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Sample records for neutrons absorbed dose

  1. Neutron absorbed dose in a pacemaker CMOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borja H, C. G.; Guzman G, K. A.; Valero L, C.; Banuelos F, A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R.; Paredes G, L.

    2012-01-01

    The neutron spectrum and the absorbed dose in a Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS), has been estimated using Monte Carlo methods. Eventually a person with a pacemaker becomes an oncology patient that must be treated in a linear accelerator. Pacemaker has integrated circuits as CMOS that are sensitive to intense and pulsed radiation fields. Above 7 MV therapeutic beam is contaminated with photoneutrons that could damage the CMOS. Here, the neutron spectrum and the absorbed dose in a CMOS cell was calculated, also the spectra were calculated in two point-like detectors in the room. Neutron spectrum in the CMOS cell shows a small peak between 0.1 to 1 MeV and a larger peak in the thermal region, joined by epithermal neutrons, same features were observed in the point-like detectors. The absorbed dose in the CMOS was 1.522 x 10 -17 Gy per neutron emitted by the source. (Author)

  2. Neutron absorbed dose in a pacemaker CMOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borja H, C. G.; Guzman G, K. A.; Valero L, C.; Banuelos F, A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Paredes G, L., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2012-06-15

    The neutron spectrum and the absorbed dose in a Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS), has been estimated using Monte Carlo methods. Eventually a person with a pacemaker becomes an oncology patient that must be treated in a linear accelerator. Pacemaker has integrated circuits as CMOS that are sensitive to intense and pulsed radiation fields. Above 7 MV therapeutic beam is contaminated with photoneutrons that could damage the CMOS. Here, the neutron spectrum and the absorbed dose in a CMOS cell was calculated, also the spectra were calculated in two point-like detectors in the room. Neutron spectrum in the CMOS cell shows a small peak between 0.1 to 1 MeV and a larger peak in the thermal region, joined by epithermal neutrons, same features were observed in the point-like detectors. The absorbed dose in the CMOS was 1.522 x 10{sup -17} Gy per neutron emitted by the source. (Author)

  3. Fast neutron radiation inactivation of Bacillus subtilis: Absorbed dose determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Lingli; Zheng Chun; Ai Zihui; Li Junjie; Dai Shaofeng

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, fast neutron inactivation effects of Bacillus subtilis were investigated with fission fast neutrons from CFBR-II reactor of INPC (Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry) and mono-energetic neutrons from the Van de Graaff accelerator at Peking University. The method for determining the absorbed dose in the Bacillus subtilis suspension contained in test tubes is introduced. The absorbed dose, on account of its dependence on the volume and the form of confined state, was determined by combined experiments and Monte Carlo method. Using the calculation results of absorbed dose, the fast neutron inactivation effects on Bacillus subtilis were studied. The survival rates and absorbed dose curve was constructed. (authors)

  4. Estimate of absorbed dose received by individuals irradiated with neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, E.S. da; Mauricio, C.L.P.

    1995-01-01

    An innovating methodology is proposed to estimate the absorbed dose received by individuals irradiated with neutrons in an accident, even in the case that the victim is not using any kind of neutron dosemeter. The method combines direct measurements of 24 Na and 32 P activated in the human body. The calculation method was developed using data taken from previously published papers and experimental measurements. Other irradiations results in different neutron spectra prove the validity of the methodology here proposed. Using a whole body counter to measure 24 Na activity, it is possible to evaluate neutron absorbed doses in the order of 140 μGy of very soft (thermal) spectra. For fast neutron fields, the lower limit for neutron dose detection increases, but the present method continues to be very useful in accidents, with higher neutron doses. (author). 5 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  5. Neutron absorbed dose in a pacemaker CMOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borja H, C. G.; Guzman G, K. A.; Valero L, C. Y.; Banuelos F, A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Paredes G, L., E-mail: candy_borja@hotmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    The absorbed dose due to neutrons by a Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) has been estimated using Monte Carlo methods. Eventually a person with a pacemaker becomes a patient that must be treated by radiotherapy with a linear accelerator; the pacemaker has integrated circuits as CMOS that are sensitive to intense and pulsed radiation fields. When the Linac is working in Bremsstrahlung mode an undesirable neutron field is produced due to photoneutron reactions; these neutrons could damage the CMOS putting the patient at risk during the radiotherapy treatment. In order to estimate the neutron dose in the CMOS a Monte Carlo calculation was carried out where a full radiotherapy vault room was modeled with a W-made spherical shell in whose center was located the source term of photoneutrons produced by a Linac head operating in Bremsstrahlung mode at 18 MV. In the calculations a phantom made of tissue equivalent was modeled while a beam of photoneutrons was applied on the phantom prostatic region using a field of 10 x 10 cm{sup 2}. During simulation neutrons were isotropically transported from the Linac head to the phantom chest, here a 1 {theta} x 1 cm{sup 2} cylinder made of polystyrene was modeled as the CMOS, where the neutron spectrum and the absorbed dose were estimated. Main damages to CMOS are by protons produced during neutron collisions protective cover made of H-rich materials, here the neutron spectrum that reach the CMOS was calculated showing a small peak around 0.1 MeV and a larger peak in the thermal region, both connected through epithermal neutrons. (Author)

  6. Intermediate and fast neutron absorbed doses in fast neutron field at the RB reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokcic-Kostic, M.; Pesic, M.; Antic, D.

    1987-10-01

    The experimental fuel channel EFC is created as one of the fast neutron fields at the RB reactor. The intermediate and fast neutron spectra in EFC are measured by activation technique. The intermediate and fast neutron absorbed doses are computed on the basis of these experimental results. At the end the obtained doses are compared. (author)

  7. Measurement of neutron and gamma absorbed doses in phantoms exposed to mixed fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beraud-Sudreau, E.; Lemaire, G.; Maas, J.

    1985-01-01

    In order to study the dosimetric characteristics of PIN junctions, the absorbed doses measured by junctions and FLi7 in air and water phantoms were compared with the doses measured by classical neutron dosimetry in mixed fields. The validity of the experimental responses of PIN junctions being thus checked and established, neutron and gamma dose distributions in tissue equivalent plastic phantoms (plastinaut) and mammals (piglets) were evaluated as well as the absorbed dose distributions in the pig bone-marrow producing areas. By using correlatively a Monte-Carlo calculation method and applying some simplifying assumptions, the absorbed doses were derived from the spectrum of SILENE's neutrons at various depths inside a cubic water phantom and the results were compared with some from the literature [fr

  8. Genetic effects induced by neutrons in Drosophila melanogaster I. Determination of absorbed dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delfin, A.; Paredes, L.C.; Zambrano, F.; Guzman-Rincon, J.; Urena-Nunez, F.

    2001-01-01

    A method to obtain the absorbed dose in Drosophila melanogaster irradiated in the thermal column facility of the Triga Mark III Reactor has been developed. The method is based on the measurements of neutron activation of gold foils produced by neutron capture to obtain the neutron fluxes. These fluxes, combined with the calculations of kinetic energy released per unit mass, enables one to obtain the absorbed doses in Drosophila melanogaster

  9. Absorbed dose conversion coefficients for embryo and foetus in neutron fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.

    2007-01-01

    The Monte Carlo code MCNPX has been used to determine mean absorbed doses to the embryo and foetus when the mother is exposed to neutron fields. There are situations, such as on-board aircraft, where high-energy neutrons are often peaked in top down (TOP) direction. In addition to previous publications for standard irradiation geometries, this study provides absorbed dose conversion coefficients for the embryo of 8 weeks and the foetus of 3, 6 or 9 months at TOP irradiation geometry. The conversion coefficients are compared with the coefficients in isotropic irradiation (ISO). With increasing neutron energies, the conversion coefficients in TOP irradiation become dominant. A set of conversion coefficients is constructed from the higher value in either ISO or TOP irradiation at a given neutron energy. In cases where the irradiation geometry is not adequately known, this set of conversion coefficients can be used in a conservative dose assessment for embryo and foetus in neutron fields. (authors)

  10. Scaling neutron absorbed dose distributions from one medium to another

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awschalom, M.; Rosenberg, I.; Ten Haken, R.K.

    1982-11-01

    Central axis depth dose (CADD) and off-axis absorbed dose ratio (OAR) measurements were made in water, muscle and whole skeletal bone TE-solutions, mineral oil and glycerin with a clinical neutron therapy beam. These measurements show that, for a given neutron beam quality and field size, there is a universal CADD distribution at infinity if the depth in the phantom is expressed in terms of appropriate scaling lengths. These are essentially the kerma-weighted neutron mean free paths in the media. The method used in ICRU No. 26 to scale the CADD by the ratio of the densities is shown to give incorrect results. the OAR's measured in different media at depths proportional to the respective mean free paths were also found to be independent of the media to a good approximation. It is recommended that relative CADD and OAR measurements be performed in water because of its universality and convenience. A table of calculated scaling lengths is given for various neutron energy spectra and for various tissues and materials of practical importance in neutron dosimetry

  11. Axial distribution of absorbed doses in fast neutron field at the RB reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokcic-Kostic, M.; Pesic, M.; Antic, D.; Ninkovic, M.

    1988-11-01

    The coupled fast thermal system CFTS at the RB reactor is created for obtaining fast neutron fields. The axial distribution of fast neutron flux density in its second configuration (CFTS-2) is measured. The axial distribution of absorbed doses is computed on the basis of mentioned experimental results. At the end these experimental and computed results are given. (Author)

  12. Absorbed dose by a CMOS in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borja H, C. G.; Valero L, C. Y.; Guzman G, K. A.; Banuelos F, A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R.; Paredes G, L. C.

    2011-10-01

    Absorbed dose by a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuit as part of a pacemaker, has been estimated using Monte Carlo calculations. For a cancer patient who is a pacemaker carrier, scattered radiation could damage pacemaker CMOS circuits affecting patient's health. Absorbed dose in CMOS circuit due to scattered photons is too small and therefore is not the cause of failures in pacemakers, but neutron calculations shown an absorbed dose that could cause damage in CMOS due to neutron-hydrogen interactions. (Author)

  13. Absorbed dose by a CMOS in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borja H, C. G.; Valero L, C. Y.; Guzman G, K. A.; Banuelos F, A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Paredes G, L. C., E-mail: candy_borja@hotmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-10-15

    Absorbed dose by a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuit as part of a pacemaker, has been estimated using Monte Carlo calculations. For a cancer patient who is a pacemaker carrier, scattered radiation could damage pacemaker CMOS circuits affecting patient's health. Absorbed dose in CMOS circuit due to scattered photons is too small and therefore is not the cause of failures in pacemakers, but neutron calculations shown an absorbed dose that could cause damage in CMOS due to neutron-hydrogen interactions. (Author)

  14. Neutron relative biological effectiveness for solid cancer incidence in the Japanese A-bomb survivors: an analysis considering the degree of independent effects from γ-ray and neutron absorbed doses with hierarchical partitioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Linda [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Department Radiation Protection and Health, Oberschleissheim (Germany); University of Manchester, The Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2013-03-15

    It has generally been assumed that the neutron and γ-ray absorbed doses in the data from the life span study (LSS) of the Japanese A-bomb survivors are too highly correlated for an independent separation of the all solid cancer risks due to neutrons and due to γ-rays. However, with the release of the most recent data for all solid cancer incidence and the increased statistical power over previous datasets, it is instructive to consider alternatives to the usual approaches. Simple excess relative risk (ERR) models for radiation-induced solid cancer incidence fitted to the LSS epidemiological data have been applied with neutron and γ-ray absorbed doses as separate explanatory covariables. A simple evaluation of the degree of independent effects from γ-ray and neutron absorbed doses on the all solid cancer risk with the hierarchical partitioning (HP) technique is presented here. The degree of multi-collinearity between the γ-ray and neutron absorbed doses has also been considered. The results show that, whereas the partial correlation between the neutron and γ-ray colon absorbed doses may be considered to be high at 0.74, this value is just below the level beyond which remedial action, such as adding the doses together, is usually recommended. The resulting variance inflation factor is 2.2. Applying HP indicates that just under half of the drop in deviance resulting from adding the γ-ray and neutron absorbed doses to the baseline risk model comes from the joint effects of the neutrons and γ-rays - leaving a substantial proportion of this deviance drop accounted for by individual effects of the neutrons and γ-rays. The average ERR/Gy γ-ray absorbed dose and the ERR/Gy neutron absorbed dose that have been obtained here directly for the first time, agree well with previous indirect estimates. The average relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons relative to γ-rays, calculated directly from fit parameters to the all solid cancer ERR model with both

  15. Methods for absorbing neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillen, Donna P [Idaho Falls, ID; Longhurst, Glen R [Idaho Falls, ID; Porter, Douglas L [Idaho Falls, ID; Parry, James R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-07-24

    A conduction cooled neutron absorber may include a metal matrix composite that comprises a metal having a thermal neutron cross-section of at least about 50 barns and a metal having a thermal conductivity of at least about 1 W/cmK. Apparatus for providing a neutron flux having a high fast-to-thermal neutron ratio may include a source of neutrons that produces fast neutrons and thermal neutrons. A neutron absorber positioned adjacent the neutron source absorbs at least some of the thermal neutrons so that a region adjacent the neutron absorber has a fast-to-thermal neutron ratio of at least about 15. A coolant in thermal contact with the neutron absorber removes heat from the neutron absorber.

  16. Scaling neutron absorbed dose distributions from one medium to another

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awschalom, M.; Rosenberg, I.; Ten Haken, R.K.

    1983-01-01

    Central axis depth dose (CADD) and off-axis absorbed dose ratio (OAR) measurements were made in water, muscle and whole skeletal bone tissue-equivalent (TE) solutions, mineral oil, and glycerin with a clinical neutron therapy beam. These measurements show that, for a given neutron beam quality and field size, there is a universal CADD distribution at infinity if the depth in the phantom is expressed in terms of appropriate scaling lengths. These are essentially the kerma-weighted neutron mean free paths in the media. The method used in ICRU Report No. 26 to scale the CADD by the ratio of the densities is shown to give incorrect results. The OARs measured in different media at depths proportional to the respective mean free paths were also found to be independent of the media to a good approximation. Therefore, neutron beam CADDs and OARs may be measured in either TE solution (USA practice) or water (European practice), and having determined the respective scaling lengths, all measurements may be scaled from one medium to any other. It is recommended that for general treatment planning purposes, scaling be made to TE muscle with a density of 1.04 g cm -3 , since this value represents muscle and other soft tissues better than TE solution of density 1.07 g cm -3 . For such a transformation, relative measurements made in water are found to require very small corrections. Hence, it is further recommended that relative CADD and OAR measurements be performed in water because of its universality and convenience. Finally, a table of calculated scaling lengths is given for various neutron energy spectra and for various tissues and materials of practical importance in neutron dosimetry

  17. Neutron Absorbing Ability Variation in Neutron Absorbing Material Caused by the Neutron Irradiation in Spent Fuel Storage Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Hee Dong; Han, Seul Gi; Lee, Sang Dong; Kim, Ki Hong; Ryu, Eag Hyang; Park, Hwa Gyu [Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    In spent fuel storage facility like high density spent fuel storage racks and dry storage casks, spent fuels are stored with neutron absorbing materials installed as a part of those facilities, and they are used for absorbing neutrons emitted from spent fuels. Usually structural material with neutron absorbing material of racks and casks are located around spent fuels, so it is irradiated by neutrons for long time. Neutron absorbing ability could be changed by the variation of nuclide composition in neutron absorbing material caused by the irradiation of neutrons. So, neutron absorbing materials are continuously faced with spent fuels with boric acid solution or inert gas environment. Major nuclides in neutron absorbing material are Al{sup 27}, C{sup 12}, B{sup 11}, B{sup 10} and they are changed to numerous other ones as radioactive decay or neutron absorption reaction. The B{sup 10} content in neutron absorbing material dominates the neutron absorbing ability, so, the variation of nuclide composition including the decrease of B{sup 10} content is the critical factor on neutron absorbing ability. In this study, neutron flux in spent fuel, the activation of neutron absorbing material and the variation of nuclide composition are calculated. And, the minimum neutron flux causing the decrease of B{sup 10} content is calculated in spent fuel storage facility. Finally, the variation of neutron multiplication factor is identified according to the one of B{sup 10} content in neutron absorbing material. The minimum neutron flux to impact the neutron absorbing ability is 10{sup 10} order, however, usual neutron flux from spent fuel is 10{sup 8} order. Therefore, even though neutron absorbing material is irradiated for over 40 years, B{sup 10} content is little decreased, so, initial neutron absorbing ability could be kept continuously.

  18. RBE/absorbed dose relationship of d(50)-Be neutrons determined for early intestinal tolerance in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueulette, J.; Wambersie, A.

    1978-01-01

    RBE/absorbed dose relationship of d(50)-Be neutrons (ref.: 60 Co) was determined using intestinal tolerance in mice (LD50) after single and fractionated irradiation. RBE is 1.8 for a single fraction (about 1000 rad 60 Co dose); it increases when decreasing dose and reaches the plateau value of 2.8 for a 60 Co dose of about 200 rad. This RBE value is used for the clinical applications with the cyclotron 'Cyclone' at Louvain-la-Neuve [fr

  19. Quantitative neutron radiography using neutron absorbing honeycomb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaki, Masayoshi; Oda, Masahiro; Takahashi, Kenji; Ohkubo, Kohei; Tasaka, Kanji; Tsuruno, Akira; Matsubayashi, Masahito.

    1993-01-01

    This investigation concerns quantitative neutron radiography and computed tomography by using a neutron absorbing honeycomb collimator. By setting the neutron absorbing honeycomb collimator between object and imaging system, neutrons scattered in the object were absorbed by the honeycomb material and eliminated before coming to the imaging system, but the neutrons which were transmitted the object without interaction could reach the imaging system. The image by purely transmitted neutrons gives the quantitative information. Two honeycombs were prepared with coating of boron nitride and gadolinium oxide and evaluated for the quantitative application. The relation between the neutron total cross section and the attenuation coefficient confirmed that they were in a fairly good agreement. Application to quantitative computed tomography was also successfully conducted. The new neutron radiography method using the neutron-absorbing honeycomb collimator for the elimination of the scattered neutrons improved remarkably the quantitativeness of the neutron radiography and computed tomography. (author)

  20. Response functions for computing absorbed dose to skeletal tissues from neutron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, Amir A.; Johnson, Perry; Jokisch, Derek W.; Eckerman, Keith F.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2011-11-01

    Spongiosa in the adult human skeleton consists of three tissues—active marrow (AM), inactive marrow (IM) and trabecularized mineral bone (TB). AM is considered to be the target tissue for assessment of both long-term leukemia risk and acute marrow toxicity following radiation exposure. The total shallow marrow (TM50), defined as all tissues lying within the first 50 µm of the bone surfaces, is considered to be the radiation target tissue of relevance for radiogenic bone cancer induction. For irradiation by sources external to the body, kerma to homogeneous spongiosa has been used as a surrogate for absorbed dose to both of these tissues, as direct dose calculations are not possible using computational phantoms with homogenized spongiosa. Recent micro-CT imaging of a 40 year old male cadaver has allowed for the accurate modeling of the fine microscopic structure of spongiosa in many regions of the adult skeleton (Hough et al 2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 2309-46). This microstructure, along with associated masses and tissue compositions, was used to compute specific absorbed fraction (SAF) values for protons originating in axial and appendicular bone sites (Jokisch et al 2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 6857-72). These proton SAFs, bone masses, tissue compositions and proton production cross sections, were subsequently used to construct neutron dose-response functions (DRFs) for both AM and TM50 targets in each bone of the reference adult male. Kerma conditions were assumed for other resultant charged particles. For comparison, AM, TM50 and spongiosa kerma coefficients were also calculated. At low incident neutron energies, AM kerma coefficients for neutrons correlate well with values of the AM DRF, while total marrow (TM) kerma coefficients correlate well with values of the TM50 DRF. At high incident neutron energies, all kerma coefficients and DRFs tend to converge as charged-particle equilibrium is established across the bone site. In the range of 10 eV to 100 Me

  1. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jor-Shan [El Cerrito, CA; Farmer, Joseph C [Tracy, CA; Lee, Chuck K [Hayward, CA; Walker, Jeffrey [Gaithersburg, MD; Russell, Paige [Las Vegas, NV; Kirkwood, Jon [Saint Leonard, MD; Yang, Nancy [Lafayette, CA; Champagne, Victor [Oxford, PA

    2012-05-29

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  2. TLD-300 detectors for separate measurement of total and gamma absorbed dose distributions of single, multiple, and moving-field neutron treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rassow, J.

    1984-01-01

    Fast neutron therapy requirements, because of the poor depth dose characteristic of present therapeutical sources, are at least as complex in treatment plans as photon therapy. The physical part of the treatment planning is very important; however, it is much more complicated than for photons or electrons owing to the need for: Separation of total and gamma absorbed dose distributions (Dsub(T) and Dsub(G)); and more stringent tissue-equivalence conditions of phantoms than in photon therapy. Therefore, methods of clinical dosimetry for the separate determination of total and gamma absorbed dose distributions in irregularly shaped (inhomogeneous) phantoms are needed. A method using TLD-300 (CaF 2 :Tm) detectors is described, which is able to give an approximate solution of the above-mentioned dosimetric requirements. The two independent doses, Dsub(T) and Dsub(G), can be calculated by an on-line computer analysis of the digitalized glow curve of TLD-300 detectors, irradiated with d(14)+Be neutrons of the cyclotron isocentric neutron therapy facility CIRCE in Essen. Results are presented for depth and lateral absorbed dose distributions (Dsub(T) and Dsub(G)) for fixed neutron beams of different field sizes compared with measurements by standard procedures (TE-TE ionization chamber, GM counter) in an A-150 phantom. The TLD-300 results for multiple and moving-field treatments (with and without wedge filters) in a patient simulating irregularly shaped (inhomogeneous) phantoms, are shown together with computer calculations of these dose distributions. The probable causes for some systematic deviations are discussed, which lead to open problems for further investigations owing to features of the detector material and the evaluation method, but mainly to differences in the composition of phantom materials used for the calculations (standard dose distributions) and TLD-300 measurements. (author)

  3. Neutron fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for embryo and fetus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.; Meyerhof, D.; Vlahovich, S.

    2004-01-01

    A problem of concern in radiation protection is the exposure of pregnant women to ionising radiation, because of the high radiosensitivity of the embryo and fetus. External neutron exposure is of concern when pregnant women travel by aeroplane. Dose assessments for neutrons frequently rely on fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients. While neutron fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for adults are recommended in International Commission on Radiological Protection publications and International Commission on Radiological Units and Measurements reports, conversion coefficients for embryos and fetuses are not given in the publications. This study undertakes Monte Carlo calculations to determine the mean absorbed doses to the embryo and fetus when the mother is exposed to neutron fields. A new set of mathematical models for the embryo and fetus has been developed at Health Canada and is used together with mathematical phantoms of a pregnant female developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Monoenergetic neutrons from 1 eV to 10 MeV are considered in this study. The irradiation geometries include antero-posterior (AP), postero-anterior (PA), lateral (LAT), rotational (ROT) and isotropic (ISO) geometries. At each of these standard irradiation geometries, absorbed doses to the fetal brain and body are calculated; for the embryo at 8 weeks and the fetus at 3, 6 or 9 months. Neutron fluence-to-absorbed dose conversion coefficients are derived for the four age groups. Neutron fluence-to-equivalent dose conversion coefficients are given for the AP irradiations which yield the highest radiation dose to the fetal body in the neutron energy range considered here. The results indicate that for neutrons <10 MeV more protection should be given to pregnant women in the first trimester due to the higher absorbed dose per unit neutron fluence to the fetus. (authors)

  4. Neutron fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for embryo and fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Meyerhof, Dorothy; Vlahovich, Slavica

    2004-01-01

    A problem of concern in radiation protection is the exposure of pregnant women to ionising radiation, because of the high radiosensitivity of the embryo and fetus. External neutron exposure is of concern when pregnant women travel by aeroplane. Dose assessments for neutrons frequently rely on fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients. While neutron fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for adults are recommended in International Commission on Radiological Protection publications and International Commission on Radiological Units and Measurements reports, conversion coefficients for embryos and fetuses are not given in the publications. This study undertakes Monte Carlo calculations to determine the mean absorbed doses to the embryo and fetus when the mother is exposed to neutron fields. A new set of mathematical models for the embryo and fetus has been developed at Health Canada and is used together with mathematical phantoms of a pregnant female developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Monoenergetic neutrons from 1 eV to 10 MeV are considered in this study. The irradiation geometries include antero-posterior (AP), postero-anterior (PA), lateral (LAT), rotational (ROT) and isotropic (ISO) geometries. At each of these standard irradiation geometries, absorbed doses to the fetal brain and body are calculated; for the embryo at 8 weeks and the fetus at 3, 6 or 9 months. Neutron fluence-to-absorbed dose conversion coefficients are derived for the four age groups. Neutron fluence-to-equivalent dose conversion coefficients are given for the AP irradiations which yield the highest radiation dose to the fetal body in the neutron energy range considered here. The results indicate that for neutrons <10 MeV more protection should be given to pregnant women in the first trimester due to the higher absorbed dose per unit neutron fluence to the fetus.

  5. Wide-range neutron dose determination with CR-39

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arneja, A.R.; Waker, A.J.

    1995-01-01

    Optical density measurements of CR-30 irradiated with 252 Cf neutrons and chemically etched with 6.5 N KOH solution have been used to determine neutron absorbed doses between 0.1 and 10 Gy. Optimum etching conditions will depend upon the absorbed dose. Since it is not always possible to know the range of absorbed dose on a CR-39 dosemeter collected from personnel and area monitor stations in a criticality accident situation, a three-step two-hour chemical etch at 60 o C has been found to be appropriate. If after a total of six hours of chemical etching the optical density is found to be below 0.04 for 500 nm light (transmission > 90%) then further treatment in the form of electrochemical etching can be carried out to determine the lower absorbed dose. In this manner, absorbed doses below 0.1 Gy can be determined by counting tracks over a unit area. (author)

  6. Prediction of in-phantom dose distribution using in-air neutron beam characteristics for BNCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verbeke, Jerome M.

    1999-01-01

    A monoenergetic neutron beam simulation study is carried out to determine the optimal neutron energy range for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis using radiation synovectomy. The goal of the treatment is the ablation of diseased synovial membranes in joints, such as knees and fingers. This study focuses on human knee joints. Two figures-of-merit are used to measure the neutron beam quality, the ratio of the synovium absorbed dose to the skin absorbed dose, and the ratio of the synovium absorbed dose to the bone absorbed dose. It was found that (a) thermal neutron beams are optimal for treatment, (b) similar absorbed dose rates and therapeutic ratios are obtained with monodirectional and isotropic neutron beams. Computation of the dose distribution in a human knee requires the simulation of particle transport from the neutron source to the knee phantom through the moderator. A method was developed to predict the dose distribution in a knee phantom from any neutron and photon beam spectra incident on the knee. This method was revealed to be reasonably accurate and enabled one to reduce by a factor of 10 the particle transport simulation time by modeling the moderator only

  7. Prediction of in-phantom dose distribution using in-air neutron beam characteristics for BNCS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verbeke, Jerome M.

    1999-12-14

    A monoenergetic neutron beam simulation study is carried out to determine the optimal neutron energy range for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis using radiation synovectomy. The goal of the treatment is the ablation of diseased synovial membranes in joints, such as knees and fingers. This study focuses on human knee joints. Two figures-of-merit are used to measure the neutron beam quality, the ratio of the synovium absorbed dose to the skin absorbed dose, and the ratio of the synovium absorbed dose to the bone absorbed dose. It was found that (a) thermal neutron beams are optimal for treatment, (b) similar absorbed dose rates and therapeutic ratios are obtained with monodirectional and isotropic neutron beams. Computation of the dose distribution in a human knee requires the simulation of particle transport from the neutron source to the knee phantom through the moderator. A method was developed to predict the dose distribution in a knee phantom from any neutron and photon beam spectra incident on the knee. This method was revealed to be reasonably accurate and enabled one to reduce by a factor of 10 the particle transport simulation time by modeling the moderator only.

  8. Influence of the neutron flux shape on the value of absorbed neutron dose; Uticaj oblika neutronskog spektra na vrednost apsorbovane doze neutrona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miric, I; Miric, P [Institute of nuclear sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1974-07-01

    This paper deals with the study od specific doses dependence on the type and approximation procedures of neutron spectra. Values of specific dose rates (dose per neutron cm{sub 2}) were analysed for neutron spectra from RB reactor in Vinca, Crac facility in Valduc (France) and HPRR reactor in Oak Ridge (USA). Data used in this analysis were obtained by methods used in Harwell (AERE), Oak Ridge (ORNL), Chalk River (AECL), CEN de Cadarache (CEA) and in the Boris Kidric Institute (IBK). Specific absorbed neutron doses were determined for each of the estimated spectra and presented in the form of kerma/(n.cm{sup -2}) and rad/((n.cm{sup -2}) units. The obtained results have shown the influence of the flux approximation procedure on the values of conversion factors for obtaining neutron doses from neutron flux. U okviru ovog rada radjeno je na ispitivanju zavisnosti specificnih doza od vrste i nacina aproksimacije neutronskog spektra. U radu su analizirane vrednosti specificnih doza (doza po n.cm{sup -2}) za neutronske spektre koji se dobijaju oko sledecih nuklearnih postrojenja: reaktora RB u Vinci, postrojenja CRAC u Valduc-u (Francuska), reaktora HPRR u Oak Ridge-u (SAD). Za analizu su korisceni podaci dobijeni metodama koje se koriste u nuklearnim centrima Harwell (AERE), Oak Ridge-u (ORNL), Chalk River-u (AECL), CEN de Cadarache (CEA) i Institutu Boris Kidric (IBK). Za svaki procenjeni spektar odredjene su specificne apsorbovane doze neutrona izrazene u kerma/(n.cm{sup -2}) i rad/(n.cm{sup -2}) jedinicama. Dobijeni rezultati su pokazali koliko nacin aproksimacije spektra utice na vrednost konverzionih faktora koji sluze za prelazak sa fluksa na dozu neutrona (author)

  9. Age-dependent conversion coefficients for organ doses and effective doses for external neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizaki, Chihiro; Endo, Akira; Takahashi, Fumiaki

    2006-06-01

    To utilize dose assessment of the public for external neutron irradiation, conversion coefficients of absorbed doses of organs and effective doses were calculated using the numerical simulation technique for six different ages (adult, 15, 10, 5 and 1 years and newborn), which represent the member of the public. Calculations were performed using six age-specific anthropomorphic phantoms and a Monte Carlo radiation transport code for two irradiation geometries, anterior-posterior and rotational geometries, for 20 incident energies from thermal to 20 MeV. Effective doses defined by the 1990 Recommendation of ICRP were calculated from the absorbed doses in 21 organs. The calculated results were tabulated in the form of absorbed doses and effective doses per unit neutron fluence. The calculated conversion coefficients are used for dose assessment of the public around nuclear facilities and accelerator facilities. (author)

  10. Three dimensional measurements of absorbed dose in BNCT by Fricke-gel imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambarini, G.; Agosteo, S.; Marchesi, P.; Nava, E.; Palazzi, P.; Pecci, A.; Rosa, R.; Rosi, G.; Tinti, R.

    2001-01-01

    A method has been studied for absorbed dose imaging and profiling in a phantom exposed to thermal or epithermal neutron fields, also discriminating between various contributions to the absorbed dose. The proposed technique is based on optical imaging of FriXy-gel phantoms, which are proper tissue-equivalent phantoms acting as continuous dosimeters. Convenient modifications in phantom composition allow, from differential measurements, the discrimination of various contributions to the absorbed dose. The dosimetry technique is based on a chemical dosimeter incorporated in a tissue-equivalent gel (Agarose). The chemical dosimeter is a ferrous sulphate solution (which is the main component of the standard Fricke dosimeter) added with a metal ion indicator (Xylenol Orange). The absorbed dose is measured by analysing the variation of gel optical absorption in the visible spectrum, imaged by means of a CCD camera provided with a suitable filter. The technique validity has been tested by irradiating and analysing phantoms in the thermal facility of the fast research reactor TAPIRO (ENEA, Casaccia, Italy). In a cylindrical phantom simulating a head, we have imaged the therapy dose from thermal neutron reactions with 10 B and the dose in healthy tissue not containing boron. In tissue without boron, we have discriminated between the two main contributions to the absorbed dose, which comes from the 1 H(n,γ) 2 H and 14 N(n,p) 14 C reactions. The comparison with the results of other experimental techniques and of simulations reveals that the technique is very promising. A method for the discrimination of fast neutron contribution to the absorbed dose, still in an experimental stage, is proposed too. (author)

  11. Absorbing rods for nuclear fast neutron reactor absorbing assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aji, M.; Ballagny, A.; Haze, R.

    1986-01-01

    The invention proposes a neutron absorber rod for neutron absorber assembly of a fast neutron reactor. The assembly comprises a bundle of vertical rods, each one comprising a stack of pellets made of a neutron absorber material contained in a long metallic casing with a certain radial play with regard to this casing; this casing includes traps for splinters from the pellets which may appear during reactor operation, at the level of contact between adjacent pellets. The present invention prevents the casing from rupture involved by the disintegration of the pellets producing pieces of boron carbide of high hardness [fr

  12. Determination of absorbed dose in reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1971-01-01

    There are many areas in the use and operation of research reactors where the absorbed dose and the neutron fluence are required. These include work on the determination of the radiolytic stability of the coolant and moderator and on the determination of radiation damage in structural materials, and reactor experiments involving radiation chemistry and radiation biology. The requirements range from rough estimates of the total heating due to radiation to precise values specifying the contributions of gamma rays, thermal neutrons and fast neutrons. To meet all these requirements a variety of experimental measurements and calculations as well as a knowledge of reactor radiations and their interactions is necessary. Realizing the complexity and importance of this field, its development at widely separated laboratories and the need to bring the experts in this work together, the IAEA has convened three panel meetings. These were: 'In-pile dosimetry', held in July 1964 (published by the Agency as Technical Reports Series No. 46); 'Neutron fluence measurements', in October 1965; and 'In-pile dosimetry', in November 1966. The recommendations of these three panels led the Agency to form a Working Group on Reactor Radiation Measurements and to commission the writing of this book and a book on Neutron Fluence Measurements. The latter was published in May 1970 (Technical Reports Series No. 107). The material on neutron fluence and absorbed dose measurements is widely scattered in reports and reviews. It was considered that it was time for all relevant information to be evaluated and put together in the form of a practical guide that would be valuable both to experienced workers and beginners in the field

  13. Neutron absorbers and methods of forming at least a portion of a neutron absorber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillen, Donna P; Porter, Douglas L; Swank, W David; Erickson, Arnold W

    2014-12-02

    Methods of forming at least a portion of a neutron absorber include combining a first material and a second material to form a compound, reducing the compound into a plurality of particles, mixing the plurality of particles with a third material, and pressing the mixture of the plurality of particles and the third material. One or more components of neutron absorbers may be formed by such methods. Neutron absorbers may include a composite material including an intermetallic compound comprising hafnium aluminide and a matrix material comprising pure aluminum.

  14. Development of highly effective neutron shields and neutron absorbing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuda, K.; Matsuda, F.; Taniuchi, H.; Yuhara, T.; Iida, T.

    1993-01-01

    A wide range of materials, including polymers and hydrogen-occluded alloys that might be usable as the neutron shielding material were examined. And a wide range of materials, including aluminum alloys that might be usable as the neutron-absorbing material were examined. After screening, the candidate material was determined on the basis of evaluation regarding its adaptabilities as a high-performance neutron-shielding and neutron-absorbing material. This candidate material was manufactured for trial, after which material properties tests, neutron-shielding tests and neutron-absorbing tests were carried out on it. The specifications of this material were thus determined. This research has resulted in materials of good performance; a neutron-shielding material based on ethylene propylene rubber and titanium hydride, and a neutron-absorbing material based on aluminum and titanium hydride. (author)

  15. Burnable neutron absorbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, K.C.; Carlson, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    A neutron-absorber body for use in burnable poison rods in a nuclear reactor. The body is composed of a matrix of Al 2 O 3 containing B 4 C, the neutron absorber. Areas of high density polycrystalline Al 2 O 3 particles are predominantly encircled by pores in some of which there are B 4 C particles. This body is produced by initially spray drying a slurry of A1 2 O 3 powder to which a binder has been added. The powder of agglomerated spheres of the A1 2 O 3 with the binder are dry mixed with B 4 C powder. The mixed powder is formed into a green body by isostatic pressure and the green body is sintered. The sintered body is processed to form the neutron-absorber body. In this case the B 4 C particles are separate from the spheres resulting from the spray drying instead of being embedded in the sphere

  16. Neutron absorbing article

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naum, R.G.; Owens, D.P.; Dooker, G.I.

    1981-01-01

    A neutron-absorbing article suitable for use in spent fuel racks is described. It comprises boron carbide particles, diluent particles, and a phenolic polymer cured to a continuous matrix. The diluent may be silicon carbide, graphite, amorphous carbon, alumina, or silica. The combined boron carbide-diluent phase contains no more than 2 percent B 2 O 3 , and the neutron-absorbing article contains from 20 to 40 percent phenol resin. The ratio of boron carbide to diluent particles is in the range 1:9 to 9:1

  17. Absorbed dose to water determination with ionization chamber dosimetry and calorimetry in restricted neutron, photon, proton and heavy-ion radiation fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brede, H J; Greif, K-D; Hecker, O; Heeg, P; Heese, J; Jones, D T L; Kluge, H; Schardt, D

    2006-08-07

    Absolute dose measurements with a transportable water calorimeter and ionization chambers were performed at a water depth of 20 mm in four different types of radiation fields, for a collimated (60)Co photon beam, for a collimated neutron beam with a fluence-averaged mean energy of 5.25 MeV, for collimated proton beams with mean energies of 36 MeV and 182 MeV at the measuring position, and for a (12)C ion beam in a scanned mode with an energy per atomic mass of 430 MeV u(-1). The ionization chambers actually used were calibrated in units of air kerma in the photon reference field of the PTB and in units of absorbed dose to water for a Farmer-type chamber at GSI. The absorbed dose to water inferred from calorimetry was compared with the dose derived from ionometry by applying the radiation-field-dependent parameters. For neutrons, the quantities of the ICRU Report 45, for protons the quantities of the ICRU Report 59 and for the (12)C ion beam, the recommended values of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) protocol (TRS 398) were applied. The mean values of the absolute absorbed dose to water obtained with these two independent methods agreed within the standard uncertainty (k = 1) of 1.8% for calorimetry and of 3.0% for ionometry for all types and energies of the radiation beams used in this comparison.

  18. Estimated neutron dose to embryo and foetus during commercial flight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.; Lewis, B. J.; Bennett, L. G. I.; Green, A. R.; Tracy, B. L.

    2005-01-01

    A study has been carried out to assess the radiation exposure from cosmic-ray neutrons to the embryo and foetus of pregnant aircrew and air travellers in consideration of the radiation exposure from cosmic-ray neutrons to the embryo and foetus. A Monte Carlo analysis was performed to determine the equivalent dose from neutrons to the brain and body of an embryo at 8 weeks and to the foetus at the 3, 6 and 9 month periods. Neutron fluence-to-absorbed dose conversion coefficients for the foetal brain and for the entire foetal body (isotropic irradiation geometry) have been determined at the four developmental stages. The equivalent dose rate to the foetus during commercial flights has been further evaluated considering the fluence-to-absorbed dose conversion coefficients, a neutron spectrum measured at an altitude of 11.3 km and an ICRP-92 radiation-weighting factor for neutrons. This study indicates that the foetus can exceed the annual dose limit of 1 mSv for the general public after, for example, 15 round trips on commercial trans-Atlantic flights. (authors)

  19. Neutron absorbing article

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naum, R.G.; Owens, D.P.; Dooher, G.I.

    1979-01-01

    A neutron absorbing article, in flat plate form and suitable for use in a storage rack for spent fuel, includes boron carbide particles, diluent particles and a solid, irreversibly cured phenolic polymer cured to a continuous matrix binding the boron carbide and diluent particles. The total conent of boron carbide and diluent particles is a major proportion of the article and the content of cured phenolic polymer present is a minor proportion. By regulation of the ratio of boron carbide particles to diluent particles, normally within the range of 1:9 and 9:1 and preferably within the range of 1:5 to 5:1, the neutron absorbing activity of the product may be controlled, which facilitates the manufacture of articles of particular absorbing activities best suitable for specific applications

  20. Monte Carlo calculations of lung dose in ORNL phantom for boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krstic, D.; Markovic, V.M.; Jovanovic, Z.; Milenkovic, B.; Nikezic, D.; Atanackovic, J.

    2014-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed to evaluate dose for possible treatment of cancers by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The computational model of male Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) phantom was used to simulate tumours in the lung. Calculations have been performed by means of the MCNP5/X code. In this simulation, two opposite neutron beams were considered, in order to obtain uniform neutron flux distribution inside the lung. The obtained results indicate that the lung cancer could be treated by BNCT under the assumptions of calculations. The difference in evaluated dose in cancer and normal lung tissue suggests that BNCT could be applied for the treatment of cancers. The difference in exposure of cancer and healthy tissue can be observed, so the healthy tissue can be spared from damage. An absorbed dose ratio of metastatic tissue-to-the healthy tissue was ∼5. Absorbed dose to all other organs was low when compared with the lung dose. Absorbed dose depth distribution shows that BNC therapy can be very useful in the treatments for tumour. The ratio of the tumour absorbed dose and irradiated healthy tissue absorbed dose was also ∼5. It was seen that an elliptical neutron field was better irradiation choice. (authors)

  1. DOSE-Analyzer. A computer program with graphical user interface to analyze absorbed dose inside a body of mouse and human upon external neutron exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Daiki; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Shigemori, Yuji; Sakamoto, Kensaku

    2010-06-01

    DOSE-Analyzer is a computer program to retrieve the dose information from a database and generate a graph through a graphical user interface (GUI). The database is constructed for absorbed dose, fluence, and energy distribution inside a body of mouse and human exposed upon external neutrons, which is calculated by our developed Monte-Carlo simulation method using voxel-based phantom and particle transport code PHITS. The input configurations of irradiation geometry, subject, and energy are set by GUI. The results are tabulated at particle types, i.e. electron, proton, deuteron, triton, and alpha particle, and target organs on a data sheet of Microsoft Office Excel TM . Simple analysis to compare the output values for two subjects is also performed on DOSE-Analyzer. This report is a user manual of DOSE-Analyzer. (author)

  2. Effects of high neutron doses and duration of the chemical etching on the optical properties of CR-39

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, G.S.; Tripathy, S.P.; Paul, S.; Sharma, S.C.; Joshi, D.S.; Gupta, A.K.; Bandyopadhyay, T.

    2015-01-01

    Effects of the duration of chemical etching on the transmittance, absorbance and optical band gap width of the CR-39 (Polyallyl diglycol carbonate) detectors irradiated to high neutron doses (12.7, 22.1, 36.0 and 43.5 Sv) were studied. The neutrons were produced by bombardment of a thick Be target with 12 MeV protons of different fluences. The unirradiated and neutron-irradiated CR-39 detectors were subjected to a stepwise chemical etching at 1 h intervals. After each step, the transmission spectra of the detectors were recorded in the range from 200 to 900 nm, and the absorbances and optical band gap widths were determined. The effect of the etching on the light transmittance of unirradiated detectors was insignificant, whereas it was very significant in the case of the irradiated detectors. The dependence of the optical absorbance on the neutron dose is linear at short etching periods, but exponential at longer ones. The optical band gap narrows with increasing etching time. It is more significant for the irradiated dosimeters than for the unirradiated ones. The rate of the narrowing of the optical band gap with increasing neutron dose increases with increasing duration of the etching. - Highlights: • The variation of optical properties of CR-39 at very high neutron dose is analyzed. Etching process is found to play a crucial role for change in optical properties of neutron-irradiated CR-39. • The optical absorbance varies linearly at lower dose, at very high dose absorbance saturation occurs. The dose at which saturation absorbance is observed shifts towards lower neutron dose with increase in etching time. • The rate of decrease in optical band gap with respect to neutron dose is found to be more at higher etching durations

  3. Burnable neutron absorbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, K.C.; Carlson, W.G.

    1985-01-01

    This patent deals with the fabrication of pellets for neutron absorber rods. Such a pellet includes a matrix of a refractory material which may be aluminum or zirconium oxide, and a burnable poison distributed throughout the matrix. The neutron absorber material may consist of one or more elements or compounds of the metals boron, gadolinium, samarium, cadmium, europium, hafnium, dysprosium and indium. The method of fabricating pellets of these materials outlined in this patent is designed to produce pores or voids in the pellets that can be used to take up the expansion of the burnable poison and to absorb the helium gas generated. In the practice of this invention a slurry of Al 2 O 3 is produced. A hard binder is added and the slurry and binder are spray dried. This powder is mixed with dry B 4 C powder, forming a homogeneous mixture. This mixture is pressed into green tubes which are then sintered. During sintering the binder volatilizes leaving a ceramic with nearly spherical high-density regions of

  4. Advances in absorbed dose measurement standards at the australian radiation laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boas, J.F.; Hargrave, N.J.; Huntley, R.B.; Kotler, L.H.; Webb, D.V.; Wise, K.N.

    1996-01-01

    The applications of ionising radiation in the medical and industrial fields require both an accurate knowledge of the amount of ionising radiation absorbed by the medium in question and the capability of relating this to National and International standards. The most useful measure of the amount of radiation is the absorbed dose which is defined as the energy absorbed per unit mass. For radiotherapy, the reference medium is water, even though the measurement of the absorbed dose to water is not straightforward. Two methods are commonly used to provide calibrations in absorbed dose to water. The first is the calibration of the chamber in terms of exposure in a Cobalt-60 beam, followed by the conversion by a protocol into dose to water in this and higher energy beams. The other route is via the use of a graphite calorimeter as a primary standard device, where the conversion from absorbed dose to graphite to absorbed dose in water is performed either by theoretical means making use of cavity ionisation theory, or by experiment where the graphite calorimeter and secondary standard ionisation chamber are placed at scaled distances from the source of the radiation beam (known as the Dose-Ratio method). Extensive measurements have been made at Cobalt-60 at ARL using both the exposure and absorbed dose to graphite routes. Agreement between the ARL measurements and those based on standards maintained by ANSTO and NPL is within ± 0.3%. Absorbed dose measurements have also been performed at ARL with photon beams of nominal energy 16 and 19 MeV obtained from the ARL linac. The validity of the protocols at high photon energies, the validity of the methods used to convert from absorbed dose in graphite to absorbed dose in water and the validity of the indices used to specify the beams are discussed. Brief mention will also be made of the establishment of a calibration facility for neutron monitors at ARL and of progress in the development of ERP dosimetry

  5. Advances in absorbed dose measurement standards at the australian radiation laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boas, J.F.; Hargrave, N.J.; Huntley, R.B.; Kotler, L.H.; Webb, D.V.; Wise, K.N. [Australian Radiation Laboratory, Yallambie, VIC (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    The applications of ionising radiation in the medical and industrial fields require both an accurate knowledge of the amount of ionising radiation absorbed by the medium in question and the capability of relating this to National and International standards. The most useful measure of the amount of radiation is the absorbed dose which is defined as the energy absorbed per unit mass. For radiotherapy, the reference medium is water, even though the measurement of the absorbed dose to water is not straightforward. Two methods are commonly used to provide calibrations in absorbed dose to water. The first is the calibration of the chamber in terms of exposure in a Cobalt-60 beam, followed by the conversion by a protocol into dose to water in this and higher energy beams. The other route is via the use of a graphite calorimeter as a primary standard device, where the conversion from absorbed dose to graphite to absorbed dose in water is performed either by theoretical means making use of cavity ionisation theory, or by experiment where the graphite calorimeter and secondary standard ionisation chamber are placed at scaled distances from the source of the radiation beam (known as the Dose-Ratio method). Extensive measurements have been made at Cobalt-60 at ARL using both the exposure and absorbed dose to graphite routes. Agreement between the ARL measurements and those based on standards maintained by ANSTO and NPL is within {+-} 0.3%. Absorbed dose measurements have also been performed at ARL with photon beams of nominal energy 16 and 19 MeV obtained from the ARL linac. The validity of the protocols at high photon energies, the validity of the methods used to convert from absorbed dose in graphite to absorbed dose in water and the validity of the indices used to specify the beams are discussed. Brief mention will also be made of the establishment of a calibration facility for neutron monitors at ARL and of progress in the development of ERP dosimetry.

  6. Current in-pile absorbed dose measurements at the Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences - Vinca, Status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draganic, G I [Institute of nuclear sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1966-11-15

    So far in-pile absorbed dose measurements have been limited only to experiments in the RA reactor at the Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences at Vinca (6.5 D{sub 2}O moderated and 2% enriched uranium). The methods used for absorbed dose and neutron flux measurements were 1,2 discussed in some earlier reports at the IAEA meetings. The purpose of the present report is to illustrate the further development of methods of determining in-pile absorbed doses (author)

  7. Discrimination of various contributions to the absorbed dose in BNCT: Fricke-gel imaging and intercomparison with other experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambarini, G. E-mail: grazia.gambarini@mi.infn.it; Agosteo, S.; Marchesi, P.; Nava, E.; Palazzi, P.; Pecci, A.; Rosi, G.; Tinti, R

    2000-11-15

    A method is described for the 3D measurements of absorbed dose in a ferrous sulphate gel phantom, exposed in the thermal column of a nuclear reactor. The method, studied for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) purposes, allows absorbed dose imaging and profiling, with the separation of different contributions coming from different secondary radiations, generated from thermal neutrons. In fact, the biological effectiveness of the different radiations is different. Tests with conventional dosimeters were performed too.

  8. The alanine detector in BNCT dosimetry: dose response in thermal and epithermal neutron fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, T; Bassler, N; Blaickner, M; Ziegner, M; Hsiao, M C; Liu, Y H; Koivunoro, H; Auterinen, I; Serén, T; Kotiluoto, P; Palmans, H; Sharpe, P; Langguth, P; Hampel, G

    2015-01-01

    The response of alanine solid state dosimeters to ionizing radiation strongly depends on particle type and energy. Due to nuclear interactions, neutron fields usually also consist of secondary particles such as photons and protons of diverse energies. Various experiments have been carried out in three different neutron beams to explore the alanine dose response behavior and to validate model predictions. Additionally, application in medical neutron fields for boron neutron capture therapy is discussed. Alanine detectors have been irradiated in the thermal neutron field of the research reactor TRIGA Mainz, Germany, in five experimental conditions, generating different secondary particle spectra. Further irradiations have been made in the epithermal neutron beams at the research reactors FiR 1 in Helsinki, Finland, and Tsing Hua open pool reactor in HsinChu, Taiwan ROC. Readout has been performed with electron spin resonance spectrometry with reference to an absorbed dose standard in a (60)Co gamma ray beam. Absorbed doses and dose components have been calculated using the Monte Carlo codes fluka and mcnp. The relative effectiveness (RE), linking absorbed dose and detector response, has been calculated using the Hansen & Olsen alanine response model. The measured dose response of the alanine detector in the different experiments has been evaluated and compared to model predictions. Therefore, a relative effectiveness has been calculated for each dose component, accounting for its dependence on particle type and energy. Agreement within 5% between model and measurement has been achieved for most irradiated detectors. Significant differences have been observed in response behavior between thermal and epithermal neutron fields, especially regarding dose composition and depth dose curves. The calculated dose components could be verified with the experimental results in the different primary and secondary particle fields. The alanine detector can be used without

  9. Absorbed dose in CT. Comparison by CT dose index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kenji; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Andou, Takashi

    2002-01-01

    Few reports have discussed the absorbed dose on CT units with increased scanning capacity even with the current widespread adoption of multi-slice CT units. To compare and investigate the dose indexes among CT units, we measured the absorbed dose on CT units operating in Nagano Prefecture Japan. The measurements showed proportionality between phantom absorbed dose and the exposured mAs values in conventional scanning operation. Further, the measurements showed that the absorbed dose in the center of the phantom differed by about 2.1-fold between the highest and lowest levels on individual CT units. Within a single company, multi-slice CT units of the same company gave absorbed doses of about 1.3 to 1.5 times those of conventional single-slice CT units under the same exposured conditions of conventional scanning. When the scanning pitch was reduced in helical scanning, the absorbed dose at the center of the phantom increased. (author)

  10. Absorbed dose thresholds and absorbed dose rate limitations for studies of electron radiation effects on polyetherimides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Edward R., Jr.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Gray, Stephanie L.; Collins, William D.

    1989-01-01

    The threshold values of total absorbed dose for causing changes in tensile properties of a polyetherimide film and the limitations of the absorbed dose rate for accelerated-exposure evaluation of the effects of electron radiation in geosynchronous orbit were studied. Total absorbed doses from 1 kGy to 100 MGy and absorbed dose rates from 0.01 MGy/hr to 100 MGy/hr were investigated, where 1 Gy equals 100 rads. Total doses less than 2.5 MGy did not significantly change the tensile properties of the film whereas doses higher than 2.5 MGy significantly reduced elongation-to-failure. There was no measurable effect of the dose rate on the tensile properties for accelerated electron exposures.

  11. RackSaver neutron absorbing device development and testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, R.; O'Leary, P.; Roberts, P.

    1996-01-01

    Siemens Power Corporation (SPC), in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), has developed the RackSaver neutron absorbing insert. The RackSaver insert can be installed onto spent nuclear fuel assemblies to replace deteriorating Boraflex neutron absorbing material installed in some spent-fuel storage racks. This paper describes results of a development and in-pool demonstration program performed to support potential utilization of the RackSaver neutron absorbing insert by affected utilities. The program objective was to advance the RackSaver concept into a field-demonstrated product. This objective was accomplished through three phases: design, licensing and criticality evaluations, and demonstration testing

  12. Spectra and absorbed dose by photo-neutrons in a solid water mannequin exposed to a Linac of 15 MV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benites R, J.; Vega C, H. R.; Velazquez F, J.

    2012-10-01

    Using Monte Carlo methods was modeled a solid water mannequin; according to the ICRU 44 (1989), Tissue substitutes in radiation dosimetry and measurements, of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements; Report 44. This material Wt 1 is made of H (8.1%), C (67.2%), N (2.4%), O (19.9%), Cl (0.1%), Ca (2.3%) and its density is of 1.02 gr/cm 3 . The mannequin was put instead of the patient, inside the treatment room and the spectra and absorbed dose were determined by photo-neutrons exposed to a Linac of 15 MV. (Author)

  13. Characterization of weak, fair and strong neutron absorbing materials by means of neutron transmission: Beam hardening effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharfi, F.; Bastuerk, M.; Boucenna, A.

    2006-09-01

    The characterization of neutron absorbing materials as well as quantification of neutron attenuation through matter is very essential in various fields, namely in shielding calculation. The objective of this work is to describe an experimental procedure to be used for the determination of neutron transmission through different materials. The proposed method is based on the relation between the gray value measured on neutron radiography image and the corresponding inducing neutron beam. For such a purpose, three kinds of materials (in shape of plate) were investigated using thermal neutrons: (1) boron-alloyed stainless steel as strong absorber; (2) copper and steel as fair absorbers and (3) aluminum as weak absorber. This work is not limited to the determination of neutron transmission through matters; it is also spread out to the measure of the surface density of the neutron absorbing elements (ρs) as a function of thickness of neutron absorbing material such as boron-alloyed stainless steel. The beam hardening effect depending on material thickness was also studied using the neutron transmission measurements. A theoretical approach was used to interpret the experimental results. The neutron transmission measurements were performed at the Neutron Radiography and Tomography facility of the Atomic Institute of the Austrian Universities in Vienna. Finally, a Maxwellian neutron distribution of incident neutron beam was used in the theoretical calculations of neutron energy shift in order to compare with experiments results. The obtained experimental results are in a good agreement with the developed theoretical approach.

  14. Neutron absorbing article and method for manufacture of such article

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hortman, M.T.; Mcmurtry, C.H.; Naum, R.G.; Owens, D.P.

    1980-01-01

    A neutron absorbing article, preferably in long, thin, flat form , suitable for but not necessarily limited to use in storage racks for spent nuclear fuel at locations between volumes of such stored fuel, to absorb neutrons from said spent fuel and prevent uncontrolled nuclear reaction of the spent fuel material, is composed of finely divided boron carbide particles and a solid, irreversibly cured phenolic polymer, forming a continuous matrix about the boron carbide particles, in such proportions that at least 6% of b10 from the boron carbide content is present therein. The described articles withstand thermal cycling from repeated spent fuel insertions and removals, withstand radiation from said spent nuclear fuel over long periods of time without losing desirable neutron absorbing and physical properties, are sufficiently chemically inert to water so as to retain neutron absorbing properties if brought into contact with it, are not galvanically corrodible and are sufficiently flexible so as to withstand operational basis earthquake and safe shutdown earthquake seismic events, without loss of neutron absorbing capability and other desirable properties, when installed in storage racks for spent nuclear fuel. The disclosure also relates to a plurality of such neutron absorbing articles in a storage rack for spent nuclear fuel and to a method for the manufacture of the articles

  15. On the definition of absorbed dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grusell, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The quantity absorbed dose is used extensively in all areas concerning the interaction of ionizing radiation with biological organisms, as well as with matter in general. The most recent and authoritative definition of absorbed dose is given by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) in ICRU Report 85. However, that definition is incomplete. The purpose of the present work is to give a rigorous definition of absorbed dose. Methods: Absorbed dose is defined in terms of the random variable specific energy imparted. A random variable is a mathematical function, and it cannot be defined without specifying its domain of definition which is a probability space. This is not done in report 85 by the ICRU, mentioned above. Results: In the present work a definition of a suitable probability space is given, so that a rigorous definition of absorbed dose is possible. This necessarily includes the specification of the experiment which the probability space describes. In this case this is an irradiation, which is specified by the initial particles released and by the material objects which can interact with the radiation. Some consequences are discussed. Specific energy imparted is defined for a volume, and the definition of absorbed dose as a point function involves the specific energy imparted for a small mass contained in a volume surrounding the point. A possible more precise definition of this volume is suggested and discussed. Conclusions: The importance of absorbed dose motivates a proper definition, and one is given in the present work. No rigorous definition has been presented before. - Highlights: • A stringent definition of absorbed dose is given. • This requires the definition of an irradiation and a suitable probability space. • A stringent definition is important for an understanding of the concept absorbed dose

  16. Aluminum alloy excellent in neutron absorbing performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Tetsuya; Tamamura, Tadao; Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Ouchi, Ken-ichiro.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain structural materials made of aluminum alloys having favorable neutron absorbing performance and excellent in the performance as structural materials such as processability and strength. Constitution: Powder of Gd 2 O 3 as a gadolinium compound or metal gadolinium is uniformly mixed with the powder of aluminum or aluminum alloy. The amount of the gadolinium compound added is set to 0.1 - 30 % by weight. No sufficient neutron absorbing performance can be obtained if it is less than 0.1 % by weight, whereas the processability and mechanical property of the alloy are degraded if it exceeds 30 % by weight. Further, the grain size is set to less about 50 μm. Further, since the neutron absorbing performance varies greatly if the aluminum powder size exceeds 100 μm, the diameter is set to less than about 100 μm. These mixtures are molded in a hot press. This enables to obtain aimed structural materials. (Takahashi, M.)

  17. Performance evaluation of METAMIC neutron absorber in spent fuel storage rack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoung Kim

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available High-density spent fuel (SF storage racks have been installed to increase SF pool capacity. In these SF racks, neutron absorber materials were placed between fuel assemblies allowing the storage of fuel assemblies in close proximity to one another. The purpose of the neutron absorber materials is to preclude neutronic coupling between adjacent fuel assemblies and to maintain the fuel in a subcritical storage condition. METAMIC neutron absorber has been used in high-density storage racks. But, neutron absorber materials can be subject to severe conditions including long-term exposure to gamma radiation and neutron radiation. Recently, some of them have experienced degradation, such as white spots on the surface. Under these conditions, the material must continue to serve its intended function of absorbing neutrons. For the first time in Korea, this article uses a neutron attenuation test to examine the performance of METAMIC surveillance coupons. Also, scanning electron microscope analysis was carried out to verify the white spots that were detected on the surface of METAMIC. In the neutron attenuation test, there was no significant sign of boron loss in most of the METAMIC coupons, but the coupon with white spots had relatively less B-10 content than the others. In the scanning electron microscope analysis, corrosion material was detected in all METAMIC coupons. Especially, it was confirmed that the coupon with white spots contains much more corrosion material than the others. Keywords: Blister, Criticality, METAMIC, Neutron Absorber, Neutron Attenuation Test, Scanning Electron Microscope

  18. Method for manufacture of neutron absorbing articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owens, D.

    1980-01-01

    A one-step curing method for the manufacture of a neutron absorbing article which comprises irreversibly curing, in desired article form, a form-retaining mixture of boron carbide particles, curable phenolic resin in solid state and in particula te form and a minor proportion of a liquid medium, which boils at a temperature below 200*c., at an elevated temperature so as to obtain bonding of the irreversibly cured phenolic polymer resulting to the boron carbide particles and production of the neutron absorbing article in desired form

  19. A neutron-absorbing porcelain enamel for coating nuclear equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iverson, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    In 1985, nuclear safety analyses showed that under upset conditions, strict administrative controls were necessary to limit access to a new processing vessel for enriched uranium service at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). In order to increase the level of nuclear safety associated with that vessel, the traditional methods of incorporating neutron absorbers (borated stainless steel, boral, cadmium foil, etc.) were reviewed, however, process conditions did not permit their use. A neutron-absorbing porcelain enamel containing large amounts of cadmium and boron was developed as a safe, cost-effective alternative to traditional neutron-absorbing methods. Several pieces of coated process equipment have been installed or are planned for installation at SRP

  20. Estimation of Absorbed Dose in Occlusal Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Young Ah; Choi, Karp Shick; Lee, Sang Han

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate absorbed dose of each important anatomic site of phantom (RT-210 Head and Neck Section R, Humanoid Systems Co., U.S.A.) head in occlusal radiography. X-radiation dosimetry at 12 anatomic sites in maxillary anterior topography, maxillary posterior topography, mandibular anterior cross-section, mandibular posterior cross-section, mandibular anterior topographic, mandibular posterior topographic occlusal projection was performed with calcium sulfate thermoluminescent dosimeters under 70 Kvp and 15 mA, 1/4 second (8 inch cone ) and 1 second (16 inch cone) exposure time. The results obtained were as follows: Skin surface produced highest absorbed dose ranged between 3264 mrad and 4073 mrad but there was little difference between projections. In maxillary anterior topographic occlusal radiography, eyeballs, maxillary sinuses, and pituitary gland sites produced higher absorbed doses than those of other sites. In maxillary posterior topographic occlusal radiography, exposed eyeball site and exposed maxillary sinus site produced high absorbed doses. In mandibular anterior cross-sectional occlusal radiography, all sites were produced relatively low absorbed dose except eyeball sites. In Mandibular posterior cross-sectional occlusal radiography, exposed eyeball site and exposed maxillary sinus site were produced relatively higher absorbed doses than other sites. In mandibular anterior topographic occlusal radiography, maxillary sinuses, submandibular glands, and thyroid gland sites produced high absorbed doses than other sites. In mandibular posterior topographic occlusal radiography, submandibular gland site of the exposed side produced high absorbed dose than other sites and eyeball site of the opposite side produced relatively high absorbed dose.

  1. Application of Whole Body Counter to Neutron Dose Assessment in Criticality Accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurihara, O.; Tsujimura, N.; Takasaki, K.; Momose, T.; Maruo, Y. [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, Tokai (Japan)

    2001-09-15

    Neutron dose assessment in criticality accidents using Whole Body Counter (WBC) was proved to be an effective method as rapid neutron dose estimation at the JCO criticality accident in Tokai-mura. The 1.36MeV gamma-ray of {sup 24}Na in a body can be detected easily by a germanium detector. The Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) of {sup 24}Na is approximately 50Bq for 10minute measurement by the germanium-type whole body counter at JNC Tokai Works. Neutron energy spectra at the typical shielding conditions in criticality accidents were calculated and the conversion factor, whole body activity-to-organ mass weighted neutron absorbed dose, corresponding to each condition were determined. The conversion factor for uncollied fission spectrum is 7.7 [(Bq{sup 24}Na/g{sup 23}Na)/mGy].

  2. Neutron absorbers, and the production method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayano, Hideo; Yajima, Seishi; Oono, Hironori.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To integrally sinter a metal powder and a metal network material thereby to obtain a material having a high neutron absorbing function, an excellent corrosion resistance and an excellent oxidation resistance. Method: An element having a high neutron absorbing function, such as Gd, or a compound thereof and a powder of a metal having excellent corrosion resistance, oxidation resistance and ductility, such as Fe, Cr or the like are uniformly mixed with each other. In a case where a substance having a neutron absorbing function is a hydroxide an organic complex or the like, it is formed into a gel-like substance and mixed uniformly with the metal powder, the gel-like substance being pasted, and covered on the surface of the metal powder and dried. Then, the mixture or the dry coated material is extended and the metal network material having excellent corrosion resistance, oxidation resistance and ductility is covered or interposed or between at least one layer of upper, intermediate or lower layers of said laminated material, and thereafter is subjected to cold or hot rolling, and then sintered and furthermore rolled, if necessary, the thus treated material being burned in vacuum or a non-oxidizing atmosphere. (Kamimura, M.)

  3. Assessment of doses due to secondary neutrons received by patient treated by proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayah, R.; Martinetti, F.; Donadille, L.; Clairand, I.; Delacroix, S.; De Oliveira, A.; Herault, J.

    2010-01-01

    Proton therapy is a specific technique of radiotherapy which aims at destroying cancerous cells by irradiating them with a proton beam. Nuclear reactions in the device and in the patient himself induce secondary radiations involving mainly neutrons which contribute to an additional dose for the patient. The author reports a study aimed at the assessment of these doses due to secondary neutrons in the case of ophthalmological and intra-cranial treatments. He presents a Monte Carlo simulation of the room and of the apparatus, reports the experimental validation of the model (dose deposited by protons in a water phantom, ambient dose equivalent due to neutrons in the treatment room, absorbed dose due to secondary particles in an anthropomorphic phantom), and the assessment with a mathematical phantom of doses dues to secondary neutrons received by organs during an ophthalmological treatment. He finally evokes current works of calculation of doses due to secondary neutrons in the case of intra-cranial treatments

  4. Applicability of thermoluminescent dosimeters in X-ray organ dose determination and in the dosimetry of systemic and boron neutron capture radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aschan, C.

    1999-01-01

    The main detectors used for clinical dosimetry are ionisation chambers and semiconductors. Thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeters are also of interest because of their following advantages: (i) wide useful dose range, (ii) small physical size, (iii) no need for high voltage or cables, i.e. stand alone character, and (iv) tissue equivalence (LiF) for most radiation types. TL detectors can particularly be used for the absorbed dose measurements performed with the aim to investigate cases where dose prediction is difficult and not as part of a routine verification procedure. In this thesis, the applicability of TL detectors was studied in different clinical applications. Particularly, the major phenomena (e.g. energy dependence, sensitivity to high LET radiation, reproducibility) affecting on the precision and accuracy of TL detectors in the dose estimations were considered in this work. In organ dose determinations of diagnostic X-ray examinations, the TL detectors were found to be accurate within 5% (1 S.D.). For in viva studies using internal irradiation source, i.e. for systemic radiation therapy, a method for determining the absorbed doses to organs was introduced. The TL method developed was found to be able to estimate the absorbed doses to those critical organs near the body surface within 50%. In the mixed neutron-gamma field of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), TL detectors were used for gamma dose and neutron fluence measurements. They were found able to measure the neutron dose component with the accuracy of 16%, and therefore to be a useful addition to the activation foils in BNCT neutron dosimetry. The absorbed gamma doses can be measured with TL detectors within 20% in the mixed neutron-gamma field, which enables in viva measurements at BNCT beams with approximately the same accuracy. In this study, the uncertainties of TL dosimeters were found to be high but not essentially greater than those in other measurement techniques used for clinical dosimetry

  5. Neutron absorbing room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoch, H.L.

    1979-01-01

    A neutron absorbing composition is described and consists of a one-component room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber composition or a two-component room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber composition in which the composition contains from 25 to 300 parts by weight based on the base silanol or vinyl containing diorganopolysiloxane polymer of a boron compound or boron powder as the neutron absorbing ingredient. An especially useful boron compound in this application is boron carbide. 20 claims

  6. Dose-response curve for blood exposed to gamma-neutron mixed field by conventional cytogenetic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F.; Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing concern about airline crew members (about one million worldwide) are exposed to measurable neutrons doses. Historically, cytogenetic biodosimetry assays have been based on quantifying asymmetrical chromosome alterations (dicentrics, centric rings and acentric fragments) in mytogen-stimulated T-lymphocytes in their first mitosis after radiation exposure. Increased levels of chromosome damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes are a sensitive indicator of radiation exposure and they are routinely exploited for assessing radiation absorbed dose after accidental or occupational exposure. Since radiological accidents are not common, not all nations feel that it is economically justified to maintain biodosimetry competence. However, dependable access to biological dosimetry capabilities is completely critical in event of an accident. In this paper the dose-response curve was measured for the induction of chromosomal alterations in peripheral blood lymphocytes after chronic exposure in vitro to neutron-gamma mixes field. Blood was obtained from one healthy donor and exposed to two neutron-gamma mixed field from sources 241 AmBe (20 Ci) at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL-CRCN/NE-PE-Brazil). The evaluated absorbed doses were 0.2 Gy; 1.0 Gy and 2.5 Gy. The dicentric chromosomes were observed at metaphase, following colcemid accumulation and 1000 well-spread metaphase figures were analyzed for the presence of dicentrics by two experienced scorers after painted by giemsa 5%. Our preliminary results showed a linear dependence between radiations absorbed dose and dicentric chromosomes frequencies. Dose-response curve described in this paper will contribute to the construction of calibration curve that will be used in our laboratory for biological dosimetry. (author)

  7. Dose-response curve for blood exposed to gamma-neutron mixed field by conventional cytogenetic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F., E-mail: jodinilson@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: fflima@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: jasantos@cnen.gov.b [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide, E-mail: santos_neide@yahoo.com.b [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Genetica

    2009-07-01

    There is increasing concern about airline crew members (about one million worldwide) are exposed to measurable neutrons doses. Historically, cytogenetic biodosimetry assays have been based on quantifying asymmetrical chromosome alterations (dicentrics, centric rings and acentric fragments) in mytogen-stimulated T-lymphocytes in their first mitosis after radiation exposure. Increased levels of chromosome damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes are a sensitive indicator of radiation exposure and they are routinely exploited for assessing radiation absorbed dose after accidental or occupational exposure. Since radiological accidents are not common, not all nations feel that it is economically justified to maintain biodosimetry competence. However, dependable access to biological dosimetry capabilities is completely critical in event of an accident. In this paper the dose-response curve was measured for the induction of chromosomal alterations in peripheral blood lymphocytes after chronic exposure in vitro to neutron-gamma mixes field. Blood was obtained from one healthy donor and exposed to two neutron-gamma mixed field from sources {sup 241}AmBe (20 Ci) at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL-CRCN/NE-PE-Brazil). The evaluated absorbed doses were 0.2 Gy; 1.0 Gy and 2.5 Gy. The dicentric chromosomes were observed at metaphase, following colcemid accumulation and 1000 well-spread metaphase figures were analyzed for the presence of dicentrics by two experienced scorers after painted by giemsa 5%. Our preliminary results showed a linear dependence between radiations absorbed dose and dicentric chromosomes frequencies. Dose-response curve described in this paper will contribute to the construction of calibration curve that will be used in our laboratory for biological dosimetry. (author)

  8. Personnel neutron dose assessment upgrade: Volume 2, Field neutron spectrometer for health physics applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Reece, W.D.; Miller, S.D.

    1988-07-01

    Both the (ICRP) and the (NCPR) have recommended an increase in neutron quality factors and the adoption of effective dose equivalent methods. The series of reports entitled Personnel Neutron Dose Assessment Upgrade (PNL-6620) addresses these changes. Volume 1 in this series of reports (Personnel Neutron Dosimetry Assessment) provided guidance on the characteristics, use, and calibration of personnel neutron dosimeters in order to meet the new recommendations. This report, Volume 2: Field Neutron Spectrometer for Health Physics Applications describes the development of a portable field spectrometer which can be set up for use in a few minutes by a single person. The field spectrometer described herein represents a significant advance in improving the accuracy of neutron dose assessment. It permits an immediate analysis of the energy spectral distribution associated with the radiation from which neutron quality factor can be determined. It is now possible to depart from the use of maximum Q by determining and realistically applying a lower Q based on spectral data. The field spectrometer is made up of two modules: a detector module with built-in electronics and an analysis module with a IBM PC/reg sign/-compatible computer to control the data acquisition and analysis of data in the field. The unit is simple enough to allow the operator to perform spectral measurements with minimal training. The instrument is intended for use in steady-state radiation fields with neutrons energies covering the fission spectrum range. The prototype field spectrometer has been field tested in plutonium processing facilities, and has been proven to operate satisfactorily. The prototype field spectrometer uses a 3 He proportional counter to measure the neutron energy spectrum between 50 keV and 5 MeV and a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) to measure absorbed neutron dose

  9. Distributions of neutron and gamma doses in phantom under a mixed field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beraud-Sudreau, E.

    1982-06-01

    A calculation program, based on Monte Carlo method, allowed to estimate the absorbed doses relatives to the reactor primary radiation, in a water cubic phantom and in cylindrical phantoms modelized from tissue compositions. This calculation is a theoretical approach of gamma and neutron dose gradient study in an animal phantom. PIN junction dosimetric characteristics have been studied experimentally. Air and water phantom radiation doses measured by PIN junction and lithium 7 fluoride, in reactor field have been compared to doses given by dosimetry classical techniques as tissue equivalent plastic and aluminium ionization chambers. Dosimeter responses have been employed to evaluate neutron and gamma doses in plastinaut (tissue equivalent plastic) and animal (piglet). Dose repartition in the piglet bone medulla has been also determined. This work has been completed by comparisons with Doerschell, Dousset and Brown results and by neutron dose calculations; the dose distribution related to lineic energy transfer in Auxier phantom has been also calculated [fr

  10. Radiation-Induced Color Centers in LiF for Dosimetry at High Absorbed Dose Rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W. L.; Miller, Arne; Ellis, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    Color centers formed by irradiation of optically clear crystals of pure LiF may be analyzed spectrophotometrically for dosimetry in the absorbed dose range from 102 to 107 Gy. Routine monitoring of intense electron beams is an important application. Both 6LiF and 7LiF forms are commercially...... available, and when used with filters as albedo dosimeters in pairs, they provide discrimination of neutron and gamma-ray doses....

  11. Experimental Determination of the Neutron Radiation-Dose Distribution in the Human Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stipcic, Neda [Institute Rudjer Bogkovic, Zagreb, Yugoslavia (Serbia)

    1967-01-15

    The quality of the radiation delivering the radiation dose to the human phantom is quite different from that of the incident neutron beam. This paper describes the experimental investigation of the variation of neutron dose related to the variation of neutron fluence with depth in the human phantom. The distribution of neutron radiation was determined in the human phantom - a cube of paraffin wax 25 cm x 25 cm x 50 cm with a density of 0.92 cm{sup -3}. Po-Be and Ra-Be point sources were used as neutron sources. Neutron fluences were measured using different types of detector: scintillation detector, BF{sub 3} counter, and nuclear-track emulsions. Since the fluence measurements with these three types of detectors were carried out under the same experimental conditions, it was possible to separate and analyse each part of the radiation dose in the paraffin. From the investigations, the distribution of the total radiation dose was obtained as a function of the paraffin depth. The maximum value of this dose distribution is constant with respect to the distance between the source and the paraffin phantom. From the results obtained, some conclusions may be drawn concerning the amount of absorbed radiation dose in the human phantom. (author)

  12. A new neutron absorber material for criticality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, Alan H.

    2007-01-01

    A new neutron absorber material based on a nickel metal matrix composite has been developed for applications such as the Transport, Aging, and Disposal (TAD) canister for the Yucca Mountain Project. This new material offers superior corrosion resistance to withstand the more demanding geochemical environments found in a 300,000 year to a million year repository. The lifetime of the TAD canister is currently limited to 10,000 years, reflecting the focus of current regulations embodied in 10 CFR 63. The use of DOE-owned nickel stocks from decommissioned enrichment facilities could reduce the cost compared to stainless steel/boron alloy. The metal matrix composite allows the inclusion of more than one neutron absorber compound, so that the exact composition may be adjusted as needed. The new neutron absorber material may also be used for supplementary criticality control of stored or transported PWR spent fuel by forming it into cylindrical pellets that can be inserted into a surrogate control rod. (authors)

  13. Neutron spectrum and dose-equivalent in shuttle flights during solar maximum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keith, J E; Badhwar, G D; Lindstrom, D J [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX (United States). Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents unambiguous measurements of the spectrum of neutrons found in spacecraft during spaceflight. The neutron spectrum was measured from thermal energies to about 10 MeV using a completely passive system of metal foils as neutron detectors. These foils were exposed to the neutron flux bare, covered by thermal neutron absorbers (Gd) and inside moderators (Bonner spheres). This set of detectors was flown on three U.S. Space Shuttle flights, STS-28, STS-36 and STS-31, during the solar maximum. We show that the measurements of the radioactivity of these foils lead to a differential neutron energy spectrum in all three flights that can be represented by a power law, J(E){approx equal}E{sup -0.765} neutrons cm{sup -2} day {sup -1} MeV{sup -1}. We also show that the measurements are even better represented by a linear combination of the terrestrial neutron albedo and a spectrum of neutrons locally produced in a aluminium by protons, computed by a previous author. We use both approximations to the neutron spectrum to produce a worst case and most probable case for the neutron spectra and the resulting dose-equivalents, computed using ICRP-51 neutron fluence-dose conversion tables. We compare these to the skin dose-equivalents due to charged particles during the same flights. (author).

  14. Standard Guide for Selection and Use of Mathematical Methods for Calculating Absorbed Dose in Radiation Processing Applications

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This guide describes different mathematical methods that may be used to calculate absorbed dose and criteria for their selection. Absorbed-dose calculations can determine the effectiveness of the radiation process, estimate the absorbed-dose distribution in product, or supplement or complement, or both, the measurement of absorbed dose. 1.2 Radiation processing is an evolving field and annotated examples are provided in Annex A6 to illustrate the applications where mathematical methods have been successfully applied. While not limited by the applications cited in these examples, applications specific to neutron transport, radiation therapy and shielding design are not addressed in this document. 1.3 This guide covers the calculation of radiation transport of electrons and photons with energies up to 25 MeV. 1.4 The mathematical methods described include Monte Carlo, point kernel, discrete ordinate, semi-empirical and empirical methods. 1.5 General purpose software packages are available for the calcul...

  15. Three-dimensional absorbed dose determinations by N.M.R. analysis of phantom-dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambarini, G.; Birattari, C.; Fumagalli, M.L.; Vai, A.; Monti, D.; Salvadori, P.; Facchielli, L.; Sichirollo, A.E.

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of a tissue-equivalent phantom is a promising technique for three-dimensional determination of absorbed dose from ionizing radiation. A reliable method of determining the spatial distribution of absorbed dose is indispensable for the planning of treatment in the presently developed radiotherapy techniques aimed at obtaining high energy selectively delivered to cancerous tissues, with low dose delivered to the surrounding healthy tissue. Aqueous gels infused with the Fricke dosemeter (i.e. with a ferrous sulphate solution), as proposed in 1984 by Gore et al., have shown interesting characteristics and, in spite of some drawbacks that cause a few limitations to their utilisation, they have shown the feasibility of three-dimensional dose determinations by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging. Fricke-infused agarose gels with various compositions have been analysed, considering the requirements of the new radiotherapy techniques, in particular Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (B.N.C.T.) and proton therapy. Special attention was paid to obtain good tissue equivalence for every radiation type of interest. In particular, the tissue equivalence for thermal neutrons, which is a not simple problem, has also been satisfactorily attained. The responses of gel-dosemeters having the various chosen compositions have been analysed, by mean of NMR instrumentation. Spectrophotometric measurements have also been performed, to verify the consistence of the results. (author)

  16. Absorbed dose estimates to structures of the brain and head using a high-resolution voxel-based head phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Jeffrey F.; Blue, Thomas E.; Gupta, Nilendu

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the viability of using a high-resolution 3-D head phantom in Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) structure dosimetry. This work describes a high-resolution voxel-based model of a human head and its use for calculating absorbed doses to the structures of the brain. The Zubal head phantom is a 3-D model of a human head that can be displayed and manipulated on a computer. Several changes were made to the original head phantom which now contains over 29 critical structures of the brain and head. The modified phantom is a 85x109x120 lattice of voxels, where each voxel is 2.2x2.2x1.4 mm 3 . This model was translated into MCNP lattice format. As a proof of principle study, two MCNP absorbed dose calculations were made (left and right lateral irradiations) using a uniformly distributed neutron disk source with an 1/E energy spectrum. Additionally, the results of these two calculations were combined to estimate the absorbed doses from a bilateral irradiation. Radiobiologically equivalent (RBE) doses were calculated for all structures and were normalized to 12.8 Gy-Eq. For a left lateral irradiation, the left motor cortex receives the limiting RBE dose. For a bilateral irradiation, the insula cortices receive the limiting dose. Among the nonencephalic structures, the parotid glands receive RBE doses that were within 15% of the limiting dose

  17. A 'hybrid' neutron area survey instrument for the determination of neutron dose quantities in the workplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, R.J.; Jenkins, R.; Lowe, T.; Silvie, J.; Joyce, M.J.; Winsby, A.; Molinos, C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Neutron survey instruments are used routinely to determine the dose rates in areas where persons may be occupationally exposed. With a few exceptions, these instruments generally use a proportional counter with a high thermal neutron response located in a moderating sphere of CH 2 . The moderating sphere in such designs contains a thermal neutron absorber to reduce the over-response to thermal and intermediate energy neutrons. However, the commercially available examples of such instruments tend to have strongly energy dependent ambient dose equivalent response characteristics. In particular, they often over-respond in the energy range between 1 eV and 10 keV. A prototype of a novel design has been produced that uses seven detectors located in a moderating sphere of CH 2 , six near the surface to detect thermal and epithermal neutrons, and one in the centre to detect fast neutrons. This has been characterized using a combination of MCNP modelling and measurements to produce an instrument that has improved energy dependence of response characteristics. Additionally, the use of seven detectors offers direction and field hardness information. The design and calibration of the instrument are described and its response in workplaces calculated. (author)

  18. Thermal Evaluation of Storage Rack with an Advanced Neutron Absorber during Normal Operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hee-Jae; Kim, Mi-Jin; Sohn, Dong-Seong [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The storage capacity of the domestic wet storage site is expected to reach saturation from Hanbit in 2024 to Sin-wolseong in 2038 and accordingly management alternatives are urgently taken. Since installation of the dense rack is considered in the short term, it is necessary to urgently develop an advanced neutron absorber which can be applied to a spent nuclear fuel storage facility. Neutron absorber is the material for controlling the reactivity. A material which has excellent thermal neutron absorption ability, high strength and corrosion resistance must be selected as the neutron absorber. Existing neutron absorbers are made of boron which has a good thermal absorption ability such as BORAL and METAMIC. However, possible problems have been reported in using the boron-based neutron absorber for wet storage facility. Gadolinium is known to have higher neutron absorption cross-section than that of boron. And the strength of duplex stainless steel is about 1.5 times higher than stainless steel 304 which has been frequently used as a structural material. Therefore, duplex stainless steel which contains gadolinium is in consideration as an advanced neutron absorber. Temperature distribution is shown in figure 4. In pool bottom region near the inlet shows a relatively low tendency and heat generated from the fuel assemblies is transmitted to the pool upper region by the vertical flow. Also, temperature gradient appear in rack structures for the axial direction and temperature is uniformly distributed in the pool upper region. Table 1 presents the calculated results. The maximum temperature is 306.63K and does not exceed the 333.15K (60℃). The maximum temperature of the neutron absorber is 306.48K.

  19. Absorbed dose rate meter for β-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bingo, K.

    1977-01-01

    The absorbed dose of β-ray depends on the energy of β-rays and the epidermal thickness of tissue in interest. In order to measure the absorbed dose rate at the interested tissue directly, the ratio of counting rate to absorbed dose should be constant independent of β-ray energy. In this purpose, a thin plastic scintillator was used as a detector with a single channel analyzer. The pulse height distribution, obtained using the scintillator whose thickness is less than the range of β-rays, shows a peak at a particular pulse height depending on the thickness of scintillator used. This means an increase of the number of pulses at lower pulse height. The lower level of discrimination and window width of the single channel analyzer are chosen according to the epidermal thickness of the tissue. In the experiment, scintillators of 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 5 and 10 mm thick were tested. It was found that desirable pulse height distribution, to obtain a constant dose sensitivity, could be obtained using the 2 mm thick scintillator. The sensitivity of the absorbed dose rate meter is constant within +-15% for β-ray with maximum energy from 0.4 to 3.5 MeV, when the absorbed dose rate for skin (epidermal thickness 7mg/cm 2 ) is measured. In order to measure the dose rate for a hand (epithermal thickness 40mg/cm 2 ) the lower level of discrimination is changed to be higher and at the same time the window width is also changed. Combining these techniques, one can get an absorbed dose rate meter for the tissue dose of various thickness, which has the constant dose sensitivity within +-15% for β-rays with maximum energy from 0.4 to 3.5 MeV

  20. Absorbed dose kernel and self-shielding calculations for a novel radiopaque glass microsphere for transarterial radioembolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Cody; Mawko, George; Archambault, John Paul; Lewandowski, Robert; Liu, David; Kehoe, Sharon; Boyd, Daniel; Abraham, Robert; Syme, Alasdair

    2018-02-01

    Radiopaque microspheres may provide intraprocedural and postprocedural feedback during transarterial radioembolization (TARE). Furthermore, the potential to use higher resolution x-ray imaging techniques as opposed to nuclear medicine imaging suggests that significant improvements in the accuracy and precision of radiation dosimetry calculations could be realized for this type of therapy. This study investigates the absorbed dose kernel for novel radiopaque microspheres including contributions of both short and long-lived contaminant radionuclides while concurrently quantifying the self-shielding of the glass network. Monte Carlo simulations using EGSnrc were performed to determine the dose kernels for all monoenergetic electron emissions and all beta spectra for radionuclides reported in a neutron activation study of the microspheres. Simulations were benchmarked against an accepted 90 Y dose point kernel. Self-shielding was quantified for the microspheres by simulating an isotropically emitting, uniformly distributed source, in glass and in water. The ratio of the absorbed doses was scored as a function of distance from a microsphere. The absorbed dose kernel for the microspheres was calculated for (a) two bead formulations following (b) two different durations of neutron activation, at (c) various time points following activation. Self-shielding varies with time postremoval from the reactor. At early time points, it is less pronounced due to the higher energies of the emissions. It is on the order of 0.4-2.8% at a radial distance of 5.43 mm with increased size from 10 to 50 μm in diameter during the time that the microspheres would be administered to a patient. At long time points, self-shielding is more pronounced and can reach values in excess of 20% near the end of the range of the emissions. Absorbed dose kernels for 90 Y, 90m Y, 85m Sr, 85 Sr, 87m Sr, 89 Sr, 70 Ga, 72 Ga, and 31 Si are presented and used to determine an overall kernel for the

  1. Proposal concerning the absorbed dose conversion factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiragai, A [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    1978-03-01

    New definitions of the absorbed dose conversion factors Csub(lambda) and Csub(E) are proposed. The absorbed dose in water is given by the product of absorbed dose conversion factor, exposure calibration factor, ionisation chamber reading, cap displacement correction factor and perturbation correction factor. At exposure calibration the material of the build-up cap must be the same as that of the chamber wall. An ionisation chamber of which the wall material is water-equivalent or air-equivalent may be used. In the latter case the wall must be thin. For these two cases absorbed dose conversion factors are introduced and it is recommended that either of the two sets should be adopted. Furthermore, if the chamber wall is neither water- nor air-equivalent, the factor by which these currently defined values should be multiplied is also given: again the wall must be thin. The ICRU definitions of Csub(lambda) and Csub(E) are inconsistent, as recently pointed out, while the definitions presented here are consistent.

  2. 6LiF sandwich type detectors for low dose individual monitoring in mixed neutron-photon fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olko, P.; Budzanowski, M.; Bilski, P.; Burgkhardt, B.; Piesch, E.

    1994-01-01

    ICRP Publication 60 recommends the reduction of the annual dose limit for occupational exposure from 50 to 20 mSv and a doubling of the quality factor for medium energy neutrons. If occupational doses are evaluated every month (which is obligatory e.g. in Germany and in Poland), the individual neutron dosemeter will have to measure neutron doses in the range of 100 μSv. No commercially available, automatic individual dosimetry monitoring system exists that fulfils this requirement. Some of the parameters which influence the evaluation of the neutron dose from readings of TL dosemeters have been studied in order to decrease the variance of the measured neutron signal. In mixed neutron-photon fields, clear separation of the neutron component from the total reading depends also on the uncertainty of the gamma dose measurements. While the thermal albedo neutrons are absorbed mostly at the surface of the 6 LiF detector, the reduction of the detector thickness results in a decrease of its photon sensitivity, while its neutron sensitivity is almost principally maintained. As a consequence, the uncertainty of gamma dose contributes with lower weight to the variance of the evaluated neutron signal. First tests of an optimised 200 μm thick sandwich detector and 0.9 mm thick standard LiF chips were made at low neutron and photon dose ranges using different readers, in order to determine the uncertainty versus dose for different neutron-photon combinations. The conditions under which the new sandwich type detectors may improve albedo neutron dosimetry are demonstrated. (Author)

  3. Fluence-to-absorbed-dose conversion coefficients for neutron beams from 0.001 eV to 100 GeV calculated for a set of pregnant female and fetus models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taranenko, Valery; Xu, X George

    2008-01-01

    Protection of fetuses against external neutron exposure is an important task. This paper reports a set of absorbed dose conversion coefficients for fetal and maternal organs for external neutron beams using the RPI-P pregnant female models and the MCNPX code. The newly developed pregnant female models represent an adult female with a fetus including its brain and skeleton at the end of each trimester. The organ masses were adjusted to match the reference values within 1%. For the 3 mm cubic voxel size, the models consist of 10-15 million voxels for 35 organs. External monoenergetic neutron beams of six standard configurations (AP, PA, LLAT, RLAT, ROT and ISO) and source energies 0.001 eV-100 GeV were considered. The results are compared with previous data that are based on simplified anatomical models. The differences in dose depend on source geometry, energy and gestation periods: from 20% up to 140% for the whole fetus, and up to 100% for the fetal brain. Anatomical differences are primarily responsible for the discrepancies in the organ doses. For the first time, the dependence of mother organ doses upon anatomical changes during pregnancy was studied. A maximum of 220% increase in dose was observed for the placenta in the nine months model compared to three months, whereas dose to the pancreas, small and large intestines decreases by 60% for the AP source for the same models. Tabulated dose conversion coefficients for the fetus and 27 maternal organs are provided

  4. The MIRD method of estimating absorbed dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    The estimate of absorbed radiation dose from internal emitters provides the information required to assess the radiation risk associated with the administration of radiopharmaceuticals for medical applications. The MIRD (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) system of dose calculation provides a systematic approach to combining the biologic distribution data and clearance data of radiopharmaceuticals and the physical properties of radionuclides to obtain dose estimates. This tutorial presents a review of the MIRD schema, the derivation of the equations used to calculate absorbed dose, and shows how the MIRD schema can be applied to estimate dose from radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine

  5. Integrity of neutron-absorbing components of LWR fuel systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, W.J.; Berting, F.M.

    1991-03-01

    A study of the integrity and behavior of neutron-absorbing components of light-water (LWR) fuel systems was performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The components studies include control blades (cruciforms) for boiling-water reactors (BWRs) and rod cluster control assemblies for pressurized-water reactors (PWRs). The results of this study can be useful for understanding the degradation of neutron-absorbing components and for waste management planning and repository design. The report includes examples of the types of degradation, damage, or failures that have been encountered. Conclusions and recommendations are listed. 84 refs

  6. Long-term effects of neutron absorber and fuel matrix corrosion on criticality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culbreth, W.G.; Zielinski, P.R.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed waste package designs will require the addition of neutron absorbing material to prevent the possibility of a sustained chain reaction occurring in the fuel in the event of water intrusion. Due to the low corrosion rates of the fuel matrix and the Zircaloy cladding, there is a possibility that the neutron absorbing material will corrode and leak from the waste container long before the subsequent release of fuel matrix material. An analysis of the release of fuel matrix and neutron absorber material based on a probabilistic model was conducted and the results were used to prepare input to KENO-V, an neutron criticality code. The results demonstrate that, in the presence of water, the computed values of k eff exceeded the maximum of 0.95 for an extended period of time

  7. Neutrons in active proton therapy. Parameterization of dose and dose equivalent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Uwe; Haelg, Roger A. [Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Physics; Radiotherapy Hirslanden AG, Aarau (Switzerland); Lomax, Tony [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland). Center for Proton Therapy

    2017-08-01

    One of the essential elements of an epidemiological study to decide if proton therapy may be associated with increased or decreased subsequent malignancies compared to photon therapy is an ability to estimate all doses to non-target tissues, including neutron dose. This work therefore aims to predict for patients using proton pencil beam scanning the spatially localized neutron doses and dose equivalents. The proton pencil beam of Gantry 1 at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) was Monte Carlo simulated using GEANT. Based on the simulated neutron dose and neutron spectra an analytical mechanistic dose model was developed. The pencil beam algorithm used for treatment planning at PSI has been extended using the developed model in order to calculate the neutron component of the delivered dose distribution for each treated patient. The neutron dose was estimated for two patient example cases. The analytical neutron dose model represents the three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulated dose distribution up to 85 cm from the proton pencil beam with a satisfying precision. The root mean square error between Monte Carlo simulation and model is largest for 138 MeV protons and is 19% and 20% for dose and dose equivalent, respectively. The model was successfully integrated into the PSI treatment planning system. In average the neutron dose is increased by 10% or 65% when using 160 MeV or 177 MeV instead of 138 MeV. For the neutron dose equivalent the increase is 8% and 57%. The presented neutron dose calculations allow for estimates of dose that can be used in subsequent epidemiological studies or, should the need arise, to estimate the neutron dose at any point where a subsequent secondary tumour may occur. It was found that the neutron dose to the patient is heavily increased with proton energy.

  8. An assessment of the secondary neutron dose in the passive scattering proton beam facility of the national cancer center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sang Eun [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Gyuseong [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Se Byeong [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The purpose of this study is to assess the additional neutron effective dose during passive scattering proton therapy. Monte Carlo code (Monte Carlo N-Particle 6) simulation was conducted based on a precise modeling of the National Cancer Center's proton therapy facility. A three-dimensional neutron effective dose profile of the interior of the treatment room was acquired via a computer simulation of the 217.8-MeV proton beam. Measurements were taken with a 3He neutron detector to support the simulation results, which were lower than the simulation results by 16% on average. The secondary photon dose was about 0.8% of the neutron dose. The dominant neutron source was deduced based on flux calculation. The secondary neutron effective dose per proton absorbed dose ranged from 4.942 ± 0.031 mSv/Gy at the end of the field to 0.324 ± 0.006 mSv/Gy at 150 cm in axial distance.

  9. Neutron absorbing element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Shigeo.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention concerns a neutron absorbing element of a neutron shielding member used for an LMFBR type reactor. The inside of a fuel can sealed at both of the upper and the lower ends thereof with plugs is partitioned into an upper and a lower chambers by an intermediate plug. A discharging hole is disposed at the upper end plug, which is in communication with the outside. A communication tube is disposed at the intermediate end plug and it is in communication with the lower chamber containing B 4 C pellets. A cylindrical support member having three porous plugs connected in series is disposed at the lower surface of the discharging hole provided at the upper end plug. Further, the end of the discharging hole is sealed with high temperature solder and He atmosphere is present at the inside of the fuel can. With such a constitution, the supporting differential pressure of the porous plugs can be made greater while discharging He gases generated from B 4 C to the outside. Further, the porous plugs can be surely wetted by coolants. Accordingly, it is possible to increase life time and shorten the size. (I.N.)

  10. Airborne and total gamma absorbed dose rates at Patiala - India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tesfaye, Tilahun; Sahota, H.S.; Singh, K.

    1999-01-01

    The external gamma absorbed dose rate due to gamma rays originating from gamma emitting aerosols in air, is compared with the total external gamma absorbed dose rate at the Physics Department of Punjabi University, Patiala. It has been found out that the contribution, to the total external gamma absorbed dose rate, of radionuclides on particulate matter suspended in air is about 20% of the overall gamma absorbed dose rate. (author)

  11. Considerations on absorbed dose estimates based on different β-dose point kernels in internal dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Isao; Yamada, Yasuhiko; Yamashita, Takashi; Okigaki, Shigeyasu; Oyamada, Hiyoshimaru; Ito, Akira.

    1995-01-01

    In radiotherapy with radiopharmaceuticals, more accurate estimates of the three-dimensional (3-D) distribution of absorbed dose is important in specifying the activity to be administered to patients to deliver a prescribed absorbed dose to target volumes without exceeding the toxicity limit of normal tissues in the body. A calculation algorithm for the purpose has already been developed by the authors. An accurate 3-D distribution of absorbed dose based on the algorithm is given by convolution of the 3-D dose matrix for a unit cubic voxel containing unit cumulated activity, which is obtained by transforming a dose point kernel into a 3-D cubic dose matrix, with the 3-D cumulated activity distribution given by the same voxel size. However, beta-dose point kernels affecting accurate estimates of the 3-D absorbed dose distribution have been different among the investigators. The purpose of this study is to elucidate how different beta-dose point kernels in water influence on the estimates of the absorbed dose distribution due to the dose point kernel convolution method by the authors. Computer simulations were performed using the MIRD thyroid and lung phantoms under assumption of uniform activity distribution of 32 P. Using beta-dose point kernels derived from Monte Carlo simulations (EGS-4 or ACCEPT computer code), the differences among their point kernels gave little differences for the mean and maximum absorbed dose estimates for the MIRD phantoms used. In the estimates of mean and maximum absorbed doses calculated using different cubic voxel sizes (4x4x4 mm and 8x8x8 mm) for the MIRD thyroid phantom, the maximum absorbed doses for the 4x4x4 mm-voxel were estimated approximately 7% greater than the cases of the 8x8x8 mm-voxel. They were found in every beta-dose point kernel used in this study. On the other hand, the percentage difference of the mean absorbed doses in the both voxel sizes for each beta-dose point kernel was less than approximately 0.6%. (author)

  12. Apparatus and method for the measurement of neutron moderating or absorbing properties of objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Untermyer, S.I.

    1981-01-01

    An apparatus and method for measuring the neutron moderating or absorbing properties of objects or materials is disclosed in which a fast neutron source cooperates with a neutron absorbing material which reduces the energy of the fast neutrons by inelastic scattering so that they can be readily thermalized by a moderator. A thermal neutron detector is disposed adjacent the material and serves to detect thermal neutrons emitted by a moderator placed to receive and thermalize the reduced energy neutrons. A material whose absorption is to be measured is placed between a moderator and the detector

  13. Extended use of alanine irradiated in experimental reactor for combined gamma- and neutron-dose assessment by ESR spectroscopy and thermal neutron fluence assessment by measurement of (14)C by LSC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoníček, B; Kučera, J; Světlík, I; Viererbl, L; Lahodová, Z; Tomášková, L; Cabalka, M

    2014-11-01

    Gamma- and neutron doses in an experimental reactor were measured using alanine/electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometry. The absorbed dose in alanine was decomposed into contributions caused by gamma and neutron radiation using neutron kerma factors. To overcome a low sensitivity of the alanine/ESR response to thermal neutrons, a novel method has been proposed for the assessment of a thermal neutron flux using the (14)N(n,p) (14)C reaction on nitrogen present in alanine and subsequent measurement of (14)C by liquid scintillation counting (LSC). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Neutron absorbing article and method for manufacture thereof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsyth, P.F.; Mcmurtry, C.H.; Naum, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    A composite, neutron absorbing, coated article, suitable for installation in storage racks for spent nuclear fuel and for other neutron absorbing applications, includes a backing member, preferably of flexible material such as woven fiberglass cloth, a synthetic organic polymeric coating or a plurality of such coatings on the backing member, preferably of cured phenolic resin, such as phenol formaldehyde or trimethylolphenol formaldehyde and boron carbide particles held to the backing member by the cured coating or a plurality of such coatings. Also within the invention is a method for the manufacture of the neutron absorbing coated article and the use of such an article. In a preferred method the backing member is first coated on both sides thereof with a filling coating of thermosettable liquid phenolic resin, which is then partially cured to solid state, one side of the backing member is then coated with a mixture of thermosettable liquid resin and finely divided boron carbide particles and the resin is partially cured to solid state, the other side is coated with a similar mixture, larger boron carbide particles are applied to it and the resin is partially cured to solid state, such side of the article is coated with thermosettable liquid phenolic resin, the resin is partially cured to solid state and such resin, including previously applied partially cured resins, is cured to final cross-linked and permanently set form

  15. A Study on the Design of Novel Neutron Absorber Using Artificial Rare Earth Compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Song Hyun; Shin, Chang Ho; Lee, Seung Hyun; Park, Jeia; Kim, Jong Kyung [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Soon Young [RADCORE Co., Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hwan Seo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    The artificial rare earth compounds (RE{sub 2}O{sub 3}) generated by the result of the pyro-processing are radioactive wastes which have many long-live radionuclides. Due to the high and long-lived radioactivity of the article RE{sub 2}O{sub 3}, specific radiation shielding and disposal techniques are required. In this study, a simultaneous disposal method of the RE{sub 2}O{sub 3} with the spent fuels is proposed by reusing them for the neutron absorber. In this study, the neutron absorber based on artificial RE{sub 2}O{sub 3} compound was designed for the use in the spent fuel storage. The design of the storage racks for the WH 17Χ17 and PLUS7 spent fuel assemblies were designed and the criticalities were evaluated with the various RE{sub 2}O{sub 3} compositions. Also, the radioactivity and irradiation calculations were performed for the applicability and stability analyses of the neutron absorber into the spent fuel storage. The results show that the neutron absorber can sufficiently reduce the criticality under the regulation guideline. It is expected that the neutron absorber can contribute minimizing the disposal area of the radioactive wastes as well as the reducing the costs and resources for the using the other types of the neutron absorbers.

  16. Dose-response relationship of leukemia incidence among atomic bomb survivors and their controls by absorbed marrow dose and two types of leukemia Hiroshima and Nagasaki, October 1950 - December 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimaru, Toranosuke; Otake, Masanori; Ichimaru, Michito; Mikami, Motoko.

    1982-07-01

    Analysis of the relationship of the incidence of leukemia to gamma and neutron dose among atomic bomb survivors until 1971 has been reported previously by RERF. The present inquiry was prompted by the extension of case finding to 1978 and by the recent availability of new dose estimates for this fixed cohort. It is focused on the relationship of absorbed marrow dose of gamma rays and neutrons to the incidence of two types of leukemia in the fixed cohort of A-bomb survivors and their controls, the Life Span Study extended sample, in the period October 1950-December 1978. Three dose-response models have been fitted to the data on acute leukemia and chronic granulocytic leukemia. The relationship of the incidence of acute leukemia to gamma and neutron dose again suggests that the ''best'' fitting model involves a dependence on the square of the gamma dose and a linear dependence on neutrons. The estimated relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons in the induction of acute leukemia is approximately 44/√Dn(Dn = neutron dose) under this model. Based on the 95% confidence limits of the estimated RBE, the risk of this disease is estimated as 0.0026 - 0.0072 cases per million person-years per rem 2 of marrow dose. This analysis has failed, however, to produce a significant dose-response function for the incidence of chronic granulocytic leukemia in relation to the two kinds of radiation. (author)

  17. Update of neutron dose yields as a function of energy for protons and deuterons incident on beryllium targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten Haken, R.K.; Awschalom, M.; Rosenberg, I.

    1982-11-01

    Neutron absorbed dose yields (absorbed dose rates per unit incident current on targets at a given SAD or SSD) increase with incident charged particle energy for both protons and deuterons. Analyses of neutron dose yield versus incident particle energy have been performed for both deuterons and protons. It is the purpose of this report to update those analyses by pooling all of the more recent published results and to reanalyze the trend of yield, Y, versus incident energy, E, which in the past has been described by an expression of the form Y = aE/sup b/, where a and b are empirical constants. From the reanalyzed trend it is concluded that for a given size cyclotron (E/sub p/ = 2E/sub d/), the dose yields using protons are higher than those using deuterons up to a proton energy E/sub p/ of 64 MeV

  18. Removing fuelling transient using neutron absorbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paquette, S.; Chan, P.K.; Bonin, H.W., E-mail: Stephane.Paquette@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Dept., Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Pant, A. [Cameco Fuel Manufacturing, Port Hope, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    Preliminary criticality and burnup calculation results indicate that by employing a small amount of neutron absorber the fuelling transient, currently occurring in a CANDU 37-element fuel bundle, can be significantly reduced. A parametric study using the Los Alamos National Laboratories' MCNP 5 code and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's WIMS-AECL 3.1 is presented in this paper. (author)

  19. High Conduction Neutron Absorber to Simulate Fast Reactor Environment in an Existing Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillen, Donna; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Parry, James

    2014-06-22

    A need was determined for a thermal neutron absorbing material that could be cooled in a gas reactor environment without using large amounts of a coolant that would thermalize the neutron flux. A new neutron absorbing material was developed that provided high conduction so a small amount of water would be sufficient for cooling thereby thermalizing the flux as little as possible. An irradiation experiment was performed to assess the effects of radiation and the performance of a new neutron absorbing material. Neutron fluence monitors were placed inside specially fabricated holders within a set of drop-in capsules and irradiated for up to four cycles in the Advanced Test Reactor. Following irradiation, the neutron fluence monitor wires were analyzed by gamma and x-ray spectrometry to determine the activities of the activation products. The adjusted neutron fluences were calculated and grouped into three bins – thermal, epithermal and fast to evaluate the spectral shift created by the new material. Fluence monitors were evaluated after four different irradiation periods to evaluate the effects of burn-up in the absorbing material. Additionally, activities of the three highest activity isotopes present in the specimens are given.

  20. Neutron personal dosimetry in criticality accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, E.S. da; Mauricio, C.L.P.

    1996-01-01

    In the present work an innovating method is proposed to estimate the absorbed dose received by individuals irradiated with neutrons in an accident, even in the case that the victim is not using any kind of neutron dosemeter. The method combines direct measurements of 24 Na and 32 P activated in the human body. The calculation method was developed using data taken from previously published papers and experimental measurements. Other irradiations results in different neutron spectra prove the validity of the method here proposed. Using a whole body counter to measure 24 Na activity, it is possible to evaluate neutron absorbed doses in the order of 140 μ Gy of very soft (thermal) spectra. For fast neutron fields, the lower limit for neutron dose detection increases, but the present method continues to be very useful in accidents, with higher neutron doses. (author)

  1. Specification of absorbed dose for reporting a therapeutic irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wambersie, A.; Chassagne, D.

    1981-01-01

    The problem of dose specification in external beam therapy with photons and electrons has been dealt with in ICRU Report 29 (1978). This problem arises from the fact that the absorbed dose distribution is usually not uniform in the target volume and that for the purpose of treatment reporting a nominal absorbed dose - which will be called target absorbed dose - has to be selected. When comparing the clinical results obtained between radiotherapy centres, the differences in the reported target absorbed doses which can be introduced by differences in the methods of dose specification often are much larger than the differences related to the dosimetric procedures themselves. This shows the importance of the problem. In this paper, some definitions of terms and concepts currently used in radiotherapy are first recalled: tumour volume, target volume, treatment volume, etc. These definitions have been proposed in ICRU Report 29 for photon and electron beams; they can be extended to any kind of irradiation. For external beam therapy with photons and electrons, the target absorbed dose is defined as the absorbed dose at selected point(s) (specification point(s)) having a meaningful relation to the target volume and/or the irradiation beams. Examples are discussed for typical cases. As far as interstitial and intracavitary therapy is concerned, the problem is more complex and no recommendations have so far been made by the ICRU Commission. A major difficulty arises from the sharp dose gradient as a function of the distance to the sources. The particular case of the treatment of cervix carcinoma is considered and some possible methods of specification are discussed: (1) the indication of the sources (in adequate units) and the duration of the application, (2) the absorbed doses at selected reference points (bladder, rectum, bony structures) and (3) the description of the tissue volume (height, width, thickness) encompassed by a given isodose surface (60Gy). (author)

  2. The Australian Commonwealth standard of measurement for absorbed radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherlock, S.L.

    1990-06-01

    This report documents the absorbed dose standard for photon beams in the range from 1 to 25 MeV. Measurements of absorbed dose in graphite irradiated by a beam of cobalt-60 gamma rays from an Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) E1 Dorado 6 teletherapy unit are reported. The measurements were performed using a graphite calorimeter, which is the primary standard for absorbed dose. The measurements are used to calibrate a working standard ion chamber in terms of absorbed dose in graphite. Details of the methods, results and correction factors applied are given in Appendices. 13 refs., 6 tabs., 6 figs

  3. Mitigation of end flux peaking in CANDU fuel bundles using neutron absorbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, D.; Chan, P.K., E-mail: dylan.pierce@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston ON, (Canada); Shen, W. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa ON, (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    End flux peaking (EFP) is a phenomenon where a region of elevated neutron flux occurs between two adjoining fuel bundles. These peaks lead to an increase in fission rate and therefore greater heat generation. It is known that addition of neutron absorbers into fuel bundles can help mitigate EFP, yet implementation in Canada Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) type reactors using natural uranium fuel has not been pursued. Monte Carlo N-Particle code (MCNP) 6.1 was used to simulate the addition of a small amount of neutron absorbers strategically within the fuel pellets. This paper will present some preliminary results collected thus far. (author)

  4. Absorbed dose to mice in prolonged irradiation by low-dose rate ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiragai, Akihiro [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Saitou, Mikio; Kudo, Iwao [and others

    2000-07-01

    In this paper, the dose absorbed by mice was evaluated as a preliminary study of the late effects of prolonged continuous irradiation of mice with low-dose rate ionizing radiation. Eight-week-old male and female SPF C3H/HeN mice in three irradiation rooms were exposed to irradiation at 8000, 400, and 20 mGy, respectively, using a {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-source. Nine racks were arranged in a circle approximately 2.5 m from the source in each room, and 10 cages were arranged on the 4 shelves of each rack. Dose distributions, such as in air at the source level, in the three rooms were estimated by using ionization chambers, and the absorbed dose distributions in the room and relative dose distributions in the cages in relation to the distance of the cage center were examined. The mean abdomen doses of the mice measured by TLD were compared with the absorbed doses in the cages. The absorbed dose distributions showed not only inverse-inverse-square-law behavior with distance from the source, but geometric symmetry in every room. The inherent scattering and absorption in each room are responsible for such behavior and asymmetry. Comparison of relative dose distributions revealed cage positions that are not suitable for experiments with high precision doses, but all positions can be used for prolonged continuous irradiation experiments if the position of the cages is rotated regularly. The mean abdomen doses of the mice were similar in each cage. The mean abdomen doses of the mice and the absorbed doses in a cage were almost the same in all cages. Except for errors concerning the positions of the racks and cages, the uncertainties in the exposure doses were estimated to be about {+-}12% for 8000 mGy group, 17% for 400 mGy group, and 35% for 20 mGy group. (K.H.)

  5. NEUTRON AND PHOTON DOSE MAPPING OF A DD NEUTRON GENERATOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metwally, Walid A; Taqatqa, Osama A; Ballaith, Mohammed M; Chen, Allan X; Piestrup, Melvin A

    2017-11-01

    Neutron generators are an excellent tool that can be effectively utilized in educational institutions for applications such as neutron activation analysis, neutron radiography, and profiling and irradiation effects. For safety purposes, it is imperative that appropriate measures are taken in order to minimize the radiation dose from such devices to the operators, students and the public. This work presents the simulation and measurement results for the neutron and photon dose rates in the vicinity of the neutron generator installed at the University of Sharjah. A very good agreement is found between the simulated and measured dose rates. All of the public dose constraints were found to be met. The occupational dose constraint was also met after imposing a 200 cm no entry zone around the generator room. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. The equidosemeter ED-02 as a device for dose equivalent measurements in mixed neutron and photon radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrosimov, A.I.; Alekseev, A.G.; Antipov, V.A.; Golovachik, V.T.

    1985-01-01

    The equidosemeter ED-02 is to be used for simultaneous measurements of the dose equivalent, absorbed dose, and mean quality factor of mixed radiations. The detector is a tissue equivalent spherical low-pressure proportional counter tube the signal of which is simultaneously recorded in two channels - a current channel and a pulse one. The current channel is linear and its response proportional to the absorbed dose. The pulse channel includes a nonlinear pulse amplitude converter the characteristic of which, taking into account the required dependence of the mean quality factor on linear energy transfer, has been chosen in such a way that in final counting the pulse channel response is proportional to the difference between dose equivalent and absorbed dose. On the basis of calculations of event spectra in the sensitive volume of the detector, the energy dependence of the dosemeter sensitivity is analysed for neutron energies up to 20 MeV. The characteristic of the nonlinear converter has been calculated on the basis of the construction parameters of the detector and optimized with respect to a representative sample of neutron spectra beyond the shields of nuclear plants. The heterogeneity of the detector, i.e. the difference between the atomic composition of wall and filling and the composition of soft biological tissue as well as the effect of the conducting coating of the case cathode, has been taken into consideration. Moreover, the test results of the device in mixed neutron-photon fields of 60 Co, 239 Pu-α-Be and 252 Cf radioisotope sources are presented. The main measuring error of dose characteristics is shown to be less than 20% in the dose range 1 x 10 -3 to 4 x 10 -3 Sv/h. (author)

  7. Experimental possibilities and fast neutron dose map of the fast neutron fields at the RB reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokcic-Kostic, M.; Pesic, M.; Antic, D.; Ninkovic, M.

    1993-01-01

    The RB is an unshielded, zero power nuclear facility with natural and enriched uranium fuel (2% and 80%) and D 2 O as moderator. It is possible to create different configurations of non-reflected and partially reflected critical systems and to make experiments in the fields of thermal neutrons. The fields of fast neutrons with 'softened' fission spectrum are made by modifying the system: modified experimental fuel channel EFC, coupled fast-thermal system in two configurations CFTS-1 and CFTS-2, coupled fast-thermal core HERBE. The intermediate and fast neutron absorbed doses in fast neutron fields are given. In first configuration of RB reactor it was almost impossible to perform dosimetric and other experiments. By creating these fields, with in our circumstances available fuel elements, the possibilities for different experiments are greatly improved. Now we can irradiate food samples, soil samples, electronic devices, study material properties, perform various dosimetry experiments, etc. (1 tab.)

  8. Evaluation of energy responses for neutron dose-equivalent meters made in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saegusa, J.; Yoshizawa, M.; Tanimura, Y.; Yoshida, M.; Yamano, T.; Nakaoka, H.

    2004-01-01

    Energy responses of three types of Japanese neutron dose-equivalent (DE) meters were evaluated by Monte Carlo simulations and measurements. The energy responses were evaluated for thermal neutrons, monoenergetic neutrons with energies up to 15.2 MeV, and also for neutrons from such radionuclide sources as 252 Cf and 241 Am-Be. The calculated results were corroborated with the measured ones. The angular dependence of the response and the DE response were also evaluated. As a result, reliable energy responses were obtained by careful simulations of the proportional counter, moderator and absorber of the DE meters. Furthermore, the relationship between pressure of counting gas and response of the DE meter was discussed. By using the obtained responses, relations between predicted readings of the DE meters and true DE values were studied for various workplace spectra

  9. Capability of NIPAM polymer gel in recording dose from the interaction of 10B and thermal neutron in BNCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khajeali, Azim; Reza Farajollahi, Ali; Kasesaz, Yaser; Khodadadi, Roghayeh; Khalili, Assef; Naseri, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    The capability of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) polymer gel to record the dose resulting from boron neutron capture reaction in BNCT was determined. In this regard, three compositions of the gel with different concentrations of 10 B were prepared and exposed to gamma radiation and thermal neutrons. Unlike irradiation with gamma rays, the boron-loaded gels irradiated by neutron exhibited sensitivity enhancement compared with the gels without 10 B. It was also found that the neutron sensitivity of the gel increased by the increase of concentration of 10 B. It can be concluded that NIPAM gel might be suitable for the measurement of the absorbed dose enhancement due to 10 B and thermal neutron reaction in BNCT. - Highlights: • Three compositions of NIPAM gel with different concentration of 10 B have been exposed by gamma and thermal neutron. • The vials containing NIPAM gel have been irradiated by an automatic system capable of providing for dose uniformity. • Suitability of NIPAM polymer gel in measuring radiation doses in BNCT has been investigated.

  10. Fuelling study of CANDU reactors using neutron absorber poisoned fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, J.J.; Chan, P.K.; Bonin, H.W., E-mail: s25815@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    A comparative fuelling study is conducted to determine the potential gain in operating margin for CANDU reactors incurred by implementing a change to the design of the conventional 37-element natural uranium (NU) fuel. The change involves insertion of minute quantities of neutron absorbers, Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3}, into the fuel pellets. The Reactor Fuelling Simulation Program (RFSP) is used to conduct core-following simulations, for the regular 37-element NU fuel, which is to be used as control for comparison. Preliminary results are presented for fuelling with the regular 37-element NU fuel, which indicate constraints on fuelling that may be relaxed with addition of neutron absorbers. (author)

  11. Absorbed dose determination in external beam radiotherapy. An international code of practice for dosimetry based on standards of absorbed dose to water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency published in 1987 an International Code of Practice entitled 'Absorbed Dose Determination in Photon and Electron Beams' (IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 277 (TRS-277)), recommending procedures to obtain the absorbed dose in water from measurements made with an ionization chamber in external beam radiotherapy. A second edition of TRS-277 was published in 1997 updating the dosimetry of photon beams, mainly kilovoltage X rays. Another International Code of Practice for radiotherapy dosimetry entitled 'The Use of Plane-Parallel Ionization Chambers in High Energy Electron and Photon Beams' (IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 381 (TRS-381)) was published in 1997 to further update TRS-277 and complement it with respect to the area of parallel-plate ionization chambers. Both codes have proven extremely valuable for users involved in the dosimetry of the radiation beams used in radiotherapy. In TRS-277 the calibration of the ionization chambers was based on primary standards of air kerma; this procedure was also used in TRS-381, but the new trend of calibrating ionization chambers directly in a water phantom in terms of absorbed dose to water was introduced. The development of primary standards of absorbed dose to water for high energy photon and electron beams, and improvements in radiation dosimetry concepts, offer the possibility of reducing the uncertainty in the dosimetry of radiotherapy beams. The dosimetry of kilovoltage X rays, as well as that of proton and heavy ion beams, interest in which has grown considerably in recent years, can also be based on these standards. Thus a coherent dosimetry system based on standards of absorbed dose to water is possible for practically all radiotherapy beams. Many Primary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories (PSDLs) already provide calibrations in terms of absorbed dose to water at the radiation quality of 60 Co gamma rays. Some laboratories have extended calibrations to high energy photon and

  12. Absorbed dose modeled for a liquid circulating around a Co-60 irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangussi, J.

    2013-01-01

    A model for the distribution of the absorbed dose in a volume of liquid circulating into an active tank containing a Co-60 irradiator is presented. The absorbed dose, the stir process and the liquid recirculation into the active tank are modeled. The absorbed dose for different fractions of the volume is calculated. The necessary irradiation times for the achievement of the required absorbed dose are evaluated. (author)

  13. Simulation of a silicon neutron detector coated with TiB2 absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krapohl, D; Nilsson, H-E; Petersson, S; Slavicek, T; Thungström, G; Pospisil, S

    2012-01-01

    Neutron radiation cannot be directly detected in semiconductor detectors and therefore needs converter layers. Planar clean-room processing can be used in the manufacturing process of semiconductor detectors with metal layers to produce a cost-effective device. We used the Geant4 Monte-Carlo toolkit to simulate the performance of a semiconductor neutron detector. A silicon photo-diode was coated with vapour deposited titanium, aluminium thin films and a titaniumdiboride (TiB 2 ) neutron absorber layer. The neutron capture reaction 10B(n, alpha)7Li is taken advantage of to create charged particles that can be counted. Boron-10 has a natural abundance of about SI 19.8%. The emitted alpha particles are absorbed in the underlying silicon detector. We varied the thickness of the converter layer and ran the simulation with a thermal neutron source in order to find the best efficiency of the TiB 2 converter layer and optimize the clean room process.

  14. SU-E-T-598: Parametric Equation for Quick and Reliable Estimate of Stray Neutron Doses in Proton Therapy and Application for Intracranial Tumor Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfrate, A; Farah, J; Sayah, R; Clairand, I [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Fontenay-aux-roses (France); De Marzi, L; Delacroix, S [Institut Curie Centre de Protontherapie d Orsay (CPO), Orsay (France); Herault, J [Centre Antoine Lacassagne (CAL) Cyclotron biomedical, Nice (France); Lee, C [National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD (United States); Bolch, W [Univ Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Development of a parametric equation suitable for a daily use in routine clinic to provide estimates of stray neutron doses in proton therapy. Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) calculations using the UF-NCI 1-year-old phantom were exercised to determine the variation of stray neutron doses as a function of irradiation parameters while performing intracranial treatments. This was done by individually changing the proton beam energy, modulation width, collimator aperture and thickness, compensator thickness and the air gap size while their impact on neutron doses were put into a single equation. The variation of neutron doses with distance from the target volume was also included in it. Then, a first step consisted in establishing the fitting coefficients by using 221 learning data which were neutron absorbed doses obtained with MC simulations while a second step consisted in validating the final equation. Results: The variation of stray neutron doses with irradiation parameters were fitted with linear, polynomial, etc. model while a power-law model was used to fit the variation of stray neutron doses with the distance from the target volume. The parametric equation fitted well MC simulations while establishing fitting coefficients as the discrepancies on the estimate of neutron absorbed doses were within 10%. The discrepancy can reach ∼25% for the bladder, the farthest organ from the target volume. Finally, the validation showed results in compliance with MC calculations since the discrepancies were also within 10% for head-and-neck and thoracic organs while they can reach ∼25%, again for pelvic organs. Conclusion: The parametric equation presents promising results and will be validated for other target sites as well as other facilities to go towards a universal method.

  15. Low-dose neutron dose response of zebrafish embryos obtained from the Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, C.Y.P.; Kong, E.Y.; Konishi, T.; Kobayashi, A.; Suya, N.; Cheng, S.H.; Yu, K.N.

    2015-01-01

    The dose response of embryos of the zebrafish, Danio rerio, irradiated at 5 h post fertilization (hpf) by 2-MeV neutrons with ≤100 mGy was determined. The neutron irradiations were made at the Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) facility in the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. A total of 10 neutron doses ranging from 0.6 to 100 mGy were employed (with a gamma-ray contribution of 14% to the total dose), and the biological effects were studied through quantification of apoptosis at 25 hpf. The responses for neutron doses of 10, 20, 25, and 50 mGy approximately fitted on a straight line, while those for neutron doses of 0.6, 1 and 2.5 mGy exhibited neutron hormetic effects. As such, hormetic responses were generically developed by different kinds of ionizing radiations with different linear energy transfer (LET) values. The responses for neutron doses of 70 and 100 mGy were significantly below the lower 95% confidence band of the best-fit line, which strongly suggested the presence of gamma-ray hormesis. - Highlights: • Neutron dose response was determined for embryos of the zebrafish, Danio rerio. • Neutron doses of 0.6, 1 and 2.5 mGy led to neutron hormetic effects. • Neutron doses of 70 and 100 mGy accompanied by gamma rays led to gamma-ray hormesis

  16. Parotid-Absorbed Doses: A Comparison Between Spiral Tomography and Panoramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Hekmatian

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Jaws spiral tomography and panoramic radiography have wide applications in dentistry, and the parotid gland is one of the most sensitive organs of the head and neck. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the parotid-absorbed dose in spiral tomography and panoramic radiographs using a thermoluminescent dosimeter. Materials and Methods A radiation analog dosimetry phantom was placed in a Cranex Tome radiograph device, and a parotid absorbed dose was measured in both techniques. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were placed bilaterally in the parotid region (on the tube side and the opposite side. Spiral tomography dosimetry was done for the upper and lower jaws in the anterior and posterior regions. Each region contained four slices of 2 mm and four slices of 4 mm in thickness. The results were analyzed by a Wilcoxon test. Results For the tube side parotid, the average absorbed doses in spiral tomography of the anterior and posterior parts of the maxilla and mandible, with the 2 mm slice thickness, were 1.70/1.40 and 1.65/1.60 mGy, respectively. The average absorbed doses with the 4mm slices were 1.65/1.70 and 1.75/1.57 mGy, respectively. For the opposite parotid, the average absorbed dose in spiral tomography of the anterior and posterior parts of the maxilla and mandible, with the 2 mm slice thickness, were 1.40/1.30 and 1.40/1.67 mGy, respectively. The average absorbed doses with the 4mm slices were 1.50/1.66 and 1.40/1.50 mGy, respectively. The average absorbed dose of the panoramic radiograph was 1.40 mGy. Conclusions There was no statistically significant difference in the parotid absorbed dose between spiral tomography and a panoramic radiograph (P value = 0.18. The overall results of this study were similar to other studies.

  17. The measurement of the indoor absorbed dose rate in air in Beijing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Mingqiang; Pan Ziqiang; Yi Nanchang; Wei Zemin; Zhang Chao; Wang Huamin; Zhu Wencai

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the indoor absorbed dose rate in air in Beijing. The average indoor absorbed dose rate in air is 8.29 μrad/h. The ratio of indoor to outdoor absorbed dose rate for 849 buildings is 1.51

  18. Absorbed dose optimization in the microplanar beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Company, F.Z.; Jaric, J.; Allen, B.J.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: Recent advances in synchrotron generated X-ray beams with high fluence rate, small divergence and sharply defined microbeam margins permit investigation of the application of an array of closely spaced, parallel or converging microbeams for radiotherapy. The proposed technique takes advantage of the repair mechanism hypothesis of capillary endothelial cells between alternate microbeam zones, which regenerates the lethally irradiated capillaries. Unlike a pencil beam, more accurate dose calculation, beam width and spacing are essential to minimise radiation damage to normal tissue cells outside the target. The absorbed dose between microbeam zones should be kept below the threshold for irreversible radiation damage. Thus the peak-to-valley ratio for the dose distribution should be optimized. The absorbed dose profile depends on the energy of the incident beam and the composition and density of the medium. Using Monte Carlo computations, the radial absorbed dose of single 24 x 24 μm 2 cross-section X-ray beams of different energies in a tissue/lung/tissue phantom was investigated. The results indicated that at 100 keV, closely spaced square cross-sectional microbeams can be applied to the lung. A bundle of parallel 24 μm-wide planar microbeams spaced at 200 μm intervals provides much more irradiation coverage of tissue than is provided by a bundle of parallel, square cross-sectional microbeam, although the former is associated with much smaller Peak (maximum absorbed dose on the beam axis) -to-Valley ( minimum interbeam absorbed dose ) ratios than the latter. In this study the lateral and depth dose of single and multiple microplanar beams with beam dimensions of width 24 μm and 48 μm and height 2-20 cm with energy of 100 keV in a tissue/lung/tissue phantom are investigated. The EGS4 Monte Carlo code is used to calculate dose profiles at different depths and bundles of beams (2 x 2 cm 2 to 20 x 20 cm 2 square cross section) with a 150 μm 200 μm and

  19. Neutronic analysis of absorbing materials for the control rod system in reactor ALLEGRO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cajko, Frantisek; Secansky, Michal; Chrebet, Tomas; Zajac, Radoslav; Darilek, Petr [VUJE, a.s., Trnava (Slovakia)

    2016-09-15

    Experimental reactor ALLEGRO is a gas cooled fast reactor in the design stage. The current design of its reactivity control system is based on control rods filled with boron carbide as the absorber. Because of disadvantages connected to high boron enrichment a possibility of using other absorbent materials was explored to lower the boron enrichment and increase the worth of the control rods. The results of neutronic Monte-Carlo analyses in a computational supercell are presented in this paper. Three absorbent materials most suitable for a use in reactor ALLEGRO (B{sub 4}C, EuB{sub 6} and ReB{sub 2}) have been analysed also in a full core model. A possible benefit of a neutron trap concept is explored as well but materials with satisfactory neutronic properties proved to be not suitable for expected high temperatures in the reactor.

  20. Neutron physics calculation for WWER-1000 absorber element lifetime determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurakin, K.Yu.; Kushmanov, S.A.

    2009-01-01

    Absorber element with compound absorber has been operating in WWER-1000 power units since 1995. AE design meets operating organizations requirements for reliability, service life (to 10 years) and safety functions. Extension of AE service life up to 20 - 30 years by the complex of calculation and experimental work is an important problem of WWER new designs development. The paper deals with the issues related to calculation determination of main factors that influence AE service life limitation - neutron flux and fluence onto absorbing and structural materials during extended service life. (Authors)

  1. High-temperature absorbed dose measurements in the megagray range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balian, P.; Ardonceau, J.; Zuppiroli, L.

    1988-01-01

    Organic conductors of the tetraselenotetracene family have been tested as ''high-temperature'' absorbed dose dosimeters. They were heated up to 120 0 C and irradiated at this temperature with 1-MeV electrons in order to simulate, in a short time, a much longer γ-ray irradiation. The electric resistance increase of the crystal can be considered a good measurement of the absorbed dose in the range 10 6 Gy to a few 10 8 Gy and presumably one order of magnitude more. This dosimeter also permits on-line (in-situ) measurements of the absorbed dose without removing the sensor from the irradiation site. The respective advantages of organic and inorganic dosimeters at these temperature and dose ranges are also discussed. In this connection, we outline new, but negative, results concerning the possible use of silica as a high-temperature, high-dose dosimeter. (author)

  2. Evaluation of neutron irradiation fields for BNCT by using absorbed dose in a phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizawa, O.

    1993-01-01

    In a previous paper, the author defined the open-quotes irradiation timeclose quotes as the time of irradiation in which the maximum open-quotes total background doseclose quotes becomes 2,500 RBE-cGy. In this paper, he has modified the definition a little as the time of irradiation in which the maximum open-quotes lμg/g B-10 doseclose quotes becomes 3,000 RBE-cGy, because he assumed that normal tissue contained 1μg/g B-10. Moreover, he has modified the dose criteria for BNCT as follows: The open-quotes eye doseclose quotes, open-quotes total body doseclose quotes and open-quotes except-head doseclose quotes should be less that 200, 100 and 50 RBE-cGy, respectively. He has added one more criterion for BNCT that the thermal neutron fluence at the tumor position should be over 2.5x10 12 n/cm 2 at the open-quotes irradiation timeclose quotes. The distance from the core side to the irradiation port in the open-quotes old configurationclose quotes of the Musashi reactor (TRIGA-II, 100kW) was 160 cm. He is now planning to design an eccentric core and to move the reactor core nearer to the irradiation port, distance between the core side and the irradiation port to be 140, 130 and 120cm. The other assumptions used in this paper are as follows: (1) The B-10 concentrations in tumor are 30 and/or 10μg/g. (2) The depth of the tumor is 5.0 cm to 5.5 cm from the surface. (3) The RBE values used are 1.0 for all gamma rays and 2.3 for B 10 (n,α) reaction products. (4) The RBE values for neutrons are the following three cases: the first case is using 1.6 for all neutrons; the second one is using 3.2 for non-thermal neutrons and 1.6 for thermal neutrons; the third case is using 4.8 for fast neutrons, 3.2 for faster epithermal and epithermal neutrons, and 1.6 for thermal neutrons

  3. Neutron sources and their characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCall, R.C.; Swanson, W.P.

    1979-03-01

    The significant sources of photoneutrons within a linear-accelerator treatment head are identified and absolute estimates of neutron production per treatment dose are given for typical components. It is found that the high-Z materials within the treatment head do not significantly alter the neutron fluence but do substantially reduce the average energy of the transmitted spectrum. Reflection of neutrons from the concrete treatment room contribute to the neutron fluence, but not substantially to the patient integral dose, because of a further reduction in average energy. The ratio of maximum fluence to the treatment dose at the same distance is given as a function of electron energy. This ratio rises with energy to an almost constant value of 2.1 x 10 5 neutrons cm -2 rad -1 at electron energies above about 25 MeV. Measured data obtained at a variety of accelerator installations are presented and compared with these calculations. Reasons for apparent deviations are suggested. Absolute depth-dose and depth-dose-equivalent distributions for realistic neutron spectra that occur at therapy installations are calculated, and a rapid falloff with depth is found. The ratio of neutron integral absorbed dose to leakage photon absorbed dose is estimated to be 0.04 and 0.2 for 14 to 25 MeV incident electron energy, respectively. Possible reasons are given for lesser neutron production from betatrons than from linear accelerators. Possible ways in which neutron production can be reduced are discussed

  4. Nuclear reactor control device by vertical displacement of neutron absorber scram rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Defaucheux, Jacques; Pasqualini, Gilbert; Wiart, Albert; Martin, Jean.

    1981-01-01

    Nuclear reactor control system by vertical displacement of an assembly absorbing the neutrons inside a reactor core and drop of the absorbing assembly in maximum insertion position under the effect of its own weight for emergency shutdown. The absorbing assembly is secured to the bottom end of a vertical control rod, the displacement of which is actuated by an electro-magnetic device [fr

  5. Electron scattering effects on absorbed dose measurements with LiF-dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertilsson, G.

    1975-10-01

    The investigation deals with absorbed dose measurements with solid wall-less dosemeters. Electron scattering complicates both measurement of absorbed dose and its theoretical interpretation. The introduction of the dosemeter in a medium causes perturbations of the radiation field. This perturbation and its effect on the distribution of the absorbed dose inside the dosemeter is studied. Plane-parallel LiF-teflon dosemeters (0.005 - 0.1 g.cm -2 ) are irradiated by a photon beam ( 137 Cs) in different media. The investigation shows that corrections must be made for perturbations caused by electron scattering phenomena. Correction factors are given for use in accurate absorbed dose determinations with thermoluminescent dosemeters. (Auth.)

  6. A calibration method for realistic neutron dosimetry in radiobiological experiments assisted by MCNP simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmohammadi Beni, Mehrdad; Krstic, Dragana; Nikezic, Dragoslav; Yu, Kwan Ngok

    2016-09-01

    Many studies on biological effects of neutrons involve dose responses of neutrons, which rely on accurately determined absorbed doses in the irradiated cells or living organisms. Absorbed doses are difficult to measure, and are commonly surrogated with doses measured using separate detectors. The present work describes the determination of doses absorbed in the cell layer underneath a medium column (D A ) and the doses absorbed in an ionization chamber (D E ) from neutrons through computer simulations using the MCNP-5 code, and the subsequent determination of the conversion coefficients R (= D A /D E ). It was found that R in general decreased with increase in the medium thickness, which was due to elastic and inelastic scattering. For 2-MeV neutrons, conspicuous bulges in R values were observed at medium thicknesses of about 500, 1500, 2500 and 4000 μm, and these were attributed to carbon, oxygen and nitrogen nuclei, and were reflections of spikes in neutron interaction cross sections with these nuclei. For 0.1-MeV neutrons, no conspicuous bulges in R were observed (except one at ~2000 μm that was due to photon interactions), which was explained by the absence of prominent spikes in the interaction cross-sections with these nuclei for neutron energies <0.1 MeV. The ratio R could be increased by ~50% for small medium thickness if the incident neutron energy was reduced from 2 MeV to 0.1 MeV. As such, the absorbed doses in cells (D A ) would vary with the incident neutron energies, even when the absorbed doses shown on the detector were the same. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  7. An international intercomparison of absorbed dose measurements for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taiman Kadni; Noriah Mod Ali

    2002-01-01

    Dose intercomparison on an international basis has become an important component of quality assurance measurement i.e. to check the performance of absorbed dose measurements in radiation therapy. The absorbed dose to water measurements for radiation therapy at the SSDL, MINT have been regularly compared through international intercomparison programmes organised by the IAEA Dosimetry Laboratory, Seibersdorf, Austria such as IAEA/WHO TLD postal dose quality audits and the Intercomparison of therapy level ionisation chamber calibration factors in terms of air kerma and absorbed dose to water calibration factors. The results of these intercomparison in terms of percentage deviations for Cobalt 60 gamma radiation and megavoltage x-ray from medical linear accelerators participated by the SSDL-MINT during the year 1985-2001 are within the acceptance limit. (Author)

  8. Fast neutron flux and intracranial dose distribution at a neutron irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Tetsuo; Aizawa, Otohiko; Nozaki, Tetsuya

    1981-01-01

    A head phantom filled with water was used to measure the fast neutron flux using 115 In(n, n')sup(115m)In and 103 Rh(n, n')sup(103m)Rh reactions. γ-ray from sup(115m)In and x-ray from sup(103m)Rh were detected by a Ge(Li) and a Na(Tl)I counter, respectively. TLD was used to investigate the γ-dose rate distribution inside the phantom. Flux of fast neutron inside the phantom was about 1 x 10 6 n/cm 2 sec, which was 3 order smaller than that of thermal neutron. The fast neutron flux decreased to 1/10 at 15 cm depth, and γ-dose rate was about 200 R/h at 100 kW inside the phantom. Total dose at the surface was 350 rad/h, to which, fast neutrons contributed more than γ-rays. The rate of fast neutron dose was about 10% of thermal neutron's in Kerma dose unit (rad), however, the rate was highly dependent on RBE value. (Nakanishi, T.)

  9. Spectral distribution measurements of neutrons in paraffin borax mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Khatib, A.M.; Gaber, M.; Abou El-Khier, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Neutron fluxes from a compact D-T neutron source has been measured in paraffin-borax mixtures by using activation foil detectors with successive threshold energies. The absorbed doses, backscattering coefficients and build-up factors were determined as well. The contribution of thermal and intermediate neutron dose is much lower, compared to that of fast neutrons. Among the used mediums, paraffin loaded with 4% borax concentration was found to be the best absorbing medium against neutrons at near depths within the blocks, while at a depth around 12 cm the neutron absorption (or scattering) is independent on the type of the used medium. (author)

  10. Absorbed decay-photon dose analysis of the IVVS/GDC plug in ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leichtle, D.; Serikov, A.; Fischer, U. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (DE). Inst. for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology (INR)

    2011-07-01

    The In-Vessel Viewing System (IVVS) and the Glow Discharge Cleaning (GDC) unit share a common port at the equatorial level of the ITER tokamak. The plug consists mainly of the IWS probe, capable of performing the laser-based in-vessel viewing and metrology, the GDC electrode, capable of producing glow discharge in the vacuum vessel during intermediate maintenance and wall conditioning periods, and their respective deployment systems to move the electrodes. The plug extends over a length of about 11 m from the GDC tip to the rear end at the bioshield level. At the present stage of the conceptual design a neutronics analysis has been requested to provide valuable input to the design strategy. To this end, a first assessment has been performed focusing on operational loads on the GDC electrode head in the so-called shielding position and on absorbed decay-photon dose rate levels in the structural components of the entire system. In this contribution we are reporting on the absorbed dose rates after the ITER life time irradiation at several cooling times. Gamma sources from activated materials of the IVVS/GDC and surrounding structures, like blanket, vacuum vessel, toroidal and poloidal field coils, have been taken into account. (orig.)

  11. Effective dose evaluation for BNCT treatment in the epithermal neutron beam at THOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.N. [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)] [Division of Health Physics, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, No. 1000, Wenhua Rd., Jiaan Village, Longtan Township, Taoyuan County 32546, Taiwan (China); Huang, C.K. [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Tsai, W.C. [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Liu, Y.H. [Nuclear Science and Technol. Develop. Center, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Jiang, S.H., E-mail: shjiang@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2011-12-15

    This paper aims to evaluate the effective dose as well as equivalent doses of several organs of an adult hermaphrodite mathematical phantom according to the definition of ICRP Publication 60 for BNCT treatments of brain tumors in the epithermal neutron beam at THOR. The MCNP5 Monte Carlo code was used for the calculation of the average absorbed dose of each organ. The effective doses for a typical brain tumor treatment with a tumor treatment dose of 20 Gy-eq were evaluated to be 0.59 and 0.35 Sv for the LLAT and TOP irradiation geometries, respectively. In addition to the stochastic effect, it was found that it is also likely to produce deterministic effects, such as cataracts and depression of haematopoiesis.

  12. European protocol for neutron dosimetry for external beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broerse, J.J.; Mijnheer, B.J.; Williams, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    The paper attempts to serve the needs of European centres participating in the High LET Therapy Project Group set up under the sponsorship of The European Organization for Research on Treatment of Cancer, to promote cooperation between physicists involved in fast neutron therapy and establish a common basis for neutron dosimetry. Differences in dosimetry procedures between European and American Groups are indicated if relevant. The subject is dealt with under the following main headings: principles of dosimetry of neutron fields, dosimetric methods, physical parameters, determination of absorbed dose at a reference point, determination of absorbed dose at any point, check of absorbed dose given to a patient, dosimetry intercomparisons between institutes. There is an ample bibliography. (U.K.)

  13. Neutron absorber qualification and acceptance testing from the designer's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bracey, W.; Chiocca, R.

    2004-01-01

    Starting in the mid 1990's, the USNRC began to require less than 100% credit for the 10B present in fixed neutron absorbers spent fuel transport packages. The current practice in the US is to use only 75% of the specified 10B in criticality safety calculations unless extensive acceptance testing demonstrates both the presence of the 10B and uniformity of its distribution. In practice, the NRC has accepted no more than 90% credit for 10B in recent years, while other national competent authorities continue to accept 100%. More recently, with the introduction of new neutron absorber materials, particularly aluminum / boron carbide metal matrix composites, the NRC has also expressed expectations for qualification testing, based in large part on Transnuclear's successful application to use a new composite material in the TN-68 storage / transport cask. The difficulty is that adding more boron than is really necessary to a metal has some negative effects on the material, reducing the ductility and the thermal conductivity, and increasing the cost. Excessive testing requirements can have the undesired effect of keeping superior materials out of spent fuel package designs, without a corresponding justification based on public safety. In European countries and especially in France, 100% credit has been accepted up to now with materials controls specified in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR): Manufacturing process approved by qualification testing Materials manufacturing controlled under a Quality Assurance system. During fabrication, acceptance testing directly on products or on representative samples. Acceptance criteria taking into account a statistical uncertainty corresponding to 3σ. The original and current bases for the reduced 10 B credit, the design requirements for neutron absorber materials, and the experience of Transnuclear and Cogema Logistics with neutron absorber testing are examined. Guidelines for qualification and acceptance testing and process controls

  14. Conceptual basis for calculations of absorbed-dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, W.K.; Rossi, H.H.; Alsmiller, R.G.; Berger, M.J.; Kellerer, A.M.; Roesch, W.C.; Spencer, L.V.; Zaider, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of radiation on matter are initiated by processes in which atoms and molecules of the medium are ionized or excited. Over a wide range of conditions, it is an excellent approximation to assume that the average number of ionizations and excitations is proportional to the amount of energy imparted to the medium by ionizing radiation in the volume of interest. The absorbed dose, that is, the average amount of energy imparted to the medium per unit mass, is therefore of central importance for the production of radiation effects, and the calculation of absorbed-dose distributions in irradiated media is the focus of interest of the present report. It should be pointed out, however, that even though absorbed dose is useful as an index relating absorbed energy to radiation effects, it is almost never sufficient; it may have to be supplemented by other information, such as the distributions of the amounts of energy imparted to small sites, the correlation of the amounts of energy imparted to adjacent sites, and so on. Such quantities are termed stochastic quantities. Unless otherwise stated, all quantities considered in this report are non-stochastic. 266 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  15. An absorbed dose calorimeter for IMRT dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duane, S.; Aldehaybes, M.; Bailey, M.; Lee, N.D.; Thomas, C.G.; Palmans, H.

    2012-01-01

    A new calorimeter for dosimetry in small and complex fields has been built. The device is intended for the direct determination of absorbed dose to water in moderately small fields and in composite fields such as IMRT treatments, and as a transfer instrument calibrated against existing absorbed dose standards in conventional reference conditions. The geometry, materials and mode of operation have been chosen to minimize detector perturbations when used in a water phantom, to give a reasonably isotropic response and to minimize the effects of heat transfer when the calorimeter is used in non-reference conditions in a water phantom. The size of the core is meant to meet the needs of measurement in IMRT treatments and is comparable to the size of the air cavity in a type NE2611 ionization chamber. The calorimeter may also be used for small field dosimetry. Initial measurements in reference conditions and in an IMRT head and neck plan, collapsed to gantry angle zero, have been made to estimate the thermal characteristics of the device, and to assess its performance in use. The standard deviation (estimated repeatability) of the reference absorbed dose measurements was 0.02 Gy (0.6%). (authors)

  16. Multilayer detector for skin absorbed dose measuring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osanov, D.P.; Panova, V.P.; Shaks, A.I.

    1985-01-01

    A method for skin dosimetry based on utilization of multilayer detectors and permitting to estimate distribution of absorbed dose by skin depth is described. The detector represents a set of thin sensitive elements separated by tissue-equivalent absorbers. Quantitative evaluation and forecasting the degree of radiation injury of skin are determined by the formula based on determination of the probability of the fact that cells are not destroyed and they can divide further on. The given method ensures a possibility of quantitative evaluation of radiobiological effect and forecasting clinical consequences of skin irradiation by results of corresponding measurements of dose by means of the miultilayer detector

  17. Fluorescent converter and neutron absorber being made of boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, G.; Teramura, M.; Sato, J.; Maeda, M.

    1983-01-01

    To improve the sensitivity of fluorescent converter is essential to the neutron radiography (NRG) which utilizes portable, not so strong, neutron sources. The fluorescent converter made of boron nitride (BN) is fabricated and tested. The sensitivity is about 1/20 of the NE426, but the homogeneity may be better. If 10 BN is utilized, the sensitivity will be five times as much as that of natural BN. Using the neutron beam of the Kyoto University Research Reactor, the flux of which is about 10 6 n/cm 2 sec, a good neutron television image was gained by X-ray television camera. As a bi-product of this converter, a flexible absorber was fabricated. (Auth.)

  18. Experimental evaluation of neutron dose in radiotherapy patients: Which dose?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero-Expósito, M., E-mail: mariateresa.romero@uab.cat; Domingo, C.; Ortega-Gelabert, O.; Gallego, S. [Grup de Recerca en Radiacions Ionizants (GRRI), Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra 08193 (Spain); Sánchez-Doblado, F. [Departamento de Fisiología Médica y Biofísica, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla 41009 (Spain); Servicio de Radiofísica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla 41009 (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: The evaluation of peripheral dose has become a relevant issue recently, in particular, the contribution of secondary neutrons. However, after the revision of the Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, there has been a lack of experimental procedure for its evaluation. Specifically, the problem comes from the replacement of organ dose equivalent by the organ-equivalent dose, being the latter “immeasurable” by definition. Therefore, dose equivalent has to be still used although it needs the calculation of the radiation quality factor Q, which depends on the unrestricted linear energy transfer, for the specific neutron irradiation conditions. On the other hand, equivalent dose is computed through the radiation weighting factor w{sub R}, which can be easily calculated using the continuous function provided by the recommendations. The aim of the paper is to compare the dose equivalent evaluated following the definition, that is, using Q, with the values obtained by replacing the quality factor with w{sub R}. Methods: Dose equivalents were estimated in selected points inside a phantom. Two types of medical environments were chosen for the irradiations: a photon- and a proton-therapy facility. For the estimation of dose equivalent, a poly-allyl-diglicol-carbonate-based neutron dosimeter was used for neutron fluence measurements and, additionally, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to obtain the energy spectrum of the fluence in each point. Results: The main contribution to dose equivalent comes from neutrons with energy higher than 0.1 MeV, even when they represent the smallest contribution in fluence. For this range of energy, the radiation quality factor and the radiation weighting factor are approximately equal. Then, dose equivalents evaluated using both factors are compatible, with differences below 12%. Conclusions: Quality factor can be replaced by the radiation weighting factor in the evaluation of dose

  19. Nuclear criticality safety: general. 6. Application of Fixed Neutron Absorbers in the New Hanford PFP Horizontal Rack Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan, J.S.; Miller, E.M.; Toffer, H.; Mo, B.S.

    2001-01-01

    absorbers and the addition of special neutron absorber plates in a storage configuration. Such an additional plate significantly enhanced criticality safety by not requiring administrative controls associated with position-dependent storage rack loads. Simplified administrative controls reduce the probability of mis-loading and decrease the radiological dose in a storage vault. (authors)

  20. Measurement of absorbed doses near interfaces, and dose mapping using gas chromic dosimetry media. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Rehim, F; Said, F I.A.; Abdel-Fattah, A A [National Centre for Radiation Research and Technology, Atomic Energy Athority, P.O.Box 29 Nasr City, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    Gas chromic dosimetry media is a thin-coated film which has advantages for high-dose radiation dosimetry, and produces high-resolution radiation image for gamma radiation. Therefore, these films were calibrated for the dose range 0.1-50 kGy in terms of increase in absorbance at 600 nm, 400 nm; increase in the area of the absorption spectra in the ranges 395-405 nm and 320-450 nm wave length as a function of absorbed dose in water. The calibrated films were used for measurement of absorbed doses close to metal interface, and dose mapping of the radiation field inside product box during a run for sterilizing surgical gloves at the mega-gamma irradiation facility.7 figs.

  1. Determination of Absorbed Dose Using a Dosimetric Film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarlat, F.; Scarisoreanu, A.; Oane, M.; Badita, E.; Mitru, E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the absorbed dose measurements by means of the irradiated dosimetric reference films. The dose distributions were made by MULTIDATA film densitometer using RTD-4 software, in INFLPR Linear Accelerator Department

  2. Absorbed dose from traversing spherically symmetric, Gaussian radioactive clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.M.; Poston, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    If a large radioactive cloud is produced, sampling may require that an airplane traverse the cloud. A method to predict the absorbed dose to the aircrew from penetrating the radioactive cloud is needed. Dose rates throughout spherically symmetric Gaussian clouds of various sizes, and the absorbed doses from traversing the clouds, were calculated. Cloud size is a dominant parameter causing dose to vary by orders of magnitude for a given dose rate measured at some distance. A method to determine cloud size, based on dose rate readings at two or more distances from the cloud center, was developed. This method, however, failed to resolve the smallest cloud sizes from measurements made at 1,000 m to 2,000 m from the cloud center

  3. X-ray absorbed doses evaluation on patients under radiological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medeiros, Regina Bitelli; Daros, Kellen A.C.

    1996-01-01

    The skin absorbed doses were evaluated on patient submitted to the following x-ray exams : chest, facial sinus, lumbar spine. Thermoluminescent dosimetry was used and a variety of irradiation techniques performed. The results shown considerable differences on the absorbed dose for the various alternative technical conditions

  4. A neutron dose equivalent meter at CAEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Shihai; Lu Yan; Wang Heyi; Yuan Yonggang; Chen Xu

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of neutron dose equivalent has been a widespread need in industry and research. In this paper, aimed at improving the accuracy of neutron dose equivalent meter: a neutron dose counter is simulated with MCNP5, and the energy response curve is optimized. The results show that the energy response factor is from 0.2 to 1.8 for neutrons in the energy range of 2.53×10 -8 MeV to 10 MeV Compared with other related meters, it turns that the design of this meter is right. (authors)

  5. Patient absorbed radiation doses estimation related to irradiation anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Flavio Augusto Penna; Soares, Amanda Anastacio; Kahl, Gabrielly Gomes

    2014-01-01

    Developed a direct equation to estimate the absorbed dose to the patient in x-ray examinations, using electric, geometric parameters and filtering combined with data from irradiated anatomy. To determine the absorbed dose for each examination, the entrance skin dose (ESD) is adjusted to the thickness of the patient's specific anatomy. ESD is calculated from the estimated KERMA greatness in the air. Beer-Lambert equations derived from power data mass absorption coefficients obtained from the NIST / USA, were developed for each tissue: bone, muscle, fat and skin. Skin thickness was set at 2 mm and the bone was estimated in the central ray of the site, in the anteroposterior view. Because they are similar in density and attenuation coefficients, muscle and fat are treated as a single tissue. For evaluation of the full equations, we chose three different anatomies: chest, hand and thigh. Although complex in its shape, the equations simplify direct determination of absorbed dose from the characteristics of the equipment and patient. The input data is inserted at a single time and total absorbed dose (mGy) is calculated instantly. The average error, when compared with available data, is less than 5% in any combination of device data and exams. In calculating the dose for an exam and patient, the operator can choose the variables that will deposit less radiation to the patient through the prior analysis of each combination of variables, using the ALARA principle in routine diagnostic radiology sector

  6. Secondary neutron doses received by patients of different ages during intracranial proton therapy treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayah, R.

    2012-01-01

    Proton therapy is an advanced radiation therapy technique that allows delivering high doses to the tumor while saving the healthy surrounding tissues due to the protons' ballistic properties. However, secondary particles, especially neutrons, are created during protons' nuclear reactions in the beam-line and the treatment room components, as well as inside the patient. Those secondary neutrons lead to unwanted dose deposition to the healthy tissues located at distance from the target, which may increase the secondary cancer risks to the patients, especially the pediatric ones. The aim of this work was to calculate the neutron secondary doses received by patients of different ages treated at the Institut Curie-centre de Protontherapie d'Orsay (ICPO) for intracranial tumors, using a 178 MeV proton beam. The treatments are undertaken at the new ICPO room equipped with an IBA gantry. The treatment room and the beam-line components, as well as the proton source were modeled using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. The obtained model was then validated by a series of comparisons between model calculations and experimental measurements. The comparisons concerned: a) depth and lateral proton dose distributions in a water phantom, b) neutron spectrometry at one position in the treatment room, c) ambient dose equivalents at different positions in the treatment room and d) secondary absorbed doses inside a physical anthropomorphic phantom. A general good agreement was found between calculations and measurements, thus our model was considered as validated. The University of Florida hybrid voxelized phantoms of different ages were introduced into the MCNPX validated model, and secondary neutron doses were calculated to many of these phantoms' organs. The calculated doses were found to decrease as the organ's distance to the treatment field increases and as the patient's age increases. The secondary doses received by a one year-old patient may be two times higher than the doses

  7. Safety implications of anomalous effects of neutron absorbers on criticality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, E.D.

    1987-04-01

    A number of ''anomalies'' in nuclear criticality have been disclosed in recent years, and as new data have become available additional anomalies have come to light. Application of existing data, without familiarity with the anomalies could lead to diminished criticality control, or more costly less efficient control. As neutron absobers are frequently used for criticality control, this paper briefly presents and discusses six apparent anomalies pertaining to the effect of neutron absorbers on the criticality of fissionable material

  8. Cell death following thermal neutron exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paterson, L.C. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Atanackovic, J. [Ontario Power Generation, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Boyer, C. [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); El-Jaby, S.; Priest, N.D. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Seymour, C.B.; Boreham, D.R. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Richardson, R.B. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    When individuals are exposed to unknown external ionizing radiation, it is desirable to have the means to assess both the absorbed dose received (Gy) and the radiation quality. Yet, conventional biodosimetry techniques, specifically the dicentric chromosome assay, cannot differentiate between the damage caused by high- and low-linear energy transfer (LET) exposures. Frequencies of apoptosis and necrosis, may provide an alternative method that assesses both the absorbed dose and radiation quality after unknown exposures. For this preliminary study, human lymphocytes were irradiated with {sup 60}Co gamma rays and thermal neutrons. Both apoptosis and necrosis increased with increasing gamma dose. In contrast, no dose-response was observed following thermal neutron exposure at doses up to 2.61 Gy. (author)

  9. Microdosimetric investigations at the fast neutron therapy facility at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langen, K.M.

    1997-01-01

    Microdosimetry was used to investigate three issues at the neutron therapy facility (NTF) at Fermilab. Firstly, the conversion factor from absorbed dose in A-150 tissue equivalent plastic to absorbed dose in ICRU tissue was determined. For this, the effective neutron kerma factor ratios, i.e., oxygen tissue equivalent plastic and carbon to A-150 tissue equivalent plastic, were measured in the neutron beam. An A-150 tissue equivalent plastic to ICRU tissue absorbed dose conversion factor of 0.92 ± 0.04 was determined. Secondly, variations in the radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) in the beam were mapped by determining variations in two related quantities, e * and R, with field size and depth in tissue. Maximal variation in e * and R of 9% and 15% respectively were determined. Lastly, the feasibility of utilizing the boron neutron capture reaction on boron-10 to selectively enhance the tumor dose in the NTF beam was investigated

  10. Photon spectrum and absorbed dose in brain tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva S, A. [General Electric Healthcare, Antonio Dovali Jaime 70, Torre A 3er. piso, Col. Santa Fe, 01210 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico); Rivera M, T. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Av. Legaria No. 694, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Using Monte Carlo methods a BOMAB phantom inside a treatment hall with a brain tumor nearby the pituitary gland was treated with photons produced by a Varian 6 MV linac. The photon spectrum and the absorbed dose were calculated in the tumor, pituitary gland and the head. The treatment beam was collimated to illuminate only the tumor volume; however photons were noticed in the gland. Photon fluence reaching the tumor is 78.1 times larger than the fluence in the pituitary gland, on the other hand the absorbed dose in the tumor is 188 times larger than the dose in the gland because photons that reach the pituitary gland are scattered, by the head and the tumor, through Compton effect. (Author)

  11. Photon spectrum and absorbed dose in brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva S, A.; Vega C, H. R.; Rivera M, T.

    2015-10-01

    Using Monte Carlo methods a BOMAB phantom inside a treatment hall with a brain tumor nearby the pituitary gland was treated with photons produced by a Varian 6 MV linac. The photon spectrum and the absorbed dose were calculated in the tumor, pituitary gland and the head. The treatment beam was collimated to illuminate only the tumor volume; however photons were noticed in the gland. Photon fluence reaching the tumor is 78.1 times larger than the fluence in the pituitary gland, on the other hand the absorbed dose in the tumor is 188 times larger than the dose in the gland because photons that reach the pituitary gland are scattered, by the head and the tumor, through Compton effect. (Author)

  12. The experimental method for neutron dose-equivalent detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Changsong

    1992-01-01

    A new method, for getting neutron dose-equivalent Cd rode absorption method is described. The method adopts Cd-rode-swarm buck absorption, which greatly improved the neutron sensitivity and simplified the adjustment method. By this method, the author has developed BH3105 model neutron dose equivalent meter, the sensitivity of this instrument reach 10 cps/μSvh -1 . γ-ray depression rate reaches 4000:1, the measurement range is 0.1 μSv/h-10 6 μSv/h. The energy response is good (from thermal neutron-14 MeV neutron), this instrument can be used to measure the dose equivalent of the neutron areas

  13. Radiation absorbed doses in cephalography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliasson, S.; Julin, P.; Richter, S.; Stenstroem, B.

    1984-01-01

    Radiation absorbed doses to different organs in the head and neck region in lateral (LAT) and postero-anterior (PA) cephalography were investigated. The doses were measured by thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) on a tissue equivalent phantom head. Lanthanide screens in speed group 4 were used at 90 and 85 k Vp. A near-focus aluminium dodger was used and the radiation beam was collimated strictly to the face. The maximum entrance dose from LAT was 0.25 mGy and 0.42 mGy from a PA exposure. The doses to the salivary glands ranged between 0.2 and 0.02 mGy at LAT and between 0.15 and 0.04 mGy at PA exposures. The average thyroid gland dose without any shielding was 0.11 mGy (LAT) and 0.06 mGy (PA). When a dodger was used the dose was reduced to 0.07 mGy (LAT). If the thyroid gland was sheilded off, the dose was further reduced to 0.01 mGy and if the thyroid region was collimated out of the primary radiation field the dose was reduced to only 0.005 mGy. (authors)

  14. Intercomparison of standards of absorbed dose between the USSR and the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlyand, V. A.; Bregadze, J. I.; Burns, J. E.; Dusautoy, A. R.; Sharpe, P. H. G.

    1991-05-01

    A comparison of national standards of absorbed dose was carried out between the All-Union Research Institute for Physical Technical and Radiotechnical Measurements (VNIIFTRI), USSR, and the National Physical Laboratotry (NPL), UK (United Kingdom). Absorbed dose to water for cobalt 60 gamma radiation was compared by means of Fricke dosimeters and ionization chambers in 1985 and 1986. The primary standards used to derive absorbed dose to water were cavity ionization chambers at NPL and a graphite calorimeter at VNIIFTRI. The ratio of absorbed dose to water, NPL to VNIIFTRI, using Fricke dosimeters was 1.008; using ionization chambers it was 1.007. This agreement is within the estimated uncertainties of the standards and measurement methods.

  15. Thermal Performance and Operation Limit of Heat Pipe Containing Neutron Absorber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Mo; Jeong, Yeong Shin; Kim, In Guk; Bang, In Choel [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Recently, passive safety systems are under development to ensure the core cooling in accidents involving impossible depressurization such as station blackout (SBO). Hydraulic control rod drive mechanisms, passive auxiliary feedwater system (PAFS), Passive autocatalystic recombiner (PAR), and so on are types of passive safety systems to enhance the safety of nuclear power plants. Heat pipe is used in various engineering fields due to its advantages in terms of easy fabrication, high heat transfer rate, and passive heat transfer. Also, the various concepts associated with safety system and heat transfer using the heat pipe were developed in nuclear engineering field.. Thus, our group suggested the hybrid control rod which combines the functions of existing control rod and heat pipe. If there is significant temperature difference between active core and condenser, the hybrid control rod can shutdown the nuclear fission reaction and remove the decay heat from the core to ultimate heat sink. The unique characteristic of the hybrid control rod is the presence of neutron absorber inside the heat pipe. Many previous researchers studied the effect of parameters on the thermal performance of heat pipe. However, the effect of neutron absorber on the thermal performance of heat pipe has not been investigated. Thus, the annular heat pipe which contains B{sub 4}C pellet in the normal heat pipe was prepared and the thermal performance of the annular heat pipe was studied in this study. Hybrid control rod concept was developed as a passive safety system of nuclear power plant to ensure the safety of the reactor at accident condition. The hybrid control rod must contain the neutron absorber for the function as a control rod. So, the effect of neutron absorber on the thermal performance of heat pipe was experimentally investigated in this study. Temperature distributions at evaporator section of annular heat pipe were lower than normal heat pipe due to the larger volume occupied by

  16. Problems in radiation absorbed dose estimation from positron emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, G.F.; Harper, P.V.; Reft, C.S.; Chen, C.T.; Lathrop, K.A.

    1986-01-01

    The positron emitters commonly used in clinical imaging studies for the most part are short-lived, so that when they are distributed in the body the radiation absorbed dose is low even though most of the energy absorbed is from the positrons themselves rather than the annihilation radiation. These considerations do not apply to the administration pathway for a radiopharmaceutical where the activity may be highly concentrated for a brief period rather than distributed in the body. Thus, high local radiation absorbed doses to the vein for an intravenous administration and to the upper airways during administration by inhalation can be expected. For these geometries, beta point source functions (FPS's) have been employed to estimate the radiation absorbed dose in the present study. Physiologic measurements were done to determine other exposure parameters for intravenous administration of O-15 and Rb-82 and for administration of O-15-CO 2 by continuous breathing. Using FPS's to calculate dose rates to the vein wall from O-15 and Rb-82 injected into a vein having an internal radius of 1.5 mm yielded dose rates of 0.51 and 0.46 (rad x g/μCi x h), respectively. The dose gradient in the vein wall and surrounding tissues was also determined using FPS's. Administration of O-15-CO 2 by continuous breathing was also investigated. Using ultra-thin thermoluninescent dosimeters (TLD's) having the effective thickness of normal tracheal mucosa, experiments were performed in which 6 dosimeters were exposed to known concentrations of O-15 positrons in a hemicylindrical tracheal phantom having an internal radius of 0.96 cm and an effective length of 14 cm. The dose rate for these conditions was 3.4 (rads/h)/(μCi/cm 3 ). 15 references, 7 figures, 6 tables

  17. Alanine and TLD coupled detectors for fast neutron dose measurements in neutron capture therapy (NCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecilia, A.; Baccaro, S.; Cemmi, A. [ENEA-FIS-ION, Casaccia RC, Via Anguillarese 301, 00060 Santa Maria di Galeria, Rome (Italy); Colli, V.; Gambarini, G. [Dept. of Physics of the Univ., INFN, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Rosi, G. [ENEA-FIS-ION, Casaccia RC, Via Anguillarese 301, 00060 Santa Maria di Galeria, Rome (Italy); Scolari, L. [Dept. of Physics of the Univ., INFN, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy)

    2004-07-01

    A method was investigated to measure gamma and fast neutron doses in phantoms exposed to an epithermal neutron beam designed for neutron capture therapy (NCT). The gamma dose component was measured by TLD-300 [CaF{sub 2}:Tm] and the fast neutron dose, mainly due to elastic scattering with hydrogen nuclei, was measured by alanine dosemeters [CH{sub 3}CH(NH{sub 2})COOH]. The gamma and fast neutron doses deposited in alanine dosemeters are very near to those released in tissue, because of the alanine tissue equivalence. Couples of TLD-300 and alanine dosemeters were irradiated in phantoms positioned in the epithermal column of the Tapiro reactor (ENEA-Casaccia RC). The dosemeter response depends on the linear energy transfer (LET) of radiation, hence the precision and reliability of the fast neutron dose values obtained with the proposed method have been investigated. Results showed that the combination of alanine and TLD detectors is a promising method to separate gamma dose and fast neutron dose in NCT. (authors)

  18. Study of thermal neutron currents near cylindrical absorbers located in heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simard, Y.N.

    1973-01-01

    The experiments reported involved determining the angular response of detectors to neutrons exterior to the surface of long cylindrical absorbers immersed in a scattering medium. The absorbers consisted of solid cylinders of copper, cadmium, or natural uranium in a fuel lattice, and combinations of copper and cadmium, as well as voided cylinders. The scattering (moderating) medium consisted of heavy water. (author)

  19. Photon spectrum and absorbed dose in brain tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene; Silva-Sanchez, Angeles; Rivera-Montalvo, Teodoro

    2016-11-01

    Using Monte Carlo methods a BOMAB phantom inside a treatment hall with a brain tumor nearby the pituitary gland was treated with photons produced by a Varian 6MV linac. The photon spectrum and the absorbed dose were calculated in the tumor, pituitary gland and the head. The treatment beam was collimated to illuminate only the tumor volume; however photons were noticed in the gland. Photon fluence reaching the tumor is and 15.7 times larger than the fluence in the pituitary gland, on the other hand the absorbed dose in the tumor is 37.1 times larger than the dose in the gland because photons that reach the pituitary gland are scattered, by the head and the tumor, through Compton effect. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of mixed energy neutron doses using TLD NG-67 type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhadi, Mukhlis; Thoyib Thamrin, M; Usmiyati Dewi, K.

    2000-01-01

    A research has been carried out to develop dose evaluation method of mixed neutron source with its neutron doses can be classified to two groups, I.e neutron doses with energy ≥ 0.5 eV and thermal neutron doses with energy less than 0.5 e V consist of epithermal and fast neutron, but in this research they were classified as fast neutron. Development of this dose evaluation method was carried out by sensitivity (S) intercomparison of TLD-600 to fast neutron, mixed energy neutron of nuclear rectors, and thermal neutron. From the experiment it was obtained that the value of Sfast : Sreactor : Sthermal = 0.005 : 0.010 : 1. Calibration factor (CF) of TLD is defined as 1/S. from the sensitivity data it can be obtained that the value of Cffast : Cfreactor : Cfthermal = 200 :100 : 1. The value of Cfreactor can be applied for mixed energy neutron doses evaluation of TLD-600. Key word : dosemeter, neutron dose, calibration factor, fast neutron, thermal neutron, nuclear reactor

  1. Isoeffective dose: a concept for biological weighting of absorbed dose in proton and heavier-ion therapies

    CERN Document Server

    Wambersie, A; Menzel, H G; Gahbauer, R; DeLuca, P M; Hendry, J H; Jones, D T L

    2011-01-01

    When reporting radiation therapy procedures, International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) recommends specifying absorbed dose at/in all clinically relevant points and/or volumes. In addition, treatment conditions should be reported as completely as possible in order to allow full understanding and interpretation of the treatment prescription. However, the clinical outcome does not only depend on absorbed dose but also on a number of other factors such as dose per fraction, overall treatment time and radiation quality radiation biology effectiveness (RBE). Therefore, weighting factors have to be applied when different types of treatments are to be compared or to be combined. This had led to the concept of `isoeffective absorbed dose', introduced by ICRU and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The isoeffective dose D(IsoE) is the dose of a treatment carried out under reference conditions producing the same clinical effects on the target volume as those of the actual treatment. It i...

  2. Computed phase equilibria for burnable neutron absorbing materials for advanced pressurized heavy water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corcoran, E.C. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Royal Military College of Canada, P.O. Box 17000, St. Forces, Kingston, Ont., K7K 7B4 (Canada)], E-mail: emily.corcoran@rmc.ca; Lewis, B.J.; Thompson, W.T. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Royal Military College of Canada, P.O. Box 17000, St. Forces, Kingston, Ont., K7K 7B4 (Canada); Hood, J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Sheridan Park, 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, Ont., L5K 1B2 (Canada); Akbari, F.; He, Z. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ont., K0J 1J0 (Canada); Reid, P. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Sheridan Park, 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, Ont., L5K 1B2 (Canada)

    2009-03-31

    Burnable neutron absorbing materials are expected to be an integral part of the new fuel design for the Advanced CANDU [CANDU is as a registered trademark of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited.] Reactor. The neutron absorbing material is composed of gadolinia and dysprosia dissolved in an inert cubic-fluorite yttria-stabilized zirconia matrix. A thermodynamic model based on Gibbs energy minimization has been created to provide estimated phase equilibria as a function of composition and temperature. This work includes some supporting experimental studies involving X-ray diffraction.

  3. Absorbed bone marrow dose in certain dental radiographic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, S.C.; Rose, T.C.

    1979-01-01

    The absorbed dose of radiation in the bone marrow of the region of the head and neck was measured during intraoral, panoramic, and cephalometric radiography. Panoramic radiography results in a dose a fifth or less than that from an intraoral survey. The use of rectangular collimation reduces the bone marrow absorbed dose from an intraoral survey by about 60%. Comparison of the doses from dental radiography with natural environmental radiation shows that an intraoral set of films results in the same total dose to the bone marrow as 65 days of background exposure. The use of rectangular collimation reduces this value to 25 days. Panoramic radiography results in significantly less irradiation, as it reduces the value to 14 days or fewer. Dental radiography thus involves exposures in the range of variation of natural environmental background values

  4. Recombination methods for boron neutron capture therapy dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golnik, N.; Tulik, P.; Zielczynski, M.

    2003-01-01

    The radiation effects of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) are associated with four-dose-compartment radiation field - boron dose (from 10 B(n,α) 7 Li) reaction), proton dose from 14 N(n,p) 14 C reaction, neutron dose (mainly fast and epithermal neutrons) and gamma-ray dose (external and from capture reaction 1 H(n,γ) 2 D). Because of this the relation between the absorbed dose and the biological effects is very complex and all the above mentioned absorbed dose components should be determined. From this point of view, the recombination chambers can be very useful instruments for characterization of the BNCT beams. They can be used for determination of gamma and high-LET dose components for the characterization of radiation quality of mixed radiation fields by recombination microdosimetric method (RMM). In present work, a graphite high-pressure recombination chamber filled with nitrogen, 10 BF 3 and tissue equivalent gas was used for studies on application of RMM for BNCT dosimetry. The use of these gases or their mixtures opens a possibility to design a recombination chamber for determination of the dose fractions due to gamma radiation, fast neutrons, neutron capture on nitrogen and high LET particles from (n, 10 B) reaction in simulated tissue with different content of 10 B. (author)

  5. Thermal neutron equivalent doses assessment around KFUPM neutron source storage area using NTDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Jarad, F.; Fazal-ur-Rehman; Al-Haddad, M.N.; Al-Jarrallah, M.I.; Nassar, R

    2002-07-01

    Area passive neutron dosemeters based on nuclear track detectors (NTDs) have been used for 13 days to assess accumulated low doses of thermal neutrons around neutron source storage area of the King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM). Moreover, the aim of this study is to check the effectiveness of shielding of the storage area. NTDs were mounted with the boron converter on their surface as one compressed unit. The converter is a lithium tetraborate (Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}) layer for thermal neutron detection via {sup 10}B(N,{alpha}){sup 7}Li and {sup 6}Li(n,{alpha}){sup 3}H nuclear reactions. The area passive dosemeters were installed on 26 different locations around the source storage area and adjacent rooms. The calibration factor for NTD-based area passive neutron dosemeters was found to be 8.3 alpha tracks.cm{sup -2}.{mu}Sv{sup -1} using active snoopy neutron dosemeters in the KFUPM neutron irradiation facility. The results show the variation of accumulated dose with locations around the storage area. The range of dose rates varied from as low as 40 nSv.h{sup -1} up to 11 {mu}Sv.h{sup -1}. The study indicates that the area passive neutron dosemeter was able to detect accumulated doses as low as 40 nSv.h{sup -1}, which could not be detected with the available active neutron dosemeters. The results of the study also indicate that an additional shielding is required to bring the dose rates down to background level. The present investigation suggests extending this study to find the contribution of doses from fast neutrons around the neutron source storage area using NTDs through proton recoil. The significance of this passive technique is that it is highly sensitive and does not require any electronics or power supplies, as is the case in active systems. (author)

  6. Simplified method for creating a density-absorbed dose calibration curve for the low dose range from Gafchromic EBT3 film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuhiro Gotanda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiochromic film dosimeters have a disadvantage in comparison with an ionization chamber in that the dosimetry process is time-consuming for creating a density-absorbed dose calibration curve. The purpose of this study was the development of a simplified method of creating a density-absorbed dose calibration curve from radiochromic film within a short time. This simplified method was performed using Gafchromic EBT3 film with a low energy dependence and step-shaped Al filter. The simplified method was compared with the standard method. The density-absorbed dose calibration curves created using the simplified and standard methods exhibited approximately similar straight lines, and the gradients of the density-absorbed dose calibration curves were −32.336 and −33.746, respectively. The simplified method can obtain calibration curves within a much shorter time compared to the standard method. It is considered that the simplified method for EBT3 film offers a more time-efficient means of determining the density-absorbed dose calibration curve within a low absorbed dose range such as the diagnostic range.

  7. Thyroid absorbed dose for people at Rongelap, Utirik, and Sifo on March 1, 1954

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessard, E.T.; Miltenberger, R.P.; Conrad, R.A.; Musoline, S.V.; Naidu, J.R.; Moorthy, A.; Schopfer, C.J.

    1985-03-01

    A study was undertaken to reexamine thyroid absorbed dose estimates for people accidentally exposed to fallout at Rongelap, Sifo, and Utirik Islands from the Pacific weapon test known as Operation Castle BRAVO. The study included: (1) reevaluation of radiochemical analysis, to relate results from pooled urine to intake, retention, and excretion functions; (2) analysis of neutron-irradiation studies of archival soil samples, to estimate areal activities of the iodine isotopes; (3) analysis of source term, weather data, and meteorological functions used in predicting atmospheric diffusion and fallout deposition, to estimate airborne concentrations of the iodine isotopes; and (4) reevaluation of radioactive fallout, which contaminated a Japanese fishing vessel in the vicinity of Rongelap Island on March 1, 1954, to determine fallout components. The conclusions of the acute exposure study were that the population mean thyroid absorbed doses were 21 gray (2100 rad) at Rongelap, 6.7 gray (670 rad) at Sifo, and 2.8 gray (280 rad) at Utirik. The overall thyroid cancer risk we estimated was in agreement with results published on the Japanese exposed at Nagasaki and Hiroshima. We now postulate that the major route for intake of fallout was by direct ingestion of food prepared and consumed outdoors. 66 refs., 13 figs., 25 tabs

  8. Thyroid absorbed dose for people at Rongelap, Utirik, and Sifo on March 1, 1954

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lessard, E.T.; Miltenberger, R.P.; Conrad, R.A.; Musoline, S.V.; Naidu, J.R.; Moorthy, A.; Schopfer, C.J.

    1985-03-01

    A study was undertaken to reexamine thyroid absorbed dose estimates for people accidentally exposed to fallout at Rongelap, Sifo, and Utirik Islands from the Pacific weapon test known as Operation Castle BRAVO. The study included: (1) reevaluation of radiochemical analysis, to relate results from pooled urine to intake, retention, and excretion functions; (2) analysis of neutron-irradiation studies of archival soil samples, to estimate areal activities of the iodine isotopes; (3) analysis of source term, weather data, and meteorological functions used in predicting atmospheric diffusion and fallout deposition, to estimate airborne concentrations of the iodine isotopes; and (4) reevaluation of radioactive fallout, which contaminated a Japanese fishing vessel in the vicinity of Rongelap Island on March 1, 1954, to determine fallout components. The conclusions of the acute exposure study were that the population mean thyroid absorbed doses were 21 gray (2100 rad) at Rongelap, 6.7 gray (670 rad) at Sifo, and 2.8 gray (280 rad) at Utirik. The overall thyroid cancer risk we estimated was in agreement with results published on the Japanese exposed at Nagasaki and Hiroshima. We now postulate that the major route for intake of fallout was by direct ingestion of food prepared and consumed outdoors. 66 refs., 13 figs., 25 tabs.

  9. Determination of absorbed dose to the lens of eye from external sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Lishu

    1993-01-01

    The methods of determining absorbed dose distributions in human eyeball by means of the experiments and available theories have been reported. A water phantom was built up. The distributions of beta dose were measured by an extrapolation ionization chamber at some depths corresponding to components of human eyeball such as cornea, sclera, anterior chamber and the lens of eye. The ratios among superficial absorbed dose (at 0.07 mm) and average absorbed doses at the depths 1,2,3 mm are obtained. They can be used for confining the deterministic effects of superficial tissues and organs such as the lens of eye for weakly penetrating radiations

  10. Microdosimetry for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maughan, R.L.; Kota, C.

    2000-01-01

    The specific aims of the research proposal were as follows: (1) To design and construct small volume tissue equivalent proportional counters for the dosimetry and microdosimetry of high intensity thermal and epithermal neutron beams used in BNCT, and of modified fast neutron beams designed for boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy (BNCEFNT). (2) To develop analytical methods for estimating the biological effectiveness of the absorbed dose in BNCT and BNCEFNT based on the measured microdosimetric spectra. (3) To develop an analytical framework for comparing the biological effectiveness of different epithermal neutron beams used in BNCT and BNCEFNT, based on correlated sets of measured microdosimetric spectra and radiobiological data. Specific aims (1) and (2) were achieved in their entirety and are comprehensively documented in Jay Burmeister's Ph.D. dissertation entitled ''Specification of physical and biologically effective absorbed dose in radiation therapies utilizing the boron neutron capture reaction'' (Wayne State University, 1999). Specific aim (3) proved difficult to accomplish because of a lack of sufficient radiobiological data

  11. A state-of-the-art report on the development of B{sub 4}C materials as neutron absorbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Choong Hwan; Kim, Sun Jae; Park, Jee Yun; Kang, Dae Kab [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-01-01

    Boron of 10 atomic weight is one of the best neutron absorbing elements. Among the boron compounds, B{sub 4}C and its composites exhibit excellent material properties. Those materials absorb thermal and fast neutrons, are thermally and chemically very stable, and are very strong in mechanical properties. By neutron irradiation B-10 transforms into Li releasing one He atom. This He release causes swelling, cracking and fragmentation of B{sub 4}C bulks and results in degradation of the materials. The essence of technical developments of B{sub 4}C-based neutron absorbers is the minimization of the effects of He release, and this can be realized through microstructural optimizations of grain and porosity distributions. While pure B{sub 4}C is very difficult in sintering, new neutron absorbing materials of B{sub 4}C-cermets are being developed. B{sub 4}C-cermets are composite materials in which B{sub 4}C powders are dispersed in the metal matrix of Al or Cu. Those materials show easiness in sintering, mechanical forming, and B{sub 4}C content controlling. Neutron absorbing and shielding materials play an important role for the safety of reactor operations and environmental protections. Those materials are being used as monolithic pellets for control rods, burnable poison fuel rods, rack materials for spent fuel storages, shielding materials for shipping casks, and especially for shielding plates for liquid metal reactors. 37 figs., 12 tabs., 41 refs. (Author).

  12. Time improvement of photoelectric effect calculation for absorbed dose estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massa, J M; Wainschenker, R S; Doorn, J H; Caselli, E E

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation therapy is a very useful tool in cancer treatment. It is very important to determine absorbed dose in human tissue to accomplish an effective treatment. A mathematical model based on affected areas is the most suitable tool to estimate the absorbed dose. Lately, Monte Carlo based techniques have become the most reliable, but they are time expensive. Absorbed dose calculating programs using different strategies have to choose between estimation quality and calculating time. This paper describes an optimized method for the photoelectron polar angle calculation in photoelectric effect, which is significant to estimate deposited energy in human tissue. In the case studies, time cost reduction nearly reached 86%, meaning that the time needed to do the calculation is approximately 1/7 th of the non optimized approach. This has been done keeping precision invariant

  13. Validity of the concept of absorbed dose as a physical quantity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Jun-Ichiro; Katoh, Kazuaki.

    1995-01-01

    The concept of the 'absorbed dose' of ionizing radiation is scrutinized from physical point of view. It is shown that the concept and definition of the quantity in the ICRU system is disqualified as a physical quantity and the absorbed dose can not always be a 'measure of cause' in describing causality relation between radiation and effects on matter. The current absorbed dose depends even on the energy that have already been brought out from the matter, contrary to the intention of introducing the quantity. Trials to remove these difficulties are made. However, it is also shown there still exists an essential problem that cannot be solved by improving the formulation. (author)

  14. Quality factor for charged particle recoils as a function of neutron energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borak, T.B.; Stinchcomb, T.G.

    1980-01-01

    A method has been developed for computing the quality factor for any neutron spectrum with a maximum energy of 4 MeV. Calculated values for 41 adjacent neutron energy intervals from thermal to 4 MeV are tabulated. The table includes the fraction of absorbed dose and neutron dose equivalent produced by hydrogen recoils in soft tissue with the remaining fraction due to heavier particles. The production rate of 2.2 MeV photons from hydrogen capture in tissue is also given. The quality factor for a neutron spectrum of interest can be obtained from a weighted integration over the values listed. The total dose equivalent must include the contributions of absorbed dose from photons having a quality factor of unity. (author)

  15. Method and apparatus for determining the dose value of neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgkhardt, B.; Piesch, E.

    1976-01-01

    A method is provided for determining the dose value of neutrons leaving a body as thermal and intermediate neutrons after having been scattered in the body. A first dose value of thermal and intermediate neutrons is detected on the surface of the body by means of a first detector for neutrons which is shielded against thermal and intermediate neutrons not emerging from the body. A second detector is used to measure a second dose value of the thermal and intermediate neutrons not emerging from the body. A first correction factor based on the first and second values is obtained from a calibration diagram and is applied to the first dose value to determine a first corrected first dose value. 21 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures

  16. Neutron absorber qualification and acceptance testing from the designer's perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracey, W. [Transnuclear, Inc, Hawthorne, NY (United States); Chiocca, R. [Cogema Logistics, St. Quentin en Yvelines (France)

    2004-07-01

    Starting in the mid 1990's, the USNRC began to require less than 100% credit for the 10B present in fixed neutron absorbers spent fuel transport packages. The current practice in the US is to use only 75% of the specified 10B in criticality safety calculations unless extensive acceptance testing demonstrates both the presence of the 10B and uniformity of its distribution. In practice, the NRC has accepted no more than 90% credit for 10B in recent years, while other national competent authorities continue to accept 100%. More recently, with the introduction of new neutron absorber materials, particularly aluminum / boron carbide metal matrix composites, the NRC has also expressed expectations for qualification testing, based in large part on Transnuclear's successful application to use a new composite material in the TN-68 storage / transport cask. The difficulty is that adding more boron than is really necessary to a metal has some negative effects on the material, reducing the ductility and the thermal conductivity, and increasing the cost. Excessive testing requirements can have the undesired effect of keeping superior materials out of spent fuel package designs, without a corresponding justification based on public safety. In European countries and especially in France, 100% credit has been accepted up to now with materials controls specified in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR): Manufacturing process approved by qualification testing Materials manufacturing controlled under a Quality Assurance system. During fabrication, acceptance testing directly on products or on representative samples. Acceptance criteria taking into account a statistical uncertainty corresponding to 3{sigma}. The original and current bases for the reduced {sup 10}B credit, the design requirements for neutron absorber materials, and the experience of Transnuclear and Cogema Logistics with neutron absorber testing are examined. Guidelines for qualification and acceptance testing and

  17. Absorbed dose to the skin in radiological examinations of upper and lower gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zonca, G.; Brusa, A.; Somigliana, A.; Pasqualotto, C.; Sichirollo, A.E.; Bellomi, M.; Cozzi, G.; Severini, A.

    1995-01-01

    Absorbed doses to the skin in radiological examinations of the upper and lower gastronintestinal tract in conventional and digital radiology are evaluated and compared. Absorbed doses were measured with LiF thermoluminescence dosemeters placed on the lower pelvis, umbilicus and forehead of the patient to evaluate the absorbed dose in and outside the primary beam. On 10 patients a reduction in absorbed dose of about 34% for double contrast barium enema and of 66% for upper gastrointestinal tract examinations was revealed with digital radiography equipment. In our working conditions the lower dose requirement for digital radiography is mainly due to image intensifiers and television chains and also, due to our equipment settings, to the dose reduction with digital spot fluorography compared with conventional spot film radiography. (Author)

  18. Absorbed dose calculations to blood and blood vessels for internally deposited radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akabani, G.; Poston, J.W. Sr.

    1992-01-01

    At present, absorbed dose calculations for radionuclides in the human circulatory system use relatively simple models and are restricted in their applications. To determine absorbed doses to the blood and to the surface of the blood vessel wall, Monte Carlo calculations were performed using the code Electron Gamma Shower (EGS4). Absorbed doses were calculated for the blood and the blood vessel wall (lumen) for different blood vessel sizes. The radionuclides chosen for this study were those commonly used in nuclear medicine. No diffusion of the radionuclide into the blood vessel was or cross fire between blood vessels was assumed. Results are useful in assessing the doses to blood and blood vessel walls for different nuclear medicine procedures

  19. Absorbed dose calculations to blood and blood vessels for internally deposited radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akabani, G.; Poston, J.W.

    1991-05-01

    At present, absorbed dose calculations for radionuclides in the human circulatory system used relatively simple models and are restricted in their applications. To determine absorbed doses to the blood and to the surface of the blood vessel wall, EGS4 Monte Carlo calculations were performed. Absorbed doses were calculated for the blood and the blood vessel wall (lumen) for different blood vessels sizes. The radionuclides chosen for this study were those commonly used in nuclear medicine. No diffusion of the radionuclide into the blood vessel was assumed nor cross fire between vessel was assumed. Results are useful in assessing the dose in blood and blood vessel walls for different nuclear medicine procedures. 6 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs

  20. Radiation absorbed dose and expected risk in head and neck tissues after thyroid radioiodine therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamed, A [National Center for Nuclear and Radiation Control, AEA., Cairo (Egypt); Farag, H I [National Cancer instiute, Cairo University, Cairo (Egypt); Saleh, A [Al-hussien Hospital, Al-Azhar University, Cairo (Egypt)

    1997-12-31

    Measurement of absorbed dose in head and neck phantom after applying I-131 therapeutic dose for the treatment of thyroid malignancies was conducted. The measurement were carried out at several sites of phantom using TL dosimeters. The absorbed doses were also measured on the skin of four patients during their administration of I-131 therapeutic doses 1.332 GBq (36 mci) I-131. The measurements were taken over 69 hours exposure at different sites of phantom. The same measurements were carried out on the four patients. At five sites of the patients head and neck, the absorbed dose were measured and compared with that measured on the phantom. The values measured are discussed in the light of the published individual absorbed doses in the organs by ICRP tables. High absorbed doses were absorbed in the different sites of the head and neck during the I-131 therapy (0.14-9.68 mGy/mCi). 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. An analytical model of leakage neutron equivalent dose for passively-scattered proton radiotherapy and validation with measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Christopher; Newhauser, Wayne; Farah, Jad

    2015-05-18

    Exposure to stray neutrons increases the risk of second cancer development after proton therapy. Previously reported analytical models of this exposure were difficult to configure and had not been investigated below 100 MeV proton energy. The purposes of this study were to test an analytical model of neutron equivalent dose per therapeutic absorbed dose  at 75 MeV and to improve the model by reducing the number of configuration parameters and making it continuous in proton energy from 100 to 250 MeV. To develop the analytical model, we used previously published H/D values in water from Monte Carlo simulations of a general-purpose beamline for proton energies from 100 to 250 MeV. We also configured and tested the model on in-air neutron equivalent doses measured for a 75 MeV ocular beamline. Predicted H/D values from the analytical model and Monte Carlo agreed well from 100 to 250 MeV (10% average difference). Predicted H/D values from the analytical model also agreed well with measurements at 75 MeV (15% average difference). The results indicate that analytical models can give fast, reliable calculations of neutron exposure after proton therapy. This ability is absent in treatment planning systems but vital to second cancer risk estimation.

  2. Measurementof photo-neutron dose from an 18-MV medical linac using a foil activation method in view of radiation protection of patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuecel, Haluk; Kolbasi, Asuman; Yueksel, Alptug Oezer; Cobanbas, Ibrahim; Kaya, Vildan

    2016-01-01

    High-energy linear accelerators are increasingly used in the medical field. However, the unwanted photo-neutrons can also be contributed to the dose delivered to the patients during their treatments. In this study, neutron fluxes were measured in a solid water phantom placed at the isocenter 1-m distance from the head of an 18-MV linac using the foil activation method. The produced activities were measured with a calibrated well-type Ge detector. From the measured fluxes, the total neutron fluence was found to be (1.17 ± 0.06) X 10 7 n/cm 2 per Gy at the phantom surface in a 20 X 20 cm 2 X-ray field size. The maximum photo-neutron dose was measured to be 0.67 ± 0.04 mSv/Gy at d max = 5 cm depth in the phantom at isocenter. The present results are compared with those obtained for different field sizes of 10 X 10cm 2 , 15 X 15cm 2 , and 20 X 20cm 2 from 10-, 15-, and 18-MV linacs. Additionally, ambient neutron dose equivalents were determined at different locations in the room and they were found to be negligibly low. The results indicate that the photo-neutron dose at the patient position is not a negligible fraction of the therapeutic photon dose. Thus, there is a need for reduction of the contaminated neutron dose by taking some additional measures, for instance, neutron absorbing-protective materials might be used as aprons during the treatment

  3. Development of an anthropomorfic simulator for simulation and measurements of neutron dose and flux the facility for BNCT studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muniz, Rafael Oliveira Rondon

    2010-01-01

    IPEN facility for researches in BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) uses IEA-R1 reactor's irradiation channel number 3, where there is a mixed radiation field - neutrons and gamma. The researches in progress require the radiation fields, in the position of the irradiation of sample, to have in its composition maximized thermal neutrons component and minimized, fast and epithermal neutron flux and gamma radiation. This work was developed with the objective of evaluating whether the present radiation field in the facility is suitable for BNCT researches. In order to achieve this objective, a methodology for the dosimetry of thermal neutrons and gamma radiation in mixed fields of high doses, which was not available in IPEN, was implemented in the Center of Nuclear Engineering of IPEN, by using thermoluminescent dosimeters - TLDs 400, 600 and 700. For the measurements of thermal and epithermal neutron flux, activation detectors of gold were used applying the cadmium ratio technique. A cylindrical phantom composed by acrylic discs was developed and tested in the facility and the DOT 3.5. computational code was used in order to obtain theoretical values of neutron flux and the dose along phantom. In the position corresponding to about half the length of the cylinder of the phantom, the following values were obtained: thermal neutron flux (2,52 ± 0,06).10 8 n/cm 2 s, epithermal neutron flux (6,17 ± 0,26).10 7 .10 6 n/cm 2 s, absorbed dose due to thermal neutrons (4,2 ± 1,8)Gy and (10,1 ± 1,3)Gy due to gamma radiation. The obtained values show that the fluxes of thermal and epithermal neutrons flux are appropriate for studies in BNCT, however, the dose due to gamma radiation is high, indicating that the facility should be improved. (author)

  4. Thermal neutron dose calculation in synovium membrane for BNCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdalla, Khalid; Naqvi, A.A.; Maalej, N.; El-Shahat, B.

    2006-01-01

    A D(d,n) reaction based setup has been optimized for Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS). The polyethylene moderator and graphite reflector sizes were optimized to deliver the highest ratio of thermal to fast neutron yield. The neutron dose was calculated at various depths in a knee phantom loaded with boron to determine therapeutic ratios of synovium dose/skin dose and synovium dose/bone dose. Normalized to same boron loading in synovium, the values of the therapeutic ratios obtained in the present study are 12-30 times higher than the published values. (author)

  5. Absorbed Doses to Patients in Nuclear Medicine; Doskatalogen foer nukleaermedicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leide-Svegborn, Sigrid; Mattsson, Soeren; Nosslin, Bertil [Universitetssjukhuset MAS, Malmoe (Sweden). Avd. foer radiofysik; Johansson, Lennart [Norrlands Universitetssjukhus, Umeaa (Sweden). Avd. foer radiofysik

    2004-09-01

    The work with a Swedish catalogue of radiation absorbed doses to patients undergoing nuclear medicine investigations has continued. After the previous report in 1999, biokinetic data and dose estimates (mean absorbed dose to various organs and tissues and effective dose) have been produced for a number of substances: {sup 11}C- acetate, {sup 11}C- methionine, {sup 18}F-DOPA, whole antibody labelled with either {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In, {sup 123}I or {sup 131}I, fragment of antibody, F(ab'){sub 2} labelled with either {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In, {sup 123}I or {sup 131}I and fragment of antibody, Fab' labelled with either {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In, {sup 123}I or {sup 131}I. The absorbed dose estimates for these substances have been made from published biokinetic information. For other substances of interest, e.g. {sup 14}C-urea (children age 3-6 years), {sup 14}C-glycocholic acid, {sup 14}C-xylose and {sup 14}C-triolein, sufficient literature data have not been available. Therefore, a large number of measurements on patients and volunteers have been carried out, in order to determine the biokinetics and dosimetry for these substances. Samples of breast milk from 50 mothers, who had been subject to nuclear medicine investigations, have been collected at various times after administration of the radiopharmaceutical to the mother. The activity concentration in the breast milk samples has been measured. The absorbed dose to various organs and tissues and the effective dose to the child who ingests the milk have been determined for 17 different radiopharmaceuticals. Based on these results revised recommendations for interruption of breast-feeding after nuclear medicine investigations are suggested.

  6. Absorbed dose from a beta source as shown by thermoluminescence dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wintle, A.G.; Aitken, M.J.

    1977-01-01

    The depth-dose curve was obtained for a 90 Sr- 90 Y beta source using a fine grain TL phosphor to measure the observed dose, aluminium absorbers being interposed between the source and the detector; the curve went through a maximum at an absorber thickness of about 40 mg cm -2 . This curve was then used to predict the average dose rate to various thicknesses of calcium fluoride which has a similar absorption characteristic to aluminium; these values were compared with experimentally determined dose rates. This work was done in connection with thermoluminescence dating of flint and calcite in archaeology and geology. (author)

  7. Dose calculation in biological samples in a mixed neutron-gamma field at the TRIGA reactor of the University of Mainz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitz, T.; Blaickner, M.; Schütz, C.

    2010-01-01

    and pin-diodes. Material and methods. When L-α-alanine is irradiated with ionizing radiation, it forms a stable radical which can be detected by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The value of the ESR signal correlates to the amount of absorbed dose. The dose for each pellet is calculated using......To establish Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for non-resectable liver metastases and for in vitro experiments at the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Mainz, Germany, it is necessary to have a reliable dose monitoring system. The in vitro experiments are used to determine the relative......-calculations for mixed radiation fields and the Hansen & Olsen alanine detector response model. With the acquired data about the background dose and charged particle spectrum, and with the acquired information of the neutron flux, we are capable of calculating the dose to the tissue. Conclusion. Monte Carlo simulation...

  8. Radiation absorbed dose from medically administered radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedler, H.D.; Kaul, A.

    1975-01-01

    The use of radiopharmaceuticals for medical examinations is increasing. Surveys carried out in West Berlin show a 20% average yearly increase in such examinations. This implies an increased genetic and somatic radiation exposure of the population in general. Determination of radiation exposure of the population as well as of individual patients examined requires a knowledge of the radiation dose absorbed by each organ affected by each examination. An extensive survey of the literature revealed that different authors reported widely different dose values for the same defined examination methods and radiopharmaceuticals. The reason for this can be found in the uncertainty of the available biokinetic data for dose calculations and in the application of various mathematical models to describe the kinetics and calculation of organ doses. Therefore, the authors recalculated some of the dose values published for radiopharmaceuticals used in patients by applying biokinetic data obtained from exponential models of usable metabolism data reported in the literature. The calculation of organ dose values was done according to the concept of absorbed fractions in its extended form. For all radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine the energy dose values for the most important organs (ovaries, testicles, liver, lungs, spleen, kidneys, skeleton, total body or residual body) were recalculated and tabulated for the gonads, skeleton and critical or examined organs respectively. These dose values are compared with those reported in the literature and the reasons for the observed deviations are discussed. On the basis of recalculated dose values for the gonads and bone-marrow as well as on the basis of results of statistical surveys in West Berlin, the genetically significant dose and the somatically (leukemia) significant dose were calculated for 1970 and estimated for 1975. For 1970 the GSD was 0.2 mrad and the LSD was 0.7 mrad. For 1975 the GSD is estimated at < 0.5 mrad and the

  9. The absorbed dose to blood from blood-borne activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hänscheid, H; Fernández, M; Lassmann, M

    2015-01-01

    The radiation absorbed dose to blood and organs from activity in the blood is relevant for nuclear medicine dosimetry and for research in biodosimetry. The present study provides coefficients for the average absorbed dose rates to the blood from blood-borne activity for radionuclides frequently used in targeted radiotherapy and in PET diagnostics. The results were deduced from published data for vessel radius-dependent dose rate coefficients and reasonable assumptions on the blood-volume distribution as a function of the vessel radius. Different parts of the circulatory system were analyzed separately. Vessel size information for heart chambers, aorta, vena cava, pulmonary artery, and capillaries was taken from published results of morphometric measurements. The remaining blood not contained in the mentioned vessels was assumed to reside in fractal-like vascular trees, the smallest branches of which are the arterioles or venules. The applied vessel size distribution is consistent with recommendations of the ICRP on the blood-volume distribution in the human. The resulting average absorbed dose rates to the blood per nuclear disintegration per milliliter (ml) of blood are (in 10 −11  Gy·s −1 ·Bq −1 ·ml) Y-90: 5.58, I-131: 2.49, Lu-177: 1.72, Sm-153: 2.97, Tc-99m: 0.366, C-11: 4.56, F-18: 3.61, Ga-68: 5.94, I-124: 2.55. Photon radiation contributes 1.1–1.2·10 −11  Gy·s −1 ·Bq −1 ·ml to the total dose rate for positron emitters but significantly less for the other nuclides. Blood self-absorption of the energy emitted by ß-particles in the whole blood ranges from 37% for Y-90 to 80% for Tc-99m. The correspondent values in vascular trees, which are important for the absorbed dose to organs, range from 30% for Y-90 to 82% for Tc-99m. (paper)

  10. Conversion of ionization measurements to radiation absorbed dose in non-water density material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Khatib, E.; Connors, S.

    1992-01-01

    In bone-equivalent materials two different calculations of absorbed dose are possible: the absorbed dose to soft tissue plastic (polystyrene) within bone-equivalent material and the dose to the bone-equivalent material itself. Both can be calculated from ionization measurements in phantoms. These two calculations result in significantly different doses in a heterogeneous phantom composed of polystyrene and aluminium (a bone substitute). The dose to a thin slab of polystyrene in aluminium is much higher than the dose to the aluminium itself at the same depth in the aluminium. Monte Carlo calculations confirm that the calculation of dose to polystyrene in aluminium can be accurately carried out using existing dosimetry protocols. However, the conversion of ionization measurements to absorbed dose to high atomic number materials cannot be accurately carried out with existing protocols and appropriate conversion factors need to be determined. (author)

  11. Assessment of human effective absorbed dose of 67 Ga-ECC based on biodistribution rat data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanehsazzadeh, Saeed; Yousefnia, Hassan; Lahooti, Afsaneh; Zolghadri, Samaneh; Jalilian, Amir Reza; Afarideh, Hossien

    2015-02-01

    In a diagnostic context, determination of absorbed dose is required before the introduction of a new radiopharmaceutical to the market to obtain marketing authorization from the relevant agencies. In this work, the absorbed dose of [67 Ga]-ethylenecysteamine cysteine [(67 Ga)ECC] to human organs was determined by using distribution data for rats. For biodistribution data, the animals were sacrificed by CO2 asphyxiation at selected times after injection (0.5, 2 and 48 h, n = 3 for each time interval), then the tissue (blood, heart, lung, brain, intestine, feces, skin, stomach, kidneys, liver, muscle and bone) were removed. The absorbed dose was determined by Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) method after calculating cumulated activities in each organ. Our prediction shows that a 185-MBq injection of (67)Ga-ECC into the humans might result in an estimated absorbed dose of 0.029 mGy in the whole body. The highest absorbed doses are observed in the spleen and liver with 33.766 and 16.847 mGy, respectively. The results show that this radiopharmaceutical can be a good SPECT tracer since it can be produced easily and also the absorbed dose in each organ is less than permitted absorbed dose.

  12. DETERMINATION OF SUPERFICIAL ABSORBED DOSE FROM EXTERNAL EXPOSURE OF WEAKLY PENETRATING RADIATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈丽姝

    1994-01-01

    The methods of determining the superficial absorbed dose distributions in a water phantom by means of the experiments and available theories have been reported.The distributions of beta dose were measured by an extrapolation ionization chamber at definite depthes corresponding to some superficial organs and tissues such as the radiosensitive layer of the skin,cornea,sclera,anterior chamber and lens of eyeball.The ratios among superficial absorbed dose D(0.07) and average absorbed doses at the depthes 1,2,3,4,5 and 6mm are also obtained with Cross's methods.They can be used for confining the deterministic effects of some superficial tissues and organs such as the skin and the components of eyeball for weakly penetrating radiations.

  13. Blood compounds irradiation process: assessment of absorbed dose using Fricke and Thermoluminescent dosimetric systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Gabriela de Amorim; Squair, Peterson Lima; Pinto, Fausto Carvalho; Belo, Luiz Claudio Meira; Grossi, Pablo Andrade [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN-CNEN/MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: gas@cdtn.br, e-mail: pls@cdtn.br, e-mail: fcp@cdtn.br, e-mail: lcmb@cdtn.br, e-mail: pabloag@cdtn.br

    2009-07-01

    The assessment of gamma absorbed doses in irradiation facilities allows the quality assurance and control of the irradiation process. The liability of dose measurements is assign to the metrological procedures adopted including the uncertainty evaluation. Fricke and TLD 800 dosimetric systems were used to measure absorbed dose in the blood compounds using the methodology presented in this paper. The measured absorbed doses were used for evaluating the effectiveness of the irradiation procedure and the gamma dose absorption inside the irradiation room of a gamma irradiation facility. The radiation eliminates the functional and proliferative capacities of donor T-lymphocytes, preventing Transfusion associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD), a possible complication of blood transfusions. The results show the applicability of such dosimetric systems in quality assurance programs, assessment of absorbed doses in blood compounds and dose uniformity assign to the blood compounds irradiation process by dose measurements in a range between 25 Gy and 100 Gy. (author)

  14. Blood compounds irradiation process: assessment of absorbed dose using Fricke and Thermoluminescent dosimetric systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Gabriela de Amorim; Squair, Peterson Lima; Pinto, Fausto Carvalho; Belo, Luiz Claudio Meira; Grossi, Pablo Andrade

    2009-01-01

    The assessment of gamma absorbed doses in irradiation facilities allows the quality assurance and control of the irradiation process. The liability of dose measurements is assign to the metrological procedures adopted including the uncertainty evaluation. Fricke and TLD 800 dosimetric systems were used to measure absorbed dose in the blood compounds using the methodology presented in this paper. The measured absorbed doses were used for evaluating the effectiveness of the irradiation procedure and the gamma dose absorption inside the irradiation room of a gamma irradiation facility. The radiation eliminates the functional and proliferative capacities of donor T-lymphocytes, preventing Transfusion associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD), a possible complication of blood transfusions. The results show the applicability of such dosimetric systems in quality assurance programs, assessment of absorbed doses in blood compounds and dose uniformity assign to the blood compounds irradiation process by dose measurements in a range between 25 Gy and 100 Gy. (author)

  15. Evaluation of the absorbed dose to the lungs due to Xe133 and Tc99m (MAA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez A, M.; Murillo C, F.; Castillo D, C.; Sifuentes D, Y.; Sanchez S, P.; Rojas P, E.; Marquez P, F.

    2015-10-01

    The absorbed dose in lungs of an adult patient has been evaluated using the biokinetics of radiopharmaceuticals containing Xe 133 or Tc 99m (MAA). The absorbed dose was calculated using the MIRD formalism, and the Cristy-and Eckerman lungs model. The absorbed dose in the lungs due to 133 Xe is 0.00104 mGy/MBq. Here, the absorbed dose due to remaining tissue, included in the 133 Xe biokinetics is not significant. The absorbed dose in the lungs, due Tc 99m (MAA), is 0.065 mGy/MBq. Approximately, 4.6% of the absorbed dose is due to organs like liver, kidneys, bladder, and the rest of tissues, included in the Tc 99m biokinetics. Here, the absorbed dose is very significant to be overlooked. The dose contribution is mainly due to photons emitted by the liver. (Author)

  16. Effect of gamma background on the dose absorbed by human embryon and foetus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miloslavov, V.; Doncheva, B.

    1989-01-01

    A method is proposed for calculation of absorbed radiation dose in different stages of human foetus development under normal or increased gamma background. On the base of ICRP-data for critical organ's mass (foetus, placenta, blood, uterus) a formula is given for absorbed dose evaluation of gonads. It is concluded that increased gamma background is insignificant compared to internal irradiation from absorbed radionuclides

  17. Investigation of reactivity change and neutron noise due to random absorber vibrations. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthel, R.

    1984-01-01

    Perturbations of the neutron flux due to stochastically excited vibrations of absorbers have been investigated using a one-dimensional core model with N pointlike absorbers. Taking into account the flux depressions near the absorbers, pronounced peaks in the spectral power densities of the flux fluctuations have been found at multiples of the resonance frequencies in addition to the direct imaging of the resonances of absorber vibrations. Investigation of the space dependence of the corresponding transfer functions has shown that a localization is possible by means of the double frequency effect and that the dispersion of absorber vibrations can be determined by using the triple frequency effect. The conclusions of the paper are qualitatively compared with results of noise measurements at a pressurized water reactor. (author)

  18. Calculation of fast neutron dose in plastic-coated optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebert, B.R.L.; Henschel, H.

    1998-01-01

    The dose of fast neutrons in optical fibers with hydrogen-containing coating materials is considerably increased by energetic recoil protons. Their contribution to the dose in a SiO 2 fiber core is calculated by the Monte Carlo method for different fiber geometries and a fiber optic cable. With 14 MeV neutrons the dose in a single fiber is increased by about 21%, whereas in fiber bundles the dose increase can reach about 170%. Maximum dose enhancement in fiber bundles (about 610%) occurs at neutron energies around 5.5 MeV. The dose increase caused by 14 MeV neutrons in the fiber of a typical laboratory cable is about 124%

  19. Organ and Effective Dose Coefficients for Cranial and Caudal Irradiation Geometries: Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veinot, K. G.; Eckerman, K. F.; Hertel, N. E.; Hiller, M. M.

    2017-09-01

    With the introduction of new recommendations by ICRP Publication 103, the methodology for determining the protection quantity, effective dose, has been modified. The modifications include changes to the defined organs and tissues, the associated tissue weighting factors, radiation weighting factors, and the introduction of reference sex-specific computational phantoms (ICRP Publication 110). Computations of equivalent doses in organs and tissues are now performed in both the male and female phantoms and the sex-averaged values used to determine the effective dose. Dose coefficients based on the ICRP 103 recommendations were reported in ICRP Publication 116, the revision of ICRP Publication 74 and ICRU Publication 57. The coefficients were determined for the following irradiation geometries: anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), right and left lateral (RLAT and LLAT), rotational (ROT), and isotropic (ISO). In this work, the methodology of ICRP Publication 116 was used to compute dose coefficients for neutron irradiation of the body with parallel beams directed upward from below the feet (caudal) and directed downward from above the head (cranial). These geometries may be encountered in the workplace from personnel standing on contaminated surfaces or volumes and from overhead sources. Calculations of organ and tissue absorbed doses for caudal and cranial exposures to neutrons ranging in energy from 10-9 MeV to 10 GeV have been performed using the MCNP6 radiation transport code and the adult reference voxel phantoms of ICRP Publication 110. At lower energies the effective dose per particle fluence for cranial and caudal exposures is less than AP orientations while above about 30 MeV the cranial and caudal values are greater.

  20. Absorbed dose to the patient by computerized whole body X-ray tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krauss, O.; Schuhmacher, H.

    1977-01-01

    The absorbed dose to the patient was measured for several medical investigations by computerized whole body scanning. An Alderson-phantom mounted with LiF-TLD was irradiated with a Delta-Scan (Ohio-Nuclear, 120 kV, 30 mA). The integral dose to the brain during a full examination (6 scans, filtration 3 mm Al) was measured to 5x10 -2 J. The maximum absorbed dose at the entrance was found to be 3.2 rd and at the exit 0.6 rd. The dose to the eyes is 0.7 rd and to the thyroid gland 0.03 rd. The integral dose to the trunk (5 scans in the region of liver and kidneys, filtration 6 mm Al) was measured to 5x10 -2 J. The maximum absorbed dose at the entrance was found to be 2.4 rd and at the exit 0.25 rd. The dose to the gonads is less than 2 and 4 mrd if the distance between the last scan and the gonads is more than 15 cm

  1. Biological dosimetry for mixed gamma-neutron field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandao, J.O.C.; Santos, J.A.L.; Souza, P.L.G.; Lima, F.F.; Vilela, E.C.; Calixto, M.S.; Santos, N.

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing concern about airline crew members (about one million worldwide) exposed to measurable neutrons doses. Historically, cytogenetic biodosimetry assays have been based on quantifying asymmetrical chromosome alterations (dicentrics, centric rings and acentric fragments) in mitogen-stimulated T-lymphocytes in their first mitosis after radiation exposure. Increased levels of chromosome damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes are a sensitive indicator of radiation exposure and they are routinely exploited for assessing radiation absorbed dose after accidental or occupational exposure. Since radiological accidents are not common, not all nations feel that it is economically justified to maintain biodosimetry competence. However, dependable access to biological dosimetry capabilities is completely critical in event of an accident. In this paper the dose-response curve was measured for the induction of chromosomal alterations in peripheral blood lymphocytes after chronic exposure in vitro to mixed gamma-neutron field. Blood was obtained from one healthy donor and exposed to two mixed gamma-neutron field from sources 241 AmBe (20 Ci) at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL - CRCN/NE - PE - Brazil). The evaluated absorbed doses were 0.2 Gy; 1.0 Gy and 2.5 Gy. The dicentric chromosomes were observed at metaphase, following colcemide accumulation and 1000 well-spread metaphases were analyzed for the presence of dicentrics by two experts after painted by giemsa 5%. The preliminary results showed a linear dependence between radiations absorbed dose and dicentric chromosomes frequencies. Dose-response curve described in this paper will contribute to the construction of calibration curve that will be used in our laboratory for biological dosimetry. (author)

  2. Absorbed dose to the urinary bladder wall for different radiopharmaceuticals using dynamic S-values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, M.; Minarik, D.; Mattsson, S.; Leide-Svegborn; Johansson, L.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Aim and background: the urinary bladder wall is a radiosensitive organ that can receive a high absorbed dose from radiopharmaceuticals used in diagnostic nuclear medicine. Current dynamic models estimate the photon and electron absorbed dose at the inner surface of the bladder wall. The aim of this work has been to create a more realistic estimation of the mean absorbed dose to the urinary bladder wall from different radiopharmaceuticals. This calculation also uses dynamic specific absorption fractions (SAF) that changes with bladder volume and are gender specific. Materials and Methods: the volume of the urinary bladder content was calculated using a spherical approximation with a urinary inflow of 1.0 ml/min and 0.5 ml/min during day and night time, respectively. The activity in the bladder content was described using a bi-exponential extraction from the body. The absorbed dose to the bladder wall was estimated using linear interpolation of SAF values from different bladder volumes, ranging from 10 ml to 800 ml. Administration of the activity was assumed to start at 09:00 with an initial voiding after 40 minutes and a voiding interval of 3.5 hours during the day. A six hour night gap, starting at midnight, with a voiding right before and after the night period, was used. Calculations were made, with the same assumptions, for an earlier dynamic bladder model and with a static SAF value from the ICRP/ICRU adult reference computational phantoms for a bladder containing 200 ml. Values for the absorbed dose per unit administered activity for 19 commonly used radiopharmaceuticals were calculated, e.g. 18 F-FDG, 99m Tc-pertechnetate, 99m Tc-MAG3 and 123 I-NaI. Results and conclusion: the results of the estimates of the absorbed doses to the inner bladder wall were a factor of ten higher than the estimates mean absorbed doses. The mean absorbed doses to the bladder wall were slightly higher for females than males, due to a smaller female

  3. Development of a neutron personal dose equivalent detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimura, N.; Yoshida, T.; Takada, C.; Momose, T.; Nunomiya, T.; Aoyama, K.

    2007-01-01

    A new neutron-measuring instrument that is intended to measure a neutron personal dose equivalent, H p (10) was developed. This instrument is composed of two parts: (1) a conventional moderator-based neutron dose equivalent meter and (2) a neutron shield made of borated polyethylene, which covers a backward hemisphere to adjust the angular dependence. The whole design was determined on the basis of MCNP calculations so as to have response characteristics that would generally match both the energy and angular dependencies of H p (10). This new instrument will be a great help in assessing the reference values of neutron H p (10) during field testing of personal neutron dosemeters in workplaces and also in interpreting their readings. (authors)

  4. Eye lens dosimetry for interventional procedures – Relation between the absorbed dose to the lens and dose at measurement positions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geber, Therese; Gunnarsson, Mikael; Mattsson, Sören

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between the absorbed dose to the lens of the eye and the absorbed dose at different measurement positions near the eye of interventional radiologists. It also visualised the dose distribution inside the head, both when protective eyewear were used and without such protection. The best position for an eye lens dosimeter was found to be at the side of the head nearest to the radiation source, close to the eye. Positioning the dosimeter at the eyebrow could lead to an underestimation of the lens dose of as much as 45%. The measured dose distribution showed that the absorbed dose to the eye lenses was high compared to the other parts of the head, which stresses the importance of wearing protective eyewear. However, many models of eyewear were found to be deficient as the radiation could slip through at several places, e.g. at the cheek. The relationship between the absorbed dose to the lens and the kerma-area-product (P KA ) delivered to the patient was also studied.

  5. Radiologist and angiographic procedures. Absorbed radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tryhus, M.; Mettler, F.A. Jr.; Kelsey, C.

    1987-01-01

    The radiation dose absorbed by the angiographer during angiographic procedures is of vital importance to the radiologist. Nevertheless, most articles on the subject are incomplete, and few measure gonadal dose. In this study, three TLDs were used for each of the following sites: radiologist's eyes, thyroid, gonads with and without shielding apron, and hands. The average dose during carotid angiograms was 2.6, 4.1, 0.4, 4.7, and 7.1 mrads to the eyes, thyroid, gonads with and without .5 mm of lead shielding, and hands, respectively. Average dose during abdominal and peripheral vascular angiographic procedures was 5.2, 7.5, 1.2, 8.5, and 39.9 mrads to the eyes, thyroid, gonads with and without shielding, and hands, respectively. A literature review demonstrates a significant reduction in radiation dose to the angiographer after the advent of automated injectors. Our measured doses for carotid angiography are compatible with contemporary reported values. There was poor correlation with fluoroscopy time and measured dose to the angiographer

  6. ESR-dosimetry in thermal and epithermal neutron fields for application in boron neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, Tobias

    2016-01-22

    Dosimetry is essential for every form of radiotherapy. In Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) mixed neutron and gamma fields have to be considered. Dose is deposited in different neutron interactions with elements in the penetrated tissue and by gamma particles, which are always part of a neutron field. The therapeutic dose in BNCT is deposited by densely ionising particles, originating from the fragmentation of the isotope boron-10 after capture of a thermal neutron. Despite being investigated for decades, dosimetry in neutron beams or fields for BNCT remains complex, due to the variety in type and energy of the secondary particles. Today usually ionisation chambers combined with metal foils are used. The applied techniques require extensive effort and are time consuming, while the resulting uncertainties remain high. Consequently, the investigation of more effective techniques or alternative dosimeters is an important field of research. In this work the possibilities of ESR-dosimeters in those fields have been investigated. Certain materials, such as alanine, generate stable radicals upon irradiation. Using Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectrometry the amount of radicals, which is proportional to absorbed dose, can be quantified. Different ESR detector materials have been irradiated in the thermal neutron field of the research reactor TRIGA research reactor in Mainz, Germany, with five setups, generating different secondary particle spectra. Further irradiations have been conducted in two epithermal neutron beams. The detector response, however, strongly depends on the dose depositing particle type and energy. It is hence necessary to accompany measurements by computational modelling and simulation. In this work the Monte Carlo code FLUKA was used to calculate absorbed doses and dose components. The relative effectiveness (RE), linking absorbed dose and detector response, has been calculated using amorphous track models. For the simulation, detailed models of

  7. Effect of head size on 10B dose distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, N.; Blue, T.E.; Gahbauer, R.

    1992-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for treatment of brain tumors is based on the utilization of large epithermal-neutron fields. Epithermal neutrons thermalize at depths of ∼2.5 cm inside the head and provide a maximum thermal fluence at deep-seated tumor sites with minimum damage to normal tissue. Brain tissue is a highly scattering medium for epithermal and thermal neutrons; therefore, a broad treatment field enables epithermal neutrons to enter the head over a large area. These neutrons slow down as they undergo scattering collisions and contribute to the thermal-neutron fluence at the tumor location. With the use of large neutron fields, the size of the head affects the thermal-neutron distribution and thereby the 10 B absorbed dose distribution inside the head. In this paper, the authors describe measurements using a boron trifluoride (BF 3 )-filled proportional counter to determine the effect of head size on 10 B absorbed dose distributions for a broad field accelerator epithermal-neutron source

  8. The neutron dose equivalent around high energy medical electron linear accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poje Marina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of neutron dose equivalent was made in four dual energy linear accelerator rooms. Two of the rooms were reconstructed after decommissioning of 60Co units, so the main limitation was the space. The measurements were performed by a nuclear track etched detectors LR-115 associated with the converter (radiator that consist of 10B and with the active neutron detector Thermo BIOREM FHT 742. The detectors were set at several locations to evaluate the neutron ambient dose equivalent and/or neutron dose rate to which medical personnel could be exposed. Also, the neutron dose dependence on collimator aperture was analyzed. The obtained neutron dose rates outside the accelerator rooms were several times smaller than the neutron dose rates inside the accelerator rooms. Nevertheless, the measured neutron dose equivalent was not negligible from the aspect of the personal dosimetry with almost 2 mSv a year per person in the areas occupied by staff (conservative estimation. In rooms with 15 MV accelerators, the neutron exposure to the personnel was significantly lower than in the rooms having 18 MV accelerators installed. It was even more pronounced in the room reconstructed after the 60Co decommissioning. This study confirms that shielding from the neutron radiation should be considered when building vaults for high energy linear accelerators, especially when the space constraints exist.

  9. Fast Neutron Dose Distribution in a Linac Radiotherapy Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Othmany, D.Sh.; Abdul-Majid, S.; Kadi, M.W.

    2011-01-01

    CR-39 plastic detectors were used for fast neutron dose mapping in the radiotherapy facility at King AbdulAziz University Hospital (KAUH). Detectors were calibrated using a 252 Cf neutron source and a neutron dosimeter. After exposure chemical etching was performed using 6N NaOH solution at 70 degree C. Tracks were counted using an optical microscope and the number of tracks/cm 2 was converted to a neutron dose. 15 track detectors were distributed inside and outside the therapy room and were left for 32 days. The average neutron doses were 142.3 mSv on the accelerator head, 28.5 mSv on inside walls, 1.4 mSv beyond the beam shield, and 1 mSv in the control room

  10. Staff and patient absorbed doses due to diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabei, F.; Neshandar Asli, I.; Aghamiri, S.M.; Arbabi, K.

    2004-01-01

    Background: annual patient effective dose equivalent can be considered as a quantitative physical parameter describing the activities performed in each nuclear medicine department. annual staff dose equivalent could be also considered as a parameter describing the amount of radiation risk for performing the activities. We calculated the staff to patient dose equivalent ratio to be used as a physical parameter for quantification of ALARA law in nuclear medicine department. Materials and methods: as a part of nationwide study, this paper reports the staff and patient absorbed dose equivalents from diagnostic nuclear medicine examinations performed in four nuclear medicine department during 1999-2002. The type and frequency of examinations in each department were determined directly from hospital medical reports. Staff absorbed doses equivalents were calculated from regular personal dosimeter reports. Results: the total number of examinations increased by 16.7 % during these years. Annual patient collective dose equivalent increased about 13.0 % and the mean effective dose equivalent per exam was 3.61 ± 0.07 mSv. Annual total staff absorbed dose equivalent (total of 24 radiation workers) in four departments increased from 40.45 mSv to 47.81 mSv during four years that indicates an increase of about 20.6 %. The average of annual ratios of staff to patient effective dose equivalents in four departments were 1.83 x 10 -3 , 1.04 x 10 -3 , 3.28 x 10 -3 and 3.24 x 10 -3 , respectively, within a range of 0.9 x 10 -3 - 4.17 x 10 -3 . The mean value of ratios in four years was about 2.24 x 10 -3 ± 1.09 x 10 -3 that indicates the staff dose of about two 1000 th of patient dose. Conclusion: The mean value of ratios in four years was about 1.89 x 10 -3 ± 0.95 x 10 -3 indicating the staff dose of about one 1000 th of the patient dose. The staff to patient absorbed dose equivalent ratio could be used as a quantitative parameter for describing ALARA law in radiation protection and

  11. Evaluation of the absorbed dose in odontological computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legnani, Adriano; Schelin, Hugo R.; Rocha, Anna Silvia P.S. da; Khoury, Helen J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper evaluated the absorbed dose at the surface entry known as 'cone beam computed tomography' (CBCT) in odontological computerized tomography. Examination were simulated with CBCT for measurements of dose. A phantom were filled with water, becoming scatter object of radiation. Thermoluminescent dosemeters were positioned on points correspondent to eyes and salivary glands

  12. Real-time measurement and monitoring of absorbed dose for electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenev, Sergey; Korenev, Ivan; Rumega, Stanislav; Grossman, Leon

    2004-09-01

    The real-time method and system for measurement and monitoring of absorbed dose for industrial and research electron accelerators is considered in the report. The system was created on the basis of beam parameters method. The main concept of this method consists in the measurement of dissipated kinetic energy of electrons in the irradiated product, determination of number of electrons and mass of irradiated product in the same cell by following calculation of absorbed dose in the cell. The manual and automation systems for dose measurements are described. The systems are acceptable for all types of electron accelerators.

  13. Real-time measurement and monitoring of absorbed dose for electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenev, Sergey E-mail: sergey_korenev@steris.com; Korenev, Ivan; Rumega, Stanislav; Grossman, Leon

    2004-10-01

    The real-time method and system for measurement and monitoring of absorbed dose for industrial and research electron accelerators is considered in the report. The system was created on the basis of beam parameters method. The main concept of this method consists in the measurement of dissipated kinetic energy of electrons in the irradiated product, determination of number of electrons and mass of irradiated product in the same cell by following calculation of absorbed dose in the cell. The manual and automation systems for dose measurements are described. The systems are acceptable for all types of electron accelerators.

  14. Real-time measurement and monitoring of absorbed dose for electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenev, Sergey; Korenev, Ivan; Rumega, Stanislav; Grossman, Leon

    2004-01-01

    The real-time method and system for measurement and monitoring of absorbed dose for industrial and research electron accelerators is considered in the report. The system was created on the basis of beam parameters method. The main concept of this method consists in the measurement of dissipated kinetic energy of electrons in the irradiated product, determination of number of electrons and mass of irradiated product in the same cell by following calculation of absorbed dose in the cell. The manual and automation systems for dose measurements are described. The systems are acceptable for all types of electron accelerators

  15. Neutron dose to patients treated with high-energy medical accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinley, P.H.

    2001-01-01

    The neutron dose equivalent received by patients treated with high energy x-ray beams was measured in this research. A total of 13 different medical accelerators were evaluated in terms of the neutron dose equivalent in the patient plane and at the beam center. The neutron dose equivalent at the beam center was found to ranged from 0.02 to 9.4 mSv per Sv of x-ray dose and values from 0.029 to 2.58 mSv per Sv of x-ray were measured in the patient plane. It was concluded that the neutron levels meet the International Electrotechnical Commission standard for the patient plane. It was also concluded that when intensity modulated radiation treatment is conducted the neutron dose equivalent received by the patient will increase by a factor of 2 to 10. (author)

  16. An Analytical Model of Leakage Neutron Equivalent Dose for Passively-Scattered Proton Radiotherapy and Validation with Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Christopher; Newhauser, Wayne; Farah, Jad

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to stray neutrons increases the risk of second cancer development after proton therapy. Previously reported analytical models of this exposure were difficult to configure and had not been investigated below 100 MeV proton energy. The purposes of this study were to test an analytical model of neutron equivalent dose per therapeutic absorbed dose (H/D) at 75 MeV and to improve the model by reducing the number of configuration parameters and making it continuous in proton energy from 100 to 250 MeV. To develop the analytical model, we used previously published H/D values in water from Monte Carlo simulations of a general-purpose beamline for proton energies from 100 to 250 MeV. We also configured and tested the model on in-air neutron equivalent doses measured for a 75 MeV ocular beamline. Predicted H/D values from the analytical model and Monte Carlo agreed well from 100 to 250 MeV (10% average difference). Predicted H/D values from the analytical model also agreed well with measurements at 75 MeV (15% average difference). The results indicate that analytical models can give fast, reliable calculations of neutron exposure after proton therapy. This ability is absent in treatment planning systems but vital to second cancer risk estimation

  17. An Analytical Model of Leakage Neutron Equivalent Dose for Passively-Scattered Proton Radiotherapy and Validation with Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Christopher; Newhauser, Wayne, E-mail: newhauser@lsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809 (United States); Farah, Jad [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, Service de Dosimétrie Externe, BP-17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2015-05-18

    Exposure to stray neutrons increases the risk of second cancer development after proton therapy. Previously reported analytical models of this exposure were difficult to configure and had not been investigated below 100 MeV proton energy. The purposes of this study were to test an analytical model of neutron equivalent dose per therapeutic absorbed dose (H/D) at 75 MeV and to improve the model by reducing the number of configuration parameters and making it continuous in proton energy from 100 to 250 MeV. To develop the analytical model, we used previously published H/D values in water from Monte Carlo simulations of a general-purpose beamline for proton energies from 100 to 250 MeV. We also configured and tested the model on in-air neutron equivalent doses measured for a 75 MeV ocular beamline. Predicted H/D values from the analytical model and Monte Carlo agreed well from 100 to 250 MeV (10% average difference). Predicted H/D values from the analytical model also agreed well with measurements at 75 MeV (15% average difference). The results indicate that analytical models can give fast, reliable calculations of neutron exposure after proton therapy. This ability is absent in treatment planning systems but vital to second cancer risk estimation.

  18. Methodic of the gamma-rays absorbed dose measurements on tooth enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linev, S.V.; Muravskij, V.A.; Mashevskij, A.A.; Ugolev, I.I.

    1997-01-01

    The analysis of the metrological aspects of the tooth enamel ESR dosimetry has been done. The sample preparation and measurement methods have been elaborated. The methods have passed metrological certification. The methods include tabletting of the mixture of tooth enamel powder and MnO paramagnetic centres concentration additional standard, two loops of additional irradiation of samples by 1 Gy dose and ESR-spectra measurements, calculation of absorbed dose by maximum likelihood algorithm. The algorithm of dose calculation uses enamel spectrum model with axial anisotropic spin-Hamiltonian based on 126 spectra of enamel samples. The algorithm takes into account spectra of the empty cavity, the tube for a sample, the glue and MnO standard. Certificated ESR-station is based on the ESR-analyser PS-100X. ESR-station provides tooth enamel absorbed dose measurements from 0.05 to 0.25 Gy with error 35%, and from 0.25 to 3 Gy with error 20%. The set of tooth enamel absorbed dose standard samples has been created and certificated for the purposes of ESR-station testing and certification. The set consists of 12 tabletted samples of tooth enamel irradiated by doses from 0.05 to 4 Gy. (authors). 7 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs

  19. Does fast-neutron radiotherapy merely reduce the radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Koichi

    1984-01-01

    We examined whether fast-neutron radiotherapy is superior to low-LET radiotherpy by comparing the relationship between cell survival and tumor control probabilities after exposure of tumor-bearing (species) to the two modalities. Analysis based on TCD 50 assay and lung colony assay indicated that single dose of fast neutron achieved animal cures at higher survival rates than other radiation modalities including single and fractionated γ-ray doses, fractionated doses of fast neutron, and the mixed-beam scheme with a sequence of N-γ-γ-γ-N. We conclude that fast-neutron radiotherapy cured animal tumors with lower cell killing rates other radiation modalities. (author)

  20. Electrical behavior research of silicon photo-cell used in online monitoring absorbed dose rate of γ-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Guixia; Li Xiaoyan; Fu Lan; Wu Wenhao; An You; Zeng Fansong

    2015-01-01

    The real-time online monitoring system for γ-ray absorbed dose rate was established to study the relationship between the photocurrent of semi-conductive silicon photo-cell BBZSGD-4 and γ-ray absorbed dose rate under the open circuit. The radioactive experiments in "6"0Co γ radiation field show that photo-cell BBZSGD-4 has good response to "6"0Co γ-ray, and their relationship accords with the linear law. The photocurrent of photo-cell can be up to 1.26 μA when the absorbed dose rate is 94.54 Gy/min. The relationship between photocurrent and the absorbed dose accords with exponential law when absorbed dose rate is 50 Gy/min, and the attenuation of photocurrent is 1% when the absorbed dose is 5445.8 Gy. Thus photo-cell BBZSGD-4 has the potential to be a real-time detector to detect low absorbed dose rate in "6"0Co γ radiation field. (authors)

  1. Absorbed Doses to Embryo from Intravenous Urography at Selected Radiological Departments in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karkus, R.; Nikodemova, D.; Horvathova, M.

    2003-01-01

    Actual legislation used in radiological protection requires quality assurance program for decreasing radiation load of patients from radiological examinations. The information about irradiation of pregnant women is very important, because the embryo is more radiosensitive as adult organism. On the basis of absence of unified calculations or measurements of absorbed doses to embryo from various radiological examinations in Slovakia we present in this study the values of absorbed doses to embryo from intravenous urography at selected radiological departments in Slovakia. Absorbed doses to embryo were obtained by measurement and calculation using the simulation of irradiation of pregnant woman by intravenous urography. The results of our study indicate, that absorbed doses to embryo were at various radiological departments considerably different, depending on type of X-ray machine and different settings of technical parameters of X-ray machine. In accordance with worldwide trend it is necessary to decrease radiation load of patients as low as possible level. Differences in radiation load between radiological departments indicate, that it is necessary to continue in solving of this problem and perform measurements and calculations of absorbed doses to embryo at different types of X-ray machines and at different examinations, where the embryo is in direct beam of X-ray. (author)

  2. Physical aspects on the neutron irradiation. 4. Dosimetry with ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, Takeshi; Takada, Masashi

    2008-01-01

    Absolute measurements of the absorbed dose for irradiation are generally made using ionization chambers, which should be calibrated by the standard radiation source. The neutron dose measurements are not simple since gamma rays always contaminate the neutron flux and a variety of charged particles are induced by neutrons. Following subjects are described: (1) The method by ICRU 45 to estimate total dose of neutrons and gamma ray, (2) The method to measure the neutron dose and the gamma ray dose separately using paired ionization-chambers, and (3) The calibration of ionization chambers. The stability of the standard ionization-chambers is also presented. (K.Y.)

  3. Absorbed dose measurement by the MIRD system in the 131-I treated Thyroid Cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Seong Woon; Lim, Sang Mu; Kim, Chang Hui; Kim, Ki Sub; Cho, Jong Sio; Jeong, Jin Sung; Park, Heung Kyu; Kwon, Oh Jin [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    Medical Internal Radiation Dose(MIRD) schema was developed for calculating the absorbed dose from the administrated radiopharmaceuticals. With the biological distribution data and physical properties of the radionuclide, we can estimated the absorbed dose by the MIRD schema. For the thyroid cancer patients received high dose 131-I therapy, the absorbed dose to the bone marrow is limiting factor to the administered dose and the duration of admission is determined by the retained activity in the whole body. To the monitoring of whole body radioactivity, we used Eberline Smart 200 system using ionization chamber as a detector. With the time activity (Author).

  4. Measurement of absorbed dose with a bone-equivalent extrapolation chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeBlois, Francois; Abdel-Rahman, Wamied; Seuntjens, Jan P.; Podgorsak, Ervin B.

    2002-01-01

    A hybrid phantom-embedded extrapolation chamber (PEEC) made of Solid Water trade mark sign and bone-equivalent material was used for determining absorbed dose in a bone-equivalent phantom irradiated with clinical radiation beams (cobalt-60 gamma rays; 6 and 18 MV x rays; and 9 and 15 MeV electrons). The dose was determined with the Spencer-Attix cavity theory, using ionization gradient measurements and an indirect determination of the chamber air-mass through measurements of chamber capacitance. The collected charge was corrected for ionic recombination and diffusion in the chamber air volume following the standard two-voltage technique. Due to the hybrid chamber design, correction factors accounting for scatter deficit and electrode composition were determined and applied in the dose equation to obtain absorbed dose in bone for the equivalent homogeneous bone phantom. Correction factors for graphite electrodes were calculated with Monte Carlo techniques and the calculated results were verified through relative air cavity dose measurements for three different polarizing electrode materials: graphite, steel, and brass in conjunction with a graphite collecting electrode. Scatter deficit, due mainly to loss of lateral scatter in the hybrid chamber, reduces the dose to the air cavity in the hybrid PEEC in comparison with full bone PEEC by 0.7% to ∼2% depending on beam quality and energy. In megavoltage photon and electron beams, graphite electrodes do not affect the dose measurement in the Solid Water trade mark sign PEEC but decrease the cavity dose by up to 5% in the bone-equivalent PEEC even for very thin graphite electrodes (<0.0025 cm). In conjunction with appropriate correction factors determined with Monte Carlo techniques, the uncalibrated hybrid PEEC can be used for measuring absorbed dose in bone material to within 2% for high-energy photon and electron beams

  5. Measuring the absorbed dose in critical organs during low rate dose brachytherapy with 137 Cs using thermoluminescent dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, A.; Gonzalez, P.R.; Furetta, C.; Azorin, J.; Andres, U.; Mendez, G.

    2003-01-01

    Intracavitary Brachytherapy is one of the most used methods for the treatment of the cervical-uterine cancer. This treatment consists in the insertion of low rate dose 137 Cs sources into the patient. The most used system for the treatment dose planning is that of Manchester. This planning is based on sources, which are considered fixed during the treatment. However, the experience has shown that, during the treatment, the sources could be displaced from its initial position, changing the dose from that previously prescribed. For this reason, it is necessary to make measurements of the absorbed dose to the surrounding organs (mainly bladder and rectum). This paper presents the results of measuring the absorbed dose using home-made LiF: Mg, Cu, P + Ptfe thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). Measurements were carried out in-vivo during 20 minutes at the beginning and at the end of the treatments. Results showed that the absorbed dose to the critical organs vary significantly due to the movement of the patient during the treatment. (Author)

  6. Out‐of‐field doses and neutron dose equivalents for electron beams from modern Varian and Elekta linear accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Carlos E.; Nitsch, Paige L.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Howell, Rebecca M.

    2016-01-01

    Out‐of‐field doses from radiotherapy can cause harmful side effects or eventually lead to secondary cancers. Scattered doses outside the applicator field, neutron source strength values, and neutron dose equivalents have not been broadly investigated for high‐energy electron beams. To better understand the extent of these exposures, we measured out‐of‐field dose characteristics of electron applicators for high‐energy electron beams on two Varian 21iXs, a Varian TrueBeam, and an Elekta Versa HD operating at various energy levels. Out‐of‐field dose profiles and percent depth‐dose curves were measured in a Wellhofer water phantom using a Farmer ion chamber. Neutron dose was assessed using a combination of moderator buckets and gold activation foils placed on the treatment couch at various locations in the patient plane on both the Varian 21iX and Elekta Versa HD linear accelerators. Our findings showed that out‐of‐field electron doses were highest for the highest electron energies. These doses typically decreased with increasing distance from the field edge but showed substantial increases over some distance ranges. The Elekta linear accelerator had higher electron out‐of‐field doses than the Varian units examined, and the Elekta dose profiles exhibited a second dose peak about 20 to 30 cm from central‐axis, which was found to be higher than typical out‐of‐field doses from photon beams. Electron doses decreased sharply with depth before becoming nearly constant; the dose was found to decrease to a depth of approximately E(MeV)/4 in cm. With respect to neutron dosimetry, Q values and neutron dose equivalents increased with electron beam energy. Neutron contamination from electron beams was found to be much lower than that from photon beams. Even though the neutron dose equivalent for electron beams represented a small portion of neutron doses observed under photon beams, neutron doses from electron beams may need to be considered for

  7. Out-of-field doses and neutron dose equivalents for electron beams from modern Varian and Elekta linear accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Carlos E; Nitsch, Paige L; Kudchadker, Rajat J; Howell, Rebecca M; Kry, Stephen F

    2016-07-08

    Out-of-field doses from radiotherapy can cause harmful side effects or eventually lead to secondary cancers. Scattered doses outside the applicator field, neutron source strength values, and neutron dose equivalents have not been broadly investigated for high-energy electron beams. To better understand the extent of these exposures, we measured out-of-field dose characteristics of electron applicators for high-energy electron beams on two Varian 21iXs, a Varian TrueBeam, and an Elekta Versa HD operating at various energy levels. Out-of-field dose profiles and percent depth-dose curves were measured in a Wellhofer water phantom using a Farmer ion chamber. Neutron dose was assessed using a combination of moderator buckets and gold activation foils placed on the treatment couch at various locations in the patient plane on both the Varian 21iX and Elekta Versa HD linear accelerators. Our findings showed that out-of-field electron doses were highest for the highest electron energies. These doses typically decreased with increasing distance from the field edge but showed substantial increases over some distance ranges. The Elekta linear accelerator had higher electron out-of-field doses than the Varian units examined, and the Elekta dose profiles exhibited a second dose peak about 20 to 30 cm from central-axis, which was found to be higher than typical out-of-field doses from photon beams. Electron doses decreased sharply with depth before becoming nearly constant; the dose was found to decrease to a depth of approximately E(MeV)/4 in cm. With respect to neutron dosimetry, Q values and neutron dose equivalents increased with electron beam energy. Neutron contamination from electron beams was found to be much lower than that from photon beams. Even though the neutron dose equivalent for electron beams represented a small portion of neutron doses observed under photon beams, neutron doses from electron beams may need to be considered for special cases.

  8. Dosimetry of clinical neutron and proton beams: An overview of recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vynckier, S.

    2004-01-01

    Neutron therapy beams are obtained by accelerating protons or deuterons on Beryllium. These neutron therapy beams present comparable dosimetric characteristics as those for photon beams obtained with linear accelerators; for instance, the penetration of a p(65) + Be neutron beam is comparable with the penetration of an 8 MV photon beam. In order to be competitive with conventional photon beam therapy, the dosimetric characteristics of the neutron beam should therefore not deviate too much from the photon beam characteristics. This paper presents a brief summary of the neutron beams used in radiotherapy. The dosimetry of the clinical neutron beams is described. Finally, recent and future developments in the field of physics for neutron therapy is mentioned. In the last two decades, a considerable number of centres have established radiotherapy treatment facilities using proton beams with energies between 50 and 250 MeV. Clinical applications require a relatively uniform dose to be delivered to the volume to be treated, and for this purpose the proton beam has to be spread out, both laterally and in depth. The technique is called 'beam modulation' and creates a region of high dose uniformity referred to as the 'spread-out Bragg peak'. Meanwhile, reference dosimetry in these beams had to catch up with photon and electron beams for which a much longer tradition of dosimetry exists. Proton beam dosimetry can be performed using different types of dosemeters, such as calorimeters, Faraday cups, track detectors and ionisation chambers. National standard dosimetry laboratories will, however, not provide a standard for the dosimetry of proton beams. To achieve uniformity on an international level, the use of an ionisation chamber should be considered. This paper reviews and summarises the basic principles and recommendations for the absorbed dose determination in a proton beam, utilising ionisation chambers calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water. These recommendations

  9. Peripheral photon and neutron doses from prostate cancer external beam irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezak, Eva; Takam, Rundgham; Marcu, Loredana G

    2015-12-01

    Peripheral photon and neutron doses from external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) are associated with increased risk of carcinogenesis in the out-of-field organs; thus, dose estimations of secondary radiation are imperative. Peripheral photon and neutron doses from EBRT of prostate carcinoma were measured in Rando phantom. (6)LiF:Mg,Cu,P and (7)LiF:Mg,Cu,P glass-rod thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) were inserted in slices of a Rando phantom followed by exposure to 80 Gy with 18-MV photon four-field 3D-CRT technique. The TLDs were calibrated using 6- and 18-MV X-ray beam. Neutron dose equivalents measured with CR-39 etch-track detectors were used to derive readout-to-neutron dose conversion factor for (6)LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs. Average neutron dose equivalents per 1 Gy of isocentre dose were 3.8±0.9 mSv Gy(-1) for thyroid and 7.0±5.4 mSv Gy(-1) for colon. For photons, the average dose equivalents per 1 Gy of isocentre dose were 0.2±0.1 mSv Gy(-1) for thyroid and 8.1±9.7 mSv Gy(-1) for colon. Paired (6)LiF:Mg,Cu,P and (7)LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs can be used to measure photon and neutron doses simultaneously. Organs in close proximity to target received larger doses from photons than those from neutrons whereas distally located organs received higher neutron versus photon dose. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Visual indicator of absorbed radiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Generalova, V V; Krasovitskii, B M; Vainshtok, B A; Gurskii, M N

    1968-10-15

    A visual indicator of the absorbed doses of ionizing radiation is proposed. The indicator has a polymer base with the addition of a dye. A distinctive feature of the indicator consists of the use of polystyrene as its polymer base with the addition of halogen-containing hydrocarbon and the light-proof dye. Such combination of the radiation-resistant polymer of polystyrene and the light-proof dyestuff makes the proposed indicator highly stable.

  11. Boron neutron capture irradiation of the rat spinal cord: effects of variable doses of borocaptate sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, Gerard M.; Coderre, Jeffrey A.; Hopewell, John W.; Micca, Peggy L.; Fisher, Craig

    1996-01-01

    The Fischer 344 rat spinal cord model has been used to evaluate the response of the central nervous system to boron neutron capture irradiation with variable doses of the neutron capture agent, borocaptate sodium (BSH). Three doses of BSH, 190, 140 and 80 mg/kg body weight, administered by i.p. injection, were used to establish the time course of 10 B accumulation in and removal from the blood. After administration of the two lower doses of BSH, blood 10 B levels peaked at 0.5 h after injection, with no significant (P > 0.1) change at 1 h after injection. Beyond this time point, levels of 10 B in the blood began to decrease after a dose of 80 mg/kg BSH, but remained constant until 3 h after administration after the two higher doses of BSH. Myelopathy developed after latent intervals of 20.4 ± 0.1, 20.8 ± 1.4, 15.0 ± 0.8, 15.4 ± 0.4 and 15.6 ± 0.4 weeks, following irradiation with thermal neutrons in combination with BSH at doses of 20, 40, 80, 140 and 190 mg/kg body weight, respectively. The radiation-induced lesion in the spinal cord was white matter necrosis. ED 50 values for myelopathy were calculated from probit-fitted dose-effect curves. Expressed as total physical absorbed doses, these values were 20.7 ± 1.9, 24.9 ± 1.2, 27.2 ± 0.9, 28.4 ± 0.6 and 32.4 ± 1.9 Gy after irradiation with thermal neutrons in the presence of 20, 40, 80, 140 and 190 mg/kg body weight of BSH, respectively. The compound biological effectiveness (CBE) factor values, estimated from this data, were in the range 0.49-0.55. There was no significant (P >0.1) variation in the CBE factor for BSH as a function of increasing 10 B concentration in the blood. It was concluded that there was no significant synergistic interaction between the low and high linear energy transfer (LET) components of the boron neutron capture (BNC) radiation field

  12. Graves' disease radioiodine-therapy: Choosing target absorbed doses for therapy planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willegaignon, J., E-mail: j.willegaignon@gmail.com; Sapienza, M. T.; Coura-Filho, G. B.; Buchpiguel, C. A. [Cancer Institute of São Paulo State (ICESP), Clinical Hospital, School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Nuclear Medicine Service, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, Sao Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Watanabe, T. [Nuclear Medicine Service, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Traino, A. C. [Unit of Medical Physics, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana, Pisa 56126 (Italy)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The precise determination of organ mass (m{sub th}) and total number of disintegrations within the thyroid gland (A{sup ~}) are essential for thyroid absorbed-dose calculations for radioiodine therapy. Nevertheless, these parameters may vary according to the method employed for their estimation, thus introducing uncertainty in the estimated thyroid absorbed dose and in any dose–response relationship derived using such estimates. In consideration of these points, thyroid absorbed doses for Graves’ disease (GD) treatment planning were calculated using different approaches to estimating the m{sub th} and the A{sup ~}. Methods: Fifty patients were included in the study. Thyroid{sup 131}I uptake measurements were performed at 2, 6, 24, 48, 96, and 220 h postadministration of a tracer activity in order to estimate the effective half-time (T{sub eff}) of {sup 131}I in the thyroid; the thyroid cumulated activity was then estimated using the T{sub eff} thus determined or, alternatively, calculated by numeric integration of the measured time-activity data. Thyroid mass was estimated by ultrasonography (USG) and scintigraphy (SCTG). Absorbed doses were calculated with the OLINDA/EXM software. The relationships between thyroid absorbed dose and therapy response were evaluated at 3 months and 1 year after therapy. Results: The average ratio (±1 standard deviation) betweenm{sub th} estimated by SCTG and USG was 1.74 (±0.64) and that between A{sup ~} obtained by T{sub eff} and the integration of measured activity in the gland was 1.71 (±0.14). These differences affect the calculated absorbed dose. Overall, therapeutic success, corresponding to induction of durable hypothyroidism or euthyroidism, was achieved in 72% of all patients at 3 months and in 90% at 1 year. A therapeutic success rate of at least 95% was found in the group of patients receiving doses of 200 Gy (p = 0.0483) and 330 Gy (p = 0.0131) when m{sub th} was measured by either USG or SCTG and A

  13. Standard practice for qualification and acceptance of boron based metallic neutron absorbers for nuclear criticality control for dry cask storage systems and transportation packaging

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This practice provides procedures for qualification and acceptance of neutron absorber materials used to provide criticality control by absorbing thermal neutrons in systems designed for nuclear fuel storage, transportation, or both. 1.2 This practice is limited to neutron absorber materials consisting of metal alloys, metal matrix composites (MMCs), and cermets, clad or unclad, containing the neutron absorber boron-10 (10B). 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  14. Tissue equivalence in neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nutton, D.H.; Harris, S.J.

    1980-01-01

    A brief review is presented of the essential features of neutron tissue equivalence for radiotherapy and gives the results of a computation of relative absorbed dose for 14 MeV neutrons, using various tissue models. It is concluded that for the Bragg-Gray equation for ionometric dosimetry it is not sufficient to define the value of W to high accuracy and that it is essential that, for dosimetric measurements to be applicable to real body tissue to an accuracy of better than several per cent, a correction to the total absorbed dose must be made according to the test and tissue atomic composition, although variations in patient anatomy and other radiotherapy parameters will often limit the benefits of such detailed dosimetry. (U.K.)

  15. Monte Carlo evaluation of a photon pencil kernel algorithm applied to fast neutron therapy treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderberg, Jonas; Alm Carlsson, Gudrun; Ahnesjö, Anders

    2003-10-01

    When dedicated software is lacking, treatment planning for fast neutron therapy is sometimes performed using dose calculation algorithms designed for photon beam therapy. In this work Monte Carlo derived neutron pencil kernels in water were parametrized using the photon dose algorithm implemented in the Nucletron TMS (treatment management system) treatment planning system. A rectangular fast-neutron fluence spectrum with energies 0-40 MeV (resembling a polyethylene filtered p(41)+ Be spectrum) was used. Central axis depth doses and lateral dose distributions were calculated and compared with the corresponding dose distributions from Monte Carlo calculations for homogeneous water and heterogeneous slab phantoms. All absorbed doses were normalized to the reference dose at 10 cm depth for a field of radius 5.6 cm in a 30 × 40 × 20 cm3 water test phantom. Agreement to within 7% was found in both the lateral and the depth dose distributions. The deviations could be explained as due to differences in size between the test phantom and that used in deriving the pencil kernel (radius 200 cm, thickness 50 cm). In the heterogeneous phantom, the TMS, with a directly applied neutron pencil kernel, and Monte Carlo calculated absorbed doses agree approximately for muscle but show large deviations for media such as adipose or bone. For the latter media, agreement was substantially improved by correcting the absorbed doses calculated in TMS with the neutron kerma factor ratio and the stopping power ratio between tissue and water. The multipurpose Monte Carlo code FLUKA was used both in calculating the pencil kernel and in direct calculations of absorbed dose in the phantom.

  16. Dose field research of analysis room for in-hospital neutron irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zizhu; Song Mingzhe; Li Wei; Chen Jun; Yang Yong; Li Yiguo

    2012-01-01

    Neutron equivalent dose rate and y ray dose rate inside the analysis room of the in-hospital neutron irradiator (IHNI) and outdoor were measured. The results show that γ ray dose rate inside the analysis room exceeds calculation value many times and γ/ ray dose rate outdoor is higher than supervision region dose limit of 7.5 μSv/h. According to the measurement results and the Monte Carlo simulation, the following shielding plan was adopted. Lead shielding with thickness of 16 cm was installed on the wall, which faces the neutron beam, to shield γ ray, and lithium polyethylene plate with thickness of l cm was installed on all the wall (not including ceiling and floor) to shield scattering neutron. After shielding transformation, the highest γ ray dose rate point inside the analysis room decreased 277 times, the neutron equivalent dose rate decreased 5.8 times, and the outdoor γ/ray dose rate decreased nearly 90 times. (authors)

  17. Effect of gamma and neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of Spectralon™ porous PTFE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourdin, William H., E-mail: gourdin1@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA USA (United States); Datte, Philip; Jensen, Wayne; Khater, Hesham; Pearson, Mark [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA USA (United States); Girard, Sylvain [Laboratoire Hubert Curien − UMR CNRS 5516, 18 rue du Pr. Benoît Lauras, F-42000 Saint Etienne (France); Paillet, Philippe; Alozy, Eric [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The effects of neutrons and gammas on PTFE are equivalent for a given absorbed dose. • A neutron fluence of 10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2} corresponds to a gamma dose of 200 Gy. • The dose-to-fluence conversion factor is approximately 5 × 10{sup 10} n/(cm{sup 2}-Gy). • Irradiation in a low-oxygen environment enhances loads and elongations. • Mechanical properties of PTFE will deteriorate at a neutron fluence of 10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}. - Abstract: We establish a correspondence between the mechanical properties (maximum load and failure elongation) of Spectralon™ porous PTFE irradiated with 14 MeV neutrons and 1.17 and 1.33 MeV gammas from a cobalt-60 source. From this correspondence we infer that the effects of neutrons and gammas on this material are approximately equivalent for a given absorbed dose.

  18. Some comments on the concept of absorbed dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez R, J.T.

    1998-12-01

    The main physical quantity for the evaluation of the induced effects by radiation ionizing is absorbed dose. ICRU report 51 defines this concept as quantity dε divided by dm, where dε is the mean energy imparted by radiation ionizing to matter of mass dm. However, nothing is said about the average operation concerning the stochastic energy imparted ε. Nevertheless, because considers the sum of all changes of rest mass of the involved nuclei and elementary particles in all interactions which occur within the mass (i.e. nuclear reactions and transformations of elementary particles), the average operation can not be done with an equilibrium statistical operator, rather, this has to be defined with a non-equilibrium statistical operator, therefore, absorbed dose is a function dependent on time. Furthermore, we present a discussion to clarify the equilibrium radiation and charged particle equilibrium within the context of thermodynamic equilibrium. (Author)

  19. Some comments on the concept of absorbed dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez R, J.T. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    1998-12-15

    The main physical quantity for the evaluation of the induced effects by radiation ionizing is absorbed dose. ICRU report 51 defines this concept as quantity d{epsilon} divided by dm, where d{epsilon} is the mean energy imparted by radiation ionizing to matter of mass dm. However, nothing is said about the average operation concerning the stochastic energy imparted {epsilon}. Nevertheless, because considers the sum of all changes of rest mass of the involved nuclei and elementary particles in all interactions which occur within the mass (i.e. nuclear reactions and transformations of elementary particles), the average operation can not be done with an equilibrium statistical operator, rather, this has to be defined with a non-equilibrium statistical operator, therefore, absorbed dose is a function dependent on time. Furthermore, we present a discussion to clarify the equilibrium radiation and charged particle equilibrium within the context of thermodynamic equilibrium. (Author)

  20. Excitation of surface waves of ultracold neutrons on absorbing trap walls as anomalous loss factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokun, R.Ch.

    2006-01-01

    One analyzed probability of excitation of surface waves of ultracold neutrons in terms of a plane model consisting of three media: vacuum, a finite depth neutron absorbing substance layer and a neutron reflecting substrate. One demonstrated the absence of the mentioned surface waves in terms of the generally accepted model of two media: vacuum contiguous to the plane surface of a substance filled half-space. One pointed out the effect of the excited surface waves of ultracold neutrons on the increase of their anomalous losses in traps [ru

  1. Some neutron absorbing elements and devices for fast nuclear reactors regulation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kervalishvili, P.J.

    2010-01-01

    It is shown that performed technological, physical-mechanical and radiation tests clearly indicate the prospects of using Neutron Absorbing Elements (NAE) based on B-10 and some rare-earth compounds during the creation of highly effective Control and Safety System (CSS) rods for fast neutron nuclear energetic reactors. Particular attention was paid to the development of new and upgrading of existing computing and real technologies for designing and preparing the optimizing NAE items characterized by all physical and strength properties for obtaining desirable operational parameters of CSS rods on their base

  2. Low doses of neutrons induce changes in gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, C.M.; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1993-01-01

    Studies were designed to identify genes induced following low-dose neutron but not following γ-ray exposure in fibroblasts. Our past work had shown differences in the expression of β-protein kinase C and c-fos genes, both being induced following γ-ray but not neutron exposure. We have identified two genes that are induced following neutron, but not γ-ray, exposure: Rp-8 (a gene induced by apoptosis) and the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the human immunodeficiency (HIV). Rp-8 mRNA induction was demonstrated in Syrian hamster embryo fibroblasts and was found to be induced in cells exposed to neutrons administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) and at high dose rate (12 cGy/min). The induction of transcription from the LTR of HIV was demonstrated in HeLa cells bearing a transfected construct of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene driven by the HIV-LTR promoter. Measures of CAT activity and CAT transcripts following irradiation demonstrated an unresponsiveness to γ rays over a broad range of doses. Twofold induction of the HIV-LTR was detected following neutron exposure (48 cGy) administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) but not high (12 cGy/min) dose rates. Ultraviolet-mediated HIV-LTR induction was inhibited by low-dose-rate neutron exposure

  3. Analytical evaluation of dose measurement of critical accident at SILENE (Contract research)

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, T; Tonoike, K

    2003-01-01

    Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) and the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) jointly organized SILENE Accident Dosimetry Intercomparison Exercise to intercompare the dose measurement systems of participating countries. Each participating country carried out dose measurements in the same irradiation field, and the measurement results were mutually compared. The participated in the exercise to measure the doses of gamma rays and neutron from SILENE by using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD's) and an alanine dosimeter. In this examination, the derived evaluation formulae for obtaining a tissue-absorbed dose from measured value (ambient dose equivalent) of TLD for neutron. We reported the tissue-absorbed dose computed using this evaluation formula to OECD/NEA. TLD's for neutron were irradiated in the TRACY facility to verify the evaluation formulae. The results of TLD's were compared with the calculations of MCNP and measurements with alanine dose meter. We found that the ratio of the dose b...

  4. Preliminary characterization of the passive neutron dose equivalent monitor with TLDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujimura, Norio; Kanai, Katsuta; Momose, Takumaro; Hayashi, Naomi [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai Works, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Chen Erhu [Beijing Institute of Nuclear Engineering, Beijing (China)

    2001-02-01

    The passive neutron dose equivalent monitor with TLDs is composed of a cubic polyethylene moderator and TLDs at the center of moderator. This monitor was originally designed for measurements of neutron doses over long-term period of time around the nuclear facilities. In this study, the energy response of this monitor was calculated by Monte Carlo methods and experimentally obtained under {sup 241}Am-Be, {sup 252}Cf and moderated {sup 252}Cf neutron irradiation. Additionally, the responses of two types of conventional neutron dose equivalent meters (rem counters) were also investigated as comparison. The authors concluded that this passive neutron monitor with TLDs had a good energy response similar to conventional rem counters and could evaluate neutron doses within 10% of accuracy to the moderated fission spectra. (author)

  5. Determination of Absorbed Dose to Water for Leksell Gamma Knife Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrsak, H.

    2013-01-01

    Because of geometry of photon beams in Leksell Gamma Knife Unit (LGK), there are several technical problems in applying standard protocols for determination of absorbed dose to water (Dw). Currently, Dw in LGK unit, measured at the center of spherical plastic phantom, is used for dose calculation in LGK radiosurgery. Treatment planning software (LGP TPS) accepts this value as a measurement in water and since plastic phantom has higher electron density than water, this leads to systematic errors in dose calculation. To reduce these errors, a photon attenuation correction (PAC) method was applied. For that purpose, measurements of absorbed dose in a center of three different plastic phantoms with 16 cm diameter (ABS - acrylonitrile butadiene styrene, PMMA - polymethyl metacrylate, PMMA + teflon - polytetrafluoroethylene 5 mm shell) were made with ionization chamber (Semiflex, PTW Freiburg). For measured dose values, PAC to water was applied based on electron density (ED) and equivalent water depths (EWD) of the plastic phantoms. The relation between CT number and ED was determined by measuring CT number of standard CT to ED phantom (CIRS Model 062 Phantom). Absorbed dose in plastic phantoms was 2.5 % lower than calculated dose in water for ABS phantom and more than 5.5 % lower for PMMA and PMMA+teflon phantom. Calculated dose in water showed more consistent values for all three phantoms (max. difference 2.6 %). EWD for human cranial bones and brain has value close to the EWD of ABS phantom, which makes this phantom most suitable for dose measurements in clinical application. In LGK radiosurgery determination of errors related to the difference of phantom materials should not be neglected and measured dose should be corrected before usage for patient treatment dose calculation.(author)

  6. Accuracy of neutron dose evaluation in the area monitoring for LHD experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanishi, H; Uda, T; Tanahashi, S; Saitou, M; Handa, H

    2000-01-01

    The error in the evaluation of neutron dose during calculation of the neutron field around the large helical device (LHD) in D-D operation is discussed. The expected neutron dose at each monitoring point was derived from the dose conversion factor and neutron fluence data, which was calculated with the radiation transport code DOT-3.5. In contrast, the detected dose at the neutron counter was obtained from the fluence data and the detector response given by calculation with MCNP-4b. The neutron counter used in these calculations consisted of a helium-3 proportional counter with a cylindrical polyethylene moderator. According to the results of the calculations, the ratio of the detected dose to the expected dose was found to lie in the range 1.0-3.0 on the outdoor monitoring points. Since the response of a single neutron counter may lead to inconsistencies in the dose conversion factor, we attempted to minimize these inconsistencies by using a pair of counters with moderators of different thickness. The ratio ...

  7. Neutron-absorbing alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portnoi, K.I.; Arabei, L.B.; Gryaznov, G.M.; Levi, L.I.; Lunin, G.L.; Kozhukhov, V.M.; Markov, J.M.; Fedotov, M.E.

    1975-01-01

    A process is described for the production of an alloy consiting of 1 to 20% In, 0.5 to 15% Sm, and from 3 to 18% Hf, the balance being Ni. Such alloys show a good absorption capacity for thermal and intermediate neutrons, good neutron capture efficiency, and good corrosion resistance, and find application in nuclear reactor automatic control and safety systems. The Hf provides for the maintenance of a reasonably high order of neutron capture efficiency throughout the lifetime of a reactor. The alloys are formed in a vacuum furnace operating with an inert gas atmosphere at 280 to 300 mm.Hg. They have a corrosion resistance from 3 to 3.5 times that of the Ag-based alloys commonly employed, and a neutron capture efficiency about twice that of the Ag alloys. Castability and structural strength are good. (U.K.)

  8. Absorbed dose measurement by using tissue equivalent ionization chamber (pair ionization chamber) in the Yayoi reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasuga, N.; Okamura, K.; Terakado, T.; Mabuchi, Y.; Nakagawa, T.; Sukegawa, Toshio; Aizawa, C.; Saito, I.; Oka, Yoshiaki

    1998-01-01

    Each dose rate of neutron and gamma ray in the thermal column of the Yayoi reactor, in which an epithermal neutron field will be used for the boron neutron capture therapy, was measured by using a tissue equivalent ionization chamber and a graphite chamber. The tissue equivalent ionization chamber has some response to both neutron and gamma ray, but the graphite chamber has a few response to the neutron, so called pair ionization chamber method. The epithermal neutron fluxes of the thermal column were calculated by ANISN (one dimensional neutron-gamma transport code). A measured value for gamma dose rate by the pair ionization chamber agrees relevantly with a calculated result. For neutron dose rate, however, the measured value was too much small in comparison with the calculated result. The discrepancy between the measured value and the calculated result for neutron dose rate is discussed in detail in the report. (M. Suetake)

  9. Absorbant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quetier, Monique.

    1978-11-01

    Absorbants play a very important part in the nuclear industry. They serve for the control, shut-down and neutron shielding of reactors and increase the capacity of spent fuel storage pools and of special transport containers. This paper surveys the usual absorbant materials, means of obtainment, their essential characteristics relating to their use and their behaviour under neutron irradiation [fr

  10. Estimate of the damage in organs induced by neutrons in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy; Estimacion del dano en organos inducido por neutrones en radioterapia conformada en 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benites R, J. L. [Centro Estatal de Cancerologia de Nayarit, Servicio de Seguridad Radiologica, Calzada de la Cruz 118 sur, 63000 Tepic, Nayarit (Mexico); Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Uribe, M. del R., E-mail: jlbenitesr@prodigy.net.mx [Instituto Tecnico Superior de Radiologia, Calle Leon No. 129, 63000 Tepic, Nayarit (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    By means of Monte Carlo methods was considered the damage in the organs, induced by neutrons, of patients with cancer that receive treatment in modality of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) with lineal accelerator Varian Ix. The objective of this work was to estimate the damage probability in radiotherapy patients, starting from the effective dose by neutrons in the organs and tissues out of the treatment region. For that a three-dimensional mannequin of equivalent tissue of 30 x 100 x 30 cm{sup 3} was modeled and spherical cells were distributed to estimate the Kerma in equivalent tissue and the absorbed dose by neutrons. With the absorbed dose the effective dose was calculated using the weighting factors for the organ type and radiation type. With the effective dose and the damage factors, considered in the ICRP 103, was considered the probability of damage induction in organs. (Author)

  11. Neutron dosimetry in organs of an adult human phantom using linacs with multileaf collimator in radiotherapy treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Ovalle, S. A.; Barquero, R.; Gomez-Ros, J. M.; Lallena, A. M. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear Aplicada y Simulacion, Universidad Pedagogica y Tecnologica de Colombia, Tunja 15001000 (Colombia); Servicio de Proteccion Radiologica, Hospital Clinico Universitario, E-47012 Valladolid (Spain) and Departamento de Radiologia, Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid E-47071 (Spain); CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 40, Madrid, E-28040 (Spain); Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, Granada E-18071 (Spain)

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: To calculate absorbed doses due to neutrons in 87 organs/tissues for anthropomorphic phantoms, irradiated in position supine (head first into the gantry) with orientations anteroposterior (AP) and right-left (RLAT) with a 18 MV accelerator. Conversion factors from monitor units to {mu}Gy per neutron in organs, equivalent doses in organs/tissues, and effective doses, which permit to quantify stochastic risks, are estimated. Methods: MAX06 and FAX06 phantoms were modeled with MCNPX and irradiated with a 18 MV Varian Clinac 2100C/D accelerator whose geometry included a multileaf collimator. Two actual fields of a pelvic treatment were simulated using electron-photon-neutron coupled transport. Absorbed doses due to neutrons were estimated from kerma. Equivalent doses were estimated using the radiation weighting factor corresponding to an average incident neutron energy 0.47 MeV. Statistical uncertainties associated to absorbed doses, as calculated by MCNPX, were also obtained. Results: Largest doses were absorbed in shallowest (with respect to the neutron pathway) organs. In {mu}GyMU{sup -1}, values of 2.66 (for penis) and 2.33 (for testes) were found in MAX06, and 1.68 (for breasts), 1.05 (for lenses of eyes), and 0.94 (for sublingual salivary glands) in FAX06, in AP orientation. In RLAT, the largest doses were found for bone tissues (leg) just at the entrance of the beam in the body (right side in our case). Values, in {mu}GyMU{sup -1}, of 1.09 in upper leg bone right spongiosa, for MAX06, and 0.63 in mandible spongiosa, for FAX06, were found. Except for gonads, liver, and stomach wall, equivalent doses found for FAX06 were, in both orientations, higher than for MAX06. Equivalent doses in AP are higher than in RLAT for all organs/tissues other than brain and liver. Effective doses of 12.6 and 4.1 {mu}SvMU{sup -1} were found for AP and RLAT, respectively. The organs/tissues with larger relative contributions to the effective dose were testes and breasts, in

  12. Radioiodine Therapy of Hyperthyroidism. Simplified patient-specific absorbed dose planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joensson, Helene

    2003-10-01

    Radioiodine therapy of hyperthyroidism is the most frequently performed radiopharmaceutical therapy. To calculate the activity of {sup 131}I to be administered for giving a certain absorbed dose to the thyroid, the mass of the thyroid and the individual biokinetic data, normally in the form of uptake and biologic half-time, have to be determined. The biologic half-time is estimated from several uptake measurements and the first one is usually made 24 hours after the intake of the test activity. However, many hospitals consider it time-consuming since at least three visits of the patient to the hospital are required (administration of test activity, first uptake measurement, second uptake measurement plus treatment). Instead, many hospitals use a fixed effective half-time or even a fixed administered activity, only requiring two visits. However, none of these methods considers the absorbed dose to the thyroid of the individual patient. In this work a simplified patient-specific method for treating hyperthyroidism is proposed, based on one single uptake measurement, thus requiring only two visits to the hospital. The calculation is as accurate as using the individual biokinetic data. The simplified method is as patient-convenient and time effective as using a fixed effective half-time or a fixed administered activity. The simplified method is based upon a linear relation between the late uptake measurement 4-7 days after intake of the test activity and the product of the extrapolated initial uptake and the effective half-time. Treatments not considering individual biokinetics in the thyroid result in a distribution of administered absorbed dose to the thyroid, with a range of -50 % to +160 % compared to a protocol calculating the absorbed dose to the thyroid of the individual patient. Treatments with a fixed administered activity of 370 MBq will in general administer 250 % higher activity to the patient, with a range of -30 % to +770 %. The absorbed dose to other

  13. Absorbed doses behind bones with MR image-based dose calculations for radiotherapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Juha; Kapanen, Mika; Keyrilainen, Jani; Seppala, Tiina; Tuomikoski, Laura; Tenhunen, Mikko

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images are used increasingly in external radiotherapy target delineation because of their superior soft tissue contrast compared to computed tomography (CT) images. Nevertheless, radiotherapy treatment planning has traditionally been based on the use of CT images, due to the restrictive features of MR images such as lack of electron density information. This research aimed to measure absorbed radiation doses in material behind different bone parts, and to evaluate dose calculation errors in two pseudo-CT images; first, by assuming a single electron density value for the bones, and second, by converting the electron density values inside bones from T(1)∕T(2)∗-weighted MR image intensity values. A dedicated phantom was constructed using fresh deer bones and gelatine. The effect of different bone parts to the absorbed dose behind them was investigated with a single open field at 6 and 15 MV, and measuring clinically detectable dose deviations by an ionization chamber matrix. Dose calculation deviations in a conversion-based pseudo-CT image and in a bulk density pseudo-CT image, where the relative electron density to water for the bones was set as 1.3, were quantified by comparing the calculation results with those obtained in a standard CT image by superposition and Monte Carlo algorithms. The calculations revealed that the applied bulk density pseudo-CT image causes deviations up to 2.7% (6 MV) and 2.0% (15 MV) to the dose behind the examined bones. The corresponding values in the conversion-based pseudo-CT image were 1.3% (6 MV) and 1.0% (15 MV). The examinations illustrated that the representation of the heterogeneous femoral bone (cortex denser compared to core) by using a bulk density for the whole bone causes dose deviations up to 2% both behind the bone edge and the middle part of the bone (diameter bones). This study indicates that the decrease in absorbed dose is not dependent on the bone diameter with all types of bones. Thus

  14. Intercomparison of personnel dosimetry for thermal neutron dose equivalent in neutron and gamma-ray mixed fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    1985-01-01

    In order to consider the problems concerned with personnel dosimetry using film badges and TLDs, an intercomparison of personnel dosimetry, especially dose equivalent responses of personnel dosimeters to thermal neutron, was carried out in five different neutron and gamma-ray mixed fields at KUR and UTR-KINKI from the practical point of view. For the estimation of thermal neutron dose equivalent, it may be concluded that each personnel dosimeter has good performances in the precision, that is, the standard deviations in the measured values by individual dosimeter were within 24 %, and the dose equivalent responses to thermal neutron were almost independent on cadmium ratio and gamma-ray contamination. However, the relative thermal neutron dose equivalent of individual dosimeter normalized to the ICRP recommended value varied considerably and a difference of about 4 times was observed among the dosimeters. From the results obtained, it is suggested that the standardization of calibration factors and procedures is required from the practical point of radiation protection and safety. (author)

  15. Phantom experiment of depth-dose distributions for gadolinium neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, T.; Kato, K.; Sakuma, Y.; Tsuruno, A.; Matsubayashi, M.

    1993-01-01

    Depth-dose distributions in a tumor simulated phantom were measured for thermal neutron flux, capture gamma-ray and internal conversion electron dose rates for gadolinium neutron capture therapy. The results show that (i) a significant dose enhancement can be achieved in the tumor by capture gamma-rays and internal conversion electrons but the dose is mainly due to capture gamma-rays from the Gd(n, γ) reactions, therefore, is not selective at the cellular level, (ii) the dose distribution was a function of strongly interrelated parameters such as gadolinium concentrations, tumor site and neutron beam size (collimator aperture size), and (iii) the Gd-NCT by thermal neutrons appears to be a potential for treatment of superficial tumor. (author)

  16. Cosmic radiation dose in aircraft - a neutron track etch detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vukovic, B.; Radolic, V.; Miklavcic, I.; Poje, M.; Varga, M. [Department of Physics, University of Osijek, 31000 Osijek, P.O. Box 125, Gajev trg 6 (Croatia); Planinic, J. [Department of Physics, University of Osijek, 31000 Osijek, P.O. Box 125, Gajev trg 6 (Croatia)], E-mail: planinic@ffos.hr

    2007-12-15

    Cosmic radiation bombards us at high altitude by ionizing particles. The radiation environment is a complex mixture of charged particles of solar and galactic origin, as well as of secondary particles produced in interaction of the galactic cosmic particles with the nuclei of atmosphere of the Earth. The radiation field at aircraft altitude consists of different types of particles, mainly photons, electrons, positrons and neutrons, with a large energy range. The non-neutron component of cosmic radiation dose aboard ATR 42 and A 320 aircrafts (flight level of 8 and 11 km, respectively) was measured with TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) detectors and the Mini 6100 semiconductor dosimeter. The estimated occupational effective dose for the aircraft crew (A 320) working 500 h per year was 1.64 mSv. Other experiments, or dose rate measurements with the neutron dosimeter, consisting of LR-115 track detector and boron foil BN-1 or 10B converter, were performed on five intercontinental flights. Comparison of the dose rates of the non-neutron component (low LET) and the neutron one (high LET) of the radiation field at the aircraft flight level showed that the neutron component carried about 50% of the total dose. The dose rate measurements on the flights from the Middle Europe to the South and Middle America, then to Korea and Japan, showed that the flights over or near the equator region carried less dose rate; this was in accordance with the known geomagnetic latitude effect.

  17. Cosmic radiation dose in aircraft - a neutron track etch detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukovic, B.; Radolic, V.; Miklavcic, I.; Poje, M.; Varga, M.; Planinic, J.

    2007-01-01

    Cosmic radiation bombards us at high altitude by ionizing particles. The radiation environment is a complex mixture of charged particles of solar and galactic origin, as well as of secondary particles produced in interaction of the galactic cosmic particles with the nuclei of atmosphere of the Earth. The radiation field at aircraft altitude consists of different types of particles, mainly photons, electrons, positrons and neutrons, with a large energy range. The non-neutron component of cosmic radiation dose aboard ATR 42 and A 320 aircrafts (flight level of 8 and 11 km, respectively) was measured with TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) detectors and the Mini 6100 semiconductor dosimeter. The estimated occupational effective dose for the aircraft crew (A 320) working 500 h per year was 1.64 mSv. Other experiments, or dose rate measurements with the neutron dosimeter, consisting of LR-115 track detector and boron foil BN-1 or 10B converter, were performed on five intercontinental flights. Comparison of the dose rates of the non-neutron component (low LET) and the neutron one (high LET) of the radiation field at the aircraft flight level showed that the neutron component carried about 50% of the total dose. The dose rate measurements on the flights from the Middle Europe to the South and Middle America, then to Korea and Japan, showed that the flights over or near the equator region carried less dose rate; this was in accordance with the known geomagnetic latitude effect

  18. Methods to verify absorbed dose of irradiated containers and evaluation of dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Meixu; Wang Chuanyao; Tang Zhangxong; Li Shurong

    2001-01-01

    The research on dose distribution in irradiated food containers and evaluation of several methods to verify absorbed dose were carried out. The minimum absorbed dose of treated five orange containers was in the top of the highest or in the bottom of lowest container. D max /D min in this study was 1.45 irradiated in a commercial 60 Co facility. The density of orange containers was about 0.391g/cm 3 . The evaluation of dosimeters showed that the PMMA-YL and clear PMMA dosimeters have linear relationship with dose response, and the word NOT in STERIN-125 and STERIN-300 indicators were covered completely at the dosage of 125 and 300 Gy respectively. (author)

  19. DOE personnel neutron dosimetry evaluation and upgrade program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faust, L.G.; Stroud, C.M.; Vallario, E.J.

    1988-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsors an extensive research program to improve the methods, dosimeters, and instruments available to DOE facilities for measuring neutron dose and assessing its effects on the work force. The Total Dose Meter was recently developed for measuring in real time the absorbed dose of mixed neutron and gamma radiation and for calculating the dose equivalent. The Field Neutron Spectrometer was developed to provide a portable instrument for determining neutron spectra in the workplace for flux-to-dose equivalent conversion and quality factor calculation. The Combination Thermoluminescence/Track Etch Dosimeter (TLD/TED) was developed to extend the effective neutron energy range of the conventional TLDs to improve detection of fast-energy neutrons. An Optically Stimulated Luminescence Dosimeter is presently being developed for application to gamma, neutron, and beta radiation. An Effective Dose Equivalent System is being developed to provide guidance in implementing the January 1987 Presidential Directive to determine effective dose equivalent. Superheated Drop Detectors are being investigated for their potential as real time neutron dosimeters. This paper includes discussions of these improvements brought about by the DOE research program

  20. Radiation absorbed dose estimate for rubidium-82 determined from in vivo measurements in human subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, J. W.; Harper, P.V.; Stark, V.S.; Peterson, E.L.; Lathrop, K.A.

    1986-01-01

    Radiation absorbed doses from rubidium-82 injected intravenously were determined in two young men, aged 23 and 27, using a dynamic conjugate counting technique to provide data for the net organ integrated time-activity curves in five organs: kidneys, lungs, liver, heart, and testes. This technique utilized a tungsten collimated Anger camera and the accuracy was validated in a prestwood phantom. The data for each organ were compared with conjugate count rates of a reference Ge-68/Ga-68 standard which had been calibrated against the Rb-82 injected. The effects of attenuation in the body were eliminated. The MIRD method was used to calculate the organ self absorbed doses and the total organ absorbed doses. The mean total absorbed doses were as follows (mrads/mCi injected): kidneys 30.9, heart walls 7.5, lungs 6.0, liver 3.0, testes 2.0 (one subject only), red marrow 1.3, remainder of body 1.3 and, extrapolating to women, ovaries 1.2. This absorbed dose to the kidney is significantly less than the pessimistic estimate of 59.4 mrads/mCi, made assuming instantaneous uptake and complete extraction of activity with no excretion by the kidneys, which receive 20% of the cardiac output. Further, in a 68 year old man the renal self absorbed dose was approximately 40% less than the mean renal self absorbed dose of the younger men. This decrease is probably related to the decline in renal blood flow which occurs with advancing age but other factors may also contribute to the observed difference. 14 references, 4 figures, 2 tables

  1. The 1997 determination of the Australian standards of exposure and absorbed dose at 60Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huntley, R.B.; Boas, J.F.; Van der Gaast, H.

    1998-05-01

    The arrangements for the maintenance of the Australian standards for 60 Co are described in detail. The primary standards are a graphite cavity chamber for exposure/air kerma and a graphite calorimeter for absorbed dose. These secondary standards are described and their responses in corresponding 90 Sr reference sources are reported. Accurate ratios between the Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL) and Australian Nuclear Science and Technology (ANSTO) 90 Sr reference sources are derived for use in future calibrations. The value of 28.8 years for the half-life of 90 Sr is confirmed. The usefulness of 90 Sr reference source measurements in quality assurance is discussed. The charge sensitivity and linearity of the ANSTO electrometers are reported by two different methods and are compared with previous results. Calibration factors for all the secondary standard ionization chambers are given, in terms of exposure, air kerma and absorbed dose to water. Calibration factors are also given for most of the chambers in terms of absorbed dose to graphite. The methods of deriving the calibration factors are explained in detail, including all the corrections applied to both the primary and secondary standard measurements. Three alternative methods of deriving the absorbed dose to water calibration factors are compared. The reported calibration factors are compared with previous results. Changes in the Australian units of exposure, air kerma and absorbed dose to graphite and water are derived from changes in the corresponding calibration factors. The Australian units of exposure and air kerma have not changed significantly since 1990. The Australian unit of absorbed dose to graphite is now 1.1 % smaller than in 1993 and 1.3 % smaller than in 1990. The Australian unit of absorbed dose to water is now 1.4 % smaller than in 1993, but is only 0.9 % smaller than in 1990. Comparisons of the Australian standards of exposure/air kerma and absorbed dose with those of the Bureau

  2. Gadolinium neutron capture brachytherapy (GdNCB), a new treatment method for intravascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enger, Shirin A.; Rezaei, Arash; Munck af Rosenschoeld, Per; Lundqvist, Hans

    2006-01-01

    Restenosis is a major problem after balloon angioplasty and stent implantation. The aim of this study is to introduce gadolinium neutron capture brachytherapy (GdNCB) as a suitable modality for treatment of stenosis. The utility of GdNCB in intravascular brachytherapy (IVBT) of stent stenosis is investigated by using the GEANT4 and MCNP4B Monte Carlo radiation transport codes. To study capture rate, Kerma, absorbed dose and absorbed dose rate around a Gd-containing stent activated with neutrons, a 30 mm long, 5 mm diameter gadolinium foil is chosen. The input data is a neutron spectrum used for clinical neutron capture therapy in Studsvik, Sweden. Thermal neutron capture in gadolinium yields a spectrum of high-energy gamma photons, which due to the build-up effect gives an almost flat dose delivery pattern to the first 4 mm around the stent. The absorbed dose rate is 1.33 Gy/min, 0.25 mm from the stent surface while the dose to normal tissue is in order of 0.22 Gy/min, i.e., a factor of 6 lower. To spare normal tissue further fractionation of the dose is also possible. The capture rate is relatively high at both ends of the foil. The dose distribution from gamma and charge particle radiation at the edges and inside the stent contributes to a nonuniform dose distribution. This will lead to higher doses to the surrounding tissue and may prevent stent edge and in-stent restenosis. The position of the stent can be verified and corrected by the treatment plan prior to activation. Activation of the stent by an external neutron field can be performed days after catherization when the target cells start to proliferate and can be expected to be more radiation sensitive. Another advantage of the nonradioactive gadolinium stent is the possibility to avoid radiation hazard to personnel

  3. Accuracy of a dose-area product compared to an absorbed dose to water at a point in a 2 cm diameter field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dufreneix, S.; Ostrowsky, A.; Rapp, B.; Daures, J.; Bordy, J. M., E-mail: jean-marc.bordy@cea.fr [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNE-LNHB), Gif-sur-Yvette F-91191 (France)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: Graphite calorimeters with a core diameter larger than the beam can be used to establish dosimetric references in small fields. The dose-area product (DAP) measured can theoretically be linked to an absorbed dose at a point by the determination of a profile correction. This study aims at comparing the DAP-based protocol to the usual absorbed dose at a point protocol in a 2 cm diameter field for which both references exist. Methods: Two calorimeters were used, respectively, with a sensitive volume of 0.6 cm (for the absorbed dose at a point measurement) and 3 cm diameter (for the DAP measurement). Profile correction was calculated from a 2D dose mapping using three detectors: a PinPoint chamber, a synthetic diamond, and EBT3 films. A specific protocol to read EBT3 films was implemented and the dose-rate and energy dependences were studied to assure a precise measurement, especially in the penumbra and out-of-field regions. Results: EBT3 films were found independent on dose rates over the range studied but showed a strong under-response (18%) at low energies. Depending on the dosimeter used for calculating the profile correction, a deviation of 0.8% (PinPoint chamber), 0.9% (diamond), or 1.9% (EBT3 films) was observed between the calibration coefficient derived from DAP measurements and the one directly established in terms of absorbed dose to water at a point. Conclusions: The DAP method can currently be linked to the classical dosimetric reference system based in an absorbed dose at a point only with a confidence interval of 95% (k = 2). None of the detectors studied can be used to determine an absorbed dose to water at a point from a DAP measurement with an uncertainty smaller than 1.2%.

  4. Graphite calorimeter, the primary standard of absorbed dose at BNM-LNHB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daures, J.; Ostrowsky, A.; Chauvenet, B.

    2002-01-01

    The graphite calorimeter is the standard for absorbed dose to water at BNM-LNHB. The transfer from absorbed dose to graphite to absorbed dose to water is then performed by means of chemical dosimeters and ionisation chamber measurements. Therefore the quality of graphite calorimeter measurements is essential. The present graphite calorimeter is described. The characteristics of this calorimeter are pointed out. Special attention is given to the thermal feedback of the core, which is the main difference with the Domen-type calorimeter. The repeatability and reproducibility of the mean absorbed dose in the calorimeter core are presented in detail. As an example, individual measurements in the 20 MV photon beam from our Saturne 43 linac are given. The y-axis quantity is the mean absorbed dose in the core divided by the reference ionisation chamber charge. Both are normalised to the monitor ionisation chamber charge. The standard deviation (of the distribution itself) is 0.12 % for the first set of measurements performed in 1999. In 2002, for each different series, the standard deviation is 0.03%. The improvement on the 2002 standard deviation is mainly due to the change of the ionisation chamber used for the beam monitoring of the linac. Some benefit also comes from changes on the thermal control and measuring systems (nanovoltmeters, Wheatstone bridges, power supplies, determination of the measuring bridge sensitivity (V/Ω.) ). The maximum difference between the means of the three series is 0.08%. This difference is due to the variation of not only the calorimetric measurements but also of the reference ionisation chamber response, of the position of the assembly and of the monitoring of the beam. The stability of the linac (electron energy, photon beam shape) has to be very good too in order to obtain this global performance. The correction factors necessary to determine the absorbed dose to graphite at the reference point in an homogeneous phantom from the

  5. Standard specification for boron-Based neutron absorbing material systems for use in nuclear spent fuel storage racks

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This specification defines criteria for boron-based neutron absorbing material systems used in racks in a pool environment for storage of nuclear light water reactor (LWR) spent-fuel assemblies or disassembled components to maintain sub-criticality in the storage rack system. 1.2 Boron-based neutron absorbing material systems normally consist of metallic boron or a chemical compound containing boron (for example, boron carbide, B4C) supported by a matrix of aluminum, steel, or other materials. 1.3 In a boron-based absorber, neutron absorption occurs primarily by the boron-10 isotope that is present in natural boron to the extent of 18.3 ± 0.2 % by weight (depending upon the geological origin of the boron). Boron, enriched in boron-10 could also be used. 1.4 The materials systems described herein shall be functional – that is always be capable to maintain a B10 areal density such that subcriticality Keff <0.95 or Keff <0.98 or Keff < 1.0 depending on the design specification for the service...

  6. Analysis of unstable chromosome alterations frequency induced by neutron-gamma mixed field radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Vale, Carlos H.F.P.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)], e-mail: psouza@cnen.gov.br, e-mail: jodinilson@cnen.gov.br; Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Genetica

    2009-07-01

    Nowadays monitoring chromosome alterations in peripheral blood lymphocytes have been used to access the radiation absorbed dose in individuals exposed accidental or occupationally to gamma radiation. However there are not many studies based on the effects of mixed field neutron-gamma. The radiobiology of neutrons has great importance because in nuclear factories worldwide there are several hundred thousand individuals monitored as potentially receiving doses of neutron. In this paper it was observed the frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by a gamma-neutron mixed field. Blood was obtained from one healthy donor and exposed to mixed field neutron-gamma sources {sup 241}AmBe (20 Ci) at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL-CRCN/NE-PE-Brazil). The chromosomes were observed at metaphase, following colcemid accumulation and 1000 well-spread metaphases were analyzed for the presence of chromosome alterations by two experienced scorers. The results suggest that there is the possibility of a directly proportional relationship between absorbed dose of neutron-gamma mixed field radiation and the frequency of unstable chromosome alterations analyzed in this paper. (author)

  7. Analysis of unstable chromosome alterations frequency induced by neutron-gamma mixed field radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Vale, Carlos H.F.P.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F.; Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays monitoring chromosome alterations in peripheral blood lymphocytes have been used to access the radiation absorbed dose in individuals exposed accidental or occupationally to gamma radiation. However there are not many studies based on the effects of mixed field neutron-gamma. The radiobiology of neutrons has great importance because in nuclear factories worldwide there are several hundred thousand individuals monitored as potentially receiving doses of neutron. In this paper it was observed the frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by a gamma-neutron mixed field. Blood was obtained from one healthy donor and exposed to mixed field neutron-gamma sources 241 AmBe (20 Ci) at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL-CRCN/NE-PE-Brazil). The chromosomes were observed at metaphase, following colcemid accumulation and 1000 well-spread metaphases were analyzed for the presence of chromosome alterations by two experienced scorers. The results suggest that there is the possibility of a directly proportional relationship between absorbed dose of neutron-gamma mixed field radiation and the frequency of unstable chromosome alterations analyzed in this paper. (author)

  8. Absorbed dose assessment in newborns during x-ray examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taipe, Patricia K.; Berrocal, Mariella J.; Carita, Raúl F.

    2012-02-01

    Often a newborn presents breathing problems during the early days of life, i.e. bronchopneumonia, wich are caused in most of cases, by aspirating a mixture of meconium and amniotic fluid. In these cases, it is necessary to make use of a radiograph, requested by the physician to reach a diagnosis. This paper seeks to evaluate the absorbed doses in neonates undergoing a radiograph. For this reason we try to simulate the real conditions in a X-ray room from Lima hospitals. With this finality we perform a simulation made according a questionnaire related to technical data of X-ray equipment, distance between the source and the neonate, and its position to be irradiated. The information obtained has been used to determine the absorbed dose by infants, using the MCNP code. Finally, the results are compared with reference values of international health agencies.

  9. Evaluation of the distribution of absorbed dose in child phantoms exposed to diagnostic medical x rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, W. L.; Poston, J. W.; Warner, G. G.

    1978-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine, by theoretical calculation and experimental measurement, the absorbed dose distributions in two heterogeneous phantoms representing one-year- and five-year-old children from typical radiographic examinations for those ages. Theoretical work included the modification of an existing internal dose code which uses Monte Carlo methods to determine doses within the Snyder-Fisher mathematical phantom. A Ge(Li) detector and a pinhole collimator were used to measure x-ray spectra which served as input to the modified Monte Carlo codes which were used to calculate organ doses in children. The calculated and measured tissue-air values were compared for a number of organs. For most organs, the results of the calculated absorbed doses agreed with the measured absorbed doses within twice the coefficient of variation of the calculated value. The absorbed dose to specific organs for several selected radiological examinations are given for one-year-old, five-year-old, and adult phantoms.

  10. Evaluation of the distribution of absorbed dose in child phantoms exposed to diagnostic medical x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.L.; Poston, J.W.; Warner, G.G.

    1978-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine, by theoretical calculation and experimental measurement, the absorbed dose distributions in two heterogeneous phantoms representing one-year- and five-year-old children from typical radiographic examinations for those ages. Theoretical work included the modification of an existing internal dose code which uses Monte Carlo methods to determine doses within the Snyder-Fisher mathematical phantom. A Ge(Li) detector and a pinhole collimator were used to measure x-ray spectra which served as input to the modified Monte Carlo codes which were used to calculate organ doses in children. The calculated and measured tissue-air values were compared for a number of organs. For most organs, the results of the calculated absorbed doses agreed with the measured absorbed doses within twice the coefficient of variation of the calculated value. The absorbed dose to specific organs for several selected radiological examinations are given for one-year-old, five-year-old, and adult phantoms

  11. Fast neutron dosemeter from the 103 Rh (n,n') 103m Rh reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arriola, H.; Monroy, F.

    1998-01-01

    Neutron dosimetry presents problems due to the form of neutron interaction with matter. Therefore, we propose an activation method using Rhodium foils to measure the neutron flux and thus calculate the doses. Rhodium has a reasonably large cross section proportional to the absorbed doses from 0.8 to 10 MeV. This method would be useful for personal dosimetry in nuclear reactors. (Author)

  12. Patient absorbed radiation doses estimation related to irradiation anatomy; Estimativa de dose absorvida pelo paciente relacionada a anatomia irradiada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Flavio Augusto Penna; Soares, Amanda Anastacio; Kahl, Gabrielly Gomes, E-mail: prof.flavio@gmail.com, E-mail: amanda-a-soares@hotmail.com, E-mail: gabriellygkahl@gmail.com [Instituto Federal de Eduacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Santa Catarina (IFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Developed a direct equation to estimate the absorbed dose to the patient in x-ray examinations, using electric, geometric parameters and filtering combined with data from irradiated anatomy. To determine the absorbed dose for each examination, the entrance skin dose (ESD) is adjusted to the thickness of the patient's specific anatomy. ESD is calculated from the estimated KERMA greatness in the air. Beer-Lambert equations derived from power data mass absorption coefficients obtained from the NIST / USA, were developed for each tissue: bone, muscle, fat and skin. Skin thickness was set at 2 mm and the bone was estimated in the central ray of the site, in the anteroposterior view. Because they are similar in density and attenuation coefficients, muscle and fat are treated as a single tissue. For evaluation of the full equations, we chose three different anatomies: chest, hand and thigh. Although complex in its shape, the equations simplify direct determination of absorbed dose from the characteristics of the equipment and patient. The input data is inserted at a single time and total absorbed dose (mGy) is calculated instantly. The average error, when compared with available data, is less than 5% in any combination of device data and exams. In calculating the dose for an exam and patient, the operator can choose the variables that will deposit less radiation to the patient through the prior analysis of each combination of variables, using the ALARA principle in routine diagnostic radiology sector.

  13. Radiation shielding for neutron guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ersez, T.; Braoudakis, G.; Osborn, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Models of the neutron guide shielding for the out of bunker guides on the thermal and cold neutron beam lines of the OPAL Reactor (ANSTO) were constructed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP 4B. The neutrons that were not reflected inside the guides but were absorbed by the supermirror (SM) layers were noted to be a significant source of gammas. Gammas also arise from neutrons absorbed by the B, Si, Na and K contained in the glass. The proposed shielding design has produced compact shielding assemblies. These arrangements are consistent with safety requirements, floor load limits, and cost constraints. To verify the design a prototype was assembled consisting of 120mm thick Pb(96%)Sb(4%) walls resting on a concrete block. There was good agreement between experimental measurements and calculated dose rates for bulk shield regions. (authors)

  14. Radiation shielding for neutron guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ersez, T.; Braoudakis, G.; Osborn, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    Models of the neutron guide shielding for the out of bunker guides on the thermal and cold neutron beam lines of the OPAL Reactor (ANSTO) were constructed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP 4B. The neutrons that were not reflected inside the guides but were absorbed by the supermirror (SM) layers were noted to be a significant source of gammas. Gammas also arise from neutrons absorbed by the B, Si, Na and K contained in the glass. The proposed shielding design has produced compact shielding assemblies. These arrangements are consistent with safety requirements, floor load limits, and cost constraints. To verify the design a prototype was assembled consisting of 120 mm thick Pb(96%)Sb(4%) walls resting on a concrete block. There was good agreement between experimental measurements and calculated dose rates for bulk shield regions

  15. Estimation of absorbed doses on the basis of cytogenetic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shevchenko, V.A.; Rubanovich, A.V.; Snigiryova, G.P.

    1998-01-01

    Long-term studies in the field of radiation cytogenetics have resulted in the discovery of relationship between induction of chromosome aberrations and the type of ionizing radiation, their intensity and dose. This has served as a basis of biological dosimetry as an area of application of the revealed relationship, and has been used in the practice to estimate absorbed doses in people exposed to emergency irradiation. The necessity of using the methods of biological dosimetry became most pressing in connection with the Chernobyl accident in 1986, as well as in connection with other radiation situations that occurred in nuclear industry of the former USSR. The materials presented in our works demonstrate the possibility of applying cytogenetic methods for assessing absorbed doses in populations of different regions exposed to radiation as a result of accidents at nuclear facilities (Chernobyl, the village Muslymovo on the Techa river, the Three Mile Island nuclear power station in the USA where an accident occurred in 1979). Fundamentally, new possibilities for retrospective dose assessment are provided by the FISH-method that permits the assessment of absorbed doses after several decades since the exposure occurred. In addition, the application of this method makes it possible to restore the dynamics of unstable chromosome aberrations (dicentrics and centric rings), which is important for further improvement of the method of biological dosimetry based on the analysis of unstable chromosome aberrations. The purpose of our presentation is a brief description of the cytogenetic methods used in biological dosimetry, consideration of statistical methods of data analysis and a description of concrete examples of their application. (J.P.N.)

  16. Peculiarities of absorbed dose forming in some wild animals in Chornobyl exclusion zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Gaychenko

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Based on field researches conducted in the exclusion zone of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in the years after the accident, the peculiarities are identified of formation of absorbed doses in animals of different taxonomic and ecological groups that live in conditions of radioactive contamination of ecosystems. It was shown importance of consideration of radiation features on wild animals according to their life cycle, conditions and ways of life. Data were displayed about the importance of different types of irradiation according to the period of stay of the animals in the ground, in burrows and nests. The questions were reviewed about value of external and internal radiation in absorbed dose of different types of wildlife. Results of the calculation of the absorbed dose of bird embryos from egg shell were shown.

  17. Determination of the absorbed dose and dose-distribution in water for low- and medium-energetic photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bultman, J.H.

    1990-05-01

    The methods to determine the absorbed dose to water for low and medium energy photons were studied. Large differences between the results of these methods exists. So, a research proposition has been made to explain these differences. The goal of this research will be the development of a method to determine the absorbed dose below approximately 400 keV with an ionization chamber calibrated at 60 Co gamma radiation. To explain the differences between the set of methods, some causes were proposed, like the influence of the ionisation chamber on the measurement in water. Also, some methods to determine the factors are proposed. (author). 29 refs

  18. Long distance elementary measurement of the radiation dose ratio produced by neutron activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Changgeng; Lou Benchao; Wu Chunlei; Hu Yonghong; Li Yan

    2009-04-01

    The working principle and the structure and performances of a long distance controllable individual radiation dose ratio instrument are described. The radiation dose ratio produced by neutron activation is elementarily measured by using this instrument in the neutron generator hall with high neutron yield. When neutron yield arrives to 2 x 10 11 s -1 , the radiation dose ratio produced by neutron activation is 99.9 μSv/h in 1 h after the generator being stopped. The radiation dose ratio is reduced to 24.4 μSv/h in 39 h after the generator being stopped. When neutron yield is 3.2 x 10 10 s -1 , the radiation dose ratio produced by neutron activation is 21.9 μSv/h in 36 min, after the generator being stopped. The measurement results may provide reference for physical experimenters and neutron generator operators. (authors)

  19. Estimation of the absorbed dose in gamma irradiated food containing bone by electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basfar, A.A.; Abdel Rehim, F.

    1997-01-01

    The use of electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy to accurately evaluate the absorbed dose to radiationprocessed bones (and thus meats) is examined. The exposure of foodstuffs containing bone to a dose of ionizing radiation results in the formation of long lived free radicals which give rise to characteristics ESR signals. The yield of radicals was found to be proportional to absorbed dose. Additive re-irradiation of previously irradiated bone was used to estimate the absorbed dose in the irradiated chicken bone. Simple non-linear rational equation was found to fit to the data and yields good dose estimates for irradiated bone in the range of doses (1.0 - 5.0 kGy). Decay of the ESR signal intensity was monitored at different dose levels (2.0 and 7.0 kGy) up to 22 days. The absorbed dose in irradiated chicken (2.Om 3.0 and 6.0 kGy) was assessed at 2, 6 and 12 days after irradiation. Relatively good results were obtained when measurements were made within the following days (up to 12 days) after irradiation. The ability of the dose additive method to provide accurate dose assessments is tested here

  20. Generalization of cavity theory for the case of neutrons. Application to the calculation of the sensitivity of a dose meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simoen, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    When a heterogeneous dose meter is used - i.e. a dose meter in which the wall and the detector medium are not of identical composition - it is possible to establish a general link between the information collected and the absorbed dose sought only on the basis of a measurement theory. For electrons, a cavity theory was progressively developed (Bragg, Gray, Burlin) and at present represents a model making possible the interpretation of measurements of doses due to photons. Regarding neutrons, only a number of special cases have been handled; as far as we are aware, no general theory similar to that of Burlin has been put forward. It is, however, possible, to generalize the cavity theory by using Burlin's analysis as a starting point and taking into account the variety of secondary charged particles brought into motion by the neutrons, particularly when the dimensions of the cavity are of the same order as, or are large in respect to, the range of the secondary charged particles. The present paper therefore proposes an analytical expression for the absorbed dose sought as a function of the data collected. This relationship involves two components, one relating to directly ionizing particles generated in the dose meter wall and the other to particles generated in the detector medium; it also takes account of the variation in the radiometrological ''constant'' associated with the detector medium as a function of the type and energy of the secondary particles. Burlin's theory then constitutes a special case of this general theory. The general relationship established makes it possible to express the response of a dose meter in terms of the various parameters relating to the characteristics of the instrument and to the primary and secondary particles concerned. (author)

  1. Fast Neutron Dosimetry Using CR-39 Nuclear Track Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZAKI, M.; ABDEL-NABY, A.; MORSY, A.

    2010-01-01

    Measurement of the neutron dose in and around the neutron sources is important for the purpose of personnel and environmental neutron dosimetry. In the present study, a method for the measurement of neutron dose using the UV-Vis spectra of CR-39 plastic track detector was investigated. A set of CR-39 plastic detectors was exposed to 252 Cf neutron source, which had the yield of 0.68x10 8 /s, and neutron dose equivalent rate 1m apart from the source is equal to 3.8 mrem/h. The samples were etched for 10 h in 6.25 N NaOH at 70 o C. The absorbance of the etched samples was measured using UV-visible spectrophotometer as a function of neutron dose. It was observed that there was a linear relationship between the optical absorption of these detectors and neutron dose. This means that the exposure dose of neutron can be determined by knowing the optical absorption of the sample. These results were compared with previous study. It was found that there was a matching and good agreement with their investigations.

  2. Technique-dependent decrease in thyroid absorbed dose for dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, R.E.; Bristow, R.G.; Clark, G.M.; Nussbaum, C.; Taylor, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    A LiF thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) system, calibrated in the tissue of interest with the beam used for experimentation, was employed to investigate dosages (muGy) to the thyroid region of an anthropomorphic phantom resultant from two dental complete-mouth radiographic procedures. Both techniques were compared in terms of dosages associated with combinations of lead apron and thyroid collar shielding while using a 70-kVp or 90-kVp x-ray beam for a 20-film complete-mouth series. Lead shielding significantly decreased the dose to the thyroid using both techniques (p less than 0.05). The use of the 90-kVp beam resulted in a significant reduction in the thyroid absorbed dose when using the bisecting angle technique (p less than 0.05) but caused a significant increase in the thyroid absorbed dose when the paralleling technique was used (p less than 0.05). The implementation of higher kilovoltage techniques in dental offices must therefore be dependent on the radiographic technique employed

  3. Metabolic kinetics and absorbed doses of 137Cs in lactating rats and progeny during suckling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyaginskaya, A.M.; Osipov, V.A.; Dement'ev, S.I.; Ermalitskij, A.P.

    2000-01-01

    The transfer of 137 Cs with maternal milk to progeny was studied in rats The rats were administered with 25 kBq/g of 137 Cs nitrate (pH = 6) in a single oral dose immediately after delivery. Nonpregnant females served as control. Absorbed doses per activity unit to lactating rats were 23 % lover than to nonlactating ones. Over the suckling period absorbed doses to young rats amounted to about 35 % of the absorbed dose to the nursing female. For nonlactating females the internal dose approximately equalled the sum of doses to the nursing female and young rats. Lactating is the effective way for removal of 1 '3 7 Cs from organism of the rats. Content of 1 '3 7 Cs in lactating rat becomes on 42.9 % lower than in organism of nonlactating rat during period of lactating (near 20 days) [ru

  4. Optical fibre temperature sensor technology and potential application in absorbed dose calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, P.D.; Hargrave, N.J.

    1992-09-01

    Optical fibre based sensors are proposed as a potential alternative to the thermistors traditionally used as temperature sensors in absorbed dose calorimetry. The development of optical fibre temperature sensor technology over the last ten years is reviewed. The potential resolution of various optical techniques is assessed with particular reference to the requirements of absorbed dose calorimetry. Attention is drawn to other issues which would require investigation before the development of practical optical fibre sensors for this purpose could occur. 192 refs., 5 tabs., 4 figs

  5. Estimation of low-level neutron dose-equivalent rate by using extrapolation method for a curie level Am–Be neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Gang; Xu, Jiayun; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Neutron radiation protection is an important research area because of the strong radiation biological effect of neutron field. The radiation dose of neutron is closely related to the neutron energy, and the connected relationship is a complex function of energy. For the low-level neutron radiation field (e.g. the Am–Be source), the commonly used commercial neutron dosimeter cannot always reflect the low-level dose rate, which is restricted by its own sensitivity limit and measuring range. In this paper, the intensity distribution of neutron field caused by a curie level Am–Be neutron source was investigated by measuring the count rates obtained through a 3 He proportional counter at different locations around the source. The results indicate that the count rates outside of the source room are negligible compared with the count rates measured in the source room. In the source room, 3 He proportional counter and neutron dosimeter were used to measure the count rates and dose rates respectively at different distances to the source. The results indicate that both the count rates and dose rates decrease exponentially with the increasing distance, and the dose rates measured by a commercial dosimeter are in good agreement with the results calculated by the Geant4 simulation within the inherent errors recommended by ICRP and IEC. Further studies presented in this paper indicate that the low-level neutron dose equivalent rates in the source room increase exponentially with the increasing low-energy neutron count rates when the source is lifted from the shield with different radiation intensities. Based on this relationship as well as the count rates measured at larger distance to the source, the dose rates can be calculated approximately by the extrapolation method. This principle can be used to estimate the low level neutron dose values in the source room which cannot be measured directly by a commercial dosimeter. - Highlights: • The scope of the affected area for

  6. Verification of an effective dose equivalent model for neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, J.E.; Piper, R.K.; Leonowich, J.A.; Faust, L.G.

    1991-10-01

    Since the effective dose equivalent, based on the weighted sum of organ dose equivalents, is not a directly measurable quantity, it must be estimated with the assistance of computer modeling techniques and a knowledge of the radiation field. Although extreme accuracy is not necessary for radiation protection purposes, a few well-chosen measurements are required to confirm the theoretical models. Neutron measurements were performed in a RANDO phantom using thermoluminescent dosemeters, track etch dosemeters, and a 1/2-in. (1.27-cm) tissue equivalent proportional counter in order to estimate neutron doses and dose equivalents within the phantom at specific locations. The phantom was exposed to bare and D 2 O-moderated 252 Cf neutrons at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory's Low Scatter Facility. The Monte Carlo code MCNP with the MIRD-V mathematical phantom was used to model the human body and calculate organ doses and dose equivalents. The experimental methods are described and the results of the measurements are compared to the calculations. 8 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Neutron-photon mixed field dosimetry by TLD-700 glow curve analysis and its implementation in dose monitoring for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boggio, E. F.; Longhino, J. M. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Departamento de Fisica de Reactores y Radiaciones / CNEA, Av. E. Bustillo Km 9.5, R8402AGP San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Andres, P. A., E-mail: efboggio@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Division Proteccion Radiologica / CNEA, Av. E. Bustillo Km 9.5, R8402AGP San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina)

    2015-10-15

    BNCT is a cancerous cells selective, non-conventional radiotherapy modality to treat malignant tumors such as glioblastoma, melanoma and recurrent head and neck cancer. It consists of a two-step procedure: first, the patient is injected with a tumor localizing drug containing a non-radioactive isotope (Boron-10) with high slow neutron capture cross-section. In a second step, the patient is irradiated with neutrons, which are absorbed by the Boron-10 agent with the subsequently nuclear reaction B- 10(n,a)Li-7, thereby resulting in dose at cellular level due to the high-Let particles. The neutron fields suitable for BNCT are characterized by high neutron fluxes and low gamma dose. Determination of each component is not an easy task, especially when the volume of measurement is quite small or inaccessible for a miniature ionization chamber, for example. A method of measuring the photon and slow neutron dose(mainly by N-14 and B-10) from the glow curve (GC) analysis of a single {sup 7}LiF thermoluminescence detector is evaluated. This method was suggested by the group headed by Dr. Grazia Gambarini. The dosemeters used were TLD-600 ({sup 6}LiF:Mg,Ti with 95.6% {sup 6}Li) and TLD-700 ({sup 7}LiF:Mg,Ti with 99.9% {sup 7}LiF) from Harshaw. Photon dose measurement using the GC analysis method with TLD-700 in mixed fields requires the relation of the two main peaks of a TLD-600 GC shape obtained from an exposition to the same neutron field, and a photon calibrated GC with TLD-700. The requirements for slow neutron dose measurements are similar. In order to properly apply the GC analysis method at the Ra-6 Research Reactor BNCT facility, measurements were carried out in a standard water phantom, fully characterized on the BNCT beam by conventional techniques (activation detectors and paired ionization chambers technique). Next, the method was implemented in whole body dose monitoring of a patient undergoing a BNCT treatment, using a Bo MAb (Bottle Manikin Absorption) phantom

  8. Spectra and absorbed dose by photo-neutrons in a solid water mannequin exposed to a Linac of 15 MV; Espectros y dosis absorbida por fotoneutrones en un maniqui de agua solida expuesta a una Linac de 15 MV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benites R, J. [Centro Estatal de Cancerologia de Nayarit, Servicio de Seguridad Radiologica, Calz. de la Cruz 118 Sur, 63000 Tepic, Nayarit (Mexico); Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Apdo. Postal 336, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico); Velazquez F, J., E-mail: jlbenitesr@prodigy.net.mx [Universidad Autonoma de Nayarit, Posgrado en Ciencias Biologico Agropecuarias, Carretera Tepic-Compostela Km 9, 63780 Jalisco-Nayarit (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    Using Monte Carlo methods was modeled a solid water mannequin; according to the ICRU 44 (1989), Tissue substitutes in radiation dosimetry and measurements, of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements; Report 44. This material Wt 1 is made of H (8.1%), C (67.2%), N (2.4%), O (19.9%), Cl (0.1%), Ca (2.3%) and its density is of 1.02 gr/cm{sup 3}. The mannequin was put instead of the patient, inside the treatment room and the spectra and absorbed dose were determined by photo-neutrons exposed to a Linac of 15 MV. (Author)

  9. Monitor units are not predictive of neutron dose for high-energy IMRT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hälg Roger A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the substantial increase in beam-on time of high energy intensity-modulated radiotherapy (>10 MV techniques to deliver the same target dose compared to conventional treatment techniques, an increased dose of scatter radiation, including neutrons, is delivered to the patient. As a consequence, an increase in second malignancies may be expected in the future with the application of intensity-modulated radiotherapy. It is commonly assumed that the neutron dose equivalent scales with the number of monitor units. Methods Measurements of neutron dose equivalent were performed for an open and an intensity-modulated field at four positions: inside and outside of the treatment field at 0.2 cm and 15 cm depth, respectively. Results It was shown that the neutron dose equivalent, which a patient receives during an intensity-modulated radiotherapy treatment, does not scale with the ratio of applied monitor units relative to an open field irradiation. Outside the treatment volume at larger depth 35% less neutron dose equivalent is delivered than expected. Conclusions The predicted increase of second cancer induction rates from intensity-modulated treatment techniques can be overestimated when the neutron dose is simply scaled with monitor units.

  10. Comparision between the IAEA's protocols (TRS-277 and TRS-398) for absorbed dose determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bero, M.; Anjak, O.

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this study is to compare between two IAEA's Protocols [IAEA-TRS-277 (1987) and IAEA-TRS-398 (2000)] for Absorbed Dose Determination. Five types (5 Chamber) of commonly used cylindrical ionization chambers (Farmer type, 0.6 cc) were used to check the difference in absorbed dose to water determination for Co-60 beams under reference condition. TLD dosimeter was also used for inter-comparison with IAEA's SSDL. The mean values of the measured absorbed dose were found to be similar in both cases and the relative error D (TRS-398)/D (TRS-277) is found to be approximately less than 0.5% for all chambers used in this study.(authors)

  11. Uncertainty analysis in the determination of absorbed dose in water by Fricke chemical dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos, Fabia; Aguirre, Eder Aguirre

    2016-01-01

    This work studies the calculations of uncertainties and the level of confidence that involves the process for obtaining the dose absorbed in water using the method of Fricke dosimetry, developed at Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas (LCR). Measurements of absorbance of samples Fricke, irradiated and non-irradiated is going to use in order to calculate the respective sensitivity coefficients, along with the expressions of the calculation of Fricke dose and the absorbed dose in water. Those expressions are used for calculating the others sensitivity coefficients from the input variable. It is going to use the combined uncertainty and the expanded uncertainty, with a level of confidence of 95.45%, in order to report the uncertainties of the measurement. (author)

  12. Neutron dose and energy spectra measurements at Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Soldat, K.L.; Haggard, D.L.; Faust, L.G.; Tomeraasen, P.L.

    1987-08-01

    Because some workers have a high potential for significant neutron exposure, the Savannah River Plant (SRP) contracted with Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to verify the accuracy of neutron dosimetry at the plant. Energy spectrum and neutron dose measurements were made at the SRP calibrations laboratory and at several other locations. The energy spectra measurements were made using multisphere or Bonner sphere spectrometers, 3 He spectrometers, and NE-213 liquid scintillator spectrometers. Neutron dose equivalent determinations were made using these instruments and others specifically designed to determine dose equivalent, such as the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC). Survey instruments, such as the Eberline PNR-4, and the thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD)-albedo and track etch dosimeters (TEDs) were also used. The TEPC, subjectively judged to provide the most accurate estimation of true dose equivalent, was used as the reference for comparison with other devices. 29 refs., 43 figs., 13 tabs

  13. Neutron dosimetric measurements in shuttle and MIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitz, G.

    2001-01-01

    Detector packages consisting of thermoluminescence detectors (TLD), nuclear emulsions and plastic track detectors were exposed at identical positions inside MIR space station and on shuttle flights inside Spacelab and Spacehab during different phases of the solar cycle. The objectives of the investigations are to provide data on charge and energy spectra of heavy ions, and the contribution of events with low-energy deposit (protons, electrons, gamma, etc.) to the dose, as well as the contribution of secondaries, such as nuclear disintegration stars and neutrons. For neutron dosimetry 6 LiF (TLD600) and 7 LiF (TLD700) chips were used both of which have almost the same response to gamma rays but different response to neutrons. Neutrons in space are produced mainly in evaporation and knock-on processes with energies mainly of 1-10 MeV and up to several 100 MeV, respectively. The energy spectrum undergoes continuous changes toward greater depth in the attenuating material until an equilibrium is reached. In equilibrium, the spectrum is a wide continuum extending down to thermal energies to which the 6 LiF is sensitive. Based on the difference of absorbed doses in the 6 LiF and 7 LiF chips, thermal neutron fluxes from 1 to 2.3 cm -2 s -1 are calculated using the assumption that the maximum induced dose in TLD600 for 1 neutron cm -2 is 1.6x10 -10 Gy (Horrowitz and Freeman, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. 157 (1978) 393). It is assumed that the flux of high-energy neutrons is at least of that quantity. Tissue doses were calculated taking as a mean ambient absorbed dose per neutron 6x10 -12 Gy cm 2 (for a 10 MeV neutron). The neutron equivalent doses for the above-mentioned fluxes are 52 μGy d -1 and 120 μGy d -1 . In recent experiments, a personal neutron dosimeter was integrated into the dosimeter packages. First results of this dosimeter which is based on nuclear track detectors with converter foils are reported. For future measurements, a scintillator counter with

  14. Study on the dose distribution of the mixed field with thermal and epi-thermal neutrons for neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Tooru; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kanda, Keiji

    1994-01-01

    Simulation calculations using DOT 3.5 were carried out in order to confirm the characteristics of depth-dependent dose distribution in water phantom dependent on incident neutron energy. The epithermal neutrons mixed to thermal neutron field is effective improving the thermal neutron depth-dose distribution for neutron capture therapy. A feasibility study on the neutron energy spectrum shifter was performed using ANISN-JR for the KUR Heavy Water Facility. The design of the neutron spectrum shifter is feasible, without reducing the performance as a thermal neutron irradiation field. (author)

  15. Dose-response relationship of dicentric chromosomes in human lymphocytes obtained for the fission neutron therapy facility MEDAPP at the research reactor FRM II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, E; Wagner, F M; Romm, H; Walsh, L; Roos, H

    2009-02-01

    The biological effectiveness of neutrons from the neutron therapy facility MEDAPP (mean neutron energy 1.9 MeV) at the new research reactor FRM II at Garching, Germany, has been analyzed, at different depths in a polyethylene phantom. Whole blood samples were exposed to the MEDAPP beam in special irradiation chambers to total doses of 0.14-3.52 Gy at 2-cm depth, and 0.18-3.04 Gy at 6-cm depth of the phantom. The neutron and gamma-ray absorbed dose rates were measured to be 0.55 Gy min(-1) and 0.27 Gy min(-1) at 2-cm depth, while they were 0.28 and 0.25 Gy min(-1) at 6-cm depth. Although the irradiation conditions at the MEDAPP beam and the RENT beam of the former FRM I research reactor were not identical, neutrons from both facilities gave a similar linear-quadratic dose-response relationship for dicentric chromosomes at a depth of 2 cm. Different dose-response curves for dicentrics were obtained for the MEDAPP beam at 2 and 6 cm depth, suggesting a significantly lower biological effectiveness of the radiation with increasing depth. No obvious differences in the dose-response curves for dicentric chromosomes estimated under interactive or additive prediction between neutrons or gamma-rays and the experimentally obtained dose-response curves could be determined. Relative to (60)Co gamma-rays, the values for the relative biological effectiveness at the MEDAPP beam decrease from 5.9 at 0.14 Gy to 1.6 at 3.52 Gy at 2-cm depth, and from 4.1 at 0.18 Gy to 1.5 at 3.04 Gy at 6-cm depth. Using the best possible conditions of consistency, i.e., using blood samples from the same donor and the same measurement techniques for about two decades, avoiding the inter-individual variations in sensitivity or the differences in methodology usually associated with inter-laboratory comparisons, a linear-quadratic dose-response relationship for the mixed neutron and gamma-ray MEDAPP field as well as for its fission neutron part was obtained. Therefore, the debate on whether the fission-neutron

  16. Experimental studies on absorbed dose in radiation sterilization of pharmaceutical preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Tokuhiro; Okamoto, Shinichi; Kimura, Syojiro; Taimatsu, Meiko.

    1991-01-01

    For radiation sterilization, it is necessary to decide the irradiation conditions considering a balance between sterilization efficiency and chemical changes of samples by irradiation. These effects may be estimated by the product of two factors (D 10 and G value) and absorbed dose. In this work, it has been found experimentally by using Fricke dosimeter that the absorbed doses of the samples in vessels different in size, material, volume, etc. are not equal under the same gamma-ray irradiation condition. The correction factor from exposure to absorbed dose was estimated to be 6-7% for organic vessels (a polyethylene bag and a polystyrene vial) and a 20-ml glass vial, 9% for a 10-ml glass vial, and 10% for the 5-ml glass vial. These values of the correction factor were confirmed by using the changes of enzymic activity of saccharated powder pepsin preparation. In the cases of using organic vessels and the 10-ml glass vial, G-values for the change of the enzymic activity were calculated to show similar values in the range from 0.79 to 0.82. However, in the case of a small glass vial (5-ml), the value was 0.93. (author)

  17. Development of Real-Time Measurement of Effective Dose for High Dose Rate Neutron Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braby, L. A.; Reece, W. D.; Hsu, W. H.

    2003-01-01

    Studies of the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation require sources of radiation which are well characterized in terms of the dose and the quality of the radiation. One of the best measures of the quality of neutron irradiation is the dose mean lineal energy. At very low dose rates this can be determined by measuring individual energy deposition events, and calculating the dose mean of the event size. However, at the dose rates that are normally required for biology experiments, the individual events can not be separated by radiation detectors. However, the total energy deposited in a specified time interval can be measured. This total energy has a random variation which depends on the size of the individual events, so the dose mean lineal energy can be calculated from the variance of repeated measurements of the energy deposited in a fixed time. We have developed a specialized charge integration circuit for the measurement of the charge produced in a small ion chamber in typical neutron irradiation experiments. We have also developed 4.3 mm diameter ion chambers with both tissue equivalent and carbon walls for the purpose of measuring dose mean lineal energy due to all radiations and due to all radiations except neutrons, respectively. By adjusting the gas pressure in the ion chamber, it can be made to simulate tissue volumes from a few nanometers to a few millimeters in diameter. The charge is integrated for 0.1 seconds, and the resulting pulse height is recorded by a multi channel analyzer. The system has been used in a variety of photon and neutron radiation fields, and measured values of dose and dose mean lineal energy are consistent with values extrapolated from measurements made by other techniques at much lower dose rates. It is expected that this technique will prove to be much more reliable than extrapolations from measurements made at low dose rates because these low dose rate exposures generally do not accurately reproduce the attenuation and

  18. Estimation dose of secondary neutrons in proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, T.

    2014-01-01

    Most of proton therapy centers for cancer treatment are still based on the passive scattering, in some of them there is system of the active scanning installed as well. The aim of this study is to compare secondary neutron doses in and around target volumes in proton therapy for both treatment techniques and for different energies and profile of incident proton beam. The proton induced neutrons have been simulated in the very simple geometry of tissue equivalent phantom (imitate the patient) and scattering and scanning nozzle, respectively. In simulations of the scattering nozzle, different types of scattering filters and brass collimators have been used as well. 3D map of neutron doses in and around the chosen/potential target volume in the phantom/patient have been evaluated and compared in the context of the dose deposited in the target volume. Finally, the simulation results have been compared with published data. (author)

  19. BH3105 type neutron dose equivalent meter of high sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Changsong; Zhang Enshan; Yang Jianfeng; Zhang Hong; Huang Jiling

    1995-10-01

    It is noted that to design a neutron dose meter of high sensitivity is almost impossible in the frame of traditional designing principle--'absorption net principle'. Based on a newly proposed principle of obtaining neutron dose equi-biological effect adjustment--' absorption stick principle', a brand-new neutron dose-equivalent meter with high neutron sensitivity BH3105 has been developed. Its sensitivity reaches 10 cps/(μSv·h -1 ), which is 18∼40 times higher than one of foreign products of the same kind and is 10 4 times higher than that of domestic FJ342 neutron rem-meter. BH3105 has a measurement range from 0.1μSv/h to 1 Sv/h which is 1 or 2 orders wider than that of the other's. It has the advanced properties of gamma-resistance, energy response, orientation, etc. (6 tabs., 5 figs.)

  20. Neutron doses to personnel from a 24 MeV betatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckham, W.A; Entwistle, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    Neutrons are produced by bombardment of most materials by high-energy photons. Because the x-ray shielding around high-energy x-ray generators may not have been designed with neutrons in mind there may be unexpected contributions to the radiation doses of staff working in the immediate vicinity. Neutron fluxes in the working area close to an Allis-Chalmers 24 MeV betatron have been measured using a lithium-6-loaded scintillator and the dose rates calculated. Hazard of staff has been found to be low; typical dose-equivalent rates in occupied areas range from 0.0042 to 0.012 mrem/hour. The flux of fast neutrons in the treatment room was found to be essentially zero. Measurements of neutron flux may be routinely performed using the scintillation detector (NE 912) described, and could usefully form part of the acceptance protocol for any new accelerator

  1. Neutron Dose Measurement Using a Cubic Moderator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheinfeld, M.; Mazor, T.; Cohen, Y.; Kadmon, Y.; Orion, I.

    2014-01-01

    The Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (BSS), introduced In July 1960 by a research group from Rice University, Texas, is a major approach to neutron spectrum estimation. The BSS, also known as multi-sphere spectrometer, consists of a set of a different diameters polyethylene spheres, carrying a small LiI(Eu) scintillator in their center. What makes this spectrometry method such widely used, is its almost isotropic response, covering an extraordinary wide range of energies, from thermal up to even hundreds of MeVs. One of the most interesting and useful consequences of the above study is the 12'' sphere characteristics, as it turned out that the response curve of its energy dependence, have a similar shape compared with the neutron's dose equivalent as a function of energy. This inexplicable and happy circumstance makes it virtually the only monitoring device capable providing realistic neutron dose estimates over such a wide energy range. However, since the detection mechanism is not strictly related to radiation dose, one can expect substantial errors when applied to widely different source conditions. Although the original design of the BSS included a small 4mmx4mmO 6LiI(Eu) scintillator, other thermal neutron detectors has been used over the years: track detectors, activation foils, BF3 filled proportional counters, etc. In this study we chose a Boron loaded scintillator, EJ-254, as the thermal neutron detector. The neutron capture reaction on the boron has a Q value of 2.78 MeV of which 2.34 MeV is shared by the alpha and lithium particles. The high manufacturing costs, the encasement issue, the installation efficiency and the fabrication complexity, led us to the idea of replacing the sphere with a cubic moderator. This article describes the considerations, as well as the Monte-Carlo simulations done in order to examine the applicability of this idea

  2. Process and device for identifying nuclear reactor neutron absorber rod etancheity defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelletier, J.; Parrat, D.

    1990-01-01

    For identifying defects in the sealing of neutron absorbing rods. The rod is placed in a pressure tight enclosure filled with a chemically agressive solution. After a time the pressure is released to allow the solution come out of the rod. An analysis of the solution allows the detection of radioactive isotopes of metals which are in the rod [fr

  3. Effects of body and organ size on absorbed dose: there is no standard patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poston, J.W.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of estimating the absorbed dose to organs and tissues of the human body due to the presence of a radiopharmaceutical in one or more organs is discussed. Complications are introduced by the fact that the body is not homogeneous and in many cases the organ shapes are not regular. Publications of the MIRD Committee have provided a direct means of estimating the absorbed dose (or absorbed fraction) for a number of radioisotopes. These estimates are based on Monte Carlo calculations for monoenergetic photons distributed uniformly in organs of an adult phantom. The medical physicist finds that his patient does not resemble the adult phantom. In addition, the absorbed fractions for the adult are not reasonable values for the child. This paper examines how these absorbed fraction estimates apply to a nonstandard patient

  4. Estimate of the damage in organs induced by neutrons in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benites R, J. L.; Vega C, H. R.; Uribe, M. del R.

    2014-08-01

    By means of Monte Carlo methods was considered the damage in the organs, induced by neutrons, of patients with cancer that receive treatment in modality of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) with lineal accelerator Varian Ix. The objective of this work was to estimate the damage probability in radiotherapy patients, starting from the effective dose by neutrons in the organs and tissues out of the treatment region. For that a three-dimensional mannequin of equivalent tissue of 30 x 100 x 30 cm 3 was modeled and spherical cells were distributed to estimate the Kerma in equivalent tissue and the absorbed dose by neutrons. With the absorbed dose the effective dose was calculated using the weighting factors for the organ type and radiation type. With the effective dose and the damage factors, considered in the ICRP 103, was considered the probability of damage induction in organs. (Author)

  5. In-phantom measurement of absorbed dose to water in medium energy x-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohlfeld, K.

    1996-01-01

    Absorbed dose values in a water phantom derived by the formalism of the IAEA Code of Practice of Absorbed Dose Determination in Photon and Electron Beams are a few per cent higher than those based on the procedure following e.g. ICRU Report 23. The maximum deviation exceeds 10% at 100 kV tube potential. The correction factor needed to take into account the differences at the calibration in terms of air kerma free in air and at the measurement in the water phantom can be determined in different ways: In comparing the result of the absorbed dose measurement by means of the ionization chambers with an other, preferably fundamental method of measurement of absorbed dose in the water phantom or by evaluating all component parts of the correction factor separately. The values of the perturbation correction factor in the IAEA Code were determined in the former way by comparing against a graphite extrapolation chamber. A review is given on a recent re-evaluation using former values of the extrapolation chamber measurements and on new determinations using an absorbed dose water calorimeter, a method based on calculated and measured air kerma values and a method of combining the component factors to the overall correction factor. Recent results achieved by the different methods are compared and a change of the data of the IAEA Code is recommended. (author). 31 refs, 14 figs, 3 tabs

  6. Assessment of absorbed dose rate from terrestrial gamma radiation in Red Sea State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdalrahman, H. E. K.

    2012-09-01

    This study is primarily conducted to contribute in the overall strategic objective of producing Sudan radiation map which will include natural radiation levels and the resultant absorbed dose rate in air. The part covered by this study is the Red Sea State. Soil samples were collected from locations lie between latitudes 17.03 ° and the 20.18 ° N and longitudes 36.06 ° E during September 2007. Activity concentrations of the primordial radionuclides, 226 Ra, 232 Th, and 40 K in the samples were measured using gamma-ray spectrometry equipped with Nal (Tl) detector. Absorbed dose rates in air a height of 1 from the ground level and the corresponding annual effective doses were calculated from the measured activities using Dose Rate Conversion Factors (DRCFs). On the average, the activity concentrations were 19.22±13.13 Bq kg -1 ( 232 Th), 17.91±15.44 Bq kg -1 ( 226 Ra) and (507.13±161.67) Bq kg -1 for 40 K. The obtained results were found to be within the global values reported in the UNSCEAR publication for normal background areas with the exception of the samples taken from Arbaat area. The absorbed dose rate in air as calculated using UNSCEAR conversion factor averaged 40.93 n Gy h -1 which corresponds to annual effective dose of 50.23 μSvy -1 . The major contribution to the total absorbed dose rate comes from 40 K, which amounts to 53.36%. Using Geographical Information System (GIS), predication maps for activity concentrations levels of the measured radionuclides in the Red Sea state was prepared to show their respective spatial distributions. Similarly, GIS predictive map was produced for annual effective dose.(Author)

  7. Neutron absorbing article and method for manufacture of such article

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMurty, C.H.; Naum, R.G.; Owens, D.P.; Hortman, M.T.

    1981-01-01

    A neutron absorbing article is described which comprises boron carbide particles and an irreversibly-cured phenol aldehyde condensation polymer cured to a continuous matrix about the boron carbide particles. Such an article may be used in spent fuel storage racks. It can be manufactured by mixing together a curable phenolic resin with boron carbide particles, compacting the mixture to an article of desired shape, curing the resin at an elevated temperature, impregnating the cured article with curable phenolic resin in liquid state, and curing the article again

  8. Fabrication and characterization of dysprosia and alumina based inert matrix neutron absorbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D Ovidio, C.; Oliber, E.; Leiva, S.; Malachevsky, M. T; Taboada, H

    2009-01-01

    Among the elements of the lanthanides series, dysprosium has interesting nuclear properties. Its high thermal neutron absorption cross-section makes it a good neutron absorber. The best ceramic compound apt for nuclear use is its oxide, the disprosia (Dy 2 O 3 ). In order to fabricate neutron absorbers diluted in an inert matrix, it is relevant to study the preparation of a ceramic compound based on alumina (Al 2 O 3 ) and disprosia. In this work, we characterize a particular composition (44,5wt% Dy 2 O 3 , 55,5wt% Al 2 O 3 ) by determining the geometrical density, microstructure and phase formation. The chosen composition corresponds to the lowest temperature eutectic of the alumina-disprosia system, allowing the sintering to proceed at 1700 oC in air. Comparing the data of the green and sinterized pellets, the relative shrinking is of about 17 %, in the same proportion both for diameter and length. The corresponding volumetric reduction is of about 43 %, indicating an increase of the relative geometric density of ∼ 70 %. X-ray diffraction analysis shows the existence of two phases corresponding to the lower eutectic: Dy 3 Al 5 O 1 2 and Al 2 O 3 . The calculated theoretical density is ∼ 5.2 g/cm3. Consequently, the relative density of the pellets is 92 %, indicating the feasibility for the fabrication of the proposed material. In a near future, samples will be irradiated to evaluate their behavior for nuclear use. [es

  9. The development of BH3105E type neutron dose-equivalent meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Changsong; Wang Tingting; Zhang Shuheng; Tan Baozeng

    2011-01-01

    A new BH3105E Type Neutron Dose-equivalent Meter has been developed. The 'multi-stick' ab- sorption method is used for thermal -14 MeV neutron equal dose-equivalent detection, what gives a high neutron sensitivity of 5 cps/μSv · h-1. RS-232 interface is accepted for signal communication (authors)

  10. ''Nonisolated-sensor'' solid polystyrene absorbed dose measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeitz, L.; Laughlin, J.S.

    1982-01-01

    A ''nonisolated-sensor'' solid polystyrene calorimeter was constructed to test the role of thermal diffusion in limiting the length of irradiation time during which temperature measurements with nonisolated sensors could be made sufficiently free of drift for determining dose with radiation fields such as gamma rays, x rays, and high-energy electrons. From measured ratios of dose at 5.0 and 0.5 cm in polystyrene and comparisons to dose measurements with a polystyrene parallel-plate (pancake) ion chamber, it was shown that thermal diffusion is sufficiently small in polystyrene to permit accurate measurements for irradiation periods of less than 20 min. Comparison of the absorbed dose measurements and depth dose ratios with pancake ion chambers and calorimeter showed, that within the precision and accuracy of the two measuring systems, there is close agreement. The nonisolated-sensor solid polystyrene calorimeter has the interesting features of (i) simplicity of construction, (ii) simplicity of operation without vacuum or feedback for temperature control, (iii) capability of simultaneous measurements at several depths and off-axis positions, (iv) the very small thermal defect correction with polystyrene, and (v) operation with the calorimeter in any orientation

  11. Nonisolated-sensor solid polystyrene absorbed dose measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeitz, L.; Laughlin, J.S.

    1982-01-01

    A nonisolated-sensor solid polystyrene calorimeter was constructed to test the role of thermal diffusion in limiting the length of irradiation time during which temperature measurements with nonisolated sensors could be made sufficiently free of drift for determining dose with radiation fields such as gamma rays, x rays, and high-energy electrons. From measured ratios of dose at 5.0 and 0.5 cm in polystyrene and comparisons to dose measurements with a polystyrene parallel-plate (pancake) ion chamber, it was shown that thermal diffusion is sufficiently small in polystyrene to permit accurate measurements for irradiation periods of less than 20 min. Comparison of the absorbed dose measurements and depth dose ratios with pancake ion chambers and calorimeter showed, that within the precision and accuracy of the two measuring systems, there is close agreement. The nonisolated-sensor solid polystyrene calorimeter has the interesting features of (i) simplicity of construction, (ii) simplicity of operation without vacuum or feedback for temperature control, (iii) capability of simultaneous measurements at several depths and off-axis positions, (iv) the very small thermal defect correction with polystyrene, and (v) operation with the calorimeter in any orientation

  12. Results of neutron dose measurements at the Rossendorf research reactors taking the actual neutron spectra into account

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimpler, A.; Kneschke, H.

    1985-01-01

    Based on a systematic evaluation of area dose studies at the beginning of the seventies, no individual routine neutron monitoring has been performed at the Rossendorf research reactors. To check this decision, a limited number of persons has been monitored with solid-state nuclear track detectors for several years. The dosemeters were calibrated on the basis of neutron spectra determined at the working places by means of the Bonner sphere method. Intermediate neutrons with a 1/E/sup α/ Fermi distribution were dominating. The fraction of fast neutrons was practically negligible. The obtained spectra, radiation, field quantities and results of individual dose measurements are presented. The dosemeter most appropriate for such neutron fields would be a 12-inch Bonner sphere rem counter. As the mean annual neutron exposure of research workers at the reactor amounted to only 2% of the maximum permissible dose, individual routine monitoring will, also in the future, not be neccessary. (author)

  13. Evaluation of absorbed dose-distribution in the X-ray or gamma-irradiator for blood products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriyama, Satoshi; Kurihara, Katsuhiko; Yokokawa, Nobuhiko; Satake, Masahiro; Juji, Takeo

    2001-01-01

    Irradiation of blood products abrogates the proliferation of lymphocytes present in cellular component, which is currently the only accepted methodology to prevent transfusion-associated graft versus host disease (TA-GVHD). A range of irradiation dose levels between 15 Gy and 50 Gy is being used, but the majority of facilities are employing 15 Gy. It should, however, be recognized that the delivered dose in the instrument canister might differ from the actual dose absorbed by the blood bag. This study have evaluated the actual dose distribution under practical conditions where a container was loaded with blood products or water bags, or filled with distilled water. This approach provides data that the maximum attenuation occurred when the container was completely filled with a blood-compatible material. Thus, an error of approximately 20 percent should be considered in the dose measured in the in-air condition. A dose calibration in an in-air condition may lead to substantial underexposure of the blood products. A dose distribution study using adequately prearranged exposure period verified that the absorbed dose of 15 Gy was attained at any point in the container for both linear accelerator and gamma-irradiator. The maximal difference in the absorbed dose between measured points was 1.5- and 1.6-fold for linear accelerator and gamma-irradiator, respectively. In conclusion, using blood-compatible materials, a careful dose calibration study should be employed in which the absorbed dose of 15 Gy is obtained at the point where the lowest dose could be expected. (author)

  14. System for determining absorbed dose and its distribution for high-energy electron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegewald, H.; Wulff, W.

    1977-01-01

    Taking into account the polarization effect, the dose determination for high-energy electron radiation from particle accelerators depends on the knowledge of the energy dependence of the mass stopping power. Results obtained with thermoluminescent dosemeters agree with theoretical values. For absorbed dose measurements the primary energy of electron radiation has been determined by nuclear photoreactions, and the calculation of the absorbed dose from charge measurements by means of the mass stopping power is described. Thus the calibration of ionization chambers for high-energy electron radiation by absolute measurements with the Faraday cage and chemical dosemeters has become possible. (author)

  15. Neutron absorbers and detector types for spent fuel verification using the self-interrogation neutron resonance densitometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossa, Riccardo; Borella, Alessandro; Labeau, Pierre-Etienne; Pauly, Nicolas; Meer, Klaas van der

    2015-01-01

    The Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) is a passive non-destructive assay (NDA) technique that is proposed for the direct measurement of 239 Pu in a spent fuel assembly. The insertion of neutron detectors wrapped with different neutron absorbing materials, or neutron filters, in the central guide tube of a PWR fuel assembly is envisaged to measure the neutron flux in the energy region close to the 0.3 eV resonance of 239 Pu. In addition, the measurement of the fast neutron flux is foreseen. This paper is focused on the determination of the Gd and Cd neutron filters thickness to maximize the detection of neutrons within the resonance region. Moreover, several detector types are compared to identify the optimal condition and to assess the expected total neutron counts that can be obtained with the SINRD measurements. Results from Monte Carlo simulations showed that ranges between 0.1–0.3 mm and 0.5–1.0 mm ensure the optimal conditions for the Gd and Cd filters, respectively. Moreover, a 239 Pu fission chamber is better suited to measure neutrons close to the 0.3 eV resonance and it has the highest sensitivity to 239 Pu, in comparison with a 235 U fission chamber, with a 3 He proportional counter, and with a 10 B proportional counter. The use of a thin Gd filter and a thick Cd filter is suggested for the 239 Pu and 235 U fission chambers to increase the total counts achieved in a measurement, while a thick Gd filter and a thin Cd filter are envisaged for the 3 He and 10 B proportional counters to increase the sensitivity to 239 Pu. We concluded that an optimization process that takes into account measurement time, filters thickness, and detector size is needed to develop a SINRD detector that can meet the requirement for an efficient verification of spent fuel assemblies

  16. Neutron absorbers and detector types for spent fuel verification using the self-interrogation neutron resonance densitometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossa, Riccardo, E-mail: rrossa@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang, 200, B2400 Mol (Belgium); Université libre de Bruxelles, Ecole polytechnique de Bruxelles, Service de Métrologie Nucléaire (CP 165/84), Avenue F.D. Roosevelt, 50, B1050 Brussels (Belgium); Borella, Alessandro, E-mail: aborella@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang, 200, B2400 Mol (Belgium); Labeau, Pierre-Etienne, E-mail: pelabeau@ulb.ac.be [Université libre de Bruxelles, Ecole polytechnique de Bruxelles, Service de Métrologie Nucléaire (CP 165/84), Avenue F.D. Roosevelt, 50, B1050 Brussels (Belgium); Pauly, Nicolas, E-mail: nipauly@ulb.ac.be [Université libre de Bruxelles, Ecole polytechnique de Bruxelles, Service de Métrologie Nucléaire (CP 165/84), Avenue F.D. Roosevelt, 50, B1050 Brussels (Belgium); Meer, Klaas van der, E-mail: kvdmeer@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang, 200, B2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2015-08-11

    The Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) is a passive non-destructive assay (NDA) technique that is proposed for the direct measurement of {sup 239}Pu in a spent fuel assembly. The insertion of neutron detectors wrapped with different neutron absorbing materials, or neutron filters, in the central guide tube of a PWR fuel assembly is envisaged to measure the neutron flux in the energy region close to the 0.3 eV resonance of {sup 239}Pu. In addition, the measurement of the fast neutron flux is foreseen. This paper is focused on the determination of the Gd and Cd neutron filters thickness to maximize the detection of neutrons within the resonance region. Moreover, several detector types are compared to identify the optimal condition and to assess the expected total neutron counts that can be obtained with the SINRD measurements. Results from Monte Carlo simulations showed that ranges between 0.1–0.3 mm and 0.5–1.0 mm ensure the optimal conditions for the Gd and Cd filters, respectively. Moreover, a {sup 239}Pu fission chamber is better suited to measure neutrons close to the 0.3 eV resonance and it has the highest sensitivity to {sup 239}Pu, in comparison with a {sup 235}U fission chamber, with a {sup 3}He proportional counter, and with a {sup 10}B proportional counter. The use of a thin Gd filter and a thick Cd filter is suggested for the {sup 239}Pu and {sup 235}U fission chambers to increase the total counts achieved in a measurement, while a thick Gd filter and a thin Cd filter are envisaged for the {sup 3}He and {sup 10}B proportional counters to increase the sensitivity to {sup 239}Pu. We concluded that an optimization process that takes into account measurement time, filters thickness, and detector size is needed to develop a SINRD detector that can meet the requirement for an efficient verification of spent fuel assemblies.

  17. Contribution to the development of a primary standard for high energy neutron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mancaux, M.

    1983-12-01

    A tissue equivalent calorimeter, made of Shonka A-150 plastic, has been constructed in order to create a primary standard for high energy neutrons and to establish a calibration procedure for ionization chambers used in neutrontherapy. After a detailed description of the calorimeter and the associated measuring system, the preliminary tests are presented, in particular, the evolution of the response as a function of accumulated dose. The measurements of the total absorbed dose (n + γ) by calorimetry in a neutron beam, in order to determine chambers' calibration factors in terms of absorbed dose to A-150 plastic, have been performed at the Neutrontherapy Unit of the Centre Hospitalier Regional d'Orleans. The uncertainty in the determination of the total absorbed dose to the tissu equivalent material using the new procedure is 3% lower than that obtained with the usual procedure, derived from an exposure calibration [fr

  18. Review of reconstruction of radiation incident air kerma by measurement of absorbed dose in tooth enamel with EPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieser, A.

    2012-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry with tooth enamel has been proved to be a reliable method to determine retrospectively exposures from photon fields with minimal detectable doses of 100 mGy or lower, which is lower than achievable with cytogenetic dose reconstruction methods. For risk assessment or validating dosimetry systems for specific radiation incidents, the relevant dose from the incident has to be calculated from the total absorbed dose in enamel by subtracting additional dose contributions from the radionuclide content in teeth, natural external background radiation and medical exposures. For calculating organ doses or evaluating dosimetry systems the absorbed dose in enamel from a radiation incident has to be converted to air kerma using dose conversion factors depending on the photon energy spectrum and geometry of the exposure scenario. This paper outlines the approach to assess individual dose contributions to absorbed dose in enamel and calculate individual air kerma of a radiation incident from the absorbed dose in tooth enamel. (author)

  19. Review of reconstruction of radiation incident air kerma by measurement of absorbed dose in tooth enamel with EPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, A

    2012-03-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry with tooth enamel has been proved to be a reliable method to determine retrospectively exposures from photon fields with minimal detectable doses of 100 mGy or lower, which is lower than achievable with cytogenetic dose reconstruction methods. For risk assessment or validating dosimetry systems for specific radiation incidents, the relevant dose from the incident has to be calculated from the total absorbed dose in enamel by subtracting additional dose contributions from the radionuclide content in teeth, natural external background radiation and medical exposures. For calculating organ doses or evaluating dosimetry systems the absorbed dose in enamel from a radiation incident has to be converted to air kerma using dose conversion factors depending on the photon energy spectrum and geometry of the exposure scenario. This paper outlines the approach to assess individual dose contributions to absorbed dose in enamel and calculate individual air kerma of a radiation incident from the absorbed dose in tooth enamel.

  20. Estimation of human absorbed dose for (166)Ho-PAM: comparison with (166)Ho-DOTMP and (166)Ho-TTHMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaez-Tehrani, Mahdokht; Zolghadri, Samaneh; Yousefnia, Hassan; Afarideh, Hossein

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the human absorbed dose of holmium-166 ((166)Ho)-pamidronate (PAM) as a potential agent for the management of multiple myeloma was estimated. (166)Ho-PAM complex was prepared at optimized conditions and injected into the rats. The equivalent and effective absorbed doses to human organs after injection of the complex were estimated by radiation-absorbed dose assessment resource and methods proposed by Sparks et al based on rat data. The red marrow to other organ absorbed dose ratios were compared with these data for (166)Ho-DOTMP, as the only clinically used (166)Ho bone marrow ablative agent, and (166)Ho-TTHMP. The highest absorbed dose amounts are observed in the bone surface and bone marrow with 1.11 and 0.903 mGy MBq(-1), respectively. Most other organs would receive approximately insignificant absorbed dose. While (166)Ho-PAM demonstrated a higher red marrow to total body absorbed dose ratio than (166)Ho-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclo dodecane-1,4,7,10 tetra ethylene phosphonic acid (DOTMP) and (166)Ho-triethylene tetramine hexa (methylene phosphonic acid) (TTHMP), the red marrow to most organ absorbed dose ratios for (166)Ho-TTHMP and (166)Ho-PAM are much higher than the ratios for (166)Ho-DOTMP. The result showed that (166)Ho-PAM has significant characteristics than (166)Ho-DOTMP and therefore, this complex can be considered as a good agent for bone marrow ablative therapy. In this work, two separate points have been investigated: (1) human absorbed dose of (166)Ho-PAM, as a potential bone marrow ablative agent, has been estimated; and (2) the complex has been compared with (166)Ho-DOTMP, as the only clinically used bone marrow ablative radiopharmaceutical, showing significant characteristics.

  1. Multilayer detector for measuring absorbed dose in skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osanov, D.P.; Panova, V.P.; Shaks, A.I.

    1985-01-01

    A method of skin dosimetry using multilayer dosimeters is described that allows the skin-depth distribution of absorbed dose to be estimated. A method of quantitative estimation and prediction of the degree of skin radiation damage using a three-layer dosimeter is demonstrated. Dosimeters are holders of tissue-equivalent material that contain photographic film, a scintillator, thermoluminophor, or any other radiation-sensitive element

  2. Estimating the Absorbed Dose to Critical Organs During Dual X-ray Absorptiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtari-Dizaji, M.; Sharafi, A. A.; Larijani, B.; Mokhlesian, N.; Hasanzadeh, H. [Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    Objective : The purpose of this study is to estimate a patient's organ dose (effective dose) during performance of dual X-ray absorptiometry by using the correlations derived from the surface dose and the depth doses in an anthropomorphic phantom. Materials and Methods : An anthropomorphic phantom was designed and TLDs (Thermoluminescent Dosimeters) were placed at the surface and these were also inserted at different depths of the thyroid and uterus of the anthropomorphic phantom. The absorbed doses were measured on the phantom for the spine and femur scan modes. The correlation coefficients and regression functions between the absorbed surface dose and the depth dose were determined. The derived correlation was then applied for 40 women patients to estimate the depth doses to the thyroid and uterus. Result : There was a correlation between the surface dose and depth dose of the thyroid and uterus in both scan modes. For the women's dosimetry, the average surface doses of the thyroid and uterus were 1.88 {mu}Gy and 1.81 Gy, respectively. Also, the scan center dose in the women was 5.70 Gy. There was correlation between the thyroid and uterus surface doses, and the scan center dose. Conclusion : We concluded that the effective dose to the patient's critical organs during dual X-ray absorptiometry can be estimated by the correlation derived from phantom dosimetry.

  3. Estimating the Absorbed Dose to Critical Organs During Dual X-ray Absorptiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhtari-Dizaji, M.; Sharafi, A. A.; Larijani, B.; Mokhlesian, N.; Hasanzadeh, H.

    2008-01-01

    Objective : The purpose of this study is to estimate a patient's organ dose (effective dose) during performance of dual X-ray absorptiometry by using the correlations derived from the surface dose and the depth doses in an anthropomorphic phantom. Materials and Methods : An anthropomorphic phantom was designed and TLDs (Thermoluminescent Dosimeters) were placed at the surface and these were also inserted at different depths of the thyroid and uterus of the anthropomorphic phantom. The absorbed doses were measured on the phantom for the spine and femur scan modes. The correlation coefficients and regression functions between the absorbed surface dose and the depth dose were determined. The derived correlation was then applied for 40 women patients to estimate the depth doses to the thyroid and uterus. Result : There was a correlation between the surface dose and depth dose of the thyroid and uterus in both scan modes. For the women's dosimetry, the average surface doses of the thyroid and uterus were 1.88 μGy and 1.81 Gy, respectively. Also, the scan center dose in the women was 5.70 Gy. There was correlation between the thyroid and uterus surface doses, and the scan center dose. Conclusion : We concluded that the effective dose to the patient's critical organs during dual X-ray absorptiometry can be estimated by the correlation derived from phantom dosimetry

  4. Equivalent-spherical-shield neutron dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.J.; Robinson, H.

    1988-01-01

    Neutron doses through 162-cm-thick spherical shields were calculated to be 1090 and 448 mrem/h for regular and magnetite concrete, respectively. These results bracket the measured data, for reinforced regular concrete, of /approximately/600 mrem/h. The calculated fraction of the high-energy (>20 MeV) dose component also bracketed the experimental data. The measured and calculated doses were for a graphite beam stop bombarded with 100 nA of 800-MeV protons. 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  5. Neutron and gamma dose and spectra measurements on the Little Boy replica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoots, S.; Wadsworth, D.

    1984-01-01

    The radiation-measurement team of the Weapons Engineering Division at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) measured neutron and gamma dose and spectra on the Little Boy replica at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in April 1983. This assembly is a replica of the gun-type atomic bomb exploded over Hiroshima in 1945. These measurements support the National Academy of Sciences Program to reassess the radiation doses due to atomic bomb explosions in Japan. Specifically, the following types of information were important: neutron spectra as a function of geometry, gamma to neutron dose ratios out to 1.5 km, and neutron attenuation in the atmosphere. We measured neutron and gamma dose/fission from close-in to a kilometer out, and neutron and gamma spectra at 90 and 30 0 close-in. This paper describes these measurements and the results. 12 references, 13 figures, 5 tables

  6. The Australian Commonwealth standard of measurement for absorbed radiation dose. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherlock, S.L.

    1989-08-01

    As an agent for the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation is responsible for maintenance of the Australian Commonwealth standard of absorbed dose. This standard of measurement has application in radiation therapy dosimetry, which is required for the treatment of cancer patients. This report is the first in a series of reports documenting the absorbed dose standard for photon beams in the range from 1 to 25 MeV. The Urquhart graphite micro-calorimeters, which is used for the determination of absorbed dose under high energy photon beams, has been now placed under computer control. Accordingly, a complete upgrade of the calorimeter systems was performed to allow operation in the hospital. In this report, control and monitoring techniques have been described, with an assessment of the performance achieved being given for 6 and 18 MeV bremsstrahlung beams. Random errors have been reduced to near negligible proportions, while systematic errors have been minimized by achieving true quasi-adiabatic operation. 16 refs., 9 tabs., 11 figs

  7. Lethal Effect of Thermal Neutrons on Hypoxic Elirlich Ascites Tumour Cells in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    MITSUHIKO, AKABOSHI; KENICHI, KAWAI; HIROTOSHI, MAKI; Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University; Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University; Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University

    1985-01-01

    Ehrlich ascites tumour cells were irradiated in vitro with thermal neutrons under aerobic and hypoxic conditions, and the survival of their reproductive capacity was assayed in vivo. Only a slight hypoxic protection was observed for thermal neutron irradiation with an oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) of 1.2, as compared with OER of 3.3 for ^Co-γ-rays. Absorbed dose of thermal neutrons was calculated by assuming that the energies of recoiled nuclei were completely absorbed within a cell nucleus....

  8. Transcriptional Response in Mouse Thyroid Tissue after 211At Administration: Effects of Absorbed Dose, Initial Dose-Rate and Time after Administration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Rudqvist

    Full Text Available 211At-labeled radiopharmaceuticals are potentially useful for tumor therapy. However, a limitation has been the preferential accumulation of released 211At in the thyroid gland, which is a critical organ for such therapy. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of absorbed dose, dose-rate, and time after 211At exposure on genome-wide transcriptional expression in mouse thyroid gland.BALB/c mice were i.v. injected with 1.7, 7.5 or 100 kBq 211At. Animals injected with 1.7 kBq were killed after 1, 6, or 168 h with mean thyroid absorbed doses of 0.023, 0.32, and 1.8 Gy, respectively. Animals injected with 7.5 and 100 kBq were killed after 6 and 1 h, respectively; mean thyroid absorbed dose was 1.4 Gy. Total RNA was extracted from pooled thyroids and the Illumina RNA microarray platform was used to determine mRNA levels. Differentially expressed transcripts and enriched GO terms were determined with adjusted p-value 1.5, and p-value <0.05, respectively.In total, 1232 differentially expressed transcripts were detected after 211At administration, demonstrating a profound effect on gene regulation. The number of regulated transcripts increased with higher initial dose-rate/absorbed dose at 1 or 6 h. However, the number of regulated transcripts decreased with mean absorbed dose/time after 1.7 kBq 211At administration. Furthermore, similar regulation profiles were seen for groups administered 1.7 kBq. Interestingly, few previously proposed radiation responsive genes were detected in the present study. Regulation of immunological processes were prevalent at 1, 6, and 168 h after 1.7 kBq administration (0.023, 0.32, 1.8 Gy.

  9. About the possibility of using the field of the portable neutron generator for treatment of oncological diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoyanov, A.Ph.; Dovbnya, A.N.; Tsymbal, V.A.

    2017-01-01

    The possibility of using a portable neutron generator (PNG) for the treatment of oncological diseases is being considered. It has been shown that when using PNG as a neutron source, it is possible to ensure sufficient therapeutic impact on sick cells, with minimal damage to healthy cells. It's about applying PNG in a brachytherapy tumor. It is important to note that the presence of a narrow ion- pipe- needle allows a neutron source to be placed close to the tumor, and thus to increase therapeutic influence. Numerical estimates of the density of neutrons and the consumed dose when using PNG for brachytherapy performed, it is shown that, for a short period of time (approx 1 minute), sufficient dose of radiation for therapy is absorbed. The calculations of the neutron field and absorbed dose are accomplished through a computer program developed by the authors based on the Monte Carlo method, designed to simulate the generation, movement, braking and absorption of neutrons.

  10. Neutron dose measurements with the GSI ball at high energy accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehrenbacher, G.; Gutermuth, F.; Radon, T.; Kozlova, E.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: At high energy particle accelerators the production of neutron radiation dominates radiation protection. For the radiation survey at accelerators there is a need for reliable detection systems (passive radiation monitors), which can measure the dose for a wide range of neutron energies independently on the beam pulse structure of the produced radiation. In this work a passive neutron dosemeter for the measurement of the ambient dose equivalent is presented. The dosemeter is suitable for measurements of the emerging neutron radiation at accelerators for the whole energy range up to about 10 GeV. The dosemeter consists of a polyethylene sphere, TL elements (pairs of TLD600/700) and an additional lead layer (PE/Pb) in neutron fields at high energy accelerators is investigated in this work. Results of dose measurements which were performed in realistic neutron fields at the high energy accelerator SPS at CERN (CERF facility) and in Cave A at the heavy ion synchrotron SIS at GSI are presented. The results of these measurements are compared with the expected dose values from the neutron spectra determined for the measurement positions at CERF and in Cave A (FLUKA) and with the dosemeter response derived by the calculated response functions (FLUKA) folded with the neutron spectra. The comparisons show that the additional lead layer in the PE/Pb-sphere improves significantly the response of the dosemeter. The response of the PE/Pb-sphere is 40 to 50 % higher at CERF and Cave A in comparison to the bare PE-sphere. At CERF the dose values of the PE/Pb-sphere is about 25 % lower than the expected dose value, whilst for Cave A, a rather good agreement was found (2 % deviation). (author)

  11. Estimation of the absorbed dose in radiation-processed food. Pt.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desrosiers, M.F.

    1991-01-01

    The use of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to accurately evaluate the absorbed dose to radiation-processed bones (and thus meats) is examined. Additive re-irradiation of the bone produces a reproducible response function which can be used to evaluate the initial dose by back-extrapolation. It was found that an exponential fit (vs linear or polynomial) to the data provides improved accuracy of the estimated dose. These data as well as the protocol for the additive dose method are presented. (author)

  12. Impact of the Revised 10 CFR 835 on the Neutron Dose Rates at LLNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radev, R.

    2009-01-01

    In June 2007, 10 CFR 835 (1) was revised to include new radiation weighting factors for neutrons, updated dosimetric models, and dose terms consistent with the newer ICRP recommendations. A significant aspect of the revised 10 CFR 835 is the adoption of the recommendations outlined in ICRP-60 (2). The recommended new quantities demand a review of much of the basic data used in protection against exposure to sources of ionizing radiation. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements has defined a number of quantities for use in personnel and area monitoring (3,4,5) including the ambient dose equivalent H*(d) to be used for area monitoring and instrument calibrations. These quantities are used in ICRP-60 and ICRP-74. This report deals only with the changes in the ambient dose equivalent and ambient dose rate equivalent for neutrons as a result of the implementation of the revised 10 CFR 835. In the report, the terms neutron dose and neutron dose rate will be used for convenience for ambient neutron dose and ambient neutron dose rate unless otherwise stated. This report provides a qualitative and quantitative estimate of how much the neutron dose rates at LLNL will change with the implementation of the revised 10 CFR 835. Neutron spectra and dose rates from selected locations at the LLNL were measured with a high resolution spectroscopic neutron dose rate system (ROSPEC) as well as with a standard neutron rem meter (a.k.a., a remball). The spectra obtained at these locations compare well with the spectra from the Radiation Calibration Laboratory's (RCL) bare californium source that is currently used to calibrate neutron dose rate instruments. The measurements obtained from the high resolution neutron spectrometer and dose meter ROSPEC and the NRD dose meter compare within the range of ±25%. When the new radiation weighting factors are adopted with the implementation of the revised 10 CFR 835, the measured dose rates will increase by up to 22%. The

  13. Neutron, Proton, and Photonuclear Cross Sections for Radiation Therapy and Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadwick, M.B.

    1998-01-01

    The authors review recent work at Los Alamos to evaluate neutron, proton, and photonuclear cross section up to 150 MeV (to 250 MeV for protons), based on experimental data and nuclear model calculations. These data are represented in the ENDF format and can be used in computer codes to simulate radiation transport. They permit calculations of absorbed dose in the body from therapy beams, and through use of kerma coefficients allow absorbed dose to be estimated for a given neutron energy distribution. For radiation protection, these data can be used to determine shielding requirements in accelerator environments, and to calculate neutron, proton, gamma-ray, and radionuclide production. Illustrative comparisons of the evaluated cross section and kerma coefficient data with measurements are given

  14. Development of methodology for assessment of absorbed dose and stopping power for low energy conversion electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Ivan Pedro Salati de

    1995-08-01

    The evaluation of absorbed dose in the case of external and internal contamination due to radionuclides is sometimes hard, because of the difficulties in the assessment of the absorbed dose caused by electrons with energy less than 100 KeV in mucous membrane. In this work, a methodology for assessment of absorbed dose and stopping power in VYNS (co-polymer of polivinyl chloride - acetate) absorbers, for the 62.5 KeV and 84-88 KeV energy 109 Cd conversion electrons, working with a 4 π proportional pressurized detector, is presented. In order to assure the reproducibility of measurement conditions, one of the detector halves has been used to obtain a spectrum of a thin 109 Cd source, without absorber. The other half of the detector was used in concomitance to obtain spectra with different thicknesses if absorber. The absorbed energy was obtained subtracting each spectrum with absorber from the spectrum without absorber, which were stored in a microcomputer connected to signal processing systems by ACE type interface. The VYNS weight and thickness were evaluated using common radionuclide metrology procedures. As VYNS has characteristics similar to a tissue equivalent material, the results obtained are consistent with dosimetric concepts and have a good agreement with those of the literature. (author)

  15. Evaluation of Neutron Response of Criticality Accident Alarm System Detector to Quasi-Monoenergetic 24 keV Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Norio; Yoshida, Tadayoshi; Yashima, Hiroshi

    The criticality accident alarm system (CAAS), which was recently developed and installed at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency's Tokai Reprocessing Plant, consists of a plastic scintillator combined with a cadmium-lined polyethylene moderator and thereby responds to both neutrons and gamma rays. To evaluate the neutron absorbed dose rate response of the CAAS detector, a 24 keV quasi-monoenergetic neutron irradiation experiment was performed at the B-1 facility of the Kyoto University Research Reactor. The detector's evaluated neutron response was confirmed to agree reasonably well with prior computer-predicted responses.

  16. Evaluation of neutron response of criticality accident alarm system detector to quasi-monoenergetic 24 keV neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimura, Norio; Yoshida, Tadayoshi; Yashima, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The criticality accident alarm system (CAAS), which was recently developed and installed at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency's Tokai Reprocessing Plant, consists of a plastic scintillator combined with a cadmium-lined polyethylene moderator and thereby responds to both neutrons and gamma rays. To evaluate the neutron absorbed dose rate response of the CAAS detector, a 24 keV quasi-monoenergetic neutron irradiation experiment was performed at the B-1 facility of the Kyoto University Research Reactor. The detector's evaluated neutron response was confirmed to agree reasonably well with prior computer-predicted responses. (author)

  17. Absorbed doses for patients undergoing panoramic radiography, cephalometric radiography and CBCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Wrzesień

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Contemporary dental radiology offers a wide spectrum of imaging methods but it also contributes to an increase in the participation of dental radiological diagnosis in the patient’s exposure to ionizing radiation. The aim of this study is to determine the absorbed doses of the brain, spinal column, thyroid and eye lens for patients during panoramic radiography, cephalometric radiography and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT. Material and Methods: The thermoluminescent dosimetry and anthropomorphic phantom was used for measuring the doses. The 15 panoramic, 4 cephalometric and 4 CBCT exposures were performed by placing high-sensitivity thermoluminescent detectors (TLD in 18 anatomical points of the phantom. Results: The maximum absorbed dose recorded during performed measurements corresponds to the point representing the brainstem and it is 10 mGy. The dose value recorded by the TLD placed in the thyroid during CBCT imaging in relation to the panoramic radiography differs by a factor of 13.5. Conclusions: Cone beam computed tomography, in comparison with panoramic or cephalometric imaging technique, provides higher radiation doses to the patients. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2017;30(5:705–713

  18. Neutron dose rate for {sup 252} Cf AT source in medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paredes, L.; Balcazar, M. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Azorin, J. [UAM-I, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Francois, J.L. [FI-UNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    The AAPM TG-43 modified protocol was used for the calculation of the neutron dose rate of {sup 252}Cf sources for two tissue substitute materials, five normal tissues and six tumours. The {sup 252}Cf AT source model was simulated using the Monte Carlo MCNPX code in spherical geometry for the following factors: a) neutron air kerma strength conversion factor, b) dose rate constant, c) radial dose function, d) geometry factor, e) anisotropy function and f) neutron dose rate. The calculated dose rate in water at 1 cm and 90 degrees from the source long axis, using the Watt fission spectrum, was D{sub n}(r{sub 0}, {theta}{sub 0})= 1.9160 cGy/h-{mu}g. When this value is compared with Rivard et al. calculation using MCNP4B code, 1.8730 cGy/h-{mu}g, a difference of 2.30% is obtained. The results for the reference neutron dose rate in other media show how small variations in the elemental composition between the tissues and malignant tumours, produce variations in the neutron dose rate up to 12.25%. (Author)

  19. Absorbed dose in fibrotic microenvironment models employing Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zambrano Ramírez, O.D.; Rojas Calderón, E.L.; Azorín Vega, E.P.; Ferro Flores, G.; Martínez Caballero, E.

    2015-01-01

    The presence or absence of fibrosis and yet more, the multimeric and multivalent nature of the radiopharmaceutical have recently been reported to have an effect on the radiation absorbed dose in tumor microenvironment models. Fibroblast and myofibroblast cells produce the extracellular matrix by the secretion of proteins which provide structural and biochemical support to cells. The reactive and reparative mechanisms triggered during the inflammatory process causes the production and deposition of extracellular matrix proteins, the abnormal excessive growth of the connective tissue leads to fibrosis. In this work, microenvironment (either not fibrotic or fibrotic) models composed of seven spheres representing cancer cells of 10 μm in diameter each with a 5 μm diameter inner sphere (cell nucleus) were created in two distinct radiation transport codes (PENELOPE and MCNP). The purpose of creating these models was to determine the radiation absorbed dose in the nucleus of cancer cells, based on previously reported radiopharmaceutical retain (by HeLa cells) percentages of the 177 Lu-Tyr 3 -octreotate (monomeric) and 177 Lu-Tyr 3 -octreotate-AuNP (multimeric) radiopharmaceuticals. A comparison in the results between the PENELOPE and MCNP was done. We found a good agreement in the results of the codes. The percent difference between the increase percentages of the absorbed dose in the not fibrotic model with respect to the fibrotic model of the codes PENELOPE and MCNP was found to be under 1% for both radiopharmaceuticals. (authors)

  20. Neutronics issues for a laboratory microfusion facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobin, M.T.

    1987-01-01

    Discussion concerning goals or design of the Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF) should include an understanding of the neutronics issues involved. We consider such aspects as first wall shielding requirements, safety standards as they will apply to such an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) facility, and the interior chamber environment. The selection of materials for the first wall, neutron moderator and absorber, and gamma ray shielding is discussed. We conclude that water or carbon are the choices for bulk neutron moderation and boron placed just in front of the first wall the choice for neutron absorber. Selection of the in-chamber materials and diagnostic design will greatly affect the relative hazards after a shot. Lead is the high-Z material of choice and plastic expendables for the diagnostics. Although a poor gamma ray attenuator, carbon is the choice for this function since it also compensates for the direct neutron shine effects and does not itself activate. Electronics may need to be hardened to the prompt gamma and neutron dose

  1. Peculiarities of absorbed dose forming in some wild animals in Chornobyl,y exclusion zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaychenko, V.A.; Krainiuk, O.Yu.

    2015-01-01

    Based on field researches conducted in the exclusion zone of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in the years after the accident, identified the peculiarities of formation absorbed doses in animals of different taxonomic and ecological groups that live in conditions of radioactive contamination of ecosystems. Was shown importance of consideration of radiation features on wild animals according to their life cycle, conditions and ways of life. Was displayed data about the importance of different types of irradiation according to the period of stay the animals in the ground, in burrows and nests. Was reviewed the questions about value of external and internal radiation in absorbed dose of different types of wildlife. Was shown the results of the calculation of the absorbed dose of bird embryos from egg shell

  2. Dose levels due to neutrons in the vicinity of high energy medical accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinley, P.H.; Wood, M.; Sohrabi, M.; Mills, M.; Rodriguez, R.

    1976-01-01

    High energy photons are generated for use in radiation therapy by the decelleration of electrons in metal targets. Fast neutrons are also generated as a result of (γ, n) and (e, e'n) interactions in the target, beam compensator filter, and collimator material. In this work the adsorbed dose to neutrons was measured at the center of a 10 x 10 cm photon beam and 5 cm outside of the beam edge for a number of treatment units. Dose levels due to slow and fast neutrons were also established outside of the treatment rooms and a Bonner sphere neutron spectrometer system was employed to determine the neutron energy spectrum due to stray neutron radiation at each accelerator. For the linac it was found that the neutron dose at the beam center was 0.0039% of the photon dose and values of 0.049% and 0.053% were observed for the Allis Chalmers betatron and the Brown Boveri Betatron. Dose equivalent rates in the range of 0.3 to 22.5 mrem/hr were measured for points outside the treatment rooms when the accelerators were operated at a photon dose rate of 100 rad/min at the treatment position

  3. Simple approximation for estimating centerline gamma absorbed dose rates due to a continuous Gaussian plume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overcamp, T.J.; Fjeld, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    A simple approximation for estimating the centerline gamma absorbed dose rates due to a continuous Gaussian plume was developed. To simplify the integration of the dose integral, this approach makes use of the Gaussian cloud concentration distribution. The solution is expressed in terms of the I1 and I2 integrals which were developed for estimating long-term dose due to a sector-averaged Gaussian plume. Estimates of tissue absorbed dose rates for the new approach and for the uniform cloud model were compared to numerical integration of the dose integral over a Gaussian plume distribution

  4. The 1997 determination of the Australian standards of exposure and absorbed dose at {sup 60}Co

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huntley, R.B.; Boas, J.F. [Australian Radiation Laboratory, Yallambie, VIC (Australia); Van der Gaast, H. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1998-05-01

    The arrangements for the maintenance of the Australian standards for {sup 60}Co are described in detail. The primary standards are a graphite cavity chamber for exposure/air kerma and a graphite calorimeter for absorbed dose. These secondary standards are described and their responses in corresponding {sup 90}Sr reference sources are reported. Accurate ratios between the Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL) and Australian Nuclear Science and Technology (ANSTO) {sup 90}Sr reference sources are derived for use in future calibrations. The value of 28.8 years for the half-life of {sup 90}Sr is confirmed. The usefulness of {sup 90}Sr reference source measurements in quality assurance is discussed. The charge sensitivity and linearity of the ANSTO electrometers are reported by two different methods and are compared with previous results. Calibration factors for all the secondary standard ionization chambers are given, in terms of exposure, air kerma and absorbed dose to water. Calibration factors are also given for most of the chambers in terms of absorbed dose to graphite. The methods of deriving the calibration factors are explained in detail, including all the corrections applied to both the primary and secondary standard measurements. Three alternative methods of deriving the absorbed dose to water calibration factors are compared. The reported calibration factors are compared with previous results. Changes in the Australian units of exposure, air kerma and absorbed dose to graphite and water are derived from changes in the corresponding calibration factors. The Australian units of exposure and air kerma have not changed significantly since 1990. The Australian unit of absorbed dose to graphite is now 1.1 % smaller than in 1993 and 1.3 % smaller than in 1990. The Australian unit of absorbed dose to water is now 1.4 % smaller than in 1993, but is only 0.9 % smaller than in 1990. Comparisons of the Australian standards of exposure/air kerma and absorbed dose with

  5. Self-shielding and burn-out effects in the irradiation of strongly-neutron-absorbing material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekine, T.; Baba, H.

    1978-01-01

    Self-shielding and burn-out effects are discussed in the evaluation of radioisotopes formed by neutron irradiation of a strongly-neutron-absorbing material. A method of the evaluation of such effects is developed both for thermal and epithermal neutrons. Gadolinium oxide uniformly mixed with graphite powder was irradiated by reactor-neutrons together with pieces of a Co-Al alloy wire (the content of Co being 0.475%) as the neutron flux monitor. The configuration of the samples and flux monitors in each of two irradiations is illustrated. The yields of activities produced in the irradiated samples were determined by the γ-spectrometry with a Ge(Li) detector of a relative detection efficiency of 8%. Activities at the end of irradiation were estimated by corrections due to pile-up, self-absorption, detection efficiency, branching ratio, and decay of the activity. Results of the calculation are discussed in comparison with the observed yields of 153 Gd, 160 Tb, and 161 Tb for the case of neutron irradiation of disc-shaped targets of gadolinium oxide. (T.G.)

  6. Characterization of the secondary neutron field produced during treatment of an anthropomorphic phantom with x-rays, protons and carbon ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Tessa, C.; Berger, T.; Kaderka, R.; Schardt, D.; Burmeister, S.; Labrenz, J.; Reitz, G.; Durante, M.

    2014-04-01

    Short- and long-term side effects following the treatment of cancer with radiation are strongly related to the amount of dose deposited to the healthy tissue surrounding the tumor. The characterization of the radiation field outside the planned target volume is the first step for estimating health risks, such as developing a secondary radioinduced malignancy. In ion and high-energy photon treatments, the major contribution to the dose deposited in the far-out-of-field region is given by neutrons, which are produced by nuclear interaction of the primary radiation with the beam line components and the patient’s body. Measurements of the secondary neutron field and its contribution to the absorbed dose and equivalent dose for different radiotherapy technologies are presented in this work. An anthropomorphic RANDO phantom was irradiated with a treatment plan designed for a simulated 5 × 2 × 5 cm3 cancer volume located in the center of the head. The experiment was repeated with 25 MV IMRT (intensity modulated radiation therapy) photons and charged particles (protons and carbon ions) delivered with both passive modulation and spot scanning in different facilities. The measurements were performed with active (silicon-scintillation) and passive (bubble, thermoluminescence 6LiF:Mg, Ti (TLD-600) and 7LiF:Mg, Ti (TLD-700)) detectors to investigate the production of neutral particles both inside and outside the phantom. These techniques provided the whole energy spectrum (E ⩽ 20 MeV) and corresponding absorbed dose and dose equivalent of photo neutrons produced by x-rays, the fluence of thermal neutrons for all irradiation types and the absorbed dose deposited by neutrons with 0.8 energy x-rays, the contribution of secondary neutrons to the dose equivalent is of the same order of magnitude as the primary radiation. In carbon therapy delivered with raster scanning, the absorbed dose deposited by neutrons in the energy region between 0.8 and 10 MeV is almost two orders of

  7. Preparation and characterization of ceramic neutron absorbers based on dysprosia and gadolinia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgos, F.; Oliber, E.; Leiva S; Lestani, H.; Malachevsky, M.T.; Taboada, H.; D'Ovidio, C.

    2012-01-01

    Among the elements of the lanthanide series, dysprosium and gadolinium have interesting nuclear properties. Due to their high thermal neutron absorption cross-section they are good neutron absorbers. The only compounds suitable for nuclear use are their oxides, dysprosia (Dy 2 O 3 ) and gadolinia (Gd 2 O 3 ). To fabricate neutron absorbers diluted in an inert matrix, e.g. alumina (Al 2 O 3 ), it is relevant to study the preparation of a ceramic compound based on alumina (Al 2 O 3 ) and dysprosia or gadolinia. In this work, we characterize four different nominal compositions with high contents of gadolinia and dysprosia: (a) (45 wt% Dy 2 O 3 , 55 wt% Al 2 O 3 ), (b) (93 wt% Dy 2 O 3 , 7 wt% Al 2 O 3 ), (c) (50 wt% Gd 2 O 3 , 50 wt% Al 2 O 3 ) and (d) (90 wt% Gd 2 O 3 , 10 wt% Al 2 O 3 ). These compositions were selected as their stoichiometry correspond to the eutectic phases found in the respective phase diagrams, so as to attain sinterization at lower temperatures of approximately 1700 o C in air. The investigated parameters are the geometrical density of the pellets, the microstructure and the phases observed using x-ray diffraction. Contraction of the pellets was obtained by measuring the volumetric change between the green and the sintered samples. It was observed that the relative contraction was the same both in thickness and diameter. We discuss the eutectic phase formation and densification observed for the different compositions (author)

  8. Absorbed doses from intraoral radiography with special emphasis on collimator dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenstroem, B.; Henrikson, C.O.; Holm, B.; Richter, S.; Huddinge Univ. Hospital, Huddinge

    1986-01-01

    Thermoluminescence dosimeters were used in a phantom head and on patients to measure the absorbed dose to organs of special interest from full surveys with intraoral films (20 exposures) and single bitewing exposures. Two x-ray machines were used, operating at 65 kVp. The apertures of the circular tube collimators had diameters of 55 mm and 48 mm. Rectangular (35 mm x44 mm) tube collimators were also used. The distance from the x-ray focus to the open end of the collimators (FSD) was 0.20 and 0.35 m. Exposure values for Kodak Ultra-Speed film (speed group D) were used. The maximum skin dose measured from the full surveys decreased by 25 per cent on changing from the circular to the rectangular apertures. Using 0.35 m FSD and rectangular collimator the maximum skin dose was 13 mGy. The absorbed doses to the salivary glands and the thyroid gland were significantly reduced on changing from circular to rectangular apertures. The doses in the central part of the parotid and the thyroid glands were then 0.5 and 0.12 mGy, respectively, from a full survey with 20 intraoral films. With a leaded shield the thyroid dose was reduced to 0.05 mGy. All dose values could be further reduced by 40 per cent by using Kodak Ektaspeed film (speed group E)

  9. Primordial radionuclides in soil and their contributions to absorbed dose rate in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriones, C.R.; Duran, E.B.; Cruz, F.M. de la

    1989-01-01

    The predominant primordial radionuclides in soil which give rise to terrestrial radiation (external irradiation) were analyzed by gamma spectrometry. 40 K has the highest average activity mass concentration, i.e. 212 Bq kg -1 . 238 U and 232 Th concentrations are much lower and are only 14 and 16 Bq kg -1 respectively. Based on conversion factors given in the UNSCEAR Report (1988), the absorbed dose rates in air at one meter above the ground surface per unit activity mass concentration of primordial radionuclides were calculated. The average per caput absorbed dose rate in air received by Filipinos due to terrestrial radiation is 23 nGy h -1 . The relative contribution of 232 Th series to the total absorbed dose rate is highest, followed closely by 40 K. The contribution of 238 U series is only about one-half that of the 232 Th series. Based on the results obtained, the terrestrial component of the average per caput exposure dose rate due to natural radiation sources is 2.64 μR h -1 or roughly 3 μR h -1 . This leads to an annual average effective dose equivalent to 202 μSv. (Author). 5 annexes; 4 figs.; 3 tabs.; 6 refs

  10. Transportable, Low-Dose Active Fast-Neutron Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihalczo, John T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wright, Michael C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McConchie, Seth M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Archer, Daniel E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Palles, Blake A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    This document contains a description of the method of transportable, low-dose active fast-neutron imaging as developed by ORNL. The discussion begins with the technique and instrumentation and continues with the image reconstruction and analysis. The analysis discussion includes an example of how a gap smaller than the neutron production spot size and detector size can be detected and characterized depending upon the measurement time.

  11. Experimental method research on neutron equal dose-equivalent detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Changsong

    1995-10-01

    The design principles of neutron dose-equivalent meter for neutron biological equi-effect detection are studied. Two traditional principles 'absorption net principle' and 'multi-detector principle' are discussed, and on the basis of which a new theoretical principle for neutron biological equi-effect detection--'absorption stick principle' has been put forward to place high hope on both increasing neutron sensitivity of this type of meters and overcoming the shortages of the two traditional methods. In accordance with this new principle a brand-new model of neutron dose-equivalent meter BH3105 has been developed. Its neutron sensitivity reaches 10 cps/(μSv·h -1 ), 18∼40 times higher than that of all the same kinds of meters 0.23∼0.56 cps/(μSv·h -1 ), available today at home and abroad and the specifications of the newly developed meter reach or surpass the levels of the same kind of meters. Therefore the new theoretical principle of neutron biological equi-effect detection--'absorption stick principle' is proved to be scientific, advanced and useful by experiments. (3 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.)

  12. One-speed neutron transport in spheres with totally absorbing cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoestrand, N.G.

    1988-01-01

    Stationary and time-dependent transport of neutrons of one speed has been studied in spheres with totally absorbing cores. For stationary, critical reactors the number of secondaries per collision has been calculated numerically for various inner and outer radii. In the time-dependent case, the decay constant has been calculated for spherical shells of different inner radii and thicknesses. For a fixed ratio between shell thickness and inner radius, the curve of the decay constant versus shell thickness crosses the Corngold limit in the same way as the curve for a homogeneous sphere. When the ratio goes to zero the curve approaches that for an infinite slab. The behaviour is discussed in view of a new result from collision theory, viz. that the following condition must be fulfilled for a body at the point where the decay constant curve crosses the Corngold limit: the average exit distance of the neutrons is equal to the mean free path for scattering

  13. Study on the neutron dosimetric characteristics of Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunomiya, T.; Kim, E.; Kurosawa, T.; Taniguchi, S.; Nakamura, T. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center; Tsujimura, N.; Momose, T.; Shinohara, K. [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Environment and Safety Division, Tokai Works, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-03-01

    The neutron dosimetric characteristics of TEPC (Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter) has been investigated under a cooperative study between Tohoku University and JNC since 1997. This TEPC is a spherical, large volume, single-wire proportional counter (the model LETSW-5, manufactured by Far West Technology, Inc.) and filled with a tissue equivalent gas in a spherical detector of the A-150 tissue equivalent plastic. The TEPC can measure the spectra of absorbed dose in LET and easily estimate the tissue equivalent dose to neutron. This report summarizes the dosimetric characteristics of TEPC to the monoenergetic neutrons with energy from 8 keV to 15 MeV. It is found that TEPC can estimate the ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), with an accuracy from 0.9 to 2 to the neutron above 0.25 MeV and TEPC has a good counting efficiency enough to measure neutron doses with low dose rate at the stray neutron fields. (author)

  14. On uncertainties in definition of dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Keiji

    1995-01-01

    The author has entertained always the doubt that in a neutron field, if the measured value of the absorbed dose with a tissue equivalent ionization chamber is 1.02±0.01 mGy, may the dose equivalent be taken as 10.2±0.1 mSv. Should it be 10.2 or 11, but the author considers it is 10 or 20. Even if effort is exerted for the precision measurement of absorbed dose, if the coefficient being multiplied to it is not precise, it is meaningless. [Absorbed dose] x [Radiation quality fctor] = [Dose equivalent] seems peculiar. How accurately can dose equivalent be evaluated ? The descriptions related to uncertainties in the publications of ICRU and ICRP are introduced, which are related to radiation quality factor, the accuracy of measuring dose equivalent and so on. Dose equivalent shows the criterion for the degree of risk, or it is considered only as a controlling quantity. The description in the ICRU report 1973 related to dose equivalent and its unit is cited. It was concluded that dose equivalent can be considered only as the absorbed dose being multiplied by a dimensionless factor. The author presented the questions. (K.I.)

  15. Neutron spectrometry and determination of neutron ambient dose equivalents in different LINAC radiotherapy rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domingo, C.; Garcia-Fuste, M.J.; Morales, E.; Amgarou, K.; Terron, J.A.; Rosello, J.; Brualla, L.; Nunez, L.; Colmenares, R.; Gomez, F.; Hartmann, G.H.; Sanchez-Doblado, F.; Fernandez, F.

    2010-01-01

    A project has been set up to study the effect on a radiotherapy patient of the neutrons produced around the LINAC accelerator head by photonuclear reactions induced by photons above ∼8 MeV. These neutrons may reach directly the patient, or they may interact with the surrounding materials until they become thermalised, scattering all over the treatment room and affecting the patient as well, contributing to peripheral dose. Spectrometry was performed with a calibrated and validated set of Bonner spheres at a point located at 50 cm from the isocenter, as well as at the place where a digital device for measuring neutrons, based on the upset of SRAM memories induced by thermal neutrons, is located inside the treatment room. Exposures have taken place in six LINAC accelerators with different energies (from 15 to 23 MV) with the aim of relating the spectrometer measurements with the readings of the digital device under various exposure and room geometry conditions. The final purpose of the project is to be able to relate, under any given treatment condition and room geometry, the readings of this digital device to patient neutron effective dose and peripheral dose in organs of interest. This would allow inferring the probability of developing second malignancies as a consequence of the treatment. Results indicate that unit neutron fluence spectra at 50 cm from the isocenter do not depend on accelerator characteristics, while spectra at the place of the digital device are strongly influenced by the treatment room geometry.

  16. Evaluation of the absorbed dose in odontological computerized tomography; Avaliacao da dose absorvida em tomografia computadorizada odontologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legnani, Adriano; Schelin, Hugo R; Rocha, Anna Silvia P.S. da, E-mail: schelin@utfpr.edu.b, E-mail: anna@utfpr.edu.b [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Khoury, Helen J., E-mail: khoury@ufpe.b [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    This paper evaluated the absorbed dose at the surface entry known as 'cone beam computed tomography' (CBCT) in odontological computerized tomography. Examination were simulated with CBCT for measurements of dose. A phantom were filled with water, becoming scatter object of radiation. Thermoluminescent dosemeters were positioned on points correspondent to eyes and salivary glands

  17. Dose conversion coefficients for high-energy photons, electrons, neutrons and protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Yukio

    2005-01-01

    Dose conversion coefficients for photons, electrons and neutrons based on new ICRP recommendations were cited in the ICRP Publication 74, but the energy ranges of these data were limited and there are no data for high energy radiations produced in accelerator facilities. For the purpose of designing the high intensity proton accelerator facilities at JAERI, the dose evaluation code system of high energy radiations based on the HERMES code was developed and the dose conversion coefficients of effective dose were evaluated for photons, neutrons and protons up to 10 GeV, and electrons up to 100 GeV. The dose conversion coefficients of effective dose equivalent were also evaluated using quality factors to consider the consistency between radiation weighting factors and Q-L relationship. The effective dose conversion coefficients obtained in this work were in good agreement with those recently evaluated by using FLUKA code for photons and electrons with all energies, and neutrons and protons below 500 MeV. There were some discrepancy between two data owing to the difference of cross sections in the nuclear reaction models. The dose conversion coefficients of effective dose equivalents for high energy radiations based on Q-L relation in ICRP Publication 60 were evaluated only in this work. The previous comparison between effective dose and effective dose equivalent made it clear that the radiation weighting factors for high energy neutrons and protons were overestimated and the modification was required. (author)

  18. SU-E-T-566: Neutron Dose Cloud Map for Compact ProteusONE Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syh, J; Patel, B; Syh, J; Rosen, L; Wu, H [Willis-Knighton Medical Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To establish the base line of neutron cloud during patient treatment in our new compact Proteus One proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) system with various beam delivery gantry angles, with or without range shifter (RS) at different body sites. Pencil beam scanning is an emerging treatment technique, for the concerns of neutron exposure, this study is to evaluate the neutron dose equivalent per given delivered dose under various treatment conditions at our proton therapy center. Methods: A wide energy neutron dose equivalent detector (SWENDI-II, Thermo Scientific, MA) was used for neutron dose measurements. It was conducted in the proton therapy vault during beam was on. The measurement location was specifically marked in order to obtain the equivalent dose of neutron activities (H). The distances of 100, 150 and 200 cm at various locations are from the patient isocenter. The neutron dose was measured of proton energy layers, # of spots, maximal energy range, modulation width, field radius, gantry angle, snout position and delivered dose in CGE. The neutron dose cloud is reproducible and is useful for the future reference. Results: When distance increased the neutron equivalent dose (H) reading did not decrease rapidly with changes of proton energy range, modulation width or spot layers. For cranial cases, the average mSv/CGE was about 0.02 versus 0.032 for pelvis cases. RS will induce higher H to be 0.10 mSv/CGE in average. Conclusion: From this study, neutron per dose ratio (mSv/CGE) slightly depends upon various treatment parameters for pencil beams. For similar treatment conditions, our measurement demonstrates this value for pencil beam scanning beam has lowest than uniform scanning or passive scattering beam with a factor of 5. This factor will be monitored continuously for other upcoming treatment parameters in our facility.

  19. On the absorbed dose determination method in high energy photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarlat, F.; Scarisoreanu, A.; Oane, M.; Mitru, E.; Avadanei, C.

    2008-01-01

    The absorbed dose determination method in water, based on standards of air kerma or exposure in high energy photon beams generated by electron with energies in the range of 1 MeV to 50 MeV is presented herein. The method is based on IAEA-398, AAPM TG-51, DIN 6800-2, IAEA-381, IAEA-277 and NACP-80 recommendations. The dosimetry equipment is composed of UNIDOS T 10005 electrometer and different ionization chambers calibrated in air kerma method in a Co 60 beam. Starting from the general formalism showed in IAEA-381, the determination of absorbed dose in water, under reference conditions in high energy photon beams, is given. This method was adopted for the secondary standard dosimetry laboratory (SSDL) in NILPRP-Bucharest

  20. Deterministic absorbed dose estimation in computed tomography using a discrete ordinates method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, Edward T.; Liu, Xin; Hsieh, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Organ dose estimation for a patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scanning is very important. Although Monte Carlo methods are considered gold-standard in patient dose estimation, the computation time required is formidable for routine clinical calculations. Here, the authors instigate a deterministic method for estimating an absorbed dose more efficiently. Methods: Compared with current Monte Carlo methods, a more efficient approach to estimating the absorbed dose is to solve the linear Boltzmann equation numerically. In this study, an axial CT scan was modeled with a software package, Denovo, which solved the linear Boltzmann equation using the discrete ordinates method. The CT scanning configuration included 16 x-ray source positions, beam collimators, flat filters, and bowtie filters. The phantom was the standard 32 cm CT dose index (CTDI) phantom. Four different Denovo simulations were performed with different simulation parameters, including the number of quadrature sets and the order of Legendre polynomial expansions. A Monte Carlo simulation was also performed for benchmarking the Denovo simulations. A quantitative comparison was made of the simulation results obtained by the Denovo and the Monte Carlo methods. Results: The difference in the simulation results of the discrete ordinates method and those of the Monte Carlo methods was found to be small, with a root-mean-square difference of around 2.4%. It was found that the discrete ordinates method, with a higher order of Legendre polynomial expansions, underestimated the absorbed dose near the center of the phantom (i.e., low dose region). Simulations of the quadrature set 8 and the first order of the Legendre polynomial expansions proved to be the most efficient computation method in the authors’ study. The single-thread computation time of the deterministic simulation of the quadrature set 8 and the first order of the Legendre polynomial expansions was 21 min on a personal computer

  1. Evaluation of absorbed radiation dose in mammography using Monte Carlo simulation; Avaliacao da dose absorvida em mamografia usando simulacao Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Bruno L.; Tomal, Alessandra [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin

    2016-07-01

    Mammography is the main tool for breast cancer diagnosis, and it is based on the use of X-rays to obtain images. However, the glandular tissue present within the breast is highly sensitive to ionizing radiation, and therefore requires strict quality control in order to minimize the absorbed dose. The quantification of the absorbed dose in the breast tissue can be done by using Monte Carlo simulation, which allows a detailed study of the deposition of energy in different regions of the breast. Besides, the results obtained from the simulation can be associated with experimental data and provide values of dose interest, such as the dose deposited in glandular tissue. (author)

  2. New detectors of neutron, gamma- and X-radiations

    CERN Document Server

    Lobanov, N S

    2002-01-01

    Paper presents new detectors to record absorbed doses of neutron, gamma- and X-ray radiations within 0-1500 Mrad range. DBF dosimeter is based on dibutyl phthalate. EDS dosimeter is based on epoxy (epoxide) resin, while SD 5-40 detector is based on a mixture of dibutyl phthalate and epoxy resin. Paper describes experimental techniques to calibrate and interprets the measurement results of absorbed doses for all detectors. All three detectors cover 0-30000 Mrad measured does range. The accuracy of measurements is +- 10% independent (practically) of irradiation dose rates within 20-2000 rad/s limits under 20-80 deg C temperature

  3. Critical experiments on an enriched uranium solution system containing periodically distributed strong thermal neutron absorbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothe, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    A series of 62 critical and critical approach experiments were performed to evaluate a possible novel means of storing large volumes of fissile solution in a critically safe configuration. This study is intended to increase safety and economy through use of such a system in commercial plants which handle fissionable materials in liquid form. The fissile solution's concentration may equal or slightly exceed the minimum-critical-volume concentration; and experiments were performed for high-enriched uranium solution. Results should be generally applicable in a wide variety of plant situations. The method is called the 'Poisoned Tube Tank' because strong neutron absorbers (neutron poisons) are placed inside periodically spaced stainless steel tubes which separate absorber material from solution, keeping the former free of contamination. Eight absorbers are investigated. Both square and triangular pitched lattice patterns are studied. Ancillary topics which closely model typical plant situations are also reported. They include the effect of removing small bundles of absorbers as might occur during inspections in a production plant. Not taking the tank out of service for these inspections would be an economic advantage. Another ancillary topic studies the effect of the presence of a significant volume of unpoisoned solution close to the Poisoned Tube Tank on the critical height. A summary of the experimental findings is that boron compounds were excellent absorbers, as expected. This was true for granular materials such as Gerstley Borate and Borax; but it was also true for the flexible solid composed of boron carbide and rubber, even though only thin sheets were used. Experiments with small bundles of absorbers intentionally removed reveal that quite reasonable tanks could be constructed that would allow a few tubes at a time to be removed from the tank for inspection without removing the tank from production service

  4. OPTIMIZATION OF THE EPITHERMAL NEUTRON BEAM FOR BORON NEUTRON CAPTURE THERAPY AT THE BROOKHAVEN MEDICAL RESEARCH REACTOR.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HU,J.P.; RORER,D.C.; RECINIELLO,R.N.; HOLDEN,N.E.

    2002-08-18

    Clinical trials of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for patients with malignant brain tumor had been carried out for half a decade, using an epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven's Medical Reactor. The decision to permanently close this reactor in 2000 cut short the efforts to implement a new conceptual design to optimize this beam in preparation for use with possible new protocols. Details of the conceptual design to produce a higher intensity, more forward-directed neutron beam with less contamination from gamma rays, fast and thermal neutrons are presented here for their potential applicability to other reactor facilities. Monte Carlo calculations were used to predict the flux and absorbed dose produced by the proposed design. The results were benchmarked by the dose rate and flux measurements taken at the facility then in use.

  5. The Norwegian system for implementing the IAEA code of practice based on absorbed dose to water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjerke, H.

    2002-01-01

    The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA) SSDL recommended in 2000 the use of absorbed dose to water as the quality for calibration and code of practice in radiotherapy. The absorbed dose to water standard traceable to BIPM was established in Norway in 1995. The international code of practice, IAEA TRS 398 was under preparation. As a part of the implementation of the new dosimetry system the SSDL went to radiotherapy departments in Norway in 2001. The aim of the visit was to: Prepare and support the users in the implementation of TRS 398 by teaching, discussions and measurements on-site; Gain experience for NRPA in the practical implementation of TRS 398 and perform comparisons between TRS 277 and TRS 398 for different beam qualities; Report experience from implementation of TRS 398 to IAEA. The NRPA 30x30x30 cm 3 water phantom is equal to the BIPM calibration phantom. This was used for the photon measurements in 16 different beams. NRPA used three chambers: NE 2571, NE 2611 and PR06C for the photon measurements. As a quality control the set-up was compared with the Finnish site-visit equipment at University Hospital of Helsinki, and the measured absorbed dose to water agreed within 0.6%. The Finnish SSDL calibrated the Norwegian chambers and the absorbed dose to water calibration factors given by the two SSDLs for the three chambers agreed within 0.3%. The local clinical dosimetry in Norway was based on TRS 277. For the site-visit the absorbed dose to water was determined by NRPA using own equipment including the three chambers and the hospitals reference chamber. The hospital determined the dose the same evening using their local equipment. For the 16 photon beams the deviations between the two absorbed dose to water determinations for TRS 277 were in the range -1,7% to +4.0%. The uncertainty in the measurements was 1% (k=1). The deviation was explained in local implementation of TRS 277, the use of plastic phantoms, no resent calibration of

  6. Evaluation of the absorbed dose in odontological computerized tomography; Avaliacao da dose absorvida em tomografia computadorizada odontologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legnani, Adriano; Schelin, Hugo R.; Rocha, Anna Silvia P.S. da, E-mail: schelin@utfpr.edu.b, E-mail: anna@utfpr.edu.b [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Khoury, Helen J., E-mail: khoury@ufpe.b [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    This paper evaluated the absorbed dose at the surface entry known as 'cone beam computed tomography' (CBCT) in odontological computerized tomography. Examination were simulated with CBCT for measurements of dose. A phantom were filled with water, becoming scatter object of radiation. Thermoluminescent dosemeters were positioned on points correspondent to eyes and salivary glands

  7. Diamond detector in absorbed dose measurements in high-energy linear accelerator photon and electron beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Binukumar, John Pichy; Al Amri, Iqbal; Davis, Cheriyathmanjiyil Antony

    2016-03-08

    Diamond detectors (DD) are preferred in small field dosimetry of radiation beams because of small dose profile penumbras, better spatial resolution, and tissue-equivalent properties. We investigated a commercially available 'microdiamond' detector in realizing absorbed dose from first principles. A microdiamond detector, type TM 60019 with tandem electrometer is used to measure absorbed doses in water, nylon, and PMMA phantoms. With sensitive volume 0.004 mm3, radius 1.1mm, thickness 1 x10(-3) mm, the nominal response is 1 nC/Gy. It is assumed that the diamond detector could collect total electric charge (nC) developed during irradiation at 0 V bias. We found that dose rate effect is less than 0.7% for changing dose rate by 500 MU/min. The reproducibility in obtaining readings with diamond detector is found to be ± 0.17% (1 SD) (n = 11). The measured absorbed doses for 6 MV and 15 MV photons arrived at using mass energy absorption coefficients and stop-ping power ratios compared well with Nd, water calibrated ion chamber measured absorbed doses within 3% in water, PMMA, and nylon media. The calibration factor obtained for diamond detector confirmed response variation is due to sensitivity due to difference in manufacturing process. For electron beams, we had to apply ratio of electron densities of water to carbon. Our results qualify diamond dosimeter as a transfer standard, based on long-term stability and reproducibility. Based on micro-dimensions, we recommend these detectors for pretreatment dose verifications in small field irradiations like stereotactic treatments with image guidance.

  8. Evaluation of nuclear data for neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tardelli, Tiago Cardoso

    2013-01-01

    Absorbed dose and Effective dose are usually calculated using radiation transport computer codes. The quality of the calculations of absorbed dose depends on nuclear data utilized, however, there are rare information about the differences in dose caused by the use of different libraries. The objective of this study is to compare dose values obtained using different nuclear data libraries due to external source of neutrons in the energy range from 10-11 to 20 MeV. The nuclear data libraries used are: JENDL 4.0, JEFF 3.3.1 and ENDF/B.VII. Dose calculations were carried out with the MCNPX code considering the anthropomorphic ICRP 110 model. The differences in the absorbed dose values using JEFF 3.3.1 and ENDF/B.VII libraries are small, around 1%, but the results obtained with JENDL 4.0 presented differences up to 85% compared to ENDF and JEFF results. Differences in effective dose values are around 1.5% between ENDF and JEFF and 11% between ENDF/B.VII and JENDL 4.0. (author)

  9. Absorbed and effective dose from periapical radiography by portable intraoral x-ray machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jeong Yeon; Han, Won Jeong; Kim, Eun Kyung

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the absorbed dose and to calculate the effective dose for periapical radiography done by portable intraoral x-ray machines. 14 full mouth, upper posterior and lower posterior periapical radiographs were taken by wall-type 1 and portable type 3 intraoral x-ray machines. Thermoluminescent dosemeters were placed at 23 sites at the layers of the tissue-equivalent ART woman phantom for dosimetry. Average tissue absorbed dose and radiation weighted dose were calculated for each major anatomical site. Effective dose was calculated using 2005 ICRP tissue weighted factors. On 14 full mouth periapical radiographs, the effective dose for wall-type x-ray machine was 30 Sv; for portable x-ray machines were 30 Sv, 22 Sv, 36 Sv. On upper posterior radiograph, the effective dose for wall-type x-ray machine was 4 Sv; for portable x-ray machines doses were 4 Sv, 3 Sv, 5 Sv. On lower posterior radiograph, the effective dose for wall type x-ray machine was 5 Sv; for portable x-ray machines doses were 4 Sv, 4 Sv, 5 Sv. Effective doses for periapical radiographs performed by portable intraoral x-ray machines were similar to doses for periapical radiographs taken by wall type intraoral x-ray machines

  10. Calorimetric and ionometric dosimetry for cyclotron produced fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, J.C.; Ma, I.C.; Laughlin, J.S.

    1977-01-01

    A portable tissue equivalent (TE) calorimeter, constructed of A-150 plastic, has been employed for the measurement of absorbed dose in two fast neutron fields produced by the 9 Be( 3 He,n) and 9 Be(d,n) interactions. A disc shaped ionization chamber has also been constructed of A-150 plastic and has a collecting volume geometrically equivalent to the calorimeter core (2 cm in diameter and 0.2 cm thick). A flow of methane compounded TE gas was maintained through the chamber at a rate of approximately 5 cc/min during the measurements. The ionization chamber was mounted within an irradiation enclosure which simulated the outer dimensions of the calorimeter housing. In this way, both detectors were placed at the same depth in TE plastic and each received approximately the same scattered radiation. The gamma-ray component of absorbed dose has been determined by the use of a miniature Geiger-Mueller dosimeter. It was found that the response sensitivity ratio for the TE ionization chamber in the two neutron fields relative to the 60 Co gamma-ray field, when normalized to the absorbed dose measured by the TE calorimeter, was approximately 1.07. Uncertainties in these calorimetric and ionometric methods for the measurements of the absorbed dose will be discussed along with measurements of the thermal defect for A-150 TE plastic

  11. Dose Calibration of the ISS-RAD Fast Neutron Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitlin, C.

    2015-01-01

    The ISS-RAD instrument has been fabricated by Southwest Research Institute and delivered to NASA for flight to the ISS in late 2015 or early 2016. ISS-RAD is essentially two instruments that share a common interface to ISS. The two instruments are the Charged Particle Detector (CPD), which is very similar to the MSL-RAD detector on Mars, and the Fast Neutron Detector (FND), which is a boron-loaded plastic scintillator with readout optimized for the 0.5 to 10 MeV energy range. As the FND is completely new, it has been necessary to develop methodology to allow it to be used to measure the neutron dose and dose equivalent. This talk will focus on the methods developed and their implementation using calibration data obtained in quasi-monoenergetic (QMN) neutron fields at the PTB facility in Braunschweig, Germany. The QMN data allow us to determine an approximate response function, from which we estimate dose and dose equivalent contributions per detected neutron as a function of the pulse height. We refer to these as the "pSv per count" curves for dose equivalent and the "pGy per count" curves for dose. The FND is required to provide a dose equivalent measurement with an accuracy of ?10% of the known value in a calibrated AmBe field. Four variants of the analysis method were developed, corresponding to two different approximations of the pSv per count curve, and two different implementations, one for real-time analysis onboard ISS and one for ground analysis. We will show that the preferred method, when applied in either real-time or ground analysis, yields good accuracy for the AmBe field. We find that the real-time algorithm is more susceptible to chance-coincidence background than is the algorithm used in ground analysis, so that the best estimates will come from the latter.

  12. Nuclear data for neutron therapy: Status and future needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-12-01

    This report discusses the status and success of neutron therapy and some of the problems in clinical neutron dosimetry. Existing neutron interaction data, in particular results of kerma factor measurements and data evaluations, are reviewed. Nuclear data relevant for neutron source reactions, collimation, and shielding are also discussed. Finally, physical aspects of the variation of biological effectiveness of neutrons with neutron energy (radiation quality) are set out. Exchange of information between neutron therapy centers is essential, since only clinical experience can determine the optimal absorbed dose, fractionation, target volume, and clinical indications/contra-indications for neutron therapy

  13. Nuclear data for neutron therapy: Status and future needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    This report discusses the status and success of neutron therapy and some of the problems in clinical neutron dosimetry. Existing neutron interaction data, in particular results of kerma factor measurements and data evaluations, are reviewed. Nuclear data relevant for neutron source reactions, collimation, and shielding are also discussed. Finally, physical aspects of the variation of biological effectiveness of neutrons with neutron energy (radiation quality) are set out. Exchange of information between neutron therapy centers is essential, since only clinical experience can determine the optimal absorbed dose, fractionation, target volume, and clinical indications/contra-indications for neutron therapy. Refs, 44 figs, 19 tabs.

  14. Study of absorbed dose distribution to high energy electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecatti, E.R.

    1983-01-01

    The depth absorbed dose distribution by electron beams was studied. The influence of the beam energy, the energy spread, field size and design characteristics of the accelerator was relieved. Three accelerators with different scattering and collimation systems were studied leading todifferent depth dose distributions. A theoretical model was constructed in order to explain the increase in the depth dose in the build-up region with the increase of the energy. The model utilizes a three-dimensional formalism based on the Fermi-Eyges multiple scattering theory, with the introduction of modifications that takes into account the criation of secondary electrons. (Author) [pt

  15. Atomic collisions by neutrons-induced charged particles in water, protein and nucleic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, R.

    1976-01-01

    The action of slow charged particles is peculiar in that atomic collisions are commonly invlolved. In atomic collisions, which are rare events when fast particles interact with matter, displacement of atoms and chemical bond-breakage is possible. Sufficiently energetic neutrons generate charged recoil particles in matter. Some of these are slow as compared to orbital electrons, but the energy transferred to such slow particles is generally relatively small. Yet, it contributes significantly to the dose absorbed from 0.1-30 keV neutrons. In tissue all recoils induced by neutrons of less than 30 keV are slow, and above 0.1 keV the absorbed dose due to collisiondominates over that due to capture reactions. The aim of the present paper is to identify those intervals of neutron energy in which atomic collision damage is most probable in living matter. The results of calculations presented here indicate that atomic collisions should be most significant for 0.5-3 keV neutrons. (author)

  16. Determination of high level absorbed dose in a 60Co gamma ray field with ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhongying Li; Benjiang Mao; Lu Zhang

    1995-01-01

    This paper relates to the principles and methods for determining the absorbed dose of high energy photons radiation with ionization chambers, and its shows the doserate results of high level 60 Co γ-rays in water measured with Farmer chambers. The results with two kinds of chambers at a same point are consistent within 0.3%, and the total uncertainty is less than ± 4%. In the domestic intercomparison on determining high level absorbed dose in which 12 laboratories participated, the deviation of our result from the mean result of the intercomparison is -0.04% [Chen Yundong (1992). Summing up report on a high level absorbed dose intercomparison (in Chinese)]. (author)

  17. Occupational dose due to neutrons in medical linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larcher, Ana M.; Bonet Duran, Stella M.; Lerner, Ana M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a semi-empirical method to calculate the occupational dose due to neutrons and capture gamma rays in medical linear accelerators. It compares theoretical dose values with measurements performed in several 15 MeV medical accelerators installed in the country. Good agreement has been found between calculations made using the model and dose measurements, except for those accelerator rooms in which the maze length was shorter than the postulated tenth value distance. For those cases the model seems to overestimate neutron dose. The results demonstrate that the semi-empirical model is a good tool for quick and conservative shielding calculations for radiation protection purposes. Nevertheless, it is necessary to continue with the measurements in order to perform a more accurate validation of the model. (author)

  18. Analytical evaluation of dose measurement of critical accident at SILENE (Contract research)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Takemi; Tonoike, Kotaro; Miyoshi, Yoshinori [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) and the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) jointly organized SILENE Accident Dosimetry Intercomparison Exercise to intercompare the dose measurement systems of participating countries. Each participating country carried out dose measurements in the same irradiation field, and the measurement results were mutually compared. The authors participated in the exercise to measure the doses of gamma rays and neutron from SILENE by using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD's) and an alanine dosimeter. In this examination, the authors derived evaluation formulae for obtaining a tissue-absorbed dose from measured value (ambient dose equivalent) of TLD for neutron. We reported the tissue-absorbed dose computed using this evaluation formula to OECD/NEA. TLD's for neutron were irradiated in the TRACY facility to verify the evaluation formulae. The results of TLD's were compared with the calculations of MCNP and measurements with alanine dose meter. We found that the ratio of the dose by the evaluation formula to the measured value by the alanine dosimeter was 0.94 and the formula agreed within 6%. From examination of this TRACY, we can conclude that the value reported to OECD/NEA has equivalent accuracy. (author)

  19. Absorbed doses received by infants subjected to panoramic dental and cephalic radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrizales, L.; Carreno, S.

    1998-01-01

    The IAEA Report No. 115 recommends that each country or region can establish levels of absorbed doses for each radiographic technique employed in diagnostic. assuming the extended and expensive of this purpose, we have been to begin in a first step with the dentistry area, in order to estimate the dose levels received at crystalline and thyroid level in infants that go to an important public institution in our country to realize panoramic and cephalic radiographs. This work will serve to justify and impel a quality assurance program in Venezuela on the dentistry area which includes aspects such as training for the medical lap referring the justification of the radiological practice, optimization of X-ray units to produce an adequate image quality that delivers to patient an absorbed dose as much lower as reasonably it can be reached without diagnostic detriment. (Author)

  20. Neutron dosimetry in biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigurbjoernsson, B.; Smith, H.H.; Gustafsson, A.

    1965-01-01

    To study adequately the biological effects of different energy neutrons it is necessary to have high-intensity sources which are not contaminated by other radiations, the most serious of which are gamma rays. An effective dosimetry must provide an accurate measure of the absorbed dose, in biological materials, of each type of radiation at any reactor facility involved in radiobiological research. A standardized biological dosimetry, in addition to physical and chemical methods, may be desirable. The ideal data needed to achieve a fully documented dosimetry has been compiled by H. Glubrecht: (1) Energy spectrum and intensity of neutrons; (2) Angular distribution of neutrons on the whole surface of the irradiated object; (3) Additional undesired radiation accompanying the neutrons; (4) Physical state and chemical composition of the irradiated object. It is not sufficient to note only an integral dose value (e.g. in 'rad') as the biological effect depends on the above data

  1. Proceedings of the workshop 'Absorbed dose in water and air'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapp, Benjamin; Bordy, Jean-Marc; Camacho Caldeira, Margarida Isabela; Sochor, Vladimir; Celarel, Aurelia; Cenusa, Constentin; Cenusa, Ioan; Donois, Marc; Dusciac, Dorin; Iliescu, Elena; Ostrowsky, Aime; Bercea, Sorin; Blideanu, Valentin; Bordy, Jean-Marc; Steurer, Andrea; Tiefenboeck, Wilhelm

    2017-05-01

    The project 'Absorbed dose in water and air' (Absorb) is aimed at sharing and improving the knowledge on the design of Primary Standards (calorimeter, cavity ionization chambers, free air ionization chambers) for 'dose' measurements in radiation therapy and diagnostic, the harmonization of calibration procedures, the determination of uncertainty and harmonization of uncertainty budgets. Within the framework of this project a workshop was organized at the LNE (Laboratoire National de metrologie et d'Essais) in Paris from February, 29 to March, 2 2016. This report is the proceeding of this workshop. It includes a state of the art of two bilateral collaborations, launched to go beyond the framework of Absorb, between CEA LIST (LNE) LNHB and in one hand IFIN-HH (Romania), and in the other hand IST-LPSR-LMRI (Portugal) to build primary cavity ionization chambers for photons emitted by cobalt-60 and Cesium-137. Absorb is a Joint Research Project of the European Metrology Programme for Innovation and Research (EMPIR) which is co-funded by the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme and the EMPIR Participating States

  2. Electron paramagnetic resonance measurements of absorbed dose in teeth from citizens of Ozyorsk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieser, A.; Semiochkina, N. [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, Neuherberg (Germany); Vasilenko, E.; Aladova, E.; Smetanin, M. [Southern Urals Biophysics Institute, Ozyorsk (Russian Federation); Fattibene, P. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    In 1945, within the frame of the Uranium Project for the production of nuclear weapons, the Mayak nuclear facilities were constructed at the Lake Irtyash in the Southern Urals, Russia. The nuclear workers of the Mayak Production Association (MPA), who lived in the city of Ozyorsk, are the focus of epidemiological studies for the assessment of health risks due to protracted exposure to ionising radiation. Electron paramagnetic resonance measurements of absorbed dose in tooth enamel have already been used in the past, in an effort to validate occupational external doses that were evaluated in the Mayak Worker Dosimetry System. In the present study, 229 teeth of Ozyorsk citizens not employed at MPA were investigated for the assessment of external background exposure in Ozyorsk. The annually absorbed dose in tooth enamel from natural background radiation was estimated to be (0.7 ± 0.3) mGy. For citizens living in Ozyorsk during the time of routine noble gas releases of the MPA, which peaked in 1953, the average excess absorbed dose in enamel above natural background was (36 ± 29) mGy, which is consistent with the gamma dose obtained by model calculations. In addition, there were indications of possible accidental gaseous MPA releases that affected the population of Ozyorsk, during the early and late MPA operation periods, before 1951 and after 1960. (orig.)

  3. Photon and neutron doses of the personnel using moisture and density measurement devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carinou, E.; Papadomarkaki, E.; Tritakis, P.; Hourdakis, C.I.; Kamenopoulou, V. [Greek Atomic Energy Commission, Agia Paraskevi, Attiki, 60092 (Greece)

    2006-07-01

    The objective of this study is to present the evolution of the photon doses received by the workers who use mobile devices for measuring the moisture and the density in various materials and to estimate the neutron doses. The workers employed in more than 30 construction companies in Greece were 76 in 2004. The devices used for that purpose incorporate a {sup 137}Cs source for density measurements and an {sup 241}Am-Be source for moisture measurements of soil, asphalt or concrete. Photon and neutron measurements were performed occasionally during the on site inspections. The results of the measurements showed that the photon and neutron dose rates were not negligible. The workers were monitored for photon radiation using film badges (Kodak Type 2, Holder NRPB type) till the year 2000 and then TLD badges issued by the Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC), on a monthly basis. Since the neutron dose rates measured by a rem-meter were not so high, no neutron dosemeters were issued for them. Their personal dose equivalent data for photons are kept in the National Dose Registry Information System (N.D.R.I.S.) in G.A.E.C. and were used for statistical analysis for the period from 1997 till 2004. As far as the neutrons are concerned, a Monte Carlo code was used to simulate the measuring devices and the working positions in order to calculate the neutron individual doses. (authors)

  4. Photon and neutron doses of the personnel using moisture and density measurement devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carinou, E.; Papadomarkaki, E.; Tritakis, P.; Hourdakis, C.I.; Kamenopoulou, V.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study is to present the evolution of the photon doses received by the workers who use mobile devices for measuring the moisture and the density in various materials and to estimate the neutron doses. The workers employed in more than 30 construction companies in Greece were 76 in 2004. The devices used for that purpose incorporate a 137 Cs source for density measurements and an 241 Am-Be source for moisture measurements of soil, asphalt or concrete. Photon and neutron measurements were performed occasionally during the on site inspections. The results of the measurements showed that the photon and neutron dose rates were not negligible. The workers were monitored for photon radiation using film badges (Kodak Type 2, Holder NRPB type) till the year 2000 and then TLD badges issued by the Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC), on a monthly basis. Since the neutron dose rates measured by a rem-meter were not so high, no neutron dosemeters were issued for them. Their personal dose equivalent data for photons are kept in the National Dose Registry Information System (N.D.R.I.S.) in G.A.E.C. and were used for statistical analysis for the period from 1997 till 2004. As far as the neutrons are concerned, a Monte Carlo code was used to simulate the measuring devices and the working positions in order to calculate the neutron individual doses. (authors)

  5. Rapid Measurement of Neutron Dose Rate for Transport Index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    A newly available neutron dose equivalent remmeter with improved sensitivity and energy response has been put into service at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). This instrument is being used to expedite measurement of the Transport Index and as an ALARA tool to identify locations where slightly elevated neutron dose equivalent rates exist. The meter is capable of measuring dose rates as low as 0.2 μSv per hour (20 μrem per hour). Tests of the angular response and energy response of the instrument are reported. Calculations of the theoretical instrument response made using MCNPtrademark are reported for materials typical of those being shipped

  6. Effects of secondary interactions on the dose calculation in treatments with Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, E.

    2004-01-01

    The aimed of this work consists of evaluating the influence of the secondary contributions of dose (thermal neutrons dose, epithermal neutrons dose, fast neutrons dose and photon dose) in treatment planning with BNCT. MCNP4B Code was used to calculate RBE-Gy doses through the irradiation of the modified Snyder head head phantom.A reduction of the therapeutical gain of monoenergetic neutron beans was observed in non invasive treatments, provoked for the predominance of the fast neutron dose component in the skin, showing that the secondary contributions of dose can contribute more in the direction to raise the dose in the fabric healthy that in the tumor, thus reducing the treatment efficiency. (author)

  7. The METAS absorbed dose to water calibration service for high energy photon and electron beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stucki, G.; Muench, W.; Quintel, H.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The Swiss Federal Office of Metrology and Accreditation (METAS) provides an absorbed dose to water calibration service for reference dosimeters using 60 Co γ radiation, ten X-ray beam qualities between TPR 20,10 =0.639 and 0.802 and ten electron beam qualities between R 50 =1.75 gcm -2 and 8.54 gcm -2 . A 22 MeV microtron accelerator with a conventional treatment head is used as radiation source for the high energy photon and electron beams. The treatment head produces clinical beams. The METAS absorbed dose calibration service for high energy photons is based on a primary standard sealed water calorimeter of the Domen type, that is used to calibrate several METAS transfer standards of type NE2611A and NE2571A in terms of absorbed dose to water in the energy range from 60 Co to TPR 20,10 = 0.802. User reference dosimeters are compared with the transfer standards to give calibration factors in absorbed dose to water with an uncertainty of 1.0% for 60 Co γ radiation and 1.4% for higher energies (coverage factor k=2). The calibration service was launched in 1997. The calibration factors measured by METAS have been compared with those derived from the Code of Practice of the International Atomic Energy Agency using the calculated k Q factors listed in table 14. The comparison showed a maximum difference of 0.8% for the NE25611A and NE 2571A chambers. At 60 Co γ radiation the METAS primary standard of absorbed dose to water was bilaterally compared with the primary standards of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures BIPM (Sevres) as well as of the National Research Council NRC (Canada). In either case the standards were in agreement within the comparison uncertainties. The METAS absorbed dose calibration service for high energy electron beams is based on a primary standard chemical dosimeter. A monoenergetic electron beam of precisely known particle energy and beam charge is totally absorbed in Fricke solution (ferrous ammonium sulphate) of a given

  8. Nuclear characteristics of epoxy resin as a space environment neutron shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeli, Ruhollah [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Central Iran Research Complex; Shirmardi, Seyed Pezhman [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Radiation Application Research School; Mazinani, Saideh [Amirkabir Nanotechnology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ahmadi, Seyed Javad [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Nuclear Fuel Cycle Research School

    2017-03-15

    In recent years many investigations have been done for choosing applicable light neutron shielding in space environmental applications. In this study, we have considered the neutron radiation-protective characteristics of neat epoxy resin, a thermoplastic polymer material and have compared it with various candidate materials in neutron radiation protection such as Al 6061 alloy and Polyethylene. The aim of this investigation is the effect of type of moderator for fast neutron, notwithstanding neutron absorbers fillers. The nuclear interactions and the effective dose at shields have been studied with the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP), using variance reductions to reduce the relative error. Among the candidates, polymer matrix showed a better performance in attenuating fast neutrons and caused a lower neutron and secondary photon effective dose.

  9. Estimation of absorbed doses in humans due to intravenous administration of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose in PET studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejia, A.A.; Nakamura, T.; Masatoshi, I.; Hatazawa, J.; Masaki, M.; Watanuki, S.

    1991-01-01

    Radiation absorbed doses due to intravenous administration of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose in positron emission tomography (PET) studies were estimated in normal volunteers. The time-activity curves were obtained for seven human organs (brain, heart, kidney, liver, lung, pancreas, and spleen) by using dynamic PET scans and for bladder content by using a single detector. These time-activity curves were used for the calculation of the cumulative activity in these organs. Absorbed doses were calculated by the MIRD method using the absorbed dose per unit of cumulated activity, 'S' value, transformed for the Japanese physique and the organ masses of the Japanese reference man. The bladder wall and the heart were the organs receiving higher doses of 1.2 x 10(-1) and 4.5 x 10(-2) mGy/MBq, respectively. The brain received a dose of 2.9 x 10(-2) mGy/MBq, and other organs received doses between 1.0 x 10(-2) and 3.0 x 10(-2) mGy/MBq. The effective dose equivalent was estimated to be 2.4 x 10(-2) mSv/MBq. These results were comparable to values of absorbed doses reported by other authors on the radiation dosimetry of this radiopharmaceutical

  10. Development of Real-Time Measurement of Effective Dose for High Dose Rate Neutron Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Braby, L A; Reece, W D

    2003-01-01

    Studies of the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation require sources of radiation which are well characterized in terms of the dose and the quality of the radiation. One of the best measures of the quality of neutron irradiation is the dose mean lineal energy. At very low dose rates this can be determined by measuring individual energy deposition events, and calculating the dose mean of the event size. However, at the dose rates that are normally required for biology experiments, the individual events can not be separated by radiation detectors. However, the total energy deposited in a specified time interval can be measured. This total energy has a random variation which depends on the size of the individual events, so the dose mean lineal energy can be calculated from the variance of repeated measurements of the energy deposited in a fixed time. We have developed a specialized charge integration circuit for the measurement of the charge produced in a small ion chamber in typical neutron irradiation exp...

  11. Calculation of absorbed dose in water by chemical Fricke dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Adenilson Paiva; Meireles, Ramiro Conceicao

    2016-01-01

    This work is the result of a laboratory activity performed in Radiological Sciences Laboratory (CRL), linked to the State University of Rio de Janeiro (UERJ). This practice aimed to determine the absorbed dose to water, through the primary calibration method called dosimetry Fricke, which consists of ferrous ions (Fe + 2) to ferric (Fe + 3), generated by water radiolysis products which is the structural change of water molecule caused by ionizing radiation. A spectrophotometer was used to extract data for analysis at a wavelength (λ) 304 and 224 nm with function of measuring the absorbance using bottles with irradiated and nonirradiated Fricke solution. (author)

  12. First-principles investigation of neutron-irradiation-induced point defects in B4C, a neutron absorber for sodium-cooled fast nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yan; Yoshida, Katsumi; Yano, Toyohiko

    2018-05-01

    Boron carbide (B4C) is a leading candidate neutron absorber material for sodium-cooled fast nuclear reactors owing to its excellent neutron-capture capability. The formation and migration energies of the neutron-irradiation-induced defects, including vacancies, neutron-capture reaction products, and knocked-out atoms were studied by density functional theory calculations. The vacancy-type defects tend to migrate to the C–B–C chains of B4C, which indicates that the icosahedral cage structures of B4C have strong resistance to neutron irradiation. We found that lithium and helium atoms had significantly lower migration barriers along the rhombohedral (111) plane of B4C than perpendicular to this plane. This implies that the helium and lithium interstitials tended to follow a two-dimensional diffusion regime in B4C at low temperatures which explains the formation of flat disk like helium bubbles experimentally observed in B4C pellets after neutron irradiation. The knocked-out atoms are considered to be annihilated by the recombination of the close pairs of self-interstitials and vacancies.

  13. International comparison of calibration standards for exposure and absorbed dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horakova, I.; Wagner, R.

    1990-01-01

    A comparison was performed of the primary calibration standards for 60 Co gamma radiation dose from Czechoslovakia (UDZ CSAV, Prague), Austria (OEFZS/BEV Seibersdorf) and Hungary (OMH Budapest) using ND 1005 (absolute measurement) and V-415 (by means of N x ) graphite ionization chambers. BEV achieved agreement better than 0.1%, OMH 0.35%. Good agreement was also achieved for the values of exposure obtained in absolute values and those obtained via N x , this for the ND 1005/8105 chamber. The first ever international comparison involving Czechoslovakia was also performed of the unit of absorbed gamma radiation in a water and/or graphite phantom. The participants included Czechoslovakia (UDZ CSAV Prague), the USSR (VNIIFTRI Moscow) and Austria (OEFZS/BEV Seibersdorf). In all measurements, the agreement was better than 1%, which, in view of the differences in methodologies (VNIIFTRI, BEV: calorimetry, UDZ, UVVVR: ionometry) and the overall inaccuracies in determining the absorbed dose values, is a good result. (author)

  14. Alterations in water and electrolyte absorption in the rat colon following neutron irradiation: influence of neutron component and irradiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dublineau, I; Ksas, B; Joubert, C; Aigueperse, J; Gourmelon, P; Griffiths, N M

    2002-12-01

    To study the absorptive function of rat colon following whole-body exposure to neutron irradiation, either to the same total dose with varying proportion of neutrons or to the same neutron proportion with an increasing irradiation dose. Different proportions of neutron irradiation were produced from the reactor SILENE using a fissile solution of uranium nitrate (8, 47 and 87% neutron). Water and electrolyte fluxes were measured in the rat in vivo under anaesthesia by insertion into the descending colon of an agarose gel cylinder simulating the faeces. Functional studies were completed by histological analyses. In the first set of experiments, rats received 3.8 Gy with various neutron percentages and were studied from 1 to 14 days after exposure. In the second set of experiments, rats were exposed to increasing doses of irradiation (1-4Gy) with a high neutron percentage (87%n) and were studied at 4 days after exposure. The absorptive capacity of rat colon was diminished by irradiation at 3-5 days, with a nadir at 4 days. The results demonstrate that an increase in the neutron proportion is associated with an amplification of the effects. Furthermore, a delay in the re-establishment of normal absorption was observed with the high neutron proportion (87%n). A dose-dependent reduction of water absorption by rat colon was also observed following neutron irradiation (87%n), with a 50% reduction at 3 Gy. Comparison of this dose-effect curve with the curve obtained following gamma (60)Co-irradiation indicates an RBE of 2.2 for absorptive colonic function in rat calculated at 4 days after exposure.

  15. Verification of an effective dose equivalent model for neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, J.E.; Piper, R.K.; Leonowich, J.A.; Faust, L.G.

    1992-01-01

    Since the effective dose equivalent, based on the weighted sum of organ dose equivalents, is not a directly measurable quantity, it must be estimated with the assistance of computer modelling techniques and a knowledge of the incident radiation field. Although extreme accuracy is not necessary for radiation protection purposes, a few well chosen measurements are required to confirm the theoretical models. Neutron doses and dose equivalents were measured in a RANDO phantom at specific locations using thermoluminescence dosemeters, etched track dosemeters, and a 1.27 cm (1/2 in) tissue-equivalent proportional counter. The phantom was exposed to a bare and a D 2 O-moderated 252 Cf neutron source at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory's Low Scatter Facility. The Monte Carlo code MCNP with the MIRD-V mathematical phantom was used to model the human body and to calculate the organ doses and dose equivalents. The experimental methods are described and the results of the measurements are compared with the calculations. (author)

  16. Evaluation of the distribution of absorbed dose in child phantoms exposed to diagnostic medical x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine, by theoretical calculation and experimental measurement, the absorbed dose distributions in two heterogeneous phantoms representing one-year- and five-year-old children from typical radiographic examinations for those ages. Theoretical work included the modification of an existing internal dose code which used Monte Carlo methods to determine doses within the Snyder-Fisher mathematical phantom. A Ge(Li) detector and a pinhole collimator were used to measure x-ray spectra which served as input (i.e., the source routine) to the modified Monte Carlo codes which were used to calculate organ doses in children. Experimental work included the fabrication of child phantoms to match the existing mathematical models. These phantoms were constructed of molded lucite shells filled with differing materials to simulate lung, skeletal, and soft-tissue regions. The skeleton regions of phantoms offered the opportunity to perform meaningful measurements of absorbed dose to bone marrow and bone. Thirteen to fourteen sites in various bones of the skeleton were chosen for placement of TLDs. These sites represented important regions in which active bone marrow is located. Sixteen typical radiographic examinations were performed representing common pediatric diagnostic procedures. The calculated and measured tissue-air values were compared for a number of organs. For most organs, the results of the calculated absorbed doses agreed with the measured absorbed doses within twice the coefficient of variation of the calculated value. The absorbed dose to specific organs for several selected radiological examinations are given for one-year-old, five-year-old, and adult phantoms. For selected radiological exposures, the risk factors of leukemia, thyroid cancer, and genetic death are estimated for one-year- and five-year-old children

  17. Neutron dose equivalent next to the target shield of a neutron therapy facility using an LET counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stinchcomb, T.G.; Kuchnir, F.T.

    1981-01-01

    The use of a spherical tissue-equivalent proportional counter for measurements of the lineal energy (y) and derivations of the linear energy transfer (LET) for fast neutrons has the advantage of giving distributions of dose and dose equivalent as functions of either LET or y. A measurement next to the target shielding of the neutron therapy facility at the University of Chicago Hospitals and Clinics (UCHC) is described, and the data processing is outlined. The distributions are presented and compared to those from measurements in the neutron beam. The average quality factors are presented

  18. Spectral correction factors for conventional neutron dose meters used in high-energy neutron environments improved and extended results based on a complete survey of all neutron spectra in IAEA-TRS-403

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oparaji, U.; Tsai, Y. H.; Liu, Y. C.; Lee, K. W.; Patelli, E.; Sheu, R. J.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents improved and extended results of our previous study on corrections for conventional neutron dose meters used in environments with high-energy neutrons (E n > 10 MeV). Conventional moderated-type neutron dose meters tend to underestimate the dose contribution of high-energy neutrons because of the opposite trends of dose conversion coefficients and detection efficiencies as the neutron energy increases. A practical correction scheme was proposed based on analysis of hundreds of neutron spectra in the IAEA-TRS-403 report. By comparing 252 Cf-calibrated dose responses with reference values derived from fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients, this study provides recommendations for neutron field characterization and the corresponding dose correction factors. Further sensitivity studies confirm the appropriateness of the proposed scheme and indicate that (1) the spectral correction factors are nearly independent of the selection of three commonly used calibration sources: 252 Cf, 241 Am-Be and 239 Pu-Be; (2) the derived correction factors for Bonner spheres of various sizes (6''-9'') are similar in trend and (3) practical high-energy neutron indexes based on measurements can be established to facilitate the application of these correction factors in workplaces. (authors)

  19. Variations in absorbed doses from 59Fe in different diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, P.; Werner, E.; Henrichs, K.; Elsasser, U.; Kaul, A.

    1986-01-01

    The biokinetics of radiopharmaceuticals administered in vivo may vary considerably with changes in organ functions. They studied the variations in absorbed doses from 59 Fe in 207 patients with different diseases, in whom ferrokinetic investigations were performed for diagnostic purposes. Radiation doses to the bone marrow were highest in patients with deserythropoietic anemias (mean 38 nSv/Bq, range 19 - 57 nSv/Bq) and in hemolytic anemias (mean 21 nSv/Bq, range 7 - 35 nSv/Bq), whereas lower and rather constant values were found in other diseases (mean values between 9 and 13 nSv/Bq). The highest organ doses, the greatest differences with respect to diagnosis and also the largest variations within each group of patients were found for liver and spleen (e. g. in aplastic anemia; liver: 66 nSv/Bq, range 29 - 104 nSv/Bq; spleen: 57 nSv/Bq, range 34 - 98 nSv/Bq. In iron deficiency; liver: 13 nSv/Bq range 12 - 14 nSv/q; spleen: 19 nSv/Bq, range 18 - 20 nSv/Bq). Lower organ doses and smaller variations within and between the groups of patients were found for the gonads (means 3 - 7 nSv/Bq), the kidneys (means 10 - 13 nSv/Bq), the bone (means 4 - 7 nSv/Bq), the lung (means 8 - 12 nSv/Bq), and the total body (means 6 - 8 nSv/Bq). In patients with chronic bleeding absorbed doses decrease concomitantly to the extent of blood loss. The D/sub E/ is not markedly affected by the variations in organ doses but is fairly constant for different diseases. 16 references, 1 figure, 3 tables

  20. Three-dimensional determination of absorbed dose by spectrophotometric analysis of ferrous-sulphate agarose gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambarini, G.; Gomarasca, G.; Marchesini, R.; Pecci, A.; Pirola, L.; Tomatis, S.

    1999-01-01

    We describe a technique to obtain three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of an absorbed dose by optical transmittance measurements of phantoms composed by agarose gel in which a ferrous sulphate and xylenol orange solution are incorporated. The analysis of gel samples is performed by acquiring transmittance images with a system based on a CCD camera provided with an interference filter matching the optical absorption peak of interest. The proposed technique for 3-D measurements of an absorbed dose is based on the imaging of phantoms composed of sets of properly piled up gel slices. The slice thickness was optimized in order to obtain a good image contrast as well as a good in-depth spatial resolution. To test the technique, a phantom has been irradiated with a collimated γ-beam and then analysed. Proper software was adapted in order to visualise the images of all slices and to attain the 2-D profiles of the dose absorbed by each slice

  1. Standardization of high-dose measurement of electron and gamma ray absorbed doses and dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    Intense electron beams and gamma radiation fields are used for sterilizing medical devices, treating municipal wastes, processing industrial goods, controlling parasites and pathogens, and extending the shelf-life of foods. Quality control of such radiation processes depends largely on maintaining measurement quality assurance through sound dosimetry procedures in the research leading to each process, in the commissioning of that process, and in the routine dose monitoring practices. This affords documentation as to whether satisfactory dose uniformity is maintained throughout the product and throughout the process. Therefore, dosimetry at high doses and dose rates must in many radiation processes be standardized carefully, so that 'dosimetry release' of a product is verified. This standardization is initiated through preliminary dosimetry intercomparison studies such as those sponsored recently by the IAEA. This is followed by establishing periodic exercises in traceability to national or international standards of absorbed dose and dose rate. Traceability is achieved by careful selection of dosimetry methods and proven reference dosimeters capable of giving sufficiently accurate and precise 'transfer' dose assessments: (1) they must be calibrated or have well-established radiation-yield indices; (2) their radiation response characteristics must be reproducible and cover the dose range of interest; (3) they must withstand the rigours of back-and-forth mailing between a central standardizing laboratory and radiation processing facilities, without excessive errors arising due to instabilities, dosimeter batch non-uniformities, and environmental and handling stresses. (author)

  2. Apparatus for controlling a nuclear reactor by vertical displacement of a unit absorbing neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiart, A.; Defaucheux, J.; Martin, J.; Pasqualini, G.

    1980-01-01

    Apparatus is described for controlling a nuclear reactor by vertical displacement of a unit absorbing neutrons, comprising, inside a sealed enclosure in communication with the interior of the reactor, a movable magnetic piece connected to a control shaft which is itself connected to the absorbent unit. This magnetic piece has at least two radial projections. The magnetic piece is displaced by an inductor with at least two pole shoes corresponding to the projections on the magnetic piece and allowing magnetic coupling between the inductor and the magnetic piece. The inductor and its displacement device are disposed outside the sealed enclosure. A control means allows the control shaft to be uncoupled from a member assuring its suspension so as to drop the absorbent unit in the event of emergency shutdown. The apparatus is particularly applicable to control rods of pressurized water nuclear reactors

  3. A European neutron dosimetry intercomparison project (ENDIP). Results and evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broerse, J.J.; Burger, G.; Coppola, M.

    1978-01-01

    A total of twenty groups from nine countries participated in sessions of the European Neutron Dosimetry Intercomparison Project (ENDIP) which were held during 1975 at GSF, Munich-Neuherberg and TNO, Rijswijk. The data of all participants are collected, the analysis and evaluation of the results are given in the present report. Specific chapters deal with the experimental arrangements and monitoring results at GSF and TNO, characteristics of the dosimetry systems employed by the paticipating groups and the basic physical data and correction factors employed for the determination of kerma and absorbed dose. In general, the participants in ENDIP quote systematic uncertainties of 7 to 8% in the neutron and total kerma or absorbed dose, which are mainly attributed to inadequate knowledge of basic constants. The variations in the results obtained by different participants seem to be in accordance with the relative large systematic uncertainties quoted. In order to determine the influence of the use of different values for the physical parameters, the relative responses of the participants' dosimeters have also been compared. The variances of quoted kerma and dose values are of the same order of magnitude as those of instrument responses. This result indicates inconsistencies in experimental techniques employed by the participants for the determination of kerma and absorbed dose. A separate nonparametric analysis of the ENDIP results confirmed that there are considerable systematic differences. Recommendations for future studies on neutron dosimetry for biological and medical applications are given at the end of the report

  4. Comparison of absorbed dose in the cervix carcinoma therapy by brachytherapy of high dose rate using the conventional planning and Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Aneli Oliveira da

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to compare the doses received for patients submitted to brachytherapy High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy, a method of treatment of the cervix carcinoma, performed in the planning system PLATO BPS with the doses obtained by Monte Carlo simulation using the radiation transport code MCNP 5 and one female anthropomorphic phantom based on voxel, the FAX. The implementation of HDR brachytherapy treatment for the cervix carcinoma consists of the insertion of an intrauterine probe and an intravaginal probe (ring or ovoid) and then two radiographs are obtained, anteroposterior (AP) and lateral (LAT) to confirm the position of the applicators in the patient and to allow the treatment planning and the determination of the absorbed dose at points of interest: rectum, bladder, sigmoid and point A, which corresponds anatomically to the crossings of the uterine arteries with ureters The absorbed doses obtained with the code MCNP 5, with the exception of the absorbed dose in the rectum and sigmoid for the simulation considering a point source of 192 Ir, are lower than the absorbed doses from PLATO BPS calculations because the MCNP 5 considers the chemical compositions and densities of FAX body, not considering the medium as water. When considering the Monte Carlo simulation for a source with dimensions equal to that used in the brachytherapy irradiator used in this study, the values of calculated absorbed dose to the bladder, to the rectum, to the right point A and to the left point A were respectively lower than those determined by the treatment planning system in 33.29, 5.01, 22.93 and 19.04%. These values are almost all larger than the maximum acceptable deviation between patient planned and administered doses (5 %). With regard to the rectum and bladder, which are organs that must be protected, the present results are in favor of the radiological protection of patients. The point A, that is on the isodose of 100%, used to tumor treatment, the results indicate

  5. Dose-effect relationship of apoptosis induced by fission-neutron in murine thymocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Bin; Li Liang; Xue Wencheng; Sun Jianmin; Wang Baoqin

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effectiveness of high LET fission-neutron to induce apoptosis in murine thymocytes and to compare it with that of low LET 60 Co γ-ray. Methods: Apoptosis induction was studied qualitatively by light and transmission electron microscopy and DNA gel electrophoresis,also quantitatively by flow cytometry(FCM) and diphenylamine (DPA)methods. Results: DNA ladders of murine thymocytes were detectable, the typical apoptosis of thymocytes could be observed morphologically by means of light and electron microscopy at 6 h after fission-neutron irradiation with doses ranging from 0.5 to 5.0 Gy, meanwhile the percentages of apoptosis increased with increasing doses. After exposure to γ-rays with doses ranging from 1.0 to 30 Gy, the experimental results were similar to those from neutron radiation. The incidence of apoptosis peaked at about 20 Gy, the percentages did not increase further when doses increased. Conclusion: Apoptosis of murine thymocytes can be induced when mice are exposed to either fission-neutron (0.5-5.0 Gy) or to γ-ray (1-30 Gy). Although the relationship between apoptosis and radiation doses is similar, the percentage of apoptosis induced by neutron irradiation is higher than that induced by γ-irradiation. The RBE values of fission-neutron for inducing apoptosis murine thymocytes are 2.09 (by FCM method) and 2.37 (by DPA method), respectively. These results also suggest that fission-neutron-induced murine immune tissue is more severe than that induced by γ-rays at several hours post-irradiation and this might be the basis for heavy damage to immune tissues induced by fission-neutron-irradiation in later period

  6. Risk from fast neutron exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, V.P.

    1978-01-01

    The recommendations made by Rossi and Mays imply that the risk associated with the current annual dose equivalent limit of 5 rem for all radiations is unacceptably high, that this limit must be reduced by a factor of 10 or more, and that the conservative linear, no threshold hypothesis must be abandoned. It is shown here that these recommendations are not supported by the newly-analyzed neutron data, and certainly cannot be applied selectively to the annual absorbed dose limit for neutrons. In particular, the judgment that the risk of an annual exposure from 0.5 rad (5 rem) of neutrons is unacceptable high, although perhaps defensible as a personal opinion of the authors, does not follow either from the assumption of a linear-quadratic dose effect relation for low-LET radiation or from other radiobiological considerations. At issue is the level of risk that is to be considered acceptable, a question that is societal and thus not resolvable on purely technical or scientific grounds

  7. Absorbed Dose Distribution in a Pulse Radiolysis Optical Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; McLaughlin, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    When a liquid solution in an optical cell is irradiated by an intense pulsed electron beam, it may be important in the chemical analysis of the solution to know the distribution of energy deposited throughout the cell. For the present work, absorbed dose distributions were measured by thin...... radiochromic dye film dosimeters placed at various depths in a quartz glass pulse radiolysis cell. The cell was irradiated with 30 ns pulses from a field-emission electron accelerator having a broad spectrum with a maximum energy of ≈MeV. The measured three-dimensional dose distributions showed sharp gradients...... in dose at the largest penetration depths in the cell and at the extreme lateral edges of the cell interior near the optical windows. This method of measurement was convenient because of the high spatial resolution capability of the detector and the linearity and absence of dose-rate dependence of its...

  8. Dose prescription in boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, N.M.S.; Gahbauer, R.A.; Blue, T.E.; Wambersie, A.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to address some aspects of the many considerations that need to go into a dose prescription in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for brain tumors; and to describe some methods to incorporate knowledge from animal studies and other experiments into the process of dose prescription. Previously, an algorithm to estimate the normal tissue tolerance to mixed high and low linear energy transfer radiations in BNCT was proposed. The authors have developed mathematical formulations and computational methods to represent this algorithm. Generalized models to fit the central axis dose rate components for an epithermal neutron field were also developed. These formulations and beam fitting models were programmed into spreadsheets to simulate two treatment techniques which are expected to be used in BNCT: a two-field bilateral scheme and a single-field treatment scheme. Parameters in these spreadsheets can be varied to represent the fractionation scheme used, the 10 B microdistribution in normal tissue, and the ratio of 10 B in tumor to normal tissue. Most of these factors have to be determined for a given neutron field and 10 B compound combination from large animal studies. The spreadsheets have been programmed to integrate all of the treatment-related information and calculate the location along the central axis where the normal tissue tolerance is exceeded first. This information is then used to compute the maximum treatment time allowable and the maximum tumor dose that may be delivered for a given BNCT treatment. The effect of different treatment variables on the treatment time and tumor dose has been shown to be very significant. It has also been shown that the location of D max shifts significantly, depending on some of the treatment variables-mainly the fractionation scheme used. These results further emphasize the fact that dose prescription in BNCT is very complicated and nonintuitive. 11 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  9. 3D calculation of absorbed dose for 131I-targeted radiotherapy: A Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeedzadeh, E.; Sarkar, S.; Abbaspour Tehrani-Fard, A.; Ay, M. R.; Khosravi, H. R.; Loudos, G.

    2008-01-01

    Various methods, such as those developed by the Medical Internal Radiation Dosimetry (MIRD) Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine or employing dose point kernels, have been applied to the radiation dosimetry of 131 I radionuclide therapy. However, studies have not shown a strong relationship between tumour absorbed dose and its overall therapeutic response, probably due in part to inaccuracies in activity and dose estimation. In the current study, the GATE Monte Carlo computer code was used to facilitate voxel-level radiation dosimetry for organ activities measured in an. 131 I-treated thyroid cancer patient. This approach allows incorporation of the size, shape and composition of organs (in the current study, in the Zubal anthropomorphic phantom) and intra-organ and intra-tumour inhomogeneities in the activity distributions. The total activities of the tumours and their heterogeneous distributions were measured from the SPECT images to calculate the dose maps. For investigating the effect of activity distribution on dose distribution, a hypothetical homogeneous distribution of the same total activity was considered in the tumours. It was observed that the tumour mean absorbed dose rates per unit cumulated activity were 0.65 E-5 and 0.61 E-5 mGY MBq -1 s -1 for the uniform and non-uniform distributions in the tumour, respectively, which do not differ considerably. However, the dose-volume histograms (DVH) show that the tumour non-uniform activity distribution decreases the absorbed dose to portions of the tumour volume. In such a case, it can be misleading to quote the mean or maximum absorbed dose, because overall response is likely limited by the tumour volume that receives low (i.e. non-cytocidal) doses. Three-dimensional radiation dosimetry, and calculation of tumour DVHs, may lead to the derivation of clinically reliable dose-response relationships and therefore may ultimately improve treatment planning as well as response assessment for radionuclide

  10. Aspects of pre-dose and other luminescence phenomena in quartz absorbed dose estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamiec, G.

    2000-01-01

    The understanding of all luminescence processes occurring in quartz is of paramount importance in the further development of robust absorbed dose estimation techniques (for the purpose of dating and retrospective dosimetry). The findings presented in this thesis, aid future improvements of absorbed dose estimation techniques using quartz by presenting investigations in the following areas: 1) interpretation of measurement results, 2) numerical modelling of luminescence in quartz, 3) phenomena needing inclusion in future physical models of luminescence. In the first part, the variability of properties of single quartz grains is examined. Through empirical and theoretical considerations, investigations are made of various problems of measurements of luminescence using multi-grain aliquots, and specifically areas where the heterogeneity of the sample at the inter-grain level may be misinterpreted at the multi-grain-aliquot level. The results obtained suggest that the heterogeneity of samples is often overlooked, and that such differences can have a profound influence on the interpretation of measurement results. Discussed are the shape of TL glow curves, OSL decay curves, dose response curves (including consequences for using certain signals as proxies for others), normalisation procedures and D E estimation techniques. Further, a numerical model of luminescence is proposed, which includes multiple R-centres and is used to describe the pre-dose sensitisation in quartz. The numerical model exhibits a broad-scale behaviour observed experimentally in a sample of annealed quartz. The shapes of TAC for lower (20 Gy) and higher doses (1 kGy) and the evolution with temperature of the isothermal sensitisation curves are qualitatively matched for the empirical and numerical systems. In the third area, a preliminary investigation of the properties of the '110 deg. C peak' in the 550 nm emission band, in annealed quartz is presented. These properties are in sharp contrast with

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of secondary neutron dose for scanning proton therapy using FLUKA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaeyeong Lee

    Full Text Available Proton therapy is a rapidly progressing field for cancer treatment. Globally, many proton therapy facilities are being commissioned or under construction. Secondary neutrons are an important issue during the commissioning process of a proton therapy facility. The purpose of this study is to model and validate scanning nozzles of proton therapy at Samsung Medical Center (SMC by Monte Carlo simulation for beam commissioning. After the commissioning, a secondary neutron ambient dose from proton scanning nozzle (Gantry 1 was simulated and measured. This simulation was performed to evaluate beam properties such as percent depth dose curve, Bragg peak, and distal fall-off, so that they could be verified with measured data. Using the validated beam nozzle, the secondary neutron ambient dose was simulated and then compared with the measured ambient dose from Gantry 1. We calculated secondary neutron dose at several different points. We demonstrated the validity modeling a proton scanning nozzle system to evaluate various parameters using FLUKA. The measured secondary neutron ambient dose showed a similar tendency with the simulation result. This work will increase the knowledge necessary for the development of radiation safety technology in medical particle accelerators.

  12. Radiation absorbed doses at radiographic examination of third molars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehnmark-Larsson, S.; Stenstroem, B.; Julin, P.; Richter, S.; Huddinge University Hospital

    1981-01-01

    The radiation absorbed doses to critical organs, i.e. the thyroid and salivary glands and the gonadal region, were measured at radiographic examination of third molars. A tissue equivalent phantom was used together with ionization chamber detectors and TLDs. The greatest thyroid dose, 35 μGy, came from a mandibular disto-oblique projection with the circular tube collimator and Ultra-Speed film. The doses in different parts of the parotid gland from the disto-oblique mandibular projection with Ultra-Speed film ranged between 2.65 and 0.052 mGy. the corresponding doses in the submandibular gland were 1.74 mGy beneath the mandible and 0.458 mGy in the fovea. A rectangular tube collimator reduced the doses by approximately 50 %. The Ekta-Speed film requirted approximately 40 % lower exposure than the Ultra-Speed film. A horizontal radiation shield reduced the thyroid doses by between 12 and 46 % and the gonadal doses by between 50 and 95 %. The reduction effect from the shield was relatively greater when using the larger aperture of the tube collimator. Combinations of leaded aprons and soft leaded collars reduced the thyroid doses between 15 and 42 % and the gonadal doses by two orders of magnitude. (Authors)

  13. Use of prompt gamma emissions from polyethylene to estimate neutron ambient dose equivalent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priyada, P.; Sarkar, P.K., E-mail: pradip.sarkar@manipal.edu

    2015-06-11

    The possibility of using measured prompt gamma emissions from polyethylene to estimate neutron ambient dose equivalent is explored theoretically. Monte Carlo simulations have been carried out using the FLUKA code to calculate the response of a high density polyethylene cylinder to emit prompt gammas from interaction of neutrons with the nuclei of hydrogen and carbon present in polyethylene. The neutron energy dependent responses of hydrogen and carbon nuclei are combined appropriately to match the energy dependent neutron fluence to ambient dose equivalent conversion coefficients. The proposed method is tested initially with simulated spectra and then validated using experimental measurements with an Am–Be neutron source. Experimental measurements and theoretical simulations have established the feasibility of estimating neutron ambient dose equivalent using measured neutron induced prompt gammas emitted from polyethylene with an overestimation of neutron dose at very low energies. - Highlights: • A new method for estimating H{sup ⁎}(10) using prompt gamma emissions from HDPE. • Linear combination of 2.2 MeV and 4.4 MeV gamma intensities approximates DCC (ICRP). • Feasibility of the method was established theoretically and experimentally. • The response of the present technique is very similar to that of the rem meters.

  14. NEUTRON GENERATOR FACILITY AT SFU: GEANT4 DOSE RATE PREDICTION AND VERIFICATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J; Chester, A; Domingo, T; Rizwan, U; Starosta, K; Voss, P

    2016-11-01

    Detailed dose rate maps for a neutron generator facility at Simon Fraser University were produced via the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework. Predicted neutron dose rates throughout the facility were compared with radiation survey measurements made during the facility commissioning process. When accounting for thermal neutrons, the prediction and measurement agree within a factor of 2 or better in most survey locations, and within 10 % inside the vault housing the neutron generator. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Need for improved standards in neutron personnel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auxier, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    There is a continuing need for standards in neutron monitoring. A discussion of special problem areas and the benefits of intercomparisons is given. The RBE for leukemia induction in the survivors of the nuclear bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki is greater than ten for absorbed doses in the bone marrow of less than 100 rads; this may have an important impact on neutron standards preparation

  16. Study on method of dose estimation for the Dual-moderated neutron survey meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Bo; Li, Taosheng; Xu, Yuhai; Gong, Cunkui; Yan, Qiang; Li, Lei

    2013-01-01

    In order to study neutron dose measurement in high energy radiation field, a Dual-moderated survey meter in the range from 1 keV to 300 MeV mean energies spectra has been developed. Measurement results of some survey meters depend on the neutron spectra characteristics in different neutron radiation fields, so the characteristics of the responses to various neutron spectra should be studied in order to get more reasonable dose. In this paper the responses of the survey meter were calculated under different neutron spectra data from IAEA of Technical Reports Series No. 318 and other references. Finally one dose estimation method was determined. The range of the reading per H*(10) for the method estimated is about 0.7–1.6 for the neutron mean energy range from 50 keV to 300 MeV. -- Highlights: • We studied a novel high energy neutron survey meter. • Response characteristics of the survey meter were calculated by using a series of neutron spectra. • One significant advantage of the survey meter is that it can provide mean energy of radiation field. • Dose estimate deviation can be corrected. • The range of corrected reading per H*(10) is about 0.7–1.6 for the neutron fluence mean energy range from 0.05 MeV to 300 MeV

  17. Calibration procedure for thermoluminescent dosemeters in water absorbed doses for Iridium-192 high dose rate sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes Cac, Franky Eduardo

    2004-10-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimeters are used in brachytherapy services quality assurance programs, with the aim of guaranteeing the correct radiation dose supplied to cancer patients, as well as with the purpose of evaluating new clinical procedures. This work describes a methodology for thermoluminescent dosimeters calibration in terms of absorbed dose to water for 192 Ir high dose rate sources. The reference dose used is measured with an ionization chamber previously calibrated for 192 Ir energy quality, applying the methodology proposed by Toelli. This methodology aims to standardizing the procedure, in a similar form to that used for external radiotherapy. The work evolves the adaptation of the TRS-277 Code of the International Atomic Energy Agency, for small and big cavities, through the introduction for non-uniform experimental factor, for the absorbed dose in the neighborhood of small brachytherapy sources. In order to simulate a water medium around the source during the experimental work, an acrylic phantom was used. It guarantees the reproducibility of the ionization chamber and the thermoluminescent dosimeter's location in relation to the radiation source. The values obtained with the ionization chamber and the thermoluminescent dosimeters, exposed to a 192 Ir high dose rate source, were compared and correction factors for different source-detector distances were determined for the thermoluminescent dosimeters. A numeric function was generated relating the correction factors and the source-detector distance. These correction factors are in fact the thermoluminescent dosimeter calibration factors for the 192 Ir source considered. As a possible application of this calibration methodology for thermoluminescent dosimeters, a practical range of source-detector distances is proposed for quality control of 192 Ir high dose rate sources. (author)

  18. Assessment of fast and thermal neutron ambient dose equivalents around the KFUPM neutron source storage area using nuclear track detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazal-ur-Rehman [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)]. E-mail: fazalr@kfupm.edu.sa; Al-Jarallah, M.I. [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Abu-Jarad, F. [Radiation Protection Unit, Environmental Protection Department, Saudi Aramco, P. O. Box 13027, Dhahran 31311 (Saudi Arabia); Qureshi, M.A. [Center for Applied Physical Sciences, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2005-11-15

    A set of five {sup 241}Am-Be neutron sources are utilized in research and teaching at King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM). Three of these sources have an activity of 16Ci each and the other two are of 5Ci each. A well-shielded storage area was designed for these sources. The aim of the study is to check the effectiveness of shielding of the KFUPM neutron source storage area. Poly allyl diglycol carbonate (PADC) Nuclear track detectors (NTDs) based fast and thermal neutron area passive dosimeters have been utilized side by side for 33 days to assess accumulated low ambient dose equivalents of fast and thermal neutrons at 30 different locations around the source storage area and adjacent rooms. Fast neutron measurements have been carried out using bare NTDs, which register fast neutrons through recoils of protons, in the detector material. NTDs were mounted with lithium tetra borate (Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}) converters on their surfaces for thermal neutron detection via B10(n,{alpha})Li6 and Li6(n,{alpha})H3 nuclear reactions. The calibration factors of NTD both for fast and thermal neutron area passive dosimeters were determined using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) with and without a polyethylene moderator. The calibration factors for fast and thermal neutron area passive dosimeters were found to be 1.33 proton tracks cm{sup -2}{mu}Sv{sup -1} and 31.5 alpha tracks cm{sup -2}{mu}Sv{sup -1}, respectively. The results show variations of accumulated dose with the locations around the storage area. The fast neutron dose equivalents rates varied from as low as 182nSvh{sup -1} up to 10.4{mu}Svh{sup -1} whereas those for thermal neutron ranged from as low as 7nSvh{sup -1} up to 9.3{mu}Svh{sup -1}. The study indicates that the area passive neutron dosimeter was able to detect dose rates as low as 7 and 182nSvh{sup -1} from accumulated dose for thermal and fast neutrons, respectively, which were not possible to detect with the available active neutron

  19. Differences between cross-section libraries for neutron dosimetry; Diferencas entre bibliotecas de secoes de choque para dosimetria de neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tardelli, T.C.; Stecher, L.C.; Coelho, T.S.; Castro, V.A. De; Cavalieri, T.A.; Menzel, F.; Giarola, R.S.; Domingos, D.B.; Yoriyaz, H., E-mail: tiago.tardelli@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia Nuclear

    2013-08-15

    Absorbed dose calculations depend on a consistent set of nuclear data used in simulations in computer codes. Nuclear data are stored in libraries, however, the information available about the differences in dose caused by different libraries are rare. The libraries are processed by a computer system to be able to be used by a radiation transport code. One of the systems capable of processing nuclear data is the NJOY system. The objective of this study is to evaluate the nuclear data libraries for neutrons available in the literature, and to quantify the differences in absorbed dose obtained using the libraries JENDL 4.0, JEFF 3.3.1 and ENDF/B.VII. The absorbed dose calculation was performed on a simple geometric model, as spheres, and in anthropomorphic model of the human body based on the ICRP-110 for neutron transport simulation using the MCNP5 code. The results were compared with literature data. The results obtained with cross sections from the libraries JEFF and ENDF/B.VII have shown to be identical in most cases, except for one case where the difference has exceeded 10%. The results obtained with JENDL library has shown to be considerably different in most cases comparing to other two libraries. Some differences were over 200%. The dose calculations showed differences between the libraries, which is justified by differences in the cross sections. It has been observed that the cross sections values of certain nuclides assume quite different values in different libraries. These differences in turn cause considerable differences in dose calculations. (author)

  20. Estimation of the total absorbed dose by quartz in retrospective conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correcher, V.; Delgado, A.

    2003-01-01

    The estimation of the total absorbed dose is of great interest in areas affected by a radiological accident when no conventional dosimetric systems are available. This paper reports about the usual methodology employed in dose reconstruction from the thermoluminescence (TL) properties of natural quartz, extracted from selected ceramic materials (12 bricks) picked up in the Chernobyl area. It has been possible to evaluate doses under 50mGy after more than 11 years later since the radiological accident happened. The main advance of this fact is the reduction of the commonly accepted limit dose estimation more than 20 times employing luminescence methods. (Author) 11 refs

  1. Dose distributions in thorax inhomogeneity for fast neutron beam from NIRS cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutsutani-Nakamura, Yuzuru; Furukawa, Shigeo; Iinuma, T.A.; Kawashima, Katsuhiro; Hoshino, Kazuo; Hiraoka, Takeshi; Maruyama, Takashi; Sakashita, Kunio; Tsunemoto, Hiroshi

    1990-01-01

    The power law tissue-air ratio (TAR) method developed by Batho appears to be practical use for inhomogeneity corrections to the dose calculated in a layered media for photon beam therapy. The validity was examined in applying the modified power law TAR and the isodose shift methods to the dose calculation in thorax tissue inhomogeneity containing the boundary region for fast neutron beam. The neutron beam is produced by bombarding a thick beryllium target with 30 MeV deuterons. Lung phantom was made of granulated tissue equivalent plastic, which resulted in density of 0.30 and 0.60 g/cm 3 . Depth dose distributions for neutron beam were measured in thorax phantom by an air-filled cylindrical ionization chamber with TE plastic wall. The power law TAR method considering TAR of zero depth at boundary was compared with the measured data and a good result was obtained that the calculated dose was within ±3 % against the measured. But the isodose shift method is not so good for dose calculation in thorax tissue inhomogeneity using fast neutron beam. (author)

  2. Calorimeter measurements of absorbed doses at the heavy water enriched uranium reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markovic, V.

    1961-12-01

    Application of calorimetry measurements of absorbed doses was imposed by the need of good knowledge of the absorbed dose values in the reactor experimental channels. Other methods are considered less reliable. The work was done in two phases: calorimetry measurements at lower reactor power (13-80 kW) by isothermal calorimeter, and differential calorimeter constructions for measurements at higher power levels (up to 1 MW). This report includes the following four annexes, papers: Isothermal calorimeter for reactor radiation monitoring, to be published; Calorimeter dosimetry of reactor radiation, presented at the Symposium about nuclear fuel held in april 1961; Radiation dosimetry of the reactor RA at Vinca, published in the Bull. Inst. Nucl. Sci. 1961; Differential calorimeter for reactor radiation dosimetry

  3. Implementation of an Analytical Model for Leakage Neutron Equivalent Dose in a Proton Radiotherapy Planning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eley, John [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas, 6767 Bertner Ave., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Newhauser, Wayne, E-mail: newhauser@lsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809 (United States); Homann, Kenneth; Howell, Rebecca [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas, 6767 Bertner Ave., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Schneider, Christopher [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809 (United States); Durante, Marco; Bert, Christoph [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany)

    2015-03-11

    Equivalent dose from neutrons produced during proton radiotherapy increases the predicted risk of radiogenic late effects. However, out-of-field neutron dose is not taken into account by commercial proton radiotherapy treatment planning systems. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of implementing an analytical model to calculate leakage neutron equivalent dose in a treatment planning system. Passive scattering proton treatment plans were created for a water phantom and for a patient. For both the phantom and patient, the neutron equivalent doses were small but non-negligible and extended far beyond the therapeutic field. The time required for neutron equivalent dose calculation was 1.6 times longer than that required for proton dose calculation, with a total calculation time of less than 1 h on one processor for both treatment plans. Our results demonstrate that it is feasible to predict neutron equivalent dose distributions using an analytical dose algorithm for individual patients with irregular surfaces and internal tissue heterogeneities. Eventually, personalized estimates of neutron equivalent dose to organs far from the treatment field may guide clinicians to create treatment plans that reduce the risk of late effects.

  4. Measurements and calculations of neutron spectra and neutron dose distribution in human phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palfalvi, J.

    1984-11-01

    The measurement and calculation of the radiation field around and in a phantom, with regard to the neutron component and the contaminating gamma radiation, are essential for radiation protection and radiotherapy purposes. The final report includes the development of the simple detector system, automized detector measuring facilities and a computerized evaluating system. The results of the depth dose and neutron spectra experiments and calculations in a human phantom are given

  5. Model of the absorbed dose on a small sphere into a gamma irradiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangussi, J.

    2009-01-01

    Several models of the absorbed dose calculated as the energy deposited by the secondary electrons on a small volume sphere are presented. The calculations use the Compton scattering of a uniform photon beam in water, the photon attenuation and the electron stopping power are included. The sphere total absorbed dose is due to the stopping of the electrons generated in three regions: into the sphere volume, ahead and behind the sphere volume. Calculations are performed for spheres of different radius and placed at various depth of the vacuum - water interface. (author)

  6. Patterns of Lethality and Absorbed Dose Distributions in Mice for Monoenergetic Neutrons; Letalite et Distribution de la Dose Absorbee chez la Souris pour des Neutrons Monoenergetiques; Letal'nost' i raspredelenie pogloshchennoj dozy pri obluchenii myshej monoehnergeticheskimi neitronami; Letalidad y Distribucion de las Dosis Absorbidas por el Raton para Neutrones Monoenergeticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frigerio, N. A.; Jordan, D. L. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

    1964-03-15

    The presence of strong C, N and O resonances in the 100 to 1500 keV region has permitted the study of specific neutron-nuclide interactions as reflected in lethality, RBE maxima etc. Sixty-two {mu}A of resolved Van de Graaf protons, 1882 to 2738 keV, yielded monoenergetic neutrons via Li{sup 7}(p, n)Be{sup 7}. Virgin female CF-1 mice were exposed in celluloid capsules to the mono-energetic neutrons at distances of 3.1 to 11.3 cm from the source at laboratory angles of 0 to 1 radian. Mice were exposed bilaterally while simultaneously in motion through either circular or elliptical orbits normal to the axis of the beam. Thus, control of dose distribution within the animal was possible. Absolute flux measurements were made with U{sup 235} fission counters and by absolute counting of Au wires and foils activated within Cd covers. Patterns of dose absorption were measured with micro-ionization chambers and with a specially developed FeSO{sub 4}-NH{sub 4}SCN dosimeter of high sensitivity. Relative dose measurements were made with Hurst proton-recoil gas counters and B{sup 10} , Li{sup 6} and proton-recoil scintillators. Neutron-energy distributions were measured with specially developed B{sup 10}, He{sup 3} and Li{sup 6} gas and solid-state spectrometers. Gamma contributions were measured with Ne/Ar chamber counters. These measurements showed gamma contribution to be less than 0.8%, and thermal-epithermal less than 0.01%, of the total rad dose. Animals were exposed to median midpoint doses ranging from 180 to 1200 rad at neutron energies from 396 to 658 keV {+-} 50 keV to cover the region of N and O resonances. Levels and patterns of lethality proved to be strong functions of neutron energy and equally strong, but independent, functions of dose distribution. Regardless of dose, energy or distribution, however, all animals surviving five days survived at least 144 days, dying then of the usual long-term effects. This suggests that monoenergetic fast neutrons, free of

  7. High conduction neutron absorber to simulate fast reactor environment in an existing test reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna Post Guillen; Larry R. Greenwood; James R. Parry

    2014-06-22

    A new metal matrix composite material has been developed to serve as a thermal neutron absorber for testing fast reactor fuels and materials in an existing pressurized water reactor. The performance of this material was evaluated by placing neutron fluence monitors within shrouded and unshrouded holders and irradiating for up to four cycles. The monitor wires were analyzed by gamma and X-ray spectrometry to determine the activities of the activation products. Adjusted neutron fluences were calculated and grouped into three bins—thermal, epithermal, and fast—to evaluate the spectral shift created by the new material. A comparison of shrouded and unshrouded fluence monitors shows a thermal fluence decrease of ~11 % for the shielded monitors. Radioisotope activity and mass for each of the major activation products is given to provide insight into the evolution of thermal absorption cross-section during irradiation. The thermal neutron absorption capability of the composite material appears to diminish at total neutron fluence levels of ~8 × 1025 n/m2. Calculated values for dpa in excess of 2.0 were obtained for two common structural materials (iron and nickel) of interest for future fast flux experiments.

  8. OEDIPE, a software for personalized Monte Carlo dosimetry and treatment planning optimization in nuclear medicine: absorbed dose and biologically effective dose considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitguillaume, A.; Broggio, D.; Franck, D.; Desbree, A.; Bernardini, M.; Labriolle Vaylet, C. de

    2014-01-01

    For targeted radionuclide therapies, treatment planning usually consists of the administration of standard activities without accounting for the patient-specific activity distribution, pharmacokinetics and dosimetry to organs at risk. The OEDIPE software is a user-friendly interface which has an automation level suitable for performing personalized Monte Carlo 3D dosimetry for diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclide administrations. Mean absorbed doses to regions of interest (ROIs), isodose curves superimposed on a personalized anatomical model of the patient and dose-volume histograms can be extracted from the absorbed dose 3D distribution. Moreover, to account for the differences in radiosensitivity between tumoral and healthy tissues, additional functionalities have been implemented to calculate the 3D distribution of the biologically effective dose (BED), mean BEDs to ROIs, isoBED curves and BED-volume histograms along with the Equivalent Uniform Biologically Effective Dose (EUD) to ROIs. Finally, optimization tools are available for treatment planning optimization using either the absorbed dose or BED distributions. These tools enable one to calculate the maximal injectable activity which meets tolerance criteria to organs at risk for a chosen fractionation protocol. This paper describes the functionalities available in the latest version of the OEDIPE software to perform personalized Monte Carlo dosimetry and treatment planning optimization in targeted radionuclide therapies. (authors)

  9. Quantitative determination of absorbed hydrogen in oxidised zircaloy by means of neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosse, M.; Lehmann, E.; Vontobel, P.; Steinbrueck, M.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen absorbed in steam-oxidised zircaloy can be determined quantitatively by means of neutron radiography. Correlation parameters between the total cross section and hydrogen content as well as oxide layer thickness were determined quantitatively. At H/Zr atomic ratios lower than 1.0, linear correlations between the hydrogen content and total cross section exist. The total cross section of Zr is lower and the effect of the hydrogen is higher in radiography measurements with a cold neutron spectrum than with a thermal spectrum. A Be filter reduces the effects of lower wavelength and epithermal neutrons and extends the linear correlations to higher H/Zr atomic ratios. Due to the better possibilities of background corrections, the neutron image should be detected by a CCD camera for a proper quantitative analysis with a medium spatial resolution of about 0.1 mm. A higher spatial resolution, but larger uncertainties in the quantitative hydrogen determination are achieved by measurements with imaging plates. The effect of oxygen layers on the total cross section is much smaller than the effect of hydrogen. The total cross section measured depends linearly on the oxide layer thickness

  10. Skin Dose Equivalent Measurement from Neutron-Deficient Isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Hua; Costigan, Steve A.; Romero, Leonard L.; Whicker, Jeffrey J.

    1997-12-01

    Neutron-deficient-isotopes decay via positron emission and/or electron capture often followed by x-ray, gamma-ray, and 0.511 MeV photons from positron annihilation. For cases of significant area and/or personnel contamination with these isotopes, determination of skin dose equivalent (SDE) is required by 10CFR835. For assessment of SDE, we evaluated the MICROSPEC-2(TM) system manufactured by Bubble Technology Industries of Canada which uses three different probes for dose measurement. We used two probes: (1) the X-probe which measures lower energy (4 - 120 keV) photon energy distributions and determines deep dose equivalent, SDE and dose equivalent to eyes, and (2) the B-probe which measures electron (positron) energy distributions, and determines skin dose equivalent. Also, the measured photon and beta spectra can be used to identify radioactive isotopes in the contaminated area. Measurements with several neutron-deficient sources showed that this system provided reasonably accurate SDE rate measurements when compared with calculated benchmark SDE rates with an average percent difference of 40%. Variations were expected because of differences between the assumed geometries used by MlCROSPEC-2 and the calculations when compared to the measurement conditions

  11. Monte Carlo estimation of the absorbed dose in computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Woo; Youn, Han Bean; Kim, Ho Kyung [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The purpose of this study is to devise an algorithm calculating absorbed dose distributions of patients based on Monte Carlo (MC) methods, and which includes the dose estimations due to primary and secondary (scattered) x-ray photons. Assessment of patient dose in computed tomography (CT) at the population level has become a subject of public attention and concern, and ultimate CT quality assurance and dose optimization have the goal of reducing radiation-induced cancer risks in the examined population. However, the conventional CT dose index (CTDI) concept is not a surrogate of risk but it has rather been designed to measure an average central dose. In addition, the CTDI or the dose-length product has showed troubles for helical CT with a wider beam collimation. Simple algorithms to estimate a patient specific CT dose based on the MCNP output data have been introduced. For numerical chest and head phantoms, the spatial dose distributions were calculated. The results were reasonable. The estimated dose distribution map can be readily converted into the effective dose. The important list for further studies includes the validation of the models with the experimental measurements and the acceleration of algorithms.

  12. Fast neutron dose equivalent rates in heavy ion target areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulmer, C.B.; Butler, H.M.; Ohnesorge, W.F.; Mosko, S.W.

    1978-01-01

    At heavy ion accelerators, personnel access to areas near the target is sometimes important for successful performance of experiments. Radiation levels determine the amount of time that can be spent in these areas without exceeding maximum permissible exposures. Inasmuch as the fast neutrons contribute the major part of the Rem dose rates in these areas, knowledge of the fast neutron levels is important for planning permissive entry to target areas. Fast neutron dose rates were measured near thick medium mass targets bombarded with beams of C, N, O, and Ne ions. beam energies ranged from 3 to 16 MeV/amu. Dose rates (mrem/h) 1 meter from the target 90 degrees from the beam direction range from approx. 0.05 at MeV/amu to approx. 50 at 16 MeV/amu. These data should be helpful in planning permissive entry to heavy ion target areas.

  13. Fast neutron dose equivalent rates in heavy ion target areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulmer, C.B.; Butler, H.M.; Ohnesorge, W.F.; Mosko, S.W.

    1978-01-01

    At heavy ion accelerators, personnel access to areas near the target is sometimes important for successful performance of experiments. Radiation levels determine the amount of time that can be spent in these areas without exceeding maximum permissible exposures. Inasmuch as the fast neutrons contribute the major part of the Rem dose rates in these areas, knowledge of the fast neutron levels is important for planning permissive entry to target areas. Fast neutron dose rates were measured near thick medium mass targets bombarded with beams of C, N, O, and Ne ions. beam energies ranged from 3 to 16 MeV/amu. Dose rates (mrem/h) 1 meter from the target 90 degrees from the beam direction range from approx. 0.05 at MeV/amu to approx. 50 at 16 MeV/amu. These data should be helpful in planning permissive entry to heavy ion target areas

  14. Extension of the Commonwealth standard of absorbed dose from cobalt-60 energy to 25 MV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherlock, S.L.

    1986-01-01

    With the introduction of high energy linear accelerators in hospitals, there is a need for direct measurement of absorbed dose for energies to 25 MV for photons and 20 MeV electrons. The present Australian standard for absorbed dose at cobalt-60 energy is a graphite micro-calorimeter maintained at the AAEC Lucas Heights Research Laboratories. A thorough theoretical analysis of calorimeter operation suggests that computer control and monitoring techniques are appropriate. Solution of Newton's law of cooling for a four-body calorimeter allows development of a computer simulation model. Different temperature control algorithms may then be run and assessed using this model. In particular, the application of a simple differencer is examined. Successful implementation of the calorimeter for energies up to 25 MV could lead to the introduction of an Australian absorbed dose protocol based on calorimetry, therby reducing the uncertainties associated with exposure-based protocols

  15. Electrochemical Corrosion Testing of Neutron Absorber Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tedd Lister; Ron Mizia; Sandra Birk; Brent Matteson; Hongbo Tian

    2006-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) has been directed by DOE-RW to develop a new repository waste package design based on the transport, aging, and disposal canister (TAD) system concept. A neutron poison material for fabrication of the internal spent nuclear fuel (SNF) baskets for these canisters needs to be identified. A material that has been used for criticality control in wet and dry storage of spent nuclear fuel is borated stainless steel. These stainless products are available as an ingot metallurgy plate product with a molybdenum addition and a powder metallurgy product that meets the requirements of ASTM A887, Grade A. A new Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy has been developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) with its research partners (Sandia National Laboratory and Lehigh University) with DOE-EM funding provided by the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP). This neutron absorbing alloy will be used to fabricate the SNF baskets in the DOE standardized canister. The INL has designed the DOE Standardized Spent Nuclear Fuel Canister for the handling, interim storage, transportation, and disposal in the national repository of DOE owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF). A corrosion testing program is required to compare these materials in environmental conditions representative of a breached waste canister. This report will summarize the results of crevice corrosion tests for three alloys in solutions representative of ionic compositions inside the waste package should a breech occur. The three alloys in these tests are Neutronit A978 (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb 304B4 Grade A (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), and Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled)

  16. Fetus absorbed dose evaluation in head and neck radiotherapy procedures of pregnant patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo da C, E.; Ribeiro da R, L. A.; Santos B, D. V.

    2014-08-01

    Each year a considerable amount of pregnant women needs to be submitted to radiotherapeutic procedures to combat malignant tumors. Radiation therapy is often a treatment of choice for these patients. It is possible to use shielding and beam positioning such that the potential dose to the fetus can be minimized. In this work the head and neck cancer treatment of a pregnant patient was experimentally simulated. The patient was simulated by an anthropomorphic Alderson phantom and the absorbed dose to the fetus was evaluated using micro-rod TLD-100 detectors in two conditions, namely protecting the patients abdomen with a 7 cm lead layer and using no abdomen shielding. The aim of this experiment was to evaluate the efficiency of the abdomen protection in reducing the fetus absorbed dose. Irradiations were performed with a Trilogy linear accelerator using x-rays of 6 MV. A total dose of 50 Gy to the target volume was delivered. The fetus doses evaluated with and without the lead shielding were, respectively, 0.52±0.039 and (0.88±0.052) c Gy, corresponding to a dose reduction of 59%. The dose (0.52±0.039) c Gy is within the zone of biological tolerance for the fetus. (Author)

  17. Fetus absorbed dose evaluation in head and neck radiotherapy procedures of pregnant patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camargo da C, E.; Ribeiro da R, L. A.; Santos B, D. V., E-mail: etieli@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria / CNEN, Av. Salvador Allende s/n, Barra de Tijuca, 22783-127 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Each year a considerable amount of pregnant women needs to be submitted to radiotherapeutic procedures to combat malignant tumors. Radiation therapy is often a treatment of choice for these patients. It is possible to use shielding and beam positioning such that the potential dose to the fetus can be minimized. In this work the head and neck cancer treatment of a pregnant patient was experimentally simulated. The patient was simulated by an anthropomorphic Alderson phantom and the absorbed dose to the fetus was evaluated using micro-rod TLD-100 detectors in two conditions, namely protecting the patients abdomen with a 7 cm lead layer and using no abdomen shielding. The aim of this experiment was to evaluate the efficiency of the abdomen protection in reducing the fetus absorbed dose. Irradiations were performed with a Trilogy linear accelerator using x-rays of 6 MV. A total dose of 50 Gy to the target volume was delivered. The fetus doses evaluated with and without the lead shielding were, respectively, 0.52±0.039 and (0.88±0.052) c Gy, corresponding to a dose reduction of 59%. The dose (0.52±0.039) c Gy is within the zone of biological tolerance for the fetus. (Author)

  18. Robotic stereotactic radioablation of breast tumors: Influence of beam size on the absorbed dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnica-Garza, H.M.

    2016-01-01

    Robotic stereotactic radioablation (RSR) therapy for breast tumors has been shown to be an effective treatment strategy when applied concomitantly with chemotherapy, with the purpose of reducing the tumor volume thus making it more amenable for breast conserving surgery. In this paper we used Monte Carlo simulation within a realistic patient model to determine the influence that the variation in beam collimation radius has on the resultant absorbed dose distributions for this type of treatment. Separate optimized plans were obtained for treatments using 300 circular beams with radii of 0.5 cm, 0.75 cm, 1.0 cm and 1.5 cm. Cumulative dose volume histograms were obtained for the gross, clinical and planning target volumes as well as for eight organs and structures at risk. Target coverage improves as the collimator size is increased, at the expense of increasing the volume of healthy tissue receiving mid-level absorbed doses. Interestingly, it is found that the maximum dose imparted to the skin is highly dependent on collimator size, while the dosimetry of other structures, such as both the ipsilateral and contralateral lung tissue are basically unaffected by a change in beam size. - Highlights: • Stereotactic body radiation therapy of breast tumors is analyzed using Monte Carlo simulation. • The influence of beam collimation on the absorbed dose distributions is determined. • Large field sizes increase target dose uniformity and midlevel doses to healthy structures. • Skin dose is greatly affected by changes in beam collimation.

  19. Nominal effective radiation doses delivered during clinical trials of boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capala, J.; Diaz, A.Z.; Chanana, A.D.

    1997-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary system that, in theory, should selectively deliver lethal, high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation to tumor cells dispersed within normal tissues. It is based on the nuclear reaction 10-B(n, α)7-Li, which occurs when the stable nucleus of boron-10 captures a thermal neutron. Due to the relatively high cross-section of the 10-B nucleus for thermal neutron capture and short ranges of the products of this reaction, tumor cells in the volume exposed to thermal neutrons and containing sufficiently high concentration of 10-B would receive a much higher radiation dose than the normal cells contained within the exposed volume. Nevertheless, radiation dose deposited in normal tissue by gamma and fast neutron contamination of the neutron beam, as well as neutron capture in nitrogen, 14-N(n,p)14-C, hydrogen, 1-H(n,γ)2-H, and in boron present in blood and normal cells, limits the dose that can be delivered to tumor cells. It is, therefore, imperative for the success of the BNCT the dosed delivered to normal tissues be accurately determined in order to optimize the irradiation geometry and to limit the volume of normal tissue exposed to thermal neutrons. These are the major objectives of BNCT treatment planning

  20. Determination of neutron flux distribution in an Am-Be irradiator using the MCNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtejer-Diaz, K; Zamboni, C B; Zahn, G S; Zevallos-Chávez, J Y

    2003-10-01

    A neutron irradiator has been assembled at IPEN facilities to perform qualitative-quantitative analysis of many materials using thermal and fast neutrons outside the nuclear reactor premises. To establish the prototype specifications, the neutron flux distribution and the absorbed dose rates were calculated using the MCNP computer code. These theoretical predictions then allow one to discuss the optimum irradiator design and its performance.

  1. Optimization of a neutron ambient dose equivalent rate meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgkhardt, B.; Fieg, G.; Piesch, E.; Klett, A.; Maushart, R.

    1994-01-01

    Co-operating in a technology transfer project, the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center and EG and G Berthold have developed a neutron equivalent doserate probe with high sensitivity and an energy dependent detection efficiency in accordance with the ICRP60 requirements. The special features of this probe were realized, on the one hand, by optimizing the moderator and absorber geometry through simulation calculations with the neutron transport code MCNP, and, on the other hand, by using a newly designed 3 He-methane proportional counter tube. The measurements were not yet completed when this paper went to press, however, it is to be expected that the response sensitivity will be more than 3 counts/nSv. (orig.) [de

  2. A proposal on evaluation method of neutron absorption performance to substitute conventional neutron attenuation test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Je Hyun; Shim, Chang Ho; Kim, Sung Hyun; Choe, Jung Hun; Cho, In Hak; Park, Hwan Seo; Park, Hyun Seo; Kim, Jung Ho; Kim, Yoon Ho

    2016-01-01

    For a verification of newly-developed neutron absorbers, one of guidelines on the qualification and acceptance of neutron absorbers is the neutron attenuation test. However, this approach can cause a problem for the qualifications that it cannot distinguish how the neutron attenuates from materials. In this study, an estimation method of neutron absorption performances for materials is proposed to detect both direct penetration and back-scattering neutrons. For the verification of the proposed method, MCNP simulations with the experimental system designed in this study were pursued using the polyethylene, iron, normal glass and the vitrified form. The results show that it can easily test neutron absorption ability using single absorber model. Also, from simulation results of single absorber and double absorbers model, it is verified that the proposed method can evaluate not only the direct thermal neutrons passing through materials, but also the scattered neutrons reflected to the materials. Therefore, the neutron absorption performances can be accurately estimated using the proposed method comparing with the conventional neutron attenuation test. It is expected that the proposed method can contribute to increase the reliability of the performance of neutron absorbers

  3. A proposal on evaluation method of neutron absorption performance to substitute conventional neutron attenuation test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Je Hyun; Shim, Chang Ho [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Hyun [Nuclear Fuel Cycle Waste Treatment Research Division, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Osaka (Japan); Choe, Jung Hun; Cho, In Hak; Park, Hwan Seo [Ionizing Radiation Center, Nuclear Fuel Cycle Waste Treatment Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyun Seo; Kim, Jung Ho; Kim, Yoon Ho [Ionizing Radiation Center, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    For a verification of newly-developed neutron absorbers, one of guidelines on the qualification and acceptance of neutron absorbers is the neutron attenuation test. However, this approach can cause a problem for the qualifications that it cannot distinguish how the neutron attenuates from materials. In this study, an estimation method of neutron absorption performances for materials is proposed to detect both direct penetration and back-scattering neutrons. For the verification of the proposed method, MCNP simulations with the experimental system designed in this study were pursued using the polyethylene, iron, normal glass and the vitrified form. The results show that it can easily test neutron absorption ability using single absorber model. Also, from simulation results of single absorber and double absorbers model, it is verified that the proposed method can evaluate not only the direct thermal neutrons passing through materials, but also the scattered neutrons reflected to the materials. Therefore, the neutron absorption performances can be accurately estimated using the proposed method comparing with the conventional neutron attenuation test. It is expected that the proposed method can contribute to increase the reliability of the performance of neutron absorbers.

  4. Status of radiation dosimetry in Germany using ionization chamber calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohlfeld, Klaus; Roos, Martin

    1995-01-01

    In 1984 the PTB as PSDL and the DIN Standard Committee on Radiology (NAR) in close co-operation decided that in Germany the measured absorbed dose to water in a water phantom should replace exposure in the dosimetry for radiation therapy. The PTB has established primary standards of water absorbed dose in the whole range of photon and electron radiation, and international comparisons at the BIPM and with other PSDLs proved agreement within 0.5%. Secondary standards are calibrated in a water phantom under reference conditions in a Co-60 gamma radiation beam at the PTB. Thus, the calibration factor in terms of water absorbed dose, N W , is transferred to the manufacturers of dosimeters, the German Calibration Service and the dosimetry laboratories of the verification authorities. The Verification Law subjects each ionization dosimeter used in the treatment of patients with external photon radiation beams under a type-test at PTB and under a verification procedure, where the calibration factor, N W , must be shown to be within given limits. The absorbed dose determination at the users' level follows the foralism prescribed in the Standard DIN 6800-2 (1995) 'Procedures for Absorbed Dose Determination in Radiology by the Ionization Method'. The concept of this DIN Standard uses exclusively one quantity from the primary standard to the user's instrument eliminating uncertainties and sources of mistakes associated with the conversion of a calibration factor. The concept is simple and clear and covers the whole range of photon and electron radiation. As a means of quality assurance in basic dosimetry the PTB runs a calibration service, up to now on a voluntary basis, which allows the user to compare his dosimetry system against PTB standards using mailed Fricke ampoules, with water absorbed dose as measured and used

  5. Pain and Mean Absorbed Dose to the Pubic Bone After Radiotherapy Among Gynecological Cancer Survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldenstroem, Ann-Charlotte; Olsson, Caroline; Wilderaeng, Ulrica; Dunberger, Gail; Lind, Helena; Al-Abany, Massoud; Palm, Asa; Avall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth; Johansson, Karl-Axel; Steineck, Gunnar

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the relationship between mean absorbed dose to the pubic bone after pelvic radiotherapy for gynecological cancer and occurrence of pubic bone pain among long-term survivors. Methods and Materials: In an unselected, population-based study, we identified 823 long-term gynecological cancer survivors treated with pelvic radiotherapy during 1991-2003. For comparison, we used a non-radiation-treated control population of 478 matched women from the Swedish Population Register. Pain, intensity of pain, and functional impairment due to pain in the pubic bone were assessed with a study-specific postal questionnaire. Results: We analyzed data from 650 survivors (participation rate 79%) with median follow-up of 6.3 years (range, 2.3-15.0 years) along with 344 control women (participation rate, 72 %). Ten percent of the survivors were treated with radiotherapy; ninety percent with surgery plus radiotherapy. Brachytherapy was added in 81%. Complete treatment records were recovered for 538/650 survivors, with dose distribution data including dose-volume histograms over the pubic bone. Pubic bone pain was reported by 73 survivors (11%); 59/517 (11%) had been exposed to mean absorbed external beam doses <52.5 Gy to the pubic bone and 5/12 (42%) to mean absorbed external beam doses ≥52.5 Gy. Thirty-three survivors reported pain affecting sleep, a 13-fold increased prevalence compared with control women. Forty-nine survivors reported functional impairment measured as pain walking indoors, a 10-fold increased prevalence. Conclusions: Mean absorbed external beam dose above 52.5 Gy to the pubic bone increases the occurrence of pain in the pubic bone and may affect daily life of long-term survivors treated with radiotherapy for gynecological cancer.

  6. Proton and photon absorbed-dose conversion coefficients for embryo and foetus from top-down irradiation geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.

    2007-01-01

    Absorbed-dose conversion coefficients are calculated for the embryo of 8 weeks and the foetus of 3, 6 or 9 months when the mother's body is exposed to protons and photons from top-down (TOP) direction. It provides data sets in addition to other standard irradiation geometries published previously. The TOP-irradiation geometry is considered here, because high-energy particles are often peaked from the TOP direction onboard aircraft. The results show that absorbed-doses from high-energy particles could be underestimated significantly if isotropic (ISO) irradiation geometry is assumed. For protons of 100 GeV, absorbed-doses from TOP irradiation are ∼2.3-2.9 times higher than the doses from ISO irradiation for different foetal ages. For 10 GeV photons, foetal doses from TOP irradiation are ∼6.8-12 times higher than the doses from ISO irradiation. The coefficients from TOP-irradiation geometry are given in wide energy ranges, from 100 MeV to 100 GeV for protons and from 50 V to 10 GeV for photons. They can, therefore, be used in various applications whenever exposure from the TOP-irradiation direction is concerned. (authors)

  7. Absorbed doses to the main parts of eyeball due to use 90Sr + 90Y ophthalmic applicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Lishu

    1993-05-01

    The ophthalmic radiotherapy dosimetry and some affecting factors are introduced. The distributions of absorbed doses to the main parts of a fresh eyeball such as the cornea, sclera, lens and anterior chamber, during the radiotherapy by using a 90 Sr + 90 Y ophthalmic applicator are presented. An tissue-equivalent extrapolation ionization chamber was used in the dose measurement. The reasonable doses during ophthalmic radiotherapy for different depths have been obtained. Therefore, the absorbed dose to the lens, the most sensitive organ, can be given. These data are useful for radiation protection in ophthalmic radiotherapy

  8. Reactor-moderated intermediate-energy neutron beams for neutron-capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Less, T.J.

    1987-01-01

    One approach to producing an intermediate energy beam is moderating fission neutrons escaping from a reactor core. The objective of this research is to evaluate materials that might produce an intermediate beam for NCT via moderation of fission neutrons. A second objective is to use the more promising moderator material in a preliminary design of an NCT facility at a research reactor. The evaluations showed that several materials or combinations of materials could produce a moderator source for an intermediate beam for NCT. The best neutron spectrum for use in NCT is produced by Al 2 O 3 , but mixtures of Al metal and D 2 O are also attractive. Using the best moderator materials, results were applied to the design of an NCT moderator at the Georgia Institute of Technology Research Reactor's bio-medical facility. The amount of photon shielding and thermal neutron absorber were optimized with respect to the desired photon dose rate and intermediate neutron flux at the patient position

  9. Dose Evaluation of Neutron within Containment Building of a CE type Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Wook; Han, Jae Mun; Kim, Kyung Doek; Yun, Cheol Whan; Suh, Jang Soo; Kim, Young Jae [Nuclear Environment Technology Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-03-15

    From measured results of the neutron fields at some principal places within the containment building in a CE type nuclear power plant in operation, the radiation exposure of a worker to the neutron at there was evaluated and the equivalent dose reflecting new recommendation (ICRP 60) was compared with that doing the old one (ICRP 26). The measured neutron field was also compared with calibration neutron field. From the analysis, the following conclusion was obtained: the average neutron radiation weighting factor according to new recommendation is 2.41 to 2.71 times higher than the old one. The average neutron radiation weighting factor at the measured place was similar to that at calibration neutron field. The average neutron energy at measured place was between 42 and 158 keV and higher than that of calibration field of 500 keV. So, the measured equivalent dose in nuclear power plant could be overestimated compared to the real equivalent dose.

  10. A Monte Carlo program converting activity distribution to absorbed dose distributions in a radionuclide treatment planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagesson, M.; Ljungberg, M.; Strand, S.E.

    1996-01-01

    In systemic radiation therapy, the absorbed dose distribution must be calculated from the individual activity distribution. A computer code has been developed for the conversion of an arbitrary activity distribution to a 3-D absorbed dose distribution. The activity distribution can be described either analytically or as a voxel based distribution, which comes from a SPECT acquisition. Decay points are sampled according to the activity map, and particles (photons and electrons) from the decay are followed through the tissue until they either escape the patient or drop below a cut off energy. To verify the calculated results, the mathematically defined MIRD phantom and unity density spheres have been included in the code. Also other published dosimetry data were used for verification. Absorbed fraction and S-values were calculated. A comparison with simulated data from the code with MIRD data shows good agreement. The S values are within 10-20% of published MIRD S values for most organs. Absorbed fractions for photons and electrons in spheres (masses between 1 g and 200 kg) are within 10-15% of those published. Radial absorbed dose distributions in a necrotic tumor show good agreement with published data. The application of the code in a radionuclide therapy dose planning system, based on quantitative SPECT, is discussed. (orig.)

  11. Evaluation of variations in absorbed dose and image noise according to patient forms in X-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubara, Kosuke; Tsujii, Hideo; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki; Koshida, Kichiro; Suzuki, Masayuki; Hayakawa, Mayumi

    2005-01-01

    Excessive radiation exposure in pediatric computed tomography (CT) scanning has become a serious problem, and it is difficult to select scan parameters for the scanning of small patients such as children. We investigated differences in absorbed dose and standard deviation (SD) in Hounsfield unit (HU) caused by differences in the form of the subject using a body-type phantom with removable body parts. Using four X-ray CT scanners, measurements were made with values from 50 mAs to 300 mAs, with slices of 50 mAs, using scan protocols that were assumed to perform thorough examinations. The results showed that the mAs values and absorbed doses were almost proportional, and the absorbed doses in the phantom without body parts were about 1.1-2.2-fold higher than those of the phantom with body parts at the same points. The SD values obtained indicated that the absorbed doses in the phantom with body parts were 0.3-0.6 times those of the phantom without body parts when the mAs values used were adjusted so that both SD values were the same. The absorbed doses in various patient forms can be estimated from these results, and they will become critical data for the selection of appropriate scan protocols. (author)

  12. Evaluation of variations in absorbed dose and image noise according to patient forms in X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Kosuke; Koshida, Kichiro; Suzuki, Masayuki; Hayakawa, Mayumi; Tsujii, Hideo; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki

    2005-12-20

    Excessive radiation exposure in pediatric computed tomography (CT) scanning has become a serious problem, and it is difficult to select scan parameters for the scanning of small patients such as children. We investigated differences in absorbed dose and standard deviation (SD) in Hounsfield unit (HU) caused by differences in the form of the subject using a body-type phantom with removable body parts. Using four X-ray CT scanners, measurements were made with values from 50 mAs to 300 mAs, with slices of 50 mAs, using scan protocols that were assumed to perform thorough examinations. The results showed that the mAs values and absorbed doses were almost proportional, and the absorbed doses in the phantom without body parts were about 1.1-2.2-fold higher than those of the phantom with body parts at the same points. The SD values obtained indicated that the absorbed doses in the phantom with body parts were 0.3-0.6 times those of the phantom without body parts when the mAs values used were adjusted so that both SD values were the same. The absorbed doses in various patient forms can be estimated from these results, and they will become critical data for the selection of appropriate scan protocols.

  13. Evaluation of variations in absorbed dose and image noise according to patient forms in X-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsubara, Kosuke; Tsujii, Hideo; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki [Kanazawa Univ., Hospital, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Koshida, Kichiro; Suzuki, Masayuki; Hayakawa, Mayumi [Kanazawa Univ., Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan)

    2005-12-15

    Excessive radiation exposure in pediatric computed tomography (CT) scanning has become a serious problem, and it is difficult to select scan parameters for the scanning of small patients such as children. We investigated differences in absorbed dose and standard deviation (SD) in Hounsfield unit (HU) caused by differences in the form of the subject using a body-type phantom with removable body parts. Using four X-ray CT scanners, measurements were made with values from 50 mAs to 300 mAs, with slices of 50 mAs, using scan protocols that were assumed to perform thorough examinations. The results showed that the mAs values and absorbed doses were almost proportional, and the absorbed doses in the phantom without body parts were about 1.1-2.2-fold higher than those of the phantom with body parts at the same points. The SD values obtained indicated that the absorbed doses in the phantom with body parts were 0.3-0.6 times those of the phantom without body parts when the mAs values used were adjusted so that both SD values were the same. The absorbed doses in various patient forms can be estimated from these results, and they will become critical data for the selection of appropriate scan protocols. (author)

  14. Neutron physical investigations on the use of burnable poisons and gray absorber rods in large pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brosche, C.; Katinger, T.; Kollmar, W.; Thieme, K.; Wagner, M.R.

    1977-11-01

    Methods and results of neutron physics calculations are described using burnable poisons and gray absorber rods in large PWR's. Calculated and measured values are compared, the effort for programming has been guessed. (orig.) [de

  15. Determination of the response function for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant criticality accident alarm system neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayloe, R.W. Jr.; Brown, A.S.; Dobelbower, M.C.; Woollard, J.E.

    1997-03-01

    Neutron-sensitive radiation detectors are used in the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant's (PORTS) criticality accident alarm system (CAAS). The CAAS is composed of numerous detectors, electronics, and logic units. It uses a telemetry system to sound building evacuation horns and to provide remote alarm status in a central control facility. The ANSI Standard for a CAAS uses a free-in-air dose rate to define the detection criteria for a minimum accident-of-concern. Previously, the free-in-air absorbed dose rate from neutrons was used for determining the areal coverge of criticality detection within PORTS buildings handling fissile materials. However, the free-in-air dose rate does not accurately reflect the response of the neutron detectors in use at PORTS. Because the cost of placing additional CAAS detectors in areas of questionable coverage (based on a free-in-air absorbed dose rate) is high, the actual response function for the CAAS neutron detectors was determined. This report, which is organized into three major sections, discusses how the actual response function for the PORTS CAAS neutron detectors was determined. The CAAS neutron detectors are described in Section 2. The model of the detector system developed to facilitate calculation of the response function is discussed in Section 3. The results of the calculations, including confirmatory measurements with neutron sources, are given in Section 4

  16. Differences between cross-section libraries for neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tardelli, T.C.; Stecher, L.C.; Coelho, T.S.; Castro, V.A. De; Cavalieri, T.A.; Menzel, F.; Giarola, R.S.; Domingos, D.B.; Yoriyaz, H.

    2013-01-01

    Absorbed dose calculations depend on a consistent set of nuclear data used in simulations in computer codes. Nuclear data are stored in libraries, however, the information available about the differences in dose caused by different libraries are rare. The libraries are processed by a computer system to be able to be used by a radiation transport code. One of the systems capable of processing nuclear data is the NJOY system. The objective of this study is to evaluate the nuclear data libraries for neutrons available in the literature, and to quantify the differences in absorbed dose obtained using the libraries JENDL 4.0, JEFF 3.3.1 and ENDF/B.VII. The absorbed dose calculation was performed on a simple geometric model, as spheres, and in anthropomorphic model of the human body based on the ICRP-110 for neutron transport simulation using the MCNP5 code. The results were compared with literature data. The results obtained with cross sections from the libraries JEFF and ENDF/B.VII have shown to be identical in most cases, except for one case where the difference has exceeded 10%. The results obtained with JENDL library has shown to be considerably different in most cases comparing to other two libraries. Some differences were over 200%. The dose calculations showed differences between the libraries, which is justified by differences in the cross sections. It has been observed that the cross sections values of certain nuclides assume quite different values in different libraries. These differences in turn cause considerable differences in dose calculations. (author)

  17. Prediction analysis of dose equivalent responses of neutron dosemeters used at a MOX fuel facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimura, N.; Yoshida, T.; Takada, C.

    2011-01-01

    To predict how accurately neutron dosemeters can measure the neutron dose equivalent (rate) in MOX fuel fabrication facility work environments, the dose equivalent responses of neutron dosemeters were calculated by the spectral folding method. The dosemeters selected included two types of personal dosemeter, namely a thermoluminescent albedo neutron dosemeter and an electronic neutron dosemeter, three moderator-based neutron survey meters, and one special instrument called an H p (10) monitor. The calculations revealed the energy dependences of the responses expected within the entire range of neutron spectral variations observed in neutron fields at workplaces. (authors)

  18. Analysis of uncertainties in the measurements of absorbed dose to water in a secondary standard dosimetry laboratory (SSDL) 60Cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Cosme Norival Mello da; Rosado, Paulo Henrique Goncalves

    2011-01-01

    The National Metrology Laboratory of Ionizing Radiation (LNMRI) is the laboratory designated by INMETRO in the field of Metrology of ionizing radiation and is a Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL). One of its guidelines is to maintain and disseminate LNMRI absorbed dose in water used as a national standard dosimetry in radiotherapy. For this pattern is metrologically acceptable accuracy and uncertainties should be assessed over time. The objective of this study is to analyze the uncertainties involved in determining the absorbed dose rate in water and standard uncertainty of absorbed dose calibration in water from a clinical dosimeter. The largest sources of uncertainty in determining the rate of absorbed dose in water are due to: calibration coefficient of the calibration certificate supplied by the BIPM, electrometer calibration, camber stability over time, variation of pressure and humidity, strong dependence and non-uniformity of the field. The expanded uncertainty is 0.94% for k = 2. For the calibration standard uncertainty of