisfaction with Virtual Communities in a Financial Services setting. Based on Expectancy Value Theory and the concept of Experiential Value we hypothesize that three sources of value drive user satisfaction in a B2B-VC: social ties, content and technology. We propose a

  16. Financial services and disaster risk finance; Examples from the community level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warner, K.; Bouwer, L.M.; Ammann, W.

    2007-01-01

    Increased attention has recently been given to the possible role of financial services in the management of natural disaster risk. Local communities have been at the forefront of developing innovative disaster risk finance strategies and implementing risk-oriented incentive programs. In view of

  17. Volunteering for College? Potential Implications of Financial Aid Tax Credits Rewarding Community Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Ryan S.; Lynch, Cassie M.

    2014-01-01

    President Obama has proposed a financial aid policy whereby students who complete 100 hours of community service would receive a tax credit of US$4,000 for college. After lawmakers cut this proposal from previous legislation, the administration was tasked with studying the feasibility of implementation. However, the implications of the policy for…

  18. Demographic Characteristics of Direct-Service Personnel in Community Residential Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Gregory J.; Comer, Peter G.

    1990-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of demographic characteristics of direct-service personnel in Melbourne community residential units for intellectually disabled individuals. Many are found to be relatively inexperienced participants in the workforce, and most are young, single females. Implications of these findings for quality of care and staff…

  19. Service Learning as a Response to Community/School Engagement: Towards a Pedagogy of Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Gregg; Khabanyane, Mokhethi

    2013-01-01

    The promulgation of the White Paper on Higher Education (1997) necessitated Higher Education Institutions (HEis) in South Africa to avail their expertise in their human resources and physical infrastructure for service learning and community engagement initiatives, in the interest of demonstrating social responsibility, collaborative partnerships…

  20. Why Teach Social Entrepreneurship: Enhance Learning and University-Community Relations through Service-Learning Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Stacy; Godshalk, Veronica M.

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on providing a convincing argument for incorporating social entrepreneurship into the business professor's classroom. The outreach provided by social entrepreneurship enhances learning and promotes university-community relations. Service-learning engagement activities, in the form of social entrepreneurship, create a three-way…

  1. Complicating College Students' Conception of the American Dream through Community Service Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seider, Scott C.; Gillmor, Susan C.; Rabinowicz, Samantha A.

    2010-01-01

    This study considered the impact of the SERVE Program upon participating college students' belief in the American Dream. The SERVE Program is a community service learning program sponsored by the philosophy and theology departments at Ignatius University. Using a mixed methods approach, the authors found that participating students demonstrated…

  2. Slaves of the state – medical internship and community service in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owing to a chronic shortage of medical staff in South Africa, sleep-deprived medical interns and community service doctors work up to 200 hours of overtime per month under the state's commuted overtime policy. Nurses moonlight in circumvention of the Basic Conditions of Employment Act. For trainee doctors, overtime ...

  3. Engaging a Developmentally Disabled Community through Arts-Based Service-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    This study examined whether teaching in a community arts organization that provides services for people with developmental disabilities enabled preservice art teachers to better understand diverse contexts of art programs and the benefits of teaching the arts to others. Through this activity, the author also examined whether preservice art…

  4. Learning Resource Centers in Community Colleges; a Study of Budgets and Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Sarah Katharine

    A study of the interrelationship between expenditures and service programs in 27 community college library learning resource centers in California, Florida, Illinois, New Jersey, Missouri, Ohio, Texas, Virginia, and Maryland was conducted. Three data gathering tables on staffing, media production, library instruction, and media advisement were…

  5. Assessment for Community Service Types of Experiential Learning in the Engineering Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Cecilia Ka Yuk

    2012-01-01

    While experiential learning has been increasingly explored and adopted by higher education institutions, few have researched the appropriate assessment methods that can be aligned with the learning outcomes of experiential learning. A literature review on the diverse forms of assessment currently used for community service types of experiential…

  6. Workforce Planning for the Community Services and Health Industry. Occasional Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmel, Tom; Blomberg, Davinia

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to provide a picture of the occupations in the community services and health industry, and how the workforce obtains the required skills. The authors argue that planning for the industry should concentrate on occupations specific to the industry and those which require high skill levels. Findings suggest that the qualification…

  7. Art Therapy Applications of Dolls in Grief Recovery, Identity, and Community Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feen-Calligan, Holly; McIntyre, Barbara; Sands-Goldstein, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the history of dollmaking that is relevant to art therapy, and the application of dolls as therapeutic media in clinical and educational settings. The authors describe their experiences using dollmaking in the resolution of grief, in professional identity construction, and in community service. The article addresses the…

  8. Early Community-Based Service Utilization and Its Effects on Institutionalization in Dementia Caregiving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaugler, Joseph E.; Kane, Robert L.; Kane, Rosalie A.; Newcomer, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The present study attempts to determine whether utilizing community-based long-term-care services early in the dementia caregiving career delays time to nursing home placement (adjusting for severity of dementia). Design and Methods: With a reliance on data from 4,761 dementia caregivers recruited from eight catchment areas in the United…

  9. Community College Developmental Education Services: Perspectives of Spanish-Speaking Latino Early Childhood Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberly, John E.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this single-case study was to understand the perceptions of Latino Spanish-speaking English learners on the efficacy of developmental education services at a Western U.S. community college. The primary data collection method was in-depth individual interviews of a purposeful sample of nine successful students. Findings indicated…

  10. Geothermal power development in Hawaii. Volume II. Infrastructure and community-services requirements, Island of Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, G.A.; Buevens, W.R.

    1982-06-01

    The requirements of infrastructure and community services necessary to accommodate the development of geothermal energy on the Island of Hawaii for electricity production are identified. The following aspects are covered: Puna District-1981, labor resources, geothermal development scenarios, geothermal land use, the impact of geothermal development on Puna, labor resource requirments, and the requirements for government activity.

  11. Implementation of Cooperative Learning in the Center for Community Service and Continuing Education at Kuwait University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alansari, Eissa M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to review the success of implementation of cooperative learning in various courses delivered at the Center for Community Service and Continuing Education at Kuwait University. According to recent research in the field of social cognition, learning situations which make use of the social context often achieve superior…

  12. Theoretical framework for government information service delivery to deep rural communities in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mvelase, PS

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a study to determine the information requirements of communities in deep rural areas on government services and how this information can be made available to them. The study then proposes an e-government theoretical framework...

  13. Developing the language of thinking within a classroom community of inquiry: pre-service teachers' experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Green

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We argue that the "community of inquiry" approach, using reading materials modelled on Lipman's Philosophy for Children programme, is a theoretically justified and teacher-friendly means of promoting effective thinking skills. The stimulus materials, used by the pre-service teachers, consist ofshort stories ofclassroom life designed to elicit children's ideas for further discussion as a community of inquiry. Research has shown that the community of inquiry approach to classroom discussion is perceived positively by educators and teachers and makes a difference to learners. This study explored how the Intermediate and Senior Phase pre-service teachers experienced a classroom community of inquiry by using a qualitative research design with 47 final year pre-service teachers. Data consisted of written reflections from the whole class and recordings of two focus group interviews with selected individuals from the group. From the analysis of the data, the following themes became evident: personal and professional development, changes in learners, contextual concerns, and curriculum links. We conclude that this approach is a valuable addition to the pedagogical strategies of pre-service teachers.

  14. Analyzing Reflections in Service Learning to Promote Personal Growth and Community Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Martha J.; Van Oss, Tracy; McGeary, Signian

    2016-01-01

    The use of structured reflections for promoting personal understanding and community self-efficacy was examined in 65 occupational therapy college students in a service learning course. Students in the experimental group wrote structured reflections throughout the semester while students in the control groups used non-structured reflections.…

  15. Community Based Social Audit of Health Services in Two Districts of ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Community Based Social Audit of Health Services in Two Districts of Afghanistan. The health system in Afghanistan has been chronically neglected during decades of war and conflict. As the country emerges from this situation, it is overwhelmed by a long list of priorities in almost every sector. Scarce health resources ...

  16. 77 FR 4654 - Senior Community Service Employment Program; Final Rule, Additional Indicator on Volunteer Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-31

    ... percent of the Federal poverty level. The program offers participants training at community service... plan, grantees are expected to assess the participants' circumstances, including their degree of social... Justice Reform, and will not unduly burden the Federal court system. The regulation has been written so as...

  17. Saint Anthony Hospital: Infusing Developmental and Family Support Services in Community-Based Medical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Paula; Isarowong, Nucha

    2015-01-01

    Physicians affiliated with small community hospitals face numerous barriers to using developmentally oriented best practices in primary care with young children. Saint Anthony Hospital's Developmental Support Project model promotes improved developmental outcomes for children through two complementary strands of services: (a) training and…

  18. Community Mediation Service: A Model for Teaching Democracy and Conflict Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaton, Christa Daryl

    This paper depicts the origins, operation, and success of the Community Mediation Service established at the University of Hawaii, Manoa in 1979. During the 1970s, a national impetus for change arose out of stresses in the justice system including clogged courts, expensive and lengthy litigation, distrust of lawyers, and dissatisfaction of both…

  19. Involving forest communities in identifying and constructing ecosystems services: millennium assessment and place specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley T. Asah; Dale J. Blahna; Clare M. Ryan

    2012-01-01

    The ecosystem services (ES) approach entails integrating people into public forest management and managing to meet their needs and wants. Managers must find ways to understand what these needs are and how they are met. In this study, we used small group discussions, in a case study of the Deschutes National Forest, to involve community members and forest staff in...

  20. Development of Adolescent Moral and Civic Identity through Community Service: A Qualitative Study in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huixuan; Yang, Min

    2018-01-01

    This article draws on Marcia's model that defines four statuses of adolescents' identity formation to examine adolescent moral and civic identity formation. Interviews were conducted with 23 students at three Hong Kong senior secondary schools to address the following research question: How does community service help adolescents develop their…

  1. Service-learning and learning communities: two innovative school projects that are mutually enriched

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen ÁLVAREZ ÁLVAREZ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reflects on the interrelationships that exist between two educational projects of today: service-learning (ApS and learning communities (CdA. The ApS is an educational methodology applied worldwide where a single project combines a learning based on experience with the implementation of a service to the community. CdA is a school transformation project to achieve that the information society does not exclude any person, constituting a reality in more than one hundred and ninety schools in Spain and Latin America. Between the two, it is possible to show differences, especially in what refers to its theoretical substrates, but in actual teaching practice in schools there is some harmony, particularly in the so closely that they cultivate both projects with the school community. Therefore, we conclude that service-learning and learning communities can occur as two innovative and relevant today projects which can be mutually enriching: because for both the approach school-community-environment and volunteering is essential.

  2. Mapping the terrain: A conceptual schema for a mental health medication support service in community pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scahill, Shane; Fowler, Jane L; Hattingh, H Laetitia; Kelly, Fiona; Wheeler, Amanda J

    2015-01-01

    Mental health-related problems pose a serious issue for primary care, and community pharmacy could make a significant contribution, but there is a dearth of information. This article reports synthesis of the literature on mental health interventions across a range of pharmacy models, and pharmacy services in contexts beyond mental health. To best inform the design of a community pharmacy medication support intervention for mental health consumers, the literature was reported as a conceptual schema and subsequent recommendations for development, implementation and evaluation of the service. A broad conceptualisation was taken in this review. In addition to mental health and community pharmacy literature, policy/initiatives, organisational culture and change management principles, and evaluative processes were reviewed. Key words were selected and literature reviews undertaken using EMBASE, PubMed, CINAHL and Web of Science. Recommendations were made around: medication support intervention design, consumer recruitment, implementation in community pharmacy and evaluation. Surprisingly, there is a scarce literature relating to mental health interventions in community pharmacy. Even so, findings from other pharmacy models and broader medicines management for chronic illness can inform development of a medication support service for mental health consumers. Key learnings include the need to expand medicines management beyond adherence with respect to both intervention design and evaluation. The conceptual framework is grounded in the need for programmes to be embedded within pharmacies that are part of the health system as a whole.

  3. Mapping the terrain: A conceptual schema for a mental health medication support service in community pharmacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scahill, Shane; Fowler, Jane L; Hattingh, H Laetitia; Kelly, Fiona; Wheeler, Amanda J

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Mental health–related problems pose a serious issue for primary care, and community pharmacy could make a significant contribution, but there is a dearth of information. Methods: This article reports synthesis of the literature on mental health interventions across a range of pharmacy models, and pharmacy services in contexts beyond mental health. To best inform the design of a community pharmacy medication support intervention for mental health consumers, the literature was reported as a conceptual schema and subsequent recommendations for development, implementation and evaluation of the service. A broad conceptualisation was taken in this review. In addition to mental health and community pharmacy literature, policy/initiatives, organisational culture and change management principles, and evaluative processes were reviewed. Key words were selected and literature reviews undertaken using EMBASE, PubMed, CINAHL and Web of Science. Results: Recommendations were made around: medication support intervention design, consumer recruitment, implementation in community pharmacy and evaluation. Surprisingly, there is a scarce literature relating to mental health interventions in community pharmacy. Even so, findings from other pharmacy models and broader medicines management for chronic illness can inform development of a medication support service for mental health consumers. Key learnings include the need to expand medicines management beyond adherence with respect to both intervention design and evaluation. Conclusion: The conceptual framework is grounded in the need for programmes to be embedded within pharmacies that are part of the health system as a whole. PMID:26770802

  4. Is involuntary outpatient commitment a remedy for community mental health service failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jonathan D

    2003-01-01

    Involuntary outpatient commitment (IOC) statutes exist in response to disorganized community mental health service delivery and perceived treatment non-compliance. These statutes attempt to force psychiatric patients to comply with outpatient mental health services. Mental health service consumers, providers, and advocates have increasingly questioned the necessity and legality of IOC. Credible research indicates that IOC does not substantially benefit consumers and may increase mental health deterioration. IOC has proven difficult to implement, enforce, and successfully measure. Rather than resorting to expanding coercive measures, mental health systems and policymakers must ensure provision of voluntary and accessible mental health services. Furthermore, IOC cannot be legally or ethically justified even if hypothetical research supporting its alleged effectiveness exists. This article summarizes influential and contradictory IOC research, explores legal issues, and proposes that providing voluntary consumer-driven services would reduce IOC usage and prevent criminalizing individuals experiencing serious emotional distress.

  5. [Nutritional status of Cuban elders in three different geriatric scenarios: community, geriatrics service, nursery home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Hernández, Alina; Cuyá Lantigua, Magdalena; González Escudero, Hilda; Sánchez Gutiérrez, Ramón; Cortina Martínez, Rafael; Barreto Penié, Jesús; Santana Porbén, Sergio; Rojas Pérez, Alberto

    2007-09-01

    The undernutrition rates observed in Cuban elders surveyed in three different geriatric scenarios: Community: coastal town of Cojímar (City of Havana); Geriatrics Service ("Hermanos Ameijeiras" Hospital, City of Havana); and Nursery Home (city of Cárdenas, province of Matanzas) by means of the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) of the Elderly are presented. Undernutrition rates were 2.7% among elders surveyed in the coastal community of Cojímar, but increased to become 91.6% among those admitted to the hospital Geriatrics Service, and 95.3% for those institutionalized in the Nursery Home, respectively. The occurrence of undernutrition can be low among elders living freely in the community, but it might affect a vast number of those seeking medical assistance at the public health institutions. Extent of undernutrition among elders in geriatric assistance scenarios should lead to the adoption of the required measures for early identification, and timely treatment, of this health problem.

  6. Integrating Personalized and Community Services for Mobile Travel Planning and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chien-Chih

    Personalized and community services have been noted as keys to enhance and facilitate e-tourism as well as mobile applications. This paper aims at proposing an integrated service framework for combining personalized and community functions to support mobile travel planning and management. Major mobile tourism related planning and decision support functions specified include personalized profile management, information search and notification, evaluation and recommendation, do-it-yourself planning and design, community and collaboration management, auction and negotiation, transaction and payment, as well as trip tracking and quality control. A system implementation process with an example prototype is also presented for illustrating the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed system framework, process model, and development methodology.

  7. Community competence and empowerment: strategies for rural change in women's health service planning and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakes, S J; Kelly, G J

    1997-02-01

    Rural women face a variety of health-related problems, some of which they share with their city sisters. However, the multiple responsibilities of women on the land, and their geographical isolation and lack of support, can lead to physical decline and increased mental strain. It is these factors which are often overlooked in the planning and allocation of funding and services to rural areas. This paper examines the application of community competence and empowerment measures in developing and implementing health services for women in rural Australian communities. A study conducted in the south-west region of Western Australia illustrates the ability of women within rural communities to identify and respond constructively to health issues of concern.

  8. Teaching Advanced Leadership Skills in Community Service (ALSCS) to medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Adam O; Calleson, Diane; Bearman, Rachel; Steiner, Beat D; Frasier, Pamela Y; Slatt, Lisa

    2009-06-01

    Inadequate access to health care, lack of health insurance, and significant health disparities reflect crises in health care affecting all of society. Training U.S. physicians to possess not only clinical expertise but also sufficient leadership skills is essential to solve these problems and to effectively improve health care systems. Few models in the undergraduate medical curriculum exist for teaching students how to combine needed leadership competencies with actual service opportunities.The Advanced Leadership Skills in Community Service (ALSCS) selective developed in response to the shortage of leadership models and leadership training for medical students. The ALSCS selective is designed specifically to increase students' leadership skills, with an emphasis on community service. The selective integrates classroom-based learning, hands-on application of learned skills, and service learning. More than 60 medical students have participated in the selective since inception. Short-term outcomes demonstrate an increase in students' self-efficacy around multiple dimensions of leadership skills (e.g., fundraising, networking, motivating others). Students have also successfully completed more than a dozen leadership and community service projects. The selective offers an innovative model of a leadership-skills-based course that can have a positive impact on leadership skill development among medical school students and that can be incorporated into the medical school curriculum.

  9. Assessment of Family Planning Services at Community Pharmacies in San Diego, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Rafie

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Levonorgestrel emergency contraception and other contraceptive methods are available over-the-counter (OTC; however youth continue to face a number of barriers in accessing healthcare services, including lack of knowledge of the method, fear of loss of privacy, difficulties in finding a provider, and cost. A descriptive, nonexperimental, cross-sectional study of a sample of 112 community pharmacies in San Diego, California was conducted between December 2009 and January 2010 to assess community pharmacy practices related to the availability and accessibility of family planning health pharmacy services and products, particularly to youth. A majority (n = 79/112, 70.5% of the pharmacies carried a wide selection of male condoms; however, the other OTC nonhormonal contraceptive products were either not available or available with limited selection. A majority of the pharmacies sold emergency contraception (n = 88/111, 78.6%. Most patient counseling areas consisted of either a public or a semi-private area. A majority of the pharmacy sites did not provide materials or services targeting youth. Significant gaps exist in providing family planning products and services in the majority of community pharmacies in San Diego, California. Education and outreach efforts are needed to promote provision of products and services, particularly to the adolescent population.

  10. Compassion Fatigue among Healthcare, Emergency and Community Service Workers: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Cocker

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Compassion fatigue (CF is stress resulting from exposure to a traumatized individual. CF has been described as the convergence of secondary traumatic stress (STS and cumulative burnout (BO, a state of physical and mental exhaustion caused by a depleted ability to cope with one’s everyday environment. Professionals regularly exposed to the traumatic experiences of the people they service, such as healthcare, emergency and community service workers, are particularly susceptible to developing CF. This can impact standards of patient care, relationships with colleagues, or lead to more serious mental health conditions such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, anxiety or depression. A systematic review of the effectiveness of interventions to reduce CF in healthcare, emergency and community service workers was conducted. Thirteen relevant studies were identified, the majority of which were conducted on nurses (n = 10. Three included studies focused on community service workers (social workers, disability sector workers, while no studies targeting emergency service workers were identified. Seven studies reported a significant difference post-intervention in BO (n = 4 or STS (n = 3. This review revealed that evidence of the effectiveness of CF interventions in at-risk health and social care professions is relatively recent. Therefore, we recommend more research to determine how best to protect vulnerable workers at work to prevent not only CF, but also the health and economic consequences related to the ensuing, and more disabling, physical and mental health outcomes.

  11. Should community health workers offer support healthcare services to survivors of sexual violence? a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatuguta, Anne; Katusiime, Barbra; Seeley, Janet; Colombini, Manuela; Mwanzo, Isaac; Devries, Karen

    2017-10-12

    Sexual violence is widespread, yet relatively few survivors receive healthcare or complete treatment. In low and middle-income countries, community health workers (CHWs) have the potential to provide support services to large numbers of survivors. The aim of this review was to document the role of CHWs in sexual violence services. We aimed to: 1) describe existing models of CHWs services including characteristics of CHWs, services delivered and populations served; 2) explore acceptability of CHWs' services to survivors and feasibility of delivering such services; and 3) document the benefits and challenges of CHW-provided sexual violence services. Quantitative and qualitative studies reporting on CHWs and other community-level paraprofessional volunteer services for sexual violence were eligible for inclusion. CHWs and sexual violence were defined according to WHO criteria. The review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Quality of included studies was assessed using two quality assessment tools for quantitative, and, the methodology checklist by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence for qualitative studies. Data were extracted and analysed separately for quantitative and qualitative studies and results integrated using a framework approach. Seven studies conducted in six countries (Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda, Burma, United States of America, Scotland, Israel) met the inclusion criteria. Different models of care had diverse CHWs roles including awareness creation, identifying, educating and building relationships with survivors, psychosocial support and follow up. Although sociocultural factors may influence CHWs' performance and willingness of survivors to use their services, studies often did not report on CHWs characteristics. Few studies assessed acceptability of CHWs' to survivors or feasibility of delivery of services. However, participants mentioned a range

  12. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Nevada. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate the operatons of public utilities in Nevada is vested generally in the Public Service Commission. The Commission is comprised of three members appointed by the governor to four year terms. One of the members is designated by the governor to act as chairman and serves in that capacity at the pleasure of the governor. Commissioners must be free from employment or pecuniary interests which are incompatible with the duties of the Commission. Within the purview of its powers, the authority of the Commission supercedes that of local governments. Local governments play a role in regulating public utilities only through the exercise of their zoning and franchising powers. In addition, municipally-owned utilities are totally exempt from Commission control. No specific procedure is provided by which the decisions of local governments regarding utilities may be reviewed by the Commission. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  13. Assessing rural small community water supply in Limpopo, South Africa: water service benchmarks and reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majuru, Batsirai; Jagals, Paul; Hunter, Paul R

    2012-10-01

    Although a number of studies have reported on water supply improvements, few have simultaneously taken into account the reliability of the water services. The study aimed to assess whether upgrading water supply systems in small rural communities improved access, availability and potability of water by assessing the water services against selected benchmarks from the World Health Organisation and South African Department of Water Affairs, and to determine the impact of unreliability on the services. These benchmarks were applied in three rural communities in Limpopo, South Africa where rudimentary water supply services were being upgraded to basic services. Data were collected through structured interviews, observations and measurement, and multi-level linear regression models were used to assess the impact of water service upgrades on key outcome measures of distance to source, daily per capita water quantity and Escherichia coli count. When the basic system was operational, 72% of households met the minimum benchmarks for distance and water quantity, but only 8% met both enhanced benchmarks. During non-operational periods of the basic service, daily per capita water consumption decreased by 5.19l (pwater sources were 639 m further (p ≤ 0.001, 95% CI 560-718). Although both rudimentary and basic systems delivered water that met potability criteria at the sources, the quality of stored water sampled in the home was still unacceptable throughout the various service levels. These results show that basic water services can make substantial improvements to water access, availability, potability, but only if such services are reliable. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Assessment of attitude toward community service among dental students of Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Sujith Anand

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The dental health care providers and their community service in any nation play a pivotal role in bridging the gap between the oral health care and social service system. Understanding that there is a shortage and disparity in the oral health services provided, a greater emphasis on its awareness and education is the present need; thus, the aim of the study is to assess the attitude toward community service among dental students. Methodology: A cross-sectional questionnaire-based study was conducted among undergraduate dental students who were present on the day of study, and their attitude toward community service was assessed using a standardized Community Service Attitude Scale which consists of eight domains. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Chi-square test, and ANOVA. The level of significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: The total participants included were 171. The levels of attitude toward community service among the study participants based on year (P = 0.0492, gender (P = 0.00482, and voluntary activity (P = 0.042 were found to be statistically significant. Conclusion: The attitude toward community service is influenced by gender and year of study. Hence, any practical training program with regard to service learning in their undergraduate curriculum would highly contribute to influence their attitude toward community service.

  15. Compliance of community teams with specialist service recommendations for obsessive-compulsive and body dysmorphic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Paul M; Drummond, Lynne M

    2016-10-01

    Aims and method To examine how often referring community mental health teams (CMHTs) utilised treatment recommendations made by the national highly specialised service for patients with severe obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). We analysed all patient notes for admissions to the unit (August 2012-August 2014) and recorded how many treatment recommendations were implemented by CMHTs prior to admission and at 6 months post-discharge. Results Overall, 66% of our recommendations were met by CMHTs prior to admission and 74% after discharge. Most recommendations concerned medication and the continued need for care coordination by the CMHT. Clinical implications A significant proportion of patients in our audit did not receive optimum treatment in the community as recommended by our service. As highly specialised services are a limited resource and these patients have not responded to previous treatment, this has implications for the use of such resources.

  16. Sustainable antenatal care services in an urban Indigenous community: the Townsville experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panaretto, Kathryn S; Mitchell, Melvina R; Anderson, Lynette; Larkins, Sarah L; Manessis, Vivienne; Buettner, Petra G; Watson, David

    2007-07-02

    To evaluate the impact of a sustained, community-based collaborative approach to antenatal care services for Indigenous women. Prospective quality improvement intervention, the Mums and Babies program, in a cohort of women attending Townsville Aboriginal and Islanders Health Service, 1 January 2000 - 31 December 2005 (MB group), compared with a historical control group (PreMB group), 1 January 1998 - 30 June 1999. Proportion of women having inadequate antenatal care and screening; perinatal indicators. The number of antenatal visits per pregnancy increased from three (interquartile range [IQR], two to six) in the PreMB group to six (IQR, four to ten) in the MB group (P Sustained access to a community-based, integrated, shared antenatal service has improved perinatal outcomes among Indigenous women in Townsville.

  17. Service and infrastructure needs to support recovery programmes for Indigenous community mental health consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, Jan M; Cleary, Michelle; Hunt, Glenn E; Burmeister, Oliver K

    2017-04-01

    Mental health is a major concern in Indigenous communities, as Indigenous people experience poorer health outcomes generally, and poorer social and emotional well-being throughout their lives, compared to non-Indigenous populations. Interviews were conducted with 20 mental health workers from a housing assistance programme for Indigenous clients with mental illness. Service and infrastructure needs identified to support clients were classified under the following overarching theme 'supports along the road to recovery'. Subthemes were: (i) It is OK to seek help; (ii) linking in to the local community; (iii) trusting the workers; and (iv) help with goal setting and having activities that support their achievement. This paper highlights the importance of targeted housing and accommodation support programmes for Indigenous people to prevent homelessness, and the essential services and infrastructure required to support Indigenous clients' mental health needs. These insights may inform service review, workforce development, and further research. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  18. Community environmental health assessment strengthens environmental public health services in the Peruvian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Brian; Gelting, Richard; Baffigo, Virginia; Sarisky, John

    2005-01-01

    In December 1999, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere, Peru Country Office (CARE Peru), initiated the Urban Environmental Health Project (SAU, in Spanish) to strengthen environmental public health services in urban and periurban settlements in Peru. The project received funding from the Woodruff Foundation as part of the CARE-CDC Health Initiative (CCHI). The "Protocol for Assessing Community Excellence in Environmental Health" (PACE EH) guided the development of a community environmental public health assessment (CEHA) process in Cardozo, a settlement in Iquitos, Peru. The project developed a three-phase process that merged scientific understanding and community perception about local environmental health problems. In phase 1, local environmental health technicians assisted the community in understanding environmental health conditions in Cardozo and selecting priorities. During phase 2, local technicians assessed the community-selected priorities: water and sanitation. Results from recent water quality assessments revealed that 82% (9 of 11) of samples from shallow dug wells, 18% (2 of 11) from deeper drilled wells, and 61% (11/18) from household drinking containers were positive for thermotolerant coliforms. Phase 3 activities produced an action plan and an intervention to mitigate health problems associated with inadequate water and sanitation services in the Cardozo community. As a result of the CEHA process, CARE Peru obtained funding from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) to develop and implement an environmental health risk monitoring system and the proposed water and sewage intervention in the settlement. CDC continues to provide technical assistance to the local environmental health services groups in Iquitos through an agreement with CARE Peru as part of the USAID-funded Urban Environmental Health Models Project (MUSA). Technical assistance activities

  19. Community-level impact of the reproductive health vouchers programme on service utilization in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obare, Francis; Warren, Charlotte; Njuki, Rebecca; Abuya, Timothy; Sunday, Joseph; Askew, Ian; Bellows, Ben

    2013-03-01

    This paper examines community-level association between exposure to the reproductive health vouchers programme in Kenya and utilization of services. The data are from a household survey conducted among 2527 women (15-49 years) from voucher and comparable non-voucher sites. Analysis entails cross-tabulations with Chi-square tests and significant tests of proportions as well as estimation of multi-level logit models to predict service utilization by exposure to the programme. The results show that for births occurring after the voucher programme began, women from communities that had been exposed to the programme since 2006 were significantly more likely to have delivered at a health facility and to have received skilled care during delivery compared with those from communities that had not been exposed to the programme at all. There were, however, no significant differences in the timing of first trimester utilization of antenatal care (ANC) and making four or more ANC visits by exposure to the programme. In addition, poor women were significantly less likely to have used safe motherhood services (health facility delivery, skilled delivery care and postnatal care) compared with their non-poor counterparts regardless of exposure to the programme. Nonetheless, a significantly higher proportion of poor women from communities that had been exposed to the programme since 2006 used the services compared with their poor counterparts from communities that had not been exposed to the programme at all. The findings suggest that the programme is associated with increased health facility deliveries and skilled delivery care especially among poor women. However, it has had limited community-level impact on the first trimester timing of antenatal care use and making four or more visits, which remain a challenge despite the high proportion of women in the country that make at least one antenatal care visit during pregnancy.

  20. Exploring home visits in a faith community as a service-learning opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Plessis, Emmerentia; Koen, Magdalene P; Bester, Petra

    2013-08-01

    Within South Africa the Psychiatric Nursing Science curriculum in undergraduate Baccalaureate nursing education utilizes home visits as a service-learning opportunity. In this context faith communities are currently unexplored with regards to service-learning opportunities. With limited literature available on this topic, the question was raised as to what are these students' and family members' experience of home visits within a faith community. To explore and describe nursing students' and family members' experiences of home visits within a faith community. A qualitative approach was used that was phenomenological, explorative and descriptive and contextual in nature. The research was conducted within a faith community as service learning opportunity for Baccalaureate degree nursing students. This community was situated in a semi-urban area in the North-West Province, South Africa. Eighteen (n=18) final year nursing students from different cultural representations, grouped into seven groups conducted home visits at seven (n=7) families. Comprehensive reflective reporting after the visits, namely that the students participated in a World Café data collection technique and interviews were conducted with family members. Three main themes emerged: students' initial experiences of feeling overwhelmed but later felt more competent; students' awareness of religious and cultural factors; and students' perception of their role. Two main themes from the family members emerged: experiencing caring and growth. There is mutual benefit for nursing students and family members. Students' experiences progress during home visits from feeling overwhelmed and incompetent towards a trusting relationship. Home visits in a faith community seems to be a valuable service learning opportunity, and the emotional competence, as well as spiritual and cultural awareness of nursing students should be facilitated in preparation for such home visits. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  1. Occupational Therapy in Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services Waivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanPuymbrouck, Laura

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) 1915(c) waivers are the largest provider of long-term services and supports for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDDs). In this study, we explored how HCBS IDD waivers projected providing occupational therapy services in Fiscal Year (FY) 2015. METHOD. Medicaid HCBS IDD waivers across the nation gathered from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed to determine how they projected providing occupational therapy services in terms of service expenditures and utilization. RESULTS. In FY 2015, $14.13 million of spending was projected for occupational therapy services of 7,500 participants. However, there was large heterogeneity across states and services in terms of total projected spending, spending per participant, and reimbursement rates. CONCLUSION. Comparisons across states strengthen the profession’s ability to assert the value of its services. These findings can help identify best practices and can advocate for the refinement of state occupational therapy programs. PMID:29426389

  2. Patient preferences for community pharmacy asthma services: a discrete choice experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik-Panvelkar, Pradnya; Armour, Carol; Rose, John M; Saini, Bandana

    2012-10-01

    Specialized community pharmacy services, involving the provision of disease state management and care by pharmacists, have been developed and trialled and have demonstrated very good health outcomes. Most of these services have been developed from a healthcare professional perspective. However, for the future uptake and long-term sustainability of these services as well as for better and sustained health outcomes for patients, it is vital to gain an understanding of patients' preferences. We can then structure healthcare services to match these preferences and needs rather than around clinical viewpoints alone. The aim of this study was to elicit patient preferences for pharmacy-based specialized asthma services using a discrete choice experiment and to explore the value/importance that patients place on the different attributes of the asthma service. The existence of preference heterogeneity in the population was also investigated. The study was conducted with asthma patients who had recently experienced a specialized asthma management service at their pharmacy in New South Wales, Australia. Pharmacists delivering the asthma service mailed out the discrete choice questionnaires to participating patients at the end of 6 months of service provision. A latent class (LC) model was used to investigate each patient's strength of preference and preference heterogeneity for several key attributes related to asthma service provision: frequency of visits, access to pharmacist, interaction with pharmacy staff, availability of a private area for consultation, provision of lung function testing, type and depth of advice provision, number of days with asthma symptoms and cost of service. Eighty useable questionnaires (of 170 questionnaires sent out) were received (response rate 47.1%). The study identified various key elements of asthma services important to patients. Further, the LC analysis revealed three classes with differing patient preferences for levels of asthma service

  3. Reducing service and substance use among frequent service users: a brief report from the Toronto Community Addictions Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draanen, Jenna van; Corneau, Simon; Henderson, Thomas; Quastel, Adam; Griller, Robin; Stergiopoulos, Vicky

    2013-05-01

    The Toronto Community Addictions Team (TCAT) is an intensive case management intervention designed to serve people with addictions who are frequent service users, thus addressing a health system priority. Questionnaires given to 65 participants at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months and semi-structured interviews of 10 program participants explored participants' outcomes and experiences with the program. Qualitative findings, analyzed using thematic content analysis, suggest that participants value the program's commitment to harm reduction, financial trusteeship, and recovery orientation. Quantitative findings from paired t-tests reveal that participants improved in community functioning and decreased days of problematic substance use and money spent on alcohol and drugs as early as 3 months after program participation. Future research should used a controlled design and explore predictors of positive outcomes in this vulnerable population.

  4. Community and health worker perceptions and preferences regarding integration of other health services with routine vaccinations: four case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryman, Tove K; Wallace, Aaron; Mihigo, Richard; Richards, Patricia; Schlanger, Karen; Cappelier, Kelli; Ndiaye, Serigne; Modjirom, Ndoutabe; Tounkara, Baba; Grant, Gavin; Anya, Blanche; Kiawi, Emmanuel C; Ochieng, Cliff; Kone, Sekou; Tesfaye, Habtamu; Trayner, Nathan; Watkins, Margaret; Luman, Elizabeth T

    2012-03-01

    Integration of routine vaccination and other maternal and child health services is becoming more common and the services being integrated more diverse. Yet knowledge gaps remain regarding community members and health workers acceptance, priorities, and concerns related to integration. Qualitative health worker interviews and community focus groups were conducted in 4 African countries (Kenya, Mali, Ethiopia, and Cameroon). Integration was generally well accepted by both community members and health workers. Most integrated services were perceived positively by the communities, although perceptions around socially sensitive services (eg, family planning and human immunodeficiency virus) differed by country. Integration benefits reported by both community members and health workers across countries included opportunity to receive multiple services at one visit, time and transportation cost savings, increased service utilization, maximized health worker efficiency, and reduced reporting requirements. Concerns related to integration included being labor intensive, inadequate staff to implement, inadequately trained staff, in addition to a number of more broad health system issues (eg, stockouts, wait times). Communities generally supported integration, and integrated services may have the potential to increase service utilization and possibly even reduce the stigma of certain services. Some concerns expressed related to health system issues rather than integration, per se, and should be addressed as part of a wider approach to improve health services. Improved planning and patient flow and increasing the number and training of health staff may help to mitigate logistical challenges of integrating services.

  5. Changing students' perceptions of the homeless: A community service learning experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Janet; Emory, Jan

    2018-03-01

    The homeless are an underserved, local vulnerable population that can benefit from a service learning clinical practicum experience for baccalaureate prepared nursing students. Negative attitudes and disrespect among healthcare workers has been identified by the homeless as a barrier to healthcare. A service learning experience with a vulnerable population has been shown to change nursing students' attitudes and beliefs. A large university in a southern city partnered with a community based organization that provided services to the homeless to educate senior nursing students in a service learning experience. The goal of this project was to examine attitudes and perceptions of nursing students toward the homeless population before and after participation in a service learning clinical practicum experience. This case study utilized a pre and post experience questionnaire to collect qualitative data for the purposes of the project. The findings revealed students demonstrated a decrease in fear, an increase in empathy, and a deeper understanding of the advocacy role of nurses for people experiencing homelessness. Nurse educators are challenged to engage students with vulnerable populations to change the attitudes and perceptions for improvement in the overall health of communities served worldwide. Partnerships and service learning experiences can benefit all. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Seeking Accountability: Multi-Service Accountability Agreements (MSAAs in Ontario’s Community Support Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Steele Gray

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Multi-Service Accountability Agreements (MSAAs have been put in place to hold Community Sector Service (CSS agencies to account for services receiving public funding in Ontario. The MSAA seeks to support financial and performance accountability, requiring CSS agencies to report on their performance quarterly. The MSAA is an expenditure policy tool that has undergone several iterations, each informed by negotiations between the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care (MOHLTC, the province’s regional authorities—known as Local Health Integration Networks (LHINs—and organizations/associations representing CSS agency interests. This approach to accountability is consistent with a broader focus on the government role as ‘steering’ service delivery rather than ‘rowing.’ The MSAA offers a standardized, politically acceptable approach to accountability. However, the MSAA relies heavily on performance indicators that may not adequately reflect quality care. The MSAA exemplifies the tension between the need for strong standardized accountability requirements for publicly-funded health service providers and the need for services that meet the needs of their communities.

  7. Transforming Community Access Services through Client- and Family-Centred Homecare Transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Carl; Camus, Susann; Fraser, Julie

    2015-03-01

    This article describes how one provincial health region adopted a client- and family-centred approach to improve access to community health services. Transition best practices and the "Triple Aim" supplied a framework for the transformation of transition of clients needing home healthcare services (Berwick et al. 2008). The need to improve the patient and family experience, establish and streamline professional practice standards, strengthen interprofessional collaborations, increase efficiency, create a critical mass of experts in the clinical domain of care transitions and program access, and evaluate customer experience were the organizational drivers for this transformation. The new framework identifies clients' needs and assigns a priority code. It also identifies which family member provides what support to the client and offers a one-stop service number staffed by individuals trained to provide client- and family-centred homecare services. This transformation of home healthcare transitions has improved the client and family experience, strengthened service provider satisfaction and generated efficiencies in prioritizing and delivering community healthcare services. Copyright © 2015 Longwoods Publishing.

  8. Pharmacists’ Attitudes and Perceived Barriers about Community Pharmacy-Based Cardiovascular Risk Screening Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Jahangard-Rafsanjani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available  Background: Community pharmacies are considered as ideal settings to provide cardiovascular risk screening (CRS. However, little is known about pharmacists’ views on providing such services in developing countries including Iran. In the present study, we evaluated the pharmacists’ attitudes and perceived barriers to providing CRS services. Methods:In a cross-sectional study, a questionnaire in three sections was developed by the investigators (attitudes, perceived barriers, and demographics. Five likert items (5 points bipolar scale were designed to evaluate pharmacists’ attitudes about their professional role in providing CRS services in community pharmacies. Seven likert items were designed to assess the pharmacists’ perceived importance of possible barriers to providing the services. The study tool was distributed among a convenient sample of 500 pharmacists, who had participated in a national continuing education event. Results:The response rate was 44% and descriptive statistics and Chi squared test were used to analyze data. Results showed that 70.4% participants had an overall positive attitude to providing CRS services. Pharmacists who were pharmacy owner and pharmacist-in-charge simultaneously were more positive about providing CRS services. Lack of regulatory policy and compensation mechanism, limited physical space in pharmacy and time limitation were reported to be the most important barriers to providing CRS services (> 50% rated as highly important. Low human resource and time limitation were significantly associated with negative attitudes (P: 0.02 and 0.001, respectively.Conclusion:The Iranian pharmacists’ attitudes seem to be positive about providing CRS services; however, their perceived barriers should be addressed prior to CRS service implementation.

  9. Client Violence and Its Negative Impacts on Work Attitudes of Child Protection Workers Compared to Community Service Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Junseob

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of client violence toward child protection workers and its negative impacts on the work attitudes of those workers compared with community service workers in South Korea. This study is based on the assumption that child protection workers are more vulnerable to violence than are community service workers…

  10. Community-Embedded Learning Experiences: Putting the Pedagogy of Service-Learning to Work in Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becnel, Kim; Moeller, Robin A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper considers the applicability and adaptability of service-learning pedagogy to online and distance education teaching environments. More specifically, it looks at the community-embedded learning model (CEL), which asks distance students to conduct service projects in their local communities, as manifested in a project undertaken by online…

  11. Community orientation of services for persons with a psychiatric disability. Comparison between Estonia, Hungary and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prof. dr. Jean Pierre Wilken; Zsolt Bugarszki; Karin Hanga; Dagmar Narusson; Koidu Saia; Marju Medar

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the way mental health services and social services are orientated on assisting people with a psychiatric disability to participate in different areas of community life. A large research project about community participation in three different countries (Estonia, Hungary and the

  12. The need and its influence factors for community-based rehabilitation services for disabled persons in one district in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Hong; Xue, Hui; Yin, Zong-Jie; Xiao, Zhong-Xin

    2006-12-01

    To explore the needs for basic community-based rehabilitation services for disabled persons in Xuanwu District, Beijing, China, and to identify factors which influence disabled persons to accept rehabilitation services. One hundred and eight disabled persons were selected by systematic sampling and simple random sampling to assess their needs for community-based rehabilitation services. Of the interviewees, 57.4% needed the community-based rehabilitation services, but only 13.9% took advantage of it. The main factors influencing the interviewees to accept these services were cost (P service (P services in Beijing and the needs for these services by disabled residents underscoring the need for improved availability, and for additional research.

  13. Water and water use in southern Nevada [Chapter 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne R. Belcher; Michael J. Moran; Megan E. Rogers

    2013-01-01

    Water and water use in southern Nevada is an important issue. The scarcity of water resources for both human and biologic communities often leads to intense competition for both surface and groundwaters. Anthropogenic and climate change impacts on scarce water resources need to be understood to assess human and ecosystem health for the study area.

  14. Decisions to initiate involuntary commitment: the role of intensive community services and other factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarvey, Elizabeth Lloyd; Leon-Verdin, MaGuadalupe; Wanchek, Tanya Nicole; Bonnie, Richard J

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the predictors of actions to initiate involuntary commitment of individuals experiencing a mental health crisis. Emergency services clinicians throughout Virginia completed a questionnaire following each face-to-face evaluation of individuals experiencing a mental health crisis. Over a one-month period in 2007, a total of 2,624 adults were evaluated. Logistic hierarchical multiple regression was used to analyze the relationship between demographic, clinical, and service-related variables and outcomes of the emergency evaluations. Several factors predicted 84% of the actions taken to initiate involuntary commitment. These included unavailability of alternatives to hospitalization, such as temporary housing or residential crisis stabilization; evaluation of the client in a hospital emergency room or police station or while in police custody; current enrollment in treatment; and clinical factors related to the commitment criteria, including risk of self-harm or harm to others, acuity and severity of the crisis, and current drug abuse or dependence. A lack of intensive community-based treatment and support in lieu of hospitalization accounted for a significant portion of variance in actions to initiate involuntary commitment. Comprehensive community services and supports for individuals experiencing mental health crises may reduce the rate of involuntary hospitalization. There is a need to enrich intensive community mental health services and supports and to evaluate the impact of these enhancements on the frequency of involuntary mental health interventions.

  15. Brighter Smiles: Service learning, inter-professional collaboration and health promotion in a First Nations community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Rosamund L; MacNab, Andrew J; Duffy, Damian J; Benton, David H J

    2006-01-01

    The goal of Brighter Smiles was to improve children's dental health in a remote First Nations community in British Columbia in the context of a service-learning experience for pediatrics residents. The provincial Ministry of Health had competitive funds available for collaborations between remote communities and medical educators. Hartley Bay (Gitga'at), a tribe of the Tsimshian Nation, responded by declaring children's dental health to be a primary health concern. This northern community has an on-reserve population fluctuating around 200 people and is accessible only by air or water. A convenience sample of children had a baseline dental exam; parents also completed a questionnaire about dental health behaviours. Only 31% (4/13) of pre-kindergarten and 8% (2/26) of kindergarten to Grade 12 children had no dental caries. Planning of the Brighter Smiles intervention involved community leaders, teachers, parents, Elders, health care staff, pediatrics residents, and dental and medical faculty from the University of British Columbia (UBC). Brighter Smiles includes school-based brush-ins, fluoride programs, classroom presentations, and regular visits by UBC pediatrics residents to Hartley Bay to provide well-child care that includes age-appropriate dental counselling to parents at the clinic visits. An early success indicator was a significantly increased proportion of dental service provider's time scheduled for preventive maintenance services rather than dental rehabilitation (restorations and extractions). The goal of providing a service-learning experience for trainee pediatricians in a remote community has been achieved. In addition, early indicators demonstrate improvements in child oral health.

  16. National community pharmacy NHS influenza vaccination service in Wales: a primary care mixed methods study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Andrew M; Wood, Fiona C; Carter, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Background Influenza is a significant cause of morbidity and excess mortality, yet vaccine coverage in the UK remains below target. Community pharmacies are increasingly being promoted as an alternative to vaccination by GPs. Aim To explore and verify the factors that influence the relative performance of pharmacies providing NHS influenza vaccinations. Design and setting A mixed methods study utilising qualitative, semi-structured interviews and quantitative analysis of predictors of vaccination numbers in community pharmacies in Wales. Method Interviews were conducted with 16 pharmacists who participated in the Welsh national pharmacy influenza service in 2013–2014. A purposive sampling strategy was used. Qualitative findings were analysed using framework analysis. Potential predictors of vaccination numbers were identified from interviews and a literature review, and included in a multivariable regression model. Results The contribution of community pharmacies towards vaccination in Wales is small. Findings suggest that community pharmacies reach younger at-risk individuals, in whom vaccine uptake is low, in greater proportion than influenza vaccination programmes as a whole. Extended opening hours and urban locations were positively associated with the number of vaccinations given, although pharmacists reported that workload, vaccine costs, unforeseen delays, lack of public awareness, and GPs’ views of the service limited their contribution. Pharmacists, aware of the potential for conflict with GPs, moderated their behaviour to mitigate such risk. Conclusion Before community pharmacies take greater responsibility for delivering healthcare services, obstacles including increasing pharmacist capacity, vaccine procurement, health service delays, managing GP–pharmacy relationships, and improving public awareness must be overcome. PMID:26965025

  17. Cultural diversity and the mistreatment of older people in black and minority ethnic communities: some implications for service provision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowes, Alison; Avan, Ghizala; Macintosh, Sherry Bien

    2012-07-01

    Previous research on mistreatment of older people in black and minority ethnic communities has identified limited service responses and the need to consider mistreatment as an issue not only for individuals but also for families, communities, and institutions. The impact of cultural factors on understandings, experiences, and remedies for mistreatment has been debated. Drawing on empirical research in the United Kingdom involving service providers and ethnically-diverse community members, the article explores implications of cultural variation for service provision. Clear gaps exist between service provision and people experiencing mistreatment due to structural and contextual factors; cultural factors have a relatively minor impact.

  18. The Professional Culture of Community Pharmacy and the Provision of MTM Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meagen M. Rosenthal

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The integration of advanced pharmacy services into community pharmacy practice is not complete. According to implementation research understanding professional culture, as a part of context, may provide insights for accelerating this process. There are three objectives in this study. The first objective of this study was to validate an adapted version of an organizational culture measure in a sample of United States’ (US community pharmacists. The second objective was to examine potential relationships between the cultural factors identified using the validated instrument and a number of socialization and education variables. The third objective was to examine any relationships between the scores on the identified cultural factors and the provision of MTM services. This study was a cross-sectional online survey for community pharmacists in the southeastern US. The survey contained questions on socialization/education, respondents’ self-reported provision of medication therapy management (MTM services, and the organizational culture profile (OCP. Analyses included descriptive statistics, a principle components analysis (PCA, independent samples t-test, and multivariate ordinal regression. A total of 303 surveys were completed. The PCA revealed a six-factor structure: social responsibility, innovation, people orientation, competitiveness, attention to detail, and reward orientation. Further analysis revealed significant relationships between social responsibility and years in practice, and people orientation and attention to detail and pharmacists’ training and practice setting. Significant positive relationships were observed between social responsibility, innovation, and competitiveness and the increased provision of MTM services. The significant relationships identified between the OCP factors and community pharmacist respondents’ provision of MTM services provides an important starting point for developing interventions to improve the

  19. Nurturing social responsibility through community service-learning: Lessons learned from a pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharamsi, Shafik; Espinoza, Nancy; Cramer, Carl; Amin, Maryam; Bainbridge, Lesley; Poole, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Community service-learning (CSL) has been proposed as one way to enrich medical and dental students' sense of social responsibility toward people who are marginalized in society. We developed and implemented a new CSL option in the integrated medical/dental curriculum and assessed its educational impact. Focus groups, individual open-ended interviews, and a survey were used to assess dental students', faculty tutors' and community partners' experiences with CSL. CSL enabled a deeper appreciation for the vulnerabilities that people who are marginalized experience; students gained a greater insight into the social determinants of health and the related importance of community engagement; and they developed useful skills in health promotion project planning, implementation and evaluation. Community partners and faculty tutors indicated that equal partnership, greater collaboration, and a participatory approach to course development are essential to sustainability in CSL. CSL can play an important role in nurturing a purposeful sense of social responsibility among future practitioners. Our study enabled the implementation of an innovative longitudinal course (professionalism and community service) in all 4 years of the dental curriculum.

  20. Nevada Underserved Science Education Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicole Rourke; Jason Marcks

    2004-07-06

    Nevada Underserved Science Education Program (NUSEP) is a project to examine the effect of implementing new and innovative Earth and space science education curriculum in Nevada schools. The project provided professional development opportunities and educational materials for teachers participating in the program.

  1. The danger of engagement: Behavioral observations of online community activity and service spending in the online gaming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaptein, M.C.; Parvinen, P.; Pöyri, E.

    2015-01-01

    Research indicates that customer engagement in online communities has positive effects on related businesses, and that, on an aggregated level, community activity and service spending are positively related. Therefore, marketing efforts tend to focus on promoting the community activity of customers.

  2. The danger of engagement : Behavioral observations of online community activity and service spending in the online gaming context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaptein, M.C.; Parvinen, Petri; Poyry, Essi

    2016-01-01

    Research indicates that customer engagement in online communities has positive effects on related businesses, and that, on an aggregated level, community activity and service spending are positively related. Therefore, marketing efforts tend to focus on promoting the community activity of customers.

  3. Higher Education Student Learning beyond the Classroom: Findings from a Community Music Service Learning Project in Rural South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrop-Allin, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Inspired by local arts community engagement initiatives and community music interventions internationally, Wits University (in Johannesburg, South Africa) developed a model of service learning that links the intentions, methodologies and purposes of these domains to promote student learning and benefit communities. This paper examines the quality…

  4. Climate Resiliency Planning: Making Extreme Event Science Useful for Managers and Planners in Northern Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, M.; Kenneston, A.; Wall, T. U.; Brown, T. J.; Redmond, K. T.

    2014-12-01

    Effective climate resiliency planning at the regional level requires extensive interactive dialogue among climate scientists, emergency managers, public health officials, urban planners, social scientists, and policy makers. Engaging federal, tribal, state, local governments and private sector business and infrastructure owners/operators in defining, assessing and characterizing the impacts of extreme events allows communities to understand how different events "break the system" forcing local communities to seek support and resources from state/federal governments and/or the private sector and what actions can be taken proactively to mitigate consequences and accelerate recovery. The Washoe County Regional Resiliency Study was prepared in response to potential climate variability related impacts specific to the Northern Nevada Region. The last several decades have seen dramatic growth in the region, coupled with increased resource demands that have forced local governments to consider how those impacts will affect the region and may, in turn, impact the region's ability to provide essential services. The Western Regional Climate Center of the Desert Research Institute provided a synthesis of climate studies with predictions regarding plausible changes in the local climate of Northern California and Nevada for the next 50 years. In general, these predictions indicate that the region's climate is undergoing a gradual shift, which will primarily affect the frequency, amount, and form of precipitation in the Sierra Nevada and Great Basin. Changes in water availability and other extreme events may have serious and long lasting effects in the Northern Nevada Region, and create a variety of social, environmental and economic concerns. A range of extreme events were considered including Adverse Air Quality, Droughts, Floods, Heat Waves, High Wind, Structure Fires, Wildland Fires, and Major Winter Storms. Due to the complexity of our climate systems, and the difficulty in

  5. Community liberalisation of the electric power market and public service obligations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristoforetti, Brice

    2008-06-01

    After an overview of original economic and social objectives at the basis of the creation of the European common market, the author examines whether the Community liberalisation of the European domestic electricity market has been an opportunity to acknowledge public service obligations in the European law, and more particularly examines the existence or relevance of the notion of electric power public service. This discussion addresses a period extending from the beginning of the 1960's to the Lisbon Treaty prepared in 2007. The author analyses rules of the European law, and the modalities and consequences of their adoption in the French law, as he considers that the evolution of French administrative legal evolution is the most relevant framework for this study on public service and electric power market. Thus, he first shows that the sector liberalisation, through the conflict between competition and defence of the general interest, actually allowed the existence of public service obligations for State members to be consecrated by the Community law. However, through the study of the electric power public service, the author shows that ambitions which had been initially put forward, are hardly compatible with some modalities of opening to competition

  6. Latest Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) services and innovative tools supporting the space weather research and operational communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, A. M. M.; Rastaetter, L.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Mays, M. L.; Chulaki, A.; Shim, J. S.; MacNeice, P. J.; Taktakishvili, A.; Collado-Vega, Y. M.; Weigand, C.; Zheng, Y.; Mullinix, R.; Patel, K.; Pembroke, A. D.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Boblitt, J. M.; Bakshi, S. S.; Tsui, T.

    2017-12-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC), with the fundamental goal of aiding the transition of modern space science models into space weather forecasting while supporting space science research, has been serving as an integral hub for over 15 years, providing invaluable resources to both space weather scientific and operational communities. CCMC has developed and provided innovative web-based point of access tools varying from: Runs-On-Request System - providing unprecedented global access to the largest collection of state-of-the-art solar and space physics models, Integrated Space Weather Analysis (iSWA) - a powerful dissemination system for space weather information, Advanced Online Visualization and Analysis tools for more accurate interpretation of model results, Standard Data formats for Simulation Data downloads, and Mobile apps to view space weather data anywhere to the scientific community. In addition to supporting research and performing model evaluations, CCMC also supports space science education by hosting summer students through local universities. In this poster, we will showcase CCMC's latest innovative tools and services, and CCMC's tools that revolutionized the way we do research and improve our operational space weather capabilities. CCMC's free tools and resources are all publicly available online (http://ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov).

  7. Nevada Photo-Based Inventory Pilot (NPIP) photo sampling procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracey S. Frescino; Gretchen G. Moisen; Kevin A. Megown; Val J. Nelson; Elizabeth A. Freeman; Paul L. Patterson; Mark Finco; James Menlove

    2009-01-01

    The Forest Inventory and Analysis program (FIA) of the U.S. Forest Service monitors status and trends in forested ecoregions nationwide. The complex nature of this broad-scale, strategic-level inventory demands constant evolution and evaluation of methods to get the best information possible while continuously increasing efficiency. In 2004, the "Nevada Photo-...

  8. Chapter 15: A desired future condition for Sierra Nevada Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. North

    2012-01-01

    An unexpected outcome of U.S. Forest Service General Technical Report PSW-GTR 220, "An Ecosystem Management Strategy for Sierran Mixed-Conifer Forests" (North et al. 2009), was how it generated discussion about a desired future condition for Sierra Nevada forests. The paper did not convey leading-edge research results or provide an exhaustive literature...

  9. Transforming systems of care: the American Association of Community Psychiatrists Guidelines for Recovery Oriented Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowers, Wesley

    2005-12-01

    Thinking about recovery has grown significantly over the last 70 years, and particularly in the past fifteen. Promotion of recovery has recently been recognized as an organizing principle for the transformation of behavioral health services. Recovery is a personal process of growth and change which typically embraces hope, autonomy and affiliation as elements of establishing satisfying and productive lives in spite of disabling conditions or experiences. Recovery oriented services replace paternalistic, illness oriented perspectives with collaborative, autonomy enhancing approaches and represent a major cultural shift in service delivery. Recovery oriented services replace the myth of chronicity and dependence with a message of individualism, empowerment and choice in the context of collaborative relationships with service providers. The American Association of Community Psychiatrists has developed Guidelines for Recovery Oriented Services to facilitate the transformation of services to this new paradigm. The guidelines are divided into three domains: administration, treatment, and supports, each consisting of several elements for which recovery enhancing characteristics are defined. Several example indicators are also provided for each element. This paper presents these guidelines and discusses their application.

  10. Outcomes from consumer-operated and community mental health services: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Steven P; Silverman, Carol J; Temkin, Tanya L

    2011-08-01

    Hierarchically organized board-and-staff-run consumer-operated service programs (COSPs) are viewed as organizations that promote recovery while working in concert with community mental health agencies (CMHAs). This study's objective was to determine the effectiveness of such combined services for people with serious mental illness. A board-and-staff-run consumer-operated drop-in center and colocated CMHA provided the context for the randomized clinical trial. In a weighted sample, 139 new clients seeking help from the CMHA were randomly assigned to agency-only service or to a combination of COSP and CMHA services. Client-members were assessed at baseline and eight months on a measure of symptom severity and on four recovery-focused outcome measures: personal empowerment, self-efficacy, independent social integration, and hopelessness. All scales used have high reliability and well-established validity. Differences in outcome by service condition were evaluated with multivariate analysis of covariance via dummy variable regression. Change scores on the five outcomes were the dependent variables. The covariates for the multivariate analysis included baseline status on each outcome measure and service condition between-group demographic differences. Results indicated that significant changes in three recovery-focused outcomes were associated with service condition across time: social integration (p<.001), personal empowerment (p<.006), and self-efficacy (p<.001). All changes favored the CMHA-only condition. Neither symptomology nor hopelessness differed by service condition across time. Hierarchically organized board-and-staff-run COSPs combined with CMHA service may be less helpful than CMHA service alone.

  11. The organization and delivery of family planning services in community health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Debora Goetz; Wood, Susan F; Johnson, Kay; Mead, Katherine Holly; Beeson, Tishra; Lewis, Julie; Rosenbaum, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Family planning and related reproductive health services are essential primary care services for women. Access is limited for women with low incomes and those living in medically underserved areas. Little information is available on how federally funded health centers organize and provide family planning services. This was a mixed methods study of the organization and delivery of family planning services in federally funded health centers across the United States. A national survey was developed and administered (n = 423) and in-depth case studies were conducted of nine health centers to obtain detailed information on their approach to family planning. Study findings indicate that health centers utilize a variety of organizational models and staffing arrangements to deliver family planning services. Health centers' family planning offerings are organized in one of two ways, either a separate service with specific providers and clinic times or fully integrated with primary care. Health centers experience difficulties in providing a full range of family planning services. Major challenges include funding limitations; hiring obstetricians/gynecologists, counselors, and advanced practice clinicians; and connecting patients to specialized services not offered by the health center. Health centers play an integral role in delivering primary care and family planning services to women in medically underserved communities. Improving the accessibility and comprehensiveness of family planning services will require a combination of additional direct funding, technical assistance, and policies that emphasize how health centers can incorporate quality family planning as a fundamental element of primary care. Copyright © 2015 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Estimates of carbon stored in harvested wood products from United States Forest Service's Sierra Nevada Bio-Regional Assessment Area of the Pacific Southwest Region, 1909-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith Stockmann; Nathaniel Anderson; Jesse Young; Ken Skog; Sean Healey; Dan Loeffler; Edward Butler; J. Greg Jones; James Morrison

    2014-01-01

    Global forests capture and store significant amounts of carbon through photosynthesis. When carbon is removed from forests through harvest, a portion of the harvested carbon is stored in wood products, often for many decades. The United States Forest Service (USFS) and other agencies are interested in accurately accounting for carbon flux associated with harvested wood...

  13. Critical service learning in community health nursing: enhancing access to cardiac health screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, Angela; Mac Lellan, Marian A

    2013-04-23

    Critical service learning (CSL) offers promise for preparing community health nursing students to be advocates for social justice and social change. The purpose of this article is to describe a community based CSL project designed to provide cardiac health screening to an underserviced population, wherein nursing's role in social justice is integrated into nursing practice. First, the relationship between social justice and CSL is explored. Then, the CSL approach is examined and differentiated from the traditional service learning models frequently observed in the nursing curriculum. The CSL project is described and the learning requisites, objectives, requirements, and project outcomes are outlined. While not a panacea for system reform, CSL offers nursing students avenues for learning about social justice and understanding the social conditions that underlie health inequalities. Nurse educators may benefit from the new strategies for incorporating social justice into nursing curriculum; this paper suggests that CSL offers one possibility.

  14. Services in the Community for Adults with Psychosis and Intellectual Disabilities: A Delphi Consultation of Professionals' Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmings, C. P.; Underwood, L. A.; Bouras, N.

    2009-01-01

    Background: There remains a severe lack of evidence on the effectiveness of community services for adults with psychosis and intellectual disabilities (ID). There has been little consensus even of what services should provide for this service user group. Method: A consultation of multidisciplinary professionals was carried out by using a…

  15. Conceptualisation of knowledge construction in community service-learning programmes in nursing education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sindi Z. Mthembu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Practices in higher education have been criticised for not developing and preparing students for the expertise required in real environments. Literature reports that educational programmes tend to favour knowledge conformation rather than knowledge construction; however, community service learning (CSL is a powerful pedagogical strategy that encourages students to make meaningful connections between the content in the classroom and real-life experiences as manifested by the communities. Through CSL, learning is achieved by the active construction of knowledge supported by multiple perspectives within meaningful real contexts, and the social interactions amongst students are seen to play a critical role in the processes of learning and cognition. This article reflects facilitators’ perspective of the knowledge construction process as used with students doing community service learning in basic nursing programmes. Objectives: The aim of this article was to conceptualise the phenomenon of knowledge construction and thereby provide educators with a shared meaning and common understanding, and to analyse the interaction strategies utilised by nurse educators in the process of knowledge construction in community service-learning programmes in basic nursing education. Method: A qualitative research approach based on a grounded theory research design was used in this article. Two nursing education institutions were purposively selected. Structured interviews were conducted with 16 participants. Results: The results revealed that the knowledge construction in community service-learning programmes is conceptualised as having specific determinants, including the use of authentic health-related problems, academic coaching through scaffolding, academic discourse-dialogue, interactive learning in communities of learners, active learning, continuous reflection as well as collaborative and inquiry-based learning. Upon completion of an experience

  16. Developing a patient satisfaction questionnaire for services provided in Iranian community pharmacies

    OpenAIRE

    Yaghoubifard, Saeed; Rashidian, Arash; Kebriaeezadeh, Abbas; Sheidaei, Ali; Varmaghani, Mehdi; Hashemi-Meshkini, Amir; Zekri, Hedieh-Sadat

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To develop a valid and reliable instrument in the Persian language for evaluating patient satisfaction with services provided in community pharmacies. Methods: We selected a valid and reliable instrument from the literature and translated it to the Persian language. Some new items were added to the first draft based on the special characteristics of the Iranian health system. Then, the feasibility of utilizing the new instrument was assessed. In the third step, we conducted a forma...

  17. Compliance of community teams with specialist service recommendations for obsessive?compulsive and body dysmorphic disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Paul M.; Drummond, Lynne M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims and method To examine how often referring community mental health teams (CMHTs) utilised treatment recommendations made by the national highly specialised service for patients with severe obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). We analysed all patient notes for admissions to the unit (August 2012-August 2014) and recorded how many treatment recommendations were implemented by CMHTs prior to admission and at 6 months post-discharge. Results Overall, 66% of ...

  18. A Study On Utilisation Of Health Services In A Muslim Slum Community Of Calcutta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya S.K

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available A cross- sectional survey of utilization of child immunization and family planning services was carried out in a systematic random sample of 100 families from a Muslim slum community of Calcutta. 15.6% of children (1-4 years were fully immunized (DPT, OPV & BCG. Couple protection rate was 28.4%. But interestingly, the proportion of protected eligible couples in single families (32.8% was significantly higher than in joint families (11.6%.

  19. Local authorities, community and Private Operators Partnerships in small towns water service delivery in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyarko, K. B.; Oduro-Kwarteng, S.; Owusu-Antwi, P.

    This paper examines the performance of partnerships between local authorities (District Assemblies) and private operators (POs) in the community managed small towns’ water service delivery in Ghana. Since 2002, partnerships in the form of management contracts are increasing especially for towns with more than 10,000 inhabitants but there has been no systematic analysis of the partnerships. Using a case study approach based on five selected community managed piped systems; three under private operator partnerships and two under direct Community Ownership and Management as study controls, the study focused on the partnership development, partnership relationship between stakeholders and the outcome of the service. The study revealed that the partnership emerged as a result of the relatively large communities and/or the complexity of the systems. Water and Sanitation Development Boards (WSDBs) are community representatives with the responsibility of overseeing the management contracts with private operators or directly managing the water systems through hired operating staff. With time the management contracts have improved as some earlier defects have been corrected in subsequent contracts. Yet some contracts suffered post-contract opportunism, weak monitoring and regulation by the District Assembly (DA), political interference in tariffs setting and removal of WSDBs members after change of government. Conflicts between the DAs and the Water and Sanitation Development Boards (WSDBs) were common resulting in direct management by the District Assembly. The success or failure of the partnership is linked to degree of conflict resolution amongst the stakeholders as well as external factors. The study also discusses the outcome of the partnerships in relation to the quality of water service delivered.

  20. Perceptions of newly-qualified nurses performing compulsory community service in KwaZulu-Natal

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    Selverani Govender

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Compulsory community service (CCS for nurses commenced in South Africain January 2008 after it was legislated in the new Nursing Act (Act No. 33 of 2005. Nurses completing their registered nurse programme are registered as community nurse practitioners (CNPs during the CCS period and make up the largest number of health professionals serving CCS. Whilst health institutions have welcomed CNPs as additional resources for the shortage of nursing staff, no structured guidelines have been provided at a regional level as to how these nurses should be utilised or managed during the CCS year. To date, no large-scale study has been conducted on nurses carrying out CCS in order to generalise the findings.Objectives: To establish the perceptions of newly-qualified nurses carrying out CCS in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.Method: A quantitative survey design was used to obtain data from a randomly selected sample of the 2012 cohort of nurses carrying out CCS in KwaZulu-Natal.Results: CNPs have a positive attitude toward CCS and perceive themselves as being well prepared for the year of community service in terms of knowledge, skills and ability to administer nursing care. They identified positive benefits of the year of community service.The concerns raised were limited orientation and support; and a few CNPs experienced problems of acceptance by the nurses with whom they work.Conclusion: It is recommended that all health institutions who receive CNPs develop structured orientation and support for these nurses in order to promote their development, thereby enhancing their benefit to the communities they serve.

  1. Identifying role of perceived quality and satisfaction on the utilization status of the community clinic services; Bangladesh context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Rizwanul M; Abdullah, Mamun S; Rahman, Anisur M; Alam, Ashraful M

    2016-06-24

    Bangladesh is one among the few countries of the world that provides free medical services at the community level through various public health facilities. It is now evident that, clients' perceived quality of services and their expectations of service standards affect health service utilization to a great extent. The aim of the study was to develop and validate the measures for perception and satisfaction of primary health care quality in Bangladesh context and to identify their aspects on the utilization status of the Community Clinic services. This mixed method cross sectional survey was conducted from January to June 2012, in the catchment area of 12 community clinics. Since most of the outcome indicators focus mainly on women and children, women having children less than 2 years of age were randomly assigned and interviewed for the study purpose. Data were collected through FGD, Key informants interview and a pretested semi- structured questionnaire. About 95 % of the respondents were Muslims and 5 % were Hindus. The average age of the respondents was 23.38 (SD 4.15) and almost all of them are home makers. The average monthly expenditure of their family was 95US $ (SD 32US$). At the beginning of the study, two psychometric research instruments; 24 items perceived quality of primary care services PQPCS scale (chronbach's α = .89) and 22 items community clinic service satisfaction CCSS scale (chronbach's α = .97), were constructed and validated. This study showed less educated, poor, landless mothers utilized the community clinic services more than their educated and wealthier counterpart. Women who lived in their own residence used the community clinic services more frequently than those who lived in a rental house. Perceptions concerning skill and competence of the health care provider and satisfaction indicating interpersonal communication and attitude of the care provider were important predictors for community clinic service utilization

  2. Long-term trends in the avifauna of the Sierra Nevada: community dynamics and species occupancy over a century of climate change

    OpenAIRE

    Tingley, Morgan Winn

    2011-01-01

    Climate change is widely considered to be one of the most important and omnipresent threats to global environmental health and biodiversity. Responding to changing climates, species are expected to shift their geographic distributions in order to remain in physiologically and ecologically favorable climates. These shifts may be species-specific, and different responses of species to a rapidly changing climate have unknown consequences for biotic communities. Despite recent evidence of shifts ...

  3. [Barriers for the implementation of cognitive services in Spanish community pharmacies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastelurrutia, Miguel Angel; Fernández-Llimos, Fernando; Benrimoj, Shalom I; Castrillon, Carla Cristina; Faus, María José

    2007-09-01

    To identify and assess barriers for dissemination, implementation, and sustainability of different cognitive services in Spanish community pharmacies. Qualitative study through semi-structured interviews followed by a descriptive analysis. Two groups of experts related to Spanish community pharmacy were chosen. One with 15 community pharmacists with a relevant professional activity, while the other group (n=18) was related to pharmacy strategists. The lack of university clinical oriented learning, lack of pharmacists' attitude towards change and some uncertainty over their professional future were identified as barriers at the pharmacists' level. In relation to pharmacy as an organization the lack of clear messages by their leaders and the small volume of Spanish pharmacies were identified as barriers. In the category of pharmacy profession, the current reimbursement system, the lack of university clinical education, and the lack of leadership by current representative organizations were the barriers found. The lack of real involvement by health authorities, the lack of knowledge about the objectives of pharmacy cognitive services, and the lack of demand of these services by patients where also identified as barriers. Finally, 12 barriers were identified and grouped into 6 categories. These barriers fit in with the barriers identified in other countries.

  4. A Cultural Competence Organizational Review for Community Health Services: Insights From a Participatory Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Mandy; Gibbs, Lisa; Pradel, Veronika; Morris, Michal; Gwatirisa, Pauline; Tadic, Maryanne; de Silva, Andrea; Hall, Martin; Young, Dana; Riggs, Elisha; Calache, Hanny; Gussy, Mark; Watt, Richard; Gondal, Iqbal; Waters, Elizabeth

    2017-05-01

    Cultural competence is an important aspect of health service access and delivery in health promotion and community health. Although a number of frameworks and tools are available to assist health service organizations improve their services to diverse communities, there are few published studies describing organizational cultural competence assessments and the extent to which these tools facilitate cultural competence. This article addresses this gap by describing the development of a cultural competence assessment, intervention, and evaluation tool called the Cultural Competence Organizational Review (CORe) and its implementation in three community sector organizations. Baseline and follow-up staff surveys and document audits were conducted at each participating organization. Process data and organizational documentation were used to evaluate and monitor the experience of CORe within the organizations. Results at follow-up indicated an overall positive trend in organizational cultural competence at each organization in terms of both policy and practice. Organizations that are able to embed actions to improve organizational cultural competence within broader organizational plans increase the likelihood of sustainable changes to policies, procedures, and practice within the organization. The benefits and lessons learned from the implementation of CORe are discussed.

  5. Introduction of electronic referral from community associated with more timely review by secondary services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, J; White, S; Day, K J; Gu, Y; Pollock, M

    2011-01-01

    Electronic referral (eReferral) from community into public secondary healthcare services was introduced to 30 referring general medical practices and 28 hospital based services in late 2007. To measure the extent of uptake of eReferral and its association with changes in referral processing. Analysis of transactional data from the eReferral message service and the patient information management system of the affected hospital; interview of clinical, operational and management stakeholders. eReferral use rose steadily to 1000 transactions per month in 2008, thereafter showing moderate growth to 1200 per month in 2010. Rate of eReferral from the community in 2010 is estimated at 56% of total referrals to the hospital from general practice, and as 71% of referrals from those having done at least one referral electronically. Referral latency from letter date to hospital triage improves significantly from 2007 to 2009 (psystem usability issues. With eReferrals, a referral's status can be checked, and its content read, by any authorized user at any time. The period of eReferral uptake was associated with significant speed-up in referral processing without changes in staffing levels. The eReferral system provides a foundation for further innovation in the community-secondary interface, such as electronic decision support and shared care planning systems. We observed substantial rapid voluntary uptake of eReferrals associated with faster, more reliable and more transparent referral processing.

  6. Increasing positive attitudes toward individuals with disabilities through community service learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Janelle E; Cruz, Rebecca A; Knollman, Gregory A

    2017-10-01

    Providing equal-status contact between those with and without disabilities can improve attitudes and reduce discrimination toward individuals with disabilities. This study investigated community service learning as a means by which to provide college students with equal-status contact with individuals with disabilities and increase their positive attitudes toward those with disabilities. A total of 166 college students in one university in the United States enrolled in an Introduction to Disability course received content on disability in society and participated in community service involving 20h of direct contact with individuals with disabilities. Findings indicated that college students who had prior contact with individuals with disabilities had more positive attitudes toward individuals with disabilities than college students who did not have prior contact at the start of the course. For the college students who did not have any prior contact, their attitudes toward individuals with disabilities became significantly more positive at the end of the community service learning course. Implications and suggestions for future research are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Community pharmacy-based asthma services: current perspectives and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bollmeier SG

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Suzanne G Bollmeier, Theresa R ProsserSt Louis College of Pharmacy, St Louis, MO, USAAbstract: Achieving and maintaining asthma control and improving patients’ quality of life are cornerstones of asthma management. This review summarizes the current literature related to services provided by community pharmacists to patients with asthma. Comprehensive asthma programs provided by community pharmacists have improved patients’ knowledge of the disease, device technique skills, patient adherence, and quality of life. One study shows such comprehensive programs are cost effective in patients with severe or uncontrolled asthma, which cannot be extrapolated to all programs. Targeted interventions by pharmacists could be provided to a larger population of patients. Pharmacists have identified that lack of time, resources, and training are barriers to implementing asthma programs. In addition, optimal models are needed to integrate interventions into the dispensing workflow. Optimal training programs should include skills in problem solving, device technique, and counseling. A movement towards “institutionalizing” routine asthma interventions or patient encounters is necessary if consistent services are to be given to all patients, and appropriate compensation is provided for pharmacist services.Keywords: community, pharmacy, pharmacist, asthma, education

  8. Integration of Community Pharmacists in Transition of Care (TOC) Services: Current Trends and Pharmacist Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeleznikar, Elizabeth A; Kroehl, Miranda E; Perica, Katharine M; Thompson, Angela M; Trinkley, Katy E

    2017-01-01

    Barriers exist for patients transitioning from one health-care setting to another, or to home, and health-care systems are falling short of meeting patient needs during this time. Community pharmacist incorporation poses a solution to the current communication breakdown and high rates of medication errors during transitions of care (TOC). The purpose of this study was to determine community pharmacists' involvement in and perceptions of TOC services. Cross-sectional study using electronic surveys nationwide to pharmacists employed by a community pharmacy chain. Of 7236 pharmacists surveyed, 546 (7.5%) responded. Only 33 (6%) pharmacists reported their pharmacy participates in TOC services. Most pharmacists (81.5%) reported receiving discharge medication lists. The most common reported barrier to TOC participation is lack of electronic integration with surrounding hospitals (51.1%). Most pharmacists agreed that (1) it is valuable to receive discharge medication lists (83.3%), (2) receiving discharge medication lists is beneficial for patients' health (89.1%), (3) discharge medication list receipt improves medication safety (88.8%). Most pharmacists reported receiving discharge medication lists and reported discharge medication lists are beneficial, but less than half purposefully used medication lists. To close TOC gaps, health-care providers must collaborate to overcome barriers for successful TOC services.

  9. CO-CD base management model of Universitas Terbuka community service program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kridasakti, S. W.; Sudirah; Siregar, H.

    2018-03-01

    These studies were to respond whether the UT social-aid management had been executed under CO-CD principles (Ife J. 1995) and what CO-CD base community service management model can be built. The goals of these evaluational studies were UT social-aid managerial performance profile (2011-2013) and CO-CD management model development. The methods used were Survey and FGD. For data collection were involving the UT officers, the counterparts, and the documents. The analysis used combination between the Performance Analysis (Irawan P., 2003) and the CIPP (Stuffelbeam, D, L., & Shinkfield, A, J., 1985). The findings showed that the quantitative targeting in program completion was credible in achievement (85%). However, the “qulitative targeting” of the management goals was indicating far from a good-stage (≤5.0_Interval-Force: 1-10 Scale). The “Gap” was due to the absent of socialization_needs-analysis_maintenance_release factors on the UT social-service grand-policy. The trial of CO-CD Base Management Model had been imposed to the community that turned out to be very effective to self-help, and the ensuing SOP had been successfully defined. Conclusion, ‘CO-CD Principles’ were not designed in UT community service programs management. However, if efficiency and effectivity likely to be achieved, the SOP of ‘CO-CD Base Management Model has to be adopted.

  10. Adoption of the B2SAFE EUDAT replication service by the EPOS community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciari, Claudio; Fares, Massimo; Fiameni, Giuseppe; Michelini, Alberto; Danecek, Peter; Wittenburg, Peter

    2014-05-01

    B2SAFE is the EUDAT service for moving and replicating data between sites and storage systems for different purposes. The goal of B2SAFE is to keep the data from a repository safe by replicating it across different geographical and administrative zones according to a set of well-defined policies. It is also a way to store large volumes of data permanently at those sites which are providing powerful on-demand data analysis facilities. In particular, B2SAFE operates on the domain of registered data where data objects are referable via persistent identifiers (PIDs). B2SAFE is more than just copying data because the PIDs must be carefully managed when data objects are moved or replicated. The EUDAT B2SAFE Service offers functionality to replicate datasets across different data centres in a safe and efficient way while maintaining all information required to easily find and query information about the replica locations. The information about the replica locations and other important information is stored in PID records, each managed in separate administrative domains. The B2SAFE Service is implemented as an iRODS module providing a set of iRODS rules or policies to interface with the EPIC handle API and uses the iRODS middleware to replicate datasets from a source data (or community) centre to a destination data centre. The definition of the dataset(s) to replicate is flexible and up to the communities using the B2SAFE service. While the B2SAFE is internally using the EPIC handle API, communities have the choice to use any PID system they prefer to assign PIDs to their digital objects. A reference to one or more EUDAT B2SAFE PIDs is returned by the B2SAFE service when a dataset is replicated. The presentation will introduce the problem space of B2SAFE, presents the achievements that have been made during the last year for enabling communities to make use of the B2SAFE service, demonstrates a EPOS use cases, outlines the commonalities and differences between the policies

  11. Addressing Cultural Competency in Pharmacy Education through International Service Learning and Community Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemin Kassam

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the design, implementation and evaluation of a course in international service learning and community engagement for pharmacy undergraduate students. The course offered students opportunities to cultivate cultural competency in an international setting foreign to their own—Sub-Saharan Africa. The experience consisted of pre-departure preparation seminars followed by subsequent community immersion to experience, explore and confront personal attitudes and perceptions. A key feature of this course was its emphasis on a continuing cycle of learning, community engagement and reflection. Three students participated, a near-maximum cohort. Their daily self-reflections were qualitatively analyzed to document the impact of their cultural learning and experiences and revealed meaningful learning in the domains of self-assessment and awareness of their personal and professional culture, exposure to a participatory health delivery model involving the patient, the community and a multidisciplinary team and opportunities to engage in patient care in a different cultural setting. This proof-of-concept course provided students with experiences that were life-changing on both personal and professional levels and confirmed the viability and relevance of international service learning for the pharmacy field within its university-wide mandate.

  12. Workforce insights on how health promotion is practised in an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, Kathryn; Devine, Sue; Judd, Jenni; Nichols, Nina; Watt, Kerrianne

    2017-07-01

    Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services deliver holistic and culturally appropriate primary health care to over 150 communities in Australia. Health promotion is a core function of comprehensive primary health care; however, little has been published on what enables or challenges health promotion practice in an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service. Apunipima Cape York Health Council (Apunipima) delivers primary health care to 11 remote north Queensland communities. The workforce includes medical, allied health, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workers and health practitioners and corporate support staff. This study aimed to identify current health promotion practices at Apunipima, and the enablers and challenges identified by the workforce, which support or hinder health promotion practice. Sixty-three staff from across this workforce completed an online survey in February 2015 (42% response rate). Key findings were: (1) health promotion is delivered across a continuum of one-on-one approaches through to population advocacy and policy change efforts; (2) the attitude towards health promotion was very positive; and (3) health promotion capacity can be enhanced at both individual and organisational levels. Workforce insights have identified areas for continued support and areas that, now identified, can be targeted to strengthen the health promotion capacity of Apunipima.

  13. A systematic review of the unit costs of allied health and community services used by older people in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farag Inez

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An economic evaluation of interventions for older people requires accurate assessment of costing and consideration of both acute and long-term services. Accurate information on the unit cost of allied health and community services is not readily available in Australia however. This systematic review therefore aims to synthesise information available in the literature on the unit costs of allied health and community services that may be utilised by an older person living in Australia. Method A comprehensive search of Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Google Scholar and Google was undertaken. Specialised economic databases were also reviewed. In addition Australian Government Department websites were inspected. The search identified the cost of specified allied health services including: physiotherapy, occupational therapy, dietetics, podiatry, counselling and home nursing. The range of community services included: personal care, meals on wheels, transport costs and domestic services. Where the information was not available, direct contact with service providers was made. Results The number of eligible studies included in the qualitative synthesis was fourty-nine. Calculated hourly rates for Australian allied health services were adjusted to be in equivalent currency and were as follows as follows: physiotherapy $157.75, occupational therapy $150.77, dietetics $163.11, psychological services $165.77, community nursing $105.76 and podiatry $129.72. Conclusions Utilisation of the Medicare Benefits Scheduled fee as a broad indicator of the costs of services, may lead to underestimation of the real costs of services and therefore to inaccuracies in economic evaluation.

  14. A memory clinic v. traditional community mental health team service: comparison of costs and quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinsztein, Judy Sasha; van Rensburg, Marelna Janse; Al-Salihy, Zerak; Girling, Deborah; Lafortune, Louise; Radhakrishnan, Muralikrishnan; Brayne, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Aims and method To compare the cost and quality of a memory-clinic-based service (MCS) with a traditional community mental health team (CMHT) service. Using a retrospective case-note review, we studied two groups, each with 33 participants. Consecutive referrals for diagnostic ‘memory’ assessments over 4 months were evaluated. Participants were evaluated for up to 6 months. Results The MCS was less costly than the CMHT service but the difference was not statistically significant (mean cost for MCS was £742, mean cost for CMHT service was £807). The MCS offered more multidisciplinary and comprehensive care, including: pre- and post-diagnostic counselling, more systematic screening of blood for reversible causes of dementia, more use of structured assessment instruments in patients/carers, signposting to the third sector as well as more consistent copying of letters to patients/carers. Clinical implications An MCS service offered more comprehensive and multidisciplinary service at no extra cost to secondary care. PMID:26191416

  15. Client Experiences with Shelter and Community Care Services in the Netherlands: Quality of Services for Homeless People, Homeless Youth, and Abused Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmoredjo, Jolanda; Beijersbergen, Mariëlle D.; Wolf, Judith R. L. M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To gain insight into client experiences with shelter or community care services for homeless people, homeless youth, and abused women and identify priority improvement areas. Methods: Seven hundred and forty-four clients rated their experiences and 116 clients rated the services' importance. Results: Clients had most positive experiences…

  16. Critical insights for a sustainability framework to address integrated community water services: Technical metrics and approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xiaobo; Schoen, Mary E; Ma, Xin Cissy; Hawkins, Troy R; Ashbolt, Nicholas J; Cashdollar, Jennifer; Garland, Jay

    2015-06-15

    Planning for sustainable community water systems requires a comprehensive understanding and assessment of the integrated source-drinking-wastewater systems over their life-cycles. Although traditional life cycle assessment and similar tools (e.g. footprints and emergy) have been applied to elements of these water services (i.e. water resources, drinking water, stormwater or wastewater treatment alone), we argue for the importance of developing and combining the system-based tools and metrics in order to holistically evaluate the complete water service system based on the concept of integrated resource management. We analyzed the strengths and weaknesses of key system-based tools and metrics, and discuss future directions to identify more sustainable municipal water services. Such efforts may include the need for novel metrics that address system adaptability to future changes and infrastructure robustness. Caution is also necessary when coupling fundamentally different tools so to avoid misunderstanding and consequently misleading decision-making. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Transitions from Assertive Community Treatment Among Urban and Rural Teams: Identifying Barriers, Service Options, and Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeFebvre, Andrea M; Dare, Bill; Farrell, Susan J; Cuddeback, Gary S

    2017-09-01

    An emerging focus of Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) teams is the transition of clients to less intensive services, which creates space for individuals in need of ACT and is consistent with a recovery orientation of treatment. However, there is limited research on team transition rates, post-ACT services, and strategies to overcome transition barriers. In addition, few studies have examined differences in these factors among urban and rural ACT teams. To address these knowledge gaps, we interviewed eight ACT teams in urban and rural areas of eastern Ontario regarding their transition rates, processes of transitioning ACT clients to less intensive services, transition barriers, and solutions to overcoming these barriers. On average, teams transitioned about 6% of their clients over our 3-year study period. Urban and rural teams described both similar and distinct clinical and systemic barriers, such as client reluctance to transition and finding psychiatric follow-up outside of ACT. Implications for ACT practice and policy are discussed.

  18. Home and community care services: a major opportunity for preventive health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lujic Sanja

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Australia, the Home and Community Care (HACC program provides services in the community to frail elderly living at home and their carers. Surprisingly little is known about the health of people who use these services. In this study we sought to describe health-related factors associated with use of HACC services, and to identify potential opportunities for targeting preventive services to those at high risk. Methods We obtained questionnaire data from the 45 and Up Study for 103,041 men and women aged 45 years and over, sampled from the general population of New South Wales, Australia in 2006-2007, and linked this with administrative data about HACC service use. We compared the characteristics of HACC clients and non-clients according to a range of variables from the 45 and Up Study questionnaire, and estimated crude and adjusted relative risks for HACC use with generalized linear models. Results 4,978 (4.8% participants used HACC services in the year prior to completing the questionnaire. Increasing age, female sex, lower pre-tax household income, not having a partner, not being in paid work, Indigenous background and living in a regional or remote location were strongly associated with HACC use. Overseas-born people and those speaking languages other than English at home were significantly less likely to use HACC services. People who were underweight, obese, sedentary, who reported falling in the past year, who were current smokers, or who ate little fruit or vegetables were significantly more likely to use HACC services. HACC service use increased with decreasing levels of physical functioning, higher levels of psychological distress, and poorer self-ratings of health, eyesight and memory. HACC clients were more likely to report chronic health conditions, in particular diabetes, stroke, Parkinson's disease, anxiety and depression, cancer, heart attack or angina, blood clotting problems, asthma and osteoarthritis

  19. Analysis of pharmacist-provided medication therapy management (MTM) services in community pharmacies over 7 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Mitchell J; Frank, Jessica; Wehring, Heidi; Newland, Brand; VonMuenster, Shannon; Kumbera, Patty; Halterman, Tom; Perry, Paul J

    2009-01-01

    Although community pharmacists have historically been paid primarily for drug distribution and dispensing services, medication therapy management (MTM) services evolved in the 1990s as a means for pharmacists and other providers to assist physicians and patients in managing clinical, service, and cost outcomes of drug therapy. The Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 (MMA 2003) and the subsequent implementation of Medicare Part D in January 2006 for the more than 20 million Medicare beneficiaries enrolled in the Part D benefit formalized MTM services for a subset of high-cost patients. Although Medicare Part D has provided a new opportunity for defining the value of pharmacist-provided MTM services in the health care system, few publications exist which quantify changes in the provision of pharmacist-provided MTM services over time. To (a) describe the changes over a 7-year period in the primary types of MTM services provided by community pharmacies that have contracted with drug plan sponsors through an MTM administrative services company, and (b) quantify potential MTM-related cost savings based on pharmacists' self-assessments of the likely effects of their interventions on health care utilization. Medication therapy management claims from a multistate MTM administrative services company were analyzed over the 7-year period from January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2006. Data extracted from each MTM claim included patient demographics (e.g., age and gender), the drug and type that triggered the intervention (e.g., drug therapeutic class and therapy type as either acute, intermittent, or chronic), and specific information about the service provided (e.g., Reason, Action, Result, and Estimated Cost Avoidance [ECA]). ECA values are derived from average national health care utilization costs, which are applied to pharmacist self-assessment of the "reasonable and foreseeable" outcome of the intervention. ECA values are updated

  20. 'Sometimes they fail to keep their faith in us': community health worker perceptions of structural barriers to quality of care and community utilisation of services in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puett, Chloe; Alderman, Harold; Sadler, Kate; Coates, Jennifer

    2015-10-01

    Community health workers (CHWs) have strong potential to extend health and nutrition services to underserved populations. However, CHWs face complex challenges when working within weak health systems and among communities with limited abilities to access and utilise CHW services. It is crucial to understand these challenges to improve programme support mechanisms. This study describes the results of qualitative investigations into CHW perceptions of barriers to quality of care among two groups of workers implementing community case management of acute respiratory infection, diarrhoea and severe acute malnutrition in southern Bangladesh. We explored systemic barriers to service delivery, pertaining to communities and health systems, which limited the usefulness and effectiveness of CHW services. Focus group discussions (n = 10) were conducted in March 2010. Discussions were analysed for themes related to CHWs' work challenges. Findings highlight several perceived barriers to effective service provision, including community poverty constraining uptake of recommended practices, irregular supplies of medicine from the health facility and poor quality of care for CHW referrals sent there. This study further documents interactions between demand-side and supply-side constraints including the influence of health system resource constraints on community trust in CHW services, and the influence of community resource constraints on the utilisation and effectiveness of CHW services. By documenting service delivery challenges from the perspective of the frontline workers themselves, this article contributes evidence to help identify appropriate support mechanisms for these workers, in order to develop scalable and sustainable CHW programmes in countries with under-resourced public health care infrastructure. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Transforming community services through the use of a multidimensional model of clinical leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Jacqueline Anne; Wild, Jill; Hynes, Celia; Wells, Stuart; Kurien, Anish; Rutherford, June; Rosen, Lyn; Ashcroft, Tim; Hartley, Victoria

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the application of a Multidimensional Model of Clinical Leadership on the community healthcare leader and on transforming community services. Healthcare policy advocates clinical leadership as the vehicle to transform community and healthcare services. Few studies have identified the key components of an effective clinical leadership development model. The first two stages of Kirkpatrick's (Personnel Administrator 28, 1983, 62) Four/Five Levels of Evaluation were used to evaluate the application of the multidimensional model of clinical leadership. Eighty community healthcare leaders were exposed to this multidimensional clinical leadership development model through attendance of a community clinical leadership development programme. Twenty five leaders participated in focus group interviews. Data from the interviews were analysed utilising thematic content analysis. Three key themes emerged that influenced the development of best practice principles for clinical leadership development: 1. Personal leadership development 2. Organisational leadership 3. The importance of multiprofessional action learning/reflective groups Emergent best practice principles for clinical leadership development include adopting a multidimensional development approach. This approach encompasses: preparing the individual leader in the role and seeking organisational leadership development that promotes the vision and corporate values of the organisation and delivers on service improvement and innovation. Moreover, application of the Multidimensional Model of Clinical Leadership could offer the best platform for embedding the Six C's of Nursing (Compassion in Practice - Our Culture of Compassionate Care, Department of Health, Crown Copyright, 2012) within the culture of the healthcare organisation: care, compassion, courage, commitment, communication, and competency. This is achieved in part through the application of emotional intelligence to understand self and to develop the

  2. Community aging initiatives and social capital: developing theories of change in the context of NORC Supportive Service Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Emily A

    2014-03-01

    This study aimed to develop theory on how Naturally Occurring Retirement Communities (NORC) Supportive Service Programs potentially transform social relationships within communities to promote aging in place. Data were analyzed from semi-structured in-depth interviews with 10 lead agencies representing 15 NORC programs in New Jersey. Results indicated that professionals seek to infuse capital within three domains of relationships: lead agency staff's relationships with older adults, formal service providers' relationships with each other, and older adults' relationships with each other. This social capital potentially enhances the amount of community-based services and supports within a residential area, as well as their accessibility, appropriateness, responsiveness, and coherence.

  3. The Bayview Hunters Point Foundation for Community Improvement: a pioneering multi-ethnic human service organization (1971-2008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe, Ellen; Schwartz, Sara L; Austin, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    The Bayview Hunters Point Foundation for Community Improvement is a nonprofit organization established in 1971 to defend the legal rights of African-Americans living in its community. Over the years, the agency diversified its services to include mental health and substance abuse treatment, violence prevention, youth programming, and HIV services. The organization has overcome multiple challenges during its 37-year history in relation to social, political, and economic changes that have influenced the way the organization has financed and delivered its services. The history of the organization presents a collaborative approach to community problem-solving and exemplifies the important role that external relationships play in relationship to nonprofit growth and survival.

  4. Attitudes Toward e-Mental Health Services in a Community Sample of Adults: Online Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Sonja; Day, Jamin; Ritchie, Gabrielle; Rowe, Arlen; Gough, Jeffrey; Hall, Tanya; Yuen, Chin Yan Jackie; Donovan, Caroline Leanne; Ireland, Michael

    2018-02-19

    Despite evidence that e-mental health services are effective, consumer preferences still appear to be in favor of face-to-face services. However, the theory of planned behavior (TPB) suggests that cognitive intentions are more proximal to behavior and thus may have a more direct influence on service use. Investigating individual characteristics that influence both preferences and intentions to use e-mental health services is important for better understanding factors that might impede or facilitate the use of these services. This study explores predictors of preferences and intentions to access e-mental health services relative to face-to-face services. Five domains were investigated (demographics, technology factors, personality, psychopathology, and beliefs), identified from previous studies and informed by the Internet interventions model. We expected that more participants would report intentions to use e-mental health services relative to reported preferences for this type of support and that these 5 domains would be significantly associated with both intentions and preferences toward online services. A mixed sample of 308 community members and university students was recruited through social media and the host institution in Australia. Ages ranged between 17 and 68 years, and 82.5% (254/308) were female. Respondents completed an online survey. Chi-square analysis and t tests were used to explore group differences, and logistic regression models were employed to explore factors predicting preferences and intentions. Most respondents (85.7%, 264/308) preferred face-to-face services over e-mental health services. Relative to preferences, a larger proportion of respondents (39.6%, 122/308) endorsed intentions to use e-mental health services if experiencing mental health difficulties in the future. In terms of the 5 predictor domains, 95% CIs of odds ratios (OR) derived from bootstrapped standard errors suggested that prior experience with online services

  5. Mental health issues and resources in rural and regional communities: an exploration of perceptions of service providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpin, Merrill; Bartlett, Helen; Kavanagh, David; Gallois, Cindy

    2007-04-01

    To identify service providers' and community organisations' perceptions of the resources available to support people with mental illness and the unmet needs of this client group in rural Queensland. An exploratory study was undertaken involving focus group interviews across the study sites. Five regional towns in rural Queensland. Ten to 14 members were recruited for each of the five focus groups. The groups represented a diverse mix of participants including health and community service providers and representatives from community organisations. Participants identified gaps in services in relation to health, employment and education, housing and accommodation, transport and social inclusion and health promotion. Inter-service communication and inappropriate funding models were themes affecting service delivery. Specific service issues of housing and transport were identified to be particularly problematic for people with mental illness across all towns. Intersectoral communication and funding models require further research.

  6. A qualitative study into the use of formal services for dementia by carers from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanley, Christopher; Boughtwood, Desiree; Adams, Jon; Santalucia, Yvonne; Kyriazopoulos, Helena; Pond, Dimity; Rowland, Jeffrey

    2012-10-09

    People with dementia and their family carers need to be able to access formal services in the community to help maintain their wellbeing and independence. While knowing about and navigating one's way through service systems is difficult for most people, it is particularly difficult for people from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities. This study addresses a lack of literature on the use of formal services for dementia by people from CALD backgrounds by examining the experiences and perceptions of dementia caregiving within four CALD communities - Italian, Chinese, Spanish and Arabic-speaking - in south western Sydney, Australia. The study used a qualitative design and the methods included focus groups with family carers and one-to-one interviews with bilingual/bicultural community workers, bilingual general practitioners and geriatricians. A total of 121 family carers participated in 15 focus groups and interviews were held with 60 health professionals. All fieldwork was audiotaped, transcribed and subjected to thematic analysis. People from CALD communities are often unfamiliar with the concept of formal services and there may be strong cultural norms about maintaining care within the family, rather than relying on external services. CALD communities often have limited knowledge of services. There is a preference for services that will allow families to keep their relative at home, for safety as well as cultural reasons, and they are particularly reluctant to use residential care. While there is a preference for ethno-specific or multicultural services, mainstream services also need to ensure they are more flexible in providing culturally appropriate care. Positive outcomes occur when ethno-specific services work in partnership with mainstream programs. Dementia service providers need to develop a trusting relationship with their local CALD communities and promote their services in a way that is understandable and culturally acceptable to

  7. A qualitative study into the use of formal services for dementia by carers from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanley Christopher

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People with dementia and their family carers need to be able to access formal services in the community to help maintain their wellbeing and independence. While knowing about and navigating one’s way through service systems is difficult for most people, it is particularly difficult for people from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD communities. This study addresses a lack of literature on the use of formal services for dementia by people from CALD backgrounds by examining the experiences and perceptions of dementia caregiving within four CALD communities – Italian, Chinese, Spanish and Arabic-speaking – in south western Sydney, Australia. Methods The study used a qualitative design and the methods included focus groups with family carers and one-to-one interviews with bilingual/bicultural community workers, bilingual general practitioners and geriatricians. A total of 121 family carers participated in 15 focus groups and interviews were held with 60 health professionals. All fieldwork was audiotaped, transcribed and subjected to thematic analysis. Results People from CALD communities are often unfamiliar with the concept of formal services and there may be strong cultural norms about maintaining care within the family, rather than relying on external services. CALD communities often have limited knowledge of services. There is a preference for services that will allow families to keep their relative at home, for safety as well as cultural reasons, and they are particularly reluctant to use residential care. While there is a preference for ethno-specific or multicultural services, mainstream services also need to ensure they are more flexible in providing culturally appropriate care. Positive outcomes occur when ethno-specific services work in partnership with mainstream programs. Dementia service providers need to develop a trusting relationship with their local CALD communities and promote their services in a

  8. A qualitative study into the use of formal services for dementia by carers from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background People with dementia and their family carers need to be able to access formal services in the community to help maintain their wellbeing and independence. While knowing about and navigating one’s way through service systems is difficult for most people, it is particularly difficult for people from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities. This study addresses a lack of literature on the use of formal services for dementia by people from CALD backgrounds by examining the experiences and perceptions of dementia caregiving within four CALD communities – Italian, Chinese, Spanish and Arabic-speaking – in south western Sydney, Australia. Methods The study used a qualitative design and the methods included focus groups with family carers and one-to-one interviews with bilingual/bicultural community workers, bilingual general practitioners and geriatricians. A total of 121 family carers participated in 15 focus groups and interviews were held with 60 health professionals. All fieldwork was audiotaped, transcribed and subjected to thematic analysis. Results People from CALD communities are often unfamiliar with the concept of formal services and there may be strong cultural norms about maintaining care within the family, rather than relying on external services. CALD communities often have limited knowledge of services. There is a preference for services that will allow families to keep their relative at home, for safety as well as cultural reasons, and they are particularly reluctant to use residential care. While there is a preference for ethno-specific or multicultural services, mainstream services also need to ensure they are more flexible in providing culturally appropriate care. Positive outcomes occur when ethno-specific services work in partnership with mainstream programs. Dementia service providers need to develop a trusting relationship with their local CALD communities and promote their services in a way that is understandable

  9. Perceptions of Spanish-speaking clientele of patient care services in a community pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olenik, Nicole L; Gonzalvo, Jasmine D; Snyder, Margie E; Nash, Christy L; Smith, Cory T

    2015-01-01

    A paucity of studies exists that have assessed community pharmacy preferences of Spanish-speaking patients living in areas of the U.S. with rapidly growing Hispanic populations. The qualitative approach to this research affords a unique opportunity to further explore perceptions of the Spanish-speaking population. To identify perceptions of Spanish-speaking patients living in the U.S. with a focus on the care provided in community pharmacies, as well as to determine their satisfaction with community pharmacies. Participants were recruited after weekly Spanish-speaking church services for approximately one month. Qualitative, semi-structured individual interviews to identify perceived unmet patient care needs were conducted in Spanish and transcribed/translated verbatim. Qualitative thematic analysis was used to summarize findings. A written questionnaire was administered to collect patient satisfaction and demographic information, summarized using descriptive statistics. Twelve interviews were conducted by the principal investigator. Primary themes included lack of insurance coupled with high medical care costs serving as a barrier for acquisition of health care, difficulty accessing timely and convenient primary care, perceived negative attitudes from pharmacy personnel, lack of Spanish-speaking health care providers, and the provision of verbal and written medication information in English. The results of this study suggest a great need for health care providers, including pharmacists, to expand outreach services to the Spanish-speaking community. Some examples derived from the interview process include increasing marketing efforts of available services in the Spanish language, hiring Spanish-speaking personnel, and offering medical terminology education classes to Spanish-speaking patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Public Schools, Nevada, 2009, Nevada Department of Education

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Nevada Department of Education locations of public schools for the 2008-2009 school year. List of schools furnished by NDE. Locations furnished by the US EPA Region 9.

  11. Sierra Nevada Subregional Boundary - Sierra Nevada Conservancy [ds542

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — Sierra Nevada Conservancy (SNC) boundary. The boundary was mapped to correspond with statute AB 2600 (2004) and as re-defined in AB 1201 (2005). Work on the boundary...

  12. Sierra Nevada Subregional Boundary - Sierra Nevada Conservancy [ds542

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Sierra Nevada Conservancy (SNC) boundary. The boundary was mapped to correspond with statute AB 2600 (2004) and as re-defined in AB 1201 (2005). Work on the boundary...

  13. Nevada Transportation Options Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    P. GEHNER; E.M. WEAVER; L. FOSSUM

    2006-01-01

    This study performs a cost and schedule analysis of three Nevada Transportation options that support waste receipt at the repository. Based on the U.S. Department of Energy preference for rail transportation in Nevada (given in the Final Environmental Impact Statement), it has been assumed that a branch rail line would be constructed to support waste receipt at the repository. However, due to potential funding constraints, it is uncertain when rail will be available. The three Nevada Transportation options have been developed to meet a varying degree of requirements for transportation and to provide cost variations used in meeting the funding constraints given in the Technical Direction Letter guidelines for this study. The options include combinations of legal-weight truck, heavy-haul truck, and rail. Option 1 uses a branch rail line that would support initial waste receipt at the repository in 2010. Rail transportation would be the primary mode, supplemented by legal weight trucks. This option provides the highest level of confidence in cost and schedule, lowest public visibility, greatest public acceptability, lowest public dose, and is the recommended option for support of waste receipt. The completion of rail by 2010 will require spending approximately $800 million prior to 2010. Option 2 uses a phased rail approach to address a constrained funding scenario. To meet funding constraints, Option 2 uses a phased approach to delay high cost activities (final design and construction) until after initial waste receipt in 2010. By doing this, approximately 95 percent of the cost associated with completion of a branch rail line is deferred until after 2010. To support waste receipt until a branch rail line is constructed in Nevada, additional legal-weight truck shipments and heavy-haul truck shipments (on a limited basis for naval spent nuclear fuel) would be used to meet the same initial waste receipt rates as in Option 1. Use of heavy-haul shipments in the absence

  14. Experiences of community pharmacists involved in the delivery of a specialist asthma service in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmerton, Lynne M; Smith, Lorraine; LeMay, Kate S; Krass, Ines; Saini, Bandana; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia Z; Reddel, Helen K; Burton, Deborah L; Stewart, Kay; Armour, Carol L

    2012-06-18

    The role of community pharmacists in disease state management has been mooted for some years. Despite a number of trials of disease state management services, there is scant literature into the engagement of, and with, pharmacists in such trials. This paper reports pharmacists' feedback as providers of a Pharmacy Asthma Management Service (PAMS), a trial coordinated across four academic research centres in Australia in 2009. We also propose recommendations for optimal involvement of pharmacists in academic research. Feedback about the pharmacists' experiences was sought via their participation in either a focus group or telephone interview (for those unable to attend their scheduled focus group) at one of three time points. A semi-structured interview guide focused discussion on the pharmacists' training to provide the asthma service, their interactions with health professionals and patients as per the service protocol, and the future for this type of service. Focus groups were facilitated by two researchers, and the individual interviews were shared between three researchers, with data transcribed verbatim and analysed manually. Of 93 pharmacists who provided the PAMS, 25 were involved in a focus group and seven via telephone interview. All pharmacists approached agreed to provide feedback. In general, the pharmacists engaged with both the service and research components, and embraced their roles as innovators in the trial of a new service. Some experienced challenges in the recruitment of patients into the service and the amount of research-related documentation, and collaborative patient-centred relationships with GPs require further attention. Specific service components, such as the spirometry, were well received by the pharmacists and their patients. Professional rewards included satisfaction from their enhanced practice, and pharmacists largely envisaged a future for the service. The PAMS provided pharmacists an opportunity to become involved in an

  15. Experiences of community pharmacists involved in the delivery of a specialist asthma service in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmerton Lynne M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of community pharmacists in disease state management has been mooted for some years. Despite a number of trials of disease state management services, there is scant literature into the engagement of, and with, pharmacists in such trials. This paper reports pharmacists’ feedback as providers of a Pharmacy Asthma Management Service (PAMS, a trial coordinated across four academic research centres in Australia in 2009. We also propose recommendations for optimal involvement of pharmacists in academic research. Methods Feedback about the pharmacists’ experiences was sought via their participation in either a focus group or telephone interview (for those unable to attend their scheduled focus group at one of three time points. A semi-structured interview guide focused discussion on the pharmacists’ training to provide the asthma service, their interactions with health professionals and patients as per the service protocol, and the future for this type of service. Focus groups were facilitated by two researchers, and the individual interviews were shared between three researchers, with data transcribed verbatim and analysed manually. Results Of 93 pharmacists who provided the PAMS, 25 were involved in a focus group and seven via telephone interview. All pharmacists approached agreed to provide feedback. In general, the pharmacists engaged with both the service and research components, and embraced their roles as innovators in the trial of a new service. Some experienced challenges in the recruitment of patients into the service and the amount of research-related documentation, and collaborative patient-centred relationships with GPs require further attention. Specific service components, such as the spirometry, were well received by the pharmacists and their patients. Professional rewards included satisfaction from their enhanced practice, and pharmacists largely envisaged a future for the service. Conclusions The

  16. Nevada`s role in the hydrogen economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaeth, T. [Dept. of Energy, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The paper discusses the promise of hydrogen and its possible applications, barriers to its development, the role that the Nevada Test Site could play if it were made more available to public and private institutions for research, and the ``clean city`` concept being developed jointly with California, Utah, and Nevada. This concept would create a ``clean corridor`` along the route from Salt Lake City through Reno to Sacramento, Los Angeles, Las Vegas, and back to Salt Lake City.

  17. Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Final environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    This environmental statement for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) considers underground nuclear detonations with yields of one megaton or less, along with the preparations necessary for such detonations. The testing activities considered also include other continuing and intermittent activities, both nuclear and nonnuclear, which can best be conducted in the remote and controlled area of the Nevada Test Site. These activities are listed, with emphasis on weapons testing programs which do not remain static

  18. Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Final environmental impact statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1977-09-01

    This environmental statement for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) considers underground nuclear detonations with yields of one megaton or less, along with the preparations necessary for such detonations. The testing activities considered also include other continuing and intermittent activities, both nuclear and nonnuclear, which can best be conducted in the remote and controlled area of the Nevada Test Site. These activities are listed, with emphasis on weapons testing programs which do not remain static.

  19. The development of a community-based spirometry service in the Canterbury region of New Zealand: observations on new service delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epton, Michael J; Stanton, Josh D; McGeoch, Graham R B; Shand, Brett I; Swanney, Maureen P

    2015-03-05

    In 2008, as part of the changes to develop integrated health care services in the Canterbury region of New Zealand, the local health board in collaboration with general practitioners, respiratory specialists and scientists introduced a programme for general practices to provide laboratory-quality spirometry in the community. The service adhered to the 2005 ATS/ERS international spirometry standards. The spirometry service was provided by trained practice nurses and community respiratory nurses, and was monitored and quality assured by certified respiratory scientists in the Respiratory Physiology Laboratory, Christchurch Hospital and CISO (Canterbury Initiative Services Organisation). These two organisations were responsible for organising training seminars and refresher courses on spirometry technique and interpretation of results. A total of 10 practices have now become approved spirometry providers, with the number of tests carried out in the primary care setting increasing gradually. Consistently high-quality spirometry tests have been obtained and are now presented on a centrally available results database for all hospital and community clinicians to review. Although the service has proved to be more convenient for patients, the tests have not been delivered as quickly as those carried out by the Respiratory Physiology Laboratory. However, the time scales for testing achieved by the community service is considered suitable for investigation of chronic disease. The success of the service has been dependent on several key factors including hospital and clinical support and a centralised quality assurance programme, a comprehensive training schedule and online clinical guidance and close integration between primary and secondary care clinicians.

  20. Evaluating the implementation fidelity of New Medicines Service for asthma patients in community pharmacies in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraeyman, Jessica; Foulon, Veerle; Mehuys, Els; Boussery, Koen; Saevels, Jan; De Vriese, Carine; Dalleur, Olivia; Housiaux, Marie; Steurbaut, Stephane; Naegels, Marc; De Meyer, Guido Ry; De Loof, Hans; Van Hal, Guido; Van den Broucke, Stephan

    In October 2013, a New Medicines Service (NMS) was introduced in community pharmacies in Belgium to support asthma patients who are novice users of inhaler devices with corticosteroids. The protocol-based intervention used the Asthma Control Test (ACT) and the Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS) to assess asthma control and medication adherence. The NMS is the first initiative that puts advanced pharmaceutical care into practice in Belgium. The present study evaluated the degree to which the NMS program is delivered as intended, drawing on the concept of implementation fidelity (IF). The main dimensions of IF and potential moderating and facilitating factors for the implementation of NMS in community pharmacies were evaluated using telephone interviews with pharmacists (n = 497), semi-structured interviews with patients eligible for NMS (n = 30), focus groups among general practitioners (n = 72) and lung specialists (n = 5), and a work system analysis in community pharmacies (n = 19). The uptake of NMS in Belgian community pharmacies remains low. In addition to practical barriers, pharmacists found it difficult to identify new asthmatic patients when they were not informed about the diagnosis. A lack of commitment from physicians, patients and pharmacists was noted in the early start-up phase of the program. Many pharmacists did not see how NMS differed from existing pharmaceutical care. Physicians considered this service as part of their own tasks and discouraged ACT for asthma follow-up in the community pharmacy. The introduction of the NMS program was not sufficiently embedded in the Belgian health care organization, causing low uptake and resistance to its implementation by pharmacists, patients, and other health care professionals. To increase the uptake of this type of service and its possible extension to other patient groups, more collaboration among the different health care professionals during design and implementation is necessary, as

  1. Sustainable energy for all? Linking poor communities to modern energy services

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Emma; Godfrey Wood, Rachel; Garside, Ben

    2012-12-15

    This paper explores energy delivery models that provide sustainable and clean energy services to the poor. Four key building blocks are: the implementation process, including finance, resource sourcing, conversion and end use; support services (additional services such as training or micro-finance facilities); the enabling environment of policies, regulations and incentives; and the socio-cultural context including local norms and preferences, decision-making structures and levels of social cohesion. A range of products and services targeted at communities located in diverse socio-cultural and geographical contexts are covered. Useful experiences are shared that can help to replicate or scale up successful models that link the poor to modern energy markets. The case studies were selected to illustrate a range of energy products and services, diverse socio-cultural contexts, various business models and partnerships, and varying degrees of formality in the markets under consideration. All of the case studies reveal the challenges of reaching the very poorest even with pro-poor innovations put in place. The four case studies explored in the paper are: The Project for Renewable Energy in Rural Markets (PERMER), Argentina; Portable solar product companies (Tough Stuff and d.light) in southern Asia and sub-Saharan Africa; The Anagi stove in Sri Lanka; and, Micro-hydro development in Nepal (the Rural Energy Development Programme). Lessons learned are highlighted.

  2. Community pharmacy-based medication therapy management services: financial impact for patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruisinger JF

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the direct financial impact for patients resulting from Medication Therapy Management (MTM interventions made by community pharmacists. Secondary objectives include evaluating the patient and physician acceptance rates of the community pharmacists’ recommended MTM interventions.Methods: This was a retrospective observational study conducted at 20 Price Chopper and Hen House grocery store chain pharmacies in the Kansas City metro area from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2010. Study patients were Medicare Part D beneficiaries eligible for MTM services. The primary outcome was the change in patient out-of-pocket prescription medication expense as a result of MTM services.Results: Of 128 patients included in this study, 68% experienced no out-of-pocket financial impact on their medication expenses as a result of MTM services. A total of 27% of the patients realized a cost-savings (USD440.50 per year, (SD=289.69 while another 5% of patients saw a cost increase in out-of-pocket expense (USD255.66 per year, (SD=324.48. The net financial impact for all 128 patients who participated in MTM services was an average savings of USD102.83 per patient per year (SD=269.18, p<0.0001. Pharmacists attempted a total of 732 recommendations; 391 (53% were accepted by both the patient and their prescriber. A total of 341 (47% recommendations were not accepted because of patient refusal (290, 85% or prescriber refusal (51, 15%.Conclusions: Patient participation in MTM services reduces patient out-of-pocket medication expense. However, this savings is driven by only 32% of subjects who are experiencing a financial impact on out-of-pocket medication expense. Additionally, the majority of the pharmacists’ recommended interventions (53% were accepted by patients and prescribers.

  3. A stakeholder visioning exercise to enhance chronic care and the integration of community pharmacy services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Trigo, L; Tudball, J; Fam, D; Benrimoj, S I; Sabater-Hernández, D

    2018-02-21

    Collaboration between relevant stakeholders in health service planning enables service contextualization and facilitates its success and integration into practice. Although community pharmacy services (CPSs) aim to improve patients' health and quality of life, their integration in primary care is far from ideal. Key stakeholders for the development of a CPS intended at preventing cardiovascular disease were identified in a previous stakeholder analysis. Engaging these stakeholders to create a shared vision is the subsequent step to focus planning directions and lay sound foundations for future work. This study aims to develop a stakeholder-shared vision of a cardiovascular care model which integrates community pharmacists and to identify initiatives to achieve this vision. A participatory visioning exercise involving 13 stakeholders across the healthcare system was performed. A facilitated workshop, structured in three parts (i.e., introduction; developing the vision; defining the initiatives towards the vision), was designed. The Chronic Care Model inspired the questions that guided the development of the vision. Workshop transcripts, researchers' notes and materials produced by participants were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Stakeholders broadened the objective of the vision to focus on the management of chronic diseases. Their vision yielded 7 principles for advanced chronic care: patient-centered care; multidisciplinary team approach; shared goals; long-term care relationships; evidence-based practice; ease of access to healthcare settings and services by patients; and good communication and coordination. Stakeholders also delineated six environmental factors that can influence their implementation. Twenty-four initiatives to achieve the developed vision were defined. The principles and factors identified as part of the stakeholder shared-vision were combined in a preliminary model for chronic care. This model and initiatives can guide policy

  4. [The community-oriented experience of early intervention services in Taipei City].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Feng-Ying

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to emphasize the importance of early intervention. The purpose of early intervention in Taipei City is to help child development, promote parenting skills, and reduce educational and social costs. In order to meet these goals, parenting groups and Taipei City Council have made great efforts to make early intervention work in Taipei City. In April 1995, Taipei City Government started planning and setting up the service network. To date, Taipei City has set up one reporting and referral center?, ?six community resources centers, 22 medical assessment and intervention clinics, 12 child development centers, one early intervention training center, three non-profit foundations and more than 300 inclusion schools, such as kindergartens and day care centers. With parent participation, professional devotion and Taipei City Government's commitment, the number of assisted children has increased from 98 to 2,523 /year. By the end of 2006, Taipei had already funded 25,277 children. We estimate Taipei City early intervention services to have affected at least 75,000 persons, including development-delayed and disabled children, their parents?, ?grandparents and siblings. We found that early intervention services help the children to build up self esteem, grow their potential, learn how to socialize, and receive an education, while the most important aim is to help them to reduce their level of disability or to prevent them from getting worse. At the same time, their families get support and a diverse range of services. An integrated early intervention program should include children, families, and multidisciplinary professionals. The system should therefore be more "family-centered" and "community-oriented" to provide appropriate services to children and families through a positive and aggressive attitude.

  5. Quality indicators of pharmacists' services in community pharmacies in Paraná State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Hipólito Júnior

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Pharmacists and their pharmacies have been evolving in their roles as health promoters in Brazil. Some examples are the recent legislation reaffirming the role of Brazilian pharmacies as health institutions, rather than having only a commercial profile, giving greater clarity to pharmacists about their roles as health care providers. This evolution came with the recognition that is already seen in other developed countries, confirming the need for the pharmacist as a health promoter, and not simply a dispenser of drugs in society. This study has obtained the profile and activities of community pharmacists, as well as the quality indicators of private community pharmacies throughout the State of Paraná through the application of an online survey sent to pharmacists in the state. Out of all pharmacists surveyed, 533 were part of the final analysis, being the pharmacists to complete the survey in full. Participants were mostly female (69.4% and were, on average, 35.2 ± 9.2 years old. Of these, 60% worked in pharmacy chains and just 37% of all pharmacist respondents were issuing the Declaration of Pharmaceutical Services. The current study showed that many pharmaceutical services are not adopted by pharmacies as these services bring no significant financial reward. Regarding the structure, the Paraná State showed that pharmacies present a good overall structure. The kind of pharmacy (chain or independent influenced the pharmaceutical services provided and the available structure, where the independent pharmacies provide a wider range of services and have better structure. This study was able to identify the profile and behaviors of pharmacists and also the quality indicators of pharmacies in Paraná State.

  6. Perspectives on family planning services among adolescents at a Boston community health center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Katherine M; Dodge, Laura E; Hacker, Michele R; Ricciotti, Hope A

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this project was to investigate adolescent perspectives on family planning services at a community-health center, with the intent to inform health center programs aimed at stemming the adolescent pregnancy rate. This project was cross-sectional and employed mixed methods, including surveys and interviews, for the purposes of quality improvement. The project was conducted in the obstetrics and gynecology clinic at an urban community health center in Boston. Twenty adolescent females (age 16-20) who used services at the health center. Participants were individually interviewed to assess perspectives on family planning services and to identify major influences on methods of pregnancy prevention. Major themes were categorized into contraceptive usage, reproductive health knowledge, adult influence and communication, barriers to contraceptive care and expectations of a family planning clinic. All participants were sexually active and 80% had experienced pregnancy. Reproductive health knowledge was variable and in many cases limited. Concern about disapproval was a prominent barrier to going to a clinician for contraception or advice and parents were not often involved in the initial contraception discussion. Other barriers to use of contraception included forgetting to use the methods and fear of side effects. We identified several potentially modifiable factors, including lack of knowledge, concern for provider disapproval and fear of side effects that may limit effective use of family planning services by adolescents. Further attention should be paid to these factors in designing and improving youth-friendly services in ob-gyn clinics. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Benefits of pharmacist-led flu vaccination services in community pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkdale, C L; Nebout, G; Megerlin, F; Thornley, T

    2017-01-01

    Seasonal influenza is a major cause of excess winter deaths and increased hospital admissions. There is a high level of economic burden associated with the infection. Although vaccination targets have been set to tackle this international issue, many countries struggle to reach these coverage targets for their at-risk populations using traditional delivery methods. Traditional providers include family doctors and nurses; however, pharmacist-led influenza vaccination has become a more commonly utilised aid to support vaccination targets. Community pharmacies are convenient and widely accessible and evaluations consistently demonstrate that patients are satisfied with pharmacist-led vaccinations. Allowing community pharmacists to administer influenza vaccination as an alternative option for delivery helps to increase the coverage rate of vaccination. In addition, commissioning community pharmacists to provide this service has been shown to contribute to achieving targets for those at-risk. Pharmacist-led influenza vaccination services can create value for payors and reduce pressure on health systems. This review aims to demonstrate the success of pharmacy-led influenza vaccinations, and the impact it has had in driving up immunisation rates within other countries. Experiences of countries such as England, Portugal and the United States provide evidence to demonstrate the benefit to both the patient and the health system. Copyright © 2016 Académie Nationale de Pharmacie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Learning affordances and participation enablers within a primary mathematics in-service community of practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mellony Graven

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the participation enablers and learning affordances identified by teachers through participation within an in-service community of practice (CoP of primary teachers called the Numeracy Inquiry Community of Leader Educators (NICLE in the Eastern Cape. The article draws on three qualitative sources of data: the annual teacher questionnaires of 42 participating teachers, interview data from 8 of the 42 sampled teachers and reflective journal entries of these 8 teachers over the first 2 years of NICLE. All three data sets point to teachers foregrounding the affordances and enablers of NICLE participation across the fundamental elements of a CoP, namely domain, community and practice. We illuminate the way in which teachers’ identification of learning affordances relates to these three structural features of a CoP. In concluding, we argue that explicit consideration of these structural elements, and their interrelationship in the design of in-service programmes, could enable clearer articulation of programme aspects and support reflection on the coherence between teacher feedback on these as programmes evolve.

  9. A Novel Method for Mining SaaS Software Tag via Community Detection in Software Services Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Li; Li, Bing; Pan, Wei-Feng; Peng, Tao

    The number of online software services based on SaaS paradigm is increasing. However, users usually find it hard to get the exact software services they need. At present, tags are widely used to annotate specific software services and also to facilitate the searching of them. Currently these tags are arbitrary and ambiguous since mostly of them are generated manually by service developers. This paper proposes a method for mining tags from the help documents of software services. By extracting terms from the help documents and calculating the similarity between the terms, we construct a software similarity network where nodes represent software services, edges denote the similarity relationship between software services, and the weights of the edges are the similarity degrees. The hierarchical clustering algorithm is used for community detection in this software similarity network. At the final stage, tags are mined for each of the communities and stored as ontology.

  10. Nevada Thickness of Cenozoic Deposits

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This study of gravity data from Nevada is part of a statewide analysis of mineral resources. The main objective of the gravity study were: 1) to infer the structure...

  11. Local government energy action in the UK: from service delivery to community leadership. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, Joanne; Pearson, Amanda; Knowland, Rachael; Flanagan, Brooke

    2007-01-01

    In October 2006 the UK government published a new Local Government White Paper. This policy statement set the framework for the role of local government in the coming years.The White Paper is one stage in the latest wave of local government reform in the UK. This reform has aimed to refocus attention away from delivery of specific services and towards community leadership, particularly with reference to sustainable development. Climate change is given some emphasis within the White Paper, and should become one of the indicators against which local government performance is measured.This paper examines energy action in local authorities in the past few years, in a situation where most, but not all, were still strongly focused on service delivery. By contrasting this with the results achieved in authorities that have taken a community leadership role, the paper examines the potential of the White Paper. It addresses the following questions: does local government have the capacity to deliver increased local action on climate change? Does the UK policy framework support and encourage development and deployment of this capacity? And do the national and regional bodies that provide support for local authorities need to change the services they offer in light of recent policy developments?

  12. Coolmine Therapeutic Community, Dublin: a 40-year history of Ireland's first voluntary drug treatment service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Shane

    2016-02-01

    To document the evolution over 40 years (from 1973 to 2013) of Coolmine Therapeutic Community (Ireland's first voluntary drug treatment service) against a background of broader drug policy developments in the Republic of Ireland and elsewhere during this period. Data were gathered by means of archival research within Coolmine, complemented by semi-structured interviews with former clients, current and former Coolmine management and staff, and representatives of outsider stakeholder interests. Coolmines's history has three phases: (1) an early and uncontentious phase, in which external authorities provided financial support for Coolmine without questioning its work practices or outcomes; (2) a middle, controversial phase, in which Coolmine struggled for survival in an external policy environment now dominated by harm reduction strategies; and (3) a final phase in which, through the use of conventional corporate governance, Coolmine management sought to repair its damaged reputation by introducing evidence-based clinical practices. Coolmine Therapeutic Community was established when drug treatment services in Ireland were in their infancy, and its changing fortunes over subsequent decades reflected changing perceptions of what constitutes appropriate addiction treatment-and in particular the role to be played by former addicts within addiction treatment systems-as well as changing perceptions of funding relationships between statutory authorities and voluntary providers of health and social services. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  13. 'Trust and teamwork matter': community health workers' experiences in integrated service delivery in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Arima

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive and integrated approach to strengthen primary health care has been the major thrust of the National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) that was launched in 2005 to revamp India's rural public health system. Though the logic of horizontal and integrated health care to strengthen health systems has long been acknowledged at policy level, empirical evidence on how such integration operates is rare. Based on recent (2011-2012) ethnographic fieldwork in Odisha, India, this article discusses community health workers' experiences in integrated service delivery through village-level outreach sessions within the NRHM. It shows that for health workers, the notion of integration goes well beyond a technical lens of mixing different health services. Crucially, they perceive 'teamwork' and 'building trust with the community' (beyond trust in health services) to be critical components of their practice. However, the comprehensive NRHM primary health care ideology - which the health workers espouse - is in constant tension with the exigencies of narrow indicators of health system performance. Our ethnography shows how monitoring mechanisms, the institutionalised privileging of statistical evidence over field-based knowledge and the highly hierarchical health bureaucratic structure that rests on top-down communications mitigate efforts towards sustainable health system integration.

  14. ESA SSA Space Radiation Expert Service Centre: the Importance of Community Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Norma; Dierckxsens, Mark; Kruglanski, Michel; De Donder, Erwin; Calders, Stijn; Messios, Neophytos; Glover, Alexi

    2017-04-01

    End-users in a wide range of sectors both in space and on the ground are affected by space weather. In the frame of its Space Situational Awareness (SSA) programme (http://swe.ssa.esa.int/) the European Space Agency (ESA) is establishing a Space Weather (SWE) Service Network to support end-users in three ways: mitigate the effects of space weather on their systems, reduce costs, and improve reliability. Almost 40 expert groups from institutes and organisations across Europe contribute to this Network organised in five Expert Service Centres (ESCs) - Solar Weather, Heliospheric Weather, Space Radiation, Ionospheric Weather, Geomagnetic Conditions. To understand the end-user needs, the ESCs are supported by the SSCC (SSA Space Weather Coordination Centre) that offers first line support to the end-users. Here we present the mission of the Space Radiation ESC (R-ESC) (http://swe.ssa.esa.int/space-radiation) and the space domain services it supports. Furthermore, we describe how the R-ESC project complements past and ongoing projects both on national level as well as international (e.g. EU projects), emphasizing the importance of inter-disciplinary communication between different communities ranging from scientists, engineers to end-users. Such collaboration is needed if basic science is to be used most efficiently for the development of products and tools that provide end-users with what they actually need. Additionally, feedback from the various communities (projects) is also essential when defining future projects.

  15. Poor people’s energy outlook 2013: Energy for community services

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-03-01

    Life without access to energy is a challenge. Despite the availability of technical solutions, two in every five people still rely on wood, charcoal, or animal waste to cook their food, and one in five people lack electricity (IEA, 2012). This is a global technology injustice. Energy is vital for human, social and economic development. The public health and environmental situation in developing countries is sobering: each year, 2 million people die from diseases caused by indoor smoke – more than deaths from malaria (UNDP/WHO, 2009). The world urgently needs a paradigm shift to deliver the energy services that poor people need, want, and have a right to. This series of reports focuses on the important role energy plays in transforming poor people’s lives. It prioritizes their perspectives and provides concrete tools and approaches to contribute to improving access to energy. The focus of the first report (Practical Action, 2010) was household energy. It analyzed how people access and use energy in the home. The second (Practical Action, 2012) highlighted the critical role energy plays for earning a living. The theme of this third PPEO report is energy for community services: health, education, public institutions, and infrastructure. Without access to modern energy supplies there is little prospect of delivering key community services. In turn, international development goals will not be achieved if health, education and other local facilities are not effective.

  16. Reframing cooperation: Challenges in overcoming tensions between professional services and volunteer organizations providing parenting support in immigrant communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponzoni, E.

    2015-01-01

    Volunteer organizations can potentially partner with mainstream professional services to provide better parenting support to immigrant parents. This qualitative study of cooperation between professional agencies and volunteer organizations known as migrant volunteer and community organizations

  17. On residents’ satisfaction with community health services after health care system reform in Shanghai, China, 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhijian

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health care system reform is a major issue in many countries and therefore how to evaluate the effects of changes is incredibly important. This study measured residents’ satisfaction with community health care service in Shanghai, China, and aimed to evaluate the effect of recent health care system reform. Methods Face-to-face interviews were performed with a stratified random sample of 2212 residents of the Shanghai residents using structured questionnaires. In addition, 972 valid responses were retrieved from internet contact. Controlling for sex, age, income and education, the study used logistic regression modeling to analyze factors associated with satisfaction and to explain the factors that affect the residents’ satisfaction. Results Comparing current attitudes with those held at the initial implementation of the reform in this investigation, four dimensions of health care were analyzed: 1 the health insurance system; 2 essential drugs; 3 basic clinical services; and 4 public health services. Satisfaction across all dimensions improved since the reform was initiated, but differences of satisfaction level were found among most dimensions and groups. Residents currently expressed greater satisfaction with clinical service (average score=3.79, with 5 being most satisfied and the public health/preventive services (average score=3.62; but less satisfied with the provision of essential drugs (average score=3.20 and health insurance schemes (average score=3.23. The disadvantaged groups (the elderly, the retired, those with only an elementary education, those with lower incomes had overall poorer satisfaction levels on these four aspects of health care (P Conclusion The respondents showed more satisfaction with the clinical services (average score=3.79 and public health services/interventions (average score=3.79; and less satisfaction with the health insurance system (average score=3.23 and the essential drug system

  18. Antenatal services for pregnant teenagers in Mbarara Municipality, Southwestern Uganda: health workers and community leaders' views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukundo, Godfrey Zari; Abaasa, Catherine; Natukunda, Peace Byamukama; Ashabahebwa, Bob Harold; Allain, Dominic

    2015-12-23

    Globally, about 11% of all annual births involve adolescents aged 15-19 years. Uganda has one of the highest teenage pregnancy rates in Sub-Saharan Africa. This study assessed stakeholders' views concerning factors affecting availability, accessibility and utilization of teenager friendly antenatal services in Mbarara Municipality, southwestern Uganda. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study utilizing Key Informant Interviews (KIIs). It was conducted in three divisions of Mbarara Municipality. The KIIs were held six Village Health Team (VHT) members, three gynecologists, six midwives, three Community leaders (LC 3 Secretaries for women affairs), one police officer from the Family and Child protection unit at Mbarara Police and three Traditional Birth Attendants (TBAs). Data analysis was done manually by identifying emergent themes which were later coded and organized into concepts which were later developed into explanations. Reproductive health stakeholders generally considered teenage pregnancy to be among the high risk pregnancies that need to be handled with care. In addition, the reproductive health workers described their experience with teenagers as challenging due to their limited skills when it comes to addressing adolescent-specific needs. Adolescent-friendly services were defined as those that could provide privacy, enough time and patience when dealing with teenagers. With this description, there were no teenager-friendly antenatal services in Mbarara municipality at the time of the study. There is need for proactive steps to establish these services if the needs of this subgroup are to be met. There are no teenager friendly antenatal services in Mbarara municipality and few teenagers access and utilise the available general antenatal services. There is need for specialized training for health workers who deal with pregnant teens in Mbarara Municipality in order for them to provide teenager friendly services.

  19. Recognition of Mangrove Ecosystem Services by the Community and Policy Makers in the Gulf of Guayaquil, Ecuador

    OpenAIRE

    Darquea, Jodie J

    2016-01-01

    In 2000 Ecuador created the “Agreements of Sustainable Use and Custody of Mangroves” management for the local communities, helping to stop deforestation of mangroves caused by shrimp farming. With this program, the Ecuadorian government offers economic incentives to support community–based management without taking into consideration the essential role of ecosystem services. This policy fails to encourage the capacity of the communities to grow through monitoring of ecosystem services. This p...

  20. Community Cleaning Services: combining market- and donor-based approaches to urban sanitation and youth engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana A. Thieme

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper sets out to analyse the three phases in the growth of the Community Cleaning Service initiative, sponsored by SC Johnson in the slums of Nairobi. After the launch of the BoP Protocol™, followed by the development of a micro-franchise system, CCS has become an independent non-profit social enterprise. In each of these three phases, the paper describes the complex relationships that develop – for the enterprise and for its micro-franchisees – between aid and the market.

  1. Community Cleaning Services : une alliance hybride pour l'assainissement urbain

    OpenAIRE

    Thieme, Tatiana; DeKoszmovszky, Justin

    2012-01-01

    Cet article vise à analyser les trois phases de développement de l’initiative Community Cleaning Service, soutenu par SC Johnson dans les bidonvilles de Nairorib. Après le lancement du BoP Protocol, puis le développement d’un système de micro-franchise, CCS est devenue une entreprise sociale à but non lucratif. On observe dans ces trois phases les relations complexes qui se tissent, ausi bien pour l’entreprise que pour les micro-franchisés, entre aide et marché.

  2. Community Cleaning Services : une alliance hybride pour l'assainissement urbain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Thieme

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cet article vise à analyser les trois phases de développement de l’initiative Community Cleaning Service, soutenu par SC Johnson dans les bidonvilles de Nairorib. Après le lancement du BoP Protocol, puis le développement d’un système de micro-franchise, CCS est devenue une entreprise sociale à but non lucratif. On observe dans ces trois phases les relations complexes qui se tissent, ausi bien pour l’entreprise que pour les micro-franchisés, entre aide et marché.

  3. Structured Communities, Science Instruction Development, and the Use of Blogging in a Pre-Service Elementary Teacher Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Steven C.; Anderson, Janice; Justice, Julie

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates the use of blogging and what it reveals about the development of science teaching ability in pre-service elementary education majors. The investigation occurs in a structured community and takes into consideration interactions among community members as they reflect on their own experiences and respond to the blogs of other…

  4. A Guide for Foodservice Education; Health Care; Community Care and School Feeding in California. Dietetic Service Supervision Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schickling, Clarice; And Others

    This curriculum guide is intended to help California community college educators understand and develop a vocational program in health care, community care, and school food service. It establishes the general need for such a program, and provides guidelines to help educators determine if there is a need for such a program in their geographic…

  5. Including a Service Learning Educational Research Project in a Biology Course-II: Assessing Community Awareness of Legionnaires' Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Shakra, Amal

    2012-01-01

    For a university service learning educational research project addressing Legionnaires' disease (LD), a Yes/No questionnaire on community awareness of LD was developed and distributed in an urban community in North Carolina, USA. The 456 questionnaires completed by the participants were sorted into yes and no sets based on responses obtained to…

  6. Transforming Teaching and Learning at University of Ghana through Community Service-Learning: Listening to the Voices of Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagoe, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Universities all over the world are undergoing change to improve teaching, learning and service. These changes have been motivated by call for universities to connect more to communities to address their problems. One of the means of ensuring that universities and communities engage mutually in a partnership where students, faculty and community…

  7. [Rehabilitation in a community psychiatric service facility--success and failure during a one year period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhart, I; Bosch, G

    1990-11-01

    Rehabilitation outcome was examined within a social psychiatric model institution including several partial hospitalization programmes and various outpatient services. After a one-year period the treatment success was measured by objective criteria in 166 consecutively admitted patients, most of them diagnosed as schizophrenics. 75% showed improvements in terms of reduced institutional protection and a more independent living situation. Vocational rehabilitation was successful in 47%. There was no significant correlation between these outcome measures. A poor outcome was found in a group of patients who had received a comparatively high rate of therapeutic activities and was classified by sociodemographic variables. Consequences concerning the therapeutic approach in community mental health services and its evaluation are shown.

  8. Staff perspectives on modified therapeutic community services for homeless dually diagnosed clients: an exploratory pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Nadia; Astone-Twerell, Janetta; Hernitche, Ted

    2009-12-01

    The modified therapeutic community (MTC) is one treatment modality developed to meet the needs of the homeless dually diagnosed population. While studies have shown the effectiveness of the MTC, little is known regarding staff perspectives of this modality. Using data from in-depth qualitative interviews, this study examines key staff perspectives on treatment services offered at an MTC in New York for homeless, mentally ill substance abusers. Many staff members indicated that the services provided are innovative, state of the art, and comprehensive as compared to other programs that specifically treat only one need. The most beneficial aspects of the MTC modality noted were the number of social workers available and the introduction of art therapy groups. The MTC modality also fostered increases in communication and collaboration between staff to introduce more specialized clinical groups not outlined in MTC guidelines to better meet the needs of clients.

  9. A customer service approach to implementing a best practice at community health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahn, Deborah; Ruland, Jodie; Thomas, Scott

    2006-02-01

    It is important that strategies for implementing evidence-based best practices into clinical care are developed and tested. This is particularly true for community health centers (CHCs), which are a primary source of care for low-income patients. This article focuses on a customer service approach to implementing best practices in CHCs. The approach was designed to be responsive to the tremendous demands on and limited resources of CHC staff. The CHC staff were the customers of the project while the project team played a supportive role, acting as a full-service vendor to identify and meet staff needs. Although a tobacco system was the focus of this project, it is applicable to implementing in clinical settings generally, regardless of the particular health topic.

  10. Predicting State Investment in Medicaid Home- and Community-Based Services, 2000-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nancy A; Kirk, Adele

    2016-01-01

    Although state use of Medicaid home- and community-based services (HCBS) to provide long-term services and supports to older adults and individuals with physical disabilities continues to increase, progress is uneven across states. We used generalized linear models to examine state factors associated with increased allocation of Medicaid dollars to HCBS for the period 2000 to 2011. We observed enhanced growth in states that began the period with limited investment in HCBS, as reflected in significant year trends among these states. The political environment appeared to be an important influence on states' investment for states with limited initial allocation to HCBS, as was housing affordability, a policy amenable variable. There continues to be wide variation in states' relative investment, calling for additional policy attention and research.

  11. Present importance of coffe production in some coffe grower communities and indian comunities in the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta Importancia actual de la caficultora en algunas comunidades campesinas e indígenas de la Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrera Rojas Gilberto

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available Coffe production followed by coffe growers and indian groups in the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, shows several differences regarding economical rationalityandtechnology. Coffe plays avery important role inthe economy and life quality ofthegrowers and indians. Traditional technology is generalized and has slowed down the deterioration of the Sierra, although life quality is very low.
    La caficultura que practican los campesinos y los grupos indlgenas de la Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, tiene notables diferencias, tanto en la racionalidad económica, como en la lógica con la cual son atendidos los cultivos. El café juega un
    papel predominante en el sostenimiento de la economla
    y en la calidad de la vida de campecinos e indlgenas. La tecnologla tradicional, cuyo uso es generalizado, ha demorado el deterioro de ese inmenso maciso, aunuqe la calidad de la vida es bastante baja.

  12. Effect of a Community-Based Service Learning Experience in Geriatrics on Internal Medicine Residents and Community Participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Rachel K; Michener, Jennifer; Yang, Phyllis; Goldstein, Karen; Groce-Martin, Jennine; True, Gala; Johnson, Jerry

    2017-09-01

    Community-based service learning (CBSL) provides an opportunity to teach internal medicine residents the social context of aging and clinical concepts. The objectives of the current study were to demonstrate the feasibility of a CBSL program targeting internal medicine residents and to assess its effect on medical residents and community participants. internal medicine residents participated in a CBSL experience for half a day during ambulatory blocks from 2011 to 2014. Residents attended a senior housing unit or center, delivered a presentation about a geriatric health topic, toured the facility, and received information about local older adult resources. Residents evaluated the experience. Postgraduate Year 3 internal medicine residents (n = 71) delivered 64 sessions. Residents felt that the experience increased their ability to communicate effectively with older adults (mean 3.91 ± 0.73 on a Likert scale with 5 = strongly agree), increased their knowledge of resources (4.09 ± 1.01), expanded their knowledge of a health topic pertinent to aging (3.48 ± 1.09), and contributed to their capacity to evaluate and care for older adults (3.84 ± 0.67). Free-text responses demonstrated that residents thought that this program would change their practice. Of 815 older adults surveyed from 36 discrete teaching sessions, 461 (56%) thought that the medical residents delivered health information clearly (4.55 ± 0.88) and that the health topics were relevant (4.26 ± 0.92). Free-text responses showed that the program helped them understand their health concerns. This CBSL program is a feasible and effective tool for teaching internal medicine residents and older adults. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  13. Lifestyle risk factors and utilization of preventive services in disabled elderly adults in the community.

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    Kim, Dae Hyun; Sagar, Utpal N; Adams, Suzanne; Whellan, David J

    2009-10-01

    Lifestyle risk factor counseling and preventive health services are important to disabled elderly adults to prevent adverse health outcomes. We aimed to examine the prevalence of lifestyle risk factors and utilization of preventive health services in community-dwelling 2,982 adults, aged 60 years or older, with or without disability, in Southeastern Pennsylvania in 2004. The severity of disability was classified as no [independent activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL)], some (independent ADL, dependent IADL), and severe limitation (dependent ADL). The prevalence of lifestyle risk factors (cigarette smoking, obesity, binge alcohol use, unhealthy diet, and physical inactivity) and utilization rate of a comprehensive list of preventive health services (risk factor counseling, disease management, vaccination, and cancer screening) were measured, across the disability categories. The prevalence of disability was 14.6% for some limitation and 10.3% for severe limitation. As disability increases, participants with unhealthy diet, physical inactivity, and obesity became more prevalent (8.8, 15.7, and 25.2% for no, some, and severe limitation, respectively) and fewer osteoporosis screenings were performed (51.5, 38.8, and 37.8%). Utilization of other services did not vary significantly across the disability categories, but participants with some or severe limitation were less likely than those without to receive needed health services overall (19.3% or 16.2 vs. 24.2%; P for trend = .047). In conclusion, disabled elderly adults have more undesirable lifestyle risk factors, but are less likely to receive needed health services than nondisabled counterparts. More attention is needed to this vulnerable population.

  14. Online learning management systems (LMS and sense of community: A pre-service practicum perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Rideout

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the impact of the implementation of an online learning management system (LMS on pre-service teachers during their major pre-service practicum. The LMS enabled students to remain connected to peers, professors, and supervisors while new relationships were formed with in-school personnel such as mentor teachers, principals, and students. The quantitative data analysis revealed that pre-service teachers perceived a higher sense of community when it included pre-service teachers only than when it included teaching faculty and part-time practicum supervisors. The online LMS was identified as the best predictor of a sense of community among pre-service teachers, when compared to other variables, and not a significant predictor when community included part-time practicum supervisors. The paper concludes with an examination of the perspectives of provincial Ministries of Education and Teachers Federations in relation to the role and evaluation of educational technology initiatives. Résumé: Cet article examine l’impact de l’implantation d’une plateforme eLearning (LMS sur de futurs enseignants en stage. La plateforme a permis aux étudiants de rester en contact avec leurs pairs, leur professeurs et leurs superviseurs, alors que de nouvelles relations se formaient avec la collectivité de l’école les accueillant pour leur stage (mentor, directeur d’école et élèves. L’analyse des données quantitatives a révélé que les futurs enseignants percevaient un meilleur esprit communautaire quand seuls les futurs enseignants en faisaient partie par opposition à une communauté composée des futurs enseignants, des professeurs de leur programme et les superviseurs à temps partiel de leur stage. La plateforme LMS a été identifiée comme le meilleur prédicteur de l’esprit communautaire chez les futurs enseignants par comparaison avec d’autres variables, et un prédicteur non significatif quand la communauté incluait

  15. Co-production in community mental health services: blurred boundaries or a game of pretend?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkegaard, Sine; Andersen, Ditte

    2018-02-25

    The concept of co-production suggests a collaborative production of public welfare services, across boundaries of participant categories, for example professionals, service users, peer-workers and volunteers. While co-production has been embraced in most European countries, the way in which it is translated into everyday practice remains understudied. Drawing on ethnographic data from Danish community mental health services, we attempt to fill this gap by critically investigating how participants interact in an organisational set-up with blurred boundaries between participant categories. In particular, we clarify under what circumstances the blurred boundaries emerge as believable. Theoretically, we combine Lamont and Molnár's (2002) distinction between symbolic boundaries and social boundaries with Goffman's (1974) microanalysis of "principles of convincingness". The article presents three findings: (1) co-production is employed as a symbolic resource for blurring social boundaries; (2) the believability of blurred boundaries is worked up through participants' access to resources of validation, knowledge and authority; and (3) incongruence between symbolic and social boundaries institutionalises practices where participants merely act 'as if' boundaries are blurred. Clarification of the principles of convincingness contributes to a general discussion of how co-production frames the everyday negotiation of symbolic and social boundaries in public welfare services. © 2018 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  16. Strengthening effective preventive services for refugee populations: toward communities of solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griswold, Kim S; Pottie, Kevin; Kim, Isok; Kim, Wooksoo; Lin, Li

    2018-01-01

    Refugee populations have unequal access to primary care and may not receive appropriate health screening or preventive service recommendations. They encounter numerous health care disadvantages as a consequence of low-income status, race and ethnicity, lower educational achievement, varying degrees of health literacy, and limited English proficiency. Refugees may not initially embrace the concept of preventive care, as these services may have been unavailable in their countries of origin, or may not be congruent with their beliefs on health care. Effective interventions in primary care include the appropriate use of culturally and linguistically trained interpreters for health care visits and use of evidence-based guidelines. Effective approaches for the delivery of preventive health and wellness services require community engagement and collaborations between public health and primary care. In order to provide optimal preventive and longitudinal screening services for refugees, policies and practice should be guided by unimpeded access to robust primary care systems. These systems should implement evidence-based guidelines, comprehensive health coverage, and evaluation of process and preventive care outcomes.

  17. The use of bedside ultrasound and community-based paracentesis in a palliative care service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landers A

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: There is little information, particularly in New Zealand, on the use of ultrasound to enhance clinical decision-making in a specialist palliative care service. Technological advances have resulted in increasingly portable, user-friendly ultrasound machines that can be used in the home setting to offer convenient access to this treatment option. AIM: To evaluate the clinical use of portable ultrasonography in the management of abdominal ascites in a community palliative care service. METHODS: Patients referred to the Nurse Maude Hospice and Palliative Care Service requiring assessment for abdominal ascites over 12 months were scanned using a newly purchased handheld ultrasound machine. The patients had a variety of diagnoses; the most common diagnosis was ovarian cancer. RESULTS: Forty-one ultrasound scans performed for 32 patients to assess for ascites drainage were recorded. Fluid was identified in 19 assessments and drainage undertaken in 17. Over half the scans were completed at home, allowing nine procedures to be performed safely and conveniently, which reduced time spent at the local hospital. There were no major complications. DISCUSSION: Ultrasonography is a tool that has not previously been utilised in palliative care locally, but has significant potential patient benefits. This novel use of technology also highlighted potential cost savings to the patient and health system, which may be beneficial to other palliative care services in New Zealand.

  18. Application of teledentistry in oral medicine in a community dental service, N. Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, M; Black, P; Noble, S; Thompson, R; Lamey, P J

    2010-10-23

    Currently, patients with oral medicine conditions from all areas of Northern Ireland are referred by dentists and doctors to a small number of specialist services: predominantly, the Regional Oral Medicine Consultant at the School of Dentistry, Belfast. On receipt of the referral the consultant makes an assessment of the urgency of the case and the patient is placed on a waiting list. Until the recent implementation of waiting list initiatives (Elective Access Protocol, Department of Health, N. Ireland, 2006), patients remained on the waiting list for long periods of time. Analysis of these patient profiles highlights that many need both multiple treatment and review appointments of their chronic conditions, and consequently remain in the hospital system for significant periods of time. This increases the waiting time for these services. The idea of using teledentistry to triage referrals, and its potential as a tool to support locally based treatment, poses an alternative approach to the management of oral medicine referrals. It may be of particular interest to practitioners in rural locations where distance from the regional centre is significant. In 2005, to test this theory, a prototype teledentistry system was set up as part of a service improvement scheme by the Community Dental Service of the Homefirst Legacy Trust (now Northern Trust) in partnership with the Oral Medicine Department at the School of Dentistry, Royal Group of Hospitals Legacy Trust (now Belfast Trust). This paper describes the feasibility study.

  19. A new financial budgetary system for community health services institutions in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Chuanmei; Yao, Lan; Fu, Jiakang; Wang, Fang; Wang, Hongqing; Dai, Tao

    2011-01-01

    The separation of revenue and expenditure budgets (SREB) is a new financial budgetary system that is being implemented in community health services (CHS) institutions in some areas in China. Through literature review, it was found that, derived from the traditional separation of revenue and expenditure budgets (TSREB) implemented in administrative public services units, SREB and TSREB have something in common and yet many more differences. On the basis of some quantitative and qualitative data that were collected by field survey, it was also found that implementation of SREB in CHS institutions brings positive outcomes in terms of the quantity, quality and efficiency of services; residents' satisfaction; and the behavior of CHS institutions. The conclusion can be suggested that SREB, as a system having impact upon the incentives facing CHS institutions and the nature of governmental responsibility for developing CHS in China, will promote CHS institutions to fulfill basic service functions if implemented well. Therefore, it is a system that is worth further development and evaluation. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Implementation of a new 'community' laboratory CD4 service in a rural health district in South Africa extends laboratory services and substantially improves local reporting turnaround time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzee, L M; Cassim, N; Glencross, D K

    2015-12-16

    The CD4 integrated service delivery model (ITSDM) provides for reasonable access to pathology services across South Africa (SA) by offering three new service tiers that extend services into remote, under-serviced areas. ITSDM identified Pixley ka Seme as such an under-serviced district. To address the poor service delivery in this area, a new ITSDM community (tier 3) laboratory was established in De Aar, SA. Laboratory performance and turnaround time (TAT) were monitored post implementation to assess the impact on local service delivery. Using the National Health Laboratory Service Corporate Data Warehouse, CD4 data were extracted for the period April 2012-July 2013 (n=11,964). Total mean TAT (in hours) was calculated and pre-analytical and analytical components assessed. Ongoing testing volumes, as well as external quality assessment performance across ten trials, were used to indicate post-implementation success. Data were analysed using Stata 12. Prior to the implementation of CD4 testing at De Aar, the total mean TAT was 20.5 hours. This fell to 8.2 hours post implementation, predominantly as a result of a lower pre-analytical mean TAT reducing from a mean of 18.9 to 1.8 hours. The analytical testing TAT remained unchanged after implementation and monthly test volumes increased by up to 20%. External quality assessment indicated adequate performance. Although subjective, questionnaires sent to facilities reported improved service delivery. Establishing CD4 testing in a remote community laboratory substantially reduces overall TAT. Additional community CD4 laboratories should be established in under-serviced areas, especially where laboratory infrastructure is already in place.