WorldWideScience

Sample records for neutron range including

  1. Neutron range spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manglos, Stephen H.

    1989-06-06

    A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are collimnated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. The computer solves the following equation in the analysis: ##EQU1## where: N(x).DELTA.x=the number of neutron interactions measured between a position x and x+.DELTA.x, A.sub.i (E.sub.i).DELTA.E.sub.i =the number of incident neutrons with energy between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i, and C=C(E.sub.i)=N .sigma.(E.sub.i) where N=the number density of absorbing atoms in the position sensitive counter means and .sigma. (E.sub.i)=the average cross section of the absorbing interaction between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i.

  2. Long-Range Neutron Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peurrung, A.J.; Stromswold, D.C.; Hansen, R.R.; Reeder, P.L.; Barnett, D.S.

    1999-01-01

    A neutron detector designed for detecting neutron sources at distances of 50 to 100 m has been constructed and tested. This detector has a large surface area (1 m 2 ) to enhance detection efficiency, and it contains a collimator and shielding to achieve direction sensitivity and reduce background. An unusual feature of the detector is that it contains no added moderator, such as polyethylene, to moderate fast neutrons before they reach the 3 He detector. As a result, the detector is sensitive mainly to thermal neutrons. The moderator-free design reduces the weight of the detector, making it more portable, and it also aids in achieving directional sensitivity and background reduction. Test results show that moderated fission-neutron sources of strength about 3 x 10 5 n/s can be detected at a distance out to 70 m in a counting time of 1000 s. The best angular resolution of the detector is obtained at distances of 30 m or less. As the separation .distance between the source and detector increases, the contribution of scattered neutrons to the measured signal increases with a resultant decrease in the ability to detect the direction to a distant source. Applications for which the long-range detector appears to be suitable include detecting remote neutron sources (including sources in moving vehicles) and monitoring neutron storage vaults for the intrusion of humans and the effects they make on the detected neutron signal. Also, the detector can be used to measure waste for the presence of transuranic material in the presence of high gamma-ray background. A test with a neutron source (3 x 10 5 n/s) in a vehicle showed that the detector could readily measure an increase in count rate at a distance of 10 m for vehicle speeds up to 35 mph (the highest speed tested). These results. indicate that the source should be detectable at this distance at speeds up to 55 mph

  3. An extended range neutron rem counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birattari, C.; Nuccetelli, C.; Pelliccioni, M.; Silari, M.

    1990-01-01

    Extensive Monte Carlo calculations have been carried out to assess the possibility of extending the sensitivity of a neutron rem counter of the Andersson-Braun type up to several hundred MeV. The validity of the model adopted has first been checked by comparing with experimental data the calculated response curve and the angular dependence of the sensitivity for a well known commercial rem counter. Next, a number of modifications to the configuration of the moderator-attenuator have been investigated. The response functions and angular distributions produced by two simple solutions yielding an instrument with a sensitivity extended up to 400 MeV are presented. The response of the original rem counter and of its two modified versions to nine test spectra has also been calculated. The resulting instrument is transportable rather than portable, but the availability of an extended range neutron survey meter would be of great advantage at medium and high energy particle accelerator facilities. (orig.)

  4. Solution of neutron slowing down equation including multiple inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Wakil, S.A.; Saad, A.E.

    1977-01-01

    The present work is devoted the presentation of an analytical method for the calculation of elastically and inelastically slowed down neutrons in an infinite non absorbing homogeneous medium. On the basis of the Central limit theory (CLT) and the integral transform technique the slowing down equation including inelastic scattering in terms of the Green function of elastic scattering is solved. The Green function is decomposed according to the number of collisions. A formula for the flux at any lethargy O (u) after any number of collisions is derived. An equation for the asymptotic flux is also obtained

  5. Differential neutron spectrometry in the very low neutron energy range. Neutron cross sections for Zr, Al, polyethylene and liquid fluoropolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokotilovskij, Yu.N.; Novopol'tsev, M.I.; Geltenbort, P.; Brenner, T.

    2003-01-01

    Some results of the test of the time-of-flight neutron spectrometers in the energy range (0.05-2.5)μeV are described. The measurements of total and differential cross sections were performed for several substances relevant to the experiments in the physics of ultracold neutrons: Zr, Al, polyethylene and liquid fluoropolymers

  6. Monte Carlo simulation of fast neutron scattering experiments including DD-breakup neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, D.; Siebert, B.R.L.

    1993-06-01

    The computational simulation of the deuteron breakup in a scattering experiment has been investigated. Experimental breakup spectra measured at 16 deuteron energies and at 7 angles for each energy served as the data base. Analysis of these input data and of the conditions of the scattering experiment made it possible to reduce the input data. The use of one weighted breakup spectrum is sufficient to simulate the scattering spectra at one incident neutron energy. A number of tests were carried out to prove the validity of this result. The simulation of neutron scattering on carbon, including the breakup, was compared with measured spectra. Differences between calculated and measured spectra were for the most part within the experimental uncertainties. Certain significant deviations can be attributed to erroneous scattering cross sections taken from an evaluation and used in the simulation. Scattering on higher-lying states in [sup 12]C can be analyzed by subtracting the simulated breakup-scattering from the experimental spectra. (orig.)

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of fast neutron scattering experiments including DD-breakup neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, D.; Siebert, B.R.L.

    1993-06-01

    The computational simulation of the deuteron breakup in a scattering experiment has been investigated. Experimental breakup spectra measured at 16 deuteron energies and at 7 angles for each energy served as the data base. Analysis of these input data and of the conditions of the scattering experiment made it possible to reduce the input data. The use of one weighted breakup spectrum is sufficient to simulate the scattering spectra at one incident neutron energy. A number of tests were carried out to prove the validity of this result. The simulation of neutron scattering on carbon, including the breakup, was compared with measured spectra. Differences between calculated and measured spectra were for the most part within the experimental uncertainties. Certain significant deviations can be attributed to erroneous scattering cross sections taken from an evaluation and used in the simulation. Scattering on higher-lying states in 12 C can be analyzed by subtracting the simulated breakup-scattering from the experimental spectra. (orig.)

  8. Range and energy functions of interest in neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, D.P.; Nagarajan, P.S.

    1978-01-01

    This report documents the energy and range functions generated and used in fast neutron interface dosimetry studies. The basic data of stopping power employed are the most recent. The present report covers a number of media mainly air, oxygen, nitrogen, polythene, graphite, bone and tissue, and a number of charged particles, namely protons, alphas, 9 Be, 11 B, 12 C, 13 C, 14 N and 16 O. These functions would be useful for generation of energy and range values for any of the above particles in any of the above media within +- 1% in any dosimetric calculations. (author)

  9. Designing an extended energy range single-sphere multi-detector neutron spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gómez-Ros, J.M.; Bedogni, R.; Moraleda, M.; Esposito, A.; Pola, A.; Introini, M.V.; Mazzitelli, G.; Quintieri, L.; Buonomo, B.

    2012-01-01

    This communication describes the design specifications for a neutron spectrometer consisting of 31 thermal neutron detectors, namely Dysprosium activation foils, embedded in a 25 cm diameter polyethylene sphere which includes a 1 cm thick lead shell insert that degrades the energy of neutrons through (n,xn) reactions, thus allowing to extension of the energy range of the response up to hundreds of MeV neutrons. The new spectrometer, called SP 2 (SPherical SPectrometer), relies on the same detection mechanism as that of the Bonner Sphere Spectrometer, but with the advantage of determining the whole neutron spectrum in a single exposure. The Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX was used to design the spectrometer in terms of sphere diameter, number and position of the detectors, position and thickness of the lead shell, as well as to obtain the response matrix for the final configuration. This work focuses on evaluating the spectrometric capabilities of the SP 2 design by simulating the exposure of SP 2 in neutron fields representing different irradiation conditions (test spectra). The simulated SP 2 readings were then unfolded with the FRUIT unfolding code, in the absence of detailed pre-information, and the unfolded spectra were compared with the known test spectra. The results are satisfactory and allowed approving the production of a prototypal spectrometer.

  10. The extended range neutron rem counter LINUS: overview and latest developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birattari, C.; Rancati, T.; Esposito, A.; Pelliccioni, M.; Ferrari, A.; Silari, M.

    1997-01-01

    The 'history' of the extended range neutron rem counter LINUS, since its first conception in 1990 is reviewed, along with the latest developments. These include the calibration of the initially cylindrical version with nearly monoenergetic neutrons in the energy range 34-66 MeV, a detailed evaluation of the anisotropy of its response function, the construction and calibration of an improved spherical version, and recent measurements in reference high energy stray radiation fields. The instrument can now be considered as being fully characterized. Similar monitors built by other laboratories following the present design have confirmed its performances. The instrument is now in semi-routine use at a number of particle accelerator facilities and is one of several devices used on-board of aircrafts for assessing the exposure to cosmic rays at commercial flight altitudes. (author)

  11. Search for Novel Short-Range Forces between Elementary Particles in Neutron Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronin, V. V.; Kuznetsov, I. A.; Shapiro, D. D.

    2018-01-01

    The sensitivity of the method of neutron scattering to novel neutron-nucleon interactions is analyzed. Upper limits on the coupling constant of such interactions are imposed using the available data on neutron powder diffraction on polycrystalline silicon. For the forces acting at ranges of λ limits are already competitive with the best existing constraints on their coupling constant. A dedicated experiment can help improve the sensitivity to this coupling constant by nearly two orders of magnitude.

  12. Total neutron scattering: The key to the local and medium range ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    pp. 713–719. Total neutron scattering: The key to the local and medium range structure of complex materials. TH PROFFEN. Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Mailstop H805,. Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA. E-mail: tproffen@lanl.gov. Abstract. Structural characterization is mainly based on the ...

  13. A new start-up range neutron monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, M.R.; Sawyer, S.D.

    1984-01-01

    In the early 1960's General Electric began producing a line of radiation monitoring equipment known as Integrated Nuclear Measurement and Control (INMAC). Recent advances in technology, especially in the area of microprocessors, now allows improved performance in the same physical package size. This paper describes a new family of radiation monitoring equipment known as Nuclear Measurement Analysis and Control (NUMAC). In these instruments all essential logic and timing are implemented through the use of Microcomputer cards. In order to provide a high assurance of operability, an optional microprocessor controlled Self Test System may be incorporated. The Self Test System continuously checks operability of all safety related functions. Other design features include highly modularized construction, an enhanced operator interface and upwards compatibility with present and future General Electric instrumentation and control products. scheduled for the third quarter of 1984. This paper describes the requirements and design of the NUMAC line with emphasis on the Source Range Monitor

  14. Broad Energy Range Neutron Spectroscopy using a Liquid Scintillator and a Proportional Counter: Application to a Neutron Spectrum Similar to that from an Improvised Nuclear Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanping; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Marino, Stephen A; Garty, Guy; Harken, Andrew; Brenner, David J

    2015-09-11

    A novel neutron irradiation facility at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been developed to mimic the neutron radiation from an Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) at relevant distances (e.g. 1.5 km) from the epicenter. The neutron spectrum of this IND-like neutron irradiator was designed according to estimations of the Hiroshima neutron spectrum at 1.5 km. It is significantly different from a standard reactor fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and it is dominated by neutron energies from 100 keV up to 9 MeV. To verify such wide energy range neutron spectrum, detailed here is the development of a combined spectroscopy system. Both a liquid scintillator detector and a gas proportional counter were used for the recoil spectra measurements, with the individual response functions estimated from a series of Monte Carlo simulations. These normalized individual response functions were formed into a single response matrix for the unfolding process. Several accelerator-based quasi-monoenergetic neutron source spectra were measured and unfolded to test this spectroscopy system. These reference neutrons were produced from two reactions: T(p,n) 3 He and D(d,n) 3 He, generating neutron energies in the range between 0.2 and 8 MeV. The unfolded quasi-monoenergetic neutron spectra indicated that the detection system can provide good neutron spectroscopy results in this energy range. A broad-energy neutron spectrum from the 9 Be(d,n) reaction using a 5 MeV deuteron beam, measured at 60 degrees to the incident beam was measured and unfolded with the evaluated response matrix. The unfolded broad neutron spectrum is comparable with published time-of-flight results. Finally, the pair of detectors were used to measure the neutron spectrum generated at the RARAF IND-like neutron facility and a comparison is made to the neutron spectrum of Hiroshima.

  15. Development of detector for neutron monitor of wide energy range. Joint research

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, E; Nakamura, T; Rasolonjatovo, D R D; Shiomi, T; Tanaka, S; Yamaguchi, Y; Yoshizawa, M

    2002-01-01

    Radiation monitoring of neutrons in high-power proton accelerator facilities is very important for radiation safety management for workers and members of the public. In the present study, a neutron detector that can evaluate dose of neutrons in the energy range from thermal energy to 100MeV was developed using an organic liquid scintillator, a boron-loaded scintillator and a sup 6 Li glass scintillator. First, a method was developed to evaluate neutron doses above several MeV by a spectrum weight function (G-function) which is applied to the organic liquid scintillator, and the validity of the methods was confirmed by dose evaluation in some neutron fields. Second, the G-function was applied to the boron-loaded scintillator which detects thermal neutrons by sup 1 sup 0 B(n, alpha) sup 7 Li reaction, in order to expand the covering neutron energy range. The response function and the G-function of the scintillator were evaluated by experiment and calculation, and the characteristics of dose measurement were ana...

  16. Secondary neutron spectrum from 250-MeV passively scattered proton therapy: measurement with an extended-range Bonner sphere system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Rebecca M; Burgett, E A

    2014-09-01

    Secondary neutrons are an unavoidable consequence of proton therapy. While the neutron dose is low compared to the primary proton dose, its presence and contribution to the patient dose is nonetheless important. The most detailed information on neutrons includes an evaluation of the neutron spectrum. However, the vast majority of the literature that has reported secondary neutron spectra in proton therapy is based on computational methods rather than measurements. This is largely due to the inherent limitations in the majority of neutron detectors, which are either not suitable for spectral measurements or have limited response at energies greater than 20 MeV. Therefore, the primary objective of the present study was to measure a secondary neutron spectrum from a proton therapy beam using a spectrometer that is sensitive to neutron energies over the entire neutron energy spectrum. The authors measured the secondary neutron spectrum from a 250-MeV passively scattered proton beam in air at a distance of 100 cm laterally from isocenter using an extended-range Bonner sphere (ERBS) measurement system. Ambient dose equivalent H*(10) was calculated using measured fluence and fluence-to-ambient dose equivalent conversion coefficients. The neutron fluence spectrum had a high-energy direct neutron peak, an evaporation peak, a thermal peak, and an intermediate energy continuum between the thermal and evaporation peaks. The H*(10) was dominated by the neutrons in the evaporation peak because of both their high abundance and the large quality conversion coefficients in that energy interval. The H*(10) 100 cm laterally from isocenter was 1.6 mSv per proton Gy (to isocenter). Approximately 35% of the dose equivalent was from neutrons with energies ≥20 MeV. The authors measured a neutron spectrum for external neutrons generated by a 250-MeV proton beam using an ERBS measurement system that was sensitive to neutrons over the entire energy range being measured, i.e., thermal to

  17. Quantification of the sensitivity range in neutron dark-field imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betz, B.; Harti, R. P.; Hovind, J.; Kaestner, A.; Lehmann, E.; Grünzweig, C.; Strobl, M.; Van Swygenhoven, H.

    2015-01-01

    In neutron grating interferometry, the dark-field image visualizes the scattering properties of samples in the small-angle and ultra-small-angle scattering range. These angles correspond to correlation lengths from several hundred nanometers up to several tens of micrometers. In this article, we present an experimental study that demonstrates the potential of quantitative neutron dark-field imaging. The dark-field signal for scattering from different particle sizes and concentrations of mono-dispersive polystyrene particles in aqueous solution is compared to theoretical predictions and the good agreement between measurements and calculations underlines the quantitative nature of the measured values and reliability of the technique with neutrons

  18. Measurement of double differential cross sections of secondary neutrons in the incident energy range 9-13 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Hongqing; Qi Bujia; Zhou Zuying; Sa Jun; Ke Zunjian; Sui Qingchang; Xia Haihong; Shen Guanren

    1992-01-01

    The status and technique of double differential cross section measurement of secondary neutrons in the incident neutron energy range 9 to 13 MeV is reviewed with emphasis on the work done at CIAE. There are scarce measurements of secondary neutron double differential cross sections in this energy region up to now. A main difficulty for this is lack of an applicable monoenergetic neutron source. When monoenergetic neutron energy reaches 8 Me/v, the break-up neutrons from the d + D or p + T reaction starts to become significant. It is difficult to get a pure secondary neutron spectrum induced only by monoenergetic neutrons. To solve this problem an abnormal fast neutron TOF facility was designed and tested. Double differential neutron emission cross sections of 238 U and 209 Bi at 10 MeV were obtained by combining the data measured by both normal and abnormal TOF spectrometers and a good agreement between measurement and calculation was achieved

  19. Neutron monitoring systems including gamma thermometers and methods of calibrating nuclear instruments using gamma thermometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Stephan Craig; Meyers, Craig Glenn; Petzen, John Alexander; Foard, Adam Muhling

    2012-08-07

    A method of calibrating a nuclear instrument using a gamma thermometer may include: measuring, in the instrument, local neutron flux; generating, from the instrument, a first signal proportional to the neutron flux; measuring, in the gamma thermometer, local gamma flux; generating, from the gamma thermometer, a second signal proportional to the gamma flux; compensating the second signal; and calibrating a gain of the instrument based on the compensated second signal. Compensating the second signal may include: calculating selected yield fractions for specific groups of delayed gamma sources; calculating time constants for the specific groups; calculating a third signal that corresponds to delayed local gamma flux based on the selected yield fractions and time constants; and calculating the compensated second signal by subtracting the third signal from the second signal. The specific groups may have decay time constants greater than 5.times.10.sup.-1 seconds and less than 5.times.10.sup.5 seconds.

  20. The wide range in-core neutron measurement system used in the Windscale AGR concluding experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodings, A.; Budd, J.; Wilson, I.

    1982-06-01

    The Windscale AGR concluding experiments included a comparison of theoretical and experimental power transients and required measurements of neutron flux as a function of position and time within the reactor core. These measurements were specified to cover a working range as wide as possible and had to be made against the in-core gamma background of up to 4 x 10 7 R(hr) - 1 . The detectors were required to operate in special channels cooled by reactor inlet CO 2 and the overall system needed a response time such that it could follow transients with doubling times down to 2s with an accuracy of 2 or 3%. These problems were solved by the use of gas ion fission chambers operating in the current fluctuation or ''Campbelling'' mode. Their neutron to gamma sensitivity ratio was optimised by the use of unusually low filling pressures and they were fitted with special ''trilaminax'' mineral insulated cables to minimise the effects of electrical interference at the 100 kHz channel centre frequency. Ten detectors were built and nine were installed in the reactor, three in each of three special stringers at different radial positions. All were processed and tested for operation at 350 deg. C and their fissile coatings (430 μg cm - 1 of natural uranium) were matched to give individual neutron sensitivities with a population spread better than +- 6% about the mean. The mean absolute sensitivities were determined to about +- 5% against manganese foils in the NESTOR reactor at AEE Winfrith. The detectors were complemented by special signal processing channels which provided current fluctuation sensitivity and appropriate output signals to the experiment data acquisition system. These channels also permitted dc measurement of chamber current for more precise flux determination near reactor full power

  1. A target development program for beamhole spallation neutron sources in the megawatt range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, G.S.; Atchison, F. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxon (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Spallation sources as an alternative to fission neutron sources have been operating successfully up to 160 kW of beam power. With the next generation of these facilities aiming at the medium power range between 0.5 and 5 MW, loads on the targets will be high enough to make present experience of little relevance. With the 0.6 MW continuous facility SINQ under construction, and a 5 MW pulsed facility (ESS) under study in Europe, a research and development program is about to be started which aimes at assessing the limits of stationary and moving solid targets and the feasibility and potential benefits of flowing liquid metal targets. Apart from theoretical work and examination of existing irradiated material, including used targets from ISIS, it is intended to take advantage of the SINQ solid rod target design to improve the relevant data base by building the target in such a way that individual rods can be equipped as irradiation capsules.

  2. 25 CFR 170.411 - What may a long-range transportation plan include?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... preservation planning to identify important issues and develop a transportation plan that is sensitive to... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What may a long-range transportation plan include? 170... Long-Range Transportation Planning § 170.411 What may a long-range transportation plan include? A...

  3. Neutron diffraction study on the medium and short-range order of ternary chalcogenide glasses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neov, S.; Gerasimova, I.; Skordeva, E.; Arsova, D.; Pamukchieva, V.; Mikula, Pavol; Lukáš, Petr; Sonntag, R.

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 34, - (1999), s. 3669-3676 ISSN 0022-2461 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV202/97/K038 Keywords : neutron diffraction * short-range order * chalcogenide glasses Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.786, year: 1999

  4. Total neutron scattering: The key to the local and medium range ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Mailstop H805,. Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA. E-mail: ... 1b shows chemical short-range order (SRO), in this case the preferred ordering along the x- and ... Here b is the scattering length, the angle brackets denote the average over the sample and dσc/dΩ is ...

  5. Longe-Range Order in beta-Brass Studied by Neutron Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathmann, Ole; Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1974-01-01

    The long-range order, M(T), in β-brass has been measured by neutron diffraction from a small extinction-free crystal. The results agree with those obtained recently by x-ray diffraction. Near Tc our data are in accordance with a power law M(T)=D(1-T/Tc)β with the critical exponent β=0...

  6. A semiempirical long-range corrected exchange correlation functional including a short-range Gaussian attenuation (LCgau-B97).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jong-Won; Peng, Daoling; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2011-11-30

    We applied an improved long-range correction scheme including a short-range Gaussian attenuation (LCgau) to the Becke97 (B97) exchange correlation functional. In the optimization of LCgau-B97 functional, the linear parameters are determined by least squares fitting. Optimizing μ parameter (0.2) that controls long-range portion of Hartree-Fock (HF) exchange to excitation energies of large molecules (Chai and Head-Gordon, J Chem Phys 2008, 128, 084106) and additional short-range Gaussian parameters (a = 0.15 and k = 0.9) that controls HF exchange inclusion ranging from short-range to mid-range (0.5-3 Å) to ground state properties achieved high performances of LCgau-B97 simultaneously on both ground state and excited state properties, which is better than other tested semiempirical density functional theory (DFT) functionals, such as ωB97, ωB97X, BMK, and M0x-family. We also found that while a small μ value (∼0.2) in LC-DFT is appropriate to the local excitation and intramolecular charge-transfer excitation energies, a larger μ value (0.42) is desirable in the Rydberg excitation-energy calculations. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. A portable and wide energy range semiconductor-based neutron spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshor, C.B.; Oakes, T.M.; Myers, E.R.; Rogers, B.J.; Currie, J.E.; Young, S.M.; Crow, J.A.; Scott, P.R.; Miller, W.H.; Bellinger, S.L.; Sobering, T.J.; Fronk, R.G.; Shultis, J.K.; McGregor, D.S.; Caruso, A.N.

    2015-01-01

    Hand-held instruments that can be used to passively detect and identify sources of neutron radiation—either bare or obscured by neutron moderating and/or absorbing material(s)—in real time are of interest in a variety of nuclear non-proliferation and health physics applications. Such an instrument must provide a means to high intrinsic detection efficiency and energy-sensitive measurements of free neutron fields, for neutrons ranging from thermal energies to the top end of the evaporation spectrum. To address and overcome the challenges inherent to the aforementioned applications, four solid-state moderating-type neutron spectrometers of varying cost, weight, and complexity have been designed, fabricated, and tested. The motivation of this work is to introduce these novel human-portable instruments by discussing the fundamental theory of their operation, investigating and analyzing the principal considerations for optimal instrument design, and evaluating the capability of each of the four fabricated spectrometers to meet the application needs.

  8. A portable and wide energy range semiconductor-based neutron spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshor, C.B. [Department of Physics, University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO (United States); Oakes, T.M. [Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Myers, E.R.; Rogers, B.J.; Currie, J.E.; Young, S.M.; Crow, J.A.; Scott, P.R. [Department of Physics, University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO (United States); Miller, W.H. [Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Missouri University Research Reactor, Columbia, MO (United States); Bellinger, S.L. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS (United States); Sobering, T.J. [Electronics Design Laboratory, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS (United States); Fronk, R.G.; Shultis, J.K.; McGregor, D.S. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS (United States); Caruso, A.N., E-mail: carusoan@umkc.edu [Department of Physics, University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO (United States)

    2015-12-11

    Hand-held instruments that can be used to passively detect and identify sources of neutron radiation—either bare or obscured by neutron moderating and/or absorbing material(s)—in real time are of interest in a variety of nuclear non-proliferation and health physics applications. Such an instrument must provide a means to high intrinsic detection efficiency and energy-sensitive measurements of free neutron fields, for neutrons ranging from thermal energies to the top end of the evaporation spectrum. To address and overcome the challenges inherent to the aforementioned applications, four solid-state moderating-type neutron spectrometers of varying cost, weight, and complexity have been designed, fabricated, and tested. The motivation of this work is to introduce these novel human-portable instruments by discussing the fundamental theory of their operation, investigating and analyzing the principal considerations for optimal instrument design, and evaluating the capability of each of the four fabricated spectrometers to meet the application needs.

  9. Contribution to the study of the unresolved resonance range of the neutrons cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguere, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    This document presents the statistical description of neutron cross sections in the unresolved resonance range. The modeling of the total cross section and of the 'shape - elastic' cross section is based on the 'average R-Matrix' formalism. The partial cross sections describing the radiative capture, elastic scattering, inelastic scattering and fission process are calculated using the Hauser-Feshbach formalism with width fluctuation corrections. In the unresolved resonance range, these models depend on the average resonance parameters (neutron strength function Sc, mean level spacing D c , average partial reaction widths Γ c , channel radius a c , effective radius R' and distant level parameter R-bar c ∞ ). The codes (NJOY, CALENDF...) dedicated to the processing of nuclear data libraries (JEFF, ENDF/B, JENDL, CENDL, BROND... ) use the average parameters to take into account the self-shielding phenomenon for the simulation of the neutron transport in Monte-Carlo (MCNP, TRIPOLI... ) and deterministic (APOLLO, ERANOS...) codes. The evaluation work consists in establishing a consistent set of average parameters as a function of the total angular momentum J of the system and of the orbital moment of the incident neutron l. The work presented in this paper aims to describe the links between the S-Matrix and the 'average R-Matrix' formalism for the calculation of Sc, R-bar c ∞ , ac and R'. (author) [fr

  10. 10-decade wide-range neutron-monitoring system. Final test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, W.K.

    1970-10-01

    The objective of Project Agreement 49 was to design, fabricate, test, and evaluate under actual nuclear reactor operating conditions, one prototype counting-Campbelling wide-range type thermal neutron flux measurement channel. This report describes the basic system designed for PA 49, and describes and presents the results of tests conducted on the system. Individual module descriptions and schematics are contained in the instruction manual which was issued with the system.

  11. TMI-2 source and intermediate range neutron flux monitors data report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCormick, R.D.

    1986-03-01

    This is a report on the preparation of data from the TMI-2 excore source and intermediate range neutron flux monitors for inclusion into the TMI Data Base. The sources of the as-recorded data are discussed as well as the process of transforming these data into digital form. The corrections to the as-recorded data are given and the data quality classification and uncertainty are established. The identifiers attached to each data set in the TMI Data Base are given

  12. The wide range in-core neutron measurement system used in the Windscale AGR concluding experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodings, A.; Budd, J.; Wilson, I.

    1982-06-01

    The Windscale AGR Concluding Experiments included a comparison of theoretical and experimental power transients and required measurements of neutron flux as a function of position and time within the reactor core. These measurements were specified to cover as wide as possible working range and had to be made against the in-core gamma background of up to 4 x 10 7 R(hr) - 1 . The detectors were required to operate in special, channels cooled by reactor inlet carbon dioxide and the overall system needed a response time such that it could follow transients with doubling times down to 2s with an accuracy of 2 or 3%. These problems were solved by the use of gas ion fission chambers operating in the current fluctuation or Campbelling mode with unusually low filling pressures and fitted with special trilaminax mineral insulated cables. Ten detectors were built and nine were installed in the reactor, three in each of three special stringers at different radial positions. The paper describes the specification against which this system was built, the design process for the detectors, and commissioning experiments together with some of the problems which were encountered. (U.K.)

  13. Final Environmental Impact Statement for Proposed Barry M. Goldwater Range East Range Enhancements (Including First and Second Record of Decision)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    quality and environmental management. Mary Harclerode Production A.A. Business Administration with 2 years experience. Rachel Healey ...Manned Range 3, Barry M Goldwater Range East, Arizona. EcoPlan Associates Mesa, Arizona. Neuzil, Anna, Jill Hjeilman, Jason Sperinck, Daniel

  14. Measurement of cross sections for the scattering of neutrons in the energy range from 2 MeV to 4 MeV with the 15N(p,n) reaction as neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poenitz, Erik

    2010-01-01

    In future nuclear facilities, the materials lead and bismuth can play a more important role than in today's nuclear reactors. Reliable cross section data are required for the design of those facilities. In particular the neutron transport in the lead spallation target of an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Reactor strongly depends on the inelastic neutron scattering cross sections in the energy region from 0.5 MeV to 6 MeV. In the recent 20 years, elastic and inelastic neutron scattering cross sections were measured with high precision for a variety of elements at the PTB time-of-flight spectrometer. The D(d,n) reaction was primarily used for the production of neutrons. Because of the Q value of the reaction and the available deuteron energies, neutrons in the energy range from 6 MeV to 16 MeV can be produced. For the cross section measurement at lower energies, however, another neutron producing reaction is required. The 15 N(p,n) 15 O reaction was chosen, as it allows the production of monoenergetic neutrons with up to 5.7MeV energy. In this work, the 15 N(p,n) reaction was studied with focus on the suitability as a source for monoenergetic neutrons in scattering experiments. This includes the measurement of differential cross sections for the neutron producing reaction and the choice of optimum target conditions. Differential elastic and inelastic neutron scattering cross sections were measured for lead at four energies in the region from 2 MeV to 4 MeV incident neutron energy using the time-of-flight technique. A lead sample with natural isotopic composition was used. NE213 liquid scintillation detectors with well-known detection efficiencies were used for the detection of the scattered neutrons. Angle-integrated cross sections were determined by a Legendre polynomial expansion using least-squares methods. Additionally, measurements were carried out for isotopically pure 209 Bi and 181 Ta samples at 4 MeV incident neutron energy. Results are compared with other

  15. Long-range versus short-range correlations in the two-neutron transfer reaction 64Ni(18O,16O)66Ni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paes, B.; Santagati, G.; Vsevolodovna, R. Magana; Cappuzzello, F.; Carbone, D.; Cardozo, E. N.; Cavallaro, M.; García-Tecocoatzi, H.; Gargano, A.; Ferreira, J. L.; Lenzi, S. M.; Linares, R.; Santopinto, E.; Vitturi, A.; Lubian, J.

    2017-10-01

    Recently, various two-neutron transfer studies using the (18O,16O) reaction were performed with a large success. This was achieved because of a combined use of the microscopic quantum description of the reaction mechanism and of the nuclear structure. In the present work we use this methodology to study the two-neutron transfer reaction of the 18O+64Ni system at 84 MeV incident energy, to the ground and first 2+ excited state of the residual 66Ni nucleus. All the experimental data were measured by the large acceptance MAGNEX spectrometer at the Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare -Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (Italy). We have performed exact finite range cross section calculations using the coupled channel Born approximation (CCBA) and coupled reaction channel (CRC) method for the sequential and direct two-neutron transfers, respectively. Moreover, this is the first time that the formalism of the microscopic interaction boson model (IBM-2) was applied to a two-neutron transfer reaction. From our results we conclude that for two-neutron transfer to the ground state of 66Ni, the direct transfer is the dominant reaction mechanism, whereas for the transfer to the first excited state of 66Ni, the sequential process dominates. A competition between long-range and short-range correlations is discussed, in particular, how the use of two different models (Shell model and IBM's) help to disentangle long- and short-range correlations.

  16. Average fast neutron flux in three energy ranges in the Quinta assembly irradiated by two types of beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strugalska-Gola Elzbieta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work was performed within the international project “Energy plus Transmutation of Radioactive Wastes” (E&T - RAW for investigations of energy production and transmutation of radioactive waste of the nuclear power industry. 89Y (Yttrium 89 samples were located in the Quinta assembly in order to measure an average high neutron flux density in three different energy ranges using deuteron and proton beams from Dubna accelerators. Our analysis showed that the neutron density flux for the neutron energy range 20.8 - 32.7 MeV is higher than for the neutron energy range 11.5 - 20.8 MeV both for protons with an energy of 0.66 GeV and deuterons with an energy of 2 GeV, while for deuteron beams of 4 and 6 GeV we did not observe this.

  17. A wide dynamic range BF{sub 3} neutron monitor with front-end electronics based on a logarithmic amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrarini, M., E-mail: michele.ferrarini@polimi.i [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento Energia, via G. Ponzio 34/3, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Fondazione CNAO, via Caminadella 16, 20123 Milano (Italy); Varoli, V. [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento Energia, via G. Ponzio 34/3, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Favalli, A. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for the Protection and Security of Citizen, TP 800, Via E. Fermi, 21027 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy); Caresana, M. [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento Energia, via G. Ponzio 34/3, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Pedersen, B. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for the Protection and Security of Citizen, TP 800, Via E. Fermi, 21027 Ispra (Italy)

    2010-02-01

    This paper describes a wide dynamic range neutron monitor based on a BF{sub 3} neutron detector. The detector is used in current mode, and front-end electronics based on a logarithmic amplifier are used in order to have a measurement capability ranging over many orders of magnitude. The system has been calibrated at the Polytechnic of Milan, CESNEF, with an AmBe neutron source, and has been tested in a pulsed field at the PUNITA facility at JRC, Ispra. The detector has achieved a dynamic range of over 6 orders of magnitude, being able to measure single neutron pulses and showing saturation-free response for a reaction rate up to 10{sup 6} s{sup -1}. It has also proved effective in measuring the PUNITA facility pulse integral fluence.

  18. Evaluation of multiple small-angle neutron scattering including magnetic interactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šaroun, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 40, s1 (2007), s701-s705 ISSN 0021-8898. [XIII International Conference on Small - Angle Scattering . Kyoto, 09.07.2006-13.07.2006] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : multiple small - angle scattering * neutron scattering * ferromagnets Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.629, year: 2007

  19. Calculated neutron-activation cross sections for E/sub n/ /le/ 100 MeV for a range of accelerator materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozoian, M.; Arthur, E.D.; Perry, R.T.; Wilson, W.B.; Young, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    Activation problems associated with particle accelerators are commonly dominated by reactions of secondary neutrons produced in reactions of beam particles with accelerator or beam stop materials. Measured values of neutron-activation cross sections above a few MeV are sparse. Calculations with the GNASH code have been made for neutrons incident on all stable nuclides of a range of elements common to accelerator materials. These elements include B, C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Ar, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Zr, Mo, Nd, and Sm. Calculations were made for a grid of incident neutron energies extending to 100 MeV. Cross sections leading to the direct production of as many as 87 activation products for each of 84 target nuclide were tabulated on this grid of neutron energies, each beginning with the threshold for the product nuclide's formation. Multigrouped values of these cross sections have been calculated and are being integrated into the cross-section library of the REAC-2 neutron activation code. Illustrative cross sections are presented. 20 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  20. Simulating irradiation hardening in tungsten under fast neutron irradiation including Re production by transmutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chen-Hsi; Gilbert, Mark R.; Marian, Jaime

    2018-02-01

    Simulations of neutron damage under fusion energy conditions must capture the effects of transmutation, both in terms of accurate chemical inventory buildup as well as the physics of the interactions between transmutation elements and irradiation defect clusters. In this work, we integrate neutronics, primary damage calculations, molecular dynamics results, Re transmutation calculations, and stochastic cluster dynamics simulations to study neutron damage in single-crystal tungsten to mimic divertor materials. To gauge the accuracy and validity of the simulations, we first study the material response under experimental conditions at the JOYO fast reactor in Japan and the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, for which measurements of cluster densities and hardening levels up to 2 dpa exist. We then provide calculations under expected DEMO fusion conditions. Several key mechanisms involving Re atoms and defect clusters are found to govern the accumulation of irradiation damage in each case. We use established correlations to translate damage accumulation into hardening increases and compare our results to the experimental measurements. We find hardening increases in excess of 5000 MPa in all cases, which casts doubts about the integrity of W-based materials under long-term fusion exposure.

  1. Systematics of neutron-induced fission cross sections over the energy range 0.1 through 15 MeV, and at 0.0253 eV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, J.W.

    1977-01-01

    Recent studies have shown straightforward systematic behavior as a function of constant proton and neutron number for neutron-induced fission cross sections of the actinide elements in the incident-neutron energy range 3 to 5 MeV. In this report, the second in a series, fission cross-section values are studied over the MeV incident-neutron energy range, and at 0.0253 eV. Fission-barrier heights and neutron-binding energies are correlated by constant proton and neutron number; however, these systematic behaviors alone do not explain the trends observed in the fission cross-section values

  2. Limits of deuterium pressure range with neutron production in plasma focus devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouzo, J.; Milanese, M.; Piriz, R.; Cortazar, D.; Moroso, R.

    1988-01-01

    In this work we present the experimental curves of neutron yield (Y) respect to the deuterium filling pressure (p) obtained in our plasma focuses device PACO. Y increases with the focus current (I f ) according with the scaling law Y ∼I 4-5 f , but it presents a limited range of p beyond which Y drastically decreases. The higher pressure limit is coincident with recently reported limit due to the energy available to maintain the ionization rate of the neutral gas during the roll-off stage. The lower pressure limit is here explained, through experimental evidences, in terms of a phenomenon connected with the dynamics of the current sheath (cs) during the roll-off stage. (author). 8 refs, 11 figs

  3. MeV-range velocity-space tomography from gamma-ray and neutron emission spectrometry measurements at JET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Nocente, M.; Jacobsen, Asger Schou

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate the measurement of a 2D MeV-range ion velocity distribution function by velocity-space tomography at JET. Deuterium ions were accelerated into the MeV-range by third harmonic ion cyclotron resonance heating. We made measurements with three neutron emission spectrometers and a high-...

  4. Multi trace element analysis of dry biological materials by neutron activation analysis including a chemical group separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weers, C.A.

    1980-07-01

    Multi-element analysis of dry biological material by neutron activation analysis has to include radiochemical separation. The evaporation process is described in terms of the half-volume. The pretreatment of the samples and the development of the destruction-evaporation apparatus are described. The successive adsorption steps with active charcoal, Al 2 O 3 and coprecipitation with Fe(OH) 3 are described. Results obtained for standard reference materials are summarized. (G.T.H.)

  5. Contributions to the study of fast neutron spectrum in the 10 keV - 3 MeV range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garlea, I.

    1979-01-01

    The main objective of the work presented in this thesis was to create a fast neutron spectrum corresponding to the conditions required for a reference neutron field. The reference system for the fast neutron dosimetry in reactors, which the author promoted, is referred to as ΣΣ-ITN in the books. The conditions for introducing the ΣΣ systems into the thermal columns have been determined. The original contribution consists in determining the Westcott parameters of reactions 151 Eu(n,γ) 152 Eu and 176 Lu(n,γ) 17 +H7Lu used as thermal spectrum factors. The neutron description of the spectrum in cavity ΣΣ revealed that it is a Maxwell thermal spectrum displaying a temperature of 305+-7 deg C and a very small epithermal component (phisub(epi)/phisub(thermal) =4,5.10 -4 ). Better methods for determining reaction absolute rates resulted in less errors in calculating the microscopic integral sections mediated on the ΣΣ spectrum; there are under 5% errors for the fission cross sections and between 3% and 8% errors for the activating ones. The section values determined by the author have been included into the EXFOR library (IAEA); they are considered as reference measuremtns for the nuclear data improvement program. Testing the proposed method for the TRIGA on the ΣΣ-INT system proved that the multiple foil method provides correct results for both describing the spectral shape and for obtaining absolute values of the flux. Taking into account that the ΣΣ-ITN spectrum is a rapid one, the proposed method could not be tested within the low energy thermal and epithermal domain. For testing the method on an operational reactor, the core of the VVR-S IFIN reactor was employed. Due to the spectral structure of this reactor, it was possible to test the procedure within the whole energy range. In this view, the 5/10 core channel was selected which is similar to the channel required for measurements in the TRIGA-ROMANIA reactor. The absolute spectrum values are given in

  6. Quenched Large Deviations for Simple Random Walks on Percolation Clusters Including Long-Range Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Noam; Mukherjee, Chiranjib; Okamura, Kazuki

    2018-03-01

    We prove a quenched large deviation principle (LDP) for a simple random walk on a supercritical percolation cluster (SRWPC) on {Z^d} ({d ≥ 2}). The models under interest include classical Bernoulli bond and site percolation as well as models that exhibit long range correlations, like the random cluster model, the random interlacement and the vacant set of random interlacements (for {d ≥ 3}) and the level sets of the Gaussian free field ({d≥ 3}). Inspired by the methods developed by Kosygina et al. (Commun Pure Appl Math 59:1489-1521, 2006) for proving quenched LDP for elliptic diffusions with a random drift, and by Yilmaz (Commun Pure Appl Math 62(8):1033-1075, 2009) and Rosenbluth (Quenched large deviations for multidimensional random walks in a random environment: a variational formula. Ph.D. thesis, NYU, arXiv:0804.1444v1) for similar results regarding elliptic random walks in random environment, we take the point of view of the moving particle and prove a large deviation principle for the quenched distribution of the pair empirical measures of the environment Markov chain in the non-elliptic case of SRWPC. Via a contraction principle, this reduces easily to a quenched LDP for the distribution of the mean velocity of the random walk and both rate functions admit explicit variational formulas. The main difficulty in our set up lies in the inherent non-ellipticity as well as the lack of translation-invariance stemming from conditioning on the fact that the origin belongs to the infinite cluster. We develop a unifying approach for proving quenched large deviations for SRWPC based on exploiting coercivity properties of the relative entropies in the context of convex variational analysis, combined with input from ergodic theory and invoking geometric properties of the supercritical percolation cluster.

  7. Fundamental neutron physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deslattes, R.; Dombeck, T.; Greene, G.; Ramsey, N.; Rauch, H.; Werner, S.

    1984-01-01

    Fundamental physics experiments of merit can be conducted at the proposed intense neutron sources. Areas of interest include: neutron particle properties, neutron wave properties, and fundamental physics utilizing reactor produced γ-rays. Such experiments require intense, full-time utilization of a beam station for periods ranging from several months to a year or more

  8. Responses of conventional and extended-range neutron detectors in mixed radiation fields around a 150-MeV electron LINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Yu-Chi; Sheu, Rong-Jiun; Chen, Ang-Yu

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzed the responses of two types of neutron detector in mixed gamma-ray and neutron radiation fields around a 150-MeV electron linear accelerator (LINAC). The detectors were self-assembled, high efficiency, and designed in two configurations: (1) a conventional moderated-type neutron detector based on a large cylindrical He-3 proportional counter; and (2) an extended-range version with an embedded layer of lead in the moderator to increase the detector’s sensitivity to high-energy neutrons. Two sets of the detectors were used to measure neutrons at the downstream and lateral locations simultaneously, where the radiation fields differed considerably in intensities and spectra of gamma rays and neutrons. Analyzing the detector responses through a comparison between calculations and measurements indicated that not only neutrons but also high-energy gamma rays (>5 MeV) triggered the detectors because of photoneutrons produced in the detector materials. In the lateral direction, the contribution of photoneutrons to both detectors was negligible. Downstream of the LINAC, where high-energy photons were abundant, photoneutrons contributed approximately 6% of the response of the conventional neutron detector; however, almost 50% of the registered counts of the extended-range neutron detector were from photoneutrons because of the presence of the detector rather than the effect of the neutron field. Dose readings delivered by extended-range neutron detectors should be interpreted cautiously when used in radiation fields containing a mixture of neutrons and high-energy gamma rays

  9. BWR transient analysis using neutronic / thermal hydraulic coupled codes including uncertainty quantification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, C.; Sanchez, V.; Tietsch, W.; Stieglitz, R.

    2012-01-01

    The KIT is involved in the development and qualification of best estimate methodologies for BWR transient analysis in cooperation with industrial partners. The goal is to establish the most advanced thermal hydraulic system codes coupled with 3D reactor dynamic codes to be able to perform a more realistic evaluation of the BWR behavior under accidental conditions. For this purpose a computational chain based on the lattice code (SCALE6/GenPMAXS), the coupled neutronic/thermal hydraulic code (TRACE/PARCS) as well as a Monte Carlo based uncertainty and sensitivity package (SUSA) has been established and applied to different kind of transients of a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). This paper will describe the multidimensional models of the plant elaborated for TRACE and PARCS to perform the investigations mentioned before. For the uncertainty quantification of the coupled code TRACE/PARCS and specifically to take into account the influence of the kinetics parameters in such studies, the PARCS code has been extended to facilitate the change of model parameters in such a way that the SUSA package can be used in connection with TRACE/PARCS for the U and S studies. This approach will be presented in detail. The results obtained for a rod drop transient with TRACE/PARCS using the SUSA-methodology showed clearly the importance of some kinetic parameters on the transient progression demonstrating that the coupling of a best-estimate coupled codes with uncertainty and sensitivity tools is very promising and of great importance for the safety assessment of nuclear reactors. (authors)

  10. CFD - neutronic coupled calculation of a quarter of a simplified PWR fuel assembly including spacer pressure drop and turbulence enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena, C.; Pellacani, F.; Macian Juan, R.; Chiva, S.; Barrachina, T.; Miro, R.

    2011-01-01

    A computational code system based on coupling the 3D neutron diffusion code PARCS v2.7 and the Ansys CFX 13.0 Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code has been developed as a tool for nuclear reactor systems simulations. This paper presents the coupling methodology between the CFD and the neutronic code. The methodology to simulate a 3D-neutronic problem coupled with 1D thermal hydraulics is already a mature technology, being part of the regular calculations performed to analyze different kinds of Reactivity Insertion Accidents (RIA) and asymmetric transients in Nuclear Power Plants, with state-of-the-art coupled codes like TRAC-B/NEM, RELAP5/PARCS, TRACE/PARCS, RELAP3D, RETRAN3D, etc. This work represents one of the first attempts to couple the multiphysics of a nuclear reactor core with a 3D spatial resolution in a computer code. This will open new possibilities regarding the analysis of fuel elements, contributing to a better understanding and design of the heat transfer process and specific fluid dynamics phenomena such as cross flow among fuel elements. The transient simulation of control rod insertion, boron dilution and cold water injection will be made possible with a degree of accuracy not achievable with current methodologies based on the use of system and/or subchannel codes. The transport of neutrons depends on several parameters, like fuel temperature, moderator temperature and density, boron concentration and fuel rod insertion. These data are calculated by the CFD code with high local resolution and used as input to the neutronic code to calculate a 3D nodal power distribution that will be returned and remapped to the CFD code control volumes (cells). Since two different nodalizations are used to discretized the same system, an averaging and interpolating procedure is needed to realize an effective data exchange. These procedures have been developed by means of the Ansys CFX 'User Fortran' interface; a library with several subroutines has been

  11. CFD - neutronic coupled calculation of a quarter of a simplified PWR fuel assembly including spacer pressure drop and turbulence enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena, C.; Pellacani, F.; Macian Juan, R., E-mail: carlos.pena@ntech.mw.tum.de, E-mail: pellacani@ntech.mw.tum.de, E-mail: macian@ntech.mw.tum.de [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Ntech Lehrstuhl fuer Nukleartechnik; Chiva, S., E-mail: schiva@emc.uji.es [Universitat Jaume I, Castellon de la Plana (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Mecanica y Construccion; Barrachina, T.; Miro, R., E-mail: rmiro@iqn.upv.es, E-mail: tbarrachina@iqn.upv.es [Universitat Politecnica de Valencia (ISIRYM/UPV) (Spain). Institute for Industrial, Radiophysical and Environmental Safety

    2011-07-01

    A computational code system based on coupling the 3D neutron diffusion code PARCS v2.7 and the Ansys CFX 13.0 Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code has been developed as a tool for nuclear reactor systems simulations. This paper presents the coupling methodology between the CFD and the neutronic code. The methodology to simulate a 3D-neutronic problem coupled with 1D thermal hydraulics is already a mature technology, being part of the regular calculations performed to analyze different kinds of Reactivity Insertion Accidents (RIA) and asymmetric transients in Nuclear Power Plants, with state-of-the-art coupled codes like TRAC-B/NEM, RELAP5/PARCS, TRACE/PARCS, RELAP3D, RETRAN3D, etc. This work represents one of the first attempts to couple the multiphysics of a nuclear reactor core with a 3D spatial resolution in a computer code. This will open new possibilities regarding the analysis of fuel elements, contributing to a better understanding and design of the heat transfer process and specific fluid dynamics phenomena such as cross flow among fuel elements. The transient simulation of control rod insertion, boron dilution and cold water injection will be made possible with a degree of accuracy not achievable with current methodologies based on the use of system and/or subchannel codes. The transport of neutrons depends on several parameters, like fuel temperature, moderator temperature and density, boron concentration and fuel rod insertion. These data are calculated by the CFD code with high local resolution and used as input to the neutronic code to calculate a 3D nodal power distribution that will be returned and remapped to the CFD code control volumes (cells). Since two different nodalizations are used to discretized the same system, an averaging and interpolating procedure is needed to realize an effective data exchange. These procedures have been developed by means of the Ansys CFX 'User Fortran' interface; a library with several subroutines has

  12. Dual sightline measurements of MeV range deuterons with neutron and gamma-ray spectroscopy at JET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, J.; Nocente, M.; Binda, F.

    2015-01-01

    Observations made in a JET experiment aimed at accelerating deuterons to the MeV range by third harmonic radio-frequency (RF) heating coupled into a deuterium beam are reported. Measurements are based on a set of advanced neutron and gamma-ray spectrometers that, for the first time, observe...... the plasma simultaneously along vertical and oblique lines of sight. Parameters of the fast ion energy distribution, such as the high energy cut-off of the deuteron distribution function and the RF coupling constant, are determined from data within a uniform analysis framework for neutron and gamma...... around the resonance, which is not correctly portrayed within the adopted one dimensional model. A framework to calculate neutron and gamma-ray emission from a spatially resolved, two-dimensional deuteron distribution specified by energy/pitch is thus developed and used for a first comparison...

  13. An improved method for including upper size range plasmids in metamobilomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Norman

    Full Text Available Two recently developed isolation methods have shown promise when recovering pure community plasmid DNA (metamobilomes/plasmidomes, which is useful in conducting culture-independent investigations into plasmid ecology. However, both methods employ multiple displacement amplification (MDA to ensure suitable quantities of plasmid DNA for high-throughput sequencing. This study demonstrates that MDA greatly favors smaller circular DNA elements (10 Kbp. Throughout the study, we used two model plasmids, a 4.4 Kbp cloning vector (pBR322, and a 56 Kbp conjugative plasmid (pKJK10, to represent lower- and upper plasmid size ranges, respectively. Subjecting a mixture of these plasmids to the overall isolation protocol revealed a 34-fold over-amplification of pBR322 after MDA. To address this bias, we propose the addition of an electroelution step that separates different plasmid size ranges prior to MDA in order to reduce size-dependent competition during incubation. Subsequent analyses of metamobilome data from wastewater spiked with the model plasmids showed in silica recovery of pKJK10 to be very poor with the established method and a 1,300-fold overrepresentation of pBR322. Conversely, complete recovery of pKJK10 was enabled with the new modified protocol although considerable care must be taken during electroelution to minimize cross-contamination between samples. For further validation, non-spiked wastewater metamobilomes were mapped to more than 2,500 known plasmid genomes. This displayed an overall recovery of plasmids well into the upper size range (median size: 30 kilobases with the modified protocol. Analysis of de novo assembled metamobilome data also suggested distinctly better recovery of larger plasmids, as gene functions associated with these plasmids, such as conjugation, was exclusively encoded in the data output generated through the modified protocol. Thus, with the suggested modification, access to a large uncharacterized pool of

  14. Characterization of Campylobacter phages including analysis of host range by selected Campylobacter Penner serotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vinni; Rosenquist, Hanne; Baggesen, Dorte Lau

    2007-01-01

    size undeterminable in PFGE. The categorization of the phages correlated with the host range patterns displayed by the phages. Six phages were subjected to transmission electron microscopy (TEM). They all belonged to the family of Myoviridae. Conclusion: We have characterized and identified the host......Background: The predominant food borne pathogen in the western world today is Campylobacter. Campylobacter specific bacteriophages (phages) have been proposed as an alternative agent for reducing the burden of Campylobacter in broilers. One concern in relation to phage biocontrol is the narrow host...

  15. Time-of-flight neutron rejection to improve prompt gamma imaging for proton range verification: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biegun, Aleksandra K; Seravalli, Enrica; Lopes, Patrícia Cambraia; Rinaldi, Ilaria; Pinto, Marco; Oxley, David C; Dendooven, Peter; Verhaegen, Frank; Parodi, Katia; Crespo, Paulo; Schaart, Dennis R

    2012-10-21

    Therapeutic proton and heavier ion beams generate prompt gamma photons that may escape from the patient. In principle, this allows for real-time, in situ monitoring of the treatment delivery, in particular, the hadron range within the patient, by imaging the emitted prompt gamma rays. Unfortunately, the neutrons simultaneously created with the prompt photons create a background that may obscure the prompt gamma signal. To enhance the accuracy of proton dose verification by prompt gamma imaging, we therefore propose a time-of-flight (TOF) technique to reject this neutron background, involving a shifting time window to account for the propagation of the protons through the patient. Time-resolved Monte Carlo simulations of the generation and transport of prompt gamma photons and neutrons upon irradiation of a PMMA phantom with 100, 150 and 200 MeV protons were performed using Geant4 (version 9.2.p02) and MCNPX (version 2.7.D). The influence of angular collimation and TOF selection on the prompt gamma and neutron longitudinal profiles is studied. Furthermore, the implications of the proton beam microstructure (characterized by the proton bunch width and repetition period) are investigated. The application of a shifting TOF window having a width of ΔTOF(z) = 1.0 ns appears to reduce the neutron background by more than 99%. Subsequent application of an energy threshold does not appear to sharpen the distal falloff of the prompt gamma profile but reduces the tail that is observed beyond the proton range. Investigations of the influence of the beam time structure show that TOF rejection of the neutron background is expected to be effective for typical therapeutic proton cyclotrons.

  16. Characterization of Campylobacter phages including analysis of host range by selected Campylobacter Penner serotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Stanley

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The predominant food borne pathogen in the western world today is Campylobacter. Campylobacter specific bacteriophages (phages have been proposed as an alternative agent for reducing the burden of Campylobacter in broilers. One concern in relation to phage biocontrol is the narrow host range often displayed by phages. To identify the potential of phages as a Campylobacter reducing agent we needed to determine their infectivity on a panel of isolates representing the Campylobacter strains found in broilers as well as humans. Results In this study, Campylobacter phages were isolated from the intestines of broilers and ducks and from abattoir sewage. Twelve phages were investigated to determine their ability to infect the Campylobacter Penner serotypes commonly present in Danish poultry and patients with campylobacteriosis. A total of 89% of the Campylobacter jejuni strains and 14% of the Campylobacter coli strains could be infected by at least one of the bacteriophages. The majority of the phages infected the most common serotypes in Danish broilers (O:1,44; O:2; O:4-complex, but showed limited ability to infect 21 of the less frequent Campylobacter serotypes. Pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and restriction endonuclease analysis (REA were used to characterize the phage genomes. Three categories of bacteriophages were observed. I: a genome size of ~194 kb and refractory to digestion with HhaI; II: a genome size of ~140 kb and digestible by HhaI; and III: a genome size undeterminable in PFGE. The categorization of the phages correlated with the host range patterns displayed by the phages. Six phages were subjected to transmission electron microscopy (TEM. They all belonged to the family of Myoviridae. Conclusion We have characterized and identified the host range of 12 Danish Campylobacter phages. Due to their ability to infect the majority of the common serotypes in Denmark we suggest the phages can become an effective

  17. Characterization of Campylobacter phages including analysis of host range by selected Campylobacter Penner serotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Vinni Mona; Rosenquist, Hanne; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Brown, Stanley; Christensen, Bjarke Bak

    2007-10-18

    The predominant food borne pathogen in the western world today is Campylobacter. Campylobacter specific bacteriophages (phages) have been proposed as an alternative agent for reducing the burden of Campylobacter in broilers. One concern in relation to phage biocontrol is the narrow host range often displayed by phages. To identify the potential of phages as a Campylobacter reducing agent we needed to determine their infectivity on a panel of isolates representing the Campylobacter strains found in broilers as well as humans. In this study, Campylobacter phages were isolated from the intestines of broilers and ducks and from abattoir sewage. Twelve phages were investigated to determine their ability to infect the Campylobacter Penner serotypes commonly present in Danish poultry and patients with campylobacteriosis. A total of 89% of the Campylobacter jejuni strains and 14% of the Campylobacter coli strains could be infected by at least one of the bacteriophages. The majority of the phages infected the most common serotypes in Danish broilers (O:1,44; O:2; O:4-complex), but showed limited ability to infect 21 of the less frequent Campylobacter serotypes. Pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) were used to characterize the phage genomes. Three categories of bacteriophages were observed. I: a genome size of approximately 194 kb and refractory to digestion with HhaI; II: a genome size of approximately 140 kb and digestible by HhaI; and III: a genome size undeterminable in PFGE. The categorization of the phages correlated with the host range patterns displayed by the phages. Six phages were subjected to transmission electron microscopy (TEM). They all belonged to the family of Myoviridae. We have characterized and identified the host range of 12 Danish Campylobacter phages. Due to their ability to infect the majority of the common serotypes in Denmark we suggest the phages can become an effective agent in the effort to reduce

  18. Enhanced UWB Radio Channel Model for Short-Range Communication Scenarios Including User Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs, Istvan Zsolt; Nguyen, Tuan Hung; Eggers, Patrick Claus F.

    2005-01-01

    channel model represents an enhancement of the existing IEEE 802.15.3a/4a PAN channel model, where antenna and user-proximity effects are not included. Our investigations showed that significant variations of the received wideband power and time-delay signal clustering are possible due the human body...

  19. Neutron-emission measurements at a white neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haight, Robert C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Data on the spectrum of neutrons emittcd from neutron-induced reactions are important in basic nuclear physics and in applications. Our program studies neutron emission from inelastic scattering as well as fission neutron spectra. A ''white'' neutron source (continuous in energy) allows measurements over a wide range of neutron energies all in one experiment. We use the tast neutron source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for incident neutron energies from 0.5 MeV to 200 MeV These experiments are based on double time-of-flight techniques to determine the energies of the incident and emitted neutrons. For the fission neutron measurements, parallel-plate ionization or avalanche detectors identify fission in actinide samples and give the required fast timing pulse. For inelastic scattering, gamma-ray detectors provide the timing and energy spectroscopy. A large neutron-detector array detects the emitted neutrons. Time-of-flight techniques are used to measure the energies of both the incident and emitted neutrons. Design considerations for the array include neutron-gamma discrimination, neutron energy resolution, angular coverage, segmentation, detector efficiency calibration and data acquisition. We have made preliminary measurements of the fission neutron spectra from {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu. Neutron emission spectra from inelastic scattering on iron and nickel have also been investigated. The results obtained will be compared with evaluated data.

  20. Geology of uranium vein deposits (including Schwartzwalder Mine) in Proterozoic metamorphic rocks, Front Range, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voto, R.H. de; Paschis, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    The Schwartzwalder uranium deposit is one of many uranium vein occurrences in the Lower Proterozoic metamorphic rocks of the Front Range, Colorado. The principal veins of significant uranium content occur marginal to the Colorado Mineral Belt; are localized by structural dilation zones, vein junctions, fault deflections or branching; and occur dominantly within or at the contact of certain preferred metamorphic-stratigraphic units, particularly the siliceous, garnetiferous gneisses, where these rock units are broken by faults and fractures associated with the north-northwest-trending throughgoing faults. Uranium at the Schwartzwalder mine occurs primarily as open-space brecciated vein filling along the steeply west-dipping Illinois vein and numerous east-dipping subsidiary veins where they cut preferred metamorphic host rocks that are tightly folded. Uraninite occurs with molybdenite, adularia, jordisite, ankerite, pyrite, base-metal sulphides, and calcite in vein-filling paragenetic sequence. Minor wall-rock alteration is mainly hematite alteration and bleaching. Vertical relief on the developed ore deposit is 900 metres and still open-ended at depth. No vertical zonation of alteration, vein mineralogy, density of the subsidiary veins, or ore grade has been detected. The Schwartzwalder uranium deposit is of substantial tonnage (greater than 10,000 metric tons of U 3 O 8 ) and grade (averaging 0.57% U 3 O 8 ). Structural mapping shows that the Illinois vein-fault is a Proterozoic structure. Discordant Proterozoic (suggested) and Laramide dates have been obtained from Schwartzwalder ore. The data suggest, therefore, a Proterozoic ancestry of this heretofore presumed Laramide (Late Cretaceous-Early Tertiary) hydrothermal uranium deposit. The authors suggest a polygenetic model for the origin of the Schwartzwalder uranium deposit

  1. On the Design and Test of a Neutron Collimator for Real-time Neutron Imaging in the MeV Energy Range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaumont, Jonathan; Colling, Bethany; Joyce, Malcolm J.; Mellor, M.

    2013-06-01

    A neutron collimator has been designed in MCNP5 and tested for feasibility of use in imaging applications. Tungsten, polyethylene, PVC and lead have been compared as collimating materials for neutrons in the MeV energy range; tungsten is predicted to be the most successful material for a restricted volume, giving the highest signal-to-noise ratio and the best resolving power. Experimental data has been used to confirm that tungsten works effectively as a neutron collimator although some discrepancies between real and MCNP5 results were observed. A suspension of tungsten powder in polyethylene has also been tested to address the machining difficulties, mass and cost issues associated with tungsten. This material performs midway between tungsten and polyethylene for a constant volume, and more successfully than tungsten for a constant mass therefore giving this material potential as a collimation material in some scenarios. Further MCNP5 modelling has been performed by varying model parameters and monitoring the collimator functions produced by these changes. These results are conclusive but dependent on the applications of the imaging system. (authors)

  2. Personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients for neutron fluence over the energy range of 20-250 MeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsher, R H; McLean, T D; Justus, A L; Devine, R T; Gadd, M S

    2010-03-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed to extend existing neutron personal dose equivalent fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients to an energy of 250 MeV. Presently, conversion coefficients, H(p,slab)(10,alpha)/Phi, are given by ICRP-74 and ICRU-57 for a range of angles of radiation incidence (alpha = 0, 15, 30, 45, 60 and 75 degrees ) in the energy range from thermal to 20 MeV. Standard practice has been to base operational dose quantity calculations 20 MeV. Both light and heavy ions (HIs) (carbon, nitrogen and oxygen recoil nuclei) were transported down to a lower energy limit (1 keV for light ions and 5 MeV for HIs). Track energy below the limit was assumed to be locally deposited. For neutron tracks slab phantom.

  3. Long Range Active Detection of HEU Based on Thermal Neutron Multiplication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forman L.; Dioszegi I.; Salwen, C.; and Vanier, P.E.

    2010-05-24

    We report on the results of measurements of proton irradiation on a series of targets at Brookhaven National Laboratory’s (BNL) Alternate Gradient Synchrotron Facility (AGS), in collaboration with LANL and SNL. We examined the prompt radiation environment in the tunnel for the DTRA-sponsored series (E 972), which investigated the penetration of air and subsequent target interaction of 4 GeV proton pulses. Measurements were made by means of an organic scintillator with a 500 MHz bandwidth system. We found that irradiation of a depleted uranium (DU) target resulted in a large gamma-ray signal in the 100-500 µsec time region after the proton flash when the DU was surrounded by polyethylene, but little signal was generated if it was surrounded by boron-loaded polyethylene. Subsequent Monte Carlo (MCNPX) calculations indicated that the source of the signal was consistent with thermal neutron capture in DU. The MCNPX calculations also indicated that if one were to perform the same experiment with a highly enriched uranium (HEU) target there would be a distinctive fast neutron yield in this 100-500 µsec time region from thermal neutron-induced fission. The fast neutrons can be recorded by the same direct current system and differentiated from gamma ray pulses in organic scintillator by pulse shape discrimination.

  4. Characterization of extended range Bonner Sphere Spectrometers in the CERF high-energy broad neutron field at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosteo, S.; Bedogni, R.; Caresana, M.; Charitonidis, N.; Chiti, M.; Esposito, A.; Ferrarini, M.; Severino, C.; Silari, M.

    2012-12-01

    The accurate determination of the ambient dose equivalent in the mixed neutron-photon fields encountered around high-energy particle accelerators still represents a challenging task. The main complexity arises from the extreme variability of the neutron energy, which spans over 10 orders of magnitude or more. Operational survey instruments, which response function attempts to mimic the fluence-to-ambient dose equivalent conversion coefficient up to GeV neutrons, are available on the market, but their response is not fully reliable over the entire energy range. Extended range rem counters (ERRC) do not require the exact knowledge of the energy distribution of the neutron field and the calibration can be done with a source spectrum. If the actual neutron field has an energy distribution different from the calibration spectrum, the measurement is affected by an added uncertainty related to the partial overlap of the fluence-to-ambient dose equivalent conversion curve and the response function. For this reason their operational use should always be preceded by an "in-field" calibration, i.e. a calibration made against a reference instrument exposed in the same field where the survey-meter will be employed. In practice the extended-range Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (ERBSS) is the only device which can serve as reference instrument in these fields, because of its wide energy range and the possibility to assess the neutron fluence and the ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)) values with the appropriate accuracy. Nevertheless, the experience gained by a number of experimental groups suggests that mandatory conditions for obtaining accurate results in workplaces are: (1) the use of a well-established response matrix, thus implying validation campaigns in reference monochromatic neutrons fields, (2) the expert and critical use of suitable unfolding codes, and (3) the performance test of the whole system (experimental set-up, elaboration and unfolding procedures) in a well

  5. Neutron capture resonances in 56Fe and 58Fe in the energy range from 10 to 100 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaeppeler, F.; Wisshak, K.; Hong, L.D.

    1982-11-01

    The neutron capture cross section of 56 Fe and 58 Fe has been measured in the energy range from 10 to 250 keV relative to the gold standard. A pulsed 3 MV Van de Graaff accelerator and the 7 Li(p, n) reaction served as a neutron source. Capture gamma rays were detected by two C 6 D 6 detectors, which were operated in coincidence and anticoincidence mode. Two-dimensional data acquisition allowed to apply the pulse height weighting technique off-line. The samples were located at a flight path of 60 cm. The total time resolution was 1.2 ns thus allowing for an energy resolution of 2 ns/m. The experimental set-up was optimized with respect to low background and low neutron sensitivity. The additional flight path of 4 cm from the sample to the detector was sufficient to discriminate capture of sample scattered neutrons by the additional time of flight. In this way reliable results were obtained even for the strong s-wave resonances of both isotopes. The experimental capture yield was analyzed with the FANAC code. The energy resolution allowed to extract resonance parameters in the energy range from 10 to 100 keV. The individual systematic uncertainties of the experimental method are discussed in detail. They were found to range between 5 and 10% while the statistical uncertainty is 3-5% for most of the resonances. A comparison to the results of other authors exhibits in case of 56 Fe systematic differences of 7-11%. For 58 Fe the present results differ up to 50% from the only other measurement for this isotope. (orig.) [de

  6. Investigation of short range order in Fe-C melts by neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, M.; Steeb, S.

    1978-01-01

    Neutron diffraction measurements were done with Fe-C-melts (5; 13; and 17 at % C) using the method of isotopic substitution. The neutron small angle scattering effect observed could be explained by magnetic scattering, caused by spin-fluctuations still existing in the molten state far away from the Curie temperature. Total structure factors were calculated from observed intensities taking into account the correction for magnetic scattering. For each carbon concentration two alloys were investigated, one using iron of natural isotopic abundance and the other using enriched 57 Fe. From a comparison of the q-region below the first maximum of the total structure factor as obtained using Fesup(nat) or 57 Fe, respectively, a tendency to the preference of unlike nearest neighbours is concluded, the distance between Fe-C-pairs being 2.2 A. (orig.) [de

  7. Vacuum system upgrade for extended Q-range small-angle neutron scattering diffractometer (EQ-SANS) at SNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Christopher; Williams, Derrick; Price, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    The Extended Q-range Small-angle Neutron Scattering Diffractometer (EQ-SANS) instrument at the spallation neutron source (SNS), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, incorporates a 69 m 3 detector vessel with a vacuum system which required an upgrade with respect to performance, ease of operation, and maintenance. The upgrade focused on improving pumping performance as well as optimizing system design to minimize opportunity for operational error. This upgrade provided the following practical contributions: •Reduced time required to evacuate from atmospheric pressure to 2 mTorr from 500 to 1000 min to 60-70 min•Provided turn-key automated control with a multi-faceted interlock for personnel and machine safety.

  8. Development of highly effective neutron shields and neutron absorbing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuda, K.; Matsuda, F.; Taniuchi, H.; Yuhara, T.; Iida, T.

    1993-01-01

    A wide range of materials, including polymers and hydrogen-occluded alloys that might be usable as the neutron shielding material were examined. And a wide range of materials, including aluminum alloys that might be usable as the neutron-absorbing material were examined. After screening, the candidate material was determined on the basis of evaluation regarding its adaptabilities as a high-performance neutron-shielding and neutron-absorbing material. This candidate material was manufactured for trial, after which material properties tests, neutron-shielding tests and neutron-absorbing tests were carried out on it. The specifications of this material were thus determined. This research has resulted in materials of good performance; a neutron-shielding material based on ethylene propylene rubber and titanium hydride, and a neutron-absorbing material based on aluminum and titanium hydride. (author)

  9. Neutron star mergers as a probe of modifications of general relativity with finite-range scalar forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagunski, Laura; Zhang, Jun; Johnson, Matthew C.; Lehner, Luis; Sakellariadou, Mairi; Liebling, Steven L.; Palenzuela, Carlos; Neilsen, David

    2018-03-01

    Observations of gravitational radiation from compact binary systems provide an unprecedented opportunity to test general relativity in the strong field dynamical regime. In this paper, we investigate how future observations of gravitational radiation from binary neutron star mergers might provide constraints on finite-range forces from a universally coupled massive scalar field. Such scalar degrees of freedom (d.o.f.) are a characteristic feature of many extensions of general relativity. For concreteness, we work in the context of metric f (R ) gravity, which is equivalent to general relativity and a universally coupled scalar field with a nonlinear potential whose form is fixed by the choice of f (R ). In theories where neutron stars (or other compact objects) obtain a significant scalar charge, the resulting attractive finite-range scalar force has implications for both the inspiral and merger phases of binary systems. We first present an analysis of the inspiral dynamics in Newtonian limit, and forecast the constraints on the mass of the scalar and charge of the compact objects for the Advanced LIGO gravitational wave observatory. We then perform a comparative study of binary neutron star mergers in general relativity with those of a one-parameter model of f (R ) gravity using fully relativistic hydrodynamical simulations. These simulations elucidate the effects of the scalar on the merger and postmerger dynamics. We comment on the utility of the full waveform (inspiral, merger, postmerger) to probe different regions of parameter space for both the particular model of f (R ) gravity studied here and for finite-range scalar forces more generally.

  10. Study of the long-range transport of atmospheric pollutants by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Yangshao

    1994-01-01

    Aerosol samples were collected to study the characteristics of marine aerosols in the different western Pacific ocean areas. During the first cruise from 15 October to 25 November 1989, aerosol samples were collected with a kA-200 Andersen cascade impactor and a kB-120 sampler. Instrumental neutron activation analysis was used to determine the elemental composition of the aerosols. The concentrations of crustal and pollution elements in aerosols were higher over the ocean area close to the China coast and decreased very rapidly with increasing distance from land. The morphology and elemental composition of aerosol particles showed that the seasalt particles may conglomerate with small crustal and pollution particles from land to form large particles. (author). 4 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  11. The secondary neutrons spectra of 235U, 238U for incident energy range 1-2.5 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornilov, N.V.; Kagalenko, A.B.; Balitsky, A.V.; Baryba, V.Ja.; Androsenko, P.A.; Androsenko, A.A.

    1993-01-01

    Spectra of inelastic scattered neutrons and fission neutrons were measured with neutron time of flight spectrometer. The solid tritium target was used as a neutron source. The energy distribution of neutrons on the sample was calculated with Monte-Carlo code, taking into account interaction income protons inside target and reaction kinematics. The detector efficiency was determined with 252 Cf source. The multiple scattering and absorption corrections were calculated with codes packet BRAND. Our results confirm ENDF/B-6 data library. (author)

  12. Neutron Scattering Studies of Liquid on or Confined in Nano- and Mesoporous Carbons, Including Carbide-Derived Carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesolowski, David J [ORNL

    2014-07-01

    This project involved the synthesis of microporous graphitic-carbon powders with subnanometer average pore size, and very narrow pore size distributions, and the use of these materials in experimental studies of pore-fluid structure and dynamics. Samples of carbide-derived carbon powder, synthesized by extraction of the metal cations from TiC by a high temperature chlorination process, followed by high temperature vacuum annealing, were prepared by Ranjan Dash and his associates at CRADA partner Y-Carbon, Inc. The resulting material had average pore sizes ranging from 5 to 8 . These powders were used in two experiments conducted by researchers involved in the Energy Frontier Research Center Directed by David J. Wesolowski at ORNL, the Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures and Transport (FIRST) Center. FIRST-funded researchers at Drexel University collaborated with scientists at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland, to measure the expansion and contraction of the microporous carbon particles during charging and discharging of supercapactor electrodes composed of these particles (Hantell et al., 2011, Electrochemistry Communications, v. 13, pp. 1221-1224.) in an electrolyte composed of tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate dissolved in acetonitrile. In the second experiment, researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Drexel University conducted quasielastic neutron scattering studies of the diffusional dynamics of water imbibed into the micropores of the same material (Chathoth et al., 2011, EuroPhysics Journal, v. 95, pp. 56001/1-6). These studies helped to establish the role of pores approaching the size of the solvent and dissolved ions in altering diffusional dynamics, ion transport and physical response of conducting substrates to ion desolvation and entry into subnamometer pores.

  13. FOREWORD: Neutron metrology Neutron metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, David J.; Nolte, Ralf; Gressier, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    industry, from the initial fuel enrichment and fabrication processes right through to storage or reprocessing, and neutron metrology is clearly important in this area. Neutron fields do, however, occur in other areas, for example where neutron sources are used in oil well logging and moisture measurements. They also occur around high energy accelerators, including photon linear accelerators used for cancer therapy, and are expected to be a more serious problem around the new hadron radiation therapy facilities. Roughly 50% of the cosmic ray doses experienced by fliers at the flight altitudes of commercial aircraft are due to neutrons. Current research on fusion presents neutron metrology with a whole new range of challenges because of the very high fluences expected. One of the most significant features of neutron fields is the very wide range of possible neutron energies. In the nuclear industry, for example, neutrons occur with energies from those of thermal neutrons at a few meV to the upper end of the fission spectrum at perhaps 10 MeV. For cosmic ray dosimetry the energy range extends into the GeV region. This enormous range sets a challenge for designing measuring devices and a parallel challenge of developing measurement standards for characterizing these devices. One of the major considerations when deciding on topics for this special issue was agreeing on what not to include. Modelling, i.e. the use of radiation transport codes, is now a very important aspect of neutron measurements. These calculations are vital for shielding and for instrument design; nevertheless, the topic has only been included here where it has a direct bearing on metrology and the development of standards. Neutron spectrometry is an increasingly important technique for unravelling some of the problems of dose equivalent measurements and for plasma diagnostics in fusion research. However, this topic is at least one step removed from primary metrology and so it was felt that it should not be

  14. Resistance of (Fe, Ni)/sub 3/V long-range-ordered alloys to neutron and ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braski, D.N.

    1981-01-01

    A series of (Fe, Ni)/sub 3/V long-range-ordered alloys were irradiated with neutrons in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) and with 4 MeV Ni ions at temperatures above 250/sup 0/C. The displacement damage levels for the two irradiations were 3.8 and 70 dpa, and the helium levels were 29 and 560 at. ppM, respectively. Irradiation in ORR generally increased the yield strength and lowered the ductility of an LRO alloy, but produced relatively little swelling. The LRO alloys retained their long-range order after ion irradiation below the critical ordering temperature, T/sub c/, and exhibited low swelling. Above T/sub c/ the alloys were disordered and showed greater swelling. Adjustment of alloy composition to prevent sigma phase formation reduced swelling.

  15. Instrumental measurement of iridium abundances in the part-per-trillion range following neutron activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, L.W.; Asaro, F.; Goulding, F.S.; Landis, D.A.; Madden, N.W.; Malone, D.F.

    1988-01-01

    An automated gamma-ray coincidence spectrometer has been constructed which, following neutron activation, can measure iridium (Ir) abundances of the order of 25 parts-per-trillion (ppt) in rock samples 500 times more rapidly than previously possible by instrumental techniques used at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Twin intrinsic Ge gamma-ray detectors count coincidences between the 316.5 and 468.1 keV gamma rays of 192 Ir, and together with a mineral-oil-based Compton suppression shield provide a sensitivity of 50 ppt Ir in 7 minute measurements of 100 mg limestone samples subsequent to irradiation in the University of Missouri reactor. Over 3000 samples have been measured, and in collaboration with many geologists and paleontologists from around the world, anomalous amounts of Ir have been detected in rocks with approximate ages of 12, 39, 67, 91, 150 and 3500 million years. Modifications are nearly complete to measure ten other elements very important to geochemical studies simultaneously (in the singles rather than the coincidence mode) with the Ir measurements

  16. Measurements of thermal- and slow-neutron dose distributions in ordinary concrete shield using a reactor neutron beam of different energy ranges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megahid, R.M.; Makarious, A.S.; El-Kolaly, M.A.; Afifi, Y.A.

    1980-01-01

    Experimental studies on the distribution and attenuation of thermal and slow neutron doses in ordinary concrete shield have been carried-out. A collimated beam of reactor neutrons emitted from one of the horizontal channels of the ET-RR-1 reactor was used. Measurements were performed using, a direct beam, cadmium filtered beam and boron carbide filtered beam. The neutron doses were measured using thermolumin-escent Li/sub 2/B/sub 4/O/sub 7/ detectors. The measured data have been analyzed and a group of attenuation curves were given for beams of reactor neutrons of different energy. These curves show that cadmium and boron carbide filters tend to decrease the neutron doses specially at the beginning of penetration. The data were transformed to that which would be obtained using neutron sources of different geometries.

  17. Extended automated separation techniques in destructive neutron activation analysis; application to various biological materials, including human tissues and blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tjioe, P.S.; Goeij, J.J.M. de; Houtman, J.P.W.

    1976-09-01

    Neutron activation analysis may be performed as a multi-element and low-level technique for many important trace elements in biological materials, provided that post-irradiation chemical separations are applied. This paper describes a chemical separation consisting of automated procedures for destruction, distillation, and anion-chromatography. The system developed enables the determination of 14 trace elements in biological materials, viz. antimony, arsenic, bromine, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, gold, iron, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, and zinc. The aspects of sample preparation, neutron irradiation, gamma-spectrum evaluation, and blank-value contribution are also discussed

  18. Angular distributions and anisotropy of fission fragments from neutron-induced fission in intermediate energy range 1–200 MeV

    OpenAIRE

    Vorobyev Alexander S.; Gagarski Alexei M.; Shcherbakov Oleg A.; Vaishnene Larisa A.; Barabanov Alexei L.

    2017-01-01

    Angular distributions of fission fragments from the neutron-induced fission of 232Th, 233U, 235U, 238U and 209Bi have been measured in the energy range 1–200 MeV at the neutron TOF spectrometer GNEIS based on the spallation neutron source at 1 GeV proton synchrocyclotron of the PNPI (Gatchina, Russia). The multiwire proportional counters have been used as a position sensitive fission fragment detector. A description of the experimental equipment and measurement procedure is given. The anisotr...

  19. Fission rate sensitivities and fission fragment ranges for uranium and thorium-bearing materials irradiated with 252 Cf neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moharram, B.M.

    2000-01-01

    The induced fission reactions of 235 U (n, f), 238 U (n,f) and 232 Th (n, f) based on the activation of natural uranium and thorium in samples with 252 Cf, neutron source, have been evaluated. The obtained results are the average of three samples from each test material (SRM 2710 Montana soil and Zirconia). The prepared samples have been configured in the so-called c ompensated - beam geometry i n which both gamma spectrometry jointly with solid state nuclear track detector techniques, revealed the fission rate sensitivity of 4.64 x 10 7 fission per gram per second per neutron (F.h 1 . S 1 .n 1 ), for zirconia as obtained by gamma activity arising from 134 I fission product (as a good monitor which is produced only from fissions), and the related value for SRM 2710 soil is 5.22 x 10 8 (F.g 1 S 1 .n 1 ). while the obtained values of the mean fission fragment ranges in SRM 2710 and zirconia as estimated from the fission track densities (by CR-39) and fission rates (by gamma spectrometry) are 3.97 x 10 3 g. cm 2 respectively which reveal good agreement with experiments and calculations done hitherto

  20. Investigation of neutron-rich rare-earth nuclei including the new isotopes 177Tm and 184Lu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rykaczewski, K.; Gippert, K.L.; Runte, E.; Schmidt-Ott, W.D.; Tidemand-Petersson, P.; Kurcewicz, W.; Nazarewicz, W.

    1989-01-01

    Decays of neutron-rich isotopes in the rare-earth region were studied by means of on-line mass separation and β-γ spectroscopy using multinucleon-transfer reactions between beams of 136 Xe (9 and 11.7 MeV/u), 186 W (11.7 and 15 MeV/u) and 238 U (11.4 MeV/u) and targets of nat W and Ta. The higher beam energies appear to be advantageous for the production of such isotopes. Two new isotopes were identified: 177 Tm with a half-life T 1/2 = 85±10/15 s, and 184 Lu with T 1/2 ≅ 18 s. A new 47 s-activity found at A = 171 is tentatively assigned to the decay of the new isotope 171 Ho. The properties of the ground and excited states of neutron-rich lanthanide isotopes are interpreted within the shell model using the deformed Woods-Saxon potential. A change of the ground-state configuration for odd-mass neutron-rich lutetium isotopes from π 7/2 + [404] to π 9/2 - [514] is suggested, this change being due to the influence of a large hexadecapole deformation. The role of a possible isometric state in 180 Lu for the nucleosynthesis of 180m Ta is discussed. (orig.)

  1. NEUTRON-PROTON EFFECTIVE RANGE PARAMETERS AND ZERO-ENERGY SHAPE DEPENDENCE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HACKENBURG, R.W.

    2005-06-01

    A completely model-independent effective range theory fit to available, unpolarized, np scattering data below 3 MeV determines the zero-energy free proton cross section {sigma}{sub 0} = 20.4287 {+-} 0.0078 b, the singlet apparent effective range r{sub s} = 2.754 {+-} 0.018{sub stat} {+-} 0.056{sub syst} fm, and improves the error slightly on the parahydrogen coherent scattering length, a{sub c} = -3.7406 {+-} 0.0010 fm. The triplet and singlet scattering lengths and the triplet mixed effective range are calculated to be a{sub t} = 5.4114 {+-} 0.0015 fm, a{sub s} = -23.7153 {+-} 0.0043 fm, and {rho}{sub t}(0,-{epsilon}{sub t}) = 1.7468 {+-} 0.0019 fm. The model-independent analysis also determines the zero-energy effective ranges by treating them as separate fit parameters without the constraint from the deuteron binding energy {epsilon}{sub t}. These are determined to be {rho}{sub t}(0,0) = 1.705 {+-} 0.023 fm and {rho}{sub s}(0,0) = 2.665 {+-} 0.056 fm. This determination of {rho}{sub t}(0,0) and {rho}{sub s}(0,0) is most sensitive to the sparse data between about 20 and 600 keV, where the correlation between the determined values of {rho}{sub t}(0,0) and {rho}{sub s}(0,0) is at a minimum. This correlation is responsible for the large systematic error in r{sub s}. More precise data in this range are needed. The present data do not event determine (with confidence) that {rho}{sub t}(0,0) {ne} {rho}{sub t}(0, -{epsilon}{sub t}), referred to here as ''zero-energy shape dependence''. The widely used measurement of {sigma}{sub 0} = 20.491 {+-} 0.014 b from W. Dilg, Phys. Rev. C 11, 103 (1975), is argued to be in error.

  2. Production of the entire range of r-process nuclides by black hole accretion disc outflows from neutron star mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meng-Ru; Fernández, Rodrigo; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel; Metzger, Brian D.

    2016-12-01

    We consider r-process nucleosynthesis in outflows from black hole accretion discs formed in double neutron star and neutron star-black hole mergers. These outflows, powered by angular momentum transport processes and nuclear recombination, represent an important - and in some cases dominant - contribution to the total mass ejected by the merger. Here we calculate the nucleosynthesis yields from disc outflows using thermodynamic trajectories from hydrodynamic simulations, coupled to a nuclear reaction network. We find that outflows produce a robust abundance pattern around the second r-process peak (mass number A ˜ 130), independent of model parameters, with significant production of A spike at A = 132 that is absent in the Solar system r-process distribution. The spike arises from convection in the disc and depends on the treatment of nuclear heating in the simulations. We conclude that disc outflows provide an important - and perhaps dominant - contribution to the r-process yields of compact binary mergers, and hence must be included when assessing the contribution of these systems to the inventory of r-process elements in the Galaxy.

  3. Short-range order and collective dynamics of DMPC bilayers: a comparison between molecular dynamics simulations, X-ray, and neutron scattering experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hub, Jochen S; Salditt, Tim; Rheinstädter, Maikel C; de Groot, Bert L

    2007-11-01

    We present an extensive comparison of short-range order and short wavelength dynamics of a hydrated phospholipid bilayer derived by molecular dynamics simulations, elastic x-ray, and inelastic neutron scattering experiments. The quantities that are compared between simulation and experiment include static and dynamic structure factors, reciprocal space mappings, and electron density profiles. We show that the simultaneous use of molecular dynamics and diffraction data can help to extract real space properties like the area per lipid and the lipid chain ordering from experimental data. In addition, we assert that the interchain distance can be computed to high accuracy from the interchain correlation peak of the structure factor. Moreover, it is found that the position of the interchain correlation peak is not affected by the area per lipid, while its correlation length decreases linearly with the area per lipid. This finding allows us to relate a property of the structure factor quantitatively to the area per lipid. Finally, the short wavelength dynamics obtained from the simulations and from inelastic neutron scattering are analyzed and compared. The conventional interpretation in terms of the three-effective-eigenmode model is found to be only partly suitable to describe the complex fluid dynamics of lipid chains.

  4. Study on the aligned uranium-235 nuclear decay in the neutron energy range of 1.7 eV - 2.15 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danelyan, L.S.; Zakharov, Yu.V.; Zykov, V.M.; Mostovoj, V.I.; Stolyarov, V.A.; Biryukov, S.A.; Zysina, N.Yu.; Osochnikov, A.A.; Svettsov, A.V.

    1983-01-01

    Using a time-of-flight neutron spectrometer comparative measurements of intensity of fission reaction on the aligned and non-oriented uranium-235 nuclei have been performed in order to identify the resonances caused by p-neutron capture as well as to determine the p-neutron contribution to the fission cross section in the region of unresolved resonances. In some isolated resonances differences in cross sections on aligned and non-oriented nuclei of about 10% have been observed which can permit to assi.on them to p-resonances. In the region of unresolved resonances in the 0.15-2.15 keV neutron energy range to the accuracy +-1% no changes in the fission cross section during the nuclear alignment have been observ

  5. Short-Range Temporal Interactions in Sleep; Hippocampal Spike Avalanches Support a Large Milieu of Sequential Activity Including Replay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Matthew Mahoney

    Full Text Available Hippocampal neural systems consolidate multiple complex behaviors into memory. However, the temporal structure of neural firing supporting complex memory consolidation is unknown. Replay of hippocampal place cells during sleep supports the view that a simple repetitive behavior modifies sleep firing dynamics, but does not explain how multiple episodes could be integrated into associative networks for recollection during future cognition. Here we decode sequential firing structure within spike avalanches of all pyramidal cells recorded in sleeping rats after running in a circular track. We find that short sequences that combine into multiple long sequences capture the majority of the sequential structure during sleep, including replay of hippocampal place cells. The ensemble, however, is not optimized for maximally producing the behavior-enriched episode. Thus behavioral programming of sequential correlations occurs at the level of short-range interactions, not whole behavioral sequences and these short sequences are assembled into a large and complex milieu that could support complex memory consolidation.

  6. Investigation of the sup 9 sup 3 Nb neutron cross-sections in resonance energy range

    CERN Document Server

    Grigoriev, Y V; Faikov-Stanchik, H; Ilchev, G; Kim, G N; Kitaev, V Ya; Mezentseva, Z V; Panteleev, T; Sinitsa, V V; Zhuravlev, B V

    2001-01-01

    The results of gamma-ray multiplicity spectra and transmission measurements for sup 9 sup 3 Nb in energy range 21.5 eV-100 keV are presented. Gamma spectra from 1 to 7 multiplicity were measured on the 501 m and 121 m flight paths of the IBR-30 using a 16-section scintillation detector with a NaI(Tl) crystals of a total volume of 36 l and a 16-section liquid scintillation detector of a total volume of 80 l for metallic samples of 50, 80 mm in diameter and 1, 1.5 mm thickness with 100% sup 9 sup 3 Nb. Besides, the total and scattering cross-section of sup 9 sup 3 Nb were measured by means batteries of B-10 and He-3 counters on the 124 m, 504 m and 1006 m flight paths of the IBR-30. Spectra of multiplicity distribution were obtained for resolved resonances in the energy region E=30-6000 eV and for energy groups in the energy region E=21.5 eV- 100 keV. They were used for determination of the average multiplicity, resonance parameters and capture cross-section in energy groups and for low-laying resonances of sup...

  7. Gauged B-L number and neutron-antineutron oscillation: long-range forces mediated by baryophotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addazi, Andrea; Berezhiani, Zurab; Kamyshkov, Yuri

    2017-05-01

    Transformation of a neutron to an antineutron n → {\\tilde{n}} has not yet been experimentally observed. In principle, it can occur with free neutrons in the vacuum or with neutrons bound inside the nuclei. In a nuclear medium the neutron and the antineutron have different potentials and for that reason n-{\\tilde{n}} conversion in nuclei is heavily suppressed. This transformation can also be suppressed for free neutrons in the presence of an environmental vector field that distinguishes the neutron from the antineutron. We consider the case of a gauge field coupled to the B-L charge of the particles (B-L photon), and we show that discovery of n-{\\tilde{n}} oscillation in experiment will lead to few order of magnitudes stronger limits on its coupling constant than present limits from the tests of the equivalence principle. If n-{\\tilde{n}} oscillation will be discovered via nuclear instability, but not in free neutron oscillations at a corresponding level, this would indicate the presence of such environmental fifth forces. In the latter case the B-L potential can be measurable by varying the external magnetic field for achieving the resonance conditions for n-{\\tilde{n}} conversion. As for neutron-mirror neutron oscillation, such potentials should have no effect once the fifth forces are associated to a common quantum number (B-L)-(B'-L') shared by the ordinary and mirror particles.

  8. Investigation of the 93Nb neutron cross-sections in resonance energy range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoriev, Yu.V.; Kitaev, V.Ya.; Zhuravlev, B.V.; Sinitsa, V.V.; Borzakov, S.B.; Faikov-Stanchik, H.; Ilchev, G.; Mezentseva, Zh.V.; Panteleev, Ts.Ts.; Kim, G.N.

    2002-01-01

    The results of gamma-ray multiplicity spectra and transmission measurements for 93 Nb in energy range 21.5 eV-100 keV are presented. Gamma spectra from 1 to 7 multiplicity were measured on the 501 m and 121 m flight paths of the IBR-30 using a 16-section scintillation detector with a NaI(Tl) crystals of a total volume of 36 l and a 16-section liquid scintillation detector of a total volume of 80 l for metallic samples of 50, 80 mm in diameter and 1, 1.5 mm thickness with 100% 93 Nb. Besides, the total and scattering cross-section of 93 Nb were measured by means batteries of B-10 and He-3 counters on the 124 m, 504 m and 1006 m flight paths of the IBR-30. Spectra of multiplicity distribution were obtained for resolved resonances in the energy region E=30-6000 eV and for energy groups in the energy region E=21.5 eV- 100 keV. They were used for determination of the average multiplicity, resonance parameters and capture cross-section in energy groups and for low-laying resonances of 93 Nb. Standard capture cross-sections of 238 U and experimental gamma-ray multiplicity spectra were also used for determination of capture cross section 93 Nb in energy groups. Similar values were calculated using the ENDF/B-6 and JENDL-3 evaluated data libraries with the help of the GRUKON computer program. Within the limits of experimental errors there is observed an agreement between the experiment and calculation, but in some groups the experimental values differ from the calculated ones. (author)

  9. Neutron cross section evaluations of europium isotopes in 1 keV - 30 MeV energy range. Format - validation - comparison; Evaluation de sections efficaces pour des neutrons incidents sur des isotopes d'europium aux energies 1 keV - 30 MeV. Format - validation - comparaison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dossantos-Uzarralde, P.; Le Luel, C.; Bauge, E. [CEA Bruyeres le Chatel, 91 (France). Dept. de Physique Theorique et Appliquee

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents neutron cross section evaluations of Europium isotopes. The cross sections are evaluated in 1 keV - 30 MeV energy range for the isotopes {sup 146}Eu, {sup 147}Eu, {sup 148}Eu, {sup 149}Eu, {sup 150}Eu, {sup 151}Eu, {sup 152}Eu, {sup 153}Eu, {sup 154}Eu in their ground state. This evaluation includes cross section productions of the long life isomeric states. Special attention is put on the options used for the description of the files written in ENDF-6 format. The final issue is a proposal of a new breed of ENDF-6 formatted neutron activation file. (authors)

  10. Short range structure of amorphous Ni50Ta50-alloys by means of X-ray- and neutron-diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlig, H.; Lamparter, P.; Steeb, S.; Rohr, L.; Guentherodt, H.J.; Fischer, P.

    1992-01-01

    Amorphous Ni 50 Ta 50 -samples with their high crystallization temperature of 985 K were investigated. To evaluate the three partial structure factors of amorphous Ni 50 Ta 50 one X-ray diffraction experiment was performed with Ni 50 Ta 50 and two neutron diffraction experiments with Co 10 Ni 40 Ta 50 and with Ni 50 Ta 50 , respectively. The Bhatia-Thornton partial structure factor S cc (Q) indicates rather strong chemical short range order which also explains the premaximum observed in the Faber-Ziman partial S NiNi (Q)-function. The nearest neighbor distance is 2.82 A for Ni-Ni, 2.91 A for Ta-Ta, and is shortest for Ni-Ta, 2.44 A. The coordination numbers are N NiNi = 4.9, N TaTa = 8.2, and N NiTa = 6.0. We report on the chemical short range order and the possible binding behavior in a-Ni 50 Ta 50 and compare the present results with those reported in the literature on a-Ni 40 Ti 60 as well as on a-Ni 55 Ta 45 . (orig.)

  11. Contribution to the algorithmic and efficient programming of new parallel architectures including accelerators for neutron physics and shielding computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubois, J.

    2011-01-01

    In science, simulation is a key process for research or validation. Modern computer technology allows faster numerical experiments, which are cheaper than real models. In the field of neutron simulation, the calculation of eigenvalues is one of the key challenges. The complexity of these problems is such that a lot of computing power may be necessary. The work of this thesis is first the evaluation of new computing hardware such as graphics card or massively multi-core chips, and their application to eigenvalue problems for neutron simulation. Then, in order to address the massive parallelism of supercomputers national, we also study the use of asynchronous hybrid methods for solving eigenvalue problems with this very high level of parallelism. Then we experiment the work of this research on several national supercomputers such as the Titane hybrid machine of the Computing Center, Research and Technology (CCRT), the Curie machine of the Very Large Computing Centre (TGCC), currently being installed, and the Hopper machine at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). We also do our experiments on local workstations to illustrate the interest of this research in an everyday use with local computing resources. (author) [fr

  12. Slotted rotatable target assembly and systematic error analysis for a search for long range spin dependent interactions from exotic vector boson exchange using neutron spin rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddock, C.; Crawford, B.; Fox, W.; Francis, I.; Holley, A.; Magers, S.; Sarsour, M.; Snow, W. M.; Vanderwerp, J.

    2018-03-01

    We discuss the design and construction of a novel target array of nonmagnetic test masses used in a neutron polarimetry measurement made in search for new possible exotic spin dependent neutron-atominteractions of Nature at sub-mm length scales. This target was designed to accept and efficiently transmit a transversely polarized slow neutron beam through a series of long open parallel slots bounded by flat rectangular plates. These openings possessed equal atom density gradients normal to the slots from the flat test masses with dimensions optimized to achieve maximum sensitivity to an exotic spin-dependent interaction from vector boson exchanges with ranges in the mm - μm regime. The parallel slots were oriented differently in four quadrants that can be rotated about the neutron beam axis in discrete 90°increments using a Geneva drive. The spin rotation signals from the 4 quadrants were measured using a segmented neutron ion chamber to suppress possible systematic errors from stray magnetic fields in the target region. We discuss the per-neutron sensitivity of the target to the exotic interaction, the design constraints, the potential sources of systematic errors which could be present in this design, and our estimate of the achievable sensitivity using this method.

  13. Yield of chromosomal aberrations and recoil particle range in Chineses hamster fibroblasts exposed to 8.5 to 500 keV neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturelid, S.; Bergman, R.

    1976-01-01

    Induction of chromatid aberrations in S-phase Chinese hamster fibroblasts has been studied for irradiation by 60 Co gamma rays and neutrons of average energy 8.5, 45, 83, 200 and 500 keV. At 10 per cent aberration level the relative biological afficiency varied between 2.2 +- 0.6 (at 8.5 keV) and a maximum of 47 +- 9 (at 200 keV). The neutron generated recoils have short range in comparison to chromosomal dimensions. The strong variation with neutron energy is therefore not necessarily reflecting variations in the average linear energy transfer. Good agreement between experimental and predicted response was obtained when effects ascribed to range were considered. A critical volume within which primary lesions should occur in order to make chromosomal aberrations probable was derived. The corresponding site radius was estimated to be 1-3 μm. (author)

  14. The energy dependence of the cosmic-ray neutron leakage flux in the range 0.01-10 MeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, R. W.; Ifedili, S. O.; Lockwood, J. A.; Razdan, H.

    1971-01-01

    Measurement of the cosmic-ray neutron leakage flux and energy spectrum in the range 1 to 10 MeV by a neutron detector on the Ogo 6 satellite from June 7 to Sept. 30, 1969. The same detector simultaneously measured the total leakage flux, having 75% of its response to the leakage flux in the interval from 1 keV to 1 MeV. For a neutron energy spectrum of the form AE to the minus gamma in the range from 1 to 10 MeV, the upper limit to gamma for polar regions was found to be 1.0 and for the equatorial regions was 1.2. For the polar regions, the lower limit to gamma was found to be 0.8. This energy spectrum at 1 to 10 MeV is slightly flatter than Newkirk (1963) predicted.

  15. A HIGH-RESOLUTION, MULTI-EPOCH SPECTRAL ATLAS OF PECULIAR STARS INCLUDING RAVE, GAIA , AND HERMES WAVELENGTH RANGES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomasella, Lina; Munari, Ulisse; Zwitter, Tomaz

    2010-01-01

    We present an Echelle+CCD, high signal-to-noise ratio, high-resolution (R = 20,000) spectroscopic atlas of 108 well-known objects representative of the most common types of peculiar and variable stars. The wavelength interval extends from 4600 to 9400 A and includes the RAVE, Gaia, and HERMES wavelength ranges. Multi-epoch spectra are provided for the majority of the observed stars. A total of 425 spectra of peculiar stars, which were collected during 56 observing nights between 1998 November and 2002 August, are presented. The spectra are given in FITS format and heliocentric wavelengths, with accurate subtraction of both the sky background and the scattered light. Auxiliary material useful for custom applications (telluric dividers, spectrophotometric stars, flat-field tracings) is also provided. The atlas aims to provide a homogeneous database of the spectral appearance of stellar peculiarities, a tool useful both for classification purposes and inter-comparison studies. It could also serve in the planning and development of automated classification algorithms designed for RAVE, Gaia, HERMES, and other large-scale spectral surveys. The spectrum of XX Oph is discussed in some detail as an example of the content of the present atlas.

  16. Fast neutron relaxation length in concretes in the range of neutron energies En=0.5 - 17.5 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desdin, L.F.; Garcia, L.; Perez, G.; Hernandez, A.; Herrera, E.; Tellez, E.

    1998-01-01

    In the present research were determined the fast neutron relaxation length y in different type of concretes, having special interest for biological shielding as well as for ordinary construction purposes, in the energy interval of 0.5-17.5 MeV. The values of Y concrete are reported with an accuracy of 6 %

  17. Radiative neutron capture cross-sections in the domain of the giant resonance for nuclei ranging from Al to La

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desthuilliers, M.G.

    1973-01-01

    The measurement of 14 MeV neutron radiative capture cross-section can be made in 2 ways. First way: the counting of the resulting nuclei (activation method) through the counting of the beta or gamma released during their decay; Second way the integration of the gamma spectra released during the decay of the resulting nuclei. The 2 methods disagree and particularly for nuclei situated between the closed neutron shells, the activation method gives a cross-section that presents shell effects. Drake and colleagues have proposed an explanation: secondary neutrons produced through (n,n'), (n,2n), (n,3n) reactions with materials surrounding the 14 MeV neutron source could lead to the activation measurement of a too high capture cross-section. The work is dedicated to the experimental validation of this assumption. We have chosen 6 nuclei that either near closed neutron shells or that are in mid-position: 27 Al, 50 Ti, 51 V, 103 Rh, 127 I and 139 La. Since these 2 types of nucleus have a very different behaviour concerning secondary neutrons, we will be able to assess the impact of secondary neutrons on radiative capture cross-section measurement. We recall in the first part the theoretical framework of the radiative capture, particularly the model of direct capture and the model of indirect capture and another model combining interferences between the 2 captures and a new formalism leading to the excitation of the giant dipolar resonance of the target-nucleus. The second part is dedicated to the experimental method and the way to eliminate the contribution of secondary neutrons to the capture cross-section. In the last part we present our results, the conclusion is that the main part of the shell effects that appear in the activation method is due to the capture of secondary neutrons [fr

  18. Anisotropy of the fission fragments from neutron-induced fission in the intermediate energy range of 1-200 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobyev, A. S.; Gagarski, A. M.; Shcherbakov, O. A.; Vaishnene, L. A.; Barabanov, A. L.

    2015-08-01

    Angular distributions of fission fragments from the neutron-induced fission of 232Th, 235U, and 238U have been measured in the energy range 1-200 MeV at the neutron time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer GNEIS using position sensitive multiwire proportional counters as fission fragment detector. A short description of the experimental equipment and measurement procedure is given. The anisotropy of fission fragments deduced from the data on measured angular distributions is presented in comparison with experimental data of other authors.

  19. Measurement of the differential neutron-deuteron scattering cross section in the energy range from 100 keV to 600 keV using a proportional counter

    CERN Document Server

    Nolte, R; Plompen, A; Röttger, S

    2014-01-01

    The angular distribution of neutron-deuteron scattering was investigated using the proportional counter P2 simultaneously as scattering target and detector for the recoil deuterons. The measurements were carried out using monoenergetic neutrons in the energy range from 150 keV to 500 keV. Various techniques were employed to reduce distortions of the experimental pulse-height distribution by photon-induced events. The experimental data were compared with realistic simulations which were carried out using different evaluated data sets. This comparison allows to conclude on inconsistencies in the evaluations.

  20. A detector for neutron imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Britton, C L; Wintenberg, A L; Warmack, R J; McKnight, T E; Frank, S S; Cooper, R G; Dudney, N J; Veith, G M; Stephan, A C

    2004-01-01

    A bright neutron source such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) places extreme requirements on detectors including excellent 2-D spatial imaging and high dynamic range. Present imaging detectors have either shown position resolutions that are less than acceptable or they exhibit excessive paralyzing dead times due to the brightness of the source. High neutron detection efficiency with good neutron- gamma discrimination is critical for applications in neutron scattering research where the usefulness of the data is highly dependent on the statistical uncertainty associated with each detector pixel.. A detector concept known as MicroMegas (MicroMEsh GAseous Structure) has been developed at CERN in Geneva for high- energy physics charged-particle tracking applications and has shown great promise for handling high data rates with a rather low-cost structure. We are attempting to optimize the MicroMegas detector concept for thermal neutrons and have designed a 1-D neutron strip detector which we have tested In ...

  1. Angular distributions and anisotropy of fission fragments from neutron-induced fission in intermediate energy range 1-200 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobyev, Alexander S.; Gagarski, Alexei M.; Shcherbakov, Oleg A.; Vaishnene, Larisa A.; Barabanov, Alexei L.

    2017-09-01

    Angular distributions of fission fragments from the neutron-induced fission of 232Th, 233U, 235U, 238U and 209Bi have been measured in the energy range 1-200 MeV at the neutron TOF spectrometer GNEIS based on the spallation neutron source at 1 GeV proton synchrocyclotron of the PNPI (Gatchina, Russia). The multiwire proportional counters have been used as a position sensitive fission fragment detector. A description of the experimental equipment and measurement procedure is given. The anisotropy of fission fragments deduced from the data on measured angular distributions is presented in comparison with experimental data of other authors, first of all, the recent data from WNR at LANSCE (Los Alamos, USA) and n_TOF(CERN).

  2. Angular distributions and anisotropy of fission fragments from neutron-induced fission in intermediate energy range 1–200 MeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorobyev Alexander S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Angular distributions of fission fragments from the neutron-induced fission of 232Th, 233U, 235U, 238U and 209Bi have been measured in the energy range 1–200 MeV at the neutron TOF spectrometer GNEIS based on the spallation neutron source at 1 GeV proton synchrocyclotron of the PNPI (Gatchina, Russia. The multiwire proportional counters have been used as a position sensitive fission fragment detector. A description of the experimental equipment and measurement procedure is given. The anisotropy of fission fragments deduced from the data on measured angular distributions is presented in comparison with experimental data of other authors, first of all, the recent data from WNR at LANSCE (Los Alamos, USA and n_TOF(CERN.

  3. The cross section functions for neutron induced reactions with Rhenium in the energy range 13.0-19.5 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovančević, N.; Daraban, L.; Stroh, H.; Oberstedt, S.; Hult, M.; Bonaldi, C.; Geerts, W.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Lutter, G.; Marissens, G.; Vidali, M.

    2017-09-01

    The technique for measuring neutron activation cross-sections using wide energy neutron beams (NAXSUN) was recently developed at JRC-Geel . This method is based on the detection of the gamma activity induced by the activation of the samples in different but overlapping neutron fields and following an unfolding procedure. In the present work, measurements of the cross-section functions by the NAXSUN technique for the (n,a), (n,2n), (n,p) and (n,3n) reactions on rhenium isotopes 185Re and 187Re were performed. The results are the first experimental data for the mentioned reaction cross-sections in the energy range 13.0-19.5 MeV. The obtained data are of interest for possible applications of Re in nuclear technology and medicine.

  4. Development of an innovative neutron reactor dosimetry method for the characterization of neutron spectrum in the energy range of 1 keV - 1 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergeyeva, Viktoriya

    2016-01-01

    The subject of this PhD was carried out in the Instrumentation Sensors and Dosimetry Laboratory at CEA Cadarache research center. Different technical teams were involved in this research. all the chemical treatments for Zr were performed in Chemical and Radiochemical analyses Laboratory (CEA Cadarache). Post-irradiation measurements were performed on MADERE platform of Instrumentation Sensors and Dosimetry Laboratory (CEA Cadarache). accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) measurements were performed by Maier-Leibnitz Laboratory (MLL TUM Munich, Germany). These PhD studies deal with the topic of neutron reactor dosimetry. The goal of reactor dosimetry is to reconstruct the neutron spectrum in a particular location inside or outside the reactor core. Classical applications are: neutron flux determination in order to anticipate embrittlement of the Pressurised Water Reactor vessel, study of material damage under high irradiation fluxes in Material Testing Reactors, perform experimental data and feed-back for cross sections evaluations such as JEFF, ENDF, IRDFF, etc. Today we can accurately reconstruct thermal (≅ eV) and fast (≅ MeV) parts of neutron spectrum by using activation detectors, also called dosimeters, with an adequate sensitivity. Nowadays there is no adequate dosimeter for the intermediate energy region between 1 keV and 1 MeV. Thus, the PhD goal is to select the 1 keV - 1 MeV sensitive target-isotope and associated nuclear reaction and verify our solution by experimental irradiation. The study started by checking the energy sensitivity of the isotopes and cross section level for neutron reactions. Finally we choose neutron capture reaction (n; γ) on 92 Zr and 94 Zr. The neutron irradiation will produce 2 isotopes: 93 Zr and 95 Zr, stable and radioactive respectively. The 2 reactions used in this work for the 1 keV - 1 MeV neutron detection are 92 Zr(n; γ) 93 Zr and 94 Zr(n; γ) 95 Zr → 95 Nb → 95 Mo. Zirconium capture reaction rate for thermal

  5. High resolution, large spectral range, in variable-included-angle soft X-ray monochromators using a plane VLS grating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reininger, Ruben; Castro, A.R.B. de

    2005-01-01

    We give a unified discussion of two different approaches to the design of grazing incidence monochromators with a variable line spacing (VLS) grating for soft X-ray undulator sources. Neither one uses an entrance slit and both work with a fixed position exit slit. In one approach, being constructed at LNLS and designed for the energy range 100< E<1000eV, the choice of the VLS parameters allows for the operation at a variable c-value with a single plane grating and little sacrifice in the maximum resolving power. In this case source size limited resolving power of circa 40000 is expected at 100eV. In the second approach, for the storage ring in Wisconsin, two gratings covering the energy range 40< E<1500eV are used, one capable of delivering a resolving power larger than 20000 at 860eV and the other lower resolving power but much higher flux

  6. Neutron Stars and Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Werner

    2009-01-01

    Neutron stars are the most compact astronomical objects in the universe which are accessible by direct observation. Studying neutron stars means studying physics in regimes unattainable in any terrestrial laboratory. Understanding their observed complex phenomena requires a wide range of scientific disciplines, including the nuclear and condensed matter physics of very dense matter in neutron star interiors, plasma physics and quantum electrodynamics of magnetospheres, and the relativistic magneto-hydrodynamics of electron-positron pulsar winds interacting with some ambient medium. Not to mention the test bed neutron stars provide for general relativity theories, and their importance as potential sources of gravitational waves. It is this variety of disciplines which, among others, makes neutron star research so fascinating, not only for those who have been working in the field for many years but also for students and young scientists. The aim of this book is to serve as a reference work which not only review...

  7. DWBA (d,N) Calculations Including Dirac Phenomenological Potentials and an Exact Treatment of Finite-range Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Eric

    2005-04-01

    An algorithm for the inclusion of both Dirac phenomenological potentials and an exact treatment of finite-range effects within the DWBA is presented. The numerical implementation of this algorithm is used to calculate low-energy deuteron stripping cross sections, analyzing powers, and polarizations. These calculations are compared with experimental data where available. The impact of using several commonly employed nuclear potentials (Reid soft-core, Bonn, Argonne v18) for the internal deuteron wave function is also examined.

  8. Use of boron nitride for neutron spectrum characterization and cross-section validation in the epithermal range through integral activation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radulović, Vladimir, E-mail: vladimir.radulovic@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Trkov, Andrej [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); IAEA, Vienna International Centre, PO Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria); Jaćimović, Radojko [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Gregoire, Gilles; Destouches, Christophe [CEA, DEN, DER, Instrumentation Sensors and Dosimetry Laboratory, Cadarache, F-13108 St. Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2016-12-21

    A recent experimental irradiation and measurement campaign using containers made from boron nitride (BN) at the Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI) TRIGA Mark II reactor in Ljubljana, Slovenia, has shown the applicability of BN for neutron spectrum characterization and cross-section validation in the epithermal range through integral activation measurements. The first part of the paper focuses on the determination of the transmission function of a BN container through Monte Carlo calculations and experimental measurements. The second part presents the process of tayloring the sensitivity of integral activation measurements to specific needs and a selection of suitable radiative capture reactions for neutron spectrum characterization in the epithermal range. A BN container used in our experiments and its qualitative effect on the neutron spectrum in the irradiation position employed is displayed in the Graphical abstract. - Graphical abstract: Neutron spectra inside the JSI TRIGA Mark II PT irradiation position, obtained with a Monte Carlo calculation: blue: unperturbed, green inside a BN container, of wall thickness 4 mm, 13 mm in diameter and 14 mm in height.

  9. Validation of Measured Damping Trends for Flight-Like Vehicle Panel/Equipment including a Range of Cable Harness Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew M.; Davis, R. Benjamin; LaVerde, Bruce T.; Fulcher, Clay W.; Jones, Douglas C.; Waldon, James M.; Craigmyle, Benjamin B.

    2012-01-01

    This validation study examines the effect on vibroacoustic response resulting from the installation of cable bundles on a curved orthogrid panel. Of interest is the level of damping provided by the installation of the cable bundles and whether this damping could be potentially leveraged in launch vehicle design. The results of this test are compared with baseline acoustic response tests without cables. Damping estimates from the measured response data are made using a new software tool that leverages a finite element model of the panel in conjunction with advanced optimization techniques. While the full test series is not yet complete, the first configuration of cable bundles that was assessed effectively increased the viscous critical damping fraction of the system by as much as 0.02 in certain frequency ranges.

  10. Movements of wolves at the northern extreme of the species' range, including during four months of darkness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L David Mech

    Full Text Available Information about wolf (Canis lupus movements anywhere near the northern extreme of the species' range in the High Arctic (>75°N latitude are lacking. There, wolves prey primarily on muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus and must survive 4 months of 24 hr/day winter darkness and temperatures reaching -53 C. The extent to which wolves remain active and prey on muskoxen during the dark period are unknown, for the closest area where information is available about winter wolf movements is >2,250 km south. We studied a pack of ≥20 wolves on Ellesmere Island, Nunavut, Canada (80°N latitude from July 2009 through mid-April 2010 by collaring a lead wolf with a Global Positioning System (GPS/Argos radio collar. The collar recorded the wolf's precise locations at 6:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. daily and transmitted the locations by satellite to our email. Straight-line distances between consecutive 12-hr locations varied between 0 and 76 km. Mean (SE linear distance between consecutive locations (n = 554 was 11 (0.5 km. Total minimum distance traveled was 5,979 km, and total area covered was 6,640 km(2, the largest wolf range reported. The wolf and presumably his pack once made a 263-km (straight-line distance foray to the southeast during 19-28 January 2010, returning 29 January to 1 February at an average of 41 km/day straight-line distances between 12-hr locations. This study produced the first detailed movement information about any large mammal in the High Arctic, and the average movements during the dark period did not differ from those afterwards. Wolf movements during the dark period in the highest latitudes match those of the other seasons and generally those of wolves in lower latitudes, and, at least with the gross movements measurable by our methods, the 4-month period without direct sunlight produced little change in movements.

  11. An improved long counter for neutron fluence measurement with a flat response over a wide energy range from 1 keV to 15 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Q.Y., E-mail: huqyuan@163.com; Zhang, J.H.; Zhang, D.; Guo, H.S.; Yang, G.Z.; Li, B.J.; Ye, F.; Si, F.N.; Liu, J.; Fu, Y.C.; Ning, J.M.; Yang, J.; Yang, H.H.; Wang, W.C.

    2014-12-21

    A new long counter has been developed with a flat energy response over a wide range from 1 keV to 15 MeV. It consists of five {sup 3}He proportional counter tubes and a number of carefully designed polyethylene moderators. The structure of this detector was determined by careful Monte Carlo simulations. The calculated results show that the efficiency of this counter is uniform from 1 keV neutron energy to 15 MeV. Calibration was performed on an Am–Be source and the accelerator-produced monoenergetic D–D and D–T neutron sources. Fluctuation of the response curve is less than 10% over this energy range.

  12. Nuclear mass formula with a neutron skin degree of freedom and finite-range model for the surface energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, P.; Myers, W.D.

    1984-03-01

    We study the possibility of extending the model used by Moeller and Nix in 1980 to calculate nuclear masses and fission barriers for nuclei throughout the periodic system, to describe compressibility effects and the existence of a neutron skin. 9 references

  13. High accuracy measurement of the $^{235}$U(n,f) reaction cross-section in the 10-30 keV neutron energy range

    CERN Multimedia

    The analysis of the neutron flux of n_TOF (in EAR1) revealed an anomaly in the 10-30 keV neutron energy range. While the flux extracted on the basis of the $^{6}$Li(n,t)$^{4}$He and $^{10}$B(n,$\\alpha$)$^{7}$Li reactions mostly agreed with each other and with the results of FLUKA simulations of the neutron beam, the one based on the $^{235}$U(n,f) reaction was found to be systematically lower, independently of the detection system used. A possible explanation is that the $^{235}$U(n,f) crosssection in that energy region, where in principle should be known with an uncertainty of 1%, may be systematically overestimated. Such a finding, which has a negligible influence on thermal reactors, would be important for future fast critical or subcritical reactors. Furthermore, its interest is more general, since the $^{235}$U(n,f) reaction is often used at that energy to determine the neutron flux, or as reference in measurements of fission cross section of other actinides. We propose to perform a high-accuracy, high-r...

  14. Sample environment for neutron scattering measurements of internal stresses in engineering materials in the temperature range of 6 K to 300 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichek, O.; Timms, J. D.; Kelleher, J. F.; Down, R. B. E.; Offer, C. D.; Kabra, S.; Zhang, S. Y.

    2017-02-01

    Internal stresses in materials have a considerable effect on material properties including strength, fracture toughness, and fatigue resistance. The ENGIN-X beamline is an engineering science facility at ISIS optimized for the measurement of strain and stress using the atomic lattice planes as a strain gauge. Nowadays, the rapidly rising interest in the mechanical properties of engineering materials at low temperatures has been stimulated by the dynamic development of the cryogenic industry and the advanced applications of the superconductor technology. Here we present the design and discuss the test results of a new cryogenic sample environment system for neutron scattering measurements of internal stresses in engineering materials under a load of up to 100 kN and in the temperature range of 6 K to 300 K. Complete cooling of the system starting from the room temperature down to the base temperature takes around 90 min. Understanding of internal stresses in engineering materials at cryogenic temperatures is vital for the modelling and designing of cutting-edge superconducting magnets and other superconductor based applications.

  15. Neutron physics

    CERN Document Server

    Reuss, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Originally just an offshoot of nuclear physics, neutron physics soon became a branch of physics in its own right. It deals with the movement of neutrons in nuclear reactors and ail the nuclear reactions they trigger there, particularly the fission of heavy nuclei which starts a chain reaction to produce energy. Neutron Physics covers the whole range of knowledge of this complex science, discussing the basics of neutron physics and some principles of neutron physics calculations. Because neutron physics is the essential part of reactor physics, it is the main subject taught to students of Nuclear Engineering. This book takes an instructional approach for that purpose. Neutron Physics is also intended for ail physicists and engineers involved in development or operational aspects of nuclear power.

  16. Measurement of the neutron fields produced by a 62 MeV proton beam on a PMMA phantom using extended range Bonner sphere spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amgarou, K.; Bedogni, R.; Domingo, C.; Esposito, A.; Gentile, A.; Carinci, G.; Russo, S.

    2011-10-01

    The experimental characterization of the neutron fields produced as parasitic effect in medical accelerators is assuming an increased importance for either the patient protection or the facility design aspects. Medical accelerators are diverse in terms of particle type (electrons or hadrons) and energy, but the radiation fields around them have in common (provided that a given threshold energy is reached) the presence of neutrons with energy span over several orders of magnitude. Due to the large variability of neutron energy, field or dosimetry measurements in these workplaces are very complex, and in general, cannot be performed with ready-to-use commercial instruments. In spite of its poor energy resolution, the Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (BSS) is the only instrument able to simultaneously determine all spectral components in such workplaces. The energy range of this instrument is limited to Emeasurements at hadron therapy facilities, an ERBSS experiment was carried out at the Centro di AdroTerapia e Applicazioni Nucleari Avanzate (CATANA) of INFN—LNS (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud), where a proton beam routinely used for ophthalmic cancer treatments is available. The 62 MeV beam was directed towards a PMMA phantom, simulating the patient, and two neutron measurement points were established at 0° and 90° with respect to the beam-line. Here the ERBSS of UAB (Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona— Grup de Física de les Radiacions) and INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati) were exposed to characterize the "forward" and "sideward" proton-induced neutron fields. The use of two ERBSS characterized by different set of spheres, central detectors, and independently established and calibrated, is important for guaranteeing the robustness of the measured spectra and estimating their overall uncertainties.

  17. Long-Range Electrostatics-Induced Two-Proton Transfer Captured by Neutron Crystallography in an Enzyme Catalytic Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlits, Oksana; Wymore, Troy; Das, Amit; Shen, Chen-Hsiang; Parks, Jerry M; Smith, Jeremy C; Weiss, Kevin L; Keen, David A; Blakeley, Matthew P; Louis, John M; Langan, Paul; Weber, Irene T; Kovalevsky, Andrey

    2016-04-11

    Neutron crystallography was used to directly locate two protons before and after a pH-induced two-proton transfer between catalytic aspartic acid residues and the hydroxy group of the bound clinical drug darunavir, located in the catalytic site of enzyme HIV-1 protease. The two-proton transfer is triggered by electrostatic effects arising from protonation state changes of surface residues far from the active site. The mechanism and pH effect are supported by quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations. The low-pH proton configuration in the catalytic site is deemed critical for the catalytic action of this enzyme and may apply more generally to other aspartic proteases. Neutrons therefore represent a superb probe to obtain structural details for proton transfer reactions in biological systems at a truly atomic level. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Long-range structure of Cu(InxGa1-x)3Se5: A complementary neutron and anomalous x-ray diffraction study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, S.; Marrón, D. fürtes; León, M.; Feyerherm, R.; Dudzik, E.; Friedrich, E. J.; Tovar, M.; Tomm, Y.; Wolf, C.; Schorr, S.; Schedel-Niedrig, Th.; Lux-Steiner, M. Ch.; Merino, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Distinguishing the scattering contributions of isoelectronic atomic species by means of conventional x-ray- and/or electron diffraction techniques is a difficult task. Such a problem occurs when determining the crystal structure of compounds containing different types of atoms with equal number of electrons. We propose a new structural model of Cu(InxGa1-x)3Se5 which is valid for the entire compositional range of the CuIn3Se5-CuGa3Se5 solid solution. Our model is based on neutron and anomalous x-ray diffraction experiments. These complementary techniques allow the separation of scattering contributions of the isoelectronic species Cu+ and Ga3+, contributing nearly identically in monoenergetic x-ray diffraction experiments. We have found that CuIII3Se5 (III=In,Ga) in its room temperature near-equilibrium modification exhibits a modified stannite structure (space group I4¯2m). Different occupation factors of the species involved, Cu+, In3+, Ga3+, and vacancies have been found at three different cationic positions of the structure (Wyckoff sites 2a, 2b, and 4d) depending on the composition of the compound. Significantly, Cu+ does not occupy the 2b site for the In-free compound, but does for the In-containing case. Structural parameters, including lattice constants, tetragonal distortions, and occupation factors are given for samples covering the entire range of the CuIn3Se5-CuGa3Se5 solid solution. At the light of the result, the denotation of Cu-poor 1:3:5 compounds as chalcopyrite-related materials is only valid in reference to their composition.

  19. Deuterium short-range order in Pd0.975Ag0.025D0.685 by diffuse neutron scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaschko, O.; Klemencic, R.; Fratzl, P.

    1983-01-01

    By diffuse neutron scattering the D short-range order in a Pd0.975Ag0.025D0.685 crystal was investigated at 50 and 70K. The results are compared with the D ordering in the PdDx system previously investigated, and it is shown that the isointensity contours around the (1/2,1,0) point are similar...... to that observed in PdD0.71. One may conclude that the characteristic changes in the short-range-order intensity which occur near x=0.7 in PdDx with concentration are due to changes of the electronic structure....

  20. Evaluation of 242Pu data for the incident neutron energy range 0.1 - 6 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladuca, G.; Sin, M.; Tudora, A.

    1996-11-01

    This report presents the models and the procedures used for the calculation of the quantities required by Files 3, 4 and 5 of ENDF-6 for 242 Pu. These quantities are the integrated cross sections for the total, fission, scattering and gamma-capture reactions and the angular and energy distributions of the scattered neutrons for the incident neutron energies 0.01/6 MeV. The direct mechanism was treated with the coupled-channel method using a deformed optical potential defined by a set of actinide region parameters established by the authors. For the compound nucleus calculations, a new HRTW version of the statistical model extended to describe the fission at subbarrier energies was used. To describe the continuous part of the transition states spectrum, analytical expressions have been established. The energy distributions of the scattered neutrons have been calculated with an author's version of the Los Alamos model. The agreement of the calculations with the existing experimental data is good. (author)

  1. The properties of atomic nuclei at the boundary of proton instability, discussed at the example of very neutron deficient isotopes in the mass range 100-150

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeckl, E.

    1981-10-01

    In this paper it shall be tried to strike the balance after the first years of experimenting at the on-line mass separator of the GSI Darmstadt and to present the main results of the study of very neutron deficient isotopes in the mass range 90-150 as well as the resulting questions for further experiments. First some foundations concerning the properties of neutron deficient nuclei and the measuring method are explained. The results and their interpretation are discussed using examples for the alpha decay, the beta decay, the mass-energy-area, and the proton-drip line. Finally the obtained results are summarized, and an outlook to further studies of nuclear properties far from beta stability is given. (orig.) [de

  2. Measurements of double differential charged particle emission cross sections and development of a wide range charged particles spectrometer for ten`s MeV neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nauchi, Yasushi; Baba, Mamoru; Kiyosumi, Takehide [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering] [and others

    1997-03-01

    We measured (n,xp), (n,xd) cross sections of C and Al for En=64.3 MeV neutrons at the {sup 7}Li(p,n) neutron sources facility at TIARA (Takasaki Establishment, JAERI) by using a conventional SSD-NaI telescope placed in the air. They show characteristic energy and angular dependence in high energy regions. In order to extend the measurements to low energy protons and {alpha} particles, a new spectrometer consisting of low pressure gas counters and BaF{sub 2} scintillators is now under development. A low threshold for low energy {alpha} particles will be achieved by using the gas counters. The particle identification over a wide energy range will be achieved by combining the {Delta}E-E method for low energy particles with the pulse shape discrimination (PSD) method of BaF{sub 2} for high energy particles. (author)

  3. Formation of incommensurate long-range magnetic order in the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya antiferromagnet Ba2CuGe2O7 studied by neutron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlbauer, S.; Brandl, G.; Mânsson, M.; Garst, M.

    2017-10-01

    Neutron diffraction on a triple-axis spectrometer and a small-angle neutron scattering instrument is used to study the magnetic phase transition in tetragonal Ba2CuGe2O7 at zero magnetic field. In addition to the incommensurate cycloidal antiferromagnetic (AFM) long-range order, we establish that weak incommensurate ferromagnetism (FM) also arises below the transition temperature TN identified by sharp Bragg peaks close to the Γ point. The intensities of both the incommensurate AFM and FM Bragg peaks vanish abruptly at TN, which is indicative of a weak first-order transition. Above TN, evidence is presented that the magnetic intensity within the tetragonal (a ,b ) plane is distributed on a ring in momentum space whose radius is determined by the incommensurate wave vector of the cycloidal order. We speculate that the associated soft fluctuations are at the origin of the weak first-order transition in the spirit of a scenario proposed by Brazovskii.

  4. Neutron sources: present practice and future potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cierjacks, S.; Smith, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    The present capability and future potential of accelerator-based monoenergetic and white neutron sources are outlined in the context of fundamental and applied neutron-nuclear research. The neutron energy range extends from thermal to 500+ MeV, and the time domain from steady-state to pico-second pulsed sources. Accelerator technology is summarized, including the production of intense light-ion, heavy-ion and electron beams. Target capabilities are discussed with attention to neutron-production efficiency and power-handling capabilities. The status of underlying neutron-producing reactions is summarized. The present and future use of neutron sources in: (i) fundamental neutron-nuclear research, (ii) nuclear-data acquisition, (iii) materials-damage studies, (iv) engineering test, and (v) biomedical applications are discussed. Emphasis is given to current status, near-term advances well within current technology, and to long-range projections

  5. Absence of a long-range ordered magnetic ground state in Pr3Rh4Sn13 studied through specific heat and inelastic neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Harikrishnan S.; Ogunbunmi, Michael O.; Ghosh, S. K.; Adroja, D. T.; Koza, M. M.; Guidi, T.; Strydom, A. M.

    2018-04-01

    Signatures of absence of a long-range ordered magnetic ground state down to 0.36 K are observed in magnetic susceptibility, specific heat, thermal/electrical transport and inelastic neutron scattering data of the quasi-skutterudite compound Pr3Rh4Sn13 which crystallizes in the Yb3Rh4Sn13-type structure with a cage-like network of Sn atoms. In this structure, Pr3+ occupies a lattice site with D 2d point symmetry having a ninefold degeneracy corresponding to J  =  4. The magnetic susceptibility of Pr3Rh4Sn13 shows only a weak temperature dependence below 10 K otherwise remaining paramagnetic-like in the range, 10 K-300 K. From the inelastic neutron scattering intensity of Pr3Rh4Sn13 recorded at different temperatures, we identify excitations at 4.5(7) K, 5.42(6) K, 10.77(5) K, 27.27(5) K, 192.28(4) K and 308.33(3) K through a careful peak analysis. However, no signatures of long-range magnetic order are observed in the neutron data down to 1.5 K, which is also confirmed by the specific heat data down to 0.36 K. A broad Schottky-like peak is recovered for the magnetic part of the specific heat, C 4f, which suggests the role of crystal electric fields of Pr3+ . A crystalline electric field model consisting of 7 levels was applied to C 4f which leads to the estimation of energy levels at 4.48(2) K, 6.94(4) K, 11.23(8) K, 27.01(5) K, 193.12(6) K and 367.30(2) K. The CEF energy levels estimated from the heat capacity analysis are in close agreement with the excitation energies seen in the neutron data. The Sommerfeld coefficient estimated from the analysis of magnetic specific heat is γ = 761(6) mJ K-2 mol-Pr which suggests the formation of heavy itinerant quasi-particles in Pr3Rh4Sn13. Combining inelastic neutron scattering results, analysis of the specific heat data down to 0.36 K, magnetic susceptibility and, electrical and thermal transport, we establish the absence of long-range ordered magnetic ground state in Pr3Rh4Sn13.

  6. neutron transmission through crystalline materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Mesiry, M.S.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the neutron transmission through crystalline materials. Therefore a study of pyrolytic graphite (PG) as a highly efficient selective thermal neutron filter and Iron single crystal as a whole one, as well as the applicability of using their polycrystalline powders as a selective cold neutron filters is given. Moreover, the use of PG and iron single crystal as an efficient neutron monochromator is also investigated. An additive formula is given which allows calculating the contribution of the total neutron cross-section including the Bragg scattering from different )(hkl planes to the neutron transmission through crystalline iron and graphite. The formula takes into account their crystalline form. A computer CFe program was developed in order to provide the required calculations for both poly- and single-crystalline iron. The validity of the CFe program was approved from the comparison of the calculated iron cross-section data with the available experimental ones. The CFe program was also adapted to calculate the reflectivity from iron single crystal when it used as a neutron monochromator The computer package GRAPHITE, developed in Neutron Physics laboratory, Nuclear Research Center, has been used in order to provide the required calculations for crystalline graphite in the neutron energy range from 0.1 meV to 10 eV. A Mono-PG code was added to the computer package GRAPHITE in order to calculate the reflectivity from PG crystal when it used as a neutron monochromator.

  7. The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Spallation Neutron Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicki, Suzanne F.; Wender, Stephen A.; Mocko, Michael

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides the scientific community with intense sources of neutrons, which can be used to perform experiments supporting civilian and national security research. These measurements include nuclear physics experiments for the defense program, basic science, and the radiation effect programs. This paper focuses on the radiation effects program, which involves mostly accelerated testing of semiconductor parts. When cosmic rays strike the earth's atmosphere, they cause nuclear reactions with elements in the air and produce a wide range of energetic particles. Because neutrons are uncharged, they can reach aircraft altitudes and sea level. These neutrons are thought to be the most important threat to semiconductor devices and integrated circuits. The best way to determine the failure rate due to these neutrons is to measure the failure rate in a neutron source that has the same spectrum as those produced by cosmic rays. Los Alamos has a high-energy and a low-energy neutron source for semiconductor testing. Both are driven by the 800-MeV proton beam from the LANSCE accelerator. The high-energy neutron source at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility uses a bare target that is designed to produce fast neutrons with energies from 100 keV to almost 800 MeV. The measured neutron energy distribution from WNR is very similar to that of the cosmic-ray-induced neutrons in the atmosphere. However, the flux provided at the WNR facility is typically 5×107 times more intense than the flux of the cosmic-ray-induced neutrons. This intense neutron flux allows testing at greatly accelerated rates. An irradiation test of less than an hour is equivalent to many years of neutron exposure due to cosmic-ray neutrons. The low-energy neutron source is located at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center. It is based on a moderated source that provides useful neutrons from subthermal energies to ∼100 keV. The characteristics of these sources, and

  8. Detection and elimination of the electromagnetic interferences in the neutron flux measurement circuit, Source Range; Deteccion y eliminacion de interferencias electromagneticas en el circuito de medicion de flujo neutronico, rango de fuente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta, J. M.; Esguivillas, L.; Valle, J. L.

    2010-07-01

    This paper compiles an experience in Asco I Nuclear Power Plant about electromagnetic interferences associated to the neutron flux measurement system, Source Range Asco I NPP. The circuit affected is the proportional detector (BF3) located outside the reactor vessel to measure the neutron leakage in shutdown and in start-up.

  9. Neutron Resonance Parameters of 238U and the Calculated Cross Sections from the Reich-Moore Analysis of Experimental Data in the Neutron Energy Range from 0 keV to 20 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derrien, H

    2005-12-05

    The neutron resonance parameters of {sup 238}U were obtained from a SAMMY analysis of high-resolution neutron transmission measurements and high-resolution capture cross section measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) in the years 1970-1990, and from more recent transmission and capture cross section measurements performed at the Geel Linear Accelerator (GELINA). Compared with previous evaluations, the energy range for this resonance analysis was extended from 10 to 20 keV, taking advantage of the high resolution of the most recent ORELA transmission measurements. The experimental database and the method of analysis are described in this report. The neutron transmissions and the capture cross sections calculated with the resonance parameters are compared with the experimental data. A description is given of the statistical properties of the resonance parameters and of the recommended values of the average parameters. The new evaluation results in a slight decrease of the effective capture resonance integral and improves the prediction of integral thermal benchmarks by 70 pcm to 200 pcm.

  10. A neutron spectrometer for neutron energies between 1 eV and 10 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.K.; Blue, T.E.

    1988-01-01

    In boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), it is the consensus that epithermal neutron beams have advantages over thermal beams in treating deep-seated brain tumors, and large neutron fields have advantages over narrow beams, since whole-brain irradiations are thought to be necessary in many cases. Epithermal neutron sources for BNCT, which include filtered reactor neutron beams and moderated reactor neutron fields, are currently being developed at many institutions around the world. Neutrons with energies between 1 eV and 10 keV are most suitable for treating brain tumors. However, techniques for measuring neutron spectra in a vacuum in this energy range are not well developed. This paper describes a new type of neutron spectrometer that has a set of response functions that peak at equally spaced intervals on a logarithmic energy scale ranging from 1 eV to 10 keV; therefore, neutron spectra (or histograms) in this energy range can be obtained by properly applying spectrum unfolding techniques to the measured data. The spectrometer is applicable for measurements in a vacuum for both narrow neutron beams and wide neutron fields

  11. Fusion neutronics

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yican

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a systematic and comprehensive introduction to fusion neutronics, covering all key topics from the fundamental theories and methodologies, as well as a wide range of fusion system designs and experiments. It is the first-ever book focusing on the subject of fusion neutronics research. Compared with other nuclear devices such as fission reactors and accelerators, fusion systems are normally characterized by their complex geometry and nuclear physics, which entail new challenges for neutronics such as complicated modeling, deep penetration, low simulation efficiency, multi-physics coupling, etc. The book focuses on the neutronics characteristics of fusion systems and introduces a series of theories and methodologies that were developed to address the challenges of fusion neutronics, and which have since been widely applied all over the world. Further, it introduces readers to neutronics design’s unique principles and procedures, experimental methodologies and technologies for fusion systems...

  12. Neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, Eiichi

    1988-01-01

    The thermal neutron absorption coefficient is essentially different from the X-ray absorption coefficient. Each substance has a characteristic absorption coefficient regardless of its density. Neutron deams have the following features: (1) neutrons are not transmitted efficiently by low molecular weight substances, (2) they are transmitted efficiently by heavy metals, and (3) the transmittance differs among isotopes. Thus, neutron beams are suitable for cheking for foreign matters in heavy metals and testing of composites consisting of both heavy and light materials. A neutron source generates fast neutrons, which should be converted into thermal neutrons by reducing their energy. Major neutron souces include nuclear reactors, radioisotopes and particle accelerators. Photographic films and television systems are mainly used to observe neutron transmission images. Computers are employed for image processing, computerized tomography and three-dimensional analysis. The major applications of neutron radiography include inspection of neclear fuel; evaluation of material for airplane; observation of fuel in the engine and oil in the hydraulic systems in airplanes; testing of composite materials; etc. (Nogami, K.)

  13. Fast-neutron interaction with niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Poenitz, W.P.; Smith, D.L.; Whalen, J.F.; Howerton, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    Results of a comprehensive study of the interaction of fast neutrons with niobium are presented, including measurement and interpretation of neutron total, differential-scattering and radiative-capture cross sections. The experimental results are interpreted in the context of the optical-statistical model, with attention to the Fermi-surface anomaly. Experimental results, physical interpretations and rigorous statistical methods are used to provide a comprehensive evaluated nuclear data file suitable for use in a wide range of applied neutronic calculations.

  14. Neutron-induced fission cross-section of 233U, 241Am and 243Am in the energy range 0.5 MeV ≤ En ≤ 20 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belloni, F.; Milazzo, P.M.; Calviani, M.

    2011-01-01

    Neutron-induced fission cross-sections of 233 U, 241 Am and 243 Am relative to 235 U have been measured in a wide energy range at the neutron time of flight facility n-TOF in Geneva to address the present discrepancies in evaluated and experimental databases for reactions and isotopes relevant for transmutation and new generation fast reactors. A dedicated fast ionization chamber was used. Each isotope was mounted in a different cell of the modular detector. The measurements took advantage of the characteristics of the n-TOF installation. Its intrinsically low background, coupled to its high instantaneous neutron flux, results in high accuracy data. Its wide energy neutron spectrum helps to reduce systematic uncertainties due to energy-domain matching problems while the 185 m flight path and a 6 ns pulse width assure an excellent energy resolution. This paper presents results obtained between 500 keV and 20 MeV neutron energy. (authors)

  15. Proton hopping and long-range transport in the protic ionic liquid [Im][TFSI], probed by pulsed-field gradient NMR and quasi-elastic neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoarfrost, Megan L; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Segalman, Rachel A; Reimer, Jeffrey A

    2012-07-19

    The management of proton conductivity in the protic ionic liquid imidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([Im][TFSI]) is investigated via the use of quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) and pulsed-field gradient NMR. The introduction of excess neutral imidazole to [Im][TFSI] leads to enhanced conductivity. We find that proton dynamics in [Im][TFSI] with excess imidazole are characterized by proton hopping that is encompassed in the slower of two translational processes, as identified by QENS. This relatively slow process contributes to long-range diffusion more than the faster process. NMR diffusion measurements show that proton hopping decreases with increasing temperature, but significant proton hopping persists even at the maximum experimental temperature of 120 °C. This, in combination with minimal ion aggregation, leads to high proton conductivity and a high proton transference number over a wide temperature range.

  16. Neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacon, G.E.

    1983-01-01

    The paper reviews neutron diffraction work from the early studies to the present-day development of the subject. Direct structural investigations were described, including chemical applications associated with single crystal techniques, and magnetic applications identified with powder techniques. The properties of the neutron beams are discussed, as well as the use of polarised beams. (UK)

  17. Compact Neutron Generators for Medical, Home Land Security, and Planetary Exploration

    CERN Document Server

    Reijonen, Jani

    2005-01-01

    The Plasma and Ion Source Technology Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has developed various types of advanced D-D (neutron energy 2.5 MeV), D-T (14 MeV) and T-T (0 - 9 MeV) neutron generators for wide range of applications. These applications include medical (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy), homeland security (Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis, Fast Neutron Activation Analysis and Pulsed Fast Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy) and planetary exploration in form of neutron based, sub-surface hydrogen detection systems. These neutron generators utilize RF induction discharge to ionize the deuterium/tritium gas. This discharge method provides high plasma density for high output current, high atomic species from molecular gases, long life operation and versatility for various discharge chamber geometries. Three main neutron generator developments are discussed here: high neutron output co-axial neutron generator for BNCT applications, point neutron generator for security applications, compact and sub-c...

  18. Neutron reflectometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klösgen-Buchkremer, Beate Maria

    2014-01-01

    Neutron (and X-ray) reflectometry constitute complementary interfacially sensitive techniques that open access to studying the structure within thin films of both soft and hard condensed matter. Film thickness starts oxide surfaces on bulk substrates, proceeding to (pauci-)molecular layers and up...... to hundreds of nanometers. Thickness resolution for flat surfaces is in the range of few Ǻngstrøm, and as a peculiar benefit, the presence and properties of buried interfaces are accessible. Focus here will be on neutron reflectometry, a technique that is unique in applications involving composite organic...... films or films with magnetic properties. The reason is the peculiar property of neutron light since the mass of a neutron is close to the one of a proton, and since it bears a magnetic moment. The optical properties of matter, when interacting with neutrons, are described by a refractive index...

  19. Angular distributions and anisotropy of the fragments from neutron-induced fission of 233U and 209Bi in the intermediate energy range of 1-200 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobyev, A. S.; Gagarski, A. M.; Shcherbakov, O. A.; Vaishnene, L. A.; Barabanov, A. L.

    2016-09-01

    New results of the neutron-induced fission experiments carried out at the neutron time-of-flight spectrometer GNEIS of the PNPI are given. Angular distributions of fission fragments from the neutron-induced fission of 233U and 209Bi nuclei have been measured in the energy range 1-200 MeV using position sensitive multiwire proportional counters as fission fragment detector. The recent improvements of the measurement and data processing procedures are described. The data on anisotropy of fission fragments deduced from the measured angular distributions are presented in comparison with the experimental data of other authors.

  20. Measurement of thick target neutron yield from the reaction (p+181 Ta) with projectiles in the range of 6-20 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sabyasachi; Sahoo, G. S.; Tripathy, S. P.; Sharma, S. C.; Joshi, D. S.; Bandyopadhyay, T.

    2018-02-01

    181Ta is a commonly used backing material for many targets in nuclear reaction studies. When the target thickness is less than the range of bombarded projectiles, the interaction via Ta(p,n) reactions in the backing can be a significant source of background. In this study, the neutron spectral yields from the reaction of protons of different energies (between 6 to 20 MeV) with a thick Ta target were determined using CR-39 detectors. The results from this study can be used as a correction factor in such situations. The parameters of registered tracks in CR-39 were analysed using an in-house image analysing program autoTRAK_n and then to derive the associated dose values. The spectral yields obtained experimentally were compared with those obtained from the theoretical calculations. The neutron yield was found to increase with increase in projectile energy mainly due to the opening of reaction channels from (p, n) to (p, 3n).

  1. Spectral correction factors for conventional neutron dosemeters used in high-energy neutron environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K W; Sheu, R J

    2015-04-01

    High-energy neutrons (>10 MeV) contribute substantially to the dose fraction but result in only a small or negligible response in most conventional moderated-type neutron detectors. Neutron dosemeters used for radiation protection purpose are commonly calibrated with (252)Cf neutron sources and are used in various workplace. A workplace-specific correction factor is suggested. In this study, the effect of the neutron spectrum on the accuracy of dose measurements was investigated. A set of neutron spectra representing various neutron environments was selected to study the dose responses of a series of Bonner spheres, including standard and extended-range spheres. By comparing (252)Cf-calibrated dose responses with reference values based on fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients, this paper presents recommendations for neutron field characterisation and appropriate correction factors for responses of conventional neutron dosemeters used in environments with high-energy neutrons. The correction depends on the estimated percentage of high-energy neutrons in the spectrum or the ratio between the measured responses of two Bonner spheres (the 4P6_8 extended-range sphere versus the 6″ standard sphere). © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Spectral correction factors for conventional neutron dosemeters used in high-energy neutron environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.W.; Sheu, R.J.

    2015-01-01

    High-energy neutrons (>10 MeV) contribute substantially to the dose fraction but result in only a small or negligible response in most conventional moderated-type neutron detectors. Neutron dosemeters used for radiation protection purpose are commonly calibrated with 252 Cf neutron sources and are used in various workplace. A workplace-specific correction factor is suggested. In this study, the effect of the neutron spectrum on the accuracy of dose measurements was investigated. A set of neutron spectra representing various neutron environments was selected to study the dose responses of a series of Bonner spheres, including standard and extended-range spheres. By comparing 252 Cf-calibrated dose responses with reference values based on fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients, this paper presents recommendations for neutron field characterisation and appropriate correction factors for responses of conventional neutron dosemeters used in environments with high-energy neutrons. The correction depends on the estimated percentage of high-energy neutrons in the spectrum or the ratio between the measured responses of two Bonner spheres (the 4P6-8 extended-range sphere versus the 6'' standard sphere). (authors)

  3. Time-of-flight neutron rejection to improve prompt gamma imaging for proton range verification : a simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biegun, Aleksandra K.; Seravalli, Enrica; Lopes, Patricia Cambraia; Rinaldi, Ilaria; Pinto, Marco; Oxley, David C.; Dendooven, Peter; Verhaegen, Frank; Parodi, Katia; Crespo, Paulo; Schaart, Dennis R.

    2012-01-01

    Therapeutic proton and heavier ion beams generate prompt gamma photons that may escape from the patient. In principle, this allows for real-time, in situ monitoring of the treatment delivery, in particular, the hadron range within the patient, by imaging the emitted prompt gamma rays. Unfortunately,

  4. Optical model neutron cross sections calculations for Cu63, Cu65 and natural Cu in the energy range 1-15 Mev

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliescu, N.

    1975-01-01

    The theory of optical model and cross sections is developing. The neutron reactions considered in the high energy rate (0,1-15 MeV) were: total, elastic, elastic angular distributions, nonelastic, inelastic for resolved levels. This region was subdivided in two parts: in the first one, ranging from 0,1 to 1 MeV, the evaluation was mainly based on empirical fits of the experimental data, whereas in the second part the fits were carried out with theoretical models: optical and statistical. The potential parameters were obtained fitting the total, elastic, inelastic cross sections and elastic angular distributions. Using Hauser-Feshbach theory, angular distribution and cross sections for compound elastic scattering and inelastic scattering are calculated

  5. Temperature-tuned Maxwell-Boltzmann neutron spectra for kT ranging from 30 up to 50 keV for nuclear astrophysics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Hernández, G; Mastinu, P F; Praena, J; Dzysiuk, N; Capote Noy, R; Pignatari, M

    2012-08-01

    The need of neutron capture cross section measurements for astrophysics motivates present work, where calculations to generate stellar neutron spectra at different temperatures are performed. The accelerator-based (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction is used. Shaping the proton beam energy and the sample covering a specific solid angle, neutron activation for measuring stellar-averaged capture cross section can be done. High-quality Maxwell-Boltzmann neutron spectra are predicted. Assuming a general behavior of the neutron capture cross section a weighted fit of the spectrum to Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions is successfully introduced. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, J.L. Jr.; Shaw, C.B.

    1975-10-21

    A neutron source which is particularly useful for neutron radiography consists of a vessel containing a moderating media of relatively low moderating ratio, a flux trap including a moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio at the center of the vessel, a shell of depleted uranium dioxide surrounding the moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio, a plurality of guide tubes each containing a movable source of neutrons surrounding the flux trap, a neutron shield surrounding one part of each guide tube, and at least one collimator extending from the flux trap to the exterior of the neutron source. The shell of depleted uranium dioxide has a window provided with depleted uranium dioxide shutters for each collimator. Reflectors are provided above and below the flux trap and on the guide tubes away from the flux trap.

  7. Neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cason, J.L. Jr.; Shaw, C.B.

    1975-01-01

    A neutron source which is particularly useful for neutron radiography consists of a vessel containing a moderating media of relatively low moderating ratio, a flux trap including a moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio at the center of the vessel, a shell of depleted uranium dioxide surrounding the moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio, a plurality of guide tubes each containing a movable source of neutrons surrounding the flux trap, a neutron shield surrounding one part of each guide tube, and at least one collimator extending from the flux trap to the exterior of the neutron source. The shell of depleted uranium dioxide has a window provided with depleted uranium dioxide shutters for each collimator. Reflectors are provided above and below the flux trap and on the guide tubes away from the flux trap

  8. Distance-including rigorous upper bounds and tight estimates for two-electron integrals over long- and short-range operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Travis H.; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2017-10-01

    We introduce both rigorous and non-rigorous distance-dependent integral estimates for four-center two-electron integrals derived from a distance-including Schwarz-type inequality. The estimates are even easier to implement than our so far most efficient distance-dependent estimates [S. A. Maurer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 136, 144107 (2012)] and, in addition, do not require well-separated charge-distributions. They are also applicable to a wide range of two-electron operators such as those found in explicitly correlated theories and in short-range hybrid density functionals. For two such operators with exponential distance decay [e-r12 and erfc (0.11 ṡr12 ) /r12], the rigorous bound is shown to be much tighter than the standard Schwarz estimate with virtually no error penalty. The non-rigorous estimate gives results very close to an exact screening for these operators and for the long-range 1/r12 operator, with errors that are completely controllable through the integral screening threshold. In addition, we present an alternative form of our non-rigorous bound that is particularly well-suited for improving the PreLinK method [J. Kussmann and C. Ochsenfeld, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 134114 (2013)] in the context of short-range exchange calculations.

  9. Distance-including rigorous upper bounds and tight estimates for two-electron integrals over long- and short-range operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Travis H; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2017-10-14

    We introduce both rigorous and non-rigorous distance-dependent integral estimates for four-center two-electron integrals derived from a distance-including Schwarz-type inequality. The estimates are even easier to implement than our so far most efficient distance-dependent estimates [S. A. Maurer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 136, 144107 (2012)] and, in addition, do not require well-separated charge-distributions. They are also applicable to a wide range of two-electron operators such as those found in explicitly correlated theories and in short-range hybrid density functionals. For two such operators with exponential distance decay [e -r 12 and erfc(0.11⋅r 12 )/r 12 ], the rigorous bound is shown to be much tighter than the standard Schwarz estimate with virtually no error penalty. The non-rigorous estimate gives results very close to an exact screening for these operators and for the long-range 1/r 12 operator, with errors that are completely controllable through the integral screening threshold. In addition, we present an alternative form of our non-rigorous bound that is particularly well-suited for improving the PreLinK method [J. Kussmann and C. Ochsenfeld, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 134114 (2013)] in the context of short-range exchange calculations.

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of quasielastic neutron scattering from localised and long-range hydrogen motion in C15 Laves phase intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bull, D.J.; Broom, D.P.; Ross, D.K.

    2003-01-01

    A number of cubic C15 Laves phase intermetallic compounds are able to absorb large amounts of hydrogen. At low solute concentrations, the protons occupy tetrahedral interstitial sites, which form a network of hexagons. It is believed that the motion of hydrogen occurs on two distinct time-scales; a rapid localised motion around the hexagons, coupled with a slower long-range diffusion between hexagons. Results from Monte Carlo simulations of hydrogen diffusion in a Laves phase compound are presented. It is demonstrated that the incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering function, obtained from the simulations, can be interpreted in terms of a broad and a narrow Lorentzian component, emanating from hydrogen motion on the two time scales. The narrower component follows a Chudley-Elliot model, indicative of long-range diffusion, whilst the broader component can be interpreted in terms of localised motion. The calculated effective jump length for long-range diffusion is significantly in excess of the actual jump-length, in agreement with experimental observation. The model is briefly discussed in relation to hydrogen diffusion in ZrV 2 H 1.1

  11. Absolute efficiency response curves of a HpGe detector in the 60-1500 keV energy range for an Am-Be neutron induced prompt gamma-ray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turhan, S.; Vural, M.; Cakir, I.T.; Demirel, H.; Demirbas, A.; Yucel, H.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: A 20 Ci 241 Am-Be neutron source has been used in conjunction with a n-type HPGe for prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis of some elements such as boron, carbon, nitrogen, gadolinium, samarium, etc. The characteristic absolute efficiency response curves of the detector for different sample geometries (point, ampoule and tube) in the presence of Li 2 CO 3 powder case and/or cadmium cap, which both have been used to shield detector against neutrons, have been measured in the energy range of 60-1500 keV by using mono-energetic and multi-gamma emitting radionuclide calibrated point and standard ampoule sources. All absolute efficiency measurements were carried out at a source-to-detector distance of 77,5 and 15 cm at which coincidence summing effects are negligible to reduce neutron and gamma-ray background in vicinity of detector used for PGA purposes

  12. Long-Range Order and Critical Scattering of Neutrons below the Transition Temperature in β-Brass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Dietrich, O.W.

    1967-01-01

    The temperature dependence of long-range order langPrang has been determined from the temperature variation of a superlattice Bragg reflection. The results fitted a power law langPrang prop (Tc-T)beta with Tc the critical temperature and beta = 0.305plusmn0.005, in agreement with the theoretical...... prediction 0.303 profiles of the (1, 0, 0) superlattice reflection at 15.5 and 2.2deg below Tc. The ratio between the susceptibilities chi+(DeltaT) and chi-(DeltaT) DeltaT deg below and above Tc was found to be 5.5plusmn2.0 at DeltaT = 4.4deg and 8...

  13. A system for fast neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klann, R.T.

    1996-01-01

    A system has been designed and a neutron generator installed to perform fast neutron radiography. With this sytem, objects as small as a coin or as large as a waste drum can be radiographed. The neutron source is an MF Physics A-711 neutron generator which produces 3x10 10 neutrons/second with an average energy of 14.5 MeV. The radiography system uses x-ray scintillation screens and film in commercially available cassettes. The cassettes have been modified to include a thin sheet of plastic to convert neutrons to protons through elastic scattering from hydrogen and other low Z materials in the plastic. For film densities from 1.8 to 3.0, exposures range from 1.9x10 7 to 3.8x10 8 n/cm 2 depending on the type of screen and film

  14. MAGNETIC NEUTRON SCATTERING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZALIZNYAK, I.A.; LEE, S.H.

    2004-01-01

    , ranging from large-scale structures and dynamics of polymers and biological systems, to electronic properties of today's technological materials. Neutron scattering developed into a vast field, encompassing many different experimental techniques aimed at exploring different aspects of matter's atomic structure and dynamics. Modern magnetic neutron scattering includes several specialized techniques designed for specific studies and/or particular classes of materials. Among these are magnetic reflectometry aimed at investigating surfaces, interfaces, and multilayers, small-angle scattering for the large-scale structures, such as a vortex lattice in a superconductor, and neutron spin-echo spectroscopy for glasses and polymers. Each of these techniques and many others offer exciting opportunities for examining magnetism and warrant extensive reviews, but the aim of this chapter is not to survey how different neutron-scattering methods are used to examine magnetic properties of different materials. Here, we concentrate on reviewing the basics of the magnetic neutron scattering, and on the recent developments in applying one of the oldest methods, the triple axis spectroscopy, that still is among the most extensively used ones. The developments discussed here are new and have not been coherently reviewed. Chapter 2 of this book reviews magnetic small-angle scattering, and modern techniques of neutron magnetic reflectometry are discussed in Chapter 3

  15. MAGNETIC NEUTRON SCATTERING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZALIZNYAK,I.A.; LEE,S.H.

    2004-07-30

    science, ranging from large-scale structures and dynamics of polymers and biological systems, to electronic properties of today's technological materials. Neutron scattering developed into a vast field, encompassing many different experimental techniques aimed at exploring different aspects of matter's atomic structure and dynamics. Modern magnetic neutron scattering includes several specialized techniques designed for specific studies and/or particular classes of materials. Among these are magnetic reflectometry aimed at investigating surfaces, interfaces, and multilayers, small-angle scattering for the large-scale structures, such as a vortex lattice in a superconductor, and neutron spin-echo spectroscopy for glasses and polymers. Each of these techniques and many others offer exciting opportunities for examining magnetism and warrant extensive reviews, but the aim of this chapter is not to survey how different neutron-scattering methods are used to examine magnetic properties of different materials. Here, we concentrate on reviewing the basics of the magnetic neutron scattering, and on the recent developments in applying one of the oldest methods, the triple axis spectroscopy, that still is among the most extensively used ones. The developments discussed here are new and have not been coherently reviewed. Chapter 2 of this book reviews magnetic small-angle scattering, and modern techniques of neutron magnetic reflectometry are discussed in Chapter 3.

  16. Development of temperature related thermal neutron scattering database for MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei Longwei; Cai Xiangzhou; Jiang Dazhen; Chen Jingen; Guo Wei

    2013-01-01

    Based on ENDF/B-Ⅶ neutron library, the thermal neutron scattering library S(α, β) for molten salt reactor moderators was developed. The temperatures of this library were chose as the characteristic temperature of the molten salt reactor. The cross section of the thermal neutron scattering of ACE format was investigated, and this library was also validated by the benchmarks of ICSBEP. The uncertainties shown in the validation were in reasonable range when compared with the thermal neutron scattering library tmccs which included in the MCNP data library. It was proved that the thermal neutron scattering library processed in this study could be used in the molten salt reactor design. (authors)

  17. Neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, M.; Howard, C.J.; Kennedy, S.

    1999-01-01

    Diffraction methods, especially X-ray diffraction, are widely used in materials science. Neutron diffraction is in many ways similar to X-ray diffraction, but is also complementary to the X-ray technique so that in some cases it yields information not accessible using X-rays. Successes of neutron diffraction include the elucidation of the crystal structures of high temperature superconductors and materials that display colossal magnetoresistance, the phase analysis of zirconia engineering ceramics, in depth stress determination in composites, successful determination of the structures of metal hydrides, transition metal polymer complexes and the determination of magnetic structure. A brief description of current studies, using neutron diffraction is given

  18. Neutron physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckurts, K.H.; Wirtz, K.

    1974-01-01

    This textbook consists of four sections which deal with the following subjects: 1. Production of neutrons and their interactions with the nuclei; neutron sources; neutron detectors; cross-section measurements. 2. Theory of neutron interactions with macroscopic media; neutron slowing down; space distribution of moderated neutrons; neutron thermalization; neutron scattering. 3. Radioactive probe measurements of thermal neutron fluxes; activation by means of epithermal neutrons; threshold detectors of fast neutrons; neutron calibration. 4. Neutron energy; slowing down kernels; neutron age; diffusion length and absorption of neutrons

  19. Neutron-induced fission cross sections of 233U and 243Am in the energy range 0.5 Mev En 20 MeV @ n_TOF

    CERN Document Server

    Belloni, F; Milazzo, P M; Calviani, M; Colonna, N; Mastinu, P; Abbondanno, U; Aerts, G; Álvarez, H; Álvarez-Velarde, F; Andriamonje, S; Andrzejewski, J; Assimakopoulos, P; Audouin, L; Badurek, G; Baumann, P; Becvár, F; Berthoumieux, E; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Capote, R; Carrapiço, C; Cennini, P; Chepel, V; Chiaveri, E; Cortes, G; Couture, A; Cox, J; Dahlfors, M; David, S; Dillmann, I; Domingo-Pardo, C; Dridi, W; Duran, I; Eleftheriadis, C; Embid-Segura, M; Ferrant, L; Ferrari, A; Ferreira-Marques, R; Fujii, K; Furman, W; Goncalves, I; González-Romero, E; Gramegna, F; Guerrero, C; Gunsing, F; Haas, B; Haight, R; Heil, M; Herrera-Martinez, A; Igashira, M; Jericha, E; Käppeler, F; Kadi, Y; Karadimos, D; Karamanis, D; Kerveno, M; Koehler, P; Kossionides, E; Krticka, M; Lampoudis, C; Leeb, H; Lindote, A; Lopes, I; Lozano, M; Lukic, S; Marganiec, J; Marrone, S; Martínez, T; Massimi, C; Mengoni, A; Moreau, C; Mosconi, M; Neves, F; Oberhummer, H; O'Brien, S; Pancin, J; Papachristodoulou, C; Papadopoulos, C; Paradela, C; Patronis, N; Pavlik, A; Pavlopoulos, P; Perrot, L; Pigni, M T; Plag, R; Plompen, A; Plukis, A; Poch, A; Praena, J; Pretel, C; Quesada, J; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Rubbia, C; Rudolf, G; Rullhusen, P; Salgado, J; Santos, C; Sarchiapone, L; Savvidis, I; Stephan, C; Tagliente, G; Tain, J L; Tassan-Got, L; Tavora, L; Terlizzi, R; Vannini, G; Vazl, P; Ventura, A; Villamarin, D; Vincente, M C; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Voss, F; Walter, S; Wiescher, M; Wisshak, K

    2011-01-01

    Neutron-induced fission cross-sections of actinides have been recently measured at the neutron time of flight facility n_TOF at CERN in the frame of a research project involving isotopes relevant for nuclear astrophysics and nuclear technologies. Fission fragments are detected by a gas counter with good discrimination between nuclear fission products and background events. Neutron-induced fission cross-sections of 233U and 243Am were determined relative to 235U. The present paper reports the results obtained at neutron energies between 0.5 and 20 MeV.

  20. Status of spallation neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyama, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Existing and planned facilities using proton accelerator driven spallation neutron source are reviewed. These include new project of neutron science proposed from Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The present status of facility requirement and accelerator technology leads us to new era of neutron science such as neutron scattering research and nuclear transmutation study using very intense neutron source. (author)

  1. Nuclear reactor neutron shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speaker, Daniel P; Neeley, Gary W; Inman, James B

    2017-09-12

    A nuclear reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel and a nuclear reactor core comprising fissile material disposed in a lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel. The lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel is disposed in a reactor cavity. An annular neutron stop is located at an elevation above the uppermost elevation of the nuclear reactor core. The annular neutron stop comprises neutron absorbing material filling an annular gap between the reactor pressure vessel and the wall of the reactor cavity. The annular neutron stop may comprise an outer neutron stop ring attached to the wall of the reactor cavity, and an inner neutron stop ring attached to the reactor pressure vessel. An excore instrument guide tube penetrates through the annular neutron stop, and a neutron plug comprising neutron absorbing material is disposed in the tube at the penetration through the neutron stop.

  2. Radiative neutron capture as a counting technique at pulsed spallation neutron sources: a review of current progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schooneveld, E. M.; Pietropaolo, A.; Andreani, C.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Rhodes, N. J.; Senesi, R.; Tardocchi, M.; Gorini, G.

    2016-09-01

    Neutron scattering techniques are attracting an increasing interest from scientists in various research fields, ranging from physics and chemistry to biology and archaeometry. The success of these neutron scattering applications is stimulated by the development of higher performance instrumentation. The development of new techniques and concepts, including radiative capture based neutron detection, is therefore a key issue to be addressed. Radiative capture based neutron detectors utilize the emission of prompt gamma rays after neutron absorption in a suitable isotope and the detection of those gammas by a photon counter. They can be used as simple counters in the thermal region and (simultaneously) as energy selector and counters for neutrons in the eV energy region. Several years of extensive development have made eV neutron spectrometers operating in the so-called resonance detector spectrometer (RDS) configuration outperform their conventional counterparts. In fact, the VESUVIO spectrometer, a flagship instrument at ISIS serving a continuous user programme for eV inelastic neutron spectroscopy measurements, is operating in the RDS configuration since 2007. In this review, we discuss the physical mechanism underlying the RDS configuration and the development of associated instrumentation. A few successful neutron scattering experiments that utilize the radiative capture counting techniques will be presented together with the potential of this technique for thermal neutron diffraction measurements. We also outline possible improvements and future perspectives for radiative capture based neutron detectors in neutron scattering application at pulsed neutron sources.

  3. X-ray and neutron diffraction study of benzoylacetone in the temperature range 8-300 K: comparison with other cis-enol molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbstein; Iversen; Kapon; Larsen; Madsen; Reisner

    1999-10-01

    The crystal structure of benzoylacetone (1-phenyl-1,3-butanedione, C(10)H(10)O(2); P2(1)/c, Z = 4) has been determined at 300, 160 (both Mo Kalpha X-ray diffraction, XRD), 20 (lambda = 1.012 Å neutron diffraction, ND) and 8 K (Ag Kalpha XRD), to which should be added earlier structure determinations at 300 (Mo Kalpha XRD and ND, lambda = 0.983 Å) and 143 K (Mo Kalpha XRD). Cell dimensions have been measured over the temperature range 8-300 K; a first- or second-order phase change does not occur within this range. The atomic displacement parameters have been analyzed using the thermal motion analysis program THMA11. The most marked change in the molecular structure is in the disposition of the methyl group, which has a librational amplitude of approximately 20 degrees at 20 K and is rotationally disordered at 300 K. The lengths of the two C-O bonds in the cis-enol ring do not differ significantly, nor do those of the two C-C bonds, nor do these lengths change between 8 and 300 K. An ND difference synthesis (20 K) shows a single enol hydrogen trough (rather than two half H atoms), approximately centered between the O atoms; analogous results were obtained by XRD (8 K). It is inferred that the enol hydrogen is in a broad, flat-bottomed single-minimum potential well between the O atoms, with a libration amplitude of approximately 0.30 Å at 8 K. These results suggest that at 8 K the cis-enol ring in benzoylacetone has quasi-aromatic character, in agreement with the results of high-level ab initio calculations made for benzoylacetone [Schiøtt et al. (1998). J. Am. Chem. Soc. 120, 12117-12124]. Application [in a related paper by Madsen et al. (1998). J. Am. Chem. Soc. 120, 10040-10045] of multipolar analysis and topological methods to the charge density obtained from the combined lowest temperature X-ray and neutron data provides evidence for an intramolecular hydrogen bond with partly electrostatic and partly covalent character, and large p-delocalization in the cis

  4. Calibration issues for neutron diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadler, G.J.; Adams, J.M.; Barnes, C.W.

    1997-10-01

    In order for ITER to meet its operational and programmatic goals, it will be necessary to measure a wide range of plasma parameters. Some of the required parameters e.g., neutron yield, fusion power and power density, ion temperature profile in the core plasma, and characteristics of confined and escaping alpha particle populations are best measured by fusion product diagnostic techniques. To make these measurements, ITER will have dedicated diagnostic systems, including radial and vertical neutron cameras, neutron and gamma ray spectrometers, internal and external fission chambers, a neutron activation system, and diagnostics for confined and escaping alpha particles. Engineering integration of many of these systems is in progress, and other systems are under investigation. This paper summarizes the present state of design of fusion product diagnostic systems for ITER and discusses expected measurement capability

  5. Accurate Bond Lengths to Hydrogen Atoms from Single-Crystal X-ray Diffraction by Including Estimated Hydrogen ADPs and Comparison to Neutron and QM/MM Benchmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Birger; Lübben, Jens; Mebs, Stefan; Wagner, Armin; Luger, Peter; Flaig, Ralf

    2017-04-03

    Amino acid structures are an ideal test set for method-development studies in crystallography. High-resolution X-ray diffraction data for eight previously studied genetically encoding amino acids are provided, complemented by a non-standard amino acid. Structures were re-investigated to study a widely applicable treatment that permits accurate X-H bond lengths to hydrogen atoms to be obtained: this treatment combines refinement of positional hydrogen-atom parameters with aspherical scattering factors with constrained "TLS+INV" estimated hydrogen anisotropic displacement parameters (H-ADPs). Tabulated invariom scattering factors allow rapid modeling without further computations, and unconstrained Hirshfeld atom refinement provides a computationally demanding alternative when database entries are missing. Both should incorporate estimated H-ADPs, as free refinement frequently leads to over-parameterization and non-positive definite H-ADPs irrespective of the aspherical scattering model used. Using estimated H-ADPs, both methods yield accurate and precise X-H distances in best quantitative agreement with neutron diffraction data (available for five of the test-set molecules). This work thus solves the last remaining problem to obtain such results more frequently. Density functional theoretical QM/MM computations are able to play the role of an alternative benchmark to neutron diffraction. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Shaft cryostat on the basis of a closed-circuit refrigerator for neutron powder diffraction studies in the temperature range 6-300 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernikov, A.N.; Zhuravlev, V.V.; Ul'yanov, V.A.; Trunov, V.A.; Bulkin, A.P.; Kolkhidashvili, M.R.

    2005-01-01

    A description of a cryostat on the basis of the closed cycle refrigerator CoolPower 5/100T for operation in the temperature range 6.2-300 K is presented. The cryostat is intended for a sample up to 18 mm in diameter and up to 100 mm of length. The reload of the sample placed into the ampoule, which is made of TiZr alloy, is performed at any temperature of the refrigerator with the help of an insert. Thermal connection between the sample and the heat exchanger of the refrigerator second step is performed with the help of heat exchange gas helium-4. The minimal temperature of the sample is 6.2 K at the accuracy of the temperature stabilization of the sample 0.1 K. Measurement and temperature stabilization is performed by a controller connected with a computer. Dependences of temperature measurements on time at cooling and heating are presented. The shaft cryostat was developed to carry out the experiments on neutron diffraction from powder samples

  7. A combined neutron and x-ray diffraction study of short- and intermediate-range structural characteristics of Ge-As sulfide glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzun, S Soyer; Sen, S; Benmore, C J; Aitken, B G

    2008-01-01

    A combination of neutron and x-ray diffraction has been employed to study the compositional dependence of the atomic structures of Ge x As x S 100-2x glasses with S concentration varying between 33.3 and 70.0 at.%. The nearest-neighbor coordination numbers of Ge and As atoms are always found to be 4 and 3, respectively, irrespective of the glass composition. Ge and As atoms have primarily heteropolar bonding to S atoms in stoichiometric and S-excess glasses with x≤18.2. Low and intermediate levels of deficiency of S (20≤x≤25) are accommodated via the formation of homopolar As-As bonds while Ge atoms remain primarily bonded to four S atoms, resulting in As-rich regions in the glass structure. Ge starts to participate in metal-metal bonding only in the highly S-deficient glasses with 27.5≤x≤33.3. The intermediate-range order and its topological influence on atomic packing in these three compositional regions, in the order of increasing deficiency in S, are controlled by (a) a mixed GeS 2 and As 2 S 3 network, (b) the coexistence of a GeS 2 network and As clusters, and (c) large Ge-As metal-rich regions. This evolution of the intermediate-range structure with composition is consistent with the corresponding variation of the position, intensity and width of the first sharp diffraction peak in the structure factor

  8. Radiochemical study of 45Sc(n,p)45Ca and 89Y(n,p)89Sr reactions in the neutron energy range of 13.9 to 14.7 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molla, N.I.; Basunia, S.; Miah, M.R.; Hossain, S.M.; Rahman, M.M.; Spellerberg, S.; Qaim, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    Cross sections for 45 Sc(n,p) 45 Ca and 89 Y(n,p) 89 Sr reactions were measured using the activation technique. Monoenergetic neutrons in the energy range of 13.9 to 14.7 MeV were produced using a D-T neutron generator. The purely β - emitting products 45 Ca and 89 Sr were separated radiochemically; their radioactivity was assayed via low-level β - counting. The measured data complement the available published experimental information, and agree with the results of statistical model calculations. (orig.)

  9. Absolute measurement of the cross sections of neutron radiative capture for 23Na, Cr, 55Mn, Fe, Ni, 103Rh, Ta, 197Au and 238U in the 10-600keV energy range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Rigoleur, Claude; Arnaud, Andre; Taste, Jean.

    1976-10-01

    The total energy weighting technique has been applied to measuring absolute neutron capture cross sections for 23 Na, Cr, 55 Mn, Fe, Ni, 103 Rh, Ta, 197 Au, 238 U in the 10-600keV energy range. A non hydrogeneous liquid scintillator was used to detect the gamma from the cascade. The neutron flux was measured with a 10 B INa(Tl) detector or a 6 Li glass scintillator of well known efficiency. The fast time-of-flight technique was used with on line digital computer data processing [fr

  10. Neutrons and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulus, W.; Meinnel, J.

    2003-01-01

    The neutron is the only probe that gives information simultaneously on structure issues through interference phenomena and on dynamics issues through spectroscopy. The neutron carries a s=1/2 spin value which allows it to be polarizable and to interact with any magnetic field through the magnetic momentum associated to its spin. The great interest of neutron in research relies on 3 facts: -) the neutron fluxes used to study matter are supplied by nuclear reactors and spallation sources with wave lengths and energy range that directly correspond to interatomic distances and thermal-motion energies of matter, -) the possibility of setting or changing the contrast of an element by using its different isotopes, and -) the neutron does not carry an electrical charge so it can enter the bulk of matter easily and gives an image of stress and patterns of large pieces of metal through a non-destructive examination. This course reviews all the aspects of the use of neutron in physics and is made up of 16 chapters: 1) properties of neutrons, 2) neutron production, 3) complementarity between X-ray and neutrons, 4) neutron diffraction, 5) neutron diffusion, 6) neutron spectroscopy, 7) crystallography, 8) imaging techniques with neutrons, 9) neutron activation analysis, 10) low-angle diffusion, 11) neutron reflectivity, 12) non-destructive testing, 13) microstructure and diffraction rays of X-radiation, 14) access to neutron source facilities, 15) composites materials and neutron diffusion, and 16) studies of liquids and glasses through neutron and X-ray diffraction. (A.C.)

  11. Neutron Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayer, Michael J.; Gee, Glendon W.

    2005-01-01

    The neutron probe is a standard tool for measuring soil water content. This article provides an overview of the underlying theory, describes the methodology for its calibration and use, discusses example applications, and identifies the safety issues. Soil water makes land-based life possible by satisfying plant water requirements, serving as a medium for nutrient movement to plant roots and nutrient cycling, and controlling the fate and transport of contaminants in the soil environment. Therefore, a successful understanding of the dynamics of plant growth, nutrient cycling, and contaminant behavior in the soil requires knowledge of the soil water content as well as its spatial and temporal variability. After more than 50 years, neutron probes remain the most reliable tool available for field monitoring of soil water content. Neutron probes provide integrated measurements over relatively large volumes of soil and, with proper access, allow for repeated sampling of the subsurface at the same locations. The limitations of neutron probes include costly and time-consuming manual operation, lack of data automation, and costly regulatory requirements. As more non-radioactive systems for soil water monitoring are developed to provide automated profiling capabilities, neutron-probe usage will likely decrease. Until then, neutron probes will continue to be a standard for reliable measurements of field water contents in soils around the globe

  12. Characterization of the new neutron imaging and materials science facility IMAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minniti, Triestino; Watanabe, Kenichi; Burca, Genoveva; Pooley, Daniel E.; Kockelmann, Winfried

    2018-04-01

    IMAT is a new cold neutron imaging and diffraction instrument located at the second target station of the pulsed neutron spallation source ISIS, UK. A broad range of materials science and materials testing areas will be covered by IMAT. We present the characterization of the imaging part, including the energy-selective and energy-dispersive imaging options, and provide the basic parameters of the radiography and tomography instrument. In particular, detailed studies on mono and bi-dimensional neutron beam flux profiles, neutron flux as a function of the neutron wavelength, spatial and energy dependent neutron beam uniformities, guide artifacts, divergence and spatial resolution, and neutron pulse widths are provided. An accurate characterization of the neutron beam at the sample position, located 56 m from the source, is required to optimize collection of radiographic and tomographic data sets and for performing energy-dispersive neutron imaging via time-of-flight methods in particular.

  13. Measurement of neutron activation cross sections in the energy range between 2 and 7 MeV by using a Ti-deuteron target and a deuteron gas target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senga, T.; Sakane, H.; Shibata, M.; Yamamoto, H.; Kawade, K. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Kasugai, Yoshimi; Ikeda, Yujiro; Takeuchi, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-03-01

    Using a Ti-deuteron target in the neutron energy range between 2 and 4.5 MeV and a deuteron gas target between 4.5 and 7 MeV, mono-energetic neutrons could be generated enough for activation cross section measurements. The KN-3750 Van de Grraff accelerator at Nagoya University and the Fusion Neutronics Source (FNS) at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) were used. Preliminary results of activation cross sections were obtained for reactions of {sup 27}Al(n,p){sup 27}Mg, {sup 47}Ti(n,p){sup 47}Sc, {sup 58}Ni(n,p){sup 58}Co. The evaluation data of JENDL-3.2 showed reasonable agreement with our results. (author)

  14. Neutron Imaging at LANSCE—From Cold to Ultrafast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald O. Nelson

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, neutron radiography and tomography have been applied at different beam lines at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE, covering a very wide neutron energy range. The field of energy-resolved neutron imaging with epi-thermal neutrons, utilizing neutron absorption resonances for contrast as well as quantitative density measurements, was pioneered at the Target 1 (Lujan center, Flight Path 5 beam line and continues to be refined. Applications include: imaging of metallic and ceramic nuclear fuels, fission gas measurements, tomography of fossils and studies of dopants in scintillators. The technique provides the ability to characterize materials opaque to thermal neutrons and to utilize neutron resonance analysis codes to quantify isotopes to within 0.1 atom %. The latter also allows measuring fuel enrichment levels or the pressure of fission gas remotely. More recently, the cold neutron spectrum at the ASTERIX beam line, also located at Target 1, was used to demonstrate phase contrast imaging with pulsed neutrons. This extends the capabilities for imaging of thin and transparent materials at LANSCE. In contrast, high-energy neutron imaging at LANSCE, using unmoderated fast spallation neutrons from Target 4 [Weapons Neutron Research (WNR facility] has been developed for applications in imaging of dense, thick objects. Using fast (ns, time-of-flight imaging, enables testing and developing imaging at specific, selected MeV neutron energies. The 4FP-60R beam line has been reconfigured with increased shielding and new, larger collimation dedicated to fast neutron imaging. The exploration of ways in which pulsed neutron beams and the time-of-flight method can provide additional benefits is continuing. We will describe the facilities and instruments, present application examples and recent results of all these efforts at LANSCE.

  15. Electromagnetic neutron-atom interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, V.F.

    1986-01-01

    In the collision of a neutron with an atom there exists, in addition to the strong interaction with the nucleus and the magnetic dipole interaction with the magnetic electrons, a number of secondary electromagnetic interactions. The latter interactions include the spin-orbit (or Schwinger) interaction, the Foldy interaction, the nuclear magnetic dipole interaction, and interactions arising from the electric polarizability and the finite intrinsic charge radius of the neutron. We present in this paper a comprehensive review of the electromagnetic neutron-atom interactions with particular emphasis on the question of the extent to which the secondary interactions are already included implicitly in the scattering lengths obtained from accurate neutron optical measurements, which one finds listed in data tables, and the conditions under which explicit corrections for the residual secondary interactions are required in the analysis of neutron diffraction and inelastic scattering data for condensed matter. The main conclusion is that, except for the lightest atoms, the current habit of neglecting the secondary interactions can lead to significant systematic errors of up to 2 to 3% in neutron scattering experiments which extend over a wide range of momentum transfers. (orig.)

  16. Measurements of the thermal neutron flux for an accelerator-based photoneutron source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Ali; Pazirandeh, Ali

    2016-12-01

    To have access to an appropriate neutron source is one of the most demanding requirements for neutron studies. This is important specially in laboratory and clinical applications, which need more compact and accessible sources. The most known neutron sources are fission reactors and natural isotopes, but there is an increasing interest for using accelerator based neutron sources because of their advantages. In this paper, we shall present a photo-neutron source prototype which is designed and fabricated to be used for different neutron researches including in-laboratory neutron activation analysis and neutron imaging, and also preliminary studies in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Series of experimental tests were conducted to examine the intensity and quality of the neutron field produced by this source. Monte-Carlo simulations were also utilized to provide more detailed evaluation of the neutron spectrum, and determine the accuracy of the experiments. The experiments demonstrated a thermal neutron flux in the order of 10 7 (n/cm 2 .s), while simulations affirmed this flux and showed a neutron spectrum with a sharp peak at thermal energy region. According to the results, about 60 % of produced neutrons are in the range of thermal to epithermal neutrons.

  17. Neutron absorbing article

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naum, R.G.; Owens, D.P.; Dooher, G.I.

    1979-01-01

    A neutron absorbing article, in flat plate form and suitable for use in a storage rack for spent fuel, includes boron carbide particles, diluent particles and a solid, irreversibly cured phenolic polymer cured to a continuous matrix binding the boron carbide and diluent particles. The total conent of boron carbide and diluent particles is a major proportion of the article and the content of cured phenolic polymer present is a minor proportion. By regulation of the ratio of boron carbide particles to diluent particles, normally within the range of 1:9 and 9:1 and preferably within the range of 1:5 to 5:1, the neutron absorbing activity of the product may be controlled, which facilitates the manufacture of articles of particular absorbing activities best suitable for specific applications

  18. Neutronic reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carleton, J.T.

    1977-01-01

    A graphite-moderated nuclear reactor includes channels between blocks of graphite and also includes spacer blocks between adjacent channeled blocks with an axis of extension normal to that of the axis of elongation of the channeled blocks to minimize changes in the physical properties of the graphite as a result of prolonged neutron bombardment. 3 claims, 6 figures

  19. Eighth International Conference on Neutron Scattering ICNS2005. Final Programme and Abstract Book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Full text: This conference encompassed a very wide range of neutron-related research. Topics addressed ranged from almost all applications of neutron scattering and diffraction like discovering magnetic ordering, magnetic properties and structural analysis, negative thermal expansion, spin states, proton dynamics, crystal structure, phase transitions and phase morphology, neutron spin echo to neutron powder diffraction studies and new generation neutron analysis methods as well as x-ray reflectivity versus neutron reflectivity, neutron resonance, cold and thermal neutron studies and spectrometers. Areas of research covered bacteria, DNA, drugs targeting, enzyme arrangement, structure of cholesterol, lung surfactant action, nanocapsules, disease, muscles, lipids, liquids, crystals, industrial gauges, metals, rare earths, shielding and geopolymers. Not all abstracts are included in this input; there exists an emphasis on Australian contributions and those from ANSTO

  20. Neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elcomb, M.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Thermal neutrons have a particular combination of properties, which make them the probe of choice for a wide range of scattering applications. They penetrate most materials easily, the wavelength matches interatomic spacings, the energy matches the atomic vibrational energies and the magnetic moment allows them to uniquely interact with magnetic structures. Their widely varying scattering length is also used to advantage. It enables the determination of light atoms in the presence of heavy ones: hydrogen in organic molecules, and oxygen in the high Tc superconductors for example, or solving problems in alloy systems where distinction of atoms, which are neighbours in the periodic table, is required. In the 50 years since thermal neutron beams have been used for research there has been a steady increase in applications as technology has advanced. This also applies to the environments in which the materials are studied. In-situ studies at other than ambient temperatures, pressures and magnetic fields are now routine. By using multiple detector channels in powder instruments the data collection rate has increased by an order of magnitude to some extent compensating for the diffuse nature of the neutron source. The applications of neutron scattering are becoming more industrially oriented. The talk will highlight the complementarity of neutrons to other more readily available techniques, and give examples of recent research and applications. Copyright (2002) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  1. Real-time thermal neutron radiographic detection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, H.; Bracher, D.A.

    1976-01-01

    Systems for real-time detection of thermal neutron images are reviewed. Characteristics of one system are presented; the data include contrast, resolution and speed of response over the thermal neutron intensity range 2.5 10 3 n/cm 2 -sec to 10 7 n/cm 2 -sec

  2. neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    Neutron radiography (or radiology) is a diverse filed that uses neutrons of various energies, subthermal, thermal, epithermal or fast in either steady state or pulsed mode to examine objects for industrial, medical, or other purposes, both microscopic and macroscopic. The applications include engineering design, biological studies, nondestructive inspection and materials evaluation. In the past decade, over 100 different centers in some 30 countries have published reports of pioneering activities using reactors, accelerators and isotopic neutron sources. While film transparency and electronic video are most common imaging methods for static or in motion objects respectively, there are other important data gathering techniques, including track etch, digital gauging and computed tomography. A survey of the world-wide progress shows the field to be gaining steadily in its diversity, its sophistication and its importance. (author)

  3. Grazing Incidence Neutron Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubarev, Mikhail V. (Inventor); Ramsey, Brian D. (Inventor); Engelhaupt, Darell E. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Neutron optics based on the two-reflection geometries are capable of controlling beams of long wavelength neutrons with low angular divergence. The preferred mirror fabrication technique is a replication process with electroform nickel replication process being preferable. In the preliminary demonstration test an electroform nickel optics gave the neutron current density gain at the focal spot of the mirror at least 8 for neutron wavelengths in the range from 6 to 20.ANG.. The replication techniques can be also be used to fabricate neutron beam controlling guides.

  4. Licensing process of the digital application: Nuclear measurement analysis and control power range neutron monitor (NUMAC-PRNM) system for their implementation in the Laguna Verde NPP unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledesma-Carrion, R.; Hernandez-Cortes, A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describe the licensing process performed by the Mexican Regulatory Commission (CNSNS) for the NUclear Measurement Analysis and Control-Power Range Neutron Monitor (NUMAC-PRNM) system, which sends trip signals to the Reactor Protection System (RPS), and has been implemented in the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant Unit (LVNPP-U2) before its first fuel loading. The review and approval process was performed with the advise role of the United States of America Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC): the regulatory frame applied includes the Code of Federal Regulation, some Regulatory Guides and some Industrial Standards. The evaluation covered topics related with the software, hardware and firmware specifications, design, tests, training, maintenance and operational experience. After the revision of these topics, the NUMAC-PRNM was approved through the CNSNS Safety Evaluation Report (SER) and then installed in the LVNPP-U2. This paper include a description of the regulatory requirements to this digital application, the safety concerns involved, the compliance to these requirements by the utility and the results of the CNSNS evaluation, mentioning the experience acquired during the process and the method used to perform the evaluation. Additionally, the interface between the designer-vendor, the utility and the regulatory body during the licensing process is commented. Finally, the conclusion is presented, taking into account the operational experience of the NUMAC applications implemented in the LVNPP. It also gives the future regulatory tasks related to the assessment of digital performance equipment and upgrades. (author)

  5. Neutron cross sections: Book of curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLane, V.; Dunford, C.L.; Rose, P.F.

    1988-01-01

    Neuton Cross Sections: Book of Curves represents the fourth edition of what was previously known as BNL-325, Neutron Cross Sections, Volume 2, CURVES. Data is presented only for (i.e., intergrated) reaction cross sections (and related fission parameters) as a function of incident-neutron energy for the energy range 0.01 eV to 200 MeV. For the first time, isometric state production cross sections have been included. 11 refs., 4 figs

  6. Characterization of the PTW 34031 ionization chamber (PMI) at RCNP with high energy neutrons ranging from 100 - 392 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theis, C.; Carbonez, P.; Feldbaumer, E.; Forkel-Wirth, D.; Jaegerhofer, L.; Pangallo, M.; Perrin, D.; Urscheler, C.; Roesler, S.; Vincke, H.; Widorski, M.; Iwamoto, Y.; Hagiwara, M.; Satoh, D.; Iwase, H.; Yashima, H.; Matsumoto, T.; Masuda, A.; Nishiyama, J.; Harano, H.; Itoga, T.; Nakamura, T.; Sato, T.; Nakane, Y.; Nakashima, H.; Sakamoto, Y.; Taniguchi, S.; Nakao, N.; Tamii, A.; Shima, T.; Hatanaka, K.

    2017-09-01

    Radiation monitoring at high energy proton accelerators poses a considerable challenge due to the complexity of the encountered stray radiation fields. These environments comprise a wide variety of different particle types and span from fractions of electron-volts up to several terra electron-volts. As a consequence the use of Monte Carlo simulation programs like FLUKA is indispensable to obtain appropriate field-specific calibration factors. At many locations of the LHC a large contribution to the particle fluence is expected to originate from high-energy neutrons and thus, benchmark experiments with mono-energetic neutron beams are of high importance to verify the aforementioned detector response calculations. This paper summarizes the results of a series of benchmark experiments with quasi mono-energetic neutrons of 100, 140, 200, 250 and 392 MeV that have been carried out at RCNP - Osaka University, during several campaigns between 2006 and 2014.

  7. Characterization of the PTW 34031 ionization chamber (PMI at RCNP with high energy neutrons ranging from 100 – 392 MeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theis C.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation monitoring at high energy proton accelerators poses a considerable challenge due to the complexity of the encountered stray radiation fields. These environments comprise a wide variety of different particle types and span from fractions of electron-volts up to several terra electron-volts. As a consequence the use of Monte Carlo simulation programs like FLUKA is indispensable to obtain appropriate field-specific calibration factors. At many locations of the LHC a large contribution to the particle fluence is expected to originate from high-energy neutrons and thus, benchmark experiments with mono-energetic neutron beams are of high importance to verify the aforementioned detector response calculations. This paper summarizes the results of a series of benchmark experiments with quasi mono-energetic neutrons of 100, 140, 200, 250 and 392 MeV that have been carried out at RCNP - Osaka University, during several campaigns between 2006 and 2014.

  8. Fission neutron spectra measurements at LANSCE - status and plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haight, Robert C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Noda, Shusaku [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nelson, Ronald O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Donnell, John M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Devlin, Matt [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chatillon, Audrey [CEA-FRANCE; Granier, Thierry [CEA-FRANCE; Taieb, Julien [CEA-FRANCE; Laurent, Benoit [CEA-FRANCE; Belier, Gilbert [CEA-FRANCE; Becker, John A [LLNL; Wu, Ching - Yen [LLNL

    2009-01-01

    A program to measure fission neutron spectra from neutron-induced fission of actinides is underway at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in a collaboration among the CEA laboratory at Bruyeres-le-Chatel, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The spallation source of fast neutrons at LANSCE is used to provide incident neutron energies from less than 1 MeV to 100 MeV or higher. The fission events take place in a gas-ionization fission chamber, and the time of flight from the neutron source to that chamber gives the energy of the incident neutron. Outgoing neutrons are detected by an array of organic liquid scintillator neutron detectors, and their energies are deduced from the time of flight from the fission chamber to the neutron detector. Measurements have been made of the fission neutrons from fission of {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu. The range of outgoing energies measured so far is from 1 MeV to approximately 8 MeV. These partial spectra and average fission neutron energies are compared with evaluated data and with models of fission neutron emission. Results to date will be presented and a discussion of uncertainties will be given in this presentation. Future plans are to make significant improvements in the fission chambers, neutron detectors, signal processing, data acquisition and the experimental environment to provide high fidelity data including mea urements of fission neutrons below 1 MeV and improvements in the data above 8 MeV.

  9. Schottky mass measurements of heavy neutron-rich nuclides in the element range $70\\leq Z\\leq 79$ at the ESR

    CERN Document Server

    Shubina, D; Litvinov, Yu A; Blaum, K; Brandau, C; Bosch, F; Carroll, J J; Casten, R F; Cullen, D M; Cullen, I J; Deo, A Y; Detwiler, B; Dimopoulou, C; Farinon, F; Geissel, H; Haettner, E; Heil, M; Kempley, R S; Kozhuharov, C; Knobel, R; Kurcewicz, J; Kuzminchuk, N; Litvinov, S A; Liu, Z; Mao, R; Nociforo, C; Nolden, F; Patyk, Z; Plass, W R; Prochazka, A; Reed, M W; Sanjari, M S; Scheidenberger, C; Steck, M; Stohlker, Th; Sun, B; Swan, T P D; Trees, G; Walker, P M; Weick, H; Winckler, N; Winkler, M; Woods, P J; Yamaguchi, T; Zhou, C

    2013-01-01

    Storage-ring mass spectrometry was applied to neutron-rich $^{197}$Au projectile fragments. Masses of $^{181,183}$Lu, $^{185,186}$Hf, $^{187,188}$Ta, $^{191}$W, and $^{192,193}$Re nuclei were measured for the first time. The uncertainty of previously known masses of $^{189,190}$W and $^{195}$Os nuclei was improved. Observed irregularities on the smooth two-neutron separation energies for Hf and W isotopes are linked to the collectivity phenomena in the corresponding nuclei.

  10. Neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, C.J.; Kennedy, S.J.

    1994-01-01

    A brief account is given of neutron diffraction techniques. Similarities and differences compared with the more familiar X-ray counterparts are discussed. In certain applications, neutron diffraction can be used to obtain information about materials which would be difficult or even impossible to obtain using other techniques. One spectacular success has been the elucidation, from neutron powder diffraction, of the crystal structures of high critical temperature oxide superconductors. There have been substantial contributions in other fields, and these are illustrated by Australian work. The ability of the neutron to penetrate deeply into most materials has been invoked for in-depth determination of stresses in composites and of phase composition in zirconia ceramics. The unique properties of the neutron have been successfully exploited in studies of metal hydrides, to determine where hydrogen is located, and in magnetic structure determination. There is much interest in studying materials under different conditions of temperature and pressure, and kinetic studies under such conditions are now becoming possible. The article includes information on the principles, the instrumentation with particular reference to the instruments installed around the HIFAR reactor at Lucas Heights, and methods for the interpretation of data. 59 refs., 3 tabs., 16 figs

  11. Neutron stochastic transport theory with delayed neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz-Cobo, J.L.; Verdu, G.

    1987-01-01

    From the stochastic transport theory with delayed neutrons, the Boltzmann transport equation with delayed neutrons for the average flux emerges in a natural way without recourse to any approximation. From this theory a general expression is obtained for the Feynman Y-function when delayed neutrons are included. The single mode approximation for the particular case of a subcritical assembly is developed, and it is shown that Y-function reduces to the familiar expression quoted in many books, when delayed neutrons are not considered, and spatial and source effects are not included. (author)

  12. Neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugliesi, R.; Freitas, A.G. de; Gammal, A.; Rizzatti, M.R.; Vercelli, P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective was to demonstrate the main characteristics of the neutron radiography technique, which has been developed in the Nuclear Physics Department of the IPEN-CNEN-SP. Its employment, in technology varies enormously and includes among others, the inspection of the hydrogen-rich substances, highly radioactive materials, etc. The indirect conversion method with Dysprosium screen was employed. The experimental arrangement used was a neutron collimator installed in the bottom of the IEA-R1 Nuclear Research Reactor pool. Several samples were analysed which were exposed in a neutron flux ∼ 10 7 n/s.cm 2 during 10 minutes. The obtained results confirm the main characteristics of this technique as well as its viability to be developed in this reactor. (author)

  13. Apple latent spherical virus vectors for reliable and effective virus-induced gene silencing among a broad range of plants including tobacco, tomato, Arabidopsis thaliana, cucurbits, and legumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Aki; Yamagata, Kousuke; Sugai, Tomokazu; Takahashi, Yukari; Sugawara, Emiko; Tamura, Akihiro; Yaegashi, Hajime; Yamagishi, Noriko; Takahashi, Tsubasa; Isogai, Masamichi; Takahashi, Hideki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2009-01-01

    Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) vectors were evaluated for virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of endogenous genes among a broad range of plant species. ALSV vectors carrying partial sequences of a subunit of magnesium chelatase (SU) and phytoene desaturase (PDS) genes induced highly uniform knockout phenotypes typical of SU and PDS inhibition on model plants such as tobacco and Arabidopsis thaliana, and economically important crops such as tomato, legume, and cucurbit species. The silencing phenotypes persisted throughout plant growth in these plants. In addition, ALSV vectors could be successfully used to silence a meristem gene, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and disease resistant N gene in tobacco and RCY1 gene in A. thaliana. As ALSV infects most host plants symptomlessly and effectively induces stable VIGS for long periods, the ALSV vector is a valuable tool to determine the functions of interested genes among a broad range of plant species.

  14. Observation of long-range ferromagnetic order in the heavy-fermion compuound URu/sub 1. 2/Re/sub 0. 8/Si/sub 2/ by neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torikachvili, M.S.; Rebelsky, L.; Motoya, K.; Shapiro, S.M.; Dalichaouch, Y.; Maple, M.B.

    1989-01-01

    We have performed a neutron scattering study of the heavy-fermion compound URu/sub 1.2/Re/sub 0.8/Si/sub 2/, in order to verify the occurrence of long-range ferromagnetic order. This study consisted of measurements of elastic, inelastic, and polarized neutron scattering, measurement of low-angle critical scattering, and the determination of the temperature dependence of the order parameter. We found a sharp peak in the critical scattering at /approx/ 30 K for the wavevector q = 0.08 /angstrom//sup /minus/1/; and an enhancement of the intensity at the position of the (101) nuclear Bragg reflection below the Curie temperature. These measurements suggest the occurrence of long-range magnetic order. The value of the ordered moment is estimated to be /approx/ 0.53 /mu//sub B/ at 10 K. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Concentration fluctuations in solutions of potassium in potassium bromide. A neutron small-angle scattering investigation in the electrolyte-to-metal transition range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jal, J.F.; Chieux, P.; Dupuy, J.

    1978-01-01

    The correlation lengths for concentration fluctuations have been investigated by small-angle neutron scattering as a function of temperature and concentration for the solutions of potassium in potassium bromide. The fluctuations were found to be essentially located above the liquid miscibility gap. The temperature dependence of the fluctuations on the liquid-liquid critical isochore gives lattice-gas-type critical indices. (Auth.)

  16. Au, Bi, Co and Nb cross-section measured by quasimonoenergetic neutrons from p + Li-7 reaction in the energy range of 18-36 MeV

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Majerle, Mitja; Bém, Pavel; Novák, Jan; Šimečková, Eva; Štefánik, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 953, SEP (2016), s. 139-157 ISSN 0375-9474 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Quasi-monoenergetic neutron * cross-section Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.916, year: 2016

  17. Measurement of the ratio of charged current neutrino cross-sections on neutrons and protons in the energy range 1-10GeV. (Gargamelle neutrino propane experiment)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerche, W.; Pohl, M.; Schultze, K.

    1978-04-01

    The charged current cross-section R=sigma(ν+n)/sigma(ν+p), averaged over the energy range 1-10 GeV, is determined by two independent methods. The combined value is R=2.08+-0.15. Semi-inclusive proton production rates on both proton and neutron targets are presented. Event rates of exclusive channels on proton target are also given

  18. Intercomparison of high energy neutron personnel dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, J.C.; Akabani, G.; Loesch, R.M.

    1993-03-01

    An intercomparison of high-energy neutron personnel dosimeters was performed to evaluate the uniformity of the response characteristics of typical neutron dosimeters presently in use at US Department of Energy (DOE) accelerator facilities. It was necessary to perform an intercomparison because there are no national or international standards for high-energy neutron dosimetry. The testing that is presently under way for the Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) is limited to the use of neutron sources that range in energy from about 1 keV to 2 MeV. Therefore, the high-energy neutron dosimeters presently in use at DOE accelerator facilities are not being tested effectively. This intercomparison employed neutrons produced by the 9 Be(p,n) 9 B interaction at the University of Washington cyclotron, using 50-MeV protons. The resulting neutron energy spectrum extended to a maximum of approximately 50-MeV, with a mean energy of about 20-MeV. Intercomparison results for currently used dosimeters, including Nuclear Type A (NTA) film, thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD)-albedo, and track-etch dosimeters (TEDs), indicated a wide variation in response to identical doses of high-energy neutrons. Results of this study will be discussed along with a description of plans for future work

  19. Methods of neutron spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerschel, B.

    1981-01-01

    The different methods of neutron spectrometry are based on the direct measurement of neutron velocity or on the use of suitable energy-dependent interaction processes. In the latter case the measuring effect of a detector is connected with the searched neutron spectrum by an integral equation. The solution needs suitable unfolding procedures. The most important methods of neutron spectrometry are the time-of-flight method, the crystal spectrometry, the neutron spectrometry by use of elastic collisions with hydrogen nuclei, and neutron spectrometry with the aid of nuclear reactions, especially of the neutron-induced activation. The advantages and disadvantages of these methods are contrasted considering the resolution, the measurable energy range, the sensitivity, and the experimental and computational efforts. (author)

  20. Intense fusion neutron sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuteev, B. V.; Goncharov, P. R.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Khripunov, V. I.

    2010-04-01

    The review describes physical principles underlying efficient production of free neutrons, up-to-date possibilities and prospects of creating fission and fusion neutron sources with intensities of 1015-1021 neutrons/s, and schemes of production and application of neutrons in fusion-fission hybrid systems. The physical processes and parameters of high-temperature plasmas are considered at which optimal conditions for producing the largest number of fusion neutrons in systems with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement are achieved. The proposed plasma methods for neutron production are compared with other methods based on fusion reactions in nonplasma media, fission reactions, spallation, and muon catalysis. At present, intense neutron fluxes are mainly used in nanotechnology, biotechnology, material science, and military and fundamental research. In the near future (10-20 years), it will be possible to apply high-power neutron sources in fusion-fission hybrid systems for producing hydrogen, electric power, and technological heat, as well as for manufacturing synthetic nuclear fuel and closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Neutron sources with intensities approaching 1020 neutrons/s may radically change the structure of power industry and considerably influence the fundamental and applied science and innovation technologies. Along with utilizing the energy produced in fusion reactions, the achievement of such high neutron intensities may stimulate wide application of subcritical fast nuclear reactors controlled by neutron sources. Superpower neutron sources will allow one to solve many problems of neutron diagnostics, monitor nano-and biological objects, and carry out radiation testing and modification of volumetric properties of materials at the industrial level. Such sources will considerably (up to 100 times) improve the accuracy of neutron physics experiments and will provide a better understanding of the structure of matter, including that of the neutron itself.

  1. Levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) and dioxin-like PCBs in free range eggs from Vietnam, including potential health risks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoang, T.T.; Traag, W.A.; Murk, A.J.; Hoogenboom, L.A.P.

    2014-01-01

    Chicken and duck eggs collected from three different areas in Vietnam were examined for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs). These regions included a background area, an area sprayed with Agent Orange and the Bien Hoa airbase area where Agent Orange was handled by the US

  2. An aerial radiological survey of the Tonopah Test Range including Clean Slate 1,2,3, Roller Coaster, decontamination area, Cactus Springs Ranch target areas. Central Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proctor, A.E.; Hendricks, T.J.

    1995-08-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted of major sections of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in central Nevada from August through October 1993. The survey consisted of aerial measurements of both natural and man-made gamma radiation emanating from the terrestrial surface. The initial purpose of the survey was to locate depleted uranium (detecting 238 U) from projectiles which had impacted on the TTR. The examination of areas near Cactus Springs Ranch (located near the western boundary of the TTR) and an animal burial area near the Double Track site were secondary objectives. When more widespread than expected 241 Am contamination was found around the Clean Slates sites, the survey was expanded to cover the area surrounding the Clean Slates and also the Double Track site. Results are reported as radiation isopleths superimposed on aerial photographs of the area

  3. Semiconductor neutron detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianakiev, Kiril D [Los Alamos, NM; Littlewood, Peter B [Cambridge, GB; Blagoev, Krastan B [Arlington, VA; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos, NM; Smith, James L [Los Alamos, NM; Sullivan, Clair J [Los Alamos, NM; Alexandrov, Boian S [Los Alamos, NM; Lashley, Jason Charles [Santa Fe, NM

    2011-03-08

    A neutron detector has a compound of lithium in a single crystal form as a neutron sensor element. The lithium compound, containing improved charge transport properties, is either lithium niobate or lithium tantalate. The sensor element is in direct contact with a monitor that detects an electric current. A signal proportional to the electric current is produced and is calibrated to indicate the neutrons sensed. The neutron detector is particularly useful for detecting neutrons in a radiation environment. Such radiation environment may, e.g. include gamma radiation and noise.

  4. Measurement of neutron capture cross section of sup 1 sup 7 sup 4 Hf in the energy range from 162 to 1200 keV

    CERN Document Server

    Xia Yi Jun; Yang Zhi Hua

    2001-01-01

    The cross sections for the sup 1 sup 7 sup 4 Hf( n, gamma) sup 1 sup 7 sup 5 Hf reaction were measured relatively to the sup 1 sup 9 sup 7 Au(n, gamma) sup 1 sup 9 sup 8 Au reaction for neutron energies from 162 to 1200 keV, using the activation technique with high resolution HPGE gamma ray spectroscopy. Some experimental data were given for the first time

  5. Small-angle neutron scattering study of the short-range organization of dispersed CsNi[Cr(CN){sub 6}] nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridier, Karl; Gillon, Béatrice; André, Gilles; Chaboussant, Grégory, E-mail: gregory.chaboussant@cea.fr [Laboratoire Léon Brillouin, UMR12 CEA-CNRS, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Catala, Laure; Mazérat, Sandra; Mallah, Talal [Institut de Chimie Moléculaire et des Matériaux d' Orsay, CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2015-09-21

    Prussian blue analogues magnetic nanoparticles (of radius R{sub 0} = 2.4–8.6 nm) embedded in PVP (polyvinylpyrrolidone) or CTA{sup +} (cetyltrimethylammonium) matrices have been studied using neutron diffraction and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) at several concentrations. For the most diluted particles in neutral PVP, the SANS signal is fully accounted for by a “single-particle” spherical form factor with no structural correlations between the nanoparticles and with radii comparable to those inferred from neutron diffraction. For higher concentration in PVP, structural correlations modify the SANS signal with the appearance of a structure factor peak, which is described using an effective “mean-field” model. A new length scale R{sup * }≈ 3R{sub 0}, corresponding to an effective repulsive interaction radius, is evidenced in PVP samples. In CTA{sup +}, electrostatic interactions play a crucial role and lead to a dense layer of CTA{sup +} around the nanoparticles, which considerably alter the SANS patterns as compared to PVP. The SANS data of nanoparticles in CTA{sup +} are best described by a core-shell model without visible inter-particle structure factor.

  6. Small-angle neutron scattering study of the short-range organization of dispersed CsNi[Cr(CN)6] nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridier, Karl; Gillon, Béatrice; André, Gilles; Chaboussant, Grégory; Catala, Laure; Mazérat, Sandra; Mallah, Talal

    2015-09-01

    Prussian blue analogues magnetic nanoparticles (of radius R0 = 2.4-8.6 nm) embedded in PVP (polyvinylpyrrolidone) or CTA+ (cetyltrimethylammonium) matrices have been studied using neutron diffraction and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) at several concentrations. For the most diluted particles in neutral PVP, the SANS signal is fully accounted for by a "single-particle" spherical form factor with no structural correlations between the nanoparticles and with radii comparable to those inferred from neutron diffraction. For higher concentration in PVP, structural correlations modify the SANS signal with the appearance of a structure factor peak, which is described using an effective "mean-field" model. A new length scale R* ≈ 3R0, corresponding to an effective repulsive interaction radius, is evidenced in PVP samples. In CTA+, electrostatic interactions play a crucial role and lead to a dense layer of CTA+ around the nanoparticles, which considerably alter the SANS patterns as compared to PVP. The SANS data of nanoparticles in CTA+ are best described by a core-shell model without visible inter-particle structure factor.

  7. Small-angle neutron scattering study of the short-range organization of dispersed CsNi[Cr(CN)6] nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridier, Karl; Gillon, Béatrice; André, Gilles; Chaboussant, Grégory; Catala, Laure; Mazérat, Sandra; Mallah, Talal

    2015-01-01

    Prussian blue analogues magnetic nanoparticles (of radius R 0  = 2.4–8.6 nm) embedded in PVP (polyvinylpyrrolidone) or CTA + (cetyltrimethylammonium) matrices have been studied using neutron diffraction and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) at several concentrations. For the most diluted particles in neutral PVP, the SANS signal is fully accounted for by a “single-particle” spherical form factor with no structural correlations between the nanoparticles and with radii comparable to those inferred from neutron diffraction. For higher concentration in PVP, structural correlations modify the SANS signal with the appearance of a structure factor peak, which is described using an effective “mean-field” model. A new length scale R *  ≈ 3R 0 , corresponding to an effective repulsive interaction radius, is evidenced in PVP samples. In CTA + , electrostatic interactions play a crucial role and lead to a dense layer of CTA + around the nanoparticles, which considerably alter the SANS patterns as compared to PVP. The SANS data of nanoparticles in CTA + are best described by a core-shell model without visible inter-particle structure factor

  8. Secondary neutron production from thick Pb target by light particle irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, J C; Debeauvais, M; Fernández, F; Krivopustov, M; Kulakov, B A; Sosnin, A; Zamani, M

    1999-01-01

    Neutron multiplicities from spallation neutron sources were measured by Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors. Light particles as protons, deuterons and alphas in the GeV range were used on Pb targets. For neutron thermalization the targets were covered by 6 cm paraffin moderator. Neutron multiplicity distributions were studied inside and on the moderator surface. Comparison of SSNTDs results were made for thermal-epithermal neutrons with sup 1 sup 3 sup 9 La activation method as well as with Dubna DCM/CEM code. Discussion including previous sup 1 sup 2 C results are given.

  9. Compact activation detectors for measuring of neutron emission on plasma focus installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krokhin, O.N.; Nikulin, V.Ya.; Peregudova, E.V.; Volobuev, I.V.

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents the two compact simple systems for the measurement of the absolute neutron yield in the range 10 6 - 10 12 neutrons/pulse and higher and spatial anisotropy of neutron radiation. The systems are destined for the registration of the short duration neutron radiation of the pulsed plasma installations, such as Plasma Focus (PF), z-pinches and others plasma installations. This paper also includes the results of the neutron emission measurements on different PF installations: 'Tulip' (P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow Russia), the PF-1000 and PF-150 installations (Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw, Poland)

  10. Materials for neutron beam optimization for boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Tetsuo

    2001-01-01

    Several prospective materials (neutron filter/moderator, beam reflector, gamma ray shielding and beam collimator) were studied with a view to generating thermal and epithermal neutron beams suited for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The beams are delivered from the thermal and thermalizing column exits situated on two opposite faces of a TRIGA-II type reactor. An investigation was performed with Monte Carlo calculations from a viewpoint of obtaining sufficiently intense thermal and epithermal neutron beams separately, and little adulterated both with neutrons of extraneous energy ranges and with gamma rays. High-density graphite (G) would be the most suitable material for thermal neutron beams as a neutron filter/moderator, and the combination of aluminum (Al) and aluminum fluoride (AlF 3 ) for epithermal neutron beams. The graphite would be also the most promising material for thermal neutron beams as a beam reflector while for epithermal neutron beams the choice would be lead fluoride (PbF 2 ). The PbF 2 would be also the most suitable material for epithermal neutron beams as a gamma ray shielding, and bismuth (Bi) for thermal neutron beam. The PbF 2 would be also the most useful material for epithermal neutron beam as a beam collimator while for thermal neutron beam the choice would be the graphite. The epithermal neutron beam for BNCT could be optimized with the progressive use of PbF 2 . (author)

  11. Atlas of neutron resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Mughabghab, Said

    2018-01-01

    Atlas of Neutron Resonances: Resonance Properties and Thermal Cross Sections Z= 1-60, Sixth Edition, contains an extensive list of detailed individual neutron resonance parameters for Z=1-60, as well as thermal cross sections, capture resonance integrals, average resonance parameters and a short survey of the physics of thermal and resonance neutrons. The long introduction contains: nuclear physics formulas aimed at neutron physicists; topics of special interest such as valence neutron capture, nuclear level density parameters, and s-, p-, and d-wave neutron strength functions; and various comparisons of measured quantities with the predictions of nuclear models, such as the optical model. As in the last edition, additional features have been added to appeal to a wider spectrum of users. These include: spin-dependent scattering lengths that are of interest to solid-state physicists, nuclear physicists and neutron evaluators; calculated and measured Maxwellian average 5-keV and 30-keV capture cross sections o...

  12. Fast neutron imaging device and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Vladimir; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Musatov, Igor V.

    2014-02-11

    A fast neutron imaging apparatus and method of constructing fast neutron radiography images, the apparatus including a neutron source and a detector that provides event-by-event acquisition of position and energy deposition, and optionally timing and pulse shape for each individual neutron event detected by the detector. The method for constructing fast neutron radiography images utilizes the apparatus of the invention.

  13. New neutron physics using spallation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, C.D.

    1988-01-01

    The extraordinary neutron intensities available from the new spallation pulsed neutron sources open up exciting opportunities for basic and applied research in neutron nuclear physics. The energy range of neutron research which is being explored with these sources extends from thermal energies to almost 800 MeV. The emphasis here is on prospective experiments below 100 keV neutron energy using the intense neutron bursts produced by the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) at Los Alamos. 30 refs., 10 figs

  14. OvidSP Medline-to-PubMed search filter translation: a methodology for extending search filter range to include PubMed's unique content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damarell, Raechel A; Tieman, Jennifer J; Sladek, Ruth M

    2013-07-02

    PubMed translations of OvidSP Medline search filters offer searchers improved ease of access. They may also facilitate access to PubMed's unique content, including citations for the most recently published biomedical evidence. Retrieving this content requires a search strategy comprising natural language terms ('textwords'), rather than Medical Subject Headings (MeSH). We describe a reproducible methodology that uses a validated PubMed search filter translation to create a textword-only strategy to extend retrieval to PubMed's unique heart failure literature. We translated an OvidSP Medline heart failure search filter for PubMed and established version equivalence in terms of indexed literature retrieval. The PubMed version was then run within PubMed to identify citations retrieved by the filter's MeSH terms (Heart failure, Left ventricular dysfunction, and Cardiomyopathy). It was then rerun with the same MeSH terms restricted to searching on title and abstract fields (i.e. as 'textwords'). Citations retrieved by the MeSH search but not the textword search were isolated. Frequency analysis of their titles/abstracts identified natural language alternatives for those MeSH terms that performed less effectively as textwords. These terms were tested in combination to determine the best performing search string for reclaiming this 'lost set'. This string, restricted to searching on PubMed's unique content, was then combined with the validated PubMed translation to extend the filter's performance in this database. The PubMed heart failure filter retrieved 6829 citations. Of these, 834 (12%) failed to be retrieved when MeSH terms were converted to textwords. Frequency analysis of the 834 citations identified five high frequency natural language alternatives that could improve retrieval of this set (cardiac failure, cardiac resynchronization, left ventricular systolic dysfunction, left ventricular diastolic dysfunction, and LV dysfunction). Together these terms reclaimed

  15. Neutron diffraction and oxide research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, B.; Howard, C.J.; Kennedy, B.J.

    1999-01-01

    Oxide compounds form a large class of interesting materials that have a diverse range of mechanical and electronic properties. This diversity and its commercial implications has had a significant impact on physics research. This is particularly evident in the fields of superconductivity magnetoresistivity and ferroelectricity, where discoveries in the last 15 years have given rise to significant shifts in research activities. Historically, oxides have been studied for many years, but it is only recently that significant effort has been diverted to the study of oxide materials for their application to mechanical and electronic devices. An important property of such materials is the atomic structure, for the determination of which diffraction techniques are ideally suited. Recent examples of structure determinations using neutron diffraction in oxide based systems are high temperature superconductors, where oxygen defects are a key factor. Here, neutron diffraction played a major role in determining the effect of oxygen on the superconducting properties. Similarly, neutron diffraction has enjoyed much success in the determination of the structures of the manganate based colossal magnetoresistive (CMR) materials. In both these cases the structure plays a pivotal role in determining theoretical models of the electronic properties. The neutron scattering group at ANSTO has investigated several oxide systems using neutron powder diffraction. Two such systems are presented in this paper; the zirconia-based materials that are used as engineering materials, and the perovskite-based oxides that include the well known cuprate superconductors and the manganate CMR materials

  16. Neutron spectra produced by moderating an isotopic neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrillo Nunnez, Aureliano; Vega Carrillo, Hector Rene

    2001-01-01

    A Monte Carlo study has been carried out to determine the neutron spectra produced by an isotopic neutron source inserted in moderating media. Most devices used for radiation protection have a response strongly dependent on neutron energy. ISO recommends several neutron sources and monoenergetic neutron radiations, but actual working situations have broad spectral neutron distributions extending from thermal to MeV energies, for instance, near nuclear power plants, medical applications accelerators and cosmic neutrons. To improve the evaluation of the dosimetric quantities, is recommended to calibrate the radiation protection devices in neutron spectra which are nearly like those met in practice. In order to complete the range of neutron calibrating sources, it seems useful to develop several wide spectral distributions representative of typical spectra down to thermal energies. The aim of this investigation was to use an isotopic neutron source in different moderating media to reproduce some of the neutron fields found in practice. MCNP code has been used during calculations, in these a 239PuBe neutron source was inserted in H2O, D2O and polyethylene moderators. Moderators were modeled as spheres and cylinders of different sizes. In the case of cylindrical geometry the anisotropy of resulting neutron spectra was calculated from 0 to 2 . From neutron spectra dosimetric features were calculated. MCNP calculations were validated by measuring the neutron spectra of a 239PuBe neutron source inserted in a H2O cylindrical moderator. The measurements were carried out with a multisphere neutron spectrometer with a 6LiI(Eu) scintillator. From the measurements the neutron spectrum was unfolded using the BUNKIUT code and the UTA4 response matrix. Some of the moderators with the source produce a neutron spectrum close to spectra found in actual applications, then can be used during the calibration of radiation protection devices

  17. Design of back-streaming white neutron beam line at CSNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L Y; Jing, H T; Tang, J Y; Li, Q; Ruan, X C; Ren, J; Ning, C J; Yu, Y J; Tan, Z X; Wang, P C; He, Y C; Wang, X Q

    2018-02-01

    A white neutron beam line using back-streaming neutrons from the spallation target is under construction at China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS). Different spectrometers, to be installed in the so-called Back-n beam line for nuclear data measurements, are also being developed in phases. The physical design of the beam line is carried out with the help of a complicated collimation system and a sophisticated neutron dump, taking the overview of the neutron beam characteristics into account. This includes energy spectrum, flux and time structure, the optimizations of neutron beam spots and in-hall background. The wide neutron energy range of 1eV-100MeV is excellent for supporting different applications, especially nuclear data measurements. At Endstation#2, which is about 80m away from the target, the main properties of the beam line include neutron flux of 10 6 n/cm 2 /s, time resolution of a few per mille over nearly the entire energy range, and in-hall background of about 0.01/cm 2 /s for both neutron and gamma. With its first commission in late 2017, Back-n will not only be the first high-performance white neutron source in China, but also one of the best white neutron sources in the world. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Procedure for the determination of gap and base ground surface configurations beneath the bottom plate of storage tanks using neutron gauging inspection techniques : including radiation safety procedure and emergency procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaafar Abdullah

    1993-01-01

    The procedure is intended for the neutron gauging inspection of gap between the bottom plate and the foundation of bulk storage tanks, which potentially exhibit uneven sinking of the bottom plate and the foundation. Its describes the requirements for the performance of neutron back scattered inspection techniques (or radiometric non-destructive evaluation techniques), using an isotopic neutron source associated with neutron detecting systems, to detect and size the gap between the bottom plate and the foundations as well as to quantify the presence of hydrogenous materials (e.g. oil or water) underneath the bottom plate. This procedure is not only outline the requirements for the neutron gauging inspection, but also describes the requirements which shall be taken into account in formulating the radiation safety and emergency procedures for the neutron gauging inspection works

  19. Personnel neutron dose assessment upgrade: Volume 1, Personnel neutron dosimetry assessment: [Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadlock, D.E.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Griffith, R.V.; Hankins, D.E.; Parkhurst, M.A.; Stroud, C.M.; Faust, L.G.; Vallario, E.J.

    1988-07-01

    This report provides guidance on the characteristics, use, and calibration criteria for personnel neutron dosimeters. The report is applicable for neutrons with energies ranging from thermal to less than 20 MeV. Background for general neutron dosimetry requirements is provided, as is relevant federal regulations and other standards. The characteristics of personnel neutron dosimeters are discussed, with particular attention paid to passive neutron dosimetry systems. Two of the systems discussed are used at DOE and DOE-contractor facilities (nuclear track emulsion and thermoluminescent-albedo) and another (the combination TLD/TED) was recently developed. Topics discussed in the field applications of these dosimeters include their theory of operation, their processing, readout, and interpretation, and their advantages and disadvantages for field use. The procedures required for occupational neutron dosimetry are discussed, including radiation monitoring and the wearing of dosimeters, their exchange periods, dose equivalent evaluations, and the documenting of neutron exposures. The coverage of dosimeter testing, maintenance, and calibration includes guidance on the selection of calibration sources, the effects of irradiation geometries, lower limits of detectability, fading, frequency of calibration, spectrometry, and quality control. 49 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs

  20. A Study on Optimized Neutron Beam Generation by Analysis of Neutron Angular Distribution from 7Li(p,n)7Be Reaction for Accelerator-Based BNCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung O

    2008-02-01

    Perpendicular neutrons (i.e., solid angle bin of 50-150 .deg. ) among ones generated from 7 Li(p,n) 7 Be reaction, which are focused on the relative low energy regions, was used to produce optimized epithermal neutron beam for Accelerator-based BNCT. By this time, most of the studies for generating the therapeutic neutron beam have used the neutrons emitted to the collinear with the incoming proton. However, it is very difficult to produce the high quantity of epithermal neutrons due to the relative high energy neutrons to be used. In this study, it was found that perpendicular neutrons (solid angle 50-150 .deg. ) include about two times as many neutrons in the energy range of 100 - 300 keV as the existing studies. In particular, epithermal neutron beam from the dual beam port assembly was simulated by MCNPX: this assembly was designed for using the neutrons in optimized neutron angle bin (solid angle 50-150 .deg. ). As the results of the IAEA recommendations for all parameters, and moderation length could be reduced. The advantage depth (AD) and dose rate in the mathematical phantom are calculated to evaluate the dosimetric characterization of the designed epithermal neutron beams. It was recognized that the tumor positioned at the maximum depth of 70 mm from skin could be treated, and tumor at 60 mm depth is approximately taken with only a treatment of a few minutes by using the beam from the dual beam port assembly. It is therefore expected that the neutrons emitted into the solid angle bin of 50 - 150 .deg. from 7 Li(p,n) 7 Be reaction are very effective to produce epithermal neutron beam for BNCT. The new dual beam port assembly which is possible to generate the therapeutic neutron beam satisfies with the IAEA recommendations at each beam port and can be used for reference study of epithermal neutron beam design

  1. Consistency of differential and integral thermonuclear neutronics data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reupke, W.A.

    1978-01-01

    To increase the accuracy of the neutronics analysis of nuclear reactors, physicists and engineers have employed a variety of techniques, including the adjustment of multigroup differential data to improve consistency with integral data. Of the various adjustment strategies, a generalized least-squares procedure which adjusts the combined differential and integral data can significantly improve the accuracy of neutronics calculations compared to calculations employing only differential data. This investigation analyzes 14 MeV neutron-driven integral experiments, using a more extensively developed methodology and a newly developed computer code, to extend the domain of adjustment from the energy range of fission reactors to the energy range of fusion reactors.

  2. Actinide neutron-induced fission cross section measurements at LANSCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tovesson, Fredrik K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Laptev, Alexander B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Tony S [INL

    2010-01-01

    Fission cross sections of a range of actinides have been measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in support of nuclear energy applications in a wide energy range from sub-thermal energies up to 200 MeV. A parallel-plate ionization chamber are used to measure fission cross sections ratios relative to the {sup 235}U standard while incident neutron energies are determined using the time-of-flight method. Recent measurements include the {sup 233,238}U, {sup 239-242}Pu and {sup 243}Am neutron-induced fission cross sections. Obtained data are presented in comparison with ex isting evaluations and previous data.

  3. Neutron powder diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, W.I.F.

    1990-01-01

    Neutron powder diffraction is a powerful technique that provides a detailed description of moderately complex crystal structures. This is nowhere more apparent than in the area of high temperature superconductors where neutron powder diffraction has provided precise structural and magnetic information, not only under ambient conditions but also at high and low temperatures and high pressures. Outside superconductor research, the variety of materials studied by neutron powder diffraction is equally impressive including zeolites, fast ionic conductors, permanent magnets and materials undergoing phase transitions. Recent advances that include high resolution studies and real-time crystallography are presented. Future possibilities of neutron powder diffraction are discussed

  4. Neutron anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacon, G.E.

    1994-01-01

    The familiar extremes of crystalline material are single-crystals and random powders. In between these two extremes are polycrystalline aggregates, not randomly arranged but possessing some preferred orientation and this is the form taken by constructional materials, be they steel girders or the bones of a human or animal skeleton. The details of the preferred orientation determine the ability of the material to withstand stress in any direction. In the case of bone the crucial factor is the orientation of the c-axes of the mineral content - the crystals of the hexagonal hydroxyapatite - and this can readily be determined by neutron diffraction. In particular it can be measured over the volume of a piece of bone, utilizing distances ranging from 1mm to 10mm. The major practical problem is to avoid the intense incoherent scattering from the hydrogen in the accompanying collagen; this can best be achieved by heat-treatment and it is demonstrated that this does not affect the underlying apatite. These studies of bone give leading anatomical information on the life and activities of humans and animals - including, for example, the life history of the human femur, the locomotion of sheep, the fracture of the legs of racehorses and the life-styles of Neolithic tribes. We conclude that the material is placed economically in the bone to withstand the expected stresses of life and the environment. The experimental results are presented in terms of the magnitude of the 0002 apatite reflection. It so happens that for a random powder the 0002, 1121 reflections, which are neighboring lines in the powder pattern, are approximately equal in intensity. The latter reflection, being of manifold multiplicity, is scarcely affected by preferred orientation so that the numerical value of the 0002/1121 ratio serves quite accurately as a quantitative measure of the degree of orientation of the c-axes in any chosen direction for a sample of bone

  5. Neutron anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, G E

    1996-01-01

    The familiar extremes of crystalline material are single-crystals and random powders. In between these two extremes are polycrystalline aggregates, not randomly arranged but possessing some preferred orientation and this is the form taken by constructional materials, be they steel girders or the bones of a human or animal skeleton. The details of the preferred orientation determine the ability of the material to withstand stress in any direction. In the case of bone the crucial factor is the orientation of the c-axes of the mineral content-the crystals of the hexagonal hydroxyapatite- and this can readily be determined by neutron diffraction. In particular it can be measured over the volume of a piece of bone, utilising distances ranging from 1 mm to 10 mm. The major practical problem is to avoid the intense incoherent scattering from the hydrogen in the accompanying collagen; this can best be achieved by heat-treatment and it is demonstrated that this does not affect the underlying apatite. These studies of bone give leading anatomical information on the life and activities of humans and animals-including, for example, the life history of the human femur, the locomotion of sheep, the fracture of the legs of racehorses and the life-styles of Neolithic tribes. We conclude that the material is placed economically in the bone to withstand the expected stresses of life and the environment. The experimental results are presented in terms of the magnitude of the 0002 apatite reflection. It so happens that for a random powder the 0002, 1121 reflections, which are neighbouring lines in the powder pattern, are approximately equal in intensity. The latter reflection, being of manifold multiplicity, is scarcely affected by preferred orientation so that the numerical value of the 0002/1121 ratio serves quite accurately as a quantitative measure of the degree of orientation of the c-axes in any chosen direction, for a sample of bone.

  6. Study of the /sup 36/Cl(n,p)/sup 36/S reaction in the neutron energy range up to 10 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gledenov, Yu.M.; Popov, Yu.P.; Rigol, J.; Salatsky, V.I.

    1985-12-01

    The /sup 36/Cl(n,p)/sup 36/S reaction cross-section was measured by the time-of-flight method in the IBR-30 pulsed reactor of the JINR. The measured cross-section shows three not previously observed neutron resonances with energies Esub(n)=1.3; 3.5 and 8.2 keV for which the parameters A/sub(p)/=gGAMMA/sub(n)/GAMMA/sub(p)//GAMMA: 0.07 +- 0.01; 0.08 +- 0.03 and 1.7 +- 0.3 eV were determined, respectively. Comparison of these results with the excited states obtained by the /sup 36/S(p,..gamma..)/sup 37/Cl reaction made possible a more exact determination of the scale energy of the /sup 37/Cl nucleus excited states.

  7. An Exploration of Neutron Detection in Semiconducting Boron Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Nina

    The 3He supply problem in the U.S. has necessitated the search for alternatives for neutron detection. The neutron detection efficiency is a function of density, atomic composition, neutron absorption cross section, and thickness of the neutron capture material. The isotope 10B is one of only a handful of isotopes with a high neutron absorption cross section---3840 barns for thermal neutrons. So a boron carbide semiconductor represents a viable alternative to 3He. This dissertation provides an evaluation of the performance of semiconducting boron carbide neutron detectors grown by plasma enhance chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) in order to determine the advantages and drawbacks of these devices for neutron detection. Improved handling of the PECVD system has resulted in an extremely stable plasma, enabling deposition of thick films of semiconducting boron carbide. A variety of material and semiconducting characterization tools have been used to investigate the structure and electronic properties of boron carbide thin films, including X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, infrared/Raman spectroscopy, current-voltage measurements and capacitance-voltage measurements. Elemental concentrations in the boron carbide films have been obtained from Rutherford backscattering and elastic recoil detection analysis. Solid state neutron detection devices have been fabricated in the form of heterostructured p-n diodes, p-type boron carbide/n-type Si. Operating conditions, including applied bias voltage, and time constants, have been optimized for maximum detection efficiency and correlated to the semiconducting properties investigated in separate electronic measurements. Accurate measurements of the neutron detection efficiency and the response of the detector to a wide range of neutron wavelengths have been performed at a well calibrated, tightly collimated, "white" cold neutron beam source using time-of-flight neutron detection technique

  8. Neutron Generators Developed at LBNL for Homeland Security and Imaging Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reijonen, Jani

    2006-01-01

    The Plasma and Ion Source Technology Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has developed various types of advanced D-D (neutron energy 2.5 MeV), D-T (14 MeV) and T-T (0-9 MeV) neutron generators for wide range of applications. These applications include medical (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy), homeland security (Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis, Fast Neutron Activation Analysis and Pulsed Fast Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy) and planetary exploration with a sub-surface material characterization on Mars. These neutron generators utilize RF induction discharge to ionize the deuterium/tritium gas. This discharge method provides high plasma density for high output current, high atomic species from molecular gases, long life operation and versatility for various discharge chamber geometries. Four main neutron generator developments are discussed here: high neutron output co-axial neutron generator for BNCT applications, point neutron generator for security applications, compact and sub-compact axial neutron generator for elemental analysis applications. Current status of the neutron generator development with experimental data will be presented

  9. Compact Neutron Generators for Medical Home Land Security and Planetary Exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reijonen, J.

    2005-01-01

    The Plasma and Ion Source Technology Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has developed various types of advanced D-D (neutron energy 2.5 MeV), D-T (14 MeV) and T-T (0-9 MeV) neutron generators for wide range of applications. These applications include medical (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy), homeland security (Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis, Fast Neutron Activation Analysis and Pulsed Fast Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy) and planetary exploration with a sub-surface material characterization on Mars. These neutron generators utilize RF induction discharge to ionize the deuterium/tritium gas. This discharge method provides high plasma density for high output current, high atomic species from molecular gases, long life operation and versatility for various discharge chamber geometries. Four main neutron generator developments are discussed here: high neutron output co-axial neutron generator for BNCT applications, point neutron generator for security applications, compact and sub-compact axial neutron generator for elemental analysis applications. Current status of the neutron generator development with experimental data will be presented

  10. THERMAL NEUTRON INTENSITIES IN SOILS IRRADIATED BY FAST NEUTRONS FROM POINT SOURCES. (R825549C054)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thermal-neutron fluences in soil are reported for selected fast-neutron sources, selected soil types, and selected irradiation geometries. Sources include 14 MeV neutrons from accelerators, neutrons from spontaneously fissioning 252Cf, and neutrons produced from alp...

  11. Neutron sources and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, D.L. [ed.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Rush, J.J. [ed.] [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Review of Neutron Sources and Applications was held at Oak Brook, Illinois, during September 8--10, 1992. This review involved some 70 national and international experts in different areas of neutron research, sources, and applications. Separate working groups were asked to (1) review the current status of advanced research reactors and spallation sources; and (2) provide an update on scientific, technological, and medical applications, including neutron scattering research in a number of disciplines, isotope production, materials irradiation, and other important uses of neutron sources such as materials analysis and fundamental neutron physics. This report summarizes the findings and conclusions of the different working groups involved in the review, and contains some of the best current expertise on neutron sources and applications.

  12. Neutron sources and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, D.L.; Rush, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    Review of Neutron Sources and Applications was held at Oak Brook, Illinois, during September 8--10, 1992. This review involved some 70 national and international experts in different areas of neutron research, sources, and applications. Separate working groups were asked to (1) review the current status of advanced research reactors and spallation sources; and (2) provide an update on scientific, technological, and medical applications, including neutron scattering research in a number of disciplines, isotope production, materials irradiation, and other important uses of neutron sources such as materials analysis and fundamental neutron physics. This report summarizes the findings and conclusions of the different working groups involved in the review, and contains some of the best current expertise on neutron sources and applications

  13. Prototype Stilbene Neutron Collar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, M. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Shumaker, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Snyderman, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Verbeke, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wong, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-26

    A neutron collar using stilbene organic scintillator cells for fast neutron counting is described for the assay of fresh low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel assemblies. The prototype stilbene collar has a form factor similar to standard He-3 based collars and uses an AmLi interrogation neutron source. This report describes the simulation of list mode neutron correlation data on various fuel assemblies including some with neutron absorbers (burnable Gd poisons). Calibration curves (doubles vs 235U linear mass density) are presented for both thermal and fast (with Cd lining) modes of operation. It is shown that the stilbene collar meets or exceeds the current capabilities of He-3 based neutron collars. A self-consistent assay methodology, uniquely suited to the stilbene collar, using triples is described which complements traditional assay based on doubles calibration curves.

  14. Neutron scattering in liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barocchi, F. [Florence Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica

    1996-12-31

    Together with X-rays, thermal neutrons are the ideal probe to study the microscopic structure of condensed matter, however the precision attainable usually with neutrons for the measurement of atomic position correlation functions in liquids is, at least, one order of magnitude better than for X-rays. In order to measure properly the microscopic dynamics a wide range of momentum transfer with corresponding energy transfer must be available in the range of liquid state excitations. This again is only attainable, with good resolution, with neutrons. (author) 7 figs., 3 refs.

  15. Neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    The annual report on hand gives an overview of the research work carried out in the Laboratory for Neutron Scattering (LNS) of the ETH Zuerich in 1990. Using the method of neutron scattering, it is possible to examine in detail the static and dynamic properties of the condensed material. In accordance with the multidisciplined character of the method, the LNS has for years maintained a system of intensive co-operation with numerous institutes in the areas of biology, chemistry, solid-state physics, crystallography and materials research. In 1990 over 100 scientists from more than 40 research groups both at home and abroad took part in the experiments. It was again a pleasure to see the number of graduate students present, who were studying for a doctorate and who could be introduced into the neutron scattering during their stay at the LNS and thus were in the position to touch on central ways of looking at a problem in their dissertation using this modern experimental method of solid-state research. In addition to the numerous and interesting ways of formulating the questions to explain the structure, nowadays the scientific programme increasingly includes particularly topical studies in connection with high temperature-supraconductors and materials research

  16. Scission neutron emission and prompt fission neutron spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Kornilov, N V

    2001-01-01

    The mass, energy and angular integrated spectra of prompt fission neutrons for sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U induced fission in the energy range from thermal to 5 MeV were analyzed. It allows assume that about 0.362+-0.025 neutrons per fission are emitted due to another mechanism then neutron emission from excited fragments after full acceleration. The spectrum of scission neutrons consists of two components with average energy 0.98 MeV and 2.74 MeV. The share of scission neutrons and their spectrum shape estimated in this work does not contradict to results of differential experiments analyzed in previous papers.

  17. Problems and prospects of neutron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Hisao

    2008-01-01

    Technical problems and future prospects of neutron imaging and neutron radiography are reviewed and discussed for further development. For technical problems, neutron sources together with cold neutron, ultra-cold neutron, epithermal and fast-neutron beams, energy converters, and the intensity of neutron beam, dynamic range associated with imaging procedure, etc, are reviewed. As standardization, such indicators as beam purity, sensitivity, image quality, and beam quality are discussed and limitation of neutron radiography is also presented. As neutron imaging has developed as a nondestructive testing technique in industrial applications, further problems and prospects of quality control and qualification to perform neutron radiography, standardization and international cooperation of neutron imaging are discussed. (S. Ohno)

  18. Neutron irradiation effects on spark plasma sintered boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buyuk, B.; Cengiz, M.; Tugrul, A.; Ozer, S.; Yucel, O.; Goller, G.; Sahin, F.C.; Lastovski, S.B.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, spark plasma sintered boron carbide (B 4 C) was examined against neutrons. The specimens were ir-radiated by reactor neutrons (include both thermal and fast neutrons) up to fluence of 1.37x10 21 n*m -2 . Thermal and fast neutrons cause swelling by different interactions with boron ( 10 B) atoms in the related materials. X-Ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images were investigated for initial and irradiated samples. In addition, lattice parameters and unit cell volumes were calculated for the samples. The swelling percentages were calculated to be within a range of 0.49-3.80 % (average 1.70 %) for the outer surface of the materials for applied neutron irradiation doses. (authors)

  19. Study of neutron rich nuclei by delayed neutron decay using the Tonnerre multidetector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timis, C.N.

    2001-01-01

    A new detection array for beta delayed neutrons was built. It includes up to 32 plastic scintillation counters 180 cm long located at 120 cm from the target. Neutron energy spectra are measured by time-of-flight in the 300 keV-15 MeV range with good energy resolution. The device was tested with several known nuclei. Its performances are discussed in comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. They very high overall detection efficiency on the TONNERRE array made it possible to study one and two neutron emission of 11 Li. A complete decay scheme was obtained. The 33 Mg and 35 Al beta decays were investigated for the first time by neutron and gamma spectroscopy. Complete decay schemes were established and compared to large scale shell-model calculations. (authors)

  20. Introductory theory of neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunn, J.M.F.

    1986-12-01

    The paper comprises a set of six lecture notes which were delivered to the summer school on 'Neutron Scattering at a pulsed source', Rutherford Laboratory, United Kingdom, 1986. The lectures concern the physical principles of neutron scattering. The topics of the lectures include: diffraction, incoherent inelastic scattering, connection with the Schroedinger equation, magnetic scattering, coherent inelastic scattering, and surfaces and neutron optics. (UK)

  1. Neutrons and Nuclear Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekkebus, Allen E.

    2007-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory hosted two workshops in April 2007 relevant to nuclear engineering education. In the Neutron Stress, Texture, and Phase Transformation for Industry workshop (http://neutrons.ornl.gov/workshops/nst2/), several invited speakers gave examples of neutron stress mapping for nuclear engineering applications. These included John Root of National Research Council of Canada, Mike Fitzpatrick of the UK's Open University, and Yan Gao of GE Global Research on their experiences with industrial and academic uses of neutron diffraction. Xun-Li Wang and Camden Hubbard described the new instruments at ORNL that can be used for such studies. This was preceded by the Neutrons for Materials Science and Engineering educational symposium (http://neutrons.ornl.gov/workshops/edsym2007). It was directed to the broad materials science and engineering community based in universities, industry and laboratories who wish to learn what the neutron sources in the US can provide for enhancing the understanding of materials behavior, processing and joining. Of particular interest was the presentation of Donald Brown of Los Alamos about using 'Neutron diffraction measurements of strain and texture to study mechanical behavior of structural materials.' At both workshops, the ORNL neutron scattering instruments relevant to nuclear engineering studies were described. The Neutron Residual Stress Mapping Facility (NRSF2) is currently in operation at the High Flux Isotope Reactor; the VULCAN Engineering Materials Diffractometer will begin commissioning in 2008 at the Spallation Neutron Source. For characteristics of these instruments, as well as details of other workshops, meetings, capabilities, and research proposal submissions, please visit http://neutrons.ornl.gov. To submit user proposals for time on NRSF2 contact Hubbard at hubbardcratornl.gov

  2. Neutron/muon correlation functions to improve neutron detection capabilities outside nuclear facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordinario, Donald Thomas

    The natural neutron background rate is largely due to cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere and the subsequent neutron emission from the interaction products. The neutron background is part of a larger cosmic radiation shower that also includes electrons, gamma rays, and muons. Since neutrons interact much differently than muons in building materials, the muon and neutron fluence rates in the natural background can be compared to the measured muon and neutron fluence rate when shielded by common building materials. The simultaneous measurement of muon and neutron fluence rates might allow for an earlier identification of man-made neutron sources, such as hidden nuclear materials. This study compares natural background neutron rates to computer simulated neutron rates shielded by common structural and building materials. The characteristic differences between neutrons and muons resulted in different attenuation properties under the same shielded conditions. Correlation functions between cosmic ray generated neutrons and muons are then used to predict neutron fluence rates in different urban environments.

  3. Development of a new electronic neutron imaging system

    CERN Document Server

    Brenizer, J S; Gibbs, K M; Mengers, P; Stebbings, C T; Polansky, D; Rogerson, D J

    1999-01-01

    An electronic neutron imaging camera system was developed for use with thermal, epithermal, and fast neutrons in applications that include nondestructive inspection of explosives, corrosion, turbine blades, electronics, low Z components, etc. The neutron images are expected to provide information to supplement that available from X-ray tests. The primary camera image area was a 30x30 cm field-of-view with a spatial resolution approaching 1.6 line pairs/mm (lp/mm). The camera had a remotely changeable second lens to limit the field-of-view to 7.6x7.6 cm for high spatial resolution (at least 4 lp/mm) thermal neutron imaging, but neutron and light scatter will limit resolution for fast neutrons to about 0.5 lp/mm. Remote focus capability enhanced camera set-up for optimum operation. The 75 dB dynamic range camera system included sup 6 Li-based screens for imaging of thermal and epithermal neutrons and ZnS(Ag)-based screens for fast neutron imaging. The fast optics was input to a Super S-25 Gen II image intensifi...

  4. Scintillating fibre tracking neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, Joakim.

    1995-04-01

    A detector for measurements of collimated fluxes of neutrons in the energy range 2-20 MeV is proposed. It utilizes (n.p) elastic scattering in scintillating optical fibres placed in successive orthogonal layers perpendicular to the neutron flux. A test module has been designed, constructed and tested with respect to separation of neutron and gamma events. The pulse height measurements show the feasibility to discriminate between neutron, gamma and background events. Application to measurements of fusion neutrons is considered. 18 refs, 22 figs, 4 tabs

  5. Estimation of scattering neutron intensities of materials for neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Kobayashi, H.

    2004-01-01

    A new database (DBNR) is prepared based on the Nuclear Data from the Joint Evaluated File Library (NDJEF) for use in scattering neutron radiography and ordinal radiography. The new database includes a data handling tool. As a result, users can easily extract nuclear data from a file on a personal computer. The nuclear data are limited to naturally existing stable elements in an energy range from 10 -6 eV to 10 -7 eV. Within the limitation, total scattering (n, γ) and (n, α) cross sections are arbitrary extracted for the desired elements and energy ranges

  6. Advanced thermal neutron area detector. The development and application of an imaging plate neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niimura, Nobuo

    1995-01-01

    This report reviews a newly developed imaging plate neutron detector (IP-ND), along with its actual application. First, imaging plate, which is an integrating two-dimensional radiation detector using photostimulated luminescence (PSL), is briefly mentioned. Then, IP-ND is described in terms of the following: design principle, trial manufacture of IP-ND, and performance (such as dynamic range, spatial resolution, neutron detection efficiency, and PSL according to kinds of neutron converters). The application of IP-ND is outlined under the following fields: (1) neutron radiography, (2) electric noiseless detector, (3) fast neutron detector, (4) neutron diffraction, (5) neutron scattering, and (6) neutron reflector. (N.K.)

  7. Influence of the neutron transport tube on neutron resonance densitometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitatani Fumito

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutron Resonance Densitometry (NRD is a non-destructive assay technique of nuclear materials in particle-like debris that contains various materials. An aim of NRD is to quantify nuclear materials in a melting fuel of Fukusima Daiichi plant, spent nuclear fuel and annihilation disposal fuel etc. NRD consists of two techniques of Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA and Neutron Resonance Capture Analysis (NRCA or Prompt Gamma-ray Analysis (PGA. A density of nuclear material isotopes is decided with NRTA. The materials absorbing a neutron in a wide energy range such as boron in a sample are identified by NRCA/PGA. The information of NRCA/PGA is used in NRTA analysis to quantify nuclear material isotopes. A neutron time of flight (TOF method is used in NRD measurements. A facility, consisting of a neutron source, a neutron flight path, and a detector is required. A short flight path and a strong neutron source are needed to downsize such a facility and put NRD into practical use. A neutron transport tube covers a flight path to prevent noises. In order to investigate the effect of neutron transport tube and pulse width of a neutron source, we carried out NRTA experiments with a 2-m short neutron transport tube constructed at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute - Linear Accelerator (KURRI-LINAC, and impacts of shield of neutron transport tube and influence of pulse width of a neutron source were examined. A shield of the neutron transport tube reduced a background and had a good influence on the measurement. The resonance dips of 183W at 27 eV was successfully observed with a pulse width of a neutron source less than 2 μs.

  8. Influence of the neutron transport tube on neutron resonance densitometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitatani, Fumito; Tsuchiya, Harufumi; Koizumi, Mitsuo; Takamine, Jun; Hori, Junichi; Sano, Tadafumi

    2017-09-01

    Neutron Resonance Densitometry (NRD) is a non-destructive assay technique of nuclear materials in particle-like debris that contains various materials. An aim of NRD is to quantify nuclear materials in a melting fuel of Fukusima Daiichi plant, spent nuclear fuel and annihilation disposal fuel etc. NRD consists of two techniques of Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) and Neutron Resonance Capture Analysis (NRCA) or Prompt Gamma-ray Analysis (PGA). A density of nuclear material isotopes is decided with NRTA. The materials absorbing a neutron in a wide energy range such as boron in a sample are identified by NRCA/PGA. The information of NRCA/PGA is used in NRTA analysis to quantify nuclear material isotopes. A neutron time of flight (TOF) method is used in NRD measurements. A facility, consisting of a neutron source, a neutron flight path, and a detector is required. A short flight path and a strong neutron source are needed to downsize such a facility and put NRD into practical use. A neutron transport tube covers a flight path to prevent noises. In order to investigate the effect of neutron transport tube and pulse width of a neutron source, we carried out NRTA experiments with a 2-m short neutron transport tube constructed at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute - Linear Accelerator (KURRI-LINAC), and impacts of shield of neutron transport tube and influence of pulse width of a neutron source were examined. A shield of the neutron transport tube reduced a background and had a good influence on the measurement. The resonance dips of 183W at 27 eV was successfully observed with a pulse width of a neutron source less than 2 μs.

  9. Digital neutron dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramondetta, P.W.; Groeber, E.O.Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Design features for a portable battery-operated neutron dosimeter are described. The system employs a 50-mil PIN detector diode, whose forward voltage increases with exposure to fast neutrons. Because this change is permanent and cumulative, the system is able to integrate small doses (from 0 to 1000 rad) over long periods of time. The system is temperature compensated over its operating range of -40 C to +52C. Display accuracies of +-20 rad for readings below 100 rad and +-20% for readings above 100 rad are maintained throughout the range. Temperature correction is performed digitally after an initial analog-to-digital conversion of both the forward diode voltage and the ambient temperature. System flexibility is promoted with the use of a replaceable ROM for the final voltage-to-dose conversion table. This digital approach to temperature compensation, combined with the extensive use of CMOS circuitry, suggests the use of custom large-scale integration as a means of further reducing system weight and size. This possibility, as well as others, is discussed as a means of reducing system size. Test and evaluation results are also included. (author)

  10. Neutron microdosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kliauga, P.

    1987-01-01

    A major effort was made during the past year to do precision microdosimetry of neutrons at the RARAF facility. By precision microdosimetry the authors mean a special effort to understand, better than previously, some of the factors which go into the limitation of the accuracy and precision of microdosimetric measurements of neutrons. That such factors are still not clearly understood, or at least accounted for, is immediately evident upon examination of published microdosimetric measurements. What becomes immediately apparent upon examination of, say, the dose mean lineal energies reported, is that the spread of reported values for exceeds the reported experimental uncertainty, commonly taken as about 5%. Differences of 50% are not uncommon. It is easy to make the mistake that since classical microdosimetry uses a well-established experimental tool, the proportional counter, that sources of error should also be well understood. However, microdosimetry makes use of the proportional counter in a way which is quite different from its origins as a low-energy photon spectroscopy device. Microdosimetric spectra, particularly of neutrons, span 5 to 6 decades of event sizes. It is by no means certain that proportionality extends over such a range, and in fact it has been pointed out that it probably does not. Data analysis techniques vary from one experimenter to another, and can substantially affect mean values as well as spectral shape. The authors are examining these parameters, as well as others, such as calibration errors, but they are especially concentrating on the effect of counter design and performance on the resultant spectra which the counter measures

  11. Neutron absorption profile in a reactor moderated by different mixtures of light and heavy waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, Mohamed E.; Aly, Mohamed N.; Gaber, Fatma A.; Dorrah, Mahmoud E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We studied neutron absorption spectra in a mixed water moderated reactor. • Changing D 2 O% in moderator induced neutron energy spectral shift. • Most of the neutrons absorbed in control rods were epithermal. • Control rods worth changes were not proportional to changes of D 2 O% in moderator. • Control rod arrangement influenced the neutronic behavior of the reactor. - Abstract: A Monte-Carlo parametric study was carried out to investigate the neutron absorption profile in a model of LR-0 reactor when it is moderated by different mixtures of heavy/light waters at molecular ratios ranging from 0% up to 100% D 2 O at increments of 10% in D 2 O. The tallies included; neutron absorption profiles in control rods and moderator, and neutron capture profile in 238 U. The work focused on neutron absorption in control rods entailing; total mass of control rods needed to attain criticality, neutron absorption density and total neutron absorption in control rods at each of the studied mixed water moderators. The aim was to explore whether thermal neutron poisons are the most suitable poisons to be used in control rods of nuclear reactors moderated by mixed heavy/light water moderators

  12. Fruits of neutron research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, C.

    1994-01-01

    Car windshields that don't break during accidents and jets that fly longer without making a refueling stop. Compact discs, credit cards, and pocket calculators. Refrigerator magnets and automatic car window openers. Beach shoes, food packaging, and bulletproof vests made of tough plastics. The quality and range of consumer products have improved steadily since the 1970s. One of the reasons: neutron research. Industries, employing neutron scattering techniques, to study materials properties, to act as diagnostics in tracing system performance, or as sources for radioactive isotopes used in medical fields for diagnostics or treatment, have all benefited from the fruits of advanced work with neutron sources

  13. Curves and tables of neutron cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Tsuneo; Asami, Tetsuo; Yoshida, Tadashi

    1990-07-01

    Neutron cross-section curves from the Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library version 3, JENDL-3, are presented in both graphical and tabular form for users in a wide range of application areas in the nuclear energy field. The contents cover cross sections for all the main reactions induced by neutrons with an energy below 20 MeV including; total, elastic scattering, capture, and fission, (n,n'), (n,2n), (n,3n), (n,α), (n,p) reactions. The 2200 m/s cross-section values, resonance integrals, and Maxwellian- and fission-spectrum averaged cross sections are also tabulated. (author)

  14. Neutron Absorbing Ability Variation in Neutron Absorbing Material Caused by the Neutron Irradiation in Spent Fuel Storage Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Hee Dong; Han, Seul Gi; Lee, Sang Dong; Kim, Ki Hong; Ryu, Eag Hyang; Park, Hwa Gyu

    2014-01-01

    In spent fuel storage facility like high density spent fuel storage racks and dry storage casks, spent fuels are stored with neutron absorbing materials installed as a part of those facilities, and they are used for absorbing neutrons emitted from spent fuels. Usually structural material with neutron absorbing material of racks and casks are located around spent fuels, so it is irradiated by neutrons for long time. Neutron absorbing ability could be changed by the variation of nuclide composition in neutron absorbing material caused by the irradiation of neutrons. So, neutron absorbing materials are continuously faced with spent fuels with boric acid solution or inert gas environment. Major nuclides in neutron absorbing material are Al 27 , C 12 , B 11 , B 10 and they are changed to numerous other ones as radioactive decay or neutron absorption reaction. The B 10 content in neutron absorbing material dominates the neutron absorbing ability, so, the variation of nuclide composition including the decrease of B 10 content is the critical factor on neutron absorbing ability. In this study, neutron flux in spent fuel, the activation of neutron absorbing material and the variation of nuclide composition are calculated. And, the minimum neutron flux causing the decrease of B 10 content is calculated in spent fuel storage facility. Finally, the variation of neutron multiplication factor is identified according to the one of B 10 content in neutron absorbing material. The minimum neutron flux to impact the neutron absorbing ability is 10 10 order, however, usual neutron flux from spent fuel is 10 8 order. Therefore, even though neutron absorbing material is irradiated for over 40 years, B 10 content is little decreased, so, initial neutron absorbing ability could be kept continuously

  15. A neutron amplifier: prospects for reactor-based waste transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanovsky, A.

    2004-01-01

    A design concept and characteristics for an epithermal breeder controlled by variable feedback and external neutron source intensity are presented. By replacing the control rods with neutron sources, we could maintain good power distribution and perform radioactive waste burning in high flux subcritical reactors (HFSR) that have primary system size, power density and cost comparable to a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Another approach for actinide transmutation is a molten salt subcritical reactor proposed by Russian scientists. To increase neutron source intensity the HFSR is divided into two zones: a booster and a blanket with solid and liquid fuels. A neutron gate (absorber and moderator) imposed between two zones permits fast neutrons from the booster to flow to the blanket. Neutrons moving in the reverse direction are moderated and absorbed in the absorber zone. In the HFSR, neptunium-plutonium fuel is circulated in the booster and blanket, and americium-curium in the absorber zone and outer reflector. Use of a liquid actinide fuel permits transport of the delayed-neutron emitters from the blanket to the booster, where they can provide additional neutrons (source-dominated mode) or all the necessary excitation without an external neutron source (self-amplifying mode). With a blanket neutron multiplication gain of 20 and a booster gain of 50, an external neutron source rate of at least 10 15 n/s (0.7 MW D-T or 2.5 MW electron beam power) is needed to control the HFSR that produces 300 MWt. Most of the power could be generated in the blanket that burns about 100 kg of actinides a year. The analysis takes into consideration a wide range of HFSR design aspects including the wave model of observed relativistic phenomena, plant seismic diagnostics, fission electric cells (FEC) with a multistage collector (anode) and layered cathode. (author)

  16. Neutron cross section standards and instrumentation: Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This annual report from the National Bureau of Standards contains a summary of the results of the Neutron Cross Section Standards and Instrumentation Program. The technical measurements for the past year are given along with the proposed program and budget needs for the next three years. The neutron standards measurements have concentrated on the most important 235 U(n,f) cross section in the thermal to 20 MeV energy range along with the development of neutron detectors required for these measurements. The NBS measurements have made a significant contribution to the improvement in the understanding of this reaction. Measurements were performed with numerous neutron detectors at overlapping energies and at different neutron sources in order to reduce the systematic errors to achieve the required accuracy in this important neutron standard. Significant progress was also made in the development of a detector to utilize the 3 He(n,p) reaction as a standard in the eV to MeV energy region. Improvements in data acquisition systems as well as additional studies of advanced neutron sources were accomplished. Contacts with private industry were maintained and coordination of the neutron standards evaluation was continued. The report also includes biographical listings of the research staff along with copies of a few of our recent publications. 13 figs., 1 tab

  17. Diagnostics and equipment for ion temperatures and implosion neutron yields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jiabin; Zheng Zhijian; Peng Hansheng; Wen Shuhuai; Zhang Baohan; Ding Yongkun; Qi Lanying; Chen Ming; Li Chaoguang

    2001-01-01

    Fuel ion temperature is of great importance in the ICF research field. A set of ultra-fast quenched plastic scintillation detector system was fabricated for low yield neutron diagnostic. The detection efficiency and the sensitivity to DT neutrons were scaled using a K-400 accelerator and a pulse neutron tube from Russia with a width 5 - 10 ns, respectively. Its time response functions were calibrated by cosmic ray and implosion neutron separately. Under the conditions of low laser energy so low neutron yield and very limited space, fuel ion temperatures (including implosion neutron yields at the same time) were obtained. The measured ion temperatures for exploding pusher capsules were between 4 keV and 5 keV with errors +-(15 - 25)%. The neutron yields were 5 x 10 8 - 3 x 10 9 for exploding pusher capsules and 1.6 x 10 7 - 3.9 x 10 8 for ablation ones with errors +- (7 - 10)%. Of the six shots of neutron yields calculated, five are in good agreement with authors' experimental results in the range of +- 20%. Not only the heat-conducting mechanism and the effects on implosion of the energy balance of each path of incidence laser, target design, fuel mixture as well as hot electron behavior have been investigated, but also the upgrade level of the laser facility Shengguang II has been tested

  18. DOE personnel neutron dosimetry evaluation and upgrade program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faust, L.G.; Stroud, C.M.; Vallario, E.J.

    1988-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsors an extensive research program to improve the methods, dosimeters, and instruments available to DOE facilities for measuring neutron dose and assessing its effects on the work force. The Total Dose Meter was recently developed for measuring in real time the absorbed dose of mixed neutron and gamma radiation and for calculating the dose equivalent. The Field Neutron Spectrometer was developed to provide a portable instrument for determining neutron spectra in the workplace for flux-to-dose equivalent conversion and quality factor calculation. The Combination Thermoluminescence/Track Etch Dosimeter (TLD/TED) was developed to extend the effective neutron energy range of the conventional TLDs to improve detection of fast-energy neutrons. An Optically Stimulated Luminescence Dosimeter is presently being developed for application to gamma, neutron, and beta radiation. An Effective Dose Equivalent System is being developed to provide guidance in implementing the January 1987 Presidential Directive to determine effective dose equivalent. Superheated Drop Detectors are being investigated for their potential as real time neutron dosimeters. This paper includes discussions of these improvements brought about by the DOE research program

  19. Neutron guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Geoffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    A neutron guide in which lengths of cylindrical glass tubing have rectangular glass plates properly dimensioned to allow insertion into the cylindrical glass tubing so that a sealed geometrically precise polygonal cross-section is formed in the cylindrical glass tubing. The neutron guide provides easier alignment between adjacent sections than do the neutron guides of the prior art.

  20. Simulation of a high energy neutron irradiation facility at beamline 11 of the China Spallation Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tairan, Liang [School of Physics and Electronic Information Inner Mongolia University for the Nationalities, Tongliao 028043 (China); Zhiduo, Li [Dongguan Branch, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Wen, Yin, E-mail: wenyin@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [Dongguan Branch, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Institute of Physics, CAS, P.O. Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China); Fei, Shen [Dongguan Branch, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Quanzhi, Yu [Dongguan Branch, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Institute of Physics, CAS, P.O. Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China); Tianjiao, Liang [Dongguan Branch, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2017-07-11

    The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) will accommodate 20 neutron beamlines at its first target station. These beamlines serve different purposes, and beamline 11 is designed to analyze the degraded models and damage mechanisms, such as Single Event Effects in electronic components and devices for aerospace electronic systems. This paper gives a preliminary discussion on the scheme of a high energy neutron irradiation experiment at the beamline 11 shutter based on the Monte Carlo simulation method. The neutron source term is generated by calculating the neutrons scattering into beamline 11 with a model that includes the target-moderator-reflector area. Then, the neutron spectrum at the sample position is obtained. The intensity of neutrons with energy of hundreds of MeV is approximately 1E8 neutron/cm{sup 2}/s, which is useful for experiments. The displacement production rate and gas productions are calculated for common materials such as tungsten, tantalum and SS316. The results indicate that the experiment can provide irradiation dose rate ranges from 1E-5 to 1E-4 dpa per operating year. The residual radioactivity is also calculated for regular maintenance work. These results give the basic reference for the experimental design.

  1. Neutron personnel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, R.V.

    1981-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art in neutron personnel dosimetry is reviewed. Topics covered include dosimetry needs and alternatives, current dosimetry approaches, personnel monitoring devices, calibration strategies, and future developments

  2. BUILDING A NETWORK FOR NEUTRON SCATTERING EDUCATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pynn, Roger; Baker, Shenda Mary; Louca, Despo A.; McGreevy, Robert L.; Ekkebus, Allen E.; Kszos, Lynn A.; Anderson, Ian S.

    2008-01-01

    concerted effort was made to involve representatives from historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and minority educational institutions (MEIs). The roadmap contained herein provides the path to a national infrastructure for education of students, faculty, and professional researchers who wish to make use of national neutron scattering facilities but do not have (or do not believe they have) the educational background to do so. Education of other stakeholders, including the public, students in kindergarten through twelfth grade (K-12), and policy makers is also included. The opening sessions of the workshop provided the current status of neutron scattering education in North America, Europe, and Australia. National neutron sources have individually developed outreach and advertising programs aimed at increasing awareness among researchers of the potential applications of neutron scattering. However, because their principal mission is to carry out scientific research, their outreach efforts are necessarily self-limiting. The opening session was designed to build awareness that the individual programs need to be coupled with, and integrated into, a broader education program that addresses the complete range of experience, from the student to the experienced researcher, and the wide range of scientific disciplines covered by neutron scattering. Such a program must also take full advantage of existing educational programs and expertise at universities and expand them using modern distance learning capabilities, recognizing that the landscape of education is changing

  3. BUILDING A NETWORK FOR NEUTRON SCATTERING EDUCATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pynn, Roger [ORNL; Baker, Shenda Mary [ORNL; Louca, Despo A [ORNL; McGreevy, Robert L [ORNL; Ekkebus, Allen E [ORNL; Kszos, Lynn A [ORNL; Anderson, Ian S [ORNL

    2008-10-01

    scattering education. A concerted effort was made to involve representatives from historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and minority educational institutions (MEIs). The roadmap contained herein provides the path to a national infrastructure for education of students, faculty, and professional researchers who wish to make use of national neutron scattering facilities but do not have (or do not believe they have) the educational background to do so. Education of other stakeholders, including the public, students in kindergarten through twelfth grade (K-12), and policy makers is also included. The opening sessions of the workshop provided the current status of neutron scattering education in North America, Europe, and Australia. National neutron sources have individually developed outreach and advertising programs aimed at increasing awareness among researchers of the potential applications of neutron scattering. However, because their principal mission is to carry out scientific research, their outreach efforts are necessarily self-limiting. The opening session was designed to build awareness that the individual programs need to be coupled with, and integrated into, a broader education program that addresses the complete range of experience, from the student to the experienced researcher, and the wide range of scientific disciplines covered by neutron scattering. Such a program must also take full advantage of existing educational programs and expertise at universities and expand them using modern distance learning capabilities, recognizing that the landscape of education is changing.

  4. Test of Monte Carlo Simulation for MoNA neutron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, J. E.; Wantz, A.; Rogers, W. F.; Frank, N.; Kuchera, A. N.; Mosby, S.; Thoennessen, M.; MoNA Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The MoNA (Modular Neutron Array) and LISA (Large multi-Institutional Scintillator Array) detector systems at NSCL are used to determine the energy and trajectory of neutrons decaying from particle-unbound states in exotic neutron-rich nuclei. In order to test the accuracy of simulation (GEANT4 with Menate_R), important for interpreting scattering data from the arrays, an experiment was recently conducted at Los Alamos LANSCE center using 16 MoNA detectors (each consisting of BC408 organic scintillator plastic measuring 200×10×10 cm3) exposed to a thin, well-characterized neutron beam over a wide energy range in order to observe neutron scattering directly. Neutrons scatter elastically from H and C nuclei and inelastically from C nuclei. Elastic scattering from C (including some inelastic channels) produce light below detector threshold, and therefore constitute ``dark scattering,'' redirecting neutron trajectories without detection, and some inelastic C channels produce additional neutrons in the array. Several features of scattering, including scattering angle, mean distance between scatters, multiplicity, and dark-scatter redirection are analyzed and compared with simulation over a wide range of incoming neutron energy. Results will be presented. Work supported by NSF Grant PHY-1744043.

  5. Measurement of the differential cross section for elastic K - neutron scattering in the c.m. energy range 1.60-1.74 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, O.; Hepp, V.; Ströbele, H.; Wittek, W.; Baillon, P.

    1982-08-01

    The final state K - pn has been analyzed in a K - deuterium bubble chamber experiment at K - momenta between 680 and 840 MeV/ c. Differential cross sections for elastic K - p and K - n scattering in the c.m. energy range of 1.60-1.74 GeV are presented. The results for K -p→K -p agree well with existing data obtained with hydrogen targets. The results for K -n→K -n are lower but still compatible with recent measurements from a counter experiment.

  6. Measurement of (n,/alpha/) cross sections of chromium, iron, and nickel in the 5- to 10-MeV neutron energy range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulsen, A.; Liskien, H.; Arnotte, F.; Widera, R.

    1981-01-01

    A measuring program has been carried out at the Van de Graaff accelerator facility of the Central Bureau for Nuclear Measurements for the determination of (n,/alpha/) cross sections on the main constituents of fast reactor structural materials, namely the elements chromium, iron, and nickel. Results obtained in the energy range from 5 to 10 Mev are presented in terms of laboratory angle-differential cross sections, relative Legendre polynomial coefficients of angular distributions, angle-integrated cross sections, and average alpha energies. 13 refs

  7. Neutron polarizability. Possibilities of its determination in neutron experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksandrov, Y A

    2001-01-01

    The history of question of neutron polarizability is discussed. Most of the neutron physical experiments conducted at neutron energies below 14 MeV to discover the electric polarizability of the neutron are reviewed.The existence of additional scattering after all known long range-related phenomena are taken into account are emphasized. In the keV neutron energy region, the effect of neutron polarizability on the angular distribution of scattering (over a wide range of angles) and the energy behavior of the total cross section of neutron interaction is studied. Finally, in the region of low energies (below 1 keV) the focus is on the influence of polarizability on the energy dependence of total neutron cross sections. It is emphasized that measurements at energies below several hundreds keV have not given any positive results yet due to the smallness of the experimental effect. Possible existence of an additional potential of neutron scattering on nuclei with a longer range than that of the usual nuclear poten...

  8. Uses of neutrons in engineering and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, J.

    1982-01-01

    Having outlined the principles of nuclear safeguards, some application of neutrons in engineering and technology are described including: the use of neutron activation analysis for on-stream analysis in the coal industry and for forensic applications, fission track detection of uranium, neutron sondes for oil and mineral exploration, tracer applications, transmutation doping of silicon, nuclear track filter production, neutron scattering studies of materials, neutron radiography, dynamic radiography, tomography and holography. (U.K.)

  9. Lectures on neutron scattering techniques: 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlile, C.J.

    1988-08-01

    The lecture on the production of neutrons was presented at a Summer School on neutron scattering, Rome, 1986. A description is given of the production of neutrons by natural radioactive sources, fission, and particle accelerator sources. Modern neutron sources with high intensities are discussed including the ISIS pulsed neutron source at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and the High Flux Reactor at the Institut Laue Langevin. (U.K.)

  10. Neutron imaging plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niimura, Nobuo

    1995-01-01

    Imaging plates have been used in the field of medical diagnosis since long ago, but their usefulness was verified as the two-dimensional detector for analyzing the X-ray crystalline structure of high bio molecules like protein, and they have contributed to the remarkable progress in this field. The great contribution is due to the excellent features, such as the detection efficiency of about 100%, the positional resolution smaller than 0.2 mm, the dynamic range of five digits, and the area of several hundreds mm square. The neutron imaging plates have not yet obtained the sufficient results. It was planned to construct the neutron diffractometer for biological matters, and to put imaging plate neutron detectors (IP-ND) to practical use as the detector. The research on the development of IP-NDs was carried out, and the IPp-NDs having the performance comparable with that for X-ray were able to be produced. Imaging plates are the integral type two-dimensional radiation detector using photostimulated luminescence matters, and their principle is explained. As to neutron imaging plates, the converter, neutron detection efficiency and the flight of secondary particles in photo-stimulated luminescence matters are described. As for the present state of development of neutron imaging plates, the IP-NDs made for trial, the dynamic range, the positional resolution, the detection efficiency and the kinds of converters, and the application of IP-NDs are reported. (K.I.)

  11. New class of neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czirr, J.B.

    1997-01-01

    An optimized neutron scattering instrument design must include all significant components, including the detector. For example, useful beam intensity is limited by detector dead time; detector pixel size determines the optimum beam diameter, sample size, and sample to detector distance; and detector efficiency vs. wavelength determines the available energy range. As an example of the next generation of detectors that could affect overall instrumentation design, we will describe a new scintillator material that is potentially superior to currently available scintillators. We have grown and tested several small, single crystal scintillators based upon the general class of cerium-activated lithium lanthanide borates. The outstanding characteristic of these materials is the high scintillation efficiency-as much as five times that of Li-glass scintillators. This increase in light output permits the practical use of the exothermic B (n, alpha) reaction for low energy neutron detection. This reaction provides a four-fold increase in capture cross section relative to the Li (n, alpha) reaction, and the intriguing possibility of demanding a charged-particle/gamma ray coincidence to reduce background detection rates. These new materials will be useful in the thermal and epithermal energy ran at reactors and pulsed neutron sources

  12. Pulsed neutron uranium borehole logging with prompt fission neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bivens, H.M.; Smith, G.W.; Jensen, D.H.

    1976-01-01

    The gross count natural gamma log normally used for uranium borehole logging is seriously affected by disequilibrium. Methods for the direct measurement of uranium, such as neutron logging, which are not affected by disequilibrium have been the object of considerable effort in recent years. This paper describes a logging system for uranium which uses a small accelerator to generate pulses of 14 MeV neutrons to detect and assay uranium by the measurement of prompt fission neutrons in the epithermal energy range. After an initial feasibility study, a prototype logging probe was built for field evaluation which began in January 1976. Physical and operational characteristics of the prototype probe, the neutron tube-transformer assembly, and the neutron tube are described. In logging operations, only the epithermal prompt fission neutrons detected between 250 microseconds to 2500 microseconds following the excitation neutron pulse are counted. Comparison of corrected neutron logs with the conventional gross count natural gamma logs and the chemical assays of cores from boreholes are shown. The results obtained with this neutron probe clearly demonstrate its advantages over the gross count natural gamma log, although at this time the accuracy of the neutron log assay is not satisfactory under some conditions. The necessary correction factors for various borehole and formation parameters are being determined and, when applied, should improve the assay accuracy

  13. Neutron detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Andrew C [Knoxville, TN; Jardret,; Vincent, D [Powell, TN

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  14. Response characteristics of selected personnel neutron dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, J.C.; Fix, J.J.; Hadley, R.T.; Holbrook, K.L.; Yoder, R.C.; Roberson, P.L.; Endres, G.W.R.; Nichols, L.L.; Schwartz, R.B.

    1983-09-01

    Performance characteristics of selected personnel neutron dosimeters in current use at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities were determined from their evaluation of neutron dose equivalent received after irradiations with specific neutron sources at either the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) or the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The characteristics assessed included: lower detection level, energy response, precision and accuracy. It was found that when all of the laboratories employed a common set of calibrations, the overall accuracy was approximately +-20%, which is within uncertainty expected for these dosimeters. For doses above 80 mrem, the accuracy improved to better than 10% when a common calibration was used. Individual differences found in this study may reflect differences in calibration technique rather than differences in the dose rates of actual calibration standards. Second, at dose rates above 100 mrem, the precision for the best participants was generally below +-10% which is also within expected limits for these types of dosimeters. The poorest results had a standard deviation of about +-25%. At the lowest doses, which were sometimes below the lower detection limit, the precision often approached or exceeded +-100%. Third, the lower level of detection for free field 252 Cf neutrons generally ranged between 20 and 50 mrem. Fourth, the energy dependence study provided a characterization of the response of the dosimeters to neutron energies far from the calibration energy. 11 references, 22 figures, 26 tables

  15. High efficiency moderator for pulsed neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, R.E.; Granada, J.R.; Gillette, V.H.; Dawidowski, J.

    1990-01-01

    Moderators consisting of clusters of smaller slow-neutron-decoupled moderating elements were tested through experiments of pulsed neutron diffraction, leakage spectrum measurement, and neutron pulse decay. A simple slab and a thin 'sandwich' moderator were also measured for comparison purposes. For a given time width of the neutron pulse in the usual wavelength range for neutron diffraction, the proposed assembly produced a much higher neutron yield. Clues to the implementation of the desired time-response in moderator design and optimization are suggested by the present results. (orig.)

  16. Production of epithermal neutron beams for BNCT

    CERN Document Server

    Bisceglie, E; Colonna, N; Paticchio, V; Santorelli, P; Variale, V

    2002-01-01

    The use of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for the treatment of deep-seated tumors requires neutron beams of suitable energy and intensity. Simulations indicate the optimal energy to reside in the epithermal region, in particular between 1 and 10 keV. Therapeutic neutron beams with high spectral purity in this energy range could be produced with accelerator-based neutron sources through a suitable neutron-producing reaction. Herein, we report on different solutions that have been investigated as possible sources of epithermal neutron beams for BNCT. The potential use of such sources for a hospital-based therapeutic facility is discussed.

  17. Forensic neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishi, T.

    1987-01-01

    The progress of forensic neutron activation analysis (FNAA) in Japan is described. FNAA began in 1965 and during the past 20 years many cases have been handled; these include determination of toxic materials, comparison examination of physical evidences (e.g., paints, metal fragments, plastics and inks) and drug sample differentiation. Neutron activation analysis is applied routinely to the scientific criminal investigation as one of multielement analytical techniques. This paper also discusses these routine works. (author) 14 refs

  18. NEUTRON IMAGING, RADIOGRAPHY AND TOMOGRAPHY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SMITH,G.C.

    2002-03-01

    Neutrons are an invaluable probe in a wide range of scientific, medical and commercial endeavors. Many of these applications require the recording of an image of the neutron signal, either in one-dimension or in two-dimensions. We summarize the reactions of neutrons with the most important elements that are used for their detection. A description is then given of the major techniques used in neutron imaging, with emphasis on the detection media and position readout principle. Important characteristics such as position resolution, linearity, counting rate capability and sensitivity to gamma-background are discussed. Finally, the application of a subset of these instruments in radiology and tomography is described.

  19. The neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheetham, A.K.

    1990-01-01

    In 1932, when Chadwick obtained the first unambiguous evidence for the existence of the neutron, his discovery confirmed the widely held belief that there existed a particle with zero charge and a mass similar to that of the proton. Indeed, as early as 1920, Lord Rutherford had suggested such a possibility in a lecture to the Royal Society. The discovery of the neutron had an immediate and dramatic impact in several areas. The nucleus, which had hitherto been regarded, somewhat unsatisfactorily, as a combination of protons and electrons, was now seen as comprising of protons and neutrons. This in turn lead to a proper understanding of the nature of isotopes and provided a fresh basis for nuclear theories. This paper examines the nature and properties of the neutron, and describes some facets of its remarkable role in contemporary science and technology. The aspects covered are its properties, the production and detection of neutrons, the reactions between neutrons and nuclei, fission reactions, neutron scattering, pulsed neutron scattering and neutron spectroscopy. (author)

  20. Atmospheric neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preszler, A.M.; Moon, S.; White, R.S.

    1976-01-01

    Additional calibrations of the University of California double-scatter neutron and additional analysis corrections lead to the slightly changed neutron fluxes reported here. The theoretical angular distributions of Merker (1975) are in general agreement with our experimental fluxes but do not give the peaks for vertical upward and downward moving neutrons. The theoretical neutron escape current J 2 /sub pi/ (Merker, 1972; Armstrong et al., 1973) is in agreement with the experimental values from 10 to 100 MeV. Our experimental fluxes agree with those of the Kanbach et al. (1974) in the overlap region from 70 to 100 MeV

  1. Neutron scattering and absorption properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, N.E.

    1993-12-01

    The Table in this report presents an evaluated set of values for the experimental quantities, which characterize the properties for scattering and absorption of neutrons. The neutron cross section is given for room temperature neutrons, 20.43{degree}C, corresponds to a thermal neutron energy of 0.0253 electron volts (eV) or a neutron velocity of 2200 meters/second. The neutron resonance integral is defined over the energy range from 0.5 eV to 0.1 {times} 10{sup 6} eV, or 0.1 MeV. A list of the major references used is given below. The literature cutoff data is October 1993. Uncertainties are given in parentheses. Parentheses with two or more numbers indicate values to the excited states(s) and to the ground state of the product nucleus.

  2. Neutron imaging integrated circuit and method for detecting neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagarkar, Vivek V.; More, Mitali J.

    2017-12-05

    The present disclosure provides a neutron imaging detector and a method for detecting neutrons. In one example, a method includes providing a neutron imaging detector including plurality of memory cells and a conversion layer on the memory cells, setting one or more of the memory cells to a first charge state, positioning the neutron imaging detector in a neutron environment for a predetermined time period, and reading a state change at one of the memory cells, and measuring a charge state change at one of the plurality of memory cells from the first charge state to a second charge state less than the first charge state, where the charge state change indicates detection of neutrons at said one of the memory cells.

  3. Dipole-dipole dispersion interactions between neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babb, James F. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, ITAMP, Cambridge, MA (United States); Higa, Renato [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Hussein, Mahir S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Estudos Avancados, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, CTA, Sao Jose dos Campos (Brazil)

    2017-06-15

    We investigate the long-range interactions between two neutrons utilizing recent data on the neutron static and dynamic electric and magnetic dipole polarizabilities. The resulting long-range potentials are used to make quantitative comparisons between the collisions of a neutron with a neutron and a neutron with a proton. We also assess the importance of the first pion production threshold and first excited state of the nucleon, the Δ-resonance (J{sup π} = +3/2, I = 3/2). We found both dynamical effects to be quite relevant for distances r between ∝ 50 fm up to ∝ 10{sup 3} fm in the nn system, the neutron-wall system and in the wall-neutron-wall system, reaching the expected asymptotic limit beyond that. Relevance of our findings to the confinement of ultra cold neutrons inside bottles is discussed. (orig.)

  4. Future directions in high-pressure neutron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, M.

    2015-04-01

    The ability to manipulate structure and properties using pressure has been well known for many centuries. Diffraction provides the unique ability to observe these structural changes in fine detail on lengthscales spanning atomic to nanometre dimensions. Amongst the broad suite of diffraction tools available today, neutrons provide unique capabilities of fundamental importance. However, to date, the growth of neutron diffraction under extremes of pressure has been limited by the weakness of available sources. In recent years, substantial government investments have led to the construction of a new generation of neutron sources while existing facilities have been revitalized by upgrades. The timely convergence of these bright facilities with new pressure-cell technologies suggests that the field of high-pressure (HP) neutron science is on the cusp of substantial growth. Here, the history of HP neutron research is examined with the hope of gleaning an accurate prediction of where some of these revolutionary capabilities will lead in the near future. In particular, a dramatic expansion of current pressure-temperature range is likely, with corresponding increased scope for extreme-conditions science with neutron diffraction. This increase in coverage will be matched with improvements in data quality. Furthermore, we can also expect broad new capabilities beyond diffraction, including in neutron imaging, small angle scattering and inelastic spectroscopy.

  5. Future directions in high-pressure neutron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, M

    2015-04-22

    The ability to manipulate structure and properties using pressure has been well known for many centuries. Diffraction provides the unique ability to observe these structural changes in fine detail on lengthscales spanning atomic to nanometre dimensions. Amongst the broad suite of diffraction tools available today, neutrons provide unique capabilities of fundamental importance. However, to date, the growth of neutron diffraction under extremes of pressure has been limited by the weakness of available sources. In recent years, substantial government investments have led to the construction of a new generation of neutron sources while existing facilities have been revitalized by upgrades. The timely convergence of these bright facilities with new pressure-cell technologies suggests that the field of high-pressure (HP) neutron science is on the cusp of substantial growth. Here, the history of HP neutron research is examined with the hope of gleaning an accurate prediction of where some of these revolutionary capabilities will lead in the near future. In particular, a dramatic expansion of current pressure-temperature range is likely, with corresponding increased scope for extreme-conditions science with neutron diffraction. This increase in coverage will be matched with improvements in data quality. Furthermore, we can also expect broad new capabilities beyond diffraction, including in neutron imaging, small angle scattering and inelastic spectroscopy.

  6. Cold neutron diffraction contrast tomography of polycrystalline material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peetermans, S; King, A; Ludwig, W; Reischig, P; Lehmann, E H

    2014-11-21

    Traditional neutron imaging is based on the attenuation of a neutron beam through scattering and absorption upon traversing a sample of interest. It offers insight into the sample's material distribution at high spatial resolution in a non-destructive way. In this work, it is expanded to include the diffracted neutrons that were ignored so far and obtain a crystallographic distribution (grain mapping). Samples are rotated in a cold neutron beam of limited wavelength band. Projections of the crystallites formed by the neutrons they diffract are captured on a two dimensional imaging detector. Their positions on the detector reveal their orientation whereas the projections themselves are used to reconstruct the shape of the grains. Indebted to established synchrotron diffraction contrast tomography, this 'cold neutron diffraction contrast tomography' is performed on recrystallized aluminium for experimental comparison between both. Differences between set-up and method are discussed, followed by the application range in terms of sample properties (crystallite size and number, mosaicity and typical materials). Neutron diffraction contrast tomography allows to study large grains in bulky metallic structures.

  7. Future directions in high-pressure neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guthrie, M

    2015-01-01

    The ability to manipulate structure and properties using pressure has been well known for many centuries. Diffraction provides the unique ability to observe these structural changes in fine detail on lengthscales spanning atomic to nanometre dimensions. Amongst the broad suite of diffraction tools available today, neutrons provide unique capabilities of fundamental importance. However, to date, the growth of neutron diffraction under extremes of pressure has been limited by the weakness of available sources. In recent years, substantial government investments have led to the construction of a new generation of neutron sources while existing facilities have been revitalized by upgrades. The timely convergence of these bright facilities with new pressure-cell technologies suggests that the field of high-pressure (HP) neutron science is on the cusp of substantial growth. Here, the history of HP neutron research is examined with the hope of gleaning an accurate prediction of where some of these revolutionary capabilities will lead in the near future. In particular, a dramatic expansion of current pressure-temperature range is likely, with corresponding increased scope for extreme-conditions science with neutron diffraction. This increase in coverage will be matched with improvements in data quality. Furthermore, we can also expect broad new capabilities beyond diffraction, including in neutron imaging, small angle scattering and inelastic spectroscopy. (topical review)

  8. Study of neutron rich nuclei by delayed neutron decay using the Tonnerre multidetector; Etude de la decroissance par neutrons retardes de noyaux legers riches en neutrons avec le multidetecteur tonnerre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timis, C.N

    2001-07-01

    A new detection array for beta delayed neutrons was built. It includes up to 32 plastic scintillation counters 180 cm long located at 120 cm from the target. Neutron energy spectra are measured by time-of-flight in the 300 keV-15 MeV range with good energy resolution. The device was tested with several known nuclei. Its performances are discussed in comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. They very high overall detection efficiency on the TONNERRE array made it possible to study one and two neutron emission of {sup 11}Li. A complete decay scheme was obtained. The {sup 33}Mg and {sup 35}Al beta decays were investigated for the first time by neutron and gamma spectroscopy. Complete decay schemes were established and compared to large scale shell-model calculations. (authors)

  9. The Swedish facility for boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skoeld, K.; Capala, J.; Kierkegaard, J.; Haakansson, R.; Gudowska, I.

    2000-01-01

    A BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) facility has been constructed at the R2-0 reactor at Studsvik, Sweden. R2-0 is a 1 MW, open core, pool reactor. The reactor core is suspended on a movable tower and can be positioned anywhere in the pool. The BNCT facility includes two adjacent, parallel filter/moderator configurations and the reactor core is positioned in front of any of them as appropriate. One of the resulting neutron beams has been optimized for clinical irradiations with a filter/moderator system that allows easy variation of the neutron spectrum from the thermal to the epithermal energy range and with an extended collimator for convenient patient positioning. The other beam has been designed for radiobiological research and is equipped with a heavy water moderator and a large irradiation cavity with a uniform field of thermal neutrons. (author)

  10. Neutron dosimetry; Dosimetria de neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fratin, Luciano

    1993-12-31

    A neutron irradiation facility was designed and built in order to establish a procedure for calibrating neutron monitors and dosemeters. A 185 GBq {sup 241} Am Be source of known is used as a reference source. The irradiation facility using this source in the air provides neutron dose rates between 9 nSv s{sup -1} and 0,5 {sup {mu}}Sv s{sup -1}. A calibrated 50 nSv s{sup -1} thermal neutron field is obtained by using a specially designed paraffin block in conjunction with the {sup 241} Am Be source. A Bonner multisphere spectrometer was calibrated, using a procedure based on three methods proposed by international standards. The unfold {sup 241} Am Be neutron spectrum was determined from the Bonner spheres data and resulted in a good agreement with expected values for fluence rate, dose rate and mean energy. A dosimetric system based on the electrochemical etching of CR-39 was developed for personal dosimetry. The dosemeter badge using a (n,{alpha}) converter, the etching chamber and high frequency power supply were designed and built specially for this project. The electrochemical etching (ECE) parameters used were: a 6N KOH solution, 59 deg C, 20 kV{sub pp} cm{sup -1}, 2,0 kHz, 3 hours of ECE for thermal and intermediate neutrons and 6 hours for fast neutrons. The calibration factors for thermal, intermediate and fast neutrons were determined for this personal dosemeter. The sensitivities determined for the developed dosimetric system were (1,46{+-} 0,09) 10{sup 4} tracks cm{sup -2} mSv{sup -1} for thermal neutrons, (9{+-}3) 10{sup 2} tracks cm{sup -2} mSV{sup -1} for intermediate neutrons and (26{+-}4) tracks cm{sup -2} mSv{sup -1} for fast neutrons. The lower and upper limits of detection were respectively 0,002 mSv and 0,6 mSv for thermal neutrons, 0,04 mSv and 8 mSv for intermediate neutrons and 1 mSv and 12 mSv for fast neutrons. In view of the 1990`s ICRP recommendations, it is possible to conclude that the personal dosemeter described in this work is

  11. Calibration of the IRD two-component TLD albedo neutron dosemeter in some moderated neutron fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, Bruno M.; Silva, Ademir X. da

    2015-01-01

    In some stray neutron fields, like those found in practices involving the handling of radionuclide sources, the neutron calibration factor for albedo neutron dosemeter can vary widely compared to the factor for bare sources. This is the case for well logging, which is the area with the largest number of workers exposed to neutrons in Brazil. The companies employ routinely 241 Am-Be neutron sources. The albedo response variation is mainly due to the presence of scattered and moderated neutrons. This paper studies the response variation of the two-component TLD albedo neutron dosemeter used in the neutron individual monitoring service of Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, in different radionuclide neutron source beams. The neutron spectra were evaluated applying a Bonner sphere spectrometer with a 6 LiI(Eu) detector in the Brazilian National Metrology Neutron Laboratory. Standard neutron sources of 241 Am-Be and 252 Cf were employed, besides 238 Pu-Be. Measurements were also made with scattered and moderated neutron beams, including 252 Cf(D 2 O) reference spectrum, 241 Am-Be moderated with paraffin and silicone and a thermal neutron flux facility. New neutron calibration factors, as a function of the incident to albedo neutron ratio, were proposed for use in the albedo algorithm for occupational fields where the primary neutron beam is one of those studied sources. (author)

  12. Fundamental of neutron radiography and the present of neutron radiography in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekita, Junichiro

    1988-01-01

    Neutron radiography refers to the application of transmitted neutrons to analysis. In general, thermal neutron is used for neutron radiography. Thermal neutron is easily absorbed by light atoms, including hydrogen, boron and lithium, while it is not easily absorbed by such heavy atoms as tungsten, lead and uranium, permitting detection of impurities in heavy metals. Other neutrons than thermal neutron can also be applied. Cold neutron is produced from fast neutron using a moderator to reduce its energy down to below that of thermal neutron. Cold neutron is usefull for analysis of thick material. Epithermal neutron can induce resonance characteristic of each substance. With a relatively small reaction area, fast neutron permits observation of thick samples. Being electrically neutral, neutrons are difficult to detect by direct means. Thus a substance that releases charged particles is put in the path of neutrons for indirect measurement. X-ray film combined with converter screen for conversion of neutrons to charge particles is placed behind the sample. Photographing is carried out by a procedure similar to X-ray photography. Major institues and laboratories in Japan provided with neutron radiography facilities are listed. (Nogami, K.)

  13. The intense neutron generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, W.B.

    1966-01-01

    The presentation discusses both the economic and research contexts that would be served by producing neutrons in gram quantities at high intensities by electrical means without uranium-235. The revenue from producing radioisotopes is attractive. The array of techniques introduced by the multipurpose 65 megawatt Intense Neutron Generator project includes liquid metal cooling, superconducting magnets for beam bending and focussing, super-conductors for low-loss high-power radiofrequency systems, efficient devices for producing radiofrequency power, plasma physics developments for producing and accelerating hydrogen, ions at high intensity that are still far out from established practice, a multimegawatt high voltage D.C. generating machine that could have several applications. The research fields served relate principally to materials science through neutron-phonon and other quantum interactions as well as through neutron diffraction. Nuclear physics is served through μ-, π- and K-meson production. Isotope production enters many fields of applied research. (author)

  14. Neutronic reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wende, C.W.J.

    1976-01-01

    A safety rod for a nuclear reactor has an inner end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient and neutron capture cross section approximately equal to those of the adjacent shield, a central portion containing materials of high neutron capture cross section and an outer end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient at least equal to that of the adjacent shield

  15. Neutron holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beynon, T.D.

    1986-01-01

    the paper concerns neutron holography, which allows an image to be constructed of the surfaces, as well as the interiors, of objects. The technique of neutron holography and its applications are described. Present and future use of the method is briefly outlined. (U.K.)

  16. Utilization of boron irradiation filters in reactor neutron activation via epithermal (n,γ) and fast neutron reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chisela, F.

    1986-01-01

    The technique of instrumental neutron activation analysis based on irradiation with reactor epithermal and fast neutrons has been described and evaluated. Important characteristics of boron neutron absorbers used to remove thermal neutrons from the reactor neutron spectrum have been examined and compared with those of cadmium. Three boron compound shields, have been designed and constructed at the BER II 5MW reactor for use in epithermal neutron activation analysis of biological materials. The major advantages offered by these filters in this application include the flexibility of varying the filter thickness, the low radioactivity induced in the filters during irradiation, ease of fabrication and the relatively low cost of the filter materials. The radiation heating due to the 10 B(n,α) 7 Li-reaction has been experimentally investigated for the filters used and the results obtained confirm the necessity for efficient cooling of these filters during irradiation. Three irradiation facilities have been characterized with respect to the neutron flux density and the flux spatial distribution. An experiment has been designed and carried out to compensate the flux inhomogeneity in two irradiation positions of the DBV facility caused by the reactor geometry. Several biological samples including well characterized reference materials have been analysed after epithermal activation and the results compared with those obtained with the classical thermal neutron activation method. Improved sensitivity of determination has been found for elements with high resonance integral to thermal neutron cross section ratios (RI/σ 0 ). The range of elements that can be determined instrumentally is extended and the time scale of analysis is considerably reduced. (orig.) [de

  17. Dipole-dipole dispersion interactions between neutrons

    OpenAIRE

    Babb, James F.; Higa, Renato; Hussein, Mahir S.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the long-range interactions between two neutrons utilizing recent data on the neutron static and dynamic electric and magnetic dipole polarizabilities. The resulting long-range potentials are used to make quantitative comparisons between the collisions of a neutron with a neutron and a neutron with a proton. We also assess the importance of the first pion production threshold and first excited state of the nucleon, the $\\Delta$-resonance ($J^{\\pi}$ = + 3/2, I = 3/2). We found b...

  18. Wide Range Neutron Detector, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Current design concepts of nuclear reactors for space applications are well advanced in core configurations and architectural design. There is a need to determine...

  19. Wide Range Neutron Detector, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Current design concepts for space nuclear reactors are well advanced in core configurations and architectural design. There is need however to determine how such...

  20. Neutron tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ka-Ngo [Hercules, CA; Lou, Tak Pui [Berkeley, CA; Reijonen, Jani [Oakland, CA

    2008-03-11

    A neutron tube or generator is based on a RF driven plasma ion source having a quartz or other chamber surrounded by an external RF antenna. A deuterium or mixed deuterium/tritium (or even just a tritium) plasma is generated in the chamber and D or D/T (or T) ions are extracted from the plasma. A neutron generating target is positioned so that the ion beam is incident thereon and loads the target. Incident ions cause D-D or D-T (or T-T) reactions which generate neutrons. Various embodiments differ primarily in size of the chamber and position and shape of the neutron generating target. Some neutron generators are small enough for implantation in the body. The target may be at the end of a catheter-like drift tube. The target may have a tapered or conical surface to increase target surface area.

  1. Calculation of neutron fluence to dose equivalent conversion coefficients using GEANT4; Calculo de coeficientes de fluencia de neutrons para equivalente de dose individual utilizando o GEANT4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Rosane M.; Santos, Denison de S.; Queiroz Filho, Pedro P. de; Mauricio, CLaudia L.P.; Silva, Livia K. da; Pessanha, Paula R., E-mail: rosanemribeiro@oi.com.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Fluence to dose equivalent conversion coefficients provide the basis for the calculation of area and personal monitors. Recently, the ICRP has started a revision of these coefficients, including new Monte Carlo codes for benchmarking. So far, little information is available about neutron transport below 10 MeV in tissue-equivalent (TE) material performed with Monte Carlo GEANT4 code. The objective of this work is to calculate neutron fluence to personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients, H{sub p} (10)/Φ, with GEANT4 code. The incidence of monoenergetic neutrons was simulated as an expanded and aligned field, with energies ranging between thermal neutrons to 10 MeV on the ICRU slab of dimension 30 x 30 x 15 cm{sup 3}, composed of 76.2% of oxygen, 10.1% of hydrogen, 11.1% of carbon and 2.6% of nitrogen. For all incident energy, a cylindrical sensitive volume is placed at a depth of 10 mm, in the largest surface of the slab (30 x 30 cm{sup 2}). Physic process are included for neutrons, photons and charged particles, and calculations are made for neutrons and secondary particles which reach the sensitive volume. Results obtained are thus compared with values published in ICRP 74. Neutron fluence in the sensitive volume was calculated for benchmarking. The Monte Carlo GEANT4 code was found to be appropriate to calculate neutron doses at energies below 10 MeV correctly. (author)

  2. ENDF/B-6. The U.S. Evaluated Nuclear Data Library for Neutron Reaction Data by the US National Nuclear Data Center - including revisions up to Sept. 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmel, H.D.

    1992-01-01

    This document summarizes the contents of the general-purpose neutron data file of ENDF/B-6, the U.S. Evaluated Nuclear Data Library. The data library is in ENDF-6 format, either in the basic compact form with resonance parameters (50 Megabytes), or in point data form where resonance parameters have been converted to cross-sections (300 Megabytes). The entire library or retrievals of selected materials are available on magnetic tape from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section free of charge. (author)

  3. Velocity-space sensitivity of neutron spectrometry measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Asger Schou; Salewski, Mirko; Eriksson, J.

    2015-01-01

    Neutron emission spectrometry (NES) measures the energies of neutrons produced in fusion reactions. Here we present velocity-space weight functions for NES and neutron yield measurements. Weight functions show the sensitivity as well as the accessible regions in velocity space for a given range...... of the neutron energy spectrum. Combined with a calculated fast-ion distribution function, they determine the part of the distribution function producing detectable neutrons in a given neutron energy range. Furthermore, we construct a forward model based on weight functions capable of rapidly calculating neutron...

  4. Imaging with cold neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, E.H.; Kaestner, A.; Josic, L.; Hartmann, S.; Mannes, D.

    2011-01-01

    Neutrons for imaging purposes are provided mainly from thermal beam lines at suitable facilities around the world. The access to cold neutrons is presently limited to very few places only. However, many challenging options for imaging with cold neutrons have been found out, given by the interaction behavior of the observed materials with neutrons in the cold energy range (3-10 A). For absorbing materials, the interaction probability increases proportionally with the wavelength with the consequence of more contrast but less transmission with cold neutrons. Many materials are predominantly scattering neutrons, in particular most of crystalline structural materials. In these cases, cold neutrons play an important role by covering the energy range of the most important Bragg edges given by the lattice planes of the crystallites. This particular behavior can be used for at least two important aspects-choosing the right energy of the initial beam enables to have a material more or less transparent, and a direct macroscopic visualization of the crystalline structure and its change in a manufacturing process. Since 2006, PSI operates its second beam line for neutron imaging, where cold neutrons are provided from a liquid deuterium cold source (operated at 25 K). It has been designed to cover the most current aspects in neutron imaging research with the help of high flexibility. This has been done with changeable inlet apertures, a turbine based velocity selector, two beam positions and variable detector systems, satisfying the demands of the individual investigation. The most important detection system was found to be a micro-tomography system that enables studies in the presently best spatial resolution. In this case, the high contrast from the sample interaction process and the high detection probability for the cold neutrons combines in an ideal combination for the best possible performance. Recently, it was found out that the energy selective studies might become a

  5. Imaging with cold neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, E. H.; Kaestner, A.; Josic, L.; Hartmann, S.; Mannes, D.

    2011-09-01

    Neutrons for imaging purposes are provided mainly from thermal beam lines at suitable facilities around the world. The access to cold neutrons is presently limited to very few places only. However, many challenging options for imaging with cold neutrons have been found out, given by the interaction behavior of the observed materials with neutrons in the cold energy range (3-10 Å). For absorbing materials, the interaction probability increases proportionally with the wavelength with the consequence of more contrast but less transmission with cold neutrons. Many materials are predominantly scattering neutrons, in particular most of crystalline structural materials. In these cases, cold neutrons play an important role by covering the energy range of the most important Bragg edges given by the lattice planes of the crystallites. This particular behavior can be used for at least two important aspects—choosing the right energy of the initial beam enables to have a material more or less transparent, and a direct macroscopic visualization of the crystalline structure and its change in a manufacturing process. Since 2006, PSI operates its second beam line for neutron imaging, where cold neutrons are provided from a liquid deuterium cold source (operated at 25 K). It has been designed to cover the most current aspects in neutron imaging research with the help of high flexibility. This has been done with changeable inlet apertures, a turbine based velocity selector, two beam positions and variable detector systems, satisfying the demands of the individual investigation. The most important detection system was found to be a micro-tomography system that enables studies in the presently best spatial resolution. In this case, the high contrast from the sample interaction process and the high detection probability for the cold neutrons combines in an ideal combination for the best possible performance. Recently, it was found out that the energy selective studies might become a

  6. Compilation of Existing Neutron Screen Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Chrysanthopoulou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of fast neutron spectra in new reactors is expected to induce a strong impact on the contained materials, including structural materials, nuclear fuels, neutron reflecting materials, and tritium breeding materials. Therefore, introduction of these reactors into operation will require extensive testing of their components, which must be performed under neutronic conditions representative of those expected to prevail inside the reactor cores when in operation. Due to limited availability of fast reactors, testing of future reactor materials will mostly take place in water cooled material test reactors (MTRs by tailoring the neutron spectrum via neutron screens. The latter rely on the utilization of materials capable of absorbing neutrons at specific energy. A large but fragmented experience is available on that topic. In this work a comprehensive compilation of the existing neutron screen technology is attempted, focusing on neutron screens developed in order to locally enhance the fast over thermal neutron flux ratio in a reactor core.

  7. Basic to industrial research on neutron platform in Japan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The co-location of reactor- and accelerator-based neutron sources offers a great opportunity for complementary use of steady and pulsed neutron beams in a wide variety of neutron science and technology areas ranging from basic research to industrial applications. In Japan, such a balance of two kinds of neutron sources ...

  8. Analytical applications for delayed neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eccleston, G.W.

    1983-01-01

    Analytical formulations that describe the time dependence of neutron populations in nuclear materials contain delayed-neutron dependent terms. These terms are important because the delayed neutrons, even though their yields in fission are small, permit control of the fission chain reaction process. Analytical applications that use delayed neutrons range from simple problems that can be solved with the point reactor kinetics equations to complex problems that can only be solved with large codes that couple fluid calculations with the neutron dynamics. Reactor safety codes, such as SIMMER, model transients of the entire reactor core using coupled space-time neutronics and comprehensive thermal-fluid dynamics. Nondestructive delayed-neutron assay instruments are designed and modeled using a three-dimensional continuous-energy Monte Carlo code. Calculations on high-burnup spent fuels and other materials that contain a mix of uranium and plutonium isotopes require accurate and complete information on the delayed-neutron periods, yields, and energy spectra. A continuing need exists for delayed-neutron parameters for all the fissioning isotopes

  9. Accelerator based continuous neutron source.

    CERN Document Server

    Shapiro, S M; Ruggiero, A G

    2003-01-01

    Until the last decade, most neutron experiments have been performed at steady-state, reactor-based sources. Recently, however, pulsed spallation sources have been shown to be very useful in a wide range of neutron studies. A major review of neutron sources in the US was conducted by a committee chaired by Nobel laureate Prof. W. Kohn: ''Neutron Sources for America's Future-BESAC Panel on Neutron Sources 1/93''. This distinguished panel concluded that steady state and pulsed sources are complementary and that the nation has need for both to maintain a balanced neutron research program. The report recommended that both a new reactor and a spallation source be built. This complementarity is recognized worldwide. The conclusion of this report is that a new continuous neutron source is needed for the second decade of the 20 year plan to replace aging US research reactors and close the US neutron gap. it is based on spallation production of neutrons using a high power continuous superconducting linac to generate pr...

  10. Development of simple neutron counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, S.; Hirota, K.

    2014-01-01

    Position sensitive neutron detectors are used for neutron scattering, neutron imaging, and neutron radiography. Developments in neutron detectors are mainly focused on spatial resolution and high counting rate in these fields. After the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster, many simple radiation counters are now marketed in Japan and are useful for estimating the radiation level. However, no simple, equivalent device exists for neutron measurements. In this work, we have developed simple neutron counters (LiM counter and HeM counter) with the following features. In the LiM counter, a 6 Li glass scintillator is employed as a neutron converter for a large dynamic range. A silicon photon MPPC (multi-pixel photon counter) detector is used separately for photon counting, thus reducing the size of the device. In the HeM counter, a 3 He neutron detector is employed. Both counters employ a pulse-height analysis function for ensuring reliable data and display the pulse-height distribution on a graphical liquid crystal display (G-LCD). The LiM counter can be used for about 6 h using a battery, operating at 264 mA and 5.1 V. (author)

  11. Neutron scattering in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knott, R.B.

    1994-01-01

    Neutron scattering techniques have been part of the Australian scientific research community for the past three decades. The High Flux Australian Reactor (HIFAR) is a multi-use facility of modest performance that provides the only neutron source in the country suitable for neutron scattering. The limitations of HIFAR have been recognized and recently a Government initiated inquiry sought to evaluate the future needs of a neutron source. In essence, the inquiry suggested that a delay of several years would enable a number of key issues to be resolved, and therefore a more appropriate decision made. In the meantime, use of the present source is being optimized, and where necessary research is being undertaken at major overseas neutron facilities either on a formal or informal basis. Australia has, at present, a formal agreement with the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK) for access to the spallation source ISIS. Various aspects of neutron scattering have been implemented on HIFAR, including investigations of the structure of biological relevant molecules. One aspect of these investigations will be presented. Preliminary results from a study of the interaction of the immunosuppressant drug, cyclosporin-A, with reconstituted membranes suggest that the hydrophobic drug interdigitated with lipid chains

  12. Neutrons and fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maynard, C.W.

    1976-01-01

    The production of energy from fusion reactions does not require neutrons in the fundamental sense that they are required in a fission reactor. Nevertheless, the dominant fusion reaction, that between deuterium and tritium, yields a 14 MeV neutron. To contrast a fusion reactor based on this reaction with the fission case, 3 x 10 20 such neutrons produced per gigawatt of power. This is four times as many neutrons as in an equivalent fission reactor and they carry seven times the energy of the fission neutrons. Thus, they dominate the energy recovery problem and create technological problems comparable to the original plasma confinement problem as far as a practical power producing device is concerned. Further contrasts of the fusion and fission cases are presented to establish the general role of neutrons in fusion devices. Details of the energy deposition processes are discussed and those reactions necessary for producing additional tritium are outlined. The relatively high energy flux with its large intensity will activate almost any materials of which the reactor may be composed. This activation is examined from the point of view of decay heat, radiological safety, and long-term storage. In addition, a discussion of the deleterious effects of neutron interactions on materials is given in some detail; this includes the helium and hydrogen producing reactions and displacement rate of the lattice atoms. The various materials that have been proposed for structural purposes, for breeding, reflecting, and moderating neutrons, and for radiation shielding are reviewed from the nuclear standpoint. The specific reactions of interest are taken up for various materials and finally a report is given on the status and prospects of data for fusion studies

  13. Summary of neutron measurements for the Viking Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, M.E.

    1975-01-01

    The results of neutron measurements for 238 Pu-fueled, 683-W (thermal) capsules fabricated for the Viking Program (Mars Lander) are presented. These results include, for each capsule, the total neutron emission rate and neutron multiplication and, for one capsule, the neutron energy spectrum. A precision long counter was used for the neutron emission rate measurements and a single stilbene crystal for the neutron spectrum measurement. (U.S.)

  14. Complexity and neutron star structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatzisavvas, K.Ch.; Psonis, V.P.; Panos, C.P.; Moustakidis, Ch.C.

    2009-01-01

    We apply the statistical measure of complexity introduced by Lopez-Ruiz, Mancini and Calbet (1995) to neutron star structure. We continue the recent application of Sanudo and Pacheco (2009) to white dwarfs. The interplay of gravity, the short-range nuclear force and the very short-range weak interaction shows that neutron stars, under the current theoretical framework, are ordered (low complexity) systems.

  15. Neutron absorbing article

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naum, R.G.; Owens, D.P.; Dooker, G.I.

    1981-01-01

    A neutron-absorbing article suitable for use in spent fuel racks is described. It comprises boron carbide particles, diluent particles, and a phenolic polymer cured to a continuous matrix. The diluent may be silicon carbide, graphite, amorphous carbon, alumina, or silica. The combined boron carbide-diluent phase contains no more than 2 percent B 2 O 3 , and the neutron-absorbing article contains from 20 to 40 percent phenol resin. The ratio of boron carbide to diluent particles is in the range 1:9 to 9:1

  16. Simplified fast neutron dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohrabi, M.

    1979-01-01

    Direct fast-neutron-induced recoil and alpha particle tracks in polycarbonate films may be enlarged for direct visual observation and automated counting procedures employing electrochemical etching techniques. Electrochemical etching is, for example, carried out in a 28% KOH solution at room temperature by applying a 2000 V peak-to-peak voltage at 1 kHz frequency. Such recoil particle amplification can be used for the detection of wide neutron dose ranges from 1 mrad to 1000 rads or higher, if desired. 5 claims

  17. Superheated drop as a neutron spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Mala; Chatterjee, B. K.; Roy, B.; Roy, S. C.

    2000-09-01

    Superheated drops are known to vaporise when exposed to energetic nuclear radiation since the discovery of bubble chamber. The application of superheated drops in neutron research especially in neutron dosimetry is a subject of intense research for quite sometime. As the degree of superheat increases in a given liquid, less and less energetic neutrons are required to cause nucleation. This property of superheated liquid makes it possible to use it as a neutron spectrometer. Neutron detection efficiency of superheated drops made of R12 exposed to Am-Be neutron source has been measured over a wide range of temperature -17-60°C and the results have been utilised to construct the energy spectrum of the neutron source. This paper demonstrates that a suitable neutron spectrometer may be constructed by using a single liquid and varying the temperature of the liquid suitably at a closer grid.

  18. Superheated drop as a neutron spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Mala; Chatterjee, B.K.; Roy, B. E-mail: biva@bosemain.boseinst.ernet.in; Roy, S.C

    2000-09-21

    Superheated drops are known to vaporise when exposed to energetic nuclear radiation since the discovery of bubble chamber. The application of superheated drops in neutron research especially in neutron dosimetry is a subject of intense research for quite sometime. As the degree of superheat increases in a given liquid, less and less energetic neutrons are required to cause nucleation. This property of superheated liquid makes it possible to use it as a neutron spectrometer. Neutron detection efficiency of superheated drops made of R12 exposed to Am-Be neutron source has been measured over a wide range of temperature -17-60 deg. C and the results have been utilised to construct the energy spectrum of the neutron source. This paper demonstrates that a suitable neutron spectrometer may be constructed by using a single liquid and varying the temperature of the liquid suitably at a closer grid.

  19. Compact neutron generator development at LBNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reijonen, J.; English, G.; Firestone, R.; Giquel, F.; King, M.; Leung, K-N.; Sun, M.

    2003-01-01

    A wide variety of applications ranging from medical (BNCT, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) and basic science (neutron imaging, material studies) to homeland security (explosive detection and nuclear material non-proliferation) are in need of compact, high flux neutron generators. The Plasma and Ion Source Technology Group in the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is developing various neutron generators for these applications. These neutron generators employed either the D-D or the D-T fusion reaction for the neutron production. The deuterium or deuterium-tritium gas mixture is ionized in an RF-driven plasma source. The ions are then accelerated to ∼100 keV energy using high current, high voltage DC-power supply to a target where the 2.45 MeV (for D-D reaction) or 14 MeV (for the D-T reaction) neutrons are generated. The development of two different types of neutron tubes are being discussed in this presentation, namely compact, pulsed operation neutron generators and cw, high yield neutron generators. These generators are currently operating at D-D neutron yields of 108 n/s and 109 n/s respectively. A facility, incorporating the larger neutron generator, has been constructed for Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis (PGAA) and Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) measurements

  20. Evaluation of the Neutron Data Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, A. D.; Pronyaev, V. G.; Capote, R.; Hale, G. M.; Chen, Z.-P.; Duran, I.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Kunieda, S.; Mannhart, W.; Marcinkevicius, B.; Nelson, R. O.; Neudecker, D.; Noguere, G.; Paris, M.; Simakov, S. P.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Smith, D. L.; Tao, X.; Trkov, A.; Wallner, A.; Wang, W.

    2018-02-01

    With the need for improving existing nuclear data evaluations, (e.g., ENDF/B-VIII.0 and JEFF-3.3 releases) the first step was to evaluate the standards for use in such a library. This new standards evaluation made use of improved experimental data and some developments in the methodology of analysis and evaluation. In addition to the work on the traditional standards, this work produced the extension of some energy ranges and includes new reactions that are called reference cross sections. Since the effort extends beyond the traditional standards, it is called the neutron data standards evaluation. This international effort has produced new evaluations of the following cross section standards: the H(n,n), 6Li(n,t), 10B(n,α), 10B(n,α1 γ), natC(n,n), Au(n,γ), 235U(n,f) and 238U(n,f). Also in the evaluation process the 238U(n,γ) and 239Pu(n,f) cross sections that are not standards were evaluated. Evaluations were also obtained for data that are not traditional standards: the Maxwellian spectrum averaged cross section for the Au(n,γ) cross section at 30 keV; reference cross sections for prompt γ-ray production in fast neutron-induced reactions; reference cross sections for very high energy fission cross sections; the 252Cf spontaneous fission neutron spectrum and the 235U prompt fission neutron spectrum induced by thermal incident neutrons; and the thermal neutron constants. The data and covariance matrices of the uncertainties were obtained directly from the evaluation procedure.

  1. The range of peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer and optic disc parameters in children aged up to but not including 18 years of age, as measured by optical coherence tomography: protocol for a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creavin, Alexandra L; Williams, Cathy; Tilling, Kate; Timpson, Nicholas; Higgins, Julian P T

    2016-04-30

    The parameters of the optic disc and peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer (pRNFL) in children may vary with disease processes that contribute to visual impairment and blindness and so could be useful as an objective measure in at-risk children. There is no standardised reference for the normal parameters of the optic disc and pRNFL in children; however, there are a large number of small individual studies that have been undertaken to look at these measures. A systematic review of current literature on the range of pRNFL and optic disc parameters in children aged less than 18 years will be performed. Studies will be considered for review if they report numerical data on optic disc and pRNFL parameters, measured using optical coherence tomography. Outcome measures will include mean pRNFL thickness and cup-disc ratio. The bibliographic databases Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE, Scopus and Web of Science will be systematically searched from 1991. Screening of search results will be conducted by two authors working independently, as will extraction of primary and secondary outcome data. Ten per cent of all other data extraction will be checked by a second author. Results will be compiled and presented in evidence tables. Where possible and appropriate, study-specific estimates will be combined to obtain an overall summary estimate of pRNFL thickness and cup-disc ratio across studies and results will be presented by age of population. Subgroup analyses will be undertaken for children of different ethnicities. This review aims to provide an overview of the parameters of the optic disc and pRNFL in children of different ages in order to identify gaps in knowledge and to improve understanding of what might be considered within/outside the range of normality. The findings will be presented in peer-reviewed journals and will be presented at conferences. PROSPERO CRD42016033068.

  2. Aerial Neutron Detection: Neutron Signatures for Nonproliferation and Emergency Response Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurer, Richard J.; Stampahar, Thomas G.; Smith, Ethan X.; Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Wolff, Ronald S.; Rourke, Timothy J.; LeDonne, Jeffrey P.; Avaro, Emanuele; Butler, D. Andre; Borders, Kevin L.; Stampahar, Jezabel; Schuck, William H.; Selfridge, Thomas L.; McKissack, Thomas M.; Duncan, William W.; Hendricks, Thane J.

    2012-10-17

    From 2007 to the present, the Remote Sensing Laboratory has been conducting a series of studies designed to expand our fundamental understanding of aerial neutron detection with the goal of designing an enhanced sensitivity detection system for long range neutron detection. Over 35 hours of aerial measurements in a helicopter were conducted for a variety of neutron emitters such as neutron point sources, a commercial nuclear power reactor, nuclear reactor spent fuel in dry cask storage, depleted uranium hexafluoride and depleted uranium metal. The goals of the project were to increase the detection sensitivity of our instruments such that a 5.4 × 104 neutron/second source could be detected at 100 feet above ground level at a speed of 70 knots and to enhance the long-range detection sensitivity for larger neutron sources, i.e., detection ranges above 1000 feet. In order to increase the sensitivity of aerial neutron detection instruments, it is important to understand the dynamics of the neutron background as a function of altitude. For aerial neutron detection, studies have shown that the neutron background primarily originates from above the aircraft, being produced in the upper atmosphere by galactic cosmic-ray interactions with air molecules. These interactions produce energetic neutrons and charged particles that cascade to the earth’s surface, producing additional neutrons in secondary collisions. Hence, the neutron background increases as a function of altitude which is an impediment to long-range neutron detection. In order to increase the sensitivity for long range detection, it is necessary to maintain a low neutron background as a function of altitude. Initial investigations show the variation in the neutron background can be decreased with the application of a cosmic-ray shield. The results of the studies along with a representative data set are presented.

  3. Application of imaging plate neutron detector to neutron radiography

    CERN Document Server

    Fujine, S; Kamata, M; Etoh, M

    1999-01-01

    As an imaging plate neutron detector (IP-ND) has been available for thermal neutron radiography (TNR) which has high resolution, high sensitivity and wide range, some basic characteristics of the IP-ND system were measured at the E-2 facility of the KUR. After basic performances of the IP were studied, images with high quality were obtained at a neutron fluence of 2 to 7x10 sup 8 n cm sup - sup 2. It was found that the IP-ND system with Gd sub 2 O sub 3 as a neutron converter material has a higher sensitivity to gamma-ray than that of a conventional film method. As a successful example, clear radiographs of the flat view for the fuel side plates with boron burnable poison were obtained. An application of the IP-ND system to neutron radiography (NR) is presented in this paper.

  4. An In-Pile Kinetic Method for Determining the Delayed Neutron Fraction βeff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilad, E.; Rivin, O.; Ettedgui, H.; Yaar, I.; Geslot, B.; Pepino, A.; Di Salvo, J.; Gruel, A.; Blaise, P.

    2014-01-01

    Delayed neutrons are of fundamental importance in the field of nuclear reactor dynamics and control. Although only a small fraction of the neutrons emitted by fission are not prompt, the knowledge of the delayed neutrons parameters is essential for transient analysis, such as startup or shutdown of the reactor, as well as for accidents analysis and control system design [1]. One of the main delayed neutron parameters used in the point reactor model equations is the effective delayed neutron fraction, which incorporates both delayed neutron spectral properties and core geometrical configuration [1,2]. Additional delayed neutron parameters include the fraction of fission neutrons emitted in each delayed group, and the delayed neutron precursors decay constants . Experimental efforts aimed at determining the value ofβ, which provide experimental support for the evaluation of delayed neutron parameters, are extremely valuable. This is due to the fact that unlike other fields in reactor physics, e.g. criticality safety or shielding, the availability of experimental data and benchmark problems for validating delayed neutron parameters and its implementation in different models is highly limited. Furthermore, the existing experimental data exhibit significant discrepancies between the different sets of parameter, which lead to substantial disparity in the analysis of kinetic experiments and reactor dynamic behavior]. In this work, a method for determining the effective delayed neutron fraction using in-pile reactivity oscillation and Fourier analysis is presented. The method is based on measurements of the reactor's power response to small periodic in-pile reactivity perturbations and utilizes Fourier analysis for reconstruction of the reactor zero power transfer function. Knowledge of the reactor transfer function enables the estimation of theβ value using multi-parameter nonlinear fit. The method accounts for higher harmonics, which are excited by the trapezoidal

  5. Geant4 Analysis of a Thermal Neutron Real-Time Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Arka; Hawari, Ayman I.

    2017-07-01

    Thermal neutron imaging is a technique for nondestructive testing providing complementary information to X-ray imaging for a wide range of applications in science and engineering. Advancement of electronic imaging systems makes it possible to obtain neutron radiographs in real time. This method requires a scintillator to convert neutrons to optical photons and a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to detect those photons. Alongside, a well collimated beam which reduces geometrical blurriness, the use of a thin scintillator can improve the spatial resolution significantly. A representative scintillator that has been applied widely for thermal neutron imaging is 6LiF:ZnS (Ag). In this paper, a multiphysics simulation approach for designing thermal neutron imaging system is investigated. The Geant4 code is used to investigate the performance of a thermal neutron imaging system starting with a neutron source and including the production of charged particles and optical photons in the scintillator and their transport for image formation in the detector. The simulation geometry includes the neutron beam collimator and sapphire filter. The 6LiF:ZnS (Ag) scintillator is modeled along with a pixelated detector for image recording. The spatial resolution of the system was obtained as the thickness of the scintillator screen was varied between 50 and 400 μm. The results of the simulation were compared to experimental results, including measurements performed using the PULSTAR nuclear reactor imaging beam, showing good agreement. Using the established model, further examination showed that the resolution contribution of the scintillator screen is correlated with its thickness and the range of the neutron absorption reaction products (i.e., the alpha and triton particles). Consequently, thinner screens exhibit improved spatial resolution. However, this will compromise detection efficiency due to the reduced probability of neutron absorption.

  6. Review of Non-Neutron and Neutron Nuclear Data, 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, Norman E.

    2005-01-01

    Review articles are in preparation for the 2004 edition of the CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics dealing with the evaluation of both non-neutron and neutron nuclear data. Data on the discovery of element 110, Darmstadtium, and element 111 have been officially accepted, while data on element 118 have been withdrawn. Data to be presented include revised values for very short-lived nuclides, long-lived nuclides, and beta-beta decay measurements. There has been a reassessment of the spontaneous fission (sf) half-lives, which distinguishes between sf decay half-lives and cluster decay half-lives, and with cluster-fission decay. New measurements of isotopic abundance values for many elements will be discussed with an emphasis on the minor isotopes of interest for use in neutron activation analysis measurements. Neutron resonance integrals will be discussed emphasizing the differences between the calculated values obtained from the analytical integration over neutron resonances and the measured values in a neutron reactor-spectrum, which does not quite conform to the assumed 1/E neutron energy spectrum. The method used to determine the neutron resonance integral from measurement, using neutron activation analysis, will be discussed

  7. Neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furrer, A.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains the text of 16 lectures given at the Summer School and the report on a panel discussion entitled ''the relative merits and complementarities of x-rays, synchrotron radiation, steady- and pulsed neutron sources''. figs., tabs., refs

  8. Outline of Neutron Scattering Formalism

    OpenAIRE

    Berk, N. F.

    1993-01-01

    Neutron scattering formalism is briefly surveyed. Topics touched upon include coherent and incoherent scattering, bound and free cross-sections, the Van Hove formalism, magnetic scattering, elastic scattering, the static approximation, sum rules, small angle scattering, inelastic scattering, thermal diffuse scattering, quasielastic scattering, and neutron optics.

  9. Conception design of shielding collimator system for high energy neutron radiography with minitype neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yang; Dou Haifeng; Tang Bin; Huo Heyong

    2013-01-01

    Shielding collimator system is necessary in the neutron radiography installation, this issue gives the conception design of shielding collimator system for FNR about high energy neutron source by MCNP. Preliminarily ascertain the material component and dimension, confirm the neutron flux at imaging position, imaging distance, imaging field range of the FNP installation in theory. (authors)

  10. Design of hyper-thermal neutron irradiation fields for neutron capture therapy in KUR-heavy water neutron irradiation facility. Mounting of hyper-thermal neutron converter in therapeutic collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Y.; Kobayashi, T.

    2001-01-01

    Neutron capture therapy (NCP) using thermal neutron needs to improve of depth dose distribution in a living body. Epi-thermal neutron following moderation of fast neutron is usually used for improving of the depth dose distribution. The moderation method of fast neutron, however, gets mixed some of high energy neutron which give some of serious effects to a living body, and involves the difficulty for collimation of thermal neutron to the diseased part. Hyper-thermal neutrons, which are in an energy range of 0.1-3 eV at high temperature side of thermal neutron, are under consideration for application to the NCP. The hyper-thermal neutrons can be produced by up-scattering of thermal neutron in a high temperature material. Fast neutron components in collimator for the NCP reduce on application of the up-scattering method. Graphite at high temperature (>1000k) is used as a hyper-thermal neutron converter. The hyper-thermal neutron converter is planted to mount on therapeutic collimator which is located at the nearest side of patient for the NCP. Total neutron flux, ratio of hyper-thermal neutron to total neutron, and ratio of gamma-ray dose to neutron flux are calculated as a function of thickness of the graphite converter using monte carlo code MCNP-V4B. (M. Suetake)

  11. Alpha decay of neutron-deficient isotopes with 52including the new isotopes /sup 106/Te (T/sub 1/2/=60 mu s) and /sup 110/Xe

    CERN Document Server

    Schardt, D; Kirchner, R; Klepper, O; Kurcewicz, W; Roeckl, E; Tidemand-Petersson, P

    1981-01-01

    Using /sup 58/Ni(/sup 58/Ni, xpyn) reactions and on-line mass separation, the alpha -decays of very neutron-deficient isotopes of tellurium, iodine, xenon and cesium were studied. The new isotopes /sup 106/Te (T/sub 1/2/=60/sub -10//sup +30/ mu s) and /sup 110/Xe were identified by their alpha -lines of 4160+or-30 keV and 3737+or-30 keV energy, respectively, with the genetic relationship between the two successive alpha -decays being verified experimentally, while for several other alpha -decaying isotopes more precise data were obtained. The observed alpha -decay properties are discussed within the systematics of energy and reduced width. (19 refs).

  12. High-Current Experiments for Accelerator-Based Neutron Capture Therapy Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gierga, D.P.; Klinkowstein, R.E.; Hughey, B.H.; Shefer, R.E.; Yanch, J.C.; Blackburn, B.W.

    1999-06-06

    Several accelerator-based neutron capture therapy applications are under development. These applications include boron neutron capture therapy for glioblastoma multiform and boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) for rheumatoid arthritis. These modalities use accelerator-based charged-particle reactions to create a suitable neutron source. Neutrons are produced using a high-current, 2-MV terminal tandem accelerator. For these applications to be feasible, high accelerator beam currents must be routinely achievable. An effort was undertaken to explore the operating regime of the accelerator in the milliampere range. In preparation for high-current operation of the accelerator, computer simulations of charged-particle beam optics were performed to establish high-current operating conditions. Herein we describe high beam current simulations and high beam current operation of the accelerator.

  13. Characterization of the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR Neutron Radiography System Imaging Plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiser Krista

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL is an epithermal pool-type research reactor licensed up to a thermal power of 2.4 MW. The ACRR facility has a neutron radiography facility that is used for imaging a wide range of items including reactor fuel and neutron generators. The ACRR neutron radiography system has four apertures (65:1, 125:1, 250:1, and 500:1 available to experimenters. The neutron flux and spectrum as well as the gamma dose rate were characterized at the imaging plane for the ACRR's neutron radiography system for the 65:1, 125:1 and 250:1 apertures.

  14. The Fate of Merging Neutron Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-08-01

    A rapidly spinning, highly magnetized neutron star is one possible outcome when two smaller neutron stars merge. [Casey Reed/Penn State University]When two neutron stars collide, the new object that they make can reveal information about the interior physics of neutron stars. New theoretical work explores what we should be seeing, and what it can teach us.Neutron Star or Black Hole?So far, the only systems from which weve detected gravitational waves are merging black holes. But other compact-object binaries exist and are expected to merge on observable timescales in particular, binary neutron stars. When two neutron stars merge, the resulting object falls into one of three categories:a stable neutron star,a black hole, ora supramassive neutron star, a large neutron star thats supported by its rotation but will eventually collapse to a black hole after it loses angular momentum.Histograms of the initial (left) and final (right) distributions of objects in the authors simulations, for five different equations of state. Most cases resulted primarily in the formation of neutron stars (NSs) or supramassive neutron stars (sNSs), not black holes (BHs). [Piro et al. 2017]Whether a binary-neutron-star merger results in another neutron star, a black hole, or a supramassive neutron star depends on the final mass of the remnant and what the correct equation of state is that describes the interiors of neutron stars a longstanding astrophysical puzzle.In a recent study, a team of scientists led by Anthony Piro (Carnegie Observatories) estimated which of these outcomes we should expect for mergers of binary neutron stars. The teams results along with future observations of binary neutron stars may help us to eventually pin down the equation of state for neutron stars.Merger OutcomesPiro and collaborators used relativistic calculations of spinning and non-spinning neutron stars to estimate the mass range that neutron stars would have for several different realistic equations of

  15. Neutron interferometers with diffraction gratings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioffe, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    A neutron interferometer is described in which the amplitude coherent division of the wave fronts is realized by means of neutron diffraction gratings. Photolithographic gratings on glass with a rectangular surface relief profile with a 58 Ni sprayed layer 2000 A thick are used as gratings. In contrast to perfect-crystal neutron interferometers the designed interferometer is capable of operating in the longwave neutron spectrum region. Variation of the value of spatial division of the interfering beams (up to 50 cm) and rather a high efficiency of the amergent beam together with the elemination of neutron beam passage through the interferometer coherent divosor material in such an interferometer permit to use it for solving problems of the solid-state physics and nuclear physics, for example, foA searching for the Yang Mills long-range field

  16. Single Crystal Diffuse Neutron Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Welberry

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse neutron scattering has become a valuable tool for investigating local structure in materials ranging from organic molecular crystals containing only light atoms to piezo-ceramics that frequently contain heavy elements. Although neutron sources will never be able to compete with X-rays in terms of the available flux the special properties of neutrons, viz. the ability to explore inelastic scattering events, the fact that scattering lengths do not vary systematically with atomic number and their ability to scatter from magnetic moments, provides strong motivation for developing neutron diffuse scattering methods. In this paper, we compare three different instruments that have been used by us to collect neutron diffuse scattering data. Two of these are on a spallation source and one on a reactor source.

  17. Neutron-induced fission cross-section measurement of 234U with quasi-monoenergetic beams in the keV and MeV range using micromegas detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsinganis, A.; Kokkoris, M.; Vlastou, R.; Kalamara, A.; Stamatopoulos, A.; Kanellakopoulos, A.; Lagoyannis, A.; Axiotis, M.

    2017-09-01

    Accurate data on neutron-induced fission cross-sections of actinides are essential for the design of advanced nuclear reactors based either on fast neutron spectra or alternative fuel cycles, as well as for the reduction of safety margins of existing and future conventional facilities. The fission cross-section of 234U was measured at incident neutron energies of 560 and 660 keV and 7.5 MeV with a setup based on `microbulk' Micromegas detectors and the same samples previously used for the measurement performed at the CERN n_TOF facility (Karadimos et al., 2014). The 235U fission cross-section was used as reference. The (quasi-)monoenergetic neutron beams were produced via the 7Li(p,n) and the 2H(d,n) reactions at the neutron beam facility of the Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics at the `Demokritos' National Centre for Scientific Research. A detailed study of the neutron spectra produced in the targets and intercepted by the samples was performed coupling the NeuSDesc and MCNPX codes, taking into account the energy spread, energy loss and angular straggling of the beam ions in the target assemblies, as well as contributions from competing reactions and neutron scattering in the experimental setup. Auxiliary Monte-Carlo simulations were performed with the FLUKA code to study the behaviour of the detectors, focusing particularly on the reproduction of the pulse height spectra of α-particles and fission fragments (using distributions produced with the GEF code) for the evaluation of the detector efficiency. An overview of the developed methodology and preliminary results are presented.

  18. Neutron-induced fission cross-section measurement of 234U with quasi-monoenergetic beams in the keV and MeV range using micromegas detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsinganis A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate data on neutron-induced fission cross-sections of actinides are essential for the design of advanced nuclear reactors based either on fast neutron spectra or alternative fuel cycles, as well as for the reduction of safety margins of existing and future conventional facilities. The fission cross-section of 234U was measured at incident neutron energies of 560 and 660 keV and 7.5 MeV with a setup based on ‘microbulk’ Micromegas detectors and the same samples previously used for the measurement performed at the CERN n_TOF facility (Karadimos et al., 2014. The 235U fission cross-section was used as reference. The (quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams were produced via the 7Li(p,n and the 2H(d,n reactions at the neutron beam facility of the Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics at the ‘Demokritos’ National Centre for Scientific Research. A detailed study of the neutron spectra produced in the targets and intercepted by the samples was performed coupling the NeuSDesc and MCNPX codes, taking into account the energy spread, energy loss and angular straggling of the beam ions in the target assemblies, as well as contributions from competing reactions and neutron scattering in the experimental setup. Auxiliary Monte-Carlo simulations were performed with the FLUKA code to study the behaviour of the detectors, focusing particularly on the reproduction of the pulse height spectra of α-particles and fission fragments (using distributions produced with the GEF code for the evaluation of the detector efficiency. An overview of the developed methodology and preliminary results are presented.

  19. Safety profile of modafinil across a range of prescribing indications, including off-label use, in a primary care setting in England: results of a modified prescription-event monitoring study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Miranda; Wilton, Lynda; Shakir, Saad

    2013-04-01

    Modafinil (Provigil) was marketed in the UK in 1998 to promote wakefulness in the treatment of narcolepsy. In April 2004, the licence was extended to include chronic pathological conditions; 2 years later, the prescription of modafinil was restricted to patients with shift work sleep disorder, narcolepsy and obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome. Following a recent review of the safety data, the licence has been further restricted to only treat patients with narcolepsy. The review highlighted the degree of off-label usage of modafinil, including patients with multiple sclerosis. The aim of this study was to examine the safety profile of modafinil in real-world clinical usage and across a range of prescribing indications, including multiple sclerosis. The study was conducted using the observational cohort technique of Modified Prescription-Event Monitoring. Patients were identified from dispensed prescriptions issued by primary care physicians from July 2004 to August 2005. Patient demographics and information on prescribing behaviour were included in the questionnaire sent to the prescribing general practitioner (GP) 6 months after the initial prescription for each patient. The questionnaire sought data on any events that patient may have experienced during that time, reasons for stopping treatment with modafinil, adverse drug reactions (ADRs), potential interaction with contraceptives, and pregnancies. Incidence densities (IDs) were calculated for all events, and stratified according to indication and dose. Specific events were evaluated by requesting further information. Of the 4,023 questionnaires sent to GPs, 2,416 were returned (response rate 60.1 %). Of these, only those patients issued modafinil after April 2004 (with the associated broadening of the indications for treatment) were included in the study, resulting in a final cohort of 1,096 patients: 497 (45.3 %) male, median age of 52 years (interquartile range [IQR] 41-63), and 599 (54.7

  20. Neutron detectors for the ESS diffractometers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stefanescu, I.; Christensen, M.; Fenske, J.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Henry, P. F.; Kirstein, O.; Muller, M.; Nowak, G.; Pooley, D.; Raspino, D.; Rhodes, N.; Šaroun, Jan; Schefer, J.; Schooneveld, E.; Sykora, J.; Schweika, W.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, JAN (2017), č. článku P01019. ISSN 1748-0221 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015048 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : instrumentation for neutron sources * neutron diffraction detectors * neutron detectors (cold, thermal, fast neutrons) Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2016

  1. Neutron Scattering in MoNA detector bars for Comparison with Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wantz, A.; Boone, J. E.; Rogers, W. F.; Frank, N.; Kuchera, A. N.; Mosby, S.; Thoennessen, M.; MoNA Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    In order to test the effectiveness and accuracy of Monte Carlo simulation (GEANT4 with Menate_R), used by the MoNA collaboration for interpreting neutron-scattering data from the MoNA (Modular Neutron Array) and LISA (Large multi-Institutional Scintillator Arrays at NSCL, MSU, an experiment was conducted at Los Alamos LANSCE center in which 16 MoNA detector bars were exposed to a well characterized neutron beam. Each MoNA bar consists of BC408 organic scintillator measuring 200×10×10 cm3 with PMTs attached to each end. In order to properly characterize important neutron scattering signatures over a wide range of incoming neutron energy, such as scattering angle, mean distance between scatters, multiplicity, and dark-scatter, it is important that background be fully understood and corrected for. Background sources include neutrons scattered from the collimator on entrance to the room, decay of neutron-activation within the bars, neutrons scattering in the room, and cosmic muons. Several methods for accounting for and removing background contributions to data were developed so that data can be compared directly with simulation (which does not contain these background features). Results, including scattering data comparisons with simulation will be presented. Work supported by NSF Grant PHY-1744043.

  2. Musashi reactor adaption for both neutron capture therapy and neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Tetsuo

    1999-01-01

    Neutron beam designs were studied at the proposed Musashi reactor (TRIGA-II, 100 kW) with a view to generating thermal and epithermal neutron beams for both neutron capture therapy (NCT) and neutron radiography (NR). The beams are delivered from thermal and thermalizing columns, and also horizontal beam hole. Thermal, epithermal and fast neutron energy ranges were selected as 10 keV, respectively. Several prospective neutron filters (aluminum (Al), aluminum oxide (Al 2 O 3 ), lead fluoride (PbF 2 ) and high-density graphite (G), bismuth (Bi), single-crystal silicon (Si)) were examined for obtaining sufficiently intense neutron beam. Monte Carlo calculations indicated that with a suitable neutron filter arrangement, thermal and epithermal neutron beams attaining 2x10 9 and 5x10 8 ncm -2 s -1 , respectively, could be obtainable from thermal and thermalizing columns with the reactor operating at 100 kW. These neutron beams could be adopted for boron neutron capture therapy. Compared with these columns, horizontal beam port would deliver neutron fluxes of from 10 -2 to 10 -3 lower intensity, but produced thermal and epithermal neutron beams would be adequate for different application to neutron radiography. (author)

  3. Neutron resonance spectroscopy at n-TOF at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunsing, F.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Alvarez, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Becvar, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calvino, F.; Calviani, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapic, C.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Goncalves, I.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Gramegna, F.; Guerrero, C.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Jericha, E.; Kappeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Kerveno, M.; Koehler, P.; Kossionides, E.; Krticka, M.; Lampoudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marrone, S.; Martinez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P.M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O'Brien, S.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Pigni, M.T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Praena, J.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J.L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M.C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.

    2008-01-01

    Neutron resonance spectroscopy plays an important role in the investigation of neutron induced reaction cross sections and nuclear structure in the MeV excitation range. Neutron time-of-flight facilities are the most used installations to explore neutron resonances. In this paper we describe the basic features of neutron resonance spectroscopy together with recent results from the time-of-flight facility n-TOF at CERN. (authors)

  4. New prospect in neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cluzeau, S.

    1991-01-01

    Neutron radiography is a very useful non-destructive testing (NDT) method which frequently complements classical X-ray inspection. Numerous inspections in some fields are currently performed at reactor-based neutron radiography facilities but many other interesting applications in different fields are at present not considered because the objects to be tested cannot be moved to a reactor. It is the goal of the DIANE project, to allow the utilization of this NDT method in industrial facilities by developing a safe and convenient neutron radiography equipment using an ''on-off'' neutron source. As a result of the efforts of the four European partners, a first laboratory demonstration model is currently in operation in Germany and a fully mobile second one is expected by the end of 1992. Good radiographs are obtained with exposure times in the range of a few seconds to ten minutes using an electronic imaging system. The fast neutron generator uses a sealed neutron tube delivering 5.10 11 neutrons.cm -2 .s -1 in 4 π steradian; with a collimator ratio of about 12, the fluence rate onto the object is then close to 1,5.10 5 thermal neutrons.cm -2 .s -1 . (author)

  5. Field neutron spectrometer using 3He, TEPC, and multisphere detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brackenbush, L.W.

    1991-01-01

    Since the last DOE Neutron Dosimetry Workshop, there have been a number of changes in radiation protection standards proposed by national and international advisory bodies. These changes include: increasing quality factors for neutrons by a factor of two, defining quality factors as a function of lineal energy rather than linear energy transfer (see ACCRUE-40; Joint Task Group 1986), and adoption of effective dose equivalent methodologies. In order to determine the effects of these proposed changes, it is necessary to know the neutron energy spectrum in the work place. In response to the possible adoption of these proposals, the Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a program to develop practical neutron spectrometry systems for use by health physicists. One part of this program was the development of a truly portable, battery operated liquid scintillator spectrometer using proprietary electronics developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); this instrument will be described in the following paper. The second part was the development at PNL of a simple transportable spectrometer based on commercially available electronics. This open-quotes field neutron spectrometerclose quotes described in this paper is intended to be used over a range of neutron energies extending from thermal to 20 MeV

  6. Design of a neutron reflectometry at a research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tun, Z.

    2006-01-01

    A neutron reflectometer is a custom-built instrument optimized for measuring reflectivity of a sample consisting of one or more flat interfaces. Its components include stepper motor drives for angles and/or slits, neutron detectors for beam monitoring and signal counting, several neutron optics elements for beam tailoring, a dedicated computer for control, and a massive radiation shielding made of neutron absorbers, steel and lead. One possible interface that a user wishes to study with reflectometry could be the surface of a liquid, and hence the most general purpose reflectometer is for horizontal sample geometry. The machine then of course operates in a vertical scattering plane. Due to mechanical complexity, however, such an instrument is more challenging to build than a machine with a horizontal scattering plane. The maximum Q one could reach in the horizontal sample geometry is often quite limited. The choice between horizontal and vertical sample geometry is just an example of many issues involved in the design of a reflectometer. As for all other neutron instruments, designing a reflectometer is a balancing act between competing issues: general functionality of the machine versus complexity and cost; high neutron flux versus as-low-as-possible background; resolution versus the extent of the dynamic Q range, etc. No universal solution exists as all research reactors are different and each presents a unique situation. (author)

  7. Determination of neutron generation time in miniature neutron source reactor by measurement of neutronics transfer function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hainoun, A.; Khamis, I.

    2000-01-01

    The prompt neutron generation time Λ and the total effective fraction of delayed neutrons (including the effect of photoneutrons) β have been experimentally determined for the miniature neutron source reactor (MNSR) of Syria. The neutron generation time was found by taking measurements of the reactor open-loop transfer function using newly devised reactivity-step-ejection method by the reactor pneumatic rabbit system. Small reactivity perturbations i.e. step changes of reactivity starting from steady state, were introduced into the reactor during operation at low power level i.e. zero-power. Relative neutron flux and reactivity versus time were obtained. Using transfer function analysis as well as least square fitting techniques and measuring the delayed neutrons fraction, the neutron generation time was determined to be 74.6±1.57 μs. Using the prompt jump approximation of neutron flux, the total effective fraction of delayed neutrons was measured and found to be 0.00783±0.00017. Measured values of Λ and β were found to be very consistent with calculated ones reported in the safety analysis report. (orig.)

  8. Development of Cold Neutron Activation Station at HANARO Cold Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, G. M.; Hoang, S. M. T.; Moon, J. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Cho, S. J.; Lee, K. H.; Park, B. G.; Choi, H. D.

    2012-01-01

    A new cold neutron source at the HANARO Research Reactor had been constructed in the framework of a five-year project, and ended in 2009. It has seven neutron guides, among which five guides were already allocated for a number of neutron scattering instruments. A new two-year project to develop a Cold Neutron Activation Station (CONAS) was carried out at the two neutron guides since May 2010, which was supported by the program of the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology, Korea. Fig. 1 shows the location of CONAS. CONAS is a complex facility including several radioanalytical instruments utilizing neutron capture reaction to analyze elements in a sample. It was designed to include three instruments like a CN-PGAA (Cold Neutron - Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis), a CN-NIPS (Cold Neutron - Neutron Induced Pair Spectrometer), and a CN-NDP (Cold Neutron - Neutron-induced prompt charged particle Depth Profiling). Fig. 2 shows the conceptual configuration of the CONAS concrete bioshield and the instruments. CN-PGAA and CN-NIPS measure the gamma-rays promptly emitted from the sample after neutron capture, whereas CN-NDP is a probe to measure the charged particles emitted from the sample surface after neutron capture. For this, we constructed two cold neutron guides called CG1 and CG2B guides from the CNS

  9. Utilization of a pulsed D-T neutron generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilaithong, T.; Singkarat, S.; Tippawan, U.

    2000-01-01

    In the past two decades the IAEA has supported the establishment of neutron laboratories in many developing countries by providing small D-T neutron generators. The neutron generator is basically a low energy (100-400 keV) ion accelerator capable of producing a continuous beam of deuterons with a current in the range between 1-2.5 mA. These neutron generators are primarily intended to be used for fast neutron activation analysis. This paper describes the utilization of a 14 MeV neutron generator in continuous and pulsed beam modes in applied neutron physics program at Chiang Mai University. (author)

  10. NSDUAZ unfolding package for neutron spectrometry and dosimetry with Bonner spheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H. R.; Martinez B, M. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Ortiz R, J. M., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Ingenieria Electrica, Av. Ramon Lopez Velarde 801, Col. Centro, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2011-10-15

    NSDUAZ (Neutron Spectrometry and Dosimetry for the Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas) is a user friendly neutron unfolding package for Bonner sphere spectrometer with {sup 6}Lil(Eu) developed under Lab View environment. Unfolding is carried out using a recursive iterative procedure with the SPUNIT algorithm, where the starting spectrum is obtained from a library initial guess spectrum to start the iterations, the package include a statistical procedure based on the count rates relative to the count rate in the 8 inches-diameter sphere to select the initial spectrum. Neutron spectrum is unfolded in 32 energy groups ranging from 10{sup -8} up to 231.2 MeV. (Author)

  11. The Advanced Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretz, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is to be a multipurpose neutron research center, constructed around a high-flux reactor now being designed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Its primary purpose is to place the United States in the forefront of neutron scattering in the twenty-first century. Other research programs include nuclear and fundamental physics, isotope production, materials irradiation, and analytical chemistry. The ANS will be a unique and invaluable research tool because of the unprecedented neutron flux available from the high-intensity research reactor. But this reactor would be ineffective without world-class research facilities that allow the fullest utilization of the available neutrons. And, in turn, those research facilities will not produce new and exciting science without a broad population of users from all parts of the nation and the world, placed in a stimulating environment in which experiments can be effectively conducted and in which scientific exchange is encouraged. This paper discusses the measures being taken to ensure that the design of the ANS focuses not only on the reactor, but on providing the experiment and user support facilities needed to allow its effective use

  12. Neutron scattering for materials science. Materials Research Society proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, S.M.; Moss, S.C.; Jorgensen, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    Neutron Scattering is by now a well-established technique which has been used by condensed matter scientists to probe both the structure and the dynamical interactions in solids and liquids. The use of neutron scattering methods in materials science research has in turn increased dramatically in recent years. The symposium presented in this book was assembled to bring together scientists with a wide range of interest, including high-T c superconducting materials, phase transformations, neutron depth profiling, structure and dynamics of glasses and liquids, surfaces and interfaces, porous media, intercalation compounds and lower dimensional systems, structure and dynamics of polymers, residual stress analysis, ordering and phase separation in alloys, and magnetism in alloys and multilayers. The symposium included talks covering the latest advances in broad areas of interest such as Rietveld structure refinement, triple axis spectrometry, quasi elastic scattering and diffusion, small angle scattering and surface scattering

  13. Direction sensitive neutron detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlen, Steven; Fisher, Peter; Dujmic, Denis; Wellenstein, Hermann F.; Inglis, Andrew

    2017-01-31

    A neutron detector includes a pressure vessel, an electrically conductive field cage assembly within the pressure vessel and an imaging subsystem. A pressurized gas mixture of CF.sub.4, .sup.3He and .sup.4He at respective partial pressures is used. The field cage establishes a relatively large drift region of low field strength, in which ionization electrons generated by neutron-He interactions are directed toward a substantially smaller amplification region of substantially higher field strength in which the ionization electrons undergo avalanche multiplication resulting in scintillation of the CF.sub.4 along scintillation tracks. The imaging system generates two-dimensional images of the scintillation patterns and employs track-finding to identify tracks and deduce the rate and direction of incident neutrons. One or more photo-multiplier tubes record the time-profile of the scintillation tracks permitting the determination of the third coordinate.

  14. A guide to the AUS modular neutronics code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, G.S.

    1987-04-01

    A general description is given of the AUS modular neutronics code system, which may be used for calculations of a very wide range of fission reactors, fusion blankets and other neutron applications. The present system has cross-section libraries derived from ENDF/B-IV and includes modules which provide for lattice calculations, one-dimensional transport calculations, and one, two, and three-dimensional diffusion calculations, burnup calculations and the flexible editing of results. Details of all system aspects of AUS are provided but the major individual modules are only outlined. Sufficient information is given to enable other modules to be added to the system

  15. An empirical fit to estimated neutron emission cross sections from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    dominated by neutrons spanning a wide range of energy from slow neutrons to several tens of MeV [1]. Moreover, protons ... expression to calculate neutron emission from proton induced reactions in the energy range. 25–105 MeV. ..... nuclear model calculations for nuclear technology applications, Trieste, Italy, SMR/284-1.

  16. Neutron fan beam source for neutron radiography purpose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Tourneur, P.; Bach, P.; Dance, W. E.

    1999-01-01

    The development of the DIANE neutron radiography system included a sealed-tube neutron generator for this purpose and the optimization of the system's neutron beam quality in terms of divergence and useful thermal neutron yield for each 14-MeV neutron produced. Following this development, the concept of a DIANE fan beam source is herewith introduced. The goal which drives this design is one of economy: by simply increasing the aperture dimension of a conventional DIANE beam in one plane of its collimator axis to a small-angle, fan-shaped output, the useful beam area for neutron radiography would be substantially increased. Thus with the same source, the throughput, or number of objects under examination at any given time, would be augmented significantly. Presented here are the design of this thermal neutron source and the initial Monte Carlo calculations. Taking into account the experience with the conventional DIANE neutron radiography system, these result are discussed and the potential of and interest in such a fan-beam source are explored

  17. The LANL/LLNL Prompt Fission Neutron Spectrum Program at LANSCE and Approach to Uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haight, R.C., E-mail: haight@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545,USA (United States); Wu, C.Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Lee, H.Y.; Taddeucci, T.N.; Perdue, B.A.; O' Donnell, J.M.; Fotiades, N.; Devlin, M.; Ullmann, J.L.; Bredeweg, T.A.; Jandel, M.; Nelson, R.O.; Wender, S.A.; Neudecker, D.; Rising, M.E.; Mosby, S.; Sjue, S.; White, M.C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545,USA (United States); Bucher, B.; Henderson, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    New data on the prompt fission neutron spectra (PFNS) from neutron-induced fission with higher accuracies are needed to resolve discrepancies in the literature and to address gaps in the experimental data. The Chi-Nu project, conducted jointly by LANL and LLNL, aims to measure the shape of the PFNS for fission of {sup 239}Pu induced by neutrons from 0.5 to 20 MeV with accuracies of 3–5% in the outgoing energy from 0.1 to 9 MeV and 15% from 9 to 12 MeV and to provide detailed experimental uncertainties. Neutrons from the WNR/LANSCE neutron source are being used to induce fission in a Parallel-Plate Avalanche Counter (PPAC). Two arrays of neutron detectors are used to cover the energy range of neutrons emitted promptly in the fission process. Challenges for the present experiment include background reduction, use of {sup 239}Pu in a PPAC, and understanding neutron detector response. Achieving the target accuracies requires the understanding of many systematic uncertainties. The status and plans for the future will be presented.

  18. The LANL/LLNL Prompt Fission Neutron Spectrum Program at LANSCE and Approach to Uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haight, R. C.; Wu, C. Y.; Lee, H. Y.; Taddeucci, T. N.; Perdue, B. A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Fotiades, N.; Devlin, M.; Ullmann, J. L.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Jandel, M.; Nelson, R. O.; Wender, S. A.; Neudecker, D.; Rising, M. E.; Mosby, S.; Sjue, S.; White, M. C.; Bucher, B.; Henderson, R.

    2015-01-01

    New data on the prompt fission neutron spectra (PFNS) from neutron-induced fission with higher accuracies are needed to resolve discrepancies in the literature and to address gaps in the experimental data. The Chi-Nu project, conducted jointly by LANL and LLNL, aims to measure the shape of the PFNS for fission of 239Pu induced by neutrons from 0.5 to 20 MeV with accuracies of 3-5% in the outgoing energy from 0.1 to 9 MeV and 15% from 9 to 12 MeV and to provide detailed experimental uncertainties. Neutrons from the WNR/LANSCE neutron source are being used to induce fission in a Parallel-Plate Avalanche Counter (PPAC). Two arrays of neutron detectors are used to cover the energy range of neutrons emitted promptly in the fission process. Challenges for the present experiment include background reduction, use of 239Pu in a PPAC, and understanding neutron detector response. Achieving the target accuracies requires the understanding of many systematic uncertainties. The status and plans for the future will be presented.

  19. Neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heger, G.

    1996-01-01

    X-ray diffraction using conventional laboratory equipment and/or synchrotron installations is the most important method for structure analyses. The purpose of this paper is to discuss special cases, for which, in addition to this indispensable part, neutrons are required to solve structural problems. Even though the huge intensity of modern synchrotron sources allows in principle the study of magnetic X-ray scattering the investigation of magnetic structures is still one of the most important applications of neutron diffraction. (author) 15 figs., 1 tab., 10 refs

  20. Neutron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heger, G. [Rheinisch-Westfaelische Technische Hochschule Aachen, Inst. fuer Kristallographie, Aachen (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    X-ray diffraction using conventional laboratory equipment and/or synchrotron installations is the most important method for structure analyses. The purpose of this paper is to discuss special cases, for which, in addition to this indispensable part, neutrons are required to solve structural problems. Even though the huge intensity of modern synchrotron sources allows in principle the study of magnetic X-ray scattering the investigation of magnetic structures is still one of the most important applications of neutron diffraction. (author) 15 figs., 1 tab., 10 refs.

  1. Neutronics of pulsed spallation neutron sources

    CERN Document Server

    Watanabe, N

    2003-01-01

    Various topics and issues on the neutronics of pulsed spallation neutron sources, mainly for neutron scattering experiments, are reviewed to give a wide circle of readers a better understanding of these sources in order to achieve a high neutronic performance. Starting from what neutrons are needed, what the spallation reaction is and how to produce slow-neutrons more efficiently, the outline of the target and moderator neutronics are explained. Various efforts with some new concepts or ideas have already been devoted to obtaining the highest possible slow-neutron intensity with desired pulse characteristics. This paper also reviews the recent progress of such efforts, mainly focused on moderator neutronics, since moderators are the final devices of a neutron source, which determine the source performance. Various governing parameters for neutron-pulse characteristics such as material issues, geometrical parameters (shape and dimensions), the target-moderator coupling scheme, the ortho-para-hydrogen ratio, po...

  2. Quantitative neutron radiography using neutron absorbing honeycomb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaki, Masayoshi; Oda, Masahiro; Takahashi, Kenji; Ohkubo, Kohei; Tasaka, Kanji; Tsuruno, Akira; Matsubayashi, Masahito.

    1993-01-01

    This investigation concerns quantitative neutron radiography and computed tomography by using a neutron absorbing honeycomb collimator. By setting the neutron absorbing honeycomb collimator between object and imaging system, neutrons scattered in the object were absorbed by the honeycomb material and eliminated before coming to the imaging system, but the neutrons which were transmitted the object without interaction could reach the imaging system. The image by purely transmitted neutrons gives the quantitative information. Two honeycombs were prepared with coating of boron nitride and gadolinium oxide and evaluated for the quantitative application. The relation between the neutron total cross section and the attenuation coefficient confirmed that they were in a fairly good agreement. Application to quantitative computed tomography was also successfully conducted. The new neutron radiography method using the neutron-absorbing honeycomb collimator for the elimination of the scattered neutrons improved remarkably the quantitativeness of the neutron radiography and computed tomography. (author)

  3. A polyethylene-B4C based concrete for enhanced neutron shielding at neutron research facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiJulio, D. D.; Cooper-Jensen, C. P.; Perrey, H.; Fissum, K.; Rofors, E.; Scherzinger, J.; Bentley, P. M.

    2017-07-01

    We present the development of a specialized concrete for neutron shielding at neutron research facilities, based on the addition of hydrogen atoms in the form of polyethylene and also B4C for enhancing the neutron capture properties of the concrete. We show information on the mechanical properties of the concrete and the neutronics, in particular its relevance to modern spallation neutron sources, such as the European Spallation Source (ESS), currently under construction in Lund, Sweden. The new concrete exhibits a 15% lower mass density, a compressible strength of 50% relative to a standard concrete and a significant increase in performance of shielding against MeV neutrons and lower energies. The concrete could find application at the ESS in for example common shielding components, individual beamline shielding and instrument caves. Initial neutronic tests of the concrete, carried out at Lund University, have also verified the performance in the MeV neutron energy range and the results are presented.

  4. Within the framework of the new fuel cycle {sup 232}Th/{sup 233}U, determination of the {sup 233}Pa(n.{gamma}) radiative capture cross section for neutron energies ranging between 0 and 1 MeV; Dans le cadre du nouveau cycle de combustible {sup 232}Th/{sup 233}U, determination de la section efficace de capture radiative {sup 233}Pa(n,{gamma}) pour des energies de neutrons comprises entre 0 et 1 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, S

    2004-10-15

    The Thorium cycle Th{sup 232}/U{sup 233} may face brilliant perspectives through advanced concepts like molten salt reactors or accelerator driven systems but it lacks accurate nuclear data concerning some nuclei. Pa{sup 233} is one of these nuclei, its high activity makes the direct measurement of its radiative neutron capture cross-section almost impossible. This difficulty has been evaded by considering the transfer reaction Th{sup 232}(He{sup 3},p)Pa{sup 234}* in which the Pa{sup 234} nucleus is produced in various excited states according to the amount of energy available in the reaction. The first chapter deals with the thorium cycle and its assets to contribute to the quenching of the fast growing world energy demand. The second chapter gives a detailed description of the experimental setting. A scintillation detector based on deuterated benzene (C{sub 6}D{sub 6}) has been used to counter gamma ray cascades. The third chapter is dedicated to data analysis. In the last chapter we compare our experimental results with ENDF and JENDL data and with computed values from 2 statistical models in the 0-1 MeV neutron energy range. Our results disagree clearly with evaluated data: our values are always above ENDF and JENDL data but tend to near computed values. We have also perform the measurement of the radiative neutron cross-section of Pa{sup 231} for a 110 keV neutron: {sigma}(n,{gamma}) 2.00 {+-} 0.14 barn. (A.C.)

  5. Magnetism and magnetic materials probed with neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velthuis, S.G.E. te, E-mail: tevelthuis@anl.gov [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S Cass Ave, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Pappas, C. [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, NL-2629JB Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-01-15

    Neutron scattering techniques are becoming increasingly accessible to a broader range of scientific communities, in part due to the onset of next-generation, high-power spallation sources, high-performance, sophisticated instruments and data analysis tools. These technical advances also advantageously impact research into magnetism and magnetic materials, where neutrons play a major role. In this Current Perspective series, the achievements and future prospects of elastic and inelastic neutron scattering, polarized neutron reflectometry, small angle neutron scattering, and neutron imaging, are highlighted as they apply to research into magnetic frustration, superconductivity and magnetism at the nanoscale. - Highlights: • Introduction to Current Perspective series titled Magnetism and Magnetic Materials probed with Neutron Scattering. • Elastic and inelastic neutron scattering in systems with magnetic frustration and superconductivity. • Small angle neutron scattering and polarized neutron reflectometry in studying magnetism at the nanoscale. • Imaging of magnetic fields and domains.

  6. Magnetism and magnetic materials probed with neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velthuis, S.G.E. te; Pappas, C.

    2014-01-01

    Neutron scattering techniques are becoming increasingly accessible to a broader range of scientific communities, in part due to the onset of next-generation, high-power spallation sources, high-performance, sophisticated instruments and data analysis tools. These technical advances also advantageously impact research into magnetism and magnetic materials, where neutrons play a major role. In this Current Perspective series, the achievements and future prospects of elastic and inelastic neutron scattering, polarized neutron reflectometry, small angle neutron scattering, and neutron imaging, are highlighted as they apply to research into magnetic frustration, superconductivity and magnetism at the nanoscale. - Highlights: • Introduction to Current Perspective series titled Magnetism and Magnetic Materials probed with Neutron Scattering. • Elastic and inelastic neutron scattering in systems with magnetic frustration and superconductivity. • Small angle neutron scattering and polarized neutron reflectometry in studying magnetism at the nanoscale. • Imaging of magnetic fields and domains

  7. Neutron dosimetry in boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairchild, R.G.; Miola, U.J.; Ettinger, K.V.

    1981-01-01

    The recent development of various borated compounds and the utilization of one of these (Na 2 B 12 H 11 SH) to treat brain tumors in clinical studies in Japan has renewed interest in neutron capture therapy. In these procedures thermal neutrons interact with 10 B in boron containing cells through the 10 B(n,α) 7 Li reaction producing charged particles with a maximum range of approx. 10μm in tissue. Borated analogs of chlorpromazine, porphyrin, thiouracil and deoxyuridine promise improved tumor uptake and blood clearance. The therapy beam from the Medical Research Reactor in Brookhaven contains neutrons from a modified and filtered fission spectrum and dosimetric consequences of the use of the above mentioned compounds in conjunction with thermal and epithermal fluxes are discussed in the paper. One of the important problems of radiation dosimetry in capture therapy is determination of the flux profile and, hence, the dose profile in the brain. This has been achieved by constructing a brain phantom made of TE plastic. The lyoluminescence technique provides a convenient way of monitoring the neutron flux distributions; the detectors for this purpose utilize 6 Li and 10 B compounds. Such compounds have been synthesized specially for the purpose of dosimetry of thermal and epithermal beams. In addition, standard lyoluminescent phosphors, like glutamine, could be used to determine the collisional component of the dose as well as the contribution of the 14 N(n,p) 14 C reaction. Measurements of thermal flux were compared with calculations and with measurements done with activation foils

  8. Neutron scattering of lanthanide materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, R.M.; Nicklow, R.M.

    1991-01-01

    A selected review of recent neutron scattering results on lanthanide materials is presented. Topics covered include the magnetic structures of the elemental metals, magnetic superlattices, enhanced nuclear magnetism, magnetic excitations and critical scattering. (orig.)

  9. Sensitivity of the neutron crystal diffraction experiment to the neutron EDM and to the nuclear P-,T-violating forces

    OpenAIRE

    Baryshevsky, V. G.; Cherkas, S. L.

    2013-01-01

    We establish a link between an angle of the neutron polarization rotation in a crystal diffraction experiment and constants of the P-,T- violating interactions. The consideration applies to the energy range of thermal and resonance neutrons.

  10. Small angle neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Sanjay

    1982-01-01

    The technique of small angle neutron scattering was first used in Germany less than two decades ago. Since then it has developed very rapidly, and today it is regarded as one of the most powerful techniques in materials, chemical and biological research. During the last decade the combination of high flux reactors and sophisticated instrumentation has revolutionized the technique. This paper endeavours to present a brief but comprehensive review of small angle scattering of neutrons and its applications in solid state research. The domain in which small angle neutron scattering is particularly useful is delineated and some of the methods used in the analysis of data are discussed with special emphasis on recent developments. Typical small angle neutron scattering cameras are described. Finally some experimental results on heterogeneities in metallic systems (both static and dynamic studies), radiation damage in materials, superconductivity, magnetic materials and the technologically very important area of non-destructive testing are reviewed in order to illustrate the wide range of applicability of this technique to problems in solid state research. (author)

  11. Time-dependent electron kinetics in N[sub 2] and H[sub 2] for a wide range of the field frequency including electron-vibration superelastic collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loureiro, J. (Centro de Electrodinamica da Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1096 Lisboa Codex (Portugal))

    1993-02-01

    Electron-energy distribution functions (EEDF), electron-transport parameters, and rate coefficients have been calculated by solving the time-dependent Boltzmann equation in weakly ionized plasmas in N[sub 2] and H[sub 2], for a wide range of the field frequency going from [omega][much lt][nu][sub [ital e

  12. Neutronic reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wende, C.W.J.

    1976-01-01

    The method of operating a water-cooled neutronic reactor having a graphite moderator is described which comprises flowing a gaseous mixture of carbon dioxide and helium, in which the helium comprises 40--60 volume percent of the mixture, in contact with the graphite moderator. 2 claims, 4 figures

  13. Neutron scattering and models: Silver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.B.

    1996-07-01

    Differential neutron elastic-scattering cross sections of elemental silver were measured from 1.5 → 10 MeV at ∼ 100 keV intervals up to 3 MeV, at ∼ 200 keV intervals from 3 → 4 MeV, and at ∼ 500 keV intervals above 4 MeV. At ≤ 4 MeV the angular range of the measurements was ∼ 20 0 → 160 0 with 10 measured values below 3 MeV and 20 from 3 → 4 MeV at each incident energy. Above 4 MeV ≥ 40 scattering angles were used distributed between ∼ 17 0 and 16 0 All of the measured elastic distributions included some contributions due to inelastic scattering. Below 4 MeV the measurements determined cross sections for ten inelastically-scattered neutron groups corresponding to observed excitations of 328 ± 13, 419 ± 50, 748 ± 25, 908 ± 26, 115 ± 38, 1286 ± 25, 1507 ± 20, 1632 ± 30, 1835 ± 20 and 1944 ± 26 keV. All of these inelastic groups probably were composites of contributions from the two isotopes 107 Ag and 109 Ag. The experimental results were interpreted in terms of the spherical optical model and of rotational and vibrational coupled-channels models, and physical implications are discussed. In particular, the neutron-scattering results are consistent with a ground-state rotational band with a quadrupole deformation Β 2 = 0.20 ± ∼ 10% for both of the naturally-occurring silver isotopes

  14. Neutron interactions at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyubimov, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    The problems of nucleon interactions are discussed. Considered are the processes at energies corresponding to the regions of minimum and of the growth of total cross sections, to the regions covered by Serpuhov and Baraviya accelerators and by the accelerator with colliding rings. The np-interactions including the experiment method on neutron beams are elucidated in detail. All this is due to the fact, that accurate experiments on neutron beams have been carried out only recently, and their experimental peculiarities were not well known. Discussed are the following problems: total cross sections, elastic forward scattering, elastic backward scattering (np-overcharge) and nucleon diffraction dissociation. The equality of total np- and pp-cross sections (which was experimentally observed at energy range of Serpuhov accelerator and the elastic scatteirng proximity in diffraction region) means, from the optical point of view, that the nuclear matter distribution in neutrons and protons in peripheric regions is practically identical. The total section equality is in agreement with the dual model forecast, connected with degeneration of rho- A 2 - trajectory. Careful investigations of diffraction nucleon dissociations at high energies (Serpuhov, Bataviya and colliding rings) have been carried out recently. Found out were some peculiarities not observed before, (at energies < 30 GeV), such as backward peak in distribution by cosTHETAsub(GJ) in the Gottfrid-Jackson system, the maximum displacement in mass spectra to the region of greater masses, the section yeild on constant at high energies and some other effects. The effects observed may be explained by the Deck mechanism, provided that single-pion exchange is taken into account along with barion exchange and interference

  15. Neutron stars as cosmic neutron matter laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pines, D.

    1986-01-01

    Recent developments which have radically changed our understanding of the dynamics of neutron star superfluids and the free precession of neutron stars are summarized, and the extent to which neutron stars are cosmic neutron matter laboratories is discussed. 17 refs., 1 tab

  16. Participant Support for Speakers and Early-Career Scientists at the 2012 American Conference on Neutron Scattering (ACNS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leighton, Chris [Materials Research Society, Warrendale, PA (United States); Dillen, J. Ardie [Materials Research Society, Warrendale, PA (United States)

    2012-11-07

    The ACNS provides a focal point for the North American neutron user community, strengthening ties within this diverse group, and promoting neutron research in related disciplines. The conference thus serves a dual role as both a national user meeting and a scientific meeting. As a venue for scientific exchange, the ACNS showcases recent results and provides a forum for scientific discussion of neutron-enabled research in fields as diverse as hard and soft condensed matter, liquids, biology, magnetism, engineering materials, chemical spectroscopy, crystal structure, elementary excitations, fundamental physics, and development of neutron instrumentation. This is achieved through a combination of invited oral presentations, contributed oral presentations, and poster sessions. Adequate opportunity for spontaneous discussion and collaboration is also built into the ACNS program in order to foster free exchange of new scientific ideas and the potential for use of powerful neutron scattering methods beyond the current realms of application. The sixth American Conference on Neutron Scattering (ACNS 2012) provided essential information on the breadth and depth of current neutron-related research worldwide. A strong program of plenary, invited and contributed talks showcased recent scientific results in neutron science in a wide range of fields, including soft and hard condensed matter, biology, chemistry, energy and engineering applications, and neutron physics.

  17. Diffraction in neutron imaging-A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woracek, Robin; Santisteban, Javier; Fedrigo, Anna; Strobl, Markus

    2018-01-01

    Neutron imaging is a highly successful experimental technique ever since adequate neutron sources were available. In general, neutron imaging is performed with a wide wavelength spectrum for best flux conditions in transmission geometry. Neutrons provide outstanding features in the penetration of many structural materials, which often makes them more suited for bulk sample studies than other forms of radiation, often in particular as they are also highly sensitive to some light elements, especially Hydrogen. In contrast to neutron scattering applications, imaging resolves macroscopic structures, nowadays down to, in the best case, below 10 micrometre, directly in real space. However, since more than a decade there is a growing number of techniques and applications in neutron imaging that - supported by powerful neutron sources - are taking advantage of wavelength resolved measurements. In this review we summarize and discuss this outstanding development and how wavelength resolved transmission neutron imaging is successfully exploiting diffraction mechanisms to access crystal structure information in the Angstrom regime, which conventionally is probed in reciprocal space by diffraction techniques. In particular the combination of information gained in real space and on crystallographic length scales makes this neutron imaging technique a valuable tool for a wide range of new applications, while it also qualifies neutron imaging to fully profit from the new generation of powerful pulsed neutron sources.

  18. Neutron energy spectrum influence on irradiation hardening and microstructural development of tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Makoto, E-mail: makoto.fukuda@qse.tohoku.ac.jp [Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8579 (Japan); Kiran Kumar, N.A.P.; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Garrison, Lauren M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, 37831 (United States); Snead, Lance L. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 02139 (United States); Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, 37831 (United States); Hasegawa, Akira [Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8579 (Japan)

    2016-10-15

    Neutron irradiation to single crystal pure tungsten was performed in the mixed spectrum High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). To investigate the influences of neutron energy spectrum, the microstructure and irradiation hardening were compared with previous data obtained from the irradiation campaigns in the mixed spectrum Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR) and the sodium-cooled fast reactor Joyo. The irradiation temperatures were in the range of ∼90–∼800 °C and fast neutron fluences were 0.02–9.00 × 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2} (E > 0.1 MeV). Post irradiation evaluation included Vickers hardness measurements and transmission electron microscopy. The hardness and microstructure changes exhibited a clear dependence on the neutron energy spectrum. The hardness appeared to increase with increasing thermal neutron flux when fast fluence exceeds 1 × 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2} (E > 0.1 MeV). Irradiation induced precipitates considered to be χ- and σ-phases were observed in samples irradiated to >1 × 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2} (E > 0.1 MeV), which were pronounced at high dose and due to the very high thermal neutron flux of HFIR. Although the irradiation hardening mainly caused by defects clusters in a low dose regime, the transmutation-induced precipitation appeared to impose additional significant hardening of the tungsten. - Highlights: • The microstructure and irradiation hardening of single crystal pure W irradiated in HFIR was investigated. • The neutron energy spectrum influence was evaluated by comparing the HFIR results with previous work in Joyo and JMTR. • In the dose range up to ∼1 dpa, the neutron energy spectrum influence of irradiation hardening was not clear. • In the dose range above 1 dpa, the neutron energy influence on irradiation hardening and microstructural development was clearly observed. • The irradiation induced precipitates caused significant irradiation hardening of pure W irradiated in HFIR.

  19. Neutron scattering science in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knott, Robert

    1999-01-01

    Neutron scattering science in Australia is making an impact on a number of fields in the scientific and industrial research communities. The unique properties of the neutron are being used to investigate problems in chemistry, materials science, physics, engineering and biology. The reactor HIFAR at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation research laboratories is the only neutron source in Australia suitable for neutron scattering science. A suite of instruments provides a wide range of opportunities for the neutron scattering community that extends throughout universities, government and industrial research laboratories. Plans are in progress to replace the present research reactor with a modern multi-purpose research reactor to offer the most advanced neutron scattering facilities. The experimental and analysis equipment associated with a modern research reactor will permit the establishment of a national centre for world class neutron science research focussed on the structure and functioning of materials, industrial irradiations and analyses in support of Australian manufacturing, minerals, petrochemical, pharmaceuticals and information science industries. (author)

  20. Neutron scattering science in Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knott, Robert [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai, NSW (Australia)

    1999-10-01

    Neutron scattering science in Australia is making an impact on a number of fields in the scientific and industrial research communities. The unique properties of the neutron are being used to investigate problems in chemistry, materials science, physics, engineering and biology. The reactor HIFAR at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation research laboratories is the only neutron source in Australia suitable for neutron scattering science. A suite of instruments provides a wide range of opportunities for the neutron scattering community that extends throughout universities, government and industrial research laboratories. Plans are in progress to replace the present research reactor with a modern multi-purpose research reactor to offer the most advanced neutron scattering facilities. The experimental and analysis equipment associated with a modern research reactor will permit the establishment of a national centre for world class neutron science research focussed on the structure and functioning of materials, industrial irradiations and analyses in support of Australian manufacturing, minerals, petrochemical, pharmaceuticals and information science industries. (author)

  1. Basic of Neutron NDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trahan, Alexis Chanel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-15

    The objectives of this presentation are to introduce the basic physics of neutron production, interactions and detection; identify the processes that generate neutrons; explain the most common neutron mechanism, spontaneous and induced fission and (a,n) reactions; describe the properties of neutron from different sources; recognize advantages of neutron measurements techniques; recognize common neutrons interactions; explain neutron cross section measurements; describe the fundamental of 3He detector function and designs; and differentiate between passive and active assay techniques.

  2. Calibration issues for neutron diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadler, G.J. [JET Joint Undertaking, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Adams, J.M. [AEA Technology, Harwell (United Kingdom); Barnes, C.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1997-12-01

    The performance of diagnostic systems are limited by their weakest constituents, including their calibration issues. Neutron diagnostics are notorious for problems encountered while determining their absolute calibrations, due mainly to the nature of the neutron transport problem. In order to facilitate the determination of an accurate and precise calibration, the diagnostic design should be such as to minimize the scattered neutron flux. ITER will use a comprehensive set of neutron diagnostics--comprising radial and vertical neutron cameras, neutron spectrometers, a neutron activation system and internal and external fission chambers--to provide accurate measurements of fusion power and power densities as a function of time. The calibration of such an important diagnostic system merits careful consideration. Some thoughts have already been given to this subject during the conceptual design phase in relation to the time-integrated neutron activation and time-dependent neutron yield monitors. However, no overall calibration strategy has been worked out so far. This paper represents a first attempt to address this vital issue. Experience gained from present large tokamaks (JET, TFTR and JT60U) and proposals for ITER are reviewed. The need to use a 14-MeV neutron generator as opposed to radioactive sources for in-situ calibration of D-T diagnostics will be stressed. It is clear that the overall absolute determination of fusion power will have to rely on a combination of nuclear measuring techniques, for which the provision of accurate and independent calibrations will constitute an ongoing process as ITER moves from one phase of operation to the next.

  3. Progress at the pulsed-spallation neutron facility KENS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, N.

    1989-01-01

    The world's smallest pulsed-spallation neutron facility KENS is still active and has been successfully operated since 1986 with increasing proton-beam intensity. Scientists of the proton accelerator group at KEK have convinced themselves that a beam intensity of 2 x 10 12 protons per pulse came within range. The beam time allocated to neutron-scattering experiments was about 1150 hours per year. Visiting scientists spent about 3500 man-days at the KENS facility in the last year from about 40 different institutes to perform experiments. Details given about the KENS neutron facility include the number of experiment proposals, the beam-time distribution of each instrument used in various research fields, the number of scientists and engineers in the Booster Synchrotron Utilization Facility and the number of research publications each year. Improvements and highlights of the research undertaken are noted. (author)

  4. NEW ENDF/B-VII.0 EVALUATIONS OF NEUTRON CROSS SECTIONS FOR 32 FISSION PRODUCTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KIM,H.; LEE, Y.-O.; HERMAN, M.; MUGHABGHAB, S.F.; OBLOZINSKY, P.; ROCHMAN, D.

    2007-04-22

    Neutron cross sections for fission products play important role not only in the design of extended burnup core and fast reactors, but also in the study of the backend fuel cycle and the criticality analysis of spent fuel. New evaluations in both the resonance and fast neutron regions were performed by the KAERI-BNL collaboration for 32 fission products. These were {sup 95}Mo, {sup 101}Ru, {sup 103}Rh, {sup 105}Pd, {sup 109}Ag, {sup 131}Xe, {sup 133}Cs, {sup 141}Pr, and complete isotope chains of {sup 142-148,150}Nd, {sup 144,147,148-154}Sm, and {sup 156,158,160-164}Dy. The evaluations cover a large amount of reaction channels, including all those needed for neutronics calculations. Also, they cover the entire energy range, from 10{sup -5} eV to 20 MeV, including the thermal, resolved, and unresolved resonance regions, and the fast neutron region.

  5. Neutron matter, neutron pairing, and neutron drops based on chiral effective field theory interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krueger, Thomas

    2016-10-19

    The physics of neutron-rich systems is of great interest in nuclear and astrophysics. Precise knowledge of the properties of neutron-rich nuclei is crucial for understanding the synthesis of heavy elements. Infinite neutron matter determines properties of neutron stars, a final stage of heavy stars after a core-collapse supernova. It also provides a unique theoretical laboratory for nuclear forces. Strong interactions are determined by quantum chromodynamics (QCD). However, QCD is non-perturbative at low energies and one presently cannot directly calculate nuclear forces from it. Chiral effective field theory circumvents these problems and connects the symmetries of QCD to nuclear interactions. It naturally and systematically includes many-nucleon forces and gives access to uncertainty estimates. We use chiral interactions throughout all calculation in this thesis. Neutron stars are very extreme objects. The densities in their interior greatly exceed those in nuclei. The exact composition and properties of neutron stars is still unclear but they consist mainly of neutrons. One can explore neutron stars theoretically with calculations of neutron matter. In the inner core of neutron stars exist very high densities and thus maybe exotic phases of matter. To investigate whether there exists a phase transition to such phases even at moderate densities we study the chiral condensate in neutron matter, the order parameter of chiral symmetry breaking, and find no evidence for a phase transition at nuclear densities. We also calculate the more extreme system of spin-polarised neutron matter. With this we address the question whether there exists such a polarised phase in neutron stars and also provide a benchmark system for lattice QCD. We find spin-polarised neutron matter to be an almost non-interacting Fermi gas. To understand the cooling of neutron stars neutron pairing is of great importance. Due to the high densities especially triplet pairing is of interest. We

  6. Measurements of neutron flux in the RA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raisic, N.

    1961-12-01

    This report includes the following separate parts: Thermal neutron flux in the experimental channels od RA reactor; Epithermal neutron flux in the experimental channels od RA reactor; Fast neutron flux in the experimental channels od RA reactor; Thermal neutron flux in the thermal column and biological experimental channel; Neutronic measurements in the RA reactor cell; Temperature reactivity coefficient of the RA reactor; design of the device for measuring the activity of wire [sr

  7. Investigation of some possible changes in Am-Be neutron source configuration in order to increase the thermal neutron flux using Monte Carlo code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiri, H.; Tavakoli-Anbaran, H.

    2018-01-01

    Am-Be neutrons source is based on (α, n) reaction and generates neutrons in the energy range of 0-11 MeV. Since the thermal neutrons are widely used in different fields, in this work, we investigate how to improve the source configuration in order to increase the thermal flux. These suggested changes include a spherical moderator instead of common cylindrical geometry, a reflector layer and an appropriate materials selection in order to achieve the maximum thermal flux. All calculations were done by using MCNP1 Monte Carlo code. Our final results indicated that a spherical paraffin moderator, a layer of beryllium as a reflector can efficiently increase the thermal neutron flux of Am-Be source.

  8. Prompt neutron spectrum of the spontaneous fission of californium-252

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamyatnin, Yu.S.; Kroshkin, N.I.; Korostylev, V.A.; Nefedov, V.N.; Ryazanov, D.K.; Starostov, B.I.; Semenov, A.F.

    1976-01-01

    The californium-252 spontaneous fission neutron spectrum was measured in the energy range of 0.01 to 10 MeV by the time-of-flight technique using various neutron detectors. The measurements of 252 Cf neutron spectrum at energies of 0.01 to 5 MeV were performed as a function of fission fragment kinetic energy. The mean neutron spectrum energy in the range of 0.7 to 10 MeV was found from the results of measurements. The irregularity in the 252 Cf neutron spectrum in the neutron energy range of less than 0.7 MeV compared to theoretical values is discussed. The mechanism of 252 Cf neutron emission is also discussed on the basis of neutron yield angle measurements. 12 references

  9. Neutron Imaging of Laser Melted SS316 Test Objects with Spatially Resolved Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J. Brooks

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel neutron far field interferometer is explored for sub-micron porosity detection in laser sintered stainless steel alloy 316 (SS316 test objects. The results shown are images and volumes of the first quantitative neutron dark-field tomography at various autocorrelation lengths, ξ . In this preliminary work, the beam defining slits were adjusted to an uncalibrated opening of 0.5 mm horizontal and 5 cm vertical; the images are blurred along the vertical direction. In spite of the blurred attenuation images, the dark-field images reveal structural information at the micron-scale. The topics explored include: the accessible size range of defects, potentially 338 nm to 4.5 μ m, that can be imaged with the small angle scattering images; the spatial resolution of the attenuation image; the maximum sample dimensions compatible with interferometry optics and neutron attenuation; the procedure for reduction of the raw interferogram images into attenuation, differential phase contrast, and small angle scattering (dark-field images; and the role of neutron far field interferometry in additive manufacturing to assess sub-micron porosity.

  10. Superconductivity, antiferromagnetism, and neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tranquada, John M.; Xu, Guangyong; Zaliznyak, Igor A.

    2014-01-01

    High-temperature superconductivity in both the copper-oxide and the iron–pnictide/chalcogenide systems occurs in close proximity to antiferromagnetically ordered states. Neutron scattering has been an essential technique for characterizing the spin correlations in the antiferromagnetic phases and for demonstrating how the spin fluctuations persist in the superconductors. While the nature of the spin correlations in the superconductors remains controversial, the neutron scattering measurements of magnetic excitations over broad ranges of energy and momentum transfers provide important constraints on the theoretical options. We present an overview of the neutron scattering work on high-temperature superconductors and discuss some of the outstanding issues. - Highlights: • High-temperature superconductivity is closely associated with antiferromagnetism. • Antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations coexist with the superconductivity. • Neutron scattering is essential for characterising the full spectrum of spin excitations

  11. The new Munich neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, W.A.

    1998-01-01

    The Munich FRM II neutron source currently under construction is to replace the FRM I research reactor in Munich, also known as 'atomic egg'. The project is executed by the Free State of Bavaria as a construction project of the Munich Technical University and managed by the University. As main contractor for the construction project, Siemens AG is also co-applicant in the licensing procedure under the Atomic Energy Act for the construction phase. The project is carried out to build a modern high flux neutron source required for a broad range of applications in research and technology mainly with thermal and cold neutrons. The 'neutron gap' existing in Germany is to be closed with the FRM II. As a national research installation, the FRM II is available to all interested scientists from a variety of disciplines. (orig.) [de

  12. Materials for spallation neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, W.F.; Daemen, L.L.

    1996-03-01

    The Workshop on Materials for Spallation Neutron Sources at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, February 6 to 10, 1995, gathered scientists from Department of Energy national laboratories, other federal institutions, universities, and industry to discuss areas in which work is needed, successful designs and use of materials, and opportunities for further studies. During the first day of the workshop, speakers presented overviews of current spallation neutron sources. During the next 3 days, seven panels allowed speakers to present information on a variety of topics ranging from experimental and theoretical considerations on radiation damage to materials safety issues. An attempt was made to identify specific problems that require attention within the context of spallation neutron sources. This proceedings is a collection of summaries from the overview sessions and the panel presentations

  13. Report on neutron reflectometry for the Australian Replacement Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, M.

    2001-01-01

    There is a clear need for at least one neutron reflectometer at the Australian Replacement Research Reactor when it commences operation in 2005. The participants at the reflectometry workshop have identified that the neutron reflectometer to be built at the Australian Replacement Research Reactor must be capable of the study of: 1. Specular scattering from air/solid, solid/liquid and in particular 'free liquid' samples; and 2. Off-specular' scattering from the above sample types. 3. Kinetics phenomena on a minute or slower time scale; 4. A range of samples of differing thicknesses, ranging from ultra-thin films to thousand angstrom thick films. In order to achieve this the reflectometer should have the capacity to vary its resolution. Interest was also expressed at the ability to conduct glancing-angle and wide-angle scattering studies for the investigation of short length scale, in-plane structures. There was little interest expressed by the workshop participants for polarised neutron reflectometry. This report contains a scientific case for a neutron reflectometer to be built at the Australian Replacement Research Reactor on a cold neutron guide, which is based on the areas of scientific research expressed by the workshop participants. In addition, trends in neutron reflectometry research conducted at major overseas neutron facilities are noted. The new neutron Reflectometer should: 1. Be based on the Time-of-Flight method; 2. Have a vertical scattering plane (i.e. operate for horizontal samples); 3. Be located on the end of a cold neutron guide, or be built off the guide axis using a bender, 4. Have a position sensitive area detector, 5. Be similar in spirit to the new D17 reflectometer at the ILL. Basic aspects of a reflectometer design are discussed which meet the above-stated scientific criteria and include a preliminary list of instrument specifications, capabilities and ancillary equipment requested by the workshop participants. A preliminary instrument

  14. Neutron emission from TFTR supershots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, J.D.; Bell, M.G.; Bitter, M.; Budny, R.; Hawryluk, R.; Hill, K.W.; Hsuan, H.; Jassby, D.L.; Johnson, L.C.; LeBlanc, B.; Mansfield, D.; Meade, D.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Mueller, D.; Park, H.; Ramsey, A.; Scott, S.; Synakowski, E.; Taylor, G.; Marmer, E.; Snipes, J.; Terry, J.

    1992-10-01

    Empirical scaling relations are deduced describing the neutron emission from TFTR supershots using a data base that includes all of the supershot plasmas (525) from the 1990 campaign. A physics-based scaling for the neutron emission is derived from the dependence of the central plasma parameters on machine settings and the energy confinement time. This scaling has been used to project the fusion rate for equivalent DT plasmas in TFTR, and to explore machine operation space which optimizes the fusion rate. Increases in neutron emission are possible by either increasing the toroidal magnetic field or further improving the limiter conditioning

  15. Neutron diffraction in materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, C.J.

    1996-01-01

    This article deals with applications of neutron diffraction in materials science. Most of the examples presented here involve the use of powder diffraction, which has been described earlier. In most of these, the Rietveld method has been used for neutron diffraction data, using the Rietveld method. This being an application which was largely pioneered at Lucas Heights. Examples involving single crystal diffraction and neutron polarization analysis are also included. Most of the examples are drawn from studies carried out at Lucas Heights where there is diffraction to the study of ceramics, and this will be reflected in the choice of examples to be considered here. (author)

  16. Neutron scattering and models: molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.B.

    1999-01-01

    A comprehensive interpretation of the fast-neutron interaction with elemental and isotopic molybdenum at energies of le 30 MeV is given. New experimental elemental-scattering information over the incident energy range 4.5 r a rrow 10 MeV is presented. Spherical, vibrational and dispersive models are deduced and discussed, including isospin, energy-dependent and mass effects. The vibrational models are consistent with the ''Lane potential''. The importance of dispersion effects is noted. Dichotomies that exist in the literature are removed. The models are vehicles for fundamental physical investigations and for the provision of data for applied purposes. A ''regional'' molybdenum model is proposed. Finally, recommendations for future work are made

  17. Neutron scattering and models : molybdenum.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A.B.

    1999-05-26

    A comprehensive interpretation of the fast-neutron interaction with elemental and isotopic molybdenum at energies of {le} 30 MeV is given. New experimental elemental-scattering information over the incident energy range 4.5 {r_arrow} 10 MeV is presented. Spherical, vibrational and dispersive models are deduced and discussed, including isospin, energy-dependent and mass effects. The vibrational models are consistent with the ''Lane potential''. The importance of dispersion effects is noted. Dichotomies that exist in the literature are removed. The models are vehicles for fundamental physical investigations and for the provision of data for applied purposes. A ''regional'' molybdenum model is proposed. Finally, recommendations for future work are made.

  18. Measuring neutron spectra in radiotherapy using the nested neutron spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglieri, Robert; Licea, Angel; Evans, Michael; Seuntjens, Jan; Kildea, John

    2015-11-01

    spectrum of a radiotherapy beam in less than 1 h, including setup and data unfolding. This work thus represents a new, fast, and practical method for neutron spectral measurements in radiotherapy.

  19. Measuring neutron spectra in radiotherapy using the nested neutron spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maglieri, Robert, E-mail: robert.maglieri@mail.mcgill.ca; Evans, Michael; Seuntjens, Jan; Kildea, John [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H4A 3J1 (Canada); Licea, Angel [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, Ontario K1P 5S9 (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    be used to reliably measure the neutron spectrum of a radiotherapy beam in less than 1 h, including setup and data unfolding. This work thus represents a new, fast, and practical method for neutron spectral measurements in radiotherapy.

  20. New generation non-stationary portable neutron generators for biophysical applications of Neutron Activation Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchese, N; Cannuli, A; Caccamo, M T; Pace, C

    2017-01-01

    Neutron sources are increasingly employed in a wide range of research fields. For some specific purposes an alternative to existing large-scale neutron scattering facilities, can be offered by the new generation of portable neutron devices. This review reports an overview for such recently available neutron generators mainly addressed to biophysics applications with specific reference to portable non-stationary neutron generators applied in Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA). The review reports a description of a typical portable neutron generator set-up addressed to biophysics applications. New generation portable neutron devices, for some specific applications, can constitute an alternative to existing large-scale neutron scattering facilities. Deuterium-Deuterium pulsed neutron sources able to generate 2.5MeV neutrons, with a neutron yield of 1.0×10 6 n/s, a pulse rate of 250Hz to 20kHz and a duty factor varying from 5% to 100%, when combined with solid-state photon detectors, show that this kind of compact devices allow rapid and user-friendly elemental analysis. "This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Science for Life" Guest Editor: Dr. Austen Angell, Dr. Salvatore Magazù and Dr. Federica Migliardo". Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Beyond KERMA - neutron data for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomgren, J.; Olsson, N.

    2003-01-01

    Presently, many new applications of fast neutrons are emerging or under development, like dose effects due to cosmic-ray neutrons for airplane crew, fast-neutron cancer therapy, studies of electronic failures induced by cosmic-ray neutrons, and accelerator-driven incineration of nuclear waste and energy production technologies. All these areas would benefit from improved neutron dosimetry. In this paper, the present rapid progress on measurements of double-differential neutron-induced nuclear reaction data are described. With such data at hand, the full response of, in principle, any system, including human tissue, can be calculated in detail. This could potentially revolutionise our understanding of biological effects in tissue due to fast neutrons. (author)

  2. Nested Focusing Optics for Compact Neutron Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and the University of Alabama Huntsville (UAH) have developed novel neutron grazing incidence optics for use with small-scale portable neutron generators. The technology was developed to enable the use of commercially available neutron generators for applications requiring high flux densities, including high performance imaging and analysis. Nested grazing incidence mirror optics, with high collection efficiency, are used to produce divergent, parallel, or convergent neutron beams. Ray tracing simulations of the system (with source-object separation of 10m for 5 meV neutrons) show nearly an order of magnitude neutron flux increase on a 1-mm diameter object. The technology is a result of joint development efforts between NASA and MIT researchers seeking to maximize neutron flux from diffuse sources for imaging and testing applications.

  3. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2012-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron scattering in contemporary research, neutron sources, symmetry of crystals, diffraction, nanostructures investigated by small-angle neutron scattering, the structure of macromolecules, spin dependent and magnetic scattering, structural analysis, neutron reflectometry, magnetic nanostructures, inelastic scattering, strongly correlated electrons, dynamics of macromolecules, applications of neutron scattering. (HSI)

  4. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2013-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, symmetry of crystals, nanostructures investigated by small-angle neutron scattering, structure of macromolecules, spin dependent and magnetic scattering, structural analysis, neutron reflectometry, magnetic nanostructures, inelastic neutron scattering, strongly correlated electrons, polymer dynamics, applications of neutron scattering. (HSI)

  5. Pulsed neutron generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bespalov, D.F.; Bykovskii, Yu.A.; Vergun, I.I.; Kozlovskii, K.I.; Kozyrev, Yu.P.; Leonov, R.K.; Simagin, B.I.; Tsybin, A.S.; Shikanov, A.Ie.

    1986-03-01

    The paper describes a new device for generating pulsed neutron fields, utilized in nuclear geophysics for carrying out pulsed neutron logging and activation analysis under field conditions. The invention employs a sealed-off neutron tube with a laser ion source which increases neutron yield to the level of 10 neutrons per second or higher. 2 refs., 1 fig

  6. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner

    2012-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron scattering in contemporary research, neutron sources, symmetry of crystals, diffraction, nanostructures investigated by small-angle neutron scattering, the structure of macromolecules, spin dependent and magnetic scattering, structural analysis, neutron reflectometry, magnetic nanostructures, inelastic scattering, strongly correlated electrons, dynamics of macromolecules, applications of neutron scattering. (HSI)

  7. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner

    2013-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, symmetry of crystals, nanostructures investigated by small-angle neutron scattering, structure of macromolecules, spin dependent and magnetic scattering, structural analysis, neutron reflectometry, magnetic nanostructures, inelastic neutron scattering, strongly correlated electrons, polymer dynamics, applications of neutron scattering. (HSI)

  8. Measurements of angular and energy distributions of prompt neutrons from thermal neutron-induced fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobyev, A. S.; Shcherbakov, O. A.; Pleva, Yu. S.; Gagarski, A. M.; Val'ski, G. V.; Petrov, G. A.; Petrova, V. I.; Zavarukhina, T. A.

    2009-01-01

    The experimental setup and methodology used to measure prompt neutron angular and energy distributions from thermal neutron-induced fission are described. The neutrons are detected using two scintillation detectors, while the fission fragments are detected by multi-wire proportional detectors in conjunction with the TOF technique. To separate events corresponding to neutrons and γ-quanta, a double discrimination by the pulse shape and the time-of-flight is applied. Some preliminary results of an experiment performed with the 235U target are presented and briefly discussed. The yield of "scission" neutrons has been estimated in the framework of a simple evaporation model and was found not to exceed 5% of the total neutron yield. Including an assumed of anisotropy of the fission neutron angular distribution in the center-of-mass system of fission fragments into the model calculation leads to an increase in the "scission" neutron yields inferred from the data.

  9. SPECTER: neutron damage calculations for materials irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwood, L.R.; Smither, R.K.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron displacement damage-energy cross sections have been calculated for 41 isotopes in the energy range from 10 -10 to 20 MeV. Calculations were performed on a 100-point energy grid using nuclear cross sections from ENDF/B-V and the DISCS computer code. Elastic scattering is treated exactly including angular distributions from ENDF/B-V. Inelastic scattering calculations consider both discrete and continuous nuclear level distributions. Multiple (n,xn) reactions use a Monte Carlo technique to derive the recoil distributions. The (n,d) and (n,t) reactions are treated as (n,p) and (n, 3 He) as (n, 4 He). The (n,γ) reaction and subsequent β-decay are also included, using a new treatment of γ-γ coincidences, angular correlations, β-neutrino correlations, and the incident neutron energy. The Lindhard model was used to compute the energy available for nuclear displacement at each recoil energy. The SPECTER computer code has been developed to simplify damage calculations. The user need only specify a neutron energy spectrum. SPECTER will then calculate spectral-averaged displacements, recoil spectra, gas production, and total damage energy (Kerma). The SPECTER computer code package is readily accessible to the fusion community via the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center (NMFECC) at Lawrence Livermore National laboratory

  10. Optimization of neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, E.B.

    1993-11-09

    I consider here the optimization of the two component neutron source, allowing beam species and energy to vary. A simple model is developed, based on the earlier publications, that permits the optimum to be obtained simply. The two component plasma, with one species of hot ion (D{sup +} or T{sup +}) and the complementary species of cold ion, is easy to analyze in the case of a spatially uniform cold plasma, as to good approximation the total number of hot ions is important but not their spatial distribution. Consequently, the optimization can ignore spatial effects. The problem of a plasma with both types of hot ions and cold ions is rather more difficult, as the neutron production by hot-hot interactions is sensitive to their spatial distributions. Consequently, consideration of this problem will be delayed to a future memorandum. The basic model is that used in the published articles on the two-component, beam-plasma mirror source. I integrate the Fokker-Planck equation analytically, obtaining good agreement with previous numerical results. This simplifies the optimization, by providing a functional form for the neutron production. The primary result is expressed in terms of the power efficiency: watts of neutrons/watts of primary power. The latter includes the positive ion neutralization efficiency. At 150 keV, the present model obtains an efficiency of 0.66%, compared with 0.53% of the earlier calculation.

  11. SEVENTH DOE WORKSHOP ON PERSONNEL NEUTRON DOSIMETRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallario, E J

    1978-10-24

    This workshop was the seventh of a series and was held on October 23-24. 1978, at the Central Electricity Generating Board, HQ, London, England. Typically~ attendees at the Workshop were concerned with one of three activities: studying and refining existing techniques in an attempt to quantify already-known parameters with greater precision, looking for ways to apply existing neutron dosirr:etry techniques to a specific local problem, identifying the needs and weaknesses of existing systems, with the goal of improving and passibly simplifying field measurements. The types of neutron dosimetry techniques discussed by participants included albedo dosimeters, track etch, and TLD. One speaker reported on NTA film, noting that fading could be eliminated by drying the emulsion in dry nitrogen before field use. There were no reports on tissue equivalent proportional counters or activation analysis. One participant discussed a metal oxide silicon dosimeter. The need to develop a consistent standard terminology, as well as calibration sources and techniques, on both the national and international level was evident. The need for standardization is particularly acute in the U.S. Techniques for evaluating dosimeter response in the field should he standardized, since several different instruments with widely different response characteristics are currently being used. The choice of instruments is often parochial. Also. the type and use of phantoms should be standardized. Neutron dose assignment is significantly affected by the position of the dosimeter on the body. for example, a typical albedo dosimeter may give differences of up to 20% depending on whether it is worn on the belt or chest. Larger errors are encountered with front-to-back (angular} orientation. 1n an attempt to minimize such errors~ at least two European facilities are using neutron dosimeter belts, which provide dosimeters both in front and in back of the wearer. The gamma-to-neutron ratio around nuclear power

  12. FAST NEUTRON SPECTROMETER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, F.J.; Hurst, G.S.; Reinhardt, P.W.

    1959-08-18

    An improved proton recoil spectrometer for determining the energy spectrum of a fast neutron beam is described. Instead of discriminating against and thereby"throwing away" the many recoil protons other than those traveling parallel to the neutron beam axis as do conventional spectrometers, this device utilizes protons scattered over a very wide solid angle. An ovoidal gas-filled recoil chamber is coated on the inside with a scintillator. The ovoidal shape of the sensitive portion of the wall defining the chamber conforms to the envelope of the range of the proton recoils from the radiator disposed within the chamber. A photomultiplier monitors the output of the scintillator, and a counter counts the pulses caused by protons of energy just sufficient to reach the scintillator.

  13. Neutron-activatable radionuclide cancer therapy using graphene oxide nanoplatelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junghyun; Jay, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Neutron-activation is a promising method of generating radiotherapeutics with minimal handling of radioactive materials. Graphene oxide nanoplatelets (GONs) were examined as a carrier for neutron-activatable holmium with the purpose of exploiting inherent characteristics for theranostic application. GONs were hypothesized to be an ideal candidate for this application owing to their desirable characteristics such as a rigid structure, high metal loading capacity, low density, heat resistance, and the ability to withstand harsh environments associated with the neutron-activation process. Non-covalently PEGylated GONs (GONs-PEG) offered enhanced dispersibility and biocompatibility, and also exhibited increased holmium loading capacity nearly two-fold greater than GONs. Holmium leaching was investigated over a wide pH range, including conditions that mimic the tumor microenvironment, following neutron irradiation. The in vitro cell-based cytotoxicity analysis of GONs-based formulations with non-radioactive holmium confirmed their safety profile within cells. The results demonstrate the potential of GONs as a carrier of neutron-activatable radiotherapeutic agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Neutron Time-Of-Flight (n_TOF) experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Brugger, M; Kaeppeler, F K; Jericha, E; Cortes rossell, G P; Riego perez, A; Baccomi, R; Laurent, B G; Griesmayer, E; Leeb, H; Dressler, M; Cano ott, D; Variale, V; Ventura, A; Carrillo de albornoz trillo, A; Andrzejewski, J J; Pavlik, A F; Kadi, Y; Zanni vlastou, R; Krticka, M; Kokkoris, M; Praena rodriguez, A J; Cortes giraldo, M A; Perkowski, J; Losito, R; Audouin, L; Weiss, C; Tagliente, G; Wallner, A; Woods, P J; Mengoni, A; Guerrero sanchez, C G; Tain enriquez, J L; Vlachoudis, V; Calviani, M; Junghans, A R; Reifarth, R; Mendoza cembranos, E; Quesada molina, J M; Babiano suarez, V; Schumann, M D; Tsinganis, A; Rauscher, T; Calvino tavares, F; Mingrone, F; Gonzalez romero, E M; Colonna, N; Negret, A L; Chiaveri, E; Milazzo, P M; De almeida carrapico, C A; Castelluccio, D M

    The neutron time-of-flight facility n_TOF at CERN, Switzerland, operational since 2001, delivers neutrons using the Proton Synchrotron (PS) 20 GeV/c proton beam impinging on a lead spallation target. The facility combines a very high instantaneous neutron flux, an excellent time of flight resolution due to the distance between the experimental area and the production target (185 meters), a low intrinsic background and a wide range of neutron energies, from thermal to GeV neutrons. These characteristics provide a unique possibility to perform neutron-induced capture and fission cross-section measurements for applications in nuclear astrophysics and in nuclear reactor technology.

  15. A study of neutron doses in water and sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou-Taleb, W.M.; Abou El-Khier, A.A.; Fawzy Salem, M.A.; Gaber, M.; El-Khatib, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental measurements have been carried out to determine the neutron flux from a compact D-T neutron generator in tissue equivalent mediums like water and sea water, and NaCl. The measurements were performed by using neutron activation foils as neutron detectors of successive threshold energies. The flux-dose conversion factors, as well as related quality factors averaged over the selected energy ranges, were used to determine equivalent dose and adsorbed dose rates, respectively. The experimental and calculated results were found to be in a good agreement. Besides, dose buildup factors were determined. The contribution of thermal and intermediate neutron dose is relatively lower than that for fast neutrons. (author)

  16. Experimental technique of neutron reflection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Bo; Huang Chaoqiang; Li Xinxi

    2006-12-01

    It is presented that the classifications, structures and components of neutron reflectometer (NR), as well s functions and parameters of each components, detailed characters of NR facility 'PRN-2M'. Based on the practical experiments, the basic experimental techniques, the measurement and the related experimental settings are described, including the choice of experimental conditions, adjustments of polarized neutron beam line, basic experimental technique and approach of measurement. The above can be an instruction for NR experiments and a reference for NR construction. (authors)

  17. Neutron beams: a new tool for industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windsor, C.; Wright, C.

    1980-01-01

    The ability of neutron probes to penetrate substances gives industrial researchers a unique tool to investigate the inside of completed components or a large bulk of material. The quality control of material containing defects can be undertaken with neutron beams using one of the following methods; neutron radiography which reveals structural flaws of millimetre sizes, small angle scattering which picks out fluctuations in density and composition that are in the pico-to-nanometre size range (10 -12 - 10 -9 m), or neutron diffraction which shows up structures on the sub-nanometre scale of atomic spacings. The three techniques are considered and specific examples of their use described. (U.K.)

  18. Neutron energy response measurement of scintillation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Hongqiong; Peng Taiping; Yang Jianlun; Tang Zhengyuan; Yang Gaozhao; Li Linbo; Hu Mengchun; Wang Zhentong; Zhang Jianhua; Li Zhongbao; Wang Lizong

    2004-01-01

    Neutron sensitivities of detectors composed of plastic scintillator ST401, ST1422, ST1423 and phyotomultiplier tube in primary energy range of fission neutron are calibrated by direct current. The energy response curve of the detectors is obtained in this experiment. The experimental result has been compared with the theoretical calculation and they are in agreement within measuring uncertainty. (authors)

  19. Basic to industrial research on neutron platform in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Yasuhiko

    2008-01-01

    The co-Iocation of reactor- and accelerator-based neutron sources offers a great opportunity for complementary use of steady and pulsed neutron beams in a wide variety of neutron science and technology areas ranging from basic research to industrial applications. In Japan, such a balance of two kinds of neutron sources has a long tradition and now we are entering into a new era with the commissioning of the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams at JSNS/J-PARC plus the existing JRR-3 reactor both co-located within 1 km of each other in Tokai. The joint operation of these neutron facilities in close proximity under a program called 'neutron platform', will allow neutron beam access not only to professional users, familiar with both pulsed and steady state techniques but also to first-time academics and industrial researchers to neutron scattering. (author)

  20. Spin echo small angle neutron scattering using a continuously pumped (3)He neutron polarisation analyser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, S R; Washington, A L; Li, K; Yan, H; Stonaha, P; Li, F; Wang, T; Walsh, A; Chen, W C; Parnell, A J; Fairclough, J P A; Baxter, D V; Snow, W M; Pynn, R

    2015-02-01

    We present a new instrument for spin echo small angle neutron scattering (SESANS) developed at the Low Energy Neutron Source at Indiana University. A description of the various instrument components is given along with the performance of these components. At the heart of the instrument are a series of resistive coils to encode the neutron trajectory into the neutron polarisation. These are shown to work well over a broad range of neutron wavelengths. Neutron polarisation analysis is accomplished using a continuously operating neutron spin filter polarised by Rb spin-exchange optical pumping of (3)He. We describe the performance of the analyser along with a study of the (3)He polarisation stability and its implications for SESANS measurements. Scattering from silica Stöber particles is investigated and agrees with samples run on similar instruments.

  1. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a next-generation spallation neutron source for neutron scattering that is currently the most powerful neutron source in...

  2. Microprocessor-controlled portable neutron spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, G.F.; Kaifer, R.C.; Slaughter, D.R.; Strout, R.E. II; Rueppel, D.W.

    1979-01-01

    A neutron spectrometer that acquires and unfolds data in the field has been developed for use in the energy range from 1 to 20 MeV. The system includes an NE213 organic scintillation detector, automatic gain stabilization, automatically stabilized pulseshape discrimination, an LSl-11 microprocessor for control and data reduction, and a multichannel analyzer for data acquisition. The system, with the exception of the multichannel analyzer, is mounted in a suitcase 47 by 66 by 23.5 cm. The mass is 23.5 kg

  3. Neutron structure analysis using neutron imaging plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasawa, Yuko; Minezaki, Yoshiaki; Niimura, Nobuo

    1997-01-01

    Neutron is complementary against X-ray and is dispensable for structure analysis. However, because of the lack of the neutron intensity, it was not so common as X-ray. In order to overcome the intensity problem, a neutron imaging plate (NIP) has been successfully developed. The NIP has opened the door of neutron structure biology, where all the hydrogen atoms and bound water molecules of protein are determined, and contributed to development of other fields such as neutron powder diffraction and neutron radiography, too. (author)

  4. J-NSE: Neutron spin echo spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf Holderer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Neutron Spin-Echo (NSE spectroscopy is well known as the only neutron scattering technique that achieves energy resolution of several neV. By using the spin precession of polarized neutrons in magnetic field one can measure tiny velocity changes of the individual neutron during the scattering process. Contrary to other inelastic neutron scattering techniques, NSE measures the intermediate scattering function S(Q,t in reciprocal space and time directly. The Neutron Spin-Echo spectrometer J-NSE, operated by JCNS, Forschungszentrum Jülich at the Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ in Garching, covers a time range (2 ps to 200 ns on length scales accessible by small angle scattering technique. Along with conventional NSE spectroscopy that allows bulk measurements in transmission mode, J-NSE offers a new possibility - gracing incidence spin echo spectroscopy (GINSENS, developed to be used as "push-button" option in order to resolve the depth dependent near surface dynamics.

  5. A measurement of the absolute neutron beam polarization produced by an optically pumped 3He neutron spin filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rich, D.R.; Bowman, J.D.; Crawford, B.E.; Delheij, P.P.J.; Espy, M.A.; Haseyama, T.; Jones, G.; Keith, C.D.; Knudson, J.; Leuschner, M.B.; Masaike, A.; Masuda, Y.; Matsuda, Y.; Penttilae, S.I.; Pomeroy, V.R.; Smith, D.A.; Snow, W.M.; Szymanski, J.J.; Stephenson, S.L.; Thompson, A.K.; Yuan, V.

    2002-01-01

    The capability of performing accurate absolute measurements of neutron beam polarization opens a number of exciting opportunities in fundamental neutron physics and in neutron scattering. At the LANSCE pulsed neutron source we have measured the neutron beam polarization with an absolute accuracy of 0.3% in the neutron energy range from 40 meV to 10 eV using an optically pumped polarized 3 He spin filter and a relative transmission measurement technique. 3 He was polarized using the Rb spin-exchange method. We describe the measurement technique, present our results, and discuss some of the systematic effects associated with the method

  6. Calibration of a special neutron dosemeter based on solid-state track detectors and fission radiators in various neutron fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerschel, B.; Krusche, M.; Schuricht, V.

    1980-01-01

    The calibration of a personnel neutron dosemeter in different neutron fields is described. The badge-like dosemeter contains 5 detectors: polycarbonate foil (10 μm, Makrofol KG), 232 Th, natural uranium, natural uranium with boron, and natural uranium with cadmium. Detector sensitivity and calibration factors have been calculated and measured in radiation fields of 252 Cf fission neutrons, WWR-S reactor neutrons with and without Cd and Fe shielding, 3-MeV (d,t) generator neutrons, and 238 PuBe neutrons. Measurement range and achievable accuracy are discussed from the point of view of applying the dosemeter in routine and emergency uses

  7. Planets Around Neutron Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolszczan, Alexander; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Anderson, Stuart B.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this proposal was to continue investigations of neutron star planetary systems in an effort to describe and understand their origin, orbital dynamics, basic physical properties and their relationship to planets around normal stars. This research represents an important element of the process of constraining the physics of planet formation around various types of stars. The research goals of this project included long-term timing measurements of the planets pulsar, PSR B1257+12, to search for more planets around it and to study the dynamics of the whole system, and sensitive searches for millisecond pulsars to detect further examples of old, rapidly spinning neutron stars with planetary systems. The instrumentation used in our project included the 305-m Arecibo antenna with the Penn State Pulsar Machine (PSPM), the 100-m Green Bank Telescope with the Berkeley- Caltech Pulsar Machine (BCPM), and the 100-m Effelsberg and 64-m Parkes telescopes equipped with the observatory supplied backend hardware.

  8. Short pulse neutron generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M.

    2016-08-02

    Short pulse neutron generators are described herein. In a general embodiment, the short pulse neutron generator includes a Blumlein structure. The Blumlein structure includes a first conductive plate, a second conductive plate, a third conductive plate, at least one of an inductor or a resistor, a switch, and a dielectric material. The first conductive plate is positioned relative to the second conductive plate such that a gap separates these plates. A vacuum chamber is positioned in the gap, and an ion source is positioned to emit ions in the vacuum chamber. The third conductive plate is electrically grounded, and the switch is operable to electrically connect and disconnect the second conductive plate and the third conductive plate. The at least one of the resistor or the inductor is coupled to the first conductive plate and the second conductive plate.

  9. An efficient plane-grating monochromator based on conical diffraction for continuous tuning in the entire soft X-ray range including tender X-rays (2-8 keV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jark, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Recently it was verified that the diffraction efficiency of reflection gratings with rectangular profile, when illuminated at grazing angles of incidence with the beam trajectory along the grooves and not perpendicular to them, remains very high for tender X-rays of several keV photon energy. This very efficient operation of a reflection grating in the extreme off-plane orientation, i.e. in conical diffraction, offers the possibility of designing a conical diffraction monochromator scheme that provides efficient continuous photon energy tuning over rather large tuning ranges. For example, the tuning could cover photon energies from below 1000 eV up to 8 keV. The expected transmission of the entire instrument is high as all components are always operated below the critical angle for total reflection. In the simplest version of the instrument a plane grating is preceded by a plane mirror rotating simultaneously with it. The photon energy selection will then be made using the combination of a focusing mirror and exit slit. As is common for grating monochromators for soft X-ray radiation, the minimum spectral bandwidth is source-size-limited, while the bandwidth can be adjusted freely to any larger value. As far as tender X-rays (2-8 keV) are concerned, the minimum bandwidth is at least one and up to two orders of magnitude larger than the bandwidth provided by Si(111) double-crystal monochromators in a collimated beam. Therefore the instrument will provide more flux, which can even be increased at the expense of a bandwidth increase. On the other hand, for softer X-rays with photon energies below 1 keV, competitive relative spectral resolving powers of the order of 10000 are possible.

  10. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, neutron properties and elastic scattering, correlation functions measured by scattering experiments, symmetry of crystals, applications of neutron scattering, polarized-neutron scattering and polarization analysis, structural analysis, magnetic and lattice excitation studied by inelastic neutron scattering, macromolecules and self-assembly, dynamics of macromolecules, correlated electrons in complex transition-metal oxides, surfaces, interfaces, and thin films investigated by neutron reflectometry, nanomagnetism. (HSI)

  11. REFRACTIVE NEUTRON LENS

    OpenAIRE

    Petrov, P. V.; Kolchevsky, N. N.

    2013-01-01

    Compound concave refractive lenses are used for focusing neutron beam. Investigations of spectral and focusing properties of a refractive neutron lens are presented. Resolution of the imaging system on the base of refractive neutron lenses depends on material properties and parameters of neutron source. Model of refractive neutron lens are proposed. Results of calculation diffraction resolution and focal depth of refractive neutron lens are discussed.

  12. High energy neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavron, A.; Morley, K.; Morris, C.; Seestrom, S.; Ullmann, J.; Yates, G.; Zumbro, J.

    1996-01-01

    High-energy spallation neutron sources are now being considered in the US and elsewhere as a replacement for neutron beams produced by reactors. High-energy and high intensity neutron beams, produced by unmoderated spallation sources, open potential new vistas of neutron radiography. The authors discuss the basic advantages and disadvantages of high-energy neutron radiography, and consider some experimental results obtained at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility at Los Alamos

  13. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner

    2010-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, neutron properties and elastic scattering, correlation functions measured by scattering experiments, symmetry of crystals, applications of neutron scattering, polarized-neutron scattering and polarization analysis, structural analysis, magnetic and lattice excitation studied by inelastic neutron scattering, macromolecules and self-assembly, dynamics of macromolecules, correlated electrons in complex transition-metal oxides, surfaces, interfaces, and thin films investigated by neutron reflectometry, nanomagnetism. (HSI)

  14. An empirical fit to estimated neutron emission cross sections from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    dominated by neutrons spanning a wide range of energy from slow neutrons to several tens of MeV [1]. Moreover, protons in the energy region below 200 MeV are constituents of cosmic rays (solar protons) which directly or through secondary neutrons induce radiation damage to the electronic components in airplanes, ...

  15. Neutron detection of the Triga Mark III reactor, using nuclear track methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa, G., E-mail: espinosa@fisica.unam.mx; Golzarri, J. I. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México Circuito de la Investigación Científica, Ciudad Universitaria. México, DF (Mexico); Raya-Arredondo, R.; Cruz-Galindo, S. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (Mexico); Sajo-Bohus, L. [Universidad Simón Bolivar, Laboratorio de Física Nuclear, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2015-07-23

    Nuclear Track Methodology (NTM), based on the neutron-proton interaction is one often employed alternative for neutron detection. In this paper we apply NTM to determine the Triga Mark III reactor operating power and neutron flux. The facility nuclear core, loaded with 85 Highly Enriched Uranium as fuel with control rods in a demineralized water pool, provide a neutron flux around 2 × 10{sup 12} n cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}, at the irradiation channel TO-2. The neutron field is measured at this channel, using Landauer{sup ®} PADC as neutron detection material, covered by 3 mm Plexiglas{sup ®} as converter. After exposure, plastic detectors were chemically etched to make observable the formed latent tracks induced by proton recoils. The track density was determined by a custom made Digital Image Analysis System. The resulting average nuclear track density shows a direct proportionality response for reactor power in the range 0.1-7 kW. We indicate several advantages of the technique including the possibility to calibrate the neutron flux density measured at low reactor power.

  16. Standard Practice for Conducting Irradiations at Accelerator-Based Neutron Sources

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1996-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for irradiations at accelerator-based neutron sources. The discussion focuses on two types of sources, namely nearly monoenergetic 14-MeV neutrons from the deuterium-tritium T(d,n) interaction, and broad spectrum neutrons from stopping deuterium beams in thick beryllium or lithium targets. However, most of the recommendations also apply to other types of accelerator-based sources, including spallation neutron sources (1). Interest in spallation sources has increased recently due to their proposed use for transmutation of fission reactor waste (2). 1.2 Many of the experiments conducted using such neutron sources are intended to simulate irradiation in another neutron spectrum, for example, that from a DT fusion reaction. The word simulation is used here in a broad sense to imply an approximation of the relevant neutron irradiation environment. The degree of conformity can range from poor to nearly exact. In general, the intent of these simulations is to establish the fundam...

  17. Ship Effect Neutron Measurements And Impacts On Low-Background Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kouzes, Richard T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Siciliano, Edward R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-10-01

    The primary particles entering the upper atmosphere as cosmic rays create showers in the atmosphere that include a broad spectrum of secondary neutrons, muons and protons. These cosmic-ray secondaries interact with materials at the surface of the Earth, yielding prompt backgrounds in radiation detection systems, as well as inducing long-lived activities through spallation events, dominated by the higher-energy neutron secondaries. For historical reasons, the multiple neutrons produced in spallation cascade events are referred to as “ship effect” neutrons. Quantifying the background from cosmic ray induced activities is important to low-background experiments, such as neutrino-less double beta decay. Since direct measurements of the effects of shielding on the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum are not available, Monte Carlo modeling is used to compute such effects. However, there are large uncertainties (orders of magnitude) in the possible cross-section libraries and the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum for the energy range needed in such calculations. The measurements reported here were initiated to validate results from Monte Carlo models through experimental measurements in order to provide some confidence in the model results. The results indicate that the models provide the correct trends of neutron production with increasing density, but there is substantial disagreement between the model and experimental results for the lower-density materials of Al, Fe and Cu.

  18. Neutron Therapy Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Neutron Therapy Facility provides a moderate intensity, broad energy spectrum neutron beam that can be used for short term irradiations for radiobiology (cells)...

  19. Measurement of Q{sub {beta}} values of neutron-rich Tc to Pd isotopes in the mass range A=110 to A=117; Messung von Q{sub {beta}}-Werten neutronenreicher Tc- bis Pd-Isotope im Massenbereich A=110 bis A=117

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloeckl, Ingo

    2008-06-15

    The present work describes the measuring of Q{sub {beta}} values of {beta}-instable isotopes of Tc, Ru, Rh and Pd. The mass range A=110 to 117 comprises neutron-rich, short-living isotopes. Due to their small (fission) abundances, few data are known, especially regarding level schemes or gamma radiation. The proton-induced fission and a fast online mass separation was used to produce these nuclides in the IGISOL facility located in Jyvaeskylaein Finland. The {beta},{gamma},X coincidence apparatus used during the experiments allows measuring Q{sub {beta}} values as well as {gamma},X coincidences. The latter represent the basic input data for a calculation of Q{sub {beta}} values out of {beta},{gamma} coincidences. It is so possible to examine nuclides with incomplete level schemes; similarly, these level schemes can be extended using beta,gamma coincidence data. Twelve Q{sub {beta}} values of neutron-rich Tc to Pd isotopes could be determined, yielding nuclear masses, mass defects and neutron separation energies. Eight of them were determined for the first time; another one could be confirmed. For three more, the error of earlier values could be decreased by a factor of nearly ten. The resulting data are of interest for the review of nuclear mass models, they represent also input in astrophysical network calculations. (orig.)

  20. Nuclear science experiments with a bright neutron source from fusion reactions on the OMEGA Laser System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, C. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Schroeder, W. U.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Sickles, M.; Stoeckl, C.; Szczepanski, J.

    2018-04-01

    Subnanosecond impulses of 1013 to 1014 neutrons, produced in direct-drive laser inertial confinement fusion implosions, have been used to irradiate deuterated targets at the OMEGA Laser System (Boehly et al., 1997). The target compounds include heavy water (D2O) and deuterated benzene (C6D6). Yields and energy spectra of neutrons from D(n,2n)p to study the breakup reaction have been measured at a forward angle of θlab = 3 .5∘ ± 3.5° with a sensitive, high-dynamic-range neutron time-of-flight spectrometer to infer the double-differential breakup cross section d2 σ/dE d Ω for 14-MeV D-T fusion neutrons.

  1. Neutron transport simulation (selected topics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, P.

    2009-10-01

    Neutron transport simulation is usually performed for criticality, power distribution, activation, scattering, dosimetry and shielding problems, among others. During the last fifteen years, innovative technological applications have been proposed (Accelerator Driven Systems, Energy Amplifiers, Spallation Neutron Sources, etc.), involving the utilization of intermediate energies (hundreds of MeV) and high-intensity (tens of mA) proton accelerators impinging in targets of high Z elements. Additionally, the use of protons, neutrons and light ions for medical applications (hadrontherapy) impose requirements on neutron dosimetry-related quantities (such as kerma factors) for biologically relevant materials, in the energy range starting at several tens of MeV. Shielding and activation related problems associated to the operation of high-energy proton accelerators, emerging space-related applications and aircrew dosimetry-related topics are also fields of intense activity requiring as accurate as possible medium- and high-energy neutron (and other hadrons) transport simulation. These applications impose specific requirements on cross-section data for structural materials, targets, actinides and biologically relevant materials. Emerging nuclear energy systems and next generation nuclear reactors also impose requirements on accurate neutron transport calculations and on cross-section data needs for structural materials, coolants and nuclear fuel materials, aiming at improved safety and detailed thermal-hydraulics and radiation damage studies. In this review paper, the state-of-the-art in the computational tools and methodologies available to perform neutron transport simulation is presented. Proton- and neutron-induced cross-section data needs and requirements are discussed. Hot topics are pinpointed, prospective views are provided and future trends identified.

  2. Neutron radiography for nondestructive testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, J.

    1979-01-01

    Neutron radiography is similar to X-ray inspection in that both depend upon use of radiation that penetrates some materials and is absorbed by others to provide a contrast image of conditions not readily available for visual inspection. X-rays are absorbed by dense materials, such as metals, whereas neutrons readily penetrate metals, but are absorbed by materials containing hydrogen. The neutron radiography has been successfully applied to a number of inspection situations. These include the inspection of explosives, advanced composites, adhesively bonded structures and a number of aircraft engine components. With the availability of Californium-252, it has become feasible to construct mobile neutron radiography systems suitable for field use. Such systems have been used for in-situ inspection of flight line aircraft, particularly to locate and measure hidden corrosion

  3. New scientific horizons with pulsed spallation neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlile, C.J.; Finney, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    Pulsed spallation sources are not just another way of producing neutrons: the time structure of the neutron pulse has consequences which allow new scientific areas to be investigated and traditional areas to be explored afresh. In addition to the high epithermal neutron component traditionally associated with pulsed sources the recent development of cold neutron techniques at ISIS illustrates that very high energy and momentum resolutions can be achieved on pulsed sources over a surprisingly wide range. (orig.)

  4. An Evaluation of Grazing-Incidence Optics for Neutron Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubarev, M. V.; Ramsey, B. D.; Engelhaupt, D. E.; Burgess, J.; Mildner, D. F. R.

    2007-01-01

    The focusing capabilities of neutron imaging optic based on the Wolter-1 geometry have been successfully demonstrated with a beam of long wavelength neutrons with low angular divergence.. A test mirror was fabricated using an electroformed nickel replication process at Marshall Space Flight Center. The neutron current density gain at the focal spot of the mirror is found to be at least 8 for neutron wavelengths in the range from 6 to 20 A. Possible applications of the optics are briefly discussed.

  5. Neutron flux measurement utilizing Campbell technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kropik, M.

    2000-01-01

    Application of the Campbell technique for the neutron flux measurement is described in the contribution. This technique utilizes the AC component (noise) of a neutron chamber signal rather than a usually used DC component. The Campbell theorem, originally discovered to describe noise behaviour of valves, explains that the root mean square of the AC component of the chamber signal is proportional to the neutron flux (reactor power). The quadratic dependence of the reactor power on the root mean square value usually permits to accomplish the whole current power range of the neutron flux measurement by only one channel. Further advantage of the Campbell technique is that large pulses of the response to neutrons are favoured over small pulses of the response to gamma rays in the ratio of their mean square charge transfer and thus, the Campbell technique provides an excellent gamma rays discrimination in the current operational range of a neutron chamber. The neutron flux measurement channel using state of the art components was designed and put into operation. Its linearity, accuracy, dynamic range, time response and gamma discrimination were tested on the VR-1 nuclear reactor in Prague, and behaviour under high neutron flux (accident conditions) was tested on the TRIGA nuclear reactor in Vienna. (author)

  6. Neutron cameras for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, L.C.; Barnes, C.W.; Batistoni, P.

    1998-01-01

    Neutron cameras with horizontal and vertical views have been designed for ITER, based on systems used on JET and TFTR. The cameras consist of fan-shaped arrays of collimated flight tubes, with suitably chosen detectors situated outside the biological shield. The sight lines view the ITER plasma through slots in the shield blanket and penetrate the vacuum vessel, cryostat, and biological shield through stainless steel windows. This paper analyzes the expected performance of several neutron camera arrangements for ITER. In addition to the reference designs, the authors examine proposed compact cameras, in which neutron fluxes are inferred from 16 N decay gammas in dedicated flowing water loops, and conventional cameras with fewer sight lines and more limited fields of view than in the reference designs. It is shown that the spatial sampling provided by the reference designs is sufficient to satisfy target measurement requirements and that some reduction in field of view may be permissible. The accuracy of measurements with 16 N-based compact cameras is not yet established, and they fail to satisfy requirements for parameter range and time resolution by large margins

  7. Lectures on magnetism and neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunn, J.M.F.

    1983-12-01

    The paper contains six lectures given to the Neutron Division of the Rutherford Appleton laboratory in 1983. The aim was to explain fundamental physics of neutron scattering and basic magnetism to the non-specialist scientist. The text includes: origin of neutron's magnetic moment and spin-dependent interactions with electrons and nuclei, why are solids magnetic, magnetic anistropy and domain structure, phenomenological spin waves, magnetic phase transitions and electronic excitations in magnets. (U.K.)

  8. Neutron Reflectivity and Grazing Angle Diffraction

    OpenAIRE

    Ankner, J. F.; Majkrzak, C. F.; Satija, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    Over the last 10 years, neutron reflectivity has emerged as a powerful technique for the investigation of surface and interfacial phenomena in many different fields. In this paper, a short review of some of the work on neutron reflectivity and grazing-angle diffraction as well as a description of the current and planned neutron rcflectometers at NIST is presented. Specific examples of the characterization of magnetic, superconducting, and polymeric surfaces and interfaces are included.

  9. Neutron Reflectivity and Grazing Angle Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankner, J F; Majkrzak, C F; Satija, S K

    1993-01-01

    Over the last 10 years, neutron reflectivity has emerged as a powerful technique for the investigation of surface and interfacial phenomena in many different fields. In this paper, a short review of some of the work on neutron reflectivity and grazing-angle diffraction as well as a description of the current and planned neutron rcflectometers at NIST is presented. Specific examples of the characterization of magnetic, superconducting, and polymeric surfaces and interfaces are included.

  10. Neutron Instrumentation and Neutron Investigation of Archaeometallurgical Arms and Armours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedrigo, Anna

    Neutron scattering, once a technique that was the preserve of physics and chemistry, has grown to be applied in a much broader range of fields, spanning engineering, archaeology, life-science, and sustainable-energy applications. The present work focuses on two topics: first, the instrument desig...

  11. Scintillating-Glass-Fiber neutron sensors, their application and performance for plutonium detection and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seymour, R.S.; Richardson, B.; Morichi, M.; Bliss, M.; Craig, R.A.; Sunberg, D.S.

    1998-01-01

    Most neutron detection sensors presently employ 3 He gas-filled detectors. Despite their excellent performance and widespread use, there are significant limitations to this technology. A significant alternative neutron sensor utilizing neutron-active material incorporated into a glass scintillator is presented that offers novel commercial sensors not possible or practical with gas tube technology. The scintillating optical fiber permits sensors with a multitude of sizes ranging from devices of a single fiber of 150μm to sensors with tens of thousands of fibers with areas as large as 5m 2 depending on the neutron flux to be measured. A second significant advantage is the use of high-speed electronics that allow a greater dynamic range, not possible with gas detectors. These sensors are flexible, conformable and less sensitive to vibration that optimizes the source-to-detector geometry and provides robust performance in field applications. The glass-fibers are sensitive to both gamma rays and neutrons. However the coincidence electronics are optimized for neutron to gamma ray discrimination allowing very sensitive measurements with a low false-alarm rate. Applications include SNM surveillance, material control and accountability (MC and A), safeguard inspections, Pu health physics / bioassay and environmental characterization. (author)

  12. Analysis of radiation damage in fusion-simulation neutron spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkin, D.M.; Goland, A.N.

    1975-01-01

    Various parameters which are relevant to an understanding of radiation effects in metals have been evaluated utilizing available neutron spectrum information for several existing sources, e.g., EBRII, HFIR, and LAMPF, as well as the hypothetical spectrum at a fusion reactor first wall, and measured Li(d,n) spectra. Recoil energy distributions were calculated for several metals including Al, Cu, and Nb. The recoil energy range was divided into groups, and the fraction of recoils occurring in each energy group was compared with the fraction of the damage energy contributed by that group. From this comparison it was possible to conclude that the significant recoil range differs by about an order of magnitude between fission and fusion sources. The analysis further confirms that basic defect production characteristics depend upon the neutron spectrum, and that integral calculations of radiation-effect parameters do not provide a complete description of the dependence. This is equally true for comparisons between fusion-related spectra or fission-reactor spectra independently. Four recoil-dependent parameter functions which describe different aspects of radiation damage were used in the calculations. The relative effectiveness of neutron sources was found to depend upon the choice of parameter function. Fission-reactor spectra comparisons are relatively insensitive to the parameter functions used whereas spectra with an appreciable component of high-energy neutrons are much more sensitive

  13. Compact neutron generator development and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani; Gicquel, Frederic; Hahto, Sami; Lou, Tak-Pui

    2004-01-01

    The Plasma and Ion Source Technology Group at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been engaging in the development of high yield compact neutron generators for the last ten years. Because neutrons in these generators are formed by using either D-D, T-T or D-T fusion reaction, one can produce either mono-energetic (2.4 MeV or 14 MeV) or white neutrons. All the neutron generators being developed by our group utilize 13.5 MHz RF induction discharge to produce a pure deuterium or a mixture of deuterium-tritium plasma. As a result, ion beams with high current density and almost pure atomic ions can be extracted from the plasma source. The ion beams are accelerated to ∼100 keV and neutrons are produced when the beams impinge on a titanium target. Neutron generators with different configurations and sizes have been designed and tested at LBNL. Their applications include neutron activation analysis, oil-well logging, boron neutron capture therapy, brachytherapy, cargo and luggage screening. A novel small point neutron source has recently been developed for radiography application. The source size can be 2 mm or less, making it possible to examine objects with sharper images. The performance of these neutron generators will be described in this paper

  14. Neutron elastic scattering cross-sections measurement on carbon and fluorine in epithermal energy range using PEREN platform; Mesure des sections efficaces de diffusion elastique des neutrons sur le carbone et le fluor dans le domaine epithermique sur la plate-forme PEREN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiolliere, N

    2005-10-15

    Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) based on Th/U cycle is one of the new generation concepts for nuclear energy production. A typical MSR is a graphite-moderated core with liquid fuel ({sup 7}LiF +ThF{sub 4} + UF{sub 4}). Many numerical studies based on Monte-Carlo codes are currently carried out but the validity of these numerical result relies on the precise knowledge of neutron cross sections used such as elastic scattering on carbon ({sigma}{sub C}), fluorine ({sigma}{sub F}) and lithium 7 ({sigma}{sub Li}). The goal of this work is to obtain {sigma}{sub C} and {sigma}{sub F} between 1 eV and 100 keV. Such measurements have been performed at the Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie (LPSC) de Grenoble on the experimental platform PEREN using slowing-down time spectrometers (C and CF{sub 2}) associated to a pulsed neutron generator (GENEPI). Capture rates are obtained for reference materials (Au, Ag, Mo and In) using YAP scintillator coupled to a photo-multiplier. Very precise simulations (MCNP code) of the experimental setup have been performed and comparison with experiments has led to the determination of {sigma}{sub C} and {sigma}{sub F} with accuracies of 1% and 2% respectively. These results show a small discrepancy to evaluated nuclear data file (ENDF). Measures of total cross-sections {sigma}{sub C} and {sigma}{sub F} at higher energy (200 - 600 keV) were also carried out at Centre des Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux using a transmission method. Mono-energetic neutrons were produced by protons accelerated by a Van de Graaff accelerator on a LiF target and transmitted neutrons are counted in a proportional hydrogen gaseous detector. Discrepancies of 5% and 9% for {sigma}{sub C} and {sigma}{sub F} respectively with ENDF have been shown. (author)

  15. Magnetic Fields of Neutron Stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sushan Konar

    2017-09-12

    Sep 12, 2017 ... Over the decades, one of the primary preoccupations of neutron star research has been to look for a unification scheme connecting the widely different observational classes (shown in Fig. 1). The magnetic field, ranging from 108 G in millisecond pulsars to 1015 G in mag- netars, has been central to this ...

  16. Neutron Shielding composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Kiiro; Okuda, Hisashi; Harada, Yoshihisa.

    1994-01-01

    1, 3-bis (N, N-diglycidyl aminomethyl) cyclohexane as a specific epoxy resin is used together with a usual epoxy resin. A polyamine mixture and an imidazole type compound are used as a hardening agent. Further, a boron compound and an inorganic filler are added. Such a neutron shielding composition is hardened at a normal temperature without requiring heating, and mechanical strength, especially, compression strength can be kept over a wide range from low temperature to high temperature after the hardening. (T.M.)

  17. Nuclear data for neutron emission in the fission process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesan, S.

    1991-11-01

    This document contains the proceedings of the IAEA Consultants' Meeting on Nuclear Data for Neutron Emission in the Fission Process, Vienna, 22 - 24 October 1990. Included are the conclusions and recommendations reached at the meeting and the papers presented by the meeting participants. These papers provide a review of the status of experimental and theoretical data on neutron emission in spontaneous and neutron induced fission with reference to the data needs for reactor applications oriented towards actinide burner studies. The specific topics covered are the following: experimental measurements and theoretical predictions and evaluations of fission neutron energy spectra, average prompt fission neutron multiplicity, correlation in neutron emission from complementary fragments, neutron emission during acceleration of fission fragments, statistical properties of neutron rich nuclei by study of emission spectra of neutrons from the excited fission fragments, integral qualification of nu-bar for the major fissile isotopes, nu-bar total of 239 Pu and 235 U, and related problems. Refs figs and tabs

  18. A neutron spectrometer for studying giant resonances with (p,n) reactions in inverse kinematics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuhl, L.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Csatlos, M.; Algora, A.; Gulyas, J.; Kalinka, G.; Timar, J.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Rigollet, C.; Bagchi, S.; Najafi, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    A neutron spectrometer, the European Low-Energy Neutron Spectrometer (ELENS), has been constructed to study exotic nuclei in inverse-kinematics experiments. The spectrometer, which consists of plastic scintillator bars, can be operated in the neutron energy range of 100 keV-10 MeV. The neutron

  19. Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA): Initial Studies of a Method for Assaying Plutonium in Spent Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David L. Chichester; James W. Sterbentz

    2011-05-01

    Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) is an analytical technique that uses neutrons to assay the isotopic content of bulk materials. The technique uses a pulsed accelerator to produce an intense, short pulse of neutrons in a time-of-flight configuration. These neutrons, traveling at different speeds according to their energy, can be used to interrogate a spent fuel (SF) assembly to determine its plutonium content. Neutron transmission through the assembly is monitored as a function of neutron energy (time after the pulse), similar to the way neutron cross-section data is often collected. The transmitted neutron intensity is recorded as a function of time, with faster (higher-energy) neutrons arriving first and slower (lower-energy) neutrons arriving later. The low-energy elastic scattering and absorption resonances of plutonium and other isotopes modulate the transmitted neutron spectrum. Plutonium content in SF can be determined by analyzing this attenuation. Work is currently underway at Idaho National Laboratory, as a part of United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), to investigate the NRTA technique and to assess its feasibility for quantifying the plutonium content in SF and for determining the diversion of SF pins from assemblies. Preliminary results indicate that NRTA has great potential for being able to assay intact SF assemblies. Operating in the 1-40 eV range, it can identify four plutonium isotopes (239, 240, 241, & 242Pu), three uranium isotopes (235, 236, & 238U), and six resonant fission products (99Tc, 103Rh, 131Xe, 133Cs, 145Nd, and 152Sm). It can determine the areal density or mass of these isotopes in single- or multiple-pin integral transmission scans. Further, multiple observables exist to allow the detection of material diversion (pin defects) including fast-neutron and x-ray radiography, gross-transmission neutron counting, plutonium resonance absorption analysis, and fission

  20. Cosmic-ray thermal neutron detection for environmental purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looms, M. C.; Rosolem, R.; Klinkby, E. B.; Andreasen, M.

    2017-12-01

    Cosmic-ray neutron detection has been successfully used to produce time-series of hectometer-scale soil moisture estimates at various soil types and land covers. The method relies on measurements of epithermal neutron intensities with energies in the range of approximately 10-1000 eV (electron Volt). As the cosmic-ray neutron technology matures, additional sensing possibilities emerge, such as biomass, snow and litter layer thickness detection. The physical processes controlling neutron transport depend on the neutron energy. Because of this, many of these new applications benefit from measurements of cosmic-ray neutrons at multiple energy levels. For instance, several published studies suggest a correlation between the thermal-to-epithermal ratio and amount of biomass, where thermal neutrons refer to neutron energies below 0.5 eV. However, the vast majority of the theoretical investigations to date have focused on epithermal neutrons for environmental applications, since epithermal neutrons are more sensitive to the presence of hydrogen than at other energies. As a result, not much is known about thermal neutron transport in environmental systems. In this study, we investigate the thermal neutron behavior in environmental settings using the neutron transport model Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport code (MCNP6). First, we model the two common detector types: 1) The bare detector, measuring mainly thermal neutrons, and 2) the moderated detector, measuring mainly epithermal neutrons. The percentage of epithermal neutrons captured using the bare detector and the percentage of the thermal neutrons captured using the moderated detector is quantified for two separate detector systems and compared to measured values. Second, we determine whether it is relevant to correct thermal measurements for changes in vapor pressure, using a similar procedure previously proposed for epithermal neutron measurements. Finally, we investigate the area of influence of the two

  1. Neutron matter, symmetry energy and neutron stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefano, Gandolfi [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Steiner, Andrew W [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in quantum Monte Carlo with modern nucleon-nucleon interactions have enabled the successful description of properties of light nuclei and neutron-rich matter. Of particular interest is the nuclear symmetry energy, the energy cost of creating an isospin asymmetry, and its connection to the structure of neutron stars. Combining these advances with recent observations of neutron star masses and radii gives insight into the equation of state of neutron-rich matter near and above the saturation density. In particular, neutron star radius measurements constrain the derivative of the symmetry energy.

  2. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, symmetry of crystals, diffraction, nanostructures investigated by small-angle neutron scattering, the structure of macromolecules, spin dependent and magnetic scattering, structural analysis, neutron reflectometry, magnetic nanostructures, inelastic scattering, strongly correlated electrons, dynamics of macromolecules, applications of neutron scattering. (HSI)

  3. Neutron generator control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peelman, H.E.; Bridges, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    A method is described of controlling the neutron output of a neutron generator tube used in neutron well logging. The system operates by monitoring the target beam current and comparing a function of this current with a reference voltage level to develop a control signal used in a series regulator to control the replenisher current of the neutron generator tube. (U.K.)

  4. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner

    2010-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, symmetry of crystals, diffraction, nanostructures investigated by small-angle neutron scattering, the structure of macromolecules, spin dependent and magnetic scattering, structural analysis, neutron reflectometry, magnetic nanostructures, inelastic scattering, strongly correlated electrons, dynamics of macromolecules, applications of neutron scattering. (HSI)

  5. HANARO Cold Neutron Source Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kye Hong; Choi, Jung Woon; Kim, Hark Rho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Yeoung Jin [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Dong Gil [GNEC, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    The cold neutron source (CNS) design has been completed and confirmed by the full scale mock-up test. When its licensing is expected to be issued within 2007, the CNS will be installed in HANARO in 2009 and be operated from 2010 after the commissioning. The production of cold neutrons from 2009 will enable the neutron guides and the scattering instruments to be commissioned in parallel. From 2010, a new era of neutron science will be open in the area of biotechnology, nano-technology, and material science through the probing capability of cold neutrons with nano-wavelength. The prominent research output that will be created from this cold neutron research facility will ensure the basic science and technology, which will provide the strong foundation for the advanced engineering and technology. This paper presents the design of in-pool assembly including the nuclear design of moderator cell, the manufacturing test of in-pool assembly, the full scale mock-up test, and the safety analysis.

  6. Fast neutron inelastic scattering from nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lachkar, J.

    1978-01-01

    The need for accurate values of inelastic scattering cross sections appears when the requests for neutron data for reactors and other applied purposes are considered. These requests are partly related to values for spherical nuclei, well studied over many years. These studies were extensively considered in two review papers presented, in 1976, at the International Conference on the Interactions of Neutrons with nuclei. Other requests are related to vibrational and rotational nuclei, and relevant studies have been recently performed. The quality of these investigations and the large number of recent results have lead to concentration on them as the topic of the present review. The constant improvements of the experimental techniques permits precise measurements of inelastic scattering cross sections to the first excited levels over a range of incident energies, such that different reactions mechanisms are predominant in different parts of that range of energies. Quadrupole, hexadecapole and octupole deformation parameters of the target nuclei can be deduced from the data using phenomenological models. The successful application of the analysis over the range of energies leads to the conclusion that reliable information on the shape of the nuclei has been derived. The validity of the various models, which include direct interaction and compound nucleus reaction mechanisms, is discussed in connection with analyses of recent experiments. (author) [fr

  7. Neutron-chamber detectors and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehlau, P.E.; Atwater, H.F.; Coop, K.L.

    1990-01-01

    Detector applications in Nuclear Safeguards and Waste Management have included measuring neutrons from fission and (alpha,n) reactions with well-moderated neutron proportional counters, often embedded in a slab of polyethylene. Other less-moderated geometries are useful for detecting both bare and moderated fission-source neutrons with good efficiency. The neutron chamber is an undermoderated detector design comprising a large, hollow, polyethylene-walled chamber containing one or more proportional counters. Neutron-chamber detectors are relatively inexpensive; can have large apertures, usually through a thin chamber wall; and offer very good detection efficiency per dollar. Neutron-chamber detectors have also been used for monitoring vehicles and for assaying large crates of transuranic waste. Our Monte Carlo calculations for a new application (monitoring low-density waste for concealed plutonium) illustrate the advantages of the hollow-chamber design for detecting moderated fission sources. 9 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Physics of neutron emission in fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmel, H.D.

    1989-06-01

    The document contains the proceedings of the IAEA Consultants' Meeting on the Physics of Neutron Emission in Fission, Mito City (Japan), 24-27 May 1988. Included are the conclusions and recommendations reached at the meeting and the papers presented by the meeting participants. These papers cover the following topics: Energy dependence of the number of fission neutrons ν-bar (3 papers), multiplicity distribution of fission neutrons (3 papers), competition between neutron and γ-ray emission (4 papers), the fission neutron yield in resonances (2 papers) and the energy spectrum of fission neutrons in experiment (9 papers), theory (4 papers) and evaluation (1 paper). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  9. Neutron scattering in Indonesia. Country report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikram, Abarrul

    2000-01-01

    Neutron scattering in Indonesia is still alienated due to some reasons and conditions which are discussed. The reactor and its latest operation mode are also described. The neutron beam facilities which include one diffractometer for residual stress measurement, one diffractometer for single crystal structural determination and texture measurement, one high resolution powder diffractometer, one neutron radiography facility, one triple axis spectrometer, one small angle neutron scattering spectrometer and one high resolution small angle neutron scattering spectrometer were presented briefly together with improvements of neutron intensities at some spectrometers in connection with the setting of main beam shutter position. Special attention is given for four instruments mostly related to this workshop. Their performances and problems faced in the past 9 months are presented as well as the future plan for refurbishment and development. (author)

  10. Neutron emissivity profile camera diagnostics considering present and future tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, S. [EURATOM-VR Association, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2001-12-01

    This thesis describes the neutron profile camera situated at JET. The profile camera is one of the most important neutron emission diagnostic devices operating at JET. It gives useful information of the total neutron yield rate but also about the neutron emissivity distribution. Data analysis was performed in order to compare three different calibration methods. The data was collected from the deuterium campaign, C4, in the beginning of 2001. The thesis also includes a section about the implication of a neutron profile camera for ITER, where the issue regarding interface difficulties is in focus. The ITER JCT (Joint Central Team) proposal of a neutron camera for ITER is studied in some detail.

  11. 14 MeV neutrons physics and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Valkovic, Vladivoj

    2015-01-01

    Despite the often difficult and time-consuming effort of performing experiments with fast (14 MeV) neutrons, these neutrons can offer special insight into nucleus and other materials because of the absence of charge. 14 MeV Neutrons: Physics and Applications explores fast neutrons in basic science and applications to problems in medicine, the environment, and security.Drawing on his more than 50 years of experience working with 14 MeV neutrons, the author focuses on:Sources of 14 MeV neutrons, including laboratory size accelerators, small and sealed tube generators, well logging sealed tube ac

  12. Functional renormalization group approach to neutron matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Drews

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The chiral nucleon-meson model, previously applied to systems with equal number of neutrons and protons, is extended to asymmetric nuclear matter. Fluctuations are included in the framework of the functional renormalization group. The equation of state for pure neutron matter is studied and compared to recent advanced many-body calculations. The chiral condensate in neutron matter is computed as a function of baryon density. It is found that, once fluctuations are incorporated, the chiral restoration transition for pure neutron matter is shifted to high densities, much beyond three times the density of normal nuclear matter.

  13. Layered magnets: polarized neutron reflection studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabel, H.; Schreyer, A. [Ruhr-Univ. Bochum, Lehrstuhl fuer Experimentalphysik/Festkoerperphysik, Bochum (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    Neutron reflectivity measurements from extended surfaces, thin films and superlattices provide information on the chemical profile parallel to the film normal, including film thicknesses, average composition and interfacial roughness parameters. Reflectivity measurements with polarized neutrons are particularly powerful for analyzing the magnetic density profiles in thin films and superlattices in addition to chemical profiles. The basic theory of polarized neutron reflectivity is provided, followed by some examples and more recent applications concerning polarized neutron reflectivity studies from exchange coupled Fe/Cr superlattices. (author) 5 figs., 13 refs.

  14. Reference Neutron Radiographs of Nuclear Reactor Fuel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1986-01-01

    Reference neutron radiographs of nuclear reactor fuel were produced by the Euraton Neutron Radiography Working Group and published in 1984 by the Reidel Publishing Company. In this collection a classification is given of the various neutron radiographic findings, that can occur in different parts...... of pelletized, annular and vibro-conpacted nuclear fuel pins. Those parts of the pins are shown where changes of appearance differ from those for the parts as fabricated. Also radiographs of those as fabricated parts are included. The collection contains 158 neutron radiographs, reproduced on photographic paper...... (twice enlarged) and on duplicating film (original size)....

  15. Miscellaneous neutron techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iddings, F.A.

    1976-01-01

    Attention is brought to the less often uses of neutrons in the areas of neutron radiography, well logging, and neutron gaging. Emphasis on neutron radiography points toward the isotopic sensitivity of the method versus the classical bulk applications. Also recognized is the ability of neutron radiography to produce image changes that correspond to thickness and density changes obtained in photon radiography. Similarly, neutron gaging applications center on the measurement of radiography. Similarly, neutron gaging applications center on the measurement of water, oil, or plastics in industrial samples. Well logging extends the neutron gaging to encompass many neutron properties and reactions besides thermalization and capture. Neutron gaging also gives information on organic structure and concentrations of a variety of elements or specific compounds in selected matrices

  16. Scintillation neutron detector with dynamic threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornilov, N.; Massey, T.; Grimes, S.

    2014-01-01

    Scintillation neutron detectors with hydrogen are a common tool for neutron spectroscopy. They provide good time resolution, neutron-gamma discrimination and high efficiency of neutron counting. The real open problems connected with application of these detectors are in the energy range >10 MeV. There are no standard neutron spectra known with high accuracy for this energy range. Therefore, traditional methods for experimental investigation of the efficiency function fail for these neutrons. The Monte Carlo simulation cannot provide reasonable accuracy due to unknown characteristics of the reactions for charged particle production (p, α and so on, light output, reaction cross-sections). The application of fission chamber with fissile material as a neutron detector did not help to solve the problem. We may avoid many problems if we use the traditional neutron detector with non-traditional data analysis. In this report we give main relations, and demonstrate the method for Cf-source. Experimental detector efficiency is compared with MC simulation. (authors)

  17. Polarized neutrons for Australian scientific research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, Shane J.

    2005-01-01

    Polarized neutron scattering has been a feature at ANSTO's HIFAR research reactor since the first polarization analysis (PA) spectrometer Longpol began operation over 30 years ago. Since that time, we have improved performance of Longpol and added new capabilities in several reincarnations of the instrument. Most of the polarized neutron experiments have been in the fields of magnetism and superconductivity, and most of that research has involved PA. Now as we plan our next generation neutron beam facility, at the Replacement Research Reactor (RRR), we intend to continue the tradition of PA but with a far broader scope in mind. Our new capabilities will combine PA and energy analysis with both cold and thermal neutron source spectra. We will also provide capabilities for research with polarized neutrons in small-angle neutron scattering and in neutron reflectometry. The discussion includes a brief historical account of the technical developments with a summary of past and present applications of polarized neutrons at HIFAR, and an outline of the polarized neutron capabilities that will be included in the first suite of instruments, which will begin operation at the new reactor in 2006

  18. Neutron Generators for Spent Fuel Assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A.

    2010-01-01

    The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S. DOE has initiated a multi-lab/university collaboration to quantify the plutonium (Pu) mass in, and detect the diversion of pins from, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies with non-destructive assay (NDA). The 14 NDA techniques being studied include several that require an external neutron source: Delayed Neutrons (DN), Differential Die-Away (DDA), Delayed Gammas (DG), and Lead Slowing-Down Spectroscopy (LSDS). This report provides a survey of currently available neutron sources and their underlying technology that may be suitable for NDA of SNF assemblies. The neutron sources considered here fall into two broad categories. The term 'neutron generator' is commonly used for sealed devices that operate at relatively low acceleration voltages of less than 150 kV. Systems that employ an acceleration structure to produce ion beam energies from hundreds of keV to several MeV, and that are pumped down to vacuum during operation, rather than being sealed units, are usually referred to as 'accelerator-driven neutron sources.' Currently available neutron sources and future options are evaluated within the parameter space of the neutron generator/source requirements as currently understood and summarized in section 2. Applicable neutron source technologies are described in section 3. Commercially available neutron generators and other source options that could be made available in the near future with some further development and customization are discussed in sections 4 and 5, respectively. The pros and cons of the various options and possible ways forward are discussed in section 6. Selection of the best approach must take a number of parameters into account including cost, size, lifetime, and power consumption, as well as neutron flux, neutron energy spectrum, and pulse structure that satisfy the requirements of the NDA instrument to be built.

  19. Neutrons in science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromley, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    Occasionally to the fiftieth anniversy of the discovery of the neutron the author presents a historical review about the impact of this discovery on different fields at physics. Especially considered are nuclear physics, the neutron as an elementary particles, ultracold neutrons, condensed matter physics, radiation damage induced by neutrons, neutron activation analysis, imaging and radiography by neutrons, neutrons in mining operations, track etching, the use of intense gamma sources, gauging systems, neutron holography and neutron stars. (HSI)

  20. Thermal neutron self-shielding correction factors for large sample instrumental neutron activation analysis using the MCNP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzika, F.; Stamatelatos, I.E.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal neutron self-shielding within large samples was studied using the Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP. The code enabled a three-dimensional modeling of the actual source and geometry configuration including reactor core, graphite pile and sample. Neutron flux self-shielding correction factors derived for a set of materials of interest for large sample neutron activation analysis are presented and evaluated. Simulations were experimentally verified by measurements performed using activation foils. The results of this study can be applied in order to determine neutron self-shielding factors of unknown samples from the thermal neutron fluxes measured at the surface of the sample

  1. Simple, empirical approach to predict neutron capture cross sections from nuclear masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couture, A.; Casten, R. F.; Cakirli, R. B.

    2017-12-01

    Background: Neutron capture cross sections are essential to understanding the astrophysical s and r processes, the modeling of nuclear reactor design and performance, and for a wide variety of nuclear forensics applications. Often, cross sections are needed for nuclei where experimental measurements are difficult. Enormous effort, over many decades, has gone into attempting to develop sophisticated statistical reaction models to predict these cross sections. Such work has met with some success but is often unable to reproduce measured cross sections to better than 40 % , and has limited predictive power, with predictions from different models rapidly differing by an order of magnitude a few nucleons from the last measurement. Purpose: To develop a new approach to predicting neutron capture cross sections over broad ranges of nuclei that accounts for their values where known and which has reliable predictive power with small uncertainties for many nuclei where they are unknown. Methods: Experimental neutron capture cross sections were compared to empirical mass observables in regions of similar structure. Results: We present an extremely simple method, based solely on empirical mass observables, that correlates neutron capture cross sections in the critical energy range from a few keV to a couple hundred keV. We show that regional cross sections are compactly correlated in medium and heavy mass nuclei with the two-neutron separation energy. These correlations are easily amenable to predict unknown cross sections, often converting the usual extrapolations to more reliable interpolations. It almost always reproduces existing data to within 25 % and estimated uncertainties are below about 40 % up to 10 nucleons beyond known data. Conclusions: Neutron capture cross sections display a surprisingly strong connection to the two-neutron separation energy, a nuclear structure property. The simple, empirical correlations uncovered provide model-independent predictions of

  2. Impact of the Revised 10 CFR 835 on the Neutron Dose Rates at LLNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radev, R.

    2009-01-01

    In June 2007, 10 CFR 835 (1) was revised to include new radiation weighting factors for neutrons, updated dosimetric models, and dose terms consistent with the newer ICRP recommendations. A significant aspect of the revised 10 CFR 835 is the adoption of the recommendations outlined in ICRP-60 (2). The recommended new quantities demand a review of much of the basic data used in protection against exposure to sources of ionizing radiation. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements has defined a number of quantities for use in personnel and area monitoring (3,4,5) including the ambient dose equivalent H*(d) to be used for area monitoring and instrument calibrations. These quantities are used in ICRP-60 and ICRP-74. This report deals only with the changes in the ambient dose equivalent and ambient dose rate equivalent for neutrons as a result of the implementation of the revised 10 CFR 835. In the report, the terms neutron dose and neutron dose rate will be used for convenience for ambient neutron dose and ambient neutron dose rate unless otherwise stated. This report provides a qualitative and quantitative estimate of how much the neutron dose rates at LLNL will change with the implementation of the revised 10 CFR 835. Neutron spectra and dose rates from selected locations at the LLNL were measured with a high resolution spectroscopic neutron dose rate system (ROSPEC) as well as with a standard neutron rem meter (a.k.a., a remball). The spectra obtained at these locations compare well with the spectra from the Radiation Calibration Laboratory's (RCL) bare californium source that is currently used to calibrate neutron dose rate instruments. The measurements obtained from the high resolution neutron spectrometer and dose meter ROSPEC and the NRD dose meter compare within the range of ±25%. When the new radiation weighting factors are adopted with the implementation of the revised 10 CFR 835, the measured dose rates will increase by up to 22%. The

  3. Moderation of neutron energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marlatt, G.R.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear reactor system having a nuclear reactor which has a core including fuel assemblies, means for transmitting through the core a coolant, the coolant having a predetermined neutron-energy moderating property, sealed tubes in the core, each tube containing a material having a different neutron-energy moderating property than the coolant, means, when actuated, to engage at least certain of the tubes, for opening certain of the tubes to permit the coolant to replace the material in the tubes thereby to change the energy spectrum of the neutrons in the reactor, hydraulic means, connected to the opening means, for actuating the opening means to engage certain of the tubes to open the tubes. A device, external to the reactor, connected to the hydraulic means controlls the actuation of the opening means, the opening means being so set with reference to the tubes that only certain of the tubes are opened at any time as the opening means is advanced towards the tubes by the hydraulic means

  4. Neutrons are flying

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    View of the n_TOF tube with members of the design and construction team of the facility(from left to right: R. Magnin/LHC, E. Radermacher/EP, P. Cennini/EP and R. Cappi/PS). A new experimental facility was inaugurated at CERN on Wednesday 8 November. The neutron Time Of Flight (n_TOF) facility received its first protons from the PS at 10:55. With an intensity of 1 x 1011 protons per cycle on the n_TOF target, an intense neutron beam has been produced at CERN for the first time, opening the door to many new avenues of research including, for example, neutron induced cross-section measurements. The facility is an offspring of the work by Carlo Rubbia and his group on the novel idea of an Energy Amplifier. The basic idea was successfully tested at the PS with the FEAT experiment and later with the TARC experiment, where the feasibility of transmutation of long-lived products by Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (ARC) was confirmed. This led to the possibility of radio-isotope production for medical applications, fo...

  5. The polarized platypus polarized neutron reflectometry made possible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saerbeck, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The magnetic moment of the neutron, together with it's highly penetrating non destructive manner, make polarized neutron reflectometry an excellent tool to study magnetic phenomena across surfaces and interfaces of thin films. Unlike other magnetometry techniques which ordinarily yield only average magnetization values or, in case of probes with higher spatial resolution (e.g. electron microscopy or scanning tunnelling microscopy), show a high surface sensitivity, PNR together with magnetic x-ray scattering provides the ability to spatially resolve vector magnetization well beneath the surface [1] The ability to obtain vector magnetization profiles across interfaces and surfaces of thin films and multilayers offers the intriguing possibility to study systematically magnetic configurations and magnetic exchange interactions through intervening layers. In this paper we present the performance of the new polarization system installed on the time of flight neutron reflectometer PLATYPUS at ANSTO's Bragg Institute. The spin state of the neutrons is polarized and analysed by spatial separation of different neutron spin states using polarizing Fe/Si supermirrors before, and after the sample stage. The supermirrors have a large wavelength acceptance bandwidth of 3 A to 12 A. To control the desired spin direction of the incoming and reflected beam from the sample, two sets of RF spin flippers are installed. In the free space between the spin flippers and the sample stage the neutron spin direction is maintained by two sets of magnetic guide field coils. The new sample environment for studies of magnetic samples includes a 1 T electromagnet and a closed cycle refrigerator which gives access to a temperature range from 4K to 3 50 K .

  6. Applications of image plates in neutron radiography and neutron diffraction at BARC, Trombay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Neutron radiography techniques based on Gd, Dy and In metallic foils and X-ray film have been used at this centre since early seventies for various NDT and R and D work in nuclear, defence and aerospace industries. In recent years use of photostimulated luminescence based phosphor imaging plate has been introduced in our work. This has enabled to achieve higher sensitivities and dynamic ranges of recording radiographs with acceptable spatial resolution. It also provides digital image information which is more convenient for quantitative evaluations. Neutron image plates have been used in variety of radiography techniques such as conventional neutron radiography (NR), neutron induced beta radiography (NIBR), hydrogen sensitive epithermal neutron radiography (HYSEN) and for neutron powder diffractometry using Apsara, CIRUS and Dhruva reactors as neutron sources. Recently the image plates have also been used for characterization of thermalized neutron beam from a plasma focus neutron source and recording neutron radiographs. Prior to the utilization image plates have been characterised for their performance. Details of the measurements and applications will be presented. (author)

  7. Response of six neutron survey meters in mixed fields of fast and thermal neutrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S I; Kim, B H; Chang, I; Lee, J I; Kim, J L; Pradhan, A S

    2013-10-01

    Calibration neutron fields have been developed at KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) to study the responses of commonly used neutron survey meters in the presence of fast neutrons of energy around 10 MeV. The neutron fields were produced by using neutrons from the (241)Am-Be sources held in a graphite pile and a DT neutron generator. The spectral details and the ambient dose equivalent rates of the calibration fields were established, and the responses of six neutron survey meters were evaluated. Four single-moderator-based survey meters exhibited an under-responses ranging from ∼9 to 55 %. DINEUTRUN, commonly used in fields around nuclear reactors, exhibited an over-response by a factor of three in the thermal neutron field and an under-response of ∼85 % in the mixed fields. REM-500 (tissue-equivalent proportional counter) exhibited a response close to 1.0 in the fast neutron fields and an under-response of ∼50 % in the thermal neutron field.

  8. Neutron diffraction studies of glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    A survey is given of the application of neutron diffraction to structural studies of oxide and halide glasses. As with crystalline materials, neutron and X-ray diffraction are the major structural probes for glasses and other amorphous solids, particularly in respect of intermediate range order. The glasses discussed mostly have structures which are dominated by a network in which the bonding is predominantly covalent. The examples discussed demonstrate the power of the neutron diffraction technique in the investigation of the structures of inorganic glasses. The best modern diffraction experiments are capable of providing accurate data with high real space resolution, which if used correctly, are an extremely fine filter for the various structural models proposed in the literature. 42 refs

  9. Data reduction for time-of-flight small-angle neutron scattering with virtual neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Rong; Tian, Haolai; Zuo, Taisen; Tang, Ming; Yan, Lili; Zhang, Junrong

    2017-09-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) is an experimental technique to detect material structures in the nanometer to micrometer range. The solution of the structural model constructed from SANS strongly depends on the accuracy of the reduced data. The time-of-flight (TOF) SANS data are dependent on the wavelength of the pulsed neutron source. Therefore, data reduction must be handled very carefully to transform measured neutron events into neutron scattering intensity. In this study, reduction algorithms for TOF SANS data are developed and optimized using simulated data from a virtual neutron experiment. Each possible effect on the measured data is studied systematically, and suitable corrections are performed to obtain high-quality data. This work will facilitate scientific research and the instrument design at China Spallation Neutron Source.

  10. Application of eV neutron scattering and eV neutron absorption techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, S.

    1989-01-01

    Intense spallation neutron sources can provide a useful eV neutron flux in the energy range 1-100 eV, which is much more intense than has ever been available from steady state sources, and makes two fruitful techniques possible. One is an eV neutron scattering technique, which allows the impulse approximation limit to be approached. The other is an eV neutron absorption technique. Both have been used to observe the motions of specific atoms in the high temperature superconducting systems La-Cu-O and Y-Ba-Cu-O. The procedure and experimental layout are given. Neutron scattering and neutron absorption spectra are presented for different temperatures. These allowed effective temperatures of atoms in the high T c materials to be found. (author)

  11. Method and apparatus for neutron radiation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarzmann, A.

    1985-01-01

    A self-calibrated neutron radiation monitor includes a flux responsive element comprised of intrinsic silicon neutron detectors and self-calibration resistors in a single structure. As the resistance of the flux responsive element increases to the value of successive calibration resistors, known increments of flux have been encountered

  12. Exploration and grade control neutron logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisler, P.L.

    1982-01-01

    Techniques used in neutron logging in boreholes are discussed. They include the application of neutron probes to porosity measurements, to lithological determinations based on macroscopic cross-section measurements and measurements of the concentration of chemical constituents in rocks and ores

  13. Magnetic short range order in Gd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Child, H.R.

    1976-01-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering has been used to investigate magnetic short range order in Gd for 80 0 K 0 K. Short range order exists throughout this range from well below T/sub C/ = 291 0 K to well above it and can be reasonably well described by an anisotropic Orstein-Zernike form for chi

  14. Compact ion source neutron generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkel, Thomas; Persaud, Arun; Kapadia, Rehan; Javey, Ali; Chang-Hasnain, Constance; Rangelow, Ivo; Kwan, Joe

    2015-10-13

    A neutron generator includes a conductive substrate comprising a plurality of conductive nanostructures with free-standing tips and a source of an atomic species to introduce the atomic species in proximity to the free-standing tips. A target placed apart from the substrate is voltage biased relative to the substrate to ionize and accelerate the ionized atomic species toward the target. The target includes an element capable of a nuclear fusion reaction with the ionized atomic species to produce a one or more neutrons as a reaction by-product.

  15. Development of neutron calibration field using accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Mamoru [Tohoku Univ., Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    A brief summary is given on the fast neutron calibration fields for 1) 8 keV to 15 MeV range, and 2) 30-80 MeV range. The field for 8 keV to 15 MeV range was developed at the Fast Neutron Laboratory (FNL) at Tohoku University using a 4.5 MV pulsed Dynamitron accelerator and neutron production reactions, {sup 45}Sc(p, n), {sup 7}Li(p, n), {sup 3}H(p, n), D(d, n) and T(d, n). The latter 30-80 MeV fields are setup at TIARA of Takasaki Establishment of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, and at Cyclotron Radio Isotope Center (CYRIC) of Tohoku University using a 90 MeV AVF cyclotron and the {sup 7}Li(p, n) reaction. These fields have been applied for various calibration of neutron spectrometers and dosimeters, and for irradiation purposes. (author)

  16. Design and Applications of a 252Cf Cold Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elijah Johnson; Larry Robinson; Li Zhao

    2000-01-01

    The goal was to design a source of cold neutrons from such sources as 252 Cf, 241 Am-Be, 244 Cm-Be, or 124 Sb-Be and to find the limitations when such a source is applied to neutron activation analysis. Here, cold neutrons are neutrons with a kinetic energy 252 Cf nucleus lies in the range from 0.5 to 10 MeV, so moderation is necessary to produce a significant quantity of cold neutrons from these initial neutrons. The same is true for the other three neutron sources. The general design that was selected for the cold neutron source has two moderation regions, and the geometry was restricted to cylindrical symmetry with the sample region along the cylindrical axis. The moderation regions may have different temperatures and may contain different moderating materials. The design tasks are then to find the optimum geometry, moderating materials, and moderating temperatures. A cold neutron flux in the sample region of 2.7 x 10 -3 cold neutrons per source neutron is obtainable in a 252 Cf cold neutron source that has polyethylene as the cold and thermal moderator or with trimethylbenzene as the cold moderator and polyethylene as the thermal moderator. The neutron fluxes obtained are probably within 10% of the fluxes that would be obtained in an actual cold neutron source that is based on the model used. This flux of cold neutrons is adequate for sensitive prompt and delayed neutron activation analysis measurements. The results show that a useful flux of cold neutrons can be obtained from small amounts of 252 Cf, 241 Am, 244 Cm, or 124 Sb

  17. The conceptual calculation for the neutron beam device at Mark 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Xinbiao; Zhu Yangni; Gao Jijin; Li Yiguo; Ji Jinzhong

    2006-01-01

    The thermal neutron beam device, epithermal neutron beam device and test duct experiment device are designed by using Monte Carlo method at 30 kW Mark 1( -1). The compared calculation for transverse cross section dimension, moderator, reflector and others of neutron filter device are studied in this paper. The three optimized neutron beams including thermal neutron beam, epithermal neutron beam and the beam for measuring blood boron density, whose neutron flux density per reactor power are rather high, are also introduced. The results show that the BNCT neutron beam can be designed by using 30kW -1 reactor. (author)

  18. RPL-SC dosimetric system for measuring gamma and neutron irradiation in case of emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khristova, M. G.

    1993-01-01

    A RPL-SC dosimetric system is designed based on radiophotoluminescence (RPL) and on the effect of fast neutron bombardment of silicon semiconductor (SC) diodes. The experimental prototype consists of a computerized automatic measurement system and an individual dosimetric cassette accommodating RPL and SC detectors. The equipment includes: a device for measurement of the direct voltage of Si diodes and the RPL light emitted by RPL detectors; a compartment with dosimetric cassettes to be measured; a manipulator with three positions executing automatic measurement of cassettes; a computer and a printer. The system operates in both manual and automatic modes. In the manual mode each step of the manipulator is set up by the operator who changes the ranges after they have been filled to capacity and registers the results. In the automatic mode the whole process of maintaining the supply and control voltage, of manipulator's operation, measuring, data recording and data processing are controlled by a specially designed computer programme. Main technical parameters: 1) Measurement range of absorbed dose: gamma rays - 10 -3 to 10 2 Gy; thermal neutrons - 10 -3 to 10 2 Gy; fast neutrons - 10 to 30 Gy. 2) Energy range: gamma rays - 0.04 to 1.25 MeV; thermal neutrons - 0.024 eV; fast neutrons - 0.3 to 14 MeV. 3) Relative measurement error - ±15% 4) Recurrent measurement of one and the same dose. 5) Measurement time of 1 detector - 15 sec. (author)

  19. Analysis of the neutron generation from a D-Li neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, I.

    1994-02-01

    The study of the neutron generation from the D-Li reaction is an important issue to define the optimum combination of the intervening parameters during the design phase of a D-Li neutron source irradiation facility. The major players in defining the neutron yield from the D-Li reaction are the deuteron incident energy and the beam current, provided that the lithium target is thick enough to stop all incident deuterons. The incident deuteron energy also plays a role on the angular distribution of the generated neutrons, on the energy distribution of the generated neutrons, and on the maximum possible energy of the neutrons. The D-Li reaction produces neutrons with energies ranging from eV's to several MeV's. The angular distribution of these neutrons is dependent on the energy of both, incident deuterons and generated neutrons. The deuterons lose energy interacting with the lithium target material in such a way that the energy of the deuterons inside the lithium target varies from the incident deuteron energy to essentially zero. The first part of this study focuses in analyzing the neutron generation rate from the D-Li reaction as a function of the intervening parameters, in defining the source term, in terms of the energy and angular distributions of the generated neutrons, and finally in providing some insights of the impact of varying input parameters on the generation rate and correlated distributions. In the second part an analytical description of the Monte Carlo sampling procedure of the neutron from the D-Li reaction is provided with the aim at further Monte Carlo transport of the D-Li neutrons

  20. 21 CFR 892.5300 - Medical neutron radiation therapy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical neutron radiation therapy system. 892.5300... therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical neutron radiation therapy system is a device intended to generate high-energy neutrons for radiation therapy. This generic type of device may include signal...