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Sample records for neutron radiotherapy facility

  1. Fast Neutron Dose Distribution in a Linac Radiotherapy Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Othmany, D.Sh.; Abdul-Majid, S.; Kadi, M.W.

    2011-01-01

    CR-39 plastic detectors were used for fast neutron dose mapping in the radiotherapy facility at King AbdulAziz University Hospital (KAUH). Detectors were calibrated using a 252 Cf neutron source and a neutron dosimeter. After exposure chemical etching was performed using 6N NaOH solution at 70 degree C. Tracks were counted using an optical microscope and the number of tracks/cm 2 was converted to a neutron dose. 15 track detectors were distributed inside and outside the therapy room and were left for 32 days. The average neutron doses were 142.3 mSv on the accelerator head, 28.5 mSv on inside walls, 1.4 mSv beyond the beam shield, and 1 mSv in the control room

  2. Dosimetry intercomparisons between fast neutron radiotherapy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almond, P.R.; Smith, A.R.; Smathers, J.B.; Otte, V.A.

    1975-01-01

    Neutron dosimetry intercomparisons have been made between M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute, Naval Research Laboratory, University of Washington Hospital, and Hammersmith Hospital. The parameters that are measured during these visits are: tissue kerma in air, tissue dose at depth of dose maximum, depth dose, beam profiles, neutron/gamma ratios and photon calibrations of ionization chambers. A preliminary report of these intercomparisons will be given including a comparison of the calculation and statement of tumor doses for each institution

  3. Neutron radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, F.J.

    1987-01-01

    The rationale for the application of neutron radiation for the treatment of malignancies is well established based on radiobiological studies. These factors include the presence of tissue hypoxia, radiation response as a function of cell cycle kinetics, the repair capacity of the malignant cells and the regeneration of malignant cells during a fractionated course of radiation. Despite the constraints under which the clinical trials to date have been conducted, promising results have been obtained. Randomized trials have demonstrated that neutron therapy is the treatment of choice for inoperable salivary gland carcinomas. A randomized trial of the RTOG has demonstrated a probable advantage for neutron radiation in the treatment of advanced prostate carcinomas but is yet to be confirmed. An improvement in local control has also been observed for selected sarcomas. Equivocal or contradictory results have been obtained for squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck, bronchogenic carcinomas, advanced rectal, transitional cell carcinomas of the bladder and cervical carcinomas. The practical consequences of these radiobiological and clinical observations on the current generation of clinical trials is discussed

  4. Neutron Therapy Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Neutron Therapy Facility provides a moderate intensity, broad energy spectrum neutron beam that can be used for short term irradiations for radiobiology (cells)...

  5. Improvement of Radiation Safety in Radiotherapy Facilities: Catering for Neutrons Outside Short Mazes in 10MV Linear Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severa, R.

    2016-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that neutron leakage cannot be neglected at 10MV when direct access doors are used or when short mazes, typically less than 7 metres in length, are employed. The majority of radiotherapy facilities in Africa have Co-60 machines installed that are now being replaced by linear accelerators. The in-coming linear accelerators are being installed in the same bunkers that were designed for Co-60 energy ranges albeit with some shielding modifications. The modifications do not alter the length of the maze and where the maze length is less than 7 metres, neutron leakage will occur in 10MV linear accelerators. There is lack of capacity within the regulatory bodies in Africa to handle this changeover from a technical and equipment perspective. The justification of medical exposures ensures that the benefits to the patients substantially outweigh any risks that the patient may incur. As such, the justification process needs to be implemented through the effective use of evidence-based referral guidelines and clinical audits. In the case of most African countries, medical diagnostic exposures of patients are not underpinned by an effective justification system. This, coupled with the scenario where physicians own outpatient diagnostic centres to which they refer patients (self-referral) increases the conflict of physicians due to dual roles as professionals and businessmen, further compromising on patient protection. Nuclear security is the responsibility of the Member State and requires that a number of key stakeholders work closely together. In the case of research reactors and nuclear power plants, this cooperation is evident and functional. However, this does not extend to the use of high-activity radioactive sources in medicine (category 1&2) where in most cases the regulators seem to be the only authority having oversight on the security of these sources without the benefit of direct input and collaboration of other key security stakeholders. This

  6. JRR-3 neutron radiography facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubayashi, M.; Tsuruno, A.

    1992-01-01

    JRR-3 neutron radiography facility consists of thermal neutron radiography facility (TNRF) and cold neutron radiography facility (CNRF). TNRF is installed in JRR-3 reactor building. CNRF is installed in the experimental beam hall adjacent to the reactor building. (author)

  7. Studsvik thermal neutron facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, O.A.; Larsson, B.; Grusell, E.; Svensson, P.

    1992-01-01

    The Studsvik thermal neutron facility at the R2-0 reactor originally designed for neutron capture radiography has been modified to permit irradiation of living cells and animals. A hole was drilled in the concrete shielding to provide a cylindrical channel with diameter of 25.3 cm. A shielding water tank serves as an entry holder for cells and animals. The advantage of this modification is that cells and animals can be irradiated at a constant thermal neutron fluence rate of approximately 10 9 n cm -2 s -1 (at 100 kW) without stopping and restarting the reactor. Topographic analysis of boron done by neutron capture autoradiography (NCR) can be irradiated under the same conditions as previously

  8. Bevalac Radiotherapy Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, J.R.; Howard, J.; Criswell, T.

    1979-03-01

    Patient Treatment Room at the Bevalac is now in full operation. In the design of this facility, emphasis has been placed on creating an atmosphere appropriate to a clinical facility; the usual features of an irradiation cave have been hidden behind carpets, curtains and paint. Patient positioning is done with a Philips Ram-style couch, with additional fixtures to accommodate a patient in the seated or standing, as well as the supine, position. Dosimetry apparatus, collimators, ion chambers and the beam flattening system used to produce the highly uniform 20 cm diameter therapy field are described

  9. Bevalac Radiotherapy Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, J.R.; Howard, J.; Criswell, T.

    1979-03-01

    Patient Treatment Room at the Bevalac is now in full operation. In the design of this facility, emphasis has been placed on creating an atmosphere appropriate to a clinical facility; the usual features of an irradiation cave have been hidden behind carpets, curtains and paint. Patient positioning is done with a Philips Ram-style couch, with additional fixtures to accommodate a patient in the seated or standing, as well as the supine, position. Dosimetry apparatus, collimators, ion chambers and the beam flattening system used to produce the highly uniform 20 cm diameter therapy field are described.

  10. Double beam neutron radiography facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanus, J.C.

    1977-09-01

    The DR1 reactor at Risoe is used as a neutron source for neutron radiography. In the double-beam neutron radiography facility a neutron flux of an intensity of 1.4 and 1.8 x 10 6 n. cm -2 . s -1 reaches the object to be radiographed. The transport and exposure container used for neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel rods is described, and the exposure technique and procedure are reviewed. The mode by which single neutron radiographs are assembled and assessed is described. This report will be published in the ''Neutron Radiography Newsletter''. (author)

  11. Measuring neutron spectra in radiotherapy using the nested neutron spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maglieri, Robert, E-mail: robert.maglieri@mail.mcgill.ca; Evans, Michael; Seuntjens, Jan; Kildea, John [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H4A 3J1 (Canada); Licea, Angel [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, Ontario K1P 5S9 (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Out-of-field neutron doses resulting from photonuclear interactions in the head of a linear accelerator pose an iatrogenic risk to patients and an occupational risk to personnel during radiotherapy. To quantify neutron production, in-room measurements have traditionally been carried out using Bonner sphere systems (BSS) with activation foils and TLDs. In this work, a recently developed active detector, the nested neutron spectrometer (NNS), was tested in radiotherapy bunkers. Methods: The NNS is designed for easy handling and is more practical than the traditional BSS. Operated in current-mode, the problem of pulse pileup due to high dose-rates is overcome by measuring current, similar to an ionization chamber. In a bunker housing a Varian Clinac 21EX, the performance of the NNS was evaluated in terms of reproducibility, linearity, and dose-rate effects. Using a custom maximum-likelihood expectation–maximization algorithm, measured neutron spectra at various locations inside the bunker were then compared to Monte Carlo simulations of an identical setup. In terms of dose, neutron ambient dose equivalents were calculated from the measured spectra and compared to bubble detector neutron dose equivalent measurements. Results: The NNS-measured spectra for neutrons at various locations in a treatment room were found to be consistent with expectations for both relative shape and absolute magnitude. Neutron fluence-rate decreased with distance from the source and the shape of the spectrum changed from a dominant fast neutron peak near the Linac head to a dominant thermal neutron peak in the moderating conditions of the maze. Monte Carlo data and NNS-measured spectra agreed within 30% at all locations except in the maze where the deviation was a maximum of 40%. Neutron ambient dose equivalents calculated from the authors’ measured spectra were consistent (one standard deviation) with bubble detector measurements in the treatment room. Conclusions: The NNS may

  12. SU-E-T-365: Estimation of Neutron Ambient Dose Equivalents for Radioprotection Exposed Workers in Radiotherapy Facilities Based On Characterization Patient Risk Estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irazola, L; Terron, J; Sanchez-Doblado, F [Departamento de Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla (Spain); Domingo, C; Romero-Exposito, M [Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra (Spain); Garcia-Fuste, M [Health and Safety Department, ALBA Synchrotron Light Source, Cerdanyola del Valles (Spain); Sanchez-Nieto, B [Instituto de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Bedogni, R [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) (Italy)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Previous measurements with Bonner spheres{sup 1} showed that normalized neutron spectra are equal for the majority of the existing linacs{sup 2}. This information, in addition to thermal neutron fluences obtained in the characterization procedure{sup 3}3, would allow to estimate neutron doses accidentally received by exposed workers, without the need of an extra experimental measurement. Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) simulations demonstrated that the thermal neutron fluence distribution inside the bunker is quite uniform, as a consequence of multiple scatter in the walls{sup 4}. Although inverse square law is approximately valid for the fast component, a more precise calculation could be obtained with a generic fast fluence distribution map around the linac, from MC simulations{sup 4}. Thus, measurements of thermal neutron fluences performed during the characterization procedure{sup 3}, together with a generic unitary spectra{sup 2}, would allow to estimate the total neutron fluences and H*(10) at any point{sup 5}. As an example, we compared estimations with Bonner sphere measurements{sup 1}, for two points in five facilities: 3 Siemens (15–23 MV), Elekta (15 MV) and Varian (15 MV). Results: Thermal neutron fluences obtained from characterization, are within (0.2–1.6×10{sup 6}) cm−{sup 2}•Gy{sup −1} for the five studied facilities. This implies ambient equivalent doses ranging from (0.27–2.01) mSv/Gy 50 cm far from the isocenter and (0.03–0.26) mSv/Gy at detector location with an average deviation of ±12.1% respect to Bonner measurements. Conclusion: The good results obtained demonstrate that neutron fluence and H*(10) can be estimated based on: (a) characterization procedure established for patient risk estimation in each facility, (b) generic unitary neutron spectrum and (c) generic MC map distribution of the fast component. [1] Radiat. Meas (2010) 45: 1391 – 1397; [2] Phys. Med. Biol (2012) 5 7:6167–6191; [3] Med. Phys (2015) 42

  13. TREAT neutron-radiography facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, L.J.

    1981-01-01

    The TREAT reactor was built as a transient irradiation test reactor. By taking advantage of built-in system features, it was possible to add a neutron-radiography facility. This facility has been used over the years to radiograph a wide variety and large number of preirradiated fuel pins in many different configurations. Eight different specimen handling casks weighing up to 54.4 t (60 T) can be accommodated. Thermal, epithermal, and track-etch radiographs have been taken. Neutron-radiography service can be provided for specimens from other reactor facilities, and the capacity for storing preirradiated specimens also exists

  14. Survey of neutron radiography facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imel, G.R.; McClellan, G.G.

    1996-01-01

    A directory of neutron radiography facilities around the world was informally compiled about ten years ago under the auspices of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), Subcommittee E7.05 (Radiology, Neutron). The work lay dormant for a number of years, but was revived in earnest in the fall of 1995. At that time, letters were mailed to all the facilities with available addresses in the original directory, requesting updated information. Additionally, information was gathered at the Second Topical meeting on neutron Radiography Facility System Design and Beam Characterization (November, 1995, Shonan Village, Japan). A second mailing was sent for final confirmation and updates in January, 1996. About 75% of the information in the directory has now been confirmed by the facility management. This paper presents a summary of the information contained in the facility directory. An electronic version of the directory in Wordperfect 6.1, uuencode, or rtf format is available by sending e-mail to the authors at imel at sign anl.gov or imel at sign baobab.cad.cea.fr. A WWW site for the directory is presently under construction

  15. Neutron irradiation facility and its characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyama, Yukio; Noda, Kenji

    1995-01-01

    A neutron irradiation facility utilizing spallation reactions with high energy protons is conceived as one of the facilities in 'Proton Engineering center (PEC)' proposed at JAERI. Characteristics of neutron irradiation field of the facility for material irradiation studies are described in terms of material damage parameters, influence of the pulse irradiation, irradiation environments other than neutronics features, etc., comparing with the other sorts of neutron irradiation facilities. Some perspectives for materials irradiation studies using PEC are presented. (author)

  16. Neutron skyshine from nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Hayashi, Katsumi.

    1984-01-01

    The advance in neutron skyshine research and the significance are first described. Then, skyshine calculation methods in 1980s particularly and the skyshine experiment in Japan with various nuclear facilities (reactors, D-T neutron sources, accelerators) are reviewed. In comparison with such experiment usable as bench mark, the skyshine calculation methods (Monte Carlo method, transport calculation method) are evaluated for their accuracy and merits and demerits. The values by Monte Carlo calculation were in agreement within about 30 % with the experimental values. Those by DOT 3.5 calculation were twice as large as the experimental values. Those by PALLAS calculation were in good agreement in dose with the experimental values, but the spectra were considerably different. The values by SKYSHINE-2 were in good agreement with the experimental values, but since the ground effect was ignored, the values may deviate from the experimental ones if it is taken into account. (Mori, K.)

  17. Does fast-neutron radiotherapy merely reduce the radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Koichi

    1984-01-01

    We examined whether fast-neutron radiotherapy is superior to low-LET radiotherpy by comparing the relationship between cell survival and tumor control probabilities after exposure of tumor-bearing (species) to the two modalities. Analysis based on TCD 50 assay and lung colony assay indicated that single dose of fast neutron achieved animal cures at higher survival rates than other radiation modalities including single and fractionated γ-ray doses, fractionated doses of fast neutron, and the mixed-beam scheme with a sequence of N-γ-γ-γ-N. We conclude that fast-neutron radiotherapy cured animal tumors with lower cell killing rates other radiation modalities. (author)

  18. Experimental evaluation of neutron dose in radiotherapy patients: Which dose?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero-Expósito, M., E-mail: mariateresa.romero@uab.cat; Domingo, C.; Ortega-Gelabert, O.; Gallego, S. [Grup de Recerca en Radiacions Ionizants (GRRI), Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra 08193 (Spain); Sánchez-Doblado, F. [Departamento de Fisiología Médica y Biofísica, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla 41009 (Spain); Servicio de Radiofísica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla 41009 (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: The evaluation of peripheral dose has become a relevant issue recently, in particular, the contribution of secondary neutrons. However, after the revision of the Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, there has been a lack of experimental procedure for its evaluation. Specifically, the problem comes from the replacement of organ dose equivalent by the organ-equivalent dose, being the latter “immeasurable” by definition. Therefore, dose equivalent has to be still used although it needs the calculation of the radiation quality factor Q, which depends on the unrestricted linear energy transfer, for the specific neutron irradiation conditions. On the other hand, equivalent dose is computed through the radiation weighting factor w{sub R}, which can be easily calculated using the continuous function provided by the recommendations. The aim of the paper is to compare the dose equivalent evaluated following the definition, that is, using Q, with the values obtained by replacing the quality factor with w{sub R}. Methods: Dose equivalents were estimated in selected points inside a phantom. Two types of medical environments were chosen for the irradiations: a photon- and a proton-therapy facility. For the estimation of dose equivalent, a poly-allyl-diglicol-carbonate-based neutron dosimeter was used for neutron fluence measurements and, additionally, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to obtain the energy spectrum of the fluence in each point. Results: The main contribution to dose equivalent comes from neutrons with energy higher than 0.1 MeV, even when they represent the smallest contribution in fluence. For this range of energy, the radiation quality factor and the radiation weighting factor are approximately equal. Then, dose equivalents evaluated using both factors are compatible, with differences below 12%. Conclusions: Quality factor can be replaced by the radiation weighting factor in the evaluation of dose

  19. Neutron fluence measurement in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camacho L, M.E.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of present work is to determine the fluence of neutrons in nuclear facilities using two neutron detectors designed and built at Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ), Mexico. The two neutron detectors are of the passive type, based on solid state nuclear tracks detectors (SSNTD). One of the two neutron detectors was used to determine the fluence distribution of the ports at the nuclear research reactor TRIGA Mark III, which belongs to ININ. In these facilities is important to know the neutron fluence distribution characteristic to carried out diverse kind of research activities. The second neutron detector was employed in order to carry out environmental neutron surveillance. The detector has the property to separate the thermal, intermediate and fast components of the neutron fluence. This detector was used to measure the neutron fluence at hundred points around the primary container of the first Mexican Nuclear Power plant 'Laguna Verde'. This last detector was also used to determine the neutron fluence in some points of interest, around and inside a low scattering neutron room at the 'Centro de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes' of the ININ, to know the background neutron field produced by the neutron sources used there. The design of the two neutron detector and the results obtained for each of the surveying facilities, are described in this work. (Author)

  20. Irradiation facilities at the advanced neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, C.D.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a facility, centered around a new 330MW(f) heavy-water cooled and reflected research reactor, proposed for construction at Oak Ridge. The main scientific justification for the new source is the United States' need for increased capabilities in neutron scattering and other neutron beam research, but the technical objectives of the project also cater for the need to replace the irradiation facilities at the aging High Flux Isotope Reactor and to provide other research capabilities to the scientific community. This document provides a description of the ANS facilities

  1. A neutron beam facility at Spiral-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledoux, X.; Bauge, E.; Belier, G.; Ethvignot, T.; Taieb, J.; Varignon, C. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, DIF, 91 (France); Andriamonje, S.; Dore, D.; Dupont, E.; Gunsing, F.; Ridikas, D.; Takibayev, A. [CEA Saclay, DSM/IRFU/SPhN, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Blideanu, V. [CEA Saclay, DSM/IRFU/Senac, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Aiche, M.; Barreau, G.; Czajkowski, S.; Jurado, B. [Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, 33 (France); Ban, G.; Lecolley, F.R.; Lecolley, J.F.; Lecouey, J.L.; Marie, N.; Steckmeyer, J.C. [LPC, 14 - Caen (France); Dessagne, P.; Kerveno, M.; Rudolf, G. [IPHC, 57 - Strasbourg (France); Bem, P.; Mrazek, J.; Novak, J. [NPI, Rez (Czech Republic); Blomgren, J.; Pomp, S. [Uppsala Univ., Dept. of Physics and Astronomy (Sweden); Fischer, U.; Herber, S.; Simakov, S.P. [FZK, Karlsruhe (Germany); Jacquot, B.; Rejmund, F. [GANIL, 14 - Caen (France); Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.; Borcea, C.; Negoita, F.; Petrascu, M. [NIPNE, Bucharest (Romania); Oberstedt, S.; Plompen, A.J.M. [JRC/IRMM, Geel (Belgium); Shcherbakov, O. [PNPI, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Fallot, M. [Subatech, 44 - Nantes (France); Smith, A.G.; Tsekhanovich, I. [Manchester Univ., Dept. of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom); Serot, O.; Sublet, J.C. [CEA Cadarache, DEN, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Perrot, L.; Tassan-Got, L. [IPNO, 91 - Orsay (France); Caillaud, T.; Giot, L.; Landoas, O.; Ramillon, J.M.; Rosse, B.; Thfoin, I. [CIMAP, 14 - Caen (France); Balanzat, E.; Bouffard, S.; Guillous, S.; Oberstedt, A. [Orebro Univ. (Sweden)

    2009-07-01

    The future Spiral-2 facility, dedicated to the production of intense radioactive ion beams, is based on a high-power superconducting driver Linac, delivering high-intensity deuteron, proton and heavy ion beams. These beams are particularly well suited to the production of neutrons in the 100 keV- 40 MeV energy range, a facility called 'Neutrons for Science' (NFS) will be built in the LINAG Experimental Area (LEA). NFS, operational in 2012, will be composed of a pulsed neutron beam for in-flight measurements and irradiation stations for activation measurements and material studies. Thick C and Be converters and a deuteron beam will produce an intense continuous neutron spectrum, while a thin {sup 7}Li target and a proton beam allow to generate quasi-mono-energetic neutrons. In the present work we show how the primary ion beam characteristics (energy, time resolution and intensity) are adequate to create a neutron time-of-flight facility delivering intense neutron fluxes in the 100 keV-40 MeV energy range. Irradiation stations for neutron, proton and deuteron reactions will also allow to perform cross-section measurements by means of the activation technique. Light-ion beams will be used to study radiation damage effects on materials for the nuclear industry. (authors)

  2. The NSCL neutron wall facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zecher, P.; Galonsky, A.; Kruse, J.

    1995-01-01

    The authors have constructed and installed a large-area, high-efficiency neutron detector at the NSCL. The motivation behind the detector's design was provided by their desire to improve a previous experiment, where they measured the soft-dipole-resonance parameters and ground state n-n correlations in 11 Li, and to perform similar experiments on other neutron-rich halo nuclei. The detector consists of two planes of liquid scintillator, each 4 square meters in area; it is position sensitive and is capable of neutron-γ-ray discrimination. A general overview of the detector's design and measurements of its performance in test experiments will be presented

  3. Current status of Pohang Neutron Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, G.N.; Lee, Y.S.; Cho, M.H. [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, Pohang (KR)] [and others

    2000-03-01

    We present the current status of Pohang Neutron Facility, which is the pulsed neutron facility, based on the 70-MeV electron linear accelerator completed on Dec.1997. We have prepared the 15-m time-of-flight path, a Ta-target system, and the Data Acquisition System. Meanwhile we have measured the total cross-sections of Dy and Hf samples at the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University and the neutron capture cross-sections of {sup 164}Dy isotope at Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology both in Japan. We also were participated the experiment at the 122-m flight path of the IBR-30 pulsed neutron source of Joint Institute of Nuclear Research in Dubna, Russia. (author)

  4. An advanced fusion neutron source facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    Accelerator-based 14-MeV-neutron sources based on modifications of the original Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility are currently under consideration for investigating the effects of high-fluence high-energy neutron irradiation on fusion-reactor materials. One such concept for a D-Li neutron source is based on recent advances in accelerator technology associated with the Continuous Wave Deuterium Demonstrator accelerator under construction at Argonne National Laboratory, associated superconducting technology, and advances in liquid-metal technology. In this paper a summary of conceptual design aspects based on improvements in technologies is presented

  5. Fast neutron radiotherapy: for equal or for better

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broerse, J.J.; Battermann, J.J.

    1981-01-01

    The renewed application of fast neutrons in clinical radiotherapy has been stimulated by fundamental radiobiological findings. The biological effects of high LET radiation, including fast neutrons, are different from those obtained with x rays in at least three respects: the oxygen enhancement ratio, the sensitivity of cells at different phases of the cell cycle, and the contribution of sublethal damage to cell reproductive death. Furthermore, wide variations in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) have been observed for different tumors and normal tissues. Measurements of volume changes in human pulmonary metastases indicate that the RBE for slowly growing tumors which are generally well-differentiated is higher than that for poorly differentiated lesions. Six thousand patients have now been treated with fast neutron beams. The results of the clinical applications vary according to the method of application and to the type of cancer involved: treatment of inoperable malignancies of the salivary gland is very encouraging: the therapeutic gain is rather small for bladder and rectal cancers, soft tissue sarcomas and advanced carcinomas of the cervix; the responses of brain tumors are very disappointing. Most neutron radiotherapy applications have been less than optimal because of inadequate physical and technical conditions. Despite these difficulties, some interesting clinical data have become available. Due to the technical shortcomings, the possible advantages of fast neutrons are probably underestimated for many tumor sites. Well-designed clinical trials, preferably performed with high energy cyclotrons in clinical environments, will provide a decisive answer to the question of the usefulness of the new radiation modality

  6. High-capacity neutron activation analysis facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochel, R.C.

    1979-01-01

    A high-capacity neutron activation analysis facility, the Reactor Activation Facility, was designed and built and has been in operation for about a year at one of the Savannah River Plant's production reactors. The facility determines uranium and about 19 other trace elements in hydrogeochemical samples collected in the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. The facility has a demonstrated average analysis rate of over 10,000 samples per month, and a peak rate of over 16,000 samples per month. Uranium is determined by cyclic activation and delayed neutron counting of the U-235 fission products; other elements are determined from gamma-ray spectra recorded in subsequent irradiation, decay, and counting steps. The method relies on the absolute activation technique and is highly automated for round-the-clock unattended operation

  7. High-capacity neutron activation analysis facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochel, R.C.; Bowman, W.W.; Zeh, C.W.

    1980-01-01

    A high-capacity neutron activation analysis facility, the Reactor Activation Facility, was designed and built and has been in operation for about a year at one of the Savannah River Plant's production reactors. The facility determines uranium and about 19 other elements in hydrogeochemical samples collected in the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program, which is sponsored and funded by the United States Department of Energy, Grand Junction Office. The facility has a demonstrated average analysis rate of over 10,000 samples per month, and a peak rate of over 16,000 samples per month. Uranium is determined by cyclic activation and delayed neutron counting of the U-235 fission products; other elements are determined from gamma-ray spectra recorded in subsequent irradiation, decay, and counting steps. The method relies on the absolute activation technique and is highly automated for round-the-clock unattended operation

  8. A standard fission neutron irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahasrabudhe, S.G.; Chakraborty, P.P.; Iyer, M.R.; Kirthi, K.N.; Soman, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    A fission neutron irradiation facility (FISNIF) has been set up at the thermal column of the CIRUS reactor at BARC. The spectrum and the flux have been measured using threshold detectors. The paper describes the setting up of the facility, measurement and application. A concentric cylinder containing UO 2 powder sealed inside surrounds the irradiation point of a pneumatic sample transfer system located in the thermal column of the reactor. Samples are loaded in a standard aluminium capsule with cadmium lining and transported pneumatically. A sample transfer time of 1 s can be achieved in the facility. Typical applications of the facility for studying activation of iron and sodium in fission neutrons are also discussed. (Auth.)

  9. Neutronics issues for a laboratory microfusion facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobin, M.T.

    1987-01-01

    Discussion concerning goals or design of the Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF) should include an understanding of the neutronics issues involved. We consider such aspects as first wall shielding requirements, safety standards as they will apply to such an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) facility, and the interior chamber environment. The selection of materials for the first wall, neutron moderator and absorber, and gamma ray shielding is discussed. We conclude that water or carbon are the choices for bulk neutron moderation and boron placed just in front of the first wall the choice for neutron absorber. Selection of the in-chamber materials and diagnostic design will greatly affect the relative hazards after a shot. Lead is the high-Z material of choice and plastic expendables for the diagnostics. Although a poor gamma ray attenuator, carbon is the choice for this function since it also compensates for the direct neutron shine effects and does not itself activate. Electronics may need to be hardened to the prompt gamma and neutron dose

  10. Neutron radiographic techniques, facilities and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanus, J.C.

    1984-08-01

    This is a collection of three papers, written for presentation on two international conferences. The first paper: ''Neutron radiography. Techniques and facilities'', written by J.P. Barton of N-Ray Engineering Co. La Jolla, CA., USA and J.C. Domanus was presented at the International Symposium on the Use and Development of Low and Medium Flux Research Reactors at the Massachusets Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass., USA, 16-19 October 1983. The second paper: ''Neutron radiography with the DR-1 reactor at Risoe National Laboratory'', written by J.C. Domanus, was presented at the same Symposium. The third paper: ''Defects in nuclear fuel revealed by neutron radiography'', written by J.C. Domanus is accepted for presentation on 18 October 1984 to the 3rd European Conference on Nondestructive Testing, Florence, Italy, 15-18 October 1984. While the first paper describes the principles of neutron radiographic techniques and facilities, the second one describes an example of such facility and the third gives an example of application of neutron radiography in the field of nuclear fuel. (author)

  11. Nuclear astrophysics experiments with Pohang neutron facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeong Duk; Yoo, Gwang Ho

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear astrophysics experiments for fundamental understanding of Big Bang nucleosynthesis was performed at Pohang Neutron Facility. Laboratory experiments, inhomogeneous Big Bang nucleosynthesis and S-process were used for nucleosynthesis. For future study, more study on S-process for the desired data and nuclear network calculation are necessary

  12. The neutron therapy facility at the University of Pennsylvania-Fox Chase Cancer Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloch, P.; Chu, J.; Larsen, R.

    1983-01-01

    The fusion of deuterium and tritium nuclei results in the formation of a helium-4 nucleus and a 14 MEV neutron. This reaction readily takes place when deuterium and tritium ions are accelerated to potentials between 150-200 kV. These energy ions can be obtained in a moderate size accelerator. A DT neutron facility has been installed in the radiation therapy department of the University of Pennsylvania Hospital-Fox Chase Cancer Center. The system is being commissioned in a hospital setting to test the efficacy of fast neutron radiotherapy

  13. Neutronics analysis of the Laboratory Microfusion Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobin, M.T.; Singh, M.S.; Meier, W.R.

    1988-01-01

    The radiological safety hazards of the experimental area (EA) for the proposed Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF) have been examined. The EA includes those structures required to establish the proper pre-shot environment, point the beams, contain the pellet yield, and measure many different facets of the experiments. The radiation dose rates from neutron activation of representative target chamber materials, the laser beam tubes and the argon gas they contain, the air surrounding the chamber, and the concrete walls of the experimental area are given. Combining these results with the allowable dose rates for workers, we show how radiological considerations affect access to the inside of the target chamber and to the diagnostic platform area located outside the chamber. Waste disposal and tritium containment issues are summarized. Other neutronics issues, such as radiation damage to the final optics and neutron heating of materials placed close to the target, are also addressed. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  14. An automated test facility for neutronic amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beattie, W.J.

    1997-01-01

    Neutronic amplifiers are used at the Chalk River Laboratory in applications such as neutron flux monitoring and reactor control systems. Routine preventive maintenance of control and safety systems included annual calibration and characterization of the neutronic amplifiers. An investigation into the traditional methods of annual routine maintenance of amplifiers concluded that frequency and phase response measurements in particular were labour intensive and subject to non-repeatable errors. A decision was made to upgrade testing methods and facilities by using programmable test equipment under the control of a computer. In order to verify the results of the routine measurements, expressions for the transfer functions were derived from the circuit diagrams. Frequency and phase responses were then calculated and plotted thus providing a bench-mark to which the test results can be compared. (author)

  15. Neutron radiotherapy for adenoid cystic carcinoma of minor salivary glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, James G.; Laramore, George E.; Austin-Seymour, Mary; Wui-Jin, Koh; Lindsley, Karen L.; Cho, Paul; Griffin, Thomas W.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the efficacy of fast neutron radiotherapy for the treatment of patients with locally advanced, adenoid cystic carcinoma of minor salivary glands and to identify prognostic variables associated with local control, overall survival, and cause specific survival. Methods and Materials: Eighty-four patients having adenoid cystic carcinoma of minor salivary glands were treated with fast neutron radiotherapy during the years 1985-1994. All patients had either unresectable disease or gross disease remaining after attempted surgical extirpation. Seventeen patients had previously received conventional radiotherapy and their subsequent treatment fields and doses for neutron radiotherapy were modified for critical sites (brainstem, spinal cord, brain). Although the median doses (tumor maximum and tumor minimum) only varied by ≤10%, treatment portals were substantially smaller in these patients because of normal tissue complication considerations. Twelve patients (13%) had distant metastases at the time of treatment and were only treated palliatively with smaller treatment portals and lower median tumor doses (≤80% of the doses delivered to curatively treated patients). Seventy-two patients were treated with curative intent, with nine of these having recurrent tumors after prior full-dose radiotherapy. The median duration of follow-up at the time of analysis was 31.5 months (range 3-115). Sites of disease and number of patients treated per disease site were as follows: paranasal sinus--31; oral cavity--20; oropharynx--12; nasopharynx--11; trachea--6; and other sites in the head and neck--4. Results: The 5-year actuarial local-regional tumor control rate for all patients treated with curative intent was 47%. Patients without involvement of the cavernous sinus, base of skull, or nasopharynx (51 patients) had a 5-year actuarial local-regional control rate of 59%, whereas local-regional control was significantly lower (15%) for patients with tumors involving

  16. Review of WHO/PAHO/IAEA recommendations concerning radiotherapy facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, G P [Worl Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland). Radiation Medicine

    1996-08-01

    Since the mid 1960s the World Health Organization, the Pan American Health Organization, and the International Atomic Energy Agency have provided recommendations concerning radiotherapy services, including organization, staff requirements and facilities. These are contained in various reports of WHO, PAHO and IAEA, which are reviewed and summarized. (author). 9 refs.

  17. Review of WHO/PAHO/IAEA recommendations concerning radiotherapy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.P.

    1996-01-01

    Since the mid 1960s the World Health Organization, the Pan American Health Organization, and the International Atomic Energy Agency have provided recommendations concerning radiotherapy services, including organization, staff requirements and facilities. These are contained in various reports of WHO, PAHO and IAEA, which are reviewed and summarized. (author). 9 refs

  18. Comparison between steel and lead shieldings for radiotherapy rooms regarding neutron doses to patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, M.G.; Rebello, W.F.; Andrade, E.R.; Medeiros, M.P.C.; Mendes, R.M.S.; Braga, K.L.; Gomes, R.G., E-mail: eng.cavaliere@gmail.com, E-mail: ggrprojetos@gmail.com [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Secao de Engenharia Nuclear; Silva, A.X., E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The NCRP Report No. 151, Structural Shielding Design and Evaluation for Megavoltage X- and Gamma-Ray Radiotherapy Facilities, considers, in shielding calculations for radiotherapy rooms, the use of lead and/or steel to be applied on bunker walls. The NCRP Report calculations were performed foreseeing a better protection of people outside the radiotherapy room. However, contribution of lead and steel to patient dose should be taken into account for radioprotection purposes. This work presents calculations performed by MCNPX code in analyzing the Ambient Dose Equivalent due to neutron, H *(10){sub n}, within a radiotherapy room, in the patients area, considering the use of additional shielding of 1 TVL of lead or 1 TVL of steel, positioned at the inner faces of walls and ceiling of a bunker. The head of the linear accelerator Varian 2100/2300 C/D was modeled working at 18MeV, with 5 x 5 cm{sup 2}, 10 x 10 cm{sup 2}, 20 x 20 cm{sup 2}, 30 x 30 cm{sup 2} and 40 x 40 cm{sup 2} openings for jaws and MLC and operating in eight gantry's angles. This study shows that the use of lead generates an average value of H *(10){sub n} at patients area, 8.02% higher than the expected when using steel. Further studies should be performed based on experimental data for comparison with those from MCNPX simulation. (author)

  19. Comparison between steel and lead shieldings for radiotherapy rooms regarding neutron doses to patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, M.G.; Rebello, W.F.; Andrade, E.R.; Medeiros, M.P.C.; Mendes, R.M.S.; Braga, K.L.; Gomes, R.G.

    2015-01-01

    The NCRP Report No. 151, Structural Shielding Design and Evaluation for Megavoltage X- and Gamma-Ray Radiotherapy Facilities, considers, in shielding calculations for radiotherapy rooms, the use of lead and/or steel to be applied on bunker walls. The NCRP Report calculations were performed foreseeing a better protection of people outside the radiotherapy room. However, contribution of lead and steel to patient dose should be taken into account for radioprotection purposes. This work presents calculations performed by MCNPX code in analyzing the Ambient Dose Equivalent due to neutron, H *(10) n , within a radiotherapy room, in the patients area, considering the use of additional shielding of 1 TVL of lead or 1 TVL of steel, positioned at the inner faces of walls and ceiling of a bunker. The head of the linear accelerator Varian 2100/2300 C/D was modeled working at 18MeV, with 5 x 5 cm 2 , 10 x 10 cm 2 , 20 x 20 cm 2 , 30 x 30 cm 2 and 40 x 40 cm 2 openings for jaws and MLC and operating in eight gantry's angles. This study shows that the use of lead generates an average value of H *(10) n at patients area, 8.02% higher than the expected when using steel. Further studies should be performed based on experimental data for comparison with those from MCNPX simulation. (author)

  20. The National Ignition Facility Neutron Imaging System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilke, Mark D.; Batha, Steven H.; Bradley, Paul A.; Day, Robert D.; Clark, David D.; Fatherley, Valerie E.; Finch, Joshua P.; Gallegos, Robert A.; Garcia, Felix P.; Grim, Gary P.; Jaramillo, Steven A.; Montoya, Andrew J.; Morgan, George L.; Oertel, John A.; Ortiz, Thomas A.; Payton, Jeremy R.; Pazuchanics, Peter; Schmidt, Derek W.; Valdez, Adelaida C.; Wilde, Carl H.

    2008-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is scheduled to begin deuterium-tritium (DT) shots possibly in the next several years. One of the important diagnostics in understanding capsule behavior and to guide changes in Hohlraum illumination, capsule design, and geometry will be neutron imaging of both the primary 14 MeV neutrons and the lower-energy downscattered neutrons in the 6-13 MeV range. The neutron imaging system (NIS) described here, which we are currently building for use on NIF, uses a precisely aligned set of apertures near the target to form the neutron images on a segmented scintillator. The images are recorded on a gated, intensified charge coupled device. Although the aperture set may be as close as 20 cm to the target, the imaging camera system will be located at a distance of 28 m from the target. At 28 m the camera system is outside the NIF building. Because of the distance and shielding, the imager will be able to obtain images with little background noise. The imager will be capable of imaging downscattered neutrons from failed capsules with yields Y n >10 14 neutrons. The shielding will also permit the NIS to function at neutron yields >10 18 , which is in contrast to most other diagnostics that may not work at high neutron yields. The following describes the current NIF NIS design and compares the predicted performance with the NIF specifications that must be satisfied to generate images that can be interpreted to understand results of a particular shot. The current design, including the aperture, scintillator, camera system, and reconstruction methods, is briefly described. System modeling of the existing Omega NIS and comparison with the Omega data that guided the NIF design based on our Omega results is described. We will show NIS model calculations of the expected NIF images based on component evaluations at Omega. We will also compare the calculated NIF input images with those unfolded from the NIS images generated from our NIS numerical

  1. General considerations for neutron capture therapy at a reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binney, S.E.

    2001-01-01

    In addition to neutron beam intensity and quality, there are also a number of other significant criteria related to a nuclear reactor that contribute to a successful neutron capture therapy (NCT) facility. These criteria are classified into four main categories: Nuclear design factors, facility management and operations factors, facility resources, and non-technical factors. Important factors to consider are given for each of these categories. In addition to an adequate neutron beam intensity and quality, key requirements for a successful neutron capture therapy facility include necessary finances to construct or convert a facility for NCT, a capable medical staff to perform the NCT, and the administrative support for the facility. The absence of any one of these four factors seriously jeopardizes the overall probability of success of the facility. Thus nuclear reactor facility management considering becoming involved in neutron capture therapy, should it be proven clinically successful, should take all these factors into consideration. (author)

  2. Personnel neutron dosimetry at Department of Energy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Endres, G.W.R.; Selby, J.M.; Vallario, E.J.

    1980-08-01

    This study assesses the state of personnel neutron dosimetry at DOE facilities. A survey of the personnel dosimetry systems in use at major DOE facilities was conducted, a literature search was made to determine recent advances in neutron dosimetry, and several dosimetry experts were interviewed. It was concluded that personnel neutron dosimeters do not meet current needs and that serious problems exist now and will increase in the future if neutron quality factors are increased and/or dose limits are lowered

  3. Introduction of neutron research facilities in Indonesia Nuclear Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, Masayuki; Muslih, M. Refai; Minakawa, Nobuaki

    2004-01-01

    In this report, some facilities for neutron diffraction installed in Indonesia nuclear Agency (BATAN) are introduced. Rough sketch of BATAN, and facility arrangement in the reactor hall and the guide hall are schematically shown. The four facilities (powder diffractometer, four-circle goniometer, three-axis goniometer and neutron radiography system) are installed in the reactor hall and the three (small angle neutron scattering (SANS), high resolution SANS and high resolution powder diffractometer) in the guide hall. Neutron wavelengths determined from four hk1 planes of standard Si powder by the BATAN's neutron diffraction facility are compared with those measured by the similar facility in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The neutron diffraction profile of W-fiber reinforced Cu composite is measured by the BATAN's facility. The experimental results show the strong 110 preferred orientation to the fiber direction. (author)

  4. Reactor cold neutron source facility, the first in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsuro, Masahiko; Maeda, Yutaka; Kawai, Takeshi; Tashiro, Tameyoshi; Sakakibara, Shoji; Katada, Minoru.

    1986-01-01

    In the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, the first cold neutron source facility for the reactor in Japan was installed, and various tests are carried out outside the reactor. Nippon Sanso K.K. had manufactured it. After the prescribed tests outside the reactor, this facility will be installed soon in the reactor, and its outline is described on this occasion. Cold neutrons are those having very small energy by being cooled to about-250 deg C. Since the wavelength of the material waves of cold neutrons is long, and their energy is small, they are very advantageous as an experimental means for clarifying the structure of living body molecules and polymers, the atom configuration in alloys, and atomic and molecular movements by neutron scattering and neutron diffraction. The basic principle of the cold neutron source facility is to irradiate thermal neutrons on a cold moderator kept around 20 K, and to moderate and cool the neutrons by nuclear scattering to convert to cold neutrons. The preparatory research on cold neutrons and hydrogen liquefaction, the basic design to put the cold neutron source facility in the graphite moderator facility, the safety countermeasures, the manufacture and quality control, the operation outside the reactor and the performance are reported. The cold neutron source facility comprises a cold moderator tank and other main parts, a deuterium gas tank, a helium refrigerator and instrumentation. (Kako, I.)

  5. Ultracold and very cold neutron facility in KUR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabata, Yuji; Utsuro, Masahiko

    1992-01-01

    The present status of the ultracold and very cold neutron facility installed in the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR) is described in this presentation. It consists of a VCN (very cold neutrons) guide tube, a VCN bender and a supermirror neutron turbine. The guide tube extracts VCN from a liquid deuterium cold neutron source in a graphite thermal column and the neutron turbine converts VCN to UCN (ultracold neutrons). As for the utilization of the present facility, VCN radiography and an UCN gravity spectrometer are shown for the practical examples of the research with VCN and UCN. (author)

  6. Overview of the Neutron experimental facilities at LANSCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mocko, Michal [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-30

    This presentation gives an overview of the neutron experimental facilities at LANSCE. The layout is mentioned in detail, with a map of the south-side experimental facilities, information on Target-4 and the Lujan Center. Then it goes into detail about neutron sources, specifically continuous versus pulsed. Target 4 is then discussed. In conclusion, we have introduced the south-side experimental facilities in operation at LANSCE. 1L target and Target 4 provide complementary neutron energy spectra. Two spallation neutron sources taken together cover more than 11 orders of magnitude in neutron energy.

  7. Measurement of photoneutron spectrum at Pohang Neutron Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, G.N.; Kovalchuk, V.; Lee, Y.S.; Skoy, V.; Cho, M.H.; Ko, I.S.; Namkung, W. [POSTECH, Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang, Kyungbuk (Korea)

    2001-03-01

    Pohang Neutron Facility, which is the pulsed neutron facility based on the 100-MeV electron linear accelerator, was constructed for nuclear data production in Korea. The Pohang Neutron Facility consists of an electron linear accelerator, a water-cooled Ta target with a water moderator and a time-of-flight path with an 11 m length. The neutron energy spectra are measured for different water levels inside the moderator and compared with the MCNP calculation. The optimum size of the water moderator is determined on the base of this result. The time dependent spectra of neutrons in the water moderator are investigated with the MCNP calculation. (author)

  8. A new polarized neutron interferometry facility at the NCNR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahi, C.B. [Physics and Engineering Physics Department, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70188 (United States); Arif, M. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Cory, D.G. [Department of Chemistry, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1Z8 (Canada); Mineeva, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1Z8 (Canada); Nsofini, J.; Sarenac, D. [Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Williams, C.J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Huber, M.G., E-mail: michael.huber@nist.gov [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Pushin, D.A., E-mail: dmitry.pushin@uwaterloo.ca [Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2016-03-21

    A new monochromatic beamline and facility has been installed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) devoted to neutron interferometry in the research areas of spin control, spin manipulation, quantum mechanics, quantum information science, spintronics, and material science. This facility is possible in part because of advances in decoherence free subspace interferometer designs that have demonstrated consistent contrast in the presence of vibrational noise; a major environmental constraint that has prevented neutron interferometry from being applied at other neutron facilities. Neutron interferometry measures the phase difference between a neutron wave function propagating along two spatially separated paths. It is a practical example of self interference and due to its modest path separation of a few centimeters allows the insertion of samples and macroscopic neutron spin rotators. Phase shifts can be caused by gravitational, magnetic and nuclear interactions as well as purely quantum mechanical effects making interferometer a robust tool in neutron research. This new facility is located in the guide hall of the NCNR upstream of the existing Neutron Interferometry and Optics Facility (NIOF) and has several advantages over the NIOF including higher incident flux, better neutron polarization, and increased accessibility. The long term goal for the new facility is to be a user supported beamline and makes neutron interferometer more generally available to the scientific community. This paper addresses both the capabilities and characteristics of the new facility.

  9. Neutron spectrometry and determination of neutron ambient dose equivalents in different LINAC radiotherapy rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domingo, C.; Garcia-Fuste, M.J.; Morales, E.; Amgarou, K.; Terron, J.A.; Rosello, J.; Brualla, L.; Nunez, L.; Colmenares, R.; Gomez, F.; Hartmann, G.H.; Sanchez-Doblado, F.; Fernandez, F.

    2010-01-01

    A project has been set up to study the effect on a radiotherapy patient of the neutrons produced around the LINAC accelerator head by photonuclear reactions induced by photons above ∼8 MeV. These neutrons may reach directly the patient, or they may interact with the surrounding materials until they become thermalised, scattering all over the treatment room and affecting the patient as well, contributing to peripheral dose. Spectrometry was performed with a calibrated and validated set of Bonner spheres at a point located at 50 cm from the isocenter, as well as at the place where a digital device for measuring neutrons, based on the upset of SRAM memories induced by thermal neutrons, is located inside the treatment room. Exposures have taken place in six LINAC accelerators with different energies (from 15 to 23 MV) with the aim of relating the spectrometer measurements with the readings of the digital device under various exposure and room geometry conditions. The final purpose of the project is to be able to relate, under any given treatment condition and room geometry, the readings of this digital device to patient neutron effective dose and peripheral dose in organs of interest. This would allow inferring the probability of developing second malignancies as a consequence of the treatment. Results indicate that unit neutron fluence spectra at 50 cm from the isocenter do not depend on accelerator characteristics, while spectra at the place of the digital device are strongly influenced by the treatment room geometry.

  10. Radiotherapy facilities: Master planning and concept design considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-08-15

    This publication provides guidelines on how to plan a radiotherapy facility in terms of the strategic master planning process including the legal, technical and infrastructure requirements. It outlines a risk assessment methodology, a typical project work plan and describes the professional expertise required for the implementation of such a project. Generic templates for a block design are suggested, which include possibilities for future expansion. These templates can be overlaid onto the designated site such that the most efficient workflow between the main functional areas can be ensured. A sample checklist is attached to act as a guideline for project management and to indicate the critical stages in the process where technical expert assistance may be needed. The publication is aimed at professionals and administrators involved in infrastructure development, planning and facility management, as well as engineers, building contractors and radiotherapy professionals.

  11. Radiotherapy Facilities: Master Planning and Concept Design Considerations (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This publication provides guidelines on how to plan a radiotherapy facility in terms of the strategic master planning process including the legal, technical and infrastructure requirements. It outlines a risk assessment methodology and a typical project work plan, and describes the professional expertise required for the implementation of such a project. Generic templates for a block design are suggested, which include possibilities for future expansion. These templates can be overlaid onto the designated site such that the most efficient workflow between the main functional areas can be ensured. A sample checklist is attached to act as a guideline for project management and to indicate the critical stages in the process where technical expert assistance may be needed. The publication is aimed at professionals and administrators involved in infrastructure development, planning and facility management, as well as engineers, building contractors and radiotherapy professionals

  12. Radiotherapy facilities: Master planning and concept design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This publication provides guidelines on how to plan a radiotherapy facility in terms of the strategic master planning process including the legal, technical and infrastructure requirements. It outlines a risk assessment methodology, a typical project work plan and describes the professional expertise required for the implementation of such a project. Generic templates for a block design are suggested, which include possibilities for future expansion. These templates can be overlaid onto the designated site such that the most efficient workflow between the main functional areas can be ensured. A sample checklist is attached to act as a guideline for project management and to indicate the critical stages in the process where technical expert assistance may be needed. The publication is aimed at professionals and administrators involved in infrastructure development, planning and facility management, as well as engineers, building contractors and radiotherapy professionals

  13. Shieldings for X-ray radiotherapy facilities calculated by computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrosa, Paulo S.; Farias, Marcos S.; Gavazza, Sergio

    2005-01-01

    This work presents a methodology for calculation of X-ray shielding in facilities of radiotherapy with help of computer. Even today, in Brazil, the calculation of shielding for X-ray radiotherapy is done based on NCRP-49 recommendation establishing a methodology for calculating required to the elaboration of a project of shielding. With regard to high energies, where is necessary the construction of a labyrinth, the NCRP-49 is not very clear, so that in this field, studies were made resulting in an article that proposes a solution to the problem. It was developed a friendly program in Delphi programming language that, through the manual data entry of a basic design of architecture and some parameters, interprets the geometry and calculates the shields of the walls, ceiling and floor of on X-ray radiation therapy facility. As the final product, this program provides a graphical screen on the computer with all the input data and the calculation of shieldings and the calculation memory. The program can be applied in practical implementation of shielding projects for radiotherapy facilities and can be used in a didactic way compared to NCRP-49.

  14. Intense neutron irradiation facility for fusion reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Kenji; Oyama, Yukio; Kato, Yoshio; Sugimoto, Masayoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Technical R and D of d-Li stripping type neutron irradiation facilities for development of fusion reactor materials was carried out in Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT) project and Energy Selective Neutron Irradiation Test Facility (ESNIT) program. Conceptual design activity (CDA) of International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), of which concept is an advanced version of FMIT and ESNIT concepts, are being performed. Progress of users` requirements and characteristics of irradiation fields in such neutron irradiation facilities, and outline of baseline conceptual design of IFMIF were described. (author)

  15. Neutron generator instrumentation at the Department 2350 Neutron Generator Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, T.C.; Mowrer, G.R.

    1979-06-01

    The computer and waveform digitizing capability at the test facility has allowed several changes in the techniques used to test neutron generators. These changes include methods used to calibrate the instrumentation and changes in the operation of the test facility. These changes have increased the efficiency of the test facility as well as increasing both timing and amplitude accuracy of neutron generator waveforms

  16. Neutron Absorbing Ability Variation in Neutron Absorbing Material Caused by the Neutron Irradiation in Spent Fuel Storage Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Hee Dong; Han, Seul Gi; Lee, Sang Dong; Kim, Ki Hong; Ryu, Eag Hyang; Park, Hwa Gyu [Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    In spent fuel storage facility like high density spent fuel storage racks and dry storage casks, spent fuels are stored with neutron absorbing materials installed as a part of those facilities, and they are used for absorbing neutrons emitted from spent fuels. Usually structural material with neutron absorbing material of racks and casks are located around spent fuels, so it is irradiated by neutrons for long time. Neutron absorbing ability could be changed by the variation of nuclide composition in neutron absorbing material caused by the irradiation of neutrons. So, neutron absorbing materials are continuously faced with spent fuels with boric acid solution or inert gas environment. Major nuclides in neutron absorbing material are Al{sup 27}, C{sup 12}, B{sup 11}, B{sup 10} and they are changed to numerous other ones as radioactive decay or neutron absorption reaction. The B{sup 10} content in neutron absorbing material dominates the neutron absorbing ability, so, the variation of nuclide composition including the decrease of B{sup 10} content is the critical factor on neutron absorbing ability. In this study, neutron flux in spent fuel, the activation of neutron absorbing material and the variation of nuclide composition are calculated. And, the minimum neutron flux causing the decrease of B{sup 10} content is calculated in spent fuel storage facility. Finally, the variation of neutron multiplication factor is identified according to the one of B{sup 10} content in neutron absorbing material. The minimum neutron flux to impact the neutron absorbing ability is 10{sup 10} order, however, usual neutron flux from spent fuel is 10{sup 8} order. Therefore, even though neutron absorbing material is irradiated for over 40 years, B{sup 10} content is little decreased, so, initial neutron absorbing ability could be kept continuously.

  17. NECTAR-A fission neutron radiography and tomography facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buecherl, T.; Lierse von Gostomski, Ch.; Breitkreutz, H.; Jungwirth, M.; Wagner, F.M.

    2011-01-01

    NECTAR (Neutron Computerized Tomography and Radiography) is a versatile facility for radiographic and tomographic investigations as well as for neutron activation experiments using fission neutrons. The radiation sources for this facility are two plates of highly enriched uranium situated in the moderator vessel in FRM II. Thermal neutrons originating from the main fuel element of the reactor generate in these plates fast neutrons. These can escape through a horizontal beam tube without moderation. The beam can be filtered and manipulated in order to reduce the accompanying gamma radiation and to match the specific experimental tasks. A summary of the main parameters required for experimental set-up and (quantitative) data evaluation is presented. The (measured) spectra of the neutron and gamma radiations are shown along with the effect of different filters on their behavior. The neutron and gamma fluxes, dose rates, L/D-ratios, etc. and the main parameters of the actually used detection systems for neutron imaging are given, too.

  18. NECTAR-A fission neutron radiography and tomography facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buecherl, T., E-mail: thomas.buecherl@radiochemie.de [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie (RCM), Walther-Meissner-Str. 3, 85748 Garching (Germany); Lierse von Gostomski, Ch. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie (RCM), Walther-Meissner-Str. 3, 85748 Garching (Germany); Breitkreutz, H.; Jungwirth, M.; Wagner, F.M. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II) (Germany)

    2011-09-21

    NECTAR (Neutron Computerized Tomography and Radiography) is a versatile facility for radiographic and tomographic investigations as well as for neutron activation experiments using fission neutrons. The radiation sources for this facility are two plates of highly enriched uranium situated in the moderator vessel in FRM II. Thermal neutrons originating from the main fuel element of the reactor generate in these plates fast neutrons. These can escape through a horizontal beam tube without moderation. The beam can be filtered and manipulated in order to reduce the accompanying gamma radiation and to match the specific experimental tasks. A summary of the main parameters required for experimental set-up and (quantitative) data evaluation is presented. The (measured) spectra of the neutron and gamma radiations are shown along with the effect of different filters on their behavior. The neutron and gamma fluxes, dose rates, L/D-ratios, etc. and the main parameters of the actually used detection systems for neutron imaging are given, too.

  19. NECTAR—A fission neutron radiography and tomography facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bücherl, T.; Lierse von Gostomski, Ch.; Breitkreutz, H.; Jungwirth, M.; Wagner, F. M.

    2011-09-01

    NECTAR (Neutron Computerized Tomography and Radiography) is a versatile facility for radiographic and tomographic investigations as well as for neutron activation experiments using fission neutrons. The radiation sources for this facility are two plates of highly enriched uranium situated in the moderator vessel in FRM II. Thermal neutrons originating from the main fuel element of the reactor generate in these plates fast neutrons. These can escape through a horizontal beam tube without moderation. The beam can be filtered and manipulated in order to reduce the accompanying gamma radiation and to match the specific experimental tasks. A summary of the main parameters required for experimental set-up and (quantitative) data evaluation is presented. The (measured) spectra of the neutron and gamma radiations are shown along with the effect of different filters on their behavior. The neutron and gamma fluxes, dose rates, L/ D-ratios, etc. and the main parameters of the actually used detection systems for neutron imaging are given, too.

  20. Basic Design of the Cold Neutron Research Facility in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hark Rho; Lee, K. H.; Kim, Y. K.

    2005-09-01

    The HANARO Cold Neutron Research Facility (CNRF) Project has been embarked in July 2003. The CNRF project has selected as one of the radiation technology development project by National Science and Technology Committee in June 2002. In this report, the output of the second project year is summarized as a basic design of cold neutron source and related systems, neutron guide, and neutron scattering instruments

  1. Basic Design of the Cold Neutron Research Facility in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hark Rho; Lee, K. H.; Kim, Y. K. (and others)

    2005-09-15

    The HANARO Cold Neutron Research Facility (CNRF) Project has been embarked in July 2003. The CNRF project has selected as one of the radiation technology development project by National Science and Technology Committee in June 2002. In this report, the output of the second project year is summarized as a basic design of cold neutron source and related systems, neutron guide, and neutron scattering instruments.

  2. User Facilities: The Education of New Neutron Users

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, Yamali; Brown, Craig M.

    2009-01-01

    Neutron scattering is a particularly useful tool enabling the study of compositional, structural and dynamical properties of materials down to the atomic scale. Due to the complexity of operating an intense source of neutrons, this technique is primarily practiced at large national facilities that cater to the research needs of chemists, biologists, physicists, engineers, and material scientists in general. In particular, these user facilities provide specialized instrumentation along with the scientific and technical support required to efficiently utilize it. Since neutron scattering experiments are performed at central facilities rather than in the home-laboratories of individual investigators, the facilities themselves must play a key role in the education and development of new users. The role of neutron scattering facilities in educating young scientists will be examined using examples from current programs at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research.

  3. Improving the neutron-to-photon discrimination capability of detectors used for neutron dosimetry in high energy photon beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irazola, L.; Terrón, J.A.; Bedogni, R; Pola, A.; Lorenzoli, M.; Sánchez-Nieto, B.; Gómez, F.; Sánchez-Doblado, F.

    2016-01-01

    The increasing interest of the medical community to radioinduced second malignancies due to photoneutrons in patients undergoing high-energy radiotherapy, has stimulated in recent years the study of peripheral doses, including the development of some dedicated active detectors. Although these devices are designed to respond to neutrons only, their parasitic photon response is usually not identically zero and anisotropic. The impact of these facts on measurement accuracy can be important, especially in points close to the photon field-edge. A simple method to estimate the photon contribution to detector readings is to cover it with a thermal neutron absorber with reduced secondary photon emission, such as a borated rubber. This technique was applied to the TNRD (Thermal Neutron Rate Detector), recently validated for thermal neutron measurements in high-energy photon radiotherapy. The positive results, together with the accessibility of the method, encourage its application to other detectors and different clinical scenarios. - Highlights: • Neutron-to-photon discrimination of a thermal neutron detector used in radiotherapy. • Photon and anisotropic response study with distance and beam incidence of thermal neutron detector. • Borated rubber for estimating photon contribution in any thermal neutron detector.

  4. Neutron fluence measurement in nuclear facilities.; Medicion de flujos de neutrones en instalaciones nucleares.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho L, M E

    1997-12-01

    The objective of present work is to determine the fluence of neutrons in nuclear facilities using two neutron detectors designed and built at Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ), Mexico. The two neutron detectors are of the passive type, based on solid state nuclear tracks detectors (SSNTD). One of the two neutron detectors was used to determine the fluence distribution of the ports at the nuclear research reactor TRIGA Mark III, which belongs to ININ. In these facilities is important to know the neutron fluence distribution characteristic to carried out diverse kind of research activities. The second neutron detector was employed in order to carry out environmental neutron surveillance. The detector has the property to separate the thermal, intermediate and fast components of the neutron fluence. This detector was used to measure the neutron fluence at hundred points around the primary container of the first Mexican Nuclear Power plant `Laguna Verde`. This last detector was also used to determine the neutron fluence in some points of interest, around and inside a low scattering neutron room at the `Centro de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes` of the ININ, to know the background neutron field produced by the neutron sources used there. The design of the two neutron detector and the results obtained for each of the surveying facilities, are described in this work. (Author).

  5. Data analysis for neutron monitoring in an enrichment facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markin, J.T.; Stewart, J.E.; Goldman, A.S.

    1982-01-01

    Area monitoring of neutron radiation to detect high-enriched uranium production is a potential strategy for inspector verification of operations in the cascade area of a centrifuge enrichment facility. This paper discusses the application of statistical filtering and hypothesis testing procedures to experimental data taken in an enrichment facility. The results demonstrate that these data analysis methods can enhance detection of facility misoperation by neutron monitoring

  6. An experimental facility for studying delayed neutron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermendzhiev, E.; Nazarov, V.M.; Pavlov, S.S.; Ruskov, Iv.; Zamyatin, Yu.S.

    1993-01-01

    A new experimental facility for studying delayed neutron emission has been designed and tested. A method based on utilization of the Dubna IBR-2 pulsed reactor, has been proposed and realized for periodical irradiation of targets composed of fissionable isotopes. Such a powerful pulsed neutron source in combination with a slow neutron chopper synchronized with the reactor bursts makes possible variation of the exposure duration and effective suppression of the fast neutron background due to delay neutrons emitted from the reactor core. Detection of delayed neutrons from the target is carried out by a high-efficiency multicounter neutron detector with a near-4π geometry. Some test measurements and results are briefly described. Possible use of the facility for other tasks is also discussed. 14 refs.; 14 figs

  7. Monoenergetic neutron fields for the calibration of neutron dosemeters at the accelerator facility of the PTB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesiecki, H.; Cosack, M.; Schoelermann, H.

    1987-01-01

    The present state in the realization of monoenergetic standard neutron fields and the possibility of calibrating neutron dose- and doserate meters at the accelerator facility of the PTB are described. There are excellent conditions for the performance of irradiations in the neutron energy range of 1 keV to 14.8 MeV. (orig.) [de

  8. One-dimensional neutron imager for the Sandia Z facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fittinghoff, David N; Bower, Dan E; Hollaway, James R; Jacoby, Barry A; Weiss, Paul B; Buckles, Robert A; Sammons, Timothy J; McPherson, Leroy A; Ruiz, Carlos L; Chandler, Gordon A; Torres, José A; Leeper, Ramon J; Cooper, Gary W; Nelson, Alan J

    2008-10-01

    A multiinstitution collaboration is developing a neutron imaging system for the Sandia Z facility. The initial system design is for slit aperture imaging system capable of obtaining a one-dimensional image of a 2.45 MeV source producing 5x10(12) neutrons with a resolution of 320 microm along the axial dimension of the plasma, but the design being developed can be modified for two-dimensional imaging and imaging of DT neutrons with other resolutions. This system will allow us to understand the spatial production of neutrons in the plasmas produced at the Z facility.

  9. A pulsed neutron facility for condensed matter research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbis, L.C.W.; Rees, G.H.; Stirling, G.C.

    1977-06-01

    The scientific and technical basis of the project is presented, as follows: broad synopsis of the proposal for a spallation neutron facility; description of neutron scattering and current work in the UK; scientific applications of the Spallation Neutron Source; discussion of various types of neutron sources; outline description of the SNS and its neutron performance parameters; appendix dealing in more detail with utilization (solid state physics, fluids and amorphous solids, structure determination, molecular and biological sciences); appendix dealing in more detail with the project design (800 MeV synchrotron, target station, shielding, radioactivity and radiation damage, utilization, overall programme). (U.K.)

  10. The neutron imaging system fielded at the National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fittinghoff D.N.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We have fielded a neutron imaging system at the National Ignition Facility to collect images of fusion neutrons produced in the implosion of inertial confinement fusion experiments and scattered neutrons from (n, n′ reactions of the source neutrons in the surrounding dense material. A description of the neutron imaging system is presented, including the pinhole array aperture, the line-of-sight collimation, the scintillator-based detection system and the alignment systems and methods. Discussion of the alignment and resolution of the system is presented. We also discuss future improvements to the system hardware.

  11. The application of the neutron beam to radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, K.

    1980-01-01

    The article discusses neutron interactions, neutron sources and damage to cells caused by neutrons and lists the disadvantages of using neutrons in cancer therapy. The only advantage of neutrons over x-rays is that they can destroy hypoxic cells, an advantage which may offset the disadvantages

  12. Neutron beam facilities at the Replacement Research Reactor, ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.

    2003-01-01

    The exciting development for Australia is the construction of a modern state-of-the-art 20-MW Replacement Research Reactor which is currently under construction to replace the aging reactor (HIFAR) at ANSTO in 2006. To cater for advanced scientific applications, the replacement reactor will provide not only thermal neutron beams but also a modern cold-neutron source moderated by liquid deuterium at approximately -250 deg C, complete with provision for installation of a hot-neutron source at a later stage. The latest 'supermirror' guides will be used to transport the neutrons to the Reactor Hall and its adjoining Neutron Guide Hall where a suite of neutron beam instruments will be installed. These new facilities will expand and enhance ANSTO's capabilities and performance in neutron beam science compared with what is possible with the existing HIFAR facilities, and will make ANSTO/Australia competitive with the best neutron facilities in the world. Eight 'leading-edge' neutron beam instruments are planned for the Replacement Research Reactor when it goes critical in 2006, followed by more instruments by 2010 and beyond. Up to 18 neutron beam instruments can be accommodated at the Replacement Research Reactor, however, it has the capacity for further expansion, including potential for a second Neutron Guide Hall. The first batch of eight instruments has been carefully selected in conjunction with a user group representing various scientific interests in Australia. A team of scientists, engineers, drafting officers and technicians has been assembled to carry out the Neutron Beam Instrument Project to successful completion. Today, most of the planned instruments have conceptual designs and are now being engineered in detail prior to construction and procurement. A suite of ancillary equipment will also be provided to enable scientific experiments at different temperatures, pressures and magnetic fields. This paper describes the Neutron Beam Instrument Project and gives

  13. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Nuclear Science Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Ronald Owen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wender, Steve [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-06-19

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facilities for Nuclear Science consist of a high-energy "white" neutron source (Target 4) with 6 flight paths, three low-energy nuclear science flight paths at the Lujan Center, and a proton reaction area. The neutron beams produced at the Target 4 complement those produced at the Lujan Center because they are of much higher energy and have shorter pulse widths. The neutron sources are driven by the 800-MeV proton beam of the LANSCE linear accelerator. With these facilities, LANSCE is able to deliver neutrons with energies ranging from a milli-electron volt to several hundreds of MeV, as well as proton beams with a wide range of energy, time and intensity characteristics. The facilities, instruments and research programs are described briefly.

  14. A high pressure sample facility for neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlile, C.J.; Glossop, B.H.

    1981-06-01

    Commissioning tests involving deformation studies and tests to destruction as well as neutron diffraction measurements of a standard sample have been carried out on the SERC high pressure sample facility for neutron scattering studies. A detailed description of the pressurising equipment is given. (author)

  15. Characterization of the Ljubljana TRIGA thermal column neutron radiographic facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemec, T.; Rant, J.; Kristof, E.; Glumac, B.

    1995-01-01

    An extensive characterization of the neutron beam of the existing neutron radiographic facility in the thermal column of the Ljubljana Triga Mark II research reactor is in progress. Neutron beam characteristics are needed to determine the effect of various neutron and gamma radiation on the neutron radiographic image. Commercially available medical scintillator converter screens based on Gd dioxy sulphite as well as Gd metal neutron converters are used to record neutron radiographic image. Thermal, epithermal and fast neutron fluxes were measured using Au and In activation detectors and cadmium ratio is determined. Neutron beam flux profiles are measured by film densitometry and by Au activation detector wires. By exposing films shielded by boral or lead plates individual contributions of thermal, epithermal neutrons and gamma radiation are estimated by densitometric measurements. By recording images of neutron image quality indicators BPI (Beam Purity Indicator) and SI (Sensitivity Indicator) produced by Riso, standard neutron radiography image characteristic are established. In gamma dosimetric measurements thermoluminescent detectors (CaF 2 Mn) are used. (author)

  16. The neutron beam facility at the Australian replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, B.; Kennedy, S.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The Australian federal government gave ANSTO final approval to build a research reactor to replace HIFAR on August 25th 1999. The replacement reactor is to be a multipurpose reactor with a thermal neutron flux of 3 x 10 14 n.cm -2 .s -1 and having improved capabilities for neutron beam research and for the production of radioisotopes for pharmaceutical, scientific and industrial use. The replacement reactor will commence operation in 2005 and will cater for Australian scientific, industrial and medical needs well into the 21st century. The scientific capabilities of the neutron beams at the replacement reactor are being developed in consultation with representatives from academia, industry and government research laboratories to provide a facility for condensed matter research in physics, chemistry, materials science, life sciences, engineering and earth sciences. Cold, thermal and hot neutron sources are to be installed, and neutron guides will be used to position most of the neutron beam instruments in a neutron guide hall outside the reactor confinement building. Eight instruments are planned for 2005, with a further three to be developed by 2010. A conceptual layout for the neutron beam facility is presented including the location of the planned suite of neutron beam instruments. The reactor and all the associated infrastructure, with the exception of the neutron beam instruments, is to be built by an accredited reactor builder in a turnkey contract. Tenders have been called for December 1999, with selection of contractor planned by June 2000. The neutron beam instruments will be developed by ANSTO and other contracted organisations in consultation with the user community and interested overseas scientists. The facility will be based, as far as possible, around a neutron guide hall that is be served by three thermal and three cold neutron guides. Efficient transportation of thermal and cold neutrons to the guide hall requires the use of modern super

  17. Thermal neutron standard fields with the KUR heavy water facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanda, K.; Kobayashi, K.; Shibata, T.

    1978-01-01

    A heavy water facility attached to the KUR (Kyoto University Reactor, swimming pool type, 5 MW) yields pure thermal neutrons in the Maxwellian distribution. The facility is faced to the core of KUR and it contains about 2 tons of heavy water. The thickness of the layer is about 140 cm. The neutron spectrum was measured with the time of flight technique using a fast chopper. The measured spectrum was in good agreement with the Maxwellian distribution in all energy region for thermal neutrons. The neutron temperature was slightly higher than the heavy water temperature. The contamination of epithermal and fast neutrons caused by photo-neutrons of the γ-n reaction of heavy water was very small. The maximum intensity of thermal neutrons is 3x10 11 n/cm 2 sec. When the bismuth scatterer is attached, the gamma rays contamination is eliminated by the ratio of 0.05 of gamma rays to neutrons in rem. This standard neutron field has been used for such experiments as thermal neutron cross section measurement, detector calibration, activation analysis, biomedical purposes etc. (author)

  18. The single-angle neutron scattering facility at Pelindaba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmeyr, C.; Mayer, R.M.; Tillwick, D.L.; Starkey, J.R.

    1978-05-01

    The small-angle neutron scattering facility at the SAFARI-1 reactor is described in detail, and with reference to theoretical and practical design considerations. Inexpensive copper microwave guides used as a guide-pipe for slow neutrons provided the basis for a useful though comparatively simple facility. The neutron-spectrum characteristics of the final facility in different configurations of the guide-pipe (both S and single-curved) agree wel with expected values based on results obtained with a test facility. The design, construction, installation and alignment of various components of the facility are outlined, as well as intensity optimisation. A general description is given of experimental procedures and data-aquisition electronics for the four-position sample holder and counter array of up to 18 3 He detectors and a beam monitor [af

  19. Proton radiotherapy facility for ocular tumours at IFJ PAN in Krakow, Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalec, Barbara; Swakon, Jan; Sowa, Urszula; Olko, Pawe

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Uveal melanoma is the most common human intraocular tumor in adult patient. Overall annual incidence is 5-7 cases per million/year and it is higher amongst fair skinned pale eyed individuals. There is about 100 cases of new diagnosed uveal melanoma per year in Poland. Presently, the clinically recommended therapy of intraocular melanoma is radiotherapy with a proton beam of initial energy 55-80 MeV. The unique properties of the Bragg curve enable a precise delivery of a high dose of radiation to the tumor region and the simultaneous spare of critical organs and healthy tissues. In most patients treated with proton radiotherapy, 5-year patient survivals of 95% as well as vision in the treated eye were achieved. The Institute of Nuclear Physics (IFJ) in Cracow, in cooperation with the Clinic of Ophthalmology and Ocular Oncology of the Collegium Medicum, Jagiellonian University and the Krakow Branch of the Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Centre of Oncology, is carrying out a project of designing and operating a proton ocular radiotherapy facility in which the 55-60 MeV proton beam accelerated in the AIC-144 isochronous cyclotron of IFJ is applied. The proton beam from the cyclotron is delivered to the therapeutic room where it is formed and monitored. The facility has been equipped with beam forming and beam monitoring elements (a range shifter, a range modulator, set of collimators for beam forming and a Spread Out Bragg Peak measuring system, an X direction scanner, an XYZ scanner for beam monitoring) as well as with some detectors dedicated for beam dosimetry. A patient positioning system i.e. the eye therapeutic chair made by Schaer Engineering which enables the patient's positioning and immobilizing with precision of tenth of millimetre has been installed. The patient's eye positioning system is ready too. The X ray system, used for eye positioning and irradiation area localization has been installed. The dosimetric system, which monitors neutron and

  20. Research and development activities of a neutron generator facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darsono Sudjatmoko; Pramudita Anggraita; Sukarman Aminjoyo

    2000-01-01

    The neutron generator facility at YNRC is used for elemental analysis, nuclear data measurement and education. In nuclear data measurement the focus is on re-evaluating the existing scattered nuclear activation cross-section to obtain systematic data for nuclear reactions such as (n,p), (n,α), and (n,2n). In elemental analysis it is used for analyzing the Nitrogen (N), Phosphor (P) and Potassium (K) contents in chemical and natural fertilizers (compost), protein in rice, soybean, and corn and pollution level in rivers. The neutron generator is also used for education and training of BATAN staff and university students. The facility can also produce neutron generator components. (author)

  1. Health physics considerations at a neutron therapy facility cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleck, J.H.; Krueger, D.J.; Mc Laughlin, J.E.; Smathers, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    The U.C.L.A. Neutron Therapy Facility (NTF) is one of four such facilities in the United States currently involved in NCI sponsored trials of neutron therapy and reflects the present interest in the use of high energy neutron beams for treating certain types of human cancers. The NTF houses a CP-45 negative ion cyclotron which accelerates a 46 MeV proton beam for production of neutrons from a beryllium target. In addition to patient treatment, the NTF is involved in the production of positron emitting radioisotopes for diagnostic use in Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The activation of therapy treatment collimators, positron and neutron target systems, and a high and rapidly varying external radiation environment in a clinical setting have contributed to the need for a comprehensive radiation control program in which patient care is balanced with the maintenance of occupational exposures to ALARA levels

  2. Neutron beam facilities at the replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, S.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: On September 3rd 1997 the Australian Federal Government announced their decision to replace the HIFAR research reactor by 2005. The proposed reactor will be a multipurpose reactor with improved capabilities for neutron beam research and for the production of radioisotopes for pharmaceutical, scientific and industrial use. The neutron beam facilities are intended to cater for Australian scientific needs well into the 21st century. In the first stage of planning the neutron Beam Facilities at the replacement reactor, a Consultative Group was formed (BFCG) to determine the scientific capabilities of the new facility. Members of the group were drawn from academia, industry and government research laboratories. The BFCG submitted their report in April 1998, outlining the scientific priorities to be addressed. Cold and hot neutron sources are to be included, and cold and thermal neutron guides will be used to position most of the instruments in a neutron guide hall outside the reactor confinement building. In 2005 it is planned to have eight instruments installed with a further three to be developed by 2010, and seven spare instrument positions for development of new instruments over the life of the reactor. A beam facilities technical group (BFTG) was then formed to prepare the engineering specifications for the tendering process. The group consisted of some members of the BFCG, several scientists and engineers from ANSTO, and scientists from leading neutron scattering centres in Europe, USA and Japan. The BFTG looked in detail at the key components of the facility such as the thermal, cold and hot neutron sources, neutron collimators, neutron beam guides and overall requirements for the neutron guide hall. The report of the BFTG, completed in August 1998, was incorporated into the draft specifications for the reactor project, which were distributed to potential reactor vendors. An assessment of the first stage of reactor vendor submissions was completed in

  3. Personal neutron dosimetry at a research reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamenopoulou, V.; Carinou, E.; Stamatelatos, I.E.

    2001-01-01

    Individual neutron monitoring presents several difficulties due to the differences in energy response of the dosemeters. In the present study, an individual dosemeter (TLD) calibration approach is attempted for the personnel of a research reactor facility. The neutron energy response function of the dosemeter was derived using the MCNP code. The results were verified by measurements to three different neutron spectra and were found to be in good agreement. Three different calibration curves were defined for thermal, intermediate and fast neutrons. At the different working positions around the reactor, neutron spectra were defined using the Monte Carlo technique and ambient dose rate measurements were performed. An estimation of the neutrons energy is provided by the ratio of the different TLD pellets of each dosemeter in combination with the information concerning the worker's position; then the dose equivalent is deduced according to the appropriate calibration curve. (author)

  4. Intense neutron source facility for the fusion energy program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, D.D.; Emigh, C.R.; Meier, K.L.; Meyer, E.A.; Schneider, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    The Intense Neutron Source Facility, INS, has been proposed to provide a neutronic environment similar to that anticipated in a fully operational fusion-power reactor. The neutron generator will produce an intense flux of 14-MeV neutrons greater than 10 14 neutrons per cm 2 /sec from the collision of two intersecting beams, one of 1.1 A of 270 keV tritium ions and the other of a supersonic jet of deuterium gas. Using either the pure 14-MeV primary neutron spectrum or by tailoring the spectrum with appropriate moderators, crucial radiation-damage effects which are likely to occur in fusion reactors can be thoroughly explored and better understood

  5. The use of steel and lead shieldings in radiotherapy rooms and its comparison with respect to neutrons doses at patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, M.G.; Rebello, W.F.; Andrade, E.R.; Medeiros, M.P.C.; Mendes, R.M.S.; Braga, K.L.; Gomes, R.G.; Santos, R.F.G.

    2015-01-01

    The NCRP Report No. 151, Structural Shielding Design and Evaluation for Megavoltage X- and Gamma-Ray Radiotherapy Facilities, considers, in shielding calculations for radiotherapy rooms, the use of lead and/or steel to be applied on bunker walls. The NCRP Report calculations were performed foreseeing a better protection of people outside the radiotherapy room. However, contribution of lead and steel to patient dose should be taken into account for radioprotection purposes. This work presents calculations performed by MCNPX code in analyzing the Ambient Dose Equivalent due to neutron, H*(10) n , within a radiotherapy room, in the patients area, considering the use of additional shielding of 1 TVL of lead or 1 TVL of steel, positioned at the inner faces of walls and ceiling of a bunker. The head of the linear accelerator Varian 2100/2300 C/D was modeled working at 18MeV, with 5x5cm 2 , 10x10cm 2 , 20x20cm 2 , 30x30cm 2 and 40x40cm 2 openings for jaws and MLC and operating in eight gantry's angles. This study shows that the use of lead generates an average value of H*(10) n at patients area, 8.02% higher than the expected when using steel. Further studies should be performed based on experimental data for comparison with those from MCNPX simulation.

  6. Pulsed neutron source and instruments at neutron facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teshigawara, Makoto; Aizawa, Kazuya; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Morii, Yukio; Watanabe, Noboru [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-11-01

    We report the results of design studies on the optimal target shape, target - moderator coupling, optimal layout of moderators, and neutron instruments for a next generation pulsed spallation source in JAERI. The source utilizes a projected high-intensity proton accelerator (linac: 1.5 GeV, {approx}8 MW in total beam power, compressor ring: {approx}5 MW). We discuss the target neutronics, moderators and their layout. The sources is designed to have at least 30 beam lines equipped with more than 40 instruments, which are selected tentatively to the present knowledge. (author)

  7. Biomedical neutron research at the Californium User Facility for Neutron Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.C.; Byrne, T.E.; Miller, L.F.

    1998-01-01

    The Californium User Facility for Neutron Science has been established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The Californium User Facility (CUF) is a part of the larger Californium Facility, which fabricates and stores compact 252 Cf neutron sources for worldwide distribution. The CUF can provide a cost-effective option for research with 252 Cf sources. Three projects at the CUF that demonstrate the versatility of 252 Cf for biological and biomedical neutron-based research are described: future establishment of a 252 Cf-based neutron activation analysis system, ongoing work to produce miniature high-intensity, remotely afterloaded 252 Cf sources for tumor therapy, and a recent experiment that irradiated living human lung cancer cells impregnated with experimental boron compounds to test their effectiveness for boron neutron capture therapy. (author)

  8. Biomedical neutron research at the Californium User Facility for neutron science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.C.; Byrne, T.E.; Miller, L.F.

    1997-01-01

    The Californium User Facility for Neutron Science has been established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The Californium User Facility (CUF) is a part of the larger Californium Facility, which fabricates and stores compact 252 Cf neutron sources for worldwide distribution. The CUF can provide a cost-effective option for research with 252 Cf sources. Three projects at the CUF that demonstrate the versatility of 252 Cf for biological and biomedical neutron-based research are described: future establishment of a 252 Cf-based neutron activation analysis system, ongoing work to produce miniature high-intensity, remotely afterloaded 252 Cf sources for tumor therapy, and a recent experiment that irradiated living human lung cancer cells impregnated with experimental boron compounds to test their effectiveness for boron neutron capture therapy

  9. Evaluation of Neutron Component in Patients under High Energy Radiotherapy By Means of an On Line and In Vivo procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposito, M. R.; Palma, B. A.; Terron, J. A.; Gomez, F.; Domingo, C.; Barquero, R.; Sanchez-Doblado, F.

    2010-01-01

    The use of improved radiotherapy methods has raised the concern about second cancer induction. Epidemiological studies have shown a major incidence of secondary cancer in radiotherapy patients compared to patients subjected to another type of treatment. In this regard, it is important to determine the peripheral dose received by the patient during the treatment. While photon doses have been deeply contemplated, neutron contamination in high energy photon beams is still a subject of research and discussion. In the present work, we introduce a new procedure based on a digital device that allows real time neutron contamination evaluation. Several irradiations of an anthropomorphic phantom have been carried out in a variety of facilities and treatments. The purpose was to correlate the measurements from the digital detector with the neutron doses obtained in the phantom by Monte Carlo simulations and experimental measurements. A model has been designed to calculate the organ equivalent dose and risk estimates during any therapeutic session. The procedure has been used to monitor more than 1000 patients showing its applicability in clinical routine. It can be used both for inductive and retrospective studies with a reasonable uncertainty. Thus, this could provide the necessary information to complement the dosimetry of patient and estimate the treatment risk.

  10. Neutron beam facilities at the Australian Replacement Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, Shane; Robinson, Robert; Hunter, Brett

    2001-01-01

    Australia is building a research reactor to replace the HIFAR reactor at Lucas Heights by the end of 2005. Like HIFAR, the Replacement Research Reactor will be multipurpose with capabilities for both neutron beam research and radioisotope production. It will be a pool-type reactor with thermal neutron flux (unperturbed) of 4 x 10 14 n/cm 2 /sec and a liquid D 2 cold neutron source. Cold and thermal neutron beams for neutron beam research will be provided at the reactor face and in a large neutron guide hall. Supermirror neutron guides will transport cold and thermal neutrons to the guide hall. The reactor and the associated infrastructure, with the exception of the neutron beam instruments, is to be built by INVAP S.E. under contract. The neutron beam instruments will be developed by ANSTO, in consultation with the Australian user community. This status report includes a review the planned scientific capabilities, a description of the facility and a summary of progress to date. (author)

  11. Neutron activation diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleuel, D. L.; Yeamans, C. B.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bionta, R. M.; Caggiano, J. A.; Drury, O. B.; Hagmann, C. A.; Hatarik, R.; Knittel, K. M.; McNaney, J. M.; Moran, M.; Schneider, D. H. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Johnson, M. Gatu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Cooper, G. W. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Knauer, J. P. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Leeper, R. J.; Ruiz, C. L. [Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Neutron yields are measured at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) by an extensive suite of neutron activation diagnostics. Neutrons interact with materials whose reaction cross sections threshold just below the fusion neutron production energy, providing an accurate measure of primary unscattered neutrons without contribution from lower-energy scattered neutrons. Indium samples are mounted on diagnostic instrument manipulators in the NIF target chamber, 25-50 cm from the source, to measure 2.45 MeV deuterium-deuterium fusion neutrons through the {sup 115}In(n,n'){sup 115m} In reaction. Outside the chamber, zirconium and copper are used to measure 14 MeV deuterium-tritium fusion neutrons via {sup 90}Zr(n,2n), {sup 63}Cu(n,2n), and {sup 65}Cu(n,2n) reactions. An array of 16 zirconium samples are located on port covers around the chamber to measure relative yield anisotropies, providing a global map of fuel areal density variation. Neutron yields are routinely measured with activation to an accuracy of 7% and are in excellent agreement both with each other and with neutron time-of-flight and magnetic recoil spectrometer measurements. Relative areal density anisotropies can be measured to a precision of less than 3%. These measurements reveal apparent bulk fuel velocities as high as 200 km/s in addition to large areal density variations between the pole and equator of the compressed fuel.

  12. A time-of-flight detector for thermal neutrons from radiotherapy Linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conti, V. [Universita degli Studi di Milano and INFN di Milano (Italy)], E-mail: conti.Valentina@gmail.com; Bartesaghi, G. [Universita degli Studi di Milano and INFN di Milano (Italy); Bolognini, D.; Mascagna, V.; Perboni, C.; Prest, M.; Scazzi, S. [Universita dell' Insubria, Como and INFN di Milano (Italy); Mozzanica, A. [Universita degli Studi di Brescia and INFN sezione di Pavia (Italy); Cappelletti, P.; Frigerio, M.; Gelosa, S.; Monti, A.; Ostinelli, A. [Fisica Sanitaria, Ospedale S. Anna di Como (Italy); Giannini, G.; Vallazza, E. [INFN, sezione di Trieste and Universita degli Studi di Trieste (Italy)

    2007-10-21

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a therapeutic technique exploiting the release of dose inside the tumour cell after a fission of a {sup 10}B nucleus following the capture of a thermal neutron. BNCT could be the treatment for extended tumors (liver, stomach, lung), radio-resistant ones (melanoma) or tumours surrounded by vital organs (brain). The application of BNCT requires a high thermal neutron flux (>5x10{sup 8}ncm{sup -2}s{sup -1}) with the correct energy spectrum (neutron energy <10keV), two requirements that for the moment are fulfilled only by nuclear reactors. The INFN PhoNeS (Photo Neutron Source) project is trying to produce such a neutron beam with standard radiotherapy Linacs, maximizing with a dedicated photo-neutron converter the neutrons produced by Giant Dipole Resonance by a high energy (>8MeV) photon beam. In this framework, we have developed a real-time detector to measure the thermal neutron time-of -flight to compute the flux and the energy spectrum. Given the pulsed nature of Linac beams, the detector is a single neutron counting system made of a scintillator detecting the photon emitted after the neutron capture by the hydrogen nuclei. The scintillator signal is sampled by a dedicated FPGA clock thus obtaining the exact arrival time of the neutron itself. The paper will present the detector and its electronics, the feasibility measurements with a Varian Clinac 1800/2100CD and comparison with a Monte Carlo simulation.

  13. The neutrons for science facility at SPIRAL-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledoux, X.; Aïche, M.; Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.; Balanzat, E.; Ban-d'Etat, B.; Ban, G.; Bauge, E.; Bélier, G.; Bém, P.; Borcea, C.; Caillaud, T.; Chatillon, A.; Czajkowski, S.; Dessagne, P.; Doré, D.; Fischer, U.; Frégeau, M. O.; Grinyer, J.; Guillous, S.; Gunsing, F.; Gustavsson, C.; Henning, G.; Jacquot, B.; Jansson, K.; Jurado, B.; Kerveno, M.; Klix, A.; Landoas, O.; Lecolley, F. R.; Lecouey, J. L.; Majerle, M.; Marie, N.; Materna, T.; Mrázek, J.; Negoita, F.; Novák, J.; Oberstedt, S.; Oberstedt, A.; Panebianco, S.; Perrot, L.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Pomp, S.; Prokofiev, A. V.; Ramillon, J. M.; Farget, F.; Ridikas, D.; Rossé, B.; Sérot, O.; Simakov, S. P.; Šimečková, E.; Štefánik, M.; Sublet, J. C.; Taïeb, J.; Tarrío, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Thfoin, I.; Varignon, C.

    2017-09-01

    Numerous domains, in fundamental research as well as in applications, require the study of reactions induced by neutrons with energies from few MeV up to few tens of MeV. Reliable measurements also are necessary to improve the evaluated databases used by nuclear transport codes. This energy range covers a large number of topics like transmutation of nuclear waste, design of future fission and fusion reactors, nuclear medicine or test and development of new detectors. A new facility called Neutrons For Science (NFS) is being built for this purpose on the GANIL site at Caen (France). NFS is composed of a pulsed neutron beam for time-of-flight facility as well as irradiation stations for cross-section measurements. Neutrons will be produced by the interaction of deuteron and proton beams, delivered by the SPIRAL-2 linear accelerator, with thick or thin converters made of beryllium or lithium. Continuous and quasi-mono-energetic spectra will be available at NFS up to 40 MeV. In this fast energy region, the neutron flux is expected to be up to 2 orders of magnitude higher than at other existing time-of-flight facilities. In addition, irradiation stations for neutron-, proton- and deuteron-induced reactions will allow performing cross-section measurements by the activation technique. After a description of the facility and its characteristics, the experiments to be performed in the short and medium term will be presented.

  14. National Low-Temperature Neutron-Irradiation Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coltman, R.R. Jr.; Klabunde, C.E.; Young, F.W. Jr.

    1983-08-01

    The Materials Sciences Division of the United States Department of Energy will establish a National Low Temperature Neutron Irradiation Facility (NLTNIF) which will utilize the Bulk Shielding Reactor (BSR) located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The facility will provide high radiation intensities and special environmental and testing conditions for qualified experiments at no cost to users. This report describes the planned experimental capabilities of the new facility

  15. Overview of US fast-neutron facilities and testing capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, E.A.; Cox, C.M.; Jackson, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    Rather than attempt a cataloging of the various fast neutron facilities developed and used in this country over the last 30 years, this paper will focus on those facilities which have been used to develop, proof test, and explore safety issues of fuels, materials and components for the breeder and fusion program. This survey paper will attempt to relate the evolution of facility capabilities with the evolution of development program which use the facilities. The work horse facilities for the breeder program are EBR-II, FFTF and TREAT. For the fusion program, RTNS-II and FMIT were selected

  16. Beam Characterization at the Neutron Radiography Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarah Morgan; Jeffrey King

    2013-01-01

    The quality of a neutron imaging beam directly impacts the quality of radiographic images produced using that beam. Fully characterizing a neutron beam, including determination of the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio, neutron flux profile, energy spectrum, image quality, and beam divergence, is vital for producing quality radiographic images. This project characterized the east neutron imaging beamline at the Idaho National Laboratory Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD). The experiments which measured the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio and image quality are based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. An analysis of the image produced by a calibrated phantom measured the beam divergence. The energy spectrum measurements consist of a series of foil irradiations using a selection of activation foils, compared to the results produced by a Monte Carlo n-Particle (MCNP) model of the beamline. Improvement of the existing NRAD MCNP beamline model includes validation of the model’s energy spectrum and the development of enhanced image simulation methods. The image simulation methods predict the radiographic image of an object based on the foil reaction rate data obtained by placing a model of the object in front of the image plane in an MCNP beamline model.

  17. New facility for post irradiation examination of neutron irradiated beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishitsuka, Etsuo; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    1995-01-01

    Beryllium is expected as a neutron multiplier and plasma facing materials in the fusion reactor, and the neutron irradiation data on properties of beryllium up to 800 degrees C need for the engineering design. The acquisition of data on the tritium behavior, swelling, thermal and mechanical properties are first priority in ITER design. Facility for the post irradiation examination of neutron irradiated beryllium was constructed in the hot laboratory of Japan Materials Testing Reactor to get the engineering design data mentioned above. This facility consist of the four glove boxes, dry air supplier, tritium monitoring and removal system, storage box of neutron irradiated samples. Beryllium handling are restricted by the amount of tritium;7.4 GBq/day and 60 Co;7.4 MBq/day

  18. The Swedish facility for boron neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skoeld, K.; Capala, J. [Studsvik Medical AB (Sweden); Kierkegaard, J.; Haakansson, R. [Studsvik Nuclear AB (Sweden); Gudowska, I. [Karolinska Institute (Sweden)

    2000-10-01

    A BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) facility has been constructed at the R2-0 reactor at Studsvik, Sweden. R2-0 is a 1 MW, open core, pool reactor. The reactor core is suspended on a movable tower and can be positioned anywhere in the pool. The BNCT facility includes two adjacent, parallel filter/moderator configurations and the reactor core is positioned in front of any of them as appropriate. One of the resulting neutron beams has been optimized for clinical irradiations with a filter/moderator system that allows easy variation of the neutron spectrum from the thermal to the epithermal energy range and with an extended collimator for convenient patient positioning. The other beam has been designed for radiobiological research and is equipped with a heavy water moderator and a large irradiation cavity with a uniform field of thermal neutrons. (author)

  19. The reactor and cold neutron research facility at NIST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prask, H J; Rowe, J M [Reactor Radiation Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1992-07-01

    The NIST Reactor (NBSR) is a 20 MW research reactor located at the Gaithersburg, MD site, and has been in operation since 1969. It services 26 thermal neutron facilities which are used for materials science, chemical analysis, nondestructive evaluation, neutron standards work, and irradiations. In 1987 the Department of Commerce and NIST began development of the CNRF - a $30M National Facility for cold neutron research -which will provide fifteen new experimental stations with capabilities currently unavailable in this country. As of May 1992, four of the planned seven guides and a cold port were installed, eight cold neutron experimental stations were operational, and the Call for Proposals for the second cycle of formally-reviewed guest-researcher experiments had been sent out. Some details of the performance of instrumentation are described, along with the proposed design of the new hydrogen cold source which will replace the present D{sub 2}O/H{sub 2}O ice cold source. (author)

  20. The Swedish facility for boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skoeld, K.; Capala, J.; Kierkegaard, J.; Haakansson, R.; Gudowska, I.

    2000-01-01

    A BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) facility has been constructed at the R2-0 reactor at Studsvik, Sweden. R2-0 is a 1 MW, open core, pool reactor. The reactor core is suspended on a movable tower and can be positioned anywhere in the pool. The BNCT facility includes two adjacent, parallel filter/moderator configurations and the reactor core is positioned in front of any of them as appropriate. One of the resulting neutron beams has been optimized for clinical irradiations with a filter/moderator system that allows easy variation of the neutron spectrum from the thermal to the epithermal energy range and with an extended collimator for convenient patient positioning. The other beam has been designed for radiobiological research and is equipped with a heavy water moderator and a large irradiation cavity with a uniform field of thermal neutrons. (author)

  1. The reactor and cold neutron research facility at NIST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prask, H.J.; Rowe, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The NIST Reactor (NBSR) is a 20 MW research reactor located at the Gaithersburg, MD site, and has been in operation since 1969. It services 26 thermal neutron facilities which are used for materials science, chemical analysis, nondestructive evaluation, neutron standards work, and irradiations. In 1987 the Department of Commerce and NIST began development of the CNRF - a $30M National Facility for cold neutron research -which will provide fifteen new experimental stations with capabilities currently unavailable in this country. As of May 1992, four of the planned seven guides and a cold port were installed, eight cold neutron experimental stations were operational, and the Call for Proposals for the second cycle of formally-reviewed guest-researcher experiments had been sent out. Some details of the performance of instrumentation are described, along with the proposed design of the new hydrogen cold source which will replace the present D 2 O/H 2 O ice cold source. (author)

  2. Neutron environment in d + Li facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, F.M.; Schmittroth, F.; Carter, L.L.

    1980-01-01

    A microscopic d + Li neutron yield model has been developed based upon classical models and experimental data. Using equations suggested by the Serber and evaporation models, a generalized least squares adjustment procedure generated angular yields for E/sub d/ to 40 MeV using the available experimental data. The HEDL-UCD experiment at E/sub d/ = 35 was used to adjust parameters describing the neutron spectra. The model is used to predict yields, spectra, and damage responses in the FMIT Test Cell

  3. Quasielastic neutron scattering facility at Dhruva reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, R.; Mitra, S.; Paranjpe, S.K.; Dasannacharya, B.A.

    2001-01-01

    Quasi-elastic neutron scattering is a powerful experimental tool for studying the various dynamical motions in solids and liquids. In this paper, we have described the salient features of the quasi-elastic neutron spectrometer in operation at Dhruva reactor at Trombay, India. The design criteria have been such as to maximise the throughput by various means like closer approach to the source, focusing a larger beam on to a sample, and Multi-Angle Reflecting X-tal mode of energy analysis. Some results of molecular motions from recently studied systems using this spectrometer are also reported

  4. Design and Shielding of Radiotherapy Treatment Facilities; IPEM Report 75, 2nd Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Patrick; Eaton, David

    2017-07-01

    Design and Shielding of Radiotherapy Treatment Facilities provides readers with a single point of reference for protection advice to the construction and modification of radiotherapy facilities. The book assembles a faculty of national and international experts on all modalities including megavoltage and kilovoltage photons, brachytherapy and high-energy particles, and on conventional and Monte Carlo shielding calculations. This book is a comprehensive reference for qualified experts and radiation-shielding designers in radiation physics and also useful to anyone involved in the design of radiotherapy facilities.

  5. Review on heavy ion radiotherapy facilities and related ion sources (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, A.; Fujita, T.; Muramatsu, M.; Biri, S.; Drentje, A. G.

    2010-01-01

    Heavy ion radiotherapy awakens worldwide interest recently. The clinical results obtained by the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan have clearly demonstrated the advantages of carbon ion radiotherapy. Presently, there are four facilities for heavy ion radiotherapy in operation, and several new facilities are under construction or being planned. The most common requests for ion sources are a long lifetime and good stability and reproducibility. Sufficient intensity has been achieved by electron cyclotron resonance ion sources at the present facilities.

  6. Neutron capture prompt gamma-ray activation analysis at the NIST cold neutron research facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindstrom, R M; Zeisler, R; Vincent, D H; Greenberg, R R; Stone, C A; Mackey, E A [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Anderson, D L [Food and Drug Administration, Washington, DC (United States); Clark, D D [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1993-01-01

    An instrument for neutron capture prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA) has been constructed as part of the Cold Neutron Research Facility at the 20 MW National Institute of Standards and Technology Research Reactor. The neutron fluence rate (thermal equivalent) is 1.5*10[sup 8] n*cm[sup -2]*s[sup -] [sup 1], with negligible fast neutrons and gamma-rays. With compact geometry and hydrogen-free construction, the sensitivity is sevenfold better than an existing thermal instrument. Hydrogen background is thirtyfold lower. (author) 17 refs.; 2 figs.

  7. The NIST NBSR and Cold Neutron Research Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rush, J.J. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Guthersburg, MD (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The 20 MW Neutron Beam Split-Core Reactor (NBSR) has nine radial thermal beam tubes, and a large, highly accessible (35cm) cold source serving an extensive network of eight guide tubes. In operation or under construction are twenty-five neutron beam instruments (20 for neutron scattering) and about a dozen other facilities for neutron trace analysis, dosimetry and irradiation. The 6 x 15cm cold neutron guides are coated with {sup 58}Ni, and the last three being installed this fall are coated top and bottom with supermirrors for further increases in intensity. The new semi-spherical liquid hydrogen source will be described, along with the eight scattering instruments (reflectometry, SANS and high-resolution spectroscopy) which have, or will have, an extensive use in biological research. These instruments will likely provide the best overall capability in the U.S. for the next decade for a number of applications in biomolecular structure and dynamics.

  8. Characterisation of neutron fields around high-energy x-ray radiotherapy machines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Králík, M.; Turek, Karel

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 110, 1-4 (2004), s. 503-507 ISSN 0144-8420 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1048901 Keywords : radiotherapy machines * neutron fields * high-energy Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 0.617, year: 2003

  9. Calculation of nuclear data for fast neutron and proton radiotherapy: A new ICRU report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadwick, M.B.

    1997-01-01

    The author discusses the determination of nuclear interaction cross sections that are needed for fast neutron and proton radiotherapy. Both nuclear theory and experimental results are used to evaluate these data. An International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) report, which is expected to be issued in 1998 and which compiles these data, is described

  10. National facility for neutron beam research

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this talk, the growth of neutron beam research (NBR) in India over the past five decades is traced beginning with research at Apsara. A range of problems in condensed matter physics could be studied at CIRUS, followed by sophisticated indegenous instrumentation and research at Dhruva. The talk ends with an overview ...

  11. Neutron irradiation facilities for fission and fusion reactor materials studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1985-01-01

    The successful development of energy-conversion machines based upon nuclear fission or fusion reactors is critically dependent upon the behavior of the engineering materials used to construct the full containment and primary heat extraction systems. The development of radiation damage-resistant materials requires irradiation testing facilities which reproduce, as closely as possible, the thermal and neutronic environment expected in a power-producing reactor. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reference core design for the Center for Neutron Research (CNR) reactor provides for instrumented facilities in regions of both hard and mixed neutron spectra, with substantially higher fluxes than are currently available. The benefits of these new facilities to the development of radiation damage resistant materials are discussed in terms of the major US fission and fusion reactor programs

  12. A neutron radiography facility on the IRT-2000 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khadduri, I.Y.

    1976-01-01

    A neutron radiography facility has been constructed on the thermal neutron channel of the IRT-2000 reactor. A collimated thermal neutron beam exposure area of 10 cm diameter is obtained with an L/D ratio of 48.8. The film used is cellulose nitrate coated with lithium tetraborate which is insensitive to gamma and beta radiation. Some pictures with good contrast and resolution have been obtained. Pictures of parts of an IRT-2000 reactor fuel pin have also been recorded. (orig) [de

  13. Neutron spectral characterization of the PCA-PV benchmark facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stallmann, F.W.; Kam, F.B.K.; Fabry, A.

    1980-01-01

    The Pool Critical Assembly (PCA) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is being used to generate the PCA-PV benchmark neutron field. A configuration consisting of steel blocks and water gaps is used to simulate the thermal shield pressure vessel configurations in power reactors. The distances between the steel blocks can be changed so that the penetration of neutrons through water and steel can be determined and compared for many different configurations. Easy access and low flux levels make it possible to conduct extensive measurements using active and passive neutron dosimetry, which are impossible to perform in commercial reactors. The clean core and simple geometry facilitates neutron transport calculations which can be validated in detail by comparison with measurements. A facility which has the same configuration of water and steel as the PCA-PV facility but contains test specimens for materials testing, will be irradiated in the higher fluxes at the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. Using the results from the PCA-PV facility, the correlation between neutron flux-fluences and radiation damage in steel can be established. This facility is being discussed in a separate paper

  14. Neutron Flux Distribution on Neutron Radiography Facility After Fixing the Collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supandi; Parikin; Mohtar; Sunardi; Roestam, S

    1996-01-01

    The Radiography Neutron Facility consists of an inner collimator, outer collimator, main shutter, second shutter and the sample chamber with 300 mm in diameter. Neutron beam quality depends on the neutron flux intensities distribution, L/D ratio Cd ratio, neutron/gamma ratio. The results show that the neutron flux intensity was 2.83 x 107 n cm-2.s-1, with deviation of + 7.8 % and it was distributed homogeneously at the sample position of 200 mm diameter. The beam characteristics were L/D ratio 98 and Rod 8, and neutron gamma ratio 3.08 x 105n.cm-2.mR-1 and Reactor Power was 20 MW. This technique can be used to examine sample with diameter of < 200 mm

  15. Shielding calculations for the Intense Neutron Source Facility. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battat, M.E.; Henninger, R.J.; Macdonald, J.L.; Dudziak, D.J.

    1978-06-01

    Results of shielding calculations for the Intnse Neutron Source (INS) facility are presented. The INS facility is designed to house two sources, each of which will produce D--T neutrons with intensities in the range from 1 to 3 x 10 15 n/s on a continuous basis. Topics covered include the design of the biological shield, use of two-dimensional discrete-ordinates results to specify the source terms for a Monte Carlo skyshine calculation, air activation, and dose rates in the source cell (after shutdown) due to activation of the biological shield

  16. Intense neutron source facility for the fusion energy program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, D.D.; Emigh, C.R.; Meier, K.L.; Meyer, E.A.; Schneider, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    The intense neutron source is based on the ability of a supersonic flow of gas to dissipate an enormous quantity of heat generated in the neutron-producing target by multiple Coulomb collisions. A description is given of the principles involved in forming the supersonic jet, in forming the intense tritium-ion beam, in the vacuum systems, and in the tritium handling systems. An overview of the entire facility is included. It is believed that the facility can be operated with high reliability, ensuring a productive radiation damage program. (U.S.)

  17. Implementation of an Analytical Model for Leakage Neutron Equivalent Dose in a Proton Radiotherapy Planning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eley, John [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas, 6767 Bertner Ave., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Newhauser, Wayne, E-mail: newhauser@lsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809 (United States); Homann, Kenneth; Howell, Rebecca [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas, 6767 Bertner Ave., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Schneider, Christopher [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809 (United States); Durante, Marco; Bert, Christoph [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany)

    2015-03-11

    Equivalent dose from neutrons produced during proton radiotherapy increases the predicted risk of radiogenic late effects. However, out-of-field neutron dose is not taken into account by commercial proton radiotherapy treatment planning systems. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of implementing an analytical model to calculate leakage neutron equivalent dose in a treatment planning system. Passive scattering proton treatment plans were created for a water phantom and for a patient. For both the phantom and patient, the neutron equivalent doses were small but non-negligible and extended far beyond the therapeutic field. The time required for neutron equivalent dose calculation was 1.6 times longer than that required for proton dose calculation, with a total calculation time of less than 1 h on one processor for both treatment plans. Our results demonstrate that it is feasible to predict neutron equivalent dose distributions using an analytical dose algorithm for individual patients with irregular surfaces and internal tissue heterogeneities. Eventually, personalized estimates of neutron equivalent dose to organs far from the treatment field may guide clinicians to create treatment plans that reduce the risk of late effects.

  18. Modeling the National Ignition Facility neutron imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, D C; Grim, G P; Tregillis, I L; Wilke, M D; Patel, M V; Sepke, S M; Morgan, G L; Hatarik, R; Loomis, E N; Wilde, C H; Oertel, J A; Fatherley, V E; Clark, D D; Fittinghoff, D N; Bower, D E; Schmitt, M J; Marinak, M M; Munro, D H; Merrill, F E; Moran, M J; Wang, T-S F; Danly, C R; Hilko, R A; Batha, S H; Frank, M; Buckles, R

    2010-10-01

    Numerical modeling of the neutron imaging system for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), forward from calculated target neutron emission to a camera image, will guide both the reduction of data and the future development of the system. Located 28 m from target chamber center, the system can produce two images at different neutron energies by gating on neutron arrival time. The brighter image, using neutrons near 14 MeV, reflects the size and symmetry of the implosion "hot spot." A second image in scattered neutrons, 10-12 MeV, reflects the size and symmetry of colder, denser fuel, but with only ∼1%-7% of the neutrons. A misalignment of the pinhole assembly up to ±175 μm is covered by a set of 37 subapertures with different pointings. The model includes the variability of the pinhole point spread function across the field of view. Omega experiments provided absolute calibration, scintillator spatial broadening, and the level of residual light in the down-scattered image from the primary neutrons. Application of the model to light decay measurements of EJ399, BC422, BCF99-55, Xylene, DPAC-30, and Liquid A suggests that DPAC-30 and Liquid A would be preferred over the BCF99-55 scintillator chosen for the first NIF system, if they could be fabricated into detectors with sufficient resolution.

  19. Estimate of the damage in organs induced by neutrons in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benites R, J. L.; Vega C, H. R.; Uribe, M. del R.

    2014-08-01

    By means of Monte Carlo methods was considered the damage in the organs, induced by neutrons, of patients with cancer that receive treatment in modality of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) with lineal accelerator Varian Ix. The objective of this work was to estimate the damage probability in radiotherapy patients, starting from the effective dose by neutrons in the organs and tissues out of the treatment region. For that a three-dimensional mannequin of equivalent tissue of 30 x 100 x 30 cm 3 was modeled and spherical cells were distributed to estimate the Kerma in equivalent tissue and the absorbed dose by neutrons. With the absorbed dose the effective dose was calculated using the weighting factors for the organ type and radiation type. With the effective dose and the damage factors, considered in the ICRP 103, was considered the probability of damage induction in organs. (Author)

  20. Plant model of KIPT neutron source facility simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Yan; Wei, Thomas Y.; Grelle, Austin L.; Gohar, Yousry

    2016-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of the United States and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine are collaborating on constructing a neutron source facility at KIPT, Kharkov, Ukraine. The facility has 100-kW electron beam driving a subcritical assembly (SCA). The electron beam interacts with a natural uranium target or a tungsten target to generate neutrons, and deposits its power in the target zone. The total fission power generated in SCA is about 300 kW. Two primary cooling loops are designed to remove 100-kW and 300-kW from the target zone and the SCA, respectively. A secondary cooling system is coupled with the primary cooling system to dispose of the generated heat outside the facility buildings to the atmosphere. In addition, the electron accelerator has a low efficiency for generating the electron beam, which uses another secondary cooling loop to remove the generated heat from the accelerator primary cooling loop. One of the main functions the KIPT neutron source facility is to train young nuclear specialists; therefore, ANL has developed the KIPT Neutron Source Facility Simulator for this function. In this simulator, a Plant Control System and a Plant Protection System were developed to perform proper control and to provide automatic protection against unsafe and improper operation of the facility during the steady-state and the transient states using a facility plant model. This report focuses on describing the physics of the plant model and provides several test cases to demonstrate its capabilities. The plant facility model uses the PYTHON script language. It is consistent with the computer language of the plant control system. It is easy to integrate with the simulator without an additional interface, and it is able to simulate the transients of the cooling systems with system control variables changing on real-time.

  1. Plant model of KIPT neutron source facility simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Yan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wei, Thomas Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Grelle, Austin L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gohar, Yousry [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of the United States and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine are collaborating on constructing a neutron source facility at KIPT, Kharkov, Ukraine. The facility has 100-kW electron beam driving a subcritical assembly (SCA). The electron beam interacts with a natural uranium target or a tungsten target to generate neutrons, and deposits its power in the target zone. The total fission power generated in SCA is about 300 kW. Two primary cooling loops are designed to remove 100-kW and 300-kW from the target zone and the SCA, respectively. A secondary cooling system is coupled with the primary cooling system to dispose of the generated heat outside the facility buildings to the atmosphere. In addition, the electron accelerator has a low efficiency for generating the electron beam, which uses another secondary cooling loop to remove the generated heat from the accelerator primary cooling loop. One of the main functions the KIPT neutron source facility is to train young nuclear specialists; therefore, ANL has developed the KIPT Neutron Source Facility Simulator for this function. In this simulator, a Plant Control System and a Plant Protection System were developed to perform proper control and to provide automatic protection against unsafe and improper operation of the facility during the steady-state and the transient states using a facility plant model. This report focuses on describing the physics of the plant model and provides several test cases to demonstrate its capabilities. The plant facility model uses the PYTHON script language. It is consistent with the computer language of the plant control system. It is easy to integrate with the simulator without an additional interface, and it is able to simulate the transients of the cooling systems with system control variables changing on real-time.

  2. In vivo neutron activation facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, R.; Yasumura, Seiichi; Dilmanian, F.A.

    1997-11-01

    Seven important body elements, C, N, Ca, P, K, Na, and Cl, can be measured with great precision and accuracy in the in vivo neutron activation facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The facilities include the delayed-gamma neutron activation, the prompt-gamma neutron activation, and the inelastic neutron scattering systems. In conjunction with measurements of total body water by the tritiated-water dilution method several body compartments can be defined from the contents of these elements, also with high precision. In particular, body fat mass is derived from total body carbon together with total body calcium and nitrogen; body protein mass is derived from total body nitrogen; extracellular fluid volume is derived from total body sodium and chlorine; lean body mass and body cell mass are derived from total body potassium; and, skeletal mass is derived from total body calcium. Thus, we suggest that neutron activation analysis may be valuable for calibrating some of the instruments routinely used in clinical studies of body composition. The instruments that would benefit from absolute calibration against neutron activation analysis are bioelectric impedance analysis, infrared interactance, transmission ultrasound, and dual energy x-ray/photon absorptiometry.

  3. Medical use of fast neutrons in radiotherapy and radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bewley, D.K.

    1975-01-01

    Over 400 patients have been treated with fast neutrons from a cyclotron at Hammersmith Hospital, London, using 16 MeV deuterons on beryllium. A large variety of malignant disease is included in this trial. A randomized trial of fast neutron therapy for cancer of the mouth and throat is in progress and preliminary results will be given. Fast neutron radiographs are often taken to check the positions of the fields used on the patients. These show no contrast from bone, but demonstrate only the presence of gas-filled cavities. As a diagnostic method, fast neutron radiography suffers from a number of disadvantages, the main ones being lack of sensitivity of the image-forming system and the hazard to the patient due to a large Quality Factor. Estimation of the absorbed dose given to different types of tissue is an important factor in the medical use of fast neutrons. More data are needed on the processes whereby fast neutrons impart energy to matter, particularly for neutrons above 15 MeV

  4. Dosimetry in Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility at BMRR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation dosimetry for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT has been performed since 1959 at Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility (TNIF of the three-megawatt light-water cooled Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR. In the early 1990s when more effective drug carriers were developed for NCT, in which the eye melanoma and brain tumors in rats were irradiated in situ, extensive clinical trials of small animals began using a focused thermal neutron beam. To improve the dosimetry at irradiation facility, a series of innovative designs and major modifications made to enhance the beam intensity and to ease the experimental sampling at BMRR were performed; including (1 in-core fuel addition to increase source strength and balance flux of neutrons towards two ports, (2 out of core moderator remodeling, done by replacing thicker D2O tanks at graphite-shutter interfacial areas, to expedite neutron thermalization, (3 beam shutter upgrade to reduce strayed neutrons and gamma dose, (4 beam collimator redesign to optimize the beam flux versus dose for animal treatment, (5 beam port shielding installation around the shutter opening area (lithium-6 enriched polyester-resin in boxes, attached with polyethylene plates to reduce prompt gamma and fast neutron doses, (6 sample holder repositioning to optimize angle versus distance for a single organ or whole body irradiation, and (7 holder wall buildup with neutron reflector materials to increase dose and dose rate from scattered thermal neutrons. During the facility upgrade, reactor dosimetry was conducted using thermoluminescent dosimeters TLD for gamma dose estimate, using ion chambers to confirm fast neutron and gamma dose rate, and by the activation of gold-foils with and without cadmium-covers, for fast and thermal neutron flux determination. Based on the combined effect from the size and depth of tumor cells and the location and geometry of dosimeters, the measured flux from cadmium-difference method was 4–7

  5. Dosimetry in Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility at BMRR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, J. P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Holden, N. E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Reciniello, R. N.

    2014-05-23

    Radiation dosimetry for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) has been performed since 1959 at Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility (TNIF) of the three-megawatt light-water cooled Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). In the early 1990s when more effective drug carriers were developed for NCT, in which the eye melanoma and brain tumors in rats were irradiated in situ, extensive clinical trials of small animals began using a focused thermal neutron beam. To improve the dosimetry at irradiation facility, a series of innovative designs and major modifications made to enhance the beam intensity and to ease the experimental sampling at BMRR were performed; including (1) in-core fuel addition to increase source strength and balance flux of neutrons towards two ports, (2) out of core moderator remodeling, done by replacing thicker D2O tanks at graphite-shutter interfacial areas, to expedite neutron thermalization, (3) beam shutter upgrade to reduce strayed neutrons and gamma dose, (4) beam collimator redesign to optimize the beam flux versus dose for animal treatment, (5) beam port shielding installation around the shutter opening area (lithium-6 enriched polyester-resin in boxes, attached with polyethylene plates) to reduce prompt gamma and fast neutron doses, (6) sample holder repositioning to optimize angle versus distance for a single organ or whole body irradiation, and (7) holder wall buildup with neutron reflector materials to increase dose and dose rate from scattered thermal neutrons. During the facility upgrade, reactor dosimetry was conducted using thermoluminescent dosimeters TLD for gamma dose estimate, using ion chambers to confirm fast neutron and gamma dose rate, and by the activation of gold-foils with and without cadmium-covers, for fast and thermal neutron flux determination. Based on the combined effect from the size and depth of tumor cells and the location and geometry of dosimeters, the measured flux from cadmium-difference method was 4 - 7

  6. Scientific opportunities with advanced facilities for neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lander, G.H.; Emery, V.J.

    1984-01-01

    The present report documents deliberations of a large group of experts in neutron scattering and fundamental physics on the need for new neutron sources of greater intensity and more sophisticated instrumentation than those currently available. An additional aspect of the Workshop was a comparison between steady-state (reactor) and pulsed (spallation) sources. The main conclusions were: (1) the case for a new higher flux neutron source is extremely strong and such a facility will lead to qualitatively new advances in condensed matter science and fundamental physics; (2) to a large extent the future needs of the scientific community could be met with either a 5 x 10 15 n cm -2 s -1 steady state source or a 10 17 n cm -2 s -1 peak flux spallation source; and (3) the findings of this Workshop are consistent with the recommendations of the Major Materials Facilities Committee

  7. Microdosimetric investigations at the fast neutron therapy facility at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langen, K.M.

    1997-01-01

    Microdosimetry was used to investigate three issues at the neutron therapy facility (NTF) at Fermilab. Firstly, the conversion factor from absorbed dose in A-150 tissue equivalent plastic to absorbed dose in ICRU tissue was determined. For this, the effective neutron kerma factor ratios, i.e., oxygen tissue equivalent plastic and carbon to A-150 tissue equivalent plastic, were measured in the neutron beam. An A-150 tissue equivalent plastic to ICRU tissue absorbed dose conversion factor of 0.92 ± 0.04 was determined. Secondly, variations in the radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) in the beam were mapped by determining variations in two related quantities, e * and R, with field size and depth in tissue. Maximal variation in e * and R of 9% and 15% respectively were determined. Lastly, the feasibility of utilizing the boron neutron capture reaction on boron-10 to selectively enhance the tumor dose in the NTF beam was investigated

  8. Neutron streaming analysis for shield design of FMIT Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, L.L.

    1980-12-01

    Applications of the Monte Carlo method have been summarized relevant to neutron streaming problems of interest in the shield design for the FMIT Facility. An improved angular biasing method has been implemented to further optimize the calculation of streaming and this method has been applied to calculate streaming within a double bend pipe

  9. A national facility for small angle neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buyers, W.J.L.; Katsaras, J.; Mellors, W.; Potter, M.M.; Powell, B.M.; Rogge, R.B.; Root, J.H.; Tennant, D.C.; Tun, Z.

    1995-01-01

    A world-class small angle neutron scattering (SANS) facility is proposed for Canada. It will provide users from the fields of biology, chemistry, physics, materials science and engineering with a uniquely powerful tool for investigating microstructural properties whose length scales lie in the optical to atomic range. (author). 7 refs

  10. A national facility for small angle neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buyers, W J.L.; Katsaras, J; Mellors, W; Potter, M M; Powell, B M; Rogge, R B; Root, J H; Tennant, D C; Tun, Z [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.; Epand, R; Gaulin, B D [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    1995-09-15

    A world-class small angle neutron scattering (SANS) facility is proposed for Canada. It will provide users from the fields of biology, chemistry, physics, materials science and engineering with a uniquely powerful tool for investigating microstructural properties whose length scales lie in the optical to atomic range. (author). 7 refs.

  11. Safety analysis report for the Neutron Multiplier Facility, 329 Building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieck, H.G.

    1978-09-01

    Neutron multiplication is a process wherein the flux of a neutron source such as 252 Cf is enhanced by fission reactions that occur in a subcritical assemblage of fissile material. The multiplication factor of the device depends upon the consequences of neutron reactions with matter and is independent of the initial number of neutrons present. Safe utilization of such a device demands that the fissile material assemblage be maintained in a subcritical state throughout all normal and credibly abnormal conditions. Examples of things that can alter the multiplication factor (and degree of subcriticality) are temperature fluctuations, changes in moderator material such as voiding or composition, addition of fissile materials, and change in assembly configuration. The Neutron Multiplier Facility (NMF) utilizes a multiplier- 252 Cf assembly to produce neutrons for activation analysis of organic and inorganic environmental samples and for on-line mass spectrometry analysis of fission products which diffuse from a stationary fissile target (less than or equal to 4 g fissile material) located in the Neutron Multiplier. The NMF annex to the 329 Building provides close proximity to related counting equipment, and delay between sample irradiation and counting is minimized

  12. Development of the RRR cold neutron beam facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovotti, Osvaldo; Masriera, Nestor; Lecot, Carlos; Hergenreder, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes some general design issues on the neutron beam facilities (cold neutron source and neutron beam transport system) of the Replacement Research Reactor (RRR) for the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). The description covers different aspect of the design: the requirements that lead to an innovative design, the overall design itself, the definition of a technical approach in order to develop the necessary design solutions, and finally the organizational framework by which international expertise from five different institutions is integrated. From the technical viewpoint, the RRR-CNS is a liquid Deuterium (LD2) moderator, sub-cooled to ensure maximum moderation efficiency, flowing within a closed natural circulation thermosyphon loop. The thermosyphon is surrounded by a zirconium alloy CNS vacuum containment that provides thermal insulation and a multiple barriers scheme to prevent Deuterium from mixing with water or air. Consistent with international practice, this vessel is designed to withstand any hypothetical energy reaction should Deuterium and air mix in its interior. The 'cold' neutrons are then taken by the NBTS and transported by the neutron guide system into the reactor beam hall and neutron guide hall, where neutron scattering instruments are located. From the management viewpoint, the adopted distributed scheme is successful to manage the complex interfacing between highly specialized technologies, allowing a smooth integration within the project. (author)

  13. A neutron tomography facility at a low power research reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Körner, S; Von Tobel, P; Rauch, H

    2001-01-01

    Neutron radiography (NR) provides a very efficient tool in the field of non-destructive testing as well as for many applications in fundamental research. A neutron beam penetrating a specimen is attenuated by the sample material and detected by a two-dimensional (2D) imaging device. The image contains information about materials and structure inside the sample because neutrons are attenuated according to the basic law of radiation attenuation. Contrary to X-rays, neutrons can be attenuated by some light materials, as for example, hydrogen and boron, but penetrate many heavy materials. Therefore, NR can yield important information not obtainable by more traditional methods. Nevertheless, there are many aspects of structure, both quantitative and qualitative, that are not accessible from 2D transmission images. Hence, there is an interest in three-dimensional neutron imaging. At the 250 kW TRIGA Mark II reactor of the Atominstitut in Austria a neutron tomography facility has been installed. The neutron flux at ...

  14. Thermal neutron filter design for the neutron radiography facility at the LVR-15 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soltes, Jaroslav [Research Centre Rez Ltd., Husinec - Rez 130, 250 68 Rez, (Czech Republic); Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, CTU in Prague, (Czech Republic); Viererbl, Ladislav; Lahodova, Zdena; Koleska, Michal; Vins, Miroslav [Research Centre Rez Ltd., Husinec - Rez 130, 250 68 Rez, (Czech Republic)

    2015-07-01

    In 2011 a decision was made to build a neutron radiography facility at one of the unused horizontal channels of the LVR-15 research reactor in Rez, Czech Republic. One of the key conditions for operating an effective radiography facility is the delivery of a high intensity, homogeneous and collimated thermal neutron beam at the sample location. Additionally the intensity of fast neutrons has to be kept as low as possible as the fast neutrons may damage the detectors used for neutron imaging. As the spectrum in the empty horizontal channel roughly copies the spectrum in the reactor core, which has a high ratio of fast neutrons, neutron filter components have to be installed inside the channel in order to achieve desired beam parameters. As the channel design does not allow the instalment of complex filters and collimators, an optimal solution represent neutron filters made of large single-crystal ingots of proper material composition. Single-crystal silicon was chosen as a favorable filter material for its wide availability in sufficient dimensions. Besides its ability to reasonably lower the ratio of fast neutrons while still keeping high intensities of thermal neutrons, due to its large dimensions, it suits as a shielding against gamma radiation from the reactor core. For designing the necessary filter dimensions the Monte-Carlo MCNP transport code was used. As the code does not provide neutron cross-section libraries for thermal neutron transport through single-crystalline silicon, these had to be created by approximating the theory of thermal neutron scattering and modifying the original cross-section data which are provided with the code. Carrying out a series of calculations the filter thickness of 1 m proved good for gaining a beam with desired parameters and a low gamma background. After mounting the filter inside the channel several measurements of the neutron field were realized at the beam exit. The results have justified the expected calculated values

  15. Set of thermal neutron-scattering experiments for the Weapons Neutron Research Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugger, R.M.

    1975-12-01

    Six classes of experiments form the base of a program of thermal neutron scattering at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) Facility. Three classes are to determine the average microscopic positions of atoms in materials and three are to determine the microscopic vibrations of these atoms. The first three classes concern (a) powder sample neutron diffraction, (b) small angle scattering, and (c) single crystal Laue diffraction. The second three concern (d) small kappa inelastic scattering, (e) scattering surface phonon measurements, and (f) line widths. An instrument to couple with the WNR pulsed source is briefly outlined for each experiment

  16. Transmutation of Americium in Fast Neutron Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Youpeng

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, the feasibility to use a medium sized sodium cooled fast reactor fully loaded with MOX fuel for efficient transmutation of americium is investigated by simulating the safety performance of a BN600-type fast reactor loaded with different fractions of americium in the fuel, using the safety parameters obtained with the SERPENT Monte Carlo code. The focus is on americium mainly due to its long-term contribution to the radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuel and its deterioration on core's safety parameters. Applying the SAS4A/SASSYS transient analysis code, it is demonstrated that the power rating needs to be reduced by 6% for each percent additional americium introduction into the reference MOX fuel, maintaining 100 K margin to fuel melting, which is the most limiting failure mechanism. Safety analysis of a new Accelerator Driven System design with a smaller pin pitch-to-diameter ratio comparing to the reference EFIT-400 design, aiming at improving neutron source efficiency, was also performed by simulating performance for unprotected loss of flow, unprotected transient overpower, and protected loss-of-heat-sink transients, using neutronic parameters obtained from MCNP calculations. Thanks to the introduction of the austenitic 15/15Ti stainless steel with enhanced creep rupture resistance and acceptable irradiation swelling rate, the suggested ADS design loaded with nitride fuel and cooled by lead-bismuth eutectic could survive the full set of transients, preserving a margin of 130 K to cladding rupture during the most limiting transient. The thesis concludes that efficient transmutation of americium in a medium sized sodium cooled fast reactor loaded with MOX fuel is possible but leads to a severe power penalty. Instead, preserving transmutation rates of minor actinides up to 42 kg/TWh th , the suggested ADS design with enhanced proton source efficiency appears like a better option for americium transmutation

  17. Neutrons leaked from a 45 MeV linac facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitaichi, Masatoshi; Sawamura, Sadashi; Yamada, Takuma; Sawamura, Teruko; Kaneko, Junnichi H. [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan); Nojiri, Itiro [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    Dose evaluation for skyshine from nuclear facilities is an issue in environmental evaluations. Therefore, benchmark data for skyshine and well-investigated codes for skyshine would be useful in the rational evaluations of nuclear facilities. The purpose of this study is to obtain benchmark data of skyshine and to investigate the effect of source spectra and angular distribution on the skyshine process. In this study spatial and time distributions of neutrons leaked from the Hokkaido University 45 MeV electron linac facility were measured and compared with calculations. Neutrons were emitted from the ( ,n) reaction produced by bremsstrahlung radiation in a lead target irradiated with electrons from the linac. The skyshine process of neutrons transported through the facility building to the outside was investigated. The source spectrum of the skyshine process was evaluated using a cylindrical multi-moderator spectrometer and unfolding code, the SAND-II, and the results were compared. Measurements were carried out to a distance of 330 m from the facility. The measured spatial dose distribution was found not to coincide with the calculations. The discrepancy is discussed based on an analysis of the spatial and time distributions, and the energy spectrum which suggests that the source spectrum and the angular distribution assumed in the calculation was not sufficiently similar to simulate the experimental situation. The time distribution introduced in this study appears to be useful in discussions of the skyshine process and its sources.

  18. RBE and clinical response in radiotherapy with neutron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, F.

    1984-01-01

    Consideration of the clinical results reported, when a cyclotron produced neutron beam was used for treatments in the pelvis region, suggested that a constant RBE of 3 should not have been used for all neutron doses. Instead a variable RBE, which increased from approximately 3 to 8 (with decreasing dose), should have been used. Although some of these RBE values are much higher than 3, they have been observed in clinical practice. An ''equivalent photon'' isodose plan was produced by employing a variable RBE and, by taking a TDF limit of 86 for bowel, an isoeffect plan was produced. This shows that in the clinical situation under consideration much of the pelvis was overdosed. Doses to tumour cells and late effects are also briefly considered. It is suggested that, in neutron therapy, both an ''equivalent photon'' isodose plan and an isoeffect plan should be produced prior to treatment. (author)

  19. Neutron activation analysis at the Californium User Facility for Neutron Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.C.; Smith, E.H.; Glasgow, D.C.; Jerde, E.A.; Marsh, D.L.; Zhao, L.

    1997-12-01

    The Californium User Facility (CUF) for Neutron Science has been established to provide 252 Cf-based neutron irradiation services and research capabilities including neutron activation analysis (NAA). A major advantage of the CUF is its accessibility and controlled experimental conditions compared with those of a reactor environment The CUF maintains the world's largest inventory of compact 252 Cf neutron sources. Neutron source intensities of ≤ 10 11 neutrons/s are available for irradiations within a contamination-free hot cell, capable of providing thermal and fast neutron fluxes exceeding 10 8 cm -2 s -1 at the sample. Total flux of ≥10 9 cm -2 s -1 is feasible for large-volume irradiation rabbits within the 252 Cf storage pool. Neutron and gamma transport calculations have been performed using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP to estimate irradiation fluxes available for sample activation within the hot cell and storage pool and to design and optimize a prompt gamma NAA (PGNAA) configuration for large sample volumes. Confirmatory NAA irradiations have been performed within the pool. Gamma spectroscopy capabilities including PGNAA are being established within the CUF for sample analysis

  20. Analysis of fuel management in the KIPT neutron source facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong Zhaopeng, E-mail: zzhong@anl.gov [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Gohar, Yousry; Talamo, Alberto [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: > Fuel management of KIPT ADS was analyzed. > Core arrangement was shuffled in stage wise. > New fuel assemblies was added into core periodically. > Beryllium reflector could also be utilized to increase the fuel life. - Abstract: Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of an experimental neutron source facility consisting of an electron accelerator driven sub-critical assembly. The neutron source driving the sub-critical assembly is generated from the interaction of 100 KW electron beam with a natural uranium target. The sub-critical assembly surrounding the target is fueled with low enriched WWR-M2 type hexagonal fuel assemblies. The U-235 enrichment of the fuel material is <20%. The facility will be utilized for basic and applied research, producing medical isotopes, and training young specialists. With the 100 KW electron beam power, the total thermal power of the facility is {approx}360 kW including the fission power of {approx}260 kW. The burnup of the fissile materials and the buildup of fission products continuously reduce the system reactivity during the operation, decrease the neutron flux level, and consequently impact the facility performance. To preserve the neutron flux level during the operation, the fuel assemblies should be added and shuffled for compensating the lost reactivity caused by burnup. Beryllium reflector could also be utilized to increase the fuel life time in the sub-critical core. This paper studies the fuel cycles and shuffling schemes of the fuel assemblies of the sub-critical assembly to preserve the system reactivity and the neutron flux level during the operation.

  1. Analysis of fuel management in the KIPT neutron source facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Zhaopeng; Gohar, Yousry; Talamo, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Fuel management of KIPT ADS was analyzed. → Core arrangement was shuffled in stage wise. → New fuel assemblies was added into core periodically. → Beryllium reflector could also be utilized to increase the fuel life. - Abstract: Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of an experimental neutron source facility consisting of an electron accelerator driven sub-critical assembly. The neutron source driving the sub-critical assembly is generated from the interaction of 100 KW electron beam with a natural uranium target. The sub-critical assembly surrounding the target is fueled with low enriched WWR-M2 type hexagonal fuel assemblies. The U-235 enrichment of the fuel material is <20%. The facility will be utilized for basic and applied research, producing medical isotopes, and training young specialists. With the 100 KW electron beam power, the total thermal power of the facility is ∼360 kW including the fission power of ∼260 kW. The burnup of the fissile materials and the buildup of fission products continuously reduce the system reactivity during the operation, decrease the neutron flux level, and consequently impact the facility performance. To preserve the neutron flux level during the operation, the fuel assemblies should be added and shuffled for compensating the lost reactivity caused by burnup. Beryllium reflector could also be utilized to increase the fuel life time in the sub-critical core. This paper studies the fuel cycles and shuffling schemes of the fuel assemblies of the sub-critical assembly to preserve the system reactivity and the neutron flux level during the operation.

  2. The neutron radiography facility at Tehran Research Reactor (TRR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali Pazirandeh

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Non-destructive testing in many fields of industry including detection of explosives, at the airports, testing for micro-cracks on airplane wings and turbine blades cracks is badly needed. Thermal neutron beam is one of preferable method to detect the micro-cracks, reveals the internal structure of components and explosives. The purpose of this paper is to present the neutron radiography facility at Tehran Research Reactor (TRR), Science and Technology Research Institute, and in particular to emphasize the industrial applications in wood industry, automobile engine inspection, minerals composition identification, turbine blade cracks detection. (author)

  3. A new facility for rapid neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeisler, R.; Makarewicz, M.; Grass, F.; Casta, J.

    1996-01-01

    Many research groups have undertaken efforts on the utilization of short-lived nuclides in a broad spectrum of neutron activation analysis (NAA) applications. The advantages of these approaches are obvious because the information on the sample can be extracted more rapidly. In addition to its other advantages, NAA can become extremely competitive in price and analysis time. Nevertheless, NAA with short-lived nuclides has not gained broad popularity, perhaps because of some difficulties in accuracy and the availability of suitable irradiation facilities. This report discusses the ASTRA reactor for neutron activation analysis capabilities

  4. Project of new tandem-driven neutron facility in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strisovska, Jana

    2014-01-01

    New neutron laboratory based on Pelletron R Accelerator with terminal voltage of 2 MV is under construction at the Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Slovakia. The accelerator will be employed as a tunable source of monoenergetic fast neutrons. Using of deuterium and in the future also tritium gas cells is foreseen. These cells will allow to produce fast neutrons with various energies via 2 H(d,n) 3 He and 3 H(p,n) 3 He nuclear reactions. Physics program of new laboratory will be focused on nuclear structure studied via inelastic neutron scattering with gamma ray detection, especially for light singly-closed shell nuclei. Fission cross section measurement and fission gamma rays studies will be performed. Development and testing of neutron detectors, as integral part of future project ALLEGRO, i.e., the demonstrator of fast nuclear reactor cooled with helium gas, is planned. Parallel to neutron program, beams of charged particles will be used for studies of resonant nuclear astrophysics reactions. Start of operation of the laboratory is foreseen in 2015. In the talk, current status, physics program and details of the facility will be presented. (authors)

  5. Accelerator shield design of KIPT neutron source facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Z.; Gohar, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of the United States and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the design development of a neutron source facility at KIPT utilizing an electron-accelerator-driven subcritical assembly. Electron beam power is 100 kW, using 100 MeV electrons. The facility is designed to perform basic and applied nuclear research, produce medical isotopes, and train young nuclear specialists. The biological shield of the accelerator building is designed to reduce the biological dose to less than 0.5-mrem/hr during operation. The main source of the biological dose is the photons and the neutrons generated by interactions of leaked electrons from the electron gun and accelerator sections with the surrounding concrete and accelerator materials. The Monte Carlo code MCNPX serves as the calculation tool for the shield design, due to its capability to transport electrons, photons, and neutrons coupled problems. The direct photon dose can be tallied by MCNPX calculation, starting with the leaked electrons. However, it is difficult to accurately tally the neutron dose directly from the leaked electrons. The neutron yield per electron from the interactions with the surrounding components is less than 0.01 neutron per electron. This causes difficulties for Monte Carlo analyses and consumes tremendous computation time for tallying with acceptable statistics the neutron dose outside the shield boundary. To avoid these difficulties, the SOURCE and TALLYX user subroutines of MCNPX were developed for the study. The generated neutrons are banked, together with all related parameters, for a subsequent MCNPX calculation to obtain the neutron and secondary photon doses. The weight windows variance reduction technique is utilized for both neutron and photon dose calculations. Two shielding materials, i.e., heavy concrete and ordinary concrete, were considered for the shield design. The main goal is to maintain the total

  6. Electron accelerator shielding design of KIPT neutron source facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Zhao Peng; Gohar, Yousry [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The Argonne National Laboratory of the United States and the Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology of the Ukraine have been collaborating on the design, development and construction of a neutron source facility at Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology utilizing an electron-accelerator-driven subcritical assembly. The electron beam power is 100 kW using 100-MeV electrons. The facility was designed to perform basic and applied nuclear research, produce medical isotopes, and train nuclear specialists. The biological shield of the accelerator building was designed to reduce the biological dose to less than 5.0e-03 mSv/h during operation. The main source of the biological dose for the accelerator building is the photons and neutrons generated from different interactions of leaked electrons from the electron gun and the accelerator sections with the surrounding components and materials. The Monte Carlo N-particle extended code (MCNPX) was used for the shielding calculations because of its capability to perform electron-, photon-, and neutron-coupled transport simulations. The photon dose was tallied using the MCNPX calculation, starting with the leaked electrons. However, it is difficult to accurately tally the neutron dose directly from the leaked electrons. The neutron yield per electron from the interactions with the surrounding components is very small, ∼0.01 neutron for 100-MeV electron and even smaller for lower-energy electrons. This causes difficulties for the Monte Carlo analyses and consumes tremendous computation resources for tallying the neutron dose outside the shield boundary with an acceptable accuracy. To avoid these difficulties, the SOURCE and TALLYX user subroutines of MCNPX were utilized for this study. The generated neutrons were banked, together with all related parameters, for a subsequent MCNPX calculation to obtain the neutron dose. The weight windows variance reduction technique was also utilized for both neutron and photon dose

  7. Analysis of neutron propagation from the skyshine port of a fusion neutron source facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakisaka, M. [Hokkaido University, Kita-8, Nishi-5, Kita-ku, Sapporo 080-8628 (Japan); Kaneko, J. [Hokkaido University, Kita-8, Nishi-5, Kita-ku, Sapporo 080-8628 (Japan)]. E-mail: kin@qe.eng.hokudai.ac.jp; Fujita, F. [Hokkaido University, Kita-8, Nishi-5, Kita-ku, Sapporo 080-8628 (Japan); Ochiai, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Institute, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan); Nishitani, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Institute, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan); Yoshida, S. [Tokai University, 1117 Kitakaname, Hirastuka, Kanagawa-ken 259-1292 (Japan); Sawamura, T. [Hokkaido University, Kita-8, Nishi-5, Kita-ku, Sapporo 080-8628 (Japan)

    2005-12-01

    The process of neutron leaking from a 14MeV neutron source facility was analyzed by calculations and experiments. The experiments were performed at the Fusion Neutron Source (FNS) facility of the Japan Atomic Energy Institute, Tokai-mura, Japan, which has a port on the roof for skyshine experiments, and a {sup 3}He counter surrounded with a polyethylene moderator of different thicknesses was used to estimate the energy spectra and dose distributions. The {sup 3}He counter with a 3-cm-thick moderator was also used for dose measurements, and the doses evaluated by the counter counts and the calculated count-to-dose conversion factor agreed with the calculations to within {approx}30%. The dose distribution was found to fit a simple analytical expression, D(r)=Q{sub D}exp(-r/{lambda}{sub D})r and the parameters Q{sub D} and {lambda}{sub D} are discussed.

  8. The proposed cold neutron irradiation facility at the Breazeale reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimeo, R. M.; Sokol, P. E.; Carpenter, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the design considerations of a Cold Neutron Irradiation Facility (CNIF) originally to have been installed at the Penn State Breazeale Reactor (PSBR). The goal of this project was to study the effects of radiation-induced damage to cryogenic moderators and, in particular, solid methane. This work evolved through the design stage undergoing a full safety analysis and received tentative approval from the PSBR Safeguards Committee but was discontinued due to budgetary constraints. (auth)

  9. Superpower proton linear accelerators for neutron generators and electronuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarev, N.V.; Kozodaev, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    The report is a review of projects on the superpower proton linear accelerators (SPLA) for neutron generators (NG) and electronuclear facilities, proposed in the recent years. The beam average output capacity in these projects reaches 100 MW. The basic parameters of certain operating NGs, as well as some projected NGs will the SPLA drivers are presented. The problems on application of superconducting resonators in the SPLA as well as the issues of the SPLA reliability and costs are discussed [ru

  10. Medical Isotope Production Analyses In KIPT Neutron Source Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talamo, Alberto; Gohar, Yousry

    2016-01-01

    Medical isotope production analyses in Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) neutron source facility were performed to include the details of the irradiation cassette and the self-shielding effect. An updated detailed model of the facility was used for the analyses. The facility consists of an accelerator-driven system (ADS), which has a subcritical assembly using low-enriched uranium fuel elements with a beryllium-graphite reflector. The beryllium assemblies of the reflector have the same outer geometry as the fuel elements, which permits loading the subcritical assembly with different number of fuel elements without impacting the reflector performance. The subcritical assembly is driven by an external neutron source generated from the interaction of 100-kW electron beam with a tungsten target. The facility construction was completed at the end of 2015, and it is planned to start the operation during the year of 2016. It is the first ADS in the world, which has a coolant system for removing the generated fission power. Argonne National Laboratory has developed the design concept and performed extensive design analyses for the facility including its utilization for the production of different radioactive medical isotopes. 99 Mo is the parent isotope of 99m Tc, which is the most commonly used medical radioactive isotope. Detailed analyses were performed to define the optimal sample irradiation location and the generated activity, for several radioactive medical isotopes, as a function of the irradiation time.

  11. Medical Isotope Production Analyses In KIPT Neutron Source Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, Alberto [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gohar, Yousry [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Medical isotope production analyses in Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) neutron source facility were performed to include the details of the irradiation cassette and the self-shielding effect. An updated detailed model of the facility was used for the analyses. The facility consists of an accelerator-driven system (ADS), which has a subcritical assembly using low-enriched uranium fuel elements with a beryllium-graphite reflector. The beryllium assemblies of the reflector have the same outer geometry as the fuel elements, which permits loading the subcritical assembly with different number of fuel elements without impacting the reflector performance. The subcritical assembly is driven by an external neutron source generated from the interaction of 100-kW electron beam with a tungsten target. The facility construction was completed at the end of 2015, and it is planned to start the operation during the year of 2016. It is the first ADS in the world, which has a coolant system for removing the generated fission power. Argonne National Laboratory has developed the design concept and performed extensive design analyses for the facility including its utilization for the production of different radioactive medical isotopes. 99Mo is the parent isotope of 99mTc, which is the most commonly used medical radioactive isotope. Detailed analyses were performed to define the optimal sample irradiation location and the generated activity, for several radioactive medical isotopes, as a function of the irradiation time.

  12. Laser heated solenoid as a neutron source facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.; Rose, P.H.

    1975-01-01

    Conceptual designs are presented for a radiation test facility based on a laser heated plasma confined in a straight solenoid. The thin plasma column, a few meters in length and less than a centimeter in diameter, serves as a line source of neutrons. Test samples are located within or just behind the plasma tube, at a radius of 1-2 cm from the axis. The plasma is heated by an axially-directed powerful long-wavelength laser beam. The plasma is confined radially in the intense magnetic field supplied by a pulsed solenoid surrounding the plasma tube. The facility is pulsed many times a second to achieve a high time-averaged neutron flux on the test samples. Based on component performance achievable in the near term (e.g., magnetic field, laser pulse energy) and assuming classical physical processes, it appears that average fluxes of 10 13 to 10 14 neutrons/cm 2 -sec can be achieved in such a device. The most severe technical problems in such a facility appear to be rapid pulsing design and lifetime of some electrical and laser components

  13. Measurement of neutron total cross-sections for {sup nat}Dy at Pohang Neutron Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, S. G.; Kye, Y. U.; Shvetsov, Valery; Cho, M. H. [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Namkung, W.; Cho, M. H. [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, G. N. [Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, M. W. [Dongnam Inst. of radiological and Medical Science, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    There are few measurements for Dy below 100 eV. Moreover, there exist discrepancies among the measurements. In the present work, the total neutron cross-sections for {sup nat}Dy were measured by using the time-of-flight (TOF) method at the Pohang Neutron Facility (PNF). The PNF consists of an electron linac, a water-cooled Ta target, and an 11-m-long TOF path. The characteristics of PNF are described elsewhere. We also briefly discuss the future plan to verify our experimental result. We have measured the total neutron cross-sections of {sup nat}Dy in the neutron energy region from 0.1 eV to 100 eV with the TOF method at the Po hang Neutron Facility. The present result is in good agreement with the previous data and the evaluated data in ENDF/B-VI. We would like to get resonance parameters by using SAMMY or REFIT codes.

  14. Fast neutron radiotherapy for soft tissue and cartilaginous sarcomas at high risk for local recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, David L.; Einck, John; Bellon, Jennifer; Laramore, George E.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The practice policy at the University of Washington has been to employ fast neutron radiotherapy for soft tissue sarcoma lesions with prognostic features predictive for poor local control. These include gross residual disease/inoperable disease, recurrent disease, and contaminated surgical margins. Cartilaginous sarcomas have also been included in this high-risk group. This report updates and expands our previously described experience with this approach. Methods and Materials: Eighty-nine soft tissue sarcoma lesions in 72 patients were treated with neutron radiotherapy in our department between 1984 and 1996. Six patients, each with solitary lesions, were excluded from analysis due to lack of follow-up. Seventy-three percent were treated with fast neutron radiation alone, the rest with a combination of neutrons and photons. Median neutron dose was 18.3 nGy (range 4.8-22). Forty-two patients with solitary lesions were treated with curative intent. Thirty-one patients (including 7 previously treated with neutrons) with 41 lesions were treated with the goal of local palliation. Tumors were predominantly located in the extremity and torso. Thirty of 35 (85%) of curative group patients treated postoperatively had close or positive surgical margins. Thirty-four (82%) lesions treated for palliation were unresectable. Thirty-five patients (53%) were treated at the time of recurrence. Median tumor size at initial presentation was 8.0 cm (range 0.6-29), median treated gross disease size was 5.0 cm (range 1-22), and 46/69 evaluable lesions (67%) were judged to be of intermediate to high histologic grade. Fourteen patients (21%) had chondrosarcomas. Results: Median follow-up was 6 months (range 2-47) and 38 months (range 2-175) for the palliative and curative groups, respectively. Kaplan-Meier estimates were obtained for probability of local relapse-free survival (68%), distant disease-free survival (59%), cause-specific survival (68%), and overall survival (66%) at

  15. Calculation of dosimetry parameters for fast neutron radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, A.H.

    1978-05-01

    A computer simulation of the interactions of 50 MeV d/sup +/ on Be and 42 MeV p/sup +/ on Be neutron spectra with ICRU muscle tissue and Shonka A-150 tissue equivalent plastic was performed to allow computation of the charged particle spectra that result. Nuclear data were obtained from the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF) whenever possible and from the Intranuclear Cascade and Evaporation models otherwise. The dosimetry parameters calculated are: the kerma ratio, K/sub A-150//K/sub tissue/; the energy required to form an ion pair, W; and the stopping power ratio, S/sub g//sup W/.

  16. Calculation of dosimetry parameters for fast neutron radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, A.H.

    1978-05-01

    A computer simulation of the interactions of 50 MeV d + on Be and 42 MeV p + on Be neutron spectra with ICRU muscle tissue and Shonka A-150 tissue equivalent plastic was performed to allow computation of the charged particle spectra that result. Nuclear data were obtained from the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF) whenever possible and from the Intranuclear Cascade and Evaporation models otherwise. The dosimetry parameters calculated are: the kerma ratio, K/sub A-150//K/sub tissue/; the energy required to form an ion pair, W; and the stopping power ratio, S/sub g//sup W/

  17. External beam radiotherapy facilities in Ukraine. Trends and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starenkiy, V.P.; Petrichenko, O.O.; Averyanova, L.O.

    2017-01-01

    The most important aspects of technological support of the radiation therapy of Ukraine are considered in accordance with the requirements of the IAEA. The reasons that influence the availability of radiotherapy for cancer patients in Ukraine are analyzed taking into account the experience of Grigoriev Institute for Medical Radiology of the National Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine.

  18. Development of moderated neutron calibration fields simulating workplaces of MOX fuel facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimura, Norio; Yoshida, Tadayoshi; Takada, Chie

    2005-01-01

    It is important for the MOX fuel facilities to control neutrons produced by the spontaneous fission of plutonium isotopes and those from (α,n) reactions between 18 O and α particles emitted by 238 Pu. Neutron dose meters should be calibrated for measuring these neutrons. We have developed moderated-neutron calibration fields employing a 252 Cf neutron source and moderators mainly for the characteristics evaluation and the calibration of neutron detectors used in MOX fuel facilities. Neutron energy spectrum can be adjusted by changing the position of the 252 Cf neutron source and combining different moderators to simulate the neutron field of the MOX fuel facility. This performance is realized owing to using an existing neutron irradiation room. (K. Yoshida)

  19. A survey of neutron energy spectra and angular distributions of the 9Be(p,n)9B reaction for fast neutron radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allab, M.

    1984-03-01

    Encouraging findings in radiobiology have stimulated a renewed use of fast neutrons in radiotherapy. The physical characteristics required for neutron beams to be suitable for radiotherapy are well established. As a result, the tendency is to replace the previous machines which generated the neutron beams from deuteron bombardment of thick targets (T, Li, Be) by hospital based cyclotrons which accelerate protons on thick Beryllium targets. This report surveys the available experimental data of the 9 Be(p,n) reaction (cross sections, neutron spectra, yields, mean neutron energies) from the threshold to the proton energy Esub(p)=120 MeV and the works using this reaction in dosimetry measurements, with an emphasis on the data since 1977

  20. Fluence-compensated down-scattered neutron imaging using the neutron imaging system at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, D. T., E-mail: casey21@llnl.gov; Munro, D. H.; Grim, G. P.; Landen, O. L.; Spears, B. K.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Field, J. E.; Smalyuk, V. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Volegov, P. L.; Merrill, F. E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The Neutron Imaging System at the National Ignition Facility is used to observe the primary ∼14 MeV neutrons from the hotspot and down-scattered neutrons (6-12 MeV) from the assembled shell. Due to the strong spatial dependence of the primary neutron fluence through the dense shell, the down-scattered image is convolved with the primary-neutron fluence much like a backlighter profile. Using a characteristic scattering angle assumption, we estimate the primary neutron fluence and compensate the down-scattered image, which reveals information about asymmetry that is otherwise difficult to extract without invoking complicated models.

  1. Calibration of the delayed-gamma neutron activation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, R.; Zhao, X.; Rarback, H.M.; Yasumura, S.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Moore, R.I.; Lo Monte, A.F.; Vodopia, K.A.; Liu, H.B.; Economos, C.D.; Nelson, M.E.; Aloia, J.F.; Vaswani, A.N.; Weber, D.A.; Pierson, R.N. Jr.; Joel, D.D.

    1996-01-01

    The delayed-gamma neutron activation facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory was originally calibrated using an anthropomorphic hollow phantom filled with solutions containing predetermined amounts of Ca. However, 99% of the total Ca in the human body is not homogeneously distributed but contained within the skeleton. Recently, an artificial skeleton was designed, constructed, and placed in a bottle phantom to better represent the Ca distribution in the human body. Neutron activation measurements of an anthropomorphic and a bottle (with no skeleton) phantom demonstrate that the difference in size and shape between the two phantoms changes the total body calcium results by less than 1%. To test the artificial skeleton, two small polyethylene jerry-can phantoms were made, one with a femur from a cadaver and one with an artificial bone in exactly the same geometry. The femur was ashed following the neutron activation measurements for chemical analysis of Ca. Results indicate that the artificial bone closely simulates the real bone in neutron activation analysis and provides accurate calibration for Ca measurements. Therefore, the calibration of the delayed-gamma neutron activation system is now based on the new bottle phantom containing an artificial skeleton. This change has improved the accuracy of measurement for total body calcium. Also, the simple geometry of this phantom and the artificial skeleton allows us to simulate the neutron activation process using a Monte Carlo code, which enables us to calibrate the system for human subjects larger and smaller than the phantoms used as standards. copyright 1996 American Association of Physicists in Medicine

  2. Cryogenic technology review of cold neutron source facility for localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hun Cheol; Park, D. S.; Moon, H. M.; Soon, Y. P. [Daesung Cryogenic Research Institute, Ansan (Korea); Kim, J. H. [United Pacific Technology, Inc., Ansan (Korea)

    1998-02-01

    This Research is performed to localize the cold neutron source(CNS) facility in HANARO and the report consists of two parts. In PART I, the local and foreign technology for CNS facility is investigated and examined. In PART II, safety and licensing are investigated. CNS facility consists of cryogenic and warm part. Cryogenic part includes a helium refrigerator, vacuum insulated pipes, condenser, cryogenic fluid tube and moderator cell. Warm part includes moderator gas control, vacuum equipment, process monitoring system. Warm part is at high level as a result of the development of semiconductor industries and can be localized. However, even though cryogenic technology is expected to play a important role in developing the 21st century's cutting technology, it lacks of specialists and the research facility since the domestic market is small and the research institutes and government do not recognize the importance. Therefore, it takes a long research time in order to localize the facility. The safety standard of reactor for hydrogen gas in domestic nuclear power regulations is compared with that of the foreign countries, and the licensing method for installation of CNS facility is examined. The system failure and its influence are also analyzed. 23 refs., 59 figs., 26 tabs. (Author)

  3. Prediction analysis of dose equivalent responses of neutron dosemeters used at a MOX fuel facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimura, N.; Yoshida, T.; Takada, C.

    2011-01-01

    To predict how accurately neutron dosemeters can measure the neutron dose equivalent (rate) in MOX fuel fabrication facility work environments, the dose equivalent responses of neutron dosemeters were calculated by the spectral folding method. The dosemeters selected included two types of personal dosemeter, namely a thermoluminescent albedo neutron dosemeter and an electronic neutron dosemeter, three moderator-based neutron survey meters, and one special instrument called an H p (10) monitor. The calculations revealed the energy dependences of the responses expected within the entire range of neutron spectral variations observed in neutron fields at workplaces. (authors)

  4. Preliminary investigations of Monte Carlo Simulations of neutron energy and LET spectra for fast neutron therapy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroc, T.K.

    2009-01-01

    No fast neutron therapy facility has been built with optimized beam quality based on a thorough understanding of the neutron spectrum and its resulting biological effectiveness. A study has been initiated to provide the information necessary for such an optimization. Monte Carlo studies will be used to simulate neutron energy spectra and LET spectra. These studies will be bench-marked with data taken at existing fast neutron therapy facilities. Results will also be compared with radiobiological studies to further support beam quality ptimization. These simulations, anchored by this data, will then be used to determine what parameters might be optimized to take full advantage of the unique LET properties of fast neutron beams. This paper will present preliminary work in generating energy and LET spectra for the Fermilab fast neutron therapy facility.

  5. Neutron flux characterization of californium-252 Neutron Research Facility at the University of Texas - Pan American by nuclear analytical technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahid, Kareem; Sanchez, Patrick; Hannan, Mohammad

    2014-03-01

    In the field of nuclear science, neutron flux is an intrinsic property of nuclear reaction facilities that is the basis for experimental irradiation calculations and analysis. In the Rio Grande Valley (Texas), the UTPA Neutron Research Facility (NRF) is currently the only neutron facility available for experimental research purposes. The facility is comprised of a 20-microgram californium-252 neutron source surrounded by a shielding cascade containing different irradiation cavities. Thermal and fast neutron flux values for the UTPA NRF have yet to be fully investigated and may be of particular interest to biomedical studies in low neutron dose applications. Though a variety of techniques exist for the characterization of neutron flux, neutron activation analysis (NAA) of metal and nonmetal foils is a commonly utilized experimental method because of its detection sensitivity and availability. The aim of our current investigation is to employ foil activation in the determination of neutron flux values for the UTPA NSRF for further research purposes. Neutron spectrum unfolding of the acquired experimental data via specialized software and subsequent comparison for consistency with computational models lends confidence to the results.

  6. Neutron measurements at BRIT/BARC medical cyclotron facility of RMC, Parel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathian, Deepa; Sathian, V.; Phandnis, U.V.; Soni, P.S.; Mohite, D.Y.

    2005-01-01

    Neutron leakage and its long distance propagation in the atmosphere from the intense neutron facilities such as high energy accelerators like Cyclotron are very important for the shielding design of the facilities and resulting dose reduction to nearby population, because of strong penetrability of high energy neutrons. The neutron interaction cross sections are highly energy dependent, so different methods are adopted for measuring different energy neutrons. The method also depends on the amount of neutron fluence rate expected at the location. When the fluence rate is very high, the foil activation is the best method for the measurement of neutron fluence rate. In foil activation technique an inactive material is activated by neutrons and the activity is measured and correlated to the neutron fluence rate. In this paper, neutron fluence rate measurement using different activation foils at medical cyclotron room of Radiation Medicine Centre (RMC) is discussed. (author)

  7. Structural Shielding Design and Evaluation for Megavoltage X- and Gamma-Ray Radiotherapy Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, Glenn P

    2006-09-01

    Structural Shielding Design and Evaluation for Megavoltage X- and Gamma-Ray Radiotherapy Facilities NCRP Report No. 151, 2005, 246 pp. (Hardcover $100). National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, 7910 Woodmont Avenue, Suite 400, Bethesda, MD 20814-3095. ISBN-10 0-0929600-87-8; http://www.NCRPonline.org. © 2006 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  8. Passive neutron survey of the 233-S Plutonium Concentration Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    A passive neutron survey was performed at the 233-S Plutonium Concentration Facility (located at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington) during late 1994 and early 1995. Four areas were surveyed: an abandoned filter box and pipe trench, column laydown trench, load-out hood, and process hood. The primary purpose of the survey was to identify locations that had plutonium to help direct decontamination and decommissioning activities. A secondary purpose of the survey was to determine the quantity of material when its presence was identified

  9. The advanced neutron source facility: Safety philosophy and studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, S.R.; Harrington, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is currently the only new civilian nuclear reactor facility proposed for construction in the United States. Even though the thermal power of this research-oriented reactor is a relatively low 300 MW, the design will undoubtedly receive intense scrutiny before construction is allowed to proceed. Safety studies are already under way to ensure that the maximum degree of safety in incorporated into the design and that the design is acceptable to the Department of Energy (DOE) and can meet the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations. This document discusses these safety studies

  10. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosnitz, L.R.; Kapp, D.S.; Weissberg, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    This review highlights developments over the past decade in radiotherapy and attempts to summarize the state of the art in the management of the major diseases in which radiotherapy has a meaningful role. The equipment, radiobiology of radiotherapy and carcinoma of the lung, breast and intestines are highlighted

  11. Responses of commercially available neutron electronic personal dosemeters in neutron fields simulating workplaces at MOX fuel fabrication facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimura, N.; Yoshida, T.; Takada, C.

    2011-01-01

    The authors investigated the performance of three commercially available electronic personal dosemeters (EPDs) in evaluating neutron dose equivalents and discussed their suitability to work environments in MOX fuel fabrication facilities. The EPDs selected for this study were NRY21 (Fuji Electric Systems), PDM-313 (Aloka) and DMC 2000 GN (MGP Instruments). All tests were conducted in moderated 252 Cf neutron fields with neutron spectral and dosimetric characteristics similar to those found in MOX fuel facilities. The test results revealed trends and the magnitude of response variations in relation to neutron spectral changes expected in work environments.

  12. User's guide for the small-angle neutron scattering facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlak, W.A.H.M.; Werkhoven, E.J.

    1989-04-01

    This report serves as a manual for the users of the small-angle neutron scattering instrument located at beamport HB3 of the High Flux Reactor in Petten. The main part of the text is devoted to the control of the facility and the data handling by means of a μVAX computer. Also, the various possibilities to access the facility across computer networks are discussed. A collection of menu-driven and command-driven programs, which utilize the flexibility of the VMS operating system without requiring detailed knowledge of the user about the computer environment, enables to control the instrument. For the convenience of the experienced user, who might wish to update or extend the software, a technical supplement is included. 15 figs.; 8 refs

  13. Neutronic computational modeling of the ASTRA critical facility using MCNPX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, L. P.; Garcia, C. R.; Milian, D.; Milian, E. E.; Brayner, C.

    2015-01-01

    The Pebble Bed Very High Temperature Reactor is considered as a prominent candidate among Generation IV nuclear energy systems. Nevertheless the Pebble Bed Very High Temperature Reactor faces an important challenge due to the insufficient validation of computer codes currently available for use in its design and safety analysis. In this paper a detailed IAEA computational benchmark announced by IAEA-TECDOC-1694 in the framework of the Coordinated Research Project 'Evaluation of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Performance' was solved in support of the Generation IV computer codes validation effort using MCNPX ver. 2.6e computational code. In the IAEA-TECDOC-1694 were summarized a set of four calculational benchmark problems performed at the ASTRA critical facility. Benchmark problems include criticality experiments, control rod worth measurements and reactivity measurements. The ASTRA Critical Facility at the Kurchatov Institute in Moscow was used to simulate the neutronic behavior of nuclear pebble bed reactors. (Author)

  14. Determination of two- and three-dimensional radiation fields for neutron radiotherapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, J.K.

    1986-01-01

    The thesis deals with the computerized investigations for fast neutron radiotherapy planning, explaining the calculation and modelling of local dose distributions in patients as a result of mixed neutron and gamma radiation fields. For a computed irradiation program (elaborated for instance by the COMRAD program system), dose distribution functions are required for the simulation of multi-field or moving beam irradiations, the functions being derived semi-empirically by non-linear regression. The necessary data on stationary field doses are derived by measurements or by computed simulation with specific transport programs from the nuclear engineering sector. Transport calculations show the effects of inhomogeneities in the patient's body on the dose distribution. The determined, strong inhomogneity effects (lungs, head) have to be taken into account as precisely as possible in order to achieve optimum irradiation planning. (orig./HP) [de

  15. Intensity Modulated Neutron Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santanam, Lakshmi; He, Tony; Yudelev, Mark; Forman, Jeffrey D.; Orton, Colin G.; Heuvel, Frank van den; Maughan, Richard L.; Burmeister, Jay

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates the enhanced conformality of neutron dose distributions obtainable through the application of intensity modulated neutron radiotherapy (IMNRT) to the treatment of prostate adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: An in-house algorithm was used to optimize individual segments for IMNRT generated using an organ-at-risk (OAR) avoidance approach. A number of beam orientation schemes were investigated in an attempt to approach an optimum solution. The IMNRT plans were created retrospectively for 5 patients previously treated for prostate adenocarcinoma using fast neutron therapy (FNT), and a comparison of these plans is presented. Dose distributions and dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were analyzed and plans were evaluated based on percentage volumes of rectum and bladder receiving 95%, 80%, and 50% (V 95 , V 80 , V 50 ) of the prescription dose, and on V 60 for both the femoral heads and GM muscle group. Results: Plans were normalized such that the IMNRT DVHs for prostate and seminal vesicles were nearly identical to those for conventional FNT plans. Use of IMNRT provided reductions in rectum V 95 and V 80 of 10% (2-27%) and 13% (5-28%), respectively, and reductions in bladder V 95 and V 80 of 12% (3-26%) and 4% (7-10%), respectively. The average decrease in V 60 for the femoral heads was 4.5% (1-18%), with no significant change in V 60 for the GM muscle group. Conclusions: This study provides the first analysis of the application of intensity modulation to neutron radiotherapy. The IMNRT technique provides a substantial reduction in normal tissue dose in the treatment of prostate cancer. This reduction should result in a significant clinical advantage for this and other treatment sites

  16. The neutronic design and performance of the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, Christopher M.

    Neutron scattering research is performed primarily at large-scale facilities. However, history has shown that smaller scale neutron scattering facilities can play a useful role in education and innovation while performing valuable materials research. This dissertation details the design and experimental validation of the LENS TMR as an example for a small scale accelerator driven neutron source. LENS achieves competitive long wavelength neutron intensities by employing a novel long pulse mode of operation, where the neutron production target is irradiated on a time scale comparable to the emission time of neutrons from the system. Monte Carlo methods have been employed to develop a design for optimal production of long wavelength neutrons from the 9Be(p,n) reaction at proton energies ranging from 7 to 13 MeV proton energy. The neutron spectrum was experimentally measured using time of flight, where it is found that the impact of the long pulse mode on energy resolution can be eliminated at sub-eV neutron energies if the emission time distribution of neutron from the system is known. The emission time distribution from the TMR system is measured using a time focussed crystal analyzer. Emission time of the fundamental cold neutron mode is found to be consistent with Monte Carlo results. The measured thermal neutron spectrum from the water reflector is found to be in agreement with Monte Carlo predictions if the scattering kernels employed are well established. It was found that the scattering kernels currently employed for cryogenic methane are inadequate for accurate prediction of the cold neutron intensity from the system. The TMR and neutronic modeling have been well characterized and the source design is flexible, such that it is possible for LENS to serve as an effective test bed for future work in neutronic development. Suggestions for improvements to the design that would allow increased neutron flux into the instruments are provided.

  17. The advanced neutron source - A world-class research reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, P.B.; Meek, W.E.

    1993-01-01

    The advanced neutron source (ANS) is a new facility being designed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory that is based on a heavy-water-moderated reactor and extensive experiment and user-support facilities. The primary purpose of the ANS is to provide world-class facilities for neutron scattering research, isotope production, and materials irradiation in the United States. The neutrons provided by the reactor will be thermalized to produce sources of hot, thermal, cold, very cold, and ultracold neutrons usable at the experiment stations. Beams of cold neutrons will be directed into a large guide hall using neutron guide technology, greatly enhancing the number of research stations possible in the project. Fundamental and nuclear physics, materials analysis, and other research pro- grams will share the neutron beam facilities. Sufficient laboratory and office space will be provided to create an effective user-oriented environment

  18. The Neutrons for Science Facility at SPIRAL-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledoux, X.; Bauge, E.; Belier, G.; Caillaud, T.; Chatillon, A.; Granier, T.; Landoas, O.; Rosse, B.; Taieeb, J.; Thfoin, I.; Varignon, C. [CEA/DAM/DIF, F-91297, Arpajon (France); Aieche, M.; Barreau, G.; Czajkowski, S.; Jurado, B.; Tsekhanovich, I. [CENBG, Gradignan (France); Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.; Borcea, C.; Negoita, F. [NIPNE, Bucharest (Romania); and others

    2011-12-13

    The ''Neutrons for Science''(NFS) facility will be a component of SPIRAL-2, the future accelerator dedicated to the production of very intense radioactive ion beams, under construction at GANIL in Caen (France). NFS will be composed of a pulsed neutron beam for in-flight measurements and irradiation stations for cross-section measurements and material studies. Continuous and quasi-monokinetic energy spectra will be available at NFS respectively produced by the interaction of deuteron beam on thick a Be converter and by the {sup 7}Li(p,n) reaction on a thin converter. The flux at NFS will be up to 2 orders of magnitude higher than those of other existing time-of-flight facilities in the 1 MeV to 40 MeV range. NFS will be a very powerful tool for physics and fundamental research as well as applications like the transmutation of nuclear waste, design of future fission and fusion reactors, nuclear medicine or test and development of new detectors.

  19. The Neutrons for Science Facility at SPIRAL-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledoux, X.; Bauge, E.; Belier, G.; Caillaud, T.; Chatillon, A.; Granier, T.; Landoas, O.; Rosse, B.; Taieeb, J.; Thfoin, I.; Varignon, C.; Aieche, M.; Barreau, G.; Czajkowski, S.; Jurado, B.; Tsekhanovich, I.; Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.; Borcea, C.; Negoita, F.

    2011-01-01

    The ''Neutrons for Science''(NFS) facility will be a component of SPIRAL-2, the future accelerator dedicated to the production of very intense radioactive ion beams, under construction at GANIL in Caen (France). NFS will be composed of a pulsed neutron beam for in-flight measurements and irradiation stations for cross-section measurements and material studies. Continuous and quasi-monokinetic energy spectra will be available at NFS respectively produced by the interaction of deuteron beam on thick a Be converter and by the 7 Li(p,n) reaction on a thin converter. The flux at NFS will be up to 2 orders of magnitude higher than those of other existing time-of-flight facilities in the 1 MeV to 40 MeV range. NFS will be a very powerful tool for physics and fundamental research as well as applications like the transmutation of nuclear waste, design of future fission and fusion reactors, nuclear medicine or test and development of new detectors.

  20. Results of the application of the Risk Evaluation System in Radiotherapy (RESRA) in radiotherapy facilities in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paz G, A.; Godinez S, V.

    2013-10-01

    The present work describes the main results of the risk evaluation for some radiotherapy treatments with lineal accelerators, cobalt 60, brachytherapy of high dose rate and brachytherapy of low dose rate that are realize in Mexico. These evaluations were carried out applying the risk matrices method with the tool computer risk evaluation system in radiotherapy, accessible for the national users through internet, and developed by the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias in Mexico, in cooperation with the Forum of Ibero-American regulators. The used methodology is based on the risk matrices method that is a mathematical tool for the risk evaluation, and it was centered in the evaluation from the risk to which are exposed the patients, the occupational exposed personnel and people in general, by the mechanical faults of the treatment equipment s, bad calibrations, human errors, or any other event initiator of accidents. The events initiators of accidents are defined as those undesirable events that can produce and administration of an excessive dose or a sub-dose of the prescribed dose by the doctor, to the planned objective volume, or undesirable dose to the patient's regions or dose to occupational exposed personnel or people in general. The barriers are the actions and systems as mechanical switches, interlocks or alarms, dedicated to avoid that these accidents take place. The evaluation analysis of the risk developed by the members of the Forum for radiotherapy facilities together with the software RESRA has demonstrated to be useful in the prevention of many possible accidents that have happened in the past in other facilities and can avoid many others in the future. (Author)

  1. Proposed Californium-252 User Facility for Neutron Science at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.C.; Laxson, R.R.; Knauer, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    The Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at ORNL has petitioned to establish a Californium-252 User Facility for Neutron Science for academic, industrial, and governmental researchers. The REDC Californium Facility (CF) stores the national inventory of sealed 252 Cf neutron source for university and research loans. Within the CF, the 252 Cf storage pool and two uncontaminated hot cells currently in service for the Californium Program will form the physical basis for the User Facility. Relevant applications include dosimetry and experiments for neutron tumor therapy; fast and thermal neutron activation analysis of materials; experimental configurations for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis; neutron shielding and material damage studies; and hardness testing of radiation detectors, cameras, and electronics. A formal User Facility simplifies working arrangements and agreements between US DOE facilities, academia, and commercial interests

  2. Status report on the cold neutron source of the Garching neutron research facility FRM-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gobrecht, K.; Gutsmiedl, E.; Scheuer, A.

    2001-01-01

    The new high flux research reactor of the Technical University of Munich (Technische Universitaet Muenchen, TUM) will be equipped with a cold neutron source (CNS). The centre of the CNS will be located in the D2O-reflector tank at 400 mm from the reactor core axis, close to the thermal neutron flux maximum. The power of 4500 W developed by the nuclear heating in the 16 litres of liquid deuterium at 25 K, and in the structures, is evacuated by a two phase thermal siphon avoiding film boiling and flooding. The thermal siphon is a single tube with counter current flow. It is inclined by 10deg from vertical, and optimised for a deuterium flow rate of 14 g/s. Optimisation of structure design and material, as well as safety aspects will be discussed. Those parts of the structure, which are exposed to high thermal neutron flux, are made from Zircaloy 4 and 6061T6 aluminium. Structure failure due to embrittlement of the structure material under high rapid neutron flux is very importable during the life time of the CNS (30 years). Double, in pile even triple, containment with inert gas liner guarantees lack of explosion risk and of tritium contamination to the environment. Adding a few percent of hydrogen (H2) to the deuterium (D2) will improve the moderating properties of our relatively small moderator volume. Nearly all of the hydrogen is bound in the form of HD molecules. The new reactor will have 13 beam tubes, 4 of which are looking at the cold neutron source (CNS), including two for very cold (VCN) and ultra-cold neutron (UCN) production. The latter will take place in the horizontal beam tube SR4, which will house an additional cryogenic moderator (e.g. solid deuterium). More than 60% of the experiments foreseen in the new neutron research facility will use cold neutrons from the CNS. The mounting of the hardware components of the CNS into the reactor has started in the spring of 2000. The CNS will go into trial operation in the end of year 2000. (J.P.N.)

  3. Status report on the cold neutron source of the Garching neutron research facility FRM-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gobrecht, K.

    1999-01-01

    ) production. The latter will take place in the horizontal beam tube SR4, which will house an additional cryogenic moderator (e.g. solid deuterium). More than 60% of the experiments foreseen in the new neutron research facility will use cold neutrons from the CNS. The mounting of the hardware components of the CNS into the reactor, and the reactor building, will start before the end of the year. The CNS will go into trial operation in the middle of year 2000. (author)

  4. Characteristics of neutron irradiation facility and dose estimation method for neutron capture therapy at Kyoto University research reactor institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Sakurai, Y.; Kanda, K.

    2001-01-01

    The neutron irradiation characteristics of the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility (HWNIF) at the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KIJRRI) for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), is described. The present method of dose measurement and its evaluation at the KURRI, is explained. Especially, the special feature and noticeable matters were expounded for the BNCT with craniotomy, which has been applied at present only in Japan. (author)

  5. Neutron Skyshine in shielding projects of radiotherapy: comparison between theoretical approach and simulation by Monte Carlo method; 'Skyshine' de neutrons em projetos de blindagens de radioterapia: comparacao entre abordagem teorica e simulacao por metodo de Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falcao, R.C.; Facure, A. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Santini, E.S. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, A.X. [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2005-07-01

    In this work, the MCNP code is used to simulate the transport of neutrons in a room of radiotherapy, whose shieldings are designed according to the method of skyshine (scattering in the atmosphere). The simulations are compared with the results obtained from empirically established expressions, which are normally used for designing the ceilings of the rooms facilities, ensuring that dose rates (neutrons + photons) around them do not exceed the maximum limits allowed by the standards of the CNEN. Good agreement is observed between the doses calculated according to these expressions and those obtained through simulation by Monte Carlo in the case of rooms without ceiling, and an overestimate of the calculations by a factor 2 or 3 in relation to the simulations, in the case of rooms with ceiling.

  6. Facilities for radiotherapy with ion beams status and worldwide developments

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, B H

    1999-01-01

    Forty-five years after the first ion beam therapy in Berkeley around 25,000 cancer patients worldwide have been treated successfully. Ion accelerators, designed for nuclear research, delivered most of this treatment. The first hospital-based facility started operation in 1998 at Loma Linda California, the first for heavier ions at Chiba, Japan in 1994 and the first commercially delivered facilities started operation in 1998 at Kashiwa, Japan. In 2000, the Harvard Medical Centre, Boston, US, will commence operation and several new facilities are planned or under construction worldwide, although none in Australia. This paper will discuss the physical and biological advantages of ion beams over x-rays and electrons. In the treatment of cancer patients ion beam therapy is especially suited for localised tumours in radiation sensitive areas like skull or spine. Heavier ions are also effective in anoxic tumour cells (found around the normally oxygenated cell population). An additional advantage of the heavier carbo...

  7. Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rema Jyothirmayi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Conservative treatment in the form of limited surgery and post-operative radiotherapy is controversial in hand and foot sarcomas, both due to poor radiation tolerance of the palm and sole, and due to technical difficulties in achieving adequate margins.This paper describes the local control and survival of 41 patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the hand or foot treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy. The acute and late toxicity of megavoltage radiotherapy to the hand and foot are described. The technical issues and details of treatment delivery are discussed. The factors influencing local control after radiotherapy are analysed.

  8. State of maintenance of JRR-3M neutron radiography facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuruno, Akira

    1994-01-01

    Nearly two years have elapsed since the use of the JRR-3M neutron radiography facilities was begun. Five years passed since the decision of the detailed specification, and this period is enough for the contained equipment and the peripheral equipment become old-fashioned. In addition, as unexpected high performance was obtained by these facilities, the measures were to be taken in many places. In this fiscal year, the improvement of the contained equipment and the increase of the peripheral equipment were carried out. These improvement and renewal are still insufficient for these facilities demonstrate the performance fully, and are expected to continue hereafter. As the measures taken in relation to the TNRF-2, the renewal of the BN shutter, the remodeling of the black box and the improvement of the interlock were carried out. As the measures taken in relation to CNRF, the new installation of auxiliary shields, the remodeling of the shutter and the new installation of internal illumination were carried out. As the measures taken in relation to the image processor, the outline based on long term perspective is shown. The equipments which were purchased in this fiscal year are the work station which becomes the center of the image-processing network, the cooled CCD camera system and the SIT camera for renewal. In the dark room, a scanning micro-densitometer was installed. (K.I.)

  9. Design of neutron radiography facility in pool for the reactor RA-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peirone, M.; Coleff, A.; Sanchez, F.; Chiaraviglio, N.

    2013-01-01

    RA-10 project consists in the design and construction of a multipurpose reactor for multiple applications, including radioisotopes production, material testing and an in pool facility for neutron imaging. Neutron imaging is a powerful tool for studies of materials and offer several advantages among other attenuation-based techniques. In this study mechanical and neutronic requirements for the RA-10 in pool neutron imaging facility are described. The MCNP neutronic model and the mechanical design satisfying these requirements in a first engineering stage are described. (author)

  10. Establishment of nuclear data system - Feasibility study for neutron-beam= facility at pohang accelerator laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam Kung, Won; Koh, In Soo; Cho, Moo Hyun; Kim, Kui Nyun; Kwang, Hung Sik; Park, Sung Joo [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    Nuclear data which have been produced by a few developed countries in the= past are essential elements to many disciplines, especially to nuclear engineering. As we promote our nuclear industry further to the level of advanced countries, we also have to establish the Nuclear Data System to produce and evaluate nuclear data independently. We have studied the possibility to build a neutron-beam facility utilizing accelerator facilities, technologies and man powers at pohang Accelerator Laboratory. We found specific parameters for the PAL 100-MeV electron linac based on the existing klystron, modulator, accelerating tubes and other facilities in the PAL; the beam energy is 60-100 MeV, the beam current for the short pulse (10 ns) is 2 A and for the long pulse is 500 mA and the pulse repetition rate is 60 Hz. We propose a neutron-beam facility using PAL 100-MeV electron linac where we can use a Ta-target for the neutron generation and three different time-of-flight beam lines (10 m, 20 m, and 100 m). One may find that the proposed neutron-beam facility is comparable with other operating neutron facilities in the world. We conclude that the proposed neutron-beam facility utilizing the existing accelerator facility in the PAL would be an excellent facility for neutron data production in combination with the ` Hanaro` facility in KAERI. 8 refs., 11 tabs., 12 figs. (author)

  11. Cold neutron PGAA facility developments at university research reactors in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uenlue, K.; Rios-Martinez, C.

    2005-01-01

    The PGAA applications can be enhanced by using subthermal neutrons, cold neutrons at university research reactors. Only two cold neutron beam facilities were developed at the U.S. university research reactors, namely at Cornell University and the University of Texas at Austin. Both facilities used mesitylene moderator. The mesitylene moderator in the Cornell Cold Neutron Beam Facility (CNBF) was cooled by a helium cryorefrigerator via copper cold fingers to maintain the moderator below 30 K at full power reactor operation. Texas Cold Neutron Source (TCNS) also uses mesitylene moderator that is cooled by a cryorefrigerator via a neon thermosiphon. The operation of the TCNS is based on a helium cryorefrigerator, which liquefies neon gas in a 3-m long thermosiphon. The thermosiphon cools and maintains mesitylene moderator at about 30 K in a chamber. Neutrons streaming through the mesitylene chamber are moderated and thus reduce their energy to produce a cold neutron distribution. (author)

  12. Status report on the cold neutron source of the Garching neutron research facility FRM-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobrecht, K.; Gutsmiedl, E.; Scheuer, A.

    2002-01-01

    foreseen in the new neutron research facility will use cold neutrons from the CNS. The mounting of the hardware components of the CNS into the reactor has started in the spring of 2000. The CNS went into trial operation in the end of year 2000.

  13. NEUTRON GENERATOR FACILITY AT SFU: GEANT4 DOSE RATE PREDICTION AND VERIFICATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J; Chester, A; Domingo, T; Rizwan, U; Starosta, K; Voss, P

    2016-11-01

    Detailed dose rate maps for a neutron generator facility at Simon Fraser University were produced via the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework. Predicted neutron dose rates throughout the facility were compared with radiation survey measurements made during the facility commissioning process. When accounting for thermal neutrons, the prediction and measurement agree within a factor of 2 or better in most survey locations, and within 10 % inside the vault housing the neutron generator. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. A Micromegas Detector for Neutron Beam Imaging at the n_TOF Facility at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Belloni, F; Berthoumieux, E; Calviani, M; Chiaveri, E; Colonna, N; Giomataris, Y; Guerrero, C; Gunsing, F; Iguaz, F J; Kebbiri, M; Pancin, J; Papaevangelou, T; Tsinganis, A; Vlachoudis, V; Altstadt, S; Andrzejewski, J; Audouin, L; Barbagallo, M; Bécares, V; Bečvář, F; Billowes, J; Boccone, V; Bosnar, D; Brugger, M; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Carrapiço, C; Cerutti, F; Chiaveri, E; Chin, M; Cortés, G; Corté-Giraldo, M A; Diakaki, M; Domingo-Pardo, C; Duran, I; Dzysiuk, N; Eleftheriadis, C; Ferrari, A; Fraval, K; Ganesan, S; García, A R; Giubrone, G; Gómez-Hornillos, M B; Gonçalves, I F; González-Romero, E; Griesmayer, E; Gurusamy, P; Jenkins, D G; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y; Käppeler, F; Karadimos, D; Koehler, P; Kokkoris, M; Krtička, M; Kroll, J; Langer, C; Lederer, C; Leeb, H; Leong, L S; Losito, R; Manousos, A; Marganiec, J; Marítnez, T; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P F; Mastromarco, M; Meaze, M; Mendoza, E; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Mingrone, F; Mirea, M; Mondalaers, W; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Perkowski, J; Plompen, A J M; Praena, J; Quesada, J M; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Riego, A; Roman, F; Rubbia, C; Sarmento, R; Schillebeeckx, P; Schmidt, S; Tagliente, G; Tain, J L; Tarrío, D; Tassan-Got, L; Valenta, S; Vannini, G; Variale, V; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Versaci, R; Vermeulen, M J; Vlastou, R; Wallner, A; Ware, T; Weigand, M; Weiss, C; Wright, T J; Žugec, P

    2014-01-01

    Micromegas (Micro-MEsh Gaseous Structure) detectors are gas detectors consisting of a stack of one ionization and one proportional chamber. A micromesh separates the two communicating regions, where two different electric fields establish respectively a charge drift and a charge multiplication regime. The n\\_TOF facility at CERN provides a white neutron beam (from thermal up to GeV neutrons) for neutron induced cross section measurements. These measurements need a perfect knowlodge of the incident neutron beam, in particular regarding its spatial profile. A position sensitive micromegas detector equipped with a B-10 based neutron/charged particle converter has been extensively used at the n\\_TOF facility for characterizing the neutron beam profile and extracting the beam interception factor for samples of different size. The boron converter allowed to scan the energy region of interest for neutron induced capture reactions as a function of the neutron energy, determined by the time of flight. Experimental ...

  15. Absolute measurement of the DT primary neutron yield on the National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leeper R.J.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of the absolute neutron yield produced in inertial confinement fusion target experiments conducted on the National Ignition Facility (NIF is essential in benchmarking progress towards the goal of achieving ignition on this facility. This paper describes three independent diagnostic techniques that have been developed to make accurate and precise DT neutron yield measurements on the NIF.

  16. Characterization of the fast neutron irradiation facility of the Portuguese Research Reactor after core conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, J.G.; Sousa, M.; Santos, J.P.; Fernandes, A.C.

    2011-01-01

    The fast neutron irradiation facility of the Portuguese Research Reactor was characterized after the reduction in uranium enrichment and rearrangement of the core configuration. In this work we report on the determination of the hardness parameter and the 1 MeV equivalent neutron flux along the facility, in the new irradiation conditions, following ASTM E722 standard.

  17. Control system specification for a cyclotron and neutron therapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacky, J.; Risler, R.; Kalet, I.; Wootton, P.; Barke, A.; Brossard, S.; Jackson, R.

    1991-01-01

    It is usually considered an essential element of good practice in engineering to produce a specification for a system before building it. However, it has been found to be quite difficult to produce useful specifications of large software systems. The authors have nearly completed a comprehensive specification for the computer control system of a cyclotron and treatment facility that provides particle beams for cancer treatments with fast neutrons, production of medical isotopes, and physics experiments. They describe the control system as thoroughly as is practical using standard technical English, supplemented by tables, diagrams, and some algebraic equations. This specification comprises over 300 single-spaced pages. A more precise and compact specification might be achieved by making greater use of formal mathematical notations instead of English. They have begun work on a formal specification of the system, using the Z and Petri net notations

  18. Recovery of spent high intensity neutron sources in Atalante Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bros, P.; Boyer Deslys, V.; Millet, A.; Solinhac, I.; Donnet, L.; Maillard, C.; Paillard, S.; Ranchoux, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Atalante facility is required by law to recover both neutron and gamma sources with activity levels exceeding 300 mCi. Most of the neutron sources consist of mixtures of alpha-emitters (238Pu, 239Pu, 241Am or 244Cm) and beryllium. Several processes now under consideration are based on routine chemical separation techniques (selective precipitation, extraction chromatography, ion exchange). The treatment produces an actinide oxide (which is used later for R and D studies) and solid beryllium nitrate, which is considered as a waste and transferred to a surface interim storage site if the overall activity of the package after 300 years is less than 50 MBq (ANDRA specifications). The Material Analysis and Metrology Laboratory of Atalante validate the residual alpha activity in the waste. The techniques used include alpha spectrometry and L-line X-ray fluorescence for alpha emitters, and plasma torch measurements (ICP-AES and ICP-MS) for beryllium analysis. Specific equipment for transport (B type cask), storage and treatment (hot shielded cells) are used for this activity. (Author)

  19. Construction of the Neutron Beam Facility at Australia's OPAL Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, J.S.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Australia's new research reactor, OPAL, has been designed for high quality neutron beam science and radioisotope production. It has a capacity for eighteen neutron beam instruments to be located at the reactor face and in a neutron guide hall. The new neutron beam facility features a 20 litre liquid deuterium cold neutron source and supermirror neutron reflecting guides for intense cold and thermal neutron beams. Nine neutron beam instruments are under development, of which seven are scheduled for completion in early 2007. The project is approaching the hot-commissioning stage, where criticality will be demonstrated. Installation of the neutron beam transport system and neutron beam instruments in the neutron guide hall and at the reactor face is underway, and the path to completion of this project is relatively clear. The lecture will outline Australia's aspirations for neutron science at the OPAL reactor, and describe the neutron beam facility under construction. The status of this project and a forecast of the program to completion, including commissioning and commencement of routine operation in 2007 will also be discussed. This project is the culmination of almost a decade of effort. We now eagerly anticipate catapulting Australia's neutron beam science capability to meet the best in the world today. (author)

  20. CUP-A New High-Flux Irradiation Position at the ANITA Neutron Facility at TSL

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prokofiev, A. V.; Passoth, E.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Majerle, Mitja

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 4 (2014), s. 1929-1936 ISSN 0018-9499. [European Conference on Radiation and its Effects on Components and Systems (RADECS). Oxford, 23.09.2013-27.09.2013] Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : accelerated testing * integrated circuit radiation effects * neutron beams * neutron detectors * neutron radiation effects * radiation facilities * single event effects * soft error rates * terrestrial radiation environments * test facilities Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.283, year: 2014

  1. Calibration and evaluation of neutron survey meters used at linac facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgado, A.P. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria - IRD, Av. Salvador Allende s/n, Recreio dos Bandeirantes, CEP 22780-160 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Pereira, W.W., E-mail: walsan@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria - IRD, Av. Salvador Allende s/n, Recreio dos Bandeirantes, CEP 22780-160 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Fonseca, E.S. da; Patrao, K.C.S. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria - IRD, Av. Salvador Allende s/n, Recreio dos Bandeirantes, CEP 22780-160 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Batista, D.V.S. [Instituto Nacional do Cancer - INCa, Praca Cruz Vermelha, 23 - centro, CEP 20230-130 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2010-12-15

    Calibrated survey meters from the Neutron Laboratory of the Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD) were used to determine the ambient dose-equivalent rate in a 15 MV linear accelerator treatment room at the Instituto Nacional do Cancer (INCa). Three different models of neutron survey meters were calibrated using four neutron radionuclide neutron sources: {sup 241}AmBe({alpha},n), {sup 252}Cf(f,n), heavy-water moderated {sup 252}Cf(f,n), and {sup 238}PuBe({alpha},n). All neutron sources were standardized in a Manganese Sulphate Bath (MSB) absolute primary system. The response of each of these instruments was compared with reference values of ambient dose-equivalent rate. The results demonstrate the complexity of making measurements in the mixed neutron/photon field produced in electron linear accelerator radiotherapy treatment rooms.

  2. Neutron scattering facilities at China Institute of Atomic Energy. Present and future situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, C.T.; Gou, C.; Yang, T.H.

    2001-01-01

    The 15 MW Heavy Water Research Reactor (HWRR) at CIAE in Beijing is the only neutron source available for neutron scattering experiments in China at present. So far totally 5 neutron scattering spectrometers are installed at 4 beam tubes. A 60 MW new research reactor, China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR), now is being built at CIAE to meet the increasing demand of neutron scattering research in China. A brief description of HWRR, the presently existing neutron scattering equipments at HWRP, CARR, and the neutron scattering facilities to be installed at CARR are presented. (J.P.N.)

  3. Spallation target-moderator-reflector studies at the Weapons Neutron Research facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.J.; Gilmore, J.S.; Prael, S.D.; Robinson, H.; Howe, S.D.

    1980-01-01

    Basic neutronics data, initiated by 800-MeV proton spallation reactions, are important to spallation neutron source development and electronuclear fuel production. Angle-dependent and energy-dependent neutron production cross sections, energy-dependent and total neutron yields, thermal and epithermal neutron surface and beam fluxes, and fertile-to-fissile conversion ratios are being measured. The measurements are being done at the Weapons Neutron Research facility on a variety of targets and target-moderator-reflector configurations. The experiments are relevant to the above applications, and provide data to validate computer codes. Preliminary results are presented and compared to calculated predictions. 13 figures

  4. Design of an irradiation facility with thermal, epithermal and fast neutron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfister, G.; Bernnat, W.; Seidel, R.; Schatz, A.K.; Wagner, F.M.; Waschkowski, W.; Schraube, H.

    1992-01-01

    The main features of a neutron irradiation facility to be installed at the planned research reactor FRM-II are presented. In addition to the operational possibilities of the existing facility at the reactor FRM-I, the new facility will produce quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields and a neutron beam in the keV region whose spectrum can be modified by application of suitable filters and scatterers. For this beam, which is well suited for boron capture therapy, calculated boron reaction rates inside a phantom and an experimental verification of the calculations at the existing facility are presented. (orig.) [de

  5. Analysis of a shield design for a DT neutron generator test facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chichester, D L; Pierce, G D

    2007-10-01

    Independent numerical simulations have been performed using the MCNP5 and SCALE5 radiation transport codes to evaluate the effectiveness of a concrete facility designed to shield personnel from neutron radiation emitted from DT neutron generators. The analysis considered radiation source terms of 14.1 MeV monoenergetic neutrons located at three discrete locations within the two test vaults in the facility, calculating neutron and photon dose rates at 44 locations around the facility using both codes. In addition, dose rate contours were established throughout the facility using the MCNP5 mesh tally feature. Neutron dose rates calculated outside of the facility are predicted to be below 0.01 mrem/h at all locations when all neutron generator source terms are operating within the facility. Similarly, the neutron dose rate in one empty test vault when the adjacent test vault is being utilized is also less then 0.01 mrem/h. For most calculation locations outside the facility the photon dose rates were less then the neutron dose rates by a factor of 10 or more.

  6. A 15-year forward look at neutron facilities in JINR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksenov, V.L.

    2017-01-01

    The service life of the IBR-2 reactor, one of the leading pulse neutron sources in the world, is expected to end in 2032. Modern trends in sciences where neutrons are used, possible variants of a concept for a new neutron source and its potential position in the world neutron landscape are discussed. The flagship experiments for a new neutron source in the fields of condensed matter research, fundamental and nuclear physics are proposed. [ru

  7. Demonstration of the importance of a dedicated neutron beam monitoring system for BNCT facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, Der-Sheng; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2016-01-01

    The neutron beam monitoring system is indispensable to BNCT facility in order to achieve an accurate patient dose delivery. The neutron beam monitoring of a reactor-based BNCT (RB-BNCT) facility can be implemented through the instrumentation and control system of a reactor provided that the reactor power level remains constant during reactor operation. However, since the neutron flux in reactor core is highly correlative to complicated reactor kinetics resulting from such as fuel depletion, poison production, and control blade movement, some extent of variation may occur in the spatial distribution of neutron flux in reactor core. Therefore, a dedicated neutron beam monitoring system is needed to be installed in the vicinity of the beam path close to the beam exit of the RB-BNCT facility, where it can measure the BNCT beam intensity as closely as possible and be free from the influence of the objects present around the beam exit. In this study, in order to demonstrate the importance of a dedicated BNCT neutron beam monitoring system, the signals originating from the two in-core neutron detectors installed at THOR were extracted and compared with the three dedicated neutron beam monitors of the THOR BNCT facility. The correlation of the readings between the in-core neutron detectors and the BNCT neutron beam monitors was established to evaluate the improvable quality of the beam intensity measurement inferred by the in-core neutron detectors. In 29 sampled intervals within 16 days of measurement, the fluctuations in the mean value of the normalized ratios between readings of the three BNCT neutron beam monitors lay within 0.2%. However, the normalized ratios of readings of the two in-core neutron detectors to one of the BNCT neutron beam monitors show great fluctuations of 5.9% and 17.5%, respectively. - Highlights: • Two in-core neutron detectors and three BNCT neutron beam monitors were compared. • BNCT neutron beam monitors improve the stability in neutron

  8. Procedure to measure the neutrons spectrum around a lineal accelerator for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega C, H. R.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Letechipia de L, C.; Benites R, J. L.; Salas L, M. A.

    2013-10-01

    An experimental procedure was developed, by means of Bonner spheres, to measure the neutrons spectrum around Linacs of medical use that only requires of a single shot of the accelerator; to this procedure we denominate Planetary or Isocentric method. One of the problems associated to the neutrons spectrum measurement in a radiotherapy room with lineal accelerator is because inside the room a mixed, intense and pulsed radiation field takes place affecting the detection systems based on active detector; this situation is solved using a passive detector. In the case of the Bonner spheres spectrometer the active detector has been substituted by activation detectors, trace detectors or thermoluminescent dosimeters. This spectrometer uses several spheres that are situated one at a time in the measurement point, this way to have the complete measurements group the accelerator should be operated, under the same conditions, so many times like spheres have the spectrometer, this activity can consume a long time and in occasions due to the work load of Linac to complicate the measurement process too. The procedure developed in this work consisted on to situate all the spectrometer spheres at the same time and to make the reading by means of a single shot, to be able to apply this procedure, is necessary that before the measurements two characteristics are evaluated: the cross-talking of the spheres and the symmetry conditions of the neutron field. This method has been applied to determine the photo-neutrons spectrum produced by a lineal accelerator of medical use Varian ix of 15 MV to 100 cm of the isocenter located to 5 cm of depth of a solid water mannequin of 30 x 30 x 15 cm. The spectrum was used to determine the total flow and the environmental dose equivalent. (Author)

  9. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zedgenidze, G.A.; Kulikov, V.A.; Mardynskij, Yu.S.

    1984-01-01

    The technique for roentgenotopometric and medicamentous preparation of patients for radiotherapy has been reported in detail. The features of planning and performing of remote, intracavitary and combined therapy in urinary bladder cancer are considered. The more effective methods of radiotherapy have been proposed taking into account own experience as well as literature data. The comparative evaluation of treatment results and prognosis are given. Radiation pathomorphism of tumors and tissues of urinary bladder is considered in detail. The problems of diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment of complications following radiodiagnosis and radiotherapy in patients with urinary bladder cancer are illustrated widely

  10. Treatment of locally advanced adenoid cystic carcinoma of the head and neck with neutron radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, James G.; Laramore, George E.; Austin-Seymour, Mary; Koh Wuijin; Stelzer, Keith; Griffin, Thomas W.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the efficacy of fast neutron radiotherapy for the treatment of locally advanced and/or recurrent adenoid cystic carcinoma of the head and neck and to identify prognostic variables associated with local-regional control and survival. Methods and Materials: One hundred fifty-nine patients with nonmetastatic, previously unirradiated, locally advanced, and/or recurrent adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) of the head and neck region were treated with fast neutron radiotherapy during the years 1985-1997. One hundred fifty-one patients had either unresectable disease, or gross residual disease (GRD) after an attempted surgical extirpation. Eight patients had microscopic residual disease and were analyzed separately. Sixty-two percent of patients had tumors arising in minor salivary glands, 29% in major salivary glands, and 9% in other sites such as the lacrimal glands, tracheal-bronchial tree, etc. Fifty-five percent of patients were treated for postsurgical recurrent disease and 13% of patients had lymph node involvement at the time of treatment. The median duration of follow-up was 32 months (range 3-142 months). Actuarial curves for survival, cause-specific survival, local-regional control, and the development of distant metastases are presented for times out to 11 years. Results: The 5-year actuarial local-regional tumor control rate for the 151 patients with GRD was 57%; the 5-year actuarial overall survival rate was 72%; and the 5-year actuarial cause-specific survival rate was 77%. Variables associated with decreased local-regional control in the patients with GRD as determined by multivariate analysis included base of skull involvement (p < 0.01) and biopsy only versus an attempted surgical resection prior to treatment (p = 0.03). Patients without these negative factors had an actuarial local-regional control rate of 80% at 5 years. Patients with microscopic residual disease (n = 8) had a 5-year actuarial local-regional control rate of 100%. Base of

  11. The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) project: A world-class research reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, P.B.; Meek, W.E.

    1993-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), a new research facility being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The facility is based on a 330 MW, heavy-water cooled and reflected reactor as the neutron source, with a thermal neutron flux of about 7.5x10 19 m -2 ·sec -1 . Within the reflector region will be one hot source which will serve 2 hot neutron beam tubes, two cryogenic cold sources serving fourteen cold neutron beam tubes, two very cold beam tubes, and seven thermal neutron beam tubes. In addition there will be ten positions for materials irradiation experiments, five of them instrumented. The paper touches on the project status, safety concerns, cost estimates and scheduling, a description of the site, the reactor, and the arrangements of the facilities

  12. Structural integrity assessment based on the HFR Petten neutron beam facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Ohms, C; Idsert, P V D

    2002-01-01

    Neutrons are becoming recognized as a valuable tool for structural-integrity assessment of industrial components and advanced materials development. Microstructure, texture and residual stress analyses are commonly performed by neutron diffraction and a joint CEN/ISO Pre-Standard for residual stress analysis is under development. Furthermore neutrons provide for defects analyses, i.e. precipitations, voids, pores and cracks, through small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) or radiography. At the High Flux Reactor, 12 beam tubes have been installed for the extraction of thermal neutrons for such applications. Two of them are equipped with neutron diffractometers for residual stress and structure determination and have been extensively used in the past. Several other facilities are currently being reactivated and upgraded. These include the SANS and radiography facilities as well as a powder diffractometer. This paper summarizes the main characteristics and current status of these facilities as well as recently in...

  13. Shielding calculations for the design of neutron radiography facility around PARR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashraf, M.M.; Khan, A.R.

    1989-06-01

    Shielding calculations for neutron radiography facility, proposed to be established around PARR have been carried out using two group diffusion theory and shielding formulae. Gamma radiation penetration calculations have been carried out using simple attenuation methods. The fabrication and installation of the neutron radiography facility would provide the basis for designing a better collimating system and would help establish under water radiography facility for the inspection of highly radioactive materials and components etc. (orig./A.B.)

  14. Neutron-irradiation facilities at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source-I for fusion magnet materials studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, B.S.; Blewitt, T.H.

    1982-01-01

    The decommissioning of reactor-based neutron sources in the USA has led to the development of a new generation of neutron sources that employ high-energy accelerators. Among the accelerator-based neutron sources presently in operation, the highest-flux source is the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS), a user facility at Argonne National Laboratory. Neutrons in this source are produced by the interaction of 400 to 500 MeV protons with either of two 238 U target systems. In the Radiation Effects Facility (REF), the 238 U target is surrounded by Pb for neutron generatjion and reflection. The REF has three separate irradiation thimbles. Two thimbles provide irradiation temperatures between that of liquid He and several hundred degrees centigrade. The third thimble operates at ambient temperature. The large irradiation volume, the neutron spectrum and flux, the ability to transfer samples without warm up, and the dedication of the facilities during the irradiation make this ideally suited for radiation damage studies on components for superconducting fusion magnets. Possible experiments for fusion magnet materials are discussed on cyclic irradiation and annealing of stabilizers in a high magnetic field, mechanical tests on organic insulation irradiated at 4 K, and superconductors measured in high fields after irradiation

  15. A conceptual design of neutron tumor therapy reactor facility with a YAYOI based fast neutron source reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakabayashi, Hiroaki; An, Shigehiro.

    1983-01-01

    Fast neutron is known as one of useful radiations for radiation therapy of tumors. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of tumors which makes use of 10 B(n, α) 7 Li reaction of 10 B compounds selectively attached to tumor cells with thermal and intermediate neutrons is another way of neutron based radiation therapy which is, above all, attractive enough to kill tumor cells selectively sparing normal tissue. In Japan, BNCT has already been applied and leaned to be effective. After more than a decade operational experiences and the specific experiments designed for therapeutical purposes, in this paper, a conceptual design of a special neutron therapy reactor facility based on YAYOI - fast neutron source reactor of Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, the University of Tokyo - modified to provide an upward beam of fast and intermediate neutrons is presented. Emphasis is placed on the in-house nature of facility and on the coordinating capability of biological and physical researches as well as maintenances of the facility. (author)

  16. CYCLONE. Neutron therapy facility at Louvain-la-Neuve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meulders, J.P.; Saedeleer, G. de; Winant, M.; Wambersie, A.

    1979-01-01

    The neutrontherapy program at Louvain-la-Neuve is carried out with the cyclotron CYCLONE of the Catholic University. This isochronous variable energy cyclotron, produced by CSF (Corbeville, France), accelerates different types of charged particles; in particular, deuterons can be accelerated at energies ranging from 13 to 50 MeV. Neutrons used for therapeutic applications are produced by bombarding a thick (10 mm) water cooled, Beryllium target with 50 MeV deuterons. A beam current of about 5 μA is used for patient treatments, which produces dose rates of about 0,5 Gy/min at a target-skin-distance (TSD) of 157 cm. The treatment room, and related medical facilities, are located one level below the main level of the cyclotron. This permits the use of a vertical therapeutic neutron beam by bending the deuteron beam at 90 0 . This vertical beam appears to be more adequate for positioning the majority of the patients. The collimation system consists of a fixed shielding and of a series of interchangeable inserts. The inserts are cylindrical in shape; their height is 80 cm and their external diameter 40 cm. The proximal part (50 cm) is a mixture of iron (equivalent thickness 22 cm) and epoxy, and the distal part (30 cm) is a mixture (50%) of borax and epoxy. The emphasis is made on the radioprotection conditions. A series of measurements made in the treatment room and in the entry maze have shown that their special configuration provides a satisfactory protection of the staff. (author)

  17. Technical design report of spallation neutron source facility in J-PARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Shinichi

    2012-02-01

    One of the experimental facilities in Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) is the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF), where high-intensity neutron beams are used as powerful probes for basic research on materials and life science, as well as research and development in industrial engineering. Neutrons are generated with nuclear spallation reaction by bombarding a mercury target with high-intensity proton beams. The neutrons are slowed down with supercritical hydrogen moderators and then extracted as beams to each experimental apparatus. The principal design of the spallation neutron source is compiled in this comprehensive report. (author)

  18. The small-angle neutron scattering facility at the SAFARI-1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmeyr, C.; Mayer, R.M.; Tillwick, D.L.

    1979-01-01

    A long-wavelength neutron scattering facility at the SAFARI-1 reactor is described. Neutrons of wavelength between 5 and 15 A can be selected. Features of the facility are the use of microwave guides as neutron conductors, flexible guide-pipe configuration and automatic sequential sample changing. Examples are given of measurements on radiation-induced voids in copper, aluminium, Al-0.4%Si and Al-0.1%In after neutron irradiation and magnetic scattering in US and in 80US-10UC-10UC 2 . (Auth.)

  19. Remote auditing of radiotherapy facilities using optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lye, Jessica, E-mail: jessica.lye@arpansa.gov.au; Dunn, Leon; Kenny, John; Alves, Andrew [Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, Yallambie, Victoria 3085 (Australia); Lehmann, Joerg; Williams, Ivan [Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, Yallambie, Victoria 3085, Australia and School of Applied Science, RMIT University, Melbourne 3000 (Australia); Kron, Tomas [School of Applied Science, RMIT University, Melbourne 3000, Australia and Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne 3008 (Australia); Oliver, Chris; Butler, Duncan; Johnston, Peter [Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, Yallambie, Victoria 3085 (Australia); Franich, Rick [School of Applied Science, RMIT University, Melbourne 3000 (Australia)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: On 1 July 2012, the Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service (ACDS) released its Optically Stimulated Luminescent Dosimeter (OSLD) Level I audit, replacing the previous TLD based audit. The aim of this work is to present the results from this new service and the complete uncertainty analysis on which the audit tolerances are based. Methods: The audit release was preceded by a rigorous evaluation of the InLight® nanoDot OSLD system from Landauer (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL). Energy dependence, signal fading from multiple irradiations, batch variation, reader variation, and dose response factors were identified and quantified for each individual OSLD. The detectors are mailed to the facility in small PMMA blocks, based on the design of the existing Radiological Physics Centre audit. Modeling and measurement were used to determine a factor that could convert the dose measured in the PMMA block, to dose in water for the facility's reference conditions. This factor is dependent on the beam spectrum. The TPR{sub 20,10} was used as the beam quality index to determine the specific block factor for a beam being audited. The audit tolerance was defined using a rigorous uncertainty calculation. The audit outcome is then determined using a scientifically based two tiered action level approach. Audit outcomes within two standard deviations were defined as Pass (Optimal Level), within three standard deviations as Pass (Action Level), and outside of three standard deviations the outcome is Fail (Out of Tolerance). Results: To-date the ACDS has audited 108 photon beams with TLD and 162 photon beams with OSLD. The TLD audit results had an average deviation from ACDS of 0.0% and a standard deviation of 1.8%. The OSLD audit results had an average deviation of −0.2% and a standard deviation of 1.4%. The relative combined standard uncertainty was calculated to be 1.3% (1σ). Pass (Optimal Level) was reduced to ≤2.6% (2σ), and Fail (Out of Tolerance) was reduced to >3

  20. Quantitative radiation dose-response relationships for normal tissues in man - I. Gustatory tissues response during photon and neutron radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mossman, K.L.

    1982-01-01

    Quantitative radiation dose-response curves for normal gustatory tissue in man were studied. Taste function, expressed as taste loss, was evaluated in 84 patients who were given either photon or neutron radiotherapy for tumors in the head and neck region. Patients were treated to average tumor doses of 6600 cGy (photon) or 2200 cGy intervals for photon patients and 320-cGy intervals for neutron patients during radiotherapy. The dose-response curves for photons and neutrons were analyzed by fitting a four-parameter logistic equation to the data. Photon and neutron curves differed principally in their relative position along the dose axis. Comparison of the dose-response curves were made by determination of RBE. At 320 cGy, the lowest neutron dose at which taste measurements were made, RBE = 5.7. If this RBE is correct, then the therapeutic gain factor may be equal to or less than 1, indicating no biological advantage in using neutrons over photons for this normal tissue. These studies suggest measurements of taste function and evaluation of dose-response relationships may also be useful in quantitatively evaluating the efficacy of chemical modifiers of radiation response such as hypoxic cell radiosensitizers and radioprotectors

  1. Characterization of a neutron imaging setup at the INES facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durisi, E. A.; Visca, L.; Albertin, F.; Brancaccio, R.; Corsi, J.; Dughera, G.; Ferrarese, W.; Giovagnoli, A.; Grassi, N.; Grazzi, F.; Lo Giudice, A.; Mila, G.; Nervo, M.; Pastrone, N.; Prino, F.; Ramello, L.; Re, A.; Romero, A.; Sacchi, R.; Salvemini, F.; Scherillo, A.; Staiano, A.

    2013-10-01

    The Italian Neutron Experimental Station (INES) located at the ISIS pulsed neutron source (Didcot, United Kingdom) provides a thermal neutron beam mainly used for diffraction analysis. A neutron transmission imaging system was also developed for beam monitoring and for aligning the sample under investigation. Although the time-of-flight neutron diffraction is a consolidated technique, the neutron imaging setup is not yet completely characterized and optimized. In this paper the performance for neutron radiography and tomography at INES of two scintillator screens read out by two different commercial CCD cameras is compared in terms of linearity, signal-to-noise ratio, effective dynamic range and spatial resolution. In addition, the results of neutron radiographies and a tomography of metal alloy test structures are presented to better characterize the INES imaging capabilities of metal artifacts in the cultural heritage field.

  2. Proposal for the design of a small-angle neutron scattering facility at a pulsed neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kley, W.

    1980-01-01

    The intensity-resolution-background considerations of an optimized small angle neutron scattering facility are reviewed for the special case of a pulsed neutron source. In the present proposal we conclude that for 'true elastic scattering experiments' filters can be used instead of expensive neutron guide tubes since low background conditions can be achieved by a combined action of filters as well as a proper time gating of the twodimensional detector. The impinging neutron beam is monochromatized by phasing a disk chopper to the neutron source pulses and in the scattered beam a second disk chopper is used to eliminate the inelastically scattered neutrons. Therefore, no time of fligh analysis is necessary for the scattered neutron intensity and true-elastic conditions are obtained by simply gating the two-dimensional detector. Considering a 4 m thick shield for the pulsed neutron source and choosing for optimum conditions a detector area element of (2.5 cm) 2 and a sample area of (1.25 cm) 2 , than for a minimum sample-detector-distance of 1.5 m, a maximum neutron source diameter of 6.67 cm is required in order to maintain always the optimum intensity- and resolution requirements

  3. Measurements in support of a neutron radiography facility for the SLOWPOKE-2 at RMC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, W.J.; Andrews, W.S.; Bennett, L.G.I.; Beeley, P.A.; Royal Military Coll. of Canada, Kingston, ON

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of using the small (20 kWh) SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor for neutron radiography has been investigated. Although designed primarily for neutron activation analysis (NAA) and radioisotope production, the SLOWPOKE-2 at RMC was installed with a thermal column of heavy water in a sector of the water gap between the beryllium reflector and the reactor container. The thermal-neutron flux in the reactor pool, just beyond the reactor container, has been measured to be a factor of 2.7 higher than in similar locations remote from the thermal column. Placed in this location was a prototype neutron radiography facility, consisting of a beam tube (or collimator), vertically tangential to the reactor core, and a beam stop. Once the feasibility of using a SLOWPOKE-2 for neutron radiography was demonstrated, subsequent investigations were carried out to optimize the quality of the obtainable radiographs. Both neutron radiographic and thermal-neutron flux measurements were undertaken to determine the optimum placement and arrangement of the beam tube. A Category III (as defined by the ASTM Standard E545-86) neutron radiography facility was obtained, although Category I or II were indicated as feasible. Based on this prototype design and experimentation, a permanent neutron radiography facility will be installed. The design calculations have been finalized, construction blueprints have been prepared, and work is proceeding with the construction, installation and commissioning of the facility. (orig.)

  4. Optimization of a neutron guide facility for the ET-RR-1 reactor. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maayouf, R M.A.; El-Kady, A S [Reactor and Nutron Physics Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo, (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    This work deals with the optimization calculations carried out for a neutron guide facility at the ET-RR-1 reactor. The facility is intended for delivering slow neutrons, emitted from one of the ET-RR-1 reactor horizontal channels, to a Fourier RTOF diffractometer. Accordingly, wavelength-dependent neutron reflectivity calculations were carried out for Cu, Ge, natural Ni, and {sup 58} Ni; materials which are usually used as reflecting surfaces of the neutron guide mirror channel walls. The results of calculations were in favour of {sup 58} Ni as the best coating of the neutron guide mirror channel walls. {sup 58} Ni gives a characteristic wavelength {lambda}{sup *}=1.36 A degree of the neutron guide. This also leads to a value of the neutron flux, at the neutron guide output, 1.4 times more than that one resulting from coating the mirror channel walls with natural nickel. The optimized neutron guide, for effective luminosity value 2.4 x 10{sup 6}, was found to be 22 m in length with mirror channel walls coated with {sup 58} Ni. Such optimization of the neutron guide length, along which a curvature 3345 m in radius, leads to a strong suppression of the background of gamma quanta and fast neutrons. Besides, the neutron wavelength range, 1.O{Alpha} degree -4.O{Alpha} degree, produced by the optimized neutron guide facility allows for neutron diffraction measurements at D values between 0.71{Alpha} degree -2.33 {Alpha} degree. 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. The cold neutron facility of the JRR-3M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumai, T.; Suzuki, M.; Kakefuda, K.

    1992-01-01

    A description is given of a cold neutron source and neutron guide tubes of the JRR-3M. The installation of the cold neutron source (CNS) together with the neutron guide system is one of the principal objectives of the remodeling project of the JRR-3 and this CNS is the first one that was installed in the high neutron flux reactors of 14 orders of magnitude in Japan. The CNS is a liquid hydrogen moderator and vertical thermosyphon type. It mainly consists of a hydrogen plant for liquid hydrogen and helium refrigerator plant for cold helium gas. Five neutron guide tubes are installed to get thermal and cold neutron beams in the beam hall. The CNS and the guide tubes have been operated very well since August 1990. (author)

  6. Design and characterisation of a pulsed neutron interrogation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favalli, A.; Pedersen, B.

    2007-01-01

    The Joint Research Centre recently obtained a license to operate a new experimental device intended for research in the field of nuclear safeguards. The research projects currently being planned for the new device includes mass determination of fissile materials in matrices and detection of contraband non-nuclear materials. The device incorporates a commercial pulsed neutron generator and a large graphite mantle surrounding the sample cavity. In this configuration, a relatively high thermal neutron flux with a long lifetime is achieved inside the sample cavity. By pulsing the neutron generator, a sample may be interrogated by a pure thermal neutron flux during repeated time periods. The paper reports on the design of the new device and the pulsed fast and thermal neutron source. The thermal neutron flux caused by the neutron generator and the graphite structure has been characterised by foil activation, fission chamber and 3 He proportional counter measurements. (authors)

  7. Neutron capture cross section measurement of $^{151}Sm$ at the CERN neutron Time of Flight Facility (nTOF)

    CERN Document Server

    Abbondanno, U; Alvarez-Velarde, F; Alvarez-Pol, H; Andriamonje, Samuel A; Andrzejewski, J; Badurek, G; Baumann, P; Becvar, F; Benlliure, J; Berthoumieux, E; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Capote, R; Cennini, P; Chepel, V; Chiaveri, Enrico; Colonna, N; Cortés, G; Cortina-Gil, D; Couture, A; Cox, J; Dababneh, S; Dahlfors, M; David, S; Dolfini, R; Domingo-Pardo, C; Durán, I; Embid-Segura, M; Ferrant, L; Ferrari, A; Ferreira-Marques, R; Frais-Kölbl, H; Furman, W; Gonçalves, I; Gallino, R; Gonzalez-Romero, E; Goverdovski, A; Gramegna, F; Griesmayer, E; Gunsing, F; Haas, B; Haight, R; Heil, M; Herrera-Martínez, A; Isaev, S; Jericha, E; Kappeler, F; Kadi, Y; Karadimos, D; Kerveno, M; Ketlerov, V; Köhler, P; Konovalov, V; Krticka, M; Lamboudis, C; Leeb, H; Lindote, A; Lopes, I; Lozano, M; Lukic, S; Marganiec, J; Marrone, S; Martinez-Val, J; Mastinu, P; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Molina-Coballes, A; Moreau, C; Mosconi, M; Neves, F; Oberhummer, Heinz; O'Brien, S; Pancin, J; Papaevangelou, T; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Pavlopoulos, P; Perlado, J M; Perrot, L; Pignatari, M; Plag, R; Plompen, A; Plukis, A; Poch, A; Policarpo, Armando; Pretel, C; Quesada, J; Raman, S; Rapp, W; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Rosetti, M; Rubbia, Carlo; Rudolf, G; Rullhusen, P; Salgado, J; Soares, J C; Stéphan, C; Tagliente, G; Taín, J L; Tassan-Got, L; Tavora, L; Terlizzi, R; Vannini, G; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Villamarín, D; Vincente, M C; Vlachoudis, V; Voss, F; Wendler, H; Wiescher, M; Wissha, K

    2004-01-01

    The measurement of **1**5**1Sm(n, gamma)**1**5**2Sm (samarium) cross section showed improved performance of the new spallation neutron facility. It covered a wide energy range with good resolution, high neutron flux, low backgrounds and a favourable duty factor. The samarium cross section was found to be of great importance for characterizing neutron capture nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant stars. The combination of these features provided a promising basis for a broad experimental program directed towards application in astrophysics and advanced nuclear technologies. (Edited abstract)

  8. Neutron dose equivalent next to the target shield of a neutron therapy facility using an LET counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stinchcomb, T.G.; Kuchnir, F.T.

    1981-01-01

    The use of a spherical tissue-equivalent proportional counter for measurements of the lineal energy (y) and derivations of the linear energy transfer (LET) for fast neutrons has the advantage of giving distributions of dose and dose equivalent as functions of either LET or y. A measurement next to the target shielding of the neutron therapy facility at the University of Chicago Hospitals and Clinics (UCHC) is described, and the data processing is outlined. The distributions are presented and compared to those from measurements in the neutron beam. The average quality factors are presented

  9. A Long-Pulse Spallation Source at Los Alamos: Facility description and preliminary neutronic performance for cold neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.J.; Weinacht, D.J.; Pitcher, E.J.; Ferguson, P.D.

    1998-03-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has discussed installing a new 1-MW spallation neutron target station in an existing building at the end of its 800-MeV proton linear accelerator. Because the accelerator provides pulses of protons each about 1 msec in duration, the new source would be a Long Pulse Spallation Source (LPSS). The facility would employ vertical extraction of moderators and reflectors, and horizontal extraction of the spallation target. An LPSS uses coupled moderators rather than decoupled ones. There are potential gains of about a factor of 6 to 7 in the time-averaged neutron brightness for cold-neutron production from a coupled liquid H 2 moderator compared to a decoupled one. However, these gains come at the expense of putting ''tails'' on the neutron pulses. The particulars of the neutron pulses from a moderator (e.g., energy-dependent rise times, peak intensities, pulse widths, and decay constant(s) of the tails) are crucial parameters for designing instruments and estimating their performance at an LPSS. Tungsten is the reference target material. Inconel 718 is the reference target canister and proton beam window material, with Al-6061 being the choice for the liquid H 2 moderator canister and vacuum container. A 1-MW LPSS would have world-class neutronic performance. The authors describe the proposed Los Alamos LPSS facility, and show that, for cold neutrons, the calculated time-averaged neutronic performance of a liquid H 2 moderator at the 1-MW LPSS is equivalent to about 1/4th the calculated neutronic performance of the best liquid D 2 moderator at the Institute Laue-Langevin reactor. They show that the time-averaged moderator neutronic brightness increases as the size of the moderator gets smaller

  10. Construction of the neutron beam facility at Australia's OPAL research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, Shane J.

    2006-01-01

    Australia's new research reactor, OPAL, has been designed principally for neutron beam science and radioisotope production. It has a capacity for 18 neutron beam instruments, located at the reactor face and in a neutron guide hall. The neutron beam facility features a 20 l liquid deuterium cold neutron source and cold and thermal supermirror neutron guides. Nine neutron beam instruments are under development, of which seven are scheduled for completion in early 2007. The project is approaching the hot-commissioning stage, when criticality will be demonstrated. Installation of the neutron beam transport system and neutron beam instruments in the neutron guide hall and at the reactor face is underway, and the path to completion of this project is relatively clear. This paper will outline the key features of the OPAL reactor, and will describe the neutron beam facility in particular. The status of the construction and a forecast of the program to completion, including commissioning and commencement of routine operation in 2007 will also be discussed

  11. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wannenmacher, M.; Debus, J.; Wenz, F.

    2006-01-01

    The book is focussed on the actual knowledge on the clinical radiotherapy and radio-oncology. Besides fundamental and general contributions specific organ systems are treated in detail. The book contains the following contributions: Basic principles, radiobiological fundamentals, physical background, radiation pathology, basics and technique of brachytherapy, methodology and technique of the stereotactic radiosurgery, whole-body irradiation, operative radiotherapy, hadron therapy, hpyerthermia, combined radio-chemo-therapy, biometric clinical studies, intensity modulated radiotherapy, side effects, oncological diagnostics; central nervous system and sense organs, head-neck carcinomas, breast cancer, thorax organs, esophagus carcinoma, stomach carcinoma, pancreas carcinoma, heptabiliary cancer and liver metastases, rectal carcinomas, kidney and urinary tract, prostate carcinoma, testicular carcinoma, female pelvis, lymphatic system carcinomas, soft tissue carcinoma, skin cancer, bone metastases, pediatric tumors, nonmalignant diseases, emergency in radio-oncology, supporting therapy, palliative therapy

  12. Primary study for boron neutron capture therapy uses the RSG-GAS beam tube facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suroso

    2000-01-01

    The minimum epithermal neutron flux as one of the prerequisite of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is 1.0 x 10 9 n/(cm 2 s) RSG-GAS have 6 beam tube facilities for neutron source, which is one of the beam tube S-2 has a possibility to utilization for BNCT facility. The totally flux neutron measurement in the front of S-2 beam tube is 1.8 x 10 7 n/(cm 2 s). The neutron flux measurement was less than for BNCT minimum prerequisite. Concerning to the flux neutron production in the reactor, which is reach to 2.5 x 10 14 n/(cm 2 s), there for the S-2 beam tube could be used beside collimator modification

  13. Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Sonja; Debus, Jürgen; Neuhof, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Solitary plasmocytoma occurring in bone (solitary plasmocytoma of the bone, SBP) or in soft tissue (extramedullary plasmocytoma, EP) can be treated effectively and with little toxicity by local radiotherapy. Ten-year local control rates of up to 90% can be achieved. Patients with multiple myeloma often suffer from symptoms such as pain or neurological impairments that are amenable to palliative radiotherapy. In a palliative setting, short treatment schedules and lower radiation doses are used to reduce toxicity and duration of hospitalization. In future, low-dose total body irradiation (TBI) may play a role in a potentially curative regimen with nonmyeloablative conditioning followed by allogenic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

  14. Comparison of the geometric accuracy of radiotherapy facilities by various manufacturers, performed within the programme of quality audits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pridal, I.; Klaclova, T.; Gremlica, D.; Zackova, H.; Snobr, J.

    1998-01-01

    The evaluation of geometric parameters of radiotherapy facilities is discussed, these parameters being of importance for focusing the target volume and for achieving the required standard of treatment. During quality audits at radiotherapy systems various shortcomings were found as regards the accuracy of irradiation. A part of the shortcomings was due to inadequate setting of the facility parameters; another, however, was related to the mechanical design of the treatment units. The latter problems cannot be easily eliminated and have to be taken into account when using the respective facilities

  15. SU-E-T-249: Neutron Model Upgrade for Radiotherapy Patients Monitoring Using a New Online Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irazola, L; Sanchez Doblado, F. [Departamento de Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla (Spain); Lorenzoli, M; Pola, A. [Politecnico di Milano, Departimento di Ingegneria Nuclear, Milano (Italy); Terron, J.A. [Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla (Spain); Bedogni, R. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) (Italy); Sanchez Nieto, B. [Instituto de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Romero-Exposito, M. [Departamento de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to improve the existing methodology to estimate neutron equivalent dose in organs during radiotherapy treatments, based on a Static Random Access Memory neutron detector (SRAMnd) [1]. This is possible thanks to the introduction of a new digital detector with improved characteristics, which is able to measure online the neutron fluence rate in the presence of an intense photon background [2]. Its reduced size, allows the direct estimation of doses in specific points inside an anthropomorphic phantom (NORMA) without using passive detectors as TLD or CR-39. This versatility will allow not only to improve the existing models (generic abdomen and H and N [1]) but to generate more specific ones for any technique. Methods: The new Thermal Neutron Rate Detector (TNRD), based on a diode device sensitized to thermal neutrons, have been inserted in 16 points of the phantom. These points are distributed to infer doses to specific organs. Simultaneous measurements of these devices and a reference one, located in front of the gantry, have been performed for the mentioned generic treatments, in order to improve the existing model. Results: These new devices have shown more precise since they agree better with Monte Carlo simulations. The comparison of the thermal neutron fluence, measured with TNRD, and the existing models, converted from events to fluence, shows an average improvement of (3.90±3.37) % for H and N and (12.61±9.43) % for abdomen, normalized to the maximum value. Conclusion: This work indicates the potential of these new devices for more precise neutron equivalent dose estimation in organs, as a consequence of radiotherapy treatments. The simplicity of the process makes possible to establish more specific models that will provide a better dose estimation. References[1] Phys Med Biol 2012; 57:6167–6191.[2] A new active thermal neutron detector. Radiat. Prot. Dosim. (in press)

  16. International fusion materials irradiation facility and neutronic calculations for its test modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokcic-Kostic, M.

    1997-01-01

    The International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is a projected high intensity neutron source for material testing. Neutron transport calculations for the IFMIF project are performed for variety of here explained reasons. The results of MCNP neutronic calculations for IFMIF test modules with NaK and He cooled high flux test cells are presented in this paper. (author). 3 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Monte Carlo Simulation of the Time-Of-Flight Technique for the Measurement of Neutron Cross-section in the Pohang Neutron Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, So Hyun; Lee, Young Ouk; Lee, Cheol Woo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Seok [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    It is essential that neutron cross sections are measured precisely for many areas of research and technique. In Korea, these experiments have been performed in the Pohang Neutron Facility (PNF) with the pulsed neutron facility based on the 100 MeV electron linear accelerator. In PNF, the neutron energy spectra have been measured for different water levels inside the moderator and compared with the results of the MCNPX calculation. The optimum size of the water moderator has been determined on the base of these results. In this study, Monte Carlo simulations for the TOF technique were performed and neutron spectra of neutrons were calculated to predict the measurements.

  18. Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Program for cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, A.L. (ed.); Dorn, R.V. III.

    1990-09-01

    This monthly bulletin describes activities in the following project areas during this reporting period: supporting technology development, large animal model studies, neutron source and facility preparation, administration and common support, and PBF operations. (FI)

  19. Test and application of thermal neutron radiography facility at Xi'an pulsed reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Yang Jun; Zhao Xiang Feng; Wang Dao Hua

    2002-01-01

    A thermal neutron radiography facility at Xi'an Pulsed Reactor is described as well as its characteristics and application. The experiment results show the inherent unsharpness of BAS ND is 0.15 mm. The efficient thermal neutron n/gamma ratio is lower in not only steady state configuration but also pulsing state configuration and it is improved using Pb filter

  20. Radiation dose distribution monitoring at neutron radiography facility area, Nuclear Energy Unit, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Razak Daud

    1995-01-01

    One experiment was carried out to get the distribution of radiation doses at the neutron radiography facilities, Nuclear Energy Unit, Malaysia. The analysis was done to evaluate the safety level of the area. The analysis was used in neutron radiography work

  1. Fissile material detection and control facility with pulsed neutron sources and digital data processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romodanov, V.L.; Chernikova, D.N.; Afanasiev, V.V.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: In connection with possible nuclear terrorism, there is long-felt need of devices for effective control of radioactive and fissile materials in the key points of crossing the state borders (airports, seaports, etc.), as well as various customs check-points. In International Science and Technology Center Projects No. 596 and No. 2978, a new physical method and digital technology have been developed for the detection of fissile and radioactive materials in models of customs facilities with a graphite moderator, pulsed neutron source and digital processing of responses from scintillation PSD detectors. Detectability of fissile materials, even those shielded with various radiation-absorbing screens, has been shown. The use of digital processing of scintillation signals in this facility is a necessary element, as neutrons and photons are discriminated in the time dependence of fissile materials responses at such loads on the electronic channels that standard types of spectrometers are inapplicable. Digital processing of neutron and photon responses practically resolves the problem of dead time and allows implementing devices, in which various energy groups of neutrons exist for some time after a pulse of source neutrons. Thus, it is possible to detect fissile materials deliberately concealed with shields having a large cross-section of absorption of photons and thermal neutrons. Two models of detection and the control of fissile materials were advanced: 1. the model based on graphite neutrons moderator and PSD scintillators with digital technology of neutrons and photons responses separation; 2. the model based on plastic scintillators and detecting of time coincidences of fission particles by digital technology. Facilities that count time coincidences of neutrons and photons occurring in the fission of fissile materials can use an Am Li source of neutrons, e.g. that is the case with the AWCC system. The disadvantages of the facility are related to the issues

  2. Total body-calcium measurements: comparison of two delayed-gamma neutron activation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, R.; Ellis, K.J.; Shypailo, R.J.; Pierson, R.N. Jr.

    1999-01-01

    This study compares two independently calibrated delayed-gamma neutron activation (DGNA) facilities, one at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, New York, and the other at the Children's Nutrition Research Center (CNRC), Houston, Texas that measure total body calcium (TBCa). A set of BNL phantoms was sent to CNRC for neutron activation analysis, and a set of CNRC phantoms was measured at BNL. Both facilities showed high precision (<2%), and the results were in good agreement, within 5%. (author)

  3. Present status of ESNIT (energy selective neutron irradiation test facility) program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, K.; Ohno, H.; Sugimoto, M.; Kato, Y.; Matsuo, H.; Watanabe, K.; Kikuchi, T.; Sawai, T.; Usui, T.; Oyama, Y.; Kondo, T.

    1994-01-01

    The present status of technical studies of a high energy neutron irradiation facility, ESNIT (energy selective neutron irradiation test facility), is summarized. Technological survey and feasibility studies of ESNIT have continued since 1988. The results of technical studies of the accelerator, the target and the experimental systems in ESNIT program were reviewed by an International Advisory Committee in February 1993. Recommendations for future R and D on ESNIT program are also summarized in this paper. ((orig.))

  4. Reshaping of computational system for dosimetry in neutron and photons radiotherapy based in stochastic methods - SISCODES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trindade, Bruno Machado

    2011-02-01

    This work shows the remodeling of the Computer System for Dosimetry of Neutrons and Photons in Radiotherapy Based on Stochastic Methods . SISCODES. The initial description and status, the alterations and expansions (proposed and concluded), and the latest system development status are shown. The SISCODES is a system that allows the execution of a 3D computational planning in radiation therapy, based on MCNP5 nuclear particle transport code. The SISCODES provides tools to build a patient's voxels model, to define a treatment planning, to simulate this planning, and to view the results of the simulation. The SISCODES implements a database of tissues, sources and nuclear data and an interface to access then. The graphical SISCODES modules were rewritten or were implemented using C++ language and GTKmm library. Studies about dose deviations were performed simulating a homogeneous water phantom as analogue of the human body in radiotherapy planning and a heterogeneous voxel phantom, pointing out possible dose miscalculations. The Soft-RT and PROPLAN computer codes that do interface with SISCODES are described. A set of voxels models created on the SISCODES are presented with its respective sizes and resolutions. To demonstrate the use of SISCODES, examples of radiation therapy and dosimetry simulations for prostate and heart are shown. Three protocols were simulated on the heart voxel model: Sm-153 filled balloon and P-32 stent, to prevent angioplasty restenosis; and Tl-201 myocardial perfusion, to imaging. Teletherapy with 6MV and 15MV beams were simulated to the prostate, and brachytherapy with I-125 seeds. The results of these simulations are shown on isodose curves and on dose-volume histograms. The SISCODES shows to be a useful tool for research of new radiation therapy treatments and, in future, can also be useful in medical practice. At the end, future improvements are proposed. I hope this work can contribute to develop more effective radiation therapy

  5. Technical Meeting on Existing and Proposed Experimental Facilities for Fast Neutron Systems. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the TM on “Existing and proposed experimental facilities for fast neutron systems” was threefold: 1) presenting and exchanging information about existing and planned experimental facilities in support of the development of innovative fast neutron systems; 2) allow creating a catalogue of existing and planned experimental facilities currently operated/developed within national or international fast reactors programmes; 3) once a clear picture of the existing experimental infrastructures is defined, new experimental facilities are discussed and proposed, on the basis of the identified R&D needs

  6. Technical Meeting on Existing and Proposed Experimental Facilities for Fast Neutron Systems. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the TM on “Existing and proposed experimental facilities for fast neutron systems” is threefold: first, it is intended for presenting and exchanging information about existing and planned experimental facilities in support of the development of innovative fast neutron systems; second, it will allow to create a catalogue of existing and planned experimental facilities currently operated/developed within national or international fast reactors programmes; third, once a clear picture of the existing experimental infrastructures is defined, new experimental facilities will be discussed and proposed, on the basis of the identified R&D needs

  7. The world’s first pelletized cold neutron moderator at a neutron scattering facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ananiev, V.; Belyakov, A.; Bulavin, M.; Kulagin, E.; Kulikov, S.; Mukhin, K.; Petukhova, T.; Sirotin, A.; Shabalin, D.; Shabalin, E.; Shirokov, V.; Verhoglyadov, A., E-mail: verhoglyadov_al@mail.ru

    2014-02-01

    In July 10, 2012 cold neutrons were generated for the first time with the unique pelletized cold neutron moderator CM-202 at the IBR-2M reactor. This new moderator system uses small spherical beads of a solid mixture of aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene derivatives) as the moderating material. Aromatic hydrocarbons are known as the most radiation-resistant hydrogenous substances and have properties to moderate slow neutrons effectively. Since the new moderator was put into routine operation in September 2013, the IBR-2 research reactor of the Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics has consolidated its position among the world’s leading pulsed neutron sources for investigation of matter with neutron scattering methods.

  8. An estimate of the radiation-induced cancer risk from the whole-body stray radiation exposure in neutron radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraci, J.P.; Jackson, K.L.; Mariano, M.S.

    1982-01-01

    1980 BEIR III risk factors have been used to estimate the secondary cancer risks from the whole-body stray radiation exposures occurring in neutron radiotherapy. Risks were calculated using linear, linear-quadratic and quadratic dose-response models for the gamma component of the stray radiation. The linear dose-response model was used to calculate risk for the neutron component of the stray radiation. These estimates take into consideration for the first time the age and sex distribution of patients undergoing neutron therapy. Changes in risk as a function of the RBE (10-100) assigned to the stray neutron radiation component have also been assessed. Excess risks in neutron-treated patients have been compared with excess risks for photon-treated patients and with the expected incidence of cancer in a normal population having the same age and sex distribution. Results indicate that it will be necessary to tolerate a higher incidence of secondary cancers in patients undergoing fast neutron therapy than is the case with conventional photon therapy. For neutron RBEs of less than 50 the increased risk is only a fraction of the normal expected incidence of cancer in this population. Comparison of the radiation-induced risk with reported normal tissue complication rates in the treatment volume indicates that the excess cancer risk is substantially lower than the risk from other late normal tissue effects. (author)

  9. Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Neutron Research Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, R.

    1981-01-01

    The Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) spallation neutron source utilizes 800-MeV protons from the Los Alamos Meson Physics linac. The proton beam transport system, the target systems, and the data acquisition and control system are described. Operating experience, present status, and planned improvements are discussed

  10. Characterization of a neutron imaging setup at the INES facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durisi, E.A., E-mail: elisabettaalessandra.durisi@unito.it [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Visca, L. [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Albertin, F.; Brancaccio, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Corsi, J. [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Dughera, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Ferrarese, W. [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Giovagnoli, A.; Grassi, N. [Fondazione Centro per la Conservazione ed il Restauro dei Beni Culturali “La Venaria Reale”, Piazza della Repubblica, 10078 Venaria Reale, Torino (Italy); Grazzi, F. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Lo Giudice, A.; Mila, G. [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); and others

    2013-10-21

    The Italian Neutron Experimental Station (INES) located at the ISIS pulsed neutron source (Didcot, United Kingdom) provides a thermal neutron beam mainly used for diffraction analysis. A neutron transmission imaging system was also developed for beam monitoring and for aligning the sample under investigation. Although the time-of-flight neutron diffraction is a consolidated technique, the neutron imaging setup is not yet completely characterized and optimized. In this paper the performance for neutron radiography and tomography at INES of two scintillator screens read out by two different commercial CCD cameras is compared in terms of linearity, signal-to-noise ratio, effective dynamic range and spatial resolution. In addition, the results of neutron radiographies and a tomography of metal alloy test structures are presented to better characterize the INES imaging capabilities of metal artifacts in the cultural heritage field. -- Highlights: A full characterization of the present INES imaging set-up was carried out. Two CCD cameras and two scintillators (ZnS/{sup 6}LiF) of different thicknesses were tested. Linearity, effective dynamic range and spatial resolution were determined. Radiographies of steep wedges were performed using the highest dynamic range setup. Tomography of a bronze cube was performed using the best spatial resolution setup.

  11. Characterization of a neutron imaging setup at the INES facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durisi, E.A.; Visca, L.; Albertin, F.; Brancaccio, R.; Corsi, J.; Dughera, G.; Ferrarese, W.; Giovagnoli, A.; Grassi, N.; Grazzi, F.; Lo Giudice, A.; Mila, G.

    2013-01-01

    The Italian Neutron Experimental Station (INES) located at the ISIS pulsed neutron source (Didcot, United Kingdom) provides a thermal neutron beam mainly used for diffraction analysis. A neutron transmission imaging system was also developed for beam monitoring and for aligning the sample under investigation. Although the time-of-flight neutron diffraction is a consolidated technique, the neutron imaging setup is not yet completely characterized and optimized. In this paper the performance for neutron radiography and tomography at INES of two scintillator screens read out by two different commercial CCD cameras is compared in terms of linearity, signal-to-noise ratio, effective dynamic range and spatial resolution. In addition, the results of neutron radiographies and a tomography of metal alloy test structures are presented to better characterize the INES imaging capabilities of metal artifacts in the cultural heritage field. -- Highlights: A full characterization of the present INES imaging set-up was carried out. Two CCD cameras and two scintillators (ZnS/ 6 LiF) of different thicknesses were tested. Linearity, effective dynamic range and spatial resolution were determined. Radiographies of steep wedges were performed using the highest dynamic range setup. Tomography of a bronze cube was performed using the best spatial resolution setup

  12. Ambient neutron dose equivalent outside concrete vault rooms for 15 and 18 MV radiotherapy accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-ovalle, S. A.; Barquero, R.; Gomez-ros, J. M.; Lallena, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), due to neutrons outside three bunkers that house a 15- and a 18-MV Varian Clinac 2100C/D and a 15-MV Elekta Inor clinical linacs, has been calculated. The Monte Carlo code MCNPX (v. 2.5) has been used to simulate the neutron production and transport. The complete geometries including linacs and full installations have been built up according to the specifications of the manufacturers and the planes provided by the corresponding medical physical services of the hospitals where the three linacs operate. Two of these installations, those lodging the Varian linacs, have an entrance door to the bunker while the other one does not, although it has a maze with two bends. Various treatment orientations were simulated in order to establish plausible annual equivalent doses. Specifically anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left lateral, right lateral orientations and an additional one with the gantry rotated 30 deg. have been studied. Significant dose rates have been found only behind the walls and the door of the bunker, near the entrance and the console, with a maximum of 12 μSv h -1 . Dose rates per year have been calculated assuming a conservative workload for the three facilities. The higher dose rates in the corresponding control areas were 799 μSv y -1 , in the case of the facility which operates the 15-MV Clinac, 159 μSv y -1 , for that with the 15-MV Elekta, and 21 μSv y -1 for the facility housing the 18-MV Varian. A comparison with measurements performed in similar installations has been carried out and a reasonable agreement has been found. The results obtained indicate that the neutron contamination does not increase the doses above the legal limits and does not produce a significant enhancement of the dose equivalent calculated. When doses are below the detection limits provided by the measuring devices available today, MCNPX simulation provides an useful method to evaluate neutron dose equivalents

  13. Neutron transport calculation for Activation Evaluation for Decommissioning of PET cyclotron Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobuhara, Fumiyoshi; Kuroyanagi, Makoto; Masumoto, Kazuyoshi; Nakamura, Hajime; Toyoda, Akihiro; Takahashi, Katsuhiko

    2017-09-01

    In order to evaluate the state of activation in a cyclotron facility used for the radioisotope production of PET diagnostics, we measured the neutron flux by using gold foils and TLDs. Then, the spatial distribution of neutrons and induced activity inside the cyclotron vault were simulated with the Monte Calro calculation code for neutron transport and DCHAIN-SP for activation calculation. The calculated results are in good agreement with measured values within factor 3. Therefore, the adaption of the advanced evaluation procedure for activation level is proved to be important for the planning of decommissioning of these facilities.

  14. A 14 MeV neutron irradiation facility with an automated fast cyclic pneumatic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, M.T.; Yoho, M.D.; Biegalski, S.R.; Landsberger, S.; Welch, L.

    2016-01-01

    This work details the design criteria, construction, controls, and optimization of the 14 MeV neutron irradiation facility at the University of Texas, built with the motivation of performing neutron activation analysis on samples with short half-lives. The facility couples a D-T neutron generator with a pneumatic transfer system capable of transit of approximately one second between source and detector, while the cyclic automated nature allows for many irradiation/count trials with any number of samples, translating to significantly improved counting statistics. (author)

  15. Study on beam geometry and image reconstruction algorithm in fast neutron computerized tomography at NECTAR facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, J.; Bücherl, T.; Zou, Y.; Guo, Z.

    2011-09-01

    Investigations on the fast neutron beam geometry for the NECTAR facility are presented. The results of MCNP simulations and experimental measurements of the beam distributions at NECTAR are compared. Boltzmann functions are used to describe the beam profile in the detection plane assuming the area source to be set up of large number of single neutron point sources. An iterative algebraic reconstruction algorithm is developed, realized and verified by both simulated and measured projection data. The feasibility for improved reconstruction in fast neutron computerized tomography at the NECTAR facility is demonstrated.

  16. Study on beam geometry and image reconstruction algorithm in fast neutron computerized tomography at NECTAR facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, J.; Buecherl, T.; Zou, Y.; Guo, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Investigations on the fast neutron beam geometry for the NECTAR facility are presented. The results of MCNP simulations and experimental measurements of the beam distributions at NECTAR are compared. Boltzmann functions are used to describe the beam profile in the detection plane assuming the area source to be set up of large number of single neutron point sources. An iterative algebraic reconstruction algorithm is developed, realized and verified by both simulated and measured projection data. The feasibility for improved reconstruction in fast neutron computerized tomography at the NECTAR facility is demonstrated.

  17. Study on beam geometry and image reconstruction algorithm in fast neutron computerized tomography at NECTAR facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, J. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and School of Physics, Peking University, 5 Yiheyuan Lu, Beijing 100871 (China); Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching 80748 (Germany); Buecherl, T. [Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching 80748 (Germany); Zou, Y., E-mail: zouyubin@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and School of Physics, Peking University, 5 Yiheyuan Lu, Beijing 100871 (China); Guo, Z. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and School of Physics, Peking University, 5 Yiheyuan Lu, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2011-09-21

    Investigations on the fast neutron beam geometry for the NECTAR facility are presented. The results of MCNP simulations and experimental measurements of the beam distributions at NECTAR are compared. Boltzmann functions are used to describe the beam profile in the detection plane assuming the area source to be set up of large number of single neutron point sources. An iterative algebraic reconstruction algorithm is developed, realized and verified by both simulated and measured projection data. The feasibility for improved reconstruction in fast neutron computerized tomography at the NECTAR facility is demonstrated.

  18. Industrial applications at the new cold neutron radiography and tomography facility of the HMI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kardjilov, N.; Hilger, A.; Manke, I.; Strobl, M.; Treimer, W.; Banhart, J.

    2005-01-01

    The new cold neutron radiography and tomography facility at the Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin is suited for the investigation of components and materials from different industrial fields. The high-flux measuring position of the facility allows real-time imaging of fast dynamical processes. Cold neutrons interact stronger with the matter compared to thermal neutrons, which leads to a much better radiography contrast. Some examples of different industry applications like investigations on discharging of a Lithium battery or on oil sediments in a vent pipe are presented

  19. Experimental possibilities and fast neutron dose map of the fast neutron fields at the RB reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokcic-Kostic, M.; Pesic, M.; Antic, D.; Ninkovic, M.

    1993-01-01

    The RB is an unshielded, zero power nuclear facility with natural and enriched uranium fuel (2% and 80%) and D 2 O as moderator. It is possible to create different configurations of non-reflected and partially reflected critical systems and to make experiments in the fields of thermal neutrons. The fields of fast neutrons with 'softened' fission spectrum are made by modifying the system: modified experimental fuel channel EFC, coupled fast-thermal system in two configurations CFTS-1 and CFTS-2, coupled fast-thermal core HERBE. The intermediate and fast neutron absorbed doses in fast neutron fields are given. In first configuration of RB reactor it was almost impossible to perform dosimetric and other experiments. By creating these fields, with in our circumstances available fuel elements, the possibilities for different experiments are greatly improved. Now we can irradiate food samples, soil samples, electronic devices, study material properties, perform various dosimetry experiments, etc. (1 tab.)

  20. Development of a neutron converter for studies of neutron-induced fission fragments at the IGISOL facility

    CERN Document Server

    Lantz, M; Al-Adili, A; Jokinen, A; Kolhinen, V; Mattera, A; Rinta-Antila, S; Penttilä, H; Pomp, S; Rakoupoulos, V; Simutkin, V; Solders, A

    2014-01-01

    The ERINDA funded scientific visit has enabled the groups at U ppsala Uni- versity and University of Jyväskylä to work closer together on the design of a neutron converter that will be used as neutron source in fissi on yield studies at the IGISOL-JYFLTRAP facility at the University of Jyväsk ylä. The design is based on simulations with both deterministic codes and Mo nte Carlo codes, and an ERINDA funded benchmark measurement. In order to obta in a com- petitive count rate the fission targets will be placed very cl ose to the neutron converter. The intention is to have a flexible design that wil l enable neutron fields with different energy distributions. In this report t he progression and the present status of the design work will be discussed, togethe r with an outlook of the future plans

  1. The CERN n_TOF Facility: Neutron Beams Performances for Cross Section Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Chiaveri, E; Andrzejewski, J; Audouin, L; Barbagallo, M; Bécares, V; Bečvář, F; Belloni, F; Berthoumieux, E; Billowes, J; Boccone, V; Bosnar, D; Brugger, M; Calviani, M; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Carrapiço, C; Cerutti, F; Chin, M; Colonna, N; Cortés, G; Cortés-Giraldo, M A; Diakaki, M; Domingo-Pardo, C; Duran, I; Dressler, R; Dzysiuk, N; Eleftheriadis, C; Ferrari, A; Fraval, K; Ganesan, S; García, A R; Giubrone, G; Gómez-Hornillos, M B; Gonçalves, I F; González-Romero, E; Griesmayer, E; Guerrero, C; Gunsing, F; Gurusamy, P; Hernández-Prieto, A; Jenkins, D G; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y; Käppeler, F; Karadimos, D; Kivel, N; Koehler, P; Kokkoris, M; Krtička, M; Kroll, J; Lampoudis, C; Langer, C; Leal-Cidoncha, E; Lederer, C; Leeb, H; Leong, L S; Losito, R; Mallick, A; Manousos, A; Marganiec, J; Martínez, T; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P F; Mastromarco, M; Meaze, M; Mendoza, E; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Mingrone, F; Mirea, M; Mondalaers, W; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Perkowski, J; Plompen, A; Praena, J; Quesada, J M; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Riego, A; Robles, M S; Roman, F; Rubbia, C; Sabaté-Gilarte, M; Sarmento, R; Saxena, A; Schillebeeckx, P; Schmidt, S; Schumann, D; Tagliente, G; Tain, J L; Tarrío, D; Tassan-Got, L; Tsinganis, A; Valenta, S; Vannini, G; Variale, V; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Versaci, R; Vermeulen, M J; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Wallner, A; Ware, T; Weigand, M; Weiss, C; Wright, T; Žugec, P

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the characteristics of the existing CERN n\\_TOF neutron beam facility (n\\_TOF-EAR1 with a flight path of 185 meters) and the future one (n\\_TOF EAR-2 with a flight path of 19 meters), which will operate in parallel from Summer 2014. The new neutron beam will provide a 25 times higher neutron flux delivered in 10 times shorter neutron pulses, thus offering more powerful capabilities for measuring small mass, low cross section and/or high activity samples.

  2. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauro, N. A., E-mail: namauro@noctrl.edu [Department of Physics, North Central College, Naperville, Illinois 60540 (United States); Vogt, A. J. [Instrument and Source Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Derendorf, K. S. [Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63130 (United States); Johnson, M. L.; Kelton, K. F. [Department of Physics and Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Washington University, 1 Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Missouri 63130 (United States); Rustan, G. E.; Quirinale, D. G.; Goldman, A. I. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Kreyssig, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Lokshin, K. A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Quantum Condensed Matter Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Neuefeind, J. C.; An, Ke [Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Wang, Xun-Li [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Ave., Kowloon (Hong Kong); Egami, T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Joint Institute for Neutron Sciences, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. However, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. To demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr{sub 64}Ni{sub 36} measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample (∼100 mg)

  3. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pistenma, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    The need for radiotherapy research is exemplified by the 100,000 cancer patients who will fail treatment locally and/or regionally annually for the next several years but who would benefit from better local treatment modalities. Theoretically, all of the areas of investigation discussed in this projection paper have the potential to significantly improve local-regional treatment of cancer by radiotherapy alone or in combination with other modalities. In many of the areas of investigation discussed in this paper encouraging results have been obtained in cellular and animal tumor studies and in limited studies in humans as well. In the not too distant future the number of patients who would benefit from better local control may increase by tens of thousands if developments in chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy provide a means to eradicate disseminated microscopic foci of cancer. Thus the efforts to improve local-regional control take on even greater significance

  4. Scientific Design of the New Neutron Radiography Facility (SANRAD) at SAFARI-1 for South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beer, F. C.; Gruenauer, F.; Radebe, J. M.; Modise, T.; Schillinger, B.

    The final scientific design for an upgraded neutron radiography/tomography facility at beam port no.2 of the SAFARI-1 nuclear research reactor has been performed through expert advice from Physics Consulting, FRMII in Germany and IPEN, Brazil. A need to upgrade the facility became apparent due to the identification of various deficiencies of the current SANRAD facility during an IAEA-sponsored expert mission of international scientists to Necsa, South Africa. A lack of adequate shielding that results in high neutron background on the beam port floor, a mismatch in the collimator aperture to the core that results in a high gradient in neutron flux on the imaging plane and due to a relative low L/D the quality of the radiographs are poor, are a number of deficiencies to name a few.The new design, based on results of Monte Carlo (MCNP-X) simulations of neutron- and gamma transport from the reactor core and through the new facility, is being outlined. The scientific design philosophy, neutron optics and imaging capabilities that include the utilization of fission neutrons, thermal neutrons, and gamma-rays emerging from the core of SAFARI-1 are discussed.

  5. Power Burst Reactor Facility as an epithermal neutron source for brain cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    The Power Burst Facility (PBF) reactor is considered for modification to provide an intense, clean source of intermediate-energy (epithermal) neutrons desirable for clinical studies of neutron capture therapy (NCT) for malignant tumors. The modifications include partial replacement of the reflector, installation of a neutron-moderating, shifting region, additional shielding, and penetration of the present concrete shield with a collimating (and optionally) filtering region. The studies have indicated that the reactor, after these modifications, will be safely operable at full power (28 MW) within the acceptable limits of the plant protection systems. The neutron beam exiting from the collimator port is predicted to be of sufficient intensity (approx.10 10 neutrons/cm 2 -s) to provide therapeutic doses in very short irradiation times. The beam would be relatively free of undesirable fast neutrons, thermal neutrons and gamma rays. The calculated neutron energy spectrum and associated gamma rays in the beam were provided as input in simulation studies that used a computer model of a patient with a brain tumor to determine predicted dose rates to the tumor and healthy tissue. The results of this conceptual study indicate an intense, clean beam of epithermal neutrons for NCT clinical trials is attainable in the PBF facility with properly engineered design modifications. 9 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs

  6. Redesign, construction and characterization of the new neutron radiography facility of the RA-6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin, J.; Sanchez, F.A.; Blaumann, H.

    2012-01-01

    Neutron radiography is a non-destructive test in which it is registered an image of the attenuation experienced by a collimated neutron beam while it passes through a sample. The image is generated by using a neutron-sensitive screen. The applications of this technique are wide, some of them include: services to industries, study of explosives, study of pieces belonging to cultural heritage and studies of the distribution of hydrogen. The actual neutron radiography facility is placed in the RA-6 reactor at the Centro Atomico Bariloche. Due to the reactor's nucleus change and the subsequent power raise, it has been necessary to redesign the facility. During the last year the pieces that constitute it had been designed and built. In April 2012 the facility has been mounted. The system employed is of on-line neutron radiographies. The maximum area of study is of 20 cm x 20 cm. The images obtained are registered by a CCD camera, whose maximum resolution is of 2776 x 2074 pixels and 65536 gray levels. In this work the initial steps towards characterization of the facility are presented, these include neutron fluxes and dose rates levels determinations. Also, in order to evaluate the functionality, images of several objects have been taken, as the one shown in Fig. 7. The results obtained reveal the good performance of the facility and its wide potential (author)

  7. Development of a medium energy polarized neutron facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burzynski, S.; Gysin, C.; Henneck, R.; Jourdan, J.; Kohler, D.; Pickar, M.A.; Plattner, G.R.; Sick, I.; Berdoz, A.; Foroughi, F.; Nussbaum, Ch.; Stammbach, Th.

    1984-01-01

    By the end of 1983 the major construction work for the new polarized neutron source was completed. The source will provide an essentially monoenergetic beam of both polarized and unpolarized neutrons in the energy range from 20 MeV to 70 MeV. Intensities are expected to be approx. 2 x 10 5 neutrons/s.cm 2 per μA of incident proton beam. The polarization is expected to be approx. 0.2 and can be chosen to be either longitudinal or transverse. Protons from the Philips injector cyclotron are focussed onto a liquid deuterium target and produce neutrons via the 2 H(p,n)2p reaction at 0 0 . This process provides essentially monoenergetic neutrons of almost the same energy as the incoming protons. The zero production angle implies that the neutron polarization comes from the polarization of the proton beam only. This allows an easy and fast change of the neutron spin direction by selecting proton spin states in the polarized ion source (atomic beam type). (Auth.)

  8. Facility for fast neutron irradiation tests of electronics at the ISIS spallation neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreani, C.; Pietropaolo, A.; Salsano, A.; Gorini, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Paccagnella, A.; Gerardin, S.; Frost, C. D.; Ansell, S.; Platt, S. P.

    2008-01-01

    The VESUVIO beam line at the ISIS spallation neutron source was set up for neutron irradiation tests in the neutron energy range above 10 MeV. The neutron flux and energy spectrum were shown, in benchmark activation measurements, to provide a neutron spectrum similar to the ambient one at sea level, but with an enhancement in intensity of a factor of 10 7 . Such conditions are suitable for accelerated testing of electronic components, as was demonstrated here by measurements of soft error rates in recent technology field programable gate arrays

  9. Fast neutron capture cross section facility at Cadarache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Rigoleur, C.; Arnaud, A.

    1975-01-01

    The total energy weighting technique has been applied to measure absolute fast neutron capture cross section at Cadarache. We use a non hydrogeneous liquid scintillator to detect the gamma from the cascade. The neutron flux is measured with a B 10 INa(Tl) detector or Li 6 glass scintillator of well known efficiency. Time of flight technique is used with on line digital computer data processing. (orig.) [de

  10. Irradiation facilities at the spallation neutron source SINQ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, E.; Ledermann, J.; Aebersold, H.; Kuehne, G.; Kohlik, K. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Four independent experiments for sample irradiation are under construction and in preparation for operational tests at the spallation source SINQ. Three of them are located inside a thermal beam port with end positions inside or near the moderator tank. The other experiment will be established at the end position of a super mirror lined neutron guide for applications with cold neutrons. (author) 3 figs., 1 tab., 6 refs.

  11. Optimization to the medical facilities for Neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin Mergarerejo, Ricardo; GarcIa Parra, Lazaro; Desdin, Luis Felipe; Lopez Aldama, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    A method of detection of the Fluorine is presented by means of the neutron activation analysis. This method supposes an accuracy in the determination of any very high element (of the ppm order); but having the particularity that with Oxygen and Fluorine after certain nuclear reactions are obtained the same reaction product (son). This implies serious inconveniences since an interference he/she takes place among the activation of the Oxygen and of the Fluorine falsifying the reading. To save this inconvenience and to take advantage of the kindness of this method it is known that the Oxygen is activated for neutrons with superior energy to the 10.5 MeV, while the Fluorine for energy of the superior incident neutrons to the 1.5 MeV. We think about as hypothesis that is possible to reduce the interference of the Oxygen using a moderator in order to affect the statistic of the count the less possible thing. The objective of the present work is to design and to optimize an installation to measure concentrations of Fluorine in presence of Oxygen using neutrons of 14 MeV coming from a generator of neutrons of the type NG-12-1. To fulfill our objective leaving of the hypothesis an experimental simulation it was implemented using mathematical methods of having proven efficiency in the transport of neutrons like the method of Mount Carlo (specifically the code MCNP-)

  12. Neutron cross-section measurements at the nTOF facility at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Colonna, N

    2004-01-01

    A neutron Time-of-Flight facility (n_TOF) has recently become operative at CERN. The innovative features of the neutron beam, in particular the high instantaneous flux, the wide energy range, the high resolution and the low background, make this facility unique for measurements of neutron-induced reactions relevant to the field of emerging nuclear technologies, as well as to Nuclear Astrophysics and fundamental Nuclear Physics. The n_TOF facility is here described, together with the main features of the experimental apparata used for cross-section measurements. The results of the first measurement campaign, which have confirmed the innovative aspects of the facility, are presented. The measurement plan of the n_TOF collaboration, in particular with regard to implications to ADS, is briefly discussed.

  13. Status report and measurement of total cross-sections at the Pohang Neutron Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, G.N.; Meaze, A.K.M.M.H.; Ahmed, H.

    2004-01-01

    We report the status of the Pohang Neutron Facility which consists of an electron linear accelerator, a water-cooled Ta target, and an 11-m time-of-flight path. It has been equipped with a four-position sample changer controlled remotely by a CAMAC data acquisition system, which allows simultaneous accumulation of the neutron time of flight spectra from 4 different detectors. It is possible to measure the neutron total cross-sections in the neutron energy range from 0.1 eV to 100 eV by using the neutron time of flight method. A 6 LiZnS(Ag) glass scintillator was used as a neutron detector. The neutron flight path from the water-cooled Ta target to the neutron detector was 10.81±0.02 m. The background level was determined by using notch-filters of Co, In, Ta, and Cd sheets. In order to reduce the gamma rays from Bremsstrahlung and those from neutron capture, we employed a neutron-gamma separation system based on their different pulse shapes. The present measurements are in general agreement with the evaluated data in ENDF/B-VI. The resonance parameters were extracted from the transmission data from the SAMMY fitting and compared with the previous ones. (author)

  14. Neutronics analysis of International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF). Japanese contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyama, Yukio; Noda, Kenji; Kosako, Kazuaki.

    1997-10-01

    In fusion reactor development for demonstration reactor, i.e., DEMO, materials tolerable for D-T neutron irradiation are absolutely required for both mechanical and safety point of views. For this requirement, several kinds of low activation materials were proposed. However, experimental data by actual D-T fusion neutron irradiation have not existed so far because of lack of fusion neutron irradiation facility, except fundamental radiation damage studies at very low neutron fluence. Therefore such a facility has been strongly requested. According to agreement of need for such a facility among the international parties, a conceptual design activity (CDA) of International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) has been carried out under the frame work of the IEA-Implementing Agreement. In the activity, a neutronics analysis on irradiation field optimization in the IFMIF test cell was performed in three parties, Japan, US and EU. As the Japanese contribution, the present paper describes a neutron source term as well as incident deuteron beam angle optimization of two beam geometry, beam shape (foot print) optimization, and dpa, gas production and heating estimation inside various material loading Module, including a sensitivity analysis of source term uncertainty to the estimated irradiation parameters. (author)

  15. Experimental characterization of HOTNES: A new thermal neutron facility with large homogeneity area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedogni, R., E-mail: roberto.bedogni@lnf.infn.it [INFN–LNF, via E. Fermi n. 40, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Sperduti, A. [INFN–LNF, via E. Fermi n. 40, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); ENEA C.R. Frascati, via E. Fermi n. 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Pietropaolo, A.; Pillon, M. [ENEA C.R. Frascati, via E. Fermi n. 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Pola, A. [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Energia, via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); INFN–Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Gómez-Ros, J.M. [INFN–LNF, via E. Fermi n. 40, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2017-01-21

    A new thermal neutron irradiation facility, called HOTNES (HOmogeneous Thermal NEutron Source), was established in the framework of a collaboration between INFN-LNF and ENEA-Frascati. HOTNES is a polyethylene assembly, with about 70 cmx70 cm square section and 100 cm height, including a large, cylindrical cavity with diameter 30 cm and height 70 cm. The facility is supplied by a {sup 241}Am-B source located at the bottom of this cavity. The facility was designed in such a way that the iso-thermal-fluence surfaces, characterizing the irradiation volume, coincide with planes parallel to the cavity bottom. The thermal fluence rate across a given isofluence plane is as uniform as 1% on a disk with 30 cm diameter. Thermal fluence rate values from about 700 cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} to 1000 cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} can be achieved. The facility design, previously optimized by Monte Carlo simulation, was experimentally verified. The following techniques were used: gold activation foils to assess the thermal fluence rate, semiconductor-based active detector for mapping the irradiation volume, and Bonner Sphere Spectrometer to determine the complete neutron spectrum. HOTNES is expected to be attractive for the scientific community involved in neutron metrology, neutron dosimetry and neutron detector testing.

  16. Design of the 50 kW neutron converter for SPIRAL2 facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avilov, M.S. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk, SB RAS (Russian Federation); Tecchio, L.B., E-mail: tecchio@lnl.infn.i [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, 35020 Legnaro (Italy); Titov, A.T. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, 630090 Novosibirsk, SB RAS (Russian Federation); Tsybulya, V.S. [Trofimuk Institute of Geology, 630090 Novosibirsk, SB RAS (Russian Federation); Zhmurikov, E.I. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk, SB RAS (Russian Federation)

    2010-06-21

    SPIRAL2 is a facility for the study of fundamental nuclear physics and multidisciplinary research. SPIRAL2 represents a major advance for research on exotic nuclei. The radioactive ion beam (RIB) production system is comprised of a neutron converter, a target and an ion source. This paper is dedicated to the designing of the 50 kW neutron converter for the SPIRAL2 facility. Among the different variants of the neutron converter, the one based on a rotating solid disk seems quite attractive due to its safety, ease in production and relatively low cost. Dense graphite used as the converter's material allows the production of high-intensity neutron flux and, at the same time, the heat removal from the converter by means of radiation cooling. Thermo-mechanical simulations performed in order to determine the basic geometry and physical characteristics of the neutron production target for SPIRAL2 facility, to define the appropriate beam power distribution, and to predict the target behaviour under the deuteron beam of nominal parameters (40 MeV, 1.2 mA, 50 kW) are presented. To study the main physical and mechanical properties and serviceability under operating conditions, several kinds of graphite have been analyzed and tested. The paper reports the results of such measurements. Radiation damage is the most important issue for the application of graphite as neutron converter. It is well known that the thermal conductivity of the neutron-irradiated graphite is reduced by a factor of 10 from the initial value after irradiation. Difference in volume expansions between the matrix and the fiber results in serious damage of neutron-irradiated C/C composites. Calculations showed that at high temperature the effect of neutron radiation is not so critical and that the change in thermal conductivity does not prevent the use of graphite as neutron converter.

  17. Design of the 50 kW neutron converter for SPIRAL2 facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avilov, M.S.; Tecchio, L.B.; Titov, A.T.; Tsybulya, V.S.; Zhmurikov, E.I.

    2010-01-01

    SPIRAL2 is a facility for the study of fundamental nuclear physics and multidisciplinary research. SPIRAL2 represents a major advance for research on exotic nuclei. The radioactive ion beam (RIB) production system is comprised of a neutron converter, a target and an ion source. This paper is dedicated to the designing of the 50 kW neutron converter for the SPIRAL2 facility. Among the different variants of the neutron converter, the one based on a rotating solid disk seems quite attractive due to its safety, ease in production and relatively low cost. Dense graphite used as the converter's material allows the production of high-intensity neutron flux and, at the same time, the heat removal from the converter by means of radiation cooling. Thermo-mechanical simulations performed in order to determine the basic geometry and physical characteristics of the neutron production target for SPIRAL2 facility, to define the appropriate beam power distribution, and to predict the target behaviour under the deuteron beam of nominal parameters (40 MeV, 1.2 mA, 50 kW) are presented. To study the main physical and mechanical properties and serviceability under operating conditions, several kinds of graphite have been analyzed and tested. The paper reports the results of such measurements. Radiation damage is the most important issue for the application of graphite as neutron converter. It is well known that the thermal conductivity of the neutron-irradiated graphite is reduced by a factor of 10 from the initial value after irradiation. Difference in volume expansions between the matrix and the fiber results in serious damage of neutron-irradiated C/C composites. Calculations showed that at high temperature the effect of neutron radiation is not so critical and that the change in thermal conductivity does not prevent the use of graphite as neutron converter.

  18. The WNR facility - a pulsed spallation neutron source at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.J.; Lisowski, P.W.; King, N.S.P.

    1978-01-01

    The Weapons Neutron Research facility (WNR) at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is the first operating example of a new class of pulsed neutron sources using the X(p,n)Y spallation reaction. At present, up to 10 microamperes of 800-MeV protons from the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) linear accelerator bombard a Ta target to produce an intense white-neutron spectrum from about 800 MeV to 100 keV. The Ta target can be coupled with CH 2 and H 2 O moderators to produce neutrons of lower energy. The time structure of the WNR proton beam may be varied to optimize neutron time-of-flight (TOF) measurements covering the energy range from several hundred MeV to a few meV. The neutronics of the WNR target and target/moderator configurations have been calculated from 800 MeV to 0.5 eV. About 11 neutrons per proton are predicted for the existing Ta target. Some initial neutron TOF data are presented and compared with calculations

  19. Racial disparities in travel time to radiotherapy facilities in the Atlanta metropolitan area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peipins, Lucy A; Graham, Shannon; Young, Randall; Lewis, Brian; Flanagan, Barry

    2013-07-01

    Low-income women with breast cancer who rely on public transportation may have difficulty in completing recommended radiation therapy due to inadequate access to radiation facilities. Using a geographic information system (GIS) and network analysis we quantified spatial accessibility to radiation treatment facilities in the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area. We built a transportation network model that included all bus and rail routes and stops, system transfers and walk and wait times experienced by public transportation system travelers. We also built a private transportation network to model travel times by automobile. We calculated travel times to radiation therapy facilities via public and private transportation from a population-weighted center of each census tract located within the study area. We broadly grouped the tracts by low, medium and high household access to a private vehicle and by race. Facility service areas were created using the network model to map the extent of areal coverage at specified travel times (30, 45 and 60 min) for both public and private modes of transportation. The median public transportation travel time to the nearest radiotherapy facility was 56 min vs. approximately 8 min by private vehicle. We found that majority black census tracts had longer public transportation travel times than white tracts across all categories of vehicle access and that 39% of women in the study area had longer than 1 h of public transportation travel time to the nearest facility. In addition, service area analyses identified locations where the travel time barriers are the greatest. Spatial inaccessibility, especially for women who must use public transportation, is one of the barriers they face in receiving optimal treatment. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Simplified geometric model for the calculation of neutron yield in an accelerator of 18 MV for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes G, L.C.; Balcazar G, M.; Francois L, J.L.; Azorin N, J.

    2008-01-01

    The results of the neutrons yield in different components of the bolster of an accelerator Varian Clinac 2100C of 18 MV for radiotherapy are presented, which contribute to the radiation of flight of neutrons in the patient and bolster planes. For the calculation of the neutrons yield, a simplified geometric model of spherical cell for the armor-plating of the bolster with Pb and W was used. Its were considered different materials for the Bremsstrahlung production and of neutrons produced through the photonuclear reactions and of electro disintegration, in function of the initial energy of the electron. The theoretical result of the total yield of neutrons is of 1.17x10 -3 n/e, considering to the choke in position of closed, in the patient plane with a distance source-surface of 100 cm; of which 15.73% corresponds to the target, 58.72% to the primary collimator, 4.53% to the levelled filter of Fe, 4.87% to the levelled filter of Ta and 16.15% to the closed choke. For an initial energy of the electrons of 18 MeV, a half energy of the neutrons of 2 MeV was obtained. The calculated values for radiation of experimental neutrons flight are inferior to the maxima limit specified in the NCRP-102 and IEC-60601-201.Ed.2.0 reports. The absorbed dose of neutrons determined through the measurements with TLD dosemeters in the isocenter to 100 cm of the target when the choke is closed one, is approximately 3 times greater that the calculated for armor-plating of W and 1.9 times greater than an armor-plating of Pb. (Author)

  1. The upgrading of the cyclic neutron activation analysis facility at the Dalat research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Doanh Ho; Manh Dung Ho; Quang Thien Tran; Dong Vu Cao; Thanh Viet Ha

    2018-01-01

    The cyclic neutron activation analysis (CNAA) facility based on a pneumatic transfer system for short irradiation and rapid counting has recently been upgraded at the Dalat research reactor. The original facility was only designed for single irradiation. Therefore, this work has aimed to upgrade both hardware and software for the cyclic irradiation. In this paper, the upgrading of the facility for CNAA was described. Irradiation time of the facility were calibrated, thereby reducing irradiation time to seconds with precision. The accuracy and sensitivity of CNAA based-on the upgraded facility were assessed by determination of some short-lived nuclides. (author)

  2. On a new method to compute photon skyshine doses around radiotherapy facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falcao, R.; Facure, A. [Comissao Nacional de Eenrgia Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Xavier, A. [PEN/Coppe -UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Nowadays, in a great number of situations constructions are raised around radiotherapy facilities. In cases where the constructions would not be in the primary x-ray beam, 'skyshine' radiation is normally accounted for. The skyshine method is commonly used to to calculate the dose contribution from scattered radiation in such circumstances, when the roof shielding is projected considering there will be no occupancy upstairs. In these cases, there will be no need to have the usual 1,5-2,0 m thick ceiling, and the construction costs can be considerably reduced. The existing expression to compute these doses do not accomplish to explain mathematically the existence of a shadow area just around the outer room walls, and its growth, as we get away from these walls. In this paper we propose a new method to compute photon skyshine doses, using geometrical considerations to find the maximum dose point. An empirical equation is derived, and its validity is tested using M.C.N.P. 5 Monte Carlo calculation to simulate radiotherapy rooms configurations. (authors)

  3. Neutron reflector design with Californium 252 neutron for Boron neutron chapter therapy facility using MCNP5 simulation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad Fakhrurreza; Kusminanto; Y Sardjono

    2014-01-01

    In this research has made a reflector design to provide beams of Neutron for BNCT with Californium-252 radioactive source. This collimator is useful to obtain optimum epithermal neutron flux with the smallest impurity radiation (thermal neutron, fast neutron, and gamma). The design process is done using Monte Carlo N-Particle simulation version 5 (MCNP5) code to calculate the neutron flux tally form. The chosen reflector design is the reflectors which use material such as BeO ceramic with 13 cm thick. Moderator use sulfur material with the slope angle of the cone is 30°. From the calculation result, it is obtained that Reflector with 1 gram Californium-252 source can produce a neutron output thermal which has thermal neutron specification 2.23189 x 10 9 n/s.cm 2 , epithermal neutron 3.51548 x 10 9 n/s.cm 2 , and fast neutron 4.82241 x 10 9 n/s.cm 2 From the result, it needs additional collimator because the BNCT requirement. (author)

  4. Neutron and meson sources on the base of high-current cyclotron facilities (prospects of development)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitrievskij, V.P.

    1985-01-01

    A brief review is given and possible ways of development of neutron and meson generators on the basis of accelerating facilities are shown. The following conclusions are made: to combine two types of generators (neutron, meson) in one accelerated beam the deuteron beam for the energy 800-1000 MeV/nucleon should be accepted as the optimal one; accelerated beam energy distribution between mesocatalytic and emission branches of neutron generation is determined by the choice of mesocatalytic reactor target parameters; efficiency is the determining parameter of the accelerating facility (complex) when it is u sed for neutron or meson generators; a combination of linear and superconducting cyclic accelerators is the most perspective co mplex as to the efficiency

  5. Utilization and facility of neutron activation analysis in HANARO research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Y.S.; Chung, Y.J.; Moon, J.H.

    1998-01-01

    The facilities of neutron activation analysis within a multi-purpose research reactor (HANARO) are described and the main applications of Neutron activation analysis (NAA) in Korea are reviewed. The sample irradiation tube, automatic and manual pneumatic transfer system, are installed at three irradiation holes. One irradiation hole is lined with a cadmium tube for epithermal-nal NAA. The performance of the NAA facility was examined to identify the characteristics of tube transfer system, irradiation sites and polyethylene irradiation capsule. The available thermal neutron flux with each irradiation site are in the range of 3.9x10 13 -1.6x10 14 n/cm 2 ·s and cadmium ratios are 15-250. Neutron activation analysis has been applied in the trace component analysis of nuclear, geological, biological, environmental and high purity materials and various polymers for research and development. Analytical services and the latest analytical results are summarized. (author)

  6. Experimental measurements and theoretical simulations for neutron flux in self-serve facility of Dhruva reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rana, Y.S.; Mishra, Abhishek; Singh, Tej

    2016-06-01

    Dhruva is a 100 MW th tank type research reactor with natural metallic uranium as fuel and heavy water as coolant, moderator and reflector. The reactor is utilized for production of a large variety of radioisotopes for fulfilling growing demands of various applications in industrial, agricultural and medicinal sectors, and neutron beam research in condensed matter physics. The core consists of two on-power tray rods for radioisotope production and fifteen experimental beam holes for neutron beam research. Recently, a self-serve facility has also been commissioned in one of the through tubes in the reactor for carrying out short term irradiations. To get accurate information about neutron flux spectrum, measurements have been carried out in self-serve facility of Dhruva reactor. The present report describes measurement method, analysis technique and results. Theoretical estimations for neutron flux were also carried out and a comparison between theoretical and experimental results is made. (author)

  7. Utilization and facility of neutron activation analysis in HANARO research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Y S; Chung, Y J; Moon, J H [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O.Box 105 Yusong, 305-600, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-07-01

    The facilities of neutron activation analysis within a multi-purpose research reactor (HANARO) are described and the main applications of Neutron activation analysis (NAA) in Korea are reviewed. The sample irradiation tube, automatic and manual pneumatic transfer system, are installed at three irradiation holes. One irradiation hole is lined with a cadmium tube for epithermal-nal NAA. The performance of the NAA facility was examined to identify the characteristics of tube transfer system, irradiation sites and polyethylene irradiation capsule. The available thermal neutron flux with each irradiation site are in the range of 3.9x10{sup 13}-1.6x10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s and cadmium ratios are 15-250. Neutron activation analysis has been applied in the trace component analysis of nuclear, geological, biological, environmental and high purity materials and various polymers for research and development. Analytical services and the latest analytical results are summarized. (author)

  8. Upgrading of neutron radiography/tomography facility at research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El Bar, Waleed; Mongy, Tarek

    2014-01-01

    A state-of-the-art neutron tomography imaging system was set up at the neutron radiography beam tube at the Egypt Second Research Reactor (ETRR-2) and was successfully commissioned in 2013. This study presents a set of tomographic experiments that demonstrate a high quality tomographic image formation. A computer technique for data processing and 3D image reconstruction was used to see inside a copy module of an ancient clay article provided by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The technique was also able to uncover tomographic imaging details of a mummified fish and provided a high resolution tomographic image of a defective fire valve. (orig.)

  9. Reduction of the secondary neutron dose in passively scattered proton radiotherapy, using an optimized pre-collimator/collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, David J; Elliston, Carl D; Hall, Eric J; Paganetti, Harald

    2009-01-01

    Proton radiotherapy represents a potential major advance in cancer therapy. Most current proton beams are spread out to cover the tumor using passive scattering and collimation, resulting in an extra whole-body high-energy neutron dose, primarily from proton interactions with the final collimator. There is considerable uncertainty as to the carcinogenic potential of low doses of high-energy neutrons, and thus we investigate whether this neutron dose can be significantly reduced without major modifications to passively scattered proton beam lines. Our goal is to optimize the design features of a patient-specific collimator or pre-collimator/collimator assembly. There are a number of often contradictory design features, in terms of geometry and material, involved in an optimal design. For example, plastic or hybrid plastic/metal collimators have a number of advantages. We quantify these design issues, and investigate the practical balances that can be achieved to significantly reduce the neutron dose without major alterations to the beamline design or function. Given that the majority of proton therapy treatments, at least for the next few years, will use passive scattering techniques, reducing the associated neutron-related risks by simple modifications of the collimator assembly design is a desirable goal.

  10. The n_TOF facility: Neutron beams for challenging future measurements at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaveri, E.; Aberle, O.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Bacak, M.; Balibrea, J.; Barbagallo, M.; Bečvář, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Billowes, J.; Bosnar, D.; Brown, A.; Caamaño, M.; Calviño, F.; Calviani, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cardella, R.; Casanovas, A.; Cerutti, F.; Chen, Y. H.; Colonna, N.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Cosentino, L.; Damone, L. A.; Diakaki, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dressler, R.; Dupont, E.; Durán, I.; Fernández-Domínguez, B.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira, P.; Finocchiaro, P.; Göbel, K.; García, A. R.; Gawlik, A.; Gilardoni, S.; Glodariu, T.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González, E.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Harada, H.; Heinitz, S.; Heyse, J.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Kalamara, A.; Kavrigin, P.; Kimura, A.; Kivel, N.; Kokkoris, M.; Krtička, M.; Kurtulgil, D.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Lerendegui-Marco, J.; Meo, S. Lo; Lonsdale, S. J.; Macina, D.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Masi, A.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mastromarco, M.; Maugeri, E. A.; Mazzone, A.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Musumarra, A.; Negret, A.; Nolte, R.; Oprea, A.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Porras, I.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Radeck, D.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rubbia, C.; Ryan, J. A.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schumann, D.; Smith, A. G.; Sosnin, N. V.; Stamatopoulos, A.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarifeño-Saldivia, A.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Warren, S.; Woods, P. J.; Wright, T.; Žugec, P.

    2017-09-01

    The CERN n_TOF neutron beam facility is characterized by a very high instantaneous neutron flux, excellent TOF resolution at the 185 m long flight path (EAR-1), low intrinsic background and coverage of a wide range of neutron energies, from thermal to a few GeV. These characteristics provide a unique possibility to perform high-accuracy measurements of neutron-induced reaction cross-sections and angular distributions of interest for fundamental and applied Nuclear Physics. Since 2001, the n_TOF Collaboration has collected a wealth of high quality nuclear data relevant for nuclear astrophysics, nuclear reactor technology, nuclear medicine, etc. The overall efficiency of the experimental program and the range of possible measurements has been expanded with the construction of a second experimental area (EAR-2), located 20 m on the vertical of the n_TOF spallation target. This upgrade, which benefits from a neutron flux 30 times higher than in EAR-1, provides a substantial extension in measurement capabilities, opening the possibility to collect data on neutron cross-section of isotopes with short half-lives or available in very small amounts. This contribution will outline the main characteristics of the n_TOF facility, with special emphasis on the new experimental area. In particular, we will discuss the innovative features of the EAR-2 neutron beam that make possible to perform very challenging measurements on short-lived radioisotopes or sub-mg samples, out of reach up to now at other neutron facilities around the world. Finally, the future perspectives of the facility will be presented.

  11. Determination of Thermal Neutron Capture Cross Sections Using Cold Neutron Beams at the Budapest PGAA-NIPS Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belgya, T.

    2006-01-01

    A complete elemental gamma-ray library was measured with our guided thermal beam at the Budapest PGAA facility in the period of 1995-2000. Using this data library in an IAEA CRP on PGAA it was managed to re-normalize the ENSDF intensity data with the Budapest intensities. Based on this renormalization thermal neutron cross sections were deduced for several isotopes. Most of these calculations were done by Richard B. Firestone. The Budapest PGAA-NIPS facilities have been used for routine prompt gamma activation analysis with cold neutrons since the year of 2000. The advantage of the cold neutron beam is that the neutron guide has much higher neutron transmission. This resulted in a gain factor about 20 relative to our thermal guide. For the analytical works a precise comparator technique was developed that is routinely used to determine partial gamma-ray production cross sections. An additional development of our methodology was necessary to be worked out to determine thermal neutron capture cross sections based on the partial gamma-ray production cross sections. In this talk our methodology of radiative capture cross section determination will be presented, including our latest results on 129 I, 204,206,207 Pb and 209 Bi. Most of these works were done in cooperation with people from EU-JRC-IRMM, Geel, Belgium and CEA Cadarache, France. Many partial cross sections of short lived nuclei have been re-measured with our new chopper technique. The uncertainty calculations of the radiative capture cross section determination procedures will be also shown. (authors)

  12. Experimental subcritical facility driven by D-D/D-T neutron generator at BARC, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Amar, E-mail: image@barc.gov.in; Roy, Tushar; Kashyap, Yogesh; Ray, Nirmal; Shukla, Mayank; Patel, Tarun; Bajpai, Shefali; Sarkar, P.S.; Bishnoi, Saroj

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: •Experimental subcritical facility BRAHMMA coupled to D-D/D-T neutron generator. •Preliminary results of PNS experiments reported. •Feynman-alpha noise measurements explored with continuous source. -- Abstract: The paper presents design of an experimental subcritical assembly driven by D-D/D-T neutron and preliminary experimental measurements. The system has been developed for investigating the static and dynamic neutronic properties of accelerator driven sub-critical systems. This system is modular in design and it is first in the series of subcritical assemblies being designed. The subcritical core consists of natural uranium fuel with high density polyethylene as moderator and beryllium oxide as reflector. The fuel is embedded in high density polyethylene moderator matrix. Estimated k{sub eff} of the system is ∼0.89. One of the unique features of subcritical core is the use of Beryllium oxide (BeO) as reflector and HDPE as moderator making the assembly a compact modular system. The subcritical core is coupled to Purnima Neutron Generator which works in D-D and D-T mode with both DC and pulsed operation. It has facility for online source strength monitoring using neutron tagging and programmable source modulation. Preliminary experiments have been carried out for spatial flux measurement and reactivity estimation using pulsed neutron source (PNS) techniques with D-D neutrons. Further experiments are being planned to measure the reactivity and other kinetic parameters using noise methods. This facility would also be used for carrying out studies on effect of source importance and measurement of source multiplication factor k{sub s} and external neutron source efficiency φ{sup ∗} in great details. Experiments with D-T neutrons are also underway.

  13. Corrections on energy spectrum and scattering for fast neutron radiography at NECTAR facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shuquan; Thomas, Boucherl; Li Hang; Zou Yubin; Lu Yuanrong; Guo Zhiyu

    2013-01-01

    Distortions caused by the neutron spectrum and scattered neutrons are major problems in fast neutron radiography and should be considered for improving the image quality. This paper puts emphasis on the removal of these image distortions and deviations for fast neutron radiography performed at the NECTAR facility of the research reactor FRM-Ⅱ in Technische Universitaet Mounchen (TUM), Germany. The NECTAR energy spectrum is analyzed and established to modify the influence caused by the neutron spectrum, and the Point Scattered Function (PScF) simulated by the Monte-Carlo program MCNPX is used to evaluate scattering effects from the object and improve image quality. Good analysis results prove the sound effects of the above two corrections. (authors)

  14. Corrections on energy spectrum and scatterings for fast neutron radiography at NECTAR facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu-Quan; Bücherl, Thomas; Li, Hang; Zou, Yu-Bin; Lu, Yuan-Rong; Guo, Zhi-Yu

    2013-11-01

    Distortions caused by the neutron spectrum and scattered neutrons are major problems in fast neutron radiography and should be considered for improving the image quality. This paper puts emphasis on the removal of these image distortions and deviations for fast neutron radiography performed at the NECTAR facility of the research reactor FRM- II in Technische Universität München (TUM), Germany. The NECTAR energy spectrum is analyzed and established to modify the influence caused by the neutron spectrum, and the Point Scattered Function (PScF) simulated by the Monte-Carlo program MCNPX is used to evaluate scattering effects from the object and improve image quality. Good analysis results prove the sound effects of the above two corrections.

  15. Post-Installation evaluation of the neutron radiography facility of ITU TRIGA Mark-II Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavuz, H.; Durmayaz, A.

    2008-01-01

    Results of the experiments for determining the characteristics of the previously described neutron radiography facility designed and built in the Istanbul Technical University are presented. The thermal and total neutron fluxes and the gamma exposure rates have been measured inside, at the exit of the neutron beam collimator, and at its surroundings. The ratio of neutron flux to gamma exposure rate at maximum power has been determined. The results have been compared to those measured in the absence of the collimator. The neutron fluxes have been determined by using the foil activation method with gold foils enclosed in cadmium capsules. The gamma exposure rates have been measured by using Li 7 F- CTLD 700 thermoluminescent dosemeters. (authors)

  16. The Neutrons for Science Facility at SPIRAL-2

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ledoux, X.; Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.; Bém, Pavel; Fischer, U.; Majerle, Mitja; Mrázek, Jaromír; Negoita, F.; Novák, Jan; Simakov, S. P.; Šimečková, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 119, MAY (2014), s. 353-356 ISSN 0090-3752 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : SPIRAL-2 * Neutron For Science * time-of-flight Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear , Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 4.571, year: 2014

  17. NNS computing facility manual P-17 Neutron and Nuclear Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeberling, M.; Nelson, R.O.

    1993-11-01

    This document describes basic policies and provides information and examples on using the computing resources provided by P-17, the Neutron and Nuclear Science (NNS) group. Information on user accounts, getting help, network access, electronic mail, disk drives, tape drives, printers, batch processing software, XSYS hints, PC networking hints, and Mac networking hints is given

  18. Neutron targets of Moscow meson facility status, problems, prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidorkin, S.; Koptelov, E.; Perekrestenko, A.; Stavissky, Y.; Trushkin, V.; Sobolevsky, N. [Institute for Nuclear Research RAS, 60-th October Anniversary Prospect, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2001-03-01

    The status, problems and possible perspectives of target complexes of the Moscow meson factory is described in the report. The results of test proton beam session to neutron source are analysed. Some technical features of targets and expected modes in the nearest sessions are stated. (author)

  19. Characterization and optimization of the R A-6 s on-line neutron radiography facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezio Guanes, Federico Andres

    2007-01-01

    With the objective of characterizing and optimizing the radiation-field filters behavior in the beam of the R A-6 on-line Neutron Radiography facility, some improvements have been done to the facility devices.We studied the camera sensibility, the best camera acquisition software configuration, the best depth of field, we increased the system tuning efficiency.We also studied the linearity of the facility vs the reactor core neutron fluence and finally we constructed a device that ensure the repeatability of the measurements.The main parameters chosen to represent the best radiation-field set-up are the thermal neutron flux and dose in the position of the camera.Finally, a camera shield optimization haven been done in function of its position [es

  20. Design of small-animal thermal neutron irradiation facility at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H.B.

    1996-01-01

    The broad beam facility (BBF) at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) can provide a thermal neutron beam with flux intensity and quality comparable to the beam currently used for research on neutron capture therapy using cell-culture and small-animal irradiations. Monte Carlo computations were made, first, to compare with the dosimetric measurements at the existing BBF and, second, to calculate the neutron and gamma fluxes and doses expected at the proposed BBF. Multiple cell cultures or small animals could be irradiated simultaneously at the so-modified BBF under conditions similar to or better than those individual animals irradiated at the existing thermal neutron irradiation Facility (TNIF) of the BMRR. The flux intensity of the collimated thermal neutron beam at the proposed BBF would be 1.7 x 10 10 n/cm 2 ·s at 3-MW reactor power, the same as at the TNIF. However, the proposed collimated beam would have much lower gamma (0.89 x 10 -11 cGy·cm 2 /n th ) and fast neutron (0.58 x 10 -11 cGy·cm 2 /n th ) contaminations, 64 and 19% of those at the TNIF, respectively. The feasibility of remodeling the facility is discussed

  1. Fundamental design of systems and facilities for cold neutron source in the Hanaro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Soo; Jeong, H. S.; Kim, Y. K.; Wu, S. I

    2006-01-15

    The CNS(Cold Neutron Source) development project has been carried out as the partial project of the reactor utilization R and D government enterprise since 2003. In the advantage of lower energy and long wave length for the cold neutron, it can be used with the essential tool in order to investigate the structure of protein, amino-acid, DNA, super lightweight composite and advanced materials in the filed of high technology. This report is mainly focused on the basic design of the systems and facilities for the HANARO cold neutron source, performed during the second fiscal project year.

  2. Fundamental design of systems and facilities for cold neutron source in the Hanaro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bong Soo; Jeong, H. S.; Kim, Y. K.; Wu, S. I.

    2006-01-01

    The CNS(Cold Neutron Source) development project has been carried out as the partial project of the reactor utilization R and D government enterprise since 2003. In the advantage of lower energy and long wave length for the cold neutron, it can be used with the essential tool in order to investigate the structure of protein, amino-acid, DNA, super lightweight composite and advanced materials in the filed of high technology. This report is mainly focused on the basic design of the systems and facilities for the HANARO cold neutron source, performed during the second fiscal project year

  3. Investigation and analysis of neutron emission characteristics in Denaplasma focus facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodarzi, Sh.; Amrollahi, R.; Babazadeh, A.; Nasiri, A.

    2003-01-01

    Since the first experiments with plasma focus facilities in 1960' s. These devices are known as intense sources of neutron when the working gas contains deuterium with a proper density. Most of the emitted neutrons are produced by D-D reactions, but the mechanism of these reactions in not still clear completely. In this paper, the results of experimental investigations of neutron emission characteristics in D ena p lasma focus facility (Filipov type, 90 kJ, 25 kV) over a range of discharge voltages and pressures are presented. Out working gases are D 2 and D 2+%1 Kr, two different conic and flat insert anodes were employed. We have simultaneously measured the total emission in our experiments for analyzing the neutron generation mechanism in this device. We have found the upper and lower pressure limits and the optimum pressure for neutron generation, and we have observed the double pluses structure of neutron signal for the first time in this device. Form the experimental results, it seems that both thermonuclear and no thermonuclear mechanisms are always present in neutron generation, but their contribution in the total yield is strongly dependent on experimental conditions (initial pressure, discharge voltage, gas admixture, etc.). It was found that the range of variation of total neutron yield and neutron emission anisotropy factor for experiments with D + %1 Kr is wider than experiments with D 2, and the best neutron emission results belongs to discharges in D 2 + %1 Kr with a conic insert anode. By employing D 2 + %1 Kr with a conic insert anode, and varying pressure between 0.3-2 torr at a discharge voltage of 16 kV, it can be deduced that in low pressures ( n ∝ I α ρ ∝E α / 2 was found about 3.62 for D 2 + %1 Kr and 3 for D 2

  4. Evaluation of energy response of neutron rem monitor applied to high-energy accelerator facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakane, Yoshihiro; Harada, Yasunori; Sakamoto, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2003-03-01

    A neutron rem monitor was newly developed for applying to the high-intensity proton accelerator facility (J-PARC) that is under construction as a joint project between the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization. To measure the dose rate accurately for wide energy range of neutrons from thermal to high-energy region, the neutron rem monitor was fabricated by adding a lead breeder layer to a conventional neutron rem monitor. The energy response of the monitor was evaluated by using neutron transport calculations for the energy range from thermal to 150 MeV. For verifying the results, the response was measured at neutron fields for the energy range from thermal to 65 MeV. The comparisons between the energy response and dose conversion coefficients show that the newly developed neutron rem monitor has a good performance in energy response up to 150 MeV, suggesting that the present study offered prospects of a practical fabrication of the rem monitor applicable to the high intensity proton accelerator facility. (author)

  5. Fast neutron flux and intracranial dose distribution at a neutron irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Tetsuo; Aizawa, Otohiko; Nozaki, Tetsuya

    1981-01-01

    A head phantom filled with water was used to measure the fast neutron flux using 115 In(n, n')sup(115m)In and 103 Rh(n, n')sup(103m)Rh reactions. γ-ray from sup(115m)In and x-ray from sup(103m)Rh were detected by a Ge(Li) and a Na(Tl)I counter, respectively. TLD was used to investigate the γ-dose rate distribution inside the phantom. Flux of fast neutron inside the phantom was about 1 x 10 6 n/cm 2 sec, which was 3 order smaller than that of thermal neutron. The fast neutron flux decreased to 1/10 at 15 cm depth, and γ-dose rate was about 200 R/h at 100 kW inside the phantom. Total dose at the surface was 350 rad/h, to which, fast neutrons contributed more than γ-rays. The rate of fast neutron dose was about 10% of thermal neutron's in Kerma dose unit (rad), however, the rate was highly dependent on RBE value. (Nakanishi, T.)

  6. Neutron spectrum measurements from a neutron guide tube facility at the ETRR-1 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maayouf, R M.A.; El-Sayed, L A.A.; El-Kady, A S.I. [Reactor and Neutron Physics Dept., NRC, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1997-12-31

    The present work deals with measurements of the neutron spectrum emitted from a neutron guide tube (NGT) recently installed at one of the ETRR-1 reactor horizontal channels designed to deliver thermal neutrons, free from fast neutrons and gamma ray background, to a fourier reverse-time-of-flight (RTOF) diffractometer. The measurements were performed using a {sup 6} Li glass scintillation detector combined with a multichannel analyzer set at channel width 4 M sec and installed at 3.4 m from a disc Fermi chopper. Also a theoretical model was specially developed for the neutron spectrum calculations. According to the model developed, the spectrum calculated was found to be in good agreement with the measured one. It was found, both from measurements and calculations, that the spectrum emitted from the NGT covers, after transmission through a fourier chopper, neutron wavelengths from 1-4 A adequate for neutron diffraction measurements at D values between 0.71-2.9 A respectively. 6 FIGS.

  7. Compendium of Neutron Beam Facilities for High Precision Nuclear Data Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-07-01

    The recent advances in the development of nuclear science and technology, demonstrating the globally growing economy, require highly accurate, powerful simulations and precise analysis of the experimental results. Confidence in these results is still determined by the accuracy of the atomic and nuclear input data. For studying material response, neutron beams produced from accelerators and research reactors in broad energy spectra are reliable and indispensable tools to obtain high accuracy experimental results for neutron induced reactions. The IAEA supports the accomplishment of high precision nuclear data using nuclear facilities in particular, based on particle accelerators and research reactors around the world. Such data are essential for numerous applications in various industries and research institutions, including the safety and economical operation of nuclear power plants, future fusion reactors, nuclear medicine and non-destructive testing technologies. The IAEA organized and coordinated the technical meeting Use of Neutron Beams for High Precision Nuclear Data Measurements, in Budapest, Hungary, 10–14 December 2012. The meeting was attended by participants from 25 Member States and three international organizations — the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), the Joint Research Centre (JRC) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA). The objectives of the meeting were to provide a forum to exchange existing know-how and to share the practical experiences of neutron beam facilities and associated instrumentation, with regard to the measurement of high precision nuclear data using both accelerators and research reactors. Furthermore, the present status and future developments of worldwide accelerator and research reactor based neutron beam facilities were discussed. This publication is a summary of the technical meeting and additional materials supplied by the international

  8. Compendium of Neutron Beam Facilities for High Precision Nuclear Data Measurements. Annex: Individual Reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-07-01

    The recent advances in the development of nuclear science and technology, demonstrating the globally growing economy, require highly accurate, powerful simulations and precise analysis of the experimental results. Confidence in these results is still determined by the accuracy of the atomic and nuclear input data. For studying material response, neutron beams produced from accelerators and research reactors in broad energy spectra are reliable and indispensable tools to obtain high accuracy experimental results for neutron induced reactions. The IAEA supports the accomplishment of high precision nuclear data using nuclear facilities in particular, based on particle accelerators and research reactors around the world. Such data are essential for numerous applications in various industries and research institutions, including the safety and economical operation of nuclear power plants, future fusion reactors, nuclear medicine and non-destructive testing technologies. The IAEA organized and coordinated the technical meeting Use of Neutron Beams for High Precision Nuclear Data Measurements, in Budapest, Hungary, 10–14 December 2012. The meeting was attended by participants from 25 Member States and three international organizations — the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), the Joint Research Centre (JRC) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA). The objectives of the meeting were to provide a forum to exchange existing know-how and to share the practical experiences of neutron beam facilities and associated instrumentation, with regard to the measurement of high precision nuclear data using both accelerators and research reactors. Furthermore, the present status and future developments of worldwide accelerator and research reactor based neutron beam facilities were discussed. This publication is a summary of the technical meeting and additional materials supplied by the international

  9. Facility at CIRUS reactor for thermal neutron induced prompt γ-ray spectroscopic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, D.C.; Danu, L.S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Kinage, L.A.; Prashanth, P.N.; Goswami, A.; Sahu, A.K.; Shaikh, A.M.; Chatterjee, A.; Choudhury, R.K.; Kailas, S.

    2013-01-01

    A facility for prompt γ-ray spectroscopic studies using thermal neutrons from a radial beam line of Canada India Research Utility Services (CIRUS) reactor, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), has been developed. To carry out on-line spectroscopy experiments, two clover germanium detectors were used for the measurement of prompt γ rays. For the first time, the prompt γ–γ coincidence technique has been used to study the thermal neutron induced fission fragment spectroscopy (FFS) in 235 U(n th , f). Using this facility, experiments have also been carried out for on-line γ-ray spectroscopic studies in 113 Cd(n th , γ) reaction

  10. The construction of a facility for 14 Mev neutron activation analysis of oxygen in aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoernstad, T.; Alstad, J.

    1984-02-01

    The article describes the construction and performance of a facility for 14 MeV neutron activation analysis, mainly for oxygen in aluminium, at the University of Oslo. It consists of a sealed tube neutron generator, a biaxial rotation system for samples in irradiation position, a mechanism for automatic separation of sample and container, and appropriate detectors and counting electronics. Especially considered are the procedures for sample preparation and packing, standardization, optimization of the energy range for integration and optimization of the irradiation, decay and counting times. The applicability of the facility is exemplified by analytical results from comparative investigations in different laboratories using different methods. (Auth.)

  11. Neutron/photon/electron shielding study for a laser-fusion facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    A Monte Carlo shielding study encompassing neutron, photon, and electron transport has been conducted for the High Energy Gas Laser Facility at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. This paper describes the application of the Monte Carlo technique and several variance reduction schemes to the study. The calculations involve a geometry which is complicated in all three dimensions, a very intense 14 MeV neutron source, skyshine and deep penetrations. The facility design with 1.83 m concrete walls and a 1.52 m concrete roof is based on these calculations

  12. Criticality experiment for No.2 core of DF-VI fast neutron criticality facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Lijun; Liu Zhenhua; Yan Fengwen; Luo Zhiwen; Chu Chun; Liang Shuhong

    2007-01-01

    At the completion of the DF-VI fast neutron criticality facility, its core changed, and it was restarted and a series of experiments and measurements were made. According to the data from 29 criticality experiments, the criticality element number and mass were calculated, the control rod reactivity worth were measured by period method and rod compensate method, reactivity worth of safety rod and safety block were measured using reactivity instrument; the reactivity worth of outer elements and radial distribution of elements were measured too. Based on all the measurements mentioned above, safety operation parameters for core 2 in DF-VI fast neutron criticality facility were conformed. (authors)

  13. Characterization and adjustment of the neutron radiography facility of the RP-10 nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravello R, Y.R.

    2001-01-01

    The main aim of this work was to characterize and adjust the neutron radiography facility of the RP-10 nuclear reactor, and therefore be able to offer with this technique services to the industry and research centers in general. This technique will be complemented with others such as x-rays and gamma radiography. First, the shielding capacity of the facility was analyzed, proving that it complies with the radiological safety requirements established by the radiological safety code. Then gamma filtration tests were conducted in order to implement the direct method for image formation, optical density curves were built according to the thickness of the gamma filter, the type of film and the type of irradiation. Also, the indirect method for image formation was implemented for two types of converters: indium and dysprosium. Growth curves for optical density were also made according to contact time between converter-film, for different types of films. The resolution of the facility was also analyzed using two methods: Klasens (1946) and Harms (1986). Harms method came closer to the resolution of the human eye when compared to the Klasens method. Finally, the application fields of neutron radiography are presented, including those conducted at the neutron radiography facility of the RP-10 nuclear reactor. With this work, the RP-10 neutron radiography facility is ready to offer inspection and research services

  14. Use of the Power Burst Facility for boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crocker, J.G.; Griebenow, M.L.; Leatham, J.

    1990-01-01

    A program is under development at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) that involves using the Power Burst Facility (PBF) for research into boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). BNCT utilizes the ionizing energy from boron-neutron capture to stop reproduction of or destroy cells in cancerous tissue in a two-step process. The first step is to selectively concentrate a boron isotope within the tumor cell, that when activated by neutron capture emits highly ionizing, short range particles. The second step involves activation of the isotope only in the vicinity of the tumor with a narrow neutron beam. The ( 10 B[n, 4 He] 7 Li) reaction with thermal neutrons produces fission products with track lengths approximately equal to a cell diameter. The INEL program includes the modification of the PBF by the addition of a filter and treatment area. The filter will down-scatter high energy neutrons into the epithermal range and remove thermal neutrons and excessively damaging gamma components. The intense source of epithermal neutrons from PBF is considered necessary to achieve optimum therapy for deep-seated tumors with minimum damage to surface tissue. THe neutron filter conceptualized for PBF utilizes aluminum and heavy water to down-scatter neutrons into the proper energy range. Bismuth will be used for gamma shielding and cadmium will remove the thermal neutron contaminant from the beam. The INEL program leads to human clinical trials at PBF which are intended to prove that brain tumors can be successfully treated through noninvasive techniques. Further research into BNCT at PBF for other cancer types is also anticipated

  15. HANARO Neutron Radiography Facility and Fuel Cell Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taejoo

    2013-01-01

    Fuel cell which generates electric energy from hydrogen and oxygen is one of noticed renewable energy system because this has high efficiency and free from CO 2 . Especially, PEMFC (Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell) is focused by automotive companies because PEMFC, which has high power rate per volume and low operating temperature (60∼80), is suited due to the compact design and short start-up time. The water management is one of the most critical issues for fuel cell commercialization. In order to make a proper scheme for water management, thein formation of water distribution and behavior is very important. Neutron imaging is the best method to visualize the water at fuel cell and has been applied worldwide with qualitative and quantitative results. Because the NRF has large beam size (350Χ450mm 2 ) and relatively high neutron flux (2Χ107 n/cm 2 sec), it is suitable for large scale fuel cell research. Neutron imaging technique was used to investigate the water distribution and behavior in PEMFC under different operating conditions. The NRF has contributed the improvement of fuel cell performance and is one of the best choices for fuel cell study

  16. Progress in neutron beam development at the HFR Petten (feasibility study for a BNCT facility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantine, G.; Moss, R.L.; Watkins, P.R.D.; Perks, C.A.; Delafield, H.J.; Ross, D.; Voorbraak, W.P.; Paardekooper, A.; Freudenreich, W.E.; Stecher-Rasmussen, F.

    1990-08-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, using intermediate energy neutrons to achieve the deep penetration essential for treating brain tumours, can be implemented with a filtered reactor neutron beam. This is designed to minimize the mean energy of the neutrons to keep proton recoil damage to the scalp within normal tissue tolerance limits whilst delivering the required thermal neutron fluence to the tumour over a reasonably short period. This can only be realized in conjunction with a high power density reactor. At the Joint Research Centre Petten an optimized neutron filter is currently being built for installation into the HB11 beam tube of the High Flux Reactor HFR. Part of the development leading to this design has been an extensive study of broad spectrum, filtered beam performance on the HB7 beam tube facility. A wide range of calculations was performed using the Monte Carlo code, MCPN, supported by validation experiments in which several filter configuration incorporating aluminium, sulphur, liquid argon, titanium and cadmium were installed for low power measurements of the neutron fluence rate, neutron spectra and beam gamma-ray contamination. The measurements were carried out within a successful European collaboration. Evaluations were made of the reactor core edge and unfiltered beam spectra, for comparison with MCNP calculations. Multi-foil activation methods and also gamma dose determination in the filtered beam using thermo-luminescent detectors were performed by the ECN. The Harwell/ Birmingham University collaborators undertook the neutron spectrum measurements in the filtered beam. proton recoil spectrometry was used above 30 keV, combined with a multi-sphere and BF 3 chamber response modification technique. Subsequent spectrum adjustment was carried out with the SENSAK code. The agreement between the calculated and measured spectra has given confidence in the reactor and filter modelling methods used to design the HB11 therapy facility. (author). 12 refs

  17. SCANDAL -- A facility for elastic neutron scattering studies in the 50--130 MeV range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klug, J.; Blomgren, J.; Atac, A.; Bergenwall, B.; Dangtip, S.; Elmgren, K.; Johansson, C.; Olsson, N.; Prokofiev, A.V.; Rahm, J.; Oberstedt, A.; Tovesson, F.; Eudes, Ph.; Haddad, F.; Kerveno, M.; Kirchner, T.; Lebrun, C.; Stuttge, L.; Slypen, I.; Michel, R.; Neumann, S.; Herpers, U.

    2001-01-01

    A facility for detection of scattered neutrons in the energy interval 50--130 MeV, SCANDAL (SCAttered Nucleon Detection AssembLy), has recently been installed at the 20--180 MeV neutron beam facility of the The Svedberg Laboratory, Uppsala. It is primarily intended for studies of elastic neutron scattering, but can be used for the (n,p) and (n,d) reaction experiments as well. The performance of the spectrometer is illustrated in measurements of the (n,p) and (n,n) reactions on 1 H and 12 C. In addition, the neutron beam facility is described in some detail

  18. SCANDAL--a facility for elastic neutron scattering studies in the 50-130 MeV range

    CERN Document Server

    Klug, J; Atac, A; Bergenwall, B; Dangtip, S; Elmgren, K; Johansson, C; Olsson, N; Pomp, S; Prokofiev, A V; Rahm, J; Tippawan, U; Jonsson, O; Nilsson, L; Renberg, P U; Nadel-Turonski, P; Ringbom, A; Oberstedt, A; Tovesson, F; Blideanu, V; Le Brun, C; Lecolley, J F; Lecolley, F R; Louvel, M; Marie, N; Schweitzer, C; Varignon, C; Eudes, P; Haddad, F; Kerveno, M; Kirchner, T; Lebrun, C; Stuttgé, L; Slypen, I; Smirnov, A N; Michel, R; Neumann, S; Herpers, U

    2002-01-01

    A facility for detection of scattered neutrons in the energy interval 50-130 MeV, SCAttered Nucleon Detection AssembLy (SCANDAL), has recently been installed at the 20-180 MeV neutron beam facility of The Svedberg Laboratory, Uppsala. It is primarily intended for studies of elastic neutron scattering, but can be used for (n,p) and (n,d) reaction experiments as well. The performance of the spectrometer is illustrated in measurements of the (n,p) and (n,n) reactions on sup 1 H and sup 1 sup 2 C. In addition, the neutron beam facility is described in some detail.

  19. A Unique Outside Neutron and Gamma Ray Instrumentation Development Test Facility at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnarik, J.; Evans, L.; Floyd, S.; Lim, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Parsons, A.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2010-01-01

    An outside neutron and gamma ray instrumentation test facility has been constructed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to evaluate conceptual designs of gamma ray and neutron systems that we intend to propose for future planetary lander and rover missions. We will describe this test facility and its current capabilities for operation of planetary in situ instrumentation, utilizing a l4 MeV pulsed neutron generator as the gamma ray excitation source with gamma ray and neutron detectors, in an open field with the ability to remotely monitor and operate experiments from a safe distance at an on-site building. The advantage of a permanent test facility with the ability to operate a neutron generator outside and the flexibility to modify testing configurations is essential for efficient testing of this type of technology. Until now, there have been no outdoor test facilities for realistically testing neutron and gamma ray instruments planned for solar system exploration

  20. Thermal and epithermal neutron fluence rate gradient measurements by PADC detectors in LINAC radiotherapy treatments-field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, M. T., E-mail: mariate9590@gmail.com; Barros, H.; Pino, F.; Sajo-Bohus, L. [Universidad Simón Bolívar, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Sartenejas, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Dávila, J. [Física Médica C. A. and Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2015-07-23

    LINAC VARIAN 2100 is where energetic electrons produce Bremsstrahlung radiation, with energies above the nucleon binding energy (E≈5.5MeV). This radiation induce (γ,n) and (e,e’n) reactions mainly in the natural tungsten target material (its total photoneutron cross section is about 4000 mb in a energy range from 9-17 MeV). These reactions may occur also in other components of the system (e.g. multi leaf collimator). During radiation treatment the human body may receive an additional dose inside and outside the treated volume produced by the mentioned nuclear reactions. We measured the neutron density at the treatment table using nuclear track detectors (PADC-NTD). These covered by a boron-converter are employed, including a cadmium filter, to determine the ratio between two groups of neutron energy, i.e. thermal and epithermal. The PADC-NTD detectors were exposed to the radiation field at the iso-center during regular operation of the accelerator. Neutron are determined indirectly by the converting reaction {sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li the emerging charged particle leave their kinetic energy in the PADC forming a latent nuclear track, enlarged by chemical etching (6N, NaOH, 70°C). Track density provides information on the neutron density through calibration coefficient (∼1.6 10{sup 4} neutrons /track) obtained by a californium source. We report the estimation of the thermal and epithermal neutron field and its gradient for photoneutrons produced in radiotherapy treatments with 18 MV linear accelerators. It was obsered that photoneutron production have higher rate at the iso-center.

  1. A Study on the Neutron Dose Distribution in Case of 10 MV X-rays Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Cheol Soo; Shin, Seong Soo; Lim, Cheong Hwan; Jung, Hong Ryang

    2008-01-01

    This study is to measure the radiation dose of neutrons generated by the particle accelerator during X-ray (photon) treatment with a neutron detection method by using CR-39, and to research how the generation of neutrons may incur problems associated with radiation doses for patient treatment when using high energy photons for cancer treatment as a clinical application. The findings are summarized as follows : The results showed that average 0.35 mSv was measured with exposure of 1 Gy photon in case of fast neutron, 0.65 mSv with exposure of 2 Gy photon, 1.82 mSv exposure of 5 Gy, 0.26 mSv with exposure of 1 Gy photon in case of thermal neutron, 0.56 mSv with exposure of 2 Gy photon, and 1.23 mSv with exposure of 5 Gy of photon. By measuring the occurrence of neutron by using Wedge Filter, it has been confirmed that the occurrence of neutrons increased when using Wedge Filter. The results also showed that more neutrons were detected over the existing experiments when using an SRS Cone requiring high doses of radiation. Total 2.85 mSv neutrons were found on the average with exposure of 5 Gy photon in case of fast neutron and 1.37 mSv neutrons were found on the average with exposure of 5 Gy photon in case of thermal neutron. During the general treatment, about 1.6 times more neutrons over 5 Gy photon were found in case of fast neutron and about 1.12 time more neutrons over 5 Gy photon were found in case of thermal neutron.

  2. Validation of computational methods for treatment planning of fast-neutron therapy using activation foil techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigg, D.W.; Wemple, C.A.; Hartwell, J.K.; Harker, Y.D.; Venhuizen, J.R.; Risler, R.

    1997-12-01

    A closed-form direct method for unfolding neutron spectra from foil activation data is presented. The method is applied to measurements of the free-field neutron spectrum produced by the proton-cyclotron-based fast-neutron radiotherapy facility at the University of Washington (UW) School of Medicine. The results compare favorably with theoretical expectations based on an a-priori calculational model of the target and neutron beamline configuration of the UW facility

  3. The stationary neutron radiography system: a TRIGA-based production neutron radiography facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chesworth, Robert H.; Hagmann, Dean B.

    1988-01-01

    General Atomics (GA) is under contract to construct a Stationary Neutron Radiography System (SNRS) - on a turnkey basis - at McClellan Air Force Base in Sacramento, California. The SNRS is a custom designed neutron radiography system which will utilize a 1000 KW TRIGA reactor as the neutron source. The partially below-ground reactor will be equipped with four inclined beam tubes originating near the top of the reactor graphite reflector and installed tangential to the reactor core to provide a strong current of thermal neutrons with minimum gamma ray contamination. The inclined beam tubes will terminate in four large bays and will interface with rugged component positioning systems designed to handle intact aircraft wings, other honeycomb aircraft structures, and pyrotechnics. The SNRS will be equipped with real-time, near real-time, and film radiographic imaging systems to provide a broad spectrum of capability for detection of entrained moisture or corrosion in large aircraft panels. GA is prime contractor to the Air Force for the SNRS and is specifically responsible for the TRIGA reactor system and a portion of the neutron beam system design. Science Applications International Corporation and the Lionakis-Beaumont Design Group are principal subcontractors to GA on the project. (author)

  4. Solid state detectors for neutron radiation monitoring in fusion facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gómez-Ros, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this communication is to summarize the main solid state based detectors proposed for neutron diagnostic in fusion applications and their applicability under the required harsh conditions in terms of intense radiation, high temperature and available space restrictions. Activation systems, semiconductor based detectors, luminescent materials and Cerenkov fibre optics sensors (C-FOS) are the main devices that are described. - Highlights: • A state-of-the-art summary of solid state based detectors are described. • Conditions and restrictions for their applicability are described. • A list of the 38 more relevant references has been included

  5. Beam plug replacement and alignment under high radiation conditions for cold neutron facilities at Hanaro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeong-Garp, Cho; Jin-Won, Shin; Jung-Hee, Lee; Jeong-Soo, Ryu

    2010-01-01

    Full text : The HANARO, an open-tank-in-pool type research reactor of a 30 MWth power in Korea, has been operating for 15 years since its initial criticality in February 1995. The beam port assigned for the cold neutron at HANARO had been used for an 8-m SANS without neutron guides until it was replaced by a cold neutron guide system in 2008. It was developed a cold neutron guide system for the delivery of cold neutrons from the cold neutron source in the reactor to the neutron scattering instruments in the guide hall. Since the HANARO has been operated from 1995, it was a big challenge to replace the existing plug and shutter with the new facilities under high radiation conditions. When the old plug was removed from the beam port in 2008, the radiation level was 230 mSv/hr at the end of beam port. In addition to that, there were more difficult situations such as the poor as-built dimensions of the beam port, limited work space and time constraint due to other constructions in parallel in the reactor hall. Before the removal of the old plug the level of the radiation was measured coming out through a small hole of the plug to estimate the radiation level during the removal of the old plug and installation of a new plug. Based on the measurement and analysis results, special tools and various shielding facilities were developed for the removal of old in-pile plug and the installation of the new in-pile plug assembly safely. In 2008, the old plug and shutter were successfully replaced by the new plug and shutter as shown in this article with a minimum exposure to the workers. A laser tracker system was also one of the main factors in our successful installation and alignment under high radiation conditions and limited work space. The laser tracker was used to measure and align all the mechanical facilities and the neutron guides with a minimum radiation exposure to workers. The alignment of all the guides and accessories were possible during reactor operation because

  6. Overview of the Division 2351 Neutron Generator Test Facility waveform digitizing system. [Explosively activated neutron generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, T.C. Jr.

    1978-02-01

    All neutron generator waveforms from units tested at the SLA neutron generator test site are digitized and the digitized data stored in the CDC 6600 tape library for display and analysis using the CDC 6600 computer. The digitizing equipment consists mainly of seven Biomation Model 8100 transient recorders, Digital Equipment Corporation PDP 11/20 computer, RK05 disk, seven-track magnetic tape transport, and appropriate DEC and SLA controllers and interfaces. The PDP 11/20 computer is programmed in BASIC with assembly language drivers. In addition to digitizing waveforms, this equipment is used for other functions such as the automated testing of multiple-operation electronic neutron generators. Although other types of analysis have been done, the largest use of the digitized data has been for various types of graphical displays using the CDC 6600 and either the SD4020 or DX4460 plotters.

  7. Neutron measurements from beam-target reactions at the ELISE neutral beam test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xufei, X.; Fan, T.; Nocente, M.; Gorini, G.; Bonomo, F.; Franzen, P.; Fröschle, M.; Grosso, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Grünauer, F.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of 2.5 MeV neutron emission from beam-target reactions performed at the ELISE neutral beam test facility are presented in this paper. The measurements are used to study the penetration of a deuterium beam in a copper dump, based on the observation of the time evolution of the neutron counting rate from beam-target reactions with a liquid scintillation detector. A calculation based on a local mixing model of deuterium deposition in the target up to a concentration of 20% at saturation is used to evaluate the expected neutron yield for comparison with data. The results are of relevance to understand neutron emission associated to beam penetration in a solid target, with applications to diagnostic systems for the SPIDER and MITICA Neutral Beam Injection prototypes

  8. Nuclear data needs for neutron spectrum tailoring at International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Masayoshi

    2001-01-01

    International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is a proposal of D-Li intense neutron source to cover all aspects of the fusion materials development in the framework of IEA collaboration. The new activity has been started to qualifying the important technical issues called Key Element technology Phase since 2000. Although the neutron spectrum can be adjusted by changing the incident beam energy, it is favorable to be carried out many irradiation tasks at the same time under the unique beam condition. For designing the tailored neutron spectrum, neutron nuclear data for the moderator-reflector materials up to 50 MeV are required. The data for estimating the induced radioactivity is also required to keep the radiation level low enough at maintenance time. The candidate materials and the required accuracy of nuclear data are summarized. (author)

  9. Nuclear data needs for neutron spectrum tailoring at International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Masayoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is a proposal of D-Li intense neutron source to cover all aspects of the fusion materials development in the framework of IEA collaboration. The new activity has been started to qualifying the important technical issues called Key Element technology Phase since 2000. Although the neutron spectrum can be adjusted by changing the incident beam energy, it is favorable to be carried out many irradiation tasks at the same time under the unique beam condition. For designing the tailored neutron spectrum, neutron nuclear data for the moderator-reflector materials up to 50 MeV are required. The data for estimating the induced radioactivity is also required to keep the radiation level low enough at maintenance time. The candidate materials and the required accuracy of nuclear data are summarized. (author)

  10. Neutron scattering facility for the calibration of the response to nuclear recoils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jochum, J.; Feilitzsch, F. von; Huber, M.; Jagemann, T.; Lachenmaier, T.; Lanfranchi, J.-C.; Potzel, W.; Ruedig, A.; Schnagl, J.; Stark, M.; Wulandari, H.; Chambon, B.; Drain, D.; Gascon, J.; Jesus, M. de; Martineau, O.; Simon, E.; Stern, M.

    2002-01-01

    A possibility to search for elementary particles as dark matter candidates is to detect elastic scattering with cryogenic detectors. For the interpretation of the data one has to determine the detector response to nuclear recoils, the so-called quenching factors. They can differ for the heat-, for the scintillation- and for the ionization-signal and can be measured by scattering of neutrons. The CRESST- and the EDELWEISS-collaborations have set up a neutron scattering facility for cryogenic detectors at the tandem-accelerator of the Munich 'Maier-Leibniz-Labor.' The scattering angle and the time-of-flight of the neutrons are measured by an array of liquid scintillator cells. The pulsed high energy (11 MeV) neutron beam is created by nuclear reaction of a 11 B on a H 2 -gas target. The set-up and the results of first tests are presented

  11. Experimental neutron capture data of 58Ni from the CERN n_TOF facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žugec P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The neutron capture cross section of 58Ni was measured at the neutron time of flight facility n_TOF at CERN, from 27 meV to 400 keV neutron energy. Special care has been taken to identify all the possible sources of background, with the so-called neutron background obtained for the first time using high-precision GEANT4 simulations. The energy range up to 122 keV was treated as the resolved resonance region, where 51 resonances were identified and analyzed by a multilevel R-matrix code SAMMY. Above 122 keV the code SESH was used in analyzing the unresolved resonance region of the capture yield. Maxwellian averaged cross sections were calculated in the temperature range of kT = 5 – 100 keV, and their astrophysical implications were investigated.

  12. Development of the irradiation facilities for silicon neutron doping in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breant, P.; Cherruau, F.; Genthon, J.P.

    1980-08-01

    Irradiation facilities for silicon irradiations in France may be classified in two categories: on the one hand the devices directly implemented in the light water of α swimming-pool reactor and on the other hand the devices implemented in a neutronic medium -heavy water here- providing a high value of the thermal to fast neutron flux ratio. The tools used in France for silicon neutron doping are recapitulated according to this classification in tables, with their main characteristics; in addition it is specified that all existing facilities are instrumented with ingot rotation, flux monitoring, automatic time integration and are associated with handling, storage, cleaning, decontamination and activity control equipment. Finally, concerning the irradiation capacities given in these tables, it is pointed out that they are realistic and present capacities, for presently running devices and according to the way they are used on an average; that is to say that they take into account the real average dimensions of the ingot supplied and not the maximum possible loading with the maximum diameters. Further extensions of capacity are possible if need be by the installation of supplementary standard irradiation modules in the pools. Particular attention will given to the new developments: -new irradiaton facilities with a high Oth/Or ratio being developed in the new research reactor ORPHEE: - developments in the OSIRIS H 2 O reactor. In particular and in connection with the facilities developped in OSIRIS, neutronic problems typical and swimming-pool reactors will be contemplated and the adopted solutions given

  13. Simulation of Thermal, Neutronic and Radiation Characteristics in Spent Nuclear Fuel and Radwaste Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poskas, P.; Bartkus, G.

    1999-01-01

    The overview of the activities in the Division of Thermo hydro-mechanics related with the assessment of thermal, neutronic and radiation characteristics in spent nuclear fuel and radwaste facilities are performed. Also some new data about radiation characteristics of the RBMK-1500 spent nuclear fuel are presented. (author)

  14. Fast neutron measurements at the nELBE time-of-flight facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junghansa A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The compact neutron-time-of-flight facility nELBE at the superconducting electron accelerator ELBE of Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf has been rebuilt. A new enlarged experimental hall with a flight path of up to 10 m is available for neutron time-of-flight experiments in the fast energy range from about 50 keV to 10 MeV. nELBE is intended to deliver nuclear data of fast neutron nuclear interactions e.g. for the transmutation of nuclear waste and improvement of neutron physical simulations of innovative nuclear systems. The experimental programme consists of transmission measurements of neutron total cross sections, elastic and inelastic scattering cross section measurements, and neutron induced fission cross sections. The inelastic scattering to the first few excited states in 56Fe was investigated by measuring the gamma production cross section with an HPGe detector. The neutron induced fission of 242Pu was studied using fast ionisation chambers with large homogeneous actinide deposits.

  15. Some existing Experimental Facilities for Fast Neutron Systems at KIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litfin, K.

    2013-01-01

    An overview is given of: • Liquid Metal Loops at the Karlsruhe Liquid Metal Laboratory (KALLA) of KIT; • THESYS: Technologies for HEavy metal SYStems; • Thermal Hydraulic experiments in THESYS; • THEADES: THErmalhydraulics and Ads DESign; • Thermal Hydraulic experiments in THEADES; • CORRIDA: CORRosion In Dynamic lead Alloys; • Experimental stagnant facilities at KALLA; • INR Liquid metal research

  16. Neutron therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riesler, Rudi

    1995-01-01

    Standard radiotherapy uses Xrays or electrons which have low LET (linear energy transfer); in contrast, particles such as neutrons with high LET have different radiobiological responses. In the late 1960s, clinical trials by Mary Catterall at the Hammersmith Hospital in London indicated that fast neutron radiation had clinical advantages for certain malignant tumours. Following these early clinical trials, several cyclotron facilities were built in the 1980s for fast neutron therapy, for example at the University of Washington, Seattle, and at UCLA. Most of these newer machines use extracted cyclotron proton beams in the range 42 to 66 MeV with beam intensities of 15 to 60 microamps. The proton beams are transported to dedicated therapy rooms, where neutrons are produced from beryllium targets. Second-generation clinical trials showed that accurate neutron beam delivery to the tumour site is more critical than for photon therapy. In order to achieve precise beam geometries, the extracted proton beams have to be transported through a gantry which can rotate around the patient and deliver beams from any angle; also the neutron beam outline (''field shape'') must be adjusted to extremely irregular shapes using a flexible collimation system. A therapy procedure has to be appropriately organized, with physicians, radiotherapists, nurses, medical physicists and other staff in attendance; other specialized equipment, such as CT or MRI scanners and radiation simulators must be made available. Neutron therapy is usually performed only in radiation oncology departments of major medical centres

  17. Conceptual design and neutronics analyses of a fusion reactor blanket simulation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beller, D.E.; Ott, K.O.; Terry, W.K.

    1987-01-01

    A new conceptual design of a fusion reactor blanket simulation facility has been developed. This design follows the principles that have been successfully employed in the Purdue Fast Breeder Blanket Facility (FBBF), where experiments have resulted in the discovery of substantial deficiencies in neutronics predictions. With this design, discrepancies between calculation and experimental data can be nearly fully attributed to calculation methods because design deficiencies that could affect results are insignificant. The conceptual design of this FBBF analog, the Fusion Reactor Blanket Facility, is presented

  18. Low-dose neutron dose response of zebrafish embryos obtained from the Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, C.Y.P.; Kong, E.Y.; Konishi, T.; Kobayashi, A.; Suya, N.; Cheng, S.H.; Yu, K.N.

    2015-01-01

    The dose response of embryos of the zebrafish, Danio rerio, irradiated at 5 h post fertilization (hpf) by 2-MeV neutrons with ≤100 mGy was determined. The neutron irradiations were made at the Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) facility in the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. A total of 10 neutron doses ranging from 0.6 to 100 mGy were employed (with a gamma-ray contribution of 14% to the total dose), and the biological effects were studied through quantification of apoptosis at 25 hpf. The responses for neutron doses of 10, 20, 25, and 50 mGy approximately fitted on a straight line, while those for neutron doses of 0.6, 1 and 2.5 mGy exhibited neutron hormetic effects. As such, hormetic responses were generically developed by different kinds of ionizing radiations with different linear energy transfer (LET) values. The responses for neutron doses of 70 and 100 mGy were significantly below the lower 95% confidence band of the best-fit line, which strongly suggested the presence of gamma-ray hormesis. - Highlights: • Neutron dose response was determined for embryos of the zebrafish, Danio rerio. • Neutron doses of 0.6, 1 and 2.5 mGy led to neutron hormetic effects. • Neutron doses of 70 and 100 mGy accompanied by gamma rays led to gamma-ray hormesis

  19. Preliminary studi on neutronic aspect of a conceptual design of the Kartini reactor base ADS facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tegas Sutondo

    2012-01-01

    A preliminary study on neutronic aspect of a conceptual design of ADS facility with the basis of Kartini Reaktor, has been performed. The study was intended to see the feasibility from neutronic point of view of Kartini reactor, to be used as a small scale of NPP’s waste transmutation experimental facility. A SRAC code was used as the basis of calculations. The results indicate that the presence of minor actinides (MA) will give a positive reactivity, which tends to increase with the increase of MA concentrations. Based on the defined criteria of subcriticality and by considering the core power distributions and the level of reactivity contribution of MA element, it is concluded that Kartini reactor is potential enough to be used as an ADS experimental facility, mainly for MA concentration between 30 to 50 % of the assumed mixture of C-MA matrix. (author)

  20. Self-sustainability of a research reactor facility with neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chilian, C.; Kennedy, G.

    2010-01-01

    Long-term self-sustainability of a small reactor facility is possible because there is a large demand for non-destructive chemical analysis of bulk materials that can only be achieved with neutron activation analysis (NAA). The Ecole Polytechnique Montreal SLOWPOKE Reactor Facility has achieved self-sustainability for over twenty years, benefiting from the extreme reliability, ease of use and stable neutron flux of the SLOWPOKE reactor. The industrial clientele developed slowly over the years, mainly because of research users of the facility. A reliable NAA service with flexibility, high accuracy and fast turn-around time was achieved by developing an efficient NAA system, using a combination of the relative and k0 standardisation methods. The techniques were optimized to meet the specific needs of the client, such as low detection limit or high accuracy at high concentration. New marketing strategies are presented, which aim at a more rapid expansion. (author)

  1. Fast-neutron dosimetry in the seed-irradiation facility, ASTRA reactor, Seibersdorf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahnstroem, G.; Burtscher, A.; Casta, J.

    1967-01-01

    An important part of the co-ordinated programme on the neutron irradiation of seeds has been the construction of a fast-neutron irradiation facility for swimming-pool reactors. This facility was installed around 70 cm from the core in the ASTRA reactor swimming-pool at the end of December, 1966. Also, for this programme a pair of constant potential ionization chambers have been constructed at the Institute of Biochemistry, Stockholm University. These chambes are of the type described in the technical annex and are the same size as the seed-irradiation vials to be used in the seed-irradiation container (diam. =15 mm, length = 60 mm). Some preliminary dosimetry experiments were undertaken to test the irradiation facility and the ionization chambers, and to investigate the usefulness of the dosimetry instructions in the Technical Annex. The results of these experiments are discussed in this paper. 3 refs, 6 figs, 7 tabs

  2. The SCANDAL facility - How to measure elastic neutron scattering in the 50-130 MeV range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klug, Joakim

    2001-01-01

    The interest in neutrons of energies above 20 MeV is growing rapidly, since new applications are being developed or have been identified. Transmutation of nuclear waste and cancer therapy with neutron beams are two research fields that would benefit from new neutron scattering data at these energies. A facility for detection of scattered neutrons in the energy interval 50-130 MeV, SCANDAL (SCAttered Nucleon Detection AssembLy), has been developed and installed at the neutron beam facility of the The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala. It can be used to study the (n,n), (n,p) and (n,d) reactions. This thesis describes the layout of the setup, the experimental procedure, and data analysis principles. The performance of the spectrometer is illustrated with measurements of the (n,p) and (n,n) reactions on 1 H and 12 C. In addition, the neutron beam facility is described in some detail

  3. Procedure to measure the neutrons spectrum around a lineal accelerator for radiotherapy; Procedimiento para medir el espectro de los neutrones en torno a un acelerador lineal para radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H. R.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Letechipia de L, C. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98060 Zacatecas (Mexico); Benites R, J. L. [Servicios de Salud de Nayarit, Centro Estatal de Cancerologia, Calzada de la Cruz 116 Sur, 63000 Tepic, Nayarit (Mexico); Salas L, M. A., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Agronomia, Apdo. Postal 336, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    An experimental procedure was developed, by means of Bonner spheres, to measure the neutrons spectrum around Linacs of medical use that only requires of a single shot of the accelerator; to this procedure we denominate Planetary or Isocentric method. One of the problems associated to the neutrons spectrum measurement in a radiotherapy room with lineal accelerator is because inside the room a mixed, intense and pulsed radiation field takes place affecting the detection systems based on active detector; this situation is solved using a passive detector. In the case of the Bonner spheres spectrometer the active detector has been substituted by activation detectors, trace detectors or thermoluminescent dosimeters. This spectrometer uses several spheres that are situated one at a time in the measurement point, this way to have the complete measurements group the accelerator should be operated, under the same conditions, so many times like spheres have the spectrometer, this activity can consume a long time and in occasions due to the work load of Linac to complicate the measurement process too. The procedure developed in this work consisted on to situate all the spectrometer spheres at the same time and to make the reading by means of a single shot, to be able to apply this procedure, is necessary that before the measurements two characteristics are evaluated: the cross-talking of the spheres and the symmetry conditions of the neutron field. This method has been applied to determine the photo-neutrons spectrum produced by a lineal accelerator of medical use Varian ix of 15 MV to 100 cm of the isocenter located to 5 cm of depth of a solid water mannequin of 30 x 30 x 15 cm. The spectrum was used to determine the total flow and the environmental dose equivalent. (Author)

  4. Final environmental impact statement, construction and operation of the Spallation Neutron Source Facility. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-04-01

    DOE proposes to construct and operate a state-of-the-art, short-pulsed, spallation neutron source comprised of an ion source, a linear accelerator, a proton accumulator ring, and an experiment building containing a liquid mercury target and a suite of neutron scattering instrumentation. The proposed Spallation Neutron Source would be designed to operate at a proton beam power of 1 megawatt. The design would accommodate future upgrades to a peak operating power of 4 megawatts. These upgrades may include construction of a second proton accumulator ring and a second target. This document analyzes the potential environmental impacts from the proposed action and the alternatives. The analysis assumes a facility operating at a power of 1 MW and 4 MW over the life of the facility. The two primary alternatives analyzed in this FEIS are: the proposed action (to proceed with building the Spallation Neutron Source) and the No-Action Alternative. The No-Action Alternative describes the expected condition of the environment if no action were taken. Four siting alternatives for the Spallation Neutron Source are evaluated: Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, (preferred alternative); Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL; Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY; and Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

  5. Fast Neutron Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Final Report of a Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Randomized Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laramore, G. E.; Krall, J. M.; Thomas, F. J.; Russell, K. J.; Maor, M. H.; Hendrickson, F. R.; Martz, K. L.; Griffin, T. W.; Davis, L. W.

    1993-01-01

    Between June 1977 and April 1983 the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) sponsored a Phase III randomized trial investigating the use of fast neutron radiotherapy for patients with locally advanced (Stages C and D1) adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland. Patients were randomized to receive either conventional photon radiation or fast neutron radiation used in a mixed-beam (neutron/photon) treatment schedule. A total of 91 analyzable patients were entered into the study, and the two patient groups were balanced with respect to the major prognostic variables. Actuarial curves are presented for local/regional control and "overall" survival. Ten-year results for clinically assessed local control are 70% for the mixed-beam group versus 58% for the photon group (p = 0.03) and for survival are 46% for the mixed-beam group versus 29% for the photon group (p = 0.04). This study suggests that a regional method of treatment can influence both local tumor control and survival in patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland.

  6. A neutron beam facility for radioactive ion beams and other applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecchio, L. B.

    1999-06-01

    In the framework of the Italian participation in the project of a high intensity proton facility for the energy amplifier and nuclear waste transmutations, LNL is involved in the design and construction of same prototypes of the injection system of the 1 GeV linac that consists of a RFQ (5 MeV, 30 mA) followed by a 100 MeV linac. This program has already been supported financially and the work is in progress. In this context LNL has proposed a project for the construction of a second generation facility for the production of radioactive ion beams (RIBs) by means of the ISOL method. The final goal is the production of neutron rich RIBs with masses ranging from 30 to 150 by using primary beams of protons, deuterons and light ions with energy of 100 MeV and 100 kW power. This project is expected to be developed in about 10 years from new and intermediate milestones and experiments are foreseen and under consideration for the next INFN five year plan (1999-2003). During that period the construction of a proton/deuteron accelerator of 10 MeV energy and 10 mA current, consisting of a RFQ (5 MeV, 30 mA) and a linac (10 MeV, 10 mA), and of a neutron area dedicated to the RIBs production and to the neutron physics, is proposed. Some remarks on the production methods will be presented. The possibility of producing radioisotopes by means of the fission induced by neutrons will be investigated and the methods of production of neutrons will be discussed. Besides the RIBs production, neutron beams for the BNCT applications and neutron physics are also planned.

  7. Studies of neutron methods for process control and criticality surveillance of fissile material processing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoltowski, T.

    1988-01-01

    The development of radiochemical processes for fissile material processing and spent fuel handling need new control procedures enabling an improvement of plant throughput. This is strictly related to the implementation of continuous criticality control policy and developing reliable methods for monitoring the reactivity of radiochemical plant operations in presence of the process perturbations. Neutron methods seem to be applicable for fissile material control in some technological facilities. The measurement of epithermal neutron source multiplication with heuristic evaluation of measured data enables surveillance of anomalous reactivity enhancement leading to unsafe states. 80 refs., 47 figs., 33 tabs. (author)

  8. Biological dosimetry studies for boron neutron capture therapy at the RA-1 research reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivillin, Veronica A.; Heber, Elisa M.; Itoiz, Maria E.; Schwint, Amanda E.; Castillo, Jorge

    2004-01-01

    Initial physical dosimetry measurements have been completed using activation spectrometry and thermoluminescent dosimeters to characterize the BNCT facility developed at the RA-1 research reactor operated by the National Atomic Energy Commission in Buenos Aires. Biological dosimetry was performed employing the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model previously validated for BNCT studies by our group. Results indicate that the RA-1 neutron source produces useful dose rates for BNCT studies but that some improvements in the initial configuration will be needed to optimize the spectrum for thermal-neutron BNCT research applications. (author)

  9. Replacement of the moderator cell unit of JRR-3's cold neutron source facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazawa, Tomoya; Nagahori, Kazuhisa; Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi

    2006-10-01

    The moderator cell of the JRR-3's cold neutron source (CNS) facility, converts thermal neutrons into cold neutrons by passing through liquid cold hydrogen. The cold neutrons are used for material and life science research such as the neutron scattering. The CNS has been operated since the start of JRR-3's in 1990. The moderator cell containing liquid hydrogen is made of stainless steel. The material irradiation lifetime is limited to 7 years due to irradiation brittleness. The first replacement was done by using a spare part made in France. This replacement work of 2006 was carried out by using the domestic moderator cell unit. The following technologies were developed for the moderator cell unit production. 1) Technical development of black treatment on moderator cell surface to increase radiation heat. 2) Development of bending technology of concentric triple tubes consisting from inside tube, Outside tube and Vacuum insulation tube. 3) Development of manufacturing technique of the moderator cell with complicated shapes. According to detail planed work procedures, replacement work was carried out. As results, the working days were reduced to 80% of old ones. The radiation dose was also reduced due to reduction of working days. It was verified by measurement of neutrons characteristics that the replaced moderator cell has the same performance as that of the old moderator cell. The domestic manufacturing of the moderator cell was succeeded. As results, the replacement cost was reduced by development of domestic production technology. (author)

  10. The Clatterbridge high-energy neutron therapy facility: specification and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnett, D.E.; Blake, S.W.; Shaw, J.E.; Bewley, D.K.

    1988-01-01

    A high energy neutron therapy facility has been installed at the Douglas Cyclotron Centre, Clatterbridge Hospital Merseyside, to extend M.R.C. clinical trials of fast neutrons. The neutron beam is produced by bombarding a beryllium target with 62 MeV protons. The target is isocentrically mounted with potential for 360 0 rotation, with a fully variable collimator, giving a range of rectilinear field sizes from 5 cm x 5 cm to 30 cm x 30 cm. Basic neutron beam data including output, field flatness, penumbra and depth-dose data have been measured. For a 10 cm x 10 cm field, 50% depth dose occurs at 16.2 cm in water and output is 1.63 cGy μ A -1 min -1 at maximum dose depth. Effectiveness of the target shielding and neutron-induced radioactivity in the treatment head were also measured. It is concluded that the equipment meets design specifications and fully satisfies criticisms of earlier neutron therapy equipment. A full radiation survey showed that radiation levels present no significant staff hazard. (UK)

  11. First Measurement of Reaction-in-Flight Neutrons at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonchev, A.; Becker, J.; Bleuel, D.; Bionta, R.; Fortner, D.; Henry, E.; Khater, H.; Shaughnessy, D.; Schnider, D.; Stoeffl, W.; Yeamans, C.; Boswell, M.; Bredeweg, T.; Grim, G.; Jungman, G.; Fowler, M.; Hayes, A.; Obst, A.; Rundberg, R.; Schulz, A.; Wilhelmy, J.; Tornow, W.; Bhike, M.; Howell, C.; Gooden, M.; LLNL/LANL/TUNL Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The first measurement of reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons, also known as tertiary neutrons, has been performed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) using an activation technique. Thulium foils positioned at 50 cm from the burning deuterium-tritium (DT) capsule have been exposed to the characteristic DT neutron spectrum. The high-energy part of these neutrons with energies above 15.0 MeV can produce 167Tm via the 169Tm(n,3n) reaction. The 208-keV γ-ray, emitted from the decay of 167Tm with a half-life of 9.2 days, has been measured using two clover detectors. The first preliminary result implies that the ratio of RIF neutrons (En > 15.0 MeV) versus the total neutrons is 1 × 10 -4 +/- 3 × 10 -5. The important implication of these measurements on our knowledge of the charged-particle stopping power in strongly coupled quantum-degenerate plasma will be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, (LLNS) under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. Intrinsic noise of a superheated droplet detector for neutron background measurements in massively shielded facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandes Ana C.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Superheated droplet detectors are a promising technique to the measurement of low-intensity neutron fields, as detectors can be rendered insensitive to minimum ionizing radiations. We report on the intrinsic neutron-induced signal of C2ClF5 devices fabricated by our group that originate from neutron- and alpha-emitting impurities in the detector constituents. The neutron background was calculated via Monte Carlo simulations using the MCNPX-PoliMi code in order to extract the recoil distributions following neutron interaction with the atoms of the superheated liquid. Various nuclear techniques were employed to characterise the detector materials with respect to source isotopes (238U, 232Th and 147Sm for the normalisation of the simulations and also light elements (B, Li having high (α, n neutron production yields. We derived a background signal of ~10-3 cts/day in a 1 liter detector of 1-3 wt.% C2ClF5, corresponding to a detection limit in the order of 10-8 n cm-2s-1. Direct measurements in a massively shielded underground facility for dark matter search have confirmed this result. With the borosilicate detector containers found to be the dominant background source in current detectors, possibilities for further noise reduction by ~2 orders of magnitude based on selected container materials are discussed.

  13. Development of the RRR Cold Neutron Source facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masriera, N.; Lecot, C.; Hergenreder, D.; Lovotti, O.; Serebrov, A.; Zakharov, A.; Mityukhlyaev, V.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes some general design issues on the Cold Neutron Source (CNS) of the Replacement Research Reactor (RRR) for the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). The description covers different aspects of the design: the requirements that lead to an innovative design, the overall design itself and the definition of a technical approach in order to develop the necessary design solutions. The RRR-CNS has liquid Deuterium (LD2) moderator, sub-cooled to ensure maximum moderation efficiency, flowing within a closed natural circulation Thermosiphon loop. The Thermosiphon is surrounded by a CNS Vacuum Containment made of zirconium alloy, that provides thermal insulation and a multiple barriers scheme to prevent Deuterium from mixing with water or air. Consistent with international practice, this vessel is designed to withstand any hypothetical energy reaction should Deuterium and air mix in its interior. The applied design approach allows ensuring that the RRR-CNS, in spite of being innovative, will meet all the design, performance and quality requirements. (author)

  14. The use of steel and lead shieldings in radiotherapy rooms and its comparison with respect to neutrons doses at patients; Comparacao de blindagens de aco e de chumbo usadas em salas de radioterapia quanto a dose devido a neutrons depositada em pacientes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, M.G.; Rebello, W.F.; Andrade, E.R.; Medeiros, M.P.C.; Mendes, R.M.S.; Braga, K.L.; Gomes, R.G., E-mail: maglosilva15@gmail.com, E-mail: rebello@ime.eb.br, E-mail: fisica.dna@gmail.com, E-mail: eng.cavaliere@gmail.com, E-mail: raphaelmsm@gmail.com, E-mail: kelmo.lins@gmail.com, E-mail: ggrprojetos@gmail.com [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Santos, R.F.G., E-mail: raphaelfgsantos@gmail.com [Centro Universitario Anhanguera, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia; Silva, Ademir X., E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The NCRP Report No. 151, Structural Shielding Design and Evaluation for Megavoltage X- and Gamma-Ray Radiotherapy Facilities, considers, in shielding calculations for radiotherapy rooms, the use of lead and/or steel to be applied on bunker walls. The NCRP Report calculations were performed foreseeing a better protection of people outside the radiotherapy room. However, contribution of lead and steel to patient dose should be taken into account for radioprotection purposes. This work presents calculations performed by MCNPX code in analyzing the Ambient Dose Equivalent due to neutron, H*(10){sub n}, within a radiotherapy room, in the patients area, considering the use of additional shielding of 1 TVL of lead or 1 TVL of steel, positioned at the inner faces of walls and ceiling of a bunker. The head of the linear accelerator Varian 2100/2300 C/D was modeled working at 18MeV, with 5x5cm{sup 2}, 10x10cm{sup 2}, 20x20cm{sup 2}, 30x30cm{sup 2} and 40x40cm{sup 2} openings for jaws and MLC and operating in eight gantry's angles. This study shows that the use of lead generates an average value of H*(10){sub n} at patients area, 8.02% higher than the expected when using steel. Further studies should be performed based on experimental data for comparison with those from MCNPX simulation.

  15. Neutron field characterization and dosimetry at the TRIUMF proton therapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, B.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In 1972 the 500 MeV H' Cyclotron of the TRIUMF (Tri University Meson Factory) located in Vancouver, Canada became operational. Beside Meson Physics, high-energy protons of various energy and beam current levels from the TRIUMF Cyclotron are used for scientific research and biomedical applications. Recently, a 500 MeV proton beam from the cyclotron was used as the booster beam for the radioactive ion beam facility, ISAC (Isotope Separator Accelerator) and a second beam as primary irradiation source for the Proton Irradiation Facility (PIF). The major commercial applications of the PIF are the provision of high-energy proton beams for radiation hardness testing of electronic components used in space applications (NASA) and proton therapy of ocular tumors (British Columbia Proton Therapy Facility). The PIF vault was constructed within the main accelerator hall of the TRIUMF using stacks of large concrete blocks. An intense field of fast neutrons is produced during the interaction of high-energy proton beam with target materials, such as, beam stops, collimators and beam energy degraders. The leakage of such neutrons due to insufficient radiological shielding or through the shielding discontinuities may constitute a major share of the personnel radiation exposure of the radiation workers. The neutron energy distribution and dose equivalent near a lead beam stopper bombarded with 116 MeV and 65 MeV collimated proton beams at the Ocular Tumor irradiation facility were evaluated using a Bonner-Sphere Spectrometer and a REM counter respectively. The results were utilized to investigate efficacy of the existing radiological shielding of the PIF. This paper highlights experimental methods to analyze the high-energy accelerator produced neutron beam and basic guideline for the radiological shielding designs of irradiation vault of Proton Therapy facilities

  16. The Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis Facility at ICN-Pitesti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbos, D.; Paunoiu, C.; Mladin, M.; Cosma, C.

    2008-01-01

    PGNAA is a very widely applicable technique for determining the presence and amount of many elements simultaneously in samples ranging in size from micrograms to many grams. PGNAA is characterized by its capability for nondestructive multi-elemental analysis and its ability to analyse elements that cannot be determined by INAA. By means of this PGNAA method we are able to increase the performance of INAA method. A facility has been developed at Institute for Nuclear Research-Pitesti so that the unique features of prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis can be used to measure trace and major elements in samples. The facility is linked at the radial neutron beam tube at ACPR-TRIGA reactor. During the PGNAA-facility is in use the ACPR reactor will be operated in steady-state mode at 250 KW maximum power. The facility consists of a radial beam-port, external sample position with shielding, and induced prompt gamma-ray counting system.Thermal neutron flux with energy lower than cadmium cut-off at the sample position was measured using thin gold foil is: φ scd = 1.10 6 n/cm 2 /s with a cadmium ratio of:80.The gamma-ray detection system consist of an HpGe detector of 16% efficiency (detector model GC1518) with 1.85 keV resolution capability. The HpGe is mounted with its axis at 90 deg. with respect to the incident neutron beam at distance about 200mm from the sample position. To establish the performance capabilities of the facility, irradiation of pure element or sample compound standards were performed to identify the gama-ray energies from each element and their count rates

  17. Tests of the space gamma spectrometer prototype at the JINR experimental facility with different types of neutron generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvak, M. L.; Vostrukhin, A. A.; Golovin, D. V.; Dubasov, P. V.; Zontikov, A. O.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Krylov, A. R.; Krylov, V. A.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Mokrousov, M. I.; Repkin, A. N.; Timoshenko, G. N.; Udovichenko, K. V.; Shvetsov, V. N.

    2017-07-01

    The results of the tests of the HPGe gamma spectrometer performed with a planetary soil model and different types of pulse neutron generators are presented. All measurements have been performed at the experimental nuclear planetary science facility (Joint Institute for Nuclear Research) for the physical calibration of active gamma and neutron spectrometers. The aim of the study is to model a space experiment on determining the elemental composition of Martian planetary matter by neutron-induced gamma spectroscopy. The advantages and disadvantages of a gas-filled neutron generator in comparison with a vacuum-tube neutron generator are examined.

  18. Assessment of Neutron Contamination Originating from the Presence of Wedge and Block in Photon Beam Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahreyni Toossi, M T; Khajetash, B; Ghorbani, M

    2018-03-01

    One of the main causes of induction of secondary cancer in radiation therapy is neutron contamination received by patients during treatment. Objective: In the present study the impact of wedge and block on neutron contamination production is investigated. The evaluations are conducted for a 15 MV Siemens Primus linear accelerator. Simulations were performed using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. 30˚, 45˚ and 60˚ wedges and a cerrobend block with dimensions of 1.5 × 1.5 × 7 cm 3 were simulated. The investigation were performed in the 10 × 10 cm 2 field size at source to surface distance of 100 cm for depth of 0.5, 2, 3 and 4 cm in a water phantom. Neutron dose was calculated using F4 tally with flux to dose conversion factors and F6 tally. Results showed that the presence of wedge increases the neutron contamination when the wedge factor was considered. In addition, 45˚ wedge produced the most amount of neutron contamination. If the block is in the center of the field, the cerrobend block caused less neutron contamination than the open field due to absorption of neutrons and photon attenuation. The results showed that neutron contamination is less in steeper depths. The results for two tallies showed practically equivalent results. Wedge causes neutron contamination hence should be considered in therapeutic protocols in which wedge is used. In terms of clinical aspects, the results of this study show that superficial tissues such as skin will tolerate more neutron contamination than the deep tissues.

  19. Monte Carlo simulation of neutron irradiation facility developed for accelerator based in vivo neutron activation measurements in human hand bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam; Prestwich, W.V.; McNeill, F.E.; Waker, A.J.

    2006-01-01

    The neutron irradiation facility developed at the McMaster University 3 MV Van de Graaff accelerator was employed to assess in vivo elemental content of aluminum and manganese in human hands. These measurements were carried out to monitor the long-term exposure of these potentially toxic trace elements through hand bone levels. The dose equivalent delivered to a patient during irradiation procedure is the limiting factor for IVNAA measurements. This article describes a method to estimate the average radiation dose equivalent delivered to the patient's hand during irradiation. The computational method described in this work augments the dose measurements carried out earlier [Arnold et al., 2002. Med. Phys. 29(11), 2718-2724]. This method employs the Monte Carlo simulation of hand irradiation facility using MCNP4B. Based on the estimated dose equivalents received by the patient hand, the proposed irradiation procedure for the IVNAA measurement of manganese in human hands [Arnold et al., 2002. Med. Phys. 29(11), 2718-2724] with normal (1 ppm) and elevated manganese content can be carried out with a reasonably low dose of 31 mSv to the hand. Sixty-three percent of the total dose equivalent is delivered by non-useful fast group (>10 keV); the filtration of this neutron group from the beam will further decrease the dose equivalent to the patient's hand

  20. Status report on the cold neutron source of the Garching neutron research facility FRM-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutsmiedl, E.; Gobrecht, K.

    2001-01-01

    The new high flux research reactor of the Technical University of Munich (Technische Universitaet Muenchen, TUM) will be equipped with a cold neutron source (CNS). The centre of the CNS will be located in the D2O-reflector tank at 400 mm from the reactor core axis, close to the thermal neutron flux maximum. The power of 4500 W developed by the nuclear heating in the 16 litres of liquid deuterium at 25 K, and in the structures, is evacuated by a two phase thermal siphon avoiding film boiling and flooding. The thermal siphon is a single tube with counter current flow. It is inclined by 10 from vertical, and optimised for a deuterium flow rate of 14 g/s. Optimisation of structure design and material, as well as safety aspects will be discussed. Those parts of the structure, which are exposed to high thermal neutron flux, are made from Zircaloy 4 and 6061T6 aluminium. Structure failure due to embrittlement of the structure material under high rapid neutron flux is very improbable during the life time of the CNS (30 years). Double, in pile even triple, containment with inert gas liner guarantees lack of explosion risk and of tritium contamination to the environment. Adding a few percent of hydrogen (H2) to the deuterium (D2) will improve the moderating properties of our relatively small moderator volume. Nearly all of the hydrogen is bound in the form of HD molecules. A long term change of the hydrogen content in the deuterium is avoided be storing the mixture not in a gas buffer volume but as a metal hydride at low pressure. The metal hydride storage system contains two getter beds, one with 250 kg of LaCo3Ni2, the other one with 150 kg of ZrCo(0.8)Ni(0.2). Each bed can take the total gas inventory, both beds together can absorb the total gas inventory in less than 6 minutes at a pressure < 3 bar. (orig.)

  1. Determination of proton and neutron spectra in the LANSCE spallation irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, M.R.; Maloy, S.A.; Sommer, W.F.; Fowler, M.M.; Dry, D.; Ferguson, P.D.; Mueller, G.; Corzine, R.K.

    1999-01-01

    Materials samples were recently irradiated in the Los Alamos Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) to provide data for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project on the effect of irradiation on the mechanical and physical properties of materials. The targets were configured to expose samples to a variety of radiation environments including, high-energy protons, mixed protons and high-energy neutrons, and low-energy neutrons. The samples were irradiated for approximately six months during a ten month period using an 800 MeV proton beam with a circular Gaussian shape of approximately 2σ = 3.0 cm. At the end of this period, the samples were extracted and tested. Activation foils were also extracted that had been placed in proximity to the materials samples. These were used to quantify the fluences in various locations

  2. High-energy neutron dosimetry at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallett, M.W.; Vasilik, D.G.; Littlejohn, G.J.; Cortez, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    Neutron energy spectrum measurements performed at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility indicated potential areas for high energy neutron exposure to personnel. The low sensitivity of the Los Alamos thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) to high energy neutrons warranted issuing a NTA dosimeter in addition to the TLD badge to employees entering these areas. The dosimeter consists of a plastic holder surrounding NTA film that has been desiccated and sealed in a dry nitrogen environment. A study of the fading of latent images in NTA film demonstrated the success of this packaging method to control the phenomenon. The Los Alamos NTA dosimeter is characterized and the fading study discussed. 10 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  3. First downscattered neutron images from Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guler Nevzat

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF are designed to understand and test the basic principles of self-sustaining fusion reactions by laser driven compression of deuterium-tritium (DT filled cryogenic plastic (CH capsules. The experimental campaign is ongoing to tune the implosions and characterize the burning plasma conditions. Nuclear diagnostics play an important role in measuring the characteristics of these burning plasmas, providing feedback to improve the implosion dynamics. The Neutron Imaging (NI diagnostic provides information on the distribution of the central fusion reaction region and the surrounding DT fuel by collecting images at two different energy bands for primary (13–15 MeV and downscattered (10–12 MeV neutrons. From these distributions, the final shape and size of the compressed capsule can be estimated and the symmetry of the compression can be inferred. The first downscattered neutron images from imploding ICF capsules are shown in this paper.

  4. First downscattered neutron images from Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, Nevzat; Aragonez, Robert J.; Archuleta, Thomas N.; Batha, Steven H.; Clark, David D.; Clark, Deborah J.; Danly, Chris R.; Day, Robert D.; Fatherley, Valerie E.; Finch, Joshua P.; Gallegos, Robert A.; Garcia, Felix P.; Grim, Gary; Hsu, Albert H.; Jaramillo, Steven A.; Loomis, Eric N.; Mares, Danielle; Martinson, Drew D.; Merrill, Frank E.; Morgan, George L.; Munson, Carter; Murphy, Thomas J.; Oertel, John A.; Polk, Paul J.; Schmidt, Derek W.; Tregillis, Ian L.; Valdez, Adelaida C.; Volegov, Petr L.; Wang, Tai-Sen F.; Wilde, Carl H.; Wilke, Mark D.; Wilson, Douglas C.; Atkinson, Dennis P.; Bower, Dan E.; Drury, Owen B.; Dzenitis, John M.; Felker, Brian; Fittinghoff, David N.; Frank, Matthias; Liddick, Sean N.; Moran, Michael J.; Roberson, George P.; Weiss, Paul; Buckles, Robert A.; Cradick, Jerry R.; Kaufman, Morris I.; Lutz, Steve S.; Malone, Robert M.; Traille, Albert

    2013-11-01

    Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are designed to understand and test the basic principles of self-sustaining fusion reactions by laser driven compression of deuterium-tritium (DT) filled cryogenic plastic (CH) capsules. The experimental campaign is ongoing to tune the implosions and characterize the burning plasma conditions. Nuclear diagnostics play an important role in measuring the characteristics of these burning plasmas, providing feedback to improve the implosion dynamics. The Neutron Imaging (NI) diagnostic provides information on the distribution of the central fusion reaction region and the surrounding DT fuel by collecting images at two different energy bands for primary (13-15 MeV) and downscattered (10-12 MeV) neutrons. From these distributions, the final shape and size of the compressed capsule can be estimated and the symmetry of the compression can be inferred. The first downscattered neutron images from imploding ICF capsules are shown in this paper.

  5. Radiation protection metrology at a high-energy neutron therapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnett, D.E.; Sherwin, A.G.; More, B.R.

    1991-01-01

    A radiation protection survey has been carried out at a high-energy neutron therapy facility using a combination of different detectors and counters. Included in the survey were measurements with a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC), a rem meter, a large volume ionisation chamber (LVI) and a Geiger counter. Dose equivalent rates, normalised to a proton beam current of 25 μA, of between 1 μSv.h -1 and 0.7 Sv.h -1 were recorded depending on the location. In general the results confirm the tendency of the rem meter to over-read in fields consisting mainly of low energy neutrons and illustrate the advantages of the diagnostic and gamma discriminating properties of the TEPC. The LVI-Geiger system was found to be the least favourable combination of dosemeters, substantially under-reading and being unable to estimate the neutron dose rate at levels below about 32 μGy.h -1 . (author)

  6. Radiotherapy in bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozan, R.

    1992-01-01

    In 1992, the problem of the vesical radiotherapy is not resolved. The author presents the situation and the different techniques of radiotherapy in bladder cancers: external radiotherapy, only and associated with surgery, interstitial curietherapy and non-classical techniques as per operative radiotherapy, neutron therapy and concurrent radiotherapy with chemotherapy. In order to compare their efficiency, the five-year survival are given in all cases.(10 tabs)

  7. Reactor physics experiments in PURNIMA sub critical facility coupled with 14 MeV neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Rajeev; Degweker, S.B.; Patel, Tarun; Bishnoi, Saroj; Adhikari, P.S.

    2011-01-01

    Accelerator Driven Sub-critical Systems (ADSS) are attracting increasing worldwide attention due to their superior safety characteristics and their potential for burning actinide and fission product waste and energy production. A number of countries around the world have drawn up roadmaps/programs for development of ADSS. Indian interest in ADSS has an additional dimension, which is related to the planned utilization of our large thorium reserves for future nuclear energy generation. A programme for development of ADSS is taken up at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) in India. This includes R and D activities for high current proton accelerator development, target development and Reactor Physics studies. As part of the ADSS Reactor Physics research programme, a sub-critical facility is coming up in BARC which will be coupled with an existing D-D/D-T neutron generator. Two types of cores are planned. In one of these, the sub-critical reactor assembly consists of natural uranium moderated by high density polyethylene (HDP) and reflected by BeO. The other consists of natural uranium moderated by light water. The maximum neutron yield of the neutron source with tritium target is around 10 10 neutron per sec. Various reactor physics experiments like measurement of the source strength, neutron flux distribution, buckling estimation and sub-critical source multiplication are planned. Apart from this, measurement of the total fission power and neutron spectrum will also be carried out. Mainly activation detectors will be used in all in-core neutron flux measurement. Measurement of the degree of sub-criticality by various deterministic and noise methods is planned. Helium detectors with advanced data acquisition card will be used for the neutron noise experiments. Noise characteristics of ADSS are expected to be different from that of traditional reactors due to the non-Poisson statistical features of the source. A new theory incorporating these features has been

  8. High-Flux Neutron Generator Facility for Geochronology and Nuclear Physics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltz, Cory; HFNG Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    A facility based on a next-generation, high-flux D-D neutron generator (HFNG) is being commissioned at UC Berkeley. The generator is designed to produce monoenergetic 2.45 MeV neutrons at outputs exceeding 1011 n/s. The HFNG is designed around two RF-driven multi-cusp ion sources that straddle a titanium-coated copper target. D + ions, accelerated up to 150 keV from the ion sources, self-load the target and drive neutron generation through the d(d,n)3 He fusion reaction. A well-integrated cooling system is capable of handling beam power reaching 120 kW impinging on the target. The unique design of the HFNG target permits experimental samples to be placed inside the target volume, allowing the samples to receive the highest neutron flux (1011 cm-2 s-1) possible from the generator. In addition, external beams of neutrons will be available simultaneously, ranging from thermal to 2.45 MeV. Achieving the highest neutron yields required carefully designed schemes to mitigate back-streaming of high energy electrons liberated from the cathode target by deuteron bombardment. The proposed science program is focused on pioneering advances in the 40 Ar/39 Ar dating technique for geochronology, new nuclear data measurements, basic nuclear science, and education. An end goal is to become a user facility for researchers. This work is supported by NSF Grant No. EAR-0960138, U.S. DOE LBNL Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, U.S. DOE LLNL Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344, and UC Office of the President Award 12-LR-238745.

  9. The Annual Neutron School: Program and Facility for Nuclear Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dingle, C.A.M.; Bautista, U.M.; Jecong, J.F.M.; Hila, F.C.; Astronomo, A.A.; Olivares, R.U.; Guillermo, N.R.D.; Ramo, M.E.S.K.V.; Saligan, P.P.

    2015-01-01

    The core realization of the mandate of the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) is the establishment and utilization of major nuclear facilities in lieu of the decommissioned research reactor. To address the need for manpower in the future, the applied physics research section (APRS) of the PNRI has initiated capacity building in the use and operation of small neutron sources which attempts to re-establish, develop and sustain expertise in nuclear science and technology. These activities have provided the theoretical and experimental training of young professionals and scientist of the institute which, consequently, resulted in the conceptualization of the Annual Neutron School (ANS).The ANS provides training and teaching environments for the young generation who will operate, utilize and regulate future nuclear facilities. More importantly, it demonstrates and presents the acquired knowledge and research outputs by the staff via “train a trainer” concept to an audience of junior undergraduate students. The successful implementation of the ANS has been participated by selected universities within Metro Manila and was able to train a number of students since its establishment in 2013. The program offers training, education, and R & D in the basic nuclear instrumentation and techniques which includes (1) characterization of different neutron sources – AmBe, PuBe and Cf-252; (2) development of Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) technique using a portable neutron source for non-destructive elemental analysis; (3) utilization of MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) code for verification of experimental data on neutron characterization, radiation dosimetry, detector design, calibration and efficiency and TRIGA fuel assembly configuration for sub-critical experiments. (author)

  10. Estimate of the damage in organs induced by neutrons in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy; Estimacion del dano en organos inducido por neutrones en radioterapia conformada en 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benites R, J. L. [Centro Estatal de Cancerologia de Nayarit, Servicio de Seguridad Radiologica, Calzada de la Cruz 118 sur, 63000 Tepic, Nayarit (Mexico); Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Uribe, M. del R., E-mail: jlbenitesr@prodigy.net.mx [Instituto Tecnico Superior de Radiologia, Calle Leon No. 129, 63000 Tepic, Nayarit (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    By means of Monte Carlo methods was considered the damage in the organs, induced by neutrons, of patients with cancer that receive treatment in modality of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) with lineal accelerator Varian Ix. The objective of this work was to estimate the damage probability in radiotherapy patients, starting from the effective dose by neutrons in the organs and tissues out of the treatment region. For that a three-dimensional mannequin of equivalent tissue of 30 x 100 x 30 cm{sup 3} was modeled and spherical cells were distributed to estimate the Kerma in equivalent tissue and the absorbed dose by neutrons. With the absorbed dose the effective dose was calculated using the weighting factors for the organ type and radiation type. With the effective dose and the damage factors, considered in the ICRP 103, was considered the probability of damage induction in organs. (Author)

  11. Comparison of HEU and LEU neutron spectra in irradiation facilities at the Oregon State TRIGA® Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schickler, R.A.; Marcum, W.R.; Reese, S.R.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The Oregon State TRIGA ® Reactor neutron spectra is characterized herein. • Neutron spectra between highly enriched uranium and low enriched uranium cores are compared. • Discussion is given as to differences between HEU and LEU core spectra results and impact on experiments. -- Abstract: In 2008, the Oregon State TRIGA ® Reactor (OSTR) was converted from highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel lifetime improvement plan (FLIP) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This effort was driven and supported by the Department of Energy's (DoE's) Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program. The basis behind the RERTR program's ongoing conversion effort is to reduce the nuclear proliferation risk of civilian research and test reactors. The original intent of the HEU FLIP fuel was to provide fuel to research reactors that could be utilized for many years before a necessary refueling cycle. As a research reactor, the OSTR provides irradiation facilities for a variety of applications, such as activation analysis, fission-track dating, commercial isotope production, neutron radiography, prompt gamma characterization, and many others. In order to accurately perform these research functions, several studies had been conducted on the HEU FLIP fuel core to characterize the neutron spectra in various experimental facilities of the OSTR (Tiyapun, 1997; Ashbaker, 2005). As useful as these analyses were, they are no longer valid due to the change in fuel composition and the resulting alteration of core performance characteristics. Additionally, the core configuration (fuel reconfiguration) was altered between the HEU and LEU cores. This study characterizes the neutron spectra in various experimental facilities within and around the current LEU core. It also compares the spectra to that which was yielded in the HEU core through use of Monte Carlo n-Particle 5 (MCNP5) and experimental adjustment via a least-squares technique. The quantification of

  12. Development of a computational model for the calculation of neutron dose equivalent in laminated primary barriers of radiotherapy rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezende, Gabriel Fonseca da Silva

    2015-01-01

    Many radiotherapy centers acquire 15 and 18 MV linear accelerators to perform more effective treatments for deep tumors. However, the acquisition of these equipment must be accompanied by an additional care in shielding planning of the rooms that will house them. In cases where space is restricted, it is common to find primary barriers made of concrete and metal. The drawback of this type of barrier is the photoneutron emission when high energy photons (e.g. 15 and 18 MV spectra) interact with the metallic material of the barrier. The emission of these particles constitutes a problem of radiation protection inside and outside of radiotherapy rooms, which should be properly assessed. A recent work has shown that the current model underestimate the dose of neutrons outside the treatment rooms. In this work, a computational model for the aforementioned problem was created from Monte Carlo Simulations and Artificial Intelligence. The developed model was composed by three neural networks, each being formed of a pair of material and spectrum: Pb18, Pb15 and Fe18. In a direct comparison with the McGinley method, the Pb18 network exhibited the best responses for approximately 78% of the cases tested; the Pb15 network showed better results for 100% of the tested cases, while the Fe18 network produced better answers to 94% of the tested cases. Thus, the computational model composed by the three networks has shown more consistent results than McGinley method. (author)

  13. In-beam test of Neutron detector array facility at IUAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugathan, P.; Jhingan, A.; Saneesh, S.

    2014-01-01

    A new experimental facility dedicated for the study of fission dynamics has been installed and commissioned recently at Inter University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), New Delhi. The facility, National Array of Neutron Detectors (NAND) is used for the systematic studies on fission dynamics around Coulomb barrier energies using heavy ion beams from the Tandem plus LINAC accelerator facilities. The detector array consists 100 neutron detectors mounted on a geodesic dome structure at a radial distance of 175 cm from the target and multi wire proportional counters (MWPC) for detection of fission fragments. Each neutron detector is made of 5'' x 5'' cylindrical cell filled with BC501A organic liquid scintillator and coupled to a 5'' photo multiplier tube. A 100 cm diameter spherical vacuum chamber has been installed at the center of the array to house the targets, fission fragment detectors and other ancillary charged particle detectors. The vacuum chamber is made of 4mm thick steel and has target ladder with linear and rotary movements. The detector array is installed on a dedicated beam line of LINAC accelerator facilities at beam hall II. The neutrons are discriminated from gamma rays using pulse shape discrimination (PSD) technique based on conventional analog electronics and the energies of neutrons are measured by the time of flight (TOF) method. For this purpose, custom made electronics modules have been built to process signal from each detector. This module contains the integrated electronics for n - γ discrimination, time of flight (TOF) and light output. The fission fragments are detected in low pressure MWPCs mounted inside the spherical vacuum chamber. The MWPC has been built based on the conventional design using three electrodes, having a central cathode foil electrode sandwiched between two position sensing anode wire/strip frames. In order to acquire data from detector array, the data acquisition system has been implemented using VME based hardware systems

  14. The TRIUMF thermal neutron facility as planned for operation by 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrott, A.S.; Templeton, T.L.; Thorson, I.M.; Blaby, R.E.; Burgerjon, J.J.

    1977-08-01

    The concepts of the thermal neutron facility have been considerably modified since they were first put forth in 1971. The move has been toward simplification. This report describes the basic vacuum tank structure, its surrounding steel shielding and the concrete structure. The vacuum tank contains a target, moderator and reflector and has ports for the extraction of thermal neutron beams. It also has capabilities for producing mesons and for irradiation of targets in the primary proton beam. The system has been designed with flexibility for modification to meet possible future demands for irradiation facilities, radiography, or pulsed operation. The targets can be easily changed, and it is planned to do this to meet the heat transfer problems as they arise on going to higher beam currents. Feasibility studies for Pb-Bi and Pb targets have been carried out. The Pb target was chosen because of safety considerations and simpler design. (author)

  15. Spallation Neutron Source Accelerator Facility Target Safety and Non-safety Control Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battle, Ronald E.; DeVan, B.; Munro, John K. Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a proton accelerator facility that generates neutrons for scientific researchers by spallation of neutrons from a mercury target. The SNS became operational on April 28, 2006, with first beam on target at approximately 200 W. The SNS accelerator, target, and conventional facilities controls are integrated by standardized hardware and software throughout the facility and were designed and fabricated to SNS conventions to ensure compatibility of systems with Experimental Physics Integrated Control System (EPICS). ControlLogix Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) interface to instruments and actuators, and EPICS performs the high-level integration of the PLCs such that all operator control can be accomplished from the Central Control room using EPICS graphical screens that pass process variables to and from the PLCs. Three active safety systems were designed to industry standards ISA S84.01 and IEEE 603 to meet the desired reliability for these safety systems. The safety systems protect facility workers and the environment from mercury vapor, mercury radiation, and proton beam radiation. The facility operators operated many of the systems prior to beam on target and developed the operating procedures. The safety and non-safety control systems were tested extensively prior to beam on target. This testing was crucial to identify wiring and software errors and failed components, the result of which was few problems during operation with beam on target. The SNS has continued beam on target since April to increase beam power, check out the scientific instruments, and continue testing the operation of facility subsystems

  16. Existing and projected neutron sources and low-temperature irradiation facilities in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boening, K.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper, a contribution given at the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute to the temporal meeting on the design of the facilities for high flux, low temperature irradiation is summarized. The following five subjects were discussed. The project of modernizing the swimming pool type research reactor FRM with 4 MW power at Munich is to achieve relatively high thermal neutron flux, and an extremely compact core is designed. The existing low temperature irradiation facility (LTIF) of the FRM is the most powerful in the world, and has been successfully operated more than 20 years. The fast and thermal neutron fluxes are 2.9 x 10 13 and 3.5 x 10 13 /cm 2 sec, respectively. The experimental techniques in the LTIF of the FRM, such as a measuring cryostat, the mounting of irradiated samples and so on, are described. The installation of new LTIFs in connection with the projects of advanced neutron sources in Germany is likely to be made in the modernized FRM at Garching, in the spallation neutron source SNQ at KFA Juelich and so on. The interesting problems in fundamental and applied researches with LTIFs, and the unusual application of LTIFs are shown. (Kako, I.)

  17. Calculation of fast neutron flux in reactor pressure tubes and experimental facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, P. C. [Canadian General Electric (Canada)

    1968-07-15

    The computer program EPITHET was used to calculate the fast neutron flux (>1 MeV) in several reactor pressure tubes and experimental facilities in order to compare the fast neutron flux in the different cases and to provide a self-consistent set of flux values which may be used to relate creep strain to fast neutron flux . The facilities considered are shown below together with the calculated fast neutron flux (>1 MeV). Fast flux 10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}s: NPD 1.14, Douglas Point 2.66, Pickering 2.89, Gentilly 2.35, SGHWR 3.65, NRU U-1 and U-2 3.25'' pressure tube - 19 element fuel 3.05, NRU U-1 and U-2 4.07'' pressure tube - 28 element fuel 3.18, NRU U-1 and U-2 4.07'' pressure tube - 18 element fuel 2.90, NRX X-5 0.88, PRTR Mk I fuel 2.81, PRTR HPD fuel 3.52, WR-1 2.73, Mk IV creep machine (NRX) 0.85, Mk VI creep machine (NRU) 2.04, Biaxial creep insert (NRU U-49) 2.61.

  18. Design and construction of the facility for neutron depth profiling in research reactor RECH-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutis P, Octavio; Navarro A, Gustavo; Henriquez A, Carlos; Pereda B, Claudio

    2002-01-01

    Here is described the experimental facility for Neutron Depth Profiling, NDP, constructed at the CCHEN laboratories, as well as some general aspects of the technique. It is also shown applications to the concentration analysis of 10 B and 6 Li as a function of depth for borophosphosilicate glass, BPSG, and for a thick sinter of 6 Li in a zinc-nickel-manganese oxide. Achieved depth resolution is comparable to that obtained in reference advanced laboratories. (author)

  19. Design of a facility by neutron activation by spectrometry of prompt gamma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, R.; Benites L, S.; Montoya Z, M.

    1993-01-01

    We show the basic design of the facility of PGNAA that we will install in the hall of the peruvian reactor RP-10. The thermal neutron flux (without a gamma filter) will be 2,0 x 10 8 n/cm -2 s -1 at 10 MW of power. The ratio of gamma exposition without gamma filter will be 29 kR/h. (authors). 8 refs., 2 figs

  20. A newly developed technique of wireless remote controlled visual inspection system for neutron guides of cold neutron research facilities at HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Hyung; Cho, Yeong Garp; Kim, Jong In

    2012-01-01

    KAERI developed a neutron guide system for cold neutron research facilities at HANARO from 2003 to 2010. In 2008, the old plug shutter and instruments were removed, and a new plug and primary shutter were installed as the first cold neutron delivery system at HANARO. At the beginning of 2010, all the neutron guides and accessories had been successfully installed as well. The neutron guide system of HANARO consists of the in pile plug assembly with in pile guides, the primary shutter with in shutter guides, the neutron guides in the guide shielding room with secondary shutter, and the neutron guides in the neutron guide hall. Three kinds of glass materials were selected with optimum lengths by considering their lifetime, shielding, maintainability and cost as well. Radiation damage of the guides can occur on the coating and glass by neutron capturing in the glass. It is a big challenge to inspect a guide failure because of the difficult surrounding environment, such as high level radiation, limited working space, and massive hard work for removing and reinstalling the shielding blocks as shown in Fig 1. Therefore, KAERI has developed a wireless remote controlled visual inspection system for neutron guides using an infrared light camera mounted on the vehicle moving in the guide

  1. Temporal variation of the neutron flux in the carousel facility of a TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacimovic, R.; Stegnar, P.; Trkov, A.

    2003-01-01

    In this work we focused on identifying quantitatively the temporal (time-dependent) variation of neutron flux in the carousel facility (CF) of TRIGA reactor at the 'Jozef Stefan' Institute (IJS) for core No. 176, set up in April 2002. The measurements are based on neutron detectors (ionisation chambers), which surround the graphite reflector of the reactor core. In principle, the variations of the neutron flux produce a systematic error in the results obtained by absolute or 'quasi' absolute measuring techniques (such as neutron activation analysis (NAA) by the k 0 -standardization method), which assume constant conditions during irradiation. The results of our study show that for typical irradiation of 20 hours in channels of the CF aligned in the direction of the ionisation chamber (safety channel) the time-dependent variation of the neutron flux is about 6-8%. In the k 0 method, which we are using for routine work at the IJS, this variation introduced a systematic error in the results up to 4.6%, depending on the half-life of investigated radionuclide. (author)

  2. MTF analysis of the MURR real-time neutron radiography facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsay, J.T.

    1982-01-01

    In neutron radiography, as in other forms of NDE, it is sometimes desirable to observe dynamic events. This need has generated increased interest in real-time neutron radiography systems. As in other forms of radiography, a standard method for measuring the image forming capability of real-time systems is necessary in order to compare the various methods and systems used. A technique which has been used extensively in general photography and has been applied in the characterization of several screen-film combinations used in conventional neutron radiography is to determine the imaging system's modulation transfer function (MTF). This gives a graphical representation of the system's spatial resolution capabilities and was therefore chosen as the method for evaluation of the real-time neutron radiography facility at the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR). The method used was to image a knife-edge, differentiate the edge gradient to obtain the line spread function (LSF) to obtain the system MTF. A Gd foil was used for the knife-edge on several neutron converter screens and was imaged by a low-light level ISIT camera. The video signal was then digitized and presented to a PDP-11/05 microcomputer for the numerical calculations

  3. Instrument intercomparison in the pulsed neutron fieldsat the CERN HiRadMat facility

    CERN Document Server

    Aza, E; Cassell, C; Charitonidis, N; Harrouch, E; Manessi, G P; Pangallo, M; Perrin, D; Samara, E; Silari, M

    2014-01-01

    An intercomparison of the performances of active neutron detectors was carried out in pulsed neutron fi elds in the new HiRadMat facility at CERN. Five detectors were employed: four of them (two ionization chambers and two rem counters) are routinely employed in the CERN radiation monitoring system, while the fi fth is a novel instrument, called LUPIN, speci fi cally conceived for applications in pulsed neutron fi elds. The measurements were performed in the stray fi eld generated by a proton beam of very short duration with momentum of 440 GeV/c impinging on a dump. The beam intensity was steadily increased during the experiment by more than three orders of magnitude, with an H*(10) due to neutrons at the detector reference positions varying between a few nSv per burst and a few m Sv per burst, whereas the gamma contribution to the total H*(10) was negligible. The aim of the experiment was to evaluate the linearity of the detector response in extreme pulsed conditions as a function of the neutron burst in- t...

  4. Measuring neutron yield and ρR anisotropies with activation foils at the National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bleuel D.L.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Neutron yields at the National Ignition Facility (NIF are measured with a suite of diagnostics, including activation of ∼20–200 g samples of materials undergoing a variety of energy-dependent neutron reactions. Indium samples were mounted on the end of a Diagnostic Instrument Manipulator (DIM, 25–50 cm from the implosion, to measure 2.45 MeV D-D fusion neutron yield. The 336.2 keV gamma rays from the 4.5 hour isomer of 115mIn produced by (n,n′ reactions are counted in high-purity germanium detectors. For capsules producing D-T fusion reactions, zirconium and copper are activated via (n,2n reactions at various locations around the target chamber and bay, measuring the 14 MeV neutron yield to accuracies on order of 7%. By mounting zirconium samples on ports at nine locations around the NIF chamber, anisotropies in the primary neutron emission due to fuel areal density asymmetries can be measured to a relative precision of 3%.

  5. Radiobiological aspects of application of BR-10 reactor neutrons for radiotherapy of malignant tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ul'yanenko, S.E.; Kuznetsova, M.N.; Obaturov, G.M.

    1992-01-01

    Possibilities to increase the factor of therapeutical gain (FTG) by optimizing irradiation conditions and using hyperglycemia were studied. It is shown that relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons in fission spectrum of the BR-10 reactor in the dose range from 10 Gy used one time is 4.2-4.5 for tumours and 4.0-4.2 for normal skin; in case of fractionated irradiation by neutrons (1-8 fractions in the range of 6-10 Gy) RBE increases practically 1.5 fold; employment of neutron beam filters and hyperglycemia in conditions of combined gamma-neutron procedures of irradiation permits a considerable increase in FTG. 3 refs

  6. Design and investigations of a DD compact neutron generator in head radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Wagner; Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro

    2013-01-01

    Neutron generators are device-based particle accelerators for producing neutrons through fusion reactions between hydrogen isotopes. Such devices may enable noninvasive treatments of head and neck tumors, which represent about one hundred twenty-nine thousand cases per year around the world. The present paper shows electromagnetic and nuclear simulations of a neutron generator coupled to collimator and evaluations of radiation dose in an analytical head phantom irradiated by the device. The results provide the generator design and the operation parameter in order to achieve prescribed tumor dose. Also, dose distribution in organs of head is presented, being suitable to surrounding brain tumors close to the skull. As conclusion, there is a visibility of neutron generator applied to brain tumor radiation therapy. (author)

  7. Conceptual design and neutronics analyses of a fusion reactor blanket simulation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beller, D.E.

    1986-01-01

    A new conceptual design of a fusion reactor blanket simulation facility was developed. This design follows the principles that have been successfully employed in the Purdue Fast Breeder Blanket Facility (FBBR), because experiments conducted in it have resulted in the discovery of deficiencies in neutronics prediction methods. With this design, discrepancies between calculation and experimental data can be fully attributed to calculation methods because design deficiencies that could affect results are insignificant. Inelastic scattering cross sections are identified as a major source of these discrepancies. The conceptual design of this FBBR analog, the fusion reactor blanket facility (FRBF), is presented. Essential features are a cylindrical geometry and a distributed, cosine-shaped line source of 14-MeV neutrons. This source can be created by sweeping a deuteron beam over an elongated titanium-tritide target. To demonstrate that the design of the FRBF will not contribute significant deviations in experimental results, neutronics analyses were performed: results of comparisons of 2-dimensional to 1-dimensional predictions are reported for two blanket compositions. Expected deviations from 1-D predictions which are due to source anisotropy and blanket asymmetry are minimal. Thus, design of the FRBF allows simple and straightforward interpretation of the experimental results, without a need for coarse 3-D calculations

  8. Feasibility study of the underwater neutron radiography facility using the University of Utah 100 kW TRIGA (UUTR) reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, D.; Xiao, S.; Jevremovic, T.; Yang, X.

    2010-01-01

    The University of Utah 100 kW TRIGA (UUTR) reactor provides usable neutron yields for neutron radiography. Currently, UUTR reactor has three irradiators (Central, Pneumatic, and Thermal irradiators) and one Fast neutron Irradiation Facility (FNIF). These irradiators are very small so they are not suitable for neutron radiography. UUTR has three beam ports but they are not available due to the structure of the core. All sides of the core are occupied by FNIF, Thermal Irradiator, and three ion chambers. The only available position for underwater vertical beam port is on the top of the FNIF. There are two factors necessary to fulfill to be able to realize vertical underwater beam port: noninterruption to other facilities and radiation shielding. Designing the vertical beam port as movable ensures good access to the core and pool, while still providing a good neutron radiography environment. Keeping the top of the beam port below the surface of the pool the water represents biological shield. Neutron radiographs, with a simple setup of efficient neutron converters and digital camera systems, can produce acceptable resolution with an exposure time as short as a few minutes. It is important to validate the design with calculations before constructing the beam port. The design of the beam port is modeled using the MCNP5 transport code. A minimum of 10 5 neutrons/cm 2 -sec thermal neutron flux is required for high resolution neutron radiography. Currently, the UUTRIGA is in the process of upgrading its power from 100 kW to 250 kW. Upon the completion of the upgrading, the maximum neutron flux in the core will be ∼7x10 12 neutrons/cm 2 -sec. This paper discusses a modeling and evaluation of capability for a neutron radiography facility. (author)

  9. Preliminary energy-filtering neutron imaging with time-of-flight method on PKUNIFTY: A compact accelerator based neutron imaging facility at Peking University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hu; Zou, Yubin, E-mail: zouyubin@pku.edu.cn; Wen, Weiwei; Lu, Yuanrong; Guo, Zhiyu

    2016-07-01

    Peking University Neutron Imaging Facility (PKUNIFTY) works on an accelerator–based neutron source with a repetition period of 10 ms and pulse duration of 0.4 ms, which has a rather low Cd ratio. To improve the effective Cd ratio and thus improve the detection capability of the facility, energy-filtering neutron imaging was realized with the intensified CCD camera and time-of-flight (TOF) method. Time structure of the pulsed neutron source was firstly simulated with Geant4, and the simulation result was evaluated with experiment. Both simulation and experiment results indicated that fast neutrons and epithermal neutrons were concentrated in the first 0.8 ms of each pulse period; meanwhile in the period of 0.8–2.0 ms only thermal neutrons existed. Based on this result, neutron images with and without energy filtering were acquired respectively, and it showed that detection capability of PKUNIFTY was improved with setting the exposure interval as 0.8–2.0 ms, especially for materials with strong moderating capability.

  10. Methodology for worker neutron exposure evaluation in the PDCF facility design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherpelz, R. I.; Traub, R. J.; Pryor, K. H.

    2004-01-01

    A project headed by Washington Group International is meant to design the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) to convert the plutonium pits from excessed nuclear weapons into plutonium oxide for ultimate disposition. Battelle staff are performing the shielding calculations that will determine appropriate shielding so that the facility workers will not exceed target exposure levels. The target exposure levels for workers in the facility are 5 mSv y -1 for the whole body and 100 mSv y -1 for the extremity, which presents a significant challenge to the designers of a facility that will process tons of radioactive material. The design effort depended on shielding calculations to determine appropriate thickness and composition for glove box walls, and concrete wall thicknesses for storage vaults. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff used ORIGEN-S and SOURCES to generate gamma and neutron source terms, and Monte Carlo (computer code for) neutron photon (transport) (MCNP-4C) to calculate the radiation transport in the facility. The shielding calculations were performed by a team of four scientists, so it was necessary to develop a consistent methodology. There was also a requirement for the study to be cost-effective, so efficient methods of evaluation were required. The calculations were subject to rigorous scrutiny by internal and external reviewers, so acceptability was a major feature of the methodology. Some of the issues addressed in the development of the methodology included selecting appropriate dose factors, developing a method for handling extremity doses, adopting an efficient method for evaluating effective dose equivalent in a non-uniform radiation field, modelling the reinforcing steel in concrete, and modularising the geometry descriptions for efficiency. The relative importance of the neutron dose equivalent compared with the gamma dose equivalent varied substantially depending on the specific shielding conditions and lessons were

  11. Improving the beam quality of the neutron radiography facility using the SLOWPOKE-2 at the Royal Military College of Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, W.J.; Bennett, L.G.I.; Teshima, P.

    1996-01-01

    At the SLOWPOKE-2 Facility at the Royal Military College of Canada, a neutron radiography facility has been designed and installed, and the beam quality has been improved by performing a series of radiographs using American standard for testing and materials (ASTM) E 545 indicators. Other means of determining the progress such as bubble detectors and activation foils were used. Modifications to the nosepiece of the beam tube including shielding and linings for fast neutron and gamma radiation were made. (orig.)

  12. Establishment of the Neutron Beam Research Facility at the OPAL Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, S.J.; Robinson, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Australia's first research reactor, HIFAR, reached criticality in January 1958. At that time Australia's main agenda was establishment of a nuclear power program. HIFAR operated for nearly 50 years, providing a firm foundation for the establishment of Australia's second generation research Reactor OPAL, which reached criticality in August 006. In HIFAR's early years a neutron beam facility was established for materials characterization, partly in aid of the nuclear energy agenda and partly in response to interest from Australia's scientific community. By the time Australia's nuclear energy program ceased (in the 1970s), radioisotope production and research had also been established at Lucas Heights. Also, by this time the neutron beam facility for scientific research had evolved into a major utilization programme, warranting establishment of an independent body to facilitate scientific access (the Australian Institute for Nuclear Science and Engineering). In HIFAR's lifetime, ANSTO established a radiopharmaceuticals service for the Australian medical community and NDT silicon production was also established and grew to maturity. So when time came to determine the strategy for nuclear research in Australia into the 21st century, it was clear that the replacement for HIFAR should be multipurpose, with major emphases on scientific applications of neutron beams and medical isotope production. With this strategy in mind, ANSTO set about to design and build OPAL with a world-class neutron beam facility, capable of supporting a large and diverse scientific research community. The establishment of the neutron beam facility became the mission of the Bragg Institute management team. This journey began in 1997 with establishment of a working budget, and reached its first major objective when OPAL reached 20 MW thermal power nearly one decade later (in 2006). The first neutron beam instruments began operation soon after (in 2007), and quickly proved themselves to be

  13. Parametric studies of target/moderator configurations for the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.J.; Seeger, P.A.; Fluharty, R.G.

    1977-03-01

    Parametric studies, using continuous-energy Monte Carlo codes, were done to optimize the neutronics of the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) target and three possible target/moderator configurations: slab target/slab moderators, cylindrical target/cylindrical moderator, and cylindrical target/double-wing moderators. The energy range was 0.5 eV to 800 MeV. A general figure-of-merit (FOM) approach was used. The WNR facility performance can be doubled or tripled by optimizing the target and target/moderator configurations; this approach is more efficient than increasing the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator power by an equivalent factor. A bare target should be used for neutron energies above approximately 100 keV. The FOM for the slab target/slab moderator configuration is the best by a factor of at least 2 to 3 below approximately 1 keV. The total neutron leakage from 0.5 eV to 100 keV through a 100- by 100-mm area centered at the peak leakage is largest for the slab moderator, exceeding that of the cylindrical moderator and double-wing moderator by factors of 1.7 and 3.4, respectively. The neutron leakage at 1 eV from one 300- by 150-mm surface of a slab moderator is 1.5 times larger than that from one 155- by 150-mm surface of a cylindrical moderator. When compared with the 1-eV leakage from two 100- by 150-mm surfaces of a double-wing moderator, that from the slab moderator is 3.4 times larger. 107 figures, 13 tables

  14. Determination of the neutron spectra in the treatment room of a linear accelerator for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega C, H.R.; Barquero, R.; Mendez, R.; Iniguez, M.P.

    2003-01-01

    By means of a series of measures and Monte Carlo calculations the dosimetric characteristics of the photoneutrons have been determined that take place in volume to a linear accelerator of radiotherapy of 18 MV, LINAC, mark Siemens Mevatron model. The measures were carried out with thermoluminescent dosemeters TLD 600 and TLD 700 that were naked exposed and confined with cover of Cd and Sn, inside a sphere of paraffin and inside spheres Bonner. (Author)

  15. Development of an anthropomorfic simulator for simulation and measurements of neutron dose and flux the facility for BNCT studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muniz, Rafael Oliveira Rondon

    2010-01-01

    IPEN facility for researches in BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) uses IEA-R1 reactor's irradiation channel number 3, where there is a mixed radiation field - neutrons and gamma. The researches in progress require the radiation fields, in the position of the irradiation of sample, to have in its composition maximized thermal neutrons component and minimized, fast and epithermal neutron flux and gamma radiation. This work was developed with the objective of evaluating whether the present radiation field in the facility is suitable for BNCT researches. In order to achieve this objective, a methodology for the dosimetry of thermal neutrons and gamma radiation in mixed fields of high doses, which was not available in IPEN, was implemented in the Center of Nuclear Engineering of IPEN, by using thermoluminescent dosimeters - TLDs 400, 600 and 700. For the measurements of thermal and epithermal neutron flux, activation detectors of gold were used applying the cadmium ratio technique. A cylindrical phantom composed by acrylic discs was developed and tested in the facility and the DOT 3.5. computational code was used in order to obtain theoretical values of neutron flux and the dose along phantom. In the position corresponding to about half the length of the cylinder of the phantom, the following values were obtained: thermal neutron flux (2,52 ± 0,06).10 8 n/cm 2 s, epithermal neutron flux (6,17 ± 0,26).10 7 .10 6 n/cm 2 s, absorbed dose due to thermal neutrons (4,2 ± 1,8)Gy and (10,1 ± 1,3)Gy due to gamma radiation. The obtained values show that the fluxes of thermal and epithermal neutrons flux are appropriate for studies in BNCT, however, the dose due to gamma radiation is high, indicating that the facility should be improved. (author)

  16. Epithermal neutron beam design for neutron capture therapy at the Power Burst Facility and the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, F.J.; Parsons, D.K.; Rushton, B.L.; Nigg, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear design studies have been performed for two reactor-based epithermal neutron beams for cancer treatment by neutron capture therapy (NCT). An intermediate-intensity epithermal beam has been designed and implemented at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). Measurements show that the BMRR design predictions for the principal characteristics of this beam are accurate. A canine program for research into the biological effects of NCT is now under way at BMRR. The design for a high-intensity epithermal beam with minimal contamination from undesirable radiation components has been finalized for the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This design will be implemented when it is determined that human NCT trials are advisable. The PBF beam will exhibit approximately an order of magnitude improvement in absolute epithermal flux intensity over that available in the BMRR, and its angular distribution and spectral characteristics will be more advantageous for NCT. The combined effects of beam intensity, angular distribution, spectrum, and contaminant level allow the desired tumor radiation dose to be delivered in much shorter times than are possible with the currently available BMRR beam, with a significant reduction (factor of 3 to 5) in collateral dose due to beam contaminants

  17. Proposed power upgrade of the hot fuel examination facility's neutron radiography reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruett, D.P.; Richards, W.J.; Heidel, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    The Hot Fuel Examination Facility, HFEF, is one of several facilities located at the Argonne Site. HFEF comprises a large hot cell where both non-destructive and destructive examination of highly-irradiated reactor fuels are conducted in support of the LMFBR program. One of the non-destructive examination techniques utilized at HFEF is neutron radiography. When the NRAD facility was designed and constructed, an operating power level of 250 kw was considered to be adequate for obtaining radiographs of the type of specimens envisaged at that time. Since that time, several things have occurred that have tended to increase radiography exposure times to as much as 90 minutes each. In order to decrease exposure times, the reactor power level is to be increased from 250 kW to 1 MW. This increase in power will necessitate several engineering and design changes. The proposed upgrade of the NRAD facility will increase the neutron flux available in the beam tubes appreciably. The increased flux will enable NRAD to continue to meet its operational commitments in a timely manner and to develop state-of-the-art techniques in the future as it has in the past

  18. High-energy quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields: existing facilities and future needs

    CERN Document Server

    Pomp, S; Mayer, S; Reitz, G; Rottger, S; Silari, M; Smit, F D; Vincke, H; Yasuda, H

    2014-01-01

    The argument that well-characterised quasi-monoenergetic neutron (QMN) sources reaching into the energy domain >20 MeV are needed is presented. A brief overview of the existing facilities is given, and a list of key factors that an ideal QMN source for dosimetry and spectrometry should offer is presented. The authors conclude that all of the six QMN facilities currently in existence worldwide operate in sub-optimal conditions for dosimetry. The only currently available QMN facility in Europe capable of operating at energies >40 MeV, TSL in Uppsala, Sweden, is threatened with shutdown in the immediate future. One facility, NFS at GANIL, France, is currently under construction. NFS could deliver QMN beams up to about 30 MeV. It is, however, so far not clear if and when NFS will be able to offer QMN beams or operate with only so-called white neutron beams. It is likely that by 2016, QMN beams with energies >40 MeV will be available only in South Africa and Japan, with none in Europe.

  19. Antiproton Radiotherapy Peripheral Dose from Secondary Neutrons produced in the Annihilation of Antiprotons in the Target

    CERN Document Server

    Fahimian, Benjamin P; Keyes, Roy; Bassler, Niels; Iwamoto, Keisuke S; Zankl, Maria; Holzscheiter, Michael H

    2009-01-01

    The AD-4/ACE collaboration studies the biological effects of antiprotons with respect to a possible use of antiprotons in cancer therapy. In vitro experiments performed by the collaboration have shown an enhanced biological effectiveness for antiprotons relative to protons. One concern is the normal tissue dose resulting from secondary neutrons produced in the annihilation of antiprotons on the nucleons of the target atoms. Here we present the first organ specific Monte Carlo calculations of normal tissue equivalent neutron dose in antiproton therapy through the use of a segmented CT-based human phantom. The MCNPX Monte Carlo code was employed to quantify the peripheral dose for a cylindrical spread out Bragg peak representing a treatment volume of 1 cm diameter and 1 cm length in the frontal lobe of a segmented whole-body phantom of a 38 year old male. The secondary neutron organ dose was tallied as a function of energy and organ.

  20. VESUVIO: a novel instrument for performing spectroscopic studies in condensed matter with eV neutrons at the ISIS facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senesi, R.; Andreani, C.; Bowden, Z.; Colognesi, D.; Degiorgi, E.; Fielding, A. L.; Mayers, J.; Nardone, M.; Norris, J.; Praitano, M.; Rhodes, N. J.; Stirling, W. G.; Tomkinson, J.; Uden, C.

    2000-03-01

    The VESUVIO project aims to provide unique prototype instrumentation at the ISIS-pulsed neutron source and to establish a routine experimental and theoretical program in neutron scattering spectroscopy at eV energies. This instrumentation will be specifically designed for high momentum, (20 Å-11 eV) inelastic neutron scattering studies of microscopic dynamical processes in materials and will represent a unique facility for EU researchers. It will allow to derive single-particle kinetic energies and single-particle momentum distributions, n(p), providing additional and/or complementary information to other neutron inelastic spectroscopic techniques.

  1. Neutron research on condensed matter: a study of the facilities and scientific opportunities in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    An in-depth review of the present status and future potential of the applications of low-energy neutron scattering to research in the condensed-matter sciences, including physics, chemistry, biology, and metallurgy is presented. The study shows that neutron scattering technology has proven to be of enormous importance to research in the above areas and especially to those of solid-state physics and chemistry. The main emphasis is on the scattering of low-energy neutrons by condensed matter. Since the same type of neutron source facilities can be used for the study of radiation damage, this related topic has also been included

  2. An advanced hadron facility: A combined kaon factory and cold-neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiessen, H.A.

    1987-01-01

    A design concept is presented for an advanced hadron facility consisting of a combined kaon factory and second generation spallation source. Our proposed facility consists of a 1.2 GeV superconducting H - linac to bring the LAMPF energy up to 2 GeV, a multi-ring 2 GeV compressor, a shared cold-neutron and stopped-pion neutrino source, a 60 GeV 25 μAmp 6 Hz proton synchrotron, and kaon and proton experimental areas. We discuss the considerations which led to this design concept. We summarize recent results of r and d work on components for rapid-cycling synchrotrons. Finally, we mention briefly a pion linac, which may be a good way to gain experience with superconducting cavities if advanced hadron facility funding is delayed

  3. The IRK time-of-flight facility for measurements of double-differential neutron emission cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlik, A.; Priller, A.; Steier, P.; Vonach, H.; Winkler, G.

    1994-01-01

    In order to improve the present experimental data base of energy- and angle-differential neutron emission cross sections at 14 MeV incident-neutron energy, a new time-of-flight (TOF) facility was installed at the Institut fuer Radiumforschung und Kernphysik (IRK), Vienna. The set-up was particularly designed to more precisely measure the high-energy part of the secondary neutron spectra and consists of three main components: (1) a pulsed neutron generator of Cockcroft-Walton type producing primary neutrons via the T(d,n)-reaction, (2) a tube system which can be evacuated containing the neutron flight path, the sample, collimators and the sample positioning system, and (3) the neutron detectors with the data acquisition equipment. Removing the air along the neutron flight path results in a drastic suppression of background due to air-scattered neutrons in the spectrum of the secondary neutrons. For every secondary neutron detected in the main detector, the time-of-flight, the pulse-shape information and the recoil energy are recorded in list-mode via a CAMAC system connected to a PDP 11/34 on-line computer. Using a Micro VAX, the multiparameter data are sorted and reduced to double-differential cross sections

  4. Accelerator-driven sub-critical research facility with low-enriched fuel in lead matrix: Neutron flux calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avramović Ivana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The H5B is a concept of an accelerator-driven sub-critical research facility (ADSRF being developed over the last couple of years at the Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade, Serbia. Using well-known computer codes, the MCNPX and MCNP, this paper deals with the results of a tar get study and neutron flux calculations in the sub-critical core. The neutron source is generated by an interaction of a proton or deuteron beam with the target placed inside the sub-critical core. The results of the total neutron flux density escaping the target and calculations of neutron yields for different target materials are also given here. Neutrons escaping the target volume with the group spectra (first step are used to specify a neutron source for further numerical simulations of the neutron flux density in the sub-critical core (second step. The results of the calculations of the neutron effective multiplication factor keff and neutron generation time L for the ADSRF model have also been presented. Neutron spectra calculations for an ADSRF with an uranium tar get (highest values of the neutron yield for the selected sub-critical core cells for both beams have also been presented in this paper.

  5. A continuously self regenerating high-flux neutron-generator facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, A. M.; Becker, T. A.; Bernstein, L. A.; van Bibber, K.; Bleuel, D. L.; Chen, A. X.; Daub, B. H.; Goldblum, B. L.; Firestone, R. B.; Leung, K.-N.; Renne, P. R.; Waltz, C.

    2013-10-01

    A facility based on a next-generation, high-flux D-D neutron generator (HFNG) is being constructed at UC Berkeley. The current generator, designed around two RF-driven multicusp deuterium ion sources, is capable of producing a neutron output of >1011 n/s. A specially designed titanium-coated copper target located between the ion sources accelerates D+ ions up to 150 keV, generating 2.45 MeV neutrons through the d(d,3He)n fusion reaction. Deuterium in the target is self loaded and regenerating through ion implantation, enabling stable and continuous long-term operation. The proposed science program is focused on pioneering advances in the 40Ar/39Ar dating technique for geochronology, new nuclear data measurements, basic nuclear science research including statistical model studies of radiative-strength functions and level densities, and education. An overview of the facility and its unique capabilities as well as first measurements from the HFNG commissioning will be presented. Work supported by NSF Grant No. EAR-0960138, U.S. DOE LBL Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, and U.S. DOE LLNL Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. The measurement programme at the neutron time-of-flight facility n_TOF at CERN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunsing F.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutron-induced reaction cross sections are important for a wide variety of research fields ranging from the study of nuclear level densities, nucleosynthesis to applications of nuclear technology like design, and criticality and safety assessment of existing and future nuclear reactors, radiation dosimetry, medical applications, nuclear waste transmutation, accelerator-driven systems and fuel cycle investigations. Simulations and calculations of nuclear technology applications largely rely on evaluated nuclear data libraries. The evaluations in these libraries are based both on experimental data and theoretical models. CERN’s neutron time-of-flight facility n_TOF has produced a considerable amount of experimental data since it has become fully operational with the start of its scientific measurement programme in 2001. While for a long period a single measurement station (EAR1 located at 185 m from the neutron production target was available, the construction of a second beam line at 20 m (EAR2 in 2014 has substantially increased the measurement capabilities of the facility. An outline of the experimental nuclear data activities at n_TOF will be presented.

  7. Development of the STEFF detector for the neutron Time Of Flight facility (n_TOF), CERN

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2092031

    Signicant work has been performed on the development of STEFF (SpecTrometer for Exotic Fission Fragments), a 2E2V (2-Energy 2-Velocity) spectrometer built by the University of Manchester Fission Group. The majority of this work was in the development of the time-of-flight systems, in particular the stop detector; with the main goals of improving the timing resolution and the detection eciency of the ssion fragments. Further development of the STEFF spectrometer was done to enable 2E2V measurements of the $^{235}$U(n,f) reaction with coincident measurements using a white neutron spectra of energies ranging from 10 meV to 200 MeV provided by the n_TOF (neutron Time Of Flight) facility, CERN. The STEFF spectrometer was successfully operated twice on the Experimental Area-2 high flux pulsed neutron beam line resulting in 2E2V measurements for ssion events with neutron energies ranging from 20 meV to 10 MeV. The first experiment received 1.36 X 10$^{18}$ POT (Protons On Target) with stable conditions and the seco...

  8. Present status of neutron beam facilities at the research reactor, HANARO, and its future prospect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang-Hee; Kang, Young-Hwan; Kuk, Il-Hiun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    2001-03-01

    Korea has been operating its new research reactor, HANARO, since its first criticality in 1995. It is an open-tank-in-pool type reactor using LEU fuel with thermal neutron flux of 2 x 10{sup 14} nominally at the nose in the D{sub 2}O reflector having 7 horizontal beam ports and a provision of vertical hole for cold neutron source installation. KAERI has pursued an extensive instrument development program since 1992 by the support of the nuclear long-term development program of the government and there are now 4 working instruments. A high resolution powder diffractometer and a neutron radiography facility has been operational since late 1997 and 1996, respectively. A four-circle diffractometer has been fully working since mid 1999 and a small angle neutron spectrometer is just under commissioning phase. With the development of linear position sensitive detector with delay-line readout electronics, we have developed a residual stress instrument as an optional machine to the HRPD for last two years. Around early 1998 informal users program started with friendly users and it became a formal users support program by the ministry of science and technology. Short description for peer group formation and users activities is given. (author)

  9. Present status of neutron beam facilities at the research reactor, HANARO, and its future prospect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang-Hee; Kang, Young-Hwan; Kuk, Il-Hiun

    2001-01-01

    Korea has been operating its new research reactor, HANARO, since its first criticality in 1995. It is an open-tank-in-pool type reactor using LEU fuel with thermal neutron flux of 2 x 10 14 nominally at the nose in the D 2 O reflector having 7 horizontal beam ports and a provision of vertical hole for cold neutron source installation. KAERI has pursued an extensive instrument development program since 1992 by the support of the nuclear long-term development program of the government and there are now 4 working instruments. A high resolution powder diffractometer and a neutron radiography facility has been operational since late 1997 and 1996, respectively. A four-circle diffractometer has been fully working since mid 1999 and a small angle neutron spectrometer is just under commissioning phase. With the development of linear position sensitive detector with delay-line readout electronics, we have developed a residual stress instrument as an optional machine to the HRPD for last two years. Around early 1998 informal users program started with friendly users and it became a formal users support program by the ministry of science and technology. Short description for peer group formation and users activities is given. (author)

  10. Reaction-in-flight neutrons as a signature for shell mixing in National Ignition Facility capsules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, A. C.; Bradley, P. A.; Grim, G. P.; Jungman, Gerard; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2010-01-01

    Analytic calculations and results from computational simulations are presented that suggest that reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons can be used to diagnose mixing of the ablator shell material into the fuel in deuterium-tritium (DT) capsules designed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. A. Paisner, J. D. Boyes, S. A. Kumpan, W. H. Lowdermilk, and M. S. Sorem, Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)]. Such mixing processes in NIF capsules are of fundamental physical interest and can have important effects on capsule performance, quenching the total thermonuclear yield. The sensitivity of RIF neutrons to hydrodynamical mixing arises through the dependence of RIF production on charged-particle stopping lengths in the mixture of DT fuel and ablator material. Since the stopping power in the plasma is a sensitive function of the electron temperature and density, it is also sensitive to mix. RIF production scales approximately inversely with the degree of mixing taking place, and the ratio of RIF to down-scattered neutrons provides a measure of the mix fraction and/or the mixing length. For sufficiently high-yield capsules, where spatially resolved RIF images may be possible, neutron imaging could be used to map RIF images into detailed mix images.

  11. The new vertical neutron beam line at the CERN n-TOF facility design and outlook on the performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiß, C., E-mail: christina.weiss@cern.ch [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Chiaveri, E.; Girod, S.; Vlachoudis, V.; Aberle, O. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Barros, S. [Instituto Tecnológico e Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); Bergström, I. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Berthoumieux, E. [Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique (CEA) Saclay – Irfu, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Calviani, M. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Guerrero, C.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M. [Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Tsinganis, A. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); National Technical University of Athens (NTUA) (Greece); Andrzejewski, J. [Uniwersytet Łódzki, Lodz (Poland); Audouin, L. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique/IN2P3 – IPN, Orsay (France); Bacak, M. [Atominstitut, Technische Universität Wien (Austria); Balibrea-Correa, J. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Barbagallo, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bari (Italy); Bécares, V. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); and others

    2015-11-01

    At the neutron time-of-flight facility n-TOF at CERN a new vertical beam line was constructed in 2014, in order to extend the experimental possibilities at this facility to an even wider range of challenging cross-section measurements of interest in astrophysics, nuclear technology and medical physics. The design of the beam line and the experimental hall was based on FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations, aiming at maximizing the neutron flux, reducing the beam halo and minimizing the background from neutrons interacting with the collimator or back-scattered in the beam dump. The present paper gives an overview on the design of the beam line and the relevant elements and provides an outlook on the expected performance regarding the neutron beam intensity, shape and energy resolution, as well as the neutron and photon backgrounds.

  12. A proton-recoil neutron spectrometer for time-dependent ion temperatures on the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, T.J.

    1995-01-01

    Ion temperatures from inertial confinement fusion targets are usually determined by measuring the Doppler broadening of the neutron spectrum using the time-of-flight method. Measurement systems are generally designed so that the contribution of the duration of neutron production (∼100 ps) to the width of the neutron signal is negligible. This precludes the possibility of time-dependent ion temperature. If, however, one could measure the neutron energy and arrival time at a detector independently, then time-dependent neutron spectra could be obtained, and ion temperature information deduced. A concept utilizing a proton-recoil neutron spectrometer has been developed in which recoil protons from a small plastic foil are measured. From the energy, arrival time, and recoil angle of the recoil proton, the birth time and energy of the incident neutron can be deduced. The sensitivity of the system is low, but the higher anticipated neutron yields from the proposed National Ignition Facility may make the technique feasible. Large scintillator arrays currently in use on the Nova facility for neutron spectral measurements consist of ∼1,000 channels and detect between 50 and 500 counts for typical time-integrated data. Time-dependent results would then require about an order of magnitude larger system. Key issues for making this system feasible will be keeping the cost per channel low while allowing adequately time (∼ 50 ps), energy (20 keV), and angular resolution (2 mrad) for each of the proton detectors

  13. The Idaho Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (PBF/BNCT) Program overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorn, R.V. III; Griebenow, M.L.; Ackermann, A.L.; Miller, L.G.; Miller, D.L.; Wheeler, F.J.; Bradshaw, K.M.; Wessol, D.E.; Harker, Y.D.; Nigg, D.W.; Randolph, P.D.; Bauer, W.F.; Gavin, P.R.; Richards, T.L.

    1992-01-01

    The Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (PBF/BNCT) Program has been funded since 1988 to evaluate brain tumor treatment using Na 2 B 12 H 11 SH (borocaptate sodium or BSH) and epithermal neutrons. The PBF/BNCT Program pursues this goal as a comprehensive, multidisciplinary, multiorganizational endeavor applying modern program management techniques. The initial focus was to: (1) establish a representative large animal model and (2) develop the generic analytical and measurement capabilities require to control treatment repeatability and determine critical treatment parameters independent of tumor type and body location. This paper will identify the PBF/BNCT Program elements and summarize the status of some of the developed capabilities

  14. Comparison of calculations with neutron dosimetry measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Poolside Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maerker, R.E.; Williams, M.L.

    1981-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Poolside Facility (PSF), like the Pool Critical Assembly (PCA), is used for benchmark dosimetry measurements which can serve to validate the transport methods used in calculating the high-energy neutron fluences (> 0.1 MeV) in LWR pressure vessels required to estimate the neutron damage to the pressure vessels in the form of embrittlement. The PSF consists of an arrangement of two water gaps of 4 and 12 cm thickness separated by a simulated thermal shield and followed by a simulated pressure vessel wall and then a void box to represent a reactor cavity. The PSF is driven by the 30 MW ORR reactor, whereas the geometrically similar core of the PCA has a maximum power of only 10 KW. This paper reports the results of some calculated activities and compares them with published PSF measurements performed by HEDL and other laboratories on the so-called Westinghouse surveillance capsule perturbation experiment.

  15. Characterisation of the epithermal neutron irradiation facility at the Portuguese research reactor using MCNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, D G; Fernandes, A C; Santos, J P; Ramos, A R; Marques, J G; King, A

    2015-05-01

    The radiation field at the epithermal beamline and irradiation chamber installed at the Portuguese Research Reactor (RPI) at the Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear of Instituto Superior Técnico was characterised in the context of Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) applications. Radiographic films, activation foils and thermoluminescence dosimeters were used to measure the neutron fluence and photon dose rates in the irradiation chamber. A fixed-source MCNPX model of the beamline and chamber was developed and compared to measurements in the first step towards planning a new irradiation chamber. The high photon background from the reactor results in the saturation of the detector and the current facility configuration yields an intrinsic insensitivity to various elements of interest for PGNAA. These will be addressed in future developments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Automated facility for analysis of soil samples by neutron activation, counting, and data control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voegele, A.L.; Jesse, R.H.; Russell, W.L.; Baker, J.

    1978-01-01

    An automated facility remotely and automatically analyzes soil, water, and sediment samples for uranium. The samples travel through pneumatic tubes and switches to be first irradiated by neutrons and then counted for resulting neutron and gamma emission. Samples are loaded into special carriers, or rabbits, which are then automatically loaded into the pneumatic transfer system. The sample carriers have been previously coded with an identification number, which can be automatically read in the system. This number is used for correlating and filing data about the samples. The transfer system, counters, and identification system are controlled by a network of microprocessors. A master microprocessor initiates routines in other microprocessors assigned to specific tasks. The software in the microprocessors is unique for this type of application and lends flexibility to the system

  17. Comparison of calculations with neutron dosimetry measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Poolside Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maerker, R.E.; Williams, M.L.

    1981-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Poolside Facility (PSF), like the Pool Critical Assembly (PCA), is used for benchmark dosimetry measurements which can serve to validate the transport methods used in calculating the high-energy neutron fluences (> 0.1 MeV) in LWR pressure vessels required to estimate the neutron damage to the pressure vessels in the form of embrittlement. The PSF consists of an arrangement of two water gaps of 4 and 12 cm thickness separated by a simulated thermal shield and followed by a simulated pressure vessel wall and then a void box to represent a reactor cavity. The PSF is driven by the 30 MW ORR reactor, whereas the geometrically similar core of the PCA has a maximum power of only 10 KW. This paper reports the results of some calculated activities and compares them with published PSF measurements performed by HEDL and other laboratories on the so-called Westinghouse surveillance capsule perturbation experiment

  18. Summary of the first neutron image data collected at the National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grim Gary P.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A summary of data and results from the first neutron images produced by the National Ignition Facility (NIF, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, USA are presented. An overview of the neutron imaging technique is presented, as well as a synopsis of data and measurements made to date. Data from directly driven, DT filled microballoons, as well as indirectly driven, cryogenically layered ignition experiments are presented. The data show that the primary cores from directly driven implosions are approximately twice as large, 64 ± 3 μm, as indirectly driven cores, 25 ± 4 and 29 ± 4 μm and more asymmetric, P2/P0 = 47% vs. − 14% and 7%. Further, comparison with the size and shape of X-ray image data on the same implosions show good agreement, indicating X-ray emission is dominated by the hot regions of the implosion.

  19. Use of the SPIRAL 2 facility for material irradiations with 14 MeV energy neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosnier, A.; Ridikas, D.; Ledoux, X.; Pellemoine, F.; Anne, R.; Huguet, Y.; Lipa, M.; Magaud, P.; Marbach, G.; Saint-Laurent, M.G.; Villari, A.C.C.

    2005-01-01

    The primary goal of an irradiation facility for fusion applications will be to generate a material irradiation database for the design, construction, licensing and safe operation of a fusion demonstration power station (e.g., DEMO). This will be achieved through testing and qualifying material performance under neutron irradiation that simulates service up to the full lifetime anticipated in the power plant. Preliminary investigations of 14 MeV neutron effects on different kinds of fusion material could be assessed by the SPIRAL 2 Project at GANIL (Caen, France), aiming at rare isotope beams production for nuclear physics research with first beams expected by 2009. In SPIRAL 2, a deuteron beam of 5 mA and 40 MeV interacts with a rotating carbon disk producing high-energy neutrons (in the range between 1 and 40 MeV) via C (d, xn) reactions. Then, the facility could be used for 3-4 months y -1 for material irradiation purposes. This would correspond to damage rates in the order of 1-2 dpa y -1 (in Fe) in a volume of ∼10 cm 3 . Therefore, the use of miniaturized specimens will be essential in order to effectively utilize the available irradiation volume in SPIRAL 2. Sample package irradiation temperature would be in the range of 250-1000 deg. C. The irradiation level of 1-2 dpa y -1 with 14 MeV neutrons (average energy) may be interesting for micro-structural and metallurgical investigations (e.g., mini-traction, small punch tests, etc.) and possibly for the understanding of specimen size/geometric effects of critical material properties. Due to the small test cell volume, sample in situ experiments are not foreseen. However, sample packages would be, if required, available each month after transfer in a special hot cell on-site

  20. INL Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program Annual Report 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Venhuizen

    2005-06-01

    This report summarizes the activities and major accomplishments for the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program for calendar year 2004. Topics covered include boron analysis in biological samples, computational dosimetry and treatment planning software development, medical neutron source development and characterization, and collaborative dosimetry studies at the RA-1 facility in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

  1. Design and development of a neutron tomography facility at the IPEN-CNEN/SP, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoueri, Roberto Mauro

    2016-01-01

    In the work reported in this dissertation, a facility for neutron tomography was developed and installed at the irradiation channel 14 of the IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor of IPEN-CNEN/SP. Several selected objects were inspected, and the obtained images demonstrate the main characteristic of the present technique that is its capability to visualize hydrogenous rich substances. In such facility, a tomography can be obtained in 400 s with a spatial resolution of 205 μm, and the obtained images have sufficient quality to allow qualitative and quantitative analysis. These characteristics are very similar to the ones of the top facilities around the world, and the quality of the provided images are sufficient to allow qualitative and quantitative analysis of the inspected object. The implementation of the neutron tomography technique opens up the possibility of new research as it provides a new tool for inspection of objects, which provides a view of its internal structure, which is not always possible for two-dimensional imaging methods. (author)

  2. Prompt gamma neutron activation analysis facility at the RA-6 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, F. A.; Calzetta, O

    2004-01-01

    A prompt gamma neutron activation activation analysis facility was developed at the 500 kw thermal power RA-6 research reactor of the Bariloche Atomic Center, Argentina.This facility consist of a radial beam port with external positioning of the sample.The gamma radiation is reduced by a bismuth filter placed inside the extraction tube and the beam diameter is limited by a set of two collimators up to 5 cm.The neutron flux at the sample position is 7 10 6 n/cm 2 s with a Cadmium ratio of 20/1.The gamma detector is a 50 % efficiency type p HPGe rounded by a NaI(Tl) for Compton suppressioning.The gamma spectra is measured through 0 to 8.5 MeV.The background have counting rate of 350 cps without sample. In this work is shown the efficiency curve, the calculed sensibilities and the lower detection limits for B, Cd, Sm, Gd, H, Cl, Hg, Eu, Ti, Ag, Au, Mo. The RA-6's PGNAA facility is fully working, although the analytic capacity is under improvement [es

  3. Development of a Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole accelerator facility for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreiner, A.J.; Thatar Vento, V.; Levinas, P.; Bergueiro, J.; Burlon, A.A.; Di Paolo, H.; Kesque, J.M.; Valda, A.A.; Debray, M.E.; Somacal, H.R.; Minsky, D.M.; Estrada, L.; Hazarabedian, A.; Johann, F.; Suarez Sandin, J.C.; Castell, W.; Davidson, J.; Davidson, M.; Repetto, M.; Obligado, M.; Nery, J.P.; Huck, H.; Igarzabal, M.; Fernandez Salares, A.

    2008-01-01

    There is a generalized perception that the availability of suitable particle accelerators installed in hospitals, as neutron sources, may be crucial for the advancement of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). An ongoing project to develop a Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole (TESQ) accelerator facility for Accelerator-Based (AB)-BNCT is described here. The project goal is a machine capable of delivering 30 mA of 2.4-2.5 MeV protons to be used in conjunction with a neutron production target based on the 7 Li(p,n) 7 Be reaction slightly beyond its resonance at 2.25 MeV. A folded tandem, with 1.20-1.25 MV terminal voltage, combined with an ESQ chain is being designed and constructed. This machine is conceptually shown to be capable of accelerating a 30 mA proton beam to 2.5 MeV. These are the specifications needed to produce sufficiently intense and clean epithermal neutron beams, based on the 7 Li(p,n) 7 Be reaction, to perform BNCT treatment for deep-seated tumors in less than an hour. This electrostatic machine is one of the technologically simplest and cheapest solutions for optimized AB-BNCT. At present there is no BNCT facility in the world with the characteristics presented in this work. For the accelerator, results on its design, construction and beam transport calculations are discussed. Taking into account the peculiarities of the expected irradiation field, the project also considers a specific study of the treatment room. This study aims at the design of the treatment room emphasizing aspects related to patient, personnel and public radiation protection; dose monitoring; patient positioning and room construction. The design considers both thermal (for the treatment of shallow tumors) and epithermal (for deep-seated tumors) neutron beams entering the room through a port connected to the accelerator via a moderation and neutron beam shaping assembly. Preliminary results of dose calculations for the treatment room design, using the MCNP program, are presented

  4. Diagnosing implosion performance at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) by means of neutron spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frenje, J.A.; Casey, D.T.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Bionta, R.; Bond, E.J.; Caggiano, J.A.; Cerjan, C.; Edwards, J.; Eckart, M.; Fittinghoff, D.N.; Friedrich, S.; Glenzer, S.; Haan, S.; Hatarik, R.; Hatchett, S.; Jones, O.S.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Knauer, J.P.; Grim, G.; Kilkenny, J.D.

    2013-01-01

    The neutron spectrum from a cryogenically layered deuterium–tritium (dt) implosion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) provides essential information about the implosion performance. From the measured primary-neutron spectrum (13–15 MeV), yield (Y n ) and hot-spot ion temperature (T i ) are determined. From the scattered neutron yield (10–12 MeV) relative to Y n , the down-scatter ratio, and the fuel areal density (ρR) are determined. These implosion parameters have been diagnosed to an unprecedented accuracy with a suite of neutron-time-of-flight spectrometers and a magnetic recoil spectrometer implemented in various locations around the NIF target chamber. This provides good implosion coverage and excellent measurement complementarity required for reliable measurements of Y n , T i and ρR, in addition to ρR asymmetries. The data indicate that the implosion performance, characterized by the experimental ignition threshold factor, has improved almost two orders of magnitude since the first shot taken in September 2010. ρR values greater than 1 g cm −2 are readily achieved. Three-dimensional semi-analytical modelling and numerical simulations of the neutron-spectrometry data, as well as other data for the hot spot and main fuel, indicate that a maximum hot-spot pressure of ∼150 Gbar has been obtained, which is almost a factor of two from the conditions required for ignition according to simulations. Observed Y n are also 3–10 times lower than predicted. The conjecture is that the observed pressure and Y n deficits are partly explained by substantial low-mode ρR asymmetries, which may cause inefficient conversion of shell kinetic energy to hot-spot thermal energy at stagnation. (paper)

  5. Determination of radiation levels by neutrons in an accelerator for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes G, L.; Salazar B, M.A.; Genis S, R.

    1998-01-01

    It was determined the radiation levels by neutrons due to photonuclear reactions (γ, n) which occur in the target, levelling filter, collimators and the small pillow blinding of a medical accelerator Varian Clinac 2100C of 18 MeV, using thermoluminescent dosemeters UD-802AS and US-809AS. The experimental values were presented for the patient level, inside and outside of the radiation field, as well as for the small pillow. (Author)

  6. Characterization of the neutron field at the ISIS-VESUVIO facility by means of a bonner sphere spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedogni, Roberto; Esposito, Adolfo; Andreani, Carla; Senesi, Roberto; De Pascale, Maria Pia; Picozza, Piergiorgio; Pietropaolo, Antonino; Gorini, Giuseppe; Frost, Christopher D.; Ansell, Stewart

    2009-01-01

    One of the more actual and promising fields of applied neutron physics is the investigation of the malfunctions induced by high-energy neutrons naturally present in the atmosphere in electronic devices, called single event effects (SEE). These studies are of primary importance for the design of devices that have to fulfill high reliability requirements and those that are likely to be exposed to enhanced levels of cosmic rays background, e.g. in aerospace and avionic applications. Particle accelerators-driven neutron sources constitute valuable irradiation facilities for these purposes as they provide an opportunity for accelerated testing of the effects of these naturally occurring neutrons, provided the neutron spectrum is comparable with the atmospheric one and the neutron fields are known with high accuracy. The latter can be achieved through the use of appropriate radiation transport codes and neutron spectrometry techniques. In view of the design and construction of CHIPIR, a dedicated beam line for SEE studies at the ISIS pulsed neutron source second target station (UK) ((http://ts-2.isis.rl.ac.uk/instruments/phase2/index.htm)), a spectrometric characterization was performed on the VESUVIO beamline (Senesi et al.,2000). The spectrometric technique was the bonner sphere spectrometer (BSS), widely used to determine neutron spectra and dose quantities around high-energy accelerators. The experimental campaign provided a complete spectrometric investigation of the VESUVIO neutron beam, allowing the integral quantities (total fluence rate, fraction of fluence in given energy intervals) to be estimated with uncertainties lower than 10%.

  7. Characterization of the neutron field at the ISIS-VESUVIO facility by means of a bonner sphere spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedogni, Roberto; Esposito, Adolfo [INFN-LNF Via E. Fermi n. 40-00044 Frascati (RM) (Italy); Andreani, Carla [Universita degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata, Dipartimento di Fisica e Centro NAST, Via R. Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Senesi, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.senesi@roma2.infn.i [Universita degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata, Dipartimento di Fisica e Centro NAST, Via R. Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); De Pascale, Maria Pia; Picozza, Piergiorgio [Universita degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata, Dipartimento di Fisica e Centro NAST, Via R. Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Pietropaolo, Antonino; Gorini, Giuseppe [CNISM and Universita degli Studi di Milano Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica ' G. Occhialini' , Piazza della Scienza 3, 20126 Milano (Italy); Frost, Christopher D. [INFN-LNF Via E. Fermi n. 40-00044 Frascati (RM) (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata, Dipartimento di Fisica e Centro NAST, Via R. Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); CNISM and Universita degli Studi di Milano Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica ' G. Occhialini' , Piazza della Scienza 3, 20126 Milano (Italy); STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, ISIS Facility, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxon, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Ansell, Stewart [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, ISIS Facility, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxon, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-21

    One of the more actual and promising fields of applied neutron physics is the investigation of the malfunctions induced by high-energy neutrons naturally present in the atmosphere in electronic devices, called single event effects (SEE). These studies are of primary importance for the design of devices that have to fulfill high reliability requirements and those that are likely to be exposed to enhanced levels of cosmic rays background, e.g. in aerospace and avionic applications. Particle accelerators-driven neutron sources constitute valuable irradiation facilities for these purposes as they provide an opportunity for accelerated testing of the effects of these naturally occurring neutrons, provided the neutron spectrum is comparable with the atmospheric one and the neutron fields are known with high accuracy. The latter can be achieved through the use of appropriate radiation transport codes and neutron spectrometry techniques. In view of the design and construction of CHIPIR, a dedicated beam line for SEE studies at the ISIS pulsed neutron source second target station (UK) ((http://ts-2.isis.rl.ac.uk/instruments/phase2/index.htm)), a spectrometric characterization was performed on the VESUVIO beamline (Senesi et al.,2000). The spectrometric technique was the bonner sphere spectrometer (BSS), widely used to determine neutron spectra and dose quantities around high-energy accelerators. The experimental campaign provided a complete spectrometric investigation of the VESUVIO neutron beam, allowing the integral quantities (total fluence rate, fraction of fluence in given energy intervals) to be estimated with uncertainties lower than 10%.

  8. Development of a Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole facility for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreiner, A.J.; Castell, W.; Di Paolo, H.; Baldo, M.; Bergueiro, J.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the present status of an ongoing project to develop a Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole (TESQ) accelerator facility for Accelerator-Based (AB)-BNCT. The project final goal is a machine capable of delivering 30 mA of 2.4 MeV protons to be used in conjunction with a neutron production target based on the 7 Li(p,n) 7 Be reaction. The machine currently being constructed is a folded TESQ with a high-voltage terminal at 0.6 MV. We report here on the progress achieved in a number of different areas.

  9. Supplementary neutron flux calculations for the ORNL pool critical assembly pressure vessel facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maerker, R.E.; Maudlin, P.J.

    1981-02-01

    A three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculation was performed to estimate the neutron flux in the 8/7 configuration of the ORNL Pool Critical Assembly Pressure Vessel Facility. The calculational tool was the multigroup transport code MORSE operated in the adjoint mode. The MORSE flux results compared well with those using a previously adopted procedure for constructing a three-dimensional flux from one- and two-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations using the DOT-IV code. This study concluded that use of these discrete ordinates constructions in previous calculations is sufficiently accurate and does not account for the existing discrepancies between calculation and experiment.

  10. Supplementary neutron flux calculations for the ORNL pool critical assembly pressure vessel facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maerker, R.E.; Maudlin, P.J.

    1981-02-01

    A three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculation was performed to estimate the neutron flux in the 8/7 configuration of the ORNL Pool Critical Assembly Pressure Vessel Facility. The calculational tool was the multigroup transport code MORSE operated in the adjoint mode. The MORSE flux results compared well with those using a previously adopted procedure for constructing a three-dimensional flux from one- and two-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations using the DOT-IV code. This study concluded that use of these discrete ordinates constructions in previous calculations is sufficiently accurate and does not account for the existing discrepancies between calculation and experiment

  11. Development of a Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole facility for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreiner, A J; Castell, W; Di Paolo, H; Baldo, M; Bergueiro, J; Burlon, A A; Cartelli, D; Vento, V Thatar; Kesque, J M; Erhardt, J; Ilardo, J C; Valda, A A; Debray, M E; Somacal, H R; Sandin, J C Suarez; Igarzabal, M; Huck, H; Estrada, L; Repetto, M; Obligado, M; Padulo, J; Minsky, D M; Herrera, M; Gonzalez, S J; Capoulat, M E

    2011-12-01

    We describe the present status of an ongoing project to develop a Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole (TESQ) accelerator facility for Accelerator-Based (AB)-BNCT. The project final goal is a machine capable of delivering 30 mA of 2.4 MeV protons to be used in conjunction with a neutron production target based on the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction. The machine currently being constructed is a folded TESQ with a high-voltage terminal at 0.6 MV. We report here on the progress achieved in a number of different areas. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. In vivo Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis Facility for Total Body Nitrogen and Cd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munive, Marco; Revilla, Angel; Solis, Jose L.

    2007-01-01

    A Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) system has been designed and constructed to measure the total body nitrogen and Cd for in vivo studies. An aqueous solution of KNO 3 was used as phantom for system calibration. The facility has been used to monitor total body nitrogen (TBN) of mice and found that is related to their diet. Some mice swallowed diluted water with Cl 2 Cd, and the presence of Cd was detected in the animals. The minimum Cd concentration that the system can detect was 20 ppm

  13. Dosimetric evaluation of semiconductor detectors for application in neutron dosimetry and microdosimetry in nuclear reactor and radiosurgical facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas, Jose Patricio Nahuel

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this research is the dosimetric evaluation of semiconductor components (surface barrier detectors and PIN photodiodes) for applications in dose equivalent measurements on low dose fields (fast and thermal fluxes) using an AmBe neutron source, the IEA-R1 reactor neutrongraphy facility (epithermal and thermal fluxes) and the Critical Unit facility IPEN/MB-01 (fast fluxes). As moderator compound to fast neutrons flux from the AmBe source was used paraffin and boron and polyethylene as converter for thermal and fast neutrons measurements. The resulting fluxes were used to the irradiation of semiconductor components (SSB - Surface Barrier Detector and PIN photodiodes). A mixed converter made of a borated polyethylene foil (Kodak) was also used. Monte Carlo simulation methodology was employed to evaluate analytically the optimal paraffin thickness. The obtained results were similar to the experimental data and allowed the evaluation of emerging neutron flux from moderator, as well as the fast neutron flux reaching the polyethylene covering the semiconductor sensitive surface. Gamma radiation levels were evaluated covering the whole detector with cadmium foil 1 mm thick, allowing thermal neutrons blockage and gamma radiation measurements. The IPEN/MB-01 facility was employed to evaluate the detector response for high neutron flux. The results were in good agreement with other studies published. Using the obtained spectra an approach to dose equivalent calculation was established. (author)

  14. Experimental facilities for calibrations at the dosimetry facility of group 6.5 'Neutron dosimetry' at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strzelczyk, H.

    1986-07-01

    The mechanical and electrical layout of the ''Dosimetriemessplatz'', a low scattering target area at the accelerator facility is described. Monoenergetic neutrons are generated at the irradiation facility for the research on neutron detectors and dosimeters for radiation protection. The report is aimed to inform dosimetry in particular for those guest's coming from other laboratories. For that purpose a detailed description is given of the mechanical construction, of cable connections and of the monitor system. The feasibitity of data transfer from the system at the target position to the user's system and the mode of acceptance of external data are explained. (orig./HP) [de

  15. Neutron flux and gamma dose measurement in the BNCT irradiation facility at the TRIGA reactor of the University of Pavia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolussi, S.; Protti, N.; Ferrari, M.; Postuma, I.; Fatemi, S.; Prata, M.; Ballarini, F.; Carante, M. P.; Farias, R.; González, S. J.; Marrale, M.; Gallo, S.; Bartolotta, A.; Iacoviello, G.; Nigg, D.; Altieri, S.

    2018-01-01

    University of Pavia is equipped with a TRIGA Mark II research nuclear reactor, operating at a maximum steady state power of 250 kW. It has been used for many years to support Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) research. An irradiation facility was constructed inside the thermal column of the reactor to produce a sufficient thermal neutron flux with low epithermal and fast neutron components, and low gamma dose. In this irradiation position, the liver of two patients affected by hepatic metastases from colon carcinoma were irradiated after borated drug administration. The facility is currently used for cell cultures and small animal irradiation. Measurements campaigns have been carried out, aimed at characterizing the neutron spectrum and the gamma dose component. The neutron spectrum has been measured by means of multifoil neutron activation spectrometry and a least squares unfolding algorithm; gamma dose was measured using alanine dosimeters. Results show that in a reference position the thermal neutron flux is (1.20 ± 0.03) ×1010 cm-2 s-1 when the reactor is working at the maximum power of 250 kW, with the epithermal and fast components, respectively, 2 and 3 orders of magnitude lower than the thermal component. The ratio of the gamma dose with respect to the thermal neutron fluence is 1.2 ×10-13 Gy/(n/cm2).

  16. Use of the National Low-Temperature Neutron Irradiation Facility (NLTNIF) for fusion materials research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coltman, R.R. Jr.; Kerchner, H.R.; Klabunde, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    In May 1983 the Division of Materials Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the Department of Energy authorized the establishment of a National Low-Temperature Neutron Irradiation Facility (NLTNIF) at ORNL's Bulk Shielding Reactor (BSR). The NLTNIF, which will be available for qualified experiments at no cost to users, will provide a combination of high radiation intensities and special environmental and testing conditions that have not been previously available in the US. Since the DOE authorization, work has proceeded on the design and construction of the new facility without interruption. This report describes the present status of the development of NLTNIF and, for the information of new candidate users, a recounting of the major specifications and capabilities is also given

  17. Numerical studies of the flux-to-current ratio method in the KIPT neutron source facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Y.; Gohar, Y.; Zhong, Z.

    2013-01-01

    The reactivity of a subcritical assembly has to be monitored continuously in order to assure its safe operation. In this paper, the flux-to-current ratio method has been studied as an approach to provide the on-line reactivity measurement of the subcritical system. Monte Carlo numerical simulations have been performed using the KIPT neutron source facility model. It is found that the reactivity obtained from the flux-to-current ratio method is sensitive to the detector position in the subcritical assembly. However, if multiple detectors are located about 12 cm above the graphite reflector and 54 cm radially, the technique is shown to be very accurate in determining the k eff this facility in the range of 0.75 to 0.975. (authors)

  18. National Low-Temperature Neutron Irradiation Facility (NLTNIF). The status of development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coltman, R.R. Jr.; Kerchner, H.R.; Klabunde, C.E.; Young, F.W. Jr.

    1985-12-01

    In May 1983, the Department of Energy authorized the establishment of a National Low-Temperature Neutron Irradiation Facility (NLTNIF) at ORNL's Bulk Shielding Reactor (BSR). The NLTNIF, which will be available for qualified experiments at no cost to users, will provide a combination of high radiation intensities and special environmental and testing conditions that have not been previously available in the US. Since the DOE authorization, work has proceeded on the design and construction of the new facility without interruption. This report describes the present status of the development of the NLTNIF and the anticipated schedule for completion and performance testing. There is a table of the major specifications and capabilities and a schematic layout of the irradiation cryostate for design and dimensioning of test and experiment assemblies

  19. Chlorine and sodium perfusion and electrolyte balance in human tissue and tumours before and during neutron and photon radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koester, L.; Knopf, K.; Auberger, Th

    1997-08-01

    Radiotherapy with nuclear reactor fission neutrons was applied in 49 cases of pre-treated patients with superficial metastases or relapses from primary carcinoma. Measurements of the decay rates of the radiation-induced radioactivity of , and in the irradiated tissue resulted in values for the simultaneous local kinetics of chlorine and sodium, and in approximate data on the electrolyte masses. The electrolytes were present in non-exchangeable and exchangeable compartments of soft tissue. Exchange times of the intravascular to extravascular turnover and the frequencies of the exchange fractions were determined for a series of irradiations. The results have been interpreted in terms of the mean electrolyte exchange rates, of a standardized functional blood flow, and of the supply capacity of the vascular system. In the average of all cases, the regional perfusion was reduced by about 30% by irradiation up to 14 Gy (equivalent photon dose ) connected with an increase in the non-exchangeable fractions. After fractionated doses higher than 14 Gy, functional blood flow and supply capacity increased to 120%, and fixed electrolytes were removed from the irradiated tissue. Data on electrolyte kinetics and vascularity are compared with the literature.

  20. Deuteron beam interaction with lithium jet in a neutron source test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.

    1996-01-01

    Testing and evaluating candidate fusion reactor materials in a high-flux, high-energy neutron environment are critical to the success and economic feasibility of a fusion device. The current understanding of materials behavior in fission-like environments and existing fusion facilities is insufficient to ensure the necessary performance of future fusion reactor components. An accelerator-based deuterium-lithium system to generate the required high neutron flux for material testing is considered to be the most promising approach in the near future. In this system, a high-energy (30-40 MeV) deuteron beam impinges on a high-speed (10-20 m/s) lithium jet to produce the high-energy (≥14 MeV) neutrons required to simulate a fusion environment via the Li (d,n) nuclear stripping reaction. Interaction of the high-energy deuteron beam and the subsequent response of the high-speed lithium jet are evaluated in detail. Deposition of the deuteron beam, jet-thermal hydraulic response, lithium-surface vaporization rate, and dynamic stability of the jet are modeled. It is found that lower beam kinetic energies produce higher surface temperature and consequently higher Li vaporization rates. Larger beam sizes significantly reduce both bulk and surface temperatures. Thermal expansion and dynamic velocities (normal to jet direction) due to beam energy deposition and momentum transfer are much lower than jet flow velocity and decrease substantially at lower beam current densities. (orig.)

  1. Deuteron beam interaction with Li jet for a neutron source test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.

    1995-09-01

    Testing and evaluating candidate fusion reactor materials in a high-flux, high-energy neutron environment are critical to the success and economic feasibility of a fusion device. The current understanding of materials behavior in fission-like environments and existing fusion facilities is insufficient to ensure the necessary performance of future fusion reactor components. An accelerator-based deuterium-lithium system to generate the required high neutron flux for material testing is considered to be the most promising approach in the near future. In this system, a high-energy (30-40 MeV) deuteron beam impinges on a high-speed (10-20 m/s) lithium jet to produce the high-energy (>14 MeV) neutrons required to simulate a fusion environment via the Li (d,n) nuclear stripping reaction. Interaction of the high-energy deuteron beam and the subsequent response of the high-speed lithium jet are evaluated in detail. Deposition of the deuteron beam, jet-thermal hydraulic response, lithium-surface vaporization rate, and dynamic stability of the jet are modeled. It is found that lower beam kinetic energies produce higher surface temperature and consequently higher Li vaporization rates. Larger beam sizes significantly reduce both bulk and surface temperatures. Thermal expansion and dynamic velocities (normal to jet direction) due to beam energy deposition and momentum transfer are much lower than jet flow velocity and decrease substantially at lower beam current densities

  2. Neutron calibration facility with an Am-Be source for pulse shape discrimination measurement of CsI(Tl) crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.S.; Bhang, H.; Choi, J.H.; Choi, S.; Joo, H.W.; Kim, G.B.; Kim, K.W.; Kim, S.C.; Kim, S.K.; Lee, J.H.; Lee, J.K.; Myung, S.S.; Hahn, I.S.; Jeon, E.J.; Kang, W.G.; Kim, Y.D.; Kim, Y.H.; Li, J.; Kim, H.J.; Leonard, D.S.

    2014-01-01

    We constructed a neutron calibration facility based on a 300-mCi Am-Be source in conjunction with a search for weakly interacting massive particle candidates for dark matter. The facility is used to study the response of CsI(Tl) crystals to nuclear recoils induced by neutrons from the Am-Be source and comparing them with the response to electron recoils produced by Compton scattering of 662-keV γ-rays from a 137 Cs source. The measured results on pulse shape discrimination (PSD) between nuclear- and electron-recoil events are quantified in terms of quality factors. A comparison with our previous result from a neutron generator demonstrate the feasibility of performing calibrations of PSD measurements using neutrons from a Am-Be source

  3. Virtual neutron scattering experiments - Training and preparing students for large-scale facility experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Hougaard Overgaard

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Dansk Vi beskriver, hvordan virtuelle eksperimenter kan udnyttes i et læringsdesign ved at forberede de studerende til hands-on-eksperimenter ved storskalafaciliteter. Vi illustrerer designet ved at vise, hvordan virtuelle eksperimenter bruges på Niels Bohr Institutets kandidatkursus om neutronspredning. I den sidste uge af kurset, rejser studerende til et storskala neutronspredningsfacilitet for at udføre neutronspredningseksperimenter. Vi bruger studerendes udsagn om deres oplevelser til at argumentere for, at arbejdet med virtuelle experimenter forbereder de studerende til at engagere sig mere frugtbart med eksperimenter ved at lade dem fokusere på fysikken og relevante data i stedet for instrumenternes funktion. Vi hævder, at det er, fordi de kan overføre deres erfaringer med virtuelle eksperimenter til rigtige eksperimenter. Vi finder dog, at læring stadig er situeret i den forstand, at kun kendskab til bestemte eksperimenter overføres. Vi afslutter med at diskutere de muligheder, som virtuelle eksperimenter giver. English We describe how virtual experiments can be utilized in a learning design that prepares students for hands-on experiments at large-scale facilities. We illustrate the design by showing how virtual experiments are used at the Niels Bohr Institute in a master level course on neutron scattering. In the last week of the course, students travel to a large-scale neutron scattering facility to perform real neutron scattering experiments. Through student interviews and survey answers, we argue, that the virtual training prepares the students to engage more fruitfully with experiments by letting them focus on physics and data rather than the overwhelming instrumentation. We argue that this is because they can transfer their virtual experimental experience to the real-life situation. However, we also find that learning is still situated in the sense that only knowledge of particular experiments is transferred. We proceed to

  4. Microdosimetric investigation of a fast neutron radiobiology facility utilising the d(4)-9Be reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waker, A J; Maughan, R L

    1986-11-01

    For fast neutron therapy and radiobiology beams, knowledge of the primary neutron spectrum is the most fundamental requirement for the definition of radiation quality. However, microdosimetric measurements in the form of single-event spectra not only complement the primary neutron spectrum as a statement of radiation quality but also provide a sensitive method of detecting changes in the radiation field in situations where it is no longer possible to have precise knowledge of the primary neutron spectrum, for example after collimator changes and in positions where the radiation field consists of a large scattered component. For the various collimator arrangements employed at the Gray Laboratory facility small perturbations of the radiation field are observed which can be related to a softening of the primary neutron spectrum with increasing field size of the collimator. Gamma fraction determinations are in very good agreement with measurements employing the dual chamber technique and also show small changes with collimator field size giving rise to gamma components ranging from 0.09 to 0.12, the higher values being measured for the larger field sizes. Quality changes represented by the shape of the measured event-size spectra and the derived microdosimetric parameters were greatest for off axis and phantom measurements. With increasing depth in water, yD was found to decrease from 47.3 keV micron-1 at 5 cm to 35.6 keV micron-1 at 15 cm depth, and the gamma fraction was found to increase from 0.23 to 0.40. Although there is no generally accepted and agreed method of relating microdosimetric information to biological effectiveness, the dual radiation theory in its original form (Kellerer and Rossi 1972) has been shown to be a very useful model for the assessment of the biological effectiveness of fast neutrons (Kellerer et al 1976). The microdosimetric parameter which is used in the dual radiation model is the dose mean specific energy corrected for saturation zeta

  5. Two years of operating experience with the Seattle clinical neutron therapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risler, R.; Brossard, S.; Eenmaa, J.; Kalet, I.; Wootton, P.

    1987-01-01

    After five years of planning, equipment acquisition, facility construction and beam testing the Seattle Clinical Neutron Therapy facility became operational in October 1984. In the past two years nearly 300 people have been treated in clinical trials. During this time 82 % of the planned treatment sessions were performed on schedule, 3 % had to be rescheduled for patient related reasons and 15 % because of equipment problems. The facility is at present running on a 5 days/week schedule: Three ten-hour treatment days, one maintenance day and one research day (radiobiology, therapy related physics). Short runs for short lived isotopes are done between patient treatments. The isocentric gantry, capable of 360 rotation is equipped with a variable collimator with 40 independent leaves. This collimation system allows the use of complex field shapes without the necessity of handling radioactive components like collimator inserts or blocks. It has turned out to be a very essential part for the efficient operation of the facility. Major causes for equipment downtime were associated with the control system, the beryllium target system, RF and magnet systems and the treatment gantry. (author)

  6. Technical review and evaluation for the installation of cold neutron source facility at HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Chang Woong; Kim, Dong Hoon; Lee, Mu Woong; Cho, Man Soon; Oh, Yun Woo; Park, Sun Hee; Park, Kuk Nam; Lee, Chang Hee

    1996-01-01

    The principle subjects of this study are to analyze the technical characteristics of cold neutron source(CNS) and take measures to cope with the matters regarding the installation of CNS facility at HANARO. This report, thus, reviews the current status of the CNS facilities that are now in operation worldwide and classifies the system and equipment to select the appropriate type for HANARO and provides advice and guidance for the future basic and detail design. As we have none of CNS facility here and very few experienced persons yet, this report provides some information for domestic users through the investigation of the utilization fields and experimental facilities of CNS, and presents the estimated total cost for the project based on JRR-3M. In addition, the work scope of the conceptual design, which will be performed in advance of the basic and detail design, and cooperative program with the countries having the advanced technology of CNS is presented in this report. 43 tabs., 57 figs., 22 refs. (Author)

  7. Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex II: Neutron Scattering Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Nakajima

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The neutron instruments suite, installed at the spallation neutron source of the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC, is reviewed. MLF has 23 neutron beam ports and 21 instruments are in operation for user programs or are under commissioning. A unique and challenging instrumental suite in MLF has been realized via combination of a high-performance neutron source, optimized for neutron scattering, and unique instruments using cutting-edge technologies. All instruments are/will serve in world-leading investigations in a broad range of fields, from fundamental physics to industrial applications. In this review, overviews, characteristic features, and typical applications of the individual instruments are mentioned.

  8. Results from the CDE phase activity on neutron dosimetry for the international fusion materials irradiation facility test cell

    CERN Document Server

    Esposito, B; Maruccia, G; Petrizzi, L; Bignon, G; Blandin, C; Chauffriat, S; Lebrun, A; Recroix, H; Trapp, J P; Kaschuck, Y

    2000-01-01

    The international fusion materials irradiation facility (IFMIF) project deals with the study of an accelerator-based, deuterium-lithium source, producing high energy neutrons at sufficient intensity and irradiation volume to test samples of candidate materials for fusion energy reactors. IFMIF would also provide calibration and validation of data from fission reactor and other accelerator based irradiation tests. This paper describes the activity on neutron/gamma dosimetry (necessary for the characterization of the specimens' irradiation) performed in the frame of the IFMIF conceptual design evaluation (CDE) neutronics tasks. During the previous phase (conceptual design activity (CDA)) the multifoil activation method was proposed for the measurement of the neutron fluence and spectrum and a set of suitable foils was defined. The cross section variances and covariances of this set of foils have now been used for tests on the sensitivity of the IFMIF neutron spectrum determination to cross section uncertainties...

  9. Standard operating procedures for quality audits of 60Co external beam radiotherapy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larrinaga Cortina, E.F.; Dominguez Hung, L.; Campa Menendez, R.

    2001-01-01

    The use of radiotherapy implies the necessity of rigorous quality standards in its different components, aimed to provide the best possible treatment and avoid potential patients' risks, that could even cause him death. Projects of technical cooperation developed in Cuba and supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency address the implementation of Programs of Quality Assurance (PGC) in radiotherapy services. The establishment of the National Quality Audit Program (PNAC) is a superior stage. The National Control Center for Medical Devices, as the national regulator entity for the control and supervision of medical devices in the National Health System, is responsible for the making and execution of the PNAC. The audit modality selected was the inspection visit in situ due to its intrinsic advantages, our geographical extension and the number of radiotherapy services. This paper presents the methodology for the execution of the PNAC, in form of a Normalized Procedure of Operation (PNO) that defines the objectives, scope, terms and definitions, responsibilities, composition and selection of the auditor team, security's conditions, materials and equipment, steps of the audit execution, results calculation and interpretation, records, etc. (author)

  10. Comparison of neutron dose measured by Albedo TLD and etched tracks detector at PNC plutonium fuel facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimura, N.; Momose, T.; Shinohara, K.; Ishiguro, H.

    1996-01-01

    Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) has fabricated Plutonium and Uranium Mixed OXide (MOX) fuel for FBR MONJU at Tokai works. In this site, PNC/Panasonic albedo TLDs/1/ are used for personnel neutron monitoring. And a part of workers wore Etched Tracks Detector (ETD) combined with TLD in order to check the accuracy of the neutron dose estimated by albedo TLD. In this paper, the neutron dose measured by TLD and ETD in the routine monitoring is compared at PNC plutonium fuel facilities. (author)

  11. Applicability of the two-angle differential method to response measurement of neutron-sensitive devices at the RCNP high-energy neutron facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuda, Akihiko, E-mail: aki-masuda@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Matsumoto, Tetsuro [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Iwamoto, Yosuke [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirakata, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hagiwara, Masayuki [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Satoh, Daiki; Sato, Tatsuhiko [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirakata, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Iwase, Hiroshi [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Yashima, Hiroshi [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, 2-1010 Asashiro-nishi, Kumatori, Sennan, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Nakane, Yoshihiro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirakata, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Nishiyama, Jun [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Shima, Tatsushi; Tamii, Atsushi; Hatanaka, Kichiji [Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, 10-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Harano, Hideki [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Nakamura, Takashi [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University, 6-3 Aramaki, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan)

    2017-03-21

    Quasi-monoenergetic high-energy neutron fields induced by {sup 7}Li(p,n) reactions are used for the response evaluation of neutron-sensitive devices. The quasi-monoenergetic high-energy field consists of high-energy monoenergetic peak neutrons and unwanted continuum neutrons down to the low-energy region. A two-angle differential method has been developed to compensate for the effect of the continuum neutrons in the response measurements. In this study, the two-angle differential method was demonstrated for Bonner sphere detectors, which are typical examples of moderator-based neutron-sensitive detectors, to investigate the method's applicability and its dependence on detector characteristics. Experiments were performed under 96–387 MeV quasi-monoenergetic high-energy neutron fields at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. The measurement results for large high-density polyethylene (HDPE) sphere detectors agreed well with Monte Carlo calculations, which verified the adequacy of the two-angle differential method. By contrast, discrepancies were observed in the results for small HDPE sphere detectors and metal-induced sphere detectors. The former indicated that detectors that are particularly sensitive to low-energy neutrons may be affected by penetrating neutrons owing to the geometrical features of the RCNP facility. The latter discrepancy could be consistently explained by a problem in the evaluated cross-section data for the metals used in the calculation. Through those discussions, the adequacy of the two-angle differential method was experimentally verified, and practical suggestions were made pertaining to this method.

  12. The design of a multisource americium-beryllium (Am-Be) neutron irradiation facility using MCNP for the neutronic performance calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogbadji, R B M; Abrefah, R G; Nyarko, B J B; Akaho, E H K; Odoi, H C; Attakorah-Birinkorang, S

    2014-08-01

    The americium-beryllium neutron irradiation facility at the National Nuclear Research Institute (NNRI), Ghana, was re-designed with four 20 Ci sources using Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code to investigate the maximum amount of flux that is produced by the combined sources. The results were compared with a single source Am-Be irradiation facility. The main objective was to enable us to harness the maximum amount of flux for the optimization of neutron activation analysis and to enable smaller sample sized samples to be irradiated. Using MCNP for the design construction and neutronic performance calculation, it was realized that the single-source Am-Be design produced a thermal neutron flux of (1.8±0.0007)×10(6) n/cm(2)s and the four-source Am-Be design produced a thermal neutron flux of (5.4±0.0007)×10(6) n/cm(2)s which is a factor of 3.5 fold increase compared to the single-source Am-Be design. The criticality effective, k(eff), of the single-source and the four-source Am-Be designs were found to be 0.00115±0.0008 and 0.00143±0.0008, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Measurements and calculations of neutron spectra and neutron dose distribution in human phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palfalvi, J.

    1984-11-01

    The measurement and calculation of the radiation field around and in a phantom, with regard to the neutron component and the contaminating gamma radiation, are essential for radiation protection and radiotherapy purposes. The final report includes the development of the simple detector system, automized detector measuring facilities and a computerized evaluating system. The results of the depth dose and neutron spectra experiments and calculations in a human phantom are given

  14. Secondary gamma-ray skyshine from 14 MeV Neutron Source Facility (OKTAVIAN). Comparison of measurement with its simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morotomi, Ryutaro; Kondo, Tetsuo; Murata, Isao; Yoshida, Shigeo; Takahashi, Akito [Osaka Univ., Department of Nuclear Engineering, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Yamamoto, Takayoshi [Osaka Univ., Radio Isotope Research Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    Measurement of secondary gamma-ray skyshine was performed at the Intense 14 MeV Neutron Source Facility (OKTAVIAN) of Osaka University with NaI and Hp-Ge detectors. From the result of measurements, some mechanism of secondary gamma-ray skyshine from 14 MeV neutron source facility was found out. The analysis of the measured result were carried out with MCNP-4B for four nuclear data files of JENDL-3.2, JENDL-F.F., FENDL-2, and ENDF/B-VI. It was confirmed that all the nuclear data are fairly reliable for calculations of secondary gamma-ray skyshine. (author)

  15. High-resolution measurements of the DT neutron spectrum using new CD foils in the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatu Johnson, M., E-mail: gatu@psfc.mit.edu; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Séguin, F. H. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Bionta, R. M.; Casey, D. T.; Eckart, M. J.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Sayre, D. B.; Skulina, K.; Yeamans, C. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Farrell, M. P.; Hoppe, M.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Reynolds, H. G.; Schoff, M. E. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility measures the DT neutron spectrum from cryogenically layered inertial confinement fusion implosions. Yield, areal density, apparent ion temperature, and directional fluid flow are inferred from the MRS data. This paper describes recent advances in MRS measurements of the primary peak using new, thinner, reduced-area deuterated plastic (CD) conversion foils. The new foils allow operation of MRS at yields 2 orders of magnitude higher than previously possible, at a resolution down to ∼200 keV FWHM.

  16. Modernization of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to Provide a Cold Neutron Source and Experimentation Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothrock, Benjamin G.; Farrar, Mike B.

    2009-01-01

    In June 1961, construction was started on the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) facility inside the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), at the recommendation of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) Division of Research. Construction was completed in early 1965 with criticality achieved on August 25, 19651. From the first full power operating cycle beginning in September 1966, the HFIR has achieved an outstanding record of service to the scientific community. In early 1995, the ORNL deputy director formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the HFIR following the cancellation of the Advanced Neutron Source Project by DOE. This group indicated that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR to produce cold neutrons for neutron scattering research uses. Cold neutrons have long wavelengths in the range of 4-12 angstroms. Cold neutrons are ideal for research applications with long length-scale molecular structures such as polymers, nanophase materials, and biological samples. These materials require large scale examination (and therefore require a longer wavelength neutron). These materials represent particular areas of science are at the forefront of current research initiatives that have a potentially significant impact on the materials we use in our everyday lives and our knowledge of biology and medicine. This paper discusses the installation of a cold neutron source at HFIR with respect to the project as a modernization of the facility. The paper focuses on why the project was required, the scope of the cold source project with specific emphasis on the design, and project management information.

  17. Neutron dose rate at the SwissFEL injector test facility: first measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohmann, E.; Frey, N.; Fuchs, A.; Harm, C.; Hoedlmoser, H.; Luescher, R.; Mayer, S.; Morath, O.; Philipp, R.; Rehmann, A.; Schietinger, T.

    2014-01-01

    At the Paul Scherrer Institute, the new SwissFEL Free Electron Laser facility is currently in the design phase. It is foreseen to accelerate electrons up to a maximum energy of 7 GeV with a pulsed time structure. An injector test facility is operated at a maximum energy of 300 MeV and serves as the principal test and demonstration plant for the SwissFEL project. Secondary radiation is created in unavoidable interactions of the primary beam with beamline components. The resulting ambient dose-equivalent rate due to neutrons was measured along the beamline with different commercially available survey instruments. The present study compares the readings of these neutron detectors (one of them is specifically designed for measurements in pulsed fields). The experiments were carried out in both, a normal and a diagnostic mode of operation of the injector. Measurements were taken at the SwissFEL injector test facility using three different types of commercially available survey instruments for normal and diagnostic mode of operation at different positions inside the accelerator vault. During normal operation, the doses indicated by the different instruments agree within the measurement uncertainty except for the beam dump region. There, due to its limited energy range and high sensitivity, the LB6411 shows significantly lower dose values than the other instruments. The photon background in the vault associated with each pulse causes the scintillator used by the LB6419 to saturate. As a result, only the channel using the delayed 12 C(n,p)12-reaction could be used during the measurements. The highest doses per pulse were measured next to the beam dump and the bunch compressor. For the optimisation of the accelerator, luminescent screens can be inserted into the beam path causing a dose distributed over several metres depending on the screen type. The dose arise to 40 % from neutrons with energies of >20 MeV. Although the charge of each pulse were reduced to decrease

  18. Integrated doses calculation in evacuation scenarios of the neutron generator facility at Missouri S&T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Manish K.; Alajo, Ayodeji B., E-mail: alajoa@mst.edu

    2016-08-11

    Any source of ionizing radiations could lead to considerable dose acquisition to individuals in a nuclear facility. Evacuation may be required when elevated levels of radiation is detected within a facility. In this situation, individuals are more likely to take the closest exit. This may not be the most expedient decision as it may lead to higher dose acquisition. The strategy followed in preventing large dose acquisitions should be predicated on the path that offers least dose acquisition. In this work, the neutron generator facility at Missouri University of Science and Technology was analyzed. The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code was used to model the entire floor of the generator's building. The simulated dose rates in the hallways were used to estimate the integrated doses for different paths leading to exits. It was shown that shortest path did not always lead to minimum dose acquisition and the approach was successful in predicting the expedient path as opposed to the approach of taking the nearest exit.

  19. Application of the INS facility as a high-flux benchmark for neutron dosimetry and for radiation damage studies in D--T fusion spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dierckx, R.; Emigh, C.R.

    1977-01-01

    An Intense Neutron Source facility (INS), is presently under construction at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. This facility is being built by the Energy Research and Development Administration for the radiation damage program in magnetic fusion energy. The facility will contain two D-T neutron sources, both producing about 10 15 primary 14-MeV neutrons per second on a continuous basis. One source will be used to produce a ''pure'' 14-MeV spectrum while the other will be surrounded by a multiplying blanket converter to produce a fusion-like spectrum with a total of about 10 16 neutrons per second

  20. The Proton Beams for the New Time-of-Flight Neutron Facility at the CERN-PS

    CERN Document Server

    Cappi, R; Métral, G

    2000-01-01

    The experimental determination of neutron cross sections in fission and capture reactions as a function of the neutron energy is of primary importance in nuclear physics. Recent developments at CERN and elsewhere have shown that many fields of research and development, such as the design of Accelerator-Driven Systems (ADS) for nuclear waste incineration, nuclear astrophysics, fundamental nuclear physics, dosimetry for radiological protection and therapy, would benefit from a better knowledge of neutron cross sections. A neutron facility at the CERN-PS has been proposed with the aim of carrying out a systematic and high resolution study of neutron cross sections through Time-Of-Flight (n-TOF) measurement. The facility requires a high intensity proton beam (about 0.7x1013 particles/bunch) distributed in a short bunch (about 25 ns total length) to produce the neutrons by means of a spallation process in a lead target. To achieve these characteristics, a number of complex beam gymnastics have to be performed. All...

  1. Characterisation of the IRSN CANEL/T400 facility producing realistic neutron fields for calibration and test purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gressier, V.; Lacoste, V.; Lebreton, L.; Muller, H.; Pelcot, G.; Bakali, M.; Fernandez, F.; Tomas, M.; Roberts, N. J.; Thomas, D. J.; Reginatto, M.; Wiegel, B.; Wittstock, J.

    2004-01-01

    The new CANEL/T400 facility has been set-up at the Inst. for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) to produce a realistic neutron field. The accurate characterisation of this neutron field is mandatory since this facility will be used as a reference neutron source. For this reason an international measuring campaign, involving four laboratories with extensive expertise in neutron metrology and spectrometry, was organised through a concerted EUROMET project. Measurements were performed with Bonner sphere (BS) systems to determine the energy distribution of the emitted neutrons over the whole energy range (from thermal energy up to a few MeV). Additional measurements were performed with proton recoil detectors to provide detailed information in the energy region above 90 keV. The results obtained by the four laboratories are in agreement with each other and are compared with a calculation performed with the MCNP4C Monte-Carlo code. As a conclusion of this exercise, a reliable characterisation of the CANEL/T400 neutron field is obtained. (authors)

  2. Simulation of a high energy neutron irradiation facility at beamline 11 of the China Spallation Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tairan, Liang [School of Physics and Electronic Information Inner Mongolia University for the Nationalities, Tongliao 028043 (China); Zhiduo, Li [Dongguan Branch, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Wen, Yin, E-mail: wenyin@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [Dongguan Branch, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Institute of Physics, CAS, P.O. Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China); Fei, Shen [Dongguan Branch, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Quanzhi, Yu [Dongguan Branch, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Institute of Physics, CAS, P.O. Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China); Tianjiao, Liang [Dongguan Branch, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2017-07-11

    The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) will accommodate 20 neutron beamlines at its first target station. These beamlines serve different purposes, and beamline 11 is designed to analyze the degraded models and damage mechanisms, such as Single Event Effects in electronic components and devices for aerospace electronic systems. This paper gives a preliminary discussion on the scheme of a high energy neutron irradiation experiment at the beamline 11 shutter based on the Monte Carlo simulation method. The neutron source term is generated by calculating the neutrons scattering into beamline 11 with a model that includes the target-moderator-reflector area. Then, the neutron spectrum at the sample position is obtained. The intensity of neutrons with energy of hundreds of MeV is approximately 1E8 neutron/cm{sup 2}/s, which is useful for experiments. The displacement production rate and gas productions are calculated for common materials such as tungsten, tantalum and SS316. The results indicate that the experiment can provide irradiation dose rate ranges from 1E-5 to 1E-4 dpa per operating year. The residual radioactivity is also calculated for regular maintenance work. These results give the basic reference for the experimental design.

  3. Rationale for a spallation neutron source target system test facility at the 1-MW Long-Pulse Spallation Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, W.F.

    1995-12-01

    The conceptual design study for a 1-MW Long-Pulse Spallation Source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center has shown the feasibility of including a spallation neutron test facility at a relatively low cost. This document presents a rationale for developing such a test bed. Currently, neutron scattering facilities operate at a maximum power of 0.2 MW. Proposed new designs call for power levels as high as 10 MW, and future transmutation activities may require as much as 200 MW. A test bed will allow assessment of target neutronics; thermal hydraulics; remote handling; mechanical structure; corrosion in aqueous, non-aqueous, liquid metal, and molten salt systems; thermal shock on systems and system components; and materials for target systems. Reliable data in these areas are crucial to the safe and reliable operation of new high-power facilities. These tests will provide data useful not only to spallation neutron sources proposed or under development, but also to other projects in accelerator-driven transmutation technologies such as the production of tritium

  4. Validation of neutron-transport calculations in benchmark facilities for improved damage-fluence predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.L.; Stallmann, F.W.; Maerker, R.E.; Kam, F.B.K.

    1983-01-01

    An accurate determination of damage fluence accumulated by reactor pressure vessels (RPV) as a function of time is essential in order to evaluate the vessel integrity for both pressurized thermal shock (PTS) transients and end-of-life considerations. The desired accuracy for neutron exposure parameters such as displacements per atom or fluence (E > 1 MeV) is of the order of 20 to 30%. However, these types of accuracies can only be obtained realistically by validation of nuclear data and calculational methods in benchmark facilities. The purposes of this paper are to review the needs and requirements for benchmark experiments, to discuss the status of current benchmark experiments, to summarize results and conclusions obtained so far, and to suggest areas where further benchmarking is needed

  5. A Large Neutrino Detector Facility at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efremenko, Y.V.

    1999-01-01

    The ORLaND (Oak Ridge Large Neutrino Detector) collaboration proposes to construct a large neutrino detector in an underground experimental hall adjacent to the first target station of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The main mission of a large (2000 ton) Scintillation-Cherenkov detector is to measure bar ν μ -> bar ν e neutrino oscillation parameters more accurately than they can be determined in other experiments, or significantly extending the covered parameter space below (sin'20 le 10 -4 ). In addition to the neutrino oscillation measurements, ORLaND would be capable of making precise measurements of sin 2 θ W , search for the magnetic moment of the muon neutrino, and investigate the anomaly in the KARMEN time spectrum, which has been attributed to a new neutral particle. With the same facility an extensive program of measurements of neutrino nucleus cross sections is also planned to support nuclear astrophysics

  6. Experimental neutron capture data of $^{58}$Ni from the CERN n_TOF facility

    CERN Document Server

    Žugec, P.; Colonna, N.; Bosnar, D.; Altstadt, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Bécares, V.; Bečvář, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Billowes, J.; Boccone, V.; Brugger, M.; Calviani, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Carrapiço, C.; Cerutti, F.; Chiaveri, E.; Chin, M.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M.A.; Diakaki, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Duran, I.; Dzysiuk, N.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Ferrari, A.; Fraval, K.; Ganesan, S.; García, A.R.; Giubrone, G.; Gómez-Hornillos, M.B.; Gonçalves, I.F.; González-Romero, E.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Gurusamy, P.; Jenkins, D.G.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Käppeler, F.; Karadimos, D.; Koehler, P.; Kokkoris, M.; Krtička, M.; Kroll, J.; Langer, C.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Leong, L.S.; Losito, R.; Manousos, A.; Marganiec, J.; Martìnez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.F.; Mastromarco, M.; Meaze, M.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P.M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Mondalaers, W.; Paradela, C.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Pignatari, M.; Plompen, A.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J.M.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego, A.; Roman, F.; Rubbia, C.; Sarmento, R.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J.L.; Tarrío, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Versaci, R.; Vermeulen, M.J.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Ware, T.; Weigand, M.; Weiß, C.; Wright, T.

    2013-01-01

    The $^{58}$Ni $(n,\\gamma)$ cross section has been measured at the neutron time of flight facility n_TOF at CERN, in the energy range from 27 meV up to 400 keV. In total, 51 resonances have been analyzed up to 122 keV. Maxwellian averaged cross sections (MACS) have been calculated for stellar temperatures of kT$=$5-100 keV with uncertainties of less than 6%, showing fair agreement with recent experimental and evaluated data up to kT = 50 keV. The MACS extracted in the present work at 30 keV is 34.2$\\pm$0.6$_\\mathrm{stat}\\pm$1.8$_\\mathrm{sys}$ mb, in agreement with latest results and evaluations, but 12% lower relative to the recent KADoNIS compilation of astrophysical cross sections. When included in models of the s-process nucleosynthesis in massive stars, this change results in a 60% increase of the abundance of $^{58}$Ni, with a negligible propagation on heavier isotopes. The reason is that, using both the old or the new MACS, 58Ni is efficiently depleted by neutron captures.

  7. Conceptual design of facilities and systems for cold neutron source in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. K.; Jung, H. S.; Wu, S. I.; Ahn, S. H.; Park, Y. C.; Cho, Y. G.; Ryu, J. S.; Kim, Y. J.

    2004-05-01

    The systems and facilities for the HANARO cold neutron source consist of hydrogen handling system, vacuum system, gas blanket system, helium refrigeration system and electrical and instrumentation and control system. The overriding safety goal in the system design is to prevent the escape of hydrogen from the system boundary or the ingress of air into the hydrogen boundary. Of primary concern is the release of hydrogen (or intrusion of oxygen) into an area where any subsequent reaction could possibly result in damage to the reactor building or safety systems or components, as well as jeopardize personnel safety. It has been an general rule that all aspects of the system design were based on the demonstrated technology of long standing world-wide. In some cases, other options are also suggested for the flexibility of independent review process. This report hopefully serves as basis for the coming detail design and engineering. This report is mainly concentrated on the conceptual system design performed during the first project year. It includes the key safety design requirements in the beginning, followed by the description of the preliminary system design. At the rear part, building layout and equipment arrangement are briefly introduced for easy understanding of the whole pictures. The design status for the In-Pool Assembly including safety analysis and neutron guide and instruments will be discussed in another report

  8. Nuclear Rocket Facility Decommissioning Project: Controlled Explosive Demolition of Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael R, Kruzic

    2008-01-01

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the Test Cell A (TCA) Facility (Figure 1) was used in the early to mid-1960s for testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program, to further space travel. Nuclear rocket testing resulted in the activation of materials around the reactors and the release of fission products and fuel particles. The TCA facility, known as Corrective Action Unit 115, was decontaminated and decommissioned (D and D) from December 2004 to July 2005 using the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The SAFER process allows environmental remediation and facility closure activities (i.e., decommissioning) to occur simultaneously, provided technical decisions are made by an experienced decision maker within the site conceptual site model. Facility closure involved a seven-step decommissioning strategy. First, preliminary investigation activities were performed, including review of process knowledge documentation, targeted facility radiological and hazardous material surveys, concrete core drilling and analysis, shield wall radiological characterization, and discrete sampling, which proved to be very useful and cost-effective in subsequent decommissioning planning and execution and worker safety. Second, site setup and mobilization of equipment and personnel were completed. Third, early removal of hazardous materials, including asbestos, lead, cadmium, and oil, was performed ensuring worker safety during more invasive demolition activities. Process piping was to be verified void of contents. Electrical systems were de-energized and other systems were rendered free of residual energy. Fourth, areas of high radiological contamination were decontaminated using multiple methods. Contamination levels varied across the facility. Fixed beta/gamma contamination levels ranged up to 2 million disintegrations per minute (dpm)/100

  9. Nuclear Rocket Facility Decommissioning Project: Controlled Explosive Demolition of Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael R. Kruzic

    2008-06-01

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the Test Cell A (TCA) Facility (Figure 1) was used in the early to mid-1960s for testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program, to further space travel. Nuclear rocket testing resulted in the activation of materials around the reactors and the release of fission products and fuel particles. The TCA facility, known as Corrective Action Unit 115, was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) from December 2004 to July 2005 using the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The SAFER process allows environmental remediation and facility closure activities (i.e., decommissioning) to occur simultaneously, provided technical decisions are made by an experienced decision maker within the site conceptual site model. Facility closure involved a seven-step decommissioning strategy. First, preliminary investigation activities were performed, including review of process knowledge documentation, targeted facility radiological and hazardous material surveys, concrete core drilling and analysis, shield wall radiological characterization, and discrete sampling, which proved to be very useful and cost-effective in subsequent decommissioning planning and execution and worker safety. Second, site setup and mobilization of equipment and personnel were completed. Third, early removal of hazardous materials, including asbestos, lead, cadmium, and oil, was performed ensuring worker safety during more invasive demolition activities. Process piping was to be verified void of contents. Electrical systems were de-energized and other systems were rendered free of residual energy. Fourth, areas of high radiological contamination were decontaminated using multiple methods. Contamination levels varied across the facility. Fixed beta/gamma contamination levels ranged up to 2 million disintegrations per minute (dpm)/100

  10. Neutronics analysis of the TRIGA Mark II reactor core and its experimental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, R.

    2010-01-01

    core into a complete mixed core. To analyze the current core, a good knowledge of burned fuel material composition is essential. Because of the complications of experimental methods for measuring each FE, the ORIGEN2 computer code is selected for burn up and relevant material composition calculation. These calculations are verified by measuring the Cesium isotope (Cs-137) for six spent FE(s). Modifying the confirmed ORIGEN2 model for 104 and 110 (FLIP) FE(s), the burn up calculations of all 83 FE(s) of the current core are completed and applied to the already developed MCNP model. The detailed MCNP model of the burned core is verified by three local consistent experiments performed in June 2009. The criticality experiment confirms the model that the current core achieves its criticality on addition of 78th FE. The five FE(s) from different ring positions are measured to confirm the theoretical results. The percent deviation between MCNP predictions and experimental observations ranges from 3 to 19 %. The radial and axial neutron flux density distribution experiment verifies the MCNP theoretical results in the core. The theoretical and experimental perturbation study in the Central Irradiation Channel (CIR) of the core is performed. The reactivity effect of three small cylindrical samples (void, Cadmium and heavy water) are measured and compared with the MCNP predictions for verification. Applying the current core MCNP model, the void coefficient of reactivity is calculated as 11 cents per %-void. To perform the calculation in the experimental facilities outside the reactor core, the MCNP model is extended to the thermal column, radiographic collimator, four beam tubes and biological shielding. The MCNP results are verified in the thermal column and the beam tube A region. The percent difference between the simulated and experimental neutron diffusion length is 13 %. (author) [de

  11. Characterization of the neutron field at the ISIS-VESUVIO facility by means of a bonner sphere spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedogni, Roberto; Esposito, Adolfo; Andreani, Carla; Senesi, Roberto; De Pascale, Maria Pia; Picozza, Piergiorgio; Pietropaolo, Antonino; Gorini, Giuseppe; Frost, Christopher D.; Ansell, Stewart

    2009-12-01

    One of the more actual and promising fields of applied neutron physics is the investigation of the malfunctions induced by high-energy neutrons naturally present in the atmosphere in electronic devices, called single event effects (SEE). These studies are of primary importance for the design of devices that have to fulfill high reliability requirements and those that are likely to be exposed to enhanced levels of cosmic rays background, e.g. in aerospace and avionic applications. Particle accelerators-driven neutron sources constitute valuable irradiation facilities for these purposes as they provide an opportunity for accelerated testing of the effects of these naturally occurring neutrons, provided the neutron spectrum is comparable with the atmospheric one and the neutron fields are known with high accuracy. The latter can be achieved through the use of appropriate radiation transport codes and neutron spectrometry techniques. In view of the design and construction of CHIPIR, a dedicated beam line for SEE studies at the ISIS pulsed neutron source second target station (UK) [1] ( http://ts-2.isis.rl.ac.uk/instruments/phase2/index.htm), a spectrometric characterization was performed on the VESUVIO beamline [2] (Senesi et al.,2000). The spectrometric technique was the bonner sphere spectrometer (BSS), widely used to determine neutron spectra and dose quantities around high-energy accelerators. The experimental campaign provided a complete spectrometric investigation of the VESUVIO neutron beam, allowing the integral quantities (total fluence rate, fraction of fluence in given energy intervals) to be estimated with uncertainties lower than 10%.

  12. Fission reactor based epithermal neutron irradiation facilities for routine clinical application in BNCT-Hatanaka memorial lecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harling, Otto K.

    2009-01-01

    Based on experience gained in the recent clinical studies at MIT/Harvard, the desirable characteristics of epithermal neutron irradiation facilities for eventual routine clinical BNCT are suggested. A discussion of two approaches to using fission reactors for epithermal neutron BNCT is provided. This is followed by specific suggestions for the performance and features needed for high throughput clinical BNCT. An example of a current state-of-the-art, reactor based facility, suited for routine clinical use is discussed. Some comments are provided on the current status of reactor versus accelerator based epithermal neutron sources for BNCT. This paper concludes with a summary and a few personal observations on BNCT by the author.

  13. Optimization of a neutron detector system for the fourier RTOF-diffractometer facility at the ETRR-1 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maayouf, R M.A.; El-Kady, A S.I.; El-Shaer, Y H [Reactor and Neutron physics Dept., NRC, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1997-12-31

    This work deals with optimization of a detector system for use with the fourier reverse time of flight (RTOF) diffractometer facility recently installed at the ETRR-1 reactor. The detector system of the diffractometer was designed for detecting neutrons scattered from the sample. It consists of 4 independent scintillation detector elements arranged according to the time focusing geometry in order to increase the luminosity of the diffractometer for the given resolution. Each of the detector elements is made of 1 mm thick {sup 6} Li-glass scintillator (NE-912) whose surface area is 200 mm{sup 2}. The present detector system ensures reliable identification and separation of thermal neutron pulses from fast neutrons and gamma- quanta. It was found from measurements with Fe sample that it is possible to make neutron diffraction measurement, within one hour using the present detector system and with resultion 0.5%. 6 FIGS.

  14. Measurement of the tissue to A-150 tissue equivalent plastic kerma ratio at two p(66)Be neutron therapy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langen, K M; Binns, P J; Schreuder, A N; Lennox, A J; Deluca, P M Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The ICRU tissue to A-150 tissue equivalent plastic kerma ratio is needed for neutron therapy dosimetry. The current ICRU protocol for neutron dosimetry recommends using a common conversion factor of 0.95 at all high-energy neutron therapy facilities. In an effort to determine facility specific ICRU tissue to A-150 plastic kerma ratios, an experimental approach was pursued. Four low pressure proportional counters that differed in wall materials (i.e. A-150, carbon, zirconium and zirconium-oxide) were used as dosimeters and integral kerma ratios were determined directly in the clinical beam. Measurements were performed at two p(66)Be facilities: iThemba LABS near Cape Town and Fermilab near Chicago. At the iThemba facility the clinical neutron beam is routinely filtered by a flattening and hardening filter combination. The influence of beam filtration on the kerma ratio was evaluated. Using two recent gas-to-wall dose conversion factor (r m,g value) evaluations a mean ICRU tissue to A-150 plastic kerma ratio of 0.93 ± 0.05 was determined for the clinical beam at iThemba LABS. The respective value for the Fermilab beam is 0.95 ± 0.05. The experimentally determined ICRU tissue to A-150 plastic kerma ratios for the two clinical beams are in agreement with theoretical evaluations. Beam filtration reduces the kerma ratio by 3 ± 2%

  15. Near term, low cost, 14 MeV fusion neutron irradiation facility for testing the viability of fusion structural materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulcinski, Gerald L., E-mail: glkulcin@wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Radel, Ross F. [Phoenix Nuclear Labs LLC, Monona, WI (United States); Davis, Andrew [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-11-01

    For over 50 years, engineers have been looking for an irradiation facility that can provide a fusion reactor appropriate neutron spectrum over a significant volume to test fusion reactor materials that is relatively inexpensive and can be built in a minimum of time. The 14 MeV neutron irradiation facility described here can nearly exactly duplicate the neutron spectrum typical of a DT fusion reactor first wall at damage rates of ≈4 displacements per atom and 40 appm He generated over a 2 l volume per full power year of operation. The projected cost of this multi-beam facility is estimated at ≈$20 million and it can be built in <4 years. A single-beam prototype, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, is already being built to produce medical isotopes. The neutrons are produced by a 300 keV deuterium beam accelerated into 4 kPa (30 Torr) tritium target. The total tritium inventory is <2 g and <0.1 g of T{sub 2} is consumed per year. The core technology proposed has already been fully demonstrated, and no new plasma physics or materials innovations will be required for the test facility to become operational.

  16. External Auditing on Absorbed Dose Using a Solid Water Phantom for Domestic Radiotherapy Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Chang Heon; Kim, Jung In; Park, Jong Min; Park, Yang Kyun; Ye, Sung Joon [Medical Research Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kun Woo; Cho, Woon Kap [Radiation Research, Korean Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Chun Il [Korea Food and Drug Administration, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    We report the results of an external audit on the absorbed dose of radiotherapy beams independently performed by third parties. For this effort, we developed a method to measure the absorbed dose to water in an easy and convenient setup of solid water phantom. In 2008, 12 radiotherapy centers voluntarily participated in the external auditing program and 47 beams of X-ray and electron were independently calibrated by the third party's American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) task group (TG)-51 protocol. Even though the AAPM TG-51 protocol recommended the use of water, water as a phantom has a few disadvantages, especially in a busy clinic. Instead, we used solid water phantom due to its reproducibility and convenience in terms of setup and transport. Dose conversion factors between solid water and water were determined for photon and electron beams of various energies by using a scaling method and experimental measurements. Most of the beams (74%) were within {+-}2% of the deviation from the third party's protocol. However, two of 20 X-ray beams and three of 27 electron beams were out of the tolerance ({+-}3%), including two beams with a >10% deviation. X-ray beams of higher than 6 MV had no conversion factors, while a 6 MV absorbed dose to a solid water phantom was 0.4% less than the dose to water. The electron dose conversion factors between the solid water phantom and water were determined: The higher the electron energy, the less is the conversion factor. The total uncertainty of the TG-51 protocol measurement using a solid water phantom was determined to be {+-}1.5%. The developed method was successfully applied for the external auditing program, which could be evolved into a credential program of multi-institutional clinical trials. This dosimetry saved time for measuring doses as well as decreased the uncertainty of measurement possibly resulting from the reference setup in water.

  17. Neutronics analysis of the conceptual design of a component test facility based on the spherical tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, S.; Voss, G.M.; Pampin, R.

    2010-01-01

    One of the crucial aspects of fusion research is the optimisation and qualification of suitable materials and components. To enable the design and construction of DEMO in the future, ITER is taken to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility and IFMIF will provide rigorous testing of small material samples. Meanwhile, a dedicated, small-scale components testing facility (CTF) is proposed to complement and extend the functions of ITER and IFMIF and operate in association with DEMO so as to reduce the risk of delays during this phase of fusion power development. The design of a spherical tokamak (ST)-based CTF is being developed which offers many advantages over conventional machines, including lower tritium consumption, easier maintenance, and a compact assembly. The neutronics analysis of this system is presented here. Based on a three-dimensional neutronics model generated by the interface programme MCAM from CAD models, a series of nuclear and radiation protection analyses were carried out using the MCNP code and FENDL2.1 nuclear data library to assess the current design and guide its development if needed. The nuclear analyses addresses key neutronics issues such as the neutron wall loading (NWL) profile, nuclear heat loads, and radiation damage to the coil insulation and to structural components, particularly the stainless steel vessel wall close to the NBI ports where shielding is limited. The shielding of the divertor coil and the internal Poloidal Field (PF) coil, which is introduced in the expanded divertor design, are optimised to reduce their radiation damage. The preliminary results show that the peak radiation damage to the structure of martensitic/ferritic steel is about 29 dpa at the mid-plane assuming a life of 12 years at a duty factor 33%, which is much lower than its ∼150 dpa limit. In addition, TBMs installed in 8 mid-plane ports and 6 lower ports, and 60% 6 Li enrichment in the Li 4 SiO 4 breeder, the total tritium generation is

  18. Options for a next generation neutron source for neutron scattering based on the projected linac facility at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezei, F.; Watanabe, Noboru; Niimura, Nobuo; Morii, Yukio; Aizawa, Kazuya; Suzuki, Jun-ichi.

    1997-03-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has a project to construct a high intensity proton accelerator to promote wide basic science using neutrons and nuclear power technologies such as radioactive nuclide transmutation. One of the most important field for utilization of neutron beam is neutron scattering. The energy and the averaged current obtained by the proton accelerator are 1.5 GeV and 4-5.3 mA, respectively and these provide 6-8 MW power. The repetition frequency is 50-60 Hz. Evaluation of options for the use of accelerators for neutron production for neutron scattering research and investigation of the neutron research opportunities offered by sharing the superconducting linac planned at JAERI were discussed. There are two ways of the utilization of proton beams for neutron scattering experiment. One is for long pulse spallation source (LPSS) and the other is for short pulse spallation source (SPSS). Quantitative evaluation of instrument performance with LPSS and SPSS was examined in the intensive discussion, calculations, workshop on this topics with Prof. F. Mezei who stayed at JAERI from October 24 to November 6, 1996. A report of the collaborative workshop will be also published separately. (author)

  19. Implosion anisotropy of neutron kinetic energy distributions as measured with the neutron time-of-flight diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartouni, Edward; Eckart, Mark; Field, John; Grim, Gary; Hatarik, Robert; Moore, Alastair; Munro, David; Sayer, Daniel; Schlossberg, David

    2017-10-01

    Neutron kinetic energy distributions from fusion reactions are characterized predominantly by the excess energy, Q, of the fusion reaction and the variance of kinetic energy which is related to the thermal temperature of the plasma as shown by e.g. Brysk. High statistics, high quality neutron time-of-flight spectra obtained at the National Ignition Facility provide a means of measuring small changes to the neutron kinetic energy due to the spatial and temporal distribution of plasma temperature, density and velocity. The modifications to the neutron kinetic energy distribution as described by Munro include plasma velocity terms with spatial orientation, suggesting that the neutron kinetic energy distributions could be anisotropic when viewed by multiple lines-of-sight. These anisotropies provide a diagnostic of burn averaged plasma velocity distributions. We present the results of measurements made for a variety of DT implosions and discuss their possible physical interpretations. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC.

  20. Microdosimetric measurements in the thermal neutron irradiation facility of LENA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colautti, P.; Moro, D.; Chiriotti, S.; Conte, V.; Evangelista, L.; Altieri, S.; Bortolussi, S.; Protti, N.; Postuma, I.

    2014-01-01

    A twin TEPC with electric-field guard tubes has been constructed to be used to characterize the BNCT field of the irradiation facility of LENA reactor. One of the two mini TEPC was doped with 50 ppm of 10 B in order to simulate the BNC events occurring in BNCT. By properly processing the two microdosimetric spectra, the gamma, neutron and BNC spectral components can be derived with good precision (∼6%). However, direct measurements of 10 B in some doped plastic samples, which were used for constructing the cathode walls, point out the scarce accuracy of the nominal 10 B concentration value. The influence of the Boral ® door, which closes the irradiation channel, has been measured. The gamma dose increases significantly (+51%) when the Boral ® door is closed. The crypt-cell-regeneration weighting function has been used to measure the quality, namely the RBE µ value, of the radiation field in different conditions. The measured RBE µ values are only partially consistent with the RBE values of other BNCT facilities. - Highlights: • A counter with two mini TEPCs, both equipped with electrical-field guard tubes, has been constructed. • The microdosimetric spectrum of the LENA-reactor irradiation vane has been studied. • The radiation-field quality (RBE) assessment confirms that the D n /D tot ratio is not an accurate parameter to characterize the BNCT radiation field

  1. Advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) for 2-nd generation carbon radiotherapy facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Shornikov, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we analyze how advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) can facilitate the progress of carbon therapy facilities. We will demonstrate that advanced ion sources enable operation of 2-nd generation ion beam therapy (IBT) accelerators. These new accelerator concepts with designs dedicated to IBT provide beams better suited for therapy and, are more cost efficient than contemporary IBT facilities. We will give a sort overview of the existing new IBT concepts and focus on those where ion source technology is the limiting factor. We will analyse whether this limitation can be overcome in the near future thanks to ongoing EBIS development.

  2. A comparison of MCNP6-1.0 and GEANT 4-10.1 when evaluating the neutron output of a complex real world nuclear environment: The thermal neutron facility at the Tri Universities Meson facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monk, S.D., E-mail: s.monk@lancaster.ac.uk [Department of Engineering, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YW (United Kingdom); Shippen, B.A. [Department of Engineering, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YW (United Kingdom); Colling, B.R. [Department of Engineering, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YW (United Kingdom); Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Cheneler, D.; Al Hamrashdi, H.; Alton, T. [Department of Engineering, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YW (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Comparison of the use of MCNP6 and GEANT4 Monte Carlo software when large distances and thicknesses are considered. • The Thermal Neutron Facility (TNF) at TRIUMF used as an example real life example location. • The effects of water, aluminium, iron and lead considered over various thicknesses up to 3 m. - Abstract: A comparison of the Monte Carlo based simulation codes MCNP6-1.0 and GEANT4-10.1 as used for modelling large scale structures is presented here. The high-energy neutron field at the Tri Universities Meson Facility (TRIUMF) in Vancouver, British Columbia is the structure modelled in this work. Work with the emphasis on the modelling of the facility and comparing with experimental results has been published previously, whereas this work is focussed on comparing the performance of the codes over relatively high depths of material rather than the accuracy of the results themselves in comparison to experimental data. Comparisons of three different locations within the neutron facility are modelled and presented using both codes as well as analysis of the transport of typical neutrons fields through large blocks of iron, water, lead and aluminium in order to determine where any deviations are likely to have occurred. Results indicate that over short distances, results from the two codes are in broad agreement – although over greater distances and within more complex geometries, deviation increases dramatically. The conclusions reached are that it is likely the deviations between the codes is caused by both the compounding effect of slight differences between the cross section files used by the two codes to determine the neutron transport through iron, and differences in the processes used by both codes.

  3. Characteristics of the neutron and X-ray tomography system at the SANRAD facility in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beer, F.C. de

    2005-01-01

    Through collaboration with the NEUTRA-facility at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Switzerland, a turnkey tomography system was designed specifically for the beam geometry at the South African Neutron Radiography (SANRAD) facility, located on the beam port floor of the SAFARI-1 nuclear research reactor and operated by Necsa. The new system is currently being extensively utilized in both 2D and 3D mode for various applications in general industry and institutional activities. The basic performance characteristics of its 3D tomography capability in a neutron and X-ray configuration are presented with the aid of several case studies. An X-ray source has also been commissioned to further diversify the capabilities of the facility

  4. Characterization of the new neutron imaging and materials science facility IMAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minniti, Triestino; Watanabe, Kenichi; Burca, Genoveva; Pooley, Daniel E.; Kockelmann, Winfried

    2018-04-01

    IMAT is a new cold neutron imaging and diffraction instrument located at the second target station of the pulsed neutron spallation source ISIS, UK. A broad range of materials science and materials testing areas will be covered by IMAT. We present the characterization of the imaging part, including the energy-selective and energy-dispersive imaging options, and provide the basic parameters of the radiography and tomography instrument. In particular, detailed studies on mono and bi-dimensional neutron beam flux profiles, neutron flux as a function of the neutron wavelength, spatial and energy dependent neutron beam uniformities, guide artifacts, divergence and spatial resolution, and neutron pulse widths are provided. An accurate characterization of the neutron beam at the sample position, located 56 m from the source, is required to optimize collection of radiographic and tomographic data sets and for performing energy-dispersive neutron imaging via time-of-flight methods in particular.

  5. Development of Data Acquisition and Control Software for Neutron Radiography Facility at Serpong, Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bharoto

    2013-01-01

    A system for data acquisition and control software for the neutron radiography facility at Serpong has been developed. The software was developed to replace the previously existing control software which was no longer used due to problems on its computer hardware. Visual Basic running under Microsoft Windows operating system was used in developing the new software. In the hardware side, the film grabber and the motor driver were replaced. In the new system, the film grabber which was used to capture the image in the old system is replaced with a programmable CCD camera. The motor driver which was used to control the camera in two directions has been replaced with a four-direction motor driver. The software is capable of displaying the images in a real time mode and record the images in the hard disk of a personal computer. To obtain optimal image quality, the software processes the captured images by performing temperature adjustment, camera exposure time adjustment, and integration of the captured image in a certain frame numbers. The software is capable of taking a number of snapshots at a certain time interval. For neutron tomography purposes, the software takes the snapshots automatically at a sample position in line with the stepping movement of the rotating sample table. The snapshots were saved in a picture format and a numeric format for further processing. The software has been successfully tested for real time method and tomography reconstruction. The data captured by using this software has been verified using both commercial and in-house computed tomography software. (author)

  6. Calibration of A Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) Facility: Experience at the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norlida Yussup

    2011-01-01

    A prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) facility at Oregon State University (OSU) TRIGA reactor has been built in year 2008 and been operated since then. PGNAA is a technique used to determine the presence and quantity of trace elements such as boron, hydrogen and carbon which are more difficult to detect with other neutron analysis method. A calibration is essential to ensure the system works as required and the output is valid and reliable. The calibration was carried out by using Standard Reference Material (SRM). Besides, background data was also acquired for comparisons and analysis. The results are analyzed and discussed in this paper. (author)

  7. Collaborative Physical and Biological Dosimetry Studies for Neutron Capture Therapy at the RA-1 Research Reactor Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David W. Nigg; Amanda E. Schwint; John K. Hartwell; Elisa M. Heber; Veronica Trivillin; Jorge Castillo; Luis Wentzeis; Patrick Sloan; Charles A. Wemple

    2004-10-01

    Initial physical dosimetry measurements have been completed using activation spectrometry and thermoluminiscent dosimeters to characterize the BNCT irradiation facility developed at the RA-1 research reactor operated by the Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission in Buenos Aires. Some biological scoping irradiations have also been completed using a small-animal (hamster) oral mucosa tumor model. Results indicate that the RA-1 neutron source produces useful dose rates but that some improvements in the initial configuration will be needed to optimize the spectrum for thermal-neutron BNCT research applications.

  8. Collaborative Physical and Biological Dosimetry Studies for Neutron Capture Therapy at the RA-1 Research Reactor Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigg, D.W.; Schwint, A.E.; Hartwell, J.K.; Heber, E.M.; Trivillin, V.; Castillo, J.; Wentzeis, L.; Sloan, P.; Wemple, C.A.

    2004-10-04

    Initial physical dosimetry measurements have been completed using activation spectrometry and thermoluminiscent dosimeters to characterize the BNCT irradiation facility developed at the RA-1 research reactor operated by the Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission in Buenos Aires. Some biological scoping irradiations have also been completed using a small-animal (hamster) oral mucosa tumor model. Results indicate that the RA-1 neutron source produces useful dose rates but that some improvements in the initial configuration will be needed to optimize the spectrum for thermal-neutron BNCT research applications.

  9. The data acquisition system of the neutron time-of-flight facility nTOF at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Abbondanno, U; Alvarez, F; Alvarez, H; Andriamonje, Samuel A; Andrzejewski, J; Badurek, G; Baumann, P; Becvar, F; Benlliure, J; Berthomieux, E; Betev, B; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Capote, R; Cennini, P; Chepel, V Yu; Chiaveri, Enrico; Colonna, N; Cortés, G; Cortina-Gil, D; Couture, A; Cox, J; Dababneh, S; David, S; Dolfini, R; Domingo-Pardo, C; Durán, I; Embid-Segura, M; Ferrant, L; Ferrari, A; Ferreira-Marques, R; Frais-Kölbl, H; Furman, W; Gonçalves, I; González-Romero, E M; Goverdovski, A A; Gramegna, F; Griesmayer, E; Gunsing, F; Haas, B; Haight, R; Heil, M; Herrera-Martínez, A; Isaev, S; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y; Käppeler, F K; Kerveno, M; Ketlerov, V; Köhler, P E; Konovalov, V; Krticka, M; Leeb, H; Lindote, A; Lopes, M I; Lozano, M; Lukic, S; Marganiec, J; Marrone, S; Martínez-Val, J M; Mastinu, P; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Molina-Coballes, A; Moreau, C; Mosconi, M; Neves, F; Oberhummer, Heinz; O'Brien, S; Pancin, J; Papaevangelou, T; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Pavlopoulos, P; Perlado, J M; Perrot, L; Peskov, Vladimir; Plag, R; Plompen, A; Plukis, A; Poch, A; Policarpo, Armando; Pretel, C; Quesada, J M; Rapp, W; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Rosetti, M; Rubbia, Carlo; Rudolf, G; Rullhusen, P; Salgado, V; Schäfer, E; Soares, J C; Stephanq, C; Tagliente, G; Taín, J L; Tassan-Got, L; Tavora, L M N; Terlizzi, R; Vannini, G; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Villamarín-Fernández, D; Vincente-Vincente, M; Vlachoudis, V; Voss, F; Wendler, H; Wiescher, M; Wisshak, K

    2005-01-01

    The n_TOF facility at CERN has been designed for the measurement of neutron capture, fission and (n, multiplied by n) cross-sections with high accuracy. This requires a flexible and - due to the high instantaneous neutron flux - almost dead time free data acquisition system. A scalable and versatile data solution has been designed based on 8-bit flash-ADCs with sampling rates up to 2 GHz and 8 Mbyte memory buffer. The software is written in C and C++ and is running on PCs equipped with RedHat Linux.

  10. An assessment of the secondary neutron dose in the passive scattering proton beam facility of the national cancer center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sang Eun [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Gyuseong [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Se Byeong [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The purpose of this study is to assess the additional neutron effective dose during passive scattering proton therapy. Monte Carlo code (Monte Carlo N-Particle 6) simulation was conducted based on a precise modeling of the National Cancer Center's proton therapy facility. A three-dimensional neutron effective dose profile of the interior of the treatment room was acquired via a computer simulation of the 217.8-MeV proton beam. Measurements were taken with a 3He neutron detector to support the simulation results, which were lower than the simulation results by 16% on average. The secondary photon dose was about 0.8% of the neutron dose. The dominant neutron source was deduced based on flux calculation. The secondary neutron effective dose per proton absorbed dose ranged from 4.942 ± 0.031 mSv/Gy at the end of the field to 0.324 ± 0.006 mSv/Gy at 150 cm in axial distance.

  11. Experiments at the GELINA facility for the validation of the self-indication neutron resonance densitometry technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossa Riccardo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-Indication Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD is a passive non-destructive method that is being investigated to quantify the 239Pu content in a spent fuel assembly. The technique relies on the energy dependence of total cross sections for neutron induced reaction. The cross sections show resonance structures that can be used to quantify the presence of materials in objects, e.g. the total cross-section of 239Pu shows a strong resonance close to 0.3 eV. This resonance will cause a reduction of the number of neutrons emitted from spent fuel when 239Pu is present. Hence such a reduction can be used to quantify the amount of 239Pu present in the fuel. A neutron detector with a high sensitivity to neutrons in this energy region is used to enhance the sensitivity to 239Pu. This principle is similar to self-indication cross section measurements. An appropriate detector can be realized by surrounding a 239Pu-loaded fission chamber with appropriate neutron absorbing material. In this contribution experiments performed at the GELINA time-of-flight facility of the JRC at Geel (Belgium to validate the simulations are discussed. The results confirm that the strongest sensitivity to the target material was achieved with the self-indication technique, highlighting the importance of using a 239Pu fission chamber for the SINRD measurements.

  12. Assessment of the gas dynamic trap mirror facility as intense neutron source for fusion material test irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, U.; Moeslang, A.; Ivanov, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    The gas dynamic trap (GDT) mirror machine has been proposed by the Budker Institute of nuclear physics, Novosibirsk, as a volumetric neutron source for fusion material test irradiations. On the basis of the GDT plasma confinement concept, 14 MeV neutrons are generated at high production rates in the two end sections of the axially symmetrical central mirror cell, serving as suitable irradiation test regions. In this paper, we present an assessment of the GDT as intense neutron source for fusion material test irradiations. This includes comparisons to irradiation conditions in fusion reactor systems (ITER, Demo) and the International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), as well as a conceptual design for a helium-cooled tubular test assembly elaborated for the largest of the two test zones taking proper account of neutronics, thermal-hydraulic and mechanical aspects. This tubular test assembly incorporates ten rigs of about 200 cm length used for inserting instrumented test capsules with miniaturized specimens taking advantage of the 'small specimen test technology'. The proposed design allows individual temperatures in each of the rigs, and active heating systems inside the capsules ensures specimen temperature stability even during beam-off periods. The major concern is about the maximum achievable dpa accumulation of less than 15 dpa per full power year on the basis of the present design parameters of the GDT neutron source. A design upgrading is proposed to allow for higher neutron wall loadings in the material test regions

  13. Three-dimensional neutron dose distribution in the environment around a 1-GeV electron synchrotron facility at INS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uwamino, Y.; Nakamura, T.

    1987-01-01

    The three-dimensional (surface and altitude) skyshine neutron-dose-equivalent distribution around the 1-GeV electron synchrotron (ES) of the Institute for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, was measured with a high-sensitivity dose-equivalent counter. The neutron spectrum in the environment was also measured with a multimoderator spectrometer incorporating a 3 He counter. The dose-equivalent distribution and the leakage neutron spectrum at the surface of the ES building were measured with a Studsvik 2202D counter and the multimoderator spectrometer, including an indium activation detector. Skyshine neutron transport calculations, beginning with the photoneutron spectrum and yielding the dose-equivalent distribution in the environment, were performed with the DOT3.5 code and two Monte Carlo codes, MMCR-2 and MMCR-3, using the DLC-87/HILO group cross sections. The calculated neutron spectra at the top surface of the concrete ceiling and at a point 111 m from the ES agreed well with the measured results, and the calculated three-dimensional dose-equivalent distribution also agreed. The dose value increased linearly with altitude, and the slope was estimated for neutron-producing facilities. (author)

  14. Development of Pneumatic Transfer Irradiation Facility (PTS no.2) for Neutron Activation Analysis at HANARO Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Y. S.; Moon, J. H.; Kim, S. H.; Sun, G. M.; Baek, S. Y.; Kim, H. R.; Kim, Y. J

    2008-03-15

    A pneumatic transfer irradiation system (PTS) is one of the most important facilities used during neutron irradiation of a target material for instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) in a research reactor. In particular, a fast pneumatic transfer system is essential for the measurement of a short half-life nuclide and a delayed neutron counting system. The pneumatic transfer irradiation system (PTS no.2) involving a manual system and an automatic system for delayed neutron activation analysis (DNAA) were reconstructed with new designs of a functional improvement at the HANARO research reactor in 2006. In this technical report, the conception, design, operation and control of PTS no.2 was described. Also the experimental results and the characteristic parameters measured by a mock-up test, a functional operation test and an irradiation test of these systems, such as the transfer time of irradiation capsule, automatic operation control by personal computer, delayed neutron counting system, the different neutron flux, the temperature of the irradiation position with an irradiation time, the radiation dose rate when the rabbit is returned, etc. are reported to provide a user information as well as a reactor's management and safety.

  15. Appli