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Sample records for neutron fluence rate

  1. Measured Thermal and Fast Neutron Fluence Rates for ATF-1 Holders During ATR Cycle 157D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Larry Don [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miller, David Torbet [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>1MeV) neutron fluence rate data for the ATF-1 holders located in core for ATR Cycle 157D which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML) as requested by the Power Reactor Programs (ATR Experiments) Radiation Measurements Work Order. This report contains measurements of the fluence rates corresponding to the particular elevations relative to the 80-ft. core elevation. The data in this report consist of (1) a table of the ATR power history and distribution, (2) a hard copy listing of all thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, and (3) plots of both the thermal and fast neutron fluence rates. The fluence rates reported are for the average power levels given in the table of power history and distribution.

  2. The measurement of the fluence rate of accelerator fusion neutrons by using the associated particle method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dalun; Li Yijun; Jiang Li

    1998-11-01

    The associated particle method is normally used to measure the fluence rate of accelerator fusion neutron. The principle, set-up and technical points are standardized. The measurement error is up to 1%∼1.5%

  3. Standard Test Method for Determining Thermal Neutron Reaction Rates and Thermal Neutron Fluence Rates by Radioactivation Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 The purpose of this test method is to define a general procedure for determining an unknown thermal-neutron fluence rate by neutron activation techniques. It is not practicable to describe completely a technique applicable to the large number of experimental situations that require the measurement of a thermal-neutron fluence rate. Therefore, this method is presented so that the user may adapt to his particular situation the fundamental procedures of the following techniques. 1.1.1 Radiometric counting technique using pure cobalt, pure gold, pure indium, cobalt-aluminum, alloy, gold-aluminum alloy, or indium-aluminum alloy. 1.1.2 Standard comparison technique using pure gold, or gold-aluminum alloy, and 1.1.3 Secondary standard comparison techniques using pure indium, indium-aluminum alloy, pure dysprosium, or dysprosium-aluminum alloy. 1.2 The techniques presented are limited to measurements at room temperatures. However, special problems when making thermal-neutron fluence rate measurements in high-...

  4. Measured thermal and fast neutron fluence rates for ATF-1 holders during ATR cycle 160A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, B. J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miller, D. T. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-06-06

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>1MeV) neutron fluence rate data for the ATF-1 holders located in core for ATR Cycle 160A which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML).

  5. Standard Test Method for Measuring Neutron Fluence Rate by Radioactivation of Cobalt and Silver

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a suitable means of obtaining the thermal neutron fluence rate, or fluence, in well moderated nuclear reactor environments where the use of cadmium, as a thermal neutron shield as described in Method E262, is undesirable because of potential spectrum perturbations or of temperatures above the melting point of cadmium. 1.2 This test method describes a means of measuring a Westcott neutron fluence rate (Note 1) by activation of cobalt- and silver-foil monitors (See Terminology E170). The reaction 59Co(n,γ)60Co results in a well-defined gamma emitter having a half-life of 1925.28 days (1). The reaction 109Ag(n,˙γ) 110mAg results in a nuclide with a complex decay scheme which is well known and having a half-life of 249.76 days (1). Both cobalt and silver are available either in very pure form or alloyed with other metals such as aluminum. A reference source of cobalt in aluminum alloy to serve as a neutron fluence rate monitor wire standard is available from the National Institute ...

  6. Time changes of vertical profile of neutron fluence rate in LVR-15 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viererbl, L.; Stehno, J.; Erben, O.; Lahodova, Z.; Marek, M.

    2003-01-01

    The LVR-15 reactor is a light water research type reactor, which is situated, in Nuclear Research Institute, Rez near Prague. The reactor is used as a multipurpose facility. For some experiments and material productions, e.g. for homogeneity of silicon resistance in production of radiation doped silicon, the time changes of vertical profile of neutron fluence rate are particularly important. The assembly used for silicon irradiation has two self-powered neutron detectors installed in a vertical irradiation channel in LVR-15 reactor. Vertical profile of thermal neutron fluence rate was automatically scanned during reactor operation. The results of measurements made in 2002 and 2003 with these detectors are presented. A set of vertical profile measurements was made during two 21-days reactor cycles. During the cycle the vertical profile slightly changes both in the position of its maximum and in the shape. The time dependences of the position of profile maximum and the profile width at half maximum during the cycle are given. (author)

  7. Neutron fluence spectrometry using disk activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loevestam, Goeran; Hult, Mikael; Fessler, Andreas; Gasparro, Joel; Kockerols, Pierre; Okkinga, Klaas; Tagziria, Hamid; Vanhavere, Filip; Wieslander, J.S. Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    A simple and robust detector for spectrometry of environmental neutrons has been developed. The technique is based on neutron activation of a series of different metal disks followed by low-level gamma-ray spectrometry of the activated disks and subsequent neutron spectrum unfolding. The technique is similar to foil activation but here the applied neutron fluence rates are much lower than usually in the case of foil activation. The detector has been tested in quasi mono-energetic neutron fields with fluence rates in the order of 1000-10000 cm -2 s -1 , where the obtained spectra showed good agreement with spectra measured using a Bonner sphere spectrometer. The detector has also been tested using an AmBe source and at a neutron fluence rate of about 40 cm -2 s -1 , again, a good agreement with the assumed spectrum was achieved

  8. Neutron fluence spectrometry using disk activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loevestam, Goeran [EC-JRC-Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium)], E-mail: goeran.loevestam@ec.europa.eu; Hult, Mikael; Fessler, Andreas; Gasparro, Joel; Kockerols, Pierre; Okkinga, Klaas [EC-JRC-Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Tagziria, Hamid [EC-JRC-Institute for the Protection and the Security of the Citizen (IPSC), Via E. Fermi 1, I-21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See,) (Italy); Vanhavere, Filip [SCK-CEN, Boeretang, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Wieslander, J.S. Elisabeth [EC-JRC-Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FIN-40014, University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2009-01-15

    A simple and robust detector for spectrometry of environmental neutrons has been developed. The technique is based on neutron activation of a series of different metal disks followed by low-level gamma-ray spectrometry of the activated disks and subsequent neutron spectrum unfolding. The technique is similar to foil activation but here the applied neutron fluence rates are much lower than usually in the case of foil activation. The detector has been tested in quasi mono-energetic neutron fields with fluence rates in the order of 1000-10000 cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, where the obtained spectra showed good agreement with spectra measured using a Bonner sphere spectrometer. The detector has also been tested using an AmBe source and at a neutron fluence rate of about 40 cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, again, a good agreement with the assumed spectrum was achieved.

  9. Measured thermal and fast neutron fluence rates for ATF-1 holders during ATR cycle 158B/159A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Larry Don [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miller, David Torbet [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Walker, Billy Justin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-11-01

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>1MeV) neutron fluence rate data for the ATF-1 holders located in core for ATR Cycle 158B/159A which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML).

  10. Neutron fluence measurement in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camacho L, M.E.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of present work is to determine the fluence of neutrons in nuclear facilities using two neutron detectors designed and built at Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ), Mexico. The two neutron detectors are of the passive type, based on solid state nuclear tracks detectors (SSNTD). One of the two neutron detectors was used to determine the fluence distribution of the ports at the nuclear research reactor TRIGA Mark III, which belongs to ININ. In these facilities is important to know the neutron fluence distribution characteristic to carried out diverse kind of research activities. The second neutron detector was employed in order to carry out environmental neutron surveillance. The detector has the property to separate the thermal, intermediate and fast components of the neutron fluence. This detector was used to measure the neutron fluence at hundred points around the primary container of the first Mexican Nuclear Power plant 'Laguna Verde'. This last detector was also used to determine the neutron fluence in some points of interest, around and inside a low scattering neutron room at the 'Centro de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes' of the ININ, to know the background neutron field produced by the neutron sources used there. The design of the two neutron detector and the results obtained for each of the surveying facilities, are described in this work. (Author)

  11. Solid-state track recorder dosimetry device to measure absolute reaction rates and neutron fluence as a function of time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Raymond; Roberts, James H.

    1989-01-01

    A solid state track recording type dosimeter is disclosed to measure the time dependence of the absolute fission rates of nuclides or neutron fluence over a period of time. In a primary species an inner recording drum is rotatably contained within an exterior housing drum that defines a series of collimating slit apertures overlying windows defined in the stationary drum through which radiation can enter. Film type solid state track recorders are positioned circumferentially about the surface of the internal recording drum to record such radiation or its secondary products during relative rotation of the two elements. In another species both the recording element and the aperture element assume the configuration of adjacent disks. Based on slit size of apertures and relative rotational velocity of the inner drum, radiation parameters within a test area may be measured as a function of time and spectra deduced therefrom.

  12. Development and application of a detector for absolute measurement of neutron fluence rate in MeV region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Dias, M. da.

    1988-01-01

    The development and performance of the DTS (Dual Thin Scintillator) for the absolute measurement of the neutron fluence rate between 1 and 15 MeV is decribed. The DTS detector consists of a pair of organic scintillators in a dual configuration, where the incident produces a proton-recoil which is detected in a 2Π geometry therefore avoiding the effect of the escape of protons. Thin scintillators are used resulting in small multiple scattering corrections. The theoretical caluclations of detector efficiency and proton-recoil spectrum were performed by means of a Monte Carlos code - CARLO DTS. The calculated efficiency was compared to the experimental one at two neutron energies namely 2.446 MeV and 14.04 MeV applying the Time Correlated Associated Particle technique. The theoretical and experimental efficiencies agreed within the experimental uncertainties of 1.44% and 0.77%, respectively. The performance of the DTS has been verified in an absolute 235 U(n,f) cross section measurement between 1 and 6 MeV neutron energy. The cross section results were compared to those obtained replacing the DTS detector by the NBS (National Bureau of Standards, USA) Black Neutron Detector. The agreement was excellent in the overlapping energy interval of the two experiments (between 1 and 3 MeV), within the estimated uncertainly in the range of 1,0 to 1,7%. The agreement with the most recent evaluation from the ENDF/B-VI was excellent in almost all the energy range between 1 and 6 MeV. The 235 U(n,f) cross section, average over the 252 Cf fission neutron spectrum has been evaluated. The result including the cross section values of the present work was 1220 mb, in excellent agreement with the average value among the most recent measurements, 1227 +- 12 mb, and with the value 1213 mb, using the ENDF/B-VI data. (author) [pt

  13. Neutron Spectra, Fluence and Dose Rates from Bare and Moderated Cf-252 Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radev, Radoslav P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    A new, stronger 252Cf source (serial number SR-CF-3050-OR) was obtained from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in 2014 to supplement the existing 252Cf sources which had significantly decayed. A new instrument positioning track system was designed and installed by Hopewell Designs, Inc. in 2011. The neutron field from the new, stronger 252Cf source in the modified calibration environment needed to be characterized as well as the modified neutron fields produced by the new source and seven different neutron moderators. Comprehensive information about our 252Cf source, its origin, production, and isotopic content and decay characteristics needed to be compiled as well. This technical report is intended to address these issues.

  14. Extension of CASCADE.04 to estimate neutron fluence and dose ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Two different methods, 'track length estimator' and 'collision estimator' are adapted for the estimation of neutron fluence rate needed to calculate the ambient dose rate. For the validation of the methods, neutron dose rates are experimentally measured at different locations of a 5Ci Am–Be source, shielded in Howitzer-type ...

  15. Extension of CASCADE.04 to estimate neutron fluence and dose ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Capability to compute neutron dose rate is introduced for the first time in the new version of the CASCADE.04 code. Two different methods, `track length estimator' and `collision estimator' are adapted for the estimation of neutron fluence rate needed to calculate the ambient dose rate. For the validation of the methods, ...

  16. Determination of the spectral neutron fluence rate onboard aircraft by means of a passive Bonner sphere spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajek, M.; Berger, T.; Vana, N.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Initiated by the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), the exposure of aircraft crew to cosmic radiation has been included as occupational exposure in the European Council directive 96/29/Euratom. Of the complex mixed radiation field at aviation altitudes the neutron component can contribute more than 50 % to the biologically relevant dose equivalent and is, therefore, of great importance. Applying the multi-sphere moderation technique, Bonner sphere spectrometers (BSS) are currently the only instruments providing a sufficient response over several orders of energy up to GeV. As could be demonstrated by extensive experiments in a variety of reference radiation fields, charged particles significantly contribute to the count rate of active detectors such as 6 LiI-scintillators or 3 He-proportional counters, which are commonly employed as thermal neutron detectors inside the spheres. This limitation can be overcome with a passive BSS, which uses different types of thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs): the thermal neutron-sensitive TLD-600 ( 6 LiF) and the thermal neutron-insensitive TLD-700 ( 7 LiF). Assuming identical responses of both types for the other radiation components, subtraction of the TLD-700 signal from the TLD-600 signal reveals a net signal from thermal neutrons. The passive BSS was calibrated in the CERN-EU High-Energy Reference Field (CERF), which provides a neutron spectrum in reasonable agreement with that occurring at aviation altitudes. Measurements onboard aircraft were performed during a series of eight north-bound flights originating from Cologne. The results are compared with calculations of the neutron spectrum by means of the well-established Monte Carlo code FLUKA. (author)

  17. Studies for improvement of WWER-440 neutron fluence determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilieva, Kr.; Belousov, S.; Apostolov, T.

    2001-01-01

    For assessment of radiation embrittlement and prediction of reactor vessel lifetime with reasonable conservatism a 'best estimated' neutron fluence is necessary. New studies purposed to improve the fluence determination are presented: 1) study on the reliability of multigroup presentation of the neutron cross sections, and 2) impact of negative gradient of reactor power in the periphery assemblies on the neutron fluence evaluation. The results of these studies are base for improvement of neutron fluence determination methodology applied by the INRNE, BAS at Kozloduy NPP. (author)

  18. Retrospective Reactor Dosimetry for Neutron Fluence, Helium, and Boron Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Oliver, Brian M.

    2003-01-01

    Neutron fluences can be measured and radiation damage parameters determined by analyzing the neutron reaction products in very small samples removed from components of an operating power research reactor. This process, known as retrospective reactor dosimetry, provides precise neutron exposure parameters for establishing or validating calculations of neutron fluences, helium generation, and radiation damage to reactor materials. Correlation of the neutron fluence and helium data helps to establish and validate models of radiation damage and helium production that are needed to address important issues such as irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking, void swelling, and weld repair of cracks. Results are presented for samples recently obtained from several operating reactors

  19. The fluence research of filter material for fast neutron fluence measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Xiding

    2010-01-01

    When the fast neutron fluence is measured by radioactivation techniques in the nuclear reactor the fast neutron is also filtered a little by the thermal neutron filter material, and if the filter material thickness increase the filtered fast neutron increases therewith. For fast neutron fluenc measurement, there are only cadmium, boron and gadolinium three elements filtering fluence can be calculated ordinarily. In order to calculate the filtered fast neutron fluence of the all elements in the filter material, the many total cross sections of nuclides had checked out from nuclear cross section data library, converted them into the same energy group structure, then element's total cross section, compound's total cross section and multilayer filters' total cross section had calculated from these total cross sections with same energy group structure, a new cross section data library can be obtained lastly through merging these cross sections into the old cross section data library used for neutron fluence measurement. The calculation analysis indicates that the results of the unit 2 surveillance capsule U of DAYA Bay NPP and the unit 1 surveillance capsule A of the Second Nuclear Power Plant of Qinshan by considering the all elements subtracting iron are smaller about 1.5% and 2.6% respectively than the ones only to consider cadmium, boron. The old measured results accord with the new values under the measurement uncertainty, are reliable. The new results are more accuracy. (authors)

  20. Neutron fluence determination for light water reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.

    1994-01-01

    A general description of limitations that exist in pressure vessel neutron fluence determinations for commercial light water reactors is presented. Complexity factors that arise in light water reactor pressure vessel neutron fluence calculations are identified and used to analyze calculational limitations. Two broad categories of calculational limitations are introduced, namely benchmark field limitations and deep penetration limitations. Explicit examples of limitations that can arise in each of these two broad categories are presented. These limitations are used to show that the recent draft regulatory guide for the determination of pressure vessel neutron fluence, developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is based upon procedures and assumptions that are not valid. To eliminate the complexity and limitations of calculational methods, it is recommended that the determination of light water reactor pressure vessel neutron fluence be based upon experiment. Recommendations for improved methods of pressure vessel surveillance neutron dosimetry are advanced

  1. Safety factors for neutron fluences in NPP safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demekhin, V.L.; Bukanov, V.N.; Il'kovich, V.V.; Pugach, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    In accordance with global practice and a number of existing regulations, the use of conservative approach is required for the calculations related to nuclear safety assessment of NPP. It implies the need to consider the determination of neutron fluence errors that is rather complicated. It is proposed to carry out the consideration by the way of multiplying the neutron fluences obtained with transport calculations by safety factors. The safety factor values are calculated by the developed technique based on the theory of errors, features of the neutron transport calculation code and the results obtained with the code. It is shown that the safety factor value is equal 1.18 with the confidence level of not less than 0.95 for the majority of VVER-1000 reactor places where neutron fluences are determined by MCPV code, and its maximum value is 1.25

  2. Development of a Secondary Neutron Fluence Standard at GELINA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyse, Jan; Eykens, Roger; Moens, Andre; Plompen, Arjan J.M.; Schillebeeckx, Peter; Wynants, Ruud; Anastasiou, Maria

    2013-06-01

    The MetroFission project, a Joint Research Project within the European Metrology Research Program, aims at addressing a number of metrological problems involved in the design of proposed Generation IV nuclear reactors. One of the objectives of this multidisciplinary project is the improvement of neutron cross section measurement techniques in order to arrive at uncertainties as required for the design and safety assessment of new generation power plants and fuel cycles. This objective is in line with the 'Uncertainty and target accuracy assessment for innovative systems using recent covariance data evaluations' published by a working party of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency in 2008. These requests are often very challenging, being at or beyond the state-of-the-art in neutron measurements, which is set by self-normalizing methods and the neutron data standards used at laboratories where the data are measured. A secondary neutron fluence standard has been developed and calibrated at the neutron time-of-flight facility GELINA of the JRC's Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM). It consists of a flux monitor, a reference ionization chamber containing a 10 B layer and a 235 U layer, and a parallel plate ionization chamber with 8 well characterized 235 U deposits. These devices are used to determine the neutron fluence, based on the well-known neutron induced fission reaction on 235 U. All deposits have been prepared and characterized at the IRMM target preparation lab. The secondary fluence standard at the GELINA facility can be used for reliable determination of the efficiency of fluence measurement devices used in neutron data measurements at IRMM and elsewhere. It is an essential tool to reliably calibrate fluence normalization devices used in neutron time-of-flight cross section measurements. (authors)

  3. The development report of an intelligent neutron fluence integration monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Zongbing; Wei Ying

    1996-10-01

    An intelligent neutron fluence integration monitor is introduced. It is used to measure the received neutron fluence of the monocrystalline silicon in reactor radiation channel. The significance of study and specifications of the instrument are briefly described. The emphasis is on the working principle, structure and characteristics of the instrument is intelligent due to use of monolithic microcomputer. It has many advantages proved in the actual practice, such as powerful function, high accuracy, diversity of application, high level automatization, easy to operate, high reliability, etc. After using this instrument the monocrystalline silicon radiation technology is improved and the efficiency of production is raised. (1 fig.)

  4. Neutron fluence produced in medical accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.C.; Silva, A.X. da; Crispim, V.R.

    2004-01-01

    Radiotherapy with photon and electron beams still represents the most diffused technique to control and treat tumour diseases. To increase the treatment efficiency, accelerators of higher energy are used, the increase of electron and photon energy is joined with generation of undesired fast neutron that contaminated the therapeutic beam and give a non-negligible contribution to the patient dose. In this work we have simulated with the MCNP4B code the produced neutron spectra in the interaction between the beam and the head to the accelerator and estimating the equivalent dose for neutrons by x-ray dose for aims far from the targets. (author)

  5. Development of neutron fluence measurement and evaluation technology for the test materials in the capsule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, U.; Choi, S. H.; Kang, H. D. [Kyungsan University, Kyungsan (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    The four kinds of the fluence monitor considered by self-shielding are design and fabricated for evaluation of neutron irradiation fluence. They are equipped with dosimeters consisting of Ni, Fe and Ti wires and so forth. The nuclear reaction rate is obtained by measurement on dosimeter using the spectroscopic analysis of induced {gamma}-ray. We established the nuetron fluence evaluating technology that is based on the measurement of the reaction rate considering reactor's irradiation history, burn-out, self-shielding in fluence monitor, and the influence of impurity in dosimeter. The distribution of high energy neutron flux on the vertical axis of the capsule shows fifth order polynomial equation and is good agree with theoretical value in the error range of 30% by MCNP/4A code. 22 refs., 50 figs., 27 tabs. (Author)

  6. The activation method for determining neutron spectra and fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogel, J.; Vespalec, R.

    1980-01-01

    3 mm thick foils of 4 and 17 mm in diameter were used for measurements. NaI scintillation detectors 45 mm in diameter by 50 mm thick and 40 mm in diameter by 1 mm thick, and a Ge-Li spectrometer of 53 cm 3 in volume were used for gamma detection. A photopeak or a certain part of the integral spectrum was measured for each radionuclide. Computer code PIKAR was applied in automatic calculation of a simple gamma spectrum obtained using the semiconductor spectrometer. The FACT code was used for calculating foil activity. Codes SAND II and RFSP were used for neutron spectra unfolding. Ge-Li detector spectrometry was used for determining neutron fluence. Code FLUE was used for determining the mean value of neutron flux density and fluence. (J.P.)

  7. Interministerial decree of 10 February 1988 fixing the derived limits of the air concentration and the annual intake limit and the values of the quality factor and the neutron fluence rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This decree establishes the derived concentration limits in the air and annual inhalation limits for the radioisotopes and the values of the quality factors and the conversion factors fluence/dose equivalent for neutrons and protons

  8. Neutron fluence in antiproton radiotherapy, measurements and simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.

    2010-01-01

    A significant part of the secondary particle spectrum from antiproton annihilation consists of fast neutrons, which may contribute to a significant dose background found outside the primary beam. Using a polystyrene phantom as a moderator, we have performed absolute measurements of the thermalized...... part of the fast neutron spectrum using Lithium-6 and -7 Fluoride TLD pairs. The experimental results are found to be in good agreement with simulations using the Monte Carlo particle transport code FLUKA. The thermal neutron kerma resulting from the measured thermal neutron fluence is insignificant...... compared to the contribution from fast neutrons. The results are found to be similar to values calculated for pion treatment, however exact modeling under more realistic treatment scenarios is still required to quantitatively compare these treatment modalities....

  9. Determination of the neutron fluence spectra in the neutron therapy room of KIRAMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, B H; Kim, J S; Kim, J L; Kim, Y S; Yang, T G; Lee, M Y

    2007-01-01

    High energy proton induced neutron fluence spectra were determined at the Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS) using an extended Bonner Sphere (BS) set from the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) in a series of measurements to quantify the neutron field. At the facility of the MC50 cyclotron of KIRAMS, two Be targets of different thicknesses, 1.0 and 10.5 mm, were bombarded by 35 and 45-MeV protons to produce six kinds of neutron fields, which were classified according to the measurement position and the use or no use of a beam collimator such as the gantry of the neutron therapy unit. In order to obtain a priori information to unfold the measured BS data the MCNPX code was used to calculate the neutron spectrum, and the influence of the surrounding materials for cooling the target assembly were also reviewed through this calculation. Some dosimetric quantities were determined by using the spectra determined in this measurement. Dose equivalent rates of these neutron fields ranged from 0.21 to 5.66 mSv h(-1)nA(-1) and the neutron yields for a thick Be target were 3.05 and 4.77% in the case of using a 35 and a 45-MeV proton, respectively.

  10. Determination of the neutron fluence spectra in the neutron therapy room of KIRAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, B. H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J. L.; Kim, Y. S.; Yang, T. G.; Lee, M. Y.

    2007-01-01

    High energy proton induced neutron fluence spectra were determined at the Korea Inst. of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS) using an extended Bonner Sphere (BS) set from the Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst. (KAERI) in a series of measurements to quantify the neutron field. At the facility of the MC50 cyclotron of KIRAMS, two Be targets of different thicknesses, 1.0 and 10.5 mm, were bombarded by 35 and 45-MeV protons to produce six kinds of neutron fields, which were classified according to the measurement position and the use or no use of a beam collimator such as the gantry of the neutron therapy unit. In order to obtain a priori information to unfold the measured BS data the MCNPX code was used to calculate the neutron spectrum, and the influence of the surrounding materials for cooling the target assembly were also reviewed through this calculation. Some dosimetric quantities were determined by using the spectra determined in this measurement. Dose equivalent rates of these neutron fields ranged from 0.21 to 5.66 mSv h -1 nA -1 and the neutron yields for a thick Be target were 3.05 and 4.77% in the case of using a 35 and a 45-MeV proton, respectively. (authors)

  11. Investigation of neutron fluence using fluence monitors for irradiation test at WWR-K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanova, N.K.; Takemoto, N.

    2013-01-01

    Irradiation test of a Si ingot is planned using WWR-K in Institute of Nuclear Physics Republic of Kazakhstan (INP RK) to develop an irradiation technology for Si semiconductor production by Neutron Transmutation Doping (NTD) method in the framework of an international cooperation between INP RK and Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Japan. It is possible to irradiate the Si ingot of 6 inch in diameter at the K-23 irradiation channel in the WWR-K. The preliminary irradiation test using 4 Al ingots was performed to evaluate the actual neutronic irradiation field at the K-23 channel in the WWR-K. Each Al ingot has the same dimension as the Si ingot, and 15 fluence monitors are equipped in it. Iron wire and aluminum-cobalt wire are inserted into them, and it is possible to evaluate both fast and thermal neutron fluxes by measurement of these radiation activities after irradiation. This report described the results of the preliminary irradiation test and the neutronic calculations by Monte Carlo method in order to evaluate the neutronic irradiation field in the irradiation position for the silicon ingot at the channel in the WWR-K. (authors)

  12. Neutron fluence effect on the IASCC susceptibility of AISI 304 stainless steel under simulated BWR conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navas, M.; Castano, M.L; Gomez-Briceno, D.; Karlsen, T.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Neutron irradiation modifies the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of AISI 304 stainless steel in high temperature water. The microstructure and the microchemistry of materials change with the increasing of dose, inducing Radiation Hardening and Radiation Induced Segregation (RIS). SCC behaviour of irradiated material is influenced by these changes, leading to a value of threshold neutron fluence which could depend on different variables. Therefore, fully understanding of the IASCC material susceptibility implies the study of the effect of critical parameters like accumulated neutron fluence, material composition and water chemistry. Experimental work is being carried out in collaboration with the Halden Reactor Project and it includes the performance of Constant Extension Rate Tests (CERT) at CIEMAT laboratories in out-of-pile loops that simulate BWR operating conditions. The main objective is to determine the influence of neutron fluence on the SCC susceptibility of austenitic steels. A test matrix was defined to test unirradiated and irradiated specimens fabricated from tubes used previously in the Crack Initiation Test (IFA 618) performed at the Halden Reactor Project. According to the irradiation periods of IFA 618, three materials (Annealed and thermally-sensitised AISI 304 and AISI 316L) with three different accumulated neutron fluences are available. This paper presents the results obtained with annealed and thermally sensitised AISI 304 SS tested in different environments. (Author)

  13. Neutron fluence measurement in the cavity of Balakovo nuclear power plant, unit 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voorbraak, W.P.; Baard, J.H.; Paardekooper, A.; Nolthenius, H.J.

    1996-12-01

    An international benchmark exercise has been organized by the Russian GOSATOMNADZOR. The aim was to reduce the uncertainty of fluence measurements in Nuclear Power Plants in particular VVER-1000 reactors. The benchmark was set up in the cavity of the Balakovo NPP 3. Eight institutes were involved. This report presents the results obtained by ECN. From this report, it can be concluded that the results of the relative large monitor set (13 different reaction rates with overlapping response regions) point to possible imperfections in the calculated neutron spectra. However the experimental information is not powerful enough to reduce the uncertainty of the neutron fluence rate especially in the energy region between 0.1 and 0.5 MeV below 50 percent. (orig.)

  14. Fluence-compensated down-scattered neutron imaging using the neutron imaging system at the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, D T; Volegov, P L; Merrill, F E; Munro, D H; Grim, G P; Landen, O L; Spears, B K; Fittinghoff, D N; Field, J E; Smalyuk, V A

    2016-11-01

    The Neutron Imaging System at the National Ignition Facility is used to observe the primary ∼14 MeV neutrons from the hotspot and down-scattered neutrons (6-12 MeV) from the assembled shell. Due to the strong spatial dependence of the primary neutron fluence through the dense shell, the down-scattered image is convolved with the primary-neutron fluence much like a backlighter profile. Using a characteristic scattering angle assumption, we estimate the primary neutron fluence and compensate the down-scattered image, which reveals information about asymmetry that is otherwise difficult to extract without invoking complicated models.

  15. Lifetime Neutron Fluence Analysis of the Ringhals Unit 1 Boiling Water Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulesza Joel A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a neutron fluence assessment considering the entire commercial operating history (35 cycles or ∼ 25 effective full power years of the Ringhals Unit 1 reactor pressure vessel beltline region. In this assessment, neutron (E >1.0 MeV fluence and iron atom displacement distributions were calculated on the moderator tank and reactor pressure vessel structures. To validate those calculations, five in-vessel surveillance chain dosimetry sets were evaluated as well as material samples taken from the upper core grid and wide range neutron monitor tubes to act as a form of retrospective dosimetry. During the analysis, it was recognized that delays in characterizing the retrospective dosimetry samples reduced the amount of reactions available to be counted and complicated the material composition determination. However, the comparisons between the surveillance chain dosimetry measurements (M and calculated (C results show similar and consistent results with the linear average M/C ratio of 1.13 which is in good agreement with the resultant least squares best estimate (BE/C ratios of 1.10 for both neutron (E >1.0 MeV flux and iron atom displacement rate.

  16. The determination of fast neutron fluence in radiation stability tests of steel samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogel, J.; Vespalec, R.

    1979-01-01

    The activation method is described of determining fast neutron fluence. Samples of steel designed for WWER type reactor pressure vessels were irradiated in the CHOUCA-rigs in the core of the WWR-S reactor. The neutron spectrum was measured by the multiple activation foil method and the effective cross sections of fluence monitors were calculated. The fluences obtained from the reactions 54 Fe(n,p) 54 Mn and 63 Cu(n,α) 60 Co are presented and the method is discussed. (author)

  17. A hybrid source-driven method to compute fast neutron fluence in reactor pressure vessel - 017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren-Tai, Chiang

    2010-01-01

    A hybrid source-driven method is developed to compute fast neutron fluence with neutron energy greater than 1 MeV in nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV). The method determines neutron flux by solving a steady-state neutron transport equation with hybrid neutron sources composed of peripheral fixed fission neutron sources and interior chain-reacted fission neutron sources. The relative rod-by-rod power distribution of the peripheral assemblies in a nuclear reactor obtained from reactor core depletion calculations and subsequent rod-by-rod power reconstruction is employed as the relative rod-by-rod fixed fission neutron source distribution. All fissionable nuclides other than U-238 (such as U-234, U-235, U-236, Pu-239 etc) are replaced with U-238 to avoid counting the fission contribution twice and to preserve fast neutron attenuation for heavy nuclides in the peripheral assemblies. An example is provided to show the feasibility of the method. Since the interior fuels only have a marginal impact on RPV fluence results due to rapid attenuation of interior fast fission neutrons, a generic set or one of several generic sets of interior fuels can be used as the driver and only the neutron sources in the peripheral assemblies will be changed in subsequent hybrid source-driven fluence calculations. Consequently, this hybrid source-driven method can simplify and reduce cost for fast neutron fluence computations. This newly developed hybrid source-driven method should be a useful and simplified tool for computing fast neutron fluence at selected locations of interest in RPV of contemporary nuclear power reactors. (authors)

  18. Absolute neutron fluence measurements between 0.5 and 3 MeV and their intercomparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, M.W.; Guung, T.C.; Pei, C.C.; Yang, T.N.; Hwang, W.S.; Thomas, D.J.

    1999-01-01

    Primary standards of monoenergetic neutron fluences for 0.565, 1.5 and 2.5 MeV neutrons produced by the 7 Li(p,n) 7 Be reaction have been developed for the calibration of neutron dosimeters and spectrometers. The fluences for 0.565 MeV neutrons were measured using both H 2 and CH 4 proton recoil proportional counters with the measured spectra fitted to the modified SPEC-4 Monte Carlo simulations for the subtraction of gamma and recoil carbons. The fluences for 1.5 and 2.5 MeV neutrons were determined with vacuum-type proton recoil telescopes. Various uncertainties for each detector are analyzed and its overall uncertainty is 3.1% for gas counter and less than 3% for the telescope. These neutron fluence standards have been intercompared with those of the National Physical Laboratory of the United Kingdom by the use of two transfer instruments: a long counter and a 3 He detector. The comparison results will be presented and discussed

  19. Feasibility study on using imaging plates to estimate thermal neutron fluence in neutron-gamma mixed fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Tanabe, Yu; Sakae, Takeji; Terunuma, Toshiyuki; Isobe, Tomonori; Kawamura, Hiraku; Yasuoka, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Harano, Hideki; Nishiyama, Jun; Masuda, Akihiko; Nohtomi, Akihiro

    2011-11-01

    In current radiotherapy, neutrons are produced in a photonuclear reaction when incident photon energy is higher than the threshold. In the present study, a method of discriminating the neutron component was investigated using an imaging plate (IP) in the neutron-gamma-ray mixed field. Two types of IP were used: a conventional IP for beta- and gamma rays, and an IP doped with Gd for detecting neutrons. IPs were irradiated in the mixed field, and the photo-stimulated luminescence (PSL) intensity of the thermal neutron component was discriminated using an expression proposed herein. The PSL intensity of the thermal neutron component was proportional to thermal neutron fluence. When additional irradiation of photons was added to constant neutron irradiation, the PSL intensity of the thermal neutron component was not affected. The uncertainty of PSL intensities was approximately 11.4 %. This method provides a simple and effective means of discriminating the neutron component in a mixed field.

  20. The plasma focus as a large fluence neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucker, O.; Bostick, W.; Long, J.; Luce, J.; Sahlin, H.

    1977-01-01

    A continuously operated, 1 pps, dense-plasma-focus device capable of delivering a minimum of 10 15 neutrons per pulse for material testing purposes is described. With I 5 scaling, predicted from analysis of existing machines, yields of 10 16 -10 17 neutrons per pulse are postulated. The average power consumption, which has become a major issue as a result of the energy crisis is shown to be highly favorable. A novel approach to the capacitor bank and switch design allowing repetitive operation is discussed. (Auth.)

  1. High Neutron Fluence Survivability Testing of Advanced Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fielder, Robert S.; Klemer, Daniel; Stinson-Bagby, Kelly L.

    2004-01-01

    The motivation for the reported research was to support NASA space nuclear power initiatives through the development of advanced fiber optic sensors for space-based nuclear power applications. The purpose of the high-neutron fluence testing was to demonstrate the survivability of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors in a fission reactor environment. 520 FBGs were installed in the Ford reactor at the University of Michigan. The reactor was operated for 1012 effective full power hours resulting in a maximum neutron fluence of approximately 5x1019 n/cm2, and a maximum gamma dose of 2x103 MGy gamma. This work is significant in that, to the knowledge of the authors, the exposure levels obtained are approximately 1000 times higher than for any previously published experiment. Four different fiber compositions were evaluated. An 87% survival rate was observed for fiber Bragg gratings located at the fuel centerline. Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry (OFDR), originally developed at the NASA Langley Research Center, can be used to interrogate several thousand low-reflectivity FBG strain and/or temperature sensors along a single optical fiber. A key advantage of the OFDR sensor technology for space nuclear power is the extremely low mass of the sensor, which consists of only a silica fiber 125μm in diameter. The sensors produced using this technology will fill applications in nuclear power for current reactor plants, emerging Generation-IV reactors, and for space nuclear power. The reported research was conducted by Luna Innovations and was funded through a Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) contract with the NASA Glenn Research Center

  2. Energy spectra and fluence of the neutrons produced in deformed space-time conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardone, F.; Rosada, A.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, spectra of energy and fluence of neutrons produced in the conditions of deformed space-time (DST), due to the violation of the local Lorentz invariance (LLI) in the nuclear interactions are shown for the first time. DST-neutrons are produced by a mechanical process in which AISI 304 steel bars undergo a sonication using ultrasounds with 20 kHz and 330 W. The energy spectrum of the DST-neutrons has been investigated both at low (less than 0.4 MeV) and at high (up to 4 MeV) energy. We could conclude that the DST-neutrons have different spectra for different energy intervals. It is therefore possible to hypothesize that the DST-neutrons production presents peculiar features not only with respect to the time (asynchrony) and space (asymmetry) but also in the neutron energy spectra.

  3. Experimental results of neutron fluence outside an iron shield in the forward direction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, M.M.C.; Elwyn, A.J.; Fein, D.; James, E.; Johns, K.; Davis, W.; Ciampa, D.P.; Mierkiewicz, E.

    1996-09-01

    Analyses of both lateral shielding measurements and Monte Carlo calculations for beam stop geometry for incident hadrons at energies between 10 GeV and 10 TeV suggests that the dose equivalent can be represented by the expression H = H 0 (E)e -r/λ /r 2 where H, is the source term, r is the radial distance to the point of interest in the shield, and λ is the effective interaction length, or absorption mean free path. However, unlike the lateral shielding case, there is no similarly simple analytical expression that can be used to describe the on-axis longitudinal cascade development. In this study the results from the measurement in the forward direction of neutron fluence spectra (and the derived quantity dose equivalent) for 25 to 150 GeV pions incident on an iron beam stop as a function of thickness of iron are presented. The observed dependence of both fluence and dose equivalent on shield thickness and hadron energy was then quantified in terms of an expression in which a build up factor as well as an attenuation term was included. On the basis of this analysis the conversion factor from fluence to dose equivalent was also determined for these forward going neutrons. This work represents the first systematic study at an high energy accelerator of the depth dependence of neutron fluence in longitudinal shielding

  4. Neutron fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors: a comparison of data sets and interpolation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, C.S.; Killough, G.G.

    1983-01-01

    Various segments of the health physics community advocate the use of different sets of neutron fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors as a function of energy and different methods of interpolation between discrete points in those data sets. The major data sets and interpolation methods are used to calculate the spectrum average fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors for five spectra associated with the various shielded conditions of the Health Physics Research Reactor. The results obtained by use of the different data sets and interpolation methods are compared and discussed. (author)

  5. A new method for the determination of unknown neutron fluence for 14.0 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, Fariha [Physics Reasearch Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)]. E-mail: fariha@pinstech.org.pk; Khan, Ehsan U. [Department of Physics, CIIT, Islamabad (Pakistan); Qureshi, Imtinan [Physics Reasearch Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Husaini, Syed N. [Physics Reasearch Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Ahmad, Waqar [Physics Reasearch Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Rajput, Usman [Physics Reasearch Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Raza, Qaiser [Applied Physics Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2006-11-15

    Measuring the correct neutron fluence in various energy intervals in and around the neutron sources is important for the purpose of personnel and environmental neutron dosimetry. In this paper, we present a new method for the measurement of the fluence of mono-energetic neutrons having the energy of 14.0 MeV. The samples exposed to neutrons from the 14.0 MeV neutron generator at PINSTECH with various fluence values ranging from 10{sup 7} to 10{sup 10} n cm{sup -2} were etched for 10 min in 6 N NaOH at 70.0{+-}1.0 {sup o}C and the transmittance of UV radiation was measured using a spectrophotometer. This procedure was repeated 20 times after etching the same sample each time for increasing time intervals till the stage when transmittance reached the constant minimum value. An exponential decay of the transmittance has been observed with respect to the increasing etching time interval in each of the samples exposed to various neutron fluence. Further, it has also been observed that there is a linear relationship between the transmittance decay constant and neutron fluence. Hence, the linear graph can be used as a calibration for measuring the unknown fluence of 14.0 MeV neutrons.

  6. An estimation of fast neutron fluence on the KMRR core wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung-Chul; Lee, Ji-Bok; Kang, Chang-Soon.

    1991-01-01

    The fast neutron fluence (E > 1 MeV) hitting the KMRR core wall of zircaloy-4 was calculated using a two-dimensional discrete ordinates transport computer code DOT4.2. For the nuclear data base, 171 neutron groups of the DLC-41C/VITAMIN-C library were collapsed into 21 groups, of which the highest 8 groups had E > 1 MeV, using an one-dimensional discrete ordinates transport computer code ANISN. To construct a three-dimensional flux, a leakage correction factor was introduced for axial leakage treatment. The leakage correction factor was obtained from ANISN cylinder and DOT(r,z) calculations. The calculated fast neutron fluence was compared with that of the three-dimensional simulation using a Monte Carlo transport computer code MCNP. Assuming a 30-yr reactor lifetime with 80% capacity factor, the maximum fast neutron fluence on the KMRR core wall is expected to be 9.80 x 10 22 n/cm 2 . (author)

  7. Evaluation of the Neutron Fluence at a Baffle-Former Zone in an Operating Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S. L.; Yoo, C. S.; Hwang, S. S.

    2008-01-01

    Neutron fluence evaluation has been performed on a reactor vessel in an operating nuclear power plant in order to evaluate the radiation embrittlement which is directly related to plant safety as well as a plant operating license, based on the operating history. Because, as the operating years increase, damage may occur in the internal structures such as a baffle former bolt due to various reasons, and one of these reasons comes from the neutron fluence, so called an irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking, thus resulting in the shutdown of a plant and the replacement of a structure which has an economic disadvantage as well as a severe effect in the integrity of a plant. Neutron flux and fluence calculations for the baffle area for one of the reactors operating in Korea have been performed for all the operating cycles from the start of the reactor using real plant operating conditions such as the operating temperature, pressure and fuel loading pattern in order to evaluate any possibility that may cause a stress corrosion cracking due to the excessive neutron irradiation

  8. Neutron flux uncertainty and covariances for spectrum adjustment and estimation of WWER-1000 pressure vessel fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehmer, Bertram

    2000-01-01

    Results of estimation of the covariance matrix of the neutron spectrum in the WWER-1000 reactor cavity and pressure vessel positions are presented. Two-dimensional calculations with the discrete ordinates transport code DORT in r-theta and r-z-geometry used to determine the neutron group spectrum covariances including gross-correlations between interesting positions. The new Russian ABBN-93 data set and CONSYST code used to supply all transport calculations with group neutron data. All possible sources of uncertainties namely caused by the neutron gross sections, fission sources, geometrical dimensions and material densities considered, whereas the uncertainty of the calculation method was considered negligible in view of the available precision of Monte Carlo simulation used for more precise evaluation of the neutron fluence. (Authors)

  9. Effect of high fluence neutron irradiation on transport properties of thermoelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Leonard, K. J.

    2017-07-01

    Thermoelectric materials were subjected to high fluence neutron irradiation in order to understand the effect of radiation damage on transport properties. This study is relevant to the NASA Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) program in which thermoelectric elements are exposed to radiation over a long period of time in space missions. Selected n-type and p-type bismuth telluride materials were irradiated at the High Flux Isotope Reactor with a neutron fluence of 1.3 × 1018 n/cm2 (E > 0.1 MeV). The increase in the Seebeck coefficient in the n-type material was partially off-set by an increase in electrical resistivity, making the power factor higher at lower temperatures. For the p-type materials, although the Seebeck coefficient was not affected by irradiation, electrical resistivity decreased slightly. The figure of merit, zT, showed a clear drop in the 300-400 K range for the p-type material and an increase for the n-type material. Considering that the p-type and n-type materials are connected in series in a module, the overall irradiation damages at the device level were limited. These results, at neutron fluences exceeding a typical space mission, are significant to ensure that the radiation damage to thermoelectrics does not affect the performance of RTGs.

  10. Effects of fluence and fluence rate of proton irradiation upon magnetism in Fe65Ni35 Invar alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Masafumi; Wada, Hideki; Matsushima, Yasushi

    2015-11-01

    Curie temperature, TC, of the Fe-Ni Invar alloys increase due to irradiation with electron and some kinds of ions. In this study, proton irradiation effects upon magnetism in an Fe65Ni35 alloy have been investigated. It is found that the increment of TC, ∆TC, increases with increasing fluence. The magnetic hysteresis curve of the alloy was found to be unaffected by irradiation. Comparing ∆TC and the calculated energy transfer from the ions to the sample, it seemed that ∆TC was found to be related to the number of vacancies formed in nuclear collision events. In addition, ∆TC was influenced by the fluence rate, i.e., the deposited energy per unit time.

  11. Impact of lamp shadowing and reflection on the fluence rate distribution in a multiple low-pressure UV lamp array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shanshan; Linden, Karl G; Ducoste, Joel; Liu, Dong

    2005-07-01

    Use of mathematical modeling for determination of ultraviolet (UV) fluence in disinfection reactors requires accurate knowledge of the fluence rate distribution in a multiple lamp array. A method for measuring the fluence rate among a multiple lamp array was demonstrated using spherical actinometry. A matrix of four low-pressure UV lamps in air were investigated to evaluate the potential for shadowing and reflection to impact the fluence rate within and surrounding the lamp array. Two fluence rate distribution models were tested to determine the ability to predict the fluence rate distribution measured by the actinometers. Shadowing proved to attenuate UV light. Reflection from the lamp surface added 3-9% to the fluence rate, depending upon position in the reactor. These effects, as well as the fluence rate at various points in the lamp matrix were effectively modeled using RAD-LSI and UVCalc3D fluence rate distribution models. At fluence rates above 8mWcm(-2), the actinometry measured fluence rate was lower than the modeled rate, presumably from saturation of the actinometer solution at high fluence rates (close to the lamp). With multiple lamp reactors, the impact of shadowing can significantly affect fluence rate distribution and thus the level of microbial inactivation. If shadowing is not included in fluence rate distribution models, the fluence rate will be over predicted in the shadow zone of a neighboring lamp, falsely skewing model inactivation predictions.

  12. A new Recoil Proton Telescope for energy and fluence measurement of fast neutron fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebreton, Lena; Bachaalany, Mario [IRSN / LMDN (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete nucleaire / Laboratoire de Metrologie et de dosimetrie des neutrons), Cadarache Bat.159, 13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance, (France); Husson, Daniel; Higueret, Stephane [IPHC / RaMsEs (Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien / Radioprotection et Mesures Environnementales), 23 rue du loess - BP28, 67037 Strasbourg cedex 2, (France)

    2015-07-01

    The spectrometer ATHENA (Accurate Telescope for High Energy Neutron metrology Applications), is being developed at the IRSN / LMDN (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete nucleaire / Laboratoire de Metrologie et de dosimetrie des neutrons) and aims at characterizing energy and fluence of fast neutron fields. The detector is a Recoil Proton Telescope and measures neutron fields in the range of 5 to 20 MeV. This telescope is intended to become a primary standard for both energy and fluence measurements. The neutron detection is achieved by a polyethylene radiator for n-p conversion, three 50{sub m} thick silicon sensors that use CMOS technology for the proton tracking and a 3 mm thick silicon diode to measure the residual proton energy. This first prototype used CMOS sensors called MIMOSTAR, initially developed for heavy ion physics. The use of CMOS sensors and silicon diode increases the intrinsic efficiency of the detector by a factor of ten compared with conventional designs. The first prototype has already been done and was a successful study giving the results it offered in terms of energy and fluence measurements. For mono energetic beams going from 5 to 19 MeV, the telescope offered an energy resolution between 5 and 11% and fluence difference going from 5 to 7% compared to other home standards. A second and final prototype of the detector is being designed. It will hold upgraded CMOS sensors called FastPixN. These CMOS sensors are supposed to run 400 times faster than the older version and therefore give the telescope the ability to support neutron flux in the order of 107 to 108cm{sup 2}:s{sup 1}. The first prototypes results showed that a 50 m pixel size is enough for a precise scattering angle reconstruction. Simulations using MCNPX and GEANT4 are already in place for further improvements. A DeltaE diode will replace the third CMOS sensor and will be installed right before the silicon diode for a better recoil proton selection. The final prototype with

  13. Flux effect on neutron irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels irradiated to high fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soneda, N.; Dohi, K.; Nishida, K.; Nomoto, A.; Iwasaki, M.; Tsuno, S.; Akiyama, T.; Watanabe, S.; Ohta, T.

    2011-01-01

    Neutron irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is of great concern for the long term operation of light water reactors. In particular, the embrittlement of the RPV steels of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) at very high fluences beyond 6*10 19 n/cm 2 , E > 1 MeV, needs to be understood in more depth because materials irradiated in material test reactors (MTRs) to such high fluences show larger shifts than predicted by current embrittlement correlation equations available worldwide. The primary difference between the irradiation conditions of MTRs and surveillance capsules is the neutron flux. The neutron flux of MTR is typically more than one order of magnitude higher than that of surveillance capsule, but it is not necessarily clear if this difference in neutron flux causes difference in mechanical properties of RPV. In this paper, we perform direct comparison, in terms of mechanical property and microstructure, between the materials irradiated in surveillance capsules and MTRs to clarify the effect of flux at very high fluences and fluxes. We irradiate the archive materials of some of the commercial reactors in Japan in the MTR, LVR-15, of NRI Rez, Czech Republic. Charpy impact test results of the MTR-irradiated materials are compared with the data from surveillance tests. The comparison of the results of microstructural analyses by means of atom probe tomography is also described to demonstrate the similarity / differences in surveillance and MTR-irradiated materials in terms of solute atom behavior. It appears that high Cu material irradiated in a MTR presents larger shifts than those of surveillance data, while low Cu materials present similar embrittlement. The microstructural changes caused by MTR irradiation and surveillance irradiation are clearly different

  14. Calculation of neutron fluence-to-dose conversion factors for extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, R.D.; Harty, R.; McDonald, J.C.; Tanner, J.E.

    1993-04-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is developing a standard for the performance testing of personnel extremity dosimeters for the US Department of Energy. Part of this effort requires the calculation of neutron fluence-to-dose conversion factors for finger and wrist extremities. This study focuses on conversion factors for two types of extremity models: namely the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom (as specified in the draft standard for performance testing of extremity dosimeters) and more realistic extremity models composed of tissue-and-bone. Calculations for each type of model are based on both bare and D 2 O-moderated 252 Cf sources. The results are then tabulated and compared with whole-body conversion factors. More appropriate energy-averaged quality factors for the extremity models have also been computed from the neutron fluence in 50 equally spaced energy bins with energies from 2.53 x 10 -8 to 15 MeV. Tabulated results show that conversion factors for both types of extremity phantom are 15 to 30% lower than the corresponcung whole-body phantom conversion factors for 252 Cf neutron sources. This difference in extremity and whole-body conversion factors is attributable to the proportionally smaller amount of back-scattering that occurs in the extremity phantoms compared with whole-body phantoms

  15. Estimation of fast neutron fluence in steel specimens type Laguna Verde in TRIGA Mark III reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galicia A, J.; Francois L, J. L.; Aguilar H, F.

    2015-09-01

    The main purpose of this work is to obtain the fluence of fast neutrons recorded within four specimens of carbon steel, similar to the material having the vessels of the BWR reactors of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde when subjected to neutron flux in a experimental facility of the TRIGA Mark III reactor, calculating an irradiation time to age the material so accelerated. For the calculation of the neutron flux in the specimens was used the Monte Carlo code MCNP5. In an initial stage, three sheets of natural molybdenum and molybdenum trioxide (MoO 3 ) were incorporated into a model developed of the TRIGA reactor operating at 1 M Wth, to calculate the resulting activity by setting a certain time of irradiation. The results obtained were compared with experimentally measured activities in these same materials to validate the calculated neutron flux in the model used. Subsequently, the fast neutron flux received by the steel specimens to incorporate them in the experimental facility E-16 of the reactor core model operating at nominal maximum power in steady-state was calculated, already from these calculations the irradiation time required was obtained for values of the neutron flux in the range of 10 18 n/cm 2 , which is estimated for the case of Laguna Verde after 32 years of effective operation at maximum power. (Author)

  16. Fast neutron fluence evaluation of the smart reactor pressure vessel by using the GEOSHIELD code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.Y.; Kim, K.S.; Kim, H.Y.; Lee, C.C.; Zee, S.Q.

    2007-01-01

    In Korea, the design of an advanced integral reactor system called SMART has been developed by KAERI to supply energy for seawater desalination as well as an electricity generation. A fast neutron fluence distribution at the SMART reactor pressure vessel was evaluated to confirm the integrity of the vessel by using the GEOSHIELD code. The GEOSHIELD code was developed by KAERI in order to prepare an input list including a geometry modeling of the DORT code and to process results from the DORT code output list. Results by a GEOSHIELD code processing and by a manual processing of the DORT show a good agreement. (author)

  17. Development of highly efficient proton recoil counter telescope for absolute measurement of neutron fluences in quasi-monoenergetic neutron calibration fields of high energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikaze, Yoshiaki; Tanimura, Yoshihiko; Saegusa, Jun; Tsutsumi, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    Precise calibration of monitors and dosimeters for use with high energy neutrons necessitates reliable and accurate neutron fluences being evaluated with use of a reference point. A highly efficient Proton Recoil counter Telescope (PRT) to make absolute measurements with use of a reference point was developed to evaluate neutron fluences in quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields. The relatively large design of the PRT componentry and relatively thick, approximately 2 mm, polyethylene converter contributed to high detection efficiency at the reference point over a large irradiation area at a long distance from the target. The polyethylene converter thickness was adjusted to maintain the same carbon density per unit area as the graphite converter for easy background subtraction. The high detection efficiency and thickness adjustment resulted in efficient absolute measurements being made of the neutron fluences of sufficient statistical precision over a short period of time. The neutron detection efficiencies of the PRT were evaluated using MCNPX code at 2.61x10 -6 , 2.16x10 -6 and 1.14x10 -6 for the respective neutron peak energies of 45, 60 and 75 MeV. The neutron fluences were determined to have been evaluated at an uncertainty of within 6.5% using analysis of measured data and the detection efficiencies. The PRT was also designed so as to be capable of simultaneously obtaining TOF data. The TOF data also increased the reliability of neutron fluence measurements and provided useful information for use in interpreting the source of proton events.

  18. Neutron fluence in a 18 MeV Electron Accelerator for Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes G, L.C.

    2001-01-01

    An investigation was made on the theoretical fundamentals for the determination of the neutron fluence in a linear electron accelerator for radiotherapy applications and the limit values of leakage neutron radiation established by guidelines and standards in radiation protection for these type of accelerators. This investigation includes the following parts: a) Exhaustive bibliographical review on the topics mentioned above, in order to combine and to update the necessary basic information to facilitate the understanding of this subject; b) Analysis of the accelerator operation and identification of its main components, specially in the accelerator head; c) Study of different types of targets and its materials for the Bremsstrahlung production which is based on the electron initial energy, the thickness of the target, and its angular distribution and energy, which influences in the neutron generation by means of the photonuclear and electro disintegration reactions; d) Analysis of the neutron yield based on the target type and its thickness, the energy of electrons and photons; e) Analysis of the neutron energy spectra generated in the accelerator head, inside and outside the treatment room; f) Study of the dosimetry fundamentals for neutron and photon mixed fields, the dosimeter selection criteria and standards applied for these applications, specially the Panasonic U D-809 thermoluminescent dosemeter and C R-39 nuclear track dosimeter; g) Theoretical calculation of the neutron yield using a simplified geometric model for the accelerator head with spherical cell, which considers the target, primary collimator, flattener filter, movable collimators and the head shielding as the main components for radiation production. The cases with W and Pb shielding for closed movable collimators and an irradiation field of 20 x 20 cm 2 were analyzed and, h) Experimental evaluation of the leakage neutron radiation from the patient and head planes, observing that the accelerator

  19. A new active method for the measurement of slow-neutron fluence in modern radiotherapy treatment rooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, F; Iglesias, A [Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Universidad de Santiago, 15782-Santiago (Spain); Doblado, F Sanchez [Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Radiofisica and Departamento de Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain)], E-mail: faustino.gomez@usc.es

    2010-02-21

    This work focuses on neutron monitoring at clinical linac facilities during high-energy modality radiotherapy treatments. Active in-room measurement of neutron fluence is a complex problem due to the pulsed nature of the fluence and the presence of high photon background, and only passive methods have been considered reliable until now. In this paper we present a new active method to perform real-time measurement of neutron production around a medical linac. The device readout is being investigated as an estimate of patient neutron dose exposure on each radiotherapy session. The new instrument was developed based on neutron interaction effects in microelectronic memory devices, in particular using neutron-sensitive SRAM devices. This paper is devoted to the description of the instrument and measurement techniques, presenting the results obtained together with their comparison and discussion. Measurements were performed in several standard clinical linac facilities, showing high reliability, being insensitive to the photon fluence and EM pulse present inside the radiotherapy room, and having detector readout statistical relative uncertainties of about 2% on measurement of neutron fluence produced by 1000 monitor units irradiation runs.

  20. Dependence of the thermal neutron fluence at the size installations radiotherapy bunker; Dependencia de la fluencia termica de neutrones en el tamano del bunquer en instalaciones de radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Soto, X.; Amgarou, K.; Langares, J. L.; Exposito, M. R.; Gomez, F.; Domingo, C.; Sanchez-Doblado, F.

    2011-07-01

    The project aims to infer the dose deposited by neutrons in the patient treated by radiation therapy, from a measurement of the thermal neutron fluence at a selected point within the treatment room. These thermal neutrons are created when fast neutrons produced in the linac head are moderate, mainly in the walls of the bunker, and its yield depends on both the volume of the room and its geometry.

  1. Characterization of the New n_TOF Neutron Beam: Fluence, Profile and Resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Guerrero, C; Perkowski, J; Andriamonje, S; Carrapico, C; Moinul, M; Vannini, G; Quesada, J M; Harrisopulos, S; Milazzo, P M; Berthier, B; Lozano, M; Krticka, M; Domingo-Pardo, C; Nolte, R; Chiaveri, E; Jericha, E; Ferrari, A; Massimi, C; Giubrone, G; Avrigeanu, V; Martinez, T; Andrzejewski, J; Karadimos, D; Mengoni, A; Mendoza, E; Ganesan, S; Vlachoudis, V; Praena, J; Becares, V; Cortes, G; Variale, V; Quinones, J; Calvino, F; Kappeler, F; Gunsing, F; Gramegna, F; Colonna, N; Marrone, S; Pavlik, A; Berthoumieux, E; Paradela, C; Mastinu, P F; Vaz, P; Tassan-Got, L; Kadi, Y; Tarrio, D; Cano-Ott, D; Brugger, M; Wallner, A; Audouin, L; Fernandez-Ordonez, M; Sarmento, R; Becvar, F; Goncalves, I F; Martin-Fuertes, F; Cerutti, F; Pina, G; Mosconi, M; Tagliente, G; Duran, I; Ioannides, K; Weiss, C; Mirea, M; Gomez-Hornillos, M B; Vlastou, R; Calviani, M; Lederer, C; Gonzalez-Romero, E; Marganiec, J; Lebbos, E; Leeb, H; Heil, M; Dillmann, I; Tain, J L; Belloni, F

    2011-01-01

    After a halt of four years, the n\\_TOF spallation neutron facility at CERN has resumed operation in November 2008 with a new spallation target characterized by an improved safety and engineering design, resulting in a more robust overall performance and efficient cooling. The first measurement during the 2009 run has aimed at the full characterization of the neutron beam. Several detectors, such as calibrated fission chambers, the n\\_TOF Silicon Monitor, a MicroMegas detector with (10)B and (235)U samples, as well as liquid and solid scintillators have been used in order to characterize the properties of the neutron fluence. The spatial profile of the beam has been studied with a specially designed ``X-Y{''} MicroMegas which provided a 2D image of the beam as a function of neutron energy. Both properties have been compared with simulations performed. with the FLUKA code. The characterization of the resolution function is based on results from simulations which have been verified by the study of narrow capture...

  2. On-Site Determination and Monitoring of Real-Time Fluence Delivery for an Operating UV Reactor Based on a True Fluence Rate Detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengkai; Li, Wentao; Qiang, Zhimin; Blatchley, Ernest R

    2017-07-18

    At present, on-site fluence (distribution) determination and monitoring of an operating UV system represent a considerable challenge. The recently developed microfluorescent silica detector (MFSD) is able to measure the approximate true fluence rate (FR) at a fixed position in a UV reactor that can be compared with a FR model directly. Hence it has provided a connection between model calculation and real-time fluence determination. In this study, an on-site determination and monitoring method of fluence delivery for an operating UV reactor was developed. True FR detectors, a UV transmittance (UVT) meter, and a flow rate meter were used for fundamental measurements. The fluence distribution, as well as reduction equivalent fluence (REF), 10th percentile dose in the UV fluence distribution (F 10 ), minimum fluence (F min ), and mean fluence (F mean ) of a test reactor, was calculated in advance by the combined use of computational fluid dynamics and FR field modeling. A field test was carried out on the test reactor for disinfection of a secondary water supply. The estimated real-time REF, F 10 , F min , and F mean decreased 73.6%, 71.4%, 69.6%, and 72.9%, respectively, during a 6-month period, which was attributable to lamp output attenuation and sleeve fouling. The results were analyzed with synchronous data from a previously developed triparameter UV monitoring system and water temperature sensor. This study allowed demonstration of an accurate method for on-site, real-time fluence determination which could be used to enhance the security and public confidence of UV-based water treatment processes.

  3. Simultaneous measurement of gamma-rays and neutron fluences using a HPGE detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfassi, Z.B.; Zlatin, T.; German, U.

    2006-01-01

    A simultaneous determination of gamma and neutron fluences in a mixed neutron + gamma field can be achieved by gamma-ray spectrometry, optimizing the moderator-converter-detector assembly and measuring both the direct gamma-lines and the neutron induced prompt gammas. For the prompt gamma-lines a combination of high efficiency and low background is the goal, and it can be best achieved if the gamma-energy is in the range above about 1 MeV up to 2.5 MeV. The optimal moderator-converter thickness can be determined experimentally. Most converter elements produce gamma-rays in the low energy range. If chlorine is used as a converter, the 1164.7 keV peak and the 1950-1960 keV peaks seems to be a good choice. A very practical material containing chlorine is PVC. It is an efficient moderator, it is solid, common, and can be handled easily. (author)

  4. EFFECTS OF IRRADIATION ON THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF ALLOY 690 AT LOW NEUTRON FLUENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WOO SEOG RYU

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Alloy 690 has been selected as a steam generator tubing material for SMART owing to a near immunity to primary water stress corrosion cracking. The steam generators of SMART are faced with a neutron flux due to the integrated arrangement inside a reactor vessel, and thus it is important to know the irradiation effects of the thermal conductivity of Alloy 690. Alloy 690 was irradiated at HANARO to fluences of (0.7−28 × 1019n/cm2 (E>0.1MeV at 250°C, and its thermal conductivity was measured using the laser-flash equipment in the IMEF. The thermal conductivity of Alloy 690 was dependent on temperature, and it was a good fit to the Smith-Palmer equation, which modified the Wiedemann-Franz law. The irradiation at 250°C did not degrade the thermal conductivity of Alloy 690, and even showed a small increase (1% at fluences of (0.7∼28 × 1019n/cm2 (E>0.1MeV.

  5. Shield design for next-generation, low-neutron-fluence, superconducting tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, V.D.; Gohar, Y.

    1985-01-01

    A shield design using stainless steel (SST), water, boron carbide, lead, and concrete materials was developed for the next-generation tokamak device with superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils and low neutron fluence. A device such as the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) is representative of the tokamak design which could use this shield design. The unique feature of this reference design is that a majority of the bulk steel in the shield is in the form of spherical balls with two small, flat spots. The balls are purchased from ball-bearing manufacturers and are added as bulk shielding to the void areas of builtup, structural steel shells which form the torus cavity of the plasma chamber. This paper describes the design configuration of the shielding components

  6. Determination of the neutron fluence in the welding of the 'Core shroud' of the BWR reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucatero, M.A.; Xolocostli M, J.V.; Gomez T, A.M.; Palacios H, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    With the purpose of defining the inspection frequency, in function of the embrittlement of the materials that compose the welding of the 'Core Shroud' or encircling of the core of a BWR type reactor, is necessary to know the neutron fluence received for this welding. In the work the calculated values of neutron fluence accumulated maxim (E > 1 MeV) during the first 8 operation cycles of the reactor are presented. The calculations were carried out according to the NRC Regulatory Guide 1.190, making use of the DORT code, which solves the transport equation in discreet ordinate in two dimensions (xy, rΘ, and rz). The results in 3D were obtained applying the Synthesis method according to the guide before mentioned. Results are presented for the horizontal welding H3, H4, and H5, showing the corresponding curves to the fluence accumulated to the cycle 8 and a projection for the cycle 14 is presented. (Author)

  7. Measurement of angular distribution of cosmic-ray muon fluence rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Jeng-Wei; Chen, Yen-Fu; Sheu, Rong-Jiun; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2010-01-01

    In this work a Berkeley Lab cosmic ray detector was used to measure the angular distribution of the cosmic-ray muon fluence rate. Angular response functions of the detector at each measurement orientation were calculated by using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code, where no energy attenuation was taken into account. Coincidence counting rates were measured at ten orientations with equiangular intervals. The muon angular fluence rate spectrum was unfolded from the measured counting rates associated with the angular response functions using both the MAXED code and the parameter adjusting method.

  8. Neutron fluence effects on SLOWPOKE-2 beryllium reflector composition and reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puig, Francesc, E-mail: fpuig@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Dennis, Haile, E-mail: haile.dennis02@uwimona.edu.jm [International Centre for Environmental and Nuclear Sciences, 2 Anguilla Close, University of the West Indies, Mona, Kingston 7 (Jamaica)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • SLOWPOKE-2 reflector composition evolution estimated using two different methods. • Reactivity effects of reflector composition changes calculated using MCNP5. • Impurities depletion dominates over poisons buildup, increasing reactivity. • Results contradict previously published behavior estimates for MNSR reactors. • Identified main factors explaining the observed prediction discrepancies. - Abstract: Within the scope of the conversion process from HEU to LEU of the Jamaican SLOWPOKE-2 reactor (JM-1), the effects of the neutron fluence on the beryllium reflector composition, and the corresponding effect on reactivity throughout the life of the reactor core, have been studied. Two different methods have been used and compared involving MCNP5, ORIGEN2.2, ORIGEN-S and COUPLE codes, reaching excellent agreement between them. The neutron flux profile and energy spectrum specific to the beryllium reflectors of this reactor design have been taken into account to analyze several scenarios, comprising both real and hypothetical conditions and involving different initial reflector compositions and reactor burnups. The analysis has been extended to provide estimates for the similar MNSR reactor design and compared with previously published predictions for the Syrian MNSR. The results show small overall reactivity effects in most cases, being dominated by impurity depletion as opposed to poison buildup, contrarily to what generally occurs in beryllium reflected reactors of far higher power and to MNSR predictions. The resulting reactivity increases are typically of less than 0.4 mk for usual impurity levels and maximum HEU core burnup achievable.

  9. Neutron fluence effects on SLOWPOKE-2 beryllium reflector composition and reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puig, Francesc; Dennis, Haile

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • SLOWPOKE-2 reflector composition evolution estimated using two different methods. • Reactivity effects of reflector composition changes calculated using MCNP5. • Impurities depletion dominates over poisons buildup, increasing reactivity. • Results contradict previously published behavior estimates for MNSR reactors. • Identified main factors explaining the observed prediction discrepancies. - Abstract: Within the scope of the conversion process from HEU to LEU of the Jamaican SLOWPOKE-2 reactor (JM-1), the effects of the neutron fluence on the beryllium reflector composition, and the corresponding effect on reactivity throughout the life of the reactor core, have been studied. Two different methods have been used and compared involving MCNP5, ORIGEN2.2, ORIGEN-S and COUPLE codes, reaching excellent agreement between them. The neutron flux profile and energy spectrum specific to the beryllium reflectors of this reactor design have been taken into account to analyze several scenarios, comprising both real and hypothetical conditions and involving different initial reflector compositions and reactor burnups. The analysis has been extended to provide estimates for the similar MNSR reactor design and compared with previously published predictions for the Syrian MNSR. The results show small overall reactivity effects in most cases, being dominated by impurity depletion as opposed to poison buildup, contrarily to what generally occurs in beryllium reflected reactors of far higher power and to MNSR predictions. The resulting reactivity increases are typically of less than 0.4 mk for usual impurity levels and maximum HEU core burnup achievable.

  10. Assessment of neutron fluence to organ dose conversion coefficients in the ORNL analytical adult phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miri Hakimabad, H; Rafat Motavalli, L; Karimi Shahri, K

    2009-03-01

    Neutron fluence to absorbed dose conversion coefficients have been evaluated for the analytical ORNL modified adult phantom in 21 body organs using MCNP4C Monte Carlo code. The calculation used 20 monodirectional monoenergetic neutron beams in the energy range 10(-9)-20 MeV, under four irradiation conditions: anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), left-lateral (LLAT) and right-lateral (RLAT). Then the conversion coefficients are compared with the data reported in ICRP publication 74 for mathematical MIRD type phantoms and by Bozkurt et al for the VIPMAN voxel model. Although the ORNL results show fewer differences with the ICRP results than the Bozkurt et al data, one can deduce neither complete agreement nor disparity between this study and other data sets. This comparison shows that in some cases any differences in applied Monte Carlo codes or simulated body models could significantly change the organ dose conversion factors. This sensitivity should be considered for radiological protection programmes. For certain organs, the results of two models with major differences can be in a satisfactory agreement because of the similarity in those organ models.

  11. Test of Fibre Bragg Gratings samples under High Fast Neutrons Fluence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheymol, G.; Remy, L.; Gusarov, A.; Kinet, D.; Mégret, P.; Laffont, G.; Blanchet, T.; Morana, A.; Marin, E.; Girard, S.

    2018-01-01

    Optical fibre sensors (OFS) are worthy of interest for measurements in nuclear reactor thanks to their unique features, particularly compact size and remote multi-point sensing for some of them. But besides non negligible constraints associated with the high temperature environment of the experiments of interest, it is well known that the performances of OFS can be severely affected by high level of radiations. The Radiation Induced Attenuation (RIA) in the fibre is probably most known effect, which can be to some extent circumvented by using rad hard fibres to limit the dynamic loss. However, when the fast neutron fluence reaches 1018 to 1019 n/cm2, the density and index variations associated to structural changes may deteriorate drastically the performances of OFS even if they are based on rad hard fibres, by causing direct errors in the measurements of temperature and/or strain changes. The aim of the present study is to access the effect of nuclear radiations on the Fabry Perot (FP) and of Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors through the comparison of measurements made on these OFS - or part of them - before and after irradiation [1]. In the context of development of OFS for high irradiation environment and especially for Material Testing Reactors (MTRs), Sake 2 experiment consists in an irradiation campaign at high level of gamma and neutron fluxes conducted on samples of fibre optics - bare or functionalised with FBG. The irradiation was performed at two levels of fast neutron fluence: 1 and 3.1019 n/cm2 (E>1MeV), at 250°± 25°C, in the SCK•CEN BR2 reactor (Mol Belgium). An irradiation capsule was designed to allow irradiation at the specified temperature without active control. The neutron fluence was measured with activation dosimeters and the results were compared with MCPN computations. Investigation of bare samples gives information on the density changes, while for the FBGs both density and refractive index perturbation are involved. Some results for

  12. Calculation of neutron fluence to dose equivalent conversion coefficients using GEANT4; Calculo de coeficientes de fluencia de neutrons para equivalente de dose individual utilizando o GEANT4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Rosane M.; Santos, Denison de S.; Queiroz Filho, Pedro P. de; Mauricio, CLaudia L.P.; Silva, Livia K. da; Pessanha, Paula R., E-mail: rosanemribeiro@oi.com.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Fluence to dose equivalent conversion coefficients provide the basis for the calculation of area and personal monitors. Recently, the ICRP has started a revision of these coefficients, including new Monte Carlo codes for benchmarking. So far, little information is available about neutron transport below 10 MeV in tissue-equivalent (TE) material performed with Monte Carlo GEANT4 code. The objective of this work is to calculate neutron fluence to personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients, H{sub p} (10)/Φ, with GEANT4 code. The incidence of monoenergetic neutrons was simulated as an expanded and aligned field, with energies ranging between thermal neutrons to 10 MeV on the ICRU slab of dimension 30 x 30 x 15 cm{sup 3}, composed of 76.2% of oxygen, 10.1% of hydrogen, 11.1% of carbon and 2.6% of nitrogen. For all incident energy, a cylindrical sensitive volume is placed at a depth of 10 mm, in the largest surface of the slab (30 x 30 cm{sup 2}). Physic process are included for neutrons, photons and charged particles, and calculations are made for neutrons and secondary particles which reach the sensitive volume. Results obtained are thus compared with values published in ICRP 74. Neutron fluence in the sensitive volume was calculated for benchmarking. The Monte Carlo GEANT4 code was found to be appropriate to calculate neutron doses at energies below 10 MeV correctly. (author)

  13. Compaction in optical fibres and fibre Bragg gratings under nuclear reactor high neutron and gamma fluence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remy, L.; Cheymol, G. [CEA, French Nuclear Energy Commission, Nuclear Energy Division, DPC/SEARS/LISL Bat 467 CEA Saclay 91191 Gif/Yvette Cedex (France); Gusarov, A. [SCK.CEN - Belgian Nuclear Research center, Boeretang 200 2400 Mol (Belgium); Morana, A.; Marin, E.; Girard, S. [Universite de Saint-Etienne, Laboratoire Hubert Curien, UMR CNRS5516, 18, rue du Pr. Lauras, F-42000 Saint-Etienne (France)

    2015-07-01

    In the framework of the development by CEA and SCK.CEN of a Fabry Perot Sensor (FPS) able to measure dimensional changes in Material Testing Reactor (MTR), the first goal of the SAKE 1 (Smirnof extention - Additional Key-tests on Elongation of glass fibres) irradiation was to measure the linear compaction of single mode fibres under high fast neutron fluence. Indeed, the compaction of the fibre which forms one side of the Fabry Perot cavity, may in particular cause a noticeable measurement error. An accurate quantification of this effect is then required to predict the radiation-induced drift and optimize the sensor design. To achieve this, an innovative approach was used. Approximately seventy uncoated fibre tips (length: 30 to 50 mm) have been prepared from several different fibre samples and were installed in the SCK.CEN BR2 reactor (Mol Belgium). After 22 days of irradiation a total fast (E > 1 MeV) fluence of 3 to 5x10{sup 19} n{sub fast}/cm{sup 2}, depending on the sample location, was accumulated. The temperature during irradiation was 291 deg. C, which is not far from the condition of the intended FPS use. A precise measurement of each fibre tip length was made before the irradiation and compared to the post irradiation measurement highlighting a decrease of the fibres' length corresponding to about 0.25% of linear compaction. The amplitude of the changes is independent of the capsule, which could mean that the compaction effect saturates even at the lowest considered fluence. In the prospect of performing distributed temperature measurement in MTR, several fibre Bragg gratings written using a femtosecond laser have been also irradiated. All the gratings were written in radiation hardened fibres, and underwent an additional treatment with a procedure enhancing their resistance to ionizing radiations. A special mounting made it possible to test the reflection and the transmission of the gratings on fibre samples cut down to 30 to 50 mm. The comparison

  14. International key comparison of neutron fluence measurements in mono-energetic neutron fields: C.C.R.I.(3)-K10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.; Wang, Z.; Rong, C. [China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE), Beijing, People' s Republic of China (China); Lovestam, G.; Plompen, A.; Puglisi, N. [EC-JRC-Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Geel (Belgium); Gilliam, D.M.; Eisenhauer, C.M.; Nico, J.S.; Dewey, M.S. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg (United States); Kudo, K.; Uritani, A.; Harano, H.; Takeda, N. [National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ), Tsukuba (Japan); Thomas, D.J.; Roberts, N.J.; Bennett, A.; Kolkowski, P. [National Physical Laboratory (NPL), Teddington (United Kingdom); Moisseev, N.N.; Kharitonov, I.A. [Mendeleyev Institute for Metrology (VNIIM), St Petersburg (Russian Federation); Guldbakke, S.; Klein, H.; Nolte, R.; Schlegel, D. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    C.C.R.I. Section III (neutron measurements) conducted a unique key comparison of neutron fluence measurements in mono-energetic neutron fields. In contrast to former comparisons, here the fluence measurements were performed with the participants' instruments in the same neutron fields at the P.T.B. accelerator facility. Seven laboratories- the C.I.A.E. (China), I.R.M.M. (E.C.), N.M.I.J. (Japan), N.I.S.T. (USA), N.P.L. (UK), P.T.B. (Germany) and the V.N.I.I.M. (Russia)-employed their primary standard reference methods or transfer instruments carefully calibrated against their primary standards, to determine the fluence of 0.144 MeV, 1.2 MeV, 5.0 MeV and 14.8 MeV neutrons and reported calibration coefficients for a selected neutron monitor and each neutron energy with a detailed uncertainty budget for the measurements. The key comparison reference values (K.C.R.V.) were finally evaluated as the weighted mean values of the neutron fluence at 1 m distance from the target in vacuum per neutron monitor count. The uncertainties of each K.C.R.V. amounted to about 1%. The degree of equivalence (D.o.E.), defined as the deviation of the result reported by the laboratories for each energy from the corresponding K.C.R.V., and the associated expanded uncertainty are also reported. The deviations between the results of two laboratories each with the corresponding expanded uncertainties complete the documentation of the degrees of equivalence. (authors)

  15. International key comparison of neutron fluence measurements in mono-energetic neutron fields: C.C.R.I.(3)-K10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.; Wang, Z.; Rong, C.; Lovestam, G.; Plompen, A.; Puglisi, N.; Gilliam, D.M.; Eisenhauer, C.M.; Nico, J.S.; Dewey, M.S.; Kudo, K.; Uritani, A.; Harano, H.; Takeda, N.; Thomas, D.J.; Roberts, N.J.; Bennett, A.; Kolkowski, P.; Moisseev, N.N.; Kharitonov, I.A.; Guldbakke, S.; Klein, H.; Nolte, R.; Schlegel, D.

    2007-01-01

    C.C.R.I. Section III (neutron measurements) conducted a unique key comparison of neutron fluence measurements in mono-energetic neutron fields. In contrast to former comparisons, here the fluence measurements were performed with the participants' instruments in the same neutron fields at the P.T.B. accelerator facility. Seven laboratories- the C.I.A.E. (China), I.R.M.M. (E.C.), N.M.I.J. (Japan), N.I.S.T. (USA), N.P.L. (UK), P.T.B. (Germany) and the V.N.I.I.M. (Russia)-employed their primary standard reference methods or transfer instruments carefully calibrated against their primary standards, to determine the fluence of 0.144 MeV, 1.2 MeV, 5.0 MeV and 14.8 MeV neutrons and reported calibration coefficients for a selected neutron monitor and each neutron energy with a detailed uncertainty budget for the measurements. The key comparison reference values (K.C.R.V.) were finally evaluated as the weighted mean values of the neutron fluence at 1 m distance from the target in vacuum per neutron monitor count. The uncertainties of each K.C.R.V. amounted to about 1%. The degree of equivalence (D.o.E.), defined as the deviation of the result reported by the laboratories for each energy from the corresponding K.C.R.V., and the associated expanded uncertainty are also reported. The deviations between the results of two laboratories each with the corresponding expanded uncertainties complete the documentation of the degrees of equivalence. (authors)

  16. Pain during photodynamic therapy is associated with protoporphyrin IX fluorescence and fluence rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiegell, S.R.; Skiveren, J.; Philipsen, P.A.

    2008-01-01

    two different fluence rates. Pain score during PDT and PpIX fluorescence prior to illumination were measured. Results The study showed that pain during illumination was associated with the PpIX fluorescence in the treatment area (P = 0.0003, R-2 = 0.31). When using a fluence rate of 34 mW cm(-2......) patients with acne had a pain score of 6 [interquartile range (IQR) 5-7] compared with 8 (IQR 6-10) when using a fluence rate of 68 mW cm(-2) (P = 0.018). After correcting the pain score for PpIX fluorescence no differences in pain scores were found between first and second acne treatment, locations of AK......Background Pain during photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a considerable problem that needs to be studied to improve this otherwise attractive treatment of skin diseases. Objectives To compare pain during PDT using two different fluence rates, and also to evaluate the association between pain...

  17. Assessment of the Efficiency of HWCon IASCC Crack Growth Rate for High Fluence BWRMaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teysseyre, Sebastien Paul [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report describes the experimental study performed to assess the efficiency of hydrogen water chemistry on the propagation rate of cracks generated by irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in high fluence material. The selection of the material and the test procedures followed for this study are presented. The test results obtained with 8.6 dpa specimen are discussed.

  18. Low fluence rate photodynamic therapy combined with intravitreal bevacizumab for neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costagliola, Ciro; Romano, Mario R; Rinaldi, Michele; dell'Omo, Roberto; Chiosi, Flavia; Menzione, Massimo; Semeraro, Francesco

    2010-02-01

    To report the efficacy and safety of intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB) alone versus IVB plus low-fluence photodynamic therapy (PDT) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) patients and to verify the occurrence of a synergistic effect of the combined approach on visual acuity, size and morphology of lesion, as well as on the treatment rate. Prospective comparative interventional study on 85 patients with treatment-naive classic, or predominantly classic, subfoveal choroidal neovascularisation secondary to AMD. Patients were randomly assigned to group 1 (IVB injections) and group 2 (IVB plus low fluence PDT). In group 2, the PDT with verteporfin was delivered with a low fluence rate (300 mW/cm2 for 83 s, 25 J/cm2). The follow-up was scheduled at 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. The eye without recurrence received a mean of 2.8 (group 1) versus 1.4 (group 2) IVB injections, whereas the eyes with recurrence received a mean of 3.2 (group 1) versus 2.2 (group 2) IVB injections. The difference in reinjection rate between the two groups was statistically significant (p=0.03, ANOVA test). Visual acuity improvement was not statistically significant between the two groups (p=0.31). The combination of IVB with low fluence PDT for the treatment of classic or predominantly classic neovascular AMD works in a synergistic fashion with a significant reduction in IVB reinjections rate.

  19. Contribution to the prompt fission neutron spectrum modeling. Uncertainty propagation on a vessel fluence calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berge, Leonie

    2015-01-01

    these uncertainties on the calculated spectrum, and obtaining realistic uncertainties without having to artificially raise them, as it is sometimes necessary in Bayesian adjustments. The experimental uncertainty propagation also impacts the spectrum correlation matrix. We present the result for thermal neutron-induced fission of 235 U and 239 Pu. For the Madland-Nix model with constant inverse cross-section, the prompt neutron mean energy is 1.979 MeV for 235 U and 2.087 MeV for 239 Pu. The last aspect of this work is the calculation of the impact of the PFNS and its covariance matrix on a reactor vessel flux. This calculation is of major importance, since the vessel fluence estimation determines the vessel integrity, and therefore determines the reactor lifetime. We observe the importance of the PFNS correlation terms, to compute in particular the vessel flux uncertainty above 1 MeV, which is of the order of 6% (uncertainty only due to PFNS). (author) [fr

  20. Investigation of the drastic change in the sputter rate of polymers at low ion fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zekonyte, J.; Zaporojtchenko, V.; Faupel, F.

    2005-01-01

    The polymer sputter rate dependence on ion fluence and ion chemistry (Ar, N 2 , O 2 ) at 1 keV energy was investigated using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) which allowed to do real time etch rate measurements and to study kinetics of sputtering. The obtained sputter rates differed drastically from polymer to polymer showing, that the chemical structure of polymer is an important factor in the polymer etch yield. A decrease in the sputter rate was observed up to ion fluence of 5 x 10 14 -5 x 10 15 cm -2 (depending on the polymer type and ion chemistry) followed by the saturation in the rate at prolonged ion bombardment. Polymer removal was accompanied by the formation of degradation products, cross-linking or branching, modification of the surface chemical structure, which was studied in situ using XPS. The dependence of the surface glass transition temperature, T gs on the ion fluence was studied using the method based on the embedding of metallic nanoparticles. The correlation between chemical yield data and ablation rate is discussed

  1. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculations of the neutron and γ-ray fluences in the TFTR diagnostic basement and comparisons with measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liew, S.L.; Ku, L.P.; Kolibal, J.G.

    1985-10-01

    Realistic calculations of the neutron and γ-ray fluences in the TFTR diagnostic basement have been carried out with three-dimensional Monte Carlo models. Comparisons with measurements show that the results are well within the experimental uncertainties

  2. Swelling of Fe-Mn and Fe-Cr-Mn alloys at high neutron fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Brager, H.R.

    1986-06-01

    Swelling data on neutron-irradiated simple Fe-Cr-Mn and Fe-Mn alloys, as well as commercial Fe-Cr-Mn base alloys are now becoming available at exposure levels approaching 50 dpa. The swelling rate decreases from the ∼1%/dpa found at lower exposures, probably due to the extensive formation of ferritic phases. As expected, commercial alloys swell less than the simple alloys

  3. Pain during photodynamic therapy is associated with protoporphyrin IX fluorescence and fluence rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiegell, S.R.; Skiveren, J.; Philipsen, P.A.

    2008-01-01

    and protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence, lesion type, lesion preparation and lesion localization. Methods Twenty-six patients with actinic keratoses (AKs) in different localizations and 34 patients with facial acne vulgaris were treated with methyl aminolaevulinate-PDT. Patients with acne were illuminated using......) patients with acne had a pain score of 6 [interquartile range (IQR) 5-7] compared with 8 (IQR 6-10) when using a fluence rate of 68 mW cm(-2) (P = 0.018). After correcting the pain score for PpIX fluorescence no differences in pain scores were found between first and second acne treatment, locations of AK...... lesions or between the two types of lesions. Conclusions Pain during PDT was correlated with the PpIX fluorescence in the treatment area prior to illumination. Pain was reduced using a lower fluence rate during PDT of acne Udgivelsesdato: 2008/4...

  4. Determination of neutron fluence and radiation brittleness temperature of WWER-440 and WWER-1000 pressure vessels in Kozloduy NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilieva, K.; Apostolov, T.; Belousov, S.; Petrova, T.; Antonov, S.; Ivanov, K.; Prodanova, R.

    1993-01-01

    In Units 1-4 of Kozloduy NPP (WWER-440/230), the weld 4 of RPV undergoes the most severe irradiation embrittlement. Neither witness-samples, nor detectors are designed for these reactors. Transport calculations of fast neutron fluence on WWER-440 RPV and ex-vessel measurements by threshold activation detectors are the primary means for adequate assessment of metal state and for prognosis concerning the reactor life span. In WWER-1000 reactors (Units 5-6) the maximum neutron fluence occurs on the weld 3. The systematical observation of metal state is performed through witness-samples and threshold activation detectors ( 54 Fe (n,p), 63 Cu (n,α), 93 Nb (n,n')) placed above the reactor top edge and at the first vessel ring level. There are big differences in energy spectrum and integral neutron flux falling onto the weld 3, the RPV base metal and the staff detectors. This requires additional neutron measurements in the air gap between the RPV and the thermal insulation. (author)

  5. Determination of the Neutron Fluence, the Beam Characteristics and the Backgrounds at the CERN-PS TOF Facility

    CERN Multimedia

    Leal, L C; Kitis, G; Guber, K H; Quaranta, A; Koehler, P E

    2002-01-01

    In the scope of our programme we propose to start in July 2000 with measurements on elements of well known cross sections, in order to check the reliability of the whole experimental installation at the CERN-TOF facility. These initial exploratory measurements will provide the key-parameters required for the further experimentation at the CERN-TOF neutron beam. The neutron fluence and energy resolution will be determined as a function of the neutron kinetic energy by reproducing standard capture and fission cross sections. The measurements of capture cross sections on elements with specific cross section features will allow to us to disentangle the different components of backgrounds and estimate their level in the experimental area. The time-energy calibration will be determined and monitored with a set of monoenergetic filters as well as by the measurements of elements with resonance-dominated cross sections. Finally, in this initial phase the behaviour of several detectors scheduled in successive measureme...

  6. Neutron flux calculation and fluence in the encircling of the core and vessel of a reactor BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez C, E.

    2011-01-01

    One of the main objectives related to the safety of any nuclear power plant, including the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde is to ensure the structural integrity of reactor pressure vessel. To identify and quantify the damage caused by neutron irradiation in the vessel of any nuclear reactor, it is necessary to know both the neutron flux and the neutron fluence that the vessel has been receiving during its operation lifetime, and that the damage observed by mechanical testing are products of microstructural effects induced by neutron irradiation; therefore, it is important the study and prediction of the neutron flux in order to have a better understanding of the damage that these materials are receiving. The calculation here described uses the DORT code, which solves the neutron transport equation in discrete ordinates in two dimensions (x-y, r-θ and r-z), according to a regulatory guide, it should make an approximation of the neutron flux in three dimensions by the so called synthesis method. It is called in that way because it achieves a representation of 3 Dimensional neutron flux combining or summarizing the fluxes calculated by DORT r-θ, r-z and r. This work presents the application of synthesis method, according to Regulatory Guide 1190, to determine the 3 Dimensional fluxes in internal BWR reactor using three different spatial meshes. The results of the neutron flux and fluence, using three different meshes in the directions r, θ and z were compared with results reported in the literature obtaining a difference not larger than 9.61%, neutron flux reached its maximum, 1.58 E + 12 n/cm 2 s, at a height H 4 (239.07 cm) and angle 32.236 o in the core shroud and 4.00 E + 09 n/cm 2 s at a height H 4 and angle 35.27 o in the inner wall of the reactor vessel, positions that are consistent to within ±10% over the ones reported in the literature. (Author)

  7. Effects of fluence and fluence rate of proton irradiation upon magnetism in Fe{sub 65}Ni{sub 35} Invar alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushita, Masafumi, E-mail: matsushita.masafumi.me@ehime-u.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ehime University, 3-Bunkyocho, Matsuyama 790-8977 (Japan); Wada, Hideki [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ehime University, 3-Bunkyocho, Matsuyama 790-8977 (Japan); Matsushima, Yasushi [Department of Physics, Okayama University, 2-naka-tsushima, Kitaku, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Curie temperature, T{sub C}, of the Fe-Ni Invar alloys increase due to irradiation with electron and some kinds of ions. In this study, proton irradiation effects upon magnetism in an Fe{sub 65}Ni{sub 35} alloy have been investigated. It is found that the increment of T{sub C,} ∆T{sub C}, increases with increasing fluence. The magnetic hysteresis curve of the alloy was found to be unaffected by irradiation. Comparing ∆T{sub C} and the calculated energy transfer from the ions to the sample, it seemed that ∆T{sub C} was found to be related to the number of vacancies formed in nuclear collision events. In addition, ∆T{sub C} was influenced by the fluence rate, i.e., the deposited energy per unit time. - Highlights: • Proton irradiation effect on T{sub C} of Fe{sub 65}Ni{sub 35} was investigated. • Increment of T{sub C}, ∆T{sub C}, was confirmed in ion passed through and stopped samples. • The relationships among ∆T{sub C} and the deposited energy and vacancies were discussed. • It was reasonable to consider that ∆T{sub C} was related to the number of vacancies. • ∆T{sub C} was influenced by fluence rate, i.e. the energy deposition rate.

  8. Personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients for neutron fluence over the energy range of 20-250 MeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsher, R H; McLean, T D; Justus, A L; Devine, R T; Gadd, M S

    2010-03-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed to extend existing neutron personal dose equivalent fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients to an energy of 250 MeV. Presently, conversion coefficients, H(p,slab)(10,alpha)/Phi, are given by ICRP-74 and ICRU-57 for a range of angles of radiation incidence (alpha = 0, 15, 30, 45, 60 and 75 degrees ) in the energy range from thermal to 20 MeV. Standard practice has been to base operational dose quantity calculations 20 MeV. Both light and heavy ions (HIs) (carbon, nitrogen and oxygen recoil nuclei) were transported down to a lower energy limit (1 keV for light ions and 5 MeV for HIs). Track energy below the limit was assumed to be locally deposited. For neutron tracks slab phantom.

  9. NGI-9 pulsed neutron generator with a fluence to 1010 n/s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allakhverdov, A.Sh.; Ogarkin, V.I.; Silicheva, G.P.; Timofeev, Yu.I.

    1975-01-01

    A neutron pulse generator with 14 MeV energy used for the activation analysis, is described. Its functional diagram and the technical characteristics are presented. The studies of the generator that resulted in determination of the effect of the accelerating voltage amplitude, the delay in the ion source firing with respect to the pulse of the accelerating voltage, the amount of operating ion sources and the energy imparted to them on the neutron flux magnitude are conducted. It is confirmed by the studies that the neutron generator operating in the nominal regime makes it possible to obtain a neutron flux of 5x10 9 -10 10 neutr./s. The dependence of the neutron flux variation on the frequency of pulse sequence for various ion sources is shown

  10. Neutron fluence in a 18 MeV Electron Accelerator for Therapy; Fluencia de neutrones en un Acelerador de Electrones de 18 MeV para terapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paredes G, L.C. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Direccion de Innovacion Tecnologica, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    An investigation was made on the theoretical fundamentals for the determination of the neutron fluence in a linear electron accelerator for radiotherapy applications and the limit values of leakage neutron radiation established by guidelines and standards in radiation protection for these type of accelerators. This investigation includes the following parts: a) Exhaustive bibliographical review on the topics mentioned above, in order to combine and to update the necessary basic information to facilitate the understanding of this subject; b) Analysis of the accelerator operation and identification of its main components, specially in the accelerator head; c) Study of different types of targets and its materials for the Bremsstrahlung production which is based on the electron initial energy, the thickness of the target, and its angular distribution and energy, which influences in the neutron generation by means of the photonuclear and electro disintegration reactions; d) Analysis of the neutron yield based on the target type and its thickness, the energy of electrons and photons; e) Analysis of the neutron energy spectra generated in the accelerator head, inside and outside the treatment room; f) Study of the dosimetry fundamentals for neutron and photon mixed fields, the dosimeter selection criteria and standards applied for these applications, specially the Panasonic U D-809 thermoluminescent dosemeter and C R-39 nuclear track dosimeter; g) Theoretical calculation of the neutron yield using a simplified geometric model for the accelerator head with spherical cell, which considers the target, primary collimator, flattener filter, movable collimators and the head shielding as the main components for radiation production. The cases with W and Pb shielding for closed movable collimators and an irradiation field of 20 x 20 cm{sup 2} were analyzed and, h) Experimental evaluation of the leakage neutron radiation from the patient and head planes, observing that the

  11. Gel dosimeters as useful dose and thermal-fluence detectors in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambarini, G.; Valente, M.; Moss, R.L.; Daquino, G.G.; Nievaart, V.A.; Mariani, M.; Vanossi, E.; Carrara, M.

    2006-01-01

    The dosimetry method based on Fricke-Xylenol-Orange-infused gels in form of layers has shown noticeable potentiality for in-phantom or in-free-beam dose and thermal flux profiling and imaging in the high fluxes of thermal or epithermal neutrons utilised for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Gel-dosimeters in form of layers give the possibility not only of obtaining spatial dose distributions but also of achieving measurements of each dose contribution in neutron fields. The discrimination of the various dose components is achieved by means of pixel-to-pixel manipulations of pairs of images obtained with gel-dosimeters having different isotopic composition. It is possible to place large dosimeters, detecting in such a way large dose images, because the layer geometry of dosimeters avoids sensitive variation of neutron transport due to the gel isotopic composition. Some results obtained after the last improvements of the method are reported. (Author)

  12. Rhodium self-powered detector for monitoring neutron fluence, energy production, and isotopic composition of fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, A.P.; Pochivalin, G.P.; Shipovskikh, Yu.M.; Garusov, Yu.V.; Chernikov, O.G.; Shevchenko, V.G.

    1993-01-01

    The use of self-powered detectors (SPDs) with a rhodium emitter customarily involves monitoring of neutron fields in the core of a nuclear reactor. Since current in an SPD is generated primarily because of the neutron flux, which is responsible for the dynamics of particular nuclear transformations, including fission reactions of heavy isotopes, the detector signal can be attributed unambiguously to energy release at the location of the detector. Computation modeling performed with the KOMDPS package of programs of the current formation in a rhodium SPD along with the neutron-physical processes that occur in the reactor core makes it possible to take account of the effect of the principal factors characterizing the operating conditions and the design features of the fuel channel and the detector, reveal quantitative relations between the generated signal and individual physical parameters, and determine the metrological parameters of the detector. The formation and transport of changed particles in the sensitive part of the SPC is calculated by the Monte Carlo method. The emitter activation, neutron transport, and dynamics of the isotopic composition in the fuel channel containing the SPD are determined by solving the kinetic equation in the multigroup representation of the neutron spectrum, using the discrete ordinate method. In this work the authors consider the operation of a rhodium SPD in a bundle of 49 fuel channels of the RBMK-1000 reactor with a fuel enrichment of 2.4% from the time it is inserted into a fresh channel

  13. Measurement of low neutron fluences with polycarbonate foils electrochemically etched with methyl alcohol-KOH solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumamoto, Y.

    1982-01-01

    Electrochemical etching of polycarbonate foils was performed using a KOH solution with a high concentration of methyl alcohol under different conditions of field strength, frequency, temperature and etching time. These studies showed that the highest neutron sensitivity relative to the inherent background in the foil was obtained under the following etching conditions: 52 kV/cm, 1 kHz, 30 0 C, 30 min in a solution of 45 gm KOH + 80 cc CH 3 OH + 20 cc H 2 O. Under these conditions, 100 mrem of neutrons from a Ra-Be source gave 70 pits per cm 2 while background was 7 +- 3 pits per cm 2 (10 +- 5 mrem). The pit diameters were about 90 μm. This sensitivity (giving lowest measurable dose of 15 mrem) is quite sufficient for personnel neutron dosimetry applications and the size of the pits is large enough for easy counting using a microscope at magnification of 40X. (author)

  14. Measurement of the fluence flux of monoenergetic neutrons on the Van de Graaff accelerator at Cadarache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabo, Imre.

    1976-12-01

    This report is a compilation of the different fast neutron flux measurements performed by the Section d'Etudes et de Mesures en Neutrons Rapides (S.E.M.N.R.-CADARACHE) in the energy range extending from 10keV to 14.8 MeV. The facilities used and the methods developed are described. The analysis of the calibrations made during the last few years, led to a final set of values for the efficiency of the ''directional counter''. This counter was used as a reference for microscopic data measurements and also for neutron flux measurements carried out in other laboratories. The accuracy obtained in the 10keV-14MeV range varied from 2 to 3.5% (one standard deviation) [fr

  15. Research Reactor Application for Materials under High Neutron Fluence. Proceedings of an IAEA Technical Meeting (TM-34779)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-05-01

    Research reactors (RRs) have played, and continue to play, a key role in the development of the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and technology. The role of the IAEA is to assist Member States in the effective utilization of these technologies in various domains of research such as fundamental and applied science, industry, human health care and environmental studies, as well as nuclear energy applications. In particular, material testing reactors (MTRs), serve as unique tools in scientific and technological development and they have quite a wide variety of applications. Today, a large range of different RR designs exist when compared with power reactors and they also have different operating modes, producing high neutron fluxes, which may be steady or pulsed. Recently, an urgent need has arisen for the development of new advanced materials, for example in the nuclear industry, where RRs offer capacities for irradiation programmes. Besides the scientific and research activities and commercial applications, RRs are also used extensively for educational training activities for scientists and engineers. This report is a compilation of outputs of an IAEA Technical Meeting (TM-34779) held on Research Reactor Application for Materials under High Neutron Fluence. The overall objective of the meeting was to review typical applications of small and medium size RRs, such as material characterization and testing, neutron physics and beam research, neutron radiography and imaging as well as isotope production and other types of non-nuclear applications. Several issues were discussed during the meeting, in particular: (1) recent development of irradiation facilities, specific irradiation programmes and their implementation; (2) effective and optimal RR operation regimes for irradiation purposes; (3) sharing of best practices and existing technical knowledge; and (4) fostering of advanced or innovative technologies, e.g. information exchange and effective collaboration. This

  16. Preliminary study on 2-dimensional distributions of 10B reaction rate in a water phantom with boron-doped CR-39 for 7Li(p, n)7Be neutrons by 1.95 MeV protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Tsuruta, T.

    2000-01-01

    In an Accelerator-based neutron irradiation field using 7 Li(p, n) 7 Be neutrons by 1.95 MeV protons, the distributions of 10 B reaction rates and thermal neutron fluence in a water phantom were measured using Boron-doped CR-39 and Au activation analysis, respectively. Comparing the results of the measurements, we discussed the validity of the evaluation method of 10 B reaction rate using thermal neutron fluence. (author)

  17. Treating Breast Cancer by Radiation with a Fluence of Thermal Neutrons & Nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askouri, N.A.; Abbas, S.K.

    2015-01-01

    In this study we mention one of the treatments to cure cancer. It is considered one of the promissing methods nowadays. It includes the use of Boron as a nano material to improve the radiation sensitivity inside the breast. These are treated with low energy thermal neutrons (0.025 eV) resulting in high alpha linear energy transporter and Lithium nucleus 7 Li in addition to Gamma photon with (0.48 MeV). The energy of these products (2.31 MeV) which destroy the cancer cells in the tissue.This treatment checks several physical factors related to the effectively of using Boron to improve the treatment with radiation. The physical factors include the amount of the falling thermal neutrons and the time of exposure and the concentration of the nano Boron material and the amount of the falling thermal neutrons.In this study the concentrations of used nano Boron were (5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50) ng, and each concentration was a target for the thermal neutrons of (0.025 eV) energy interaction. The times of exposure (1800) s , while the other factors were kept fixed.The results showed a great improvement in the received dose and improvement in the number of the destroyed cancer cells. The increase is due to two reasons:First : the selective accumulation of stableB10 in the cells of the tumor only and not the healthy tissue.Second : 10 B tendency towards thermal neutrons (0.025 eV) interaction. The resultant from this interaction is unstable 11 B causing the production of high linear energy transporter represented by alpha particle ( 1.47 MeV) and 7 Li nucleus (0.84 MeV), as well as Gamma photon (0.48 MeV).The energy of both products is deposited within (5-9 μm) of the tissue which is close to the cells diameter and it spreads in two opposite directions in destroying the DNA chain responsible for regenerating new cells, therefore, the possibility of destroying cancer cells is high

  18. Study of the response of a piezoceramic motor irradiated in a fast reactor up to a neutron fluence of 2.77E+17 n/cm2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillon, Mario; Monti, Chiara; Mugnaini, Giampiero; Neri, Carlo; Rossi, Paolo; Carta, Mario; Fiorani, Orlando; Santagata, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Piezoceramic motors are compliant with magnetic field, temperature and vacuum. • We studied the response of a piezoceramic motor during the irradiation with neutrons. • The response was studied using 1 MeV neutrons up to a neutron fluence of 2.77E+17 n/cm 2 . • Neutron irradiation produces a shift of the optimal resonance frequency and a decrease of the motor speed. • The performance changes do not affect the proper operation of the motor. - Abstract: A piezoceramic motor has been identified as the potential apparatus for carrying out the rotation of the scanning head of a laser radar system used for viewing the first wall of the ITER vessel. This diagnostic is simply referred to as IVVS (In Vessel Viewing System). The choice fell on a piezoceramic motor due to the presence of strong magnetic fields (up 8 T) and of the high vacuum and temperature conditions. To be compliant with all the ITER environmental conditions it was necessary to qualify the piezo-motor under gamma and neutron irradiation. In this paper are described the procedures and tests that have been performed to verify the compatibility of the operation of the motor adopted in the presence of a fast neutron fluence which was gradually increased over time in order to reach a total value of 2.77 × 10 17 n/cm 2 . Such neutron fluence was obtained by irradiating the motor in a position close to the core of the fast nuclear reactor TAPIRO, in operation at the ENEA Casaccia Research Centre, Italy. The neutron spectrum in this position has been identified as representative of that found in the rest position of the IVVS head during ITER operation. The cumulative neutron fluence reached corresponds to that it is expected to be reached during the entire life of ITER for the IVVS in the rest position without any shield. This work describes the experimental results of this test; the methodology adopted to determine the total neutron fluence achieved and the methodology adopted for the

  19. The effect of incremental gamma-ray doses and incremental neutron fluences upon the performance of self-biased sup 1 sup 0 B-coated high-purity epitaxial GaAs thermal neutron detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gersch, H K; Simpson, P A

    2002-01-01

    High-purity epitaxial GaAs sup 1 sup 0 B-coated thermal neutron detectors advantageously operate at room temperature without externally applied voltage. Sample detectors were systematically irradiated at fixed grid locations near the core of a 2 MW research reactor to determine their operational neutron dose threshold. Reactor pool locations were assigned so that fast and thermal neutron fluxes to the devices were similar. Neutron fluences ranged between 10 sup 1 sup 1 and 10 sup 1 sup 4 n/cm sup 2. GaAs detectors were exposed to exponential fluences of base ten. Ten detector designs were irradiated and studied, differentiated between p-i-n diodes and Schottky barrier diodes. The irradiated sup 1 sup 0 B-coated detectors were tested for neutron detection sensitivity in a thermalized neutron beam. Little damage was observed for detectors irradiated at neutron fluences of 10 sup 1 sup 2 n/cm sup 2 and below, but signals noticeably degraded at fluences of 10 sup 1 sup 3 n/cm sup 2. Catastrophic damage was appare...

  20. Neutron/muon correlation functions to improve neutron detection capabilities outside nuclear facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordinario, Donald Thomas

    The natural neutron background rate is largely due to cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere and the subsequent neutron emission from the interaction products. The neutron background is part of a larger cosmic radiation shower that also includes electrons, gamma rays, and muons. Since neutrons interact much differently than muons in building materials, the muon and neutron fluence rates in the natural background can be compared to the measured muon and neutron fluence rate when shielded by common building materials. The simultaneous measurement of muon and neutron fluence rates might allow for an earlier identification of man-made neutron sources, such as hidden nuclear materials. This study compares natural background neutron rates to computer simulated neutron rates shielded by common structural and building materials. The characteristic differences between neutrons and muons resulted in different attenuation properties under the same shielded conditions. Correlation functions between cosmic ray generated neutrons and muons are then used to predict neutron fluence rates in different urban environments.

  1. Development of a TPC for energy and fluence references in low energies neutronic fields (from 8 keV to 5 MeV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maire, Donovan

    2015-01-01

    In order to judge the measurement reliability, metrology requires to measure quantities with their uncertainties, in relation to a reference through a documented and unbroken chain of calibrations. In neutron radiation field, instrument response has to be known as a function of the neutron energy. Then detector calibrations are required using reference neutron fields. In France, primary reference neutron fields are held by the LNE-IRSN, at the Laboratory for Neutron Metrology and Dosimetry (LMDN). In order to improve reference neutron field characterization, the LNE-IRSN MIMAC μTPC has been developed. This detector is a Time Projection Chamber (TPC), using a gas at low pressure (30 mbar abs. to 1 bar abs.). Nuclear recoils are generated by neutron elastic scattering onto gas atoms. By measuring the nuclear recoil energy and scattering angle, the μTPC detector is able to measure the energy distribution of the neutron fluence between 8 keV and 5 MeV. The main challenge was to perform accurate spectrometry of neutron fields in the keV range, following a primary procedure. First of all, a metrological approach was followed in order to master every physical process taking part in the neutron detection. This approach led to develop the direct and inverse models, representing the detector response function and its inverse function respectively. Using this detailed characterization, the energy distribution of the neutron fluence has been measured for a continuous neutron field of 27 keV. The reconstructed energy is 28,2 ± 4,5 keV, the difference between μTPC integral fluence measurement and other measurement methods is less than 6%. The LNE-IRSN MIMAC μTPC system becomes the only one system able to measure simultaneously energy and fluence at energies lower than 100 keV, following a primary procedure. The project goal is then reached. These measurements at energies lower than 100 keV shows also a non-linearity between the ionization charge and the ion kinetic energy

  2. Neutron fluence at the reactor pressure vessel wall - a comparison of French and German procedures and strategies in PWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tricot, N. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, IRSN/DES/SECCA, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France); Jendrich, U. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Garching (Germany)

    2003-01-01

    While the neutrons within the core may take part in the chain reaction, those neutrons emitted from the core are basically lost for the energy production. This 'neutron leakage' represents a loss of fuel efficiency and causes neutron embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) wall. The latter raises safety concerns, needs to be monitored closely and may necessitate mitigating measures. There are different strategies to deal with these two undesirable effects: The neutron emission may be reduced to some extent all around the core or just at the 'hot spots' of RPV embrittlement by tailored core loading patterns. A higher absorption rate of neutrons may also be achieved by a larger water gap between the core and the RPV. In this paper the inter-relations between the distribution of neutron flux, core geometry, core loading strategy, RPV embrittlement and its surveillance are discussed at first. Then the different strategies followed by the German and French operators are described. Finally the conclusions will highlight the communalities and differences between these strategies as different approaches to the same problem of safety as well as economy. (authors)

  3. Neutron fluence and energy reconstruction with the IRSN recoil detector μ-TPC at 27 keV, 144 keV and 565 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maire, D.; Lebreton, L.; Richer, J.P. [IRSN, PRP-HOM, SDE, LMDN, 13115 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Bosson, G.; Bourrion, O.; Guillaudin, O.; Riffard, Q.; Santos, D. [CNRS/IN2P3-UJF-INPG, LPSC, 38000 Grenoble (France)

    2015-07-01

    The French Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), associated to the French Metrology Institute (LNE), is developing a time projection chamber using a Micromegas anode: μ-TPC. This work is carried out in collaboration with the Laboratory of Subatomic Physics and Cosmology (LPSC). The aim is to characterize with a primary procedure the energy distribution of neutron fluence in the energy range 8 keV - 1 MeV. The time projection chambers are gaseous detectors, which are able to measure charged particles energy and to reconstruct their track if a pixelated anode is used. In our case, the gas is used as a (n, p) converter in order to detect neutrons down to few keV. Coming from elastic collisions with neutrons, recoil protons lose a part of their kinetic energy by ionizing the gas. The ionization electrons are drifted toward a pixelated anode (2D projection), read at 50 MHz by a self-triggered electronic system to obtain the third track dimension. The neutron energy is reconstructed event by event thanks to proton scattering angle and proton energy measurements. The scattering angle is deduced from the 3D track. The proton energy is obtained by charge collection measurements, knowing the ionization quenching factor (i.e. the part of proton kinetic energy lost by ionizing the gas). The fluence is calculated thanks to the detected events number and the simulated detector response. The μ-TPC is a new reliable detector which enables to measure energy distribution of the neutron fluence without deconvolution or neutron calibration contrary to usual gaseous counters. The μ-TPC is still being developed and measurements have been carried out at the AMANDE facility, with neutrons energies going from 8 keV to 565 keV. After the context and the μ-TPC working principle presentation, measurements of the neutron energy and fluence at 27.2 keV, 144 keV and 565 keV are shown and compared to the complete detector simulation. This work shows the first direct

  4. A Project for High Fluence 14 MeV Neutron Source

    CERN Document Server

    Pillon, Mario; Pizzuto, Aldo; Pietropaolo, Antonino

    2014-01-01

    The international community agrees on the importance to build a large facility devoted to test and validate materials to be used in harsh neutron environments. Such a facility, proposed by ENEA , reconsiders a previous study known as “Sorgentina” but takes into account new technological development so far attained. The “New Sorgentina” Fusion Source (NSFS) project is based upon an intense D - T 14 MeV neutron source achievable with T and D ion beams impinging on 2 m radius rotating target s . NSFS produces about 1 x10 13 n cm - 2 s - 1 over about 50 cm 3 . The NSFS facility will use the ion source and accelerating system technology developed for the Positive Ion Injectors (PII) used to heat the plasma in the fusion experiments,. NSFS, to be intended as an European facility, may be realized in a few years, once provided a preliminary technological program devote to study the operation of the ion source in continuous mode, target h eat loading/ removal, target and tritium handling, inventory as well as ...

  5. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program BWR High-Fluence Material Project: Assessment of the Role of High-Fluence on the Efficiency of HWC Mitigation on SCC Crack Growth Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastien Teysseyre

    2014-04-01

    As nuclear power plants age, the increasing neutron fluence experienced by stainless steels components affects the materials resistance to stress corrosion cracking and fracture toughness. The purpose of this report is to identify any new issues that are expected to rise as boiling water reactor power plants reach the end of their initial life and to propose a path forward to study such issues. It has been identified that the efficiency of hydrogen water chemistry mitigation technology may decrease as fluence increases for high-stress intensity factors. This report summarizes the data available to support this hypothesis and describes a program plan to determine the efficiency of hydrogen water chemistry as a function of the stress intensity factor applied and fluence. This program plan includes acquisition of irradiated materials, generation of material via irradiation in a test reactor, and description of the test plan. This plan offers three approaches, each with an estimated timetable and budget.

  6. Identification of neutron irradiation induced strain rate sensitivity change using inverse FEM analysis of Charpy test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haušild, Petr; Materna, Aleš; Kytka, Miloš

    2015-04-01

    A simple methodology how to obtain additional information about the mechanical behaviour of neutron-irradiated WWER 440 reactor pressure vessel steel was developed. Using inverse identification, the instrumented Charpy test data records were compared with the finite element computations in order to estimate the strain rate sensitivity of 15Ch2MFA steel irradiated with different neutron fluences. The results are interpreted in terms of activation volume change.

  7. Identification of neutron irradiation induced strain rate sensitivity change using inverse FEM analysis of Charpy test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haušild, Petr, E-mail: petr.hausild@fjfi.cvut.cz [Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Department of Materials, Trojanova 13, 120 00 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); Materna, Aleš [Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Department of Materials, Trojanova 13, 120 00 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); Kytka, Miloš [Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Department of Materials, Trojanova 13, 120 00 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institut, ÚJV Řež, a.s., Hlavní 130, Řež, 250 68 Husinec (Czech Republic)

    2015-04-15

    A simple methodology how to obtain additional information about the mechanical behaviour of neutron-irradiated WWER 440 reactor pressure vessel steel was developed. Using inverse identification, the instrumented Charpy test data records were compared with the finite element computations in order to estimate the strain rate sensitivity of 15Ch2MFA steel irradiated with different neutron fluences. The results are interpreted in terms of activation volume change.

  8. Irradiation creep of nano-powder sintered silicon carbide at low neutron fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyanagi, T.; Shimoda, K.; Kondo, S.; Hinoki, T.; Ozawa, K.; Katoh, Y.

    2014-01-01

    The irradiation creep behavior of nano-powder sintered silicon carbide was investigated using the bend stress relaxation method under neutron irradiation up to 1.9 dpa. The creep deformation was observed at all temperatures ranging from 380 to 1180°C mainly from the irradiation creep but with the increasing contributions from the thermal creep at higher temperatures. The apparent stress exponent of the irradiation creep slightly exceeded unity, and instantaneous creep coefficient at 380 to 790°C was estimated to be ∼1 × 10 -5 [MPa -1 dpa -1 ] at ∼0.1 dpa and 1 × 10 -7 to 1 × 10 -6 [MPa -1 dpa -1 ] at ∼1 dpa. The irradiation creep strain appeared greater than that for the high purity SiC. Microstructural observation and data analysis indicated that the grain-boundary sliding associated with the secondary phases contributes to the irradiation creep at 380–790°C to 0.01–0.11 dpa. (author)

  9. Maximum proton kinetic energy and patient-generated neutron fluence considerations in proton beam arc delivery radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengbusch, E.; Perez-Andujar, A.; DeLuca, P. M. Jr.; Mackie, T. R.

    2009-01-01

    proton kinetic energy from 250 to 200 MeV decreases the total neutron energy fluence produced by stopping a monoenergetic pencil beam in a water phantom by a factor of 2.3. It is possible to significantly lower the requirements on the maximum kinetic energy of a compact proton accelerator if the ability to treat a small percentage of patients with rotational therapy is sacrificed. This decrease in maximum kinetic energy, along with the corresponding decrease in neutron production, could lower the cost and ease the engineering constraints on a compact proton accelerator treatment facility.

  10. Application of low-cost Gallium Arsenide light-emitting-diodes as kerma dosemeter and fluence monitor for high-energy neutrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, B; Simrock, S; Khachan, J; Rybka, D; Romaniuk, R

    2007-01-01

    Displacement damage (DD) caused by fast neutrons in unbiased Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) light emitting diodes (LED) resulted in a reduction of the light output. On the other hand, a similar type of LED irradiated with gamma rays from a (60)Co source up to a dose level in excess of 1.0 kGy (1.0 x 10(5) rad) was found to show no significant drop of the light emission. This phenomenon was used to develop a low cost passive fluence monitor and kinetic energy released per unit mass dosemeter for accelerator-produced neutrons. These LED-dosemeters were used to assess the integrated fluence of photoneutrons, which were contaminated with a strong bremsstrahlung gamma-background generated by the 730 MeV superconducting electron linac driving the free electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron. The applications of GaAs LED as a routine neutron fluence monitor and DD precursor for the electronic components located in high-energy accelerator environment are highlighted.

  11. The vessel fluence; Fluence cuve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the technical meeting on the reactors vessels fluence. They are grouped in eight sessions: the industrial context and the stakes of the vessels control; the organization and the methodology for the fluence computation; the concerned physical properties; the reference computation methods; the fluence monitoring in an industrial context; vessels monitoring under irradiation; others methods in the world; the research and development programs. (A.L.B.)

  12. Evaluation of the fluence to dose conversion coefficients for high energy neutrons using a voxel phantom coupled with the GEANT4 code

    CERN Document Server

    Paganini, S

    2005-01-01

    Crews working on present-day jet aircraft are a large occupationally exposed group with a relatively high average effective dose from Galactic cosmic radiation. Crews of future high-speed commercial flying at higher altitudes would be even more exposed. To help reduce the significant uncertainties in calculations of such exposures, the male adult voxels phantom MAX, developed in the Nuclear Energy Department of Pernambuco Federal University in Brazil, has been coupled with the Monte Carlo simulation code GEANT4. This toolkit, distributed and upgraded from the international scientific community of CERN/Switzerland, simulates thermal to ultrahigh energy neutrons transport and interactions in the matter. The high energy neutrons are pointed as the component that contribute about 70% of the neutron effective dose that represent the 35% to 60% total dose at aircraft altitude. In this research calculations of conversion coefficients from fluence to effective dose are performed for neutrons of energies from 100 MeV ...

  13. A study of rates of (n, f), (n, γ), and (n, 2n) reactions in natU and 232Th produced by the neutron fluence in the graphite set-up (gamma-3) irradiated by 2.33 GeV deuteron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, J.; Chitra Bhatia; Katovskij, K.

    2011-01-01

    Spallation neutrons produced in a collision of 2.33 GeV deuteron beam with the large lead target are moderated by the thick graphite block surrounding the target and used to activate the radioactive samples of nat U and Th put at the three different positions, identified as holes 'a', 'b' and 'c' in the graphite block. Rates of the (n, f), (n, γ), and (n, 2n) reactions in the two samples are determined using the gamma spectrometry. Ratio of the experimental reaction rates, R(n, 2n)/R(n, f) for the 232 Th and nat U are estimated in order to understand the role of reactions of (n, xn) type in Accelerator Driven Subcritical Systems. For the Th-sample, the ratio is ∼ 54(10)% in case of hole 'a' and ∼ 95(57)% in case of hole 'b' compared to 1.73(20)% for the hole 'a' and 0.710(9)% for the hole 'b' in case of the nat U sample. Also the ratio of fission rates in uranium to thorium, nat U(n, f)/ 232 Th(n, f), is ∼ 11.2(17) in case of hole 'a' and 26.8(85) in hole 'b'. Similarly, ratio 238 U(n, 2n)/ 232 Th(n, 2n) is 0.36(4) for the hole 'a' and 0.20(10) for the hole 'b' showing that 232 Th is more prone to the (n, xn) reaction than 238 U. All the experimental reaction rates are compared with the simulated ones by generating neutron fluxes at the three holes from MCNPX 2.6c and making use of LA150 library of cross sections. The experimental and calculated rates of all the three reactions are in good agreement. The transmutation power of the set-up is estimated using the rates of (n, γ) and (n, 2n) reactions for both the samples in the three holes and compared with some of the results of the 'Energy plus Transmutation' set-up and TARC experiment

  14. Naphthalene degradation in seawater by UV irradiation: The effects of fluence rate, salinity, temperature and initial concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, Liang; Chen, Bing; Zhang, Baiyu; Zheng, Jisi; Liu, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The removal of naphthalene follows first order kinetics in seawater. • Irradiance and temperature are the most influential factors. • An increase in irradiance can linearly promote photodegradation. • High salinity suppresses the photodegradation of naphthalene. - Abstract: A large amount of oil pollution at sea is produced by the operational discharge of oily wastewater. The removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from such sources using UV irradiation has become attractive, yet the photolysis mechanism in seawater has remained unclear. This study examines the photodegradation kinetics of naphthalene in natural seawater through a full factorial design of experiments (DOE). The effects of fluence rate, salinity, temperature and initial concentration are investigated. Results show that fluence rate, temperature and the interaction between temperature and initial concentration are the most influential factors. An increase in fluence rate can linearly promote the photodegradation process. Salinity increasingly impedes the removal of naphthalene because of the existence of free-radical scavengers and photon competitors. The results will help understand the photolysis mechanism of PAHs and develop more effective methods for treating oily seawater generated from offshore industries

  15. Neutrons in the moon. [neutron flux and production rate calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornblum, J. J.; Fireman, E. L.; Levine, M.; Aronson, A.

    1973-01-01

    Neutron fluxes for energies between 15 MeV and thermal at depths of 0 to 300 g/sq cm in the moon are calculated by the discrete ordinate mathod with the ANISN code. With the energy spectrum of Lingenfelter et al. (1972). A total neutron-production rate for the moon of 26 plus or minus neutrons/sq cm sec is determined from the Ar-37 activity measurements in the Apollo 16 drill string, which are found to have a depth dependence in accordance with a neutron source function that decreases exponentially with an attenuation length of 155 g/sq cm.

  16. An improved analytic function for predicting light fluence rate in circular fields on a semi-infinite geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Timothy C; Lu, Amy; Ong, Yi-Hong

    2016-03-07

    Accurate determination of in-vivo light fluence rate is critical for preclinical and clinical studies involving photodynamic therapy (PDT). This study compares the longitudinal light fluence distribution inside biological tissue in the central axis of a 1 cm diameter circular uniform light field for a range of in-vivo tissue optical properties (absorption coefficients (μ a ) between 0.01 and 1 cm -1 and reduced scattering coefficients (μ s ') between 2 and 40 cm -1 ). This was done using Monte-Carlo simulations for a semi-infinite turbid medium in an air-tissue interface. The end goal is to develop an analytical expression that would fit the results from the Monte Carlo simulation for both the 1 cm diameter circular beam and the broad beam. Each of these parameters is expressed as a function of tissue optical properties. These results can then be compared against the existing expressions in the literature for broad beam for analysis in both accuracy and applicable range. Using the 6-parameter model, the range and accuracy for light transport through biological tissue is improved and may be used in the future as a guide in PDT for light fluence distribution for known tissue optical properties.

  17. A Green Method to Determine VUV (185 nm) Fluence Rate Based on Hydrogen Peroxide Production in Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Laxiang; Li, Mengkai; Li, Wentao; Bolton, James R; Qiang, Zhimin

    2018-02-19

    A mini-fluidic vacuum ultraviolet/ultraviolet (VUV/UV) photoreaction system (MVPS) was developed in our previous study. Based on the MVPS, a green method to determine VUV fluence rate has been developed using the production rate of H 2 O 2 when water is exposed to 185 nm VUV. The H 2 O 2 production followed pseudo-zero-order reaction kinetics well over the first 10 min of VUV/UV exposure. This new method was well calibrated with a standard cis-cyclooctene cis-trans photoisomerization actinometer as recommended by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry. The apparent quantum yield for H 2 O 2 production by 185 nm VUV irradiation of water was determined to be 0.024 ± 0.002. As the solution pH increased from 5.0 to 8.0, the H 2 O 2 production rate decreased from 0.83 to 0.40 μM min -1 . Dissolved oxygen had a negligible influence on the H 2 O 2 production. This study proposes a novel VUV fluence rate determination method with advantages of non-toxicity, low detection limits, low costs and convenience, and it can be used as a good alternative to traditional actinometers. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison of pressure vessel neutron fluences for the Balakovo-3 reactor with measurements and investigation of the influence of neutron cross sections and number of groups on the results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barz, H.U.; Boehmer, B.; Konheiser, J.; Stephan, I.

    1998-10-01

    The general methodical questions of experimental and theoretical determination of neutron fluences have been described in connection with the measurements and 3-D Monte Carlo calculation for the Rovno-3 reactor. The same calculation and measurement methods were applied for the Balakovo-3 reactor. In the first part, the results of the comparison for Balakovo will be given and discussed. However, for this reactor the main attention was focussed on investigations of the accuracy of the calculation. In this connection an important question is the influence of neutron data on the results. With this respect not only the source of the data but also the number of energy groups is important. (orig.)

  19. Neutron measurements at BRIT/BARC medical cyclotron facility of RMC, Parel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathian, Deepa; Sathian, V.; Phandnis, U.V.; Soni, P.S.; Mohite, D.Y.

    2005-01-01

    Neutron leakage and its long distance propagation in the atmosphere from the intense neutron facilities such as high energy accelerators like Cyclotron are very important for the shielding design of the facilities and resulting dose reduction to nearby population, because of strong penetrability of high energy neutrons. The neutron interaction cross sections are highly energy dependent, so different methods are adopted for measuring different energy neutrons. The method also depends on the amount of neutron fluence rate expected at the location. When the fluence rate is very high, the foil activation is the best method for the measurement of neutron fluence rate. In foil activation technique an inactive material is activated by neutrons and the activity is measured and correlated to the neutron fluence rate. In this paper, neutron fluence rate measurement using different activation foils at medical cyclotron room of Radiation Medicine Centre (RMC) is discussed. (author)

  20. Photo neutron dose equivalent rate in 15 MV X-ray beam from a Siemens Primus Linac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, A; Pourfallah, T Allahverdi; Akbari, M R; Babapour, H; Shahidi, M

    2015-01-01

    Fast and thermal neutron fluence rates from a 15 MV X-ray beams of a Siemens Primus Linac were measured using bare and moderated BF3 proportional counter inside the treatment room at different locations. Fluence rate values were converted to dose equivalent rate (DER) utilizing conversion factors of American Association of Physicist in Medicine's (AAPM) report number 19. For thermal neutrons, maximum and minimum DERs were 3.46 × 10(-6) (3 m from isocenter in +Y direction, 0 × 0 field size) and 8.36 × 10(-8) Sv/min (in maze, 40 × 40 field size), respectively. For fast neutrons, maximum DERs using 9" and 3" moderators were 1.6 × 10(-5) and 1.74 × 10(-5) Sv/min (2 m from isocenter in +Y direction, 0 × 0 field size), respectively. By changing the field size, the variation in thermal neutron DER was more than the fast neutron DER and the changes in fast neutron DER were not significant in the bunker except inside the radiation field. This study showed that at all points and distances, by decreasing field size of the beam, thermal and fast neutron DER increases and the number of thermal neutrons is more than fast neutrons.

  1. Tabulated Neutron Emission Rates for Plutonium Oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shores, Erik Frederick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-24

    This work tabulates neutron emission rates for 80 plutonium oxide samples as reported in the literature. Plutonium-­238 and plutonium-­239 oxides are included and such emission rates are useful for scaling tallies from Monte Carlo simulations and estimating dose rates for health physics applications.

  2. Standard Test Method for Measuring Fast-Neutron Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Copper

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures for measuring reaction rates by the activation reaction 63Cu(n,α)60Co. The cross section for 60Co produced in this reaction increases rapidly with neutrons having energies greater than about 5 MeV. 60Co decays with a half-life of 1925.27 days (±0.29 days)(1) and emits two gamma rays having energies of 1.1732278 and 1.332492 MeV (1). The isotopic content of natural copper is 69.17 % 63Cu and 30.83 % 65Cu (2). The neutron reaction, 63Cu(n,γ)64Cu, produces a radioactive product that emits gamma rays which might interfere with the counting of the 60Co gamma rays. 1.2 With suitable techniques, fission-neutron fluence rates above 109 cm−2·s−1 can be determined. The 63Cu(n,α)60Co reaction can be used to determine fast-neutron fluences for irradiation times up to about 15 years (for longer irradiations, see Practice E261). 1.3 Detailed procedures for other fast-neutron detectors are referenced in Practice E261. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the...

  3. Standard Test Method for Measuring Fast-Neutron Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Nickel

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures for measuring reaction rates by the activation reaction 58Ni(n,p)58Co. 1.2 This activation reaction is useful for measuring neutrons with energies above approximately 2.1 MeV and for irradiation times up to about 200 days in the absence of high thermal neutron fluence rates (for longer irradiations, see Practice E 261). 1.3 With suitable techniques fission-neutron fluence rates densities above 107 cm−2·s−1 can be determined. 1.4 Detailed procedures for other fast-neutron detectors are referenced in Practice E 261. 1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. Note—The burnup corrections were com...

  4. Standard Test Method for Measuring Fast-Neutron Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Titanium

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures for measuring reaction rates by the activation reactions 46Ti(n,p) 46Sc + 47Ti(n, np)46Sc. Note 1—Since the cross section for the (n,np) reaction is relatively small for energies less than 12 MeV and is not easily distinguished from that of the (n,p) reaction, this test method will refer to the (n,p) reaction only. 1.2 The reaction is useful for measuring neutrons with energies above approximately 4.4 MeV and for irradiation times up to about 250 days (for longer irradiations, see Practice E 261). 1.3 With suitable techniques, fission-neutron fluence rates above 109 cm–2·s–1 can be determined. However, in the presence of a high thermal-neutron fluence rate, 46Sc depletion should be investigated. 1.4 Detailed procedures for other fast-neutron detectors are referenced in Practice E 261. 1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all...

  5. Estimation of fast neutron fluence in steel specimens type Laguna Verde in TRIGA Mark III reactor; Estimacion de la fluencia de neutrones rapidos en probetas de acero tipo Laguna Verde en el reactor Triga Mark III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galicia A, J.; Francois L, J. L. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Aguilar H, F., E-mail: blink19871@hotmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    The main purpose of this work is to obtain the fluence of fast neutrons recorded within four specimens of carbon steel, similar to the material having the vessels of the BWR reactors of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde when subjected to neutron flux in a experimental facility of the TRIGA Mark III reactor, calculating an irradiation time to age the material so accelerated. For the calculation of the neutron flux in the specimens was used the Monte Carlo code MCNP5. In an initial stage, three sheets of natural molybdenum and molybdenum trioxide (MoO{sub 3}) were incorporated into a model developed of the TRIGA reactor operating at 1 M Wth, to calculate the resulting activity by setting a certain time of irradiation. The results obtained were compared with experimentally measured activities in these same materials to validate the calculated neutron flux in the model used. Subsequently, the fast neutron flux received by the steel specimens to incorporate them in the experimental facility E-16 of the reactor core model operating at nominal maximum power in steady-state was calculated, already from these calculations the irradiation time required was obtained for values of the neutron flux in the range of 10{sup 18} n/cm{sup 2}, which is estimated for the case of Laguna Verde after 32 years of effective operation at maximum power. (Author)

  6. Standard Test Method for Measuring Fast-Neutron Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Aluminum

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures measuring reaction rates by the activation reaction 27Al(n,α)24Na. 1.2 This activation reaction is useful for measuring neutrons with energies above approximately 6.5 MeV and for irradiation times up to about 2 days (for longer irradiations, see Practice E261). 1.3 With suitable techniques, fission-neutron fluence rates above 106 cm−2·s−1 can be determined. 1.4 Detailed procedures for other fast neutron detectors are referenced in Practice E261. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  7. Comparison of four NDT methods for indication of reactor steel degradation by high fluences of neutron irradiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomáš, Ivan; Vértesy, G.; Pirfo Barroso, S.; Kobayashi, S.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 265, DEC (2013), s. 201-209 ISSN 0029-5493 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : neutron irradiation * steel degradation * nuclear reactor pressure vessel * magnetic NDT * magnetic minor hysteresis loops * Magnetic Barkhausen Emission Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.972, year: 2013 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0029549313004664

  8. Standard Test Method for Measuring Fast-Neutron Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Iron

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    DESIG: E 263 09 ^TITLE: Standard Test Method for Measuring Fast-Neutron Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Iron ^SIGNUSE: Refer to Guide E 844 for guidance on the selection, irradiation, and quality control of neutron dosimeters. Refer to Practice E 261 for a general discussion of the determination of fast-neutron fluence rate with threshold detectors. Pure iron in the form of foil or wire is readily available and easily handled. Fig. 1 shows a plot of cross section as a function of neutron energy for the fast-neutron reaction 54Fe(n,p)54Mn (1). This figure is for illustrative purposes only to indicate the range of response of the 54Fe(n,p)54Mn reaction. Refer to Guide E 1018 for descriptions of recommended tabulated dosimetry cross sections. 54Mn has a half-life of 312.13 days (3) (2) and emits a gamma ray with an energy of 834.845 keV (5). (2) Interfering activities generated by neutron activation arising from thermal or fast neutron interactions are 2.57878 (46)-h 56Mn, 44.95-d (8) 59Fe, and 5.27...

  9. In vivo fluence rate measurements during Foscan (R) - mediated photodynamic therapy of persistent and recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinomas using a dedicated light applicator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, R. L. P.; Nyst, H.; Rai Indrasari, S.; Adham Yudharto, M.; Robinson, D. J.; Tan, I. B.; Meewis, C.; Peters, R.; Spaniol, S.; Stewart, F. A.; Levendag, P. C.; Sterenborg, H. J. C. M.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of a dedicated light applicator for light delivery and fluence rate monitoring during Foscan (R)-mediated photodynamic therapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma in a clinical phase I/II study. We have developed a flexible silicone applicator that

  10. Study of the response of a piezoceramic motor irradiated in a fast reactor up to a neutron fluence of 2.77E+17 n/cm{sup 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillon, Mario, E-mail: mario.pillon@enea.it [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, ENEA C.R. Frascati, via E. Fermi, 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Monti, Chiara; Mugnaini, Giampiero; Neri, Carlo; Rossi, Paolo [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, ENEA C.R. Frascati, via E. Fermi, 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Carta, Mario; Fiorani, Orlando; Santagata, Alfonso [ENEA C.R. CASACCIA, via Anguillarese, 301, 00123 S. Maria di Galeria, Rome (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Piezoceramic motors are compliant with magnetic field, temperature and vacuum. • We studied the response of a piezoceramic motor during the irradiation with neutrons. • The response was studied using 1 MeV neutrons up to a neutron fluence of 2.77E+17 n/cm{sup 2}. • Neutron irradiation produces a shift of the optimal resonance frequency and a decrease of the motor speed. • The performance changes do not affect the proper operation of the motor. - Abstract: A piezoceramic motor has been identified as the potential apparatus for carrying out the rotation of the scanning head of a laser radar system used for viewing the first wall of the ITER vessel. This diagnostic is simply referred to as IVVS (In Vessel Viewing System). The choice fell on a piezoceramic motor due to the presence of strong magnetic fields (up 8 T) and of the high vacuum and temperature conditions. To be compliant with all the ITER environmental conditions it was necessary to qualify the piezo-motor under gamma and neutron irradiation. In this paper are described the procedures and tests that have been performed to verify the compatibility of the operation of the motor adopted in the presence of a fast neutron fluence which was gradually increased over time in order to reach a total value of 2.77 × 10{sup 17} n/cm{sup 2}. Such neutron fluence was obtained by irradiating the motor in a position close to the core of the fast nuclear reactor TAPIRO, in operation at the ENEA Casaccia Research Centre, Italy. The neutron spectrum in this position has been identified as representative of that found in the rest position of the IVVS head during ITER operation. The cumulative neutron fluence reached corresponds to that it is expected to be reached during the entire life of ITER for the IVVS in the rest position without any shield. This work describes the experimental results of this test; the methodology adopted to determine the total neutron fluence achieved and the methodology adopted

  11. Fuels and materials research under the high neutron fluence using a fast reactor Joyo and post-irradiation examination facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soga, Tomonori; Ito, Chikara; Aoyama, Takafumi; Suzuki, Soju

    2009-01-01

    The experimental fast reactor Joyo at Oarai Research and Development Center (ORDC) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is Japan's sodium-cooled fast reactor (FR). In 2003, this reactor's upgrade to the 140MWt MK-III core was completed to increase the irradiation testing capability. The MK-III core provides the fast neutron flux of 4.0x10 15 n/cm 2 s as an irradiation test bed for improving the fuels and material of FR in Japan. Three post-irradiation examination (PIE) facilities named FMF, MMF and AGF related to Joyo are in ORDC. Irradiated subassemblies and core components are carried into the FMF (Fuel Monitoring Facility) and conducted nondestructive examinations. Each subassembly is disassembled to conduct some destructive examinations and to prepare the fuel and material samples for further detailed examinations. Fuel samples are sent to the AGF (Alpha-Gamma Facility), and material samples are sent to the MMF (Materials Monitoring Facility). These overall and elaborate data provided by PIE contribute to investigate the irradiation effect and behavior of fuels and materials. This facility complex is indispensable to promote the R and D of FR in Japan. And, the function and technology of irradiation test and PIE enable to contribute to the R and D of innovative fission or fusion reactor material which will be required to use under the high neutron exposure. (author)

  12. Desing study of high voltage plasma focus for a large fluence neutron source by using a water capacitor bank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Isao; Kobata, Tadasuke (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering)

    1983-03-01

    A new possibility for high intensity neutron source (HINS) would be opened by the plasma focus device if we have a high voltage capacitor bank. A scaling law of neutron yield for D-T gas discharge in plasma focus device is obtained after Imshennik, Filippov and Filippova. The resulting scaling law shows the realizability of the D-T HINS by the use of plasma focus, provided that the device is operated under a high voltage condition. Until now, it has been difficult to construct the high voltage capacitor bank of long life, for example with V/sub 0/=300kV, C/sub 0/=200..mu..F and L/sub 0/--5nH necessary in the level of HINS. It becomes possible to design this capacitor bank by using the coaxial water capacitor which has been developed for the electron and ion beam accelerator. The size of a capacitor designed for V/sub 0/=300kV, C/sub 0/=1..mu..F is phi5m x 22m. Two hundred capacitors are used in parallel in order to get the 200..mu..F.

  13. Reduced photoinactivation of 10-dodecyl acridine orange-sensitized yeast cells at high fluence rates measurements and computer simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keij, J.F.; Jansen, J.Th.M.; Schultz, F.W.; Visser, J.W.M.

    1994-01-01

    During the development of a photodamage cell sorter several photosensitizers were tested for their ability to photoinactivate more than 90% of the sensitized cells after a brief irradiation with a fluence of 10 kJ/m2. In pilot experiments, yeast cells sensitized with 10-dodecyl acridine orange (DAO)

  14. Fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for neutrons and protons calculated using the PHITS code and ICRP/ICRU adult reference computational phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Endo, Akira; Zankl, Maria; Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Niita, Koji

    2009-01-01

    The fluence to organ-dose and effective-dose conversion coefficients for neutrons and protons with energies up to 100 GeV was calculated using the PHITS code coupled to male and female adult reference computational phantoms, which are to be released as a common ICRP/ICRU publication. For the calculation, the radiation and tissue weighting factors, w R and w T , respectively, as revised in ICRP Publication 103 were employed. The conversion coefficients for effective dose equivalents derived using the radiation quality factors of both Q(L) and Q(y) relationships were also estimated, utilizing the functions for calculating the probability densities of the absorbed dose in terms of LET (L) and lineal energy (y), respectively, implemented in PHITS. By comparing these data with the corresponding data for the effective dose, we found that the numerical compatibilities of the revised w R with the Q(L) and Q(y) relationships are fairly established. The calculated data of these dose conversion coefficients are indispensable for constructing the radiation protection systems based on the new recommendations given in ICRP103 for aircrews and astronauts, as well as for workers in accelerators and nuclear facilities.

  15. The dependence of rate coefficients and product yields upon fluence, intensity, and time in unimolecular reactions induced by monochromatic infrared radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quack, M.; Humbert, P.; van den Bergh, H.

    1980-07-01

    The influence of the three parameters (with two degrees of freedom) fluence, intensity, and time on rate coefficients and product yields in collisionless Unimolecular Reactions Induced by Monochromatic Infrared Radiation (URIMIR) is discussed in some detail in terms of the recently proposed logarithmic reactant fluence plots. Model calculations for several archetypes of such plots are presented, based on solutions of the Pauli master equation and solutions of the quantum mechanical equations of motion for spectra involving many states at each level of excitation. Linear diagrams, turnups, and turnovers are found and are discussed systematically. Experimental examples re-evaluated from the literature and new measurements on the laser induced decomposition of CF2HCl are reported which nicely illustrate the various theoretical possibilities. Steady state rate coefficients for six molecules are evaluated and summarized. In some situations the intrinsic nonlinear intensity dependence of the steady state rate coefficients and deviations from simple fluence dependence of the product yields both before and at steady state are shown to be important theoretically and experimentally. The role of the reducibility of the rate coefficient matrix is discussed in connection with turnovers and with the strong influence of initial temperature that is found in the laser induced decomposition of CF2HCl.

  16. Production and storage of ultra cold neutrons at pulse neutron sources with low repetition rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokotilovski, Y.N.; Muzychka, A.Yu.

    1996-01-01

    High densities of ultracold neutrons can be stored in experimental volumes if one uses pulse thermal neutron source with a low repetition rate, a very low temperature converter, a high quality curved neutron guide, and a shutter at the entrance window of the storage volume. Some results of a Monte Carlo simulation are presented of the nonstationary transport of very cold (VCN) and ultracold neutrons (UCN) in straight and curved horizontal, and vertical neutron guides with a rectangular cross section, in the presence of neutron losses due to neutron capture and diffuse scattering on imperfectly smooth reflecting surface of the guides wall. The gravitational neutron deceleration and bending of neutron trajectories are taken into account rigorously. The nonstationary storage of UCN in experimental chambers is modelled for a low periodic or aperiodic pulse neutron source. (author)

  17. Quantum dot imaging in the second near-infrared optical window: studies on reflectance fluorescence imaging depths by effective fluence rate and multiple image acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yebin; Jeong, Sanghwa; Nayoun, Won; Ahn, Boeun; Kwag, Jungheon; Geol Kim, Sang; Kim, Sungjee

    2015-04-01

    Quantum dot (QD) imaging capability was investigated by the imaging depth at a near-infrared second optical window (SOW; 1000 to 1400 nm) using time-modulated pulsed laser excitations to control the effective fluence rate. Various media, such as liquid phantoms, tissues, and in vivo small animals, were used and the imaging depths were compared with our predicted values. The QD imaging depth under excitation of continuous 20 mW/cm2 laser was determined to be 10.3 mm for 2 wt% hemoglobin phantom medium and 5.85 mm for 1 wt% intralipid phantom, which were extended by more than two times on increasing the effective fluence rate to 2000 mW/cm2. Bovine liver and porcine skin tissues also showed similar enhancement in the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) values. A QD sample was inserted into the abdomen of a mouse. With a higher effective fluence rate, the CNR increased more than twofold and the QD sample became clearly visualized, which was completely undetectable under continuous excitation. Multiple acquisitions of QD images and averaging process pixel by pixel were performed to overcome the thermal noise issue of the detector in SOW, which yielded significant enhancement in the imaging capability, showing up to a 1.5 times increase in the CNR.

  18. Comparison of relevant parameters of multi-pixel sensors for tracker detectors after irradiation with high proton and neutron fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergholz, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    The further increase of the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN requires new sensors for the tracking detector of the Compact Muon Soleniod (CMS) experiment. These sensors must be more radiation hard and of a finer granularity to lower the occupancy. In addition the new sensor modules must have a lower material budget and have to be self triggering. Sensor prototypes, the so called ''MPix''-sensors, produced on different materials were investigated for their radiation hardness. These sensors were fully characterized before and after irradiation. Of particular interest was the comparison of different bias methods, different materials and the influence of various geometries. The degeneration rate differs for the different sensor materials. The increase of the dark current of Float-Zone-Silicon is stronger for thicker sensors and less than for Magnetic-Czochralski-Silicon sensors. Both tested bias structures are damaged by the irradiation. The poly silicon resistance increases after irradiation by fifty percent. The Punch-Through-Structure is more effected by irradiation. The punch-through voltage increase by a factor of two. Due to the higher pixel current, the working point of the sensor is shifted to smaller differential resistances.

  19. Fast reactor fluence dosimetry. Technical progress report, January--November 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The objectives of this task are to: (1) develop and demonstrate the use of 10 B and 6 Li helium accumulation fluence monitors (HAFM's) as a reliable and accurate method of measuring reactor neutron fluence; (2) develop and apply an expanded set of HAFM's which will provide fluence responses in different but overlapping neutron energy ranges; (3) identify, through the precise measurement of spectrum-integrated helium production cross sections, those elements which produce significant helium when used individually or as components of advanced alloys in FTR and LMFBR neutron environments, so that their use might be eliminated, minimized, or controlled; (4) use this information to predict, with confidence, the helium production rate for any alloy or material considered for fast reactor use, and (5) maintain a centralized helium measurements laboratory available to the research community, and upgrade the sample throughput capacity to handle FTR dosimetry requirements

  20. Double neutron stars: merger rates revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chruslinska, Martyna; Belczynski, Krzysztof; Klencki, Jakub; Benacquista, Matthew

    2018-03-01

    We revisit double neutron star (DNS) formation in the classical binary evolution scenario in light of the recent Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO)/Virgo DNS detection (GW170817). The observationally estimated Galactic DNS merger rate of R_MW = 21^{+28}_{-14} Myr-1, based on three Galactic DNS systems, fully supports our standard input physics model with RMW = 24 Myr-1. This estimate for the Galaxy translates in a non-trivial way (due to cosmological evolution of progenitor stars in chemically evolving Universe) into a local (z ≈ 0) DNS merger rate density of Rlocal = 48 Gpc-3 yr-1, which is not consistent with the current LIGO/Virgo DNS merger rate estimate (1540^{+3200}_{-1220} Gpc-3 yr-1). Within our study of the parameter space, we find solutions that allow for DNS merger rates as high as R_local ≈ 600^{+600}_{-300} Gpc-3 yr-1 which are thus consistent with the LIGO/Virgo estimate. However, our corresponding BH-BH merger rates for the models with high DNS merger rates exceed the current LIGO/Virgo estimate of local BH-BH merger rate (12-213 Gpc-3 yr-1). Apart from being particularly sensitive to the common envelope treatment, DNS merger rates are rather robust against variations of several of the key factors probed in our study (e.g. mass transfer, angular momentum loss, and natal kicks). This might suggest that either common envelope development/survival works differently for DNS (˜10-20 M⊙ stars) than for BH-BH (˜40-100 M⊙ stars) progenitors, or high black hole (BH) natal kicks are needed to meet observational constraints for both types of binaries. Our conclusion is based on a limited number of (21) evolutionary models and is valid within this particular DNS and BH-BH isolated binary formation scenario.

  1. Investigation of Response of Several Neutron Surveymeters by a DT Neutron Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang In; Jang, In Su; Kim, Jang Lyul; Lee, Jung IL; Kim, Bong Hwan

    2012-01-01

    Several neutron measuring devices were tested under the neutron fields characterized with two distinct kinds of thermal and fast neutron spectrum. These neutron fields were constructed by the mixing of both thermal neutron fields and fast neutron fields. The thermal neutron field was constructed using by a graphite pile with eight AmBe neutron sources. The fast neutron field of 14 MeV was made by a DT neutron generator. In order to change the fraction of fast neutron fluence rate in each neutron fields, a neutron generator was placed in the thermal neutron field at 50 cm and 150 cm from the reference position. The polyethylene neutron collimator was used to make moderated 14 MeV neutron field. These neutron spectra were measured by using a Bonner sphere system with an LiI scintillator, and dosimetric quantities delivered to neutron surveymeters were determined from these measurement results.

  2. Neutron detector for fusion reaction-rate measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerche, R.A.; Phillion, D.W.; Tietbohl, G.L.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a fast, sensitive neutron detector for recording the fusion reaction-rate history of inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. The detector is based on the fast rise-time of a commercial plastic scintillator (BC-422) and has a response 7 neutrons

  3. Calculation of the neutron flux and fluence in the covering of the nucleus and the vessel of a BWR; Calculo del flujo neutronico y fluencia en la envolvente del nucleo y la vasija de un reactor nuclear BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez C, E.; Del Valle G, E. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, U. P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Col. Lindavista, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Longoria G, L. C., E-mail: evalle@esfm.ipn.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    One of the main objectives related with the safety in any nuclear power plant, including the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, is to guarantee the structural integrity of the pressure vessel of the reactor. To identify and quantifying the damage caused be neutron irradiation in the vessel of any nuclear reactor, is necessary to know as much the neutron flux as the fluence that it has been receiving during their time of operation life, since the observables damages by means of tests mechanics are products of micro-structural effects, induced by neutron irradiation, therefore, is important the study and prediction of the neutron flux to have a better knowledge of the damage that are receiving these materials. In our calculation the code DORT was used, which solves the transport equation in discreet coordinates and in two dimensions (x-y, r-{theta} and r-z), in accord to the regulator guide, it requires to make and approach of the neutron flux in three dimensions by means of the Synthesis Method. Whit this method is possible to achieve a representation of the flux in 3D combining or synthesizing the calculated fluxes by DORT code in r-{theta}, r-z and r. In this work the application of the Synthesis Method is presented, according to the Regulator Guide 1.190, to determine the fluxes 3D in the interns of a BWR using three different space meshes. (Author)

  4. Experimental evaluation of gamma fluence-rate predictions from Argon-41 releases to the atmosphere over a nuclear research reactor site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rojas-Palma, C.; Aage, H.K.; Astrup, P.

    2004-01-01

    was measured with remote sensing (Lidar) of the aerosol plumes while surface radiation levels were measured under the plume using gamma detectors at downwind distances of up to 1500 in from the release point. A database was built with simultaneous measurements of plume geometry and radiation field from Ar-41......An experimental study of radionuclide dispersion in the atmosphere has been conducted at the BR1 research reactor in Mol, Belgium. Artificially generated aerosols ('white smoke') were mixed with the routine releases of Ar-41 in the reactor's 60-m tall venting stack. The detailed plume geometry...... decay, together with in-situ measurements of meteorological parameters. The joint tracer/radiation experimental dataset has been subsequently used to evaluate the accuracy of predictions of dispersion parameters and gamma fluence rates obtained by the atmospheric dispersion and dose rate model RIMPUFF....

  5. Reduced recanalization rates of the great saphenous vein after endovenous laser treatment with increased energy dosing: definition of a threshold for the endovenous fluence equivalent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proebstle, Thomas Michael; Moehler, Thomas; Herdemann, Sylvia

    2006-10-01

    Recent reports indicated a correlation between the amount of energy released during endovenous laser treatment (ELT) of the great saphenous vein (GSV) and the success and durability of the procedure. Our objective was to analyze the influence of increased energy dosing on immediate occlusion and recanalization rates after ELT of the GSV. GSVs were treated with either 15 or 30 W of laser power by using a 940-nm diode laser with continuous fiber pullback and tumescent local anesthesia. Patients were followed up prospectively with duplex ultrasonography at day 1 and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. A total of 114 GSVs were treated with 15 W, and 149 GSVs were treated with 30 W. The average endovenous fluence equivalents were 12.8 +/- 5.1 J/cm2 and 35.1 +/- 15.6 J/cm2, respectively. GSV occlusion rates according to the method of Kaplan and Meier for the 15- and 30-W groups were 95.6% and 100%, respectively, at day 1, 90.4% and 100% at 3 months, and 82.7% and 97.0% at 12 months after ELT (log-rank; P = .001). An endovenous fluence equivalent exceeding 20 J/cm2 was associated with durable GSV occlusion after 12 months' follow-up, thus suggesting a schedule for dosing of laser energy with respect to the vein diameter. Higher dosing of laser energy shows a 100% immediate success rate and a significantly reduced recanalization rate during 12 months' follow-up.

  6. Experimental Neutron Capture Rate Constraint Far from Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddick, S N; Spyrou, A; Crider, B P; Naqvi, F; Larsen, A C; Guttormsen, M; Mumpower, M; Surman, R; Perdikakis, G; Bleuel, D L; Couture, A; Crespo Campo, L; Dombos, A C; Lewis, R; Mosby, S; Nikas, S; Prokop, C J; Renstrom, T; Rubio, B; Siem, S; Quinn, S J

    2016-06-17

    Nuclear reactions where an exotic nucleus captures a neutron are critical for a wide variety of applications, from energy production and national security, to astrophysical processes, and nucleosynthesis. Neutron capture rates are well constrained near stable isotopes where experimental data are available; however, moving far from the valley of stability, uncertainties grow by orders of magnitude. This is due to the complete lack of experimental constraints, as the direct measurement of a neutron-capture reaction on a short-lived nucleus is extremely challenging. Here, we report on the first experimental extraction of a neutron capture reaction rate on ^{69}Ni, a nucleus that is five neutrons away from the last stable isotope of Ni. The implications of this measurement on nucleosynthesis around mass 70 are discussed, and the impact of similar future measurements on the understanding of the origin of the heavy elements in the cosmos is presented.

  7. Accuracy of helium accumulation fluence monitor for fast reactor dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Chikara; Aoyama, Takafumi [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1998-03-01

    A helium (He) accumulation fluence monitor (HAFM) has been developed for fast reactor dosimetry. In order to evaluate the measurement accuracy of neutron fluence by the HAFM method, the HAFMs of enriched boron (B) and beryllium (Be) were irradiated in the Fast Neutron Source Reactor `YAYOI`. The number of He atoms produced in the HAFMs were measured and compared with the calculated values. As a result of this study, it was confirmed that the neutron fluence could be measured within 5 % by the HAFM method, and that met the required accuracy for fast reactor dosimetry. (author)

  8. The neutron production rate measurement of an indigenously developed compact D-D neutron generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Basanta Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One electrostatic accelerator based compact neutron generator was developed. The deuterium ions generated by the ion source were accelerated by one accelerating gap after the extraction from the ion source and bombarded to a target. Two different types of targets, the drive - in titanium target and the deuteriated titanium target were used. The neutron generator was operated at the ion source discharge potential at +Ve 1 kV that generates the deuterium ion current of 200 mA at the target while accelerated through a negative potential of 80 kV in the vacuum at 1.3×10-2 Pa filled with deuterium gas. A comparative study for the neutron yield with both the targets was carried out. The neutron flux measurement was done by the bubble detectors purchased from Bubble Technology Industries. The number of bubbles formed in the detector is the direct measurement of the total energy deposited in the detector. By counting the number of bubbles the total dose was estimated. With the help of the ICRP-74 neutron flux to dose equivalent rate conversion factors and the solid angle covered by the detector, the total neutron flux was calculated. In this presentation the operation of the generator, neutron detection by bubble detector and estimation of neutron flux has been discussed.

  9. Heat-to-heat variability of irradiation creep and swelling of HT9 irradiated to high neutron fluence at 400-600{degrees}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Irradiation creep data on ferritic/martensitic steels are difficult and expensive to obtain, and are not available for fusion-relevant neutron spectra and displacement rates. Therefore, an extensive creep data rescue and analysis effort is in progress to characterize irradiation creep of ferritic/martensitic alloys in other reactors and to develop a methodology for applying it to fusion applications. In the current study, four tube sets constructed from three nominally similar heats of HT9 subjected to one of two heat treatments were constructed as helium-pressurized creep tubes and irradiated in FFTF-MOTA at four temperatures between 400 and 600{degrees}C. Each of the four heats exhibited a different stress-free swelling behavior at 400{degrees}C, with the creep rate following the swelling according to the familiar B{sub o} + DS creep law. No stress-free swelling was observed at the other three irradiation temperatures. Using a stress exponent of n = 1.0 as the defining criterion, {open_quotes}classic{close_quotes} irradiation creep was found at all temperatures, but, only over limited stress ranges that decreased with increasing temperature. The creep coefficient B{sub o} is a little lower ({approx}50%) than that observed for austenitic steel, but the swelling-creep coupling coefficient D is comparable to that of austenitic steels. Primary transient creep behavior was also observed at all temperatures except 400{degrees}C, and thermal creep behavior was found to dominate the deformation at high stress levels at 550 and 600{degrees}C.

  10. Space dependence of neutron dose rates from the external neutron converter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasic, N.; Pesic, M.

    1999-01-01

    The knowledge of neutron and gamma doses from the external converter (ENC) is necessary for variety studies in dosimetry, radiation protection and irradiation of samples in determined neutron fields. Considering that the dose measurements in these fields are complicated, their previous calculation, by using any of the referent computer codes, simplifies the job. In this paper, space dependence of dose rates behind the ENC was calculated using MCNP code based on Monte Carlo techniques in radiation transport modelling. (author)

  11. Simulation of high fluence swelling behavior in technological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Powell, R.W.; Diamond, S.; Lauritzen, T.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Sprague, J.A.; Keefer, D.

    1977-06-01

    The U.S. Breeder Reactor Program is employing charged particle irradiation experiments at accelerated displacement rates to simulate neutron-induced microstructural changes in materials of technological interest. Applications of the simulation technique range from the study of fundamental microstructural mechanisms to the development of predictions of the high fluence swelling behavior of candidate alloys for breeder reactor ducts and fuel cladding. An exact equivalence probably cannot be established between all facets of the microstructural evolution which occurs in the disparate charged-particle and neutron environments. To aid in the correlation of data developed in the two environments an assessment has been made of the factors influencing the simulation process. A series of intercorrelation programs and analysis activities have been conducted to identify and explore the relevant phenomena. The factors found to exert substantial influence on the correlation process fall into two categories, one which deals with those variables which are atypical of the neutron environment and one which deals with the additional factors which arise due to the large differences in displacement rate of the two irradiation environments. While the various simulation techniques have been invaluable in determining the basic mechanisms and parametric dependencies of swelling, the potential of these tools in the confident prediction of swelling at high neutron fluence has yet to be realized. The basic problem lies in the inability of the simulation technique to reproduce the early microstructural development in the period that precedes and encompasses the incubation of voids. The concepts of temperature shift and dose equivalency have also been found to be more complicated than previously imagined. Preconditioning of metals in a neutron environment prior to simulation testing is now being employed in order to provide more appropriate starting microstructures

  12. s-process studies in the light of new experimental cross sections: Distribution of neutron fluences and r-process residuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaeppeler, F.; Beer, H.; Wisshak, K.; Clayton, D.D.; Macklin, R.L.; Ward, R.A.

    1981-08-01

    A best set of neutron-capture cross sections has been evaluated for the most important s-process isotopes. With this data base, s-process studies have been carried out using the traditional model which assumes a steady neutron flux and an exponential distribution of neutron irradiations. The calculated sigmaN-curve is in excellent agreement with the empirical sigmaN-values of pure s-process nuclei. Simultaneously, good agreement is found between the difference of solar and s-process abundances and the abundances of pure r-process nuclei. We also discuss the abundance pattern of the iron group elements where our s-process results complement the abundances obtained from explosive nuclear burning. The results obtained from the traditional s-process model such as seed abundances, mean neutron irradiations, or neutron densities are compared to recent stellar model calculations which assume the He-burning shells of red giant stars as the site for the s-process. (orig.) [de

  13. Verification of neutron irradiation on S/G tube materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Byoung Hwi; Lee, S. K.; Jang, D. Y.; Jo, K. H.

    2010-12-01

    The fluence monitors were fabricated with metal wires of the purity ≥ 99.9%, whose dimensions were 0.1mm diameter, about 3mm length, and around 150-200 μg mass range. Three wire samples (Fe, Ni, Ti) were prepared for one irradiation aluminum capsule. Five capsules were irradiated in the OR5 hole of the HANARO reactor at 30 MW power for about 25 days. The reaction rates were calculated by using the measured radiation activity data, and then neutron fluence were obtained from the reaction rates and the weighted neutron cross section with calculated neutron spectrum at the fluence monitor position. The measured neutron fluences were compared to the calculated ones. (Errors ≤ 35%)

  14. Study of the distribution of neutron fluence in a treatment room with proton; Estudio de la distribucion de fluencia neutronica en una sala de tratamientos con protonterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagares, J. I.; Arce, P.; Sansaloni, F.; Terron, J. A.; Exposito, M. R.; Nieto-Camero, J. J.; Korf, A.; Loubser, M.; Sanchez-Doblado, F.

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the energy distribution of flow in the treatment room. With this information we seek the most appropriate location in which to place an active detector, based on digital memories, to calculate the neutron dose in the patient peripheral.

  15. Measurements of thermal neutron fluence in the bunker of a cyclotron for PET isotope production; Medidas de fluencia de neutrones termicos en el bunker de un ciclotron de produccion de isotopos para PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendez Villafane, R.; Sansoloni florit, F.; Lagares gonzalez, J. L.; Llop Roig, J.; Guerrero Araque, J. E.; Muniz Gutierrez, J. L.; Perez Morales, J. M.

    2011-07-01

    To measure the neutron spectrum has been used spectrometry system based on Bonner spheres with Au flakes as thermal neutron detector at its center while the results are still pending and will be analyzing another job.

  16. An improved long counter for neutron fluence measurement with a flat response over a wide energy range from 1 keV to 15 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Q.Y., E-mail: huqyuan@163.com; Zhang, J.H.; Zhang, D.; Guo, H.S.; Yang, G.Z.; Li, B.J.; Ye, F.; Si, F.N.; Liu, J.; Fu, Y.C.; Ning, J.M.; Yang, J.; Yang, H.H.; Wang, W.C.

    2014-12-21

    A new long counter has been developed with a flat energy response over a wide range from 1 keV to 15 MeV. It consists of five {sup 3}He proportional counter tubes and a number of carefully designed polyethylene moderators. The structure of this detector was determined by careful Monte Carlo simulations. The calculated results show that the efficiency of this counter is uniform from 1 keV neutron energy to 15 MeV. Calibration was performed on an Am–Be source and the accelerator-produced monoenergetic D–D and D–T neutron sources. Fluctuation of the response curve is less than 10% over this energy range.

  17. Project ''PHANTOM'' - measurement of the absorbed dose, the ''averaged LET'' and the thermal neutron fluence in a tissue equivalent Phantom onboard space station MIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, T.; Hajek, M.; Vana, N.; Schoener, W.; Akatov, Y.; Shurshakov, V.; Arkhangelsky, V.

    2001-01-01

    A water filled phantom with a diameter of 35 cm was developed at the Institute for Biomedical Problems. This tissue equivalent phantom is equipped with 4 channels to deposit dosemeters in different depths. In the framework of the project 'PHANTOM' (phase 1-3) thermoluminescent dosemeters of the commercially available Types TLD - 600 and TLD - 700 were exposed from May 1997 to February 1999 for an overall of 572 days in the different channels (perpendicular and normal to the hull of the spacecraft) of the phantom. The phantom was positioned in the commander cabin, the board engineer cabin and in the module KWANT 2. Besides the measurement of the depth dose distribution, the 'averaged LET' was determined using the HTR - method. The HTR - method utilizes the different LET - efficiencies of the main - and the high temperature glow peaks of LiF dosemeters for the evaluation of the 'averaged LET' in mixed radiation fields. Therefore it is possible to calculate the depth distribution of the biologically relevant dose equivalent. The results show, that despite of the depth decrease of the absorbed dose, the depth dose equivalent is almost constant. This can be explained by the production of secondary particles inside the phantom. The flux of the thermal neutrons was determined using the pair method. Calibration was performed at the research reactor of the Austrian Universities. First results show, that the contribution of thermal neutrons are roughly 10% of the total neutron dose equivalent. (orig.) [de

  18. Study of the environmental neutron spectrum at Zacatecas city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega C, H.R.

    2003-01-01

    The environmental neutron spectrum has been measured at Zacatecas City in Mexico. Neutron spectrum was unfolded from count rates obtained with a multisphere neutron spectrometer with a Li I(Eu) scintillator. With the spectrum information the ambient dose equivalent and the isotropic effective dose were calculated. A model based upon the geomagnetic latitude and the altitude above sea level, that allows to estimate the neutron fluence rate is proposed, the model results are compared with total neutron fluences measured at several locations worldwide. Environmental neutron spectrum shows peaks at 1 and 100 MeV as well as a relevant amount of low energy neutrons. The neutron fluence rate was 65 ± 3 cm -2 -h -1 , producing 13.7 ± 0.6 n Sv-h -1 due to ambient dose equivalent rate and an isotropic effective dose rate of 14.1 ± 0.6 n Sv-h -1 . Neutron fluence rates predicted with the model are in agreement with those reported in the literature. (Author)

  19. Extended use of alanine irradiated in experimental reactor for combined gamma- and neutron-dose assessment by ESR spectroscopy and thermal neutron fluence assessment by measurement of (14)C by LSC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoníček, B; Kučera, J; Světlík, I; Viererbl, L; Lahodová, Z; Tomášková, L; Cabalka, M

    2014-11-01

    Gamma- and neutron doses in an experimental reactor were measured using alanine/electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometry. The absorbed dose in alanine was decomposed into contributions caused by gamma and neutron radiation using neutron kerma factors. To overcome a low sensitivity of the alanine/ESR response to thermal neutrons, a novel method has been proposed for the assessment of a thermal neutron flux using the (14)N(n,p) (14)C reaction on nitrogen present in alanine and subsequent measurement of (14)C by liquid scintillation counting (LSC). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Study of neutron fields around an intense neutron generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kicka, L; Machrafi, R; Miller, A

    2017-12-01

    Neutron fields in the vicinity of the newly built neutron facility, at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT), have been investigated in a series of Monte Carlo simulations and measurements. The facility hosts a P-385 neutron generator based on a deuterium-deuterium fusion reaction. The neutron fluence at different locations around the neutron generator facility has been simulated using MCNPX 2.7E Monte Carlo particle transport program. To characterize neutron fields, three neutron sources were modeled with distributions corresponding to different incident deuteron energies of 90kV, 110kV, and 130kV. Measurements have been carried out to determine the dose rate at locations adjacent to the generator using bubble detectors (BDs). The neutron intensity was evaluated and the total dose rates corresponding to different applied acceleration potentials were estimated at various locations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison of initial damage rates using neutron and electron irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstone, J.A.R.

    1978-08-01

    The purpose of this experiment was twofold: (1) The number of interstitials that pin dislocations was studied as a function of neutron energy. (2) By comparison with electron irradiations on the sample, a correlation between the predicted and measured numbers of defects was found. All irradiations were performed on the same high purity copper sample. The sample was machined in the form of a cantilever beam with a flexural resonant frequency of 770 Hz. Changes in Young's modulus at constant strain amplitude were monitored continuously through changes in the resonant frequency of the sample. These changes in the modulus can be related to the number of pinning points added to dislocation lines, which are in turn related to the number of free interstitials produced. Neutron energy dependence experiments were done from 2 to 24 MeV on the copper sample and at 14 MeV on a gold sample. By equating pinning rates from electron and neutron irradiations and using the free interstitial production rate obtained from electron irradiations, an estimate of the free interstitial production cross section for neutrons of 2 to 24 MeV was made

  2. Basics of Neutrons for First Responders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rees, Brian G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-02-05

    These are slides from a presentation on the basics of neutrons. A few topics covered are: common origins of terrestrial neutron radiation, neutron sources, neutron energy, interactions, detecting neutrons, gammas from neutron interactions, neutron signatures in gamma-ray spectra, neutrons and NaI, neutron fluence to dose (msV), instruments' response to neutrons.

  3. The irradiation creep characteristics of graphite to high fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, C.R.; Cundy, M.; Kleist, G.

    1988-01-01

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) have massive blocks of graphite with thermal and neutron-flux gradients causing high internal stresses. Thermal stresses are transient; however, stresses generated by differential growth due to neutron damage continue to increase with time. Fortunately, graphite also experiences creep under irradiation allowing relaxation of stresses to nominally safe levels. Because of complexity of irradiation creep experiments, data demonstrating this phenomenon are generally limited to fairly low fluences compared to the overall fluences expected in most reactors. Notable exceptions have been experiments at 300/degree/C and 500/degree/C run at Petten under tension and compression creep stresses to fluences greater than 4 /times/ 10 26 (E > 50 keV) neutrons/m 2 . This study complements the previous results by extending the irradiation temperature to 900/degree/C. 2 refs., 3 figs

  4. Neutron dosimetry; Dosimetria de neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fratin, Luciano

    1993-12-31

    A neutron irradiation facility was designed and built in order to establish a procedure for calibrating neutron monitors and dosemeters. A 185 GBq {sup 241} Am Be source of known is used as a reference source. The irradiation facility using this source in the air provides neutron dose rates between 9 nSv s{sup -1} and 0,5 {sup {mu}}Sv s{sup -1}. A calibrated 50 nSv s{sup -1} thermal neutron field is obtained by using a specially designed paraffin block in conjunction with the {sup 241} Am Be source. A Bonner multisphere spectrometer was calibrated, using a procedure based on three methods proposed by international standards. The unfold {sup 241} Am Be neutron spectrum was determined from the Bonner spheres data and resulted in a good agreement with expected values for fluence rate, dose rate and mean energy. A dosimetric system based on the electrochemical etching of CR-39 was developed for personal dosimetry. The dosemeter badge using a (n,{alpha}) converter, the etching chamber and high frequency power supply were designed and built specially for this project. The electrochemical etching (ECE) parameters used were: a 6N KOH solution, 59 deg C, 20 kV{sub pp} cm{sup -1}, 2,0 kHz, 3 hours of ECE for thermal and intermediate neutrons and 6 hours for fast neutrons. The calibration factors for thermal, intermediate and fast neutrons were determined for this personal dosemeter. The sensitivities determined for the developed dosimetric system were (1,46{+-} 0,09) 10{sup 4} tracks cm{sup -2} mSv{sup -1} for thermal neutrons, (9{+-}3) 10{sup 2} tracks cm{sup -2} mSV{sup -1} for intermediate neutrons and (26{+-}4) tracks cm{sup -2} mSv{sup -1} for fast neutrons. The lower and upper limits of detection were respectively 0,002 mSv and 0,6 mSv for thermal neutrons, 0,04 mSv and 8 mSv for intermediate neutrons and 1 mSv and 12 mSv for fast neutrons. In view of the 1990`s ICRP recommendations, it is possible to conclude that the personal dosemeter described in this work is

  5. Extended use of alanine irradiated in experimental reactor for combined gamma-and neutron-dose assessment by ESR spectroscopy and thermal neutron fluence assessment by measurement of C-14 by LSC

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartoníček, B.; Kučera, Jan; Světlík, Ivo; Viererbl, L.; Lahodová, Z.; Tomášková, Lenka; Cabalka, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 93, NOV (2014), s. 52-56 ISSN 0969-8043 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA02010218 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : reactor rediation * alanine/ESR dosimeter * C-14 * LSC simultaneous gamma * neutron dose * assessment Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics Impact factor: 1.231, year: 2014

  6. Neutron dose rate in the facility at the Cyclotron Center of Chung Shan Medical University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee Juiping; Chen Chienyi

    2008-01-01

    The neutron dose equivalent rate (DR) leaking from the self-shielded cyclotron was measured using an FHT-751 neutron counting system in the facility at the Cyclotron Center of Chung Shan Medical University. This system was calibrated using two 252 Cf neutron sources and simulated according to MCNP code. The results show various DRs up to 120 μSv h -1 in the cyclotron room. Two-dimensional distributions of measured neutron DRs indicate an explicit, heavy leakage of neutrons through the self-shielded interlock. The neutron DR of the operating cyclotron that is hazardous to the health of medical personal and the public is evaluated. (author)

  7. Neutrons around thick target bombarded by 50 MeV/u sup 1 sup 8 O-ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Li, G; Li, Z; Su, Y; Zhang, S

    1999-01-01

    Neutron energy, fluence rate, angular distributions and dose equivalent rate distributions around thick Be, Cu, Au targets bombarded by a 50 MeV/u sup 1 sup 8 O-ion beam were measured by using a threshold detector activation method. The neutron yields and emission rates in the forward direction were obtained. (author)

  8. Determination of the neutron fluence in the welding of the 'Core shroud' of the BWR reactor core; Determinacion de la fluencia neutronica en las soldaduras del 'core shroud' del nucleo de un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucatero, M.A.; Xolocostli M, J.V.; Gomez T, A.M.; Palacios H, J.C. [ININ, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: mal@nuclear.inin.mx

    2006-07-01

    With the purpose of defining the inspection frequency, in function of the embrittlement of the materials that compose the welding of the 'Core Shroud' or encircling of the core of a BWR type reactor, is necessary to know the neutron fluence received for this welding. In the work the calculated values of neutron fluence accumulated maxim (E > 1 MeV) during the first 8 operation cycles of the reactor are presented. The calculations were carried out according to the NRC Regulatory Guide 1.190, making use of the DORT code, which solves the transport equation in discreet ordinate in two dimensions (xy, r{theta}, and rz). The results in 3D were obtained applying the Synthesis method according to the guide before mentioned. Results are presented for the horizontal welding H3, H4, and H5, showing the corresponding curves to the fluence accumulated to the cycle 8 and a projection for the cycle 14 is presented. (Author)

  9. Calculation of reactor pressure vessel fluence using TORT code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Chul Ho; Kim, Jong Kyung

    1998-01-01

    TORT is employed for fast neutron fluence calculation at the reactor pressure vessel. KORI Unit 1 reactor at cycle 1 is modeled for this calculation. Three-dimensional cycle averaged assembly power distributions for KORI Unit 1 at cycle 1 are calculated by using the core physics code, NESTLE 5.0. The root mean square error is within 4.3% compared with NDR (Nuclear Design Report) for all burnup steps. The C/E (Calculated/Experimental) values for the in-vessel dosimeters distribute between 0.98 and 1.36. The most updated cross-section library, BUGLE-96 based on ENDF/B-VI is used for the neutron fluence calculation. The maximum fast neutron fluence calculated on reactor pressure vessel for KORI Unit 1 operated for 411.41 effective full power days is 1.784x10 18 n/cm 2 . The position of the maximum neutron fluence in RPV wall 1/4 T is nearby 60 cm below the midplane at zero degree

  10. A Simple Correlation for Neutron Capture Rates from Nuclear Masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couture, Aaron Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-30

    Recent studies of neutron capture performed at LANL have revealed a previously unrecognized connection between nuclear masses and the average neutron capture cross section. A team of three scientists from Los Alamos (P-27), Yale Univ., and Istanbul Univ. (Turkey) recently discovered this connection and have published their results as a Rapid Communication in Physical Review C. Neutron capture is a reaction in which a free neutron is absorbed by the nucleus, keeping the element unchanged, but changing isotopes. This reaction is typically exothermic. As a result, the reaction can proceed even when many other reaction channels are closed. In an astrophysical environment, this means that neutron capture is the primary mechanism by which all of the elements with atomic number greater than nickel are produced is neutron capture.

  11. Fluence determination by scattering measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Albergo, S; Potenza, R; Tricomi, A; Pillon, M; Angarano, M M; Creanza, D; De Palma, M

    2000-01-01

    An alternative method to determine particle fluence is proposed, which is particularly suitable for irradiations with low-energy charged-particle beams. The fluence is obtained by measuring the elastic scattering produced by a composite thin target placed upstream of the sample. The absolute calibration is performed by comparison with the measured radioactivation of vanadium and copper samples. The composite thin target, made of aluminium, carbon and gold, allows not only the fluence to be measured, but also a continuous monitoring of the beam space distribution. Experimental results with a 27 MeV proton beam are reported and compared with Monte Carlo simulations. (7 refs).

  12. Resistivity damage rates in fusion-neutron-irradiated metals at 4.2 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guinan, M.W.; Kinney, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    Changes in electrical resistivity at liquid helium temperature have been used to monitor the production of damage in dilute alloys of vanadium, niobium and molybdenum, and pure tungsten, aluminum and copper irradiated with high energy neutrons. The neutrons were produced at the Livermore rotating-target neutron sources (RTNS-I and RTNS-II). Further experiments on V, Nb and Mo were carried out with 30 MeV d-Be neutrons and slightly degraded fission-spectra neutrons. The results for all six materials are compared to those obtained in a pure fission spectrum. The relative damage production rates are in agreement with predictions based on damage energy calculations

  13. Use of a high repetition rate neutron generator for in vivo body composition measurements via neutron inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kehayias, J.J.; Ellis, K.J.; Cohn, S.H.; Weinlein, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    A small D-T neutron generator with a high pulse rate is used for the in vivo measurement of body carbon, oxygen and hydrogen. The core of the neutron generator is a 13 cm-long Zetatron tube pulsed at a rate of 10 kHz delivering 10 3 to 10 4 neutrons per pulse. A target-current feedback system regulates the source of the accelerator to assure constant neutron output. Carbon is measured by detecting the 4.44 MeV γ-rays from inelastic scattering. The short half-life of the 4.44 MeV state of carbon requires detection of the γ-rays during the 10 μs neutron pulse. Generators with low pulsing rate were found inappropriate for carbon measurements because of their low duty-cycle (high neutron output during the pulse). In vivo measurements were performed with normal volunteers using a scanning bed facility for a dose less than 25 mrem. This technique offers medical as well as general bulk analysis applications. 8 refs., 5 figs

  14. Measurements of 36Cl production rates from Cl, K, and Ca in concrete at the 500-MeV neutron irradiation facility of KENS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aze, T.; Fujimura, M.; Matsumura, H.; Masumoto, K.; Nakao, N.; Kawai, M.; Matsuzaki, H.; Nagai, H.

    2005-01-01

    In high-energy accelerator facilities, concrete components around beam lines are exposed to secondary neutrons having various energies during machine operation. The neutrons produce the various long half-life radionuclides, such as 3 H, 36 Cl, 60 Co, and 152 Eu, in the concrete. Most of the nuclides mainly produced by thermal neutron-capture reactions and their specific activities are important from the viewpoint of accelerator clearance. In previous work, the specific activities of the 36 Cl in the concretes at the various accelerator facilities have been measured and it was suggested that the 36 Cl in the concrete is useful as an indicator for thermal neutron fluence because of a characteristic of very long half life (301 kyr). However, in the concretes of the accelerator facilities over several hundreds of MeV, the 36 Cl are considerably produced by spallation from other concrete components, such as K and Ca, in addition to the thermal neutron capture of 35 Cl. The contribution of the 36 Cl productions from the spallation is unclear due to the lack of the cross sections for the neutron-induced reactions. In this work, therefore, we measured the 36 Cl production rates in concrete from Cl, K, and Ca targets in irradiation with secondary neutrons, which were produced by a bombardment of primary 500-MeV protons with W targets, at high-energy neutron-irradiation course of KENS. Samples of NaCl, K2CO 3 , and CaCO 3 were set into 7. irradiation spaces located on the depth raging from O to 320 cm from the concrete surface and irradiated for approximately one week. After the irradiation, separations of Cl from the samples were carried out radiochemically and the production rates of 36 Cl were determined by the AMS. The production rates from Cl, K, and Ca exponentially decreased with an increase of the depth from the concrete surface, and the profiles were very similar each other. Although the production rates from Cl were two orders higher than those from Ca in the same

  15. Determination of the emission rate for the 14 MeV neutron generator with the use of radio-yttrium

    OpenAIRE

    Laszynska Ewa; Jednorog Slawomir; Ziolkowski Adam; Gierlik Michal; Rzadkiewicz Jacek

    2015-01-01

    The neutron emission rate is a crucial parameter for most of the radiation sources that emit neutrons. In the case of large fusion devices the determination of this parameter is necessary for a proper assessment of the power release and the prediction for the neutron budget. The 14 MeV neutron generator will be used for calibration of neutron diagnostics at JET and ITER facilities. The stability of the neutron generator working parameters like emission and angular homogeneity affects the accu...

  16. NEUTRON GENERATOR FACILITY AT SFU: GEANT4 DOSE RATE PREDICTION AND VERIFICATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J; Chester, A; Domingo, T; Rizwan, U; Starosta, K; Voss, P

    2016-11-01

    Detailed dose rate maps for a neutron generator facility at Simon Fraser University were produced via the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework. Predicted neutron dose rates throughout the facility were compared with radiation survey measurements made during the facility commissioning process. When accounting for thermal neutrons, the prediction and measurement agree within a factor of 2 or better in most survey locations, and within 10 % inside the vault housing the neutron generator. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. A new neutron dose equivalent rate meter with improved neutron energy response in terms of H*(10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klett, A.; Maushart, R.; Burgkhardt, B.; Fieg, G.; Piesch, E.

    1994-01-01

    Conventional neutron dose rate meters make use of thermal neutron detectors such as 3 He counters located in the center of a moderator and absorber for thermal neutrons. The various commercial types used up to now have the disadvantage that the reading is extremely energy dependent exceeding a factor of up to 15. The need to improve the energy response and the sensitivity in the lower dose rate range resulted in joint cooperation between KfK and EG7G Berthold. On the basis of Monte-Carlo calculations and comprehensive calibrations with monoenergetic neutrons at the PTB Braunshweig, a new type of rem-counter has been optimized using a 10 cm x 4 cm diameter 3 He-counter. Both calculations and experiments resulted in a lower energy dependence within ±40% in the energy range 20 keV to 19 MeV. The commercially available dose rate meter of 25 cm diameter, with a weight below 10 kg and with a high neutron sensitivity of 3 counts per nSv has a dose rate range of 0.1 μSv/h - 100 mSv/h and low γ-sensitivity. With integrated electronics, this instrument is applicable for routine monitoring as well as for stationary monitoring of radiation fields near accelerators

  18. Studsvik thermal neutron facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, O.A.; Larsson, B.; Grusell, E.; Svensson, P.

    1992-01-01

    The Studsvik thermal neutron facility at the R2-0 reactor originally designed for neutron capture radiography has been modified to permit irradiation of living cells and animals. A hole was drilled in the concrete shielding to provide a cylindrical channel with diameter of 25.3 cm. A shielding water tank serves as an entry holder for cells and animals. The advantage of this modification is that cells and animals can be irradiated at a constant thermal neutron fluence rate of approximately 10 9 n cm -2 s -1 (at 100 kW) without stopping and restarting the reactor. Topographic analysis of boron done by neutron capture autoradiography (NCR) can be irradiated under the same conditions as previously

  19. Calibration of a neutron detector based on single event upset of SRAM memories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingo, C., E-mail: carles.domingo@uab.ca [Departament de Fisica, Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Gomez, F. [Dpto. de Particulas, Univ. de Santiago, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Sanchez-Doblado, F. [Dpto. de Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Univ. de Sevilla, 41009 Sevilla (Spain); Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Univ. Virgen Macarena, 41009 Sevilla (Spain); Hartmann, G.H. [DKFZ E0400, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Amgarou, K.; Garcia-Fuste, M.J. [Departament de Fisica, Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Romero, M.T. [Dpto. de Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Univ. de Sevilla, 41009 Sevilla (Spain); Boettger, R.; Nolte, R.; Wissmann, F.; Zimbal, A.; Schuhmacher, H. [PTB, Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    One of the challenges of measuring neutron fluences around medical linacs is the fact that the scattered photon fluence is important and higher than the surrounding neutron leakage fluence. Additionally most electron accelerators are pulsed, with repetition rates of the order of hundreds of Hertz, while the pulse duration is in the microsecond range. For this reason, neutron fluence around RT linacs is usually measured through passive methods, with the inconvenience of their time consuming analysis. A new neutron detector, based on the relation between Single Event Upsets (SEU) in digital SRAM memories and the existing thermal neutron fluence, has been developed. This work reports the calibration results of prototypes of this detector, obtained from exposures to the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt in Braunschweig (PTB) moderated {sup 252}Cf source, to PTB quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams of 0.565 MeV, 1.2 MeV, 5 MeV, 8 MeV and 14.8 MeV, and to the GKSS thermal neutron beam.

  20. Dose levels and neutron reaction rates for HPRR and SHEBA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renier, J.P.; Westfall, R.M.; Knight, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    The analysis shows good agreement between calculated and experimental values of the neutron doses at 6 meters, while the gamma-ray doses vary by 25%. For distances greater than 6 meters, there are larger differences between the calculated and experimental doses, which may be due to experimental uncertainties. The Henderson and ANSI-STD neutron and gamma-ray doses for the BARE-SHEBA, LS-HPRR and BARE-HPRR configurations are also displayed. At distances of 6 meters and greater, the neutron doses of the LS-HPRR are similar to those of BARE-SHEBA. For the BARE-HPRR, the neutron doses are up to a factor of 8 greater. The gamma-ray doses of the LS-HPRR are smaller by as much as 75% of the BARE-SHEBA values. The gamma-ray doses of the BARE-HPRR and LS-HPRR show less variation

  1. Construction of monoenergetic neutron calibration fields using 45Sc(p, n)45Ti reaction at JAEA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimura, Y; Saegusa, J; Shikaze, Y; Tsutsumi, M; Shimizu, S; Yoshizawa, M

    2007-01-01

    The 8 and 27 keV monoenergetic neutron calibration fields have been developed by using (45)Sc(p, n)(45)Ti reaction. Protons from a 4-MV Pelletron accelerator are used to bombard a thin scandium target evaporated onto a platinum disc. The proton energies are finely adjusted to the resonance to generate the 8 and 27 keV neutrons by applying a high voltage to the target assemblies. The neutron energies were measured using the time-of-flight method with a lithium glass scintillation detector. The neutron fluences at a calibration point located at 50 cm from the target were evaluated using Bonner spheres. A long counter was placed at 2.2 m from the target and at 60 degrees to the direction of the proton beam in order to monitor the fluence at the calibration point. Fluence and dose equivalent rates at the calibration point are sufficient to calibrate many types of the neutron survey metres.

  2. Impact of the Revised 10 CFR 835 on the Neutron Dose Rates at LLNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radev, R.

    2009-01-01

    In June 2007, 10 CFR 835 (1) was revised to include new radiation weighting factors for neutrons, updated dosimetric models, and dose terms consistent with the newer ICRP recommendations. A significant aspect of the revised 10 CFR 835 is the adoption of the recommendations outlined in ICRP-60 (2). The recommended new quantities demand a review of much of the basic data used in protection against exposure to sources of ionizing radiation. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements has defined a number of quantities for use in personnel and area monitoring (3,4,5) including the ambient dose equivalent H*(d) to be used for area monitoring and instrument calibrations. These quantities are used in ICRP-60 and ICRP-74. This report deals only with the changes in the ambient dose equivalent and ambient dose rate equivalent for neutrons as a result of the implementation of the revised 10 CFR 835. In the report, the terms neutron dose and neutron dose rate will be used for convenience for ambient neutron dose and ambient neutron dose rate unless otherwise stated. This report provides a qualitative and quantitative estimate of how much the neutron dose rates at LLNL will change with the implementation of the revised 10 CFR 835. Neutron spectra and dose rates from selected locations at the LLNL were measured with a high resolution spectroscopic neutron dose rate system (ROSPEC) as well as with a standard neutron rem meter (a.k.a., a remball). The spectra obtained at these locations compare well with the spectra from the Radiation Calibration Laboratory's (RCL) bare californium source that is currently used to calibrate neutron dose rate instruments. The measurements obtained from the high resolution neutron spectrometer and dose meter ROSPEC and the NRD dose meter compare within the range of ±25%. When the new radiation weighting factors are adopted with the implementation of the revised 10 CFR 835, the measured dose rates will increase by up to 22%. The

  3. Capture and Fission rate of 232-Th, 238-U, 237-Np and 239-Pu from spallation neutrons in a huge block of lead.

    CERN Document Server

    Vlachoudis, Vasilis

    2000-01-01

    The study is centered on the research of the incineration possibility of nuclear waste, by the association of a particle accelerator with a multiplying medium of neutrons, in the project "Energy Amplifier" of C. Rubbia. It consists of the experimental determination of the rates of capture and fission of certain elements (232-Th, 238-U, 237-Np and 239-Pu) subjected to a fluence of fast spallation neutrons. These neutrons are produced by the interaction of high kinetic energy protons (several GeV) provided by the CERN-PS accelerator, on a large lead solid volume. The measurement techniques used in this work, are based on the activation of elements in the lead volume and the subsequent gamma spectroscopy of the activated elements, and also by the detection of fission fragment traces. The development, of a Monte Carlo code makes it possible, on one hand, to better understand the relevant processes, and on the other hand, to validate the code, by comparison with measurements, for the design and the construction of...

  4. Measurement of reaction rates for different neutron induced reactions in27Al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulc, Martin; Baroň, Petr; Novák, Evžen; Jánský, Bohumil; Harutyunyan, Davit

    2016-12-01

    The presented paper aims to compare various measured neutron induced reaction rates in Aluminium with computed ones in different nuclear data libraries. A 252 Cf neutron source with emission rate of 9.53E8 n/s was used. Reactions involved in the study were 27 Al(n,g), 27 Al (n,p) and 27 Al (n,α). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Neutron irradiation effect of thermally-sensitized stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hide, Kouitiro [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan). Komae Research Lab.

    1998-03-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) susceptibility of irradiated thermally-sensitized Type 304 Stainless Steels (SSs) was studied as a function of neutron fluence and correlated with mechanical responses of the materials. Neutron irradiation was carried out to neutron fluences up to 1.1 x 10{sup 24} n/m{sup 2} (E > 1MeV) at the light water reactor temperature in the Japan Material Test Reactor. The irradiated specimens were examined by slow strain rate stress corrosion cracking tests in 290degC pure water of 0.2 ppm dissolved oxygen concentration and microhardness measurements. The IGSCC susceptibility of the irradiated specimens increased with neutron fluence up to 1.1 x 10{sup 24} n/m{sup 2}. From an attempt to correlate the IGSCC susceptibility with the mechanical properties, an excellent correlation was identified between the susceptibility and microhardness increments at the grain boundary relative to the grain center. While intergranular corrosion rate of thermally sensitized SS increased with neutron fluence up to 1.1 x 10{sup 24} n/m{sup 2}, that of solution annealed SS did not change. The incremental grain boundary hardening and degradation of intergranular corrosion resistance may presumably be the major factors affecting IGSCC performance. (author)

  6. Stellar neutron capture rates and the s process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Käppeler F.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Neutron reactions are responsible for the formation of the elements heavier than iron. The corresponding scenarios relate to helium burning in Red Giant stars (s process and to supernova explosions (r and p processes. The s process, which operates in or near the valley of β-stability, has produced about half of the elemental abundances between Fe and Bi. Accurate (n, γ cross sections are the essential input for s process studies, because they determine the abundances produced by that process. Following a brief summary of the neutron capture processes, the focus will be set on the s process in massive stars, where the role of reliable cross section information is particularly important. Eventually, the intriguing aspects of the origin of 60Fe will be addressed. Attempts to determine the stellar cross section of that isotope are pushing experimental possibilities to their limits and present a pertinent challenge for future facilities.

  7. FOREWORD: Neutron metrology Neutron metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, David J.; Nolte, Ralf; Gressier, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    covered, particularly as a compendium of papers on spectrometry for radiation protection has been published relatively recently [1]. The CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA), whereby national measurement standards and certificates issued by different national metrology institutes (NMIs) can be recognized internationally, is covered only briefly, although the key comparisons which underpin the CIPM MRA are highlighted. The papers included in this issue concentrate on the primary physical quantities—neutron source emission rate and neutron fluence, papers on the latter quantity covering the wide range of neutron energies for which standards are required. Neutron cross sections are fundamental to neutron physics and their importance in neutron metrology is also covered. A large amount of work by acknowledged experts in neutron metrology has gone into the preparation of this special issue and we are indebted to them for their time and effort. The list of contributors begins with the authors of the papers but also includes the referees who provided invisible but invaluable input. We are grateful for the support and encouragement of Professor Georgio Moscati, president of the CCRI when the work was proposed, Dr Kim Carneiro the current president, and Dr Penny Allisy-Roberts the executive secretary of the CCRI. When this work was first proposed a list of potential topics was drawn up by the then chairman of Section (III) Dr Horst Klein. It is a measure of his insight and knowledge of the field that the resulting document matches almost exactly the original plan he drew up. This special issue is thus a tribute to his very extensive contribution to the field. We sincerely hope its contents provide an accurate picture of the present state of neutron metrology in view of Dr Klein's conviction of the importance in metrology of getting things right. Reference [1] Thomas D J and Klein H (ed) 2003 Neutron and photon spectrometry techniques for radiation protection Radiat

  8. Estimation of low-level neutron dose-equivalent rate by using extrapolation method for a curie level Am–Be neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Gang; Xu, Jiayun; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Neutron radiation protection is an important research area because of the strong radiation biological effect of neutron field. The radiation dose of neutron is closely related to the neutron energy, and the connected relationship is a complex function of energy. For the low-level neutron radiation field (e.g. the Am–Be source), the commonly used commercial neutron dosimeter cannot always reflect the low-level dose rate, which is restricted by its own sensitivity limit and measuring range. In this paper, the intensity distribution of neutron field caused by a curie level Am–Be neutron source was investigated by measuring the count rates obtained through a 3 He proportional counter at different locations around the source. The results indicate that the count rates outside of the source room are negligible compared with the count rates measured in the source room. In the source room, 3 He proportional counter and neutron dosimeter were used to measure the count rates and dose rates respectively at different distances to the source. The results indicate that both the count rates and dose rates decrease exponentially with the increasing distance, and the dose rates measured by a commercial dosimeter are in good agreement with the results calculated by the Geant4 simulation within the inherent errors recommended by ICRP and IEC. Further studies presented in this paper indicate that the low-level neutron dose equivalent rates in the source room increase exponentially with the increasing low-energy neutron count rates when the source is lifted from the shield with different radiation intensities. Based on this relationship as well as the count rates measured at larger distance to the source, the dose rates can be calculated approximately by the extrapolation method. This principle can be used to estimate the low level neutron dose values in the source room which cannot be measured directly by a commercial dosimeter. - Highlights: • The scope of the affected area for

  9. Application of damage functions to CTR component fluence limit predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simons, R.L.; Doran, D.G.

    1975-01-01

    Material behavior observed under irradiation conditions in test reactors is not always directly applicable to the design of reactor components such as CTR first wall because of differences in the damage effectiveness of test reactor and service spectra. The interpolation and, under some conditions, extrapolation of material property change data from test conditions to different neutron spectra in service conditions can be accomplished using semi-empirical damage functions. The derivation and application of damage functions to CTR conditions is reviewed. Since limited amounts of data are available for applications to CTR design spectra, considerable attention is placed on the effectiveness of various available and proposed neutron sources in determining a damage function and subsequent fluence limit prediction. Neutron sources included in this study were EBR-II, HIFR, LAMPF (Be and Cu targets), high energy deuterons incident on Be (D-Be), and 14 MeV neutrons (D-T)

  10. Expected count rate for the Self- Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry measurements of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossa, Riccardo [SCK.CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang, 200 - B2400 Mol (Belgium); Universite libre de Bruxelles, Ecole polytechnique de Bruxelles - Service de Metrologie Nucleaire, CP 165/84, Avenue F.D. Roosevelt, 50 - B1050 Brussels (Belgium); Borella, Alessandro; Van der Meer, Klaas [SCK.CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang, 200 - B2400 Mol (Belgium); Labeau, Pierre-Etienne; Pauly, Nicolas [Universite libre de Bruxelles, Ecole polytechnique de Bruxelles - Service de Metrologie Nucleaire, CP 165/84, Avenue F.D. Roosevelt, 50 - B1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-07-01

    The Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) is a passive neutron technique that aims at a direct quantification of {sup 239}Pu in the fuel assemblies by measuring the attenuation of the neutron flux in the energy region close to the 0.3 eV resonance of {sup 239}Pu. The {sup 239}Pu mass is estimated by calculating the SINRD signature, that is the ratio between the neutron flux integrated over the fast energy region and around the 0.3 eV resonance region. The SINRD measurement approach considered in this study consists in introducing a small neutron detector in the central guide tube of a PWR 17x17 fuel assembly. In order to measure the neutron flux in the energy regions defined in the SINRD signature, different detector types are used. The response of a bare {sup 238}U fission chamber is considered for the determination of the fast neutron flux, while other thermal-epithermal detectors wrapped in neutron absorbers are envisaged to measure the neutron flux around the resonance region. This paper provides an estimation of the count rate that can be achieved with the detector types proposed for the SINRD measurement. In the first section a set of detectors are evaluated in terms of count rate and sensitivity to the {sup 239}Pu content, in order to identify the optimal measurement configuration for each detector type. Then a study is performed to increase the count rate by increasing the detector size. The study shows that the highest count rate is achieved by using either {sup 3}He or {sup 10}B proportional counters because of the high neutron efficiency of these detectors. However, the calculations indicate that the biggest contribution to the measurement uncertainty is due to the measurement of the fast neutron flux. Finally, similar sensitivity to the {sup 239}Pu content is obtained by using the different detector types for the measurement of the neutron flux close to the resonance region. Therefore, the count rate associated to each detector type

  11. A high repetition rate laser-heavy water based neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hah, Jungmoo; He, Zhaohan; Nees, John; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alexander; CenterUltrafast Optical Science Team

    2015-11-01

    Neutrons have numerous applications in diverse areas, such as medicine, security, and material science. For example, sources of MeV neutrons may be used for active interrogation for nuclear security applications. Recently, alternative ways to generate neutron flux have been studied. Among them, ultrashort laser pulse interactions with dense plasma have attracted significant attention as compact, pulse sources of neutrons. To generate neutrons using a laser through fusion reactions, thin solid density targets have been used in a pitcher-catcher arrangement, using deuterated plastic for example. However, the use of solid targets is limited for high-repetition rate operation due to the need to refresh the target for every laser shot. Here, we use a free flowing heavy water target with a high repetition rate (500 Hz) laser without a catcher. From the interaction between a 10 micron scale diameter heavy water stream with the Lambda-cubed laser system at the Univ. of Michigan (12mJ, 800nm, 35fs), deuterons collide with each other resulting in D-D fusion reactions generating 2.45 MeV neutrons. Under best conditions a time average of ~ 105 n/s of neutrons are generated.

  12. Rate of formation of neutron stars in the galaxy estimated from stellar statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endal, A.S.

    1979-01-01

    Stellar statistics and stellar evolution models can be used to estimate the rate of formation of neutron stars in the Galaxy. A recent analysis by Hills suggests that the mean interval between neutron-star births is greater than 27 years. This is incompatible with estimates based on pulsar statistics. However, a closer examination of the stellar data shows that Hill's result is incorrect. A mean interval between neutron-star births as short as 4 years is consistent with (though certainly not required by) stellar evolution theory

  13. ACDOS2: a code for neutron-induced activities and dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruby, L.; Keney, G.S.; Lagache, J.C.

    1981-10-01

    In order to anticipate problems from the radioactivation of neutral beam sources as a result of testing, a code has been developed which calculates both the radioactivities produced and the dose rates resulting therefrom. The code ACDOS2 requires neutron source strength and spectral distribution as input, or alternately, the source strength can be calculated internally from an input of neutral beam source parameters. A variety of simple geometries can be specified, and up to 12 times of interest following the shutdown of the neutron source. Radiation attenuating and daughter radioactivities are treated accurately. ACDOS2 is also of use for neutron-induced radioactivation problems involving accelerators, fusion reactors, or fission reactors

  14. Study of natural diamond detector spectrometric properties under neutron irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Alekseyev, A B; Kaschuck, Y; Krasilnikov, A; Portnov, D; Tugarinov, S

    2002-01-01

    Natural diamond detector (NDD) performance was studied up to a neutron fluence of 10 sup 1 sup 5 neutron/cm sup 2. The variations of the NDD spectrometric response to incident alpha-particles from sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am source after exposure to fast neutron fluences up to 3x10 sup 1 sup 6 n/cm sup 2 were examined. No significant variations up to the level of 10 sup 1 sup 4 n/cm sup 2 were observed. Degradation of charge collection efficiency at higher fluences is reported. No remarkable increase of the NDD leakage current and count rate change had been observed up to a neutron fluence of 3x10 sup 1 sup 6 n/cm sup 2. The charge collection efficiency variations of neutron irradiated diamond spectrometer were studied ex situ under gamma-rays, beta-radiation and visible light excitation. Charge collection efficiency restoration up to 75% level and the NDD performance stabilization by extrinsic low-intensity visible light (550 nm

  15. Comparison of embrittlement trend curves to high fluence surveillance results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogaert, A.S.; Gerard, R.; Chaouadi, R.

    2011-01-01

    In the regulatory justification of the integrity of the reactor pressure vessels (RPV) for long term operation, use is made of predictive formulas (also called trend curves) to evaluate the RPV embrittlement (expressed in terms of RTNDT shifts) in function of fluence, chemical composition and in some cases temperature, neutron flux or product form. It has been shown recently that some of the existing or proposed trend curves tend to underpredict high dose embrittlement. Due to the scarcity of representative surveillance data at high dose, some test reactor results were used in these evaluations and raise the issue of representativeness of the accelerated test reactor irradiations (dose rate effects). In Belgium the surveillance capsules withdrawal schedule was modified in the nineties in order to obtain results corresponding to 60 years of operation or more with the initial surveillance program. Some of these results are already available and offer a good opportunity to test the validity of the predictive formulas at high dose. In addition, advanced surveillance methods are used in Belgium like the Master Curve, increased tensile tests, and microstructural investigations. These techniques made it possible to show the conservatism of the regulatory approach and to demonstrate increased margins, especially for the first generation units. In this paper the surveillance results are compared to different predictive formulas, as well as to an engineering hardening model developed at SCK.CEN. Generally accepted property-to-property correlations are critically revisited. Conclusions are made on the reliability and applicability of the embrittlement trend curves. (authors)

  16. Determination of the emission rate for the 14 MeV neutron generator with the use of radio-yttrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laszynska Ewa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The neutron emission rate is a crucial parameter for most of the radiation sources that emit neutrons. In the case of large fusion devices the determination of this parameter is necessary for a proper assessment of the power release and the prediction for the neutron budget. The 14 MeV neutron generator will be used for calibration of neutron diagnostics at JET and ITER facilities. The stability of the neutron generator working parameters like emission and angular homogeneity affects the accuracy of calibration other neutron diagnostics. The aim of our experiment was to confirm the usefulness of yttrium activation method for monitoring of the neutron generator SODERN Model: GENIE 16. The reaction rate induced by neutrons inside the yttrium sample was indirectly measured by activation of the yttrium sample, and then by means of the γ-spectrometry method. The pre-calibrated HPGe detector was used to determine the yttrium radioactivity. The emissivity of neutron generator calculated on the basis of the measured radioactivity was compared with the value resulting from its electrical settings, and both of these values were found to be consistent. This allowed for a positive verification of the reaction cross section that was used to determine the reaction rate (6.45 × 10−21 reactions per second and the neutron emission rate (1.04 × 108 n·s−1. Our study confirms usefulness of the yttrium activation method for monitoring of the neutron generator.

  17. Thermal neutron calibration channel at LNMRI/IRD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astuto, A.; Salgado, A.P.; Lopes, R.T.; Leite, S.P.; Patrao, K.C.S.; Fonseca, E.S.; Pereira, W.W.

    2014-01-01

    The Brazilian Metrology Laboratory of Ionizing Radiations (LNMRI) standard thermal neutron flux facility was designed to provide uniform neutron fluence for calibration of small neutron detectors and individual dosemeters. This fluence is obtained by neutron moderation from four 241 Am-Be sources, each with 596 GBq, in a facility built with blocks of graphite/paraffin compound and high-purity carbon graphite. This study was carried out in two steps. In the first step, simulations using the MCNPX code on different geometric arrangements of moderator materials and neutron sources were performed. The quality of the resulting neutron fluence in terms of spectrum, cadmium ratio and gamma-neutron ratio was evaluated. In the second step, the system was assembled based on the results obtained on the simulations, and new measurements are being made. These measurements will validate the system, and other intercomparisons will ensure traceability to the International System of Units. The pile construction form using blocks allows distinct arrangements for new studies and possibilities of other LNMRI reference fields. The results can be predicted by the simulation used in this work. Different number of each type of blocks and sources can be used. The main difference observed between the final measurement and simulation results might be due to the difference in composition of paraffin blocks used in assembling the pile. In order to confirm the thermal neutron field and fluence rate in the central chamber (inside the channel) that will be used to irradiate small neutron detectors, it is necessary to use another quantification method such as the gold foils activation with measurement traceability. It will be performed in a future stage. (authors)

  18. Implications of Binary Black Hole Detections on the Merger Rates of Double Neutron Stars and Neutron Star–Black Holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Anuradha; Arun, K. G.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.

    2017-01-01

    We show that the inferred merger rate and chirp masses of binary black holes (BBHs) detected by advanced LIGO (aLIGO) can be used to constrain the rate of double neutron star (DNS) and neutron star–black hole (NSBH) mergers in the universe. We explicitly demonstrate this by considering a set of publicly available population synthesis models of Dominik et al. and show that if all the BBH mergers, GW150914, LVT151012, GW151226, and GW170104, observed by aLIGO arise from isolated binary evolution, the predicted DNS merger rate may be constrained to be 2.3–471.0 Gpc −3 yr −1 and that of NSBH mergers will be constrained to 0.2–48.5 Gpc −3 yr −1 . The DNS merger rates are not constrained much, but the NSBH rates are tightened by a factor of ∼4 as compared to their previous rates. Note that these constrained DNS and NSBH rates are extremely model-dependent and are compared to the unconstrained values 2.3–472.5 Gpc −3 yr −1 and 0.2–218 Gpc −3 yr −1 , respectively, using the same models of Dominik et al. (2012a). These rate estimates may have implications for short Gamma Ray Burst progenitor models assuming they are powered (solely) by DNS or NSBH mergers. While these results are based on a set of open access population synthesis models, which may not necessarily be the representative ones, the proposed method is very general and can be applied to any number of models, thereby yielding more realistic constraints on the DNS and NSBH merger rates from the inferred BBH merger rate and chirp mass.

  19. Implications of Binary Black Hole Detections on the Merger Rates of Double Neutron Stars and Neutron Star–Black Holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Anuradha; Arun, K. G.; Sathyaprakash, B. S., E-mail: axg645@psu.edu, E-mail: kgarun@cmi.ac.in, E-mail: bss25@psu.edu [Institute for Gravitation and Cosmos, Physics Department, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2017-11-01

    We show that the inferred merger rate and chirp masses of binary black holes (BBHs) detected by advanced LIGO (aLIGO) can be used to constrain the rate of double neutron star (DNS) and neutron star–black hole (NSBH) mergers in the universe. We explicitly demonstrate this by considering a set of publicly available population synthesis models of Dominik et al. and show that if all the BBH mergers, GW150914, LVT151012, GW151226, and GW170104, observed by aLIGO arise from isolated binary evolution, the predicted DNS merger rate may be constrained to be 2.3–471.0 Gpc{sup −3} yr{sup −1} and that of NSBH mergers will be constrained to 0.2–48.5 Gpc{sup −3} yr{sup −1}. The DNS merger rates are not constrained much, but the NSBH rates are tightened by a factor of ∼4 as compared to their previous rates. Note that these constrained DNS and NSBH rates are extremely model-dependent and are compared to the unconstrained values 2.3–472.5 Gpc{sup −3} yr{sup −1} and 0.2–218 Gpc{sup −3} yr{sup −1}, respectively, using the same models of Dominik et al. (2012a). These rate estimates may have implications for short Gamma Ray Burst progenitor models assuming they are powered (solely) by DNS or NSBH mergers. While these results are based on a set of open access population synthesis models, which may not necessarily be the representative ones, the proposed method is very general and can be applied to any number of models, thereby yielding more realistic constraints on the DNS and NSBH merger rates from the inferred BBH merger rate and chirp mass.

  20. Investigations of the tritium recycling in TFTR using the DT neutron rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, S.E.; Callen, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    During deuterim-only neutral-beam-injected discharges, tritium from earlier deuterium-tritium discharges is released from the vessel limiters and walls to cause a deuterium-tritium neutron count rate comparable to the deuterium-deuterium neutron count rate. A measure of the tritium density in the plasma based on neutron rate measurements is defined and used to determine which parameters influence tritium influx to the plasma core. The tritium density is observed to decrease in a sequence of deuterium-only supershots and to depend on the amount of tritium injected in prior DT shots and the amount of tritium present in the limiter. A weak correlation is also observed with the plasma current, but not with beam power, hydrogen influx, carbon influx, visible bremsstrahlung, lithium pellet injection, blooms, nor disruptions

  1. Calculations on neutron irradiation damage in reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sone, Kazuho; Shiraishi, Kensuke

    1976-01-01

    Neutron irradiation damage calculations were made for Mo, Nb, V, Fe, Ni and Cr. Firstly, damage functions were calculated as a function of neutron energy with neutron cross sections of elastic and inelastic scatterings, and (n,2n) and (n,γ) reactions filed in ENDF/B-III. Secondly, displacement damage expressed in displacements per atom (DPA) was estimated for neutron environments such as fission spectrum, thermal neutron reactor (JMTR), fast breeder reactor (MONJU) and two fusion reactors (The Conceptual Design of Fusion Reactor in JAERI and ORNL-Benchmark). then, damage cross section in units of dpa. barn was defined as a factor to convert a given neutron fluence to the DPA value, and was calculated for the materials in the above neutron environments. Finally, production rates of helium and hydrogen atoms were calculated with (n,α) and (n,p) cross sections in ENDF/B-III for the materials irradiated in the above reactors. (auth.)

  2. Ultra- cold neutron sources: UCN production rate in solid deuterium converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Gheisari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A new model is presented herein to calculate optimal value for ultra-cold neutron (UCN production rate of a UCN source. The cold neutron (CN converter is the main component of UCN source. In this paper, we study the UCN source which contains the D2O neutron moderator, the sD2 converter, 590 Mev proton beam, and the spallation target (a mixture of Pb, D2O and Zr. In order to determine the quantities, the neutron transport equation, written in MATLAB, has been combined with the MCNPX simulation code. The neutron transport equation in cylindrical coordinate has been solved everywhere in sD2 by using simulated CN flux as boundary value. By loading a cylindrical shell with different materials, surrounding the converter, different values for UCN production rate and density were obtained. The results of the UCN production rate and density and their comparison with previous results show that the present method has a good capability for optimization of UCN source parameters.

  3. Heavy Ion Irradiation Fluence Dependence for Single-Event Upsets of NAND Flash Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dakai; Wilcox, Edward; Ladbury, Raymond; Kim, Hak; Phan, Anthony; Seidleck, Christina; LaBel, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the single-event effect (SEE) susceptibility of the Micron 16 nm NAND flash, and found the single-event upset (SEU) cross section varied inversely with fluence. The SEU cross section decreased with increasing fluence. We attribute the effect to the variable upset sensitivities of the memory cells. The current test standards and procedures assume that SEU follow a Poisson process and do not take into account the variability in the error rate with fluence. Therefore, heavy ion irradiation of devices with variable upset sensitivity distribution using typical fluence levels may underestimate the cross section and on-orbit event rate.

  4. Determination of neutron flux densities in WWR-S reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomasek, F.

    1989-04-01

    The method is described of determining neutron flux densities and neutron fluences using activation detectors. The basic definitions and relations for determining reaction rates, fluence and neutron flux as well as the characteristics of some reactions and of sitable activation detectors are reported. The flux densities were determined of thermal and fast neutrons and of gamma quanta in the WWR-S reactor core. The data measured in the period 1984-1987 are tabulated. Cross sections for the individual reactions were determined from spectra measurements processed using program SAND-II and cross section library ENDF-B IV. Neutron flux densities were also measured for the WWR-S reactor vertical channels. (E.J.). 10 figs., 8 tabs., 111 refs

  5. New prospect in neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cluzeau, S.

    1991-01-01

    Neutron radiography is a very useful non-destructive testing (NDT) method which frequently complements classical X-ray inspection. Numerous inspections in some fields are currently performed at reactor-based neutron radiography facilities but many other interesting applications in different fields are at present not considered because the objects to be tested cannot be moved to a reactor. It is the goal of the DIANE project, to allow the utilization of this NDT method in industrial facilities by developing a safe and convenient neutron radiography equipment using an ''on-off'' neutron source. As a result of the efforts of the four European partners, a first laboratory demonstration model is currently in operation in Germany and a fully mobile second one is expected by the end of 1992. Good radiographs are obtained with exposure times in the range of a few seconds to ten minutes using an electronic imaging system. The fast neutron generator uses a sealed neutron tube delivering 5.10 11 neutrons.cm -2 .s -1 in 4 π steradian; with a collimator ratio of about 12, the fluence rate onto the object is then close to 1,5.10 5 thermal neutrons.cm -2 .s -1 . (author)

  6. Fluence-to-absorbed-dose conversion coefficients for neutron beams from 0.001 eV to 100 GeV calculated for a set of pregnant female and fetus models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taranenko, Valery; Xu, X George

    2008-01-01

    Protection of fetuses against external neutron exposure is an important task. This paper reports a set of absorbed dose conversion coefficients for fetal and maternal organs for external neutron beams using the RPI-P pregnant female models and the MCNPX code. The newly developed pregnant female models represent an adult female with a fetus including its brain and skeleton at the end of each trimester. The organ masses were adjusted to match the reference values within 1%. For the 3 mm cubic voxel size, the models consist of 10-15 million voxels for 35 organs. External monoenergetic neutron beams of six standard configurations (AP, PA, LLAT, RLAT, ROT and ISO) and source energies 0.001 eV-100 GeV were considered. The results are compared with previous data that are based on simplified anatomical models. The differences in dose depend on source geometry, energy and gestation periods: from 20% up to 140% for the whole fetus, and up to 100% for the fetal brain. Anatomical differences are primarily responsible for the discrepancies in the organ doses. For the first time, the dependence of mother organ doses upon anatomical changes during pregnancy was studied. A maximum of 220% increase in dose was observed for the placenta in the nine months model compared to three months, whereas dose to the pancreas, small and large intestines decreases by 60% for the AP source for the same models. Tabulated dose conversion coefficients for the fetus and 27 maternal organs are provided

  7. The rate of neutron star binary mergers in the universe - Minimal predictions for gravity wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phinney, E. S.

    1991-01-01

    Of the many sources which gravitational wave observatories might see, merging neutron star binaries are the most predictable. Their waveforms at the observable frequencies are easy to calculate. And three systems which will merge in less than a Hubble time have already been observed as binary pulsars: two in the disk of the Galaxy, and one in a globular cluster. From the lifetimes and positions of these, a lower limit to the merger rate in the Galaxy and globular cluster system are inferred with confidence. Taking the merger rate in other galaxies to scale with the star formation rate, the merger rate expected in the local universe is computed. An ultraconservative lower limit to the rate gives three per year within 1 Gpc. The best estimate, still conservative in that it considers only systems like those already observed, gives three per year within 200 Mpc. An upper limit of three mergers per year within 23/h Mpc is set by the rate of Type Ib supernovae. The rates of black hole binary mergers and black hole-neutron star binary mergers are model-dependent, but could be comparable to the given rate of neutron-star binary mergers.

  8. Calculation of Neutron Production Rates and Spectra from Compounds of Actinides and Light Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlaskin Gennady

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The code NEDIS allows the calculation of neutron production rate and continuous energy spectra due to (α,n reaction on Li, Be, B, C, O, F, Ne, Na Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, Ar, K, and Ca. It accounts for anisotropic angular distribution of neutrons of (α,n reaction in centre-of- mass system and dimensions of alpha emitting source material particles. Spontaneous fission spectra are calculated with evaluated half-life, spontaneous fission branching, ν- averaged per fission, and Watt spectrum parameters. The results of calculations by NEDIS can be used as input for Monte Carlo simulation for materials that will be used in radiation shielding and for underground neutron experiments

  9. Reconciliation of Measured and TRANSP-calculated Neutron Emission Rates in the National Spherical Torus Experiment: Circa 2002-2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.S. Medley; D.S. Darrow; A.L. Roquemore

    2005-06-15

    A change in the response of the neutron detectors on the National Spherical Torus Experiment occurred between the 2002-2003 and 2004 experimental run periods. An analysis of this behavior by investigating the neutron diagnostic operating conditions and comparing measured and TRANSP-calculated neutron rates is presented. Also a revised procedure for cross calibration of the neutron scintillator detectors with the fission chamber detectors was implemented that delivers good agreement amongst the measured neutron rates for all neutron detectors and all run periods. For L-mode discharges, the measured and TRANSP-calculated neutron rates now match closely for all run years. For H-mode discharges over the entire 2002-2004 period, the 2FG scintillator and fission chamber measurements match each other but imply a neutron deficit of 11.5% relative to the TRANSP-calculated neutron. The results of this report impose a modification on all of the previously used calibration factors for the entire neutron detector suite over the 2002-2004 period. A tabular summary of the new calibration factors is provided including certified calibration factors for the 2005 run.

  10. Reconciliation of Measured and TRANSP-calculated Neutron Emission Rates in the National Spherical Torus Experiment: Circa 2002-2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medley, S.S.; Darrow, D.S.; Roquemore, A.L.

    2005-01-01

    A change in the response of the neutron detectors on the National Spherical Torus Experiment occurred between the 2002-2003 and 2004 experimental run periods. An analysis of this behavior by investigating the neutron diagnostic operating conditions and comparing measured and TRANSP-calculated neutron rates is presented. Also a revised procedure for cross calibration of the neutron scintillator detectors with the fission chamber detectors was implemented that delivers good agreement amongst the measured neutron rates for all neutron detectors and all run periods. For L-mode discharges, the measured and TRANSP-calculated neutron rates now match closely for all run years. For H-mode discharges over the entire 2002-2004 period, the 2FG scintillator and fission chamber measurements match each other but imply a neutron deficit of 11.5% relative to the TRANSP-calculated neutron. The results of this report impose a modification on all of the previously used calibration factors for the entire neutron detector suite over the 2002-2004 period. A tabular summary of the new calibration factors is provided including certified calibration factors for the 2005 run

  11. Rates for neutron-capture reactions on tungsten isotopes in iron meteorites. [Abstract only

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masarik, J.; Reedy, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    High-precision W isotopic analyses by Harper and Jacobsen indicate the W-182/W-183 ratio in the Toluca iron meteorite is shifted by -(3.0 +/- 0.9) x 10(exp -4) relative to a terrestrial standard. Possible causes of this shift are neutron-capture reactions on W during Toluca's approximately 600-Ma exposure to cosmic ray particles or radiogenic growth of W-182 from 9-Ma Hf-182 in the silicate portion of the Earth after removal of W to the Earth's core. Calculations for the rates of neutron-capture reactions on W isotopes were done to study the first possibility. The LAHET Code System (LCS) which consists of the Los Alamos High Energy Transport (LAHET) code and the Monte Carlo N-Particle(MCNP) transport code was used to numerically simulate the irradiation of the Toluca iron meteorite by galactic-cosmic-ray (GCR) particles and to calculate the rates of W(n, gamma) reactions. Toluca was modeled as a 3.9-m-radius sphere with the composition of a typical IA iron meteorite. The incident GCR protons and their interactions were modeled with LAHET, which also handled the interactions of neutrons with energies above 20 MeV. The rates for the capture of neutrons by W-182, W-183, and W-186 were calculated using the detailed library of (n, gamma) cross sections in MCNP. For this study of the possible effect of W(n, gamma) reactions on W isotope systematics, we consider the peak rates. The calculated maximum change in the normalized W-182/W-183 ratio due to neutron-capture reactions cannot account for more than 25% of the mass 182 deficit observed in Toluca W.

  12. Upper Limits on the Rates of Binary Neutron Star and Neutron Star-Black Hole Mergers from Advanced LIGO’s First Observing Run

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio., M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dasgupta, A.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; De, S.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Fenyvesi, E.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Geng, P.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jian, L.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; K, Haris; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chi-Woong; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.-M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kissel, J. S.; Klein, B.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Lewis, J. B.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magaña Zertuche, L.; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O. E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Setyawati, Y.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-12-01

    We report here the non-detection of gravitational waves from the merger of binary-neutron star systems and neutron star-black hole systems during the first observing run of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO). In particular, we searched for gravitational-wave signals from binary-neutron star systems with component masses \\in [1,3] {M}⊙ and component dimensionless spins <0.05. We also searched for neutron star-black hole systems with the same neutron star parameters, black hole mass \\in [2,99] {M}⊙ , and no restriction on the black hole spin magnitude. We assess the sensitivity of the two LIGO detectors to these systems and find that they could have detected the merger of binary-neutron star systems with component mass distributions of 1.35 ± 0.13 M ⊙ at a volume-weighted average distance of ˜70 Mpc, and for neutron star-black hole systems with neutron star masses of 1.4 M ⊙ and black hole masses of at least 5 M ⊙, a volume-weighted average distance of at least ˜110 Mpc. From this we constrain with 90% confidence the merger rate to be less than 12,600 Gpc-3 yr-1 for binary-neutron star systems and less than 3600 Gpc-3 yr-1 for neutron star-black hole systems. We discuss the astrophysical implications of these results, which we find to be in conflict with only the most optimistic predictions. However, we find that if no detection of neutron star-binary mergers is made in the next two Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo observing runs we would place significant constraints on the merger rates. Finally, assuming a rate of {10}-7+20 Gpc-3 yr-1, short gamma-ray bursts beamed toward the Earth, and assuming that all short gamma-ray bursts have binary-neutron star (neutron star-black hole) progenitors, we can use our 90% confidence rate upper limits to constrain the beaming angle of the gamma-ray burst to be greater than 2\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} {3}-1.1+1.7 (4\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} {3}-1.9+3.1).

  13. Microscopic (n,γ) rates with astrophysical relevance near the N = 50 neutron core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, Saumi; Gangopadhyay, G.; Bhattacharyya, Abhijit

    2016-01-01

    The weak s-process component, that takes place in He core and C-burning shell of massive stars, produces elements in the mass range 56 < A < 90 from iron up to Sr-Y-Mo region. Neutron capture rates are crucial in the study of weak s-process nucleosynthesis via classical or model-based network calculations. The nuclei in the vicinity of shell closures have very small capture cross sections and hence, act as bottlenecks to the reaction chain. The (n,γ) rates of s-only isotopes are crucial to test the validity of local approximation. Precise neutron capture rates have also consequences for s-process branching analysis that can predict various constraints about the astrophysical medium. The neutron capture rates are also important for p-process study. The rates of the (γ, n) reactions can be deduced from (n,γ) rates via detailed balance. The nuclei, for which experimental data do not exist, a good theoretical model can predict the values

  14. Neutron detectors for nuclear reactor control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchene, Jean; Verdant, Robert.

    1974-01-01

    In view of the importance of in-core measurements the distinction is made between detectors used outside and inside the core. In the former case proportional counters, fission chambers and boron chambers are reviewed in turn. The only in-core detectors considered are those giving a direct measurement, i.e. supplying an electric signal representative of the neutron fluence rate while in the measurement position at the point given. Two kinds of detectors are used for direct measurements: miniature fission chambers and collectors, known also as neutron-electron converters [fr

  15. Effects of neutron irradiation on resistivity of reactor pressure vessel steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengliang; Shu, Guogang; Liu, Yi; Huang, Yili; Chen, Jun; Duan, Yuangang; Liu, Wei

    2018-02-01

    The embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel owing to fast-neutron irradiation is one of its primary failure mechanisms. In this work, neutron irradiation tests were performed on an RPV steel at a high temperature (565 K) using a neutron irradiation test reactor. In addition, resistivity measurements were performed on the RPV steel both before and after irradiation in a hot laboratory using the four-probe method. The results showed that the resistivity of the RPV steel exhibits nonlinear behaviour with respect to the radiation fluence and that the nonlinearity becomes more pronounced with an increase in the radiation fluence. For instance, when the radiation fluence is 0.1540 dpa and the excitation current is increased from 0.2 mA to 200 mA, the resistivity of the RPV steel decreases by as much as 67.12%. During irradiation embrittlement, the resistivity increases with the fluence. When the radiation fluence is greater than 0.116 dpa, the increase in the resistivity accelerates. When the radiation fluence is less than 0.116 dpa and when an excitation current of 2 mA or 20 mA is used, the relationship between the resistivity and the radiation fluence for the RPV steel is a quadratic one, whereas that between the rate of change in the resistivity and the radiation fluence is a linear one. Thus, the resistivity of RPV steel can be used to characterise its degree of irradiation embrittlement, and resistivity measurements can be employed as a nondestructive evaluation technique for monitoring the degree of irradiation damage experienced by in-service RPV steel.

  16. Fluence to Dose Equivalent Conversion Coefficients for Evaluation of Accelerator Radiation Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Ralph H.; Zeman, Gary H.

    2001-01-01

    The derivation of a set of conversion functions for the expression of neutron fluence measurements in terms of Effective Dose, E, is described. Four functions in analytical form are presented, covering the neutron energy range from 2.5 10-8 to 10+4 MeV, for the interpretation of fluence measurements in the typical irradiation conditions experienced around high-energy proton accelerators such as the Bevatron. For neutron energies below 200 MeV the analytical functions were modeled after the ISO and ROT conversion coefficients in ICRU 57. For neutron energies above 200 MeV, the analytical function was derived from an analysis of recent published data. Sample calculations using either the analytical expressions or the tabulated conversion coefficients from which the analytical expressions are derived show agreement to better than plus/minus 5%

  17. Spectrum and H(10) of secondary neutrons around Linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz H, A.; Hernandez A, B.; Vega C, H. R.; Hernandez D, V. M. [Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Cipres 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Rivera M, T. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, IPN, Av. Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)], e-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com

    2009-10-15

    Neutron spectrum and ambient dose equivalent has been measured around two 10 MV linear accelerators. Accelerators are Siemens, one is a Mevatron model while another is the Primus. Main differences between those models are the beam collimator and the vault room. Here, Bonner sphere spectrometer with a passive thermal neutron detector has been utilized to measure the neutron spectrum inside the vault. Using an active detector the neutron spectrum was measured by the vaults door of both accelerators. With a neutron area monitor the dose equivalent was measured by the doors. Neutron strength, total fluence rate and ambient dose equivalent were compared, from this was found that shielding conditions are better in the Primus model. (Author)

  18. Reaction Rate Measurement at the Californium User Facility (CUF) for unfolding the neutron spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Mohammad; Ortega, Ruben

    2011-03-01

    Neutron Activation Analysis was used to determine Reaction Rate measurement of several activation detectors at the ORNL Californium User Facility (CUF). The irradiations were performed with 34 mg Cf 252 neutron source strength.. Ten source capsules > 34 mgwerepositionedconcentricallyaroundasamplecavity . Wehavedeterminedabsoluteactivityperatomof 9 detectors : Au 197 (n , γ) Au 198 , Al 27 (n , α) Na 24 , Al 27 (n , p) Mg 27 , Fe 56 (n , p) Mn 5 , Fe 54 (n , p) Mn 54 , In 115 (n , γ) In 116 , Ti 46 (n , p) Sc 46 , Ni 60 (n , p) Co 60 , Fe 58 (n , γ) Fe 59 . Theerrorsarewithin 1.5 - 8 60 and Fe 58 have errors of 46% and 32 %. These high errors may be attributed to the counting statistics. These reaction rate values will be used to unfold the neutron spectrum of the CUF using the MAXED 2000, a computer code for the de convolution of multi sphere neutron spectrometer data and the results are discussed. The authors acknowledge help, advise, and using facility at ORNL-CUF to Dr. Rodger martin and Mr. David C. Galsgow.

  19. Calculation of neutron and gamma-ray flux-to-dose-rate conversion factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, S.G.; Lee, S.Y.; Yook, C.C.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents flux-to-dose-rate conversion factors for neutrons and gamma rays based on the American National Standard Institute (ANSI) N666. These data are used to calculate the dose rate distribution of neutron and gamma ray in radiation fields. Neutron flux-to-dose-rate conversion factors for energies from 2.5 x 10 -8 to 20 MeV are presented; the corresponding energy range for gamma rays is 0.01 to 15 MeV. Flux-to-dose-rate conversion factors were calculated, under the assumption that radiation energy distribution has nonlinearity in the phantom, have different meaning from those values obtained by monoenergetic radiation. Especially, these values were determined with the cross section library. The flux-to-dose-rate conversion factors obtained in this work were in a good agreement to the values presented by ANSI. Those data will be useful for the radiation shielding analysis and the radiation dosimetry in the case of continuous energy distributions. (author)

  20. Neutron dose rate analysis on HTGR-10 reactor using Monte Carlo code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwoto; Adrial, H.; Hamzah, A.; Zuhair; Bakhri, S.; Sunaryo, G. R.

    2018-02-01

    The HTGR-10 reactor is cylinder-shaped core fuelled with kernel TRISO coated fuel particles in the spherical pebble with helium cooling system. The outlet helium gas coolant temperature outputted from the reactor core is designed to 700 °C. One advantage HTGR type reactor is capable of co-generation, as an addition to generating electricity, the reactor was designed to produce heat at high temperature can be used for other processes. The spherical fuel pebble contains 8335 TRISO UO2 kernel coated particles with enrichment of 10% and 17% are dispersed in a graphite matrix. The main purpose of this study was to analysis the distribution of neutron dose rates generated from HTGR-10 reactors. The calculation and analysis result of neutron dose rate in the HTGR-10 reactor core was performed using Monte Carlo MCNP5v1.6 code. The problems of double heterogeneity in kernel fuel coated particles TRISO and spherical fuel pebble in the HTGR-10 core are modelled well with MCNP5v1.6 code. The neutron flux to dose conversion factors taken from the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP-74) was used to determine the dose rate that passes through the active core, reflectors, core barrel, reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and a biological shield. The calculated results of neutron dose rate with MCNP5v1.6 code using a conversion factor of ICRP-74 (2009) for radiation workers in the radial direction on the outside of the RPV (radial position = 220 cm from the center of the patio HTGR-10) provides the respective value of 9.22E-4 μSv/h and 9.58E-4 μSv/h for enrichment 10% and 17%, respectively. The calculated values of neutron dose rates are compliant with BAPETEN Chairman’s Regulation Number 4 Year 2013 on Radiation Protection and Safety in Nuclear Energy Utilization which sets the limit value for the average effective dose for radiation workers 20 mSv/year or 10μSv/h. Thus the protection and safety for radiation workers to be safe from the radiation source has

  1. THERMAL NEUTRON INTENSITIES IN SOILS IRRADIATED BY FAST NEUTRONS FROM POINT SOURCES. (R825549C054)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thermal-neutron fluences in soil are reported for selected fast-neutron sources, selected soil types, and selected irradiation geometries. Sources include 14 MeV neutrons from accelerators, neutrons from spontaneously fissioning 252Cf, and neutrons produced from alp...

  2. Neutron capture production rates of cosmogenic 60Co, 59Ni and 36Cl in stony meteorites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spergel, M.S.; Reedy, R.C.; Lazareth, O.W.; Levy, P.W.; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY)

    1986-01-01

    Results for neutron flux calculations in stony meteoroids (of various radii and compositions) and production rates for Cl-36, Ni-59, and Co-60 are reported. The Ni-59/Co-60 ratio is nearly constant with depth in most meteorites: this effect is consistent with the neutron flux and capture cross section properties. The shape of the neutron flux energy spectrum, varies little with depth in a meteorite. The size of the parent meteorite can be determined from one of its fragments, using the Ni-59/Co-60 ratios, if the parent meteorite was less than 75 g/cm(2) in radius. If the parent meteorite was larger, a lower limit on the size of the parent meteorite can be determined from a fragment. In C3 chondrites this is not possible. In stony meteorites with R less than 50 g/cm(2) the calculated Co-60 production rates (mass less than 4 kg), are below 1 atom/min g-Co. The highest Co-60 production rates occur in stony meteorites with radius about 250 g/cm(2) (1.4 m across). In meteorites with radii greater than 400 g/cm(2), the maximum Co-60 production rate occurs at a depth of about 175 g/cm(2) in L-chondrite, 125 g/cm(2) in C3 chrondrite, and 190 g/cm(2) in aubrites

  3. Development of a phoswich detector for neutron dose rate measurements in the Earth's atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doensdorf, Esther Miriam

    2014-01-01

    The Earth is constantly exposed to a stream of energetic particles from outer space. Through the interaction of this radiation with the Earth's magnetosphere and atmosphere a complex radiation field is formed which varies with the location inside the Earth's atmosphere. This radiation field consists of charged and uncharged particles leading to the constant exposure of human beings to radiation. As this ionizing radiation can be harmful for humans, it is necessary to perform dose rate measurements in different altitudes in the Earth's atmosphere. Due to their higher biological effectiveness the exposure to neutrons is more harmful than the exposure to γ-rays and charged particles, which is why the determination of neutron dose rates is the focus of this work. In this work the prototype of a Phoswich detector called PING (Phoswich Instrument for Neutrons and Gammas) is developed to determine dose rates caused by neutrons in the Earth's atmosphere and to distinguish these from γ-rays. The instrument is composed of two different scintillators optically coupled to each other and read out by one common photomultiplier tube. The scintillator package consists of an inner plastic scintillator made of the material BC-412 and a surrounding anti-coincidence made of sodium doped caesium iodide (CsI(Na)). In this work the instrument is calibrated, tested and flown and a procedure for a pulse shape analysis for this instrument is developed. With this analysis it is possible to distinguish pulses from the plastic scintillator and pulses from the CsI(Na). The pulses from the plastic scintillator are mainly due to the interaction of neutrons but there is an energy-dependent contribution of γ-rays to these events. Measurements performed on board an airplane show that the dose rates measured with the developed detector are in the same order of magnitude as results of other instruments. During measurements on board stratospheric balloons the altitude dependence of count rates and

  4. Neutron imaging and small angle neutron scattering instruments at KUR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Yasushi; Oba, Yojiro; Hino, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    We review the neutron imaging (NI) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) instruments at KUR, Kumatori, Osaka, Japan. There are two NI and one SANS instruments. The both instruments are compact and used flexibly. Some challenging experiments taking advantage of low neutron fluence are described. The feature of KUR is also described briefly. (author)

  5. General Electric PETtrace cyclotron as a neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosko, Andrey

    This research investigates the use of a PETtrace cyclotron produced by General Electric (GE) as a neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The GE PETtrace was chosen for this investigation because this type of cyclotron is popular among nuclear pharmacies and clinics in many countries; it is compact and reliable; it produces protons with energies high enough to produce neutrons with appropriate energy and fluence rate for BNCT and it does not require significant changes in design to provide neutrons. In particular, the standard PETtrace 18O target is considered. The cyclotron efficiency may be significantly increased if unused neutrons produced during radioisotopes production could be utilized for other medical modalities such as BNCT at the same time. The resulting dose from the radiation emitted from the target is evaluated using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP at several depths in a brain phantom for different scattering geometries. Four different moderating materials of various thicknesses were considered: light water, carbon, heavy water, arid Fluental(TM). The fluence rate tally was used to calculate photon and neutron dose, by applying fluence rate-to-dose conversion factors. Fifteen different geometries were considered and a 30-cm thick heavy water moderator was chosen as the most suitable for BNCT with the GE PETtrace cyclotron. According to the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) protocol, the maximum dose to the normal brain is set to 12.5 RBEGy, which for the conditions of using a heavy water moderator, assuming a 60 muA beam current, would be reached with a treatment time of 258 min. Results showed that using a PETtrace cyclotron in this configuration provides a therapeutic ratio of about 2.4 for depths up to 4 cm inside a brain phantom. Further increase of beam current proposed by GE should significantly improve the beam quality or the treatment time and allow treating tumors at greater depths.

  6. Development of a direct measurement system for the standardization of neutron emission rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogheard, Florestan

    2012-01-01

    The manganese bath technique is the reference method for neutron source emission rates calibration. It is used to calibrate neutron sources using radionuclides (AmBe, PuBe, 252 Cf,...) in terms of neutron emission rate under 4π sr. As a complement to this technique, the anisotropy of the source is measured using a rotating source holder and a neutron long counter. The neutron source to be measured is immersed in a manganese sulphate solution whereby the emitted neutrons are captured within the bath contents. In a typical configuration (a 1 m diameter sphere and a concentrated solution), approximately half of the neutrons lead to the creation of 56 Mn via the 55 Mn(n, γ) capture reaction. The 56 Mn radionuclide has a half-life of approximately 2.6 hours and the bath reaches saturation when the number of nuclei decaying is equal to the number of nuclei created per unit time. The neutron emission rate from the source can then be deduced from the 56 Mn activity at saturation, assuming proper modelling of the nuclear reactions occurring in the bath. The manganese bath facility at LNE-LNHB has been recently refurbished in order to comply with appropriate safety and radioprotection regulations. This has lead to the upgrading of both the measurement methodology and the modelling of the bath, and a study on the development of a new detector for the on-line measurement of the manganese activity was started. This new detector uses the β-γ coincidence measurement method. The beta channel consists of two photomultipliers tubes which allow the detection of Cerenkov light, and the gamma channel uses a solid scintillation detector. The advantage of this measurement method is that it allows the determination of the bath activity without any prior calibration, unlike the former method which uses a gamma-ray detector calibrated using a high activity manganese source. The principle of the Cerenkov-gamma coincidence measurement has been validated by a prototype of the detector and

  7. Stellar neutron capture rates – key data for the s process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Käppeler F.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Neutron reactions are responsible for the formation of the elements heavier than iron. The corresponding scenarios relate to the He- and C- burning phases of stellar evolution (s process and to supernova explosions (r and p processes. The s process, which is characterized by low neutron densities, operates in or near the valley of β stability and has produced about half of the elemental abundances between Fe and Bi in the solar system and in the Universe. Because the s abundances are essentially determined by the (n, γ cross sections along the reaction path, accurate neutron data constitute the key input for s process studies. Important constraints for the physical conditions at the stellar sites can be inferred by comparison of the abundance patterns from current s-process models with solar system material or presolar grains. The experimental methods for the determination of stellar (n, γ rates are outlined at the example of recent cross section measurements and remaining quests will be discussed with respect to existing laboratory neutron sources and new developments.

  8. Development, improvement and calibration of neutronic reaction rates measurements: elaboration of a standard techniques basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudelot, J.P.

    1998-06-01

    In order to improve and to validate the neutronics calculation schemes, perfecting integral measurements of neutronics parameters is necessary. This thesis focuses on the conception, the improvement and the development of neutronics reaction rates measurements, and aims at building a base of standard techniques. Two subjects are discussed. The first one deals with direct measurements by fission chambers. A short presentation of the different usual techniques is given. Then, those last ones are applied through the example of doubling time measurements on the EOLE facility during the MISTRAL 1 experimental programme. Two calibration devices of fission chambers are developed: a thermal column located in the central part of the MINERVE facility, and a calibration cell using a pulsed high flux neutron generator and based on the discrimination of the energy of the neutrons with a time-of-flight method. This second device will soon allow to measure the mass of fission chambers with a precision of about 1 %. Finally, the necessity of those calibrations will be shown through spectral indices measurements in core MISTRAL 1 (UO 2 ) and MISTRAL 2 (MOX) of the EOLE facility. In each case, the associated calculation schemes, performed using the Monte Carlo MCNP code with the ENDF-BV library, will be validated. Concerning the second one, the goal is to develop a method for measuring the modified conversion ratio of 238 U (defined as the ratio of 238 U capture rate to total fission rate) by gamma-ray spectrometry of fuel rods. Within the framework of the MISTRAL 1 and MISTRAL 2 programmes, the measurement device, the experimental results and the spectrometer calibration are described. Furthermore, the MCNP calculations of neutron self-shielding and gamma self-absorption are validated. It is finally shown that measurement uncertainties are better than 1 %. The extension of this technique to future modified conversion ratio measurements for 242 Pu (on MOX rods) and 232 Th (on

  9. Calculated neutron dose rates and flux densities from implantable californium-252 point and line sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, A; Schwartz, B; Windham, J P; Kereiakes, J G

    1976-01-01

    The results of neutron-transport flux-density and dose rate calculations for implantable Californium-252 point and line sources in essentially infinite tissue-equivalent material are presented. The point-source flux densities were obtained from a discrete ordinates calculation, and the point dose rates were established by multiplying the flux densities by their appropriate kerma factors. Line-source dose rates were evaluated by integrating the point dose rates over the length of the line source. Dose-rate data are given within a 20 X 20-cm region from the source center for source lengths of 1.5, 2, and 3 cm. The dose rates established by these calculations showed good agreement with an independent Monte Carlo calculation. Detailed point-source flux-density data as a function of energy and position are also given.

  10. Active on-line detector for in-room radiotherapy neutron measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, F., E-mail: faustino.gomez@usc.e [Dpt. Fisica de Particulas, Facultad de Fisica, Campus Sur, Univ. Santiago de Compostela, Santiago 15782 (Spain); Sanchez-Doblado, F. [Dpt. de Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Univ. Sevilla, Sevilla (Spain); Hospital Virgen Macarena, Sevilla (Spain); Iglesias, A. [Dpt. Fisica de Particulas, Facultad de Fisica, Campus Sur, Univ. Santiago de Compostela, Santiago 15782 (Spain); Domingo, C. [Dpt. Fisica, Univ. Autonoma Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-12-15

    The measurement of the neutron fluence produced inside a radiotherapy installation has been a matter of concern specially in the photon high megavoltage modalities. Until now, due to the pulsed nature of the beam and the high photon fluence inside the radiotherapy room, only passive methods were considered reliable. In this work we describe a neutron detector, based on neutron sensitive SRAM devices, that can operate inside the treatment room and is insensitive to the scattered photon fluence. This device has been used to estimate the neutron production and the patient exposure to neutrons in several clinical installations with different linac commercial models. The detection principle is based on the production of Single Event Upset (SEU) of memory states on modern sub-micron technology SRAMs. Spectral sensitivity was initially studied using low energy neutron shielding (boron and cadmium layers) and later using dedicated calibration neutron beams. With a 3 mm thick flex-boron shield, the SEU rate was reduced to around 5% of the unshielded rate, demonstrating that the dominant contribution of the SEU cross section of the chosen SRAM was due to low energy neutrons. The total memory size was scaled to obtain a response repeatability with relative typical uncertainty of about 2% for 1000 Monitor Units (MU) in a 15 MV accelerator facility with excellent linearity with MU. The sensitivity of this digital detector is around 0.3 {mu}Sv H{sup *}(10) per event and considering the signal to fluence ratio around 2 x 10{sup -4} event cm{sup 2}.

  11. The Primary Origin of Dose Rate Effects on Microstructural Evolution of Austenitic Alloys During Neutron Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okita, Taira; Sato, Toshihiko; Sekimura, Naoto; Garner, Francis A.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.

    2002-01-01

    The effect of dose rate on neutron-induced microstructural evolution was experimentally estimated. Solution-annealed austenitic model alloys were irradiated at approximately 400 degrees C with fast neutrons at seven different dose rates that vary more than two orders difference in magnitude, and two different doses were achieved at each dose rate. Both cavity nucleation and growth were found to be enhanced at lower dose rate. The net vacancy flux is calculated from the growth rate of cavities that had already nucleated during the first cycle of irradiation and grown during the second cycle. The net vacancy flux was found to be proportional to (dpa/sec) exp (1/2) up to 28.8 dpa and 8.4 x 10 exp (-7) dpa/sec. This implies that mutual recombination dominates point defect annihilation, in this experiment even though point defect sinks such as cavities and dislocations were well developed. Thus, mutual recombination is thought to be the primary origin of the effect of dose rate on microstructural evolution

  12. Evaluation of the equivalent dose rates due to neutrons emitted by plutonium oxide sources. Graphs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouguet, Jackie.

    1975-06-01

    In irradiated fuel processing plants, the personnel concerned with radioprotection often require a rapid estimation of the equivalent dose rates due to neutrons emitted by plutonium oxide sources, sources having different physical and geometrical characteristics. Graphs are presented which facilitate rapid determinations. Graphs enabling the equivalent dose rates to be evaluated in contact with or at some distance from plutonium oxide sources of different geometrical characteristics are presented, the plutonium being obtained from fuels having been irradiated at different burn up in light water power reactors [fr

  13. Development of high-frame rate neutron radiography and quantitative measurement method for multiphase flow research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, K.; Hibiki, T.

    1998-01-01

    Neutron radiography (NR) is one of the radiographic techniques which makes use of the difference in attenuation characteristics of neutrons in materials. Fluid measurement using the NR technique is a non-intrusive method which enables visualization of dynamic images of multiphase flow of opaque fluids and/or in a metallic duct. To apply the NR technique to multiphase flow research, high frame-rate NR was developed by combining up-to-date technologies for neutron sources, scintillator, high-speed video and image intensifier. This imaging system has several advantages such as a long recording time (up to 21 minutes), high-frame-rate (up to 1000 frames/s) imaging and there is no need for a triggering signal. Visualization studies of air-water two-phase flow in a metallic duct and molten metal-water interaction were performed at recording speeds of 250, 500 and 1000 frames/s. The qualities of the consequent images were sufficient to observe the flow pattern and behavior. It was also demonstrated that some characteristics of two-phase flow could be measured from these images in collaboration with image processing techniques. By utilizing geometrical information extracted from NR images, data on flow regime, bubble rise velocity, and wave height and interfacial area in annular flow were obtained. By utilizing attenuation characteristics of neutrons in materials, measurements of void profile and average void fraction were performed. It was confirmed that this new technique may have significant advantages both in visualizing and measuring high-speed fluid phenomena when other methods, such as an optical method and X-ray radiography, cannot be applied. (author)

  14. Application of high-frame-rate neutron radiography to fluid measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, Kaichiro; Hibiki, Takashi

    1997-01-01

    To apply Neutron radiography (NR) technique to multiphase flow research, high frame-rate NR was developed by assembling up-to-date technologies for neutron source, scintillator, high-speed video and image intensifier. This imaging system has several advantages such as a long recording time (up to 21 minutes), high-frame-rate (up to 1000 frames/s) imaging and no need for triggering signal. Visualization studies of air-water two-phase flow in a metallic duct and molten metal-water interaction were performed at the recording speeds of 250, 500 and 1000 frames/s. The qualities of those consecutive images were good enough to observe the flow pattern and behavior. It was demonstrated also that some characteristics of two-phase flow could be measured from those images in collaboration with image processing techniques. By utilizing geometrical information extracted from NR images, data on flow regime, rising velocity of bubbles, and wave height and interfacial area in annular flow could be obtained. By utilizing attenuation characteristics of neutrons in materials, measurements of void profile and average void fraction could be performed. For this purpose, a quantification method, i.e. Σ-scaling method, was proposed based upon the consideration on the effect of scattered neutrons. This method was tested against known void profiles and compared with existing measurement methods and a correlation for void fraction. It was confirmed that this new technique has significant advantages both in visualizing and measuring high-speed fluid phenomena. (J.P.N.)

  15. Application of high-frame-rate neutron radiography to fluid measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishima, Kaichiro; Hibiki, Takashi [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.

    1997-02-01

    To apply Neutron radiography (NR) technique to multiphase flow research, high frame-rate NR was developed by assembling up-to-date technologies for neutron source, scintillator, high-speed video and image intensifier. This imaging system has several advantages such as a long recording time (up to 21 minutes), high-frame-rate (up to 1000 frames/s) imaging and no need for triggering signal. Visualization studies of air-water two-phase flow in a metallic duct and molten metal-water interaction were performed at the recording speeds of 250, 500 and 1000 frames/s. The qualities of those consecutive images were good enough to observe the flow pattern and behavior. It was demonstrated also that some characteristics of two-phase flow could be measured from those images in collaboration with image processing techniques. By utilizing geometrical information extracted from NR images, data on flow regime, rising velocity of bubbles, and wave height and interfacial area in annular flow could be obtained. By utilizing attenuation characteristics of neutrons in materials, measurements of void profile and average void fraction could be performed. For this purpose, a quantification method, i.e. {Sigma}-scaling method, was proposed based upon the consideration on the effect of scattered neutrons. This method was tested against known void profiles and compared with existing measurement methods and a correlation for void fraction. It was confirmed that this new technique has significant advantages both in visualizing and measuring high-speed fluid phenomena. (J.P.N.)

  16. Using r-process enhanced galaxies to estimate the neutron star merger rate at high redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roederer, Ian

    2018-01-01

    The rapid neutron-capture process, or r-process, is one of the fundamental ways that stars produce heavy elements. I describe a new approach that uses the existence of r-process enhanced galaxies, like the recently discovered ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Reticulum II, to derive a rate for neutron star mergers at high redshift. This method relies on three assertions. First, several lines of reasoning point to neutron star mergers as a rare yet prolific producer of r-process elements, and one merger event is capable of enriching most of the stars in a low-mass dwarf galaxy. Second, the Local Group is cosmologically representative of the halo mass function at the mass scales of low-luminosity dwarf galaxies, and the volume that their progenitors spanned at high redshifts can be estimated from simulations. Third, many of these dwarf galaxies are extremely old, and the metals found in their stars today date from the earliest times at high redshift. These galaxies occupy a quantifiable volume of the Universe, from which the frequency of r-process enhanced galaxies can be estimated. This frequency may be interpreted as lower limit to the neutron star merger rate at a redshift (z ~ 5-10) that is much higher than is accessible to gravitational wave observatories. I will present a proof of concept demonstration using medium-resolution multi-object spectroscopy from the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System (M2FS) to recover the known r-process galaxy Reticulum II, and I will discuss future plans to apply this method to other Local Group dwarf galaxies.

  17. Neutron and Gamma Fluxes and dpa Rates for HFIR Vessel Beltline Region (Present and Upgrade Designs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blakeman, E.D.

    2001-01-11

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is currently undergoing an upgrading program, a part of which is to increase the diameters of two of the four radiation beam tubes (HB-2 and HB-4). This change will cause increased neutron and gamma radiation dose rates at and near locations where the tubes penetrate the vessel wall. Consequently, the rate of radiation damage to the reactor vessel wall at those locations will also increase. This report summarizes calculations of the neutron and gamma flux (particles/cm{sup 2}/s) and the dpa rate (displacements/atom/s) in iron at critical locations in the vessel wall. The calculated dpa rate values have been recently incorporated into statistical damage evaluation codes used in the assessment of radiation induced embrittlement. Calculations were performed using models based on the discrete ordinates methodology and utilizing ORNL two-dimensional and three-dimensional discrete ordinates codes. Models for present and proposed beam tube designs are shown and their results are compared. Results show that for HB-2, the dpa rate in the vessel wall where the tube penetrates the vessel will be increased by {approximately}10 by the proposed enlargement. For HB-4, a smaller increase of {approximately}2.6 is calculated.

  18. Reaction rate and composition dependence of the stability of thermonuclear burning on accreting neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keek, L.; Cyburt, R. H.; Heger, A.

    2014-01-01

    The stability of thermonuclear burning of hydrogen and helium accreted onto neutron stars is strongly dependent on the mass accretion rate. The burning behavior is observed to change from Type I X-ray bursts to stable burning, with oscillatory burning occurring at the transition. Simulations predict the transition at a 10 times higher mass accretion rate than observed. Using numerical models we investigate how the transition depends on the hydrogen, helium, and CNO mass fractions of the accreted material, as well as on the nuclear reaction rates of 3α and the hot-CNO breakout reactions 15 O(α, γ) 19 Ne and 18 Ne(α, p) 21 Na. For a lower hydrogen content the transition is at higher accretion rates. Furthermore, most experimentally allowed reaction rate variations change the transition accretion rate by at most 10%. A factor 10 decrease of the 15 O(α, γ) 19 Ne rate, however, produces an increase of the transition accretion rate of 35%. None of our models reproduce the transition at the observed rate, and depending on the true 15 O(α, γ) 19 Ne reaction rate, the actual discrepancy may be substantially larger. We find that the width of the interval of accretion rates with marginally stable burning depends strongly on both composition and reaction rates. Furthermore, close to the stability transition, our models predict that X-ray bursts have extended tails where freshly accreted fuel prolongs nuclear burning.

  19. Numerical modeling of radioactive neutron capture influence of Hf isotopic composition dynamics rate in the RBMK-1500 reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Jurkevicius, A; Auzelyte, V; Remeikis, V

    2000-01-01

    The nuclide composition of the nuclear fuel and isotopic composition of the hafnium in the radial neutron flux detectors of the RBMK-1500 reactor were numerically modelled. The sequence SAS2 from package SCALE 4.3 was used for calculations. The nuclear fuel nuclide concentrations, the concentration of Hf isotopes, the neutron absorption rate on Hf isotopes and summary absorption rate dependences on the fuel assembly burn up are presented. (author)

  20. Method to determine the strength of a neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H.R.; Manzanares A, E.; Hernandez D, V.M.; Chacon R, A.; Mercado, G.A. [UAZ, A.P. 336, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico); Gallego, E.; Lorente, A. [Depto. Ingenieria Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    The use of a gamma-ray spectrometer with a 3 {phi} x 3 NaI(Tl) detector, with a moderator sphere has been studied in the aim to measure the neutron fluence rate and to determine the source strength. Moderators with a large amount of hydrogen are able to slowdown and thermalize neutrons; once thermalized there is a probability that thermal neutron to be captured by hydrogen producing 2.22 MeV prompt gamma-ray. The pulse-height spectrum collected in a multicharmel analyzer shows a photopeak around 2.22 MeV whose net area is proportional to total neutron fluence rate and to the neutron source strength. The characteristics of this system were determined by a Monte Carlo study using the MCNP 4C code, where a detailed model of the Nal(Tl) was utilized. As moderators 3, 5, and 10 inches-diameter spheres where utilized and the response was calculated for monoenergetic and isotopic neutrons sources. (Author)

  1. Mechanical properties and microstructure of neutron irradiated cold worked Al-6063 alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munitz, A.; Shtechman, A.; Cotler, C.; Dahan, S. [Nuclear Res. Center-Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Talianker, M. [Ben-Gurion Univ., Beer-Sheva (Israel). Dept. of Materials Science

    1998-01-01

    The impact of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties and fracture morphology of cold worked Al-6063 were studied, using scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and tensile measurements. Specimens (50 mm long and 6 mm wide gauge sections) were punched out from an Al-6063 23% cold worked tubes, which had been exposed to prolonged neutron irradiation of up to 4.5 x 10{sup 25} thermal neutrons/m{sup 2} (E < 0.625 eV). The temperature ranged between 41 and 52 C. The tensile specimens were then tensioned till fracture in an Instron tensiometer with strain rate of 2 x 10{sup -3} s{sup -1}. The uniform elongation and the ultimate tensile strength increase as functions of fluence. Metallographic examination and fractography reveal a decrease in the local area reduction of the final fracture necking. This reduction is accompanied with a morphology transition from ductile transgranular shear rupture to a combination of transgranular shear with intergranular dimpled rupture. The intergranular rupture area increases with fluence. No voids could be observed up to the maximum fluence. The dislocation density of cold worked Al decreases with the thermal neutron fluence. Prolonged annealing of unirradiated cold worked Al-6063 at 52 C revealed similar results. It thus appears that under our irradiation conditions the temperature during irradiation is the major factor influencing the mechanical properties and the microstructure during irradiation. (orig.). 23 refs.

  2. Development of Real-Time Measurement of Effective Dose for High Dose Rate Neutron Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braby, L. A.; Reece, W. D.; Hsu, W. H.

    2003-01-01

    Studies of the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation require sources of radiation which are well characterized in terms of the dose and the quality of the radiation. One of the best measures of the quality of neutron irradiation is the dose mean lineal energy. At very low dose rates this can be determined by measuring individual energy deposition events, and calculating the dose mean of the event size. However, at the dose rates that are normally required for biology experiments, the individual events can not be separated by radiation detectors. However, the total energy deposited in a specified time interval can be measured. This total energy has a random variation which depends on the size of the individual events, so the dose mean lineal energy can be calculated from the variance of repeated measurements of the energy deposited in a fixed time. We have developed a specialized charge integration circuit for the measurement of the charge produced in a small ion chamber in typical neutron irradiation experiments. We have also developed 4.3 mm diameter ion chambers with both tissue equivalent and carbon walls for the purpose of measuring dose mean lineal energy due to all radiations and due to all radiations except neutrons, respectively. By adjusting the gas pressure in the ion chamber, it can be made to simulate tissue volumes from a few nanometers to a few millimeters in diameter. The charge is integrated for 0.1 seconds, and the resulting pulse height is recorded by a multi channel analyzer. The system has been used in a variety of photon and neutron radiation fields, and measured values of dose and dose mean lineal energy are consistent with values extrapolated from measurements made by other techniques at much lower dose rates. It is expected that this technique will prove to be much more reliable than extrapolations from measurements made at low dose rates because these low dose rate exposures generally do not accurately reproduce the attenuation and

  3. Dosimetry in mixed neutron-gamma fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remec, I.

    1998-04-01

    The gamma field accompanying neutrons may, in certain circumstances, play an important role in the analysis of neutron dosimetry and even in the interpretation of radiation induced steel embrittlement. At the High Flux Isotope Reactor pressure vessel the gamma induced reactions dominate the responses of 237 Np and 238 U dosimeters, and 9 Be helium accumulation fluence monitors. The gamma induced atom displacement rate in steel is higher than corresponding neutron rate, and is the cause of ''accelerated embrittlement'' of HFIR materials. In a large body of water, adjacent to a fission plate, photofissions contribute significantly to the responses of fission monitors and need to be taken into account if the measurements are used for the qualification of the transport codes and cross-section libraries

  4. Measuring neutron spectra in radiotherapy using the nested neutron spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglieri, Robert; Licea, Angel; Evans, Michael; Seuntjens, Jan; Kildea, John

    2015-11-01

    Out-of-field neutron doses resulting from photonuclear interactions in the head of a linear accelerator pose an iatrogenic risk to patients and an occupational risk to personnel during radiotherapy. To quantify neutron production, in-room measurements have traditionally been carried out using Bonner sphere systems (BSS) with activation foils and TLDs. In this work, a recently developed active detector, the nested neutron spectrometer (NNS), was tested in radiotherapy bunkers. The NNS is designed for easy handling and is more practical than the traditional BSS. Operated in current-mode, the problem of pulse pileup due to high dose-rates is overcome by measuring current, similar to an ionization chamber. In a bunker housing a Varian Clinac 21EX, the performance of the NNS was evaluated in terms of reproducibility, linearity, and dose-rate effects. Using a custom maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization algorithm, measured neutron spectra at various locations inside the bunker were then compared to Monte Carlo simulations of an identical setup. In terms of dose, neutron ambient dose equivalents were calculated from the measured spectra and compared to bubble detector neutron dose equivalent measurements. The NNS-measured spectra for neutrons at various locations in a treatment room were found to be consistent with expectations for both relative shape and absolute magnitude. Neutron fluence-rate decreased with distance from the source and the shape of the spectrum changed from a dominant fast neutron peak near the Linac head to a dominant thermal neutron peak in the moderating conditions of the maze. Monte Carlo data and NNS-measured spectra agreed within 30% at all locations except in the maze where the deviation was a maximum of 40%. Neutron ambient dose equivalents calculated from the authors' measured spectra were consistent (one standard deviation) with bubble detector measurements in the treatment room. The NNS may be used to reliably measure the neutron

  5. Measuring neutron spectra in radiotherapy using the nested neutron spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maglieri, Robert, E-mail: robert.maglieri@mail.mcgill.ca; Evans, Michael; Seuntjens, Jan; Kildea, John [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H4A 3J1 (Canada); Licea, Angel [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, Ontario K1P 5S9 (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Out-of-field neutron doses resulting from photonuclear interactions in the head of a linear accelerator pose an iatrogenic risk to patients and an occupational risk to personnel during radiotherapy. To quantify neutron production, in-room measurements have traditionally been carried out using Bonner sphere systems (BSS) with activation foils and TLDs. In this work, a recently developed active detector, the nested neutron spectrometer (NNS), was tested in radiotherapy bunkers. Methods: The NNS is designed for easy handling and is more practical than the traditional BSS. Operated in current-mode, the problem of pulse pileup due to high dose-rates is overcome by measuring current, similar to an ionization chamber. In a bunker housing a Varian Clinac 21EX, the performance of the NNS was evaluated in terms of reproducibility, linearity, and dose-rate effects. Using a custom maximum-likelihood expectation–maximization algorithm, measured neutron spectra at various locations inside the bunker were then compared to Monte Carlo simulations of an identical setup. In terms of dose, neutron ambient dose equivalents were calculated from the measured spectra and compared to bubble detector neutron dose equivalent measurements. Results: The NNS-measured spectra for neutrons at various locations in a treatment room were found to be consistent with expectations for both relative shape and absolute magnitude. Neutron fluence-rate decreased with distance from the source and the shape of the spectrum changed from a dominant fast neutron peak near the Linac head to a dominant thermal neutron peak in the moderating conditions of the maze. Monte Carlo data and NNS-measured spectra agreed within 30% at all locations except in the maze where the deviation was a maximum of 40%. Neutron ambient dose equivalents calculated from the authors’ measured spectra were consistent (one standard deviation) with bubble detector measurements in the treatment room. Conclusions: The NNS may

  6. Choppers to optimise the repetition rate multiplication technique on a direct geometry neutron chopper spectrometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vickery, Anette; Deen, P. P.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years the use of repetition rate multiplication (RRM) on direct geometry neutron spectrometers has been established and is the common mode of operation on a growing number of instruments. However, the chopper configurations are not ideally optimised for RRM with a resultant 100 fold flux...... in time resolution probed for a single European Spallation Source (ESS) period, which is ideal to probe complex relaxational behaviour. These two chopper configurations have been simulated for the Versatile Optimal Resolution direct geometry spectrometer, VOR, that will be built at ESS....

  7. DIANE, a simulation code for the interaction of neutrons with living tissues. Application to low doses of fast neutrons on human tumoral cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nenot, M.L.

    2003-07-01

    Our work deals with the irradiation of cells and living tissues by 14 MeV neutrons at very low doses (a few 10 -2 Gy). Such experiments require an accurate knowledge of the values of neutron dose rates and fluences at the level of cell cultures. We have performed measurements of fluence rates through an activation method applied to gold and copper foils. The fluence rate is deduced from the gamma rays emitted by the irradiated foils. Neutron doses and dose rates have been measured through varied methods: PIN diodes, ionization tissue equivalent chambers, and Geiger-Mueller counters. We have designed the DIANE code to simulate the impact of energetic neutrons on cells. This code can be used with isolated cells or macroscopic tissues, it takes into account the roles of the ionisation electrons produced by recoil nuclei entering the cell. This point is all the more important since recent works have highlighted the impact of very low energy electrons on DNA. (A.C.)

  8. Soft error rate simulation and initial design considerations of neutron intercepting silicon chip (NISC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Cihangir

    Advances in microelectronics result in sub-micrometer electronic technologies as predicted by Moore's Law, 1965, which states the number of transistors in a given space would double every two years. The most available memory architectures today have submicrometer transistor dimensions. The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS), a continuation of Moore's Law, predicts that Dynamic Random Access Memory (DRAM) will have an average half pitch size of 50 nm and Microprocessor Units (MPU) will have an average gate length of 30 nm over the period of 2008-2012. Decreases in the dimensions satisfy the producer and consumer requirements of low power consumption, more data storage for a given space, faster clock speed, and portability of integrated circuits (IC), particularly memories. On the other hand, these properties also lead to a higher susceptibility of IC designs to temperature, magnetic interference, power supply, and environmental noise, and radiation. Radiation can directly or indirectly affect device operation. When a single energetic particle strikes a sensitive node in the micro-electronic device, it can cause a permanent or transient malfunction in the device. This behavior is called a Single Event Effect (SEE). SEEs are mostly transient errors that generate an electric pulse which alters the state of a logic node in the memory device without having a permanent effect on the functionality of the device. This is called a Single Event Upset (SEU) or Soft Error . Contrary to SEU, Single Event Latchup (SEL), Single Event Gate Rapture (SEGR), or Single Event Burnout (SEB) they have permanent effects on the device operation and a system reset or recovery is needed to return to proper operations. The rate at which a device or system encounters soft errors is defined as Soft Error Rate (SER). The semiconductor industry has been struggling with SEEs and is taking necessary measures in order to continue to improve system designs in nano

  9. Neutron spectrometry with artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega C, H.R.; Hernandez D, V.M.; Manzanares A, E.; Rodriguez, J.M.; Mercado S, G.A.; Iniguez de la Torre Bayo, M.P.; Barquero, R.; Arteaga A, T.

    2005-01-01

    An artificial neural network has been designed to obtain the neutron spectra from the Bonner spheres spectrometer's count rates. The neural network was trained using 129 neutron spectra. These include isotopic neutron sources; reference and operational spectra from accelerators and nuclear reactors, spectra from mathematical functions as well as few energy groups and monoenergetic spectra. The spectra were transformed from lethargy to energy distribution and were re-bin ned to 31 energy groups using the MCNP 4C code. Re-binned spectra and UTA4 response matrix were used to calculate the expected count rates in Bonner spheres spectrometer. These count rates were used as input and the respective spectrum was used as output during neural network training. After training the network was tested with the Bonner spheres count rates produced by a set of neutron spectra. This set contains data used during network training as well as data not used. Training and testing was carried out in the Mat lab program. To verify the network unfolding performance the original and unfolded spectra were compared using the χ 2 -test and the total fluence ratios. The use of Artificial Neural Networks to unfold neutron spectra in neutron spectrometry is an alternative procedure that overcomes the drawbacks associated in this ill-conditioned problem. (Author)

  10. Neutron spectrometry with artificial neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H.R.; Hernandez D, V.M.; Manzanares A, E.; Rodriguez, J.M.; Mercado S, G.A. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, A.P. 336, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico); Iniguez de la Torre Bayo, M.P. [Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid (Spain); Barquero, R. [Hospital Universitario Rio Hortega, Valladolid (Spain); Arteaga A, T. [Envases de Zacatecas, S.A. de C.V., Zacatecas (Mexico)]. e-mail: rvega@cantera.reduaz.mx

    2005-07-01

    An artificial neural network has been designed to obtain the neutron spectra from the Bonner spheres spectrometer's count rates. The neural network was trained using 129 neutron spectra. These include isotopic neutron sources; reference and operational spectra from accelerators and nuclear reactors, spectra from mathematical functions as well as few energy groups and monoenergetic spectra. The spectra were transformed from lethargy to energy distribution and were re-bin ned to 31 energy groups using the MCNP 4C code. Re-binned spectra and UTA4 response matrix were used to calculate the expected count rates in Bonner spheres spectrometer. These count rates were used as input and the respective spectrum was used as output during neural network training. After training the network was tested with the Bonner spheres count rates produced by a set of neutron spectra. This set contains data used during network training as well as data not used. Training and testing was carried out in the Mat lab program. To verify the network unfolding performance the original and unfolded spectra were compared using the {chi}{sup 2}-test and the total fluence ratios. The use of Artificial Neural Networks to unfold neutron spectra in neutron spectrometry is an alternative procedure that overcomes the drawbacks associated in this ill-conditioned problem. (Author)

  11. Study of the influence of ADC sampling rate on the efficiency of neutron-gamma discrimination by the pulse shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chepurnov, A. S.; Gavrilenko, O. I.; Kirsanov, M. A.; Klimanov, S. G.; Kubankin, A. S.

    2017-12-01

    The influence of a sampling rate of ADC on the efficiency of the pulse shape discrimination procedure (PSDP) developed for gamma-neutron discrimination was studied. Pu-Be neutron source and two types of digitizers (CAEN DT5730 and CAEN DT5743) were used. Both digitizers together with application software allow to store sequences of waveforms from a scintillation detector. The functional features of the CAEN DT5730 and CAEN DT5743 are described, and experimental characteristics of their operation are compared. Experimental values of an efficiency of neutron/gamma signal discrimination using two ADCs with different sampling frequencies are presented.

  12. Fluence-dependent sputtering yield of micro-architectured materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthes, Christopher S.R.; Ghoniem, Nasr M., E-mail: ghoniem@ucla.edu; Li, Gary Z.; Matlock, Taylor S.; Goebel, Dan M.; Dodson, Chris A.; Wirz, Richard E.

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Sputtering yield is shown to be transient and heavily dependent on surface architecture. • Fabricated nano- and Microstructures cause geometric re-trapping of sputtered material, which leads to a self-healing mechanism. • Initially, the sputtering yield of micro-architectured Mo is approximately 1/2 the value as that of a planar surface. • The study demonstrates that the sputtering yield is a dynamic property, dependent on the surface structure of a material. • A developed phenomenological model mathematically describes the transient behavior of the sputtering yield as a function of plasma fluence. - Abstract: We present an experimental examination of the relationship between the surface morphology of Mo and its instantaneous sputtering rate as function of low-energy plasma ion fluence. We quantify the dynamic evolution of nano/micro features of surfaces with built-in architecture, and the corresponding variation in the sputtering yield. Ballistic deposition of sputtered atoms as a result of geometric re-trapping is observed, and re-growth of surface layers is confirmed. This provides a self-healing mechanism of micro-architectured surfaces during plasma exposure. A variety of material characterization techniques are used to show that the sputtering yield is not a fundamental property, but that it is quantitatively related to the initial surface architecture and to its subsequent evolution. The sputtering yield of textured molybdenum samples exposed to 300 eV Ar plasma is roughly 1/2 of the corresponding value for flat samples, and increases with ion fluence. Mo samples exhibited a sputtering yield initially as low as 0.22 ± 5%, converging to 0.4 ± 5% at high fluence. The sputtering yield exhibits a transient behavior as function of the integrated ion fluence, reaching a steady-state value that is independent of initial surface conditions. A phenomenological model is proposed to explain the observed transient sputtering phenomenon, and to

  13. APPLE-2: an improved version of APPLE code for plotting neutron and gamma ray spectra and reaction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Hiromitsu; Seki, Yasushi.

    1982-07-01

    A computer code APPLE-2 which plots the spatial distribution of energy spectra of multi-group neutron and/or gamma ray fluxes, and reaction rates has been developed. This code is an improved version of the previously developed APPLE code and has the following features: (1) It plots energy spectra of neutron and/or gamma ray fluxes calculated by ANISN, DOT and MORSE. (2) It calculates and plots the spatial distribution of neutron and gamma ray fluxes and various types of reaction rates such as nuclear heating rates, operational dose rates, displacement damage rates. (3) Input data specification is greatly simplified by the use of standard, response libraries and by close coupling with radiation transport calculation codes. (4) Plotting outputs are given in camera ready form. (author)

  14. Prospects for a new cold neutron beam measurement of the neutron lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, Geoffrey L [ORNL; Snow, William M [ORNL; Dewey, M. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD; Gilliam, D [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD; Nico, Jeffrey S [ORNL; Coakley, K [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder; Yue, A [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Laptev, A [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Wietfeldt, F [Tulane University

    2009-01-01

    In the most accurate cold neutron beam determination of the neutron lifetime based on the absolute counting of decay protons, the largest uncertainty was attributed to the absolute determination of the capture flux of the cold neutron beam. Currently an experimental effort is underway at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) that will significantly reduce this contribution to the uncertainty in the lifetime determination. The next largest source of uncertainty is the determination of the absolute count rate of decay protons, which contributes to the experimental uncertainty approximately at the 1 s level. Experience with the recent neutron radiative decay experiment, which used the neutron lifetime apparatus, has provided valuable insights into ways to reduce other uncertainties. In addition, the cold neutron fluence rate at NIST is presently 1.5 times greater than in the 2003 measurement, and there is the prospect for a significantly higher rate with the new guide hall expansion. This paper discusses an approach for achieving a determination of the neutron lifetime with an accuracy of approximately 1 s.

  15. Prospects for a new cold neutron beam measurement of the neutron lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, M.; Coakley, K.; Gilliam, D.; Greene, G.; Laptev, A.; Nico, J.; Snow, W.; Wietfeldt, F.; Yue, A.

    2009-12-01

    In the most accurate cold neutron beam determination of the neutron lifetime based on the absolute counting of decay protons, the largest uncertainty was attributed to the absolute determination of the capture flux of the cold neutron beam. Currently an experimental effort is underway at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) that will significantly reduce this contribution to the uncertainty in the lifetime determination. The next largest source of uncertainty is the determination of the absolute count rate of decay protons, which contributes to the experimental uncertainty approximately at the 1 s level. Experience with the recent neutron radiative decay experiment, which used the neutron lifetime apparatus, has provided valuable insights into ways to reduce other uncertainties. In addition, the cold neutron fluence rate at NIST is presently 1.5 times greater than in the 2003 measurement, and there is the prospect for a significantly higher rate with the new guide hall expansion. This paper discusses an approach for achieving a determination of the neutron lifetime with an accuracy of approximately 1 s.

  16. Prospects for a new cold neutron beam measurement of the neutron lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, M., E-mail: mdewey@nist.go [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Coakley, K., E-mail: kevin.coakley@nist.go [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Gilliam, D., E-mail: david.gilliam@nist.go [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Greene, G., E-mail: greenegl@ornl.go [Department of Physics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Lab, Building 6010, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Laptev, A., E-mail: alaptev@nist.go [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Nico, J., E-mail: jnico@nist.go [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Snow, W., E-mail: wsnow@indiana.ed [Indiana University/IUCF, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Wietfeldt, F., E-mail: few@tulane.ed [Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Yue, A., E-mail: ayue@nist.go [Department of Physics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2009-12-11

    In the most accurate cold neutron beam determination of the neutron lifetime based on the absolute counting of decay protons, the largest uncertainty was attributed to the absolute determination of the capture flux of the cold neutron beam. Currently an experimental effort is underway at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) that will significantly reduce this contribution to the uncertainty in the lifetime determination. The next largest source of uncertainty is the determination of the absolute count rate of decay protons, which contributes to the experimental uncertainty approximately at the 1 s level. Experience with the recent neutron radiative decay experiment, which used the neutron lifetime apparatus, has provided valuable insights into ways to reduce other uncertainties. In addition, the cold neutron fluence rate at NIST is presently 1.5 times greater than in the 2003 measurement, and there is the prospect for a significantly higher rate with the new guide hall expansion. This paper discusses an approach for achieving a determination of the neutron lifetime with an accuracy of approximately 1 s.

  17. Measurement of dose rate components of the BNCT beam at THOR using paired ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai Wenchyi; Chen Angyu; Liu Yuanhao; Jiang Shianghuei; Liu Yenwan Hsueh; Liu Hongming

    2006-01-01

    Paired ionization chambers were used in this work to measure the neutron and gamma-ray dose rates of the BNCT epithermal neutron beam at THOR along the beam axis free-in-air and in the water phantom. The position dependent and kerma rate weighted neutron sensitivities of the TE(TE) chamber were adopted in the measurements. Monte Carlo calculations of the neutron fluence rates and neutron kerma rates using the MCNP4C code were used to support the measurements and compare with the measured results. It concludes that the relative neutron sensitivity of the Mg(Ar) chamber warrants a detailed investigation to improve the accuracy of the dose rate measurement using paired ionization chambers in a mixed field. (author)

  18. Front-end electronics for high rate, position sensitive neutron detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, B; Harder, J A; Hrisoho, A; Radeka, V; Smith, G C

    2002-01-01

    Advanced neutron detectors for experiments at new spallation sources will require greater counting rate capabilities than previously attainable. This necessitates careful design of both detector and readout electronics. As part of a new instrument for protein crystallography at LANSCE, we are constructing a detector whose concept was described previously (IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. NS-46 (1999) 1916). Here, we describe the signal processing circuit, which is well suited for sup 3 He detectors with a continuous interpolating readout. The circuit is based on standard charge preamplification, transmission of this signal over 20 meters or so, followed by sample and hold using a second order gated baseline restorer. This latter unit provides high rate capability without requiring pole-zero and tail cancellation circuits. There is also provision for gain-adjustment. The circuits are produced in surface mounted technology.

  19. DIANE, a simulation code for the interaction of neutrons with living tissues. Application to low doses of fast neutrons on human tumoral cells; DIANE, un code de simulation de l'interaction des neutrons avec la matiere vivante. Applications aux faibles doses de neutrons rapides sur des cellules tumorales humaines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenot, M.L

    2003-07-15

    Our work deals with the irradiation of cells and living tissues by 14 MeV neutrons at very low doses (a few 10{sup -2} Gy). Such experiments require an accurate knowledge of the values of neutron dose rates and fluences at the level of cell cultures. We have performed measurements of fluence rates through an activation method applied to gold and copper foils. The fluence rate is deduced from the gamma rays emitted by the irradiated foils. Neutron doses and dose rates have been measured through varied methods: PIN diodes, ionization tissue equivalent chambers, and Geiger-Mueller counters. We have designed the DIANE code to simulate the impact of energetic neutrons on cells. This code can be used with isolated cells or macroscopic tissues, it takes into account the roles of the ionisation electrons produced by recoil nuclei entering the cell. This point is all the more important since recent works have highlighted the impact of very low energy electrons on DNA. (A.C.)

  20. Artificial neural networks in neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Hernandez-Davila, V. M.; Manzanares-Acuna, E.; Mercado, G. A.; Gallego, E.; Lorente, A.; Perales-Munoz, W. A.; Robles-Rodriguez, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    An artificial neural network (ANN) has been designed to obtain neutron doses using only the count rates of a Bonner spheres spectrometer (BSS). Ambient, personal and effective neutron doses were included. One hundred and eighty-one neutron spectra were utilised to calculate the Bonner count rates and the neutron doses. The spectra were transformed from lethargy to energy distribution and were re-binned to 31 energy groups using the MCNP 4C code. Re-binned spectra, UTA4 response matrix and fluence-to-dose coefficients were used to calculate the count rates in the BSS and the doses. Count rates were used as input and the respective doses were used as output during neural network training. Training and testing were carried out in the MATLAB R environment. The impact of uncertainties in BSS count rates upon the dose quantities calculated with the ANN was investigated by modifying by ±5% the BSS count rates used in the training set. The use of ANNs in neutron dosimetry is an alternative procedure that overcomes the drawbacks associated with this ill-conditioned problem. (authors)

  1. Beta-decay rate and beta-delayed neutron emission probability of improved gross theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koura, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-01

    A theoretical study has been carried out on beta-decay rate and beta-delayed neutron emission probability. The gross theory of the beta decay is based on an idea of the sum rule of the beta-decay strength function, and has succeeded in describing beta-decay half-lives of nuclei overall nuclear mass region. The gross theory includes not only the allowed transition as the Fermi and the Gamow-Teller, but also the first-forbidden transition. In this work, some improvements are introduced as the nuclear shell correction on nuclear level densities and the nuclear deformation for nuclear strength functions, those effects were not included in the original gross theory. The shell energy and the nuclear deformation for unmeasured nuclei are adopted from the KTUY nuclear mass formula, which is based on the spherical-basis method. Considering the properties of the integrated Fermi function, we can roughly categorized energy region of excited-state of a daughter nucleus into three regions: a highly-excited energy region, which fully affect a delayed neutron probability, a middle energy region, which is estimated to contribute the decay heat, and a region neighboring the ground-state, which determines the beta-decay rate. Some results will be given in the presentation. A theoretical study has been carried out on beta-decay rate and beta-delayed neutron emission probability. The gross theory of the beta decay is based on an idea of the sum rule of the beta-decay strength function, and has succeeded in describing beta-decay half-lives of nuclei overall nuclear mass region. The gross theory includes not only the allowed transition as the Fermi and the Gamow-Teller, but also the first-forbidden transition. In this work, some improvements are introduced as the nuclear shell correction on nuclear level densities and the nuclear deformation for nuclear strength functions, those effects were not included in the original gross theory. The shell energy and the nuclear deformation for

  2. Revised Production Rates for Na-22 and Mn-54 in Meteorites Using Cross Sections Measured for Neutron-induced Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisterson, J. M.; Kim, K. J.; Reedy, R. C.

    2004-01-01

    The interactions of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) with extraterrestrial bodies produce small amounts of radionuclides and stable isotopes. The production rates of many relatively short-lived radionuclides, including 2.6-year Na-22 and 312-day Mn-54, have been measured in several meteorites collected very soon after they fell. Theoretical models used to calculate production rates for comparison with the measured values rely on input data containing good cross section measurements for all relevant reactions. Most GCR particles are protons, but secondary neutrons make most cosmogenic nuclides. Calculated production rates using only cross sections for proton-induced reactions do not agree well with measurements. One possible explanation is that the contribution to the production rate from reactions initiated by secondary neutrons produced in primary GCR interactions should be included explicitly. This, however, is difficult to do because so few of the relevant cross sections for neutron-induced reactions have been measured.

  3. A high-resolution neutron spectra unfolding method using the Genetic Algorithm technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, Bhaskar

    2002-01-01

    The Bonner sphere spectrometers (BSS) are commonly used to determine the neutron spectra within various nuclear facilities. Sophisticated mathematical tools are used to unfold the neutron energy distribution from the output data of the BSS. This paper highlights a novel high-resolution neutron spectra-unfolding method using the Genetic Algorithm (GA) technique. The GA imitates the biological evolution process prevailing in the nature to solve complex optimisation problems. The GA method was utilised to evaluate the neutron energy distribution, average energy, fluence and equivalent dose rates at important work places of a DIDO class research reactor and a high-energy superconducting heavy ion cyclotron. The spectrometer was calibrated with a 241 Am/Be (α,n) neutron standard source. The results of the GA method agreed satisfactorily with the results obtained by using the well-known BUNKI neutron spectra unfolding code

  4. Neutron dose rate in the upper part of a PWR containment. Comparison between measurements and TRIPOLI-2 calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergnaud, T.; Bourdet, L.; Gonnord, J.; Nimal, J.C.; Champion, G.

    1984-01-01

    Conception of a reactor building requires large openings in the primary concrete shield for a postulated loss-of-coolant accident. Through these openings neutrons escape and produce dose rates in several parts of the reactor building. Some calculations using ANISN, DOT and essentially TRIPOLI-2 codes allow to compute the neutron dose rates at several places such as reactor containment operating floor and containment annulus. Some complementary shields are provided and the instrumentations are placed in area where the dose rate is lower. Comparisons are presented between measurements and calculations

  5. Binary neutron star merger rate via the luminosity function of short gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Debdutta

    2018-04-01

    The luminosity function of short Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) is modelled by using the available catalogue data of all short GRBs (sGRBs) detected till October, 2017. The luminosities are estimated via the `pseudo-redshifts' obtained from the `Yonetoku correlation', assuming a standard delay distribution between the cosmic star formation rate and the production rate of their progenitors. While the simple powerlaw is ruled out to high confidence, the data is fit well both by exponential cutoff powerlaw and broken powerlaw models. Using the derived parameters of these models along with conservative values in the jet opening angles seen from afterglow observations, the true rate of short GRBs are derived. Assuming a short GRB is produced from each binary neutron star merger (BNSM), the rate of gravitational wave (GW) detections from these mergers are derived for the past, present and future configurations of the GW detector networks. Stringent lower limits of 1.87yr-1 for the aLIGO-VIRGO, and 3.11yr-1 for the upcoming aLIGO-VIRGO-KAGRA-LIGO/India configurations are thus derived for the BNSM rate at 68% confidence. The BNSM rates calculated from this work and that independently inferred from the observation of the only confirmed BNSM observed till date, are shown to have a mild tension; however the scenario that all BNSMs produce sGRBs cannot be ruled out.

  6. Rates of short-GRB afterglows in association with binary neutron star mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, M.; Pai, Archana; Misra, Kuntal; Resmi, L.; Arun, K. G.

    2018-03-01

    Assuming all binary neutron star (BNS) mergers produce short gamma-ray bursts, we combine the merger rates of BNS from population synthesis studies, the sensitivities of advanced gravitational wave (GW) interferometer networks, and of the electromagnetic (EM) facilities in various wavebands, to compute the detection rate of associated afterglows in these bands. Using the inclination angle measured from GWs as a proxy for the viewing angle and assuming a uniform distribution of jet opening angle between 3° and 30°, we generate light curves of the counterparts using the open access afterglow hydrodynamics package BOXFIT for X-ray, optical, and radio bands. For different EM detectors, we obtain the fraction of EM counterparts detectable in these three bands by imposing appropriate detection thresholds. In association with BNS mergers detected by five (three) detector networks of advanced GW interferometers, assuming a BNS merger rate of 0.6-774 Gpc-3 yr-1 from population synthesis models, we find the afterglow detection rates (per year) to be 0.04-53 (0.02-27), 0.03-36 (0.01-19), and 0.04-47 (0.02-25) in the X-ray, optical, and radio bands, respectively. Our rates represent maximum possible detections for the given BNS rate since we ignore effects of cadence and field of view in EM follow-up observations.

  7. Net Reaction Rate and Neutrino Cooling Rate for the Urca Process in Departure from Chemical Equilibrium in the Crust of Fast-accreting Neutron Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Hua; Huang, Xi; Zheng, Xiao-Ping

    We discuss the effect of compression on Urca shells in the ocean and crust of accreting neutron stars, especially in superbursting sources. We find that Urca shells may be deviated from chemical equilibrium in neutron stars which accrete at several tenths of the local Eddington accretion rate. The deviation depends on the energy threshold of the parent and daughter nuclei, the transition strength, the temperature, and the local accretion rate. In a typical crust model of accreting neutron stars, the chemical departures range from a few tenths of kBT to tens of kBT for various Urca pairs. If the Urca shell can exist in crusts of accreting neutron stars, compression may enhance the net neutrino cooling rate by a factor of about 1-2 relative to the neutrino emissivity in chemical equilibrium. For some cases, such as Urca pairs with small energy thresholds and/or weak transition strength, the large chemical departure may result in net heating rather than cooling, although the released heat can be small. Strong Urca pairs in the deep crust are hard to be deviated even in neutron stars accreting at the local Eddington accretion rate.

  8. Optical absorption characteristics of neutron irradiated heavy metal fluoride glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitra, S.S.; Banerjee, P.K.; Pereira, J.M.T.; Gedam, S.G.

    1987-10-15

    Samples of ZBLA and HBLA glasses were subjected to various fluences of neutron irradiation, and the spectral dependence of optical absorption was measured before and after irradiation. The IR edge was found to be unaffected by neutron irradiation for the fluences used. However, a red shift occurred at the UV edge which slightly recovered after three weeks.

  9. A fluence device for precise radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnott, R.G.T.; Peak, M.J.

    1979-01-01

    An instrument is described which has been designed to ensure precise positioning of samples and sensing devices in three dimensions at all times during irradiation procedures. The system, which is both robust and sensitive, overcomes difficulties experienced when slight variations in the positioning of a sample under irradiation results in large changes in fluence. (UK)

  10. High-frame rate imaging of two-phase flow in a thin rectangular channel using fast neutrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zboray, R; Mor, I; Dangendorf, V; Stark, M; Tittelmeier, K; Cortesi, M; Adams, R

    2014-08-01

    We have demonstrated the feasibility of performing high-frame-rate, fast neutron radiography of air-water two-phase flows in a thin channel with rectangular cross section. The experiments have been carried out at the accelerator facility of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. A polychromatic, high-intensity fast neutron beam with average energy of 6 MeV was produced by 11.5 MeV deuterons hitting a thick Be target. Image sequences down to 10 ms exposure times were obtained using a fast-neutron imaging detector developed in the context of fast-neutron resonance imaging. Different two-phase flow regimes such as bubbly slug and churn flows have been examined. Two phase flow parameters like the volumetric gas fraction, bubble size and mean bubble velocities have been measured. The first results are promising, improvements for future experiments are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Muon Fluence Measurements for Homeland Security Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ankney, Austin S.; Berguson, Timothy J.; Borgardt, James D.; Kouzes, Richard T.

    2010-08-10

    This report focuses on work conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to better characterize aspects of backgrounds in RPMs deployed for homeland security purposes. Two polyvinyl toluene scintillators were utilized with supporting NIM electronics to measure the muon coincidence rate. Muon spallation is one mechanism by which background neutrons are produced. The measurements performed concentrated on a broad investigation of the dependence of the muon flux on a) variations in solid angle subtended by the detector; b) the detector inclination with the horizontal; c) depth underground; and d) diurnal effects. These tests were conducted inside at Building 318/133, outdoors at Building 331G, and underground at Building 3425 at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  12. Characterization of the neutron irradiation system for use in the Low-Dose-Rate Irradiation Facility at Sandia National Laboratories.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, Manuel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this work was to characterize the neutron irradiation system consisting of americium-241 beryllium (241AmBe) neutron sources placed in a polyethylene shielding for use at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Low Dose Rate Irradiation Facility (LDRIF). With a total activity of 0.3 TBq (9 Ci), the source consisted of three recycled 241AmBe sources of different activities that had been combined into a single source. The source in its polyethylene shielding will be used in neutron irradiation testing of components. The characterization of the source-shielding system was necessary to evaluate the radiation environment for future experiments. Characterization of the source was also necessary because the documentation for the three component sources and their relative alignment within the Special Form Capsule (SFC) was inadequate. The system consisting of the source and shielding was modeled using Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP). The model was validated by benchmarking it against measurements using multiple techniques. To characterize the radiation fields over the full spatial geometry of the irradiation system, it was necessary to use a number of instruments of varying sensitivities. First, the computed photon radiography assisted in determining orientation of the component sources. With the capsule properly oriented inside the shielding, the neutron spectra were measured using a variety of techniques. A N-probe Microspec and a neutron Bubble Dosimeter Spectrometer (BDS) set were used to characterize the neutron spectra/field in several locations. In the third technique, neutron foil activation was used to ascertain the neutron spectra. A high purity germanium (HPGe) detector was used to characterize the photon spectrum. The experimentally measured spectra and the MCNP results compared well. Once the MCNP model was validated to an adequate level of confidence, parametric analyses was performed on the model to optimize for potential

  13. Measurement and evaluation of fast neutron flux of CT and OR5 irradiation hole in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Seong Woo; Choo, Kee Nam; Lee, Seung-Kyu; Kim, Yong Kyun

    2012-01-01

    The irradiation test has been conducted to evaluate the irradiation performance of many materials by a material capsule at HANARO. Since the fast neutron fluence above 1 MeV is important for the irradiation test of material, it must be measured and evaluated exactly at each irradiation hole. Therefore, a fast neutron flux was measured and evaluated by a 09M-02K capsule irradiated in an OR5 irradiation hole and a 10M-01K capsule irradiated in a CT irradiation hole. Fe, Ni, and Ti wires as the fluence monitor were used for the detection of fast neutron flux. Before the irradiation test, the neutron flux and spectrum was calculated for each irradiation hole using an MCNP code. After the irradiation test, the activity of the fluence monitor was measured by an HPGe detector and the reaction rate was calculated. For the OR5 irradiation hole, the radial difference of the fast neutron flux was observed from a calculated data due to the OR5 irradiation hole being located outside the core. Furthermore, a control absorber rod was withdrawn from the core as the increase of the irradiation time at the same irradiation cycle, so the distribution of neutron flux was changed from the beginning to the end of the cycle. These effects were considered to evaluate the fast neutron flux. Neutron spectrums of the CT and OR5 irradiation hole were adjusted by the measured data. The fluxes of a fast neutron above 1 MeV were compared with calculated and measured value. Although the maximum difference was shown at 18.48%, most of the results showed good agreement. (author)

  14. Characterisation of an accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT versus beam energy

    CERN Document Server

    Agosteo, S; D'Errico, F; Nath, R; Tinti, R

    2002-01-01

    Neutron capture in sup 1 sup 0 B produces energetic alpha particles that have a high linear energy transfer in tissue. This results in higher cell killing and a higher relative biological effectiveness compared to photons. Using suitably designed boron compounds which preferentially localize in cancerous cells instead of healthy tissues, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has the potential of providing a higher tumor cure rate within minimal toxicity to normal tissues. This clinical approach requires a thermal neutron source, generally a nuclear reactor, with a fluence rate sufficient to deliver tumorcidal doses within a reasonable treatment time (minutes). Thermal neutrons do not penetrate deeply in tissue, therefore BNCT is limited to lesions which are either superficial or otherwise accessible. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of an accelerator-based thermal neutron source for the BNCT of skin melanomas. The source was designed via MCNP Monte Carlo simulations of the thermalization of a fast ...

  15. The Influence of Used Construction Material and Its Thickness on the Neutron Dose Rate Around the Linear Accelerator - Experimental Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krpan, I; Miklavcic, I.; Poje, M.; Radolic, V.; Vukovic, B.; Zivkovic, A.; Faj, D.; Ivkovic, A.

    2013-01-01

    Since linear accelerators for medical radiotherapy do not have active radioactive sources it makes them adequate from the radioprotection point of view. However, when operating at the energy higher than 10 MeV, they can become a source of unwanted neutron radiation in the giant dipole resonance reaction between the photon beam and the accelerator head material. Neutrons created in this reaction are almost isotropic in direction with an energy range between 700 keV and 1 MeV. During the accelerator installation and different phases of the construction work around the accelerator, a neutron dose rate at several important locations was investigated. Both passive (solid state nuclear track etched detectors - CR 39 and/or LR-115 with the 10B foil) and active detectors (Thermo Biorem FHT 752) were used. A higher photon dose rate was measured around the accelerator facility. An effective photon dose reduction was achieved using steel plates. However, this was the secondary source of neutrons in the reaction between the photons and steel plates, since higher values were measured. Neutron reduction was done by additional layers of barite concrete. A very conservative assessment of the effective dose was done for the medical personnel inside the control room. At the accelerator extreme operating regime (fixed accelerator direction - gantry angle, highest energy possible used), the neutron dose rate in the control room of 12 μSv/h was measured. Knowing the number of working days and number of patients per technician (per day), an exposure to the neutron dose of 1,1 mSv per year was calculated.(author)

  16. SU-F-BRE-11: Neutron Measurements Around the Varian TrueBeam Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maglieri, R; Seuntjens, J; Kildea, J; Liang, L; DeBlois, F; Evans, M; Licea, A; Dubeau, J; Witharana, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: With the emergence of flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams, several authors have noted many advantages to their use. One such advantage is the decrease in neutron production by photonuclear reactions in the linac head. In the present work we investigate the reduction in neutrons from a Varian TrueBeam linac using the Nested Neutron Spectrometer (NNS, Detec). The neutron spectrum, total fluence and source strength were measured and compared for 10 MV with and without flattening filter and the effect of moderation by the room and maze was studied for the 15 MV beam. Methods: The NNS, similar to traditional Bonner sphere detectors but operated in current mode, was used to measure the neutron fluence and spectrum. The NNS was validated for use in high dose rate environments using Monte Carlo simulations and calibrated at NIST and NRC Canada. Measurements were performed at several positions within the treatment room and maze with the linac jaws closed to maximize neutron production. Results: The measurements showed a total fluence reduction between 35-40% in the room and maze when the flattening filter was removed. The neutron source strength Qn was calculated from in-room fluence measurements and was found to be 0.042 × 10 2 n/Gy, 0.026 × 10 2 n/Gy and 0.59 × 101 2 n/Gy for the 10 MV, the 10 MV FFF and 15 MV beams, respectively. We measured ambient equivalent doses of 11 mSv/hr, 7 mSv/hr and 218 mSv/hr for the 10 MV, 10 MV FFF and 15 MV by the head. Conclusion: Our measurements revealed a decrease in total fluence, neutron source strength and equivalent dose of approximately 35-40% across the treatment room for the FFF compared to FF modes. This demonstrates, as expected, that the flattening filter is a major component of the neutron production for the TrueBeam. The authors greatly acknowledge support form the Canadian Nuclear Commission and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada through the CREATE program. Co-authors Dubeau

  17. Extraction of neutron spectral information from Bonner-Sphere data

    CERN Document Server

    Haney, J H; Zaidins, C S

    1999-01-01

    We have extended a least-squares method of extracting neutron spectral information from Bonner-Sphere data which was previously developed by Zaidins et al. (Med. Phys. 5 (1978) 42). A pulse-height analysis with background stripping is employed which provided a more accurate count rate for each sphere. Newer response curves by Mares and Schraube (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 366 (1994) 461) were included for the moderating spheres and the bare detector which comprise the Bonner spectrometer system. Finally, the neutron energy spectrum of interest was divided using the philosophy of fuzzy logic into three trapezoidal regimes corresponding to slow, moderate, and fast neutrons. Spectral data was taken using a PuBe source in two different environments and the analyzed data is presented for these cases as slow, moderate, and fast neutron fluences. (author)

  18. Artificial neural networks in neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega C, H.R.; Hernandez D, V.M.; Manzanares A, E.; Mercado, G.A.; Perales M, W.A.; Robles R, J.A.; Gallego, E.; Lorente, A.

    2005-01-01

    An artificial neural network has been designed to obtain the neutron doses using only the Bonner spheres spectrometer's count rates. Ambient, personal and effective neutron doses were included. 187 neutron spectra were utilized to calculate the Bonner count rates and the neutron doses. The spectra were transformed from lethargy to energy distribution and were re-binned to 31 energy groups using the MCNP 4C code. Re-binned spectra, UTA4 response matrix and fluence-to-dose coefficients were used to calculate the count rates in Bonner spheres spectrometer and the doses. Count rates were used as input and the respective doses were used as output during neural network training. Training and testing was carried out in Mat lab environment. The artificial neural network performance was evaluated using the χ 2 - test, where the original and calculated doses were compared. The use of Artificial Neural Networks in neutron dosimetry is an alternative procedure that overcomes the drawbacks associated in this ill-conditioned problem. (Author)

  19. Neutron dose rate at the SwissFEL injector test facility: first measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohmann, E.; Frey, N.; Fuchs, A.; Harm, C.; Hoedlmoser, H.; Luescher, R.; Mayer, S.; Morath, O.; Philipp, R.; Rehmann, A.; Schietinger, T.

    2014-01-01

    At the Paul Scherrer Institute, the new SwissFEL Free Electron Laser facility is currently in the design phase. It is foreseen to accelerate electrons up to a maximum energy of 7 GeV with a pulsed time structure. An injector test facility is operated at a maximum energy of 300 MeV and serves as the principal test and demonstration plant for the SwissFEL project. Secondary radiation is created in unavoidable interactions of the primary beam with beamline components. The resulting ambient dose-equivalent rate due to neutrons was measured along the beamline with different commercially available survey instruments. The present study compares the readings of these neutron detectors (one of them is specifically designed for measurements in pulsed fields). The experiments were carried out in both, a normal and a diagnostic mode of operation of the injector. Measurements were taken at the SwissFEL injector test facility using three different types of commercially available survey instruments for normal and diagnostic mode of operation at different positions inside the accelerator vault. During normal operation, the doses indicated by the different instruments agree within the measurement uncertainty except for the beam dump region. There, due to its limited energy range and high sensitivity, the LB6411 shows significantly lower dose values than the other instruments. The photon background in the vault associated with each pulse causes the scintillator used by the LB6419 to saturate. As a result, only the channel using the delayed 12 C(n,p)12-reaction could be used during the measurements. The highest doses per pulse were measured next to the beam dump and the bunch compressor. For the optimisation of the accelerator, luminescent screens can be inserted into the beam path causing a dose distributed over several metres depending on the screen type. The dose arise to 40 % from neutrons with energies of >20 MeV. Although the charge of each pulse were reduced to decrease

  20. Photon fluence measurements relative to a Bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merle, G.; Zerbib, J.

    1969-01-01

    With the help of a gamma spectrometry measurement apparatus using a NaI: Tl crystal, the authors have studied the passage from the pulse distributions received on a multichannel spectrometer to the spectral distribution of the photons. This work has necessitated the use of a previously calibrated gamma probe for measuring the mono-energetic photon fluence. A simple method is used for producing the spectrum for an energy range of from 30 keV to 2 MeV; the photon population is classified in about twenty groups. The determination of these groups, whose width increases with the energy E γ , depends on the probe parameters and on the probability used for the calculation of the gaussian distribution of the pulses of the total absorption peak, centred on the group under consideration. The spectral analysis method is tested for one and then several radionuclides which are present simultaneously and whose gamma emission is known. The tests are complemented with fluence measurements with a view to testing the validity of the method proposed. The class determination operation (number and width), and the calculation of the spectral distribution of the photon fluences and of the irradiation intensities are carried out by computer (FORTRAN IV program). an actual example is described for measuring the Bremsstrahlung near the 2 MeV Van de Graaff 'Yvette' at the Saclay Nuclear Sciences and Technology Institute (I.N.S.T.N.). (authors) [fr

  1. Development of the real-time neutron activation diagnostic system for NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Jaben R.; Jedlovec, Donald R.; Edwards, Ellen R.; Yeamans, Charles B.; Golod, Tony; Hernandez, Jose; Adams, Phil; Brunton, Gordon

    2017-08-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is one of the highest fluence neutron sources provided by the nuclear fusion of deuterium and tritium nuclei. One of the resultant products is 14.1 MeV neutrons which provide key information to the conditions in which they were formed. The degree of polar and azimuthal symmetry of the neutron flux is a key metric for the performance of the capsule, thus a spatially-resolved measurement of the neutron distribution is critical. Implementing a suite of 48 lanthanum bromide detectors with zirconium activation samples around the target chamber has been developed to measure the neutron distribution. The system provides near real-time time estimates of the neutron fluence distribution. It is designed to operate over six orders of magnitude of neutron yield, providing overall yield estimates precise to 2%. The system is designed to operate continuously through the NIF shot cycles, accommodating high data rates. We will describe the nuclear counting system, data acquisition and archiving, analysis, and yield distribution results for some NIF high yield shots. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-CONF-736439

  2. Feasibility study of measuring the 238U fission rates by neutrons of 14 MeV in specifical experiment condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Zhongwei

    2004-12-01

    Using uranium fission chambers of minitype slab in the case of 14 MeV neutrons penetrating through the special experiment model, the pure 238 U absolute fission rates are measured. Comparing the measurement results with and without reflect shell, the reflect coefficient of shell is gained. The calculate results are compared with experiment results, to prove the model calculate method and parameter. (author)

  3. Proton Particle Test Fluence: What's the Right Number?

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Ladbury, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    While we have been utilizing standard fluence levels such as those listed in the JESD57 document, we have begun revisiting what an appropriate test fluence is when it comes to qualifying a device for single events. Instead of a fixed fluence level or until a specific number of events occurs, a different thought process is required.

  4. Void Fraction Measurement in Subcooled-Boiling Flow Using High-Frame-Rate Neutron Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kureta, Masatoshi; Akimoto, Hajime; Hibiki, Takashi; Mishima, Kaichiro

    2001-01-01

    A high-frame-rate neutron radiography (NR) technique was applied to measure the void fraction distribution in forced-convective subcooled-boiling flow. The focus was experimental technique and error estimation of the high-frame-rate NR. The results of void fraction measurement in the boiling flow were described. Measurement errors on instantaneous and time-averaged void fractions were evaluated experimentally and analytically. Measurement errors were within 18 and 2% for instantaneous void fraction (measurement time is 0.89 ms), and time-averaged void fraction, respectively. The void fraction distribution of subcooled boiling was measured using atmospheric-pressure water in rectangular channels with channel width 30 mm, heated length 100 mm, channel gap 3 and 5 mm, inlet water subcooling from 10 to 30 K, and mass velocity ranging from 240 to 2000 kg/(m 2 .s). One side of the channel was heated homogeneously. Instantaneous void fraction and time-averaged void fraction distribution were measured parametrically. The effects of flow parameters on void fraction were investigated

  5. Experimental test of a new neutron threshold detector and its application

    CERN Document Server

    Li Gui Sheng; Su You Wu; Li Shu Wei

    2002-01-01

    The possibility of using sup 2 sup 0 sup 9 Bi as a new threshold detector to measure high-energy neutrons was investigated for the first time. At the same time the experiment measured successfully the emitted neutron fluence rate, energy spectrum and dose equivalent rate distributions in the heavy ion target area using a detector complex including sup 2 sup 0 sup 9 Bi, sup 1 sup 1 sup 5 In, sup 2 sup 7 Al, sup 1 sup 9 F and sup 1 sup 2 C samples

  6. Evaluation of the environmental equivalent dose rate using area monitors for neutrons in clinical linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salgado, Ana Paula; Pereira, Walsan Wagner; Patrao, Karla C. de Souza; Fonseca, Evaldo S. da; Batista, Delano V.S.

    2009-01-01

    The Neutron Laboratory of the Radioprotection and Dosimetry Institute - IRD/CNEN, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, initiated studies on the process of calibration of neutron area monitors and the results of the measurements performed at radiotherapy treatment rooms, containing clinical accelerators

  7. EURISOL-DS Multi-MWatt Hg Target: Neutron flux and fission rate calculations for the MAFF configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Romanets, Y; Vaz, P; Herrera-Martinez, A; Kadi, Y; Kharoua, C; Lettry, J; Lindroos, M

    The EURISOL (The EURopean Isotope Separation On-Line Radioactive Ion Beam) project aims at producing high intensity radioactive ion beams produced by neutron induced fission on a fissile target (235U) surrounding a liquid mercury converter. A proton beam of 1 GeV and 4 MW impinges on the Hg converter generating by spallation reactions high neutron fluxes. In this work the state-of-the-art Monte Carlo codes MCNPX and FLUKA were used to assess the neutronics performance of the system which geometry, inspired from the MAFF concept, allows a versatile manipulation of the fission targets. The objective of the study was to optimize the geometry of the system and the materials used in the fuel and reflector elements of the system, in order to achieve the highest possible fission rate.

  8. Effects of high thermal and high fast fluences on the mechanical properties of type 6061 aluminum in the HFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, J.R.; Czajkowski, C.J.; Tichler, P.R.

    1988-01-01

    The High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is an epithermal, externally moderated (by D 2 O) facility designed to produce neutron beams for research. Type 6061 T-6 aluminum was used for the beam tubes, pressure vessel, fuel cladding, and most other components in the high flux area. The HFBR has operated since 1965. The epithermal, external moderation of the HFBR means that materials irradiated in different areas of the facility receive widely different flux spectra. Thus, specimens from a control rod drive follower tube (CRDF) have received 1.5 /times/ 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) and 3.2 /times/ 10 23 n/cm 2 thermal fluence, while those from a vertical thimble flow shroud received 1.9 /times/ 10 23 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) and 1.0 /times/ 10 23 n/cm 2 thermal. These numbers correspond to fast to thermal fluence ratios ranging from 0.05 to 1.9. Irradiations are occurring at approximately 333/degree/K. The data indicate that the increase in tensile strength and decrease in ductility result primarily from the thermal fluence, i.e., the transmutation of aluminum to silicon. These effects appear to be saturating at fluences above approximately 1.8 /times/ 10 23 n/cm 2 thermal at values of 90,000 psi (6700 Kg/mm 2 ) and 9%, respectively. The specimens receiving the highest fluence ratios appear to have less increase in tensile strength and less decrease in ductility than specimens with a lower fast to thermal fluence ratio and the same thermal fluence, suggesting a possible beneficial effect of the high energy neutrons in preventing formation of silicon crystallites. 7 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Heavy Ion Irradiation Fluence Dependence for Single-Event Upsets in a NAND Flash Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dakai; Wilcox, Edward; Ladbury, Raymond L.; Kim, Hak; Phan, Anthony; Seidleck, Christina; Label, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the single-event effect (SEE) susceptibility of the Micron 16 nm NAND flash, and found that the single-event upset (SEU) cross section varied inversely with cumulative fluence. We attribute the effect to the variable upset sensitivities of the memory cells. Furthermore, the effect impacts only single cell upsets in general. The rate of multiple-bit upsets remained relatively constant with fluence. The current test standards and procedures assume that SEU follow a Poisson process and do not take into account the variability in the error rate with fluence. Therefore, traditional SEE testing techniques may underestimate the on-orbit event rate for a device with variable upset sensitivity.

  10. Study of sampling rate influence on neutron-gamma discrimination with stilbene coupled to a silicon photomultiplier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinglong; Moore, Michael E; Wang, Zhonghai; Rong, Zhou; Yang, Chaowen; Hayward, Jason P

    2017-10-01

    Choosing a digitizer with an appropriate sampling rate is often a trade-off between performance and economy. The influence of sampling rates on the neutron-gamma Pulse Shape Discrimination (PSD) with a solid stilbene scintillator coupled to a Silicon Photomultiplier was investigated in this work. Sampling rates from 125MSPS to 2GSPS from a 10-bit digitizer were used to collect detector pulses produced by the interactions of a Cf-252 source. Due to the decreased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the PSD performance degraded with reduced sampling rates. The reason of PSD performance degradation was discussed. Then, an efficient combination of filtering and digital signal processing (DSP) was then applied to suppress the timing noise and electronic background noise. The results demonstrate an improved PSD performance especially at low sampling rates, down to 125MSPS. Using filtering and DSP, the ascribed Figure of Merit (FOM) at 125keV ee (± 10keV ee ) increased from 0.95 to 1.02 at 125MSPS. At 300keV ee and above, all the FOMs are better than 2.00. Our study suggests that 250MSPS is a good enough sampling rate for neutron-gamma discrimination in this system in order to be sensitive to neutrons at and above ~ 125keV ee . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Neutron spectra due 13N production in a PET cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benavente, J.A.; Vega-Carrillo, H.R.; Lacerda, M.A.S.; Fonseca, T.C.F.; Faria, F.P.; Silva, T.A. da

    2015-01-01

    Monte Carlo and experimental methods have been used to characterize the neutron radiation field around PET (Positron Emission Tomography) cyclotrons. In this work, the Monte Carlo code MCNPX was used to estimate the neutron spectra, the neutron fluence rates and the ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)) in seven locations around a PET cyclotron during 13 N production. In order to validate these calculations, H*(10) was measured in three sites and were compared with the calculated doses. All the spectra have two peaks, one above 0.1 MeV due to the evaporation neutrons and another in the thermal region due to the room-return effects. Despite the relatively large difference between the measured and calculated H*(10) for one point, the agreement was considered good, compared with that obtained for 18 F production in a previous work. - Highlights: • MCNPX code was used to estimate the neutron spectra in a PET cyclotron. • Neutrons were estimated when 13 N is produced. • Neutron spectra show evaporation and room-return neutrons. • Calculated H*(10) were compared with measured H*(10)

  12. Neutron and γ-irradiation of bacteriophage M13 DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.P.; Lavin, M.F.; Cohen, D.; Dytlewski, N.; Houldsworth, J.

    1990-01-01

    We describe here the use of the Van de Graaff accelerator as a source of high energy neutrons for biological irradiation. Single-stranded bacteriophage M13 DNA was chosen as the system to determine the relative biological effectiveness of monoenergetic neutrons. A Standard Neutron Irradiation Facility (SNIF) was established using a 3 MV Van de Graaff accelerator. The 2 D (d,n) 3 He nuclear reaction was used to produce neutron fluxes of 3 x 10 8 cm -2 sec -1 yielding dose rates as high as 50 Gy h -1 . A detailed description of the neutron source, neutron fluence measurement, dose calculation and calibration are included. Exposure of single-stranded bacteriophage M13 DNA to 90 Gy of neutrons reduced survival to 0.18% of the unirradiated value. Five hundred Gy of γ-rays were required for the same level of killing, and RBE was estimated at 6 based on Do values. Determination of the extent of DNA damage after exposure to cleavage using gel electrophoresis, gave RBE values of 6-8 which was very similar to that observed for bacteriophage survival. The facility described here provides a reproducible source of high energy monoenergetic neutrons and dose levels suitable for experiments designed to measure DNA damage and effects on DNA synthesis. (author)

  13. Alpha-particle fluence in radiobiological experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikezic, Dragoslav; Yu, Kwan Ngok

    2017-03-01

    Two methods were proposed for determining alpha-particle fluence for radiobiological experiments. The first involved calculating the probabilities of hitting the target for alpha particles emitted from a source through Monte Carlo simulations, which when multiplied by the activity of the source gave the fluence at the target. The second relied on the number of chemically etched alpha-particle tracks developed on a solid-state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) that was irradiated by an alpha-particle source. The etching efficiencies (defined as percentages of latent tracks created by alpha particles from the source that could develop to become visible tracks upon chemical etching) were computed through Monte Carlo simulations, which when multiplied by the experimentally counted number of visible tracks would also give the fluence at the target. We studied alpha particles with an energy of 5.486 MeV emitted from an 241Am source, and considered the alpha-particle tracks developed on polyallyldiglycol carbonate film, which is a common SSNTD. Our results showed that the etching efficiencies were equal to one for source-film distances of from 0.6 to 3.5 cm for a circular film of radius of 1 cm, and for source-film distances of from 1 to 3 cm for circular film of radius of 2 cm. For circular film with a radius of 3 cm, the etching efficiencies never reached 1. On the other hand, the hit probability decreased monotonically with increase in the source-target distance, and fell to zero when the source-target distance was larger than the particle range in air. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  14. IMRT fluence map editing to control hot and cold spots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor Cook, J.; Tobler, Matt; Leavitt, Dennis D.; Watson, Gordon

    2005-01-01

    Manually editing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fluence maps effectively controls hot and cold spots that the IMRT optimization cannot control. Many times, re-optimizing does not reduce the hot spots or increase the cold spots. In fact, re-optimizing only places the hot and cold spots in different locations. Fluence-map editing provides manual control of dose delivery and provides the best treatment plan possible. Several IMRT treatments were planned using the Varian Eclipse planning system. We compare the effects on dose distributions between fluence-map editing and re-optimization, discuss techniques for fluence-map editing, and analyze differences between fluence editing on one beam vs. multiple beams. When editing a beam's fluence map, it is essential to choose a beam that least affects dose to the tumor and critical structures. Editing fluence maps gives an advantage in treatment planning and provides controlled delivery of IMRT dose

  15. Vessel fluence evaluation for SMART using DLC-23 and DLC-185 data libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyo Youn; Cho, Byung Oh; Joo, Han Gyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-10-01

    In this report, it was performed the vessel fluence evaluation for SMART using nuclear cross-section libraries of DLC-23/CASK and DLC-185/BUGLE-96 and it was compared with the results. It was shown that the maximum neutron fluences for the inner surface of SMART vessel, which has 60 years lifetime and 90% capacity factor, resulted from using DLC-23/CASK and DLC-185/BUGLE-96 are 2.88x10{sup 16} n/cm{sup 2} and 1.98 x10{sup 16} n/cm{sup 2}, respectively. It is concluded that the fast neutron fluence at the reactor pressure vessel of SMART is far less than 1.0x10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} which is specified by the requirement of 10 CFR 50.61 and the SMART has the preservation of reactor vessel integrity throughout the reactor lifetime. Also, it was shown that the result using DLC-23/CASK has conservatism of about 30% comparing with the result using DLC-185/BUGLE-96. 15 refs., 7 figs., 13 tabs. (Author)

  16. Experimental assessment of incineration rates of actinides in high intensity neutron fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deruelle, O.

    2001-01-01

    The Mini-inca project develops new experimental facilities and computational methods to carry out integral measurements of actinide transmutation in given irradiation conditions. 2 types of irradiations are foreseen: -) short irradiations to have a precise determination of unknown nuclear parameters such as capture and fission cross sections including branching ratios; -) long irradiations of mono-isotopic sample or known mixtures of isotopes to determine transmutation rates in given high intensity neutron spectra. Irradiations will be carried out in the ILL reactor in Grenoble. A new detection system named Mini-inca chamber has been developed and installed at the ILL reactor, it allows accurate alpha-gamma spectroscopy just after irradiation and even between successive irradiations of the same sample. The advantages of alpha-gamma spectroscopy to determine the composition of the sample are that it is fast, it needs no chemistry and it is non-destructive. The first validation experiments have been performed and their results concerning the irradiation of a Pu-242 target are presented. (A.C.)

  17. Improvement in the calibration time of absolute emission rate of radioisotopic neutron sources using vanadyl sulfate bath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khabaz, Rahim

    2012-01-01

    In this study, for calibration of emission rate of radioisotopic neutron sources, a suitable vanadium salt was proposed instead manganese sulfate because the shorter half-life of 52 V would facilitate faster neutron yield measurements to be made with a shorter delay time between subsequent measurements. Using Monte Carlo method, different correction factors of manganese and vanadyl sulfate baths were calculated and compared with each other. The results showed that for having an appropriate efficiency of VBS, high concentrations of solution must be used. - Highlights: ► The widely used method for measurement of emission rate of radioisotopic neutron sources is MBS. ► One of limitations of MBS is time required for activation to saturation and background measurement. ► The aim of this study is to evaluate a calibration method by VBS with about one-hour full-cycle time. ► The relative efficiency per neutron of VBS was just about half that obtained from MBS. ► The relative efficiency of VBS is compensated with increasing the concentration of solution.

  18. Fluence of dielectric constant (D), (H/sup +/) and (SO/sub 4/sup -2/) on the rate of redox reaction between tris (2,2-bipyridine) iron (II) and ceric sulphate in aqueous sulphuric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattak, R.; Naqvi, I.I.; Farrukh, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Kinetic of the redox reaction between tris (2,2-bipyridine)iron(II) cation and ceric sulphate has been studied in aqueous sulphuric acid medium. Different methods were employed for the determination of order of reaction. The order of reaction is found to be first with respect to reductant however retarding effect of increasing initial concentration of oxidant is found. Influence of (H/sup +/), (SO/sub 4/sup 2-) and dielectric constant (D) on the rate of redox reaction has also been studied. Increase in (H/sup +/) and dielectric constant of the medium retard the rate while enhancement of the (SO/sub 4/sup 2-/) accelerates the rate first and then the reaction goes towards retardation. Effects of (H/sup +/) and (SO/sub 4/sup 2-/) were studied by using acetic acid-sodium acetate buffer for the first one and varying ionic concentrations of the salt sodium sulphate for the latter one, whereas dielectric constant was varied by using 0%, 10% and 20% ethanol-water mixtures. Results of effects of each one of the factors i.e., H/sup +/, SO/sub 4/sup 2-/ and dielectric constant (D) have been compared and on the basis of these factors, (Ce(SO/sub 4/ )/sub 3/)/sup 2-/ is suggested to be the active species of cerium(IV). However a rate law consistent with the observed kinetic data has also been derived supporting the proposed mechanism. (author)

  19. SU-E-T-249: Neutron Model Upgrade for Radiotherapy Patients Monitoring Using a New Online Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irazola, L; Sanchez Doblado, F. [Departamento de Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla (Spain); Lorenzoli, M; Pola, A. [Politecnico di Milano, Departimento di Ingegneria Nuclear, Milano (Italy); Terron, J.A. [Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla (Spain); Bedogni, R. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) (Italy); Sanchez Nieto, B. [Instituto de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Romero-Exposito, M. [Departamento de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to improve the existing methodology to estimate neutron equivalent dose in organs during radiotherapy treatments, based on a Static Random Access Memory neutron detector (SRAMnd) [1]. This is possible thanks to the introduction of a new digital detector with improved characteristics, which is able to measure online the neutron fluence rate in the presence of an intense photon background [2]. Its reduced size, allows the direct estimation of doses in specific points inside an anthropomorphic phantom (NORMA) without using passive detectors as TLD or CR-39. This versatility will allow not only to improve the existing models (generic abdomen and H and N [1]) but to generate more specific ones for any technique. Methods: The new Thermal Neutron Rate Detector (TNRD), based on a diode device sensitized to thermal neutrons, have been inserted in 16 points of the phantom. These points are distributed to infer doses to specific organs. Simultaneous measurements of these devices and a reference one, located in front of the gantry, have been performed for the mentioned generic treatments, in order to improve the existing model. Results: These new devices have shown more precise since they agree better with Monte Carlo simulations. The comparison of the thermal neutron fluence, measured with TNRD, and the existing models, converted from events to fluence, shows an average improvement of (3.90±3.37) % for H and N and (12.61±9.43) % for abdomen, normalized to the maximum value. Conclusion: This work indicates the potential of these new devices for more precise neutron equivalent dose estimation in organs, as a consequence of radiotherapy treatments. The simplicity of the process makes possible to establish more specific models that will provide a better dose estimation. References[1] Phys Med Biol 2012; 57:6167–6191.[2] A new active thermal neutron detector. Radiat. Prot. Dosim. (in press)

  20. Isotopic dependence of GCR fluence behind shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Saganti, Premkumar; Hu, Xiaodong; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Cleghorn, Timothy; Zeitlin, Cary; Tripathi, Ram K.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we consider the effects of the isotopic composition of the primary galactic cosmic rays (GCR), nuclear fragmentation cross sections, and isotopic-grid on the solution to transport models used for shielding studies. Satellite measurements are used to describe the isotopic composition of the GCR. For the nuclear interaction data-base and transport solution, we use the quantum multiple scattering theory of nuclear fragmentation (QMSFRG) and high-charge and energy (HZETRN) transport code, respectively. The QMSFRG model is shown to accurately describe existing fragmentation data including proper description of the odd-even effects as function of the iso-spin dependence on the projectile nucleus. The principle finding of this study is that large errors (±100%) will occur in the mass-fluence spectra when comparing transport models that use a complete isotopic-grid (∼170 ions) to ones that use a reduced isotopic-grid, for example the 59 ion-grid used in the HZETRN code in the past; however, less significant errors (<+/-20%) occur in the elemental-fluence spectra. Because a complete isotopic-grid is readily handled on small computer workstations and is needed for several applications studying GCR propagation and scattering, it is recommended that they be used for future GCR studies

  1. Crack growth rate in core shroud horizontal welds using two models for a BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arganis Juárez, C.R., E-mail: carlos.arganis@inin.gob.mx; Hernández Callejas, R.; Medina Almazán, A.L.

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Two models were used to predict SCC growth rate in a core shroud of a BWR. • A weld residual stress distribution with 30% stress relaxation by neutron was used. • Agreement is shown between the measurements of SCC growth rate and the predictions. • Slip–oxidation model is better at low fluences and empirical model at high fluences. - Abstract: An empirical crack growth rate correlation model and a predictive model based on the slip–oxidation mechanism for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) were used to calculate the crack growth rate in a BWR core shroud. In this study, the crack growth rate was calculated by accounting for the environmental factors related to aqueous environment, neutron irradiation to high fluence and the complex residual stress conditions resulting from welding. In estimating the SCC behavior the crack growth measurements data from a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) plant are referred to, and the stress intensity factor vs crack depth throughout thickness is calculated using a generic weld residual stress distribution for a core shroud, with a 30% stress relaxation induced by neutron irradiation. Quantitative agreement is shown between the measurements of SCC growth rate and the predictions of the slip–oxidation mechanism model for relatively low fluences (5 × 10{sup 24} n/m{sup 2}), and the empirical model predicted better the SCC growth rate than the slip–oxidation model for high fluences (>1 × 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}). The relevance of the models predictions for SCC growth rate behavior depends on knowing the model parameters.

  2. SU-F-T-289: MLC Fluence Sonogram Based Delivery Quality Assurance for Bilateral Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiyagarajan, Rajesh; Karrthick, KP; Kataria, Tejinder; Mahendran, Ramu; Selvan, Tamil; Duraikannu, Palani [Division of Radiation Oncology, Medanta The Medicity, Gurgaon, Haryana (India); Raj, Nambi [Department of Physics, School of Advanced sciences, VIT University, Vellore (India); Arunai, N

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Performing DQA for Bilateral (B-L) breast tomotherapy is a challenging task due to the limitation of any commercially available detector array or film. Aim of this study is to perform DQA for B-L breast tomotherapy plan using MLC fluence sinogram. Methods: Treatment plan was generated on Tomotherapy system for B-L breast tumour. B-L breast targets were given 50.4 Gy prescribed over 28 fractions. Plan is generated with 6 MV photon beam & pitch was set to 0.3. As the width of the total target is 39 cm (left & right) length is 20 cm. DQA plan delivered without any phantom on the mega voltage computed tomography (MCVT) detector system. The pulses recorded by MVCT system were exported to the delivery analysis software (Tomotherapy Inc.) for reconstruction. The detector signals are reconstructed to a sonogram and converted to MLC fluence sonogram. The MLC fluence sinogram compared with the planned fluence sinogram. Also point dose measured with cheese phantom and ionization chamber to verify the absolute dose component Results: Planned fluence sinogram and reconstructed MLC fluence sinogram were compared using Gamma metric. MLC positional difference and intensity of the beamlet were used as parameters to evaluate gamma. 3 mm positional difference and 3% beamlet intensity difference were used set for gamma calculation. A total of 26784 non-zero beamlets were included in the analysis out of which 161 beamlets had gamma more than 1. The gamma passing rate found to be 99.4%. Point dose measurements were within 1.3% of the calculated dose. Conclusion: MLC fluence sinogram based delivery quality assurance performed for bilateral breast irradiation. This would be a suitable alternate for large volume targets like bilateral breast, Total body irradiation etc. However conventional method of DQA should be used to validate this method periodically.

  3. Swelling in simple ferritic alloys irradiated to high fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.; Meinecke, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    A series of Fe-Cr-C-Mo simple alloys has been measured for density change as a function of irradiation in EBR-II over the temperature range 400 to 650 0 C to fluences as high as 2.13 x 10 23 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) or 105 dpa. The highest swelling was found in a Fe-12Cr binary alloy, 4.72 percent, after 1.87 x 10 23 n/cm 2 or 95 dpa at 425 0 C, which corresponds to a swelling rate of 0.06%/dpa. This peak swelling rate value can be used to define swelling predictions for commercial ferritic alloys to 40 MWy/m 2

  4. EDITAR: a module for reaction rate editing and cross-section averaging within the AUS neutronics code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, G.S.

    1986-03-01

    The EDITAR module of the AUS neutronics code system edits one and two-dimensional flux data pools produced by other AUS modules to form reaction rates for materials and their constituent nuclides, and to average cross sections over space and energy. The module includes a Bsub(L) flux calculation for application to cell leakage. The STATUS data pool of the AUS system is used to enable the 'unsmearing' of fluxes and nuclide editing with minimal user input. The module distinguishes between neutron and photon groups, and printed reaction rates are formed accordingly. Bilinear weighting may be used to obtain material reactivity worths and to average cross sections. Bilinear weighting is at present restricted to diffusion theory leakage estimates made using mesh-average fluxes

  5. Transmutation of 129I and 237Np using spallation neutrons produced by 1.5, 3.7 and 7.4 GeV protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochs, M.; Schmidt, Th.; Wan, J.-S.

    1999-01-01

    Small samples of approximately 1 g of 129 I and 237 Np, two long-lived radioactive waste nuclides, were exposed to spallation neutron fluences from relatively small metal targets of lead or uranium, surrounded with a paraffin moderator 6 cm thick irradiated with 1.5, 3.7 and 7.4 GeV protons. The (n, γ) transmutation rates have been determined for the two radioactive waste nuclides. Conventional radiochemical La and U sensors and a variety of solid-state nuclear track detectors were irradiated simultaneously with secondary neutrons. The observed secondary neutron fluences appear to be systematically larger, as compared to the calculations with the well-known cascade codes (LAHET from Los Alamos and DCM-CEM from Dubna)

  6. LiCaAlF6 scintillators in neutron and gamma radiation fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viererbl, L.; Klupák, V.; Vinš, M.; Koleška, M.; Šoltés, J.; Yoshikawa, A.; Nikl, M.

    2016-09-01

    Intentionally doped LiCaAlF6 (LiCAF) single crystals are prospective scintillators, especially for thermal neutron detection through the 6Li(n,t)4He nuclear reaction. Four different LiCAF scintillator samples were tested in various neutron and gamma fields. Two of the tested samples were LiCAF:Eu and LiCAF:Eu,Na single crystals, and another two samples were made of LiCAF:Eu micro crystals dispersed in transparent rubber, with different rubber dimensions. All LiCAF samples contain lithium enriched to6Li. A plutonium-beryllium source was used as a neutron source. The neutron spectrum was modified by moderator and filter to get different ratios between thermal, epithermal and fast neutron fluence rates. The MCNP code was used for calculations of the fluence rates for different configurations. Radionuclides 137Cs and 60Co were applied as gamma radiation sources. The light signal from the scintillator was evaluated with a photomultiplier and a multichannel analyzer. The purpose of this work was to study the characteristics of LiCAF scintillators, especially the ability to discriminate signals from neutron and gamma radiation, which is the basic scintillator condition for neutron detection in mixed neutron-gamma radiation fields. Generally, the discrimination can be done by the pulse height and/or the pulse shape of the evaluated signals. Both methods can be used for a LiCAF scintillator. However, only the pulse height discrimination method is discussed in this paper. The possibility of fast neutron detection with LiCAF scintillators was also tested.

  7. Uncertainties in the Fluence Determination in the Surveillance Samples of VVER-440

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konheiser Joerg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The reactor pressure vessel (RPV represents one of the most important safety components in a nuclear power plant. Therefore, surveillance specimen (SS programs for the RPV material exist to deliver a reliable assessment of RPV residual lifetime. This report will present neutron fluence calculations for SS. These calculations were carried out by the codes TRAMO [1] and DORT [2]. This study was accompanied by ex-vessel neutron dosimetry experiments at Kola NPP. The main neutron activation monitoring reactions were 54Fe(n,p54Mn and 58Ni(n,p58Co. Good agreement was found between the deterministic and stochastic calculation results and between the calculations and the ex-vessel measurements. The different influences on the monitors were studied. In order to exclude the possible healing effects of the samples due to excessive temperatures, the heat release in the surveillance specimens was determined based on the calculated gamma fluences. Under comparatively realistic conditions, the heat increased by 6 K.

  8. Neutron equivalent dose rates at the surroundings of the electron linear accelerator operated by the university of Sao Paulo - Physics institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagihara, L.S.

    1984-01-01

    For the determination of the neutron dose rates at the surroundings of an electron linear accelerators it is necessary the knowledge of the neutron spectrum or its mean energy, because the conversion factor of the flux in equivalent dose rates, is strongly dependent on the neutron energy. Taking this fact into consideration, equivalent dose rates were determined in the three representative sites of the IF/USP Linear Electron Accelerator. Also, due to the radiation field be pulsed, a theoretical and experimental study has been realized to evaluate the effect produced by the variation of the field on the detector. (author)

  9. Using neutron angular anisotropy information to dynamically determine the ratio of the (α,n) rate to spontaneous fission rate for coincidence counting applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holewa, L.; Charlton, W.; Miller, E.; Pozzi, S.

    2013-02-01

    Typically, when neutron coincidence or multiplicity counting is performed, there are three unknowns: the sample mass, the leakage self-multiplication, and the ratio of the (α,n) rate of the source to the spontaneous fission rate. For a given counting time, the strength of the source or the detector efficiency must be sufficiently high for the singles, doubles, and triples count rates to represent statistically meaningful quantities. Often, the strength of the source and the allotted counting time are such that only the singles and doubles count rates are statistically meaningful. In this latter case, the ratio of (α,n) to the spontaneous fission must be estimated through some other means. With a simulated (α,n) rate, the two equations related to the singles and doubles count rates can be used to determine the sample mass. In order to determine the ratio of (α,n) to spontaneous fission rate of the source, the isotopic composition of the sample as well as the light element impurities inside the source must be known. Ideally, there would be a way to dynamically determine the (α,n) rate of the source from count rate information. In this paper, it is shown that the (α,n) rate of the source can be determined by using information about the ratio of the number of coincident neutrons at 180° to the number at 90°. By using this information, the three aforementioned unknowns can be dynamically determined through the sole use of singles and doubles count rates.

  10. Installation and testing of an optimized epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairchild, R.G.; Kalef-Ezra, J.; Saraf, S.K.; Fiarman, S.; Ramsey, E.; Wielopolski, L.; Laster, B.; Wheeler, F. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA); Ioannina Univ. (Greece); Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA); State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (USA). Health Science Center; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA); EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1989-01-01

    Various calculations indicate that an optimized epithermal neutron beam can be produced by moderating fission neutrons either with a combination of Al and D{sub 2}O, or with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. We have designed, installed and tested an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} moderated epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). The epithermal neutron fluence rate of 1.8 {times} 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2}-sec produces a peak thermal neutron fluence rate of 1.9 to 2.8 {times} 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2}-sec in a tissue equivalent (TE) phantom head, depending on the configuration. Thus a single therapy treatment of 5 {times} 10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} can be delivered in 30--45 minutes. All irradiation times are given for a BMRR power of 3 MW, which is the highest power which can be delivered continuously. 18 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Reactor dosimetry integral reaction rate data in LMFBR Benchmark and standard neutron fields: status, accuracy and implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabry, A.; Ceulemans, H.; Vandeplas, P.; McElroy, W.N.; Lippincott, E.P.

    1977-01-01

    This paper provides conclusions that may be drawn regarding the consistency and accuracy of dosimetry cross-section files on the basis of integral reaction rate data measured in U.S. and European benchmark and standard neutron fields. In a discussion of the major experimental facilities CFRMF (Idaho Falls), BIGTEN (Los Alamos), ΣΣ (Mol, Bucharest), NISUS (London), TAPIRO (Roma), FISSION SPECTRA (NBS, Mol, PTB), attention is paid to quantifying the sensitivity of computed integral data relative to the presently evaluated accuracy of the various neutron spectral distributions. The status of available integral data is reviewed and the assigned uncertainties are appraised, including experience gained by interlaboratory comparisons. For all reactions studied and for the various neutron fields, the measured integral data are compared to the ones computed from the ENDF/B-IV and the SAND-II dosimetry cross-section libraries as well as to some other differential data in relevant cases. This comparison, together with the proposed sensitivity and accuracy assessments, is used, whenever possible, to establish how well the best cross-sections evaluated on the basis of differential measurements (category I dosimetry reactions) are reliable in terms of integral reaction rates prediction and, for those reactions for which discrepancies are indicated, in which energy range it is presumed that additional differential measurements might help. For the other reactions (category II), the inconsistencies and trends are examined. The need for further integral measurements and interlaboratory comparisons is also considered

  12. Data and software for calculating neutron spectra from measured reaction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berzonis, M.A.; Bonbars, Kh.Ya.

    1981-01-01

    The information system SAIPS is presented, which allows the automated calculation of neutron spectra and the use of cross section libraries on EC type computers. The following programmes can be applied: SAND II, WINDOWS, CRYSTAL BALL, RFSP JUEL, etc. The system includes both cross section libraries established by means of the code mentioned and libraries recommended by several laboratories. (author)

  13. Evaluation of gamma and neutron irradiation effects on the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    However, appreciable change in the capacitance has been observed due to low doses of fast neutrons (cumulative dose, 115 cGy) with flux ∼ 9.925 × 107 neutrons/cm2 h from 252Cf neutron source of fluence, 2.5 × 107 neutrons/s. We have also observed that the impact of gamma and neutron irradiation is more at ...

  14. Standard Test Method for Application and Analysis of Helium Accumulation Fluence Monitors for Reactor Vessel Surveillance, E706 (IIIC)

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes the concept and use of helium accumulation for neutron fluence dosimetry for reactor vessel surveillance. Although this test method is directed toward applications in vessel surveillance, the concepts and techniques are equally applicable to the general field of neutron dosimetry. The various applications of this test method for reactor vessel surveillance are as follows: 1.1.1 Helium accumulation fluence monitor (HAFM) capsules, 1.1.2 Unencapsulated, or cadmium or gadolinium covered, radiometric monitors (RM) and HAFM wires for helium analysis, 1.1.3 Charpy test block samples for helium accumulation, and 1.1.4 Reactor vessel (RV) wall samples for helium accumulation. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  15. Neutron-capture rates for explosive nucleosynthesis: the case of 68Ni(n, γ)69Ni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyrou, A.; Larsen, A. C.; Liddick, S. N.; Naqvi, F.; Crider, B. P.; Dombos, A. C.; Guttormsen, M.; Bleuel, D. L.; Couture, A.; Crespo Campo, L.; Lewis, R.; Mosby, S.; Mumpower, M. R.; Perdikakis, G.; Prokop, C. J.; Quinn, S. J.; Renstrøm, T.; Siem, S.; Surman, R.

    2017-04-01

    Neutron-capture reactions play an important role in heavy element nucleosynthesis, since they are the driving force for the two processes that create the vast majority of the heavy elements. When a neutron capture occurs on a short-lived nucleus, it is extremely challenging to study the reaction directly and therefore the use of indirect techniques is essential. The present work reports on such an indirect measurement that provides strong constraints on the 68Ni(n, γ)69Ni reaction rate. This is done by populating the compound nucleus 69Ni via the β decay of 69Co and measuring the γ-ray deexcitation of excited states in 69Ni. The β-Oslo method was used to extract the γ-ray strength function and the nuclear level density. In addition the half-life of 69Co was extracted and found to be in agreement with previous literature values. Before the present results, the 68Ni(n, γ)69Ni reaction was unconstrained and the purely theoretical reaction rate was highly uncertain. The new uncertainty on the reaction rate based on the present experiment (variation between upper and lower limit) is approximately a factor of 3. The commonly used reaction libraries JINA-REACLIB and BRUSLIB are in relatively good agreement with the experimental rate. The impact of the new rate on weak r-process calculations is discussed.

  16. Li-Ion Batteries for Forensic Neutron Dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Li-Ion Batteries for Forensic Neutron Dosimetry Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release, distribution is unlimited. March...ion batteries are the common technology for powering portable electronics. The nuclear reactions within the batteries are sensitive to neutrons . By...characterizing this dependence, neutron dose and fluence information can be determined. The dose information can be used on an individual basis to

  17. Characterization of a {sup 239}PuBe isotopic neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H. R.; Hernandez D, V. M. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Rivera M, T. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Calz. Legaria No. 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Sanchez, A., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    A Bonner sphere spectrometer was used to determine the features of a {sup 239}PuBe neutron source used to operate the ESFM-Ipn Subcritical Reactor. The spectrometer is a {sup 6}Lil(Eu) scintillator and 2, 3, 5, 8, 10 and 12 inches-diameter polyethylene spheres, that was located 100 cm from the neutron source. The count rates obtained with the spectrometer were unfolded using the NSDUAZ code and neutron spectrum, total fluence, and ambient dose equivalent were determined. A Monte Carlo calculation, using the MCNP5 code, was carried out to estimate the spectrum and integral features being less that values obtained experimentally due to the presence of {sup 241}Pu in the Pu used to fabricate the source. Using the experimental information the actual neutron yield and the mass fraction of {sup 241}Pu was estimated. (Author)

  18. Advisory Committee for the Calibration Standards of Ionizing Radiation Measurement: Section 3. Neutron measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Section III (Mesures neutroniques) of the Comite Consultatif pour les Etalons de Mesure des Rayonnements Ionisants held its fifth meeting in May 1981. Recent work carried out at BIPM in the field of neutron measurements was reported. The status of a full-scale 252 Cf neutron source intercomparison (10 7 s - 1 ) and of several restricted comparisons was discussed. Intercomparisons of fast neutron fluence rates are in progress ( 115 In(n,n') 115 Insup(m); NB/Zr) or will take place in the near future ( 115 n(n,#betta#) 116 Insup(m); 235 U and 238 U fission chambers). An intercomparison of neutron dosimetry standards by circulating tissue-equivalent ion chambers will be prepared and organized by BIPM. Finally, there was a broad exchange of information on work in progress at the various laboratories represented at the meeting [fr

  19. Niobium as an ex-vessel neutron dosimeter for PWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgson, L.M.; Apple, S.C.; Culp, R.R. (Arkansas Technical Univ., Russellville (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The use of niobium as a neutron monitor has generated considerable interest among those doing reactor pressure vessel neutron dosimetry. The product of the {sup 93}Nb(n,n{prime}){sup 93m}Nb reaction has a half-life of 16.1 years. It decays by internal conversion emitting 16.6- and 18.6keV X rays. Niobium's attributes are the similarity of its neutron cross section to the damage cross section of iron and its long half-life and activation sensitivity. Niobium's disadvantages are self-attenuation of the low-energy X rays and X-ray fluorescence induced by other radiation that might be present. Since 1983, several niobium foils have been irradiated along with conventional neutron dosimeters in the two nuclear reactors at Arkansas Nuclear One. The conventional dosimeter set contained copper, titanium, nickel, iron, {sup 238}U, and {sup 237}Np monitors. The niobium foils were analyzed for {sup 93m}Nb activity, correcting for both self-attenuation and fluorescence. Reaction rates were determined for each foil. These reaction rates were compared with reaction rates calculated from the neutron fluence measurements obtained with the conventional dosimeters. This paper discusses the stated disadvantages and the results of the reaction rate comparison.

  20. Progress in neutron beam development at the HFR Petten (feasibility study for a BNCT facility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantine, G.; Moss, R.L.; Watkins, P.R.D.; Perks, C.A.; Delafield, H.J.; Ross, D.; Voorbraak, W.P.; Paardekooper, A.; Freudenreich, W.E.; Stecher-Rasmussen, F.

    1990-08-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, using intermediate energy neutrons to achieve the deep penetration essential for treating brain tumours, can be implemented with a filtered reactor neutron beam. This is designed to minimize the mean energy of the neutrons to keep proton recoil damage to the scalp within normal tissue tolerance limits whilst delivering the required thermal neutron fluence to the tumour over a reasonably short period. This can only be realized in conjunction with a high power density reactor. At the Joint Research Centre Petten an optimized neutron filter is currently being built for installation into the HB11 beam tube of the High Flux Reactor HFR. Part of the development leading to this design has been an extensive study of broad spectrum, filtered beam performance on the HB7 beam tube facility. A wide range of calculations was performed using the Monte Carlo code, MCPN, supported by validation experiments in which several filter configuration incorporating aluminium, sulphur, liquid argon, titanium and cadmium were installed for low power measurements of the neutron fluence rate, neutron spectra and beam gamma-ray contamination. The measurements were carried out within a successful European collaboration. Evaluations were made of the reactor core edge and unfiltered beam spectra, for comparison with MCNP calculations. Multi-foil activation methods and also gamma dose determination in the filtered beam using thermo-luminescent detectors were performed by the ECN. The Harwell/ Birmingham University collaborators undertook the neutron spectrum measurements in the filtered beam. proton recoil spectrometry was used above 30 keV, combined with a multi-sphere and BF 3 chamber response modification technique. Subsequent spectrum adjustment was carried out with the SENSAK code. The agreement between the calculated and measured spectra has given confidence in the reactor and filter modelling methods used to design the HB11 therapy facility. (author). 12 refs

  1. Effects of high temperature neutron irradiation on the physical, chemical and mechanical properties of fine-grained isotropic graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, H.; Nomura, S.; Imai, H.; Oku, T.; Eto, M.

    1987-01-01

    Effects of neutron irradiation on the dimensional change, coefficient of thermal expansion(CTE), thermal conductivity, corrosion rate, Young's modulus and strengths were studied for the candidate graphite material IG-110 of the experimental very high temperature gas-cooled reactor(VHTR) after irradiation at 585 - 1273 deg C to neutron fluences of up to about 3 x 10 25 n/m 2 (E > 29 fJ) in the JMTR and JRR-2, and to about 7 x 10 25 n/m 2 (E > 29 fJ) in the HFR. The results were compared with the irradiation behaviors of other graphites. Dimensional shrinkage was observed in the whole irradiation temperature range, showing lower value than 2 %. The shrinkage rate showed the minimum in the irradiation temperature of around 850 deg C, followed by the increase for the samples irradiated at higher temperatures. The dimensional stability of the material was clarified to be almost the same with that of H451 graphite. The CTE, thermal resistivity and Young's modulus increased in the early stage of irradiation and then only the CTE decreased while the thermal resistivity and Young's modulus levelled off with further irradiation. The neutron fluence showing the maximum CTE shifted to the lower fluence with increasing irradiation temperature. The increases of both thermal resistivity and Young's modulus were remarkable for the samples irradiated at lower temperatures. Compressive and bending strengths measured at room temperature increased after irradiation as well. The corrosion rate with water-vapor of 0.65 % in helium at high temperatures decreased owing to irradiation and the reduction was independent of irradiation temperature and neutron fluence. The activation energy for the reaction was estimated to be the same before and after irradiation. (author)

  2. Fluence dependent electrical conductivity in aluminium thin films grown by infrared pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebollar, Esther, E-mail: e.rebollar@csic.es [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, IQFR-CSIC, Serrano 19, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Martínez-Tong, Daniel E. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Sanz, Mikel; Oujja, Mohamed; Marco, José F. [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, IQFR-CSIC, Serrano 19, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Ezquerra, Tiberio A. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Castillejo, Marta [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, IQFR-CSIC, Serrano 19, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • IR pulsed laser ablation of aluminium gives rise to smooth layers of several tens of nanometers. • Irradiation at fluences around 2.7 J/cm{sup 2} and above 7 J/cm{sup 2} resulted in deposition of amorphous aluminium oxide films and metallic aluminium films respectively. • Highly ionized species are more abundant in the ablation plumes generated at higher fluences. • It is possible to control by PLD the metal or dielectric character of the films. - Abstract: We studied the effect of laser fluence on the morphology, composition, structure and electric conductivity of deposits generated by pulsed laser ablation of a metallic aluminium target in vacuum using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm, 15 ns). Upon irradiation for one hour at a repetition rate of 10 Hz, a smooth layer of several tens of nanometres, as revealed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) was deposited on glass. Surface chemical composition was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and to study the conductivity of deposits both I–V curves and conductive-AFM measurements were performed. Irradiation at fluences around 2.7 J/cm{sup 2} resulted in deposition of amorphous aluminium oxide films. Differently, at higher fluences above 7 J/cm{sup 2}, the films are constituted by metallic aluminium. Optical emission spectroscopy revealed that highly ionized species are more abundant in the ablation plumes generated at higher fluences. The results demonstrate the possibility to control by PLD the metal or dielectric character of the films.

  3. Photoluminescence in large fluence radiation irradiated space silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hisamatsu, Tadashi; Kawasaki, Osamu; Matsuda, Sumio [National Space Development Agency of Japan, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan). Tsukuba Space Center; Tsukamoto, Kazuyoshi

    1997-03-01

    Photoluminescence spectroscopy measurements were carried out for silicon 50{mu}m BSFR space solar cells irradiated with 1MeV electrons with a fluence exceeding 1 x 10{sup 16} e/cm{sup 2} and 10MeV protons with a fluence exceeding 1 x 10{sup 13} p/cm{sup 2}. The results were compared with the previous result performed in a relative low fluence region, and the radiation-induced defects which cause anomalous degradation of the cell performance in such large fluence regions were discussed. As far as we know, this is the first report which presents the PL measurement results at 4.2K of the large fluence radiation irradiated silicon solar cells. (author)

  4. Thermonuclear reaction rates for proton induced reactions on 41K and neutron induced reactions on 41Ca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevior, M.E.; Anderson, M.R.; Mitchell, L.W.; Kennett, S.R.; Sargood, D.G.

    1981-01-01

    The yield of γ-rays from the reaction 41 K(p,γ) 42 Ca has been measured as a function of bombarding energy over the range 0.68-2.48 MeV and from the reaction 41 K(p,αγ) 38 Ar over the range 1.20-2.48 MeV, and the yield of neutrons from the reaction 41 K(p,n) 41 Ca has been measured from threshold to a bombarding energy of 2.48 MeV. The energy dependence of the cross sections is compared with statistical-model calculations with global optical model parameters in all particle channels. The calculations seriously overestimate the cross section for the neutron channel and underestimate those for the other channels. A reduction in the imaginary well depth in the neutron channel leads to good agreement with all the data. Statistical-model calculations with this modified set of parameters are then carried out to provide cross sections for the astrophysically interesting reactions 41 Ca(n,p) 41 K, 41 Ca(n,α) 38 Ar, and 41 Ca(n,γ) 42 Ca. Thermonuclear reaction rates are calculated for all six reactions over the temperature range 5 x 10 8 - 10 1 0K which includes the range of temperatures of interest in nucleosynthesis calculations

  5. Experimental characterization of the neutron spectra generated by a high-energy clinical LINAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amgarou, K., E-mail: khalil.amgarou@uab.e [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Laboratoire de Metrologie et de Dosimetrie des Neutrons, F-13115 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Lacoste, V.; Martin, A. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Laboratoire de Metrologie et de Dosimetrie des Neutrons, F-13115 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2011-02-11

    The production of unwanted neutrons by electron linear accelerators (LINACs) has attracted a special attention since the early 50s. The renewed interest in this topic during the last years is due mainly to the increased use of such machines in radiotherapy. Specially, in most of developing countries where many old teletherapy irradiators, based on {sup 60}Co and {sup 137}Cs radioactive sources, are being replaced with new LINAC units. The main objective of this work is to report the results of an experimental characterization of the neutron spectra generated by a high-energy clinical LINAC. Measurements were carried out, considering four irradiation configurations, by means of our recently developed passive Bonner sphere spectrometer (BSS) using pure gold activation foils as central detectors. This system offers the possibility to measure neutrons over a wide energy range (from thermal up to a few MeV) at pulsed, intense and complex mixed n-{gamma} fields. A two-step unfolding method that combines the NUBAY and MAXED codes was applied to derive the final neutron spectra as well as their associated integral quantities (in terms of total neutron fluence and ambient dose equivalent rates) and fluence-averaged energies.

  6. Characterization of saturation of CR-39 detector at high alpha-particle fluence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. El Ghazaly

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of saturation in the CR-39 detector reduces and limits its detection dynamic range; nevertheless, this range could be extended using spectroscopic techniques and by measuring the net bulk rate of the saturated CR-39 detector surface. CR-39 detectors were irradiated by 1.5 MeV high alpha-particle fluence varying from 0.06 × 108 to 7.36 × 108 alphas/cm2 from Am-241 source; thereafter, they were etched in a 6.25N NaOH solution at a temperature of 70°C for different durations. Net bulk etch rate measurement of the 1.5 MeV alpha-irradiated CR-39 detector surface revealed that rate increases with increasing etching time and reaches its maximum value at the end of the alpha-particle range. It is also correlated with the alpha-particle fluence. The measurements of UV–Visible (UV–Vis absorbance at 500 and 600 nm reveal that the absorbance is linearly correlated with the fluence of alpha particles at the etching times of 2 and 4 hour. For extended etching times of 6, 10, and 14.5 hour, the absorbance is saturated for fluence values of 4.05 × 108, 5.30 × 108, and 7.36 × 108 alphas/cm2. These new methods pave the way to extend the dynamic range of polymer-based solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs in measurement of high fluence of heavy ions as well as in radiation dosimetry. Keywords: Alpha Particle, Bulk Etch Rate, CR-39 Detector, Saturated Regime, UV–Vis Spectroscopy

  7. DT fusion neutron irradiation of ORNL magnesium oxide crystals and BNL--LASL superconductor wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacLean, S.C.

    1978-01-01

    The DT fusion neutron irradiation of two ORNL magnesium oxide crystals and eleven BNL-LASL superconductor wires is described. The sample position and neutron dose record are given. The maximum neutron fluence on any sample was 2.16 x 10 16 neutrons/cm 2

  8. Calculation of the reaction rate and response matrix of a neutron spectroscopy consisting of a water sphere of variable diameter and BF3 detector using the MCNP5-beta code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albashir, K.; Nahili, M.; Al-Zawahera, S.

    2015-01-01

    The MCNP5-beta code was used to calculate the reaction rate 1 0B(n,α) 7 Li and the neutron energy response matrix of a neutron spectrometer consisting of a water sphere with variable diameter and detector BF 3 using point and disk neutron sources 2 41Am-Be. The reaction rate and the response matrix of disk neutron source shows higher value than these obtained from the point neutron source. The response of the matrix disk neutron source in the energy range from 4.14x10 - 7 to 11.09 MeV show a maximum value for sphere of 12 inch diameter, where the response with point neutron source stile increasing calculated value in this condition .The calculated values of neutron energy responses for a disk neutron source agreed well with published results. (author)

  9. Diagnostic assessment to estimate and minimize neutron dose rates received by occupationally exposed individuals at cyclotron facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reina, L C; Silva, A X; Suita, J C; Souza, M I S; Facure, A; Silva, J C P; Furlanetto, J A D; Rebello, W

    2010-03-01

    Since 2003, radiopharmaceuticals for medical diagnostic purposes have been produced at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, in Brazil, using two cyclotron accelerators - CV-28 and RDS111. As a result of the ever increasing production, a diagnostic assessment to reduce neutron dose rates received by occupationally exposed individuals during irradiation processes has been developed. The purpose of this work is to present this assessment, which is currently being applied to both the Fluorine and Iodine targets of CV-28 and RDS111 cyclotron accelerators. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Biological effects and RAPD analysis of alfalfa (medicago sativa L.) irradiated by fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Weibo; Zhang Yuexue; Tang Fenglan; Liu Jielin; Liu Fengqi; Shang Chen; Kong Fuquan; Wang Xiao; Liu Luxiang

    2011-01-01

    Dry seeds of alfalfa variety Zhaodong were irradiated by fast neutrons generated by linear accelerator with three fluences, 3.60 × 10 11 , 7.10 × 10 11 and 3.54 × 10 12 /cm 2 respectively. Seed germination, growth, and RAPD analysis on the mutation were reported in this study. The results showed that germination vigor and germination rate of irradiated seeds were higher than those of control, but seedling height and root length were reduced with the increase of fluences. When the dosages reached 3.54 × 10 12 /cm 2 , seedling root length decreased by 81.63% compared with the control, but the seedling didn't grow any true leaves except for cotyledon. 36 primers were used in RAPD analysis, and the results showed that the RAPD polymorphic loci rate was 7.25%, 6.52% and 5.80% among the 3.60 × 10 11 /cm 2 , 7.10 × 10 11 /cm 2 and 3.54 × 10 12 /cm 2 treated M 1 plants. RAPD polymorphic loci rate in the 3.60 × 10 11 /cm 2 treated plants was the highest among three treatment. It is concluded that 3.60 × 10 11 /cm 2 could be on optimum fluences for a alfalfa mutation by fast neutrons. (authors)

  11. Characterization of the neutron field at the ISIS-VESUVIO facility by means of a bonner sphere spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedogni, Roberto; Esposito, Adolfo; Andreani, Carla; Senesi, Roberto; De Pascale, Maria Pia; Picozza, Piergiorgio; Pietropaolo, Antonino; Gorini, Giuseppe; Frost, Christopher D.; Ansell, Stewart

    2009-12-01

    One of the more actual and promising fields of applied neutron physics is the investigation of the malfunctions induced by high-energy neutrons naturally present in the atmosphere in electronic devices, called single event effects (SEE). These studies are of primary importance for the design of devices that have to fulfill high reliability requirements and those that are likely to be exposed to enhanced levels of cosmic rays background, e.g. in aerospace and avionic applications. Particle accelerators-driven neutron sources constitute valuable irradiation facilities for these purposes as they provide an opportunity for accelerated testing of the effects of these naturally occurring neutrons, provided the neutron spectrum is comparable with the atmospheric one and the neutron fields are known with high accuracy. The latter can be achieved through the use of appropriate radiation transport codes and neutron spectrometry techniques. In view of the design and construction of CHIPIR, a dedicated beam line for SEE studies at the ISIS pulsed neutron source second target station (UK) [1] ( http://ts-2.isis.rl.ac.uk/instruments/phase2/index.htm), a spectrometric characterization was performed on the VESUVIO beamline [2] (Senesi et al.,2000). The spectrometric technique was the bonner sphere spectrometer (BSS), widely used to determine neutron spectra and dose quantities around high-energy accelerators. The experimental campaign provided a complete spectrometric investigation of the VESUVIO neutron beam, allowing the integral quantities (total fluence rate, fraction of fluence in given energy intervals) to be estimated with uncertainties lower than 10%.

  12. Determination of the fluence profile in three dimension for the thermal column of the TRIGA Mark III reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera A, E.; Urena N, F.; Delfin L, A.; Garcia M, T.

    2006-01-01

    In this work the results of the dosimetric properties of the lithium carbonate are presented (detecting), before the thermal neutrons. The process consists on irradiating samples of lithium carbonate in the installation of the thermal column of the TRIGA Mark III reactor, with a controlled period and with time intervals of 20 hours of irradiation. It is necessary to mention that the detectors were placed in different internal positions of the thermal column. With the purpose of being used these results for future studies, like it is the fluence profile in the thermal column. To use the BNCT technique (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy). Which is a binary technique that requires the simultaneous presence of a neutron flux with appropriate energy and a neutron captor (10B), those which interacting to attack to the tumor cells without producing significant damage to the tissues when both agents are separated. (Author)

  13. Swelling and tensile properties of neutron-irradiated vanadium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, B.A.; Smith, D.L.

    1990-07-01

    Vanadium-base alloys are candidates for use as structural material in magnetic fusion reactors. In comparison to other candidate structural materials (e.g., Type 316 stainless and HT-9 ferritic steels), vanadium-base alloys such as V-15Cr-5Ti and V-20Ti have intrinsically lower long-term neutron activation, neutron irradiation after-heat, biological hazard potential, and neutron-induced helium and hydrogen transmutation rates. Moreover, vanadium-base alloys can withstand a higher surface-heat, flux than steels because of their lower thermal stress factor. In addition to having these favorable neutronic and physical properties, a candidate alloy for use as structural material in a fusion reactor must have dimensional stability, i.e., swelling resistance, and resistance to embrittlement during the reactor lifetime at a level of structural strength commensurate with the reactor operating temperature and structural loads. In this paper, we present experimental results on the swelling and tensile properties of several vanadium-base alloys after irradiation at 420, 520, and 600 degree C to neutron fluences ranging from 0.3 to 1.9 x 10 27 neutrons/m 2 (17 to 114 atom displacements per atom [dpa])

  14. Moderator design studies for a new neutron reference source based on the D–T fusion reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozhayev, Andrey V.; Piper, Roman K.; Rathbone, Bruce A.; McDonald, Joseph C.

    2016-01-01

    The radioactive isotope Californium-252 ( 252 Cf) is relied upon internationally as a neutron calibration source for ionizing radiation dosimetry because of its high specific activity. The source may be placed within a heavy-water (D 2 O) moderating sphere to produce a softened spectrum representative of neutron fields common to commercial nuclear power plant environments, among others. Due to termination of the U.S. Department of Energy loan/lease program in 2012, the expense of obtaining 252 Cf sources has undergone a significant increase, rendering high output sources largely unattainable. On the other hand, the use of neutron generators in research and industry applications has increased dramatically in recent years. Neutron generators based on deuteriumtritium (D–T) fusion reaction provide high neutron fluence rates and, therefore, could possibly be used as a replacement for 252 Cf. To be viable, the 14 MeV D–T output spectrum must be significantly moderated to approximate common workplace environments. This paper presents the results of an effort to select appropriate moderating materials and design a configuration to reshape the primary neutron field toward a spectrum approaching that from a nuclear power plant workplace. A series of Monte-Carlo (MCNP) simulations of single layer high- and low-Z materials are used to identify initial candidate moderators. Candidates are refined through a similar series of simulations involving combinations of 2–5 different materials. The simulated energy distribution using these candidate moderators are rated in comparison to a target spectrum. Other properties, such as fluence preservation and/or enhancement, prompt gamma production and other characteristics are also considered. - Highlights: • D–T generator neutron calibration field replacement for D 2 O-moderated 252 Cf. • Determination of representative nuclear power plant workplace neutron spectrum. • Simulations to assess moderating materials to soften 14

  15. Fast neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.

    1993-01-01

    Research concentrated on three major areas during the last twelve months: (1) investigations of energy fluence and absorbed dose measurements using crystalline and hot pressed TLD materials exposes to ultrasoft beams of photons, (2) fast neutron kerma factor measurements for several important elements as well as NE-213 scintillation material response function determinations at the intense ''white'' source available at the WNR facility at LAMPF, and (3) kerma factor ratio determinations for carbon and oxygen to A-150 tissue equivalent plastic at the clinical fast neutron radiation facility at Harper Hospital, Detroit, MI. Progress summary reports of these efforts are given in this report

  16. UPPER LIMITS ON THE RATES OF BINARY NEUTRON STAR AND NEUTRON STAR-BLACK HOLE MERGERS FROM ADVANCED LIGO'S FIRST OBSERVING RUN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, E.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Phythian-Adams, A.T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.T.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, R.D.; Barone, E.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, M.J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, A.L.S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, J.G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bond, T.C; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, A.D.; Brown, D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderon Bustillo, J.; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, D. S.; Chen, Y; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Qian; Chua, S. E.; Chung, E.S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, E.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, E.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -E; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, A.C.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, A.L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dasgupta, A.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; De, S.; Debra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.A.; Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Giovanni, M.G.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H. -B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, T. M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.M.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Fenyvesi, E.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M; Fournier, J. -D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garunfi, E.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Geng, P.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.P.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; Gonzalez, R.G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Lee-Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.M.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Buffoni-Hall, R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.L.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, P.J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.A.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, D.H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jian, L.; Jimenez-Forteza, E.; Johnson, W.; Jones, I.D.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.H.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kefelian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.E.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan., S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kusunchoo, N.; Kim, Chi-Woong; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Namjun; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kissel, J. S.; Klein, B.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krolak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzar, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C.H.; Lee, K.H.; Lee, M.H.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Lewis, J. B.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Luck, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Zertuche, L. Magana; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, E.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, E.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B.C.; Moore, J.C.; Moraru, D.; Gutierrez Moreno, M.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, S.D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P.G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Gutierrez-Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton-Howes, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Deill, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M. B.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, E.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.S; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passahieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Proxhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Purrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, E. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, D.M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rudiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.A.; Sachdev, P.S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O. E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.B.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schonbecx, A.; Schreiber, K.E.C.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, M.S.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Setyawati, Y.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltevi, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, António Dias da; Singer, A; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith, N.D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, J.R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.D.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tapai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, W.R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Toxmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Toyra, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifiro, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.G.; van den Brand, J. E. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.F.F.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heuningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, E.; Vicere, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, MT; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.M.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, D.R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Worden, J.; Wright, J.L.; Wu, D.S.; Wu, G.; Yablong, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the non-detection of gravitational waves from the merger of binary-neutron star systems and neutron star-black hole systems during the first observing run of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO). In particular, we searched for gravitational-wave

  17. Prospects for a new cold neutron beam measurement of theneutron lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, M. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD; Gilliam, D [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD; Coakley, K [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder; Greene, G [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Yue, A [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Greene, G [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Laptev, A [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Snow, W [Indiana University Cyclotron Facility, Bloomington, IN; Wietfeldt, F [Tulane University

    2009-01-01

    In the most accurate cold neutron beam determination of the neutron lifetime based on the absolute counting of decay protons, the largest uncertainty was attributed to the absolute determination of the capture flux of the cold neutron beam. Currently an experimental effort is underway at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) that will significantly reduce this contribution to the uncertainty in the lifetime determination. The next largest source of uncertainty is the determination of the absolute count rate of decay protons, which contributes to the experimental uncertainty approximately at the 1 s level. Experience with the recent neutron radiative decay experiment, which used the neutron lifetime apparatus, has provided valuable insights into ways to reduce other uncertainties. In addition, the cold neutron fluence rate at NIST is presently 1.5 times greater than in the 2003 measurement, and there is the prospect for a significantly higher rate with the new guide hall expansion. This paper discusses an approach for achieving a determination of the neutron lifetime with an accuracy of approximately 1 s.

  18. Characterization of the neutron sources storage pool of the Neutron Standards Laboratory, using Montecarlo Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campo Blanco, X.

    2015-01-01

    The development of irradiation damage resistant materials is one of the most important open fields in the design of experimental facilities and conceptual nucleoelectric fusion plants. The Neutron Standards Laboratory aims to contribute to this development by allowing the neutron irradiation of materials in its calibration neutron sources storage pool. For this purposes, it is essential to characterize the pool itself in terms of neutron fluence and spectra due to the calibration neutron sources. In this work, the main features of this facility are presented and the characterization of the storage pool is carried out. Finally, an application is shown of the obtained results to the neutron irradiation of material.

  19. Fission rate sensitivities and fission fragment ranges for uranium and thorium-bearing materials irradiated with 252 Cf neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moharram, B.M.

    2000-01-01

    The induced fission reactions of 235 U (n, f), 238 U (n,f) and 232 Th (n, f) based on the activation of natural uranium and thorium in samples with 252 Cf, neutron source, have been evaluated. The obtained results are the average of three samples from each test material (SRM 2710 Montana soil and Zirconia). The prepared samples have been configured in the so-called c ompensated - beam geometry i n which both gamma spectrometry jointly with solid state nuclear track detector techniques, revealed the fission rate sensitivity of 4.64 x 10 7 fission per gram per second per neutron (F.h 1 . S 1 .n 1 ), for zirconia as obtained by gamma activity arising from 134 I fission product (as a good monitor which is produced only from fissions), and the related value for SRM 2710 soil is 5.22 x 10 8 (F.g 1 S 1 .n 1 ). while the obtained values of the mean fission fragment ranges in SRM 2710 and zirconia as estimated from the fission track densities (by CR-39) and fission rates (by gamma spectrometry) are 3.97 x 10 3 g. cm 2 respectively which reveal good agreement with experiments and calculations done hitherto

  20. Method of measuring neutron spectra in JMTR exclusively used for irradiation and their evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Kiyoshi

    1983-01-01

    In the core of the Japan Materials Testing Reactor, about 60 capsules are irradiated. These are the material capsules for irradiating reactor materials, the fuel capsules for irradiating reactor fuel, the RI capsules for producing radioisotopes and so on. In the irradiation experiment using a reactor, the information on the neutron fluence is indispensable, and the neutron fluence in the irradiated specimen part is evaluated with a dosimeter or the nuclear calculation for the core of the JMTR. At the time of irradiating reactor materials, the dosimeter Fe-54 (n,p) Mn-54 is generally used for evaluating the neutron fluence more than 1 MeV. In the case of fuel irradiation, the thermal neutron fluence is evaluated with the dosimeter Co-59 (n,γ) Co-60. It is important to examine in detail neutron spectra by both calculation and experiment in the reactors exclusively used for irradiation such as the JMTR. The neutron irradiation field in the JMTR, neutron spectrum measuring experiment, the neutron flux monitors for standardizing data, the measurement of X-ray and gamma ray, neutron guess spectrum, the compilation of neutron cross section for SAND 2, and the unfolding of neutron spectra are reported. The degree of agreement of the neutron fluence more than 1 MeV by measurement and calculation was +- 10 to 20 %. (Kako, I.)

  1. Low-intensity red and infrared laser effects at high fluences on Escherichia coli cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barboza, L.L.; Campos, V.M.A.; Magalhaes, L.A.G. [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria; Paoli, F. [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (UFJF), Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Morfologia; Fonseca, A.S., E-mail: adnfonseca@ig.com.br [Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Ciencias Fisiologicas

    2015-10-15

    Semiconductor laser devices are readily available and practical radiation sources providing wavelength tenability and high monochromaticity. Low-intensity red and near-infrared lasers are considered safe for use in clinical applications. However, adverse effects can occur via free radical generation, and the biological effects of these lasers from unusually high fluences or high doses have not yet been evaluated. Here, we evaluated the survival, filamentation induction and morphology of Escherichia coli cells deficient in repair of oxidative DNA lesions when exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers at unusually high fluences. Cultures of wild-type (AB1157), endonuclease III-deficient (JW1625-1), and endonuclease IV-deficient (JW2146-1) E. coli, in exponential and stationary growth phases, were exposed to red and infrared lasers (0, 250, 500, and 1000 J/cm{sup 2}) to evaluate their survival rates, filamentation phenotype induction and cell morphologies. The results showed that low-intensity red and infrared lasers at high fluences are lethal, induce a filamentation phenotype, and alter the morphology of the E. coli cells. Low-intensity red and infrared lasers have potential to induce adverse effects on cells, whether used at unusually high fluences, or at high doses. Hence, there is a need to reinforce the importance of accurate dosimetry in therapeutic protocols. (author)

  2. Monte Carlo fluence simulation for prospective evaluation of interstitial photodynamic therapy treatment plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Jeffrey; Betz, Vaughn; Lilge, Lothar

    2015-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) delivers a localized cytotoxic dose that is a function of tissue oxygen availability, photosensitive drug concentration, and light fluence. Providing safe and effective PDT requires an understanding of all three elements and the physiological response to the radicals generated. Interstitial PDT (IPDT) for solid tumours poses particular challenges due to complex organ geometries and the associated limitations for diffusion theory based fluence rate prediction, in addition to restricted access for light delivery and dose monitoring. As a first step towards enabling a complete prospective IPDT treatment-planning platform, we demonstrate use of our previously developed FullMonte tetrahedral Monte Carlo simulation engine for modeling of the interstitial fluence field due to intravesicular insertion of brief light sources. The goal is to enable a complete treatment planning and monitoring work flow analogous to that used in ionizing radiation therapy, including plan evaluation through dose-volume histograms and algorithmic treatment plan optimization. FullMonte is to our knowledge the fastest open-source tetrahedral MC light propagation software. Using custom hardware acceleration, we achieve 4x faster computing with 67x better power efficiency for limited-size meshes compared to the software. Ongoing work will improve the performance advantage to 16x with unlimited mesh size, enabling algorithmic plan optimization in reasonable time. Using FullMonte, we demonstrate significant new plan-evaluation capabilities including fluence field visualization, generation of organ dose-volume histograms, and rendering of isofluence surfaces for a representative bladder cancer mesh from a real patient. We also discuss the advantages of MC simulations for dose-volume histogram generation and the need for online personalized fluence-rate monitoring.

  3. High repetition-rate neutron generation by several-mJ, 35 fs pulses interacting with free-flowing D2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hah, J.; Petrov, G. M.; Nees, J. A.; He, Z.-H.; Hammig, M. D.; Krushelnick, K.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2016-10-01

    Using several-mJ energy pulses from a high-repetition rate (1/2 kHz), ultrashort (35 fs) pulsed laser interacting with a ˜ 10 μm diameter stream of free-flowing heavy water (D2O), we demonstrate a 2.45 MeV neutron flux of 105/s. Operating at high intensity (of order 1019 W/cm2), laser pulse energy is efficiently absorbed in the pre-plasma, generating energetic deuterons. These collide with deuterium nuclei in both the bulk target and the large volume of low density D2O vapor surrounding the target to generate neutrons through d ( d , n ) 3 He reactions. The neutron flux, as measured by a calibrated neutron bubble detector, increases as the laser pulse energy is increased from 6 mJ to 12 mJ. A quantitative comparison between the measured flux and the results derived from 2D-particle-in-cell simulations shows comparable neutron fluxes for laser characteristics similar to the experiment. The simulations reveal that there are two groups of deuterons. Forward moving deuterons generate deuterium-deuterium fusion reactions in the D2O stream and act as a point source of neutrons, while backward moving deuterons propagate through the low-density D2O vapor filled chamber and yield a volumetric source of neutrons.

  4. On unfolding counting-rate spectra of recoil-proton neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeivin, Yehuda

    1983-01-01

    This note proposes a possible scheme for unfolding recoil-proton neutron detector data, in which at first the undistorted proton source spectrum is derived. The main argument in favour of this scheme is that, compared with the conventional scheme, it necessitates somewhat weaker assumptions with respect to the unknown spectrum above the detector's upper energy cutoff, and would therefore be more reliable. We also demonstrate a simple, elementary proof of the wall effect correction for spherical detectors, and, in order to gain insight of the potential merits of the proposed unfolding scheme, illustrate our main argument by considering a hypothetic linear range-energy relation, in which case complete unfolding becomes possible with no assumptions at all on the proton spectrum above the cutoff energy. (author)

  5. Depression of DNA synthesis rate following hyperthermia, gamma irradiation, cyclotron neutrons and mixed modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, H.J.; Muehlensiepen, H.; Porschen, W.; Feinendegen, L.E.; Dietzel, F.

    1978-01-01

    The incorporation of the thymidine analogue I-UdR is proportional to the activity of DNA synthesis. The maximum depression of 125-I-UdR incorporation occurs approximately 4 hours after all kinds of treatment. The increase which follow reflects cell processes like reoxygeneration, recovery, recycling and recruitment (although a direct relation is not yet demonstrable). The degree of depression 4 hours after treatment and the time required needs to reach control level is dependent on dose and radiation quaility but no such dependence could be clearly seen for the times of hyperthermia treatment we used. Neutron irradiation and the combination gamma irradiation + hyperthermia show a higher depression and a slower return to normal than gamma irradiation at the same dose. (orig.) [de

  6. Testing the new stochastic neutronic code ANET in simulating safety important parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xenofontos, T.; Delipei, G.-K.; Savva, P.; Varvayanni, M.; Maillard, J.; Silva, J.; Catsaros, N.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • ANET is a new neutronics stochastic code. • Criticality calculations in both subcritical and critical nuclear systems of conventional design were conducted. • Simulations of thermal, lower epithermal and fast neutron fluence rates were performed. • Axial fission rate distributions in standard and MOX fuel pins were computed. - Abstract: ANET (Advanced Neutronics with Evolution and Thermal hydraulic feedback) is an under development Monte Carlo code for simulating both GEN II/III reactors as well as innovative nuclear reactor designs, based on the high energy physics code GEANT3.21 of CERN. ANET is built through continuous GEANT3.21 applicability amplifications, comprising the simulation of particles’ transport and interaction in low energy along with the accessibility of user-provided libraries and tracking algorithms for energies below 20 MeV, as well as the simulation of elastic and inelastic collision, capture and fission. Successive testing applications performed throughout the ANET development have been utilized to verify the new code capabilities. In this context the ANET reliability in simulating certain reactor parameters important to safety is here examined. More specifically the reactor criticality as well as the neutron fluence and fission rates are benchmarked and validated. The Portuguese Research Reactor (RPI) after its conversion to low enrichment in U-235 and the OECD/NEA VENUS-2 MOX international benchmark were considered appropriate for the present study, the former providing criticality and neutron flux data and the latter reaction rates. Concerning criticality benchmarking, the subcritical, Training Nuclear Reactor of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (TNR-AUTh) was also analyzed. The obtained results are compared with experimental data from the critical infrastructures and with computations performed by two different, well established stochastic neutronics codes, i.e. TRIPOLI-4.8 and MCNP5. Satisfactory agreement

  7. Measurement of 237Np fission rate ratio relative to 235U fission rate in cores with various thermal neutron spectrum at the Kyoto University Critical Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unesaki, Hironobu; Shiroya, Seiji; Iwasaki, Tomohiko; Fujiwara, Daisuke; Kitada, Takanori; Kuroda, Mitsuo; Kohashi, Akio; Kato, Takeshi; Ikeuchi, Yoshitaka

    2000-01-01

    Integral measurements of 237 Np fission rate ratio relative to 235 U fission rate have been performed at Kyoto University Citrical Assembly. The fission rates have been measured using the back-to back type double fission chamber at five thermal cores with different H/ 235 U ratio so that the neutron spectra of the cores were systematically varied. The measured fission rate ratio per atom was 0.00439 to 0.0298, with a typical uncertainty of 2 to 3%. The measured data were compared with the calculated results using SRAC/TWOTRAN and MVP based on JENDL-3.2, which gave the averaged C/E values of 0.93 and 0.95, respectively. Obtained results of C/E using 237 Np cross sections from JENDL-3/2, ENDF/B-VI.5 and JEF2.2 show that the latter two gave smaller results than JENDL-3.2 by about 4%, which clearly reflects the discrepancy in the evaluated cross section among the libraries. This difference arises from both fast fission and resonance region. Although further improvement is recommended, 237 Np fission cross section in JENDL-3.2 is considered to be superior to those in the other libraries and can be adopted for use in design calculations for minor actinide transmutation system using thermal reactors with prediction precision of 237 Np fission rate with in 10%. (author)

  8. A wide dynamic range BF{sub 3} neutron monitor with front-end electronics based on a logarithmic amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrarini, M., E-mail: michele.ferrarini@polimi.i [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento Energia, via G. Ponzio 34/3, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Fondazione CNAO, via Caminadella 16, 20123 Milano (Italy); Varoli, V. [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento Energia, via G. Ponzio 34/3, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Favalli, A. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for the Protection and Security of Citizen, TP 800, Via E. Fermi, 21027 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy); Caresana, M. [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento Energia, via G. Ponzio 34/3, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Pedersen, B. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for the Protection and Security of Citizen, TP 800, Via E. Fermi, 21027 Ispra (Italy)

    2010-02-01

    This paper describes a wide dynamic range neutron monitor based on a BF{sub 3} neutron detector. The detector is used in current mode, and front-end electronics based on a logarithmic amplifier are used in order to have a measurement capability ranging over many orders of magnitude. The system has been calibrated at the Polytechnic of Milan, CESNEF, with an AmBe neutron source, and has been tested in a pulsed field at the PUNITA facility at JRC, Ispra. The detector has achieved a dynamic range of over 6 orders of magnitude, being able to measure single neutron pulses and showing saturation-free response for a reaction rate up to 10{sup 6} s{sup -1}. It has also proved effective in measuring the PUNITA facility pulse integral fluence.

  9. Recoil mixing in high-fluence ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littmark, U.; Hofer, W.O.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of recoil mixing on the collection and depth distribution of implanted projectiles during high-fluence irradiation of a random solid is investigated by model calculations based on a previously published transport theoretical approach to the general problem of recoil mixing. The most pronounced effects are observed in the maximum implantable amount of projectiles and in the critical fluence for saturation. Both values are significantly increased by recoil mixing. (Auth.)

  10. Irradiation Programs and Test Plans to Assess High-Fluence Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teysseyre, Sebastien [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    . Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a known issue in current reactors. In a 60 year lifetime, reactor core internals may experience fluence levels up to 15 dpa for boiling water reactors (BWR) and 100+ dpa for pressurized water reactors (PWR). To support a safe operation of our fleet of reactors and maintain their economic viability it is important to be able to predict any evolution of material behaviors as reactors age and therefore fluence accumulated by reactor core component increases. For PWR reactors, the difficulty to predict high fluence behavior comes from the fact that there is not a consensus of the mechanism of IASCC and that little data is available. It is however possible to use the current state of knowledge on the evolution of irradiated microstructure and on the processes that influences IASCC to emit hypotheses. This report identifies several potential changes in microstructure and proposes to identify their potential impact of IASCC. The susceptibility of a component to high fluence IASCC is considered to not only depends on the intrinsic IASCC susceptibility of the component due to radiation effects on the material but to also be related to the evolution of the loading history of the material and interaction with the environment as total fluence increases. Single variation type experiments are proposed to be performed with materials that are representative of PWR condition and with materials irradiated in other conditions. To address the lack of IASCC propagation and initiation data generated with material irradiated in PWR condition, it is proposed to investigate the effect of spectrum and flux rate on the evolution of microstructure. A long term irradiation, aimed to generate a well-controlled irradiation history on a set on selected materials is also proposed for consideration. For BWR, the study of available data permitted to identify an area of concern for long term performance of component. The efficiency of

  11. Ultra Low Level Environmental Neutron Measurements Using Superheated Droplet Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, A.C. [Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10 - km 139.7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa. Av. Prof. Gama Pinto, 2, 1649- 003 Lisboa (Portugal); Felizardo, M.; Girard, T.A.; Kling, A.; Ramos, A.R. [Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa. Av. Prof. Gama Pinto, 2, 1649- 003 Lisboa (Portugal); Marques, J.G.; Prudencio, M.I.; Marques, R.; Carvalho, F.P. [Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10 - km 139.7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal)

    2015-07-01

    Through the application of superheated droplet detectors (SDDs), the SIMPLE project for the direct search for dark matter (DM) reached the most restrictive limits on the spin-dependent sector to date. The experiment is based on the detection of recoils following WIMP-nuclei interaction, mimicking those from neutron scattering. The thermodynamic operation conditions yield the SDDs intrinsically insensitive to radiations with linear energy transfer below ∼150 keVμm{sup -1} such as photons, electrons, muons and neutrons with energies below ∼40 keV. Underground facilities are increasingly employed for measurements in a low-level radiation background (DM search, gamma-spectroscopy, intrinsic soft-error rate measurements, etc.), where the rock overburden shields against cosmic radiation. In this environment the SDDs are sensitive only to α-particles and neutrons naturally emitted from the surrounding materials. Recently developed signal analysis techniques allow discrimination between neutron and α-induced signals. SDDs are therefore a promising instrument for low-level neutron and α measurements, namely environmental neutron measurements and α-contamination assays. In this work neutron measurements performed in the challenging conditions of the latest SIMPLE experiment (1500 mwe depth with 50-75 cm water shield) are reported. The results are compared with those obtained by detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the neutron background induced by {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th traces in the facility, shielding and detector materials. Calculations of the neutron energy distribution yield the following neutron fluence rates (in 10{sup -8} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}): thermal (<0.5 eV): 2.5; epithermal (0.5 eV-100 keV): 2.2; fast (>1 MeV): 3.9. Signal rates were derived using standard cross sections and codes routinely employed in reactor dosimetry. The measured and calculated neutron count rates per unit of active mass were 0.15 ct/kgd and 0.33 ct/kg-d respectively. As the major

  12. General relativistic ray-tracing algorithm for the determination of the electron-positron energy deposition rate from neutrino pair annihilation around rotating neutron and quark stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Z.; Harko, T.

    2011-11-01

    We present a full general relativistic numerical code for estimating the energy-momentum deposition rate (EMDR) from neutrino pair annihilation (?). The source of the neutrinos is assumed to be a neutrino-cooled accretion disc around neutron and quark stars. We calculate the neutrino trajectories by using a ray-tracing algorithm with the general relativistic Hamilton's equations for neutrinos and derive the spatial distribution of the EMDR due to the annihilations of neutrinos and antineutrinos around rotating neutron and quark stars. We obtain the EMDR for several classes of rotating neutron stars, described by different equations of state of the neutron matter, and for quark stars, described by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) bag model equation of state and in the colour-flavour-locked (CFL) phase. The distribution of the total annihilation rate of the neutrino-antineutrino pairs around rotating neutron and quark stars is studied for isothermal discs and accretion discs in thermodynamical equilibrium. We demonstrate both the differences in the equations of state for neutron and quark matter and rotation with the general relativistic effects significantly modify the EMDR of the electrons and positrons generated by the neutrino-antineutrino pair annihilation around compact stellar objects, as measured at infinity.

  13. A single-supply, high rate, small size and cheap electronic chain for 3He neutron counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boffa, A.; Fazzi, A.; Pirovano, C.; Varoli, V.

    1996-01-01

    The paper describes a complete counting chain (charge preamplifier, shaping amplifier and threshold discriminator) devoted to 3 He neutron detectors. Since it is characterized by single supply operation, high counting rate, small size and low cost, it is well suited for high efficiency neutron well detectors where a large number (10 - 100) of counting tubes are used. Such detectors are commonly used for verification of Plutonium stocks. The preamplifier adopts an innovative circuit with the gate of the input JFET floating and a DC feedback loop that stabilizes the output voltage acting on the input cascode second transistor. Static and dynamic analysis, including the effects of the detector bias network, is reported. The shaping amplifier transfer function is a fifth order approximation of the gaussian response. All the complex pole pairs are realized with a single fourth order Voltage Controlled Voltage Source cell thus minimizing component count. Experimental signals and spectra, obtained with shaping time constants in the 1 μs - 100 ns range, are reported and discussed

  14. Fusion neutron damage to a charge coupled device camera

    OpenAIRE

    Amaden, Christopher Dean

    1997-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited A charge coupled device (CCD) camera's performance has been degraded by damage produced by 14 MeV neutrons (n) from the Rotating Target Neutron Source. High energy neutrons produce atomic dislocation in doped silicon electronics. This thesis explores changes in Dark Current (J), Charge Transfer Inefficiency (CTI), and Contrast Transfer Function (CTF) as measures of neutron damage. The camera was irradiated to a fluence, Phi, of 6.60 x ...

  15. NEUTRON IRRADIATION EFFECTS ON SPARK PLASMA SINTERED BORON CARBIDE

    OpenAIRE

    Buyuk, Bulent; Cengiz, Meral; Tugrul, A. Beril

    2015-01-01

    In this study, spark plasma sintered boron carbide (B4C) was examined against neutrons. The specimens were irradiated by reactor neutrons (include both thermal and fast neutrons) up to fluence of 1.37x1021n m-2. Thermal and fast neutrons cause swelling by different interactions with boron (10B) atoms in the related materials. X-Ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images were investigated for initial and irradiated samples. In addition, lattice parameters and ...

  16. Low-Dose-Rate Californium-252 Neutron Intracavitary Afterloading Radiotherapy Combined With Conformal Radiotherapy for Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Min [Department of Oncology, Armed Police Hospital of Hangzhou, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Xu Hongde [Cancer Center, Armed Police Hospital of Hangzhou, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Pan Songdan; Lin Shan; Yue Jianhua [Department of Oncology, Armed Police Hospital of Hangzhou, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Liu Jianren, E-mail: liujianren0571@hotmail.com [Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province (China)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To study the efficacy of low-dose-rate californium-252 ({sup 252}Cf) neutron intracavitary afterloading radiotherapy (RT) combined with external pelvic RT for treatment of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: The records of 96 patients treated for cervical cancer from 2006 to 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. For patients with tumors {<=}4 cm in diameter, external beam radiation was performed (1.8 Gy/day, five times/week) until the dose reached 20 Gy, and then {sup 252}Cf neutron intracavitary afterloading RT (once/week) was begun, and the frequency of external beam radiation was changed to four times/week. For patients with tumors >4 cm, {sup 252}Cf RT was performed one to two times before whole-pelvis external beam radiation. The tumor-eliminating dose was determined by using the depth limit of 5 mm below the mucosa as the reference point. In all patients, the total dose of the external beam radiation ranged from 46.8 to 50 Gy. For {sup 252}Cf RT, the dose delivered to point A was 6 Gy/fraction, once per week, for a total of seven times, and the total dose was 42 Gy. Results: The mean {+-} SD patient age was 54.7 {+-} 13.7 years. Six patients had disease assessed at stage IB, 13 patients had stage IIA, 49 patients had stage IIB, 3 patients had stage IIIA, 24 patients had stage IIIB, and 1 patient had stage IVA. All patients obtained complete tumor regression (CR). The mean {+-} SD time to CR was 23.5 {+-} 3.4 days. Vaginal bleeding was fully controlled in 80 patients within 1 to 8 days. The mean {+-} SD follow-up period was 27.6 {+-} 12.7 months (range, 6-48 months). Five patients died due to recurrence or metastasis. The 3-year survival and disease-free recurrence rates were 89.6% and 87.5 %, respectively. Nine patients experienced mild radiation proctitis, and 4 patients developed radiocystitis. Conclusions: Low-dose-rate {sup 252}Cf neutron RT combined with external pelvic RT is effective for treating cervical cancer, with a low incidence of

  17. Low-dose-rate californium-252 neutron intracavitary afterloading radiotherapy combined with conformal radiotherapy for treatment of cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Xu, Hong-De; Pan, Song-Dan; Lin, Shan; Yue, Jian-Hua; Liu, Jian-Ren

    2012-07-01

    To study the efficacy of low-dose-rate californium-252 ((252)Cf) neutron intracavitary afterloading radiotherapy (RT) combined with external pelvic RT for treatment of cervical cancer. The records of 96 patients treated for cervical cancer from 2006 to 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. For patients with tumors ≤4 cm in diameter, external beam radiation was performed (1.8 Gy/day, five times/week) until the dose reached 20 Gy, and then (252)Cf neutron intracavitary afterloading RT (once/week) was begun, and the frequency of external beam radiation was changed to four times/week. For patients with tumors >4 cm, (252)Cf RT was performed one to two times before whole-pelvis external beam radiation. The tumor-eliminating dose was determined by using the depth limit of 5 mm below the mucosa as the reference point. In all patients, the total dose of the external beam radiation ranged from 46.8 to 50 Gy. For (252)Cf RT, the dose delivered to point A was 6 Gy/fraction, once per week, for a total of seven times, and the total dose was 42 Gy. The mean ± SD patient age was 54.7 ± 13.7 years. Six patients had disease assessed at stage IB, 13 patients had stage IIA, 49 patients had stage IIB, 3 patients had stage IIIA, 24 patients had stage IIIB, and 1 patient had stage IVA. All patients obtained complete tumor regression (CR). The mean ± SD time to CR was 23.5 ± 3.4 days. Vaginal bleeding was fully controlled in 80 patients within 1 to 8 days. The mean ± SD follow-up period was 27.6 ± 12.7 months (range, 6-48 months). Five patients died due to recurrence or metastasis. The 3-year survival and disease-free recurrence rates were 89.6% and 87.5 %, respectively. Nine patients experienced mild radiation proctitis, and 4 patients developed radiocystitis. Low-dose-rate (252)Cf neutron RT combined with external pelvic RT is effective for treating cervical cancer, with a low incidence of complications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Optical fluence modelling for ultraviolet light emitting diode-based water treatment systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, R; Gabbai, U E; Moram, M A

    2014-12-01

    This work presents a validated optical fluence rate model optimised for ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs), which allow a very wide range of emission wavelengths and source geometries to be used in water treatment units. The model is based on a Monte Carlo approach, in which an incremental ray-tracing algorithm is used to calculate the local volumetric rate of energy absorption and subsequently convert it to the local fluence rate distribution for an UV-LED water treatment chamber of arbitrary design. The model includes contributions from optical reflections and scattering by treatment chamber walls and from scattering due to particulates and/or microorganisms. The model successfully predicts optical fluence rates in point-of-use water treatment units, as verified using biodosimetry with MS-2 bacteriophage at a UV-LED emission wavelength of 254 nm. The effects of chamber geometry are also modelled effectively and are consistent with the inactivation data for E. coli at 254 nm. The data indicate that this model is suitable for application in the design and optimisation of UV-LED-based water treatment systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Verification of dosimetry cross sections above 10 MeV based on measurement of activation reaction rates in fission neutron field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odano, Naoteru; Miura, Toshimasa; Yamaji, Akio.

    1996-01-01

    To validate the dosimetry cross sections in fast neutron energy range, activation reaction rates were measured for 5 types of dosimetry cross sections which have sensitivity in the energy rage above 10 MeV utilizing JRR-4 reactor of JAERI. The measured reaction rates were compared with the calculations reaction rates by a continuous energy monte carlo code MVP. The calculated reaction rates were based on two dosimetry files, JENDL Dosimetry File and IRDF-90.2. (author)

  20. Neutron spectra at different High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel surveillance locations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remec, I.; Kam, F.B.

    1993-12-01

    This project addresses the potential problem of radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) supports. Surveillance specimens irradiated at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at relatively low neutron flux levels (about 1.5E + 8 cm -2 .s -1 ) and low temperatures (about 50 degrees C) showed embrittlement more rapidly than expected. Commercial power reactors have similar flux levels and temperatures at the level vessel support structures. The purposes of this work are to provide the neutron fluence spectra data that are needed to evaluate previously measured mechanical property changes in the HFIR, to explain the discrepancies in neutron flux levels between the nickel dosimeters and two other dosimeters, neptunium and beryllium, and to address any questions or peculiarities of the HFIR reactor environment. The current work consists of neutron and gamma transport calculations, dosimetry measurements, and least-squares logarithmic adjustment to obtain the best estimates for the neutron spectra and the related neutron exposure parameters. The results indicate that the fission rates in neptunium-237 (Np-237) and uranium-238 (U-238) and the helium production rates in beryllium-9 (Be-9) are dominated by photo-induced reactions. The displacements per atom rate for iron (dpa/s) from gamma rays is five times higher than the dpa/s from neutrons. The neutron fluxes in key 7, position 5 do not show any significant gradient in the surveillance capsule, but key 4 and key 2 showed differences in magnitude as well as in the shape of the spectrum. The stainless steel monitor in the V-notch of the Charpy specimens of the surveillance capsules is adequate to determine the neutron flux above 1.0 MeV at the desired V-notch location. Simultaneous adjustment of neutron and gamma fluxes with the measurements has been demonstrated and should avoid future problems with photo-induced reactions

  1. Precipitate evolution in low-nickel austenitic stainless steels during neutron irradiation at very low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isobe, Y.; Sagisaka, M.; Garner, F.; Okita, T.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Not all components of a fusion reactor will be subjected to high atomic displacement rates. Some components outside the plasma containment may experience relatively low displacement rates but data generated under long-term irradiation at low dpa rates is hard to obtain. In another study the neutron-induced microstructural evolution in response to long term irradiation at very low dose rates was studied for a Russian low-nickel austenitic stainless steel that is analogous to AISI 304. The irradiated samples were obtained from an out-of-core anti-crush support column for the BN-600 fast reactor with doses ranging from 1.5 to 22 dpa generated at 3x10 -9 to 4x10 -8 dpa/s. The irradiation temperatures were in a very narrow range of 370-375 deg. C. Microstructural observation showed that in addition to voids and dislocations, an unexpectedly high density of small carbide precipitates was formed that are not usually observed at higher dpa rates in this temperature range. These results required us to ask if such unexpected precipitation was anomalous or was a general feature of low-flux, long-term irradiation. It is shown in this paper that a similar behavior was observed in a western stainless steel, namely AISI 304 stainless steel, irradiated at similar temperatures and dpa rates in the EBR-II fast reactor, indicating that irradiation at low dpa rates for many years leads to a different precipitate microstructure and therefore different associated changes in matrix composition than are generated at higher dpa rates. One consequence of this precipitation is a reduced lattice parameter of the alloy matrix, leading to densification that increases in strength with increasing temperature and dose. A. non-destructive method to evaluate these precipitates is under development and is also discussed in this paper. (authors)

  2. The astrophysical r-process and its dependence on properties of nuclei far from stability: Beta strength functions and neutron capture rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klapdor, H.V.; Metzinger, J.; Oda, T.; Thielemann, F.K.; Hillebrandt, W.

    1981-01-01

    The question of the astrophysical site of the rapid neutron capture (r-) process which is believed to be responsible for the production of the heavy elements in the universe has been a problem in astrophysics for more than two decades. The solution of this problem is not only dependent on the development of realistic astrophysical supernova models, i.e. correct treatment of the hydrodynamics of gravitational collapse and supernova explosion and the equation of state of hot and dense matter, but is shown in this paper to be very sensitive also to 'standard' nuclear physics properties of nuclei far from stability such as beta decay properties and neutron capture rates. For both of the latter, strongly oversimplifying assumptions, not applying the development in nuclear physics during the last decade, have been made in almost all r-process calculations performed up to now. A critical discussion of the state of the art of such calculations seems therefore to be indicated. In this paper procedures are described which allow one to obtain: 1) β-decay properties (decay rates, β-delayed neutron emissions and fission rates); 2) neutron capture rates for neutron-rich nuclei considerably improved over what has been used up to now. The beta strength functions are calculated for approx. equal to6000 nuclei between beta stability line and neutron drip line. By hydrodynamical supernova explosion calculations using realistic stellar models it is shown that as a consequence of the improved β-rates explosive He burning is a convincing alternative site to the 'classical' r-process whose existence still is questionable. The new β-rates will be important also for the investigation of further astrophysical sites producing heavy elements such as the r(n)-processes in explosive C or Ne burning. (orig.)

  3. Passive neutron dosemeter with activation detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valero L, C.; Banuelos F, A.; Guzman G, K. A.; Borja H, C. G.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2011-10-15

    A passive neutron dosemeter with {sup 197}Au activation detector has been developed. The area dosemeter was made as a 20.5 {phi} x 20.5 cm{sup 2} polyethylene moderator, with a polyethylene pug where a {sup 197}Au foil can be located either parallel or perpendicular to moderator axis. Using Monte Carlo methods, with the MCNP5 code. With the fluence response and the fluence-to-equivalent dose conversion coefficients from ICRP-74, responses to H*(10) were also calculated, these were compared against responses of commercially available neutron area monitors and dosemeters. (Author)

  4. Changes in electrical properties of MOS transistor induced by single 14 MeV neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haider, F. A.; Chee, F. P.; Abu Hassan, H.; Saafie, S.; Afishah, A.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron radiation causes significant changes in the characteristics of MOS devices by the creation of oxide-trapped charge and interface traps. The degradation of the current gain of the GF4936 dual n-channel depletion mode MOS transistor, caused by neutron displacement defects, was measured using in-situ method during neutron irradiation. The average degradation of the gain current is 35 mA at maximum fluence of 2.0 × 10 10 n/cm2 while with an average of 25 mA at minimum fluence of 5.0 × 10 8 n/cm 2 . The change in channel current gain increased proportionally with neutron fluence, meanwhile drain saturation current decreased proportionally with the neutron fluence

  5. Changes in electrical properties of MOS transistor induced by single 14 MeV neutron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haider, F. A., E-mail: haider@salam.uitm.edu.my; Chee, F. P., E-mail: fpchee06@ums.edu.my; Abu Hassan, H. [School of Physics and Materials, Faculty of Applied Science, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Saafie, S.; Afishah, A. [Physics with Electronic Department, Faculty of Science and Natural Resources, University of Malaysia Sabah, Kota Kinabalu, Sabah (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    Neutron radiation causes significant changes in the characteristics of MOS devices by the creation of oxide-trapped charge and interface traps. The degradation of the current gain of the GF4936 dual n-channel depletion mode MOS transistor, caused by neutron displacement defects, was measured using in-situ method during neutron irradiation. The average degradation of the gain current is 35 mA at maximum fluence of 2.0 × 10{sup 10} n/cm2 while with an average of 25 mA at minimum fluence of 5.0 × 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}. The change in channel current gain increased proportionally with neutron fluence, meanwhile drain saturation current decreased proportionally with the neutron fluence.

  6. High precision corrections to the neutron beta decay rate and electron asymmetry and current determination of Vud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GarcIa-Luna, J L; GarcIa, A

    2006-01-01

    The goal of the present analysis is to find, in the free neutron beta decay, the expressions for the decay rate and the electron asymmetry that contain all the theoretical effects at the 10 -4 level. This accuracy is better than the current experimental precision that modern experiments allow. For this aim it is necessary to study the strong interaction effects, the radiative corrections and the recoil of the proton. A conceptual problem that we discuss in detail is the Fermi function additivity. The model dependence in the radiative corrections yields important effects which must be incorporated. We show that this is the only source of uncertainty that is out of control still at the mentioned order. As an application, we compare the values of the CKM matrix element |V ud | from this decay with the values both from the superallowed Fermi transition beta decays and the unitarity of the CKM matrix. We discuss the relevance of the observed discrepancies

  7. SPECTRUM WEIGHTED RESPONSES OF SEVERAL DETECTORS IN MIXED FIELDS OF FAST AND THERMAL NEUTRONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANG IN KIM

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum weighted responses of various detectors were calculated to provide guidance on the proper selection and use of survey instruments on the basis of their energy response characteristics on the neutron fields. To yield the spectrum weighted response, the detector response functions of 17 neutron-measuring devices were numerically folded with each of the produced calibration neutron spectra through the in-house developed software ‘K-SWR’. The detectors’ response functions were taken from the IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 403 (TRS-403. The reference neutron fields of 21 kinds with 2 spectra groups with different proportions of thermal and fast neutrons have been produced using neutrons from the 241Am-Be sources held in a graphite pile, a bare 241Am-Be source, and a DT neutron generator. Fluence-average energy (Eave varied from 3.8 MeV to 16.9 MeV, and the ambient-dose-equivalent rate [H*(10/h] varied from 0.99 to 16.5 mSv/h.

  8. Neutron dosimetry in EDF experimental surveillance programme for VVER-440 nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.; Erben, O.; Novosad, P.; Zerola, L.; Hogel, J.; Trollat, C.

    2001-01-01

    Fourteen chains containing experimental surveillance material specimens of the VVER 440/213 nuclear power reactor pressure vessels were irradiated in the surveillance channels of the Nuclear Power Plant Dukovany in the Czech Republic. The irradiation periods were one, two or three cycles. The chains contained different number and types of containers, the omitted ones were replaced by chain elements. All of the containers were instrumented with wire neutron fluence detectors, some of the containers in the chain had spectrometric sets of neutron fluence monitors. For the absolute fluence values evaluation it was taken into account time history of the reactor power and local changes of the neutron flux along the reactor core height, correction factors due to the orientation of monitors with respect to the reactor core centre. Unfolding programs SAND-II or BASA-CF were used. The relative axial fluence distribution was obtained from the O-wire measurements. Neutron fluence values above 0.5 MeV energy and above 1.0 MeV energy in the container axis on the axial positions of the sample centres and fluence values in the geometric centre of the samples was calculated making use the exponential attenuation model of the incident neutron beam. Received fast neutron fluence values can be used as reference values to all VVER-440 type 213 nuclear power plant reactors. (author)

  9. Characterization of Monoenergetic Low Energy Neutron Fields with the {mu}TPC Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golabek, C.; Lebreton, L.; Petit, M. [Laboratoire de Metrologie et de Dosimetrie des Neutrons, IRSN Cadarache, 13115 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Billard, J.; Grignon, C.; Bosson, G.; Bourrion, O.; Guillaudin, O.; Mayet, F.; Richer, J.-P.; Santos, D. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Universite Joseph (France)

    2011-12-13

    The AMANDE facility produces monoenergetic neutron fields from 2 keV to 20 MeV for metrological purposes. To be considered as a reference facility, fluence and energy distributions of neutron fields have to be determined by primary measurement standards. For this purpose, a micro Time Projection Chamber is being developed to be dedicated to measure neutron fields with energy ranging from 2 keV up to 1 MeV. We present simulations showing that such a detector, which allows the measurement of the ionization energy and the 3D reconstruction of the recoil nucleus, provides the determination of neutron energy and fluence of such low energy neutron fields.

  10. A method for measuring the corrosion rate of materials in spallation neutron source target/blanket cooling loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lillard, R.S.; Butt, D.P.

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarizes the ongoing evaluation of the susceptibility of materials in accelerator target/blanket cooling loops to corrosion. To simulate the exposure environment in a target/blanket cooling loop, samples were irradiated by an 800 MeV proton beam at the A6 Target Station of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). To accomplish this, a cooling water loop capable of exposing corrosion samples to an 800 MeV proton beam at currents upwards of 1 mA was constructed. This loop allowed control and evaluation hydrogen water chemistry, water conductivity, and solution pH. Specially designed ceramic sealed samples were used to measure the real-time corrosion rates of materials placed directly in the proton beam using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). EIS was also used to measure real-time corrosion rates of samples that were out of the proton beam and downstream from the in-beam samples. These out-of-beam probes primarily examined the effects of long lived water radiolysis products from proton irradiation on corrosion rates. An overview of the LANSCE corrosion loop, the corrosion probes, and data from an in-beam alloy 718 probe are presented

  11. Performance of a Micro-Strip Gas Chamber for event wise, high rate thermal neutron detection with accurate 2D position determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindur, B.; Alimov, S.; Fiutowski, T.; Schulz, C.; Wilpert, T.

    2014-12-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) position sensitive detector for neutron scattering applications based on low-pressure gas amplification and micro-strip technology was built and tested with an innovative readout electronics and data acquisition system. This detector contains a thin solid neutron converter and was developed for time- and thus wavelength-resolved neutron detection in single-event counting mode, which improves the image contrast in comparison with integrating detectors. The prototype detector of a Micro-Strip Gas Chamber (MSGC) was built with a solid natGd/CsI thermal neutron converter for spatial resolutions of about 100 μm and counting rates up to 107 neutrons/s. For attaining very high spatial resolutions and counting rates via micro-strip readout with centre-of-gravity evaluation of the signal amplitude distributions, a fast, channel-wise, self-triggering ASIC was developed. The front-end chips (MSGCROCs), which are very first signal processing components, are read out into powerful ADC-FPGA boards for on-line data processing and thereafter via Gigabit Ethernet link into the data receiving PC. The workstation PC is controlled by a modular, high performance dedicated software suite. Such a fast and accurate system is crucial for efficient radiography/tomography, diffraction or imaging applications based on high flux thermal neutron beam. In this paper a brief description of the detector concept with its operation principles, readout electronics requirements and design together with the signals processing stages performed in hardware and software are presented. In more detail the neutron test beam conditions and measurement results are reported. The focus of this paper is on the system integration, two dimensional spatial resolution, the time resolution of the readout system and the imaging capabilities of the overall setup. The detection efficiency of the detector prototype is estimated as well.

  12. Characterization of the storage pool of the Neutron Standards Laboratory of CIEMAT, using Monte Carlo techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campo B, X.; Mendez V, R.; Embid S, M. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Av. Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98060 Zacatecas (Mexico); Sanz G, J., E-mail: xandra.campo@ciemat.es [Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, C. Juan del Rosal 12, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-08-15

    Neutron Standards Laboratory of CIEMAT in Spain is a brand new irradiation facility, with {sup 241}Am-Be (185 GBq) and {sup 252}Cf (5 GBq) calibrated neutron sources which are stored in a water pool with a concrete cover. From this storage place an automated system is able to take the selected source and place it in the irradiation position, 4 m over the ground level and in the geometrical center of the Irradiation Room with 9 m (length) x 7.5 m (width) x 8 m (height). For calibration or irradiation purposes, detectors or materials can be placed on a bench but it is possible to use the pool (1.0 m x 1.5 m and more than 1.0 m depth) for long time irradiations in thermal neutron fields. For this reason it is essential to characterize the pool itself in terms of neutron spectrum. In this document, the main features of this facility are presented and the characterization of the storage pool in terms of neutron fluence rate and neutron spectrum has been carried out using simulations with MCNPX-2.7.e code. The MCNPX-2.7.e model has been validated using experimental measurements outside the pool (Bert hold LB6411). Inside the pool, the fluence rate decreases and the spectra is thermalized with the distance to the {sup 252}Cf source. This source predominates and the effect of the {sup 241}Am-Be source in these magnitudes is not shown until positions closer than 20 cm from it. (author)

  13. Characterization of the storage pool of the Neutron Standards Laboratory of CIEMAT, using Monte Carlo techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campo B, X.; Mendez V, R.; Embid S, M.; Vega C, H. R.; Sanz G, J.

    2014-08-01

    Neutron Standards Laboratory of CIEMAT in Spain is a brand new irradiation facility, with 241 Am-Be (185 GBq) and 252 Cf (5 GBq) calibrated neutron sources which are stored in a water pool with a concrete cover. From this storage place an automated system is able to take the selected source and place it in the irradiation position, 4 m over the ground level and in the geometrical center of the Irradiation Room with 9 m (length) x 7.5 m (width) x 8 m (height). For calibration or irradiation purposes, detectors or materials can be placed on a bench but it is possible to use the pool (1.0 m x 1.5 m and more than 1.0 m depth) for long time irradiations in thermal neutron fields. For this reason it is essential to characterize the pool itself in terms of neutron spectrum. In this document, the main features of this facility are presented and the characterization of the storage pool in terms of neutron fluence rate and neutron spectrum has been carried out using simulations with MCNPX-2.7.e code. The MCNPX-2.7.e model has been validated using experimental measurements outside the pool (Bert hold LB6411). Inside the pool, the fluence rate decreases and the spectra is thermalized with the distance to the 252 Cf source. This source predominates and the effect of the 241 Am-Be source in these magnitudes is not shown until positions closer than 20 cm from it. (author)

  14. Standard Test Method for Oxygen Content Using a 14-MeV Neutron Activation and Direct-Counting Technique

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the measurement of oxygen concentration in almost any matrix by using a 14-MeV neutron activation and direct-counting technique. Essentially, the same system may be used to determine oxygen concentrations ranging from over 50 % to about 10 g/g, or less, depending on the sample size and available 14-MeV neutron fluence rates. Note 1 - The range of analysis may be extended by using higher neutron fluence rates, larger samples, and higher counting efficiency detectors. 1.2 This test method may be used on either solid or liquid samples, provided that they can be made to conform in size, shape, and macroscopic density during irradiation and counting to a standard sample of known oxygen content. Several variants of this method have been described in the technical literature. A monograph is available which provides a comprehensive description of the principles of activation analysis using a neutron generator (1). 1.3 The values stated in either SI or inch-pound units are to be regarded...

  15. High laser-fluence deposition of organic materials in water ice matrices by ''MAPLE''

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Rodrigo, K.; Schou, Jørgen

    2005-01-01

    Matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) is a deposition technique for organic material. Water ice was used as a matrix for the biotechnologically important guest material, polyethylene glycol (PEG), for concentrations from 0.5 to 4 wt.%. The target was irradiated with 6 ns laser pulses...... at 355 nm at a fluence of 2.5-12 J/cm(2). Even at this high fluence, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) indicates a chemical structure of the deposit close to that of the un-irradiated PEG. Matrix assisted laser desorption and ionization (MALDI) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) show...... that the mass distribution of the deposited PEG is similar to that of the starting material. Optical pictures of the films show particle structures of PEG of a size up to 5-10 mu m. The deposition rate measured with a quartz crystal microbalance is typically of the order of 1 ng/ (cm(2) shot). (c) 2005 Elsevier...

  16. Application of imaging plate neutron detector to neutron radiography

    CERN Document Server

    Fujine, S; Kamata, M; Etoh, M

    1999-01-01

    As an imaging plate neutron detector (IP-ND) has been available for thermal neutron radiography (TNR) which has high resolution, high sensitivity and wide range, some basic characteristics of the IP-ND system were measured at the E-2 facility of the KUR. After basic performances of the IP were studied, images with high quality were obtained at a neutron fluence of 2 to 7x10 sup 8 n cm sup - sup 2. It was found that the IP-ND system with Gd sub 2 O sub 3 as a neutron converter material has a higher sensitivity to gamma-ray than that of a conventional film method. As a successful example, clear radiographs of the flat view for the fuel side plates with boron burnable poison were obtained. An application of the IP-ND system to neutron radiography (NR) is presented in this paper.

  17. Pollution of liquid argon after neutron irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Andrieux, M L; Collot, J; de Saintignon, P; Ferrari, A; Hostachy, J Y; Hoummada, A; Martin, P; Merkel, B; Puzo, P; Sauvage, D; Wielers, M

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the neutron facility installed at SARA is to investigate the behavior of various materials to be used in the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter, when submitted to fast neutron radiation. The samples are placed in a liquid argon cryostat a few cm away from the neutron source. Various pieces of the electromagnetic calorimeter have been tested in order to evaluate the rate of pollution of the liquid and consequently the possible signal loss in energy measurements. The average fluence was equivalent to the maximum expected in the calorimeter in about 10 years. The most striking feature of the results is that the pollution is not due to oxygen, at least for most of it. Using a particular value of the absorption length derived from these data, a simulation was carried out and the energy signal loss in the calorimeter could be predicted. Within the limits of our present knowledge, the conclusion is that damages due to this pollution will not be a problem. (17 refs).

  18. Dosimetric And Fluence Measurements At Hadron Facilities For LHC Radiation Damage Studies

    CERN Document Server

    León-Florián, E

    2001-01-01

    Dosimetry plays an essential role in experiments assessing radiation damage and hardness for the components of detectors to be operated at the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN (European Laboratory for Particle Physics), Geneva, Switzerland. Dosimetry is used both for calibration of the radiation fields and estimate of fluences and doses during the irradiation tests. The LHC environment will result in a complex radiation field composed of hadrons (mainly neutrons, pions and protons) and photons, each having an energy spectrum ranging from a few keV to several hundreds of MeV or several GeV, even. In this thesis, are exposed the results of measurements of particle fluences and doses at different hadron irradiation facilities: SARA, πE1-PSI and ZT7PS used for testing the radiation hardness of materials and equipment to be used in the future experiments at LHC. These measurements are applied to the evaluation of radiation damage inflicted to various semiconductors (such as silicon) and electronics ...

  19. Nuclear-reaction rates in the thermonuclear runaway phase of accreting neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiescher, M.; Barnard, V.; Goerres, J.; Fisker, J.L.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.; Langanke, K.; Rembges, F.; Thielemann, F.K.; Schatz, H.

    2002-01-01

    The rp-process has been suggested as the dominant nucleosynthesis process in explosive hydrogen burning at high temperature and density conditions. The process is characterized by a sequence of fast proton capture reactions and subsequent β-decays. The reaction path of the rp-process runs along the drip line up to Z∼50. Most of the charged-particle reaction rates for the reaction path are presently based on statistical Hauser-Feshbach calculations. While these rates are supposed to be reliable within a factor of two for conditions of high density in the compound nuclei, discrepancies may occur for nuclei near closed shells or near the proton drip line where the Q-values of proton capture processes are typically very small. It has been argued that the thermonuclear runaway is less sensitive to the reaction rates because of the rapid time-scale of the event. However, since these processes may operate at the same time-scale as fast mixing and convection processes, a change in reaction rates indeed may have a significant impact. In this paper we present two examples, the break-out from the hot CNO cycles, and the thermonuclear runaway in X-ray bursts itself, where changes in reaction rates have a direct impact on time-scale, energy generation and nucleosynthesis predictions for the explosive event. (orig.)

  20. SENSMG: First-Order Sensitivities of Neutron Reaction Rates, Reaction-Rate Ratios, Leakage, keff, and α Using PARTISN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favorite, Jeffrey A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-21

    SENSMG is a tool for computing first-order sensitivities of neutron reaction rates, reaction-rate ratios, leakage, keff, and α using the PARTISN multigroup discrete-ordinates code. SENSMG computes sensitivities to all of the transport cross sections and data (total, fission, nu, chi, and all scattering moments), two edit cross sections (absorption and capture), and the density for every isotope and energy group. It also computes sensitivities to the mass density for every material and derivatives with respect to all interface locations. The tool can be used for one-dimensional spherical (r) and two-dimensional cylindrical (r-z) geometries. The tool can be used for fixed-source and eigenvalue problems. The tool implements Generalized Perturbation Theory (GPT) as discussed by Williams and Stacey. Section II of this report describes the theory behind adjoint-based sensitivities, gives the equations that SENSMG solves, and defines the sensitivities that are output. Section III describes the user interface, including the input file and command line options. Section IV describes the output. Section V gives some notes about the coding that may be of interest. Section VI discusses verification, which is ongoing. Section VII lists needs and ideas for future work. Appendix A lists all of the input files whose results are presented in Sec. VI.

  1. Fluence dependence of disorder depth profiles in Pb implanted Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christodoulides, C.E.; Kadhim, N.J.; Carter, G.

    1980-01-01

    The total, depth integrated disorder, induced by Pb implantation into Si at room temperature, initially increases rapidly with implantation fluence and then reaches a quasi saturation level where the increase with fluence is slow. Measurements of the depth distributions of the disorder, using high resolution low angle exit Rutherford Backscattering/Channelling analysis, suggest that the quasi saturation results from overlapping of disordered zones generated deep in the tail of the disorder-depth profiles. The depth of the disordered solid-crystal boundary, xsub(D), increases with ion fluence PHI, according to the relation xsub(D) = x bar + f(PHI).σ, where x bar is the most probable projected depth and σ the projected standard deviation of disorder generation. It is shown that this relationship is consistent with an approximately Gaussian depth distribution of disorder production. (author)

  2. Monte Carlo calculation of the neutron dose to a fetus at commercial flight altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, M. C.; Galeano, D. C.; Santos, W. S.; Hunt, John G.; d'Errico, Francesco; Souza, S. O.; de Carvalho Júnior, A. B.

    2017-11-01

    Aircrew members are exposed to primary cosmic rays as well as to secondary radiations from the interaction of cosmic rays with the atmosphere and with the aircraft. The radiation field at flight altitudes comprises neutrons, protons, electrons, positrons, photons, muons and pions. Generally, 50% of the effective dose to airplane passengers is due to neutrons. Care must be taken especially with pregnant aircrew members and frequent fliers so that the equivalent dose to the fetus will not exceed prescribed limits during pregnancy (1 mSv according to ICRP, and 5 mSv according to NCRP). Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the equivalent dose to a fetus in the maternal womb. Up to now, the equivalent dose rate to a fetus at commercial flight altitudes was obtained using stylized pregnant-female phantom models. The aim of this study was calculating neutron fluence to dose conversion coefficients for a fetus of six months of gestation age using a new, realistic pregnant-female mesh-phantom. The equivalent dose rate to a fetus during an intercontinental flight was also calculated by folding our conversion coefficients with published spectral neutron flux data. The calculated equivalent dose rate to the fetus was 2.35 μSv.h-1, that is 1.5 times higher than equivalent dose rates reported in the literature. The neutron fluence to dose conversion coefficients for the fetus calculated in this study were 2.7, 3.1 and 3.9 times higher than those from previous studies using fetus models of 3, 6 and 9 months of gestation age, respectively. The differences between our study and data from the literature highlight the importance of using more realistic anthropomorphic phantoms to estimate doses to a fetus in pregnant aircrew members.

  3. Thick-foils activation technique for neutron spectrum unfolding with the MINUIT routine-Comparison with GEANT4 simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagena, E.; Theodorou, K.; Stoulos, S.

    2018-04-01

    Neutron activation technique has been applied using a proposed set of twelve thick metal foils (Au, As, Cd, In, Ir, Er, Mn, Ni, Se, Sm, W, Zn) for off-site measurements to obtain the neutron spectrum over a wide energy range (from thermal up to a few MeV) in intense neutron-gamma mixed fields such as around medical Linacs. The unfolding procedure takes into account the activation rates measured using thirteen (n , γ) and two (n , p) reactions without imposing a guess solution-spectrum. The MINUIT minimization routine unfolds a neutron spectrum that is dominated by fast neutrons (70%) peaking at 0.3 MeV, while the thermal peak corresponds to the 15% of the total neutron fluence equal to the epithermal-resonances area. The comparison of the unfolded neutron spectrum against the simulated one with the GEANT4 Monte-Carlo code shows a reasonable agreement within the measurement uncertainties. Therefore, the proposed set of activation thick-foils could be a useful tool in order to determine low flux neutrons spectrum in intense mixed field.

  4. Pulsed laser ablation of Germanium under vacuum and hydrogen environments at various fluences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iqbal, Muhammad Hassan [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, Government College University, Lahore (Pakistan); Bashir, Shazia, E-mail: shaziabashir@gcu.edu.pk [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, Government College University, Lahore (Pakistan); Rafique, Muhammad Shahid [Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore (Pakistan); Dawood, Asadullah; Akram, Mahreen; Mahmood, Khaliq; Hayat, Asma; Ahmad, Riaz; Hussain, Tousif [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, Government College University, Lahore (Pakistan); Mahmood, Arshad [National Institute of Laser and Optronics (NILOP), Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2015-07-30

    Highlights: • Germanium targets were exposed under vacuum and H{sub 2} environment by nanosecond laser pulses. • The effect of laser fluence and ambient environment has been investigated. • The surface morphology is investigated by SEM analysis. • Raman and FTIR Spectroscopy are performed to reveal structural modification. • Electrical conductivity is probed by four probe method. - Abstract: Laser fluence and ambient environment play a significant role for the formation and development of the micro/nano-structures on the laser irradiated targets. Single crystal (1 0 0) Germanium (Ge) has been ablated under two environments of vacuum (10{sup −3} Torr) and hydrogen (100 Torr) at various fluences ranging from 4.5 J cm{sup −2} to 6 J cm{sup −2}. For this purpose KrF Excimer laser with wavelength of 248 nm, pulse duration of 18 ns and repetition rate of 20 Hz has been employed. Surface morphology has been observed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Whereas, structural modification of irradiated targets was explored by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. Electrical conductivity of the irradiated Ge is measured by four probe method. SEM analysis exhibits the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS), cones and micro-bumps in both ambient environments (vacuum and hydrogen). The formation as well as development of these structures is strongly dependent upon the laser fluence and environmental conditions. The periodicity of LIPSS or ripples varies from 38 μm to 60 μm in case of vacuum whereas in case of hydrogen environment, the periodicity varies from 20 μm to 45 μm. The difference in number of ripples and periodicity as well as in shape and size of cones and bumps in vacuum and hydrogen is explained on the basis of confinement and shielding effect of plasma. FTIR spectroscopy reveals that no new bands are formed for laser ablated Ge under vacuum, whereas C−H stretching vibration band is

  5. Photon energy-fluence correction factor in low energy brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antunes, Paula C.G.; Yoriyaz, Hélio [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Vijande, Javier; Giménez-Alventosa, Vicent; Ballester, Facundo, E-mail: pacrisguian@gmail.com [Department of Atomic, Molecular, and Nuclear Physics and Instituto de Física Corpuscular (UV-CSIC), University of Valencia (Spain)

    2017-07-01

    The AAPM TG-43 brachytherapy dosimetry formalism has become a standard for brachytherapy dosimetry worldwide; it implicitly assumes that charged-particle equilibrium (CPE) exists for the determination of absorbed dose to water at different locations. At the time of relating dose to tissue and dose to water, or vice versa, it is usually assumed that the photon fluence in water and in tissues are practically identical, so that the absorbed dose in the two media can be related by their ratio of mass energy-absorption coefficients. The purpose of this work is to study the influence of photon energy-fluence in different media and to evaluate a proposal for energy-fluence correction factors for the conversion between dose-to-tissue (D{sub tis}) and dose-to-water (D{sub w}). State-of-the art Monte Carlo (MC) calculations are used to score photon fluence differential in energy in water and in various human tissues (muscle, adipose and bone) in two different codes, MCNP and PENELOPE, which in all cases include a realistic modeling of the {sup 125}I low-energy brachytherapy seed in order to benchmark the formalism proposed. A correction is introduced that is based on the ratio of the water-to-tissue photon energy-fluences using the large-cavity theory. In this work, an efficient way to correlate absorbed dose to water and absorbed dose to tissue in brachytherapy calculations at clinically relevant distances for low-energy photon emitting seed is proposed. The energy-fluence based corrections given in this work are able to correlate absorbed dose to tissue and absorbed dose to water with an accuracy better than 0.5% in the most critical cases. (author)

  6. BETA DOSE RATES FROM NEUTRON-IRRADIATED URANIUM-235 CARBIDE PARTICLES,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small highly radioactive particles could be injected into the biosphere from the re-entry and burnup of a nuclear propulsion reactor. This would...using tissue equivalent electrodes. The beta dose from the irradiated particles delivered to a segment of tissue can be calculated using a rate law derived from the experimental values.

  7. Positron annihilation studies of neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brauer, G.; Liszkay, L.; Molnar, B.

    1988-01-01

    Several annealing studies by positron annihilation (Doppler broadening, lifetime) on neutron irradiated Cr-Mo-V reactor pressure vessel steels (Soviet type 15Kh2MFA) regarding the influences of irradiation temperature, fluence of fast neutrons as well as different impurity contents are presented and discussed. A possibility of explaining the positron annihilation data by irradiation induced carbide formation is proposed. (author)

  8. Dosimetry methods in boron neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambarini, G.; Artuso, E.; Felisi, M.; Regazzoni, V.; Giove, D. [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Department of Physics, Via Festa del Patrono 7, 20122 Milano (Italy); Agosteo, S.; Barcaglioni, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milano (Italy); Campi, F.; Garlati, L. [Politecnico di Milano, Energy Department, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); De Errico, F. [Universita degli Studi di Pisa, Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering, Lungamo Pacinotti 43, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Borroni, M.; Carrara, M. [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Medical Physics Unit, Via Venezian 1, 20133 Milano (Italy); Burian, J.; Klupak, V.; Viererbl, L.; Marek, M. [Research Centre Rez, Department of Neutron Physics, 250-68 Husinec-Rez (Czech Republic)

    2014-08-15

    Dosimetry studies have been carried out at thermal and epithermal columns of Lvr-15 research reactor for investigating the spatial distribution of gamma dose, fast neutron dose and thermal neutron fluence. Two different dosimetry methods, both based on solid state detectors, have been studied and applied and the accuracy and consistency of the results have been inspected. One method is based on Fricke gel dosimeters that are dilute water solutions and have good tissue equivalence for neutrons and also for all the secondary radiations produced by neutron interactions in tissue or water phantoms. Fricke gel dosimeters give the possibility of separating the various dose contributions, i.e. the gamma dose, the fast neutron dose and the dose due to charged particles generated during thermal neutron reactions by isotopes having high cross section, like 10-B. From this last dose, thermal neutron fluence can be obtained by means of the kerma factor. The second method is based on thermoluminescence dosimeters. In particular, the developed method draw advantage from the different heights of the peaks of the glow curve of such phosphors when irradiated with photons or with thermal neutrons. The results show that satisfactory results can be obtained with simple methods, in spite of the complexity of the subject. However, the more suitable dosimeters and principally their utilization and analysis modalities are different for the various neutron beams, mainly depending on the relative intensities of the three components of the neutron field, in particular are different for thermal and epithermal columns. (Author)

  9. Investigation of (n, 2n) reaction and fission rates in iron-shielded uranium samples bombarded by 14.9 MeV neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shani, G.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of the thickness of iron shielding on the (n, 2n) reaction rate in a fusion reactor (hybrid) blanket is investigated. The results are compared with the fission rate-dependence. Samples of natural uranium are irradiated with 14 MeV neutrons, with iron slabs of various thickness between the neutron generator target and the samples. Both reactions are threshold reactions but the fact that the 238 U (n, 2n) reaction threshold is at 6 MeV and that of fission is at 2 MeV makes the ratio between the two very much geometry-dependent. Two geometrical effects take place, the 1/r 2 and the build-up. While the build-up affects the (n, 2n) reaction rate, the fission rate is affected more by the 1/r 2 effect. The reason is that both elastic and inelastic scattering end up with neutrons with energy above fission threshold, while only elastic scattering brings high energy neutrons to the sample and causes (n, 2n) reaction. A comparison is made with calculated results where the geometrical effects do not exist. (author)

  10. The relationship between dose rate and transformation induction in C3H/10T1/2 cells by TRIGA reactor fission neutrons at 0.3 Gy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balcer-Kubiczek, E.K.; Harrison, G.H.

    1989-01-01

    The authors present their own and other data showing dose-effect relations for cell survival and the induction of transformations in C3H/IOT 1/2 cells in exponential or stationary cultures after a range of high dose-rate irradiations with X-rays or AFRRI neutrons. (UK)

  11. Activation Inventories after Exposure to DD/DT Neutrons in Safety Analysis of Nuclear Fusion Installations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankunas, Gediminas; Cufar, Aljaz; Tidikas, Andrius; Batistoni, Paola

    2017-11-23

    Irradiations with 14 MeV fusion neutrons are planned at Joint European Torus (JET) in DT operations with the objective to validate the calculation of the activation of structural materials in functional materials expected in ITER and fusion plants. This study describes the activation and dose rate calculations performed for materials irradiated throughout the DT plasma operation during which the samples of real fusion materials are exposed to 14 MeV neutrons inside the JET vacuum vessel. Preparatory activities are in progress during the current DD operations with dosimetry foils to measure the local neutron fluence and spectrum at the sample irradiation position. The materials included those used in the manufacturing of the main in-vessel components, such as ITER-grade W, Be, CuCrZr, 316 L(N) and the functional materials used in diagnostics and heating systems. The neutron-induced activities and dose rates at shutdown were calculated by the FISPACT code, using the neutron fluxes and spectra that were provided by the preceding MCNP neutron transport calculations. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Neutron scattering in ORNL's calibration facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J.C.; Sims, C.S.; Casson, W.H.; Murakami, H.

    1991-01-01

    Room scattering corrections for several common neutron detectors in a new neutron calibration facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory were measured. Results for three radioisotopic sources in ground scattering and enclosed room scattering situations are compared with two model calculations, and the agreement is good. A personnel neutron spectrometer was used to examine further the spectral variation inside the enclosed neutron room. Scattered fluence and scattered dose equivalent results from the spectral measurements indicate that the scattering predictions using models hold only for small-source-to-detector distances. Additional observations from this study are also presented. (author)

  13. Measurements of the {sup 235}U(n,f) cross section in the 3 to 30 MeV neutron energy region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, A.D.; Wasson, O.A. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Lisowski, P.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1991-12-31

    To improve the accuracy of the {sup 235}U(n,f) cross section, measurements have been made of this standard cross section at the target 4 facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The data were obtained at the 20-meter flight path of that facility. The fission reaction rate was determined with a fast parallel plate ionization chamber and the neutron fluence was measured with an annular proton recoil telescope. The measurements provide the shape of the {sup 235}U(n,f) cross section relative to the hydrogen scattering cross section for neutron energies from about 3 to 30 MeV neutron energy. The data have been normalized to the very accurately known value near 14 MeV. The results are in good agreement with the ENDF/B-VI evaluation up to about 15 MeV neutron energy. Above this energy differences as large as 5% are observed.

  14. Neutron physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckurts, K.H.; Wirtz, K.

    1974-01-01

    This textbook consists of four sections which deal with the following subjects: 1. Production of neutrons and their interactions with the nuclei; neutron sources; neutron detectors; cross-section measurements. 2. Theory of neutron interactions with macroscopic media; neutron slowing down; space distribution of moderated neutrons; neutron thermalization; neutron scattering. 3. Radioactive probe measurements of thermal neutron fluxes; activation by means of epithermal neutrons; threshold detectors of fast neutrons; neutron calibration. 4. Neutron energy; slowing down kernels; neutron age; diffusion length and absorption of neutrons

  15. Effects of laser fluence on silicon modification by four-beam laser interference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Le; Li, Dayou; Wang, Zuobin; Yue, Yong; Zhang, Jinjin; Yu, Miao; Li, Siwei

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the effects of laser fluence on silicon modification by four-beam laser interference. In this work, four-beam laser interference was used to pattern single crystal silicon wafers for the fabrication of surface structures, and the number of laser pulses was applied to the process in air. By controlling the parameters of laser irradiation, different shapes of silicon structures were fabricated. The results were obtained with the single laser fluence of 354 mJ/cm 2 , 495 mJ/cm 2 , and 637 mJ/cm 2 , the pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz, the laser exposure pulses of 30, 100, and 300, the laser wavelength of 1064 nm, and the pulse duration of 7–9 ns. The effects of the heat transfer and the radiation of laser interference plasma on silicon wafer surfaces were investigated. The equations of heat flow and radiation effects of laser plasma of interfering patterns in a four-beam laser interference distribution were proposed to describe their impacts on silicon wafer surfaces. The experimental results have shown that the laser fluence has to be properly selected for the fabrication of well-defined surface structures in a four-beam laser interference process. Laser interference patterns can directly fabricate different shape structures for their corresponding applications

  16. Monte Carlo simulations of the secondary neutron ambient and effective dose equivalent rates from surface to suborbital altitudes and low Earth orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Jaby, Samy; Richardson, Richard B

    2015-07-01

    Occupational exposures from ionizing radiation are currently regulated for airline travel (Earth orbit (∼300-400 km). Aircrew typically receive between 1 and 6 mSv of occupational dose annually, while aboard the International Space Station, the area radiation dose equivalent measured over just 168 days was 106 mSv at solar minimum conditions. It is anticipated that space tourism vehicles will reach suborbital altitudes of approximately 100 km and, therefore, the annual occupational dose to flight crew during repeated transits is expected to fall somewhere between those observed for aircrew and astronauts. Unfortunately, measurements of the radiation environment at the high altitudes reached by suborbital vehicles are sparse, and modelling efforts have been similarly limited. In this paper, preliminary MCNPX radiation transport code simulations are developed of the secondary neutron flux profile in air from surface altitudes up to low Earth orbit at solar minimum conditions and excluding the effects of spacecraft shielding. These secondary neutrons are produced by galactic cosmic radiation interacting with Earth's atmosphere and are among the sources of radiation that can pose a health risk. Associated estimates of the operational neutron ambient dose equivalent, used for radiation protection purposes, and the neutron effective dose equivalent that is typically used for estimates of stochastic health risks, are provided in air. Simulations show that the neutron radiation dose rates received at suborbital altitudes are comparable to those experienced by aircrew flying at 7 to 14 km. We also show that the total neutron dose rate tails off beyond the Pfotzer maximum on ascension from surface up to low Earth orbit. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Sensor Radiation Testing With Californium-252 Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braasch, Robert

    1989-09-01

    Neutron fluence testing of large dimension electrical components at cryogenic temperatures has traditionally been performed at fast burst reactors. A new facility, using Californium-252 (252Cf) as a neutron radiation source, was designed and built at the IRT Corporate Headquarters in San Diego. This paper discusses the physical properties of the californium isotope, describes the facility and its test capabilities, and presents the results of the 1 MeV calibration as well as IR and visible sensor testing.

  18. Muon fluence measurements at the site boundary for 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elwyn, A.J.

    1986-03-01

    Muon fluence (muons cm -2 ) was measured downstream of the experimental area beamlines, just beyond the Fermilab site boundary at Route 38. The purpose of these measurements was to obtain an estimate of the yearly off-site radiation exposure to the general population due to accelerator-produced muons during the 1985 800 GeV run

  19. Neutron induced fission cross sections for 232Th, 235,238U, 237Np, and 239Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisowski, P.W.; Ullmann, J.L.; Balestrini, S.J.; Hill, N.W.; Carlson, A.D.; Wasson, O.A.

    1989-01-01

    Neutron-induced fission cross section ratios for samples of 232 Th, 235,238 U, 237 Np and 239 Pu have been measured from 1 to 400 MeV. The fission reaction rate was determined for all samples simultaneously using a fast parallel plate ionization chamber at a 20-m flight path. A well characterized annular proton recoil telescope was used to measure the neutron fluence from 3 to 30 MeV. Those data provided the shape of the 235 U(n,f) cross section relative to the hydrogen scattering cross section. That shape was then normalized to the very accurately known value for 235 U(n,f) at 14.178 MeV. From 30 to 400 MeV cross section values were determined using the neutron fluence measured with a plastic scintillator. Cross section values of 232 Th, 235,238 U, 237 Np and 239 Pu were computed from the ratio data using the authors' values for 235 U(n,f). In addition to providing new results at high neutron energies, these data highlight several areas of deficiency in the evaluated nuclear data files and provide new information for the 235 U(n,f) standard

  20. Fluence compensated photoacoustic tomography in small animals (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Altaf; Pool, Martin; Daoudi, Khalid; de Vries, Liesbeth G.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2017-03-01

    Light fluence inside turbid media can be experimentally mapped by measuring ultrasonically modulated light (Acousto-optics). To demonstrate the feasibility of fluence corrected Photoacoustic (PA) imaging, we have realized a tri-modality (i.e. photoacoustic, acousto-optic and ultrasound) tomographic small animal imaging system. Wherein PA imaging provides high resolution map of absorbed optical energy density, Acousto-optics yields the fluence distribution map in the corresponding PA imaging plane and Ultrasound provides morphological information. Further, normalization of the PA image with the acousto-optically measured fluence map results in an image that directly represents the optical absorption. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is commonly found overexpressed in human cancers, among which breast cancers, resulting in a more aggressive tumor phenotype. Identification of HER2-expression is clinically relevant, because cancers overexpressing this marker are amenable to HER2-directed therapies, among which antibodies trastuzumab and pertuzumab. Here, we investigate the feasibility and advantage of acousto-optically assisted fluence compensated PA imaging over PA imaging alone in visualizing and quantifying HER2 expression. For this experiment, nude mice were xenografted with human breast cancer cell lines SKBR3 and BT474 (both HER2 overexpressing), as well as HER2-negative MDA-MB-231. To visualize HER2 expression in these mice, HER2 monoclonal antibody pertuzumab (Perjeta®, Roche), was conjugated to near-infrared dye IRDye 800CW (800CW, LICOR Biosciences) at a ratio of 1∶2 antibody to 800CW. When xenograft tumors measured ≥ 100 mm3, mice received 100 µg 800CW-pertuzumab intravenously. Three days post injection, mice were scanned for fluorescence signal with an IVIS scanner. After fluorescence scans, mice were euthanized and imaged in our PA tomographic imaging system.

  1. Neutron radiation from medical electron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCall, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    A method is described using simple gold foils and relatively inexpensive moderators to measure neutron fluences, both fast nd thermal, which then can be converted to dose equivalent using a few simple formulas. The method is sensitive, easy to calibrate, and should work at most accelerators regardless of energy or room geometry

  2. The Measurement of Epithermal-to-Thermal U-238 Neutron Capture Rate (ρ28) in Aagesta Power Reactor Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernander, G.

    1967-09-01

    The epithermal-to-thermal neutron capture rate ratio ρ 28 in U-238 in Aagesta fuel has been measured by the chemical separation method. The method involves the isolation of Np-239 from uranium and fission products by reversed phase partition chromatography. Although somewhat elaborate, and in spite of difficulties with residual fission products, the method has yielded reasonably accurate results. Further development work on chemical procedures may lead to some improvement. A comparison with the coincidence method - electronic separation of activities - has not shown any large systematic differences between the two methods. The separation of the epithermal U-235 activation from the total has been achieved by means of the '1/v subtraction technique' using copper foils as the 1/v monitor. The complementary thermal column irradiations required have been performed in the research reactors TRIGA (Helsinki) and R1 (Stockholm). From the measured ρ 28 values the resonance escape probability (p) and the initial conversion ratio (ICR) may be calculated using cross-section data and other lattice parameters. Comparisons with theoretical values of ρ and ICR as calculated with the BURNUP lattice parameter code are favourable

  3. Total Absorption Spectroscopy Study of the Beta Decay of 60Mn to Constrain the Neutron Capture Rate of 60Fe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Debra; Spyrou, Artemis; Dombos, Alex; Couture, Aaron; e15034 Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Interest in 60Fe, a long lived radioisotope synthesized in massive stars, has recently peaked. The signature of its decay allows us to probe astrophysical processes, events such as the early formation of the solar system and nucleosynthesis. To understand these observations a complete understanding of the creation, destruction and nuclear properties of 60Fe in the astrophysical environment are required. Using the beta decay of 60Mn in conjunction with total absorption spectroscopy (TAS), made possible by the high efficiency gamma ray calorimeter SuN (Summing NaI detector) at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), to study the distribution of beta-decay intensity over the daughter-nucleus 60Fe, provides information about the structure of the daughter and improves the predictive power of astrophysical models. In addition to the ongoing TAS analysis, The Beta-Oslo method will be used to extract the nuclear level density and gamma-strength function of 60Fe providing much needed constraints on the neutron capture reaction rate responsible for the creation of this nucleus.

  4. Neutron-induced electronic failures around a high-energy linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kry, Stephen F.; Johnson, Jennifer L.; White, R. Allen; Howell, Rebecca M.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Gillin, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: After a new in-vault CT-on-rails system repeatedly malfunctioned following use of a high-energy radiotherapy beam, we investigated the presence and impact of neutron radiation on this electronic system, as well as neutron shielding options. Methods: We first determined the CT scanner's failure rate as a function of the number of 18 MV monitor units (MUs) delivered. We then re-examined the failure rate with both 2.7-cm-thick and 7.6-cm-thick borated polyethylene (BPE) covering the linac head for neutron shielding. To further examine shielding options, as well as to explore which neutrons were relevant to the scanner failure, Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate the neutron fluence and spectrum in the bore of the CT scanner. Simulations included BPE covering the CT scanner itself as well as covering the linac head. Results: We found that the CT scanner had a 57% chance of failure after the delivery of 200 MUs. While the addition of neutron shielding to the accelerator head reduced this risk of failure, the benefit was minimal and even 7.6 cm of BPE was still associated with a 29% chance of failure after the delivery of 200 MU. This shielding benefit was achieved regardless of whether the linac head or CT scanner was shielded. Additionally, it was determined that fast neutrons were primarily responsible for the electronic failures. Conclusions: As illustrated by the CT-on-rails system in the current study, physicists should be aware that electronic systems may be highly sensitive to neutron radiation. Medical physicists should therefore monitor electronic systems that have not been evaluated for potential neutron sensitivity. This is particularly relevant as electronics are increasingly common in the therapy vault and newer electronic systems may exhibit increased sensitivity.

  5. Neutron environmental characterization requirements for reactor fuels and materials development and surveillance programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElroy, W.N.; Bennett, R.A.; Johnson, D.L.; Dudey, N.D.

    1975-01-01

    Neutron environmental characterization requirements for reactor fuels and materials development and surveillance programs for Light Water Reactors (LWRs), High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGRs), Fast Breeder Reactors (FBRs), and Controlled Thermonuclear Reactors (CTRs) are varied. Presently, the most demanding requirements are associated with the development of FBRs where goal accuracies in the range of 1 to 3 percent (1sigma) have been requested for the determination of fission rates, burnups, and neutron fluxes and fluences. Total fluence associated with a measured material property change in a fast test reactor can presently be determined in the 5 to 10 percent (1sigma) range, and application of improved dosimetry techniques is expected to reduce this to the 2 to 5 percent (1sigma) range. Without direct dosimetry measurements, however, uncertainties of 25 percent and more are not uncommon. International standardization, development, and application of improved dosimetry methods for reactor materials development and surveillance programs for LWRs, HTGRs, FBRs, and CTRs are essential. The discussion of requirements for neutron environmental characterization for these different reactor concepts is an important aspect of this conference. Here, these requirements are reviewed in light of currently known design, development, testing, and operation considerations for U.S. LMFBR and CTR programs. 97 references. (auth)

  6. Chemical Engineering Division fast-neutron dosimetry annual report, July 1975--June 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinrich, R R; Greenwood, L R; Kennerley, R J; Chellew, N R; Popek, R J; Malewicki, R L; Cafasso, F A; Burris, L

    1976-01-01

    One of the objectives of the Dosimetry and Damage Analysis Center is to provide standardized dosimetry technology for materials-study programs within the ERDA Division of Magnetic Fusion Energy. Current efforts have included characterization of neutron environments in terms of fluence and spectral distribution for materials experiments conducted at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's (LLL) Rotating Target Neutron Source and at the LLL-Davis Cyclograaff. Environment characterization efforts at Brookhaven National Laboratory's High Flux Beam Reactor and those pertaining to an enriched-uranium converter for the ANL CP-5 reactor are also described. The capability of calculating material radiation damage parameters associated with these neutron environments is demonstrated. Average fission yields determined from two fast-neutron irradiations and one thermal-neutron irradiation are compiled for laboratories participating in the interlaboratory Reaction Rate program. These results are in excellent agreement with literature values. Progress on the development of /sup 10/B- and /sup 6/Li-loaded liquid scintillation detectors for detecting very low intensity neutrons is presented. Material purification tests and performance tests of scintillation mixtures are described.

  7. Design of analytical instrumentation with D-T sealed neutron generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao Yahua; Wu Jizong; Zheng Weiming; Liu Quanwei; Zhang Min

    2008-01-01

    Analytical instrumentation with D-T sealed neutron generators source activation, The 14 MeV D-T sealed neutron tube with 10 9 n · s -1 neutron yield is used as generator source. The optimal structure of moderator and shield was achieved by MC computing.The instrumentation's configuration is showed. The instrumentation is made up of the SMY-DT50.8-2.1 sealed neutron tube and the high-voltage power supply system, which center is the sealed neutron generators. 6 cm Pb and 20 cm polythene is chosen as moderator, Pb, polythene and 10 cm boron-PE was chosen as shield .The sample box is far the source from 9 cm, the measurement system were made up of HPGe detector and the sample transforming system. After moderator and shield, the thermal neutron fluence rate at the point of sample is 0.93 × 10 6 n · s -1 cm -2 , which is accorded with design demand, and the laboratory and surroundings reaches the safety standard of the dose levels. (authors)

  8. Study of neutron spectra in extended uranium target. New experimental data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paraipan M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The spatial distribution of neutron fluences in the extended uranium target (“Quinta” assembly irradiated with 0.66 GeV proton, 4 AGeV deuteron and carbon beams was studied using the reactions with different threshold energy (Eth. The data sets were obtained with 59Co samples. The accumulation rates for the following isotopes: 60Co (Eth 0 MeV, 59Fe (Eth 3 MeV, 58Co (Eth 10 MeV, 57Co (Eth 20 MeV, 56Co (Eth 32 MeV, 47Sc (Eth 55 MeV, and 48V (Eth 70 MeV were measured with HPGe spectrometer. The experimental accumulation rates were compared with the predictions of the simulations with Geant4 code. Substantial difference between the reconstructed and the simulated data for the hard part of the neutron spectrum was analyzed.

  9. Etching behavior of fission fragment tracks in synthetic quartz and its application to neutron detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawamura, Teruko; Baba, Satoshi; Narita, Masakuni; Yamazaki, Hatsuo

    1994-01-01

    The etching behavior of fission fragment tracks in synthetic quartz plates concerning to +x, y and z planes was studied using NaOH solution as an etchant. Systematic experiments gave an optimum etching condition of 65% NaOH at 150degC suitable for track detection. Under this etching condition, following several properties were studied; the bulk etching rate, the etched track opening shape and its growth rate, the critical angle of track etching, and the irradiation effect of low LET radiation. All of three different cuts were demonstrated to be useful for plates as fission track detectors. An application to neutron detection was studied for the +x-plane of an x-cut plate. The detection sensitivity of the plane in close contact with a Th-radiator was 2.7x10 -6 tracks/fluence for 14 MeV neutrons. (author)

  10. Radiation Transport Analysis in Chalcogenide-Based Devices and a Neutron Howitzer Using MCNP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowler, Herbert

    As photons, electrons, and neutrons traverse a medium, they impart their energy in ways that are analytically difficult to describe. Monte Carlo methods provide valuable insight into understanding this behavior, especially when the radiation source or environment is too complex to simplify. This research investigates simulating various radiation sources using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code, characterizing their impact on various materials, and comparing the simulation results to general theory and measurements. A total of five sources were of interest: two photon sources of different incident particle energies (3.83 eV and 1.25 MeV), two electron sources also of different energies (30 keV and 100 keV), and a californium-252 (Cf-252) spontaneous fission neutron source. Lateral and vertical programmable metallization cells (PMCs) were developed by other researchers for exposure to these photon and electron sources, so simplified PMC models were implemented in MCNP to estimate the doses and fluences. Dose rates measured around the neutron source and the predicted maximum activity of activation foils exposed to the neutrons were determined using MCNP and compared to experimental results obtained from gamma-ray spectroscopy. The analytical fluence calculations for the photon and electron cases agreed with MCNP results, and differences are due to MCNP considering particle movements that hand calculations do not. Doses for the photon cases agreed between the analytical and simulated results, while the electron cases differed by a factor of up to 4.8. Physical dose rate measurements taken from the neutron source agreed with MCNP within the 10% tolerance of the measurement device. The activity results had a percent error of up to 50%, which suggests a need to further evaluate the spectroscopy setup.

  11. Aging and Embrittlement of High Fluence Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Was, gary; Jiao, Zhijie; der ven, Anton Van; Bruemmer, Stephen; Edwards, Dan

    2012-12-31

    Irradiation of austenitic stainless steels results in the formation of dislocation loops, stacking fault tetrahedral, Ni-Si clusters and radiation-induced segregation (RIS). Of these features, it is the formation of precipitates which is most likely to impact the mechanical integrity at high dose. Unlike dislocation loops and RIS, precipitates exhibit an incubation period that can extend from 10 to 46 dpa, above which the cluster composition changes and a separate phase, (G-phase) forms. Both neutron and heavy ion irradiation showed that these clusters develop slowly and continue to evolve beyond 100 dpa. Overall, this work shows that the irradiated microstructure features produced by heavy ion irradiation are remarkably comparable in nature to those produced by neutron irradiation at much lower dose rates. The use of a temperature shift to account for the higher damage rate in heavy ion irradiation results in a fairly good match in the dislocation loop microstructure and the precipitate microstructure in austenitic stainless steels. Both irradiations also show segregation of the same elements and in the same directions, but to achieve comparable magnitudes, heavy ion irradiation must be conducted at a much higher temperature than that which produces a match with loops and precipitates. First-principles modeling has confirmed that the formation of Ni-Si precipitates under irradiation is likely caused by supersaturation of solute to defect sinks caused by highly correlated diffusion of Ni and Si. Thus, the formation and evolution of Ni-Si precipitates at high dose in austenitic stainless steels containing Si is inevitable.

  12. Activation method for measuring the reaction rates and studying the neutron spectra parameters, based on using the unified composition detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demidov, A.M.; Dikarev, V.S.; Efimov, B.V.; Ionov, V.S.; Marin, S.V.

    2005-01-01

    The method proposed for estimation of parameters thermal and epithermal parts of energy distribution of neutrons is described. The method based on application of activation measuring with use of unified composition detectors (UCD) and samples of fuel. The method is applicable for definition of neutron spectrum parameters and velocities of division in fuel of nuclear installations. Theoretical bases and the description of a method, expedients of manufacturing and calibration for the detectors, the experimental data, carried out in RRC KI are given and processing of experimental data, and also. The parametric model of a spectrum constructed on the basis of Westcott's formalism is described. The parameter of stiffness is entered and its role for temperature of neutron gas, spectral coefficients of isotopes of detectors, the transition area thermal and epithermal parts of neutron spectra is observationally appreciated. It is offered to confirm the found results by calculations with use of MCU Monte Carlo code [ru

  13. Emission Mössbauer spectroscopy study of fluence dependence of paramagnetic relaxation in Mn/Fe implanted ZnO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masenda, H., E-mail: hilary.masenda@wits.ac.za [University of the Witwatersrand, School of Physics (South Africa); Geburt, S. [University of Jena, Institute of Solid State Physics (Germany); Bharuth-Ram, K. [Durban University of Technology, Physics Department (South Africa); Naidoo, D. [University of the Witwatersrand, School of Physics (South Africa); Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Johnston, K. [PH Dept, ISOLDE/CERN (Switzerland); Mantovan, R. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR (Italy); Mølholt, T. E. [PH Dept, ISOLDE/CERN (Switzerland); Ncube, M. [University of the Witwatersrand, School of Physics (South Africa); Shayestehaminzadeh, S. [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Materials Chemistry (Germany); Gislason, H. P. [University of Iceland, Science Institute (Iceland); Langouche, G. [Instituut voor Kern-en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven (Belgium); Ólafsson, S. [University of Iceland, Science Institute (Iceland); Ronning, C. [University of Jena, Institute of Solid State Physics (Germany); Collaboration: ISOLDE Collaboration

    2016-12-15

    Emission Mössbauer Spectroscopy following the implantation of radioactive precursor isotope {sup 57}Mn{sup +} (T{sub 1/2}= 1.5 min) into ZnO single crystals at ISOLDE/CERN shows that a large fraction of {sup 57}Fe atoms produced in the {sup 57}Mn beta decay is created as paramagnetic Fe{sup 3+} with relatively long spin-lattice relaxation times. Here we report on ZnO pre-implanted with {sup 56}Fe to fluences of 2×10{sup 13}, 5×10 {sup 13} and 8 × 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2} in order to investigate the dependence of the paramagnetic relaxation rate of Fe{sup 3+} on fluence. The spectra are dominated by magnetic features displaying paramagnetic relaxation effects. The extracted spin-lattice relaxation rates show a slight increase with increasing ion fluence at corresponding temperatures and the area fraction of Fe{sup 3+} at room temperature reaches a maximum contribution of 80(3)% in the studied fluence range.

  14. Moderator design studies for a new neutron reference source based on the D–T fusion reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozhayev, Andrey V.; Piper, Roman K.; Rathbone, Bruce A.; McDonald, Joseph C.

    2016-06-01

    The radioactive isotope Californium-252 (252Cf) is relied upon internationally as a neutron calibration source for ionizing radiation dosimetry because of its high specific activity. The source may be placed within a heavy-water (D2O) moderating sphere to produce a softened spectrum representative of neutron fields common to commercial nuclear power plant environments, among others. Due to termination of the U.S. Department of Energy loan/lease program in 2012, the expense of obtaining 252Cf sources has undergone a significant increase, rendering high output sources largely unattainable. On the other hand, the use of neutron generators in research and industry applications has increased dramatically in recent years. Neutron generators based on deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion reaction provide high neutron fluence rates and, therefore, could possibly be used as a replacement for 252Cf. To be viable, the 14.6 MeV D-T output spectrum must be significantly moderated to approximate common workplace environments. This paper presents the results of an effort to select appropriate moderating materials and design a configuration to reshape the primary neutron field toward a spectrum approaching that from a nuclear power plant workplace. A series of Monte-Carlo (MCNP) simulations of single layer high- and low-Z materials are used to identify initial candidate moderators. Candidates are refined through a similar series of simulations involving combinations of 2 to 5 different materials. The simulated energy distribution using these candidate moderators are rated in comparison to a target spectrum. Other properties, such as fluence preservation and/or enhancement, prompt gamma production and other characteristics are also considered.

  15. Moderator design studies for a new neutron reference source based on the D-T fusion reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozhayev, Andrey V.; Piper, Roman K.; Rathbone, Bruce A.; McDonald, Joseph C.

    2016-06-01

    The radioactive isotope Californium-252 (252Cf) is relied upon internationally as a neutron calibration source for ionizing radiation dosimetry because of its high specific activity. The source may be placed within a heavy-water (D2O) moderating sphere to produce a softened spectrum representative of neutron fields common to commercial nuclear power plant environments, among others. Due to termination of the U.S. Department of Energy loan/lease program in 2012, the expense of obtaining 252Cf sources has undergone a significant increase, rendering high output sources largely unattainable. On the other hand, the use of neutron generators in research and industry applications has increased dramatically in recent years. Neutron generators based on deuteriumtritium (D-T) fusion reaction provide high neutron fluence rates and, therefore, could possibly be used as a replacement for 252Cf. To be viable, the 14 MeV D-T output spectrum must be significantly moderated to approximate common workplace environments. This paper presents the results of an effort to select appropriate moderating materials and design a configuration to reshape the primary neutron field toward a spectrum approaching that from a nuclear power plant workplace. A series of Monte-Carlo (MCNP) simulations of single layer high- and low-Z materials are used to identify initial candidate moderators. Candidates are refined through a similar series of simulations involving combinations of 2-5 different materials. The simulated energy distribution using these candidate moderators are rated in comparison to a target spectrum. Other properties, such as fluence preservation and/or enhancement, prompt gamma production and other characteristics are also considered.

  16. Neutron monitors and muon detectors for solar modulation studies: Interstellar flux, yield function, and assessment of critical parameters in count rate calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurin, D.; Cheminet, A.; Derome, L.; Ghelfi, A.; Hubert, G.

    2015-01-01

    Particles count rates at given Earth location and altitude result from the convolution of (i) the interstellar (IS) cosmic-ray fluxes outside the solar cavity, (ii) the time-dependent modulation of IS into Top-of-Atmosphere (TOA) fluxes, (iii) the rigidity cut-off (or geomagnetic transmission function) and grammage at the counter location, (iv) the atmosphere response to incoming TOA cosmic rays (shower development), and (v) the counter response to the various particles/energies in the shower. Count rates from neutron monitors or muon counters are therefore a proxy to solar activity. In this paper, we review all ingredients, discuss how their uncertainties impact count rate calculations, and how they translate into variation/uncertainties on the level of solar modulation ϕ (in the simple Force-Field approximation). The main uncertainty for neutron monitors is related to the yield function. However, many other effects have a significant impact, at the 5-10% level on ϕ values. We find no clear ranking of the dominant effects, as some depend on the station position and/or the weather and/or the season. An abacus to translate any variation of count rates (for neutron and μ detectors) to a variation of the solar modulation ϕ is provided.

  17. Calculation of the neutron W value for neutron dosimetry below the MeV energy region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, S.; Shizuma, K.; Goodhead, D.T.

    2000-01-01

    The effective neutron W value for tissue-equivalent gas in the energy region from 5 keV to 5.7 MeV has been calculated using W values for recoil particles (protons, alpha particles, oxygen, carbon and nitrogen ions), which are produced by incident neutrons. The W value is assumed to be an energy-fluence-average over the W values of the recoil particles. The energy fluence spectra for the recoil particles are calculated by using a continuous slowing-down approximation (CSDA). For the W values of recoil particles in the low-energy region, the recently evaluated data by Siebert et al and Taylor et al were used. Results are presented which show that the effective neutron W value depends strongly on energy in the low-energy region. This result indicates that neutron dose measurements using ionization chambers need a considerable correction of the W value in the low-energy region. (author)

  18. Monte Carlo Simulation of Neutron Background Sources in the Measurement of the ^12C(α,γ)^16O Reaction Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullikson, Kevin; Ugalde, Claudio

    2009-10-01

    The ^12C(α, γ)^16O reaction rate strongly affects the relative abundances of chemical elements, as well as when core collapse supernovae occur. In a proposed experiment, a water-filled bubble chamber will be used to measure the reverse reaction rate. A potential background source is photoneutrons from the γ-ray beam collimator entering the bubble chamber and generating a false signal. To minimize this effect, a Monte Carlo simulation has been performed to compare the number of photoneutrons created in lead, copper, and aluminum collimators. The simulation also compared the effectiveness of concrete, polyethylene, and water neutron shields. It was found that 30 cm of copper would be an effective collimator, and 30-40 cm of polyethylene a satisfactory neutron shield.

  19. Analysis of antiphase domain growth in ternary FeCo alloys after different cooling rates and annealing treatments using neutron diffraction and positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilles, Ralph; Hofmann, Michael; Johnson, Francis; Gao Yan; Mukherji, Debashis; Hugenschmidt, Christoph; Pikart, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → In-situ observation at high temperatures of atomic position change Fe and Co with neutron diffraction. → Determination of antiphase domain growth with neutron diffraction. → Determination of vacacny defects at antiphase domain boundaries with positron annihilation. → Combination of neutron diffraction and positron annihilation to correlate ordering/disordering process and the defect density of ternary FeCo alloys. - Abstract: FeCo alloys are industrially important engineering materials which play an outstanding role in applications requiring soft magnetic materials. The challenge is to include ternary elements to improve the mechanical properties. Here noble elements as Pt or Pd were used for these experiments. With neutron diffraction and positron annihilation technique Fe 67 Co 30 Pt 3 and Fe 67 Co 30 Pd 3 (at. pct.) samples were measured to study the influence of different cooling rates on ordering and disordering. The ordering and disordering process is responsible for the mechanical properties in dependence of temperature. The correlation of ordering and defect density is described.

  20. Monte Carlo based dosimetry and treatment planning for neutron capture therapy of brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamenhof, R.G.; Clement, S.D.; Harling, O.K.; Brenner, J.F.; Wazer, D.E.; Madoc-Jones, H.; Yanch, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    Monte Carlo based dosimetry and computer-aided treatment planning for neutron capture therapy have been developed to provide the necessary link between physical dosimetric measurements performed on the MITR-II epithermal-neutron beams and the need of the radiation oncologist to synthesize large amounts of dosimetric data into a clinically meaningful treatment plan for each individual patient. Monte Carlo simulation has been employed to characterize the spatial dose distributions within a skull/brain model irradiated by an epithermal-neutron beam designed for neutron capture therapy applications. The geometry and elemental composition employed for the mathematical skull/brain model and the neutron and photon fluence-to-dose conversion formalism are presented. A treatment planning program, NCTPLAN, developed specifically for neutron capture therapy, is described. Examples are presented illustrating both one and two-dimensional dose distributions obtainable within the brain with an experimental epithermal-neutron beam, together with beam quality and treatment plan efficacy criteria which have been formulated for neutron capture therapy. The incorporation of three-dimensional computed tomographic image data into the treatment planning procedure is illustrated. The experimental epithermal-neutron beam has a maximum usable circular diameter of 20 cm, and with 30 ppm of B-10 in tumor and 3 ppm of B-10 in blood, it produces a beam-axis advantage depth of 7.4 cm, a beam-axis advantage ratio of 1.83, a global advantage ratio of 1.70, and an advantage depth RBE-dose rate to tumor of 20.6 RBE-cGy/min (cJ/kg-min). These characteristics make this beam well suited for clinical applications, enabling an RBE-dose of 2,000 RBE-cGy/min (cJ/kg-min) to be delivered to tumor at brain midline in six fractions with a treatment time of approximately 16 minutes per fraction

  1. Divergence of Cs-137 sources fluence used in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vianello, E.A.; Almeida, C.E. de

    1998-01-01

    In this work the experimental determination of correction factor for fluence divergence (kln) of linear Cs-137 sources CDCS J4, with Farmer ionization chamber model 2571 in a central and perpendicular plan to source axis, for distances range from 1 to 7 cm., has been presented. The experimental results were compared to calculating by Kondo and Randolph (1960) isotropic theory and Bielajew (1990) anisotropic theory. (Author)

  2. Experimental measurements of the 15O(alpha,gamma)19Ne reaction rate and the stability of thermonuclear burning on accreting neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisker, J; Tan, W; Goerres, J; Wiescher, M; Cooper, R

    2007-01-01

    Neutron stars in close binary star systems often accrete matter from their companion stars. Thermonuclear ignition of the accreted material in the atmosphere of the neutron star leads to a thermonuclear explosion which is observed as an X-ray burst occurring periodically between hours and days depending on the accretion rate. The ignition conditions are characterized by a sensitive interplay between the accretion rate of the fuel supply and its depletion rate by nuclear burning in the hot CNO cycle and the rp-process. For accretion rates close to stable burning the burst ignition therefore depends critically on the hot CNO breakout reaction 15 O(α, γ) 19 Ne that regulates the flow between the hot CNO cycle and the rapid proton capture process. Until recently, the 15 O(α, γ) 19 Ne reaction rate was not known experimentally and the theoretical estimates carried significant uncertainties. In this paper we perform a parameter study of the uncertainty of this reaction rate and determine the astrophysical consequences of the first measurement of this reaction rate. Our results corroborate earlier predictions and show that theoretically burning remains unstable up to accretion rates near the Eddington limit, in contrast to astronomical observations

  3. Unfolding of neutron spectra from Godiva type critical assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, J.T.; Meason, J.L.; Wright, H.L.

    1976-01-01

    The results from three experiments conducted at the White Sands Missile Range Fast Burst Reactor Facility are discussed. The experiments were designed to measure the ''free-field'' neutron leakage spectrum and the neutron spectra from mildly perturbed environments. SAND-II was used to calculate the neutron spectrum utilizing several different trial input spectra for each experiment. Comparisons are made between the unfolded neutron spectrum for each trial input on the basis of the following parameters: average neutron energy (above 10 KeV), integral fluence (above 10 KeV), spectral index and the hardness parameter, phi/sub eq//phi

  4. Comparative analysis of dose rates in bricks determined by neutron activation analysis, alpha counting and X-ray fluorescence analysis for the thermoluminescence fine grain dating method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bártová, H.; Kučera, Jan; Musílek, L.; Trojek, T.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 104, NOV (2014), s. 393-397 ISSN 0969-806X. [1st International Conference on Dosimetry and its Applications (ICDA). Prague, 23.6.2013-28.6.2013] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(XE) LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Alpha coutning * neutron activation analysis * X-ray fluorescence * thermoluminescence dating * dose rate Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry , Separation Impact factor: 1.380, year: 2014

  5. Relationships between energy fluence and energy incident on, emitted by or imparted to a body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, C A

    1979-11-01

    From knowledge of the energy and angular distribution of the fluence around a body, the energy incident on, emitted by or imparted to a body can be calculated. The calculation is easily performed if the quantity 'vectorial fluence' is used. Examples taken from the literature are used to illustrate the erroneous results obtained by integrating energy fluence over area instead of integrating the scalar product of vectorial energy fluence and vectorial area.

  6. Effects of the neutronic irradiation on the impact tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapena, J.; Perosanz, F.J.; Hernandez, M.T.

    1993-01-01

    The changes that the Charpy curves suffer when steel is exposed to neutronic fluence are studied. Three steels with different chemical composition were chosen, two of them (JPF and JPJ) being treated at only one neutronic fluence, while the last one (JRQ) was irradiated at three fluences. In this way, it was possible to compare the effect of increasing the neutronic dose, and to study the experimental results as a function of the steel chemical composition. Two characteristic facts have been observed: the displacement of the curve at higher temperatures, and decrease of the upper shelf energy (USE). The mechanical recovery of the materials after two different thermal treatments is also described, and a comparation between the experimental results obtained and the damage prediction formulas given by different regulatory international organisms in the nuclear field is established. Author. 11 refs

  7. Study and development of new dosemeters for thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urena N, F.

    1998-01-01

    An alanine-boron compound, alanine hydroborate, was synthesized and chemically characterized to be used for thermal neutrons fluence measurements. The synthesis of the compound was made by reacting the amino acid alanine with boric acid in three different media: acidic, neutral and alkaline. Physicochemical analysis showed that the alkaline medium is favorable for the synthesis of the alanine hydroborate. The compound was evaluated as a thermal neutron fluence detector by the detection of the free radical yield upon neutron thermal irradiation by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR). The present work also studies the EPR-signal response of the three preparations to thermal neutron irradiation (φ = 5 x 10 7 n/cm 2 -s). The following EPR signal parameters of the samples were investigated: peak-to-peak signal intensity vs. thermal neutron fluence Φ = φ Δt ; where Δt = 1, 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, 90, 100, 110 and 120 h. , peak-to-peak signal intensity vs. microwave power, signal fading; repeatability, batch homogeneity, stability and zero dose response. It is concluded that these new products could be used in thermal neutron fluence estimations. (Author)

  8. Neutron and photon scattering properties of high density concretes used in radiation therapy facilities: A Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesbahi, Asghar; Khaldari, Rezvan

    2017-09-01

    In the current study the neutron and photon scattering properties of some newly developed high density concretes (HDCs) were calculated by using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. Five high-density concretes including Steel-Magnetite, Barite, Datolite-Galena, Ilmenite-ilmenite, Magnetite-Lead with the densities ranging from 5.11 g/cm3 and ordinary concrete with density of 2.3 g/cm3 were studied in our simulations. The photon beam spectra of 4 and 18 MV from Varian linac and neutron spectra of clinical 18 MeV photon beam was used for calculations. The fluence of scattered photon and neutron from all studied concretes was calculated in different angles. Overall, the ordinary concrete showed higher scattered photons and Datolite-Galena concrete (4.42 g/cm3) had the lowest scattered photons among all studied concretes. For neutron scattering, fluence at the angle of 180 was higher relative to other angles while for photons scattering fluence was maximum at 90 degree. The scattering fluence for photons and neutrons was dependent on the angle and composition of concrete. The results showed that the fluence of scattered photons and neutrons changes with the composition of high density concrete. Also, for high density concretes, the variation of scattered fluence with angle was very pronounced for neutrons but it changed slightly for photons. The results can be used for design of radiation therapy bunkers.

  9. Neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elcomb, M.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Thermal neutrons have a particular combination of properties, which make them the probe of choice for a wide range of scattering applications. They penetrate most materials easily, the wavelength matches interatomic spacings, the energy matches the atomic vibrational energies and the magnetic moment allows them to uniquely interact with magnetic structures. Their widely varying scattering length is also used to advantage. It enables the determination of light atoms in the presence of heavy ones: hydrogen in organic molecules, and oxygen in the high Tc superconductors for example, or solving problems in alloy systems where distinction of atoms, which are neighbours in the periodic table, is required. In the 50 years since thermal neutron beams have been used for research there has been a steady increase in applications as technology has advanced. This also applies to the environments in which the materials are studied. In-situ studies at other than ambient temperatures, pressures and magnetic fields are now routine. By using multiple detector channels in powder instruments the data collection rate has increased by an order of magnitude to some extent compensating for the diffuse nature of the neutron source. The applications of neutron scattering are becoming more industrially oriented. The talk will highlight the complementarity of neutrons to other more readily available techniques, and give examples of recent research and applications. Copyright (2002) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  10. Study and development of new dosemeters for thermal neutrons; Estudio y desarrollo de nuevos dosimetros para neutrones termicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urena N, F

    1998-12-31

    An alanine-boron compound, alanine hydroborate, was synthesized and chemically characterized to be used for thermal neutrons fluence measurements. The synthesis of the compound was made by reacting the amino acid alanine with boric acid in three different media: acidic, neutral and alkaline. Physicochemical analysis showed that the alkaline medium is favorable for the synthesis of the alanine hydroborate. The compound was evaluated as a thermal neutron fluence detector by the detection of the free radical yield upon neutron thermal irradiation by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR). The present work also studies the EPR-signal response of the three preparations to thermal neutron irradiation ({phi} = 5 x 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2} -s). The following EPR signal parameters of the samples were investigated: peak-to-peak signal intensity vs. thermal neutron fluence {Phi} = {phi} {Delta}t ; where {Delta}t = 1, 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, 90, 100, 110 and 120 h. , peak-to-peak signal intensity vs. microwave power, signal fading; repeatability, batch homogeneity, stability and zero dose response. It is concluded that these new products could be used in thermal neutron fluence estimations. (Author)

  11. Tandem analyzer crystals system doubles counting rate for Bonse Hart ultra-small-angle neutron-scattering spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Koizumi, Satoshi; Motokawa, Ryuhei; Kumada, Takayuki; Aizawa, Kazuya; Hashimoto, Takeji

    2006-11-01

    A new tandem analyzer crystals system was introduced on Bonse-Hart ultra-small-angle neutron-scattering spectrometer at research reactor JRR-3, Tokai, Japan. Conventional Bonse-Hart setup consumes a considerable time to measure a scattering profile of whole q range (2×10 -4 nm -1neutrons from the sample and having different q are measured step by step. To overcome this difficulty two analyzer channel-cut silicon perfect crystals were settled in tandem and each of them diffracted the scattering of different q. In consequence, a simultaneous detection at two different q positions was realized and the measurement time was reduced to half.

  12. Killing effect of carboranyl uridine on boron neutron capture reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagaki, M.; Oda, Y.; Zhang, Z.

    1994-01-01

    This paper deals with the killing effect of carboranyl uridine (CU) on thermal neutron capture reaction in cultured glioma cell line (C6). The tumoricidal effect of CU for boron neutron capture therapy in the cultured cell system is presented. To assess the uptake of CU, the number of germ cells was determined by comparing protein concentrations of C6 cells in vitro with that of intracranially transplanted C6 tumor cells in vivo. To assess tumoricidal effects of CU, human glioma cells (T98G), containing 25 ppm natural boron of CU, were irradiated with various doses of thermal neutrons at a constant fluence rate. The uptake and killing effects of mercaptoboron and boric acid were also investigated as controls. Subcellular boron concentrations confirmed the selective affinity to the nucleic acid synthesis. CU was found to have an affinity to nucleic acid synthesis and to be accumulated into nucleus of tumor cells. The irradiation dose which yielded 37% survival rate in the case of CU and control were 3.78+12E nvt and 5.80+12E nvt, respectively. The killing effect of CU was slightly higher than that of B-SH or BA. The effective way of CU injection should be further studied to obtain the uniform CU uptake in tumor cells. (N.K.)

  13. Neutron radiation damage studies on silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zheng; Chen, W.; Kraner, H.W.

    1990-10-01

    Effects of neutron radiation on electrical properties of Si detectors have been studied. At high neutron fluence (Φ n ≥ 10 12 n/cm 2 ), C-V characteristics of detectors with high resistivities (ρ ≥ 1 kΩ-cm) become frequency dependent. A two-trap level model describing this frequency dependent effect is proposed. Room temperature anneal of neutron damaged (at LN 2 temperature) detectors shows three anneal stages, while only two anneal stages were observed in elevated temperature anneal. 19 refs., 14 figs

  14. Dose and dose rate extrapolation factors for malignant and non-malignant health endpoints after exposure to gamma and neutron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Van; Little, Mark P

    2017-11-01

    Murine experiments were conducted at the JANUS reactor in Argonne National Laboratory from 1970 to 1992 to study the effect of acute and protracted radiation dose from gamma rays and fission neutron whole body exposure. The present study reports the reanalysis of the JANUS data on 36,718 mice, of which 16,973 mice were irradiated with neutrons, 13,638 were irradiated with gamma rays, and 6107 were controls. Mice were mostly Mus musculus, but one experiment used Peromyscus leucopus. For both types of radiation exposure, a Cox proportional hazards model was used, using age as timescale, and stratifying on sex and experiment. The optimal model was one with linear and quadratic terms in cumulative lagged dose, with adjustments to both linear and quadratic dose terms for low-dose rate irradiation (neutron exposure most endpoints, malignant and non-malignant, show downward curvature in the dose response, and for most endpoints this is statistically significant (p neutron exposure is generally statistically significantly less than 1 for most malignant and non-malignant endpoints, with central estimates mostly in the range 0.1-0.9. In contrast to the situation at higher dose rates, there are statistically non-significant decreases of risk per unit dose at gamma dose rates of less than or equal to 5 mGy/h for most malignant endpoints, and generally non-significant increases in risk per unit dose at gamma dose rates ≤5 mGy/h for most non-malignant endpoints. Associated with this, the dose-rate extrapolation factor, the ratio of high dose-rate to low dose-rate (≤5 mGy/h) gamma dose response slopes, for many tumour sites is in the range 1.2-2.3, albeit not statistically significantly elevated from 1, while for most non-malignant endpoints the gamma dose-rate extrapolation factor is less than 1, with most estimates in the range 0.2-0.8. After neutron exposure there are non-significant indications of lower risk per unit dose at dose rates ≤5 mGy/h compared to higher

  15. Source characterization of Purnima Neutron Generator (PNG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishnoi, Saroj; Patel, T.; Paul, Ram K.; Sarkar, P.S.; Adhikari, P.S.; Sinha, Amar

    2011-01-01

    The use of 14.1 MeV neutron generators for the applications such as elemental analysis, Accelerated Driven System (ADS) study, fast neutron radiography requires the characterization of neutron source i.e neutron yield (emission rate in n/sec), neutron dose, beam spot size and energy spectrum. In this paper, a series of experiments carried out to characterize this neutron source. The neutron source has been quantified with neutron emission rate, neutron dose at various source strength and beam spot size at target position

  16. EURISOL-DS multi-MW target unit: Neutronics performance and shielding assessment, dose rate and material activation calculations for the MAFF configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Romanets, Y; Kadi, Y; Luis, R; Goncalves, I F; Tecchio, L; Kharoua, C; Vaz, P; Ene, D; David, J C; Rocca, R; Negoita, F

    2010-01-01

    One of the objectives of the EURISOL (EURopean Isotope Separation On-Line Radioactive Ion Beam) Design Study consisted of providing a safe and reliable facility layout and design for the following operational parameters and characteristics: (a) a 4 MW proton beam of 1 GeV energy impinging on a mercury target (the converter); (b) high neutron fluxes (similar to 3 x 10(16) neutrons/s) generated by spallation reactions of the protons impinging in the converter and (c) fission rate on fissile U-235 targets in excess of 10(15) fissions/s. In this work, the state-of-the-art Monte Carlo codes MCNPX (Pelowitz, 2005) and FLUKA (Vlachoudis, 2009; Ferrari et al., 2008) were used to characterize the neutronics performance and to perform the shielding assessment (Herrera-Martinez and Kadi, 2006; Cornell, 2003) of the EURISOLTarget Unit and to provide estimations of dose rate and activation of different components, in view of the radiation safety assessment of the facility. Dosimetry and activation calculations were perfor...

  17. A method to build an analytic model of the 10B(n,alpha)7Li reaction rate space distribution for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morand, Josselin; Moss, Raymond; Hachem, Sabet; Sauerwein, Wolfgang

    2009-07-01

    This work provides the basis of a methodology to build a deterministic model for the spatial distribution of the (10)B(n,alpha)(7)Li reaction rate in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), as a function of space variables, boron concentration and beam incidence angle in homogeneous isotropic environments but also in different heterogeneous environments. Building the analytic function in a simple homogeneous environment with numerical methods leads to a mathematical formulation of the (10)B(n,alpha)(7)Li reactions rate.

  18. Neutron induced fission cross sections for /sup 232/Th, /sup 235,238/U, /sup 237/Np and /sup 239/Pu from 1 to 400 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisowski, P.W.; Ullmann, J.L.; Balestrini, S.J.; Carlson, A.D.; Wasson, O.A.; Hill, N.W.

    1988-01-01

    Neutron-induced fission cross section ratios for samples of /sup 232/Th, /sup 235,238/U, /sup 237/Np and /sup 239/Pu have been measured from 1 to 400 MeV. The fission reaction rate was determined for all samples simultaneously using a fast parallel plate ionization chamber at a 20-m flight path. A well characterized annular proton recoil telescope was used to measure the neutron fluence up to 30 MeV. These data provided the shape of the /sup 235/U(n,f) cross section relative to the hydrogen scattering cross section. That shape was then normalized to the very accurately known values were determined using the neutron fluence measured with a second proton recoil telescope. Cross section values for /sup 232/Th, /sup 238/U, /sup 237/Np, and /sup 239/Pu were computed from the ratio data using our values for /sup 235/U(n,f). In addition to providing new results at high neutron energies, these data resolve long standing discrepancies among different data sets. 1 ref., 1 fig.

  19. Characterization of the Neutron Fields in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Radiation Calibration Laboratory Low Scatter Calibration Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radev, R

    2009-09-04

    In June 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) revised its rule on Occupational Radiation Protection, Part 10 CFR 835. A significant aspect of the revision was the adoption of the recommendations outlined in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Report 60 (ICRP-60), including new radiation weighting factors for neutrons, updated internal dosimetric models, and dose terms consistent with the newer ICRP recommendations. ICRP-60 uses the quantities defined by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) for personnel and area monitoring including the ambient dose equivalent H*(d). A Joint Task Group of ICRU and ICRP has developed various fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients which are published in ICRP-74 for both protection and operational quantities. In February 2008, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) replaced its old pneumatic transport neutron irradiation system in the Radiation Calibration Laboratory (RCL) Low Scatter Calibration Facility (B255, Room 183A) with a Hopewell Designs irradiator model N40. The exposure tube for the Hopewell system is located close to, but not in exactly the same position as the exposure tube for the pneumatic system. Additionally, the sources for the Hopewell system are stored in Room 183A where, prior to the change, they were stored in a separate room (Room 183C). The new source configuration and revision of the 10 CFR 835 radiation weighting factors necessitate a re-evaluation of the neutron dose rates in B255 Room 183A. This report deals only with the changes in the operational quantities ambient dose equivalent and ambient dose rate equivalent for neutrons as a result of the implementation of the revised 10 CFR 835. In the report, the terms 'neutron dose' and 'neutron dose rate' will be used for convenience for ambient neutron dose equivalent and ambient neutron dose rate equivalent unless otherwise stated.

  20. Damage rates in neutron irradiated FeCo and FeCo2V ordered and disordered alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riviere, J.P.; Dinhut, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    Ordered and disordered samples of FeCo and FeCo2V alloys have been irradiated at liquid hydrogen temperature with fission neutrons up to an integrated dose of about 7.2 x 10 17 n/cm 2 (E > 1 MeV). During the irradiation, the resistivity increases continuously due to point defect production. (author)

  1. Microstructure and mechanical properties of neutron irradiated beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishitsuka, E.; Kawamura, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Terai, T.; Tanaka, S.

    1998-01-01

    Microstructure and mechanical properties of the neutron irradiated beryllium with total fast neutron fluences of 1.3 - 4.3 x 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (E>1 MeV) at 327 - 616degC were studied. Swelling increased by high irradiation temperature, high fluence, and by the small grain size and high impurity. Obvious decreasing of the fracture stress was observed in the bending test and in small grain specimens which had many helium bubbles on the grain boundary. Decreasing of the fracture stress for small grain specimens was presumably caused by crack propagation on the grain boundaries which weekend by helium bubbles. (author)

  2. Determination of the thermal and epithermal neutron sensitivities of an LBO chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Satoru; Sato, Hitoshi; Shimazaki, Takuto; Nakajima, Erika; Kotani, Kei; Suda, Mitsuru; Hamano, Tsuyoshi; Kajimoto, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Kenichi; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2017-08-01

    An LBO (Li 2 B 4 O 7 ) walled ionization chamber was designed to monitor the epithermal neutron fluence in boron neutron capture therapy clinical irradiation. The thermal and epithermal neutron sensitivities of the device were evaluated using accelerator neutrons from the 9 Be(d, n) reaction at a deuteron energy of 4 MeV (4 MeV d-Be neutrons). The response of the chamber in terms of the electric charge induced in the LBO chamber was compared with the thermal and epithermal neutron fluences measured using the gold-foil activation method. The thermal and epithermal neutron sensitivities obtained were expressed in units of pC cm 2 , i.e., from the chamber response divided by neutron fluence (cm -2 ). The measured LBO chamber sensitivities were 2.23 × 10 -7  ± 0.34 × 10 -7 (pC cm 2 ) for thermal neutrons and 2.00 × 10 -5  ± 0.12 × 10 -5 (pC cm 2 ) for epithermal neutrons. This shows that the LBO chamber is sufficiently sensitive to epithermal neutrons to be useful for epithermal neutron monitoring in BNCT irradiation.

  3. Determination of the thermal and epithermal neutron sensitivities of an LBO chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, Satoru; Kotani, Kei; Kajimoto, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Kenichi [Hiroshima University, Quantum Energy Applications, Graduate School of Engineering, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Sato, Hitoshi; Nakajima, Erika [Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Science, Radiological Sciences, Ibaraki (Japan); Shimazaki, Takuto [Hiroshima University, Quantum Energy Applications, Graduate School of Engineering, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Delta Kogyo Co., Ltd., Hiroshima (Japan); Suda, Mitsuru; Hamano, Tsuyoshi [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba-Shi, Chiba (Japan); Hoshi, Masaharu [Hiroshima University, Institute for Peace Science, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2017-08-15

    An LBO (Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}) walled ionization chamber was designed to monitor the epithermal neutron fluence in boron neutron capture therapy clinical irradiation. The thermal and epithermal neutron sensitivities of the device were evaluated using accelerator neutrons from the {sup 9}Be(d, n) reaction at a deuteron energy of 4 MeV (4 MeV d-Be neutrons). The response of the chamber in terms of the electric charge induced in the LBO chamber was compared with the thermal and epithermal neutron fluences measured using the gold-foil activation method. The thermal and epithermal neutron sensitivities obtained were expressed in units of pC cm{sup 2}, i.e., from the chamber response divided by neutron fluence (cm{sup -2}). The measured LBO chamber sensitivities were 2.23 x 10{sup -7} ± 0.34 x 10{sup -7} (pC cm{sup 2}) for thermal neutrons and 2.00 x 10{sup -5} ± 0.12 x 10{sup -5} (pC cm{sup 2}) for epithermal neutrons. This shows that the LBO chamber is sufficiently sensitive to epithermal neutrons to be useful for epithermal neutron monitoring in BNCT irradiation. (orig.)

  4. Prototype Neutron Energy Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Mitchell, Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay, Richard Maurer, Ronald Wolff

    2010-06-16

    The project goals are: (1) Use three to five pressurized helium tubes with varying polyethylene moderators to build a neutron energy spectrometer that is most sensitive to the incident neutron energy of interest. Neutron energies that are of particular interest are those from the fission neutrons (typically around 1-2 MeV); (2) Neutron Source Identification - Use the neutron energy 'selectivity' property as a tool to discriminate against other competing processes by which neutrons are generated (viz. Cosmic ray induced neutron production [ship effect], [a, n] reactions); (3) Determine the efficiency as a function of neutron energy (response function) of each of the detectors, and thereby obtain the composite neutron energy spectrum from the detector count rates; and (4) Far-field data characterization and effectively discerning shielded fission source. Summary of the presentation is: (1) A light weight simple form factor compact neutron energy spectrometer ready to be used in maritime missions has been built; (2) Under laboratory conditions, individual Single Neutron Source Identification is possible within 30 minutes. (3) Sources belonging to the same type of origin viz., (a, n), fission, cosmic cluster in the same place in the 2-D plot shown; and (4) Isotopes belonging to the same source origin like Cm-Be, Am-Be (a, n) or Pu-239, U-235 (fission) do have some overlap in the 2-D plot.

  5. Flux dependence of cluster formation in neutron-irradiated weld material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergner, F; Ulbricht, A; Hein, H; Kammel, M

    2008-01-01

    The effect of neutron flux on the formation of irradiation-induced clusters in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is an unresolved issue. Small-angle neutron scattering was measured for a neutron-irradiated RPV weld material containing 0.22 wt% impurity Cu. The experiment was focused on the influence of neutron flux on the formation of irradiation-induced clusters at fixed fluence. The aim was to separate and tentatively interpret the effect of flux on the characteristics of the cluster size distribution. We have observed a pronounced effect of neutron flux on cluster size, whereas the total volume fraction of irradiation-induced clusters is insensitive to the level of flux. The result is compatible with a rate theory model according to which the range of applied fluxes covers the transition from a flux-independent regime at lower fluxes to a regime of decelerating cluster growth. The results are confronted with measured irradiation-induced changes of mechanical properties. Despite the observed flux effect on cluster size, both yield stress increase and transition temperature shift turned out to be independent of flux. This is in agreement with the volume fraction of irradiation-induced clusters being insensitive to the level of flux

  6. Neutron-induced modifications on Hostaphan and Makrofol wettability and etching behaviors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sayed, D.; El-Saftawy, A.A.; Abd El Aal, S.A.; Fayez-Hassan, M.; Al-Abyad, M.; Mansour, N.A.; Seddik, U.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the nature of polymers used as nuclear detectors is crucial to enhance their behaviors. In this work, the induced modifications in wettability and etching properties of Hostaphan and Makrofol polymers irradiated by different fluences of thermal neutrons are investigated. The wetting properties are studied by contact angle technique which showed the spread out of various liquids over the irradiated polymers surfaces (wettability enhanced). This wetting behavior is attributed to the induced changes in surface free energy (SFE), morphology, roughness, structure, hardness, and chemistry. SFE values are calculated by three different models and found to increase after neutrons irradiation associated with differences depending on the used model. These differences result from the intermolecular interactions in the liquid/polymer system. Surface morphology and roughness of both polymers showed drastic changes after irradiation. Additionally, surface structure and hardness of pristine and irradiated polymers were discussed and correlated to the surface wettability improvements. The changes in surface chemistry are examined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), which indicate an increase in surface polarity due to the formation of polar groups. The irradiated polymers etching characteristics and activation energies are discussed as well. Lastly, it is evident that thermal neutrons show efficiency in improving surface wettability and etching properties of Hostaphan and Makrofol in a controlled way. - Highlights: • Neutrons radiation used to modify Hostaphan and Makrofol polymer wetting behavior. • Tailoring surface structure, topography and chemistry control its wettability. • Bulk etching rate and activation energy improved after neutrons irradiation.

  7. Biological effects of neutron radiation and their implications for the nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennis, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Stimulated biophysical theories of the action of radiation on the cells of mammalian tissues, research on the effects of neutrons has been interpreted as implying that neutron radiation is about 60 times more effective than gamma radiation for the induction of tumours in rodents and for shortening their lives. This contrasts with the assumption made for protection purposes that it is only about ten times as effective. However, the same experiments can be interpreted also as implying that gamma radiation at the dose rates encountered in the workplace is five to ten times less effective than is generally assumed. Taken together these observations suggest that the real risks to humans from neutrons are comparable with the assumed risks from X- and gamma radiation. Further data are required to confirm these observations and their interpretation, and in the short term there is no need to change the current practices of radiological protection as regards neutron radiation. Nevertheless, it might be wise for long-term planning purposes to anticipate a reduction in the maximum permissible fluences of neutrons by a factor of about 3. (author)

  8. Investigating multi-objective fluence and beam orientation IMRT optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potrebko, Peter S.; Fiege, Jason; Biagioli, Matthew; Poleszczuk, Jan

    2017-07-01

    Radiation Oncology treatment planning requires compromises to be made between clinical objectives that are invariably in conflict. It would be beneficial to have a ‘bird’s-eye-view’ perspective of the full spectrum of treatment plans that represent the possible trade-offs between delivering the intended dose to the planning target volume (PTV) while optimally sparing the organs-at-risk (OARs). In this work, the authors demonstrate Pareto-aware radiotherapy evolutionary treatment optimization (PARETO), a multi-objective tool featuring such bird’s-eye-view functionality, which optimizes fluence patterns and beam angles for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning. The problem of IMRT treatment plan optimization is managed as a combined monolithic problem, where all beam fluence and angle parameters are treated equally during the optimization. To achieve this, PARETO is built around a powerful multi-objective evolutionary algorithm, called Ferret, which simultaneously optimizes multiple fitness functions that encode the attributes of the desired dose distribution for the PTV and OARs. The graphical interfaces within PARETO provide useful information such as: the convergence behavior during optimization, trade-off plots between the competing objectives, and a graphical representation of the optimal solution database allowing for the rapid exploration of treatment plan quality through the evaluation of dose-volume histograms and isodose distributions. PARETO was evaluated for two relatively complex clinical cases, a paranasal sinus and a pancreas case. The end result of each PARETO run was a database of optimal (non-dominated) treatment plans that demonstrated trade-offs between the OAR and PTV fitness functions, which were all equally good in the Pareto-optimal sense (where no one objective can be improved without worsening at least one other). Ferret was able to produce high quality solutions even though a large number of parameters

  9. High-damage-fluence laser glass for Nova

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallerstein, E.P.; Campbell, J.H.; Grens, J.Z.

    1987-01-01

    The ten-beam Nova laser at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is the world's largest and most powerful laser system. The authors describe how using oxidizing conditions combined with newly developed melting techniques, the metallic Pt contamination in phosphate laser glass has been reduced by a factor of --8000 to an average of --0.5 particle per disk. (It is important to realize that the techniques for eliminating Pt particles are dependent on the chemistry of the laser glass and that a solution for one type of glass will not necessarily work for another.) It is acceptable to have a small number of particles which do not grow beyond 250 μm in diameter under the full Nova fluence. During summer 1986, twenty nearly inclusion-free Nova disks were prepared in trial production by each vendor. On the basis of these results, full production has begun in late November. A related problem is the detection of Pt particles at an early stage of manufacture. It is nearly impossible to inspect visually large volumes of laser glass and insure that there are no microscopic Pt particles. Therefore, an automated laser scanning system to test for the presence of damaging inclusions was developed. The system uses a YAG laser to deliver high-fluence pulses to the glass disk. The pulse fluence is --2-3 times the Pt damage threshold. When present, Pt inclusions are easily directed by the characteristic fracture sites they create. The laser operates at 20 Hz and is used to scan the entire disk in --4-8h. Postshot examination of the disk for damage sites takes --1h. If the glass does not meet the Nova specification it is rejected. LLNL has provided damage test systems to both Hoya and Schott which are being used ot test all the production glass

  10. BNCT enhanced fast neutron therapy: in vitro studies for preparing a clinical trial at the Essen cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittig, A.; Sauerwein, W.; Hideghety, K.; Poeller, F.; Pignol, J.P.; Mueller, W.

    2000-01-01

    At the University Hospital Essen a cyclotron producing d(14)+Be fast neutrons is used routinely for patient treatment. Fast neutrons have demonstrated their potential to sterilize glioblastoma but could not show a clinical benefit because of lethal damages to healthy brain. At depth, fast neutrons are thermalized allowing neutron capture reactions, which can be used to enhance the applied dose. A selective increase of the dose to the tumor cells by BNCT may offer a chance to an effective treatment. In order to prepare a clinical trial in vitro experiments were performed. MeWo cells were irradiated in a tissue equivalent phantom at a depth of 6.5 cm. 91% 10 B enriched BSH was used to generate BNC effects. For a total dose of 1 Gy the thermal fluence rate was 3.4x10 10 cm -2 . An amount of 960 ppm 10 B present in the cell medium during irradiation led to a reduction of the cell survival from 3.6% (neutron alone) to 0.2%. If the irradiation was performed after incubation of the cells in BSH, but in a medium without BSH the survival was 1.6%. The in vitro set up demonstrates the capacity of BSH to considerably increase the biological effects of the neutron irradiation and add arguments for the opening of a clinical trial. (author)

  11. A new online detector for estimation of peripheral neutron equivalent dose in organ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irazola, L., E-mail: leticia@us.es; Sanchez-Doblado, F. [Departamento de Fisiología Médica y Biofísica, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla 41009, Spain and Servicio de Radiofísica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla 41007 (Spain); Lorenzoli, M.; Pola, A. [Departimento di Ingegneria Nuclear, Politecnico di Milano, Milano 20133 (Italy); Bedogni, R. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Frascati Roma 00044 (Italy); Terrón, J. A. [Servicio de Radiofísica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla 41007 (Spain); Sanchez-Nieto, B. [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 4880 (Chile); Expósito, M. R. [Departamento de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra 08193 (Spain); Lagares, J. I.; Sansaloni, F. [Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas y Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT), Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Peripheral dose in radiotherapy treatments represents a potential source of secondary neoplasic processes. As in the last few years, there has been a fast-growing concern on neutron collateral effects, this work focuses on this component. A previous established methodology to estimate peripheral neutron equivalent doses relied on passive (TLD, CR39) neutron detectors exposed in-phantom, in parallel to an active [static random access memory (SRAMnd)] thermal neutron detector exposed ex-phantom. A newly miniaturized, quick, and reliable active thermal neutron detector (TNRD, Thermal Neutron Rate Detector) was validated for both procedures. This first miniaturized active system eliminates the long postprocessing, required for passive detectors, giving thermal neutron fluences in real time. Methods: To validate TNRD for the established methodology, intrinsic characteristics, characterization of 4 facilities [to correlate monitor value (MU) with risk], and a cohort of 200 real patients (for second cancer risk estimates) were evaluated and compared with the well-established SRAMnd device. Finally, TNRD was compared to TLD pairs for 3 generic radiotherapy treatments through 16 strategic points inside an anthropomorphic phantom. Results: The performed tests indicate similar linear dependence with dose for both detectors, TNRD and SRAMnd, while a slightly better reproducibility has been obtained for TNRD (1.7% vs 2.2%). Risk estimates when delivering 1000 MU are in good agreement between both detectors (mean deviation of TNRD measurements with respect to the ones of SRAMnd is 0.07 cases per 1000, with differences always smaller than 0.08 cases per 1000). As far as the in-phantom measurements are concerned, a mean deviation smaller than 1.7% was obtained. Conclusions: The results obtained indicate that direct evaluation of equivalent dose estimation in organs, both in phantom and patients, is perfectly feasible with this new detector. This will open the door to an

  12. A new online detector for estimation of peripheral neutron equivalent dose in organ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irazola, L.; Sanchez-Doblado, F.; Lorenzoli, M.; Pola, A.; Bedogni, R.; Terrón, J. A.; Sanchez-Nieto, B.; Expósito, M. R.; Lagares, J. I.; Sansaloni, F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Peripheral dose in radiotherapy treatments represents a potential source of secondary neoplasic processes. As in the last few years, there has been a fast-growing concern on neutron collateral effects, this work focuses on this component. A previous established methodology to estimate peripheral neutron equivalent doses relied on passive (TLD, CR39) neutron detectors exposed in-phantom, in parallel to an active [static random access memory (SRAMnd)] thermal neutron detector exposed ex-phantom. A newly miniaturized, quick, and reliable active thermal neutron detector (TNRD, Thermal Neutron Rate Detector) was validated for both procedures. This first miniaturized active system eliminates the long postprocessing, required for passive detectors, giving thermal neutron fluences in real time. Methods: To validate TNRD for the established methodology, intrinsic characteristics, characterization of 4 facilities [to correlate monitor value (MU) with risk], and a cohort of 200 real patients (for second cancer risk estimates) were evaluated and compared with the well-established SRAMnd device. Finally, TNRD was compared to TLD pairs for 3 generic radiotherapy treatments through 16 strategic points inside an anthropomorphic phantom. Results: The performed tests indicate similar linear dependence with dose for both detectors, TNRD and SRAMnd, while a slightly better reproducibility has been obtained for TNRD (1.7% vs 2.2%). Risk estimates when delivering 1000 MU are in good agreement between both detectors (mean deviation of TNRD measurements with respect to the ones of SRAMnd is 0.07 cases per 1000, with differences always smaller than 0.08 cases per 1000). As far as the in-phantom measurements are concerned, a mean deviation smaller than 1.7% was obtained. Conclusions: The results obtained indicate that direct evaluation of equivalent dose estimation in organs, both in phantom and patients, is perfectly feasible with this new detector. This will open the door to an

  13. New thermal neutron prompt γ-ray activation analysis instrument at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackey, E.A.; Anderson, D.L.; Liposky, P.J.; Lindstrom, R.M.; Chen-Mayer, H.; Lamaze, G.P.

    2004-01-01

    A new thermal neutron prompt γ-ray activation analysis (PGAA) instrument was designed and built to replace the original PGAA system at the NIST Center for Neutron Research. By placing a sapphire filter in the neutron beam shutter assembly, the fast neutron fluence rate was reduced by a factor of 5 and low-energy (50-200 keV) γ-ray intensities were reduced by factors of 5-10. The thermal neutron fluence rate was reduced by only a factor of 1.13. A new external beam tube, sample chamber, beam stop, and support structure were built and a new detection system installed. The new beam tube is made of two cylindrical aluminum sections lined with a lithiated polymer. Both sections are kept under vacuum to reduce the number of neutrons scattered by air into the beam tube walls. The sample chamber is also fabricated from aluminum and lined with lithiated polymer, and may be evacuated to minimize the number of neutrons scattered and absorbed by air. The beam tube and sample chamber assembly is suspended from the aluminum support structure. The detection system consists of a 40% efficient (relative) germanium detector (resolution 2.0 at 1332.5 keV) and a bismuth germanate Compton suppressor. The detection system is shielded by lead, surrounded by borated and lithiated polyethylene, and placed on a table attached to the support structure. The new, more compact beam stop is welded to the support structure. Capture γ-ray photopeaks from H, B, C, N, Na, Al, Fe, Ge, I and Pb in the background spectrum were either of lower intensity or eliminated with the new PGAA instrument. The more efficient detection system, positioned closer to the sample, yielded element sensitivity increases of 5-50%. Limits of detection have been greatly reduced compared with those of the original instrument due to reduced Compton and scattered γ-ray backgrounds (especially in the low-energy region), increased sensitivities, and reduction of background γ-ray photopeak intensities

  14. Final Report on investigations of the influence of helium concentration and implantation rate on cavity nucleation and growth during neutron irradiation of Fe and EUROFER 97

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eldrup, M.; Singh, B.N.; Golubov, S.

    2010-09-01

    Model have been carried out for neutron irradiation with and without prior He implantation and for different implantation rates for comparison with the experimental results. Further, the purpose was to evaluate the role of helium in cavity nucleation and growth during 14 MeV neutron irradiation in a fusion reactor. Calculations were carried out for the experimental temperatures of 323 K and 623 K, i.e. below and above the recovery stage V. In general, the calculations agree qualitatively with the experimental observations and in some cases quantitatively. In this way the calculations give an experimentally supported detailed insight into the evolution of the cavity microstructure under different conditions. (author)

  15. Final Report on investigations of the influence of helium concentration and implantation rate on cavity nucleation and growth during neutron irradiation of Fe and EUROFER 97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldrup, M.; Singh, B.N. (Risoe DTU, Materials Research Div., Roskilde (Denmark)); Golubov, S. (Materials Science and Technology Div., Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge (United States))

    2010-09-15

    framework of the Production Bias Model have been carried out for neutron irradiation with and without prior He implantation and for different implantation rates for comparison with the experimental results. Further, the purpose was to evaluate the role of helium in cavity nucleation and growth during 14 MeV neutron irradiation in a fusion reactor. Calculations were carried out for the experimental temperatures of 323 K and 623 K, i.e. below and above the recovery stage V. In general, the calculations agree qualitatively with the experimental observations and in some cases quantitatively. In this way the calculations give an experimentally supported detailed insight into the evolution of the cavity microstructure under different conditions. (author)

  16. A survey on development of neutron standards and neutron measurement technique corresponding to various fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Tetsuro

    2007-01-01

    Various uses of neutrons are being watched in many fields such as industry, medical technology and radiation protection. Especially, high energy neutrons above 15 MeV are important in a radiation exposure issue of an aircraft and a soft error issue of a semiconductor. Therefore neutron fluence standards for the high energy region are very important. However, the standards are not almost provided all over the world. Three reasons are mainly considered: (1) poor measurement techniques for the high energy neutrons, (2) a small number of high energy neutron facilities and (3) lack of nuclear data for high energy particle reactions. In this paper, the present status of the measurement techniques, the facilities and the nuclear data is investigated and discussed. In NMIJ/AIST, the 19.0-MeV neutron fluence standard will be established by 2010, and development of high energy neutron standards above 20 MeV is also examined. An outline of the development of the high energy neutron standards is also shown in this paper. (author)

  17. Benchmark experiments on neutron streaming through JET Torus Hall penetrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batistoni, P.; Conroy, S.; Lilley, S.; Naish, J.; Obryk, B.; Popovichev, S.; Stamatelatos, I.; Syme, B.; Vasilopoulou, T.; contributors, JET

    2015-05-01

    Neutronics experiments are performed at JET for validating in a real fusion environment the neutronics codes and nuclear data applied in ITER nuclear analyses. In particular, the neutron fluence through the penetrations of the JET torus hall is measured and compared with calculations to assess the capability of state-of-art numerical tools to correctly predict the radiation streaming in the ITER biological shield penetrations up to large distances from the neutron source, in large and complex geometries. Neutron streaming experiments started in 2012 when several hundreds of very sensitive thermo-luminescence detectors (TLDs), enriched to different levels in 6LiF/7LiF, were used to measure the neutron and gamma dose separately. Lessons learnt from this first experiment led to significant improvements in the experimental arrangements to reduce the effects due to directional neutron source and self-shielding of TLDs. Here we report the results of measurements performed during the 2013-2014 JET campaign. Data from new positions, at further locations in the South West labyrinth and down to the Torus Hall basement through the air duct chimney, were obtained up to about a 40 m distance from the plasma neutron source. In order to avoid interference between TLDs due to self-shielding effects, only TLDs containing natural Lithium and 99.97% 7Li were used. All TLDs were located in the centre of large polyethylene (PE) moderators, with natLi and 7Li crystals evenly arranged within two PE containers, one in horizontal and the other in vertical orientation, to investigate the shadowing effect in the directional neutron field. All TLDs were calibrated in the quantities of air kerma and neutron fluence. This improved experimental arrangement led to reduced statistical spread in the experimental data. The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code was used to calculate the air kerma due to neutrons and the neutron fluence at detector positions, using a JET model validated up to the

  18. Neutron induced degradation in nitrided pyrogenic field oxide MOS capacitors

    CERN Document Server

    Vaidya, S J; Shaikh, A M; Chandorkar, A N

    2002-01-01

    Neutron induced oxide charge trapping and generation of interface states in MOS capacitors with pyrogenic and nitrided pyrogenic field oxides have been studied. In order to assess the damage due to neutrons alone, it is necessary to account for the damage produced by the accompanying gamma rays from neutron radiation. This is done by measuring the intensity of gamma radiation accompanying neutrons at different neutron fluences at the irradiation position. MOS capacitor structures were subjected to neutron radiation in a swimming pool type of reactor. Other samples from the same batch were then subjected to an equivalent dose of gamma radiation from a Co sup 6 sup 0 source. The difference in the damage observed was used to characterize the damage caused by neutrons. It is observed that neutrons, though uncharged, are capable of causing ionization damage. This damage is found to be significant when the radiation is performed under biased conditions. Nitridation in different ambients is found to improve the radi...

  19. Tandem analyzer crystals system doubles counting rate for Bonse-Hart ultra-small-angle neutron-scattering spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Koizumi, Satoshi; Motokawa, Ryuhei; Kumada, Takayuki; Aizawa, Kazuya; Hashimoto, Takeji

    2006-01-01

    A new tandem analyzer crystals system was introduced on Bonse-Hart ultra-small-angle neutron-scattering spectrometer at research reactor JRR-3, Tokai, Japan. Conventional Bonse-Hart setup consumes a considerable time to measure a scattering profile of whole q range (2x10 -4 nm -1 -2 nm -1 , where q denotes magnitude of scattering vector) due to the step scan system, in which the scattered neutrons from the sample and having different q are measured step by step. To overcome this difficulty two analyzer channel-cut silicon perfect crystals were settled in tandem and each of them diffracted the scattering of different q. In consequence, a simultaneous detection at two different q positions was realized and the measurement time was reduced to half

  20. APPLE-3: improvement of APPLE for neutron and gamma-ray flux, spectrum and reaction rate plotting code, and of its code manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Hiromitu; Maki, Koichi; Seki, Yasushi.

    1991-03-01

    A code APPLE was produced in 1976 for calculating and plotting tritium breeding ratio and tritium production rate distributions. That code was improved as 'APPLE-2' in 1982, to calculate and plot not only tritium breeding ratio but also distributions of neutron and gamma-ray fluxes, their spectra, nuclear heating rates and other reaction rates, and dose rate distributions during operation and after shutdown in 1982. The code APPLE-2 can calculate and plot these nuclear properties derived from neutron and gamma-ray fluxes by ANISN (one dimensional transport code), DOT3.5 (two dimensional transport code) and MORSE (three dimensional Monte Carlo code). We revised the code APPLE-2 as 'APPLE-3' by adding many functions to the APPLE-2 code in accordance with users' requirements proposed in recent progress of fusion reaction nuclear design. With minor modification of APPLE-2, a number of inconsistencies have been found between the code manual and the input data in the code. In the present report, the new functions added to APPLE-2 and improved users' manual are explained. (author)

  1. Spectra of photons and neutrons generated in a heterogeneous head of a 15 MV LINAC at differents field sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benites-Rengifo, J. L.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Velazquez-Fernandez, J. B. [Posgrado en CBAP, Universidad Autonoma de Nayarit, Carretera Tepic-Compostela km 9. C.P. 63780. Xalisco, Nayarit (Mexico); Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Apdo. Postal 336, 98000 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico); Posgrado en CBAP, Universidad Autonoma de Nayarit, Carretera Tepic-Compostela km 9. C.P. 63780. Xalisco, Nayarit (Mexico)

    2012-10-23

    Spectra of photons and neutrons were calculated, using the Monte Carlo code MCNP-5 using the e/p/n mode. A heterogeneous model was used to define the linac head where the collimators were modeled to produce five different treatment fields at the isocenter. Photon and neutron spectra were estimated in several points along two directions from the isocenter. The total photon fluence beyond 60 cm behaves according to 1/r{sup 2} rule, while total neutron fluence, beyond 80 cm, can be described by diffusion theory using an infinite plane as a neutron source.

  2. Gadolinium neutron capture therapy for brain tumors. Biological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagaki, Masao; Oda, Yoshifumi; Matsumoto, Masato; Kikuchi, Haruhiko; Kobayashi, Tooru; Kanda, Keiji; Ujeno, Yowri.

    1994-01-01

    This study investigated the tumoricidal effect of gadolinium neutron capture therapy (Gd-NCT) in in vitro and in vivo systems using Gd-DTPA. In in vitro study, a certain amount of Gd-DTPA, yielding 5000 ppm Gd-n, was added to human glioma cells, T98G, upon which thermal neutrons were exposed. After irradiation, the cells were incubated and the colonies were counted 10 days later. In in vivo study, Fisher-344 rats with experimentally induced gliosarcoma cells (9L) were exposed to thermal neutrons at a fluence rate of 3E+9/s for 1 h immediately after iv injection of Gd-DTPA. Two weeks after irradiation, brain samples were histologically examined. Tumor clearance of Gd-DTPA was also determined. In vitro analysis showed that a 1% survival level was obtained at 3.75E+12 (n/cm 2 ) for the Gd (+) medium and 2.50E+13 (n/cm 2 ) for the Gd (-) medium. In in vivo analysis, the concentration of Gd in 9L-rat brain tumor after iv injection of 0.2 mg/kg Gd-DTPA was found to be less than 100 ppm, but Gd-NCT on 9L-rat brain tumor administered with a ten-fold dose showed a substantial killing effect on tumor without serious injury to the normal brain structure. The killing effect of Gd-NCT was confirmed in in vitro and in vivo systems. (N.K.)

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of light fluence calculation during pleural PDT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meo, Julia L.; Zhu, Timothy

    2013-03-01

    A thorough understanding of light distribution in the desired tissue is necessary for accurate light dosimetry in PDT. Solving the problem of light dose depends, in part, on the geometry of the tissue to be treated. When considering PDT in the thoracic cavity for treatment of malignant, localized tumors such as those observed in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), changes in light dose caused by the cavity geometry should be accounted for in order to improve treatment efficacy. Cavity-like geometries demonstrate what is known as the "integrating sphere effect" where multiple light scattering off the cavity walls induces an overall increase in light dose in the cavity. We present a Monte Carlo simulation of light fluence based on a spherical and an elliptical cavity geometry with various dimensions. The tissue optical properties as well as the non-scattering medium (air and water) varies. We have also introduced small absorption inside the cavity to simulate the effect of blood absorption. We expand the MC simulation to track photons both within the cavity and in the surrounding cavity walls. Simulations are run for a variety of cavity optical properties determined using spectroscopic methods. We concluded from the MC simulation that the light fluence inside the cavity is inversely proportional to the surface area.

  4. Effects of light fluence and wavelength on expression of the gene encoding cucumber hydroxypyruvate reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoni, G P; Becker, W M

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the regulation of cucumber (Cucumis sativus) hydroxypyruvate reductase mRNA abundance in response to white-, red-, and far-red-light treatments. Following irradiation of dark-adapted cucumber seedlings with 15 min to 4 h of either white or red light and return to darkness, the mRNA level for the gene encoding hydroxypyruvate reductase (Hpr) in cotyledons peaks in the darkness 16 to 20 h later. The response of the Hpr mRNA level to total fluence of white light depends more directly on irradiation time than on fluence rate. In addition to this time-dependent component, a phytochrome-dependent component is involved in Hpr regulation in dark-adapted green cotyledons as shown by red-light induction and partial far-red-light reversibility. Parallel measurements of mRNA levels for the ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase small subunit and for the chlorophyll a/b-binding protein show that Hpr is the most responsive to short (about 60 min) white- and red-light treatments and that each mRNA has a characteristic pattern of accumulation in dark-adapted cotyledons in response to light. PMID:8022942

  5. Theoretical Time Dependent Thermal Neutron Spectra and Reaction Rates in H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purohit, S.N.

    1966-04-15

    The early theoretical and experimental time dependent neutron thermalization studies were limited to the study of the transient spectrum in the diffusion period. The recent experimental measurements of the time dependent thermal neutron spectra and reaction rates, for a number of moderators, have generated considerable interest in the study of the time dependent Boltzmann equation. In this paper we present detailed results for the time dependent spectra and the reaction rates for resonance detectors using several scattering models of H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O. This study has been undertaken in order to interpret the integral time dependent neutron thermalization experiments in liquid moderators which have been performed at the AB Atomenergi. The proton gas and the deuteron gas models are inadequate to explain the measured reaction rates in H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O. The bound models of Nelkin for H{sub 2}O and of Butler for D{sub 2}O give much better agreement with the experimental results than the gas models. Nevertheless, some disagreement between theoretical and experimental results still persists. This study also indicates that the bound model of Butler and the effective mass 3. 6 gas model of Brown and St. John give almost identical reaction rates. It is also surprising to note that the calculated reaction rate for Cd for the Butler model appears to be in better agreement with the experimental results of D{sub 2}O than of the Nelkin model with H{sub 2}O experiments. The present reaction rate studies are sensitive enough so as to distinguish between the gas model and the bound model of a moderator. However, to investigate the details of a scattering law (such as the effect of the hindered rotations in H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O and the weights of different dynamical modes) with the help of these studies would require further theoretical as well as experimental investigations. Theoretical results can be further improved by improving the source for thermal neutrons, the

  6. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy on neutron irradiated MgB2 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Capua, Roberto; Salluzzo, Marco; Vaglio, Ruggero; Ferdeghini, Carlo; Ferrando, Valeria; Putti, Marina; Xi Xiaoxing; Aebersold, Hans U.

    2007-01-01

    Neutron irradiation was performed on MgB 2 thin films grown by hybrid physical chemical vapor deposition. Samples irradiated with different neutron fluences, having different critical temperatures, were studied by scanning tunneling spectroscopy in order to investigate the effect of the introduced disorder on the superconducting and spectroscopic properties. A monotonic increase of the π gap with increasing disorder was found

  7. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy on neutron irradiated MgB{sub 2} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Capua, Roberto [University of Napoli and CNR-INFM/Coherentia, Via Cinthia, Naples I-80126 (Italy)], E-mail: rdicapua@na.infn.it; Salluzzo, Marco; Vaglio, Ruggero [University of Napoli and CNR-INFM/Coherentia, Via Cinthia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); Ferdeghini, Carlo [CNR-INFM/LAMIA, Via Dodecaneso 33, Genova I-16146 (Italy); Ferrando, Valeria [CNR-INFM/LAMIA, Via Dodecaneso 33, Genova I-16146 (Italy); Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Putti, Marina [CNR-INFM/LAMIA, Via Dodecaneso 33, Genova I-16146 (Italy); Xi Xiaoxing [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Aebersold, Hans U. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen CH-5232 (Switzerland)

    2007-09-01

    Neutron irradiation was performed on MgB{sub 2} thin films grown by hybrid physical chemical vapor deposition. Samples irradiated with different neutron fluences, having different critical temperatures, were studied by scanning tunneling spectroscopy in order to investigate the effect of the introduced disorder on the superconducting and spectroscopic properties. A monotonic increase of the {pi} gap with increasing disorder was found.

  8. High repetition-rate neutron generation by several-mJ, 35 fs pulses interacting with free-flowing D2O

    OpenAIRE

    Hah, J.; Petrov, G.M.; Nees, J.A.; He, Z.-H.; Hammig, M.D.; Krushelnick, K.; Thomas, A.G.R.

    2016-01-01

    Using several-mJ energy pulses from a high-repetition rate (1/2 kHz), ultrashort (35 fs) pulsed laser interacting with a 10 lm diameter stream of free-flowing heavy water (D2O), we demonstrate a 2.45 MeV neutron flux of 105/s. Operating at high intensity (of order 1019W/cm2), laser pulse energy is efficiently absorbed in the pre-plasma, generating energetic deuterons. These collide with deuterium nuclei in both the bulk target and the large volume of low density D2O vapor surrounding the targ...

  9. Validation of MCNP NPP Activation Simulations for Decommissioning Studies by Analysis of NPP Neutron Activation Foil Measurement Campaigns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volmert Ben

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an overview of the Swiss Nuclear Power Plant (NPP activation methodology is presented and the work towards its validation by in-situ NPP foil irradiation campaigns is outlined. Nuclear Research and consultancy Group (NRG in The Netherlands has been given the task of performing the corresponding neutron metrology. For this purpose, small Aluminium boxes containing a set of circular-shaped neutron activation foils have been prepared. After being irradiated for one complete reactor cycle, the sets have been successfully retrieved, followed by gamma-spectrometric measurements of the individual foils at NRG. Along with the individual activities of the foils, the reaction rates and thermal, intermediate and fast neutron fluence rates at the foil locations have been determined. These determinations include appropriate corrections for gamma self-absorption and neutron self-shielding as well as corresponding measurement uncertainties. The comparison of the NPP Monte Carlo calculations with the results of the foil measurements is done by using an individual generic MCNP model functioning as an interface and allowing the simulation of individual foil activation by predetermined neutron spectra. To summarize, the comparison between calculation and measurement serve as a sound validation of the Swiss NPP activation methodology by demonstrating a satisfying agreement between measurement and calculation. Finally, the validation offers a chance for further improvements of the existing NPP models by ensuing calibration and/or modelling optimizations for key components and structures.

  10. Radiation damage in silicon due to albedo neutrons emitted from hadronic beam dumps (Fe and U)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, T.A.; Bishop, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    Calculations have been carried out to determine the level of radiation damage that can be expected from albedo neutrons when 1- and 5-GeV negative pions are incident on iron and uranium beam dumps. The calculated damage data are presented in several ways including neutron fluence above 0.111 MeV, 1 MeV equivalent neutron fluence, damage energy deposition, and DPA or displacements per atom. Details are presented as to the method of calculation. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  11. Influence of target-scattered neutrons on cross-section measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesiecki, H.; Cosack, M.; Siebert, B.R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Monoenergetic neutrons produced with accelerators are usually accompanied by degraded and secondary neutrons which arise from reactions of source neutrons in the material of the target construction. A Monte Carlo code was wr