WorldWideScience

Sample records for neutron equivalent fluence

  1. Neutron fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors: a comparison of data sets and interpolation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, C.S.; Killough, G.G.

    1983-01-01

    Various segments of the health physics community advocate the use of different sets of neutron fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors as a function of energy and different methods of interpolation between discrete points in those data sets. The major data sets and interpolation methods are used to calculate the spectrum average fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors for five spectra associated with the various shielded conditions of the Health Physics Research Reactor. The results obtained by use of the different data sets and interpolation methods are compared and discussed. (author)

  2. Calculation of neutron fluence to dose equivalent conversion coefficients using GEANT4; Calculo de coeficientes de fluencia de neutrons para equivalente de dose individual utilizando o GEANT4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Rosane M.; Santos, Denison de S.; Queiroz Filho, Pedro P. de; Mauricio, CLaudia L.P.; Silva, Livia K. da; Pessanha, Paula R., E-mail: rosanemribeiro@oi.com.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Fluence to dose equivalent conversion coefficients provide the basis for the calculation of area and personal monitors. Recently, the ICRP has started a revision of these coefficients, including new Monte Carlo codes for benchmarking. So far, little information is available about neutron transport below 10 MeV in tissue-equivalent (TE) material performed with Monte Carlo GEANT4 code. The objective of this work is to calculate neutron fluence to personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients, H{sub p} (10)/Φ, with GEANT4 code. The incidence of monoenergetic neutrons was simulated as an expanded and aligned field, with energies ranging between thermal neutrons to 10 MeV on the ICRU slab of dimension 30 x 30 x 15 cm{sup 3}, composed of 76.2% of oxygen, 10.1% of hydrogen, 11.1% of carbon and 2.6% of nitrogen. For all incident energy, a cylindrical sensitive volume is placed at a depth of 10 mm, in the largest surface of the slab (30 x 30 cm{sup 2}). Physic process are included for neutrons, photons and charged particles, and calculations are made for neutrons and secondary particles which reach the sensitive volume. Results obtained are thus compared with values published in ICRP 74. Neutron fluence in the sensitive volume was calculated for benchmarking. The Monte Carlo GEANT4 code was found to be appropriate to calculate neutron doses at energies below 10 MeV correctly. (author)

  3. Personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients for neutron fluence over the energy range of 20-250 MeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsher, R H; McLean, T D; Justus, A L; Devine, R T; Gadd, M S

    2010-03-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed to extend existing neutron personal dose equivalent fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients to an energy of 250 MeV. Presently, conversion coefficients, H(p,slab)(10,alpha)/Phi, are given by ICRP-74 and ICRU-57 for a range of angles of radiation incidence (alpha = 0, 15, 30, 45, 60 and 75 degrees ) in the energy range from thermal to 20 MeV. Standard practice has been to base operational dose quantity calculations 20 MeV. Both light and heavy ions (HIs) (carbon, nitrogen and oxygen recoil nuclei) were transported down to a lower energy limit (1 keV for light ions and 5 MeV for HIs). Track energy below the limit was assumed to be locally deposited. For neutron tracks slab phantom.

  4. Neutron fluence measurement in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camacho L, M.E.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of present work is to determine the fluence of neutrons in nuclear facilities using two neutron detectors designed and built at Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ), Mexico. The two neutron detectors are of the passive type, based on solid state nuclear tracks detectors (SSNTD). One of the two neutron detectors was used to determine the fluence distribution of the ports at the nuclear research reactor TRIGA Mark III, which belongs to ININ. In these facilities is important to know the neutron fluence distribution characteristic to carried out diverse kind of research activities. The second neutron detector was employed in order to carry out environmental neutron surveillance. The detector has the property to separate the thermal, intermediate and fast components of the neutron fluence. This detector was used to measure the neutron fluence at hundred points around the primary container of the first Mexican Nuclear Power plant 'Laguna Verde'. This last detector was also used to determine the neutron fluence in some points of interest, around and inside a low scattering neutron room at the 'Centro de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes' of the ININ, to know the background neutron field produced by the neutron sources used there. The design of the two neutron detector and the results obtained for each of the surveying facilities, are described in this work. (Author)

  5. Neutron fluence spectrometry using disk activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loevestam, Goeran; Hult, Mikael; Fessler, Andreas; Gasparro, Joel; Kockerols, Pierre; Okkinga, Klaas; Tagziria, Hamid; Vanhavere, Filip; Wieslander, J.S. Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    A simple and robust detector for spectrometry of environmental neutrons has been developed. The technique is based on neutron activation of a series of different metal disks followed by low-level gamma-ray spectrometry of the activated disks and subsequent neutron spectrum unfolding. The technique is similar to foil activation but here the applied neutron fluence rates are much lower than usually in the case of foil activation. The detector has been tested in quasi mono-energetic neutron fields with fluence rates in the order of 1000-10000 cm -2 s -1 , where the obtained spectra showed good agreement with spectra measured using a Bonner sphere spectrometer. The detector has also been tested using an AmBe source and at a neutron fluence rate of about 40 cm -2 s -1 , again, a good agreement with the assumed spectrum was achieved

  6. Neutron fluence spectrometry using disk activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loevestam, Goeran [EC-JRC-Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium)], E-mail: goeran.loevestam@ec.europa.eu; Hult, Mikael; Fessler, Andreas; Gasparro, Joel; Kockerols, Pierre; Okkinga, Klaas [EC-JRC-Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Tagziria, Hamid [EC-JRC-Institute for the Protection and the Security of the Citizen (IPSC), Via E. Fermi 1, I-21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See,) (Italy); Vanhavere, Filip [SCK-CEN, Boeretang, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Wieslander, J.S. Elisabeth [EC-JRC-Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FIN-40014, University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2009-01-15

    A simple and robust detector for spectrometry of environmental neutrons has been developed. The technique is based on neutron activation of a series of different metal disks followed by low-level gamma-ray spectrometry of the activated disks and subsequent neutron spectrum unfolding. The technique is similar to foil activation but here the applied neutron fluence rates are much lower than usually in the case of foil activation. The detector has been tested in quasi mono-energetic neutron fields with fluence rates in the order of 1000-10000 cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, where the obtained spectra showed good agreement with spectra measured using a Bonner sphere spectrometer. The detector has also been tested using an AmBe source and at a neutron fluence rate of about 40 cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, again, a good agreement with the assumed spectrum was achieved.

  7. Project ''PHANTOM'' - measurement of the absorbed dose, the ''averaged LET'' and the thermal neutron fluence in a tissue equivalent Phantom onboard space station MIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, T.; Hajek, M.; Vana, N.; Schoener, W.; Akatov, Y.; Shurshakov, V.; Arkhangelsky, V.

    2001-01-01

    A water filled phantom with a diameter of 35 cm was developed at the Institute for Biomedical Problems. This tissue equivalent phantom is equipped with 4 channels to deposit dosemeters in different depths. In the framework of the project 'PHANTOM' (phase 1-3) thermoluminescent dosemeters of the commercially available Types TLD - 600 and TLD - 700 were exposed from May 1997 to February 1999 for an overall of 572 days in the different channels (perpendicular and normal to the hull of the spacecraft) of the phantom. The phantom was positioned in the commander cabin, the board engineer cabin and in the module KWANT 2. Besides the measurement of the depth dose distribution, the 'averaged LET' was determined using the HTR - method. The HTR - method utilizes the different LET - efficiencies of the main - and the high temperature glow peaks of LiF dosemeters for the evaluation of the 'averaged LET' in mixed radiation fields. Therefore it is possible to calculate the depth distribution of the biologically relevant dose equivalent. The results show, that despite of the depth decrease of the absorbed dose, the depth dose equivalent is almost constant. This can be explained by the production of secondary particles inside the phantom. The flux of the thermal neutrons was determined using the pair method. Calibration was performed at the research reactor of the Austrian Universities. First results show, that the contribution of thermal neutrons are roughly 10% of the total neutron dose equivalent. (orig.) [de

  8. Neutron fluence produced in medical accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.C.; Silva, A.X. da; Crispim, V.R.

    2004-01-01

    Radiotherapy with photon and electron beams still represents the most diffused technique to control and treat tumour diseases. To increase the treatment efficiency, accelerators of higher energy are used, the increase of electron and photon energy is joined with generation of undesired fast neutron that contaminated the therapeutic beam and give a non-negligible contribution to the patient dose. In this work we have simulated with the MCNP4B code the produced neutron spectra in the interaction between the beam and the head to the accelerator and estimating the equivalent dose for neutrons by x-ray dose for aims far from the targets. (author)

  9. Studies for improvement of WWER-440 neutron fluence determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilieva, Kr.; Belousov, S.; Apostolov, T.

    2001-01-01

    For assessment of radiation embrittlement and prediction of reactor vessel lifetime with reasonable conservatism a 'best estimated' neutron fluence is necessary. New studies purposed to improve the fluence determination are presented: 1) study on the reliability of multigroup presentation of the neutron cross sections, and 2) impact of negative gradient of reactor power in the periphery assemblies on the neutron fluence evaluation. The results of these studies are base for improvement of neutron fluence determination methodology applied by the INRNE, BAS at Kozloduy NPP. (author)

  10. Retrospective Reactor Dosimetry for Neutron Fluence, Helium, and Boron Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Oliver, Brian M.

    2003-01-01

    Neutron fluences can be measured and radiation damage parameters determined by analyzing the neutron reaction products in very small samples removed from components of an operating power research reactor. This process, known as retrospective reactor dosimetry, provides precise neutron exposure parameters for establishing or validating calculations of neutron fluences, helium generation, and radiation damage to reactor materials. Correlation of the neutron fluence and helium data helps to establish and validate models of radiation damage and helium production that are needed to address important issues such as irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking, void swelling, and weld repair of cracks. Results are presented for samples recently obtained from several operating reactors

  11. The fluence research of filter material for fast neutron fluence measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Xiding

    2010-01-01

    When the fast neutron fluence is measured by radioactivation techniques in the nuclear reactor the fast neutron is also filtered a little by the thermal neutron filter material, and if the filter material thickness increase the filtered fast neutron increases therewith. For fast neutron fluenc measurement, there are only cadmium, boron and gadolinium three elements filtering fluence can be calculated ordinarily. In order to calculate the filtered fast neutron fluence of the all elements in the filter material, the many total cross sections of nuclides had checked out from nuclear cross section data library, converted them into the same energy group structure, then element's total cross section, compound's total cross section and multilayer filters' total cross section had calculated from these total cross sections with same energy group structure, a new cross section data library can be obtained lastly through merging these cross sections into the old cross section data library used for neutron fluence measurement. The calculation analysis indicates that the results of the unit 2 surveillance capsule U of DAYA Bay NPP and the unit 1 surveillance capsule A of the Second Nuclear Power Plant of Qinshan by considering the all elements subtracting iron are smaller about 1.5% and 2.6% respectively than the ones only to consider cadmium, boron. The old measured results accord with the new values under the measurement uncertainty, are reliable. The new results are more accuracy. (authors)

  12. Neutron fluence determination for light water reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.

    1994-01-01

    A general description of limitations that exist in pressure vessel neutron fluence determinations for commercial light water reactors is presented. Complexity factors that arise in light water reactor pressure vessel neutron fluence calculations are identified and used to analyze calculational limitations. Two broad categories of calculational limitations are introduced, namely benchmark field limitations and deep penetration limitations. Explicit examples of limitations that can arise in each of these two broad categories are presented. These limitations are used to show that the recent draft regulatory guide for the determination of pressure vessel neutron fluence, developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is based upon procedures and assumptions that are not valid. To eliminate the complexity and limitations of calculational methods, it is recommended that the determination of light water reactor pressure vessel neutron fluence be based upon experiment. Recommendations for improved methods of pressure vessel surveillance neutron dosimetry are advanced

  13. Extension of CASCADE.04 to estimate neutron fluence and dose ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Two different methods, 'track length estimator' and 'collision estimator' are adapted for the estimation of neutron fluence rate needed to calculate the ambient dose rate. For the validation of the methods, neutron dose rates are experimentally measured at different locations of a 5Ci Am–Be source, shielded in Howitzer-type ...

  14. Extension of CASCADE.04 to estimate neutron fluence and dose ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Capability to compute neutron dose rate is introduced for the first time in the new version of the CASCADE.04 code. Two different methods, `track length estimator' and `collision estimator' are adapted for the estimation of neutron fluence rate needed to calculate the ambient dose rate. For the validation of the methods, ...

  15. Safety factors for neutron fluences in NPP safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demekhin, V.L.; Bukanov, V.N.; Il'kovich, V.V.; Pugach, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    In accordance with global practice and a number of existing regulations, the use of conservative approach is required for the calculations related to nuclear safety assessment of NPP. It implies the need to consider the determination of neutron fluence errors that is rather complicated. It is proposed to carry out the consideration by the way of multiplying the neutron fluences obtained with transport calculations by safety factors. The safety factor values are calculated by the developed technique based on the theory of errors, features of the neutron transport calculation code and the results obtained with the code. It is shown that the safety factor value is equal 1.18 with the confidence level of not less than 0.95 for the majority of VVER-1000 reactor places where neutron fluences are determined by MCPV code, and its maximum value is 1.25

  16. Development of a Secondary Neutron Fluence Standard at GELINA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyse, Jan; Eykens, Roger; Moens, Andre; Plompen, Arjan J.M.; Schillebeeckx, Peter; Wynants, Ruud; Anastasiou, Maria

    2013-06-01

    The MetroFission project, a Joint Research Project within the European Metrology Research Program, aims at addressing a number of metrological problems involved in the design of proposed Generation IV nuclear reactors. One of the objectives of this multidisciplinary project is the improvement of neutron cross section measurement techniques in order to arrive at uncertainties as required for the design and safety assessment of new generation power plants and fuel cycles. This objective is in line with the 'Uncertainty and target accuracy assessment for innovative systems using recent covariance data evaluations' published by a working party of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency in 2008. These requests are often very challenging, being at or beyond the state-of-the-art in neutron measurements, which is set by self-normalizing methods and the neutron data standards used at laboratories where the data are measured. A secondary neutron fluence standard has been developed and calibrated at the neutron time-of-flight facility GELINA of the JRC's Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM). It consists of a flux monitor, a reference ionization chamber containing a 10 B layer and a 235 U layer, and a parallel plate ionization chamber with 8 well characterized 235 U deposits. These devices are used to determine the neutron fluence, based on the well-known neutron induced fission reaction on 235 U. All deposits have been prepared and characterized at the IRMM target preparation lab. The secondary fluence standard at the GELINA facility can be used for reliable determination of the efficiency of fluence measurement devices used in neutron data measurements at IRMM and elsewhere. It is an essential tool to reliably calibrate fluence normalization devices used in neutron time-of-flight cross section measurements. (authors)

  17. Experimental results of neutron fluence outside an iron shield in the forward direction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, M.M.C.; Elwyn, A.J.; Fein, D.; James, E.; Johns, K.; Davis, W.; Ciampa, D.P.; Mierkiewicz, E.

    1996-09-01

    Analyses of both lateral shielding measurements and Monte Carlo calculations for beam stop geometry for incident hadrons at energies between 10 GeV and 10 TeV suggests that the dose equivalent can be represented by the expression H = H 0 (E)e -r/λ /r 2 where H, is the source term, r is the radial distance to the point of interest in the shield, and λ is the effective interaction length, or absorption mean free path. However, unlike the lateral shielding case, there is no similarly simple analytical expression that can be used to describe the on-axis longitudinal cascade development. In this study the results from the measurement in the forward direction of neutron fluence spectra (and the derived quantity dose equivalent) for 25 to 150 GeV pions incident on an iron beam stop as a function of thickness of iron are presented. The observed dependence of both fluence and dose equivalent on shield thickness and hadron energy was then quantified in terms of an expression in which a build up factor as well as an attenuation term was included. On the basis of this analysis the conversion factor from fluence to dose equivalent was also determined for these forward going neutrons. This work represents the first systematic study at an high energy accelerator of the depth dependence of neutron fluence in longitudinal shielding

  18. The development report of an intelligent neutron fluence integration monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Zongbing; Wei Ying

    1996-10-01

    An intelligent neutron fluence integration monitor is introduced. It is used to measure the received neutron fluence of the monocrystalline silicon in reactor radiation channel. The significance of study and specifications of the instrument are briefly described. The emphasis is on the working principle, structure and characteristics of the instrument is intelligent due to use of monolithic microcomputer. It has many advantages proved in the actual practice, such as powerful function, high accuracy, diversity of application, high level automatization, easy to operate, high reliability, etc. After using this instrument the monocrystalline silicon radiation technology is improved and the efficiency of production is raised. (1 fig.)

  19. Determination of the neutron fluence spectra in the neutron therapy room of KIRAMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, B H; Kim, J S; Kim, J L; Kim, Y S; Yang, T G; Lee, M Y

    2007-01-01

    High energy proton induced neutron fluence spectra were determined at the Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS) using an extended Bonner Sphere (BS) set from the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) in a series of measurements to quantify the neutron field. At the facility of the MC50 cyclotron of KIRAMS, two Be targets of different thicknesses, 1.0 and 10.5 mm, were bombarded by 35 and 45-MeV protons to produce six kinds of neutron fields, which were classified according to the measurement position and the use or no use of a beam collimator such as the gantry of the neutron therapy unit. In order to obtain a priori information to unfold the measured BS data the MCNPX code was used to calculate the neutron spectrum, and the influence of the surrounding materials for cooling the target assembly were also reviewed through this calculation. Some dosimetric quantities were determined by using the spectra determined in this measurement. Dose equivalent rates of these neutron fields ranged from 0.21 to 5.66 mSv h(-1)nA(-1) and the neutron yields for a thick Be target were 3.05 and 4.77% in the case of using a 35 and a 45-MeV proton, respectively.

  20. Determination of the neutron fluence spectra in the neutron therapy room of KIRAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, B. H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J. L.; Kim, Y. S.; Yang, T. G.; Lee, M. Y.

    2007-01-01

    High energy proton induced neutron fluence spectra were determined at the Korea Inst. of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS) using an extended Bonner Sphere (BS) set from the Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst. (KAERI) in a series of measurements to quantify the neutron field. At the facility of the MC50 cyclotron of KIRAMS, two Be targets of different thicknesses, 1.0 and 10.5 mm, were bombarded by 35 and 45-MeV protons to produce six kinds of neutron fields, which were classified according to the measurement position and the use or no use of a beam collimator such as the gantry of the neutron therapy unit. In order to obtain a priori information to unfold the measured BS data the MCNPX code was used to calculate the neutron spectrum, and the influence of the surrounding materials for cooling the target assembly were also reviewed through this calculation. Some dosimetric quantities were determined by using the spectra determined in this measurement. Dose equivalent rates of these neutron fields ranged from 0.21 to 5.66 mSv h -1 nA -1 and the neutron yields for a thick Be target were 3.05 and 4.77% in the case of using a 35 and a 45-MeV proton, respectively. (authors)

  1. The activation method for determining neutron spectra and fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogel, J.; Vespalec, R.

    1980-01-01

    3 mm thick foils of 4 and 17 mm in diameter were used for measurements. NaI scintillation detectors 45 mm in diameter by 50 mm thick and 40 mm in diameter by 1 mm thick, and a Ge-Li spectrometer of 53 cm 3 in volume were used for gamma detection. A photopeak or a certain part of the integral spectrum was measured for each radionuclide. Computer code PIKAR was applied in automatic calculation of a simple gamma spectrum obtained using the semiconductor spectrometer. The FACT code was used for calculating foil activity. Codes SAND II and RFSP were used for neutron spectra unfolding. Ge-Li detector spectrometry was used for determining neutron fluence. Code FLUE was used for determining the mean value of neutron flux density and fluence. (J.P.)

  2. Neutron fluence in antiproton radiotherapy, measurements and simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.

    2010-01-01

    A significant part of the secondary particle spectrum from antiproton annihilation consists of fast neutrons, which may contribute to a significant dose background found outside the primary beam. Using a polystyrene phantom as a moderator, we have performed absolute measurements of the thermalized...... part of the fast neutron spectrum using Lithium-6 and -7 Fluoride TLD pairs. The experimental results are found to be in good agreement with simulations using the Monte Carlo particle transport code FLUKA. The thermal neutron kerma resulting from the measured thermal neutron fluence is insignificant...... compared to the contribution from fast neutrons. The results are found to be similar to values calculated for pion treatment, however exact modeling under more realistic treatment scenarios is still required to quantitatively compare these treatment modalities....

  3. Investigation of neutron fluence using fluence monitors for irradiation test at WWR-K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanova, N.K.; Takemoto, N.

    2013-01-01

    Irradiation test of a Si ingot is planned using WWR-K in Institute of Nuclear Physics Republic of Kazakhstan (INP RK) to develop an irradiation technology for Si semiconductor production by Neutron Transmutation Doping (NTD) method in the framework of an international cooperation between INP RK and Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Japan. It is possible to irradiate the Si ingot of 6 inch in diameter at the K-23 irradiation channel in the WWR-K. The preliminary irradiation test using 4 Al ingots was performed to evaluate the actual neutronic irradiation field at the K-23 channel in the WWR-K. Each Al ingot has the same dimension as the Si ingot, and 15 fluence monitors are equipped in it. Iron wire and aluminum-cobalt wire are inserted into them, and it is possible to evaluate both fast and thermal neutron fluxes by measurement of these radiation activities after irradiation. This report described the results of the preliminary irradiation test and the neutronic calculations by Monte Carlo method in order to evaluate the neutronic irradiation field in the irradiation position for the silicon ingot at the channel in the WWR-K. (authors)

  4. Fluence to Dose Equivalent Conversion Coefficients for Evaluation of Accelerator Radiation Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Ralph H.; Zeman, Gary H.

    2001-01-01

    The derivation of a set of conversion functions for the expression of neutron fluence measurements in terms of Effective Dose, E, is described. Four functions in analytical form are presented, covering the neutron energy range from 2.5 10-8 to 10+4 MeV, for the interpretation of fluence measurements in the typical irradiation conditions experienced around high-energy proton accelerators such as the Bevatron. For neutron energies below 200 MeV the analytical functions were modeled after the ISO and ROT conversion coefficients in ICRU 57. For neutron energies above 200 MeV, the analytical function was derived from an analysis of recent published data. Sample calculations using either the analytical expressions or the tabulated conversion coefficients from which the analytical expressions are derived show agreement to better than plus/minus 5%

  5. Fluence-compensated down-scattered neutron imaging using the neutron imaging system at the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, D T; Volegov, P L; Merrill, F E; Munro, D H; Grim, G P; Landen, O L; Spears, B K; Fittinghoff, D N; Field, J E; Smalyuk, V A

    2016-11-01

    The Neutron Imaging System at the National Ignition Facility is used to observe the primary ∼14 MeV neutrons from the hotspot and down-scattered neutrons (6-12 MeV) from the assembled shell. Due to the strong spatial dependence of the primary neutron fluence through the dense shell, the down-scattered image is convolved with the primary-neutron fluence much like a backlighter profile. Using a characteristic scattering angle assumption, we estimate the primary neutron fluence and compensate the down-scattered image, which reveals information about asymmetry that is otherwise difficult to extract without invoking complicated models.

  6. International key comparison of neutron fluence measurements in mono-energetic neutron fields: C.C.R.I.(3)-K10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.; Wang, Z.; Rong, C. [China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE), Beijing, People' s Republic of China (China); Lovestam, G.; Plompen, A.; Puglisi, N. [EC-JRC-Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Geel (Belgium); Gilliam, D.M.; Eisenhauer, C.M.; Nico, J.S.; Dewey, M.S. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg (United States); Kudo, K.; Uritani, A.; Harano, H.; Takeda, N. [National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ), Tsukuba (Japan); Thomas, D.J.; Roberts, N.J.; Bennett, A.; Kolkowski, P. [National Physical Laboratory (NPL), Teddington (United Kingdom); Moisseev, N.N.; Kharitonov, I.A. [Mendeleyev Institute for Metrology (VNIIM), St Petersburg (Russian Federation); Guldbakke, S.; Klein, H.; Nolte, R.; Schlegel, D. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    C.C.R.I. Section III (neutron measurements) conducted a unique key comparison of neutron fluence measurements in mono-energetic neutron fields. In contrast to former comparisons, here the fluence measurements were performed with the participants' instruments in the same neutron fields at the P.T.B. accelerator facility. Seven laboratories- the C.I.A.E. (China), I.R.M.M. (E.C.), N.M.I.J. (Japan), N.I.S.T. (USA), N.P.L. (UK), P.T.B. (Germany) and the V.N.I.I.M. (Russia)-employed their primary standard reference methods or transfer instruments carefully calibrated against their primary standards, to determine the fluence of 0.144 MeV, 1.2 MeV, 5.0 MeV and 14.8 MeV neutrons and reported calibration coefficients for a selected neutron monitor and each neutron energy with a detailed uncertainty budget for the measurements. The key comparison reference values (K.C.R.V.) were finally evaluated as the weighted mean values of the neutron fluence at 1 m distance from the target in vacuum per neutron monitor count. The uncertainties of each K.C.R.V. amounted to about 1%. The degree of equivalence (D.o.E.), defined as the deviation of the result reported by the laboratories for each energy from the corresponding K.C.R.V., and the associated expanded uncertainty are also reported. The deviations between the results of two laboratories each with the corresponding expanded uncertainties complete the documentation of the degrees of equivalence. (authors)

  7. International key comparison of neutron fluence measurements in mono-energetic neutron fields: C.C.R.I.(3)-K10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.; Wang, Z.; Rong, C.; Lovestam, G.; Plompen, A.; Puglisi, N.; Gilliam, D.M.; Eisenhauer, C.M.; Nico, J.S.; Dewey, M.S.; Kudo, K.; Uritani, A.; Harano, H.; Takeda, N.; Thomas, D.J.; Roberts, N.J.; Bennett, A.; Kolkowski, P.; Moisseev, N.N.; Kharitonov, I.A.; Guldbakke, S.; Klein, H.; Nolte, R.; Schlegel, D.

    2007-01-01

    C.C.R.I. Section III (neutron measurements) conducted a unique key comparison of neutron fluence measurements in mono-energetic neutron fields. In contrast to former comparisons, here the fluence measurements were performed with the participants' instruments in the same neutron fields at the P.T.B. accelerator facility. Seven laboratories- the C.I.A.E. (China), I.R.M.M. (E.C.), N.M.I.J. (Japan), N.I.S.T. (USA), N.P.L. (UK), P.T.B. (Germany) and the V.N.I.I.M. (Russia)-employed their primary standard reference methods or transfer instruments carefully calibrated against their primary standards, to determine the fluence of 0.144 MeV, 1.2 MeV, 5.0 MeV and 14.8 MeV neutrons and reported calibration coefficients for a selected neutron monitor and each neutron energy with a detailed uncertainty budget for the measurements. The key comparison reference values (K.C.R.V.) were finally evaluated as the weighted mean values of the neutron fluence at 1 m distance from the target in vacuum per neutron monitor count. The uncertainties of each K.C.R.V. amounted to about 1%. The degree of equivalence (D.o.E.), defined as the deviation of the result reported by the laboratories for each energy from the corresponding K.C.R.V., and the associated expanded uncertainty are also reported. The deviations between the results of two laboratories each with the corresponding expanded uncertainties complete the documentation of the degrees of equivalence. (authors)

  8. Measured Thermal and Fast Neutron Fluence Rates for ATF-1 Holders During ATR Cycle 157D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Larry Don [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miller, David Torbet [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>1MeV) neutron fluence rate data for the ATF-1 holders located in core for ATR Cycle 157D which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML) as requested by the Power Reactor Programs (ATR Experiments) Radiation Measurements Work Order. This report contains measurements of the fluence rates corresponding to the particular elevations relative to the 80-ft. core elevation. The data in this report consist of (1) a table of the ATR power history and distribution, (2) a hard copy listing of all thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, and (3) plots of both the thermal and fast neutron fluence rates. The fluence rates reported are for the average power levels given in the table of power history and distribution.

  9. The measurement of the fluence rate of accelerator fusion neutrons by using the associated particle method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dalun; Li Yijun; Jiang Li

    1998-11-01

    The associated particle method is normally used to measure the fluence rate of accelerator fusion neutron. The principle, set-up and technical points are standardized. The measurement error is up to 1%∼1.5%

  10. Interministerial decree of 10 February 1988 fixing the derived limits of the air concentration and the annual intake limit and the values of the quality factor and the neutron fluence rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This decree establishes the derived concentration limits in the air and annual inhalation limits for the radioisotopes and the values of the quality factors and the conversion factors fluence/dose equivalent for neutrons and protons

  11. The determination of fast neutron fluence in radiation stability tests of steel samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogel, J.; Vespalec, R.

    1979-01-01

    The activation method is described of determining fast neutron fluence. Samples of steel designed for WWER type reactor pressure vessels were irradiated in the CHOUCA-rigs in the core of the WWR-S reactor. The neutron spectrum was measured by the multiple activation foil method and the effective cross sections of fluence monitors were calculated. The fluences obtained from the reactions 54 Fe(n,p) 54 Mn and 63 Cu(n,α) 60 Co are presented and the method is discussed. (author)

  12. A hybrid source-driven method to compute fast neutron fluence in reactor pressure vessel - 017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren-Tai, Chiang

    2010-01-01

    A hybrid source-driven method is developed to compute fast neutron fluence with neutron energy greater than 1 MeV in nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV). The method determines neutron flux by solving a steady-state neutron transport equation with hybrid neutron sources composed of peripheral fixed fission neutron sources and interior chain-reacted fission neutron sources. The relative rod-by-rod power distribution of the peripheral assemblies in a nuclear reactor obtained from reactor core depletion calculations and subsequent rod-by-rod power reconstruction is employed as the relative rod-by-rod fixed fission neutron source distribution. All fissionable nuclides other than U-238 (such as U-234, U-235, U-236, Pu-239 etc) are replaced with U-238 to avoid counting the fission contribution twice and to preserve fast neutron attenuation for heavy nuclides in the peripheral assemblies. An example is provided to show the feasibility of the method. Since the interior fuels only have a marginal impact on RPV fluence results due to rapid attenuation of interior fast fission neutrons, a generic set or one of several generic sets of interior fuels can be used as the driver and only the neutron sources in the peripheral assemblies will be changed in subsequent hybrid source-driven fluence calculations. Consequently, this hybrid source-driven method can simplify and reduce cost for fast neutron fluence computations. This newly developed hybrid source-driven method should be a useful and simplified tool for computing fast neutron fluence at selected locations of interest in RPV of contemporary nuclear power reactors. (authors)

  13. Studies on the Neutron Radiation Damage Equivalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZOU De-hui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To establish a unified standard of the evaluation of different sources of radiation damage, the neutron radiation damage equivalent standard source was determined both at home and abroad, and a lot of equivalence research work was done for making weapons anti neutron radiation performance examination and acceptance basis. The theoretical research progress was combed according to the relationship between the displacement damage function and the radiation source spectra ,and the experimental research progress was combed from the basic experimental methods, the controlling trend of effect parameters and field parameters. The experiment method to reduce the uncertainty was discussed, and present the research directions of radiation damage equivalence.

  14. Development of neutron fluence measurement and evaluation technology for the test materials in the capsule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, U.; Choi, S. H.; Kang, H. D. [Kyungsan University, Kyungsan (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    The four kinds of the fluence monitor considered by self-shielding are design and fabricated for evaluation of neutron irradiation fluence. They are equipped with dosimeters consisting of Ni, Fe and Ti wires and so forth. The nuclear reaction rate is obtained by measurement on dosimeter using the spectroscopic analysis of induced {gamma}-ray. We established the nuetron fluence evaluating technology that is based on the measurement of the reaction rate considering reactor's irradiation history, burn-out, self-shielding in fluence monitor, and the influence of impurity in dosimeter. The distribution of high energy neutron flux on the vertical axis of the capsule shows fifth order polynomial equation and is good agree with theoretical value in the error range of 30% by MCNP/4A code. 22 refs., 50 figs., 27 tabs. (Author)

  15. Absolute neutron fluence measurements between 0.5 and 3 MeV and their intercomparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, M.W.; Guung, T.C.; Pei, C.C.; Yang, T.N.; Hwang, W.S.; Thomas, D.J.

    1999-01-01

    Primary standards of monoenergetic neutron fluences for 0.565, 1.5 and 2.5 MeV neutrons produced by the 7 Li(p,n) 7 Be reaction have been developed for the calibration of neutron dosimeters and spectrometers. The fluences for 0.565 MeV neutrons were measured using both H 2 and CH 4 proton recoil proportional counters with the measured spectra fitted to the modified SPEC-4 Monte Carlo simulations for the subtraction of gamma and recoil carbons. The fluences for 1.5 and 2.5 MeV neutrons were determined with vacuum-type proton recoil telescopes. Various uncertainties for each detector are analyzed and its overall uncertainty is 3.1% for gas counter and less than 3% for the telescope. These neutron fluence standards have been intercompared with those of the National Physical Laboratory of the United Kingdom by the use of two transfer instruments: a long counter and a 3 He detector. The comparison results will be presented and discussed

  16. Feasibility study on using imaging plates to estimate thermal neutron fluence in neutron-gamma mixed fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Tanabe, Yu; Sakae, Takeji; Terunuma, Toshiyuki; Isobe, Tomonori; Kawamura, Hiraku; Yasuoka, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Harano, Hideki; Nishiyama, Jun; Masuda, Akihiko; Nohtomi, Akihiro

    2011-11-01

    In current radiotherapy, neutrons are produced in a photonuclear reaction when incident photon energy is higher than the threshold. In the present study, a method of discriminating the neutron component was investigated using an imaging plate (IP) in the neutron-gamma-ray mixed field. Two types of IP were used: a conventional IP for beta- and gamma rays, and an IP doped with Gd for detecting neutrons. IPs were irradiated in the mixed field, and the photo-stimulated luminescence (PSL) intensity of the thermal neutron component was discriminated using an expression proposed herein. The PSL intensity of the thermal neutron component was proportional to thermal neutron fluence. When additional irradiation of photons was added to constant neutron irradiation, the PSL intensity of the thermal neutron component was not affected. The uncertainty of PSL intensities was approximately 11.4 %. This method provides a simple and effective means of discriminating the neutron component in a mixed field.

  17. Test of Fibre Bragg Gratings samples under High Fast Neutrons Fluence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheymol, G.; Remy, L.; Gusarov, A.; Kinet, D.; Mégret, P.; Laffont, G.; Blanchet, T.; Morana, A.; Marin, E.; Girard, S.

    2018-01-01

    Optical fibre sensors (OFS) are worthy of interest for measurements in nuclear reactor thanks to their unique features, particularly compact size and remote multi-point sensing for some of them. But besides non negligible constraints associated with the high temperature environment of the experiments of interest, it is well known that the performances of OFS can be severely affected by high level of radiations. The Radiation Induced Attenuation (RIA) in the fibre is probably most known effect, which can be to some extent circumvented by using rad hard fibres to limit the dynamic loss. However, when the fast neutron fluence reaches 1018 to 1019 n/cm2, the density and index variations associated to structural changes may deteriorate drastically the performances of OFS even if they are based on rad hard fibres, by causing direct errors in the measurements of temperature and/or strain changes. The aim of the present study is to access the effect of nuclear radiations on the Fabry Perot (FP) and of Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors through the comparison of measurements made on these OFS - or part of them - before and after irradiation [1]. In the context of development of OFS for high irradiation environment and especially for Material Testing Reactors (MTRs), Sake 2 experiment consists in an irradiation campaign at high level of gamma and neutron fluxes conducted on samples of fibre optics - bare or functionalised with FBG. The irradiation was performed at two levels of fast neutron fluence: 1 and 3.1019 n/cm2 (E>1MeV), at 250°± 25°C, in the SCK•CEN BR2 reactor (Mol Belgium). An irradiation capsule was designed to allow irradiation at the specified temperature without active control. The neutron fluence was measured with activation dosimeters and the results were compared with MCPN computations. Investigation of bare samples gives information on the density changes, while for the FBGs both density and refractive index perturbation are involved. Some results for

  18. Neutron fluence effect on the IASCC susceptibility of AISI 304 stainless steel under simulated BWR conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navas, M.; Castano, M.L; Gomez-Briceno, D.; Karlsen, T.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Neutron irradiation modifies the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of AISI 304 stainless steel in high temperature water. The microstructure and the microchemistry of materials change with the increasing of dose, inducing Radiation Hardening and Radiation Induced Segregation (RIS). SCC behaviour of irradiated material is influenced by these changes, leading to a value of threshold neutron fluence which could depend on different variables. Therefore, fully understanding of the IASCC material susceptibility implies the study of the effect of critical parameters like accumulated neutron fluence, material composition and water chemistry. Experimental work is being carried out in collaboration with the Halden Reactor Project and it includes the performance of Constant Extension Rate Tests (CERT) at CIEMAT laboratories in out-of-pile loops that simulate BWR operating conditions. The main objective is to determine the influence of neutron fluence on the SCC susceptibility of austenitic steels. A test matrix was defined to test unirradiated and irradiated specimens fabricated from tubes used previously in the Crack Initiation Test (IFA 618) performed at the Halden Reactor Project. According to the irradiation periods of IFA 618, three materials (Annealed and thermally-sensitised AISI 304 and AISI 316L) with three different accumulated neutron fluences are available. This paper presents the results obtained with annealed and thermally sensitised AISI 304 SS tested in different environments. (Author)

  19. The plasma focus as a large fluence neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucker, O.; Bostick, W.; Long, J.; Luce, J.; Sahlin, H.

    1977-01-01

    A continuously operated, 1 pps, dense-plasma-focus device capable of delivering a minimum of 10 15 neutrons per pulse for material testing purposes is described. With I 5 scaling, predicted from analysis of existing machines, yields of 10 16 -10 17 neutrons per pulse are postulated. The average power consumption, which has become a major issue as a result of the energy crisis is shown to be highly favorable. A novel approach to the capacitor bank and switch design allowing repetitive operation is discussed. (Auth.)

  20. Measured thermal and fast neutron fluence rates for ATF-1 holders during ATR cycle 160A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, B. J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miller, D. T. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-06-06

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>1MeV) neutron fluence rate data for the ATF-1 holders located in core for ATR Cycle 160A which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML).

  1. Standard Test Method for Measuring Neutron Fluence Rate by Radioactivation of Cobalt and Silver

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a suitable means of obtaining the thermal neutron fluence rate, or fluence, in well moderated nuclear reactor environments where the use of cadmium, as a thermal neutron shield as described in Method E262, is undesirable because of potential spectrum perturbations or of temperatures above the melting point of cadmium. 1.2 This test method describes a means of measuring a Westcott neutron fluence rate (Note 1) by activation of cobalt- and silver-foil monitors (See Terminology E170). The reaction 59Co(n,γ)60Co results in a well-defined gamma emitter having a half-life of 1925.28 days (1). The reaction 109Ag(n,˙γ) 110mAg results in a nuclide with a complex decay scheme which is well known and having a half-life of 249.76 days (1). Both cobalt and silver are available either in very pure form or alloyed with other metals such as aluminum. A reference source of cobalt in aluminum alloy to serve as a neutron fluence rate monitor wire standard is available from the National Institute ...

  2. Energy spectra and fluence of the neutrons produced in deformed space-time conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardone, F.; Rosada, A.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, spectra of energy and fluence of neutrons produced in the conditions of deformed space-time (DST), due to the violation of the local Lorentz invariance (LLI) in the nuclear interactions are shown for the first time. DST-neutrons are produced by a mechanical process in which AISI 304 steel bars undergo a sonication using ultrasounds with 20 kHz and 330 W. The energy spectrum of the DST-neutrons has been investigated both at low (less than 0.4 MeV) and at high (up to 4 MeV) energy. We could conclude that the DST-neutrons have different spectra for different energy intervals. It is therefore possible to hypothesize that the DST-neutrons production presents peculiar features not only with respect to the time (asynchrony) and space (asymmetry) but also in the neutron energy spectra.

  3. A new method for the determination of unknown neutron fluence for 14.0 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, Fariha [Physics Reasearch Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)]. E-mail: fariha@pinstech.org.pk; Khan, Ehsan U. [Department of Physics, CIIT, Islamabad (Pakistan); Qureshi, Imtinan [Physics Reasearch Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Husaini, Syed N. [Physics Reasearch Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Ahmad, Waqar [Physics Reasearch Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Rajput, Usman [Physics Reasearch Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Raza, Qaiser [Applied Physics Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2006-11-15

    Measuring the correct neutron fluence in various energy intervals in and around the neutron sources is important for the purpose of personnel and environmental neutron dosimetry. In this paper, we present a new method for the measurement of the fluence of mono-energetic neutrons having the energy of 14.0 MeV. The samples exposed to neutrons from the 14.0 MeV neutron generator at PINSTECH with various fluence values ranging from 10{sup 7} to 10{sup 10} n cm{sup -2} were etched for 10 min in 6 N NaOH at 70.0{+-}1.0 {sup o}C and the transmittance of UV radiation was measured using a spectrophotometer. This procedure was repeated 20 times after etching the same sample each time for increasing time intervals till the stage when transmittance reached the constant minimum value. An exponential decay of the transmittance has been observed with respect to the increasing etching time interval in each of the samples exposed to various neutron fluence. Further, it has also been observed that there is a linear relationship between the transmittance decay constant and neutron fluence. Hence, the linear graph can be used as a calibration for measuring the unknown fluence of 14.0 MeV neutrons.

  4. An estimation of fast neutron fluence on the KMRR core wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung-Chul; Lee, Ji-Bok; Kang, Chang-Soon.

    1991-01-01

    The fast neutron fluence (E > 1 MeV) hitting the KMRR core wall of zircaloy-4 was calculated using a two-dimensional discrete ordinates transport computer code DOT4.2. For the nuclear data base, 171 neutron groups of the DLC-41C/VITAMIN-C library were collapsed into 21 groups, of which the highest 8 groups had E > 1 MeV, using an one-dimensional discrete ordinates transport computer code ANISN. To construct a three-dimensional flux, a leakage correction factor was introduced for axial leakage treatment. The leakage correction factor was obtained from ANISN cylinder and DOT(r,z) calculations. The calculated fast neutron fluence was compared with that of the three-dimensional simulation using a Monte Carlo transport computer code MCNP. Assuming a 30-yr reactor lifetime with 80% capacity factor, the maximum fast neutron fluence on the KMRR core wall is expected to be 9.80 x 10 22 n/cm 2 . (author)

  5. Evaluation of the Neutron Fluence at a Baffle-Former Zone in an Operating Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S. L.; Yoo, C. S.; Hwang, S. S.

    2008-01-01

    Neutron fluence evaluation has been performed on a reactor vessel in an operating nuclear power plant in order to evaluate the radiation embrittlement which is directly related to plant safety as well as a plant operating license, based on the operating history. Because, as the operating years increase, damage may occur in the internal structures such as a baffle former bolt due to various reasons, and one of these reasons comes from the neutron fluence, so called an irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking, thus resulting in the shutdown of a plant and the replacement of a structure which has an economic disadvantage as well as a severe effect in the integrity of a plant. Neutron flux and fluence calculations for the baffle area for one of the reactors operating in Korea have been performed for all the operating cycles from the start of the reactor using real plant operating conditions such as the operating temperature, pressure and fuel loading pattern in order to evaluate any possibility that may cause a stress corrosion cracking due to the excessive neutron irradiation

  6. Development of neutron dosimeter using CR-39 for measurement of ambient dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maki, Daisuke; Shinozaki, Wakako; Ohguchi, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Takayoshi; Nakamura, Takayoshi

    2010-01-01

    A CR-39 has good advantages such as cumulative type dosimeter, small fading effect and gamma-ray insensitive. Therefore, we developed the wide energy-range environmental neutron dosimeter using eight CR-39s for area monitoring in this study. This dosimeter is made of octagonal columnar polyethylene block which height is 60 mm and bottom side is 25 mm. The dosimeter contains two types of CR-39s for fast neutron detection and slow neutron detection. Four CR-39s for fast neutron detection are used for detection of recoil protons produced by H (n, p) reactions. Four CR-39s for slow neutron detection are used with boron nitride converter to detect alpha-rays produced by 10 B (n, α) 7 Li reactions. Ambient dose equivalent is obtained by adding the number of etch-pits observed in four CR-39s for fast neutron detection to the number of etch-pits observed in four CR-39s for slow neutron detection with appropriate constants respectively. Dosimeters were irradiated with some energetic neutrons and evaluated results of ambient dose equivalent were compared with results from neutron transport calculations. Energy response of dosimeter shows good agreement with neutron fluence to ambient dose equivalent conversion coefficients. Directional dependence of dosimeter is at the same level as the rem-counter. (author)

  7. Neutron flux uncertainty and covariances for spectrum adjustment and estimation of WWER-1000 pressure vessel fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehmer, Bertram

    2000-01-01

    Results of estimation of the covariance matrix of the neutron spectrum in the WWER-1000 reactor cavity and pressure vessel positions are presented. Two-dimensional calculations with the discrete ordinates transport code DORT in r-theta and r-z-geometry used to determine the neutron group spectrum covariances including gross-correlations between interesting positions. The new Russian ABBN-93 data set and CONSYST code used to supply all transport calculations with group neutron data. All possible sources of uncertainties namely caused by the neutron gross sections, fission sources, geometrical dimensions and material densities considered, whereas the uncertainty of the calculation method was considered negligible in view of the available precision of Monte Carlo simulation used for more precise evaluation of the neutron fluence. (Authors)

  8. Neutron fluence measurement in the cavity of Balakovo nuclear power plant, unit 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voorbraak, W.P.; Baard, J.H.; Paardekooper, A.; Nolthenius, H.J.

    1996-12-01

    An international benchmark exercise has been organized by the Russian GOSATOMNADZOR. The aim was to reduce the uncertainty of fluence measurements in Nuclear Power Plants in particular VVER-1000 reactors. The benchmark was set up in the cavity of the Balakovo NPP 3. Eight institutes were involved. This report presents the results obtained by ECN. From this report, it can be concluded that the results of the relative large monitor set (13 different reaction rates with overlapping response regions) point to possible imperfections in the calculated neutron spectra. However the experimental information is not powerful enough to reduce the uncertainty of the neutron fluence rate especially in the energy region between 0.1 and 0.5 MeV below 50 percent. (orig.)

  9. Effect of high fluence neutron irradiation on transport properties of thermoelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Leonard, K. J.

    2017-07-01

    Thermoelectric materials were subjected to high fluence neutron irradiation in order to understand the effect of radiation damage on transport properties. This study is relevant to the NASA Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) program in which thermoelectric elements are exposed to radiation over a long period of time in space missions. Selected n-type and p-type bismuth telluride materials were irradiated at the High Flux Isotope Reactor with a neutron fluence of 1.3 × 1018 n/cm2 (E > 0.1 MeV). The increase in the Seebeck coefficient in the n-type material was partially off-set by an increase in electrical resistivity, making the power factor higher at lower temperatures. For the p-type materials, although the Seebeck coefficient was not affected by irradiation, electrical resistivity decreased slightly. The figure of merit, zT, showed a clear drop in the 300-400 K range for the p-type material and an increase for the n-type material. Considering that the p-type and n-type materials are connected in series in a module, the overall irradiation damages at the device level were limited. These results, at neutron fluences exceeding a typical space mission, are significant to ensure that the radiation damage to thermoelectrics does not affect the performance of RTGs.

  10. Standard Test Method for Determining Thermal Neutron Reaction Rates and Thermal Neutron Fluence Rates by Radioactivation Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 The purpose of this test method is to define a general procedure for determining an unknown thermal-neutron fluence rate by neutron activation techniques. It is not practicable to describe completely a technique applicable to the large number of experimental situations that require the measurement of a thermal-neutron fluence rate. Therefore, this method is presented so that the user may adapt to his particular situation the fundamental procedures of the following techniques. 1.1.1 Radiometric counting technique using pure cobalt, pure gold, pure indium, cobalt-aluminum, alloy, gold-aluminum alloy, or indium-aluminum alloy. 1.1.2 Standard comparison technique using pure gold, or gold-aluminum alloy, and 1.1.3 Secondary standard comparison techniques using pure indium, indium-aluminum alloy, pure dysprosium, or dysprosium-aluminum alloy. 1.2 The techniques presented are limited to measurements at room temperatures. However, special problems when making thermal-neutron fluence rate measurements in high-...

  11. Lifetime Neutron Fluence Analysis of the Ringhals Unit 1 Boiling Water Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulesza Joel A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a neutron fluence assessment considering the entire commercial operating history (35 cycles or ∼ 25 effective full power years of the Ringhals Unit 1 reactor pressure vessel beltline region. In this assessment, neutron (E >1.0 MeV fluence and iron atom displacement distributions were calculated on the moderator tank and reactor pressure vessel structures. To validate those calculations, five in-vessel surveillance chain dosimetry sets were evaluated as well as material samples taken from the upper core grid and wide range neutron monitor tubes to act as a form of retrospective dosimetry. During the analysis, it was recognized that delays in characterizing the retrospective dosimetry samples reduced the amount of reactions available to be counted and complicated the material composition determination. However, the comparisons between the surveillance chain dosimetry measurements (M and calculated (C results show similar and consistent results with the linear average M/C ratio of 1.13 which is in good agreement with the resultant least squares best estimate (BE/C ratios of 1.10 for both neutron (E >1.0 MeV flux and iron atom displacement rate.

  12. A new Recoil Proton Telescope for energy and fluence measurement of fast neutron fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebreton, Lena; Bachaalany, Mario [IRSN / LMDN (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete nucleaire / Laboratoire de Metrologie et de dosimetrie des neutrons), Cadarache Bat.159, 13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance, (France); Husson, Daniel; Higueret, Stephane [IPHC / RaMsEs (Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien / Radioprotection et Mesures Environnementales), 23 rue du loess - BP28, 67037 Strasbourg cedex 2, (France)

    2015-07-01

    The spectrometer ATHENA (Accurate Telescope for High Energy Neutron metrology Applications), is being developed at the IRSN / LMDN (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete nucleaire / Laboratoire de Metrologie et de dosimetrie des neutrons) and aims at characterizing energy and fluence of fast neutron fields. The detector is a Recoil Proton Telescope and measures neutron fields in the range of 5 to 20 MeV. This telescope is intended to become a primary standard for both energy and fluence measurements. The neutron detection is achieved by a polyethylene radiator for n-p conversion, three 50{sub m} thick silicon sensors that use CMOS technology for the proton tracking and a 3 mm thick silicon diode to measure the residual proton energy. This first prototype used CMOS sensors called MIMOSTAR, initially developed for heavy ion physics. The use of CMOS sensors and silicon diode increases the intrinsic efficiency of the detector by a factor of ten compared with conventional designs. The first prototype has already been done and was a successful study giving the results it offered in terms of energy and fluence measurements. For mono energetic beams going from 5 to 19 MeV, the telescope offered an energy resolution between 5 and 11% and fluence difference going from 5 to 7% compared to other home standards. A second and final prototype of the detector is being designed. It will hold upgraded CMOS sensors called FastPixN. These CMOS sensors are supposed to run 400 times faster than the older version and therefore give the telescope the ability to support neutron flux in the order of 107 to 108cm{sup 2}:s{sup 1}. The first prototypes results showed that a 50 m pixel size is enough for a precise scattering angle reconstruction. Simulations using MCNPX and GEANT4 are already in place for further improvements. A DeltaE diode will replace the third CMOS sensor and will be installed right before the silicon diode for a better recoil proton selection. The final prototype with

  13. Flux effect on neutron irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels irradiated to high fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soneda, N.; Dohi, K.; Nishida, K.; Nomoto, A.; Iwasaki, M.; Tsuno, S.; Akiyama, T.; Watanabe, S.; Ohta, T.

    2011-01-01

    Neutron irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is of great concern for the long term operation of light water reactors. In particular, the embrittlement of the RPV steels of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) at very high fluences beyond 6*10 19 n/cm 2 , E > 1 MeV, needs to be understood in more depth because materials irradiated in material test reactors (MTRs) to such high fluences show larger shifts than predicted by current embrittlement correlation equations available worldwide. The primary difference between the irradiation conditions of MTRs and surveillance capsules is the neutron flux. The neutron flux of MTR is typically more than one order of magnitude higher than that of surveillance capsule, but it is not necessarily clear if this difference in neutron flux causes difference in mechanical properties of RPV. In this paper, we perform direct comparison, in terms of mechanical property and microstructure, between the materials irradiated in surveillance capsules and MTRs to clarify the effect of flux at very high fluences and fluxes. We irradiate the archive materials of some of the commercial reactors in Japan in the MTR, LVR-15, of NRI Rez, Czech Republic. Charpy impact test results of the MTR-irradiated materials are compared with the data from surveillance tests. The comparison of the results of microstructural analyses by means of atom probe tomography is also described to demonstrate the similarity / differences in surveillance and MTR-irradiated materials in terms of solute atom behavior. It appears that high Cu material irradiated in a MTR presents larger shifts than those of surveillance data, while low Cu materials present similar embrittlement. The microstructural changes caused by MTR irradiation and surveillance irradiation are clearly different

  14. Calculation of neutron fluence-to-dose conversion factors for extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, R.D.; Harty, R.; McDonald, J.C.; Tanner, J.E.

    1993-04-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is developing a standard for the performance testing of personnel extremity dosimeters for the US Department of Energy. Part of this effort requires the calculation of neutron fluence-to-dose conversion factors for finger and wrist extremities. This study focuses on conversion factors for two types of extremity models: namely the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom (as specified in the draft standard for performance testing of extremity dosimeters) and more realistic extremity models composed of tissue-and-bone. Calculations for each type of model are based on both bare and D 2 O-moderated 252 Cf sources. The results are then tabulated and compared with whole-body conversion factors. More appropriate energy-averaged quality factors for the extremity models have also been computed from the neutron fluence in 50 equally spaced energy bins with energies from 2.53 x 10 -8 to 15 MeV. Tabulated results show that conversion factors for both types of extremity phantom are 15 to 30% lower than the corresponcung whole-body phantom conversion factors for 252 Cf neutron sources. This difference in extremity and whole-body conversion factors is attributable to the proportionally smaller amount of back-scattering that occurs in the extremity phantoms compared with whole-body phantoms

  15. Time changes of vertical profile of neutron fluence rate in LVR-15 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viererbl, L.; Stehno, J.; Erben, O.; Lahodova, Z.; Marek, M.

    2003-01-01

    The LVR-15 reactor is a light water research type reactor, which is situated, in Nuclear Research Institute, Rez near Prague. The reactor is used as a multipurpose facility. For some experiments and material productions, e.g. for homogeneity of silicon resistance in production of radiation doped silicon, the time changes of vertical profile of neutron fluence rate are particularly important. The assembly used for silicon irradiation has two self-powered neutron detectors installed in a vertical irradiation channel in LVR-15 reactor. Vertical profile of thermal neutron fluence rate was automatically scanned during reactor operation. The results of measurements made in 2002 and 2003 with these detectors are presented. A set of vertical profile measurements was made during two 21-days reactor cycles. During the cycle the vertical profile slightly changes both in the position of its maximum and in the shape. The time dependences of the position of profile maximum and the profile width at half maximum during the cycle are given. (author)

  16. Estimation of fast neutron fluence in steel specimens type Laguna Verde in TRIGA Mark III reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galicia A, J.; Francois L, J. L.; Aguilar H, F.

    2015-09-01

    The main purpose of this work is to obtain the fluence of fast neutrons recorded within four specimens of carbon steel, similar to the material having the vessels of the BWR reactors of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde when subjected to neutron flux in a experimental facility of the TRIGA Mark III reactor, calculating an irradiation time to age the material so accelerated. For the calculation of the neutron flux in the specimens was used the Monte Carlo code MCNP5. In an initial stage, three sheets of natural molybdenum and molybdenum trioxide (MoO 3 ) were incorporated into a model developed of the TRIGA reactor operating at 1 M Wth, to calculate the resulting activity by setting a certain time of irradiation. The results obtained were compared with experimentally measured activities in these same materials to validate the calculated neutron flux in the model used. Subsequently, the fast neutron flux received by the steel specimens to incorporate them in the experimental facility E-16 of the reactor core model operating at nominal maximum power in steady-state was calculated, already from these calculations the irradiation time required was obtained for values of the neutron flux in the range of 10 18 n/cm 2 , which is estimated for the case of Laguna Verde after 32 years of effective operation at maximum power. (Author)

  17. Fast neutron fluence evaluation of the smart reactor pressure vessel by using the GEOSHIELD code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.Y.; Kim, K.S.; Kim, H.Y.; Lee, C.C.; Zee, S.Q.

    2007-01-01

    In Korea, the design of an advanced integral reactor system called SMART has been developed by KAERI to supply energy for seawater desalination as well as an electricity generation. A fast neutron fluence distribution at the SMART reactor pressure vessel was evaluated to confirm the integrity of the vessel by using the GEOSHIELD code. The GEOSHIELD code was developed by KAERI in order to prepare an input list including a geometry modeling of the DORT code and to process results from the DORT code output list. Results by a GEOSHIELD code processing and by a manual processing of the DORT show a good agreement. (author)

  18. Development of highly efficient proton recoil counter telescope for absolute measurement of neutron fluences in quasi-monoenergetic neutron calibration fields of high energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikaze, Yoshiaki; Tanimura, Yoshihiko; Saegusa, Jun; Tsutsumi, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    Precise calibration of monitors and dosimeters for use with high energy neutrons necessitates reliable and accurate neutron fluences being evaluated with use of a reference point. A highly efficient Proton Recoil counter Telescope (PRT) to make absolute measurements with use of a reference point was developed to evaluate neutron fluences in quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields. The relatively large design of the PRT componentry and relatively thick, approximately 2 mm, polyethylene converter contributed to high detection efficiency at the reference point over a large irradiation area at a long distance from the target. The polyethylene converter thickness was adjusted to maintain the same carbon density per unit area as the graphite converter for easy background subtraction. The high detection efficiency and thickness adjustment resulted in efficient absolute measurements being made of the neutron fluences of sufficient statistical precision over a short period of time. The neutron detection efficiencies of the PRT were evaluated using MCNPX code at 2.61x10 -6 , 2.16x10 -6 and 1.14x10 -6 for the respective neutron peak energies of 45, 60 and 75 MeV. The neutron fluences were determined to have been evaluated at an uncertainty of within 6.5% using analysis of measured data and the detection efficiencies. The PRT was also designed so as to be capable of simultaneously obtaining TOF data. The TOF data also increased the reliability of neutron fluence measurements and provided useful information for use in interpreting the source of proton events.

  19. Neutron fluence in a 18 MeV Electron Accelerator for Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes G, L.C.

    2001-01-01

    An investigation was made on the theoretical fundamentals for the determination of the neutron fluence in a linear electron accelerator for radiotherapy applications and the limit values of leakage neutron radiation established by guidelines and standards in radiation protection for these type of accelerators. This investigation includes the following parts: a) Exhaustive bibliographical review on the topics mentioned above, in order to combine and to update the necessary basic information to facilitate the understanding of this subject; b) Analysis of the accelerator operation and identification of its main components, specially in the accelerator head; c) Study of different types of targets and its materials for the Bremsstrahlung production which is based on the electron initial energy, the thickness of the target, and its angular distribution and energy, which influences in the neutron generation by means of the photonuclear and electro disintegration reactions; d) Analysis of the neutron yield based on the target type and its thickness, the energy of electrons and photons; e) Analysis of the neutron energy spectra generated in the accelerator head, inside and outside the treatment room; f) Study of the dosimetry fundamentals for neutron and photon mixed fields, the dosimeter selection criteria and standards applied for these applications, specially the Panasonic U D-809 thermoluminescent dosemeter and C R-39 nuclear track dosimeter; g) Theoretical calculation of the neutron yield using a simplified geometric model for the accelerator head with spherical cell, which considers the target, primary collimator, flattener filter, movable collimators and the head shielding as the main components for radiation production. The cases with W and Pb shielding for closed movable collimators and an irradiation field of 20 x 20 cm 2 were analyzed and, h) Experimental evaluation of the leakage neutron radiation from the patient and head planes, observing that the accelerator

  20. A new active method for the measurement of slow-neutron fluence in modern radiotherapy treatment rooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, F; Iglesias, A [Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Universidad de Santiago, 15782-Santiago (Spain); Doblado, F Sanchez [Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Radiofisica and Departamento de Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain)], E-mail: faustino.gomez@usc.es

    2010-02-21

    This work focuses on neutron monitoring at clinical linac facilities during high-energy modality radiotherapy treatments. Active in-room measurement of neutron fluence is a complex problem due to the pulsed nature of the fluence and the presence of high photon background, and only passive methods have been considered reliable until now. In this paper we present a new active method to perform real-time measurement of neutron production around a medical linac. The device readout is being investigated as an estimate of patient neutron dose exposure on each radiotherapy session. The new instrument was developed based on neutron interaction effects in microelectronic memory devices, in particular using neutron-sensitive SRAM devices. This paper is devoted to the description of the instrument and measurement techniques, presenting the results obtained together with their comparison and discussion. Measurements were performed in several standard clinical linac facilities, showing high reliability, being insensitive to the photon fluence and EM pulse present inside the radiotherapy room, and having detector readout statistical relative uncertainties of about 2% on measurement of neutron fluence produced by 1000 monitor units irradiation runs.

  1. Dependence of the thermal neutron fluence at the size installations radiotherapy bunker; Dependencia de la fluencia termica de neutrones en el tamano del bunquer en instalaciones de radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Soto, X.; Amgarou, K.; Langares, J. L.; Exposito, M. R.; Gomez, F.; Domingo, C.; Sanchez-Doblado, F.

    2011-07-01

    The project aims to infer the dose deposited by neutrons in the patient treated by radiation therapy, from a measurement of the thermal neutron fluence at a selected point within the treatment room. These thermal neutrons are created when fast neutrons produced in the linac head are moderate, mainly in the walls of the bunker, and its yield depends on both the volume of the room and its geometry.

  2. Characterization of the New n_TOF Neutron Beam: Fluence, Profile and Resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Guerrero, C; Perkowski, J; Andriamonje, S; Carrapico, C; Moinul, M; Vannini, G; Quesada, J M; Harrisopulos, S; Milazzo, P M; Berthier, B; Lozano, M; Krticka, M; Domingo-Pardo, C; Nolte, R; Chiaveri, E; Jericha, E; Ferrari, A; Massimi, C; Giubrone, G; Avrigeanu, V; Martinez, T; Andrzejewski, J; Karadimos, D; Mengoni, A; Mendoza, E; Ganesan, S; Vlachoudis, V; Praena, J; Becares, V; Cortes, G; Variale, V; Quinones, J; Calvino, F; Kappeler, F; Gunsing, F; Gramegna, F; Colonna, N; Marrone, S; Pavlik, A; Berthoumieux, E; Paradela, C; Mastinu, P F; Vaz, P; Tassan-Got, L; Kadi, Y; Tarrio, D; Cano-Ott, D; Brugger, M; Wallner, A; Audouin, L; Fernandez-Ordonez, M; Sarmento, R; Becvar, F; Goncalves, I F; Martin-Fuertes, F; Cerutti, F; Pina, G; Mosconi, M; Tagliente, G; Duran, I; Ioannides, K; Weiss, C; Mirea, M; Gomez-Hornillos, M B; Vlastou, R; Calviani, M; Lederer, C; Gonzalez-Romero, E; Marganiec, J; Lebbos, E; Leeb, H; Heil, M; Dillmann, I; Tain, J L; Belloni, F

    2011-01-01

    After a halt of four years, the n\\_TOF spallation neutron facility at CERN has resumed operation in November 2008 with a new spallation target characterized by an improved safety and engineering design, resulting in a more robust overall performance and efficient cooling. The first measurement during the 2009 run has aimed at the full characterization of the neutron beam. Several detectors, such as calibrated fission chambers, the n\\_TOF Silicon Monitor, a MicroMegas detector with (10)B and (235)U samples, as well as liquid and solid scintillators have been used in order to characterize the properties of the neutron fluence. The spatial profile of the beam has been studied with a specially designed ``X-Y{''} MicroMegas which provided a 2D image of the beam as a function of neutron energy. Both properties have been compared with simulations performed. with the FLUKA code. The characterization of the resolution function is based on results from simulations which have been verified by the study of narrow capture...

  3. Simultaneous measurement of gamma-rays and neutron fluences using a HPGE detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfassi, Z.B.; Zlatin, T.; German, U.

    2006-01-01

    A simultaneous determination of gamma and neutron fluences in a mixed neutron + gamma field can be achieved by gamma-ray spectrometry, optimizing the moderator-converter-detector assembly and measuring both the direct gamma-lines and the neutron induced prompt gammas. For the prompt gamma-lines a combination of high efficiency and low background is the goal, and it can be best achieved if the gamma-energy is in the range above about 1 MeV up to 2.5 MeV. The optimal moderator-converter thickness can be determined experimentally. Most converter elements produce gamma-rays in the low energy range. If chlorine is used as a converter, the 1164.7 keV peak and the 1950-1960 keV peaks seems to be a good choice. A very practical material containing chlorine is PVC. It is an efficient moderator, it is solid, common, and can be handled easily. (author)

  4. EFFECTS OF IRRADIATION ON THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF ALLOY 690 AT LOW NEUTRON FLUENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WOO SEOG RYU

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Alloy 690 has been selected as a steam generator tubing material for SMART owing to a near immunity to primary water stress corrosion cracking. The steam generators of SMART are faced with a neutron flux due to the integrated arrangement inside a reactor vessel, and thus it is important to know the irradiation effects of the thermal conductivity of Alloy 690. Alloy 690 was irradiated at HANARO to fluences of (0.7−28 × 1019n/cm2 (E>0.1MeV at 250°C, and its thermal conductivity was measured using the laser-flash equipment in the IMEF. The thermal conductivity of Alloy 690 was dependent on temperature, and it was a good fit to the Smith-Palmer equation, which modified the Wiedemann-Franz law. The irradiation at 250°C did not degrade the thermal conductivity of Alloy 690, and even showed a small increase (1% at fluences of (0.7∼28 × 1019n/cm2 (E>0.1MeV.

  5. Shield design for next-generation, low-neutron-fluence, superconducting tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, V.D.; Gohar, Y.

    1985-01-01

    A shield design using stainless steel (SST), water, boron carbide, lead, and concrete materials was developed for the next-generation tokamak device with superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils and low neutron fluence. A device such as the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) is representative of the tokamak design which could use this shield design. The unique feature of this reference design is that a majority of the bulk steel in the shield is in the form of spherical balls with two small, flat spots. The balls are purchased from ball-bearing manufacturers and are added as bulk shielding to the void areas of builtup, structural steel shells which form the torus cavity of the plasma chamber. This paper describes the design configuration of the shielding components

  6. High Neutron Fluence Survivability Testing of Advanced Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fielder, Robert S.; Klemer, Daniel; Stinson-Bagby, Kelly L.

    2004-01-01

    The motivation for the reported research was to support NASA space nuclear power initiatives through the development of advanced fiber optic sensors for space-based nuclear power applications. The purpose of the high-neutron fluence testing was to demonstrate the survivability of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors in a fission reactor environment. 520 FBGs were installed in the Ford reactor at the University of Michigan. The reactor was operated for 1012 effective full power hours resulting in a maximum neutron fluence of approximately 5x1019 n/cm2, and a maximum gamma dose of 2x103 MGy gamma. This work is significant in that, to the knowledge of the authors, the exposure levels obtained are approximately 1000 times higher than for any previously published experiment. Four different fiber compositions were evaluated. An 87% survival rate was observed for fiber Bragg gratings located at the fuel centerline. Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry (OFDR), originally developed at the NASA Langley Research Center, can be used to interrogate several thousand low-reflectivity FBG strain and/or temperature sensors along a single optical fiber. A key advantage of the OFDR sensor technology for space nuclear power is the extremely low mass of the sensor, which consists of only a silica fiber 125μm in diameter. The sensors produced using this technology will fill applications in nuclear power for current reactor plants, emerging Generation-IV reactors, and for space nuclear power. The reported research was conducted by Luna Innovations and was funded through a Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) contract with the NASA Glenn Research Center

  7. Minimum detectable dose equivalant of NTA film for fast neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Masashi; Kumazawa, Shigeru; Nishi, Tatsuo; Numakunai, Takao

    1982-01-01

    A method has been studied of estimating the minimum detectable dose equivalent of fast neutrons for measurement of recoil proton tracks in NTA film. Poisson distribution was applied in estimation of the minimum detectable number of tracks. Factors such as sensitivity of the film for fast neutrons, energy dependency of the film response, and latent image fading of the tracks were taken into consideration in the estimation. The minimum detectable dose equivalent was affected by fluctuation in the number of tracks due to background radiation and degree of the affection depended on the measured area. The minimum detectable dose equivalent decreased with increasing the measuring area of background radiation even if the measuring area of neutron-irradiated film was small. The relation between the minimum detectable dose equivalent and the measuring area of neutron-irradiated film was obtained considering the effect of latent image fading. (author)

  8. Development of a neutron personal dose equivalent detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimura, N.; Yoshida, T.; Takada, C.; Momose, T.; Nunomiya, T.; Aoyama, K.

    2007-01-01

    A new neutron-measuring instrument that is intended to measure a neutron personal dose equivalent, H p (10) was developed. This instrument is composed of two parts: (1) a conventional moderator-based neutron dose equivalent meter and (2) a neutron shield made of borated polyethylene, which covers a backward hemisphere to adjust the angular dependence. The whole design was determined on the basis of MCNP calculations so as to have response characteristics that would generally match both the energy and angular dependencies of H p (10). This new instrument will be a great help in assessing the reference values of neutron H p (10) during field testing of personal neutron dosemeters in workplaces and also in interpreting their readings. (authors)

  9. Determination of the neutron fluence in the welding of the 'Core shroud' of the BWR reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucatero, M.A.; Xolocostli M, J.V.; Gomez T, A.M.; Palacios H, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    With the purpose of defining the inspection frequency, in function of the embrittlement of the materials that compose the welding of the 'Core Shroud' or encircling of the core of a BWR type reactor, is necessary to know the neutron fluence received for this welding. In the work the calculated values of neutron fluence accumulated maxim (E > 1 MeV) during the first 8 operation cycles of the reactor are presented. The calculations were carried out according to the NRC Regulatory Guide 1.190, making use of the DORT code, which solves the transport equation in discreet ordinate in two dimensions (xy, rΘ, and rz). The results in 3D were obtained applying the Synthesis method according to the guide before mentioned. Results are presented for the horizontal welding H3, H4, and H5, showing the corresponding curves to the fluence accumulated to the cycle 8 and a projection for the cycle 14 is presented. (Author)

  10. Measured thermal and fast neutron fluence rates for ATF-1 holders during ATR cycle 158B/159A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Larry Don [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miller, David Torbet [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Walker, Billy Justin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-11-01

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>1MeV) neutron fluence rate data for the ATF-1 holders located in core for ATR Cycle 158B/159A which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML).

  11. Photo neutron dose equivalent rate in 15 MV X-ray beam from a Siemens Primus Linac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, A; Pourfallah, T Allahverdi; Akbari, M R; Babapour, H; Shahidi, M

    2015-01-01

    Fast and thermal neutron fluence rates from a 15 MV X-ray beams of a Siemens Primus Linac were measured using bare and moderated BF3 proportional counter inside the treatment room at different locations. Fluence rate values were converted to dose equivalent rate (DER) utilizing conversion factors of American Association of Physicist in Medicine's (AAPM) report number 19. For thermal neutrons, maximum and minimum DERs were 3.46 × 10(-6) (3 m from isocenter in +Y direction, 0 × 0 field size) and 8.36 × 10(-8) Sv/min (in maze, 40 × 40 field size), respectively. For fast neutrons, maximum DERs using 9" and 3" moderators were 1.6 × 10(-5) and 1.74 × 10(-5) Sv/min (2 m from isocenter in +Y direction, 0 × 0 field size), respectively. By changing the field size, the variation in thermal neutron DER was more than the fast neutron DER and the changes in fast neutron DER were not significant in the bunker except inside the radiation field. This study showed that at all points and distances, by decreasing field size of the beam, thermal and fast neutron DER increases and the number of thermal neutrons is more than fast neutrons.

  12. Neutron fluence effects on SLOWPOKE-2 beryllium reflector composition and reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puig, Francesc, E-mail: fpuig@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Dennis, Haile, E-mail: haile.dennis02@uwimona.edu.jm [International Centre for Environmental and Nuclear Sciences, 2 Anguilla Close, University of the West Indies, Mona, Kingston 7 (Jamaica)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • SLOWPOKE-2 reflector composition evolution estimated using two different methods. • Reactivity effects of reflector composition changes calculated using MCNP5. • Impurities depletion dominates over poisons buildup, increasing reactivity. • Results contradict previously published behavior estimates for MNSR reactors. • Identified main factors explaining the observed prediction discrepancies. - Abstract: Within the scope of the conversion process from HEU to LEU of the Jamaican SLOWPOKE-2 reactor (JM-1), the effects of the neutron fluence on the beryllium reflector composition, and the corresponding effect on reactivity throughout the life of the reactor core, have been studied. Two different methods have been used and compared involving MCNP5, ORIGEN2.2, ORIGEN-S and COUPLE codes, reaching excellent agreement between them. The neutron flux profile and energy spectrum specific to the beryllium reflectors of this reactor design have been taken into account to analyze several scenarios, comprising both real and hypothetical conditions and involving different initial reflector compositions and reactor burnups. The analysis has been extended to provide estimates for the similar MNSR reactor design and compared with previously published predictions for the Syrian MNSR. The results show small overall reactivity effects in most cases, being dominated by impurity depletion as opposed to poison buildup, contrarily to what generally occurs in beryllium reflected reactors of far higher power and to MNSR predictions. The resulting reactivity increases are typically of less than 0.4 mk for usual impurity levels and maximum HEU core burnup achievable.

  13. Neutron fluence effects on SLOWPOKE-2 beryllium reflector composition and reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puig, Francesc; Dennis, Haile

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • SLOWPOKE-2 reflector composition evolution estimated using two different methods. • Reactivity effects of reflector composition changes calculated using MCNP5. • Impurities depletion dominates over poisons buildup, increasing reactivity. • Results contradict previously published behavior estimates for MNSR reactors. • Identified main factors explaining the observed prediction discrepancies. - Abstract: Within the scope of the conversion process from HEU to LEU of the Jamaican SLOWPOKE-2 reactor (JM-1), the effects of the neutron fluence on the beryllium reflector composition, and the corresponding effect on reactivity throughout the life of the reactor core, have been studied. Two different methods have been used and compared involving MCNP5, ORIGEN2.2, ORIGEN-S and COUPLE codes, reaching excellent agreement between them. The neutron flux profile and energy spectrum specific to the beryllium reflectors of this reactor design have been taken into account to analyze several scenarios, comprising both real and hypothetical conditions and involving different initial reflector compositions and reactor burnups. The analysis has been extended to provide estimates for the similar MNSR reactor design and compared with previously published predictions for the Syrian MNSR. The results show small overall reactivity effects in most cases, being dominated by impurity depletion as opposed to poison buildup, contrarily to what generally occurs in beryllium reflected reactors of far higher power and to MNSR predictions. The resulting reactivity increases are typically of less than 0.4 mk for usual impurity levels and maximum HEU core burnup achievable.

  14. Assessment of neutron fluence to organ dose conversion coefficients in the ORNL analytical adult phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miri Hakimabad, H; Rafat Motavalli, L; Karimi Shahri, K

    2009-03-01

    Neutron fluence to absorbed dose conversion coefficients have been evaluated for the analytical ORNL modified adult phantom in 21 body organs using MCNP4C Monte Carlo code. The calculation used 20 monodirectional monoenergetic neutron beams in the energy range 10(-9)-20 MeV, under four irradiation conditions: anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), left-lateral (LLAT) and right-lateral (RLAT). Then the conversion coefficients are compared with the data reported in ICRP publication 74 for mathematical MIRD type phantoms and by Bozkurt et al for the VIPMAN voxel model. Although the ORNL results show fewer differences with the ICRP results than the Bozkurt et al data, one can deduce neither complete agreement nor disparity between this study and other data sets. This comparison shows that in some cases any differences in applied Monte Carlo codes or simulated body models could significantly change the organ dose conversion factors. This sensitivity should be considered for radiological protection programmes. For certain organs, the results of two models with major differences can be in a satisfactory agreement because of the similarity in those organ models.

  15. A new online detector for estimation of peripheral neutron equivalent dose in organ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irazola, L., E-mail: leticia@us.es; Sanchez-Doblado, F. [Departamento de Fisiología Médica y Biofísica, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla 41009, Spain and Servicio de Radiofísica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla 41007 (Spain); Lorenzoli, M.; Pola, A. [Departimento di Ingegneria Nuclear, Politecnico di Milano, Milano 20133 (Italy); Bedogni, R. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Frascati Roma 00044 (Italy); Terrón, J. A. [Servicio de Radiofísica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla 41007 (Spain); Sanchez-Nieto, B. [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 4880 (Chile); Expósito, M. R. [Departamento de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra 08193 (Spain); Lagares, J. I.; Sansaloni, F. [Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas y Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT), Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Peripheral dose in radiotherapy treatments represents a potential source of secondary neoplasic processes. As in the last few years, there has been a fast-growing concern on neutron collateral effects, this work focuses on this component. A previous established methodology to estimate peripheral neutron equivalent doses relied on passive (TLD, CR39) neutron detectors exposed in-phantom, in parallel to an active [static random access memory (SRAMnd)] thermal neutron detector exposed ex-phantom. A newly miniaturized, quick, and reliable active thermal neutron detector (TNRD, Thermal Neutron Rate Detector) was validated for both procedures. This first miniaturized active system eliminates the long postprocessing, required for passive detectors, giving thermal neutron fluences in real time. Methods: To validate TNRD for the established methodology, intrinsic characteristics, characterization of 4 facilities [to correlate monitor value (MU) with risk], and a cohort of 200 real patients (for second cancer risk estimates) were evaluated and compared with the well-established SRAMnd device. Finally, TNRD was compared to TLD pairs for 3 generic radiotherapy treatments through 16 strategic points inside an anthropomorphic phantom. Results: The performed tests indicate similar linear dependence with dose for both detectors, TNRD and SRAMnd, while a slightly better reproducibility has been obtained for TNRD (1.7% vs 2.2%). Risk estimates when delivering 1000 MU are in good agreement between both detectors (mean deviation of TNRD measurements with respect to the ones of SRAMnd is 0.07 cases per 1000, with differences always smaller than 0.08 cases per 1000). As far as the in-phantom measurements are concerned, a mean deviation smaller than 1.7% was obtained. Conclusions: The results obtained indicate that direct evaluation of equivalent dose estimation in organs, both in phantom and patients, is perfectly feasible with this new detector. This will open the door to an

  16. Ambient neutron dose equivalent during proton therapy using wobbling scanning system: Measurements and calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yung-Chieh; Lee, Chung-Chi; Chao, Tsi-Chian; Tsai, Hui-Yu

    2017-11-01

    Neutron production is a concern in proton therapy, particularly in scattering proton beam delivery systems. Despite this fact, little is known about the effects of secondary neutron exposure around wobbling scattered proton treatment nozzles. The objective of this study was to estimate the neutron dose level resulting from the use of a wobbling scattered proton treatment unit. We applied the Monte Carlo method for predict the ambient neutron dose equivalent, H*(10), per absorbed dose at the treatment isocenter, D, in the proton therapy center of Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taiwan. For a 190-MeV proton beam, H* (10) / D values typically decreased with the distance from the isocenter, being 1.106 mSv/Gy at the isocenter versus 0.112 mSv/Gy at a distance of 150 cm from the isocenter. The H* (10) / D values generally decreased as the neutron receptors moved away from the isocenter, and increased when the angle from the initial beam axis increased. The ambient neutron dose equivalents were observed to be slightly lower in the direction of multileaf collimator movement. For radiation protection, the central axis of a proton-treated patient is suggested to be at the 0° angle of the beam. If the beam direction at the 90° angle is necessary, the patient axis is suggested to be along with the direction of MLC movement. Our study provides the neutron dose level and neutron energy fluence for the first wobbling proton system at the proton therapy center of Chang Gung Memorial Hospital.

  17. A new online detector for estimation of peripheral neutron equivalent dose in organ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irazola, L.; Sanchez-Doblado, F.; Lorenzoli, M.; Pola, A.; Bedogni, R.; Terrón, J. A.; Sanchez-Nieto, B.; Expósito, M. R.; Lagares, J. I.; Sansaloni, F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Peripheral dose in radiotherapy treatments represents a potential source of secondary neoplasic processes. As in the last few years, there has been a fast-growing concern on neutron collateral effects, this work focuses on this component. A previous established methodology to estimate peripheral neutron equivalent doses relied on passive (TLD, CR39) neutron detectors exposed in-phantom, in parallel to an active [static random access memory (SRAMnd)] thermal neutron detector exposed ex-phantom. A newly miniaturized, quick, and reliable active thermal neutron detector (TNRD, Thermal Neutron Rate Detector) was validated for both procedures. This first miniaturized active system eliminates the long postprocessing, required for passive detectors, giving thermal neutron fluences in real time. Methods: To validate TNRD for the established methodology, intrinsic characteristics, characterization of 4 facilities [to correlate monitor value (MU) with risk], and a cohort of 200 real patients (for second cancer risk estimates) were evaluated and compared with the well-established SRAMnd device. Finally, TNRD was compared to TLD pairs for 3 generic radiotherapy treatments through 16 strategic points inside an anthropomorphic phantom. Results: The performed tests indicate similar linear dependence with dose for both detectors, TNRD and SRAMnd, while a slightly better reproducibility has been obtained for TNRD (1.7% vs 2.2%). Risk estimates when delivering 1000 MU are in good agreement between both detectors (mean deviation of TNRD measurements with respect to the ones of SRAMnd is 0.07 cases per 1000, with differences always smaller than 0.08 cases per 1000). As far as the in-phantom measurements are concerned, a mean deviation smaller than 1.7% was obtained. Conclusions: The results obtained indicate that direct evaluation of equivalent dose estimation in organs, both in phantom and patients, is perfectly feasible with this new detector. This will open the door to an

  18. Compaction in optical fibres and fibre Bragg gratings under nuclear reactor high neutron and gamma fluence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remy, L.; Cheymol, G. [CEA, French Nuclear Energy Commission, Nuclear Energy Division, DPC/SEARS/LISL Bat 467 CEA Saclay 91191 Gif/Yvette Cedex (France); Gusarov, A. [SCK.CEN - Belgian Nuclear Research center, Boeretang 200 2400 Mol (Belgium); Morana, A.; Marin, E.; Girard, S. [Universite de Saint-Etienne, Laboratoire Hubert Curien, UMR CNRS5516, 18, rue du Pr. Lauras, F-42000 Saint-Etienne (France)

    2015-07-01

    In the framework of the development by CEA and SCK.CEN of a Fabry Perot Sensor (FPS) able to measure dimensional changes in Material Testing Reactor (MTR), the first goal of the SAKE 1 (Smirnof extention - Additional Key-tests on Elongation of glass fibres) irradiation was to measure the linear compaction of single mode fibres under high fast neutron fluence. Indeed, the compaction of the fibre which forms one side of the Fabry Perot cavity, may in particular cause a noticeable measurement error. An accurate quantification of this effect is then required to predict the radiation-induced drift and optimize the sensor design. To achieve this, an innovative approach was used. Approximately seventy uncoated fibre tips (length: 30 to 50 mm) have been prepared from several different fibre samples and were installed in the SCK.CEN BR2 reactor (Mol Belgium). After 22 days of irradiation a total fast (E > 1 MeV) fluence of 3 to 5x10{sup 19} n{sub fast}/cm{sup 2}, depending on the sample location, was accumulated. The temperature during irradiation was 291 deg. C, which is not far from the condition of the intended FPS use. A precise measurement of each fibre tip length was made before the irradiation and compared to the post irradiation measurement highlighting a decrease of the fibres' length corresponding to about 0.25% of linear compaction. The amplitude of the changes is independent of the capsule, which could mean that the compaction effect saturates even at the lowest considered fluence. In the prospect of performing distributed temperature measurement in MTR, several fibre Bragg gratings written using a femtosecond laser have been also irradiated. All the gratings were written in radiation hardened fibres, and underwent an additional treatment with a procedure enhancing their resistance to ionizing radiations. A special mounting made it possible to test the reflection and the transmission of the gratings on fibre samples cut down to 30 to 50 mm. The comparison

  19. BH3105 type neutron dose equivalent meter of high sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Changsong; Zhang Enshan; Yang Jianfeng; Zhang Hong; Huang Jiling

    1995-10-01

    It is noted that to design a neutron dose meter of high sensitivity is almost impossible in the frame of traditional designing principle--'absorption net principle'. Based on a newly proposed principle of obtaining neutron dose equi-biological effect adjustment--' absorption stick principle', a brand-new neutron dose-equivalent meter with high neutron sensitivity BH3105 has been developed. Its sensitivity reaches 10 cps/(μSv·h -1 ), which is 18∼40 times higher than one of foreign products of the same kind and is 10 4 times higher than that of domestic FJ342 neutron rem-meter. BH3105 has a measurement range from 0.1μSv/h to 1 Sv/h which is 1 or 2 orders wider than that of the other's. It has the advanced properties of gamma-resistance, energy response, orientation, etc. (6 tabs., 5 figs.)

  20. Experimental method research on neutron equal dose-equivalent detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Changsong

    1995-10-01

    The design principles of neutron dose-equivalent meter for neutron biological equi-effect detection are studied. Two traditional principles 'absorption net principle' and 'multi-detector principle' are discussed, and on the basis of which a new theoretical principle for neutron biological equi-effect detection--'absorption stick principle' has been put forward to place high hope on both increasing neutron sensitivity of this type of meters and overcoming the shortages of the two traditional methods. In accordance with this new principle a brand-new model of neutron dose-equivalent meter BH3105 has been developed. Its neutron sensitivity reaches 10 cps/(μSv·h -1 ), 18∼40 times higher than that of all the same kinds of meters 0.23∼0.56 cps/(μSv·h -1 ), available today at home and abroad and the specifications of the newly developed meter reach or surpass the levels of the same kind of meters. Therefore the new theoretical principle of neutron biological equi-effect detection--'absorption stick principle' is proved to be scientific, advanced and useful by experiments. (3 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.)

  1. Contribution to the prompt fission neutron spectrum modeling. Uncertainty propagation on a vessel fluence calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berge, Leonie

    2015-01-01

    these uncertainties on the calculated spectrum, and obtaining realistic uncertainties without having to artificially raise them, as it is sometimes necessary in Bayesian adjustments. The experimental uncertainty propagation also impacts the spectrum correlation matrix. We present the result for thermal neutron-induced fission of 235 U and 239 Pu. For the Madland-Nix model with constant inverse cross-section, the prompt neutron mean energy is 1.979 MeV for 235 U and 2.087 MeV for 239 Pu. The last aspect of this work is the calculation of the impact of the PFNS and its covariance matrix on a reactor vessel flux. This calculation is of major importance, since the vessel fluence estimation determines the vessel integrity, and therefore determines the reactor lifetime. We observe the importance of the PFNS correlation terms, to compute in particular the vessel flux uncertainty above 1 MeV, which is of the order of 6% (uncertainty only due to PFNS). (author) [fr

  2. Verification of an effective dose equivalent model for neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, J.E.; Piper, R.K.; Leonowich, J.A.; Faust, L.G.

    1991-10-01

    Since the effective dose equivalent, based on the weighted sum of organ dose equivalents, is not a directly measurable quantity, it must be estimated with the assistance of computer modeling techniques and a knowledge of the radiation field. Although extreme accuracy is not necessary for radiation protection purposes, a few well-chosen measurements are required to confirm the theoretical models. Neutron measurements were performed in a RANDO phantom using thermoluminescent dosemeters, track etch dosemeters, and a 1/2-in. (1.27-cm) tissue equivalent proportional counter in order to estimate neutron doses and dose equivalents within the phantom at specific locations. The phantom was exposed to bare and D 2 O-moderated 252 Cf neutrons at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory's Low Scatter Facility. The Monte Carlo code MCNP with the MIRD-V mathematical phantom was used to model the human body and calculate organ doses and dose equivalents. The experimental methods are described and the results of the measurements are compared to the calculations. 8 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  3. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculations of the neutron and γ-ray fluences in the TFTR diagnostic basement and comparisons with measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liew, S.L.; Ku, L.P.; Kolibal, J.G.

    1985-10-01

    Realistic calculations of the neutron and γ-ray fluences in the TFTR diagnostic basement have been carried out with three-dimensional Monte Carlo models. Comparisons with measurements show that the results are well within the experimental uncertainties

  4. Determination of neutron fluence and radiation brittleness temperature of WWER-440 and WWER-1000 pressure vessels in Kozloduy NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilieva, K.; Apostolov, T.; Belousov, S.; Petrova, T.; Antonov, S.; Ivanov, K.; Prodanova, R.

    1993-01-01

    In Units 1-4 of Kozloduy NPP (WWER-440/230), the weld 4 of RPV undergoes the most severe irradiation embrittlement. Neither witness-samples, nor detectors are designed for these reactors. Transport calculations of fast neutron fluence on WWER-440 RPV and ex-vessel measurements by threshold activation detectors are the primary means for adequate assessment of metal state and for prognosis concerning the reactor life span. In WWER-1000 reactors (Units 5-6) the maximum neutron fluence occurs on the weld 3. The systematical observation of metal state is performed through witness-samples and threshold activation detectors ( 54 Fe (n,p), 63 Cu (n,α), 93 Nb (n,n')) placed above the reactor top edge and at the first vessel ring level. There are big differences in energy spectrum and integral neutron flux falling onto the weld 3, the RPV base metal and the staff detectors. This requires additional neutron measurements in the air gap between the RPV and the thermal insulation. (author)

  5. Determination of the Neutron Fluence, the Beam Characteristics and the Backgrounds at the CERN-PS TOF Facility

    CERN Multimedia

    Leal, L C; Kitis, G; Guber, K H; Quaranta, A; Koehler, P E

    2002-01-01

    In the scope of our programme we propose to start in July 2000 with measurements on elements of well known cross sections, in order to check the reliability of the whole experimental installation at the CERN-TOF facility. These initial exploratory measurements will provide the key-parameters required for the further experimentation at the CERN-TOF neutron beam. The neutron fluence and energy resolution will be determined as a function of the neutron kinetic energy by reproducing standard capture and fission cross sections. The measurements of capture cross sections on elements with specific cross section features will allow to us to disentangle the different components of backgrounds and estimate their level in the experimental area. The time-energy calibration will be determined and monitored with a set of monoenergetic filters as well as by the measurements of elements with resonance-dominated cross sections. Finally, in this initial phase the behaviour of several detectors scheduled in successive measureme...

  6. Verification of an effective dose equivalent model for neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, J.E.; Piper, R.K.; Leonowich, J.A.; Faust, L.G.

    1992-01-01

    Since the effective dose equivalent, based on the weighted sum of organ dose equivalents, is not a directly measurable quantity, it must be estimated with the assistance of computer modelling techniques and a knowledge of the incident radiation field. Although extreme accuracy is not necessary for radiation protection purposes, a few well chosen measurements are required to confirm the theoretical models. Neutron doses and dose equivalents were measured in a RANDO phantom at specific locations using thermoluminescence dosemeters, etched track dosemeters, and a 1.27 cm (1/2 in) tissue-equivalent proportional counter. The phantom was exposed to a bare and a D 2 O-moderated 252 Cf neutron source at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory's Low Scatter Facility. The Monte Carlo code MCNP with the MIRD-V mathematical phantom was used to model the human body and to calculate the organ doses and dose equivalents. The experimental methods are described and the results of the measurements are compared with the calculations. (author)

  7. Neutron flux calculation and fluence in the encircling of the core and vessel of a reactor BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez C, E.

    2011-01-01

    One of the main objectives related to the safety of any nuclear power plant, including the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde is to ensure the structural integrity of reactor pressure vessel. To identify and quantify the damage caused by neutron irradiation in the vessel of any nuclear reactor, it is necessary to know both the neutron flux and the neutron fluence that the vessel has been receiving during its operation lifetime, and that the damage observed by mechanical testing are products of microstructural effects induced by neutron irradiation; therefore, it is important the study and prediction of the neutron flux in order to have a better understanding of the damage that these materials are receiving. The calculation here described uses the DORT code, which solves the neutron transport equation in discrete ordinates in two dimensions (x-y, r-θ and r-z), according to a regulatory guide, it should make an approximation of the neutron flux in three dimensions by the so called synthesis method. It is called in that way because it achieves a representation of 3 Dimensional neutron flux combining or summarizing the fluxes calculated by DORT r-θ, r-z and r. This work presents the application of synthesis method, according to Regulatory Guide 1190, to determine the 3 Dimensional fluxes in internal BWR reactor using three different spatial meshes. The results of the neutron flux and fluence, using three different meshes in the directions r, θ and z were compared with results reported in the literature obtaining a difference not larger than 9.61%, neutron flux reached its maximum, 1.58 E + 12 n/cm 2 s, at a height H 4 (239.07 cm) and angle 32.236 o in the core shroud and 4.00 E + 09 n/cm 2 s at a height H 4 and angle 35.27 o in the inner wall of the reactor vessel, positions that are consistent to within ±10% over the ones reported in the literature. (Author)

  8. Skin Dose Equivalent Measurement from Neutron-Deficient Isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Hua; Costigan, Steve A.; Romero, Leonard L.; Whicker, Jeffrey J.

    1997-12-01

    Neutron-deficient-isotopes decay via positron emission and/or electron capture often followed by x-ray, gamma-ray, and 0.511 MeV photons from positron annihilation. For cases of significant area and/or personnel contamination with these isotopes, determination of skin dose equivalent (SDE) is required by 10CFR835. For assessment of SDE, we evaluated the MICROSPEC-2(TM) system manufactured by Bubble Technology Industries of Canada which uses three different probes for dose measurement. We used two probes: (1) the X-probe which measures lower energy (4 - 120 keV) photon energy distributions and determines deep dose equivalent, SDE and dose equivalent to eyes, and (2) the B-probe which measures electron (positron) energy distributions, and determines skin dose equivalent. Also, the measured photon and beta spectra can be used to identify radioactive isotopes in the contaminated area. Measurements with several neutron-deficient sources showed that this system provided reasonably accurate SDE rate measurements when compared with calculated benchmark SDE rates with an average percent difference of 40%. Variations were expected because of differences between the assumed geometries used by MlCROSPEC-2 and the calculations when compared to the measurement conditions

  9. Skin Dose Equivalent Measurement from Neutron-Deficient Isotopes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Hua; Costigan, Steve A.; Romero, Leonard L.; Whicker, Jeffrey J.

    1997-12-31

    Neutron-deficient-isotopes decay via positron emission and/or electron capture often followed by x-ray, gamma-ray, and 0.511 MeV photons from positron annihilation. For cases of significant area and/or personnel contamination with these isotopes, determination of skin dose equivalent (SDE) is required by 10CFR835. For assessment of SDE, we evaluated the MICROSPEC-2(TM) system manufactured by Bubble Technology Industries of Canada which uses three different probes for dose measurement. We used two probes: (1) the X-probe which measures lower energy (4 - 120 keV) photon energy distributions and determines deep dose equivalent, SDE and dose equivalent to eyes, and (2) the B-probe which measures electron (positron) energy distributions, and determines skin dose equivalent. Also, the measured photon and beta spectra can be used to identify radioactive isotopes in the contaminated area. Measurements with several neutron-deficient sources showed that this system provided reasonably accurate SDE rate measurements when compared with calculated benchmark SDE rates with an average percent difference of 40%. Variations were expected because of differences between the assumed geometries used by MlCROSPEC-2 and the calculations when compared to the measurement conditions.

  10. Neutron spectrometry and determination of neutron ambient dose equivalents in different LINAC radiotherapy rooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingo, C., E-mail: carles.domingo@uab.ca [Grup de Fisica de les Radiacions, Departament de Fisica. Edifici C, Campus UAB, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Garcia-Fuste, M.J.; Morales, E.; Amgarou, K. [Grup de Fisica de les Radiacions, Departament de Fisica. Edifici C, Campus UAB, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Terron, J.A. [Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena. E- 41009 Sevilla. Spain (Spain); Rosello, J.; Brualla, L. [ERESA, Avda. Tres Cruces s/n. E-46014 Valencia (Spain); Nunez, L. [Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital. Puerta de Hierro. E-28222 Majadahonda (Spain); Colmenares, R. [Serv. de Oncologia Radioterapica, Hosp. Ramon y Cajal, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Gomez, F. [Dpto. de Particulas. Univ. de Santiago. E-15782 Santiago de Compostela. Spain (Spain); Hartmann, G.H. [DKFZ E0400 Im Neuenheimer Feld 280. D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany) (Germany); Sanchez-Doblado, F. [Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena. E- 41009 Sevilla. Spain (Spain); Dpto. de Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica. Universidad de Sevilla. E-41009 Sevilla. Spain (Spain); Fernandez, F. [Grup de Fisica de les Radiacions, Departament de Fisica. Edifici C, Campus UAB, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear, Justo Dorado 11 E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-12-15

    A project has been set up to study the effect on a radiotherapy patient of the neutrons produced around the LINAC accelerator head by photonuclear reactions induced by photons above {approx}8 MeV. These neutrons may reach directly the patient, or they may interact with the surrounding materials until they become thermalised, scattering all over the treatment room and affecting the patient as well, contributing to peripheral dose. Spectrometry was performed with a calibrated and validated set of Bonner spheres at a point located at 50 cm from the isocenter, as well as at the place where a digital device for measuring neutrons, based on the upset of SRAM memories induced by thermal neutrons, is located inside the treatment room. Exposures have taken place in six LINAC accelerators with different energies (from 15 to 23 MV) with the aim of relating the spectrometer measurements with the readings of the digital device under various exposure and room geometry conditions. The final purpose of the project is to be able to relate, under any given treatment condition and room geometry, the readings of this digital device to patient neutron effective dose and peripheral dose in organs of interest. This would allow inferring the probability of developing second malignancies as a consequence of the treatment. Results indicate that unit neutron fluence spectra at 50 cm from the isocenter do not depend on accelerator characteristics, while spectra at the place of the digital device are strongly influenced by the treatment room geometry.

  11. Neutron spectrometry and determination of neutron ambient dose equivalents in different LINAC radiotherapy rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domingo, C.; Garcia-Fuste, M.J.; Morales, E.; Amgarou, K.; Terron, J.A.; Rosello, J.; Brualla, L.; Nunez, L.; Colmenares, R.; Gomez, F.; Hartmann, G.H.; Sanchez-Doblado, F.; Fernandez, F.

    2010-01-01

    A project has been set up to study the effect on a radiotherapy patient of the neutrons produced around the LINAC accelerator head by photonuclear reactions induced by photons above ∼8 MeV. These neutrons may reach directly the patient, or they may interact with the surrounding materials until they become thermalised, scattering all over the treatment room and affecting the patient as well, contributing to peripheral dose. Spectrometry was performed with a calibrated and validated set of Bonner spheres at a point located at 50 cm from the isocenter, as well as at the place where a digital device for measuring neutrons, based on the upset of SRAM memories induced by thermal neutrons, is located inside the treatment room. Exposures have taken place in six LINAC accelerators with different energies (from 15 to 23 MV) with the aim of relating the spectrometer measurements with the readings of the digital device under various exposure and room geometry conditions. The final purpose of the project is to be able to relate, under any given treatment condition and room geometry, the readings of this digital device to patient neutron effective dose and peripheral dose in organs of interest. This would allow inferring the probability of developing second malignancies as a consequence of the treatment. Results indicate that unit neutron fluence spectra at 50 cm from the isocenter do not depend on accelerator characteristics, while spectra at the place of the digital device are strongly influenced by the treatment room geometry.

  12. SU-E-T-365: Estimation of Neutron Ambient Dose Equivalents for Radioprotection Exposed Workers in Radiotherapy Facilities Based On Characterization Patient Risk Estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irazola, L; Terron, J; Sanchez-Doblado, F [Departamento de Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla (Spain); Domingo, C; Romero-Exposito, M [Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra (Spain); Garcia-Fuste, M [Health and Safety Department, ALBA Synchrotron Light Source, Cerdanyola del Valles (Spain); Sanchez-Nieto, B [Instituto de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Bedogni, R [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) (Italy)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Previous measurements with Bonner spheres{sup 1} showed that normalized neutron spectra are equal for the majority of the existing linacs{sup 2}. This information, in addition to thermal neutron fluences obtained in the characterization procedure{sup 3}3, would allow to estimate neutron doses accidentally received by exposed workers, without the need of an extra experimental measurement. Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) simulations demonstrated that the thermal neutron fluence distribution inside the bunker is quite uniform, as a consequence of multiple scatter in the walls{sup 4}. Although inverse square law is approximately valid for the fast component, a more precise calculation could be obtained with a generic fast fluence distribution map around the linac, from MC simulations{sup 4}. Thus, measurements of thermal neutron fluences performed during the characterization procedure{sup 3}, together with a generic unitary spectra{sup 2}, would allow to estimate the total neutron fluences and H*(10) at any point{sup 5}. As an example, we compared estimations with Bonner sphere measurements{sup 1}, for two points in five facilities: 3 Siemens (15–23 MV), Elekta (15 MV) and Varian (15 MV). Results: Thermal neutron fluences obtained from characterization, are within (0.2–1.6×10{sup 6}) cm−{sup 2}•Gy{sup −1} for the five studied facilities. This implies ambient equivalent doses ranging from (0.27–2.01) mSv/Gy 50 cm far from the isocenter and (0.03–0.26) mSv/Gy at detector location with an average deviation of ±12.1% respect to Bonner measurements. Conclusion: The good results obtained demonstrate that neutron fluence and H*(10) can be estimated based on: (a) characterization procedure established for patient risk estimation in each facility, (b) generic unitary neutron spectrum and (c) generic MC map distribution of the fast component. [1] Radiat. Meas (2010) 45: 1391 – 1397; [2] Phys. Med. Biol (2012) 5 7:6167–6191; [3] Med. Phys (2015) 42

  13. NGI-9 pulsed neutron generator with a fluence to 1010 n/s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allakhverdov, A.Sh.; Ogarkin, V.I.; Silicheva, G.P.; Timofeev, Yu.I.

    1975-01-01

    A neutron pulse generator with 14 MeV energy used for the activation analysis, is described. Its functional diagram and the technical characteristics are presented. The studies of the generator that resulted in determination of the effect of the accelerating voltage amplitude, the delay in the ion source firing with respect to the pulse of the accelerating voltage, the amount of operating ion sources and the energy imparted to them on the neutron flux magnitude are conducted. It is confirmed by the studies that the neutron generator operating in the nominal regime makes it possible to obtain a neutron flux of 5x10 9 -10 10 neutr./s. The dependence of the neutron flux variation on the frequency of pulse sequence for various ion sources is shown

  14. Neutron fluence in a 18 MeV Electron Accelerator for Therapy; Fluencia de neutrones en un Acelerador de Electrones de 18 MeV para terapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paredes G, L.C. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Direccion de Innovacion Tecnologica, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    An investigation was made on the theoretical fundamentals for the determination of the neutron fluence in a linear electron accelerator for radiotherapy applications and the limit values of leakage neutron radiation established by guidelines and standards in radiation protection for these type of accelerators. This investigation includes the following parts: a) Exhaustive bibliographical review on the topics mentioned above, in order to combine and to update the necessary basic information to facilitate the understanding of this subject; b) Analysis of the accelerator operation and identification of its main components, specially in the accelerator head; c) Study of different types of targets and its materials for the Bremsstrahlung production which is based on the electron initial energy, the thickness of the target, and its angular distribution and energy, which influences in the neutron generation by means of the photonuclear and electro disintegration reactions; d) Analysis of the neutron yield based on the target type and its thickness, the energy of electrons and photons; e) Analysis of the neutron energy spectra generated in the accelerator head, inside and outside the treatment room; f) Study of the dosimetry fundamentals for neutron and photon mixed fields, the dosimeter selection criteria and standards applied for these applications, specially the Panasonic U D-809 thermoluminescent dosemeter and C R-39 nuclear track dosimeter; g) Theoretical calculation of the neutron yield using a simplified geometric model for the accelerator head with spherical cell, which considers the target, primary collimator, flattener filter, movable collimators and the head shielding as the main components for radiation production. The cases with W and Pb shielding for closed movable collimators and an irradiation field of 20 x 20 cm{sup 2} were analyzed and, h) Experimental evaluation of the leakage neutron radiation from the patient and head planes, observing that the

  15. Development and application of a detector for absolute measurement of neutron fluence rate in MeV region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Dias, M. da.

    1988-01-01

    The development and performance of the DTS (Dual Thin Scintillator) for the absolute measurement of the neutron fluence rate between 1 and 15 MeV is decribed. The DTS detector consists of a pair of organic scintillators in a dual configuration, where the incident produces a proton-recoil which is detected in a 2Π geometry therefore avoiding the effect of the escape of protons. Thin scintillators are used resulting in small multiple scattering corrections. The theoretical caluclations of detector efficiency and proton-recoil spectrum were performed by means of a Monte Carlos code - CARLO DTS. The calculated efficiency was compared to the experimental one at two neutron energies namely 2.446 MeV and 14.04 MeV applying the Time Correlated Associated Particle technique. The theoretical and experimental efficiencies agreed within the experimental uncertainties of 1.44% and 0.77%, respectively. The performance of the DTS has been verified in an absolute 235 U(n,f) cross section measurement between 1 and 6 MeV neutron energy. The cross section results were compared to those obtained replacing the DTS detector by the NBS (National Bureau of Standards, USA) Black Neutron Detector. The agreement was excellent in the overlapping energy interval of the two experiments (between 1 and 3 MeV), within the estimated uncertainly in the range of 1,0 to 1,7%. The agreement with the most recent evaluation from the ENDF/B-VI was excellent in almost all the energy range between 1 and 6 MeV. The 235 U(n,f) cross section, average over the 252 Cf fission neutron spectrum has been evaluated. The result including the cross section values of the present work was 1220 mb, in excellent agreement with the average value among the most recent measurements, 1227 +- 12 mb, and with the value 1213 mb, using the ENDF/B-VI data. (author) [pt

  16. Gel dosimeters as useful dose and thermal-fluence detectors in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambarini, G.; Valente, M.; Moss, R.L.; Daquino, G.G.; Nievaart, V.A.; Mariani, M.; Vanossi, E.; Carrara, M.

    2006-01-01

    The dosimetry method based on Fricke-Xylenol-Orange-infused gels in form of layers has shown noticeable potentiality for in-phantom or in-free-beam dose and thermal flux profiling and imaging in the high fluxes of thermal or epithermal neutrons utilised for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Gel-dosimeters in form of layers give the possibility not only of obtaining spatial dose distributions but also of achieving measurements of each dose contribution in neutron fields. The discrimination of the various dose components is achieved by means of pixel-to-pixel manipulations of pairs of images obtained with gel-dosimeters having different isotopic composition. It is possible to place large dosimeters, detecting in such a way large dose images, because the layer geometry of dosimeters avoids sensitive variation of neutron transport due to the gel isotopic composition. Some results obtained after the last improvements of the method are reported. (Author)

  17. The radiobiology of boron neutron capture therapy: Are ''photon-equivalent'' doses really photon-equivalent?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coderre, J.A.; Diaz, A.Z.; Ma, R.

    2001-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) produces a mixture of radiation dose components. The high-linear energy transfer (LET) particles are more damaging in tissue than equal doses of low-LET radiation. Each of the high-LET components can multiplied by an experimentally determined factor to adjust for the increased biological effectiveness and the resulting sum expressed in photon-equivalent units (Gy-Eq). BNCT doses in photon-equivalent units are based on a number of assumptions. It may be possible to test the validity of these assumptions and the accuracy of the calculated BNCT doses by 1) comparing the effects of BNCT in other animal or biological models where the effects of photon radiation are known, or 2) if there are endpoints reached in the BNCT dose escalation clinical trials that can be related to the known response to photons of the tissue in question. The calculated Gy-Eq BNCT doses delivered to dogs and to humans with BPA and the epithermal neutron beam of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor were compared to expected responses to photon irradiation. The data indicate that Gy-Eq doses in brain may be underestimated. Doses to skin are consistent with the expected response to photons. Gy-Eq doses to tumor are significantly overestimated. A model system of cells in culture irradiated at various depths in a lucite phantom using the epithermal beam is under development. Preliminary data indicate that this approach can be used to detect differences in the relative biological effectiveness of the beam. The rat 9L gliosarcoma cell survival data was converted to photon-equivalent doses using the same factors assumed in the clinical studies. The results superimposed on the survival curve derived from irradiation with Cs-137 photons indicating the potential utility of this model system. (author)

  18. Solid-state track recorder dosimetry device to measure absolute reaction rates and neutron fluence as a function of time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Raymond; Roberts, James H.

    1989-01-01

    A solid state track recording type dosimeter is disclosed to measure the time dependence of the absolute fission rates of nuclides or neutron fluence over a period of time. In a primary species an inner recording drum is rotatably contained within an exterior housing drum that defines a series of collimating slit apertures overlying windows defined in the stationary drum through which radiation can enter. Film type solid state track recorders are positioned circumferentially about the surface of the internal recording drum to record such radiation or its secondary products during relative rotation of the two elements. In another species both the recording element and the aperture element assume the configuration of adjacent disks. Based on slit size of apertures and relative rotational velocity of the inner drum, radiation parameters within a test area may be measured as a function of time and spectra deduced therefrom.

  19. Rhodium self-powered detector for monitoring neutron fluence, energy production, and isotopic composition of fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, A.P.; Pochivalin, G.P.; Shipovskikh, Yu.M.; Garusov, Yu.V.; Chernikov, O.G.; Shevchenko, V.G.

    1993-01-01

    The use of self-powered detectors (SPDs) with a rhodium emitter customarily involves monitoring of neutron fields in the core of a nuclear reactor. Since current in an SPD is generated primarily because of the neutron flux, which is responsible for the dynamics of particular nuclear transformations, including fission reactions of heavy isotopes, the detector signal can be attributed unambiguously to energy release at the location of the detector. Computation modeling performed with the KOMDPS package of programs of the current formation in a rhodium SPD along with the neutron-physical processes that occur in the reactor core makes it possible to take account of the effect of the principal factors characterizing the operating conditions and the design features of the fuel channel and the detector, reveal quantitative relations between the generated signal and individual physical parameters, and determine the metrological parameters of the detector. The formation and transport of changed particles in the sensitive part of the SPC is calculated by the Monte Carlo method. The emitter activation, neutron transport, and dynamics of the isotopic composition in the fuel channel containing the SPD are determined by solving the kinetic equation in the multigroup representation of the neutron spectrum, using the discrete ordinate method. In this work the authors consider the operation of a rhodium SPD in a bundle of 49 fuel channels of the RBMK-1000 reactor with a fuel enrichment of 2.4% from the time it is inserted into a fresh channel

  20. Measurement of low neutron fluences with polycarbonate foils electrochemically etched with methyl alcohol-KOH solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumamoto, Y.

    1982-01-01

    Electrochemical etching of polycarbonate foils was performed using a KOH solution with a high concentration of methyl alcohol under different conditions of field strength, frequency, temperature and etching time. These studies showed that the highest neutron sensitivity relative to the inherent background in the foil was obtained under the following etching conditions: 52 kV/cm, 1 kHz, 30 0 C, 30 min in a solution of 45 gm KOH + 80 cc CH 3 OH + 20 cc H 2 O. Under these conditions, 100 mrem of neutrons from a Ra-Be source gave 70 pits per cm 2 while background was 7 +- 3 pits per cm 2 (10 +- 5 mrem). The pit diameters were about 90 μm. This sensitivity (giving lowest measurable dose of 15 mrem) is quite sufficient for personnel neutron dosimetry applications and the size of the pits is large enough for easy counting using a microscope at magnification of 40X. (author)

  1. Neutron Spectra, Fluence and Dose Rates from Bare and Moderated Cf-252 Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radev, Radoslav P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    A new, stronger 252Cf source (serial number SR-CF-3050-OR) was obtained from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in 2014 to supplement the existing 252Cf sources which had significantly decayed. A new instrument positioning track system was designed and installed by Hopewell Designs, Inc. in 2011. The neutron field from the new, stronger 252Cf source in the modified calibration environment needed to be characterized as well as the modified neutron fields produced by the new source and seven different neutron moderators. Comprehensive information about our 252Cf source, its origin, production, and isotopic content and decay characteristics needed to be compiled as well. This technical report is intended to address these issues.

  2. Measurement of the fluence flux of monoenergetic neutrons on the Van de Graaff accelerator at Cadarache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabo, Imre.

    1976-12-01

    This report is a compilation of the different fast neutron flux measurements performed by the Section d'Etudes et de Mesures en Neutrons Rapides (S.E.M.N.R.-CADARACHE) in the energy range extending from 10keV to 14.8 MeV. The facilities used and the methods developed are described. The analysis of the calibrations made during the last few years, led to a final set of values for the efficiency of the ''directional counter''. This counter was used as a reference for microscopic data measurements and also for neutron flux measurements carried out in other laboratories. The accuracy obtained in the 10keV-14MeV range varied from 2 to 3.5% (one standard deviation) [fr

  3. Research Reactor Application for Materials under High Neutron Fluence. Proceedings of an IAEA Technical Meeting (TM-34779)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-05-01

    Research reactors (RRs) have played, and continue to play, a key role in the development of the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and technology. The role of the IAEA is to assist Member States in the effective utilization of these technologies in various domains of research such as fundamental and applied science, industry, human health care and environmental studies, as well as nuclear energy applications. In particular, material testing reactors (MTRs), serve as unique tools in scientific and technological development and they have quite a wide variety of applications. Today, a large range of different RR designs exist when compared with power reactors and they also have different operating modes, producing high neutron fluxes, which may be steady or pulsed. Recently, an urgent need has arisen for the development of new advanced materials, for example in the nuclear industry, where RRs offer capacities for irradiation programmes. Besides the scientific and research activities and commercial applications, RRs are also used extensively for educational training activities for scientists and engineers. This report is a compilation of outputs of an IAEA Technical Meeting (TM-34779) held on Research Reactor Application for Materials under High Neutron Fluence. The overall objective of the meeting was to review typical applications of small and medium size RRs, such as material characterization and testing, neutron physics and beam research, neutron radiography and imaging as well as isotope production and other types of non-nuclear applications. Several issues were discussed during the meeting, in particular: (1) recent development of irradiation facilities, specific irradiation programmes and their implementation; (2) effective and optimal RR operation regimes for irradiation purposes; (3) sharing of best practices and existing technical knowledge; and (4) fostering of advanced or innovative technologies, e.g. information exchange and effective collaboration. This

  4. Determination of the neutron and photon dose equivalent at work places in nuclear facilities of Sweden. An SSI - EURADOS comparison exercise. Part 2: Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, D.; Drake, P.; Lindborg, L.; Klein, H.; Schmitz, Th.; Tichy, M.

    1999-06-01

    Various mixed neutron-photon fields at workplaces in the containment of pressurised water reactors and in the vicinity of transport containers with spent fuel elements were investigated with spectrometers and dosimeters. The spectral neutron fluences evaluated from measurements with multisphere systems were recommended to be used for the calculation of dosimetric reference values for comparison with the readings of the dosemeters applied simultaneously. It turned out that most of the moderator based area dosemeters overestimated, while the TEPC systems generally underestimated the ambient dose equivalent (DE) values of the rather soft neutron fields encountered at these workplaces. The discrepancies can, however, be explained on the basis of energy dependent responses of the instruments used. The ambient DE values obtained with recently developed area dosemeters based on superheated drop detectors and with track etch based personal dosemeters on phantoms, however, were in satisfying agreement with the reference data. Sets of personal dosemeters simultaneously irradiated on a phantom allowed to roughly estimate the directional dependence of the neutron fluence. Hence, personal and limiting dose equivalent quantities could also be calculated. The personal and ambient DE values were always conservative estimates of the limiting quantities. Unexpectedly, discrepancies were observed for photon DE data measured with GM counters and TEPC systems. The up to 50 % higher readings of the GM counters may be explained by a considerable contribution of high energy photons to the total photon dose equivalent, but photon spectrometry is necessary for final clarification

  5. Determination of the neutron and photon dose equivalent at work places in nuclear facilities of Sweden. An SSI - EURADOS comparison exercise. Part 2: Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartlett, D. [National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (United Kingdom); Drake, P. [Vattenfall AB, Vaeroebacka (Sweden); Lindborg, L. [Swedish Radiation Protection Inst., Stockholm (Sweden); Klein, H. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); Schmitz, Th. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany); Tichy, M

    1999-06-01

    Various mixed neutron-photon fields at workplaces in the containment of pressurised water reactors and in the vicinity of transport containers with spent fuel elements were investigated with spectrometers and dosimeters. The spectral neutron fluences evaluated from measurements with multisphere systems were recommended to be used for the calculation of dosimetric reference values for comparison with the readings of the dosemeters applied simultaneously. It turned out that most of the moderator based area dosemeters overestimated, while the TEPC systems generally underestimated the ambient dose equivalent (DE) values of the rather soft neutron fields encountered at these workplaces. The discrepancies can, however, be explained on the basis of energy dependent responses of the instruments used. The ambient DE values obtained with recently developed area dosemeters based on superheated drop detectors and with track etch based personal dosemeters on phantoms, however, were in satisfying agreement with the reference data. Sets of personal dosemeters simultaneously irradiated on a phantom allowed to roughly estimate the directional dependence of the neutron fluence. Hence, personal and limiting dose equivalent quantities could also be calculated. The personal and ambient DE values were always conservative estimates of the limiting quantities. Unexpectedly, discrepancies were observed for photon DE data measured with GM counters and TEPC systems. The up to 50 % higher readings of the GM counters may be explained by a considerable contribution of high energy photons to the total photon dose equivalent, but photon spectrometry is necessary for final clarification.

  6. Fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for neutrons and protons calculated using the PHITS code and ICRP/ICRU adult reference computational phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Endo, Akira; Zankl, Maria; Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Niita, Koji

    2009-01-01

    The fluence to organ-dose and effective-dose conversion coefficients for neutrons and protons with energies up to 100 GeV was calculated using the PHITS code coupled to male and female adult reference computational phantoms, which are to be released as a common ICRP/ICRU publication. For the calculation, the radiation and tissue weighting factors, w R and w T , respectively, as revised in ICRP Publication 103 were employed. The conversion coefficients for effective dose equivalents derived using the radiation quality factors of both Q(L) and Q(y) relationships were also estimated, utilizing the functions for calculating the probability densities of the absorbed dose in terms of LET (L) and lineal energy (y), respectively, implemented in PHITS. By comparing these data with the corresponding data for the effective dose, we found that the numerical compatibilities of the revised w R with the Q(L) and Q(y) relationships are fairly established. The calculated data of these dose conversion coefficients are indispensable for constructing the radiation protection systems based on the new recommendations given in ICRP103 for aircrews and astronauts, as well as for workers in accelerators and nuclear facilities.

  7. Swelling of Fe-Mn and Fe-Cr-Mn alloys at high neutron fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Brager, H.R.

    1986-06-01

    Swelling data on neutron-irradiated simple Fe-Cr-Mn and Fe-Mn alloys, as well as commercial Fe-Cr-Mn base alloys are now becoming available at exposure levels approaching 50 dpa. The swelling rate decreases from the ∼1%/dpa found at lower exposures, probably due to the extensive formation of ferritic phases. As expected, commercial alloys swell less than the simple alloys

  8. Treating Breast Cancer by Radiation with a Fluence of Thermal Neutrons & Nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askouri, N.A.; Abbas, S.K.

    2015-01-01

    In this study we mention one of the treatments to cure cancer. It is considered one of the promissing methods nowadays. It includes the use of Boron as a nano material to improve the radiation sensitivity inside the breast. These are treated with low energy thermal neutrons (0.025 eV) resulting in high alpha linear energy transporter and Lithium nucleus 7 Li in addition to Gamma photon with (0.48 MeV). The energy of these products (2.31 MeV) which destroy the cancer cells in the tissue.This treatment checks several physical factors related to the effectively of using Boron to improve the treatment with radiation. The physical factors include the amount of the falling thermal neutrons and the time of exposure and the concentration of the nano Boron material and the amount of the falling thermal neutrons.In this study the concentrations of used nano Boron were (5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50) ng, and each concentration was a target for the thermal neutrons of (0.025 eV) energy interaction. The times of exposure (1800) s , while the other factors were kept fixed.The results showed a great improvement in the received dose and improvement in the number of the destroyed cancer cells. The increase is due to two reasons:First : the selective accumulation of stableB10 in the cells of the tumor only and not the healthy tissue.Second : 10 B tendency towards thermal neutrons (0.025 eV) interaction. The resultant from this interaction is unstable 11 B causing the production of high linear energy transporter represented by alpha particle ( 1.47 MeV) and 7 Li nucleus (0.84 MeV), as well as Gamma photon (0.48 MeV).The energy of both products is deposited within (5-9 μm) of the tissue which is close to the cells diameter and it spreads in two opposite directions in destroying the DNA chain responsible for regenerating new cells, therefore, the possibility of destroying cancer cells is high

  9. Determination of the spectral neutron fluence rate onboard aircraft by means of a passive Bonner sphere spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajek, M.; Berger, T.; Vana, N.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Initiated by the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), the exposure of aircraft crew to cosmic radiation has been included as occupational exposure in the European Council directive 96/29/Euratom. Of the complex mixed radiation field at aviation altitudes the neutron component can contribute more than 50 % to the biologically relevant dose equivalent and is, therefore, of great importance. Applying the multi-sphere moderation technique, Bonner sphere spectrometers (BSS) are currently the only instruments providing a sufficient response over several orders of energy up to GeV. As could be demonstrated by extensive experiments in a variety of reference radiation fields, charged particles significantly contribute to the count rate of active detectors such as 6 LiI-scintillators or 3 He-proportional counters, which are commonly employed as thermal neutron detectors inside the spheres. This limitation can be overcome with a passive BSS, which uses different types of thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs): the thermal neutron-sensitive TLD-600 ( 6 LiF) and the thermal neutron-insensitive TLD-700 ( 7 LiF). Assuming identical responses of both types for the other radiation components, subtraction of the TLD-700 signal from the TLD-600 signal reveals a net signal from thermal neutrons. The passive BSS was calibrated in the CERN-EU High-Energy Reference Field (CERF), which provides a neutron spectrum in reasonable agreement with that occurring at aviation altitudes. Measurements onboard aircraft were performed during a series of eight north-bound flights originating from Cologne. The results are compared with calculations of the neutron spectrum by means of the well-established Monte Carlo code FLUKA. (author)

  10. Study of the response of a piezoceramic motor irradiated in a fast reactor up to a neutron fluence of 2.77E+17 n/cm2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillon, Mario; Monti, Chiara; Mugnaini, Giampiero; Neri, Carlo; Rossi, Paolo; Carta, Mario; Fiorani, Orlando; Santagata, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Piezoceramic motors are compliant with magnetic field, temperature and vacuum. • We studied the response of a piezoceramic motor during the irradiation with neutrons. • The response was studied using 1 MeV neutrons up to a neutron fluence of 2.77E+17 n/cm 2 . • Neutron irradiation produces a shift of the optimal resonance frequency and a decrease of the motor speed. • The performance changes do not affect the proper operation of the motor. - Abstract: A piezoceramic motor has been identified as the potential apparatus for carrying out the rotation of the scanning head of a laser radar system used for viewing the first wall of the ITER vessel. This diagnostic is simply referred to as IVVS (In Vessel Viewing System). The choice fell on a piezoceramic motor due to the presence of strong magnetic fields (up 8 T) and of the high vacuum and temperature conditions. To be compliant with all the ITER environmental conditions it was necessary to qualify the piezo-motor under gamma and neutron irradiation. In this paper are described the procedures and tests that have been performed to verify the compatibility of the operation of the motor adopted in the presence of a fast neutron fluence which was gradually increased over time in order to reach a total value of 2.77 × 10 17 n/cm 2 . Such neutron fluence was obtained by irradiating the motor in a position close to the core of the fast nuclear reactor TAPIRO, in operation at the ENEA Casaccia Research Centre, Italy. The neutron spectrum in this position has been identified as representative of that found in the rest position of the IVVS head during ITER operation. The cumulative neutron fluence reached corresponds to that it is expected to be reached during the entire life of ITER for the IVVS in the rest position without any shield. This work describes the experimental results of this test; the methodology adopted to determine the total neutron fluence achieved and the methodology adopted for the

  11. The effect of incremental gamma-ray doses and incremental neutron fluences upon the performance of self-biased sup 1 sup 0 B-coated high-purity epitaxial GaAs thermal neutron detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gersch, H K; Simpson, P A

    2002-01-01

    High-purity epitaxial GaAs sup 1 sup 0 B-coated thermal neutron detectors advantageously operate at room temperature without externally applied voltage. Sample detectors were systematically irradiated at fixed grid locations near the core of a 2 MW research reactor to determine their operational neutron dose threshold. Reactor pool locations were assigned so that fast and thermal neutron fluxes to the devices were similar. Neutron fluences ranged between 10 sup 1 sup 1 and 10 sup 1 sup 4 n/cm sup 2. GaAs detectors were exposed to exponential fluences of base ten. Ten detector designs were irradiated and studied, differentiated between p-i-n diodes and Schottky barrier diodes. The irradiated sup 1 sup 0 B-coated detectors were tested for neutron detection sensitivity in a thermalized neutron beam. Little damage was observed for detectors irradiated at neutron fluences of 10 sup 1 sup 2 n/cm sup 2 and below, but signals noticeably degraded at fluences of 10 sup 1 sup 3 n/cm sup 2. Catastrophic damage was appare...

  12. Test of Fibre Bragg Gratings samples under High Fast Neutrons Fluence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheymol G.

    2018-01-01

    The measurements show that for nearly all gratings the Bragg peak remains visible after the irradiation, and that Radiation Induced Bragg Wavelength Shifts (RI-BWSs vary from few pm (equivalent to an error of less than 1°C for a temperature sensor to nearly 1 nm (equivalent to 100°C depending of the FBG types. High RI-BWSs could indeed be expected when considering the huge refractive index variation and compaction of the bare fibre samples that have been measured by other techniques. Post writing thermal annealing is confirmed as a key parameter in order to obtain a more radiation tolerant FBG. Our results show that specific annealing regimes allow making FGBs suitable to perform temperature measurements in a MTR experiment.

  13. Development of a TPC for energy and fluence references in low energies neutronic fields (from 8 keV to 5 MeV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maire, Donovan

    2015-01-01

    In order to judge the measurement reliability, metrology requires to measure quantities with their uncertainties, in relation to a reference through a documented and unbroken chain of calibrations. In neutron radiation field, instrument response has to be known as a function of the neutron energy. Then detector calibrations are required using reference neutron fields. In France, primary reference neutron fields are held by the LNE-IRSN, at the Laboratory for Neutron Metrology and Dosimetry (LMDN). In order to improve reference neutron field characterization, the LNE-IRSN MIMAC μTPC has been developed. This detector is a Time Projection Chamber (TPC), using a gas at low pressure (30 mbar abs. to 1 bar abs.). Nuclear recoils are generated by neutron elastic scattering onto gas atoms. By measuring the nuclear recoil energy and scattering angle, the μTPC detector is able to measure the energy distribution of the neutron fluence between 8 keV and 5 MeV. The main challenge was to perform accurate spectrometry of neutron fields in the keV range, following a primary procedure. First of all, a metrological approach was followed in order to master every physical process taking part in the neutron detection. This approach led to develop the direct and inverse models, representing the detector response function and its inverse function respectively. Using this detailed characterization, the energy distribution of the neutron fluence has been measured for a continuous neutron field of 27 keV. The reconstructed energy is 28,2 ± 4,5 keV, the difference between μTPC integral fluence measurement and other measurement methods is less than 6%. The LNE-IRSN MIMAC μTPC system becomes the only one system able to measure simultaneously energy and fluence at energies lower than 100 keV, following a primary procedure. The project goal is then reached. These measurements at energies lower than 100 keV shows also a non-linearity between the ionization charge and the ion kinetic energy

  14. Neutron fluence and energy reconstruction with the IRSN recoil detector μ-TPC at 27 keV, 144 keV and 565 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maire, D.; Lebreton, L.; Richer, J.P. [IRSN, PRP-HOM, SDE, LMDN, 13115 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Bosson, G.; Bourrion, O.; Guillaudin, O.; Riffard, Q.; Santos, D. [CNRS/IN2P3-UJF-INPG, LPSC, 38000 Grenoble (France)

    2015-07-01

    The French Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), associated to the French Metrology Institute (LNE), is developing a time projection chamber using a Micromegas anode: μ-TPC. This work is carried out in collaboration with the Laboratory of Subatomic Physics and Cosmology (LPSC). The aim is to characterize with a primary procedure the energy distribution of neutron fluence in the energy range 8 keV - 1 MeV. The time projection chambers are gaseous detectors, which are able to measure charged particles energy and to reconstruct their track if a pixelated anode is used. In our case, the gas is used as a (n, p) converter in order to detect neutrons down to few keV. Coming from elastic collisions with neutrons, recoil protons lose a part of their kinetic energy by ionizing the gas. The ionization electrons are drifted toward a pixelated anode (2D projection), read at 50 MHz by a self-triggered electronic system to obtain the third track dimension. The neutron energy is reconstructed event by event thanks to proton scattering angle and proton energy measurements. The scattering angle is deduced from the 3D track. The proton energy is obtained by charge collection measurements, knowing the ionization quenching factor (i.e. the part of proton kinetic energy lost by ionizing the gas). The fluence is calculated thanks to the detected events number and the simulated detector response. The μ-TPC is a new reliable detector which enables to measure energy distribution of the neutron fluence without deconvolution or neutron calibration contrary to usual gaseous counters. The μ-TPC is still being developed and measurements have been carried out at the AMANDE facility, with neutrons energies going from 8 keV to 565 keV. After the context and the μ-TPC working principle presentation, measurements of the neutron energy and fluence at 27.2 keV, 144 keV and 565 keV are shown and compared to the complete detector simulation. This work shows the first direct

  15. A Project for High Fluence 14 MeV Neutron Source

    CERN Document Server

    Pillon, Mario; Pizzuto, Aldo; Pietropaolo, Antonino

    2014-01-01

    The international community agrees on the importance to build a large facility devoted to test and validate materials to be used in harsh neutron environments. Such a facility, proposed by ENEA , reconsiders a previous study known as “Sorgentina” but takes into account new technological development so far attained. The “New Sorgentina” Fusion Source (NSFS) project is based upon an intense D - T 14 MeV neutron source achievable with T and D ion beams impinging on 2 m radius rotating target s . NSFS produces about 1 x10 13 n cm - 2 s - 1 over about 50 cm 3 . The NSFS facility will use the ion source and accelerating system technology developed for the Positive Ion Injectors (PII) used to heat the plasma in the fusion experiments,. NSFS, to be intended as an European facility, may be realized in a few years, once provided a preliminary technological program devote to study the operation of the ion source in continuous mode, target h eat loading/ removal, target and tritium handling, inventory as well as ...

  16. Reduced recanalization rates of the great saphenous vein after endovenous laser treatment with increased energy dosing: definition of a threshold for the endovenous fluence equivalent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proebstle, Thomas Michael; Moehler, Thomas; Herdemann, Sylvia

    2006-10-01

    Recent reports indicated a correlation between the amount of energy released during endovenous laser treatment (ELT) of the great saphenous vein (GSV) and the success and durability of the procedure. Our objective was to analyze the influence of increased energy dosing on immediate occlusion and recanalization rates after ELT of the GSV. GSVs were treated with either 15 or 30 W of laser power by using a 940-nm diode laser with continuous fiber pullback and tumescent local anesthesia. Patients were followed up prospectively with duplex ultrasonography at day 1 and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. A total of 114 GSVs were treated with 15 W, and 149 GSVs were treated with 30 W. The average endovenous fluence equivalents were 12.8 +/- 5.1 J/cm2 and 35.1 +/- 15.6 J/cm2, respectively. GSV occlusion rates according to the method of Kaplan and Meier for the 15- and 30-W groups were 95.6% and 100%, respectively, at day 1, 90.4% and 100% at 3 months, and 82.7% and 97.0% at 12 months after ELT (log-rank; P = .001). An endovenous fluence equivalent exceeding 20 J/cm2 was associated with durable GSV occlusion after 12 months' follow-up, thus suggesting a schedule for dosing of laser energy with respect to the vein diameter. Higher dosing of laser energy shows a 100% immediate success rate and a significantly reduced recanalization rate during 12 months' follow-up.

  17. On experimental testing of the weak equivalence principle for the neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokotilovskij, Yu.N.

    1994-01-01

    The considerations is presented of the experimental situation with the verification of the weak equivalence principle for the neutron. The direct method is proposed to significantly increase (to ∼ 10 -6 ) the precision of the equivalence principle for the neutron in the Galilei type experiment, which uses the thin-film Fabri-Perot interferometer and precise time-of-flight spectrometry of ultracold neutrons

  18. Irradiation creep of nano-powder sintered silicon carbide at low neutron fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyanagi, T.; Shimoda, K.; Kondo, S.; Hinoki, T.; Ozawa, K.; Katoh, Y.

    2014-01-01

    The irradiation creep behavior of nano-powder sintered silicon carbide was investigated using the bend stress relaxation method under neutron irradiation up to 1.9 dpa. The creep deformation was observed at all temperatures ranging from 380 to 1180°C mainly from the irradiation creep but with the increasing contributions from the thermal creep at higher temperatures. The apparent stress exponent of the irradiation creep slightly exceeded unity, and instantaneous creep coefficient at 380 to 790°C was estimated to be ∼1 × 10 -5 [MPa -1 dpa -1 ] at ∼0.1 dpa and 1 × 10 -7 to 1 × 10 -6 [MPa -1 dpa -1 ] at ∼1 dpa. The irradiation creep strain appeared greater than that for the high purity SiC. Microstructural observation and data analysis indicated that the grain-boundary sliding associated with the secondary phases contributes to the irradiation creep at 380–790°C to 0.01–0.11 dpa. (author)

  19. Electron fluence to dose equivalent conversion factors calculated with EGS3 for electrons and positrons with energies from 100 keV to 20 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, D.W.O.

    1983-01-01

    At NRC the general purpose Monte-Carlo electron-photon transport code EGS3 is being applied to a variety of radiation dosimetry problems. To test its accuracy at low energies a detailed set of depth-dose curves for electrons and photons has been generated and compared to previous calculations. It was found that by changing the default step-size algorithm in EGS3, significant changes were obtained for incident electron beam cases. It was found that restricting the step-size to a 4% energy loss was appropriate below incident electron beam energies of 10 MeV. With this change, the calculated depth-dose curves were found to be in reasonable agreement with other calculations right down to incident electron energies of 100 keV although small (less than or equal to 10%) but persistent discrepancies with the NBS code ETRAN were obtained. EGS3 predicts higher initial dose and shorter range than ETRAN. These discrepancies are typical of a wide range of energies as is the better agreement with the results of Nahum. Data is presented for the electron fluence to maximal dose equivalent in a 30 cm thick slab of ICRU 4-element tissue irradiated by broad parallel beams of electrons incident normal to the surface. On their own, these values only give an indication of the dose equivalent expected from a spectrum of electrons since one needs to fold the spectrum maximal dose equivalent value. Calculations have also been done for incident positron beams. Despite the large statistical uncertainties, maximal dose equivalent although their values are 5 to 10% lower in a band around 10 MeV

  20. Maximum proton kinetic energy and patient-generated neutron fluence considerations in proton beam arc delivery radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengbusch, E.; Perez-Andujar, A.; DeLuca, P. M. Jr.; Mackie, T. R.

    2009-01-01

    proton kinetic energy from 250 to 200 MeV decreases the total neutron energy fluence produced by stopping a monoenergetic pencil beam in a water phantom by a factor of 2.3. It is possible to significantly lower the requirements on the maximum kinetic energy of a compact proton accelerator if the ability to treat a small percentage of patients with rotational therapy is sacrificed. This decrease in maximum kinetic energy, along with the corresponding decrease in neutron production, could lower the cost and ease the engineering constraints on a compact proton accelerator treatment facility.

  1. Preliminary On-Orbit Neutron Dose Equivalent and Energy Spectrum Results from the ISS-RAD Fast Neutron Detector (FND)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semones, Edward; Leitgab, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The ISS-RAD instrument was activated on ISS on February 1st, 2016. Integrated in ISS-RAD, the Fast Neutron Detector (FND) performs, for the first time on ISS, routine and precise direct neutron measurements between 0.5 and 8 MeV. Preliminary results for neutron dose equivalent and neutron flux energy distributions from online/on-board algorithms and offline ground analyses will be shown, along with comparisons to simulated data and previously measured neutron spectral data. On-orbit data quality and pre-launch analysis validation results will be discussed as well.

  2. Application of low-cost Gallium Arsenide light-emitting-diodes as kerma dosemeter and fluence monitor for high-energy neutrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, B; Simrock, S; Khachan, J; Rybka, D; Romaniuk, R

    2007-01-01

    Displacement damage (DD) caused by fast neutrons in unbiased Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) light emitting diodes (LED) resulted in a reduction of the light output. On the other hand, a similar type of LED irradiated with gamma rays from a (60)Co source up to a dose level in excess of 1.0 kGy (1.0 x 10(5) rad) was found to show no significant drop of the light emission. This phenomenon was used to develop a low cost passive fluence monitor and kinetic energy released per unit mass dosemeter for accelerator-produced neutrons. These LED-dosemeters were used to assess the integrated fluence of photoneutrons, which were contaminated with a strong bremsstrahlung gamma-background generated by the 730 MeV superconducting electron linac driving the free electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron. The applications of GaAs LED as a routine neutron fluence monitor and DD precursor for the electronic components located in high-energy accelerator environment are highlighted.

  3. Design of an improved neutron dose equivalent dosimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Brushwood, J M; Spyrou, N M

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the design and development of a new active area neutron dosimeter. The design incorporates a traditional central detector with a moderator/filter arrangement and a number of outer PIN type photodiodes sensitised to thermal neutrons by the application of a lithium fluoride converter. The outer thermal detectors allow the determination of the neutron radiation field characteristics. The experimental programme has demonstrated that such an arrangement is capable of discriminating between various neutron fields and the usefulness of MCNP4b as a design tool.

  4. The vessel fluence; Fluence cuve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the technical meeting on the reactors vessels fluence. They are grouped in eight sessions: the industrial context and the stakes of the vessels control; the organization and the methodology for the fluence computation; the concerned physical properties; the reference computation methods; the fluence monitoring in an industrial context; vessels monitoring under irradiation; others methods in the world; the research and development programs. (A.L.B.)

  5. Evaluation of the fluence to dose conversion coefficients for high energy neutrons using a voxel phantom coupled with the GEANT4 code

    CERN Document Server

    Paganini, S

    2005-01-01

    Crews working on present-day jet aircraft are a large occupationally exposed group with a relatively high average effective dose from Galactic cosmic radiation. Crews of future high-speed commercial flying at higher altitudes would be even more exposed. To help reduce the significant uncertainties in calculations of such exposures, the male adult voxels phantom MAX, developed in the Nuclear Energy Department of Pernambuco Federal University in Brazil, has been coupled with the Monte Carlo simulation code GEANT4. This toolkit, distributed and upgraded from the international scientific community of CERN/Switzerland, simulates thermal to ultrahigh energy neutrons transport and interactions in the matter. The high energy neutrons are pointed as the component that contribute about 70% of the neutron effective dose that represent the 35% to 60% total dose at aircraft altitude. In this research calculations of conversion coefficients from fluence to effective dose are performed for neutrons of energies from 100 MeV ...

  6. Implementation of an Analytical Model for Leakage Neutron Equivalent Dose in a Proton Radiotherapy Planning System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Eley

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Equivalent dose from neutrons produced during proton radiotherapy increases the predicted risk of radiogenic late effects. However, out-of-field neutron dose is not taken into account by commercial proton radiotherapy treatment planning systems. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of implementing an analytical model to calculate leakage neutron equivalent dose in a treatment planning system. Passive scattering proton treatment plans were created for a water phantom and for a patient. For both the phantom and patient, the neutron equivalent doses were small but non-negligible and extended far beyond the therapeutic field. The time required for neutron equivalent dose calculation was 1.6 times longer than that required for proton dose calculation, with a total calculation time of less than 1 h on one processor for both treatment plans. Our results demonstrate that it is feasible to predict neutron equivalent dose distributions using an analytical dose algorithm for individual patients with irregular surfaces and internal tissue heterogeneities. Eventually, personalized estimates of neutron equivalent dose to organs far from the treatment field may guide clinicians to create treatment plans that reduce the risk of late effects.

  7. Characterization of thermal neutron fields for calibration of neutron monitors in accordance with great equivalent dose environment H⁎(10); Caracterização de campos de nêutrons térmicos para a calibração de monitores de nêutrons em termos da grandeza equivalente de dose ambiente H⁎(10)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Larissa P. S. da; Silva, Felipe S.; Fonseca, Evaldo S.; Patrao, Karla C.S.; Pereira, Walsan W. [Instituto de Radioproteção e Dosimetria (LNMRI/IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Laboratório Nacional de Metrologia das Radiações Ionizantes; Astuto, Achilles, E-mail: larissapaizante@poli.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The Laboratório Brasileiro de Nêutrons do Instituto de Radioproteção e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN) has developed and built a thermal neutron flux facility to provide neutron fluence for dosimeters (Astuto, 2014). This fluency is obtained by four 16 Ci sources {sup 241}AmBe (α, n) positioned around the channel positioned in the center of the Thermal Flow Unit (UFT). The UFT was built with blocks of paraffin with graphite addition and graphite blocks of high purity to obtain a central field with a homogeneous thermal neutron fluence for calibration purposes with the following measurements: 1.2 x 1.2 x 1.2 m{sup 3}. The objective of this work is to characterize several points, in the thermal energy range, in terms of the equivalent ambient dose quantity H⁎(10) for calibration and irradiation of monitors neutrons.

  8. Neutrons in active proton therapy. Parameterization of dose and dose equivalent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Uwe; Haelg, Roger A. [Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Physics; Radiotherapy Hirslanden AG, Aarau (Switzerland); Lomax, Tony [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland). Center for Proton Therapy

    2017-08-01

    One of the essential elements of an epidemiological study to decide if proton therapy may be associated with increased or decreased subsequent malignancies compared to photon therapy is an ability to estimate all doses to non-target tissues, including neutron dose. This work therefore aims to predict for patients using proton pencil beam scanning the spatially localized neutron doses and dose equivalents. The proton pencil beam of Gantry 1 at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) was Monte Carlo simulated using GEANT. Based on the simulated neutron dose and neutron spectra an analytical mechanistic dose model was developed. The pencil beam algorithm used for treatment planning at PSI has been extended using the developed model in order to calculate the neutron component of the delivered dose distribution for each treated patient. The neutron dose was estimated for two patient example cases. The analytical neutron dose model represents the three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulated dose distribution up to 85 cm from the proton pencil beam with a satisfying precision. The root mean square error between Monte Carlo simulation and model is largest for 138 MeV protons and is 19% and 20% for dose and dose equivalent, respectively. The model was successfully integrated into the PSI treatment planning system. In average the neutron dose is increased by 10% or 65% when using 160 MeV or 177 MeV instead of 138 MeV. For the neutron dose equivalent the increase is 8% and 57%. The presented neutron dose calculations allow for estimates of dose that can be used in subsequent epidemiological studies or, should the need arise, to estimate the neutron dose at any point where a subsequent secondary tumour may occur. It was found that the neutron dose to the patient is heavily increased with proton energy.

  9. Dose equivalent response of personal neutron dosemeters as a function of angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, J.E.; McDonald, J.C.; Stewart, R.D.; Wernli, C.

    1997-01-01

    The measured and calculated dose equivalent response as a function of angle has been examined for an albedo-type thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD) that was exposed to unmoderated and D 2 O-moderated 252 Cf neutron sources while mounted on a 40 x 40 15 cm 3 polymethylmethacrylate phantom. The dosemeter used in this study is similar to many neutron personal dosemeters currently in use. The detailed construction of the dosemeter was modelled, and the dose equivalent response was calculated, using the MCNP code. Good agreement was found between the measured and calculated values of the relative dose equivalent angular response for the TLD albedo dosemeter. The relative dose equivalent angular response was also compared with the values of directional and personal dose equivalent as a function of angle published by Siebert and Schuhmacher. (author)

  10. Comparison of pressure vessel neutron fluences for the Balakovo-3 reactor with measurements and investigation of the influence of neutron cross sections and number of groups on the results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barz, H.U.; Boehmer, B.; Konheiser, J.; Stephan, I.

    1998-10-01

    The general methodical questions of experimental and theoretical determination of neutron fluences have been described in connection with the measurements and 3-D Monte Carlo calculation for the Rovno-3 reactor. The same calculation and measurement methods were applied for the Balakovo-3 reactor. In the first part, the results of the comparison for Balakovo will be given and discussed. However, for this reactor the main attention was focussed on investigations of the accuracy of the calculation. In this connection an important question is the influence of neutron data on the results. With this respect not only the source of the data but also the number of energy groups is important. (orig.)

  11. Dose-equivalent response CR-39 track detector for personnel neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, K.; Ito, M.; Yoneda, H.; Miyake, H.; Yamamoto, J.; Tsuruta, T.

    1991-01-01

    A dose-equivalent response detector based on CR-39 has been designed to be applied for personnel neutron dosimetry. The intrinsic detection efficiency of bare CR-39 was first evaluated from irradiation experiments with monoenergetic neutrons and theoretical calculations. In the second step, the radiator effect was investigated for the purpose of sensitization to fast neutrons. A two-layer radiator consisting of deuterized dotriacontane (C 32 D 66 ) and polyethylene (CH 2 ) was designed. Finally, we made the CR-39 detector sensitive to thermal neutrons by doping with orthocarbone (B 10 H 12 C 2 ), and also estimated the contribution of albedo neutrons. It was found that the new detector - boron-doped CR-39 with the two-layer radiator - would have a flat response with an error of about 70% in a wide energy region, ranging from thermal to 15 MeV. (orig.)

  12. Measured neutron and gamma spectra from californium-252 in a tissue-equivalent medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elson, H R; Stupar, T A; Shapiro, A; Kereiakes, J G

    1979-01-01

    A method of experimentally obtaining both neutron and gamma-ray spectra in a scattering medium is described. The method utilizes a liquid-organic scintillator (NE-213) coupled with a pulse-shape discrimination circuit. This allows the separation of the neutron-induced pulse-height data from the gamma-ray pulse-height data. Using mathematical unfolding techniques, the two sets of pulse-height data were transformed to obtain the neutron and gamma-ray energy spectra. A small spherical detector was designed and constructed to reduce the errors incurred by attempting spectral measurements in a scattering medium. Demonstration of the utility of the system to obtain the neutron and gamma-ray spectra in a scattering medium was performed by characterizing the neutron and gamma-ray spectra at various sites about a 3.7-microgram (1.5 cm active length) californium-252 source in a tissue-equivalent medium.

  13. Calculation methods for determining dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endres, G.W.R.; Tanner, J.E.; Scherpelz, R.I.; Hadlock, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    A series of calculations of neutron fluence as a function of energy in an anthropomorphic phantom was performed to develop a system for determining effective dose equivalent for external radiation sources. critical organ dose equivalents are calculated and effective dose equivalents are determined using ICRP-26 methods. Quality factors based on both present definitions and ICRP-40 definitions are used in the analysis. The results of these calculations are presented and discussed

  14. Neutron fluence at the reactor pressure vessel wall - a comparison of French and German procedures and strategies in PWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tricot, N. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, IRSN/DES/SECCA, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France); Jendrich, U. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Garching (Germany)

    2003-01-01

    While the neutrons within the core may take part in the chain reaction, those neutrons emitted from the core are basically lost for the energy production. This 'neutron leakage' represents a loss of fuel efficiency and causes neutron embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) wall. The latter raises safety concerns, needs to be monitored closely and may necessitate mitigating measures. There are different strategies to deal with these two undesirable effects: The neutron emission may be reduced to some extent all around the core or just at the 'hot spots' of RPV embrittlement by tailored core loading patterns. A higher absorption rate of neutrons may also be achieved by a larger water gap between the core and the RPV. In this paper the inter-relations between the distribution of neutron flux, core geometry, core loading strategy, RPV embrittlement and its surveillance are discussed at first. Then the different strategies followed by the German and French operators are described. Finally the conclusions will highlight the communalities and differences between these strategies as different approaches to the same problem of safety as well as economy. (authors)

  15. Estimation of fast neutron fluence in steel specimens type Laguna Verde in TRIGA Mark III reactor; Estimacion de la fluencia de neutrones rapidos en probetas de acero tipo Laguna Verde en el reactor Triga Mark III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galicia A, J.; Francois L, J. L. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Aguilar H, F., E-mail: blink19871@hotmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    The main purpose of this work is to obtain the fluence of fast neutrons recorded within four specimens of carbon steel, similar to the material having the vessels of the BWR reactors of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde when subjected to neutron flux in a experimental facility of the TRIGA Mark III reactor, calculating an irradiation time to age the material so accelerated. For the calculation of the neutron flux in the specimens was used the Monte Carlo code MCNP5. In an initial stage, three sheets of natural molybdenum and molybdenum trioxide (MoO{sub 3}) were incorporated into a model developed of the TRIGA reactor operating at 1 M Wth, to calculate the resulting activity by setting a certain time of irradiation. The results obtained were compared with experimentally measured activities in these same materials to validate the calculated neutron flux in the model used. Subsequently, the fast neutron flux received by the steel specimens to incorporate them in the experimental facility E-16 of the reactor core model operating at nominal maximum power in steady-state was calculated, already from these calculations the irradiation time required was obtained for values of the neutron flux in the range of 10{sup 18} n/cm{sup 2}, which is estimated for the case of Laguna Verde after 32 years of effective operation at maximum power. (Author)

  16. Neutron equivalent doses and associated lifetime cancer incidence risks for head & neck and spinal proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athar, Basit S.; Paganetti, Harald

    2009-08-01

    In this work we have simulated the absorbed equivalent doses to various organs distant to the field edge assuming proton therapy treatments of brain or spine lesions. We have used computational whole-body (gender-specific and age-dependent) voxel phantoms and considered six treatment fields with varying treatment volumes and depths. The maximum neutron equivalent dose to organs near the field edge was found to be approximately 8 mSv Gy-1. We were able to clearly demonstrate that organ-specific neutron equivalent doses are age (stature) dependent. For example, assuming an 8-year-old patient, the dose to brain from the spinal fields ranged from 0.04 to 0.10 mSv Gy-1, whereas the dose to the brain assuming a 9-month-old patient ranged from 0.5 to 1.0 mSv Gy-1. Further, as the field aperture opening increases, the secondary neutron equivalent dose caused by the treatment head decreases, while the secondary neutron equivalent dose caused by the patient itself increases. To interpret the dosimetric data, we analyzed second cancer incidence risks for various organs as a function of patient age and field size based on two risk models. The results show that, for example, in an 8-year-old female patient treated with a spinal proton therapy field, breasts, lungs and rectum have the highest radiation-induced lifetime cancer incidence risks. These are estimated to be 0.71%, 1.05% and 0.60%, respectively. For an 11-year-old male patient treated with a spinal field, bronchi and rectum show the highest risks of 0.32% and 0.43%, respectively. Risks for male and female patients increase as their age at treatment time decreases.

  17. Changes of Dielectric Properties induced by Fast neutrons in Tissue Equivalent Plastic A-150

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.S.

    2000-01-01

    Tissue equivalent plastic A-150 (TEP A-150) samples are exposed to fast neutrons. Dielectric studies for TEP A-150 are carried out in the frequency range from 40 Hz to 4 MHz in the temperature range 295-343 K. The obtained data revealed that, both the dielectric properties and conductivity sigma ac (omega) of TEP A-150 are altered when irradiated by a relatively high fast neutron dose (15 Sv). The values of dielectric constant and conductivity are increased for the irradiated samples to about 24% than the blank samples

  18. Comparison of four NDT methods for indication of reactor steel degradation by high fluences of neutron irradiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomáš, Ivan; Vértesy, G.; Pirfo Barroso, S.; Kobayashi, S.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 265, DEC (2013), s. 201-209 ISSN 0029-5493 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : neutron irradiation * steel degradation * nuclear reactor pressure vessel * magnetic NDT * magnetic minor hysteresis loops * Magnetic Barkhausen Emission Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.972, year: 2013 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0029549313004664

  19. Evaluation of the equivalent dose rates due to neutrons emitted by plutonium oxide sources. Graphs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouguet, Jackie.

    1975-06-01

    In irradiated fuel processing plants, the personnel concerned with radioprotection often require a rapid estimation of the equivalent dose rates due to neutrons emitted by plutonium oxide sources, sources having different physical and geometrical characteristics. Graphs are presented which facilitate rapid determinations. Graphs enabling the equivalent dose rates to be evaluated in contact with or at some distance from plutonium oxide sources of different geometrical characteristics are presented, the plutonium being obtained from fuels having been irradiated at different burn up in light water power reactors [fr

  20. Measurements of the neutron dose equivalent for various radiation qualities, treatment machines and delivery techniques in radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hälg, R A; Besserer, J; Boschung, M; Mayer, S; Lomax, A J; Schneider, U

    2014-05-21

    In radiation therapy, high energy photon and proton beams cause the production of secondary neutrons. This leads to an unwanted dose contribution, which can be considerable for tissues outside of the target volume regarding the long term health of cancer patients. Due to the high biological effectiveness of neutrons in regards to cancer induction, small neutron doses can be important. This study quantified the neutron doses for different radiation therapy modalities. Most of the reports in the literature used neutron dose measurements free in air or on the surface of phantoms to estimate the amount of neutron dose to the patient. In this study, dose measurements were performed in terms of neutron dose equivalent inside an anthropomorphic phantom. The neutron dose equivalent was determined using track etch detectors as a function of the distance to the isocenter, as well as for radiation sensitive organs. The dose distributions were compared with respect to treatment techniques (3D-conformal, volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for photons; spot scanning and passive scattering for protons), therapy machines (Varian, Elekta and Siemens linear accelerators) and radiation quality (photons and protons). The neutron dose equivalent varied between 0.002 and 3 mSv per treatment gray over all measurements. Only small differences were found when comparing treatment techniques, but substantial differences were observed between the linear accelerator models. The neutron dose equivalent for proton therapy was higher than for photons in general and in particular for double-scattered protons. The overall neutron dose equivalent measured in this study was an order of magnitude lower than the stray dose of a treatment using 6 MV photons, suggesting that the contribution of the secondary neutron dose equivalent to the integral dose of a radiotherapy patient is small.

  1. Study of the response of a piezoceramic motor irradiated in a fast reactor up to a neutron fluence of 2.77E+17 n/cm{sup 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillon, Mario, E-mail: mario.pillon@enea.it [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, ENEA C.R. Frascati, via E. Fermi, 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Monti, Chiara; Mugnaini, Giampiero; Neri, Carlo; Rossi, Paolo [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, ENEA C.R. Frascati, via E. Fermi, 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Carta, Mario; Fiorani, Orlando; Santagata, Alfonso [ENEA C.R. CASACCIA, via Anguillarese, 301, 00123 S. Maria di Galeria, Rome (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Piezoceramic motors are compliant with magnetic field, temperature and vacuum. • We studied the response of a piezoceramic motor during the irradiation with neutrons. • The response was studied using 1 MeV neutrons up to a neutron fluence of 2.77E+17 n/cm{sup 2}. • Neutron irradiation produces a shift of the optimal resonance frequency and a decrease of the motor speed. • The performance changes do not affect the proper operation of the motor. - Abstract: A piezoceramic motor has been identified as the potential apparatus for carrying out the rotation of the scanning head of a laser radar system used for viewing the first wall of the ITER vessel. This diagnostic is simply referred to as IVVS (In Vessel Viewing System). The choice fell on a piezoceramic motor due to the presence of strong magnetic fields (up 8 T) and of the high vacuum and temperature conditions. To be compliant with all the ITER environmental conditions it was necessary to qualify the piezo-motor under gamma and neutron irradiation. In this paper are described the procedures and tests that have been performed to verify the compatibility of the operation of the motor adopted in the presence of a fast neutron fluence which was gradually increased over time in order to reach a total value of 2.77 × 10{sup 17} n/cm{sup 2}. Such neutron fluence was obtained by irradiating the motor in a position close to the core of the fast nuclear reactor TAPIRO, in operation at the ENEA Casaccia Research Centre, Italy. The neutron spectrum in this position has been identified as representative of that found in the rest position of the IVVS head during ITER operation. The cumulative neutron fluence reached corresponds to that it is expected to be reached during the entire life of ITER for the IVVS in the rest position without any shield. This work describes the experimental results of this test; the methodology adopted to determine the total neutron fluence achieved and the methodology adopted

  2. Fuels and materials research under the high neutron fluence using a fast reactor Joyo and post-irradiation examination facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soga, Tomonori; Ito, Chikara; Aoyama, Takafumi; Suzuki, Soju

    2009-01-01

    The experimental fast reactor Joyo at Oarai Research and Development Center (ORDC) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is Japan's sodium-cooled fast reactor (FR). In 2003, this reactor's upgrade to the 140MWt MK-III core was completed to increase the irradiation testing capability. The MK-III core provides the fast neutron flux of 4.0x10 15 n/cm 2 s as an irradiation test bed for improving the fuels and material of FR in Japan. Three post-irradiation examination (PIE) facilities named FMF, MMF and AGF related to Joyo are in ORDC. Irradiated subassemblies and core components are carried into the FMF (Fuel Monitoring Facility) and conducted nondestructive examinations. Each subassembly is disassembled to conduct some destructive examinations and to prepare the fuel and material samples for further detailed examinations. Fuel samples are sent to the AGF (Alpha-Gamma Facility), and material samples are sent to the MMF (Materials Monitoring Facility). These overall and elaborate data provided by PIE contribute to investigate the irradiation effect and behavior of fuels and materials. This facility complex is indispensable to promote the R and D of FR in Japan. And, the function and technology of irradiation test and PIE enable to contribute to the R and D of innovative fission or fusion reactor material which will be required to use under the high neutron exposure. (author)

  3. Desing study of high voltage plasma focus for a large fluence neutron source by using a water capacitor bank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Isao; Kobata, Tadasuke (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering)

    1983-03-01

    A new possibility for high intensity neutron source (HINS) would be opened by the plasma focus device if we have a high voltage capacitor bank. A scaling law of neutron yield for D-T gas discharge in plasma focus device is obtained after Imshennik, Filippov and Filippova. The resulting scaling law shows the realizability of the D-T HINS by the use of plasma focus, provided that the device is operated under a high voltage condition. Until now, it has been difficult to construct the high voltage capacitor bank of long life, for example with V/sub 0/=300kV, C/sub 0/=200..mu..F and L/sub 0/--5nH necessary in the level of HINS. It becomes possible to design this capacitor bank by using the coaxial water capacitor which has been developed for the electron and ion beam accelerator. The size of a capacitor designed for V/sub 0/=300kV, C/sub 0/=1..mu..F is phi5m x 22m. Two hundred capacitors are used in parallel in order to get the 200..mu..F.

  4. Calculation of Ambient (H*(10)) and Personal (Hp(10)) Dose Equivalent from a 252Cf Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traub, Richard J.

    2010-03-26

    The purpose of this calculation is to calculate the neutron dose factors for the Sr-Cf-3000 neutron source that is located in the 318 low scatter room (LSR). The dose factors were based on the dose conversion factors published in ICRP-21 Appendix 6, and the Ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)) and Personal dose equivalent (Hp(10)) dose factors published in ICRP Publication 74.

  5. Comparison of whole-body phantom designs to estimate organ equivalent neutron doses for secondary cancer risk assessment in proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moteabbed, Maryam; Drenkhahn, Robert; Paganetti, Harald; Geyer, Amy; Bolch, Wesley E

    2012-01-01

    Secondary neutron fluence created during proton therapy can be a significant source of radiation exposure in organs distant from the treatment site, especially in pediatric patients. Various published studies have used computational phantoms to estimate neutron equivalent doses in proton therapy. In these simulations, whole-body patient representations were applied considering either generic whole-body phantoms or generic age- and gender-dependent phantoms. No studies to date have reported using patient-specific geometry information. The purpose of this study was to estimate the effects of patient–phantom matching when using computational pediatric phantoms. To achieve this goal, three sets of phantoms, including different ages and genders, were compared to the patients’ whole-body CT. These sets consisted of pediatric age-specific reference, age-adjusted reference and anatomically sculpted phantoms. The neutron equivalent dose for a subset of out-of-field organs was calculated using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo toolkit, where proton fields were used to irradiate the cranium and the spine of all phantoms and the CT-segmented patient models. The maximum neutron equivalent dose per treatment absorbed dose was calculated and found to be on the order of 0 to 5 mSv Gy −1 . The relative dose difference between each phantom and their respective CT-segmented patient model for most organs showed a dependence on how close the phantom and patient heights were matched. The weight matching was found to have much smaller impact on the dose accuracy except for very heavy patients. Analysis of relative dose difference with respect to height difference suggested that phantom sculpting has a positive effect in terms of dose accuracy as long as the patient is close to the 50th percentile height and weight. Otherwise, the benefit of sculpting was masked by inherent uncertainties, i.e. variations in organ shapes, sizes and locations. Other sources of uncertainty included errors

  6. Ambient neutron dose equivalent outside concrete vault rooms for 15 and 18 MV radiotherapy accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-ovalle, S. A.; Barquero, R.; Gomez-ros, J. M.; Lallena, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), due to neutrons outside three bunkers that house a 15- and a 18-MV Varian Clinac 2100C/D and a 15-MV Elekta Inor clinical linacs, has been calculated. The Monte Carlo code MCNPX (v. 2.5) has been used to simulate the neutron production and transport. The complete geometries including linacs and full installations have been built up according to the specifications of the manufacturers and the planes provided by the corresponding medical physical services of the hospitals where the three linacs operate. Two of these installations, those lodging the Varian linacs, have an entrance door to the bunker while the other one does not, although it has a maze with two bends. Various treatment orientations were simulated in order to establish plausible annual equivalent doses. Specifically anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left lateral, right lateral orientations and an additional one with the gantry rotated 30 deg. have been studied. Significant dose rates have been found only behind the walls and the door of the bunker, near the entrance and the console, with a maximum of 12 μSv h -1 . Dose rates per year have been calculated assuming a conservative workload for the three facilities. The higher dose rates in the corresponding control areas were 799 μSv y -1 , in the case of the facility which operates the 15-MV Clinac, 159 μSv y -1 , for that with the 15-MV Elekta, and 21 μSv y -1 for the facility housing the 18-MV Varian. A comparison with measurements performed in similar installations has been carried out and a reasonable agreement has been found. The results obtained indicate that the neutron contamination does not increase the doses above the legal limits and does not produce a significant enhancement of the dose equivalent calculated. When doses are below the detection limits provided by the measuring devices available today, MCNPX simulation provides an useful method to evaluate neutron dose equivalents

  7. A point-kernel shielding code for calculations of neutron and secondary gamma-ray 1cm dose equivalents: PKN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotegawa, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Shun-ichi

    1991-09-01

    A point-kernel integral technique code, PKN, and the related data library have been developed to calculate neutron and secondary gamma-ray dose equivalents in water, concrete and iron shields for neutron sources in 3-dimensional geometry. The comparison between calculational results of the present code and those of the 1-dimensional transport code ANISN = JR, and the 2-dimensional transport code DOT4.2 showed a sufficient accuracy, and the availability of the PKN code has been confirmed. (author)

  8. Simulation of high fluence swelling behavior in technological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Powell, R.W.; Diamond, S.; Lauritzen, T.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Sprague, J.A.; Keefer, D.

    1977-06-01

    The U.S. Breeder Reactor Program is employing charged particle irradiation experiments at accelerated displacement rates to simulate neutron-induced microstructural changes in materials of technological interest. Applications of the simulation technique range from the study of fundamental microstructural mechanisms to the development of predictions of the high fluence swelling behavior of candidate alloys for breeder reactor ducts and fuel cladding. An exact equivalence probably cannot be established between all facets of the microstructural evolution which occurs in the disparate charged-particle and neutron environments. To aid in the correlation of data developed in the two environments an assessment has been made of the factors influencing the simulation process. A series of intercorrelation programs and analysis activities have been conducted to identify and explore the relevant phenomena. The factors found to exert substantial influence on the correlation process fall into two categories, one which deals with those variables which are atypical of the neutron environment and one which deals with the additional factors which arise due to the large differences in displacement rate of the two irradiation environments. While the various simulation techniques have been invaluable in determining the basic mechanisms and parametric dependencies of swelling, the potential of these tools in the confident prediction of swelling at high neutron fluence has yet to be realized. The basic problem lies in the inability of the simulation technique to reproduce the early microstructural development in the period that precedes and encompasses the incubation of voids. The concepts of temperature shift and dose equivalency have also been found to be more complicated than previously imagined. Preconditioning of metals in a neutron environment prior to simulation testing is now being employed in order to provide more appropriate starting microstructures

  9. Development of a neutron dosemeter for personnel dosimetry with direct response of dose equivalent in neutron fields of different energy spectra. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerschel, B.

    1978-12-01

    An energy-independent neutron dosemeter is described. The dosemeter is based on a dielectric track detector (mica foil of 6 μm thickness) between uranium and a thorium-232 radiator pulverized and pressed with polyvinyl alcohol enclosed within a cadmium shell. The track density is direct proportional to the dose equivalent between 5 x 10 -4 and 10 Sv. When evaluated every two months, the dosemeter has for 3 mSv an error of +- 50% decreasing at higher dose equivalents

  10. Estimation of low-level neutron dose-equivalent rate by using extrapolation method for a curie level Am–Be neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Gang; Xu, Jiayun; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Neutron radiation protection is an important research area because of the strong radiation biological effect of neutron field. The radiation dose of neutron is closely related to the neutron energy, and the connected relationship is a complex function of energy. For the low-level neutron radiation field (e.g. the Am–Be source), the commonly used commercial neutron dosimeter cannot always reflect the low-level dose rate, which is restricted by its own sensitivity limit and measuring range. In this paper, the intensity distribution of neutron field caused by a curie level Am–Be neutron source was investigated by measuring the count rates obtained through a 3 He proportional counter at different locations around the source. The results indicate that the count rates outside of the source room are negligible compared with the count rates measured in the source room. In the source room, 3 He proportional counter and neutron dosimeter were used to measure the count rates and dose rates respectively at different distances to the source. The results indicate that both the count rates and dose rates decrease exponentially with the increasing distance, and the dose rates measured by a commercial dosimeter are in good agreement with the results calculated by the Geant4 simulation within the inherent errors recommended by ICRP and IEC. Further studies presented in this paper indicate that the low-level neutron dose equivalent rates in the source room increase exponentially with the increasing low-energy neutron count rates when the source is lifted from the shield with different radiation intensities. Based on this relationship as well as the count rates measured at larger distance to the source, the dose rates can be calculated approximately by the extrapolation method. This principle can be used to estimate the low level neutron dose values in the source room which cannot be measured directly by a commercial dosimeter. - Highlights: • The scope of the affected area for

  11. Calculation of the neutron flux and fluence in the covering of the nucleus and the vessel of a BWR; Calculo del flujo neutronico y fluencia en la envolvente del nucleo y la vasija de un reactor nuclear BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez C, E.; Del Valle G, E. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, U. P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Col. Lindavista, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Longoria G, L. C., E-mail: evalle@esfm.ipn.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    One of the main objectives related with the safety in any nuclear power plant, including the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, is to guarantee the structural integrity of the pressure vessel of the reactor. To identify and quantifying the damage caused be neutron irradiation in the vessel of any nuclear reactor, is necessary to know as much the neutron flux as the fluence that it has been receiving during their time of operation life, since the observables damages by means of tests mechanics are products of micro-structural effects, induced by neutron irradiation, therefore, is important the study and prediction of the neutron flux to have a better knowledge of the damage that are receiving these materials. In our calculation the code DORT was used, which solves the transport equation in discreet coordinates and in two dimensions (x-y, r-{theta} and r-z), in accord to the regulator guide, it requires to make and approach of the neutron flux in three dimensions by means of the Synthesis Method. Whit this method is possible to achieve a representation of the flux in 3D combining or synthesizing the calculated fluxes by DORT code in r-{theta}, r-z and r. In this work the application of the Synthesis Method is presented, according to the Regulator Guide 1.190, to determine the fluxes 3D in the interns of a BWR using three different space meshes. (Author)

  12. Method for measuring dose-equivalent in a neutron flux with an unknown energy spectra and means for carrying out that method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distenfeld, Carl H.

    1978-01-01

    A method for measuring the dose-equivalent for exposure to an unknown and/or time varing neutron flux which comprises simultaneously exposing a plurality of neutron detecting elements of different types to a neutron flux and combining the measured responses of the various detecting elements by means of a function, whose value is an approximate measure of the dose-equivalent, which is substantially independent of the energy spectra of the flux. Also, a personnel neutron dosimeter, which is useful in carrying out the above method, comprising a plurality of various neutron detecting elements in a single housing suitable for personnel to wear while working in a radiation area.

  13. Comparison of Out-Of-Field Neutron Equivalent Doses in Scanning Carbon and Proton Therapies for Cranial Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Athar, B.; Henker, K.; Jäkel, O.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this analysis is to compare the secondary neutron lateral doses from scanning carbon and proton beam therapies. Method and Materials: We simulated secondary neutron doses for out-of-field organs in an 11-year old male patient. Scanned carbon and proton beams were simulated......, absorbed neutron doses to tonsils and pharynx close to the field-edge were found to be 5x10-4 mSv/GyE and 4x10-4 mSv/GyE, respectively. Whereas, neutron equivalent doses to tonsils and pharynx were estimated to be 0.57mSv/GyE and 0.55 mSv/GyE in scanned proton therapy, respectively. In heavy ion carbon...... beams neutrons produced inside the patient are emitted at small angles, predominantly in the forward direction, whereas in proton therapy, neutrons are emitted more isotropic. Therefore the absorbed neutron doses in carbon therapy lateral to the field edge are smaller compared to the corresponding...

  14. Out‐of‐field doses and neutron dose equivalents for electron beams from modern Varian and Elekta linear accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Carlos E.; Nitsch, Paige L.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Howell, Rebecca M.

    2016-01-01

    Out‐of‐field doses from radiotherapy can cause harmful side effects or eventually lead to secondary cancers. Scattered doses outside the applicator field, neutron source strength values, and neutron dose equivalents have not been broadly investigated for high‐energy electron beams. To better understand the extent of these exposures, we measured out‐of‐field dose characteristics of electron applicators for high‐energy electron beams on two Varian 21iXs, a Varian TrueBeam, and an Elekta Versa HD operating at various energy levels. Out‐of‐field dose profiles and percent depth‐dose curves were measured in a Wellhofer water phantom using a Farmer ion chamber. Neutron dose was assessed using a combination of moderator buckets and gold activation foils placed on the treatment couch at various locations in the patient plane on both the Varian 21iX and Elekta Versa HD linear accelerators. Our findings showed that out‐of‐field electron doses were highest for the highest electron energies. These doses typically decreased with increasing distance from the field edge but showed substantial increases over some distance ranges. The Elekta linear accelerator had higher electron out‐of‐field doses than the Varian units examined, and the Elekta dose profiles exhibited a second dose peak about 20 to 30 cm from central‐axis, which was found to be higher than typical out‐of‐field doses from photon beams. Electron doses decreased sharply with depth before becoming nearly constant; the dose was found to decrease to a depth of approximately E(MeV)/4 in cm. With respect to neutron dosimetry, Q values and neutron dose equivalents increased with electron beam energy. Neutron contamination from electron beams was found to be much lower than that from photon beams. Even though the neutron dose equivalent for electron beams represented a small portion of neutron doses observed under photon beams, neutron doses from electron beams may need to be considered for

  15. Out-of-field doses and neutron dose equivalents for electron beams from modern Varian and Elekta linear accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Carlos E; Nitsch, Paige L; Kudchadker, Rajat J; Howell, Rebecca M; Kry, Stephen F

    2016-07-08

    Out-of-field doses from radiotherapy can cause harmful side effects or eventually lead to secondary cancers. Scattered doses outside the applicator field, neutron source strength values, and neutron dose equivalents have not been broadly investigated for high-energy electron beams. To better understand the extent of these exposures, we measured out-of-field dose characteristics of electron applicators for high-energy electron beams on two Varian 21iXs, a Varian TrueBeam, and an Elekta Versa HD operating at various energy levels. Out-of-field dose profiles and percent depth-dose curves were measured in a Wellhofer water phantom using a Farmer ion chamber. Neutron dose was assessed using a combination of moderator buckets and gold activation foils placed on the treatment couch at various locations in the patient plane on both the Varian 21iX and Elekta Versa HD linear accelerators. Our findings showed that out-of-field electron doses were highest for the highest electron energies. These doses typically decreased with increasing distance from the field edge but showed substantial increases over some distance ranges. The Elekta linear accelerator had higher electron out-of-field doses than the Varian units examined, and the Elekta dose profiles exhibited a second dose peak about 20 to 30 cm from central-axis, which was found to be higher than typical out-of-field doses from photon beams. Electron doses decreased sharply with depth before becoming nearly constant; the dose was found to decrease to a depth of approximately E(MeV)/4 in cm. With respect to neutron dosimetry, Q values and neutron dose equivalents increased with electron beam energy. Neutron contamination from electron beams was found to be much lower than that from photon beams. Even though the neutron dose equivalent for electron beams represented a small portion of neutron doses observed under photon beams, neutron doses from electron beams may need to be considered for special cases.

  16. Accuracy of helium accumulation fluence monitor for fast reactor dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Chikara; Aoyama, Takafumi [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1998-03-01

    A helium (He) accumulation fluence monitor (HAFM) has been developed for fast reactor dosimetry. In order to evaluate the measurement accuracy of neutron fluence by the HAFM method, the HAFMs of enriched boron (B) and beryllium (Be) were irradiated in the Fast Neutron Source Reactor `YAYOI`. The number of He atoms produced in the HAFMs were measured and compared with the calculated values. As a result of this study, it was confirmed that the neutron fluence could be measured within 5 % by the HAFM method, and that met the required accuracy for fast reactor dosimetry. (author)

  17. Study of the environmental neutron spectrum at Zacatecas city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega C, H.R.

    2003-01-01

    The environmental neutron spectrum has been measured at Zacatecas City in Mexico. Neutron spectrum was unfolded from count rates obtained with a multisphere neutron spectrometer with a Li I(Eu) scintillator. With the spectrum information the ambient dose equivalent and the isotropic effective dose were calculated. A model based upon the geomagnetic latitude and the altitude above sea level, that allows to estimate the neutron fluence rate is proposed, the model results are compared with total neutron fluences measured at several locations worldwide. Environmental neutron spectrum shows peaks at 1 and 100 MeV as well as a relevant amount of low energy neutrons. The neutron fluence rate was 65 ± 3 cm -2 -h -1 , producing 13.7 ± 0.6 n Sv-h -1 due to ambient dose equivalent rate and an isotropic effective dose rate of 14.1 ± 0.6 n Sv-h -1 . Neutron fluence rates predicted with the model are in agreement with those reported in the literature. (Author)

  18. Neutron radiation from medical electron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCall, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    A method is described using simple gold foils and relatively inexpensive moderators to measure neutron fluences, both fast nd thermal, which then can be converted to dose equivalent using a few simple formulas. The method is sensitive, easy to calibrate, and should work at most accelerators regardless of energy or room geometry

  19. Evaluation of the environmental equivalent dose rate using area monitors for neutrons in clinical linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salgado, Ana Paula; Pereira, Walsan Wagner; Patrao, Karla C. de Souza; Fonseca, Evaldo S. da; Batista, Delano V.S.

    2009-01-01

    The Neutron Laboratory of the Radioprotection and Dosimetry Institute - IRD/CNEN, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, initiated studies on the process of calibration of neutron area monitors and the results of the measurements performed at radiotherapy treatment rooms, containing clinical accelerators

  20. A new neutron dose equivalent rate meter with improved neutron energy response in terms of H*(10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klett, A.; Maushart, R.; Burgkhardt, B.; Fieg, G.; Piesch, E.

    1994-01-01

    Conventional neutron dose rate meters make use of thermal neutron detectors such as 3 He counters located in the center of a moderator and absorber for thermal neutrons. The various commercial types used up to now have the disadvantage that the reading is extremely energy dependent exceeding a factor of up to 15. The need to improve the energy response and the sensitivity in the lower dose rate range resulted in joint cooperation between KfK and EG7G Berthold. On the basis of Monte-Carlo calculations and comprehensive calibrations with monoenergetic neutrons at the PTB Braunshweig, a new type of rem-counter has been optimized using a 10 cm x 4 cm diameter 3 He-counter. Both calculations and experiments resulted in a lower energy dependence within ±40% in the energy range 20 keV to 19 MeV. The commercially available dose rate meter of 25 cm diameter, with a weight below 10 kg and with a high neutron sensitivity of 3 counts per nSv has a dose rate range of 0.1 μSv/h - 100 mSv/h and low γ-sensitivity. With integrated electronics, this instrument is applicable for routine monitoring as well as for stationary monitoring of radiation fields near accelerators

  1. Passive neutron dosemeter with activation detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valero L, C.; Banuelos F, A.; Guzman G, K. A.; Borja H, C. G.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2011-10-15

    A passive neutron dosemeter with {sup 197}Au activation detector has been developed. The area dosemeter was made as a 20.5 {phi} x 20.5 cm{sup 2} polyethylene moderator, with a polyethylene pug where a {sup 197}Au foil can be located either parallel or perpendicular to moderator axis. Using Monte Carlo methods, with the MCNP5 code. With the fluence response and the fluence-to-equivalent dose conversion coefficients from ICRP-74, responses to H*(10) were also calculated, these were compared against responses of commercially available neutron area monitors and dosemeters. (Author)

  2. s-process studies in the light of new experimental cross sections: Distribution of neutron fluences and r-process residuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaeppeler, F.; Beer, H.; Wisshak, K.; Clayton, D.D.; Macklin, R.L.; Ward, R.A.

    1981-08-01

    A best set of neutron-capture cross sections has been evaluated for the most important s-process isotopes. With this data base, s-process studies have been carried out using the traditional model which assumes a steady neutron flux and an exponential distribution of neutron irradiations. The calculated sigmaN-curve is in excellent agreement with the empirical sigmaN-values of pure s-process nuclei. Simultaneously, good agreement is found between the difference of solar and s-process abundances and the abundances of pure r-process nuclei. We also discuss the abundance pattern of the iron group elements where our s-process results complement the abundances obtained from explosive nuclear burning. The results obtained from the traditional s-process model such as seed abundances, mean neutron irradiations, or neutron densities are compared to recent stellar model calculations which assume the He-burning shells of red giant stars as the site for the s-process. (orig.) [de

  3. Study of the distribution of neutron fluence in a treatment room with proton; Estudio de la distribucion de fluencia neutronica en una sala de tratamientos con protonterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagares, J. I.; Arce, P.; Sansaloni, F.; Terron, J. A.; Exposito, M. R.; Nieto-Camero, J. J.; Korf, A.; Loubser, M.; Sanchez-Doblado, F.

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the energy distribution of flow in the treatment room. With this information we seek the most appropriate location in which to place an active detector, based on digital memories, to calculate the neutron dose in the patient peripheral.

  4. Fast neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.

    1993-01-01

    Research concentrated on three major areas during the last twelve months: (1) investigations of energy fluence and absorbed dose measurements using crystalline and hot pressed TLD materials exposes to ultrasoft beams of photons, (2) fast neutron kerma factor measurements for several important elements as well as NE-213 scintillation material response function determinations at the intense ''white'' source available at the WNR facility at LAMPF, and (3) kerma factor ratio determinations for carbon and oxygen to A-150 tissue equivalent plastic at the clinical fast neutron radiation facility at Harper Hospital, Detroit, MI. Progress summary reports of these efforts are given in this report

  5. Neutrons around thick target bombarded by 50 MeV/u sup 1 sup 8 O-ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Li, G; Li, Z; Su, Y; Zhang, S

    1999-01-01

    Neutron energy, fluence rate, angular distributions and dose equivalent rate distributions around thick Be, Cu, Au targets bombarded by a 50 MeV/u sup 1 sup 8 O-ion beam were measured by using a threshold detector activation method. The neutron yields and emission rates in the forward direction were obtained. (author)

  6. Neutron equivalent dose rates at the surroundings of the electron linear accelerator operated by the university of Sao Paulo - Physics institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagihara, L.S.

    1984-01-01

    For the determination of the neutron dose rates at the surroundings of an electron linear accelerators it is necessary the knowledge of the neutron spectrum or its mean energy, because the conversion factor of the flux in equivalent dose rates, is strongly dependent on the neutron energy. Taking this fact into consideration, equivalent dose rates were determined in the three representative sites of the IF/USP Linear Electron Accelerator. Also, due to the radiation field be pulsed, a theoretical and experimental study has been realized to evaluate the effect produced by the variation of the field on the detector. (author)

  7. Neutron scattering in ORNL's calibration facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J.C.; Sims, C.S.; Casson, W.H.; Murakami, H.

    1991-01-01

    Room scattering corrections for several common neutron detectors in a new neutron calibration facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory were measured. Results for three radioisotopic sources in ground scattering and enclosed room scattering situations are compared with two model calculations, and the agreement is good. A personnel neutron spectrometer was used to examine further the spectral variation inside the enclosed neutron room. Scattered fluence and scattered dose equivalent results from the spectral measurements indicate that the scattering predictions using models hold only for small-source-to-detector distances. Additional observations from this study are also presented. (author)

  8. Estimation of neutron dose equivalent at the mezzanine of the Advanced Light Source and the laboratory boundary using the ORNL program MORSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, R K

    1990-12-01

    To investigate the radiation effect of neutrons near the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) with respect to the neutron dose equivalents in nearby occupied areas and at the site boundary, the neutron transport code MORSE, from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), was used. These dose equivalents result from both skyshine neutrons transported by air scattering and direct neutrons penetrating the shielding. The ALS neutron sources are a 50-MeV linear accelerator and its transfer line, a 1.5-GeV booster, a beam extraction line, and a 1.9-GeV storage ring. The most conservative total occupational-dose-equivalent rate in the center of the ALS mezzanine, 39 m from the ALS center, was found to be 1.14 X 10(-3) Sv y-1 per 2000-h "occupational" year, and the total environmental-dose-equivalent rate at the ALS boundary, 125 m from the ALS center, was found to be 3.02 X 10(-4) Sv y-1 per 8760-h calendar year. More realistic dose-equivalent rates, using the nominal (expected) storage-ring current, were calculated to be 1.0 X 10(-4) Sv y-1 and 2.65 X 10(-5) Sv y-1 occupational year and calendar year, respectively, which are much lower than the DOE reporting levels.

  9. Measurements of thermal neutron fluence in the bunker of a cyclotron for PET isotope production; Medidas de fluencia de neutrones termicos en el bunker de un ciclotron de produccion de isotopos para PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendez Villafane, R.; Sansoloni florit, F.; Lagares gonzalez, J. L.; Llop Roig, J.; Guerrero Araque, J. E.; Muniz Gutierrez, J. L.; Perez Morales, J. M.

    2011-07-01

    To measure the neutron spectrum has been used spectrometry system based on Bonner spheres with Au flakes as thermal neutron detector at its center while the results are still pending and will be analyzing another job.

  10. An improved long counter for neutron fluence measurement with a flat response over a wide energy range from 1 keV to 15 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Q.Y., E-mail: huqyuan@163.com; Zhang, J.H.; Zhang, D.; Guo, H.S.; Yang, G.Z.; Li, B.J.; Ye, F.; Si, F.N.; Liu, J.; Fu, Y.C.; Ning, J.M.; Yang, J.; Yang, H.H.; Wang, W.C.

    2014-12-21

    A new long counter has been developed with a flat energy response over a wide range from 1 keV to 15 MeV. It consists of five {sup 3}He proportional counter tubes and a number of carefully designed polyethylene moderators. The structure of this detector was determined by careful Monte Carlo simulations. The calculated results show that the efficiency of this counter is uniform from 1 keV neutron energy to 15 MeV. Calibration was performed on an Am–Be source and the accelerator-produced monoenergetic D–D and D–T neutron sources. Fluctuation of the response curve is less than 10% over this energy range.

  11. Extended use of alanine irradiated in experimental reactor for combined gamma- and neutron-dose assessment by ESR spectroscopy and thermal neutron fluence assessment by measurement of (14)C by LSC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoníček, B; Kučera, J; Světlík, I; Viererbl, L; Lahodová, Z; Tomášková, L; Cabalka, M

    2014-11-01

    Gamma- and neutron doses in an experimental reactor were measured using alanine/electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometry. The absorbed dose in alanine was decomposed into contributions caused by gamma and neutron radiation using neutron kerma factors. To overcome a low sensitivity of the alanine/ESR response to thermal neutrons, a novel method has been proposed for the assessment of a thermal neutron flux using the (14)N(n,p) (14)C reaction on nitrogen present in alanine and subsequent measurement of (14)C by liquid scintillation counting (LSC). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Optimization of artificial neural networks for the reconstruction of the neutrons spectrum and their equivalent doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes A, A.; Ortiz R, J. M.; Reyes H, A.; Castaneda M, R.; Solis S, L. O.; Vega C, H. R.

    2014-08-01

    In this work was used the robust design methodology of artificial neural networks to determine a good topology of net able to solve with efficiency the problems of neutrons spectrometry and dosimetry. For the design of the topology of optimized net 36 different net architectures based on an orthogonal arrangement with a configuration L 9 (3 4 ), L 4 (3 2 ) were trained. For the training of the neural networks, was used a computer code developed in the ambient of Mat lab programming, which automates the process and analysis of the information, reducing the time used in this activity considerably for the investigator. For the training of the propagation nets forward was utilized a neutrons spectrum compendium published by the International Atomic Energy Agency, where of the total 80% was used for the training and 20% for the test, it trained with an inverse propagation algorithm being the entrance data the count rates corresponding to the 7 spheres of the spectrometric system of Bonner spheres, as exit data, the neural network obtains the neutrons spectrum expressed in 60 energy groups and are calculated of simultaneous way 15 dosimetric quantities. (Author)

  13. Radiation damage in silicon due to albedo neutrons emitted from hadronic beam dumps (Fe and U)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, T.A.; Bishop, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    Calculations have been carried out to determine the level of radiation damage that can be expected from albedo neutrons when 1- and 5-GeV negative pions are incident on iron and uranium beam dumps. The calculated damage data are presented in several ways including neutron fluence above 0.111 MeV, 1 MeV equivalent neutron fluence, damage energy deposition, and DPA or displacements per atom. Details are presented as to the method of calculation. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  14. Spectrum and H(10) of secondary neutrons around Linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz H, A.; Hernandez A, B.; Vega C, H. R.; Hernandez D, V. M. [Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Cipres 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Rivera M, T. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, IPN, Av. Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)], e-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com

    2009-10-15

    Neutron spectrum and ambient dose equivalent has been measured around two 10 MV linear accelerators. Accelerators are Siemens, one is a Mevatron model while another is the Primus. Main differences between those models are the beam collimator and the vault room. Here, Bonner sphere spectrometer with a passive thermal neutron detector has been utilized to measure the neutron spectrum inside the vault. Using an active detector the neutron spectrum was measured by the vaults door of both accelerators. With a neutron area monitor the dose equivalent was measured by the doors. Neutron strength, total fluence rate and ambient dose equivalent were compared, from this was found that shielding conditions are better in the Primus model. (Author)

  15. Basics of Neutrons for First Responders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rees, Brian G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-02-05

    These are slides from a presentation on the basics of neutrons. A few topics covered are: common origins of terrestrial neutron radiation, neutron sources, neutron energy, interactions, detecting neutrons, gammas from neutron interactions, neutron signatures in gamma-ray spectra, neutrons and NaI, neutron fluence to dose (msV), instruments' response to neutrons.

  16. Heat-to-heat variability of irradiation creep and swelling of HT9 irradiated to high neutron fluence at 400-600{degrees}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Irradiation creep data on ferritic/martensitic steels are difficult and expensive to obtain, and are not available for fusion-relevant neutron spectra and displacement rates. Therefore, an extensive creep data rescue and analysis effort is in progress to characterize irradiation creep of ferritic/martensitic alloys in other reactors and to develop a methodology for applying it to fusion applications. In the current study, four tube sets constructed from three nominally similar heats of HT9 subjected to one of two heat treatments were constructed as helium-pressurized creep tubes and irradiated in FFTF-MOTA at four temperatures between 400 and 600{degrees}C. Each of the four heats exhibited a different stress-free swelling behavior at 400{degrees}C, with the creep rate following the swelling according to the familiar B{sub o} + DS creep law. No stress-free swelling was observed at the other three irradiation temperatures. Using a stress exponent of n = 1.0 as the defining criterion, {open_quotes}classic{close_quotes} irradiation creep was found at all temperatures, but, only over limited stress ranges that decreased with increasing temperature. The creep coefficient B{sub o} is a little lower ({approx}50%) than that observed for austenitic steel, but the swelling-creep coupling coefficient D is comparable to that of austenitic steels. Primary transient creep behavior was also observed at all temperatures except 400{degrees}C, and thermal creep behavior was found to dominate the deformation at high stress levels at 550 and 600{degrees}C.

  17. Construction of monoenergetic neutron calibration fields using 45Sc(p, n)45Ti reaction at JAEA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimura, Y; Saegusa, J; Shikaze, Y; Tsutsumi, M; Shimizu, S; Yoshizawa, M

    2007-01-01

    The 8 and 27 keV monoenergetic neutron calibration fields have been developed by using (45)Sc(p, n)(45)Ti reaction. Protons from a 4-MV Pelletron accelerator are used to bombard a thin scandium target evaporated onto a platinum disc. The proton energies are finely adjusted to the resonance to generate the 8 and 27 keV neutrons by applying a high voltage to the target assemblies. The neutron energies were measured using the time-of-flight method with a lithium glass scintillation detector. The neutron fluences at a calibration point located at 50 cm from the target were evaluated using Bonner spheres. A long counter was placed at 2.2 m from the target and at 60 degrees to the direction of the proton beam in order to monitor the fluence at the calibration point. Fluence and dose equivalent rates at the calibration point are sufficient to calibrate many types of the neutron survey metres.

  18. Experimental evaluation of neutron dose in radiotherapy patients: Which dose?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero-Expósito, M., E-mail: mariateresa.romero@uab.cat; Domingo, C.; Ortega-Gelabert, O.; Gallego, S. [Grup de Recerca en Radiacions Ionizants (GRRI), Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra 08193 (Spain); Sánchez-Doblado, F. [Departamento de Fisiología Médica y Biofísica, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla 41009 (Spain); Servicio de Radiofísica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla 41009 (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: The evaluation of peripheral dose has become a relevant issue recently, in particular, the contribution of secondary neutrons. However, after the revision of the Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, there has been a lack of experimental procedure for its evaluation. Specifically, the problem comes from the replacement of organ dose equivalent by the organ-equivalent dose, being the latter “immeasurable” by definition. Therefore, dose equivalent has to be still used although it needs the calculation of the radiation quality factor Q, which depends on the unrestricted linear energy transfer, for the specific neutron irradiation conditions. On the other hand, equivalent dose is computed through the radiation weighting factor w{sub R}, which can be easily calculated using the continuous function provided by the recommendations. The aim of the paper is to compare the dose equivalent evaluated following the definition, that is, using Q, with the values obtained by replacing the quality factor with w{sub R}. Methods: Dose equivalents were estimated in selected points inside a phantom. Two types of medical environments were chosen for the irradiations: a photon- and a proton-therapy facility. For the estimation of dose equivalent, a poly-allyl-diglicol-carbonate-based neutron dosimeter was used for neutron fluence measurements and, additionally, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to obtain the energy spectrum of the fluence in each point. Results: The main contribution to dose equivalent comes from neutrons with energy higher than 0.1 MeV, even when they represent the smallest contribution in fluence. For this range of energy, the radiation quality factor and the radiation weighting factor are approximately equal. Then, dose equivalents evaluated using both factors are compatible, with differences below 12%. Conclusions: Quality factor can be replaced by the radiation weighting factor in the evaluation of dose

  19. Calculation of the neutron W value for neutron dosimetry below the MeV energy region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, S.; Shizuma, K.; Goodhead, D.T.

    2000-01-01

    The effective neutron W value for tissue-equivalent gas in the energy region from 5 keV to 5.7 MeV has been calculated using W values for recoil particles (protons, alpha particles, oxygen, carbon and nitrogen ions), which are produced by incident neutrons. The W value is assumed to be an energy-fluence-average over the W values of the recoil particles. The energy fluence spectra for the recoil particles are calculated by using a continuous slowing-down approximation (CSDA). For the W values of recoil particles in the low-energy region, the recently evaluated data by Siebert et al and Taylor et al were used. Results are presented which show that the effective neutron W value depends strongly on energy in the low-energy region. This result indicates that neutron dose measurements using ionization chambers need a considerable correction of the W value in the low-energy region. (author)

  20. Dosimetry methods in boron neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambarini, G.; Artuso, E.; Felisi, M.; Regazzoni, V.; Giove, D. [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Department of Physics, Via Festa del Patrono 7, 20122 Milano (Italy); Agosteo, S.; Barcaglioni, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milano (Italy); Campi, F.; Garlati, L. [Politecnico di Milano, Energy Department, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); De Errico, F. [Universita degli Studi di Pisa, Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering, Lungamo Pacinotti 43, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Borroni, M.; Carrara, M. [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Medical Physics Unit, Via Venezian 1, 20133 Milano (Italy); Burian, J.; Klupak, V.; Viererbl, L.; Marek, M. [Research Centre Rez, Department of Neutron Physics, 250-68 Husinec-Rez (Czech Republic)

    2014-08-15

    Dosimetry studies have been carried out at thermal and epithermal columns of Lvr-15 research reactor for investigating the spatial distribution of gamma dose, fast neutron dose and thermal neutron fluence. Two different dosimetry methods, both based on solid state detectors, have been studied and applied and the accuracy and consistency of the results have been inspected. One method is based on Fricke gel dosimeters that are dilute water solutions and have good tissue equivalence for neutrons and also for all the secondary radiations produced by neutron interactions in tissue or water phantoms. Fricke gel dosimeters give the possibility of separating the various dose contributions, i.e. the gamma dose, the fast neutron dose and the dose due to charged particles generated during thermal neutron reactions by isotopes having high cross section, like 10-B. From this last dose, thermal neutron fluence can be obtained by means of the kerma factor. The second method is based on thermoluminescence dosimeters. In particular, the developed method draw advantage from the different heights of the peaks of the glow curve of such phosphors when irradiated with photons or with thermal neutrons. The results show that satisfactory results can be obtained with simple methods, in spite of the complexity of the subject. However, the more suitable dosimeters and principally their utilization and analysis modalities are different for the various neutron beams, mainly depending on the relative intensities of the three components of the neutron field, in particular are different for thermal and epithermal columns. (Author)

  1. The irradiation creep characteristics of graphite to high fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, C.R.; Cundy, M.; Kleist, G.

    1988-01-01

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) have massive blocks of graphite with thermal and neutron-flux gradients causing high internal stresses. Thermal stresses are transient; however, stresses generated by differential growth due to neutron damage continue to increase with time. Fortunately, graphite also experiences creep under irradiation allowing relaxation of stresses to nominally safe levels. Because of complexity of irradiation creep experiments, data demonstrating this phenomenon are generally limited to fairly low fluences compared to the overall fluences expected in most reactors. Notable exceptions have been experiments at 300/degree/C and 500/degree/C run at Petten under tension and compression creep stresses to fluences greater than 4 /times/ 10 26 (E > 50 keV) neutrons/m 2 . This study complements the previous results by extending the irradiation temperature to 900/degree/C. 2 refs., 3 figs

  2. A MULTI-ELEMENT THICK GAS ELECTRON MULTIPLIER-BASED MICRODOSEMETER FOR MEASUREMENT OF NEUTRONS DOSE-EQUIVALENT: A MONTE CARLO STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslehi, A; Raisali, G

    2017-11-01

    To determine the dose-equivalent of neutrons in an extended energy range, in the present work a multi-element thick gas electron multiplier-based microdosemeter made of PMMA (Perspex) walls of 10 mm in thickness is designed. Each cavity is filled with the propane-based tissue-equivalent (TE) gas simulating 1 µm of tissue. Also, a few weight fractions of 3He are assumed to be added to the TE gas. The dose-equivalents are determined for 11 neutron energies between thermal and 14 MeV using the lineal energy distributions calculated by Geant4 simulation toolkit and also the lineal energy-based quality factors. The results show that by adding 0.04% of 3He to the TE gas in each cavity, an energy-independent dose-equivalent response within 30% uncertainty around a median value of 0.91 in the above energy range is achieved. It is concluded that after its construction, the studied microdosemeter can be used to measure the dose-equivalent of neutrons, favorably. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. properties of the SN - equivalent integral transport operator in slab geometry and the iterative acceleration of neutron transport methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massimiliano, Rosa; Azmy, Y.Y.; Morel, J.E.

    2005-01-01

    The general expressions for the matrix elements of the discrete Sn-equivalent integral transport operator have been derived in slab geometry. Their asymptotic behavior has been investigated both for a homogeneous slab and for a heterogeneous slab characterized by a periodic material discontinuity wherein each optically thick cell is surrounded by two optically thin cells in a repeating pattern. In the case of a homogeneous slab, the asymptotic analysis conducted in a diffusive limit obtained as the thick limit of computational cell size for a highly scattering medium, has shown that the discretized integral transport operator is approximated by a sparse matrix characterized by a tri-diagonal diffusion-like coupling stencil. Also, the tri-diagonal matrix structure, characteristic of the diffusion coupling stencil, is approached at a fast exponential rate. In the case of periodically heterogeneous slab configurations, the asymptotic behavior investigated is that in which the cells' optical thicknesses are pushed apart, i.e. the thick is made thicker while the thin is made thinner at a prescribed rate. It has been shown that in this limit the discretized integral transport operator is approximated by a penta-diagonal structure. Notwithstanding, the discrete operator is amenable to algebraic transformations leading to a matrix representation still asymptotically approaching a tri-diagonal structure at a fast exponential rate. The existence of a low order tri-diagonal approximation to the full discrete integral transport operator in the case of a periodically heterogeneous slab might provide a basic understanding of the superior convergence properties of diffusion-based acceleration schemes observed in slab geometry, even in the presence of sharp material discontinuities. The obtained results also suggest that a sparse approximation to the S n -equivalent integral transport operator might itself be used as the low-order operator in an acceleration scheme for the

  4. Extended use of alanine irradiated in experimental reactor for combined gamma-and neutron-dose assessment by ESR spectroscopy and thermal neutron fluence assessment by measurement of C-14 by LSC

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartoníček, B.; Kučera, Jan; Světlík, Ivo; Viererbl, L.; Lahodová, Z.; Tomášková, Lenka; Cabalka, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 93, NOV (2014), s. 52-56 ISSN 0969-8043 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA02010218 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : reactor rediation * alanine/ESR dosimeter * C-14 * LSC simultaneous gamma * neutron dose * assessment Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics Impact factor: 1.231, year: 2014

  5. Neutron induced degradation in nitrided pyrogenic field oxide MOS capacitors

    CERN Document Server

    Vaidya, S J; Shaikh, A M; Chandorkar, A N

    2002-01-01

    Neutron induced oxide charge trapping and generation of interface states in MOS capacitors with pyrogenic and nitrided pyrogenic field oxides have been studied. In order to assess the damage due to neutrons alone, it is necessary to account for the damage produced by the accompanying gamma rays from neutron radiation. This is done by measuring the intensity of gamma radiation accompanying neutrons at different neutron fluences at the irradiation position. MOS capacitor structures were subjected to neutron radiation in a swimming pool type of reactor. Other samples from the same batch were then subjected to an equivalent dose of gamma radiation from a Co sup 6 sup 0 source. The difference in the damage observed was used to characterize the damage caused by neutrons. It is observed that neutrons, though uncharged, are capable of causing ionization damage. This damage is found to be significant when the radiation is performed under biased conditions. Nitridation in different ambients is found to improve the radi...

  6. Response of different neutrons measurers with the new ICRP 60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgois, L.; Girod, M.; Ferreux, L.

    1999-01-01

    The publication 60 of the ICRP has modified the factors of fluence conversion dose equivalent for the neutrons. The majority of neutrons counters are from old generation. The comparison of the two curves can give factor 2 in the measure of dose equivalents according to neutrons energy (700 keV). It is important to check in function of energy the response of neutrons counters used in radiation protection by taking the conversion factors of the ICRP 60 given in the ICRP 74. Three neutrons measurers of the old generation and a new one have been tested. The different devices answer better the new ICRP than the ICRP 21; (the devices were Studvick, Cramal and Dineutron counters, Berthold LB 123-N for the new generation and they have been tested with neutrons sources: Am-Li, Am-F, Am-B, Am-Be). (N.C.)

  7. Performance of the discrete ordinates method-like neutron transport computation with equivalent group condensation and angle-collapsing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Han Jong; Won, Jong Hyuck; Cho, Nam Zin

    2011-01-01

    In computational studies of neutron transport equations, the fine-group to few-group condensation procedure leads to equivalent total cross section that becomes angle dependent. The difficulty of this angle dependency has been traditionally treated by consistent P or extended transport approximation in the literature. In a previous study, we retained the angle dependency of the total cross section and applied directly to the discrete ordinates equation, with additional concept of angle-collapsing, and tested in a one-dimensional slab problem. In this study, we provide further results of this discrete ordinates-like method in comparison with the typical traditional methods. In addition, IRAM acceleration (based on Krylov subspace method) is tested for the purpose of further reducing the computational burden of few-group calculation. From the test results, it is ascertained that the angle-dependent total cross section with angle-collapsing gives excellent estimation of k eff and flux distribution and that IRAM acceleration effectively reduces the number of outer iterations. However, since IRAM requires sufficient convergence in inner iterations, speedup in total computer time is not significant for problems with upscattering. (author)

  8. Determination of the equivalent dose in mixed neutron-gamma fields using spectrophotometric readout method: A study on NIRR-1 and Am-Be source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassimu, A.A.; Akpa, T.C.; Jonah, S. A.; Mallam, S. P.

    2007-01-01

    Aliquots of alanine powder were irradiated with neutrons from a 5 5Ci-Am-Be source in the inner and outer channels of the Nigeria Research Reactor 1 (NIRR-1) in the Centre for Energy Research and Training, Zaria. The aim is to use the radiation-induced free radicals to determine the dose from the neutron sources. The irradiated amino acid was dissolved in a solution containing ferrous ammonium sulphate and xylenol orange in 0.05N H 2 SO 4 (FX-solution). The free radicals oxidize the Fe -2 to Fe -3 , which forms a complex with xylenol orange. The complex absorbs strongly at wavelength of 525nm. The absorbance was measured using CECIL CE 1020 spectrophotometer. Results show that the equivalent dose rate for the Am-Be source which is mainly from thermal neutrons component was 81.5 mSv/hr and that of the NIRR-1 which is mainly from the gamma ray component were 1.54 1011Sv/hr and 3.09 1010 Sv/hr for the inner and outer channels respectively. This shows that the equivalent dose rate in the inner channel is 5 times that of the outer channel. The estimated number of radicals producing a unit equivalent dose (Sv) is 3.33 1012 and 1.67 1012 for the inner and the outer channels respectively. This is in agreement with the predicted thermal neutron flux ratio of 2:1 for the channels in the reactor

  9. Monte Carlo simulations of the secondary neutron ambient and effective dose equivalent rates from surface to suborbital altitudes and low Earth orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Jaby, Samy; Richardson, Richard B

    2015-07-01

    Occupational exposures from ionizing radiation are currently regulated for airline travel (Earth orbit (∼300-400 km). Aircrew typically receive between 1 and 6 mSv of occupational dose annually, while aboard the International Space Station, the area radiation dose equivalent measured over just 168 days was 106 mSv at solar minimum conditions. It is anticipated that space tourism vehicles will reach suborbital altitudes of approximately 100 km and, therefore, the annual occupational dose to flight crew during repeated transits is expected to fall somewhere between those observed for aircrew and astronauts. Unfortunately, measurements of the radiation environment at the high altitudes reached by suborbital vehicles are sparse, and modelling efforts have been similarly limited. In this paper, preliminary MCNPX radiation transport code simulations are developed of the secondary neutron flux profile in air from surface altitudes up to low Earth orbit at solar minimum conditions and excluding the effects of spacecraft shielding. These secondary neutrons are produced by galactic cosmic radiation interacting with Earth's atmosphere and are among the sources of radiation that can pose a health risk. Associated estimates of the operational neutron ambient dose equivalent, used for radiation protection purposes, and the neutron effective dose equivalent that is typically used for estimates of stochastic health risks, are provided in air. Simulations show that the neutron radiation dose rates received at suborbital altitudes are comparable to those experienced by aircrew flying at 7 to 14 km. We also show that the total neutron dose rate tails off beyond the Pfotzer maximum on ascension from surface up to low Earth orbit. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Determination of the neutron fluence in the welding of the 'Core shroud' of the BWR reactor core; Determinacion de la fluencia neutronica en las soldaduras del 'core shroud' del nucleo de un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucatero, M.A.; Xolocostli M, J.V.; Gomez T, A.M.; Palacios H, J.C. [ININ, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: mal@nuclear.inin.mx

    2006-07-01

    With the purpose of defining the inspection frequency, in function of the embrittlement of the materials that compose the welding of the 'Core Shroud' or encircling of the core of a BWR type reactor, is necessary to know the neutron fluence received for this welding. In the work the calculated values of neutron fluence accumulated maxim (E > 1 MeV) during the first 8 operation cycles of the reactor are presented. The calculations were carried out according to the NRC Regulatory Guide 1.190, making use of the DORT code, which solves the transport equation in discreet ordinate in two dimensions (xy, r{theta}, and rz). The results in 3D were obtained applying the Synthesis method according to the guide before mentioned. Results are presented for the horizontal welding H3, H4, and H5, showing the corresponding curves to the fluence accumulated to the cycle 8 and a projection for the cycle 14 is presented. (Author)

  11. Calculation of reactor pressure vessel fluence using TORT code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Chul Ho; Kim, Jong Kyung

    1998-01-01

    TORT is employed for fast neutron fluence calculation at the reactor pressure vessel. KORI Unit 1 reactor at cycle 1 is modeled for this calculation. Three-dimensional cycle averaged assembly power distributions for KORI Unit 1 at cycle 1 are calculated by using the core physics code, NESTLE 5.0. The root mean square error is within 4.3% compared with NDR (Nuclear Design Report) for all burnup steps. The C/E (Calculated/Experimental) values for the in-vessel dosimeters distribute between 0.98 and 1.36. The most updated cross-section library, BUGLE-96 based on ENDF/B-VI is used for the neutron fluence calculation. The maximum fast neutron fluence calculated on reactor pressure vessel for KORI Unit 1 operated for 411.41 effective full power days is 1.784x10 18 n/cm 2 . The position of the maximum neutron fluence in RPV wall 1/4 T is nearby 60 cm below the midplane at zero degree

  12. Spectrometry using the PTB neutron multisphere spectrometer (NEMUS) at flight altitudes and at ground level

    CERN Document Server

    Wiegel, B; Matzke, M; Schrewe, U J; Wittstock, J

    2002-01-01

    Bonner sphere measurements are presented for flights at altitudes of up to 12 km and geomagnetic latitudes between 26 deg.N and 86 deg.N and compared with results obtained by several survey meters. As an example of the natural neutron background near sea level, results from a recent longterm measurement campaign performed at the PTB site using an extended spectrometer are presented. The dependence of neutron fluence and ambient dose equivalent on the atmospheric pressure is demonstrated.

  13. Frequency of occurrence of various nuclear reactions when fast neutrons (greater than or equal to 50 MeV) pass through tissue-equivalent material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.

    1975-07-01

    Calculated results are presented for the frequency with which various partial nuclear-reaction cross sections are utilized when fast neutrons (less than or equal to 50 MeV) are transported through a tissue-equivalent phantom to obtain an indication of which cross sections are of most importance for radiotherapy applications and are therefore in need of experimental verification. (6 tables) (U.S.)

  14. Fluence determination by scattering measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Albergo, S; Potenza, R; Tricomi, A; Pillon, M; Angarano, M M; Creanza, D; De Palma, M

    2000-01-01

    An alternative method to determine particle fluence is proposed, which is particularly suitable for irradiations with low-energy charged-particle beams. The fluence is obtained by measuring the elastic scattering produced by a composite thin target placed upstream of the sample. The absolute calibration is performed by comparison with the measured radioactivation of vanadium and copper samples. The composite thin target, made of aluminium, carbon and gold, allows not only the fluence to be measured, but also a continuous monitoring of the beam space distribution. Experimental results with a 27 MeV proton beam are reported and compared with Monte Carlo simulations. (7 refs).

  15. Response of CR-39 based personnel neutron dosemeter in terms of directional dose equivalent, in free air and on phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, Rupali R.; Sathian, Deepa; Jayalakshmi, V.; Chougaonkar, M.P.

    2011-01-01

    CR-39 is the most sensitive of nuclear track detectors for protons and is recommended as an effective neutron dosimeter because of it's low threshold energy of 100 keV neutrons. The fraction of protons that gives detectable tracks in CR-39 depends on the energy of the proton angle of incidence and etching conditions. As a consequence the registration efficiency of neutrons in the CR-39 plastics used for neutron personnel monitoring is strongly influenced by the direction of radiation incidence. This paper presents the relative response of CR-39 at varying neutron incident angles, for 241 Am-Be neutron source spectra in free air and on ISO phantom, in terms of operational quantities. It is observed that the angular dependence of CR-39 for irradiations in air and on phantom is essentially the same indicating that the phantom does not affect the directional response of CR-39. (author)

  16. FOREWORD: Neutron metrology Neutron metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, David J.; Nolte, Ralf; Gressier, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    industry, from the initial fuel enrichment and fabrication processes right through to storage or reprocessing, and neutron metrology is clearly important in this area. Neutron fields do, however, occur in other areas, for example where neutron sources are used in oil well logging and moisture measurements. They also occur around high energy accelerators, including photon linear accelerators used for cancer therapy, and are expected to be a more serious problem around the new hadron radiation therapy facilities. Roughly 50% of the cosmic ray doses experienced by fliers at the flight altitudes of commercial aircraft are due to neutrons. Current research on fusion presents neutron metrology with a whole new range of challenges because of the very high fluences expected. One of the most significant features of neutron fields is the very wide range of possible neutron energies. In the nuclear industry, for example, neutrons occur with energies from those of thermal neutrons at a few meV to the upper end of the fission spectrum at perhaps 10 MeV. For cosmic ray dosimetry the energy range extends into the GeV region. This enormous range sets a challenge for designing measuring devices and a parallel challenge of developing measurement standards for characterizing these devices. One of the major considerations when deciding on topics for this special issue was agreeing on what not to include. Modelling, i.e. the use of radiation transport codes, is now a very important aspect of neutron measurements. These calculations are vital for shielding and for instrument design; nevertheless, the topic has only been included here where it has a direct bearing on metrology and the development of standards. Neutron spectrometry is an increasingly important technique for unravelling some of the problems of dose equivalent measurements and for plasma diagnostics in fusion research. However, this topic is at least one step removed from primary metrology and so it was felt that it should not be

  17. Secondary neutron spectrum from 250-MeV passively scattered proton therapy: measurement with an extended-range Bonner sphere system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Rebecca M; Burgett, E A

    2014-09-01

    Secondary neutrons are an unavoidable consequence of proton therapy. While the neutron dose is low compared to the primary proton dose, its presence and contribution to the patient dose is nonetheless important. The most detailed information on neutrons includes an evaluation of the neutron spectrum. However, the vast majority of the literature that has reported secondary neutron spectra in proton therapy is based on computational methods rather than measurements. This is largely due to the inherent limitations in the majority of neutron detectors, which are either not suitable for spectral measurements or have limited response at energies greater than 20 MeV. Therefore, the primary objective of the present study was to measure a secondary neutron spectrum from a proton therapy beam using a spectrometer that is sensitive to neutron energies over the entire neutron energy spectrum. The authors measured the secondary neutron spectrum from a 250-MeV passively scattered proton beam in air at a distance of 100 cm laterally from isocenter using an extended-range Bonner sphere (ERBS) measurement system. Ambient dose equivalent H*(10) was calculated using measured fluence and fluence-to-ambient dose equivalent conversion coefficients. The neutron fluence spectrum had a high-energy direct neutron peak, an evaporation peak, a thermal peak, and an intermediate energy continuum between the thermal and evaporation peaks. The H*(10) was dominated by the neutrons in the evaporation peak because of both their high abundance and the large quality conversion coefficients in that energy interval. The H*(10) 100 cm laterally from isocenter was 1.6 mSv per proton Gy (to isocenter). Approximately 35% of the dose equivalent was from neutrons with energies ≥20 MeV. The authors measured a neutron spectrum for external neutrons generated by a 250-MeV proton beam using an ERBS measurement system that was sensitive to neutrons over the entire energy range being measured, i.e., thermal to

  18. Field calibration of PADC track etch detectors for local neutron dosimetry in man using different radiation qualities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haelg, Roger A., E-mail: rhaelg@phys.ethz.ch [Institute for Radiotherapy, Radiotherapie Hirslanden AG, Hirslanden Medical Center, Rain 34, CH-5000 Aarau (Switzerland); Besserer, Juergen [Institute for Radiotherapy, Radiotherapie Hirslanden AG, Hirslanden Medical Center, Rain 34, CH-5000 Aarau (Switzerland); Boschung, Markus; Mayer, Sabine [Division for Radiation Safety and Security, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Clasie, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 30 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Kry, Stephen F. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Schneider, Uwe [Institute for Radiotherapy, Radiotherapie Hirslanden AG, Hirslanden Medical Center, Rain 34, CH-5000 Aarau (Switzerland); Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 204, CH-8057 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2012-12-01

    In order to quantify the dose from neutrons to a patient for contemporary radiation treatment techniques, measurements inside phantoms, representing the patient, are necessary. Published reports on neutron dose measurements cover measurements performed free in air or on the surface of phantoms and the doses are expressed in terms of personal dose equivalent or ambient dose equivalent. This study focuses on measurements of local neutron doses inside a radiotherapy phantom and presents a field calibration procedure for PADC track etch detectors. An initial absolute calibration factor in terms of H{sub p}(10) for personal dosimetry is converted into neutron dose equivalent and additional calibration factors are derived to account for the spectral changes in the neutron fluence for different radiation therapy beam qualities and depths in the phantom. The neutron spectra used for the calculation of the calibration factors are determined in different depths by Monte Carlo simulations for the investigated radiation qualities. These spectra are used together with the energy dependent response function of the PADC detectors to account for the spectral changes in the neutron fluence. The resulting total calibration factors are 0.76 for a photon beam (in- and out-of-field), 1.00 (in-field) and 0.84 (out-of-field) for an active proton beam and 1.05 (in-field) and 0.91 (out-of-field) for a passive proton beam, respectively. The uncertainty for neutron dose measurements using this field calibration method is less than 40%. The extended calibration procedure presented in this work showed that it is possible to use PADC track etch detectors for measurements of local neutron dose equivalent inside anthropomorphic phantoms by accounting for spectral changes in the neutron fluence.

  19. Neutron/muon correlation functions to improve neutron detection capabilities outside nuclear facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordinario, Donald Thomas

    The natural neutron background rate is largely due to cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere and the subsequent neutron emission from the interaction products. The neutron background is part of a larger cosmic radiation shower that also includes electrons, gamma rays, and muons. Since neutrons interact much differently than muons in building materials, the muon and neutron fluence rates in the natural background can be compared to the measured muon and neutron fluence rate when shielded by common building materials. The simultaneous measurement of muon and neutron fluence rates might allow for an earlier identification of man-made neutron sources, such as hidden nuclear materials. This study compares natural background neutron rates to computer simulated neutron rates shielded by common structural and building materials. The characteristic differences between neutrons and muons resulted in different attenuation properties under the same shielded conditions. Correlation functions between cosmic ray generated neutrons and muons are then used to predict neutron fluence rates in different urban environments.

  20. Completely boundary-free minimum and maximum principles for neutron transport and their least-squares and Galerkin equivalents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackroyd, R.T.

    1982-01-01

    Some minimum and maximum variational principles for even-parity neutron transport are reviewed and the corresponding principles for odd-parity transport are derived by a simple method to show why the essential boundary conditions associated with these maximum principles have to be imposed. The method also shows why both the essential and some of the natural boundary conditions associated with these minimum principles have to be imposed. These imposed boundary conditions for trial functions in the variational principles limit the choice of the finite element used to represent trial functions. The reasons for the boundary conditions imposed on the principles for even- and odd-parity transport point the way to a treatment of composite neutron transport, for which completely boundary-free maximum and minimum principles are derived from a functional identity. In general a trial function is used for each parity in the composite neutron transport, but this can be reduced to one without any boundary conditions having to be imposed. (author)

  1. Application of damage functions to CTR component fluence limit predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simons, R.L.; Doran, D.G.

    1975-01-01

    Material behavior observed under irradiation conditions in test reactors is not always directly applicable to the design of reactor components such as CTR first wall because of differences in the damage effectiveness of test reactor and service spectra. The interpolation and, under some conditions, extrapolation of material property change data from test conditions to different neutron spectra in service conditions can be accomplished using semi-empirical damage functions. The derivation and application of damage functions to CTR conditions is reviewed. Since limited amounts of data are available for applications to CTR design spectra, considerable attention is placed on the effectiveness of various available and proposed neutron sources in determining a damage function and subsequent fluence limit prediction. Neutron sources included in this study were EBR-II, HIFR, LAMPF (Be and Cu targets), high energy deuterons incident on Be (D-Be), and 14 MeV neutrons (D-T)

  2. Measuring neutron spectra in radiotherapy using the nested neutron spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglieri, Robert; Licea, Angel; Evans, Michael; Seuntjens, Jan; Kildea, John

    2015-11-01

    Out-of-field neutron doses resulting from photonuclear interactions in the head of a linear accelerator pose an iatrogenic risk to patients and an occupational risk to personnel during radiotherapy. To quantify neutron production, in-room measurements have traditionally been carried out using Bonner sphere systems (BSS) with activation foils and TLDs. In this work, a recently developed active detector, the nested neutron spectrometer (NNS), was tested in radiotherapy bunkers. The NNS is designed for easy handling and is more practical than the traditional BSS. Operated in current-mode, the problem of pulse pileup due to high dose-rates is overcome by measuring current, similar to an ionization chamber. In a bunker housing a Varian Clinac 21EX, the performance of the NNS was evaluated in terms of reproducibility, linearity, and dose-rate effects. Using a custom maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization algorithm, measured neutron spectra at various locations inside the bunker were then compared to Monte Carlo simulations of an identical setup. In terms of dose, neutron ambient dose equivalents were calculated from the measured spectra and compared to bubble detector neutron dose equivalent measurements. The NNS-measured spectra for neutrons at various locations in a treatment room were found to be consistent with expectations for both relative shape and absolute magnitude. Neutron fluence-rate decreased with distance from the source and the shape of the spectrum changed from a dominant fast neutron peak near the Linac head to a dominant thermal neutron peak in the moderating conditions of the maze. Monte Carlo data and NNS-measured spectra agreed within 30% at all locations except in the maze where the deviation was a maximum of 40%. Neutron ambient dose equivalents calculated from the authors' measured spectra were consistent (one standard deviation) with bubble detector measurements in the treatment room. The NNS may be used to reliably measure the neutron

  3. Measuring neutron spectra in radiotherapy using the nested neutron spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maglieri, Robert, E-mail: robert.maglieri@mail.mcgill.ca; Evans, Michael; Seuntjens, Jan; Kildea, John [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H4A 3J1 (Canada); Licea, Angel [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, Ontario K1P 5S9 (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Out-of-field neutron doses resulting from photonuclear interactions in the head of a linear accelerator pose an iatrogenic risk to patients and an occupational risk to personnel during radiotherapy. To quantify neutron production, in-room measurements have traditionally been carried out using Bonner sphere systems (BSS) with activation foils and TLDs. In this work, a recently developed active detector, the nested neutron spectrometer (NNS), was tested in radiotherapy bunkers. Methods: The NNS is designed for easy handling and is more practical than the traditional BSS. Operated in current-mode, the problem of pulse pileup due to high dose-rates is overcome by measuring current, similar to an ionization chamber. In a bunker housing a Varian Clinac 21EX, the performance of the NNS was evaluated in terms of reproducibility, linearity, and dose-rate effects. Using a custom maximum-likelihood expectation–maximization algorithm, measured neutron spectra at various locations inside the bunker were then compared to Monte Carlo simulations of an identical setup. In terms of dose, neutron ambient dose equivalents were calculated from the measured spectra and compared to bubble detector neutron dose equivalent measurements. Results: The NNS-measured spectra for neutrons at various locations in a treatment room were found to be consistent with expectations for both relative shape and absolute magnitude. Neutron fluence-rate decreased with distance from the source and the shape of the spectrum changed from a dominant fast neutron peak near the Linac head to a dominant thermal neutron peak in the moderating conditions of the maze. Monte Carlo data and NNS-measured spectra agreed within 30% at all locations except in the maze where the deviation was a maximum of 40%. Neutron ambient dose equivalents calculated from the authors’ measured spectra were consistent (one standard deviation) with bubble detector measurements in the treatment room. Conclusions: The NNS may

  4. Standard Test Method for Use of 2N2222A Silicon Bipolar Transistors as Neutron Spectrum Sensors and Displacement Damage Monitors

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the use of 2N2222A silicon bipolar transistors as dosimetry sensors in the determination of neutron energy spectra, and as silicon 1-MeV(Si) equivalent displacement damage fluence monitors. 1.2 The neutron displacement damage is especially valuable as a neutron spectrum sensor in the range 0.1 to 2.0 MeV when fission foils are not available. It has been applied in the fluence range between 2 × 10 12 n/cm2 and 1 × 1014 n/cm2 and should be useful up to 1015 n/cm2. This test method details the steps for the acquisition and use of silicon 1-MeV equivalent fluence information (in a manner similar to the use of activation foil data) for the determination of neutron spectra. 1.3 In addition, this sensor can provide important confirmation of neutron spectra determined with other sensors, and yields a direct measurement of the silicon 1-MeV fluence by the transfer technique. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in ...

  5. Determination of the damage-energy cross section of 14-MeV neutrons from critical-property changes in irradiated Nb3Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snead, C.L. Jr.; Parkin, D.M.; Guinan, M.W.; Van Konynenburg, A.

    1976-01-01

    Short samples of single-core and 19-core multifilament wires in bronze jackets have been irradiated with 14-MeV neutrons to a total fluence of 2 x 10 18 n/cm 2 using the Livermore Rotating Target Neutron source. At fluences of 1 and 2 x 10 18 n/cm 2 the critical temperature was measured, and also the critical current as a function of applied transverse magnetic field up to 175 kG to ascertain the radiation-induced changes in these properties. Measurements as a function of fluence of identical samples following reactor-neutron irradiation established the baseline for comparison of the 14-MeV results. By comparing the changes observed and relating them to the spectrum-averaged damage-energy cross section for the HFBR neutrons, a value for the damage-energy cross section for 14-MeV neutrons has been deduced of 313 +50 /sub -80/ bkeV. Comparison of the critical current vs applied field for the two types of irradiation indicates that the flux-pinning characteristics are different for equal damage energies. This can be explained by a larger cascade region produced by the 14-MeV neutrons relative to those produced by fission-reactor neutrons with a coupled reduced resistivity increase for 14-MeV neutrons with respect to fission-reactor neutrons for equivalent damage energies

  6. Neutron spectrometry in mixed fields: characterisation of the Ra-1- reactor workplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregori, B.; Carelli, J.; Cruzate, J.; Papadopulos, S.

    2006-01-01

    The characterisation of the neutron spectrum of a workplace is an essential dosimetric tool for improving the assessment of the personal equivalent dose of the workers. In addition, if the operational conditions of the facility are well defined, the set of field spectra obtained may be used as a reference for comparing the performance of different type of neutron detectors. Recently, using a neutron spectrometric system based on a set of moderated spheres with 3 He detector, the characterisation of the neutron spectra in workplaces of the Argentine Reactor No. 1 (R.A. -1) has been carried out. The spectrometric system consists of 12 spheres made of the high density polyethylene d mean δ =0.95 g cm 3 , with diameters between 3'' and 12'' and a proportional counter of 3 He, 4 atm of nominal pressure, Centronic trade mark, located in the centre of the spheres. The neutron response matrix was calculated using the M.C.N.P. -I.V.B. code and E.N.D.F./B-VI library in the energy range between thermal neutron and 100 MeV. The neutron spectrum was unfolded using the M.A.X.E.D. unfolding code. The validation of the spectrometric system was performed at Cea-Cadarache (France) with of 252 Cf, Am Be, and 252 Cf + D 2 O sources. Therefore, in this work, the spectral fluence of the field in the selected points of the facility (R.A.-1) has been presented and the ambient dose equivalent, H *(10), and the personal dose equivalent, Hp(10), have been derived from the neutron fluence, applying ICRP-74 recommended fluence to dose conversion factors. The quantities evaluated have uncertainties less than 15%, which is considered good enough for radiation protection requirements. (authors)

  7. On-Site Determination and Monitoring of Real-Time Fluence Delivery for an Operating UV Reactor Based on a True Fluence Rate Detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengkai; Li, Wentao; Qiang, Zhimin; Blatchley, Ernest R

    2017-07-18

    At present, on-site fluence (distribution) determination and monitoring of an operating UV system represent a considerable challenge. The recently developed microfluorescent silica detector (MFSD) is able to measure the approximate true fluence rate (FR) at a fixed position in a UV reactor that can be compared with a FR model directly. Hence it has provided a connection between model calculation and real-time fluence determination. In this study, an on-site determination and monitoring method of fluence delivery for an operating UV reactor was developed. True FR detectors, a UV transmittance (UVT) meter, and a flow rate meter were used for fundamental measurements. The fluence distribution, as well as reduction equivalent fluence (REF), 10th percentile dose in the UV fluence distribution (F 10 ), minimum fluence (F min ), and mean fluence (F mean ) of a test reactor, was calculated in advance by the combined use of computational fluid dynamics and FR field modeling. A field test was carried out on the test reactor for disinfection of a secondary water supply. The estimated real-time REF, F 10 , F min , and F mean decreased 73.6%, 71.4%, 69.6%, and 72.9%, respectively, during a 6-month period, which was attributable to lamp output attenuation and sleeve fouling. The results were analyzed with synchronous data from a previously developed triparameter UV monitoring system and water temperature sensor. This study allowed demonstration of an accurate method for on-site, real-time fluence determination which could be used to enhance the security and public confidence of UV-based water treatment processes.

  8. Fast reactor fluence dosimetry. Technical progress report, January--November 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The objectives of this task are to: (1) develop and demonstrate the use of 10 B and 6 Li helium accumulation fluence monitors (HAFM's) as a reliable and accurate method of measuring reactor neutron fluence; (2) develop and apply an expanded set of HAFM's which will provide fluence responses in different but overlapping neutron energy ranges; (3) identify, through the precise measurement of spectrum-integrated helium production cross sections, those elements which produce significant helium when used individually or as components of advanced alloys in FTR and LMFBR neutron environments, so that their use might be eliminated, minimized, or controlled; (4) use this information to predict, with confidence, the helium production rate for any alloy or material considered for fast reactor use, and (5) maintain a centralized helium measurements laboratory available to the research community, and upgrade the sample throughput capacity to handle FTR dosimetry requirements

  9. A high-resolution neutron spectra unfolding method using the Genetic Algorithm technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, Bhaskar

    2002-01-01

    The Bonner sphere spectrometers (BSS) are commonly used to determine the neutron spectra within various nuclear facilities. Sophisticated mathematical tools are used to unfold the neutron energy distribution from the output data of the BSS. This paper highlights a novel high-resolution neutron spectra-unfolding method using the Genetic Algorithm (GA) technique. The GA imitates the biological evolution process prevailing in the nature to solve complex optimisation problems. The GA method was utilised to evaluate the neutron energy distribution, average energy, fluence and equivalent dose rates at important work places of a DIDO class research reactor and a high-energy superconducting heavy ion cyclotron. The spectrometer was calibrated with a 241 Am/Be (α,n) neutron standard source. The results of the GA method agreed satisfactorily with the results obtained by using the well-known BUNKI neutron spectra unfolding code

  10. Development of a computational model for the calculation of neutron dose equivalent in laminated primary barriers of radiotherapy rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezende, Gabriel Fonseca da Silva

    2015-01-01

    Many radiotherapy centers acquire 15 and 18 MV linear accelerators to perform more effective treatments for deep tumors. However, the acquisition of these equipment must be accompanied by an additional care in shielding planning of the rooms that will house them. In cases where space is restricted, it is common to find primary barriers made of concrete and metal. The drawback of this type of barrier is the photoneutron emission when high energy photons (e.g. 15 and 18 MV spectra) interact with the metallic material of the barrier. The emission of these particles constitutes a problem of radiation protection inside and outside of radiotherapy rooms, which should be properly assessed. A recent work has shown that the current model underestimate the dose of neutrons outside the treatment rooms. In this work, a computational model for the aforementioned problem was created from Monte Carlo Simulations and Artificial Intelligence. The developed model was composed by three neural networks, each being formed of a pair of material and spectrum: Pb18, Pb15 and Fe18. In a direct comparison with the McGinley method, the Pb18 network exhibited the best responses for approximately 78% of the cases tested; the Pb15 network showed better results for 100% of the tested cases, while the Fe18 network produced better answers to 94% of the tested cases. Thus, the computational model composed by the three networks has shown more consistent results than McGinley method. (author)

  11. Estimation of the contribution of neutrons to the equivalent dose for personnel occupationally exposed and public in medical facilities: X-ray with energy equal or greater than 10MV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Alfonso Mayer; Jimenez, Roberto Ortega; Sanchez, Mario A. Reyes; Moranchel y Mejia, Mario

    2013-01-01

    In Mexico the use of electron accelerators for treating cancerous tumors had grown enormously in the last decade. When the treatments are carried out with X-ray beam energy below 10 MV the design of the shielding of the radioactive facility is determined by analyzing the interaction of X-rays, which have a direct impact and dispersion, with materials of the facility. However, when it makes use of X-ray beam energy equal to or greater than 10 MV the neutrons presence is imminent due to their generation by the interaction of the primary beam X-ray with materials head of the accelerator and of the table of treatment, mainly. In these cases, the design and calculation of shielding considers the generation of high-energy neutrons which contribute the equivalent dose that public and Occupationally Staff Exposed (POE) will receive in the areas surrounding the facility radioactive. However, very few measurements have been performed to determine the actual contribution to the neutron dose equivalent received by POE and public during working hours. This paper presents an estimate of the actual contribution of the neutron dose equivalent received by public and POE facilities in various radioactive medical use, considering many factors. To this end, measurements were made of the equivalent dose by using a neutron monitor in areas surrounding different radioactive installations (of Mexico) which used electron accelerators medical use during treatment with X-ray beam energy equal to or greater than 10 MV. The results are presented after a statistical analysis of a wide range of measures in order to estimate more reliability real contribution of the neutron dose equivalent for POE and the public. (author)

  12. Estimation of the contribution by neutrons to the equivalent dose for exposed occupationally personnel and people in medical use facilities: X rays of equal or superior energy to 10 MV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega J, R.; Reyes S, M. A.; Moranchel y R, M.

    2013-10-01

    In Mexico the use of electron accelerators for treating cancerous tumors had grown enormously in the last decade. When the treatments are carried out with X-ray beam energy below 10 MV the design of the shielding of the radioactive facility is determined by analyzing the interaction of X-rays, which have a direct impact and dispersion, with materials of the facility. However, when it makes use of X-ray beam energy equal to or greater than 10 MV the neutrons presence is imminent due to their generation by the interaction of the primary beam X-ray with materials head of the accelerator and of the table of treatment, mainly. In these cases, the design and calculation of shielding considers the generation of high-energy neutrons which contribute the equivalent dose that public and occupationally staff exposed (POE) will receive in the areas surrounding the facility radioactive. However, very few measurements have been performed to determine the actual contribution to the neutron dose equivalent received by POE and public during working hours. This paper presents and estimate of the actual contribution of the neutron dose equivalent received by public and POE facilities in various radioactive medical use, considering many factors. To this end, measurements were made of the equivalent dose by using a neutron monitor in areas surrounding different radioactive installations (of Mexico) which used electron accelerators medical use during treatment with X-ray beam energy equal to or greater than 10 MV. The results are presented after a statistical analysis of a wide range of measures in order to estimate more reliability real contribution of the neutron dose equivalent for POE and the public. (author)

  13. Fluence-to-absorbed-dose conversion coefficients for neutron beams from 0.001 eV to 100 GeV calculated for a set of pregnant female and fetus models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taranenko, Valery; Xu, X George

    2008-01-01

    Protection of fetuses against external neutron exposure is an important task. This paper reports a set of absorbed dose conversion coefficients for fetal and maternal organs for external neutron beams using the RPI-P pregnant female models and the MCNPX code. The newly developed pregnant female models represent an adult female with a fetus including its brain and skeleton at the end of each trimester. The organ masses were adjusted to match the reference values within 1%. For the 3 mm cubic voxel size, the models consist of 10-15 million voxels for 35 organs. External monoenergetic neutron beams of six standard configurations (AP, PA, LLAT, RLAT, ROT and ISO) and source energies 0.001 eV-100 GeV were considered. The results are compared with previous data that are based on simplified anatomical models. The differences in dose depend on source geometry, energy and gestation periods: from 20% up to 140% for the whole fetus, and up to 100% for the fetal brain. Anatomical differences are primarily responsible for the discrepancies in the organ doses. For the first time, the dependence of mother organ doses upon anatomical changes during pregnancy was studied. A maximum of 220% increase in dose was observed for the placenta in the nine months model compared to three months, whereas dose to the pancreas, small and large intestines decreases by 60% for the AP source for the same models. Tabulated dose conversion coefficients for the fetus and 27 maternal organs are provided

  14. SU-F-BRE-11: Neutron Measurements Around the Varian TrueBeam Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maglieri, R; Seuntjens, J; Kildea, J; Liang, L; DeBlois, F; Evans, M; Licea, A; Dubeau, J; Witharana, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: With the emergence of flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams, several authors have noted many advantages to their use. One such advantage is the decrease in neutron production by photonuclear reactions in the linac head. In the present work we investigate the reduction in neutrons from a Varian TrueBeam linac using the Nested Neutron Spectrometer (NNS, Detec). The neutron spectrum, total fluence and source strength were measured and compared for 10 MV with and without flattening filter and the effect of moderation by the room and maze was studied for the 15 MV beam. Methods: The NNS, similar to traditional Bonner sphere detectors but operated in current mode, was used to measure the neutron fluence and spectrum. The NNS was validated for use in high dose rate environments using Monte Carlo simulations and calibrated at NIST and NRC Canada. Measurements were performed at several positions within the treatment room and maze with the linac jaws closed to maximize neutron production. Results: The measurements showed a total fluence reduction between 35-40% in the room and maze when the flattening filter was removed. The neutron source strength Qn was calculated from in-room fluence measurements and was found to be 0.042 × 10 2 n/Gy, 0.026 × 10 2 n/Gy and 0.59 × 101 2 n/Gy for the 10 MV, the 10 MV FFF and 15 MV beams, respectively. We measured ambient equivalent doses of 11 mSv/hr, 7 mSv/hr and 218 mSv/hr for the 10 MV, 10 MV FFF and 15 MV by the head. Conclusion: Our measurements revealed a decrease in total fluence, neutron source strength and equivalent dose of approximately 35-40% across the treatment room for the FFF compared to FF modes. This demonstrates, as expected, that the flattening filter is a major component of the neutron production for the TrueBeam. The authors greatly acknowledge support form the Canadian Nuclear Commission and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada through the CREATE program. Co-authors Dubeau

  15. Improving neutron dosimetry using bubble detector technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckner, M.A.

    1993-02-01

    Providing accurate neutron dosimetry for a variety of neutron energy spectra is a formidable task for any dosimetry system. Unless something is known about the neutron spectrum prior to processing the dosimeter, the calculated dose may vary greatly from that actually encountered; that is until now. The entrance of bubble detector technology into the field of neutron dosimetry has eliminated the necessity of having an a priori knowledge of the neutron energy spectra. Recently, a new approach in measuring personnel neutron dose equivalent was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. By using bubble detectors in combination with current thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) as a Combination Personnel Neutron Dosimeter (CPND), not only is it possible to provide accurate dose equivalent results, but a simple four-interval neutron energy spectrum is obtained as well. The components of the CPND are a Harshaw albedo TLD and two bubble detectors with theoretical energy thresholds of 100 key and 1500 keV. Presented are (1) a synoptic history surrounding emergence of bubble detector technology, (2) a brief overview of the current theory on mechanisms of interaction, (3) the data and analysis process involved in refining the response functions, (4) performance evaluation of the original CPND and a reevaluation of the same data under the modified method, (5) the procedure used to determine the reference values of component fluence and dose equivalent for field assessment, (6) analysis of the after-modification results, (7) a critique of some currently held assumptions, offering some alternative explanations, and (8) thoughts concerning potential applications and directions for future research

  16. Improving neutron dosimetry using bubble detector technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckner, M.A.

    1993-02-01

    Providing accurate neutron dosimetry for a variety of neutron energy spectra is a formidable task for any dosimetry system. Unless something is known about the neutron spectrum prior to processing the dosimeter, the calculated dose may vary greatly from that actually encountered; that is until now. The entrance of bubble detector technology into the field of neutron dosimetry has eliminated the necessity of having an a priori knowledge of the neutron energy spectra. Recently, a new approach in measuring personnel neutron dose equivalent was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. By using bubble detectors in combination with current thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) as a Combination Personnel Neutron Dosimeter (CPND), not only is it possible to provide accurate dose equivalent results, but a simple four-interval neutron energy spectrum is obtained as well. The components of the CPND are a Harshaw albedo TLD and two bubble detectors with theoretical energy thresholds of 100 key and 1500 keV. Presented are (1) a synoptic history surrounding emergence of bubble detector technology, (2) a brief overview of the current theory on mechanisms of interaction, (3) the data and analysis process involved in refining the response functions, (4) performance evaluation of the original CPND and a reevaluation of the same data under the modified method, (5) the procedure used to determine the reference values of component fluence and dose equivalent for field assessment, (6) analysis of the after-modification results, (7) a critique of some currently held assumptions, offering some alternative explanations, and (8) thoughts concerning potential applications and directions for future research.

  17. Neutron personnel dosimetry considerations for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, T.P.; Easterly, C.E.

    1979-07-01

    The increasing development of fusion reactor technology warrants an evaluation of personnel neutron dosimetry systems to aid in the concurrent development of a radiation protection program. For this reason, current state of knowledge neutron dosimeters have been reviewed with emphasis placed on practical utilization and the problems inherent in each type of dosimetry system. Evaluations of salient parameters such as energy response, latent image instability, and minimum detectable dose equivalent are presented for nuclear emulsion films, track etch techniques, albedo and other thermoluminescent dosimetry techniques, electrical conductivity damage effects, lyoluminescence, thermocurrent, and thermally stimulated exoelectron emission. Brief summaries of dosimetry regulatory requirements and intercomparison study results help to establish compliance and recent trends, respectively. Spectrum modeling data generated by the Neutron Physics Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the Princeton Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Facility have been analyzed by both International Commission on Radiological Protection fluence to dose conversion factors and an adjoint technique of radiation dosimetry, in an attempt to determine the applicability of current neutron dosimetry systems to deuterium and tritium fusion reactor leakage spectra. Based on the modeling data, a wide range of neutron energies will probably be present in the leakage spectra of the TFTR facility, and no appreciable risk of somatic injury to occupationally exposed workers is expected. The relative dose contributions due to high energy and thermal neutrons indicate that neutron dosimetry will probably not be a serious limitation in the development of fusion power

  18. Simulations of the neutron energy-spectra at the Olympus Gate Environmental Monitoring Station due to historical Bevatron operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donahue, R.J.; Thomas, R.H.; Zeman, G.H.

    2001-01-01

    Offsite neutron fluences resulting from Bevatron operations reached a maximum in 1959, prior to the addition of a permanent concrete roof shield, which was constructed in 1962. From the first operation of the Bevatron measurements of neutron fluence were made at locations around the perimeter of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) campus. Since the late 1950's measurements made at several locations, and particularly at the site of what is now called the Olympus Gate Environmental Monitoring Station, have been routinely reported and published. Early measurements were used to establish the shape of the neutron-energy spectrum from which an energy-averaged fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion coefficient could be derived. This conversion coefficient was then applied to a measured total neutron fluence to obtain the appropriate dose equivalent quantity required by regulation. Recent work by Thomas et al. (2000) have compared the early conversion coefficients used in the sixties with those accepted today and suggest suggested that ''the dose equivalents reported in the late fifties and early sixties were conservative by factors between two and four. In any current review of the historical data, therefore it would be prudent to reduce the reported dose equivalents by at least a factor of two.'' However, that analysis was based on the ''state of the art'' neutron energy-spectra of the '60s. This paper provides a detailed knowledge of the neutron energy spectrum at the site boundary paper thus removing any uncertainty in the analysis of Thomas et al., which might be caused by the use of the early neutron energy-spectra. Detailed Monte Carlo analyses of the interactions of 6.2 GeV protons in thick, medium-A targets are described. In the computer simulations, neutrons produced were allowed to scatter in the atmosphere. Detailed neutron energy spectra were calculated at a distance and elevation corresponding to the location of the Olympus Gate EMS. Both older

  19. THERMAL NEUTRON INTENSITIES IN SOILS IRRADIATED BY FAST NEUTRONS FROM POINT SOURCES. (R825549C054)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thermal-neutron fluences in soil are reported for selected fast-neutron sources, selected soil types, and selected irradiation geometries. Sources include 14 MeV neutrons from accelerators, neutrons from spontaneously fissioning 252Cf, and neutrons produced from alp...

  20. Neutron induced degradation in nitrided pyrogenic field oxide MOS capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, S. J.; Sharma, D. K.; Shaikh, A. M.; Chandorkar, A. N.

    2002-09-01

    Neutron induced oxide charge trapping and generation of interface states in MOS capacitors with pyrogenic and nitrided pyrogenic field oxides have been studied. In order to assess the damage due to neutrons alone, it is necessary to account for the damage produced by the accompanying gamma rays from neutron radiation. This is done by measuring the intensity of gamma radiation accompanying neutrons at different neutron fluences at the irradiation position. MOS capacitor structures were subjected to neutron radiation in a swimming pool type of reactor. Other samples from the same batch were then subjected to an equivalent dose of gamma radiation from a Co 60 source. The difference in the damage observed was used to characterize the damage caused by neutrons. It is observed that neutrons, though uncharged, are capable of causing ionization damage. This damage is found to be significant when the radiation is performed under biased conditions. Nitridation in different ambients is found to improve the radiation performance of pyrogenic field oxides with respect to positive charge build up as well as interface state generation. Pyrogenic oxide nitrided in N 2O is found to be the best oxynitride as damage due to neutrons is the least.

  1. The Use Of Optical Properties Of Cr-39 In Alpha Particle Equivalent Dose Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shnishin, K.A.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, optical properties of alpha irradiated Cr-39 were measured as a function of optical photon wavelength from 200-1100 nm. Optical energy gap and optical absorption at finite wavelength was also calculated and correlated to alpha fluence and dose equivalent. Alpha doses were calculated from the corresponding irradiation fluence and specific energy loss using TRIM computer program. It was found that, the optical absorption of unattached Cr-39 was varied with alpha fluence and corresponding equivalent doses. Also the optical energy gab was varied with fluence and dose equivalent of alpha particles. This work introduces a reasonably simple method for the Rn dose equivalent calculation by Cr-39 track

  2. Experimental test of a new neutron threshold detector and its application

    CERN Document Server

    Li Gui Sheng; Su You Wu; Li Shu Wei

    2002-01-01

    The possibility of using sup 2 sup 0 sup 9 Bi as a new threshold detector to measure high-energy neutrons was investigated for the first time. At the same time the experiment measured successfully the emitted neutron fluence rate, energy spectrum and dose equivalent rate distributions in the heavy ion target area using a detector complex including sup 2 sup 0 sup 9 Bi, sup 1 sup 1 sup 5 In, sup 2 sup 7 Al, sup 1 sup 9 F and sup 1 sup 2 C samples

  3. Fast neutron dosimetry. Progress report, 30 August 1992--1 September 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.

    1993-12-01

    Research concentrated on three major areas during the last twelve months: (1) investigations of energy fluence and absorbed dose measurements using crystalline and hot pressed TLD materials exposes to ultrasoft beams of photons, (2) fast neutron kerma factor measurements for several important elements as well as NE-213 scintillation material response function determinations at the intense ``white`` source available at the WNR facility at LAMPF, and (3) kerma factor ratio determinations for carbon and oxygen to A-150 tissue equivalent plastic at the clinical fast neutron radiation facility at Harper Hospital, Detroit, MI. Progress summary reports of these efforts are given in this report.

  4. Review of diagnostic methods for TFTR D{endash}T radiation shielding and neutronics studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kugel, H.W.; Ascione, G.; Gilbert, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Azziz, N.; Goldhagen, P.; Reginatto, M.; Shebell, P. [U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Measurements Laboratory, New York, New York 10014-4811 (United States); Kumar, A. [School of Engineering and Applied Science, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The methods and instrument systems used for TFTR D{endash}T radiation shielding and neutronics studies involving signal strengths ranging over 10 orders of magnitude are reviewed. Neutron and gamma dose-equivalent, fluence, spectral, and materials activation measurements have been performed at various locations from the TFTR vessel to the nearest property lines. The detection systems include {sup 3}He, BF{sub 3}, and {sup 235}U proportional counters in moderated spheres, Bonner sphere arrays, advanced thermoluminescent detectors, argon ionization chambers, intrinsic Ge gamma detectors, and activation foil spectrometry methods. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Review of diagnostic methods for TFTR D-T radiation shielding and neutronics studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kugel, H.W.; Ascione, G.; Gilbert, J. [Princeton Univ., NJ (US). Princeton Plasma Physics Lab.; Azziz, N.; Goldhagen, P.; Reginatto, M.; Shebell, P. [Dept. of Energy, New York, NY (US). Environmental Measurements Lab.; Kumar, A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (US). School of Engineering and Applied Science

    1996-10-01

    The methods and instrument systems used for TFTR D-T radiation shielding and neutronics studies involving signal strengths ranging over 10 orders of magnitude are reviewed. Neutron and gamma dose-equivalent, fluence, spectral, and materials activation measurements have been performed at various locations from the TFTR vessel to the nearest property lines. The detection systems include {sup 3}He, BF{sub 3}, and {sup 235}U proportional counters in moderated spheres, Bonner sphere arrays, advanced thermoluminescent detectors, argon ionization chambers, intrinsic Ge gamma detectors, and activation foil spectrometry methods.

  6. Neutron imaging and small angle neutron scattering instruments at KUR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Yasushi; Oba, Yojiro; Hino, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    We review the neutron imaging (NI) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) instruments at KUR, Kumatori, Osaka, Japan. There are two NI and one SANS instruments. The both instruments are compact and used flexibly. Some challenging experiments taking advantage of low neutron fluence are described. The feature of KUR is also described briefly. (author)

  7. DIANE, a simulation code for the interaction of neutrons with living tissues. Application to low doses of fast neutrons on human tumoral cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nenot, M.L.

    2003-07-01

    Our work deals with the irradiation of cells and living tissues by 14 MeV neutrons at very low doses (a few 10 -2 Gy). Such experiments require an accurate knowledge of the values of neutron dose rates and fluences at the level of cell cultures. We have performed measurements of fluence rates through an activation method applied to gold and copper foils. The fluence rate is deduced from the gamma rays emitted by the irradiated foils. Neutron doses and dose rates have been measured through varied methods: PIN diodes, ionization tissue equivalent chambers, and Geiger-Mueller counters. We have designed the DIANE code to simulate the impact of energetic neutrons on cells. This code can be used with isolated cells or macroscopic tissues, it takes into account the roles of the ionisation electrons produced by recoil nuclei entering the cell. This point is all the more important since recent works have highlighted the impact of very low energy electrons on DNA. (A.C.)

  8. SU-E-T-249: Neutron Model Upgrade for Radiotherapy Patients Monitoring Using a New Online Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irazola, L; Sanchez Doblado, F. [Departamento de Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla (Spain); Lorenzoli, M; Pola, A. [Politecnico di Milano, Departimento di Ingegneria Nuclear, Milano (Italy); Terron, J.A. [Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla (Spain); Bedogni, R. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) (Italy); Sanchez Nieto, B. [Instituto de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Romero-Exposito, M. [Departamento de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to improve the existing methodology to estimate neutron equivalent dose in organs during radiotherapy treatments, based on a Static Random Access Memory neutron detector (SRAMnd) [1]. This is possible thanks to the introduction of a new digital detector with improved characteristics, which is able to measure online the neutron fluence rate in the presence of an intense photon background [2]. Its reduced size, allows the direct estimation of doses in specific points inside an anthropomorphic phantom (NORMA) without using passive detectors as TLD or CR-39. This versatility will allow not only to improve the existing models (generic abdomen and H and N [1]) but to generate more specific ones for any technique. Methods: The new Thermal Neutron Rate Detector (TNRD), based on a diode device sensitized to thermal neutrons, have been inserted in 16 points of the phantom. These points are distributed to infer doses to specific organs. Simultaneous measurements of these devices and a reference one, located in front of the gantry, have been performed for the mentioned generic treatments, in order to improve the existing model. Results: These new devices have shown more precise since they agree better with Monte Carlo simulations. The comparison of the thermal neutron fluence, measured with TNRD, and the existing models, converted from events to fluence, shows an average improvement of (3.90±3.37) % for H and N and (12.61±9.43) % for abdomen, normalized to the maximum value. Conclusion: This work indicates the potential of these new devices for more precise neutron equivalent dose estimation in organs, as a consequence of radiotherapy treatments. The simplicity of the process makes possible to establish more specific models that will provide a better dose estimation. References[1] Phys Med Biol 2012; 57:6167–6191.[2] A new active thermal neutron detector. Radiat. Prot. Dosim. (in press)

  9. Monte Carlo calculation of the neutron dose to a fetus at commercial flight altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, M. C.; Galeano, D. C.; Santos, W. S.; Hunt, John G.; d'Errico, Francesco; Souza, S. O.; de Carvalho Júnior, A. B.

    2017-11-01

    Aircrew members are exposed to primary cosmic rays as well as to secondary radiations from the interaction of cosmic rays with the atmosphere and with the aircraft. The radiation field at flight altitudes comprises neutrons, protons, electrons, positrons, photons, muons and pions. Generally, 50% of the effective dose to airplane passengers is due to neutrons. Care must be taken especially with pregnant aircrew members and frequent fliers so that the equivalent dose to the fetus will not exceed prescribed limits during pregnancy (1 mSv according to ICRP, and 5 mSv according to NCRP). Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the equivalent dose to a fetus in the maternal womb. Up to now, the equivalent dose rate to a fetus at commercial flight altitudes was obtained using stylized pregnant-female phantom models. The aim of this study was calculating neutron fluence to dose conversion coefficients for a fetus of six months of gestation age using a new, realistic pregnant-female mesh-phantom. The equivalent dose rate to a fetus during an intercontinental flight was also calculated by folding our conversion coefficients with published spectral neutron flux data. The calculated equivalent dose rate to the fetus was 2.35 μSv.h-1, that is 1.5 times higher than equivalent dose rates reported in the literature. The neutron fluence to dose conversion coefficients for the fetus calculated in this study were 2.7, 3.1 and 3.9 times higher than those from previous studies using fetus models of 3, 6 and 9 months of gestation age, respectively. The differences between our study and data from the literature highlight the importance of using more realistic anthropomorphic phantoms to estimate doses to a fetus in pregnant aircrew members.

  10. Estimation of the contribution of neutrons to the equivalent dose for personnel occupationally exposed and public in medical facilities: X-ray with energy equal or greater than 10MV; Estimacion de la contribucion por neutrones a la dosis equivalente para personal ocupacionalmente expuesto y publico en instalaciones de uso medico: rayos X de energia igual y/o superior a 10MV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Alfonso Mayer; Jimenez, Roberto Ortega; Sanchez, Mario A. Reyes, E-mail: amgesfm@hotmail.com, E-mail: rojimenez@cnsns.gob.mx [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (CNSNS), Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Moranchel y Mejia, Mario, E-mail: mmoranchel@ipn.mx [Instituto Politecnico Nacional (ESFM/IPN), Mexico, D.F. (Mexico). Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas. Departamento de lngenieria Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    In Mexico the use of electron accelerators for treating cancerous tumors had grown enormously in the last decade. When the treatments are carried out with X-ray beam energy below 10 MV the design of the shielding of the radioactive facility is determined by analyzing the interaction of X-rays, which have a direct impact and dispersion, with materials of the facility. However, when it makes use of X-ray beam energy equal to or greater than 10 MV the neutrons presence is imminent due to their generation by the interaction of the primary beam X-ray with materials head of the accelerator and of the table of treatment, mainly. In these cases, the design and calculation of shielding considers the generation of high-energy neutrons which contribute the equivalent dose that public and Occupationally Staff Exposed (POE) will receive in the areas surrounding the facility radioactive. However, very few measurements have been performed to determine the actual contribution to the neutron dose equivalent received by POE and public during working hours. This paper presents an estimate of the actual contribution of the neutron dose equivalent received by public and POE facilities in various radioactive medical use, considering many factors. To this end, measurements were made of the equivalent dose by using a neutron monitor in areas surrounding different radioactive installations (of Mexico) which used electron accelerators medical use during treatment with X-ray beam energy equal to or greater than 10 MV. The results are presented after a statistical analysis of a wide range of measures in order to estimate more reliability real contribution of the neutron dose equivalent for POE and the public. (author)

  11. Estimation of the contribution by neutrons to the equivalent dose for exposed occupationally personnel and people in medical use facilities: X rays of equal or superior energy to 10 MV; Estimacion de la contribucion por neutrones a la dosis equivalente para personal ocupacionalmente expuesto y publico en instalaciones de uso medico: rayos X de energia igual y/o superior a 10 MV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega J, R.; Reyes S, M. A. [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Jose Ma. Barragan 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Moranchel y R, M., E-mail: rojimenez@cnsns.gob.mx [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional s/n, U. P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Edif. 9, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    In Mexico the use of electron accelerators for treating cancerous tumors had grown enormously in the last decade. When the treatments are carried out with X-ray beam energy below 10 MV the design of the shielding of the radioactive facility is determined by analyzing the interaction of X-rays, which have a direct impact and dispersion, with materials of the facility. However, when it makes use of X-ray beam energy equal to or greater than 10 MV the neutrons presence is imminent due to their generation by the interaction of the primary beam X-ray with materials head of the accelerator and of the table of treatment, mainly. In these cases, the design and calculation of shielding considers the generation of high-energy neutrons which contribute the equivalent dose that public and occupationally staff exposed (POE) will receive in the areas surrounding the facility radioactive. However, very few measurements have been performed to determine the actual contribution to the neutron dose equivalent received by POE and public during working hours. This paper presents and estimate of the actual contribution of the neutron dose equivalent received by public and POE facilities in various radioactive medical use, considering many factors. To this end, measurements were made of the equivalent dose by using a neutron monitor in areas surrounding different radioactive installations (of Mexico) which used electron accelerators medical use during treatment with X-ray beam energy equal to or greater than 10 MV. The results are presented after a statistical analysis of a wide range of measures in order to estimate more reliability real contribution of the neutron dose equivalent for POE and the public. (author)

  12. Neutron measurements at BRIT/BARC medical cyclotron facility of RMC, Parel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathian, Deepa; Sathian, V.; Phandnis, U.V.; Soni, P.S.; Mohite, D.Y.

    2005-01-01

    Neutron leakage and its long distance propagation in the atmosphere from the intense neutron facilities such as high energy accelerators like Cyclotron are very important for the shielding design of the facilities and resulting dose reduction to nearby population, because of strong penetrability of high energy neutrons. The neutron interaction cross sections are highly energy dependent, so different methods are adopted for measuring different energy neutrons. The method also depends on the amount of neutron fluence rate expected at the location. When the fluence rate is very high, the foil activation is the best method for the measurement of neutron fluence rate. In foil activation technique an inactive material is activated by neutrons and the activity is measured and correlated to the neutron fluence rate. In this paper, neutron fluence rate measurement using different activation foils at medical cyclotron room of Radiation Medicine Centre (RMC) is discussed. (author)

  13. Neutron spectra due 13N production in a PET cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benavente, J.A.; Vega-Carrillo, H.R.; Lacerda, M.A.S.; Fonseca, T.C.F.; Faria, F.P.; Silva, T.A. da

    2015-01-01

    Monte Carlo and experimental methods have been used to characterize the neutron radiation field around PET (Positron Emission Tomography) cyclotrons. In this work, the Monte Carlo code MCNPX was used to estimate the neutron spectra, the neutron fluence rates and the ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)) in seven locations around a PET cyclotron during 13 N production. In order to validate these calculations, H*(10) was measured in three sites and were compared with the calculated doses. All the spectra have two peaks, one above 0.1 MeV due to the evaporation neutrons and another in the thermal region due to the room-return effects. Despite the relatively large difference between the measured and calculated H*(10) for one point, the agreement was considered good, compared with that obtained for 18 F production in a previous work. - Highlights: • MCNPX code was used to estimate the neutron spectra in a PET cyclotron. • Neutrons were estimated when 13 N is produced. • Neutron spectra show evaporation and room-return neutrons. • Calculated H*(10) were compared with measured H*(10)

  14. DIANE, a simulation code for the interaction of neutrons with living tissues. Application to low doses of fast neutrons on human tumoral cells; DIANE, un code de simulation de l'interaction des neutrons avec la matiere vivante. Applications aux faibles doses de neutrons rapides sur des cellules tumorales humaines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenot, M.L

    2003-07-15

    Our work deals with the irradiation of cells and living tissues by 14 MeV neutrons at very low doses (a few 10{sup -2} Gy). Such experiments require an accurate knowledge of the values of neutron dose rates and fluences at the level of cell cultures. We have performed measurements of fluence rates through an activation method applied to gold and copper foils. The fluence rate is deduced from the gamma rays emitted by the irradiated foils. Neutron doses and dose rates have been measured through varied methods: PIN diodes, ionization tissue equivalent chambers, and Geiger-Mueller counters. We have designed the DIANE code to simulate the impact of energetic neutrons on cells. This code can be used with isolated cells or macroscopic tissues, it takes into account the roles of the ionisation electrons produced by recoil nuclei entering the cell. This point is all the more important since recent works have highlighted the impact of very low energy electrons on DNA. (A.C.)

  15. Characterization of a {sup 239}PuBe isotopic neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H. R.; Hernandez D, V. M. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Rivera M, T. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Calz. Legaria No. 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Sanchez, A., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    A Bonner sphere spectrometer was used to determine the features of a {sup 239}PuBe neutron source used to operate the ESFM-Ipn Subcritical Reactor. The spectrometer is a {sup 6}Lil(Eu) scintillator and 2, 3, 5, 8, 10 and 12 inches-diameter polyethylene spheres, that was located 100 cm from the neutron source. The count rates obtained with the spectrometer were unfolded using the NSDUAZ code and neutron spectrum, total fluence, and ambient dose equivalent were determined. A Monte Carlo calculation, using the MCNP5 code, was carried out to estimate the spectrum and integral features being less that values obtained experimentally due to the presence of {sup 241}Pu in the Pu used to fabricate the source. Using the experimental information the actual neutron yield and the mass fraction of {sup 241}Pu was estimated. (Author)

  16. Advisory Committee for the Calibration Standards of Ionizing Radiation Measurement: Section 3. Neutron measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Section III (Mesures neutroniques) of the Comite Consultatif pour les Etalons de Mesure des Rayonnements Ionisants held its fifth meeting in May 1981. Recent work carried out at BIPM in the field of neutron measurements was reported. The status of a full-scale 252 Cf neutron source intercomparison (10 7 s - 1 ) and of several restricted comparisons was discussed. Intercomparisons of fast neutron fluence rates are in progress ( 115 In(n,n') 115 Insup(m); NB/Zr) or will take place in the near future ( 115 n(n,#betta#) 116 Insup(m); 235 U and 238 U fission chambers). An intercomparison of neutron dosimetry standards by circulating tissue-equivalent ion chambers will be prepared and organized by BIPM. Finally, there was a broad exchange of information on work in progress at the various laboratories represented at the meeting [fr

  17. Investigation of Response of Several Neutron Surveymeters by a DT Neutron Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang In; Jang, In Su; Kim, Jang Lyul; Lee, Jung IL; Kim, Bong Hwan

    2012-01-01

    Several neutron measuring devices were tested under the neutron fields characterized with two distinct kinds of thermal and fast neutron spectrum. These neutron fields were constructed by the mixing of both thermal neutron fields and fast neutron fields. The thermal neutron field was constructed using by a graphite pile with eight AmBe neutron sources. The fast neutron field of 14 MeV was made by a DT neutron generator. In order to change the fraction of fast neutron fluence rate in each neutron fields, a neutron generator was placed in the thermal neutron field at 50 cm and 150 cm from the reference position. The polyethylene neutron collimator was used to make moderated 14 MeV neutron field. These neutron spectra were measured by using a Bonner sphere system with an LiI scintillator, and dosimetric quantities delivered to neutron surveymeters were determined from these measurement results.

  18. In-phantom spectra and dose distributions from a high-energy neutron therapy beam

    CERN Document Server

    Benck, S; Denis, J M; Meulders, J P; Nath, R; Pitcher, E J

    2002-01-01

    In radiotherapy with external beams, healthy tissues surrounding the target volumes are inevitably irradiated. In the case of neutron therapy, the estimation of dose to the organs surrounding the target volume is particularly challenging, because of the varying contributions from primary and secondary neutrons and photons of different energies. The neutron doses to tissues surrounding the target volume at the Louvain-la-Neuve (LLN) facility were investigated in this work. At LLN, primary neutrons have a broad spectrum with a mean energy of about 30 MeV. The transport of a 10x10 cm sup 2 beam through a water phantom was simulated by means of the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. Distributions of energy-differential values of neutron fluence, kerma and kerma equivalent were estimated at different locations in a water phantom. The evolution of neutron dose and dose equivalent inside the phantom was deduced. Measurements of absorbed dose and of dose equivalent were then carried out in a water phantom using an ionization ch...

  19. Neutron spectrometry for protection dosimetry at very low levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardell, A.G.; Thomas, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    Dose limits for exposure of members of the public are significantly lower than those for designated radiation workers. The new ICRP 60 recommendation for critical groups of the general public is an effective dose limit of 1 mSv per year which requires a measurement capability at levels down to about 100 nSv h - 1. Radiation protection dosimetry for neutrons at these levels is problematical, nevertheless, operators of nuclear sites are still required to demonstrate acceptably low radiation levels in areas accessible to the public. In addition to the known poor dose equivalent response of available dosemeters, there is an added problem at low levels of inadequate sensitivity. Personal dosemeters are certainly not sufficiently sensitive, and the sensitivity of area survey instruments is such that they can only be used in integral mode Even then, the statistical uncertainties are likely to be large. One further problem concerns the quantity measured. Survey instruments are designed to measure the operational quantity ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), which always tends to be an overestimate of the present limiting quantity effective dose equivalent. If in any situation exposure is near the limit, an estimate of H*(10) may not be sufficient to prove conclusively that levels are less than the statutory limit, and a direct estimate of effective dose equivalent may need to be made. The only way of estimating effective dose equivalent is via an absolute spectral measurement. From such a spectrum any relevant dosimetric quantity can be estimated via tabulated fluence to dose equivalent conversion factors. (Certain quantities also require information about the angular dependence of the field - see later text). Spectrometry at such low neutron fluence levels is difficult, however, there is one instrument available which can perform the required measurements, and this is a well characterised Bonner sphere (BS) set. (author)

  20. In-phantom spectra and dose distributions from a high-energy neutron therapy beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benck, S. E-mail: benck@fynu.ucl.ac.be; D' Errico, F.; Denis, J.-M.; Meulders, J.-P.; Nath, R.; Pitcher, E.J

    2002-01-01

    In radiotherapy with external beams, healthy tissues surrounding the target volumes are inevitably irradiated. In the case of neutron therapy, the estimation of dose to the organs surrounding the target volume is particularly challenging, because of the varying contributions from primary and secondary neutrons and photons of different energies. The neutron doses to tissues surrounding the target volume at the Louvain-la-Neuve (LLN) facility were investigated in this work. At LLN, primary neutrons have a broad spectrum with a mean energy of about 30 MeV. The transport of a 10x10 cm{sup 2} beam through a water phantom was simulated by means of the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. Distributions of energy-differential values of neutron fluence, kerma and kerma equivalent were estimated at different locations in a water phantom. The evolution of neutron dose and dose equivalent inside the phantom was deduced. Measurements of absorbed dose and of dose equivalent were then carried out in a water phantom using an ionization chamber and superheated drop detectors (SDDs). On the beam axis, the calculations agreed well with the ionization chamber data, but disagreed significantly from the SDD data due to the detector's under-response to neutrons above 20 MeV. Off the beam axis, the calculated absorbed doses were significantly lower than the ionization chamber readings, since gamma fields were not accounted for. The calculated data are doses from neutron-induced charge particles, and these agreed with the values measured by the photon-insensitive SDDs. When exposed to the degraded spectra off the beam axis, the SDD offered reliable estimates of the neutron dose equivalent.

  1. Characterisation of mixed neutron-photon workplace fields at nuclear facilities by spectrometry (energy and direction) within the EVIDOS project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luszik-Bhadra, M.; Bartlett, D.; Bolognese-Milsztajn, T.; Boschung, M.; Coeck, M.; Curzio, G.; D'Errico, F.; Fiechtner, A.; Lacoste, V.; Lindborg, L.; Reginatto, M.; Schuhmacher, H.; Tanner, R.; Vanhavere, F.

    2007-01-01

    Within the EC project EVIDOS, 17 different mixed neutron-photon workplace fields at nuclear facilities (boiling water reactor, pressurised water reactor, research reactor, fuel processing, storage of spent fuel) were characterised using conventional Bonner sphere spectrometry and newly developed direction spectrometers. The results of the analysis, using Bayesian parameter estimation methods and different unfolding codes, some of them especially adapted to simultaneously unfold energy and direction distributions of the neutron fluence, showed that neutron spectra differed strongly at the different places, both in energy and direction distribution. The implication of the results for the determination of reference values for radiation protection quantities (ambient dose equivalent, personal dose equivalent and effective dose) and the related uncertainties are discussed. (authors)

  2. Optical absorption characteristics of neutron irradiated heavy metal fluoride glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitra, S.S.; Banerjee, P.K.; Pereira, J.M.T.; Gedam, S.G.

    1987-10-15

    Samples of ZBLA and HBLA glasses were subjected to various fluences of neutron irradiation, and the spectral dependence of optical absorption was measured before and after irradiation. The IR edge was found to be unaffected by neutron irradiation for the fluences used. However, a red shift occurred at the UV edge which slightly recovered after three weeks.

  3. A fluence device for precise radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnott, R.G.T.; Peak, M.J.

    1979-01-01

    An instrument is described which has been designed to ensure precise positioning of samples and sensing devices in three dimensions at all times during irradiation procedures. The system, which is both robust and sensitive, overcomes difficulties experienced when slight variations in the positioning of a sample under irradiation results in large changes in fluence. (UK)

  4. Experimental characterization of the neutron spectra generated by a high-energy clinical LINAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amgarou, K., E-mail: khalil.amgarou@uab.e [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Laboratoire de Metrologie et de Dosimetrie des Neutrons, F-13115 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Lacoste, V.; Martin, A. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Laboratoire de Metrologie et de Dosimetrie des Neutrons, F-13115 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2011-02-11

    The production of unwanted neutrons by electron linear accelerators (LINACs) has attracted a special attention since the early 50s. The renewed interest in this topic during the last years is due mainly to the increased use of such machines in radiotherapy. Specially, in most of developing countries where many old teletherapy irradiators, based on {sup 60}Co and {sup 137}Cs radioactive sources, are being replaced with new LINAC units. The main objective of this work is to report the results of an experimental characterization of the neutron spectra generated by a high-energy clinical LINAC. Measurements were carried out, considering four irradiation configurations, by means of our recently developed passive Bonner sphere spectrometer (BSS) using pure gold activation foils as central detectors. This system offers the possibility to measure neutrons over a wide energy range (from thermal up to a few MeV) at pulsed, intense and complex mixed n-{gamma} fields. A two-step unfolding method that combines the NUBAY and MAXED codes was applied to derive the final neutron spectra as well as their associated integral quantities (in terms of total neutron fluence and ambient dose equivalent rates) and fluence-averaged energies.

  5. Installation and testing of an optimized epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairchild, R.G.; Kalef-Ezra, J.; Saraf, S.K.; Fiarman, S.; Ramsey, E.; Wielopolski, L.; Laster, B.; Wheeler, F. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA); Ioannina Univ. (Greece); Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA); State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (USA). Health Science Center; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA); EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1989-01-01

    Various calculations indicate that an optimized epithermal neutron beam can be produced by moderating fission neutrons either with a combination of Al and D{sub 2}O, or with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. We have designed, installed and tested an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} moderated epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). The epithermal neutron fluence rate of 1.8 {times} 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2}-sec produces a peak thermal neutron fluence rate of 1.9 to 2.8 {times} 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2}-sec in a tissue equivalent (TE) phantom head, depending on the configuration. Thus a single therapy treatment of 5 {times} 10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} can be delivered in 30--45 minutes. All irradiation times are given for a BMRR power of 3 MW, which is the highest power which can be delivered continuously. 18 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Neutron dosimetry; Dosimetria de neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fratin, Luciano

    1993-12-31

    A neutron irradiation facility was designed and built in order to establish a procedure for calibrating neutron monitors and dosemeters. A 185 GBq {sup 241} Am Be source of known is used as a reference source. The irradiation facility using this source in the air provides neutron dose rates between 9 nSv s{sup -1} and 0,5 {sup {mu}}Sv s{sup -1}. A calibrated 50 nSv s{sup -1} thermal neutron field is obtained by using a specially designed paraffin block in conjunction with the {sup 241} Am Be source. A Bonner multisphere spectrometer was calibrated, using a procedure based on three methods proposed by international standards. The unfold {sup 241} Am Be neutron spectrum was determined from the Bonner spheres data and resulted in a good agreement with expected values for fluence rate, dose rate and mean energy. A dosimetric system based on the electrochemical etching of CR-39 was developed for personal dosimetry. The dosemeter badge using a (n,{alpha}) converter, the etching chamber and high frequency power supply were designed and built specially for this project. The electrochemical etching (ECE) parameters used were: a 6N KOH solution, 59 deg C, 20 kV{sub pp} cm{sup -1}, 2,0 kHz, 3 hours of ECE for thermal and intermediate neutrons and 6 hours for fast neutrons. The calibration factors for thermal, intermediate and fast neutrons were determined for this personal dosemeter. The sensitivities determined for the developed dosimetric system were (1,46{+-} 0,09) 10{sup 4} tracks cm{sup -2} mSv{sup -1} for thermal neutrons, (9{+-}3) 10{sup 2} tracks cm{sup -2} mSV{sup -1} for intermediate neutrons and (26{+-}4) tracks cm{sup -2} mSv{sup -1} for fast neutrons. The lower and upper limits of detection were respectively 0,002 mSv and 0,6 mSv for thermal neutrons, 0,04 mSv and 8 mSv for intermediate neutrons and 1 mSv and 12 mSv for fast neutrons. In view of the 1990`s ICRP recommendations, it is possible to conclude that the personal dosemeter described in this work is

  7. Photon fluence measurements relative to a Bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merle, G.; Zerbib, J.

    1969-01-01

    With the help of a gamma spectrometry measurement apparatus using a NaI: Tl crystal, the authors have studied the passage from the pulse distributions received on a multichannel spectrometer to the spectral distribution of the photons. This work has necessitated the use of a previously calibrated gamma probe for measuring the mono-energetic photon fluence. A simple method is used for producing the spectrum for an energy range of from 30 keV to 2 MeV; the photon population is classified in about twenty groups. The determination of these groups, whose width increases with the energy E γ , depends on the probe parameters and on the probability used for the calculation of the gaussian distribution of the pulses of the total absorption peak, centred on the group under consideration. The spectral analysis method is tested for one and then several radionuclides which are present simultaneously and whose gamma emission is known. The tests are complemented with fluence measurements with a view to testing the validity of the method proposed. The class determination operation (number and width), and the calculation of the spectral distribution of the photon fluences and of the irradiation intensities are carried out by computer (FORTRAN IV program). an actual example is described for measuring the Bremsstrahlung near the 2 MeV Van de Graaff 'Yvette' at the Saclay Nuclear Sciences and Technology Institute (I.N.S.T.N.). (authors) [fr

  8. Crystallographic changes in lead zirconate titanate due to neutron irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Henriques

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric and ferroelectric materials are useful as the active element in non-destructive monitoring devices for high-radiation areas. Here, crystallographic structural refinement (i.e., the Rietveld method is used to quantify the type and extent of structural changes in PbZr0.5Ti0.5O3 after exposure to a 1 MeV equivalent neutron fluence of 1.7 × 1015 neutrons/cm2. The results show a measurable decrease in the occupancy of Pb and O due to irradiation, with O vacancies in the tetragonal phase being created preferentially on one of the two O sites. The results demonstrate a method by which the effects of radiation on crystallographic structure may be investigated.

  9. Characterisation of neutron fields: challenges in assessing the directional distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cauwels, Vanessa; Vanhavere, Filip; Reginatto, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    The SCK.CEN has carried out neutron field characterisation campaigns at several nuclear reactors. The main goal of these measurement campaigns was to evaluate the performance of different neutron personal dosemeters. To be able to evaluate the performance of neutron personal dosemeters in terms of H p (10), knowledge of the directional distribution is indispensable. This distribution was estimated by placing several personal dosemeters on all six sides of a slab phantom. The interpretation and conversion of this information into a reliable value for H p (10) requires great care. The data were analysed using three methods. In the first approach, a linear interpolation was performed on three perpendicular axes. In the other two approaches, an icosahedron was used to model the angle of incidence of the neutrons and a linear interpolation or a Bayesian analysis was performed. This study describes the limitations and advantages of each of these methods and provides recommendations for their use to estimate the personal dose equivalent H p (10) for neutron dosimetry. Neutron personal dosimetry is complicated by the fact that the neutron dose quantity H p (10) is strongly energy and angular dependent. Instead of simply assuming that the fluence is unidirectional or that the fluence is isotropic, an attempt was made to estimate the directional distribution of the neutron field using a relatively simple measurement procedure. A number of active and passive personal dosemeters were placed on the six faces of a slab phantom and the results were analysed via different algorithms to obtain partial fluences in several directions of incidence. The results from all calculations in this study show the importance of introducing information about the directional distribution of the neutron fluence for the estimation of the personal dose equivalent H p (10). The difference between H p (10) dose estimates carried out using a unidirectional or an isotropic distribution can be of up

  10. Characterization of the Neutron Fields in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Radiation Calibration Laboratory Low Scatter Calibration Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radev, R

    2009-09-04

    In June 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) revised its rule on Occupational Radiation Protection, Part 10 CFR 835. A significant aspect of the revision was the adoption of the recommendations outlined in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Report 60 (ICRP-60), including new radiation weighting factors for neutrons, updated internal dosimetric models, and dose terms consistent with the newer ICRP recommendations. ICRP-60 uses the quantities defined by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) for personnel and area monitoring including the ambient dose equivalent H*(d). A Joint Task Group of ICRU and ICRP has developed various fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients which are published in ICRP-74 for both protection and operational quantities. In February 2008, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) replaced its old pneumatic transport neutron irradiation system in the Radiation Calibration Laboratory (RCL) Low Scatter Calibration Facility (B255, Room 183A) with a Hopewell Designs irradiator model N40. The exposure tube for the Hopewell system is located close to, but not in exactly the same position as the exposure tube for the pneumatic system. Additionally, the sources for the Hopewell system are stored in Room 183A where, prior to the change, they were stored in a separate room (Room 183C). The new source configuration and revision of the 10 CFR 835 radiation weighting factors necessitate a re-evaluation of the neutron dose rates in B255 Room 183A. This report deals only with the changes in the operational quantities ambient dose equivalent and ambient dose rate equivalent for neutrons as a result of the implementation of the revised 10 CFR 835. In the report, the terms 'neutron dose' and 'neutron dose rate' will be used for convenience for ambient neutron dose equivalent and ambient neutron dose rate equivalent unless otherwise stated.

  11. Proton Particle Test Fluence: What's the Right Number?

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Ladbury, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    While we have been utilizing standard fluence levels such as those listed in the JESD57 document, we have begun revisiting what an appropriate test fluence is when it comes to qualifying a device for single events. Instead of a fixed fluence level or until a specific number of events occurs, a different thought process is required.

  12. Effects of high thermal and high fast fluences on the mechanical properties of type 6061 aluminum in the HFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, J.R.; Czajkowski, C.J.; Tichler, P.R.

    1988-01-01

    The High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is an epithermal, externally moderated (by D 2 O) facility designed to produce neutron beams for research. Type 6061 T-6 aluminum was used for the beam tubes, pressure vessel, fuel cladding, and most other components in the high flux area. The HFBR has operated since 1965. The epithermal, external moderation of the HFBR means that materials irradiated in different areas of the facility receive widely different flux spectra. Thus, specimens from a control rod drive follower tube (CRDF) have received 1.5 /times/ 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) and 3.2 /times/ 10 23 n/cm 2 thermal fluence, while those from a vertical thimble flow shroud received 1.9 /times/ 10 23 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) and 1.0 /times/ 10 23 n/cm 2 thermal. These numbers correspond to fast to thermal fluence ratios ranging from 0.05 to 1.9. Irradiations are occurring at approximately 333/degree/K. The data indicate that the increase in tensile strength and decrease in ductility result primarily from the thermal fluence, i.e., the transmutation of aluminum to silicon. These effects appear to be saturating at fluences above approximately 1.8 /times/ 10 23 n/cm 2 thermal at values of 90,000 psi (6700 Kg/mm 2 ) and 9%, respectively. The specimens receiving the highest fluence ratios appear to have less increase in tensile strength and less decrease in ductility than specimens with a lower fast to thermal fluence ratio and the same thermal fluence, suggesting a possible beneficial effect of the high energy neutrons in preventing formation of silicon crystallites. 7 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Managing NIF safety equipment in a high neutron and gamma radiation environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datte, Philip; Eckart, Mark; Jackson, Mark; Khater, Hesham; Manuel, Stacie; Newton, Mark

    2013-06-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192 laser beam facility that supports the Inertial Confinement Fusion program. During the ignition experimental campaign, the NIF is expected to perform shots with varying fusion yield producing 14 MeV neutrons up to 20 MJ or 7.1 × 10(18) neutrons per shot and a maximum annual yield of 1,200 MJ. Several infrastructure support systems will be exposed to varying high yield shots over the facility's 30-y life span. In response to this potential exposure, analysis and testing of several facility safety systems have been conducted. A detailed MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code) model has been developed for the NIF facility, and it includes most of the major structures inside the Target Bay. The model has been used in the simulation of expected neutron and gamma fluences throughout the Target Bay. Radiation susceptible components were identified and tested to fluences greater than 10(13) (n cm(-2)) for 14 MeV neutrons and γ-ray equivalent. The testing includes component irradiation using a 60Co gamma source and accelerator-based irradiation using 4- and 14- MeV neutron sources. The subsystem implementation in the facility is based on the fluence estimates after shielding and survivability guidelines derived from the dose maps and component tests results. This paper reports on the evaluation and implementation of mitigations for several infrastructure safety support systems, including video, oxygen monitoring, pressure monitors, water sensing systems, and access control interfaces found at the NIF.

  14. Alpha-particle fluence in radiobiological experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikezic, Dragoslav; Yu, Kwan Ngok

    2017-03-01

    Two methods were proposed for determining alpha-particle fluence for radiobiological experiments. The first involved calculating the probabilities of hitting the target for alpha particles emitted from a source through Monte Carlo simulations, which when multiplied by the activity of the source gave the fluence at the target. The second relied on the number of chemically etched alpha-particle tracks developed on a solid-state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) that was irradiated by an alpha-particle source. The etching efficiencies (defined as percentages of latent tracks created by alpha particles from the source that could develop to become visible tracks upon chemical etching) were computed through Monte Carlo simulations, which when multiplied by the experimentally counted number of visible tracks would also give the fluence at the target. We studied alpha particles with an energy of 5.486 MeV emitted from an 241Am source, and considered the alpha-particle tracks developed on polyallyldiglycol carbonate film, which is a common SSNTD. Our results showed that the etching efficiencies were equal to one for source-film distances of from 0.6 to 3.5 cm for a circular film of radius of 1 cm, and for source-film distances of from 1 to 3 cm for circular film of radius of 2 cm. For circular film with a radius of 3 cm, the etching efficiencies never reached 1. On the other hand, the hit probability decreased monotonically with increase in the source-target distance, and fell to zero when the source-target distance was larger than the particle range in air. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  15. IMRT fluence map editing to control hot and cold spots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor Cook, J.; Tobler, Matt; Leavitt, Dennis D.; Watson, Gordon

    2005-01-01

    Manually editing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fluence maps effectively controls hot and cold spots that the IMRT optimization cannot control. Many times, re-optimizing does not reduce the hot spots or increase the cold spots. In fact, re-optimizing only places the hot and cold spots in different locations. Fluence-map editing provides manual control of dose delivery and provides the best treatment plan possible. Several IMRT treatments were planned using the Varian Eclipse planning system. We compare the effects on dose distributions between fluence-map editing and re-optimization, discuss techniques for fluence-map editing, and analyze differences between fluence editing on one beam vs. multiple beams. When editing a beam's fluence map, it is essential to choose a beam that least affects dose to the tumor and critical structures. Editing fluence maps gives an advantage in treatment planning and provides controlled delivery of IMRT dose

  16. Vessel fluence evaluation for SMART using DLC-23 and DLC-185 data libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyo Youn; Cho, Byung Oh; Joo, Han Gyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-10-01

    In this report, it was performed the vessel fluence evaluation for SMART using nuclear cross-section libraries of DLC-23/CASK and DLC-185/BUGLE-96 and it was compared with the results. It was shown that the maximum neutron fluences for the inner surface of SMART vessel, which has 60 years lifetime and 90% capacity factor, resulted from using DLC-23/CASK and DLC-185/BUGLE-96 are 2.88x10{sup 16} n/cm{sup 2} and 1.98 x10{sup 16} n/cm{sup 2}, respectively. It is concluded that the fast neutron fluence at the reactor pressure vessel of SMART is far less than 1.0x10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} which is specified by the requirement of 10 CFR 50.61 and the SMART has the preservation of reactor vessel integrity throughout the reactor lifetime. Also, it was shown that the result using DLC-23/CASK has conservatism of about 30% comparing with the result using DLC-185/BUGLE-96. 15 refs., 7 figs., 13 tabs. (Author)

  17. Isotopic dependence of GCR fluence behind shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Saganti, Premkumar; Hu, Xiaodong; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Cleghorn, Timothy; Zeitlin, Cary; Tripathi, Ram K.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we consider the effects of the isotopic composition of the primary galactic cosmic rays (GCR), nuclear fragmentation cross sections, and isotopic-grid on the solution to transport models used for shielding studies. Satellite measurements are used to describe the isotopic composition of the GCR. For the nuclear interaction data-base and transport solution, we use the quantum multiple scattering theory of nuclear fragmentation (QMSFRG) and high-charge and energy (HZETRN) transport code, respectively. The QMSFRG model is shown to accurately describe existing fragmentation data including proper description of the odd-even effects as function of the iso-spin dependence on the projectile nucleus. The principle finding of this study is that large errors (±100%) will occur in the mass-fluence spectra when comparing transport models that use a complete isotopic-grid (∼170 ions) to ones that use a reduced isotopic-grid, for example the 59 ion-grid used in the HZETRN code in the past; however, less significant errors (<+/-20%) occur in the elemental-fluence spectra. Because a complete isotopic-grid is readily handled on small computer workstations and is needed for several applications studying GCR propagation and scattering, it is recommended that they be used for future GCR studies

  18. The effect of a paraffin screen on the neutron dose at the maze door of a 15 MV linear accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krmar, M; Nikolić, D; Kuzmanović, A; Kuzmanović, Z; Ganezer, K

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of a paraffin screen located at various positions in the maze on the neutron dose equivalent at the maze door. The neutron dose equivalent was measured at the maze door of a room containing a 15 MV linear accelerator for x-ray therapy. Measurements were performed for several positions of the paraffin screen covering only 27.5% of the cross-sectional area of the maze. The neutron dose equivalent was also measured at all screen positions. Two simple models of the neutron source were considered in which the first assumed that the source was the cross-sectional area at the inner entrance of the maze, radiating neutrons in an isotropic manner. In the second model the reduction in the neutron dose equivalent at the maze door due to the paraffin screen was considered to be a function of the mean values of the neutron fluence and energy at the screen. The results of this study indicate that the equivalent dose at the maze door was reduced by a factor of 3 through the use of a paraffin screen that was placed inside the maze. It was also determined that the contributions to the dosage from areas that were not covered by the paraffin screen as viewed from the dosimeter, were 2.5 times higher than the contributions from the covered areas. This study also concluded that the contributions of the maze walls, ceiling, and floor to the total neutron dose equivalent were an order of magnitude lower than those from the surface at the far end of the maze. This study demonstrated that a paraffin screen could be used to reduce the neutron dose equivalent at the maze door by a factor of 3. This paper also found that the reduction of the neutron dose equivalent was a linear function of the area covered by the maze screen and that the decrease in the dose at the maze door could be modeled as an exponential function of the product φ·E at the screen.

  19. Optimization of artificial neural networks for the reconstruction of the neutrons spectrum and their equivalent doses; Optimizacion de redes neuronales artificiales para la reconstruccion del espectro de neutrones y sus dosis equivalentes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes A, A.; Ortiz R, J. M.; Reyes H, A.; Castaneda M, R.; Solis S, L. O.; Vega C, H. R., E-mail: art8291@hotmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Ingenieria Electrica, Av. Lopez Velarde No. 801, Col. Centro, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    In this work was used the robust design methodology of artificial neural networks to determine a good topology of net able to solve with efficiency the problems of neutrons spectrometry and dosimetry. For the design of the topology of optimized net 36 different net architectures based on an orthogonal arrangement with a configuration L{sub 9}(3{sup 4}), L{sub 4}(3{sup 2}) were trained. For the training of the neural networks, was used a computer code developed in the ambient of Mat lab programming, which automates the process and analysis of the information, reducing the time used in this activity considerably for the investigator. For the training of the propagation nets forward was utilized a neutrons spectrum compendium published by the International Atomic Energy Agency, where of the total 80% was used for the training and 20% for the test, it trained with an inverse propagation algorithm being the entrance data the count rates corresponding to the 7 spheres of the spectrometric system of Bonner spheres, as exit data, the neural network obtains the neutrons spectrum expressed in 60 energy groups and are calculated of simultaneous way 15 dosimetric quantities. (Author)

  20. Comparison of embrittlement trend curves to high fluence surveillance results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogaert, A.S.; Gerard, R.; Chaouadi, R.

    2011-01-01

    In the regulatory justification of the integrity of the reactor pressure vessels (RPV) for long term operation, use is made of predictive formulas (also called trend curves) to evaluate the RPV embrittlement (expressed in terms of RTNDT shifts) in function of fluence, chemical composition and in some cases temperature, neutron flux or product form. It has been shown recently that some of the existing or proposed trend curves tend to underpredict high dose embrittlement. Due to the scarcity of representative surveillance data at high dose, some test reactor results were used in these evaluations and raise the issue of representativeness of the accelerated test reactor irradiations (dose rate effects). In Belgium the surveillance capsules withdrawal schedule was modified in the nineties in order to obtain results corresponding to 60 years of operation or more with the initial surveillance program. Some of these results are already available and offer a good opportunity to test the validity of the predictive formulas at high dose. In addition, advanced surveillance methods are used in Belgium like the Master Curve, increased tensile tests, and microstructural investigations. These techniques made it possible to show the conservatism of the regulatory approach and to demonstrate increased margins, especially for the first generation units. In this paper the surveillance results are compared to different predictive formulas, as well as to an engineering hardening model developed at SCK.CEN. Generally accepted property-to-property correlations are critically revisited. Conclusions are made on the reliability and applicability of the embrittlement trend curves. (authors)

  1. SPECTRUM WEIGHTED RESPONSES OF SEVERAL DETECTORS IN MIXED FIELDS OF FAST AND THERMAL NEUTRONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANG IN KIM

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum weighted responses of various detectors were calculated to provide guidance on the proper selection and use of survey instruments on the basis of their energy response characteristics on the neutron fields. To yield the spectrum weighted response, the detector response functions of 17 neutron-measuring devices were numerically folded with each of the produced calibration neutron spectra through the in-house developed software ‘K-SWR’. The detectors’ response functions were taken from the IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 403 (TRS-403. The reference neutron fields of 21 kinds with 2 spectra groups with different proportions of thermal and fast neutrons have been produced using neutrons from the 241Am-Be sources held in a graphite pile, a bare 241Am-Be source, and a DT neutron generator. Fluence-average energy (Eave varied from 3.8 MeV to 16.9 MeV, and the ambient-dose-equivalent rate [H*(10/h] varied from 0.99 to 16.5 mSv/h.

  2. Gyrokinetic equivalence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parra, Felix I; Catto, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    We compare two different derivations of the gyrokinetic equation: the Hamiltonian approach in Dubin D H E et al (1983 Phys. Fluids 26 3524) and the recursive methodology in Parra F I and Catto P J (2008 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 50 065014). We prove that both approaches yield the same result at least to second order in a Larmor radius over macroscopic length expansion. There are subtle differences in the definitions of some of the functions that need to be taken into account to prove the equivalence.

  3. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program BWR High-Fluence Material Project: Assessment of the Role of High-Fluence on the Efficiency of HWC Mitigation on SCC Crack Growth Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastien Teysseyre

    2014-04-01

    As nuclear power plants age, the increasing neutron fluence experienced by stainless steels components affects the materials resistance to stress corrosion cracking and fracture toughness. The purpose of this report is to identify any new issues that are expected to rise as boiling water reactor power plants reach the end of their initial life and to propose a path forward to study such issues. It has been identified that the efficiency of hydrogen water chemistry mitigation technology may decrease as fluence increases for high-stress intensity factors. This report summarizes the data available to support this hypothesis and describes a program plan to determine the efficiency of hydrogen water chemistry as a function of the stress intensity factor applied and fluence. This program plan includes acquisition of irradiated materials, generation of material via irradiation in a test reactor, and description of the test plan. This plan offers three approaches, each with an estimated timetable and budget.

  4. SU-E-T-08: A Convolution Model for Head Scatter Fluence in the Intensity Modulated Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, M; Mo, X; Chen, Y; Parnell, D; Key, S; Olivera, G; Galmarini, W; Lu, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To efficiently calculate the head scatter fluence for an arbitrary intensity-modulated field with any source distribution using the source occlusion model. Method: The source occlusion model with focal and extra focal radiation (Jaffray et al, 1993) can be used to account for LINAC head scatter. In the model, the fluence map of any field shape at any point can be calculated via integration of the source distribution within the visible range, as confined by each segment, using the detector eye's view. A 2D integration would be required for each segment and each fluence plane point, which is time-consuming, as an intensity-modulated field contains typically tens to hundreds of segments. In this work, we prove that the superposition of the segmental integrations is equivalent to a simple convolution regardless of what the source distribution is. In fact, for each point, the detector eye's view of the field shape can be represented as a function with the origin defined at the point's pinhole reflection through the center of the collimator plane. We were thus able to reduce hundreds of source plane integration to one convolution. We calculated the fluence map for various 3D and IMRT beams and various extra-focal source distributions using both the segmental integration approach and the convolution approach and compared the computation time and fluence map results of both approaches. Results: The fluence maps calculated using the convolution approach were the same as those calculated using the segmental approach, except for rounding errors (<0.1%). While it took considerably longer time to calculate all segmental integrations, the fluence map calculation using the convolution approach took only ∼1/3 of the time for typical IMRT fields with ∼100 segments. Conclusions: The convolution approach for head scatter fluence calculation is fast and accurate and can be used to enhance the online process.

  5. Pollution of liquid argon after neutron irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Andrieux, M L; Collot, J; de Saintignon, P; Ferrari, A; Hostachy, J Y; Hoummada, A; Martin, P; Merkel, B; Puzo, P; Sauvage, D; Wielers, M

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the neutron facility installed at SARA is to investigate the behavior of various materials to be used in the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter, when submitted to fast neutron radiation. The samples are placed in a liquid argon cryostat a few cm away from the neutron source. Various pieces of the electromagnetic calorimeter have been tested in order to evaluate the rate of pollution of the liquid and consequently the possible signal loss in energy measurements. The average fluence was equivalent to the maximum expected in the calorimeter in about 10 years. The most striking feature of the results is that the pollution is not due to oxygen, at least for most of it. Using a particular value of the absorption length derived from these data, a simulation was carried out and the energy signal loss in the calorimeter could be predicted. Within the limits of our present knowledge, the conclusion is that damages due to this pollution will not be a problem. (17 refs).

  6. Study of neutron fields around an intense neutron generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kicka, L; Machrafi, R; Miller, A

    2017-12-01

    Neutron fields in the vicinity of the newly built neutron facility, at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT), have been investigated in a series of Monte Carlo simulations and measurements. The facility hosts a P-385 neutron generator based on a deuterium-deuterium fusion reaction. The neutron fluence at different locations around the neutron generator facility has been simulated using MCNPX 2.7E Monte Carlo particle transport program. To characterize neutron fields, three neutron sources were modeled with distributions corresponding to different incident deuteron energies of 90kV, 110kV, and 130kV. Measurements have been carried out to determine the dose rate at locations adjacent to the generator using bubble detectors (BDs). The neutron intensity was evaluated and the total dose rates corresponding to different applied acceleration potentials were estimated at various locations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of two personal dosemeters in polyenergetic mono- and multi-directional neutron fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunes, J. C.; Surette, R. A.

    2005-01-01

    The neutron dose-equivalent response of two commercially available electronic personal neutron dosemeters was studied in several laboratory-produced broad-spectrum neutron fields. Fluence-weighted mean energies ranged from 200 keV to 4 MeV; personal dose-equivalent rates ranged from 75 to 10 mSv h -1 ; and angles of incidence were multidirectional, 0 deg., 30 deg. and 60 deg.. Three of these fields have been shown previously to resemble ones found in CANDU (Canadian Deuterium Uranium is a registered trademark of the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited) power plant workplaces. Both dosemeters were found to perform reasonably well across the range of energy spectra and angles of incidence. One type of dosemeter displayed values of the personal dose equivalent that were, at worst, within a factor of ∼2 of the reference values and, at best, within a few per cent of the reference values. The other type displayed values of the personal dose equivalent that were consistently within unity and 20% of the reference values. Although the radiological performance of one was found to be more accurate, this device was also found to be the less rugged of the two. Some of the data acquired in this work were compared with results previously published by others. There was consistency between these sets of data. (authors)

  8. Neutron spectra and H*(10) around and 18 MV Linac by Ann's

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banuelos F, A.; Valero L, C.; Borja H, C. G.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R., E-mail: alanb535@hotmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2011-10-15

    Neutron spectra and ambient dose equivalent H*(10) were calculated for a radiotherapy room in 16 point-like detectors, 15 located inside the vault room and 1 located outside the bunker. The calculation was carried out using Monte Carlo Methods with the MCNP5 code for a generic radiotherapy room model operating with a 18 MV Linac, obtaining 16 neutron spectra with 47 energy bins, the H*(10) values were calculated from the neutron spectra by the use of the fluence-dose conversion factors. An artificial neural network were designed and trained to determine the neutron H*(10) in 15 different locations inside the vault room from the H*(10) dose calculated for the detector located outside the room, using the calculated dose values as training set, using the scaled conjugated gradient training algorithm. The mean squared error set for the network training was 1E(-14), adjusting the data in 99.992 %. In the treatment hall, as the distance respect to the isocenter is increased, the amount of neutrons and the H*(10) are reduced, neutrons in the high-energy region are shifted to lower region peaking around 0.1 MeV, however the epithermal and thermal neutrons remain constant due to the room-return effect. In the maze the spectra are dominated by epithermal and thermal neutrons that contributes to produce activation and the production of prompt gamma-rays. The results shows the using this artificial intelligence technic as a useful tool for the neutron spectrometry and dosimetry by the simplification on the neutronic fields characterization inside radiotherapy rooms avoiding the use of traditional spectrometric systems. And once the H*(10) doses have been calculated, to take the appropriated actions to reduce or prevent the patient and working staff exposure to this undesirable neutron radiation. (Author)

  9. Uncertainties in the Fluence Determination in the Surveillance Samples of VVER-440

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konheiser Joerg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The reactor pressure vessel (RPV represents one of the most important safety components in a nuclear power plant. Therefore, surveillance specimen (SS programs for the RPV material exist to deliver a reliable assessment of RPV residual lifetime. This report will present neutron fluence calculations for SS. These calculations were carried out by the codes TRAMO [1] and DORT [2]. This study was accompanied by ex-vessel neutron dosimetry experiments at Kola NPP. The main neutron activation monitoring reactions were 54Fe(n,p54Mn and 58Ni(n,p58Co. Good agreement was found between the deterministic and stochastic calculation results and between the calculations and the ex-vessel measurements. The different influences on the monitors were studied. In order to exclude the possible healing effects of the samples due to excessive temperatures, the heat release in the surveillance specimens was determined based on the calculated gamma fluences. Under comparatively realistic conditions, the heat increased by 6 K.

  10. Time structure of charge signals and noise studies of GaAs detectors irradiated by neutrons and protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunschweig, W.; Chu, Z.H.; Karpinski, W.; Kubicki, Th.; Lubelsmeyer, K.; Rente, C.; Syben, O.; Tenbusch, F.; Toporowsky, M.; Wittmer, B.; Xiao, W.J.

    1996-01-01

    Semiconductor detectors processed in Aachen using Si GaAs from different manufactures have been irradiated with neutrons (peak energy ∼ 1 MeV) up to 4.0·10 14 n/cm 2 and protons (energy 24 GeV) up to 8.2·10 13 p/cm 2 . All detectors work well after the exposure. The leakage current density at 200 V of detectors made of AXT material increases by a factor of four after the highest neutron fluence and a factor of three after the maximal proton fluence. For the FEW-LC material the leakage current decreases significantly after irradiation. No significant difference can be observed between biased and non-biased detectors during the exposure to neutrons. The equivalent noise charged (ENC) calculated from the noise density spectra agrees well with that extracted from the pedestal width for the different neutron and proton fluences. Before irradiation the charge signals for minimum ionizing particles (MIPs) increase with the peaking time in the range of 40 ns to 2 μs, while this dependence cannot be observed after the exposure to neutrons or protons. The reason for this behaviour is the different time structure of the charge signals before and after irradiation. For AXT material the charge signals for MIPs correspond to 7100 electrons after 4.0·10 14 n/cm 2 and of 4300 electrons after 8.2·10 13 p/cm 2 are obtained. For FEW-LC material the signals at 200 V are reduced from 15700 electrons before irradiation to 6000 electrons after 8.2·10 13 p/cm 2 for this peaking time

  11. Evaluation of gamma and neutron irradiation effects on the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    However, appreciable change in the capacitance has been observed due to low doses of fast neutrons (cumulative dose, 115 cGy) with flux ∼ 9.925 × 107 neutrons/cm2 h from 252Cf neutron source of fluence, 2.5 × 107 neutrons/s. We have also observed that the impact of gamma and neutron irradiation is more at ...

  12. Standard Test Method for Application and Analysis of Helium Accumulation Fluence Monitors for Reactor Vessel Surveillance, E706 (IIIC)

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes the concept and use of helium accumulation for neutron fluence dosimetry for reactor vessel surveillance. Although this test method is directed toward applications in vessel surveillance, the concepts and techniques are equally applicable to the general field of neutron dosimetry. The various applications of this test method for reactor vessel surveillance are as follows: 1.1.1 Helium accumulation fluence monitor (HAFM) capsules, 1.1.2 Unencapsulated, or cadmium or gadolinium covered, radiometric monitors (RM) and HAFM wires for helium analysis, 1.1.3 Charpy test block samples for helium accumulation, and 1.1.4 Reactor vessel (RV) wall samples for helium accumulation. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  13. SU-E-T-591: Measurement and Monte Carlo Simulation of Stray Neutrons in Passive Scattering Proton Therapy: Needs and Challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farah, J; Bonfrate, A; Donadille, L; Dubourg, N; Lacoste, V; Martinetti, F; Sayah, R; Trompier, F; Clairand, I [IRSN - Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, Fontenay-aux-roses (France); Caresana, M [Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Delacroix, S; Nauraye, C [Institut Curie - Centre de Protontherapie d Orsay, Orsay (France); Herault, J [Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France); Piau, S; Vabre, I [Institut de Physique Nucleaire d Orsay, Orsay (France)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Measure stray radiation inside a passive scattering proton therapy facility, compare values to Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and identify the actual needs and challenges. Methods: Measurements and MC simulations were considered to acknowledge neutron exposure associated with 75 MeV ocular or 180 MeV intracranial passively scattered proton treatments. First, using a specifically-designed high sensitivity Bonner Sphere system, neutron spectra were measured at different positions inside the treatment rooms. Next, measurement-based mapping of neutron ambient dose equivalent was fulfilled using several TEPCs and rem-meters. Finally, photon and neutron organ doses were measured using TLDs, RPLs and PADCs set inside anthropomorphic phantoms (Rando, 1 and 5-years-old CIRS). All measurements were also simulated with MCNPX to investigate the efficiency of MC models in predicting stray neutrons considering different nuclear cross sections and models. Results: Knowledge of the neutron fluence and energy distribution inside a proton therapy room is critical for stray radiation dosimetry. However, as spectrometry unfolding is initiated using a MC guess spectrum and suffers from algorithmic limits a 20% spectrometry uncertainty is expected. H*(10) mapping with TEPCs and rem-meters showed a good agreement between the detectors. Differences within measurement uncertainty (10–15%) were observed and are inherent to the energy, fluence and directional response of each detector. For a typical ocular and intracranial treatment respectively, neutron doses outside the clinical target volume of 0.4 and 11 mGy were measured inside the Rando phantom. Photon doses were 2–10 times lower depending on organs position. High uncertainties (40%) are inherent to TLDs and PADCs measurements due to the need for neutron spectra at detector position. Finally, stray neutrons prediction with MC simulations proved to be extremely dependent on proton beam energy and the used nuclear models and

  14. Li-Ion Batteries for Forensic Neutron Dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Li-Ion Batteries for Forensic Neutron Dosimetry Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release, distribution is unlimited. March...ion batteries are the common technology for powering portable electronics. The nuclear reactions within the batteries are sensitive to neutrons . By...characterizing this dependence, neutron dose and fluence information can be determined. The dose information can be used on an individual basis to

  15. Photoluminescence in large fluence radiation irradiated space silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hisamatsu, Tadashi; Kawasaki, Osamu; Matsuda, Sumio [National Space Development Agency of Japan, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan). Tsukuba Space Center; Tsukamoto, Kazuyoshi

    1997-03-01

    Photoluminescence spectroscopy measurements were carried out for silicon 50{mu}m BSFR space solar cells irradiated with 1MeV electrons with a fluence exceeding 1 x 10{sup 16} e/cm{sup 2} and 10MeV protons with a fluence exceeding 1 x 10{sup 13} p/cm{sup 2}. The results were compared with the previous result performed in a relative low fluence region, and the radiation-induced defects which cause anomalous degradation of the cell performance in such large fluence regions were discussed. As far as we know, this is the first report which presents the PL measurement results at 4.2K of the large fluence radiation irradiated silicon solar cells. (author)

  16. Verification of neutron irradiation on S/G tube materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Byoung Hwi; Lee, S. K.; Jang, D. Y.; Jo, K. H.

    2010-12-01

    The fluence monitors were fabricated with metal wires of the purity ≥ 99.9%, whose dimensions were 0.1mm diameter, about 3mm length, and around 150-200 μg mass range. Three wire samples (Fe, Ni, Ti) were prepared for one irradiation aluminum capsule. Five capsules were irradiated in the OR5 hole of the HANARO reactor at 30 MW power for about 25 days. The reaction rates were calculated by using the measured radiation activity data, and then neutron fluence were obtained from the reaction rates and the weighted neutron cross section with calculated neutron spectrum at the fluence monitor position. The measured neutron fluences were compared to the calculated ones. (Errors ≤ 35%)

  17. Development of a computational model for the calculation of neutron dose equivalent in laminated primary barriers of radiotherapy rooms; Desenvolvimento de um modelo computacional para calculo do equivalente de dose de neutrons em barreiras primarias laminadas de salas de radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezende, Gabriel Fonseca da Silva

    2015-06-01

    Many radiotherapy centers acquire 15 and 18 MV linear accelerators to perform more effective treatments for deep tumors. However, the acquisition of these equipment must be accompanied by an additional care in shielding planning of the rooms that will house them. In cases where space is restricted, it is common to find primary barriers made of concrete and metal. The drawback of this type of barrier is the photoneutron emission when high energy photons (e.g. 15 and 18 MV spectra) interact with the metallic material of the barrier. The emission of these particles constitutes a problem of radiation protection inside and outside of radiotherapy rooms, which should be properly assessed. A recent work has shown that the current model underestimate the dose of neutrons outside the treatment rooms. In this work, a computational model for the aforementioned problem was created from Monte Carlo Simulations and Artificial Intelligence. The developed model was composed by three neural networks, each being formed of a pair of material and spectrum: Pb18, Pb15 and Fe18. In a direct comparison with the McGinley method, the Pb18 network exhibited the best responses for approximately 78% of the cases tested; the Pb15 network showed better results for 100% of the tested cases, while the Fe18 network produced better answers to 94% of the tested cases. Thus, the computational model composed by the three networks has shown more consistent results than McGinley method. (author)

  18. DT fusion neutron irradiation of ORNL magnesium oxide crystals and BNL--LASL superconductor wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacLean, S.C.

    1978-01-01

    The DT fusion neutron irradiation of two ORNL magnesium oxide crystals and eleven BNL-LASL superconductor wires is described. The sample position and neutron dose record are given. The maximum neutron fluence on any sample was 2.16 x 10 16 neutrons/cm 2

  19. Simulation of energy and fluence dependence of heavy ion induced displacement damage factor in bipolar junction transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, S. R.; Ravindra, M.; Joshi, G. R.; Damle, R.

    2004-05-01

    This article presents the theoretical calculation of the variation of displacement damage factors as a function of energy and rad equivalent fluence in bipolar junction transistor for various particulate radiation viz ., He, Si, Cl, Ti, Ni, Br, Ag, I, and Au. The calculation is based on the experimental data on gamma-ray induced gain degradation in a commercial space borne BJT (2N3019). The method involves the calculation of gamma-ray dose (rad(Si)) equivalent of effective particle fluence. The linear energy transfer (LET) in silicon for different particle radiation obtained from TRIM calculation has been used for the conversion of gamma-dose into fluence of various particles. The estimation predicts a smooth increase in the displacement damage factor as the mass of the ion increases. Further, the displacement damage factor reaches a maximum at the same value of energy, which corresponds to maximum LET for all heavy ions. The maximum value of damage factor marginally decreases with increasing ion fluence for an ion of given energy. The results are compared with the data available in the literature for proton, deuteron, and helium induced displacement damage.

  20. Determination of the fluence profile in three dimension for the thermal column of the TRIGA Mark III reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera A, E.; Urena N, F.; Delfin L, A.; Garcia M, T.

    2006-01-01

    In this work the results of the dosimetric properties of the lithium carbonate are presented (detecting), before the thermal neutrons. The process consists on irradiating samples of lithium carbonate in the installation of the thermal column of the TRIGA Mark III reactor, with a controlled period and with time intervals of 20 hours of irradiation. It is necessary to mention that the detectors were placed in different internal positions of the thermal column. With the purpose of being used these results for future studies, like it is the fluence profile in the thermal column. To use the BNCT technique (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy). Which is a binary technique that requires the simultaneous presence of a neutron flux with appropriate energy and a neutron captor (10B), those which interacting to attack to the tumor cells without producing significant damage to the tissues when both agents are separated. (Author)

  1. Effects of irradiation fluence and creep on fracture toughness of 347/348 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haggag, F.M.; Server, W.L.; Reuter, W.G.; Beeston, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The postirradiation fracture toughness of Type 347/348 stainless steel was investigated using 5.08-mm thick three-point bend specimens tested at 427 0 C. The J/sub Ic/ values were determined using the single-specimen unloading compliance technique in accordance with ASTM E 813-81. Equivalent values of plane strain fracture toughness, K/sub Ic/, were computed from experimentally determined J/sub Ic/ values for several fluence levels ranging from 2.3 to 4.8 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 1.0 MeV) and for irradiation creep of 0.0, 0.6, 1.1, and 1.8%. The test matrix involved four variables: fluence, creep, helium content, and heat-to-heat variation. Results show that an interpolated trend exists, i.e., K/sub Ic/ decreases with increasing combinations of fluence, creep, and helium content. These results also suggest that irradiation creep has less effect on reducing K/sub Ic/ than has been suggested previously

  2. Development and calibration of large volume proton-recoil counters for neutron spectrometry in radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delafield, H.J.; Birch, R.

    1988-08-01

    A transportable neutron spectrometry system of high sensitivity, based on four cylindrical proton-recoil proportional counters, has been developed for the high-resolution measurement of neutron spectra in the working environment at dose-equivalent rates in the range 5-50 μSv h -1 . The system uses modern compact electronics to provide simultaneous data acquisition with a single multichannel analyser. This report describes in detail the research and development undertaken to produce a set of four cylindrical counters to cover the neutron energy-range from about 50 keV to 2 MeV. Counter studies were made to optimize the type and size of anode wire, the gas fillings and manufacturing procedure. The counters were calibrated at the National Physical Laboratory using monoenergetic neutrons, incident side-on and end-on, to provide measured response functions, energy and fluence calibrations. The system will generally be used together with a set of multispheres, to measure the dose-equivalent below 50 keV, and an α-recoil proportional counter to extend the spectral measurement up to 15 MeV. (author)

  3. Characterization of the neutron sources storage pool of the Neutron Standards Laboratory, using Montecarlo Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campo Blanco, X.

    2015-01-01

    The development of irradiation damage resistant materials is one of the most important open fields in the design of experimental facilities and conceptual nucleoelectric fusion plants. The Neutron Standards Laboratory aims to contribute to this development by allowing the neutron irradiation of materials in its calibration neutron sources storage pool. For this purposes, it is essential to characterize the pool itself in terms of neutron fluence and spectra due to the calibration neutron sources. In this work, the main features of this facility are presented and the characterization of the storage pool is carried out. Finally, an application is shown of the obtained results to the neutron irradiation of material.

  4. Method of measuring neutron spectra in JMTR exclusively used for irradiation and their evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Kiyoshi

    1983-01-01

    In the core of the Japan Materials Testing Reactor, about 60 capsules are irradiated. These are the material capsules for irradiating reactor materials, the fuel capsules for irradiating reactor fuel, the RI capsules for producing radioisotopes and so on. In the irradiation experiment using a reactor, the information on the neutron fluence is indispensable, and the neutron fluence in the irradiated specimen part is evaluated with a dosimeter or the nuclear calculation for the core of the JMTR. At the time of irradiating reactor materials, the dosimeter Fe-54 (n,p) Mn-54 is generally used for evaluating the neutron fluence more than 1 MeV. In the case of fuel irradiation, the thermal neutron fluence is evaluated with the dosimeter Co-59 (n,γ) Co-60. It is important to examine in detail neutron spectra by both calculation and experiment in the reactors exclusively used for irradiation such as the JMTR. The neutron irradiation field in the JMTR, neutron spectrum measuring experiment, the neutron flux monitors for standardizing data, the measurement of X-ray and gamma ray, neutron guess spectrum, the compilation of neutron cross section for SAND 2, and the unfolding of neutron spectra are reported. The degree of agreement of the neutron fluence more than 1 MeV by measurement and calculation was +- 10 to 20 %. (Kako, I.)

  5. Studsvik thermal neutron facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, O.A.; Larsson, B.; Grusell, E.; Svensson, P.

    1992-01-01

    The Studsvik thermal neutron facility at the R2-0 reactor originally designed for neutron capture radiography has been modified to permit irradiation of living cells and animals. A hole was drilled in the concrete shielding to provide a cylindrical channel with diameter of 25.3 cm. A shielding water tank serves as an entry holder for cells and animals. The advantage of this modification is that cells and animals can be irradiated at a constant thermal neutron fluence rate of approximately 10 9 n cm -2 s -1 (at 100 kW) without stopping and restarting the reactor. Topographic analysis of boron done by neutron capture autoradiography (NCR) can be irradiated under the same conditions as previously

  6. Muon Fluence Measurements for Homeland Security Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ankney, Austin S.; Berguson, Timothy J.; Borgardt, James D.; Kouzes, Richard T.

    2010-08-10

    This report focuses on work conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to better characterize aspects of backgrounds in RPMs deployed for homeland security purposes. Two polyvinyl toluene scintillators were utilized with supporting NIM electronics to measure the muon coincidence rate. Muon spallation is one mechanism by which background neutrons are produced. The measurements performed concentrated on a broad investigation of the dependence of the muon flux on a) variations in solid angle subtended by the detector; b) the detector inclination with the horizontal; c) depth underground; and d) diurnal effects. These tests were conducted inside at Building 318/133, outdoors at Building 331G, and underground at Building 3425 at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  7. Induced effects of gamma-rays and fast neutrons on the D.C. electric resistivity of polyethylene for high level dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youssef, S.K.; Mashad, A.M.; Osiris, W.C.; Adawi, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of gamma- and neutron-irradiations on the D.C. electric resistivity of polyethylene were investigated. The results showed that, the D.C. electric resistivity of polyethylene decreased as the samples irradiation by gamma doses as well as fast neutron fluences over the ranges 10 2 -6x10 6 Gy, and 10 8 -10 11 n/cm 2 , respectively. Moreover, electric resistivity of the polyethylene samples indicated more sensitivity change when irradiated by fast neutrons in comparison with equivalent doses of gamma-radiation. Semi-empirical formulae were deduced for the calculation of gamma-dose and/or neutron fluence from the changes in the electric resistivity of the detector. Storage of the irradiated specimens at room decay temperature showed a continuous increase in the relative fade of electric resistivity by recovery with time. The retained electric resistivity by recovery showed values of about 47% and 33% for post specimens irradiated by 6x10 6 Gy and 1x10 11 n/cm 2 , respectively, after 80 hours

  8. Recoil mixing in high-fluence ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littmark, U.; Hofer, W.O.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of recoil mixing on the collection and depth distribution of implanted projectiles during high-fluence irradiation of a random solid is investigated by model calculations based on a previously published transport theoretical approach to the general problem of recoil mixing. The most pronounced effects are observed in the maximum implantable amount of projectiles and in the critical fluence for saturation. Both values are significantly increased by recoil mixing. (Auth.)

  9. High-Resolution Measurements of Neutron Energy Spectra from Americium-Beryllium and Americium-Boron Neutron Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, James W.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. A Helium-3 sandwich spectrometer incorporating two semiconductor detectors was designed and constructed to enable the measurement of high resolution neutron energy spectra in the energy range from 100 keV to 15 MeV. The instrument is novel in respect of the inclusion of an anode wire which enables the gas chamber to function as a gas proportional counter. Few similar instruments have been constructed and no similar instrument is known to be currently (1990) in use in the UK. The efficiency of the spectrometer was determined experimentally, using a Californium-252 spontaneous fission source, in the low-scatter facility of the National physical Laboratory. A Monte Carlo code has been written to determine the absolute efficiency over an energy range from 81 keV to 20 MeV. The calculated values were used to extrapolate the measured efficiency to higher energies. Furthermore the Monte Carlo code was used to determine certain operating parameters to optimise the efficiency of the spectrometer. The neutron energy spectra from two different size standard Am-Be neutron sources and a standard Am-B neutron source available at NPL were measured. Although these types of neutron sources have been subject to energy spectra measurements elsewhere, the present work improves considerably on the previous poorer energy resolution and energy range. The new data indicates for the three neutron sources studied that the ambient dose equivalent, H*(10) per unit fluence, for each, were identical, being within 2% of 3.70 E-10 Sv cm^2.

  10. PIN diode and neutron spectrum measurements at the Army Pulse Radiation Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    The Army Pulse Radiation Facility (APRF) is a multi-faceted facility operating a Godiva type pulse reactor, housed in a low scatter aluminum silo 30m in diameter and 20m high. The reactor is movable to several locations and heights. Several well characterized exposure environments are available for experiments. When testing silicon devices against a nuclear threat, it is essential to consider the difference between the neutron energy spectrum of the threat environment and that of the test environment. In this paper, neutron spectrum measurements using the foil activation technique have been made in two widely varying environments. One is an extremely high neutron-to-gamma field and the other extremely low. These measurements were used to characterize the fields and to evaluate the use of the DN-156 PIN diode for measuring 1 MeV equivalent neutron fluence in silicon (Φ1MeV(Si)). The agreement between the Φ1MeV(Si) as measured with diodes and as determined by the spectral measurements was within ± 5%. A proton recoil neutron spectrum measurement was also made in the low gamma environment

  11. Use of borated polyethylene to improve low energy response of a prompt gamma based neutron dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priyada, P.; Ashwini, U.; Sarkar, P.K., E-mail: pradip.sarkar@manipal.edu

    2016-05-21

    The feasibility of using a combined sample of borated polyethylene and normal polyethylene to estimate neutron ambient dose equivalent from measured prompt gamma emissions is investigated theoretically to demonstrate improvements in low energy neutron dose response compared to only polyethylene. Monte Carlo simulations have been carried out using the FLUKA code to calculate the response of boron, hydrogen and carbon prompt gamma emissions to mono energetic neutrons. The weighted least square method is employed to arrive at the best linear combination of these responses that approximates the ICRP fluence to dose conversion coefficients well in the energy range of 10{sup −8} MeV to 14 MeV. The configuration of the combined system is optimized through FLUKA simulations. The proposed method is validated theoretically with five different workplace neutron spectra with satisfactory outcome. - Highlights: • An improved method is proposed for estimating H⁎(10) using prompt gamma emissions. • A combination of BHDPE and HDPE cylinders is used as a sample. • Linear combination of prompt gamma intensities approximates ICRP-DCC closely. • Feasibility of the method was tested theoretically using workplace neutron spectra.

  12. BNCT enhanced fast neutron therapy: in vitro studies for preparing a clinical trial at the Essen cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittig, A.; Sauerwein, W.; Hideghety, K.; Poeller, F.; Pignol, J.P.; Mueller, W.

    2000-01-01

    At the University Hospital Essen a cyclotron producing d(14)+Be fast neutrons is used routinely for patient treatment. Fast neutrons have demonstrated their potential to sterilize glioblastoma but could not show a clinical benefit because of lethal damages to healthy brain. At depth, fast neutrons are thermalized allowing neutron capture reactions, which can be used to enhance the applied dose. A selective increase of the dose to the tumor cells by BNCT may offer a chance to an effective treatment. In order to prepare a clinical trial in vitro experiments were performed. MeWo cells were irradiated in a tissue equivalent phantom at a depth of 6.5 cm. 91% 10 B enriched BSH was used to generate BNC effects. For a total dose of 1 Gy the thermal fluence rate was 3.4x10 10 cm -2 . An amount of 960 ppm 10 B present in the cell medium during irradiation led to a reduction of the cell survival from 3.6% (neutron alone) to 0.2%. If the irradiation was performed after incubation of the cells in BSH, but in a medium without BSH the survival was 1.6%. The in vitro set up demonstrates the capacity of BSH to considerably increase the biological effects of the neutron irradiation and add arguments for the opening of a clinical trial. (author)

  13. Fusion neutron damage to a charge coupled device camera

    OpenAIRE

    Amaden, Christopher Dean

    1997-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited A charge coupled device (CCD) camera's performance has been degraded by damage produced by 14 MeV neutrons (n) from the Rotating Target Neutron Source. High energy neutrons produce atomic dislocation in doped silicon electronics. This thesis explores changes in Dark Current (J), Charge Transfer Inefficiency (CTI), and Contrast Transfer Function (CTF) as measures of neutron damage. The camera was irradiated to a fluence, Phi, of 6.60 x ...

  14. NEUTRON IRRADIATION EFFECTS ON SPARK PLASMA SINTERED BORON CARBIDE

    OpenAIRE

    Buyuk, Bulent; Cengiz, Meral; Tugrul, A. Beril

    2015-01-01

    In this study, spark plasma sintered boron carbide (B4C) was examined against neutrons. The specimens were irradiated by reactor neutrons (include both thermal and fast neutrons) up to fluence of 1.37x1021n m-2. Thermal and fast neutrons cause swelling by different interactions with boron (10B) atoms in the related materials. X-Ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images were investigated for initial and irradiated samples. In addition, lattice parameters and ...

  15. Neutron dosimetry using activation of thermoluminescent CaSO 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azorín, Juan; Gutiérrez, Alicia

    1984-11-01

    Sulfur activation in calcium sulfate doped with dysprosium (CaSO 4:Dy) thermoluminescent powder, which is bound in pure sulfur, has been used to measure the fast neutron dose at the tangential beam port of a Triga Mark III reactor. After a post-irradiation time of 3 d, the dosimeters were annealed at 600°C for 30 min in order to erase all the thermoluminescence acquired during the irradiation. The dosimeters were then stored to allow self-irradiation by betas from 32P produced by sulfur activation. The thermoluminescent signal accumulated during a post-irradiation time of 20 d due to a neutron fluence of 2.2 × 10 11 n/cm 2 was equivalent to an absorbed dose of 10 mGy of 60Co gamma rays. The thermoluminescence as a function of fast neutron dose fitted to a straight line on a log-log scale from 1 Gy to 10 4Gy.

  16. Changes in electrical properties of MOS transistor induced by single 14 MeV neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haider, F. A.; Chee, F. P.; Abu Hassan, H.; Saafie, S.; Afishah, A.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron radiation causes significant changes in the characteristics of MOS devices by the creation of oxide-trapped charge and interface traps. The degradation of the current gain of the GF4936 dual n-channel depletion mode MOS transistor, caused by neutron displacement defects, was measured using in-situ method during neutron irradiation. The average degradation of the gain current is 35 mA at maximum fluence of 2.0 × 10 10 n/cm2 while with an average of 25 mA at minimum fluence of 5.0 × 10 8 n/cm 2 . The change in channel current gain increased proportionally with neutron fluence, meanwhile drain saturation current decreased proportionally with the neutron fluence

  17. Changes in electrical properties of MOS transistor induced by single 14 MeV neutron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haider, F. A., E-mail: haider@salam.uitm.edu.my; Chee, F. P., E-mail: fpchee06@ums.edu.my; Abu Hassan, H. [School of Physics and Materials, Faculty of Applied Science, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Saafie, S.; Afishah, A. [Physics with Electronic Department, Faculty of Science and Natural Resources, University of Malaysia Sabah, Kota Kinabalu, Sabah (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    Neutron radiation causes significant changes in the characteristics of MOS devices by the creation of oxide-trapped charge and interface traps. The degradation of the current gain of the GF4936 dual n-channel depletion mode MOS transistor, caused by neutron displacement defects, was measured using in-situ method during neutron irradiation. The average degradation of the gain current is 35 mA at maximum fluence of 2.0 × 10{sup 10} n/cm2 while with an average of 25 mA at minimum fluence of 5.0 × 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}. The change in channel current gain increased proportionally with neutron fluence, meanwhile drain saturation current decreased proportionally with the neutron fluence.

  18. Analysis of Neutron Production in Passively Scattered Ion-Beam Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Seunguk; Yoo, Seunghoon; Song, Yongkeun; Kim, Eunho; Shin, Jaeik; Han, Soorim; Jung, Wongyun; Nam, Sanghee; Lee, Rena; Lee, Kitae; Cho, Sungho

    2017-07-01

    A new treatment facility for heavy ion therapy since 2010 was constructed. In the broad beam, a range shifter, ridge filter and multi leaf collimator (MLC) for the generation of the spread-out Bragg peak is used. In this case, secondary neutrons produced by the interactions of the ion field with beam-modifying devices (e.g. double-scattering system, beam shaping collimators and range compensators) are very important for patient safety. Therefore, these components must be carefully examined in the context of secondary neutron yield and associated secondary cancer risk. In this article, Monte Carlo simulation has been carried out with the FLUktuierende KAskade particle transport code, the fluence and distribution of neutron generation and the neutron dose equivalent from the broad beam components are compared using carbon and proton beams. As a result, it is confirmed that the yield of neutron production using a carbon beam from all components of the broad beam was higher than using a proton beam. The ambient dose by neutrons per heavy ion and proton ion from the MLC surface was 0.12-0.18 and 0.0067-0.0087 pSv, respectively, which shows that heavy ions generate more neutrons than protons. However, ambient dose per treatment 2 Gy, which means physical dose during treatment by ion beam, is higher than carbon beam because proton therapy needs more beam flux to make 2-Gy prescription dose. Therefore, the neutron production from the MLC, which is closed to the patient, is a very important parameter for patient safety. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Analysis of neutron production in passively scattered ion-beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, Seunguk; Yoo, Seunghoon; Song, Yongkeun; Kim, Eunho; Shin, Jaeik; Han, Soorim; Wongyun Jung; Nam, Sanghee; Lee, Rena; Lee, Kitae; Cho, Sungho

    2017-01-01

    A new treatment facility for heavy ion therapy since 2010 was constructed. In the broad beam, a range shifter, ridge filter and multi leaf collimator (MLC) for the generation of the spread-out Bragg peak is used. In this case, secondary neutrons produced by the interactions of the ion field with beam-modifying devices (e.g. double-scattering system, beam shaping collimators and range compensators) are very important for patient safety. Therefore, these components must be carefully examined in the context of secondary neutron yield and associated secondary cancer risk. In this article, Monte Carlo simulation has been carried out with the FLUktuierende KAskade particle transport code, the fluence and distribution of neutron generation and the neutron dose equivalent from the broad beam components are compared using carbon and proton beams. As a result, it is confirmed that the yield of neutron production using a carbon beam from all components of the broad beam was higher than using a proton beam. The ambient dose by neutrons per heavy ion and proton ion from the MLC surface was 0.12 0.18 and 0.0067 0.0087 pSv, respectively, which shows that heavy ions generate more neutrons than protons. However, ambient dose per treatment 2 Gy, which means physical dose during treatment by ion beam, is higher than carbon beam because proton therapy needs more beam flux to make 2-Gy prescription dose. Therefore, the neutron production from the MLC, which is closed to the patient, is a very important parameter for patient safety. (authors)

  20. The Effect of Radiator on CR-39 Registration of Fast Neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Badrya, B.A.; Hegazya, T.M.; Morsya, A.A.; Zaki, M.F.

    2008-01-01

    Three different configurations of a personal neutron dosimeter using CR-39 plastic detector were placed in Plastiplast pouch composed from inside to outside of Aluminum ( 27 Al, 40 Ξ m), polyethylene (PE, 20 Ξ m), Cellulose Nitrate (CN, 40 Ξ m). One dosimeter was composed of a CR-39 detector and a PE radiator (1 mm thick), another of two CR-39 detectors with one serving as radiator, and the other of CR-39 alone (without radiator). These dosimeters have been irradiated with fast neutrons of average energy 4.5 MeV with neutron fluence ranging from 5.5 x 10 6 to 0.5 x 10 8 cm - 2 emitted from 241 Am-Be neutron source. The polymeric materials have been chosen on the basis of their hydrogen contents, which are as followed: CR-39, 48%, Polyethylene, 66.7% and CN, 32% by atomic ratio to produce protons via (n, p) elastic scattering with hydrogen and increasing the detection efficiency of CR-39. After irradiation, the dose equivalent response of the detectors has been studied by using conventional etching for two periods, 6h and 8h for these configurations. The thicknesses and compositions of the radiators are chosen so as to suppress the CR-39 response below 4 MeV by preventing the recoils of hydrogen nuclei, out of the hydrogen-rich radiators (PE, CR-39), from reaching the post-etch surface of the detector. Track counting was performed using an automated system. It was found that the dosemeter responses were linear as a function of a neutron equivalent dose and that the CR-39 detector has the same response with radiator or without radiator and thus appears as a promising fast neutron dosimeter. The results are discussed and compared with the literature

  1. Neutron dosimetry in EDF experimental surveillance programme for VVER-440 nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.; Erben, O.; Novosad, P.; Zerola, L.; Hogel, J.; Trollat, C.

    2001-01-01

    Fourteen chains containing experimental surveillance material specimens of the VVER 440/213 nuclear power reactor pressure vessels were irradiated in the surveillance channels of the Nuclear Power Plant Dukovany in the Czech Republic. The irradiation periods were one, two or three cycles. The chains contained different number and types of containers, the omitted ones were replaced by chain elements. All of the containers were instrumented with wire neutron fluence detectors, some of the containers in the chain had spectrometric sets of neutron fluence monitors. For the absolute fluence values evaluation it was taken into account time history of the reactor power and local changes of the neutron flux along the reactor core height, correction factors due to the orientation of monitors with respect to the reactor core centre. Unfolding programs SAND-II or BASA-CF were used. The relative axial fluence distribution was obtained from the O-wire measurements. Neutron fluence values above 0.5 MeV energy and above 1.0 MeV energy in the container axis on the axial positions of the sample centres and fluence values in the geometric centre of the samples was calculated making use the exponential attenuation model of the incident neutron beam. Received fast neutron fluence values can be used as reference values to all VVER-440 type 213 nuclear power plant reactors. (author)

  2. Characterization of Monoenergetic Low Energy Neutron Fields with the {mu}TPC Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golabek, C.; Lebreton, L.; Petit, M. [Laboratoire de Metrologie et de Dosimetrie des Neutrons, IRSN Cadarache, 13115 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Billard, J.; Grignon, C.; Bosson, G.; Bourrion, O.; Guillaudin, O.; Mayet, F.; Richer, J.-P.; Santos, D. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Universite Joseph (France)

    2011-12-13

    The AMANDE facility produces monoenergetic neutron fields from 2 keV to 20 MeV for metrological purposes. To be considered as a reference facility, fluence and energy distributions of neutron fields have to be determined by primary measurement standards. For this purpose, a micro Time Projection Chamber is being developed to be dedicated to measure neutron fields with energy ranging from 2 keV up to 1 MeV. We present simulations showing that such a detector, which allows the measurement of the ionization energy and the 3D reconstruction of the recoil nucleus, provides the determination of neutron energy and fluence of such low energy neutron fields.

  3. Application of imaging plate neutron detector to neutron radiography

    CERN Document Server

    Fujine, S; Kamata, M; Etoh, M

    1999-01-01

    As an imaging plate neutron detector (IP-ND) has been available for thermal neutron radiography (TNR) which has high resolution, high sensitivity and wide range, some basic characteristics of the IP-ND system were measured at the E-2 facility of the KUR. After basic performances of the IP were studied, images with high quality were obtained at a neutron fluence of 2 to 7x10 sup 8 n cm sup - sup 2. It was found that the IP-ND system with Gd sub 2 O sub 3 as a neutron converter material has a higher sensitivity to gamma-ray than that of a conventional film method. As a successful example, clear radiographs of the flat view for the fuel side plates with boron burnable poison were obtained. An application of the IP-ND system to neutron radiography (NR) is presented in this paper.

  4. Dosimetric And Fluence Measurements At Hadron Facilities For LHC Radiation Damage Studies

    CERN Document Server

    León-Florián, E

    2001-01-01

    Dosimetry plays an essential role in experiments assessing radiation damage and hardness for the components of detectors to be operated at the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN (European Laboratory for Particle Physics), Geneva, Switzerland. Dosimetry is used both for calibration of the radiation fields and estimate of fluences and doses during the irradiation tests. The LHC environment will result in a complex radiation field composed of hadrons (mainly neutrons, pions and protons) and photons, each having an energy spectrum ranging from a few keV to several hundreds of MeV or several GeV, even. In this thesis, are exposed the results of measurements of particle fluences and doses at different hadron irradiation facilities: SARA, πE1-PSI and ZT7PS used for testing the radiation hardness of materials and equipment to be used in the future experiments at LHC. These measurements are applied to the evaluation of radiation damage inflicted to various semiconductors (such as silicon) and electronics ...

  5. Fluence dependence of disorder depth profiles in Pb implanted Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christodoulides, C.E.; Kadhim, N.J.; Carter, G.

    1980-01-01

    The total, depth integrated disorder, induced by Pb implantation into Si at room temperature, initially increases rapidly with implantation fluence and then reaches a quasi saturation level where the increase with fluence is slow. Measurements of the depth distributions of the disorder, using high resolution low angle exit Rutherford Backscattering/Channelling analysis, suggest that the quasi saturation results from overlapping of disordered zones generated deep in the tail of the disorder-depth profiles. The depth of the disordered solid-crystal boundary, xsub(D), increases with ion fluence PHI, according to the relation xsub(D) = x bar + f(PHI).σ, where x bar is the most probable projected depth and σ the projected standard deviation of disorder generation. It is shown that this relationship is consistent with an approximately Gaussian depth distribution of disorder production. (author)

  6. Photon energy-fluence correction factor in low energy brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antunes, Paula C.G.; Yoriyaz, Hélio [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Vijande, Javier; Giménez-Alventosa, Vicent; Ballester, Facundo, E-mail: pacrisguian@gmail.com [Department of Atomic, Molecular, and Nuclear Physics and Instituto de Física Corpuscular (UV-CSIC), University of Valencia (Spain)

    2017-07-01

    The AAPM TG-43 brachytherapy dosimetry formalism has become a standard for brachytherapy dosimetry worldwide; it implicitly assumes that charged-particle equilibrium (CPE) exists for the determination of absorbed dose to water at different locations. At the time of relating dose to tissue and dose to water, or vice versa, it is usually assumed that the photon fluence in water and in tissues are practically identical, so that the absorbed dose in the two media can be related by their ratio of mass energy-absorption coefficients. The purpose of this work is to study the influence of photon energy-fluence in different media and to evaluate a proposal for energy-fluence correction factors for the conversion between dose-to-tissue (D{sub tis}) and dose-to-water (D{sub w}). State-of-the art Monte Carlo (MC) calculations are used to score photon fluence differential in energy in water and in various human tissues (muscle, adipose and bone) in two different codes, MCNP and PENELOPE, which in all cases include a realistic modeling of the {sup 125}I low-energy brachytherapy seed in order to benchmark the formalism proposed. A correction is introduced that is based on the ratio of the water-to-tissue photon energy-fluences using the large-cavity theory. In this work, an efficient way to correlate absorbed dose to water and absorbed dose to tissue in brachytherapy calculations at clinically relevant distances for low-energy photon emitting seed is proposed. The energy-fluence based corrections given in this work are able to correlate absorbed dose to tissue and absorbed dose to water with an accuracy better than 0.5% in the most critical cases. (author)

  7. Positron annihilation studies of neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brauer, G.; Liszkay, L.; Molnar, B.

    1988-01-01

    Several annealing studies by positron annihilation (Doppler broadening, lifetime) on neutron irradiated Cr-Mo-V reactor pressure vessel steels (Soviet type 15Kh2MFA) regarding the influences of irradiation temperature, fluence of fast neutrons as well as different impurity contents are presented and discussed. A possibility of explaining the positron annihilation data by irradiation induced carbide formation is proposed. (author)

  8. Charged particle mutagenesis at low dose and fluence in mouse splenic T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grygoryev, Dmytro [Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239 (United States); Gauny, Stacey [Biological Systems and Engineering Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lasarev, Michael; Ohlrich, Anna [Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239 (United States); Kronenberg, Amy [Biological Systems and Engineering Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Turker, Mitchell S., E-mail: turkerm@ohsu.edu [Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239 (United States); Molecular and Medical Genetics, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Densely ionizing forms of space radiation induce mutations in splenic T cells at low fluence. • Large interstitial deletions and discontinuous LOH patterns are radiation signature mutations. • Space radiation mutagenesis suggests a cancer risk from deep space travel. - Abstract: High-energy heavy charged particles (HZE ions) found in the deep space environment can significantly affect human health by inducing mutations and related cancers. To better understand the relation between HZE ion exposure and somatic mutation, we examined cell survival fraction, Aprt mutant frequencies, and the types of mutations detected for mouse splenic T cells exposed in vivo to graded doses of densely ionizing {sup 48}Ti ions (1 GeV/amu, LET = 107 keV/μm), {sup 56}Fe ions (1 GeV/amu, LET = 151 keV/μm) ions, or sparsely ionizing protons (1 GeV, LET = 0.24 keV/μm). The lowest doses for {sup 48}Ti and {sup 56}Fe ions were equivalent to a fluence of approximately 1 or 2 particle traversals per nucleus. In most cases, Aprt mutant frequencies in the irradiated mice were not significantly increased relative to the controls for any of the particles or doses tested at the pre-determined harvest time (3–5 months after irradiation). Despite the lack of increased Aprt mutant frequencies in the irradiated splenocytes, a molecular analysis centered on chromosome 8 revealed the induction of radiation signature mutations (large interstitial deletions and complex mutational patterns), with the highest levels of induction at 2 particles nucleus for the {sup 48}Ti and {sup 56}Fe ions. In total, the results show that densely ionizing HZE ions can induce characteristic mutations in splenic T cells at low fluence, and that at least a subset of radiation-induced mutant cells are stably retained despite the apparent lack of increased mutant frequencies at the time of harvest.

  9. Neutron physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckurts, K.H.; Wirtz, K.

    1974-01-01

    This textbook consists of four sections which deal with the following subjects: 1. Production of neutrons and their interactions with the nuclei; neutron sources; neutron detectors; cross-section measurements. 2. Theory of neutron interactions with macroscopic media; neutron slowing down; space distribution of moderated neutrons; neutron thermalization; neutron scattering. 3. Radioactive probe measurements of thermal neutron fluxes; activation by means of epithermal neutrons; threshold detectors of fast neutrons; neutron calibration. 4. Neutron energy; slowing down kernels; neutron age; diffusion length and absorption of neutrons

  10. Characterization of extended range Bonner Sphere Spectrometers in the CERF high-energy broad neutron field at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosteo, S.; Bedogni, R.; Caresana, M.; Charitonidis, N.; Chiti, M.; Esposito, A.; Ferrarini, M.; Severino, C.; Silari, M.

    2012-12-01

    The accurate determination of the ambient dose equivalent in the mixed neutron-photon fields encountered around high-energy particle accelerators still represents a challenging task. The main complexity arises from the extreme variability of the neutron energy, which spans over 10 orders of magnitude or more. Operational survey instruments, which response function attempts to mimic the fluence-to-ambient dose equivalent conversion coefficient up to GeV neutrons, are available on the market, but their response is not fully reliable over the entire energy range. Extended range rem counters (ERRC) do not require the exact knowledge of the energy distribution of the neutron field and the calibration can be done with a source spectrum. If the actual neutron field has an energy distribution different from the calibration spectrum, the measurement is affected by an added uncertainty related to the partial overlap of the fluence-to-ambient dose equivalent conversion curve and the response function. For this reason their operational use should always be preceded by an "in-field" calibration, i.e. a calibration made against a reference instrument exposed in the same field where the survey-meter will be employed. In practice the extended-range Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (ERBSS) is the only device which can serve as reference instrument in these fields, because of its wide energy range and the possibility to assess the neutron fluence and the ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)) values with the appropriate accuracy. Nevertheless, the experience gained by a number of experimental groups suggests that mandatory conditions for obtaining accurate results in workplaces are: (1) the use of a well-established response matrix, thus implying validation campaigns in reference monochromatic neutrons fields, (2) the expert and critical use of suitable unfolding codes, and (3) the performance test of the whole system (experimental set-up, elaboration and unfolding procedures) in a well

  11. Sensor Radiation Testing With Californium-252 Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braasch, Robert

    1989-09-01

    Neutron fluence testing of large dimension electrical components at cryogenic temperatures has traditionally been performed at fast burst reactors. A new facility, using Californium-252 (252Cf) as a neutron radiation source, was designed and built at the IRT Corporate Headquarters in San Diego. This paper discusses the physical properties of the californium isotope, describes the facility and its test capabilities, and presents the results of the 1 MeV calibration as well as IR and visible sensor testing.

  12. Muon fluence measurements at the site boundary for 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elwyn, A.J.

    1986-03-01

    Muon fluence (muons cm -2 ) was measured downstream of the experimental area beamlines, just beyond the Fermilab site boundary at Route 38. The purpose of these measurements was to obtain an estimate of the yearly off-site radiation exposure to the general population due to accelerator-produced muons during the 1985 800 GeV run

  13. Fluence compensated photoacoustic tomography in small animals (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Altaf; Pool, Martin; Daoudi, Khalid; de Vries, Liesbeth G.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2017-03-01

    Light fluence inside turbid media can be experimentally mapped by measuring ultrasonically modulated light (Acousto-optics). To demonstrate the feasibility of fluence corrected Photoacoustic (PA) imaging, we have realized a tri-modality (i.e. photoacoustic, acousto-optic and ultrasound) tomographic small animal imaging system. Wherein PA imaging provides high resolution map of absorbed optical energy density, Acousto-optics yields the fluence distribution map in the corresponding PA imaging plane and Ultrasound provides morphological information. Further, normalization of the PA image with the acousto-optically measured fluence map results in an image that directly represents the optical absorption. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is commonly found overexpressed in human cancers, among which breast cancers, resulting in a more aggressive tumor phenotype. Identification of HER2-expression is clinically relevant, because cancers overexpressing this marker are amenable to HER2-directed therapies, among which antibodies trastuzumab and pertuzumab. Here, we investigate the feasibility and advantage of acousto-optically assisted fluence compensated PA imaging over PA imaging alone in visualizing and quantifying HER2 expression. For this experiment, nude mice were xenografted with human breast cancer cell lines SKBR3 and BT474 (both HER2 overexpressing), as well as HER2-negative MDA-MB-231. To visualize HER2 expression in these mice, HER2 monoclonal antibody pertuzumab (Perjeta®, Roche), was conjugated to near-infrared dye IRDye 800CW (800CW, LICOR Biosciences) at a ratio of 1∶2 antibody to 800CW. When xenograft tumors measured ≥ 100 mm3, mice received 100 µg 800CW-pertuzumab intravenously. Three days post injection, mice were scanned for fluorescence signal with an IVIS scanner. After fluorescence scans, mice were euthanized and imaged in our PA tomographic imaging system.

  14. Portable neutron spectrometer and dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waechter, D.A.; Erkkila, B.H.; Vasilik, D.G.

    The disclosure relates to a battery operated neutron spectrometer/dosimeter utilizing a microprocessor, a built-in tissue equivalent LET neutron detector, and a 128-channel pulse height analyzer with integral liquid crystal display. The apparatus calculates doses and dose rates from neutrons incident on the detector and displays a spectrum of rad or rem as a function of keV per micron of equivalent tissue and also calculates and displays accumulated dose in millirads and millirem as well as neutron dose rates in millirads per hour and millirem per hour.

  15. Preliminary study on 2-dimensional distributions of 10B reaction rate in a water phantom with boron-doped CR-39 for 7Li(p, n)7Be neutrons by 1.95 MeV protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Tsuruta, T.

    2000-01-01

    In an Accelerator-based neutron irradiation field using 7 Li(p, n) 7 Be neutrons by 1.95 MeV protons, the distributions of 10 B reaction rates and thermal neutron fluence in a water phantom were measured using Boron-doped CR-39 and Au activation analysis, respectively. Comparing the results of the measurements, we discussed the validity of the evaluation method of 10 B reaction rate using thermal neutron fluence. (author)

  16. Politico-economic equivalence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez Eiras, Martin; Niepelt, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Traditional "economic equivalence'' results, like the Ricardian equivalence proposition, define equivalence classes over exogenous policies. We derive "politico-economic equivalence" conditions that apply in environments where policy is endogenous and chosen sequentially. A policy regime...... and a state are equivalent to another such pair if both pairs give rise to the same allocation in politico-economic equilibrium. The equivalence conditions help to identify factors that render institutional change non-neutral and to construct politico-economic equilibria in new policy regimes. We exemplify...

  17. Fluence Correction Factors and Stopping Power Ratios for Clinical Ion Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Hansen, David Christoffer; Sobolevsky, Nikolai

    2011-01-01

    Background. In radiation therapy, the principal dosimetric quantity of interest is the absorbed dose to water. Therefore, a dose conversion to dose to water is required for dose deposited by ion beams in other media. This is in particular necessary for dose measurements in plastic phantoms...... for increased positioning accuracy, graphite calorimetry being developed as a primary standard for dose to water dosimetry, but also for the comparison of dose distributions from Monte Carlo simulations with those of pencil beam algorithms. Material and methods. In the conversion of absorbed dose to phantom...... material to absorbed dose to water the water-to-material stopping power ratios (STPR) and the fluence correction factors (FCF) for the full charged particle spectra are needed. We determined STPR as well as FCF for water to graphite, bone (compact), and PMMA as a function of water equivalent depth, zw...

  18. A study of rates of (n, f), (n, γ), and (n, 2n) reactions in natU and 232Th produced by the neutron fluence in the graphite set-up (gamma-3) irradiated by 2.33 GeV deuteron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, J.; Chitra Bhatia; Katovskij, K.

    2011-01-01

    Spallation neutrons produced in a collision of 2.33 GeV deuteron beam with the large lead target are moderated by the thick graphite block surrounding the target and used to activate the radioactive samples of nat U and Th put at the three different positions, identified as holes 'a', 'b' and 'c' in the graphite block. Rates of the (n, f), (n, γ), and (n, 2n) reactions in the two samples are determined using the gamma spectrometry. Ratio of the experimental reaction rates, R(n, 2n)/R(n, f) for the 232 Th and nat U are estimated in order to understand the role of reactions of (n, xn) type in Accelerator Driven Subcritical Systems. For the Th-sample, the ratio is ∼ 54(10)% in case of hole 'a' and ∼ 95(57)% in case of hole 'b' compared to 1.73(20)% for the hole 'a' and 0.710(9)% for the hole 'b' in case of the nat U sample. Also the ratio of fission rates in uranium to thorium, nat U(n, f)/ 232 Th(n, f), is ∼ 11.2(17) in case of hole 'a' and 26.8(85) in hole 'b'. Similarly, ratio 238 U(n, 2n)/ 232 Th(n, 2n) is 0.36(4) for the hole 'a' and 0.20(10) for the hole 'b' showing that 232 Th is more prone to the (n, xn) reaction than 238 U. All the experimental reaction rates are compared with the simulated ones by generating neutron fluxes at the three holes from MCNPX 2.6c and making use of LA150 library of cross sections. The experimental and calculated rates of all the three reactions are in good agreement. The transmutation power of the set-up is estimated using the rates of (n, γ) and (n, 2n) reactions for both the samples in the three holes and compared with some of the results of the 'Energy plus Transmutation' set-up and TARC experiment

  19. Determination of workplace neutron spectra at a high energy hadron accelerator using active and passive Bonner sphere spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedogni, R.; Esposito, A.; Chiti, M.

    2008-01-01

    In the framework of the 2006 experimental benchmark organized at the GSI (Darmstadt, Germany) by the EC CONRAD network, a neutron dosimetry intercomparison was performed in a workplace field around a carbon target hit by 400 MeV/u 12 C ions. The radiation protection group of the INFN-LNF participated to the intercomparison with a Bonner sphere spectrometer equipped with an active 6 LiI(Eu) scintillator and a set of passive detectors, namely MCP-6s (80mgcm -2 )/MCP-7 TLD pairs from TLD Poland. Both active and passive spectrometers, independently tested and calibrated, were used to determine the field and dosimetric quantities in the measurement point. The FRUIT unfolding code, developed at the INFN-LNF radiation protection group, was used to unfold the raw BSS data. This paper compares the results of the active or passive spectrometers, obtaining a satisfactory agreement in terms of both spectrum shape and value of the integral quantities, as the neutron fluence or the ambient dose equivalent. These results allow qualifying the BSS based on TLD pairs as a reliable passive method to be used around high energy particle accelerators even in low dose rate areas. This is particularly useful in those workplaces where the active instruments could be disturbed by the presence of pulsed fields, large photon fluence or electromagnetic noise

  20. SU-E-T-521: Investigation of the Uncertainties Involved in Secondary Neutron/gamma Production in Geant4/MCNP6 Monte Carlo Codes for Proton Therapy Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzakhanian, L; Enger, S; Giusti, V

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A major concern in proton therapy is the production of secondary neutrons causing secondary cancers, especially in young adults and children. Most utilized Monte Carlo codes in proton therapy are Geant4 and MCNP. However, the default versions of Geant4 and MCNP6 do not have suitable cross sections or physical models to properly handle secondary particle production in proton energy ranges used for therapy. In this study, default versions of Geant4 and MCNP6 were modified to better handle production of secondaries by adding the TENDL-2012 cross-section library. Methods: In-water proton depth-dose was measured at the “The Svedberg Laboratory” in Uppsala (Sweden). The proton beam was mono-energetic with mean energy of 178.25±0.2 MeV. The measurement set-up was simulated by Geant4 version 10.00 (default and modified version) and MCNP6. Proton depth-dose, primary and secondary particle fluence and neutron equivalent dose were calculated. In case of Geant4, the secondary particle fluence was filtered by all the physics processes to identify the main process responsible for the difference between the default and modified version. Results: The proton depth-dose curves and primary proton fluence show a good agreement between both Geant4 versions and MCNP6. With respect to the modified version, default Geant4 underestimates the production of secondary neutrons while overestimates that of gammas. The “ProtonInElastic” process was identified as the main responsible process for the difference between the two versions. MCNP6 shows higher neutron production and lower gamma production than both Geant4 versions. Conclusion: Despite the good agreement on the proton depth dose curve and primary proton fluence, there is a significant discrepancy on secondary neutron production between MCNP6 and both versions of Geant4. Further studies are thus in order to find the possible cause of this discrepancy or more accurate cross-sections/models to handle the nuclear

  1. Fluence-dependent sputtering yield of micro-architectured materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthes, Christopher S.R.; Ghoniem, Nasr M., E-mail: ghoniem@ucla.edu; Li, Gary Z.; Matlock, Taylor S.; Goebel, Dan M.; Dodson, Chris A.; Wirz, Richard E.

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Sputtering yield is shown to be transient and heavily dependent on surface architecture. • Fabricated nano- and Microstructures cause geometric re-trapping of sputtered material, which leads to a self-healing mechanism. • Initially, the sputtering yield of micro-architectured Mo is approximately 1/2 the value as that of a planar surface. • The study demonstrates that the sputtering yield is a dynamic property, dependent on the surface structure of a material. • A developed phenomenological model mathematically describes the transient behavior of the sputtering yield as a function of plasma fluence. - Abstract: We present an experimental examination of the relationship between the surface morphology of Mo and its instantaneous sputtering rate as function of low-energy plasma ion fluence. We quantify the dynamic evolution of nano/micro features of surfaces with built-in architecture, and the corresponding variation in the sputtering yield. Ballistic deposition of sputtered atoms as a result of geometric re-trapping is observed, and re-growth of surface layers is confirmed. This provides a self-healing mechanism of micro-architectured surfaces during plasma exposure. A variety of material characterization techniques are used to show that the sputtering yield is not a fundamental property, but that it is quantitatively related to the initial surface architecture and to its subsequent evolution. The sputtering yield of textured molybdenum samples exposed to 300 eV Ar plasma is roughly 1/2 of the corresponding value for flat samples, and increases with ion fluence. Mo samples exhibited a sputtering yield initially as low as 0.22 ± 5%, converging to 0.4 ± 5% at high fluence. The sputtering yield exhibits a transient behavior as function of the integrated ion fluence, reaching a steady-state value that is independent of initial surface conditions. A phenomenological model is proposed to explain the observed transient sputtering phenomenon, and to

  2. Equivalence principles and electromagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, W.-T.

    1977-01-01

    The implications of the weak equivalence principles are investigated in detail for electromagnetic systems in a general framework. In particular, it is shown that the universality of free-fall trajectories (Galileo weak equivalence principle) does not imply the validity of the Einstein equivalence principle. However, the Galileo principle plus the universality of free-fall rotation states does imply the Einstein principle.

  3. How can a potential moderation and/or reflexion of the neutrons between the fuel units be modelled to give the maximum of the k-eff. No equivalence between a water layer and a mist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavarenne, C.; Leclaire, N.; Cossenet, A.

    2003-01-01

    This article points out the problem of 'how can a potential moderation and/or reflexion of the neutrons between the fuel units be modelled to give the maximum of the k-effective'. It proves that there can be some very important differences in k-effective between the two types of model. If only one type of model is used in a criticality study, the maximum of the k-effective can be under-estimated by more than 9% in Δk eff , especially when there are some important absorptions and/or leakages of the neutrons in the system. (author)

  4. Determination of conversion factors of kerma and fluence to ambient dose equivalent for X-rays generated between 50 kV{sub p} to 125 kV{sub p}; Determinacao dos fatores de conversao de kerma no ar e de fluencia para o equivalente de dose ambiental para raios-X gerados no intervalo de 50 kV{sub p} a 125 kV{sub p}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, Maria do Socorro

    1997-12-31

    The ambient dose equivalent was determined experimentally on the interval of energy of X ray applied in diagnostic radiology. A PMMA sphere was used to simulate the trunk human (phantom), based on the definition of the report ICRU 39. The absorbed dose in different positions in the phantom was determined using LiF-TLD 100. The X ray spectra were measured with a high-purity germanium detector (HP Ge). It was also determined the HVL and the effective energy in this energy range. The conversion coefficient of the K{sub air} and {Phi} to H{sup *}(d) were determined to 10, 50 and 60 mm deep in the PMMA sphere. The obtained values were compared with data of the literature. The maximum uncertainty obtained for the coefficients was 7.2%. All parameters were also determined to the X ray quality of the incident and transmitted beam by the patient, according to the recommendation of the standard DIN 6872. The conversion factor was calculated for those situations where the X-ray beam is transmitted by a layer and Pb and it is necessary to estimate the effective dose, as in the case of shielding project of radiology diagnosis room. (author) 51 refs., 35 figs., 15 tabs.

  5. Divergence of Cs-137 sources fluence used in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vianello, E.A.; Almeida, C.E. de

    1998-01-01

    In this work the experimental determination of correction factor for fluence divergence (kln) of linear Cs-137 sources CDCS J4, with Farmer ionization chamber model 2571 in a central and perpendicular plan to source axis, for distances range from 1 to 7 cm., has been presented. The experimental results were compared to calculating by Kondo and Randolph (1960) isotropic theory and Bielajew (1990) anisotropic theory. (Author)

  6. Unfolding of neutron spectra from Godiva type critical assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, J.T.; Meason, J.L.; Wright, H.L.

    1976-01-01

    The results from three experiments conducted at the White Sands Missile Range Fast Burst Reactor Facility are discussed. The experiments were designed to measure the ''free-field'' neutron leakage spectrum and the neutron spectra from mildly perturbed environments. SAND-II was used to calculate the neutron spectrum utilizing several different trial input spectra for each experiment. Comparisons are made between the unfolded neutron spectrum for each trial input on the basis of the following parameters: average neutron energy (above 10 KeV), integral fluence (above 10 KeV), spectral index and the hardness parameter, phi/sub eq//phi

  7. Relationships between energy fluence and energy incident on, emitted by or imparted to a body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, C A

    1979-11-01

    From knowledge of the energy and angular distribution of the fluence around a body, the energy incident on, emitted by or imparted to a body can be calculated. The calculation is easily performed if the quantity 'vectorial fluence' is used. Examples taken from the literature are used to illustrate the erroneous results obtained by integrating energy fluence over area instead of integrating the scalar product of vectorial energy fluence and vectorial area.

  8. Effects of the neutronic irradiation on the impact tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapena, J.; Perosanz, F.J.; Hernandez, M.T.

    1993-01-01

    The changes that the Charpy curves suffer when steel is exposed to neutronic fluence are studied. Three steels with different chemical composition were chosen, two of them (JPF and JPJ) being treated at only one neutronic fluence, while the last one (JRQ) was irradiated at three fluences. In this way, it was possible to compare the effect of increasing the neutronic dose, and to study the experimental results as a function of the steel chemical composition. Two characteristic facts have been observed: the displacement of the curve at higher temperatures, and decrease of the upper shelf energy (USE). The mechanical recovery of the materials after two different thermal treatments is also described, and a comparation between the experimental results obtained and the damage prediction formulas given by different regulatory international organisms in the nuclear field is established. Author. 11 refs

  9. Study and development of new dosemeters for thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urena N, F.

    1998-01-01

    An alanine-boron compound, alanine hydroborate, was synthesized and chemically characterized to be used for thermal neutrons fluence measurements. The synthesis of the compound was made by reacting the amino acid alanine with boric acid in three different media: acidic, neutral and alkaline. Physicochemical analysis showed that the alkaline medium is favorable for the synthesis of the alanine hydroborate. The compound was evaluated as a thermal neutron fluence detector by the detection of the free radical yield upon neutron thermal irradiation by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR). The present work also studies the EPR-signal response of the three preparations to thermal neutron irradiation (φ = 5 x 10 7 n/cm 2 -s). The following EPR signal parameters of the samples were investigated: peak-to-peak signal intensity vs. thermal neutron fluence Φ = φ Δt ; where Δt = 1, 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, 90, 100, 110 and 120 h. , peak-to-peak signal intensity vs. microwave power, signal fading; repeatability, batch homogeneity, stability and zero dose response. It is concluded that these new products could be used in thermal neutron fluence estimations. (Author)

  10. New prospect in neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cluzeau, S.

    1991-01-01

    Neutron radiography is a very useful non-destructive testing (NDT) method which frequently complements classical X-ray inspection. Numerous inspections in some fields are currently performed at reactor-based neutron radiography facilities but many other interesting applications in different fields are at present not considered because the objects to be tested cannot be moved to a reactor. It is the goal of the DIANE project, to allow the utilization of this NDT method in industrial facilities by developing a safe and convenient neutron radiography equipment using an ''on-off'' neutron source. As a result of the efforts of the four European partners, a first laboratory demonstration model is currently in operation in Germany and a fully mobile second one is expected by the end of 1992. Good radiographs are obtained with exposure times in the range of a few seconds to ten minutes using an electronic imaging system. The fast neutron generator uses a sealed neutron tube delivering 5.10 11 neutrons.cm -2 .s -1 in 4 π steradian; with a collimator ratio of about 12, the fluence rate onto the object is then close to 1,5.10 5 thermal neutrons.cm -2 .s -1 . (author)

  11. Effects of fluence and fluence rate of proton irradiation upon magnetism in Fe65Ni35 Invar alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Masafumi; Wada, Hideki; Matsushima, Yasushi

    2015-11-01

    Curie temperature, TC, of the Fe-Ni Invar alloys increase due to irradiation with electron and some kinds of ions. In this study, proton irradiation effects upon magnetism in an Fe65Ni35 alloy have been investigated. It is found that the increment of TC, ∆TC, increases with increasing fluence. The magnetic hysteresis curve of the alloy was found to be unaffected by irradiation. Comparing ∆TC and the calculated energy transfer from the ions to the sample, it seemed that ∆TC was found to be related to the number of vacancies formed in nuclear collision events. In addition, ∆TC was influenced by the fluence rate, i.e., the deposited energy per unit time.

  12. Neutron and photon scattering properties of high density concretes used in radiation therapy facilities: A Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesbahi, Asghar; Khaldari, Rezvan

    2017-09-01

    In the current study the neutron and photon scattering properties of some newly developed high density concretes (HDCs) were calculated by using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. Five high-density concretes including Steel-Magnetite, Barite, Datolite-Galena, Ilmenite-ilmenite, Magnetite-Lead with the densities ranging from 5.11 g/cm3 and ordinary concrete with density of 2.3 g/cm3 were studied in our simulations. The photon beam spectra of 4 and 18 MV from Varian linac and neutron spectra of clinical 18 MeV photon beam was used for calculations. The fluence of scattered photon and neutron from all studied concretes was calculated in different angles. Overall, the ordinary concrete showed higher scattered photons and Datolite-Galena concrete (4.42 g/cm3) had the lowest scattered photons among all studied concretes. For neutron scattering, fluence at the angle of 180 was higher relative to other angles while for photons scattering fluence was maximum at 90 degree. The scattering fluence for photons and neutrons was dependent on the angle and composition of concrete. The results showed that the fluence of scattered photons and neutrons changes with the composition of high density concrete. Also, for high density concretes, the variation of scattered fluence with angle was very pronounced for neutrons but it changed slightly for photons. The results can be used for design of radiation therapy bunkers.

  13. Dependence of fluence errors in dynamic IMRT on leaf-positional errors varying with time and leaf number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zygmanski, Piotr; Kung, Jong H.; Jiang, Steve B.; Chin, Lee

    2003-01-01

    ALPO is an Average Leaf Pair Opening (the concept of ALPO was previously introduced by us in Med. Phys. 28, 2220-2226 (2001). Therefore, dose errors associated with RLP errors are larger for fields requiring small leaf gaps. For an N-field IMRT plan, we demonstrate that the total fluence error (if we neglect inhomogeneities and scatter) is proportional to 1/√(N), where N is the number of fields, which slightly reduces the impact of RLP errors of individual fields on the total fluence error. We tested and applied the analytical apparatus in the context of commercial inverse treatment planning systems used in our clinics (Helios TM and BrainScan TM ). We determined the actual distribution of leaf-positional errors by studying MLC controller (Varian Mark II and Brainlab Novalis MLCs) log files created by the controller after each field delivery. The analytically derived relationship between fluence error and RLP errors was confirmed by numerical simulations. The equivalence of relative fluence error to relative dose error was verified by a direct dose calculation. We also experimentally verified the truthfulness of fluences derived from the log file data by comparing them to film data

  14. Study and development of new dosemeters for thermal neutrons; Estudio y desarrollo de nuevos dosimetros para neutrones termicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urena N, F

    1998-12-31

    An alanine-boron compound, alanine hydroborate, was synthesized and chemically characterized to be used for thermal neutrons fluence measurements. The synthesis of the compound was made by reacting the amino acid alanine with boric acid in three different media: acidic, neutral and alkaline. Physicochemical analysis showed that the alkaline medium is favorable for the synthesis of the alanine hydroborate. The compound was evaluated as a thermal neutron fluence detector by the detection of the free radical yield upon neutron thermal irradiation by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR). The present work also studies the EPR-signal response of the three preparations to thermal neutron irradiation ({phi} = 5 x 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2} -s). The following EPR signal parameters of the samples were investigated: peak-to-peak signal intensity vs. thermal neutron fluence {Phi} = {phi} {Delta}t ; where {Delta}t = 1, 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, 90, 100, 110 and 120 h. , peak-to-peak signal intensity vs. microwave power, signal fading; repeatability, batch homogeneity, stability and zero dose response. It is concluded that these new products could be used in thermal neutron fluence estimations. (Author)

  15. Neutron radiation damage studies on silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zheng; Chen, W.; Kraner, H.W.

    1990-10-01

    Effects of neutron radiation on electrical properties of Si detectors have been studied. At high neutron fluence (Φ n ≥ 10 12 n/cm 2 ), C-V characteristics of detectors with high resistivities (ρ ≥ 1 kΩ-cm) become frequency dependent. A two-trap level model describing this frequency dependent effect is proposed. Room temperature anneal of neutron damaged (at LN 2 temperature) detectors shows three anneal stages, while only two anneal stages were observed in elevated temperature anneal. 19 refs., 14 figs

  16. Calibration of a neutron detector based on single event upset of SRAM memories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingo, C., E-mail: carles.domingo@uab.ca [Departament de Fisica, Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Gomez, F. [Dpto. de Particulas, Univ. de Santiago, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Sanchez-Doblado, F. [Dpto. de Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Univ. de Sevilla, 41009 Sevilla (Spain); Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Univ. Virgen Macarena, 41009 Sevilla (Spain); Hartmann, G.H. [DKFZ E0400, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Amgarou, K.; Garcia-Fuste, M.J. [Departament de Fisica, Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Romero, M.T. [Dpto. de Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Univ. de Sevilla, 41009 Sevilla (Spain); Boettger, R.; Nolte, R.; Wissmann, F.; Zimbal, A.; Schuhmacher, H. [PTB, Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    One of the challenges of measuring neutron fluences around medical linacs is the fact that the scattered photon fluence is important and higher than the surrounding neutron leakage fluence. Additionally most electron accelerators are pulsed, with repetition rates of the order of hundreds of Hertz, while the pulse duration is in the microsecond range. For this reason, neutron fluence around RT linacs is usually measured through passive methods, with the inconvenience of their time consuming analysis. A new neutron detector, based on the relation between Single Event Upsets (SEU) in digital SRAM memories and the existing thermal neutron fluence, has been developed. This work reports the calibration results of prototypes of this detector, obtained from exposures to the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt in Braunschweig (PTB) moderated {sup 252}Cf source, to PTB quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams of 0.565 MeV, 1.2 MeV, 5 MeV, 8 MeV and 14.8 MeV, and to the GKSS thermal neutron beam.

  17. Neutron source for generating fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schraube, H.; Morhart, A.

    1980-01-01

    In radiotherapeutics, neutron sources are needed, generating a dose rate as high as possible and neutrons as energetic as possible. By bombardment of tritium targets with deuterons of some 100 keV, neutrons of about 15 MeV are produced, but because of the large slow-down effect in the target consisting of heavy metal the yield is too small. On applying beryllium targets the neutron yields are too small below a deuteron energy of 15 MeV; at the same time, the high percentage of low energy neutrons is undesirable. Based on the favorable yield of the D(d,n) He 3 reaction for deuterons of about 100 MeV, a gas-target chamber is designed. The pressure chamber is designed for a deuterium pressure of up to 11 atmospheres and provided with cooling devices. The flux density in beam direction at a distance of 1 m reaches 108 per cm 2 , the maximum energy of the neutrons amounts to 12 MeV at deuteron energies of 9 MeV, and the neutron share below 9 MeV is small. The maximum dose rate in a tissue-equivalent phantom lies at 40 rads/min. (orig./PW)

  18. Einstein's equivalence principle in quantum mechanics revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauenberg, Michael

    2016-11-01

    The gravitational equivalence principle in quantum mechanics is of considerable importance, but it is generally not included in physics textbooks. In this note, we present a precise quantum formulation of this principle and comment on its verification in a neutron diffraction experiment. The solution of the time dependent Schrödinger equation for this problem also gives the wave function for the motion of a charged particle in a homogeneous electric field, which is also usually ignored in textbooks on quantum mechanics.

  19. Calibration of neutrons monitors with moderators and application in the calibration factors of albedo dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuch, L.A.

    1978-11-01

    The calibration factors and the reproducibility of an Albedo Dosimeter designed for personal neutron monitoring were determined. These factor were obtained simulating the dosimeter reading and the equivalent dose in the locality by a convenient combination of responses of the Bonner Sphere Spectrometer. The results obtained in the simulation were verified experimentally for different spectra employing the Am-Be, bare 252 Cf source and 253 Cf source with graphite sields of varying thickness. Different standards were used in the procedures necessary for the determination of the calibration factors. An Am-Be neutron source, standardized by the activation of a manganese sulphate bath was used as a primary standard. As a secondary standard, for the measurement of the neutron fluence, a De Pangher Long Counter was used and the scattering effects were determined using the shadow cone method. The other monitors such as the Rem-Counter and the Bonner Sphere Spectrometer were also calibrated with reference to the secondary standard with a view to comparing the results obtained with those furnished by the Albedo Dosimeter. (Author) [pt

  20. Microstructure and mechanical properties of neutron irradiated beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishitsuka, E.; Kawamura, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Terai, T.; Tanaka, S.

    1998-01-01

    Microstructure and mechanical properties of the neutron irradiated beryllium with total fast neutron fluences of 1.3 - 4.3 x 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (E>1 MeV) at 327 - 616degC were studied. Swelling increased by high irradiation temperature, high fluence, and by the small grain size and high impurity. Obvious decreasing of the fracture stress was observed in the bending test and in small grain specimens which had many helium bubbles on the grain boundary. Decreasing of the fracture stress for small grain specimens was presumably caused by crack propagation on the grain boundaries which weekend by helium bubbles. (author)

  1. Determination of the thermal and epithermal neutron sensitivities of an LBO chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Satoru; Sato, Hitoshi; Shimazaki, Takuto; Nakajima, Erika; Kotani, Kei; Suda, Mitsuru; Hamano, Tsuyoshi; Kajimoto, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Kenichi; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2017-08-01

    An LBO (Li 2 B 4 O 7 ) walled ionization chamber was designed to monitor the epithermal neutron fluence in boron neutron capture therapy clinical irradiation. The thermal and epithermal neutron sensitivities of the device were evaluated using accelerator neutrons from the 9 Be(d, n) reaction at a deuteron energy of 4 MeV (4 MeV d-Be neutrons). The response of the chamber in terms of the electric charge induced in the LBO chamber was compared with the thermal and epithermal neutron fluences measured using the gold-foil activation method. The thermal and epithermal neutron sensitivities obtained were expressed in units of pC cm 2 , i.e., from the chamber response divided by neutron fluence (cm -2 ). The measured LBO chamber sensitivities were 2.23 × 10 -7  ± 0.34 × 10 -7 (pC cm 2 ) for thermal neutrons and 2.00 × 10 -5  ± 0.12 × 10 -5 (pC cm 2 ) for epithermal neutrons. This shows that the LBO chamber is sufficiently sensitive to epithermal neutrons to be useful for epithermal neutron monitoring in BNCT irradiation.

  2. Determination of the thermal and epithermal neutron sensitivities of an LBO chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, Satoru; Kotani, Kei; Kajimoto, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Kenichi [Hiroshima University, Quantum Energy Applications, Graduate School of Engineering, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Sato, Hitoshi; Nakajima, Erika [Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Science, Radiological Sciences, Ibaraki (Japan); Shimazaki, Takuto [Hiroshima University, Quantum Energy Applications, Graduate School of Engineering, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Delta Kogyo Co., Ltd., Hiroshima (Japan); Suda, Mitsuru; Hamano, Tsuyoshi [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba-Shi, Chiba (Japan); Hoshi, Masaharu [Hiroshima University, Institute for Peace Science, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2017-08-15

    An LBO (Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}) walled ionization chamber was designed to monitor the epithermal neutron fluence in boron neutron capture therapy clinical irradiation. The thermal and epithermal neutron sensitivities of the device were evaluated using accelerator neutrons from the {sup 9}Be(d, n) reaction at a deuteron energy of 4 MeV (4 MeV d-Be neutrons). The response of the chamber in terms of the electric charge induced in the LBO chamber was compared with the thermal and epithermal neutron fluences measured using the gold-foil activation method. The thermal and epithermal neutron sensitivities obtained were expressed in units of pC cm{sup 2}, i.e., from the chamber response divided by neutron fluence (cm{sup -2}). The measured LBO chamber sensitivities were 2.23 x 10{sup -7} ± 0.34 x 10{sup -7} (pC cm{sup 2}) for thermal neutrons and 2.00 x 10{sup -5} ± 0.12 x 10{sup -5} (pC cm{sup 2}) for epithermal neutrons. This shows that the LBO chamber is sufficiently sensitive to epithermal neutrons to be useful for epithermal neutron monitoring in BNCT irradiation. (orig.)

  3. Measurement of Photo-Neutron Dose from an 18-MV Medical Linac Using a Foil Activation Method in View of Radiation Protection of Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haluk Yücel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available High-energy linear accelerators are increasingly used in the medical field. However, the unwanted photo-neutrons can also be contributed to the dose delivered to the patients during their treatments. In this study, neutron fluxes were measured in a solid water phantom placed at the isocenter 1-m distance from the head of an 18-MV linac using the foil activation method. The produced activities were measured with a calibrated well-type Ge detector. From the measured fluxes, the total neutron fluence was found to be (1.17 ± 0.06 × 107 n/cm2 per Gy at the phantom surface in a 20 × 20 cm2 X-ray field size. The maximum photo-neutron dose was measured to be 0.67 ± 0.04 mSv/Gy at dmax = 5 cm depth in the phantom at isocenter. The present results are compared with those obtained for different field sizes of 10 × 10cm2, 15 × 15cm2, and 20 × 20cm2 from 10-, 15-, and 18-MV linacs. Additionally, ambient neutron dose equivalents were determined at different locations in the room and they were found to be negligibly low. The results indicate that the photo-neutron dose at the patient position is not a negligible fraction of the therapeutic photon dose. Thus, there is a need for reduction of the contaminated neutron dose by taking some additional measures, for instance, neutron absorbing-protective materials might be used as aprons during the treatment.

  4. Characterization of revenue equivalence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heydenreich, B.; Müller, R.; Uetz, Marc Jochen; Vohra, R.

    2009-01-01

    The property of an allocation rule to be implementable in dominant strategies by a unique payment scheme is called revenue equivalence. We give a characterization of revenue equivalence based on a graph theoretic interpretation of the incentive compatibility constraints. The characterization holds

  5. Characterization of Revenue Equivalence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heydenreich, Birgit; Müller, Rudolf; Uetz, Marc Jochen; Vohra, Rakesh

    2008-01-01

    The property of an allocation rule to be implementable in dominant strategies by a unique payment scheme is called \\emph{revenue equivalence}. In this paper we give a characterization of revenue equivalence based on a graph theoretic interpretation of the incentive compatibility constraints. The

  6. On the operator equivalents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenet, G.; Kibler, M.

    1978-06-01

    A closed polynomial formula for the qth component of the diagonal operator equivalent of order k is derived in terms of angular momentum operators. The interest in various fields of molecular and solid state physics of using such a formula in connection with symmetry adapted operator equivalents is outlined

  7. Investigating multi-objective fluence and beam orientation IMRT optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potrebko, Peter S.; Fiege, Jason; Biagioli, Matthew; Poleszczuk, Jan

    2017-07-01

    Radiation Oncology treatment planning requires compromises to be made between clinical objectives that are invariably in conflict. It would be beneficial to have a ‘bird’s-eye-view’ perspective of the full spectrum of treatment plans that represent the possible trade-offs between delivering the intended dose to the planning target volume (PTV) while optimally sparing the organs-at-risk (OARs). In this work, the authors demonstrate Pareto-aware radiotherapy evolutionary treatment optimization (PARETO), a multi-objective tool featuring such bird’s-eye-view functionality, which optimizes fluence patterns and beam angles for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning. The problem of IMRT treatment plan optimization is managed as a combined monolithic problem, where all beam fluence and angle parameters are treated equally during the optimization. To achieve this, PARETO is built around a powerful multi-objective evolutionary algorithm, called Ferret, which simultaneously optimizes multiple fitness functions that encode the attributes of the desired dose distribution for the PTV and OARs. The graphical interfaces within PARETO provide useful information such as: the convergence behavior during optimization, trade-off plots between the competing objectives, and a graphical representation of the optimal solution database allowing for the rapid exploration of treatment plan quality through the evaluation of dose-volume histograms and isodose distributions. PARETO was evaluated for two relatively complex clinical cases, a paranasal sinus and a pancreas case. The end result of each PARETO run was a database of optimal (non-dominated) treatment plans that demonstrated trade-offs between the OAR and PTV fitness functions, which were all equally good in the Pareto-optimal sense (where no one objective can be improved without worsening at least one other). Ferret was able to produce high quality solutions even though a large number of parameters

  8. High-damage-fluence laser glass for Nova

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallerstein, E.P.; Campbell, J.H.; Grens, J.Z.

    1987-01-01

    The ten-beam Nova laser at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is the world's largest and most powerful laser system. The authors describe how using oxidizing conditions combined with newly developed melting techniques, the metallic Pt contamination in phosphate laser glass has been reduced by a factor of --8000 to an average of --0.5 particle per disk. (It is important to realize that the techniques for eliminating Pt particles are dependent on the chemistry of the laser glass and that a solution for one type of glass will not necessarily work for another.) It is acceptable to have a small number of particles which do not grow beyond 250 μm in diameter under the full Nova fluence. During summer 1986, twenty nearly inclusion-free Nova disks were prepared in trial production by each vendor. On the basis of these results, full production has begun in late November. A related problem is the detection of Pt particles at an early stage of manufacture. It is nearly impossible to inspect visually large volumes of laser glass and insure that there are no microscopic Pt particles. Therefore, an automated laser scanning system to test for the presence of damaging inclusions was developed. The system uses a YAG laser to deliver high-fluence pulses to the glass disk. The pulse fluence is --2-3 times the Pt damage threshold. When present, Pt inclusions are easily directed by the characteristic fracture sites they create. The laser operates at 20 Hz and is used to scan the entire disk in --4-8h. Postshot examination of the disk for damage sites takes --1h. If the glass does not meet the Nova specification it is rejected. LLNL has provided damage test systems to both Hoya and Schott which are being used ot test all the production glass

  9. A survey on development of neutron standards and neutron measurement technique corresponding to various fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Tetsuro

    2007-01-01

    Various uses of neutrons are being watched in many fields such as industry, medical technology and radiation protection. Especially, high energy neutrons above 15 MeV are important in a radiation exposure issue of an aircraft and a soft error issue of a semiconductor. Therefore neutron fluence standards for the high energy region are very important. However, the standards are not almost provided all over the world. Three reasons are mainly considered: (1) poor measurement techniques for the high energy neutrons, (2) a small number of high energy neutron facilities and (3) lack of nuclear data for high energy particle reactions. In this paper, the present status of the measurement techniques, the facilities and the nuclear data is investigated and discussed. In NMIJ/AIST, the 19.0-MeV neutron fluence standard will be established by 2010, and development of high energy neutron standards above 20 MeV is also examined. An outline of the development of the high energy neutron standards is also shown in this paper. (author)

  10. Benchmark experiments on neutron streaming through JET Torus Hall penetrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batistoni, P.; Conroy, S.; Lilley, S.; Naish, J.; Obryk, B.; Popovichev, S.; Stamatelatos, I.; Syme, B.; Vasilopoulou, T.; contributors, JET

    2015-05-01

    Neutronics experiments are performed at JET for validating in a real fusion environment the neutronics codes and nuclear data applied in ITER nuclear analyses. In particular, the neutron fluence through the penetrations of the JET torus hall is measured and compared with calculations to assess the capability of state-of-art numerical tools to correctly predict the radiation streaming in the ITER biological shield penetrations up to large distances from the neutron source, in large and complex geometries. Neutron streaming experiments started in 2012 when several hundreds of very sensitive thermo-luminescence detectors (TLDs), enriched to different levels in 6LiF/7LiF, were used to measure the neutron and gamma dose separately. Lessons learnt from this first experiment led to significant improvements in the experimental arrangements to reduce the effects due to directional neutron source and self-shielding of TLDs. Here we report the results of measurements performed during the 2013-2014 JET campaign. Data from new positions, at further locations in the South West labyrinth and down to the Torus Hall basement through the air duct chimney, were obtained up to about a 40 m distance from the plasma neutron source. In order to avoid interference between TLDs due to self-shielding effects, only TLDs containing natural Lithium and 99.97% 7Li were used. All TLDs were located in the centre of large polyethylene (PE) moderators, with natLi and 7Li crystals evenly arranged within two PE containers, one in horizontal and the other in vertical orientation, to investigate the shadowing effect in the directional neutron field. All TLDs were calibrated in the quantities of air kerma and neutron fluence. This improved experimental arrangement led to reduced statistical spread in the experimental data. The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code was used to calculate the air kerma due to neutrons and the neutron fluence at detector positions, using a JET model validated up to the

  11. Neutron irradiation effect of thermally-sensitized stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hide, Kouitiro [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan). Komae Research Lab.

    1998-03-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) susceptibility of irradiated thermally-sensitized Type 304 Stainless Steels (SSs) was studied as a function of neutron fluence and correlated with mechanical responses of the materials. Neutron irradiation was carried out to neutron fluences up to 1.1 x 10{sup 24} n/m{sup 2} (E > 1MeV) at the light water reactor temperature in the Japan Material Test Reactor. The irradiated specimens were examined by slow strain rate stress corrosion cracking tests in 290degC pure water of 0.2 ppm dissolved oxygen concentration and microhardness measurements. The IGSCC susceptibility of the irradiated specimens increased with neutron fluence up to 1.1 x 10{sup 24} n/m{sup 2}. From an attempt to correlate the IGSCC susceptibility with the mechanical properties, an excellent correlation was identified between the susceptibility and microhardness increments at the grain boundary relative to the grain center. While intergranular corrosion rate of thermally sensitized SS increased with neutron fluence up to 1.1 x 10{sup 24} n/m{sup 2}, that of solution annealed SS did not change. The incremental grain boundary hardening and degradation of intergranular corrosion resistance may presumably be the major factors affecting IGSCC performance. (author)

  12. Study of natural diamond detector spectrometric properties under neutron irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Alekseyev, A B; Kaschuck, Y; Krasilnikov, A; Portnov, D; Tugarinov, S

    2002-01-01

    Natural diamond detector (NDD) performance was studied up to a neutron fluence of 10 sup 1 sup 5 neutron/cm sup 2. The variations of the NDD spectrometric response to incident alpha-particles from sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am source after exposure to fast neutron fluences up to 3x10 sup 1 sup 6 n/cm sup 2 were examined. No significant variations up to the level of 10 sup 1 sup 4 n/cm sup 2 were observed. Degradation of charge collection efficiency at higher fluences is reported. No remarkable increase of the NDD leakage current and count rate change had been observed up to a neutron fluence of 3x10 sup 1 sup 6 n/cm sup 2. The charge collection efficiency variations of neutron irradiated diamond spectrometer were studied ex situ under gamma-rays, beta-radiation and visible light excitation. Charge collection efficiency restoration up to 75% level and the NDD performance stabilization by extrinsic low-intensity visible light (550 nm

  13. Synovectomy by Neutron capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega C, H.R.; Torres M, C.

    1998-01-01

    The Synovectomy by Neutron capture has as purpose the treatment of the rheumatoid arthritis, illness which at present does not have a definitive curing. This therapy requires a neutron source for irradiating the articulation affected. The energy spectra and the intensity of these neutrons are fundamental since these neutrons induce nuclear reactions of capture with Boron-10 inside the articulation and the freely energy of these reactions is transferred at the productive tissue of synovial liquid, annihilating it. In this work it is presented the neutron spectra results obtained with moderator packings of spherical geometry which contains in its center a Pu 239 Be source. The calculations were realized through Monte Carlo method. The moderators assayed were light water, heavy water base and the both combination of them. The spectra obtained, the average energy, the neutron total number by neutron emitted by source, the thermal neutron percentage and the dose equivalent allow us to suggest that the moderator packing more adequate is what has a light water thickness 0.5 cm (radius 2 cm) and 24.5 cm heavy water (radius 26.5 cm). (Author)

  14. Spectra of photons and neutrons generated in a heterogeneous head of a 15 MV LINAC at differents field sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benites-Rengifo, J. L.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Velazquez-Fernandez, J. B. [Posgrado en CBAP, Universidad Autonoma de Nayarit, Carretera Tepic-Compostela km 9. C.P. 63780. Xalisco, Nayarit (Mexico); Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Apdo. Postal 336, 98000 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico); Posgrado en CBAP, Universidad Autonoma de Nayarit, Carretera Tepic-Compostela km 9. C.P. 63780. Xalisco, Nayarit (Mexico)

    2012-10-23

    Spectra of photons and neutrons were calculated, using the Monte Carlo code MCNP-5 using the e/p/n mode. A heterogeneous model was used to define the linac head where the collimators were modeled to produce five different treatment fields at the isocenter. Photon and neutron spectra were estimated in several points along two directions from the isocenter. The total photon fluence beyond 60 cm behaves according to 1/r{sup 2} rule, while total neutron fluence, beyond 80 cm, can be described by diffusion theory using an infinite plane as a neutron source.

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of light fluence calculation during pleural PDT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meo, Julia L.; Zhu, Timothy

    2013-03-01

    A thorough understanding of light distribution in the desired tissue is necessary for accurate light dosimetry in PDT. Solving the problem of light dose depends, in part, on the geometry of the tissue to be treated. When considering PDT in the thoracic cavity for treatment of malignant, localized tumors such as those observed in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), changes in light dose caused by the cavity geometry should be accounted for in order to improve treatment efficacy. Cavity-like geometries demonstrate what is known as the "integrating sphere effect" where multiple light scattering off the cavity walls induces an overall increase in light dose in the cavity. We present a Monte Carlo simulation of light fluence based on a spherical and an elliptical cavity geometry with various dimensions. The tissue optical properties as well as the non-scattering medium (air and water) varies. We have also introduced small absorption inside the cavity to simulate the effect of blood absorption. We expand the MC simulation to track photons both within the cavity and in the surrounding cavity walls. Simulations are run for a variety of cavity optical properties determined using spectroscopic methods. We concluded from the MC simulation that the light fluence inside the cavity is inversely proportional to the surface area.

  16. Thermal neutron calibration channel at LNMRI/IRD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astuto, A.; Salgado, A.P.; Lopes, R.T.; Leite, S.P.; Patrao, K.C.S.; Fonseca, E.S.; Pereira, W.W.

    2014-01-01

    The Brazilian Metrology Laboratory of Ionizing Radiations (LNMRI) standard thermal neutron flux facility was designed to provide uniform neutron fluence for calibration of small neutron detectors and individual dosemeters. This fluence is obtained by neutron moderation from four 241 Am-Be sources, each with 596 GBq, in a facility built with blocks of graphite/paraffin compound and high-purity carbon graphite. This study was carried out in two steps. In the first step, simulations using the MCNPX code on different geometric arrangements of moderator materials and neutron sources were performed. The quality of the resulting neutron fluence in terms of spectrum, cadmium ratio and gamma-neutron ratio was evaluated. In the second step, the system was assembled based on the results obtained on the simulations, and new measurements are being made. These measurements will validate the system, and other intercomparisons will ensure traceability to the International System of Units. The pile construction form using blocks allows distinct arrangements for new studies and possibilities of other LNMRI reference fields. The results can be predicted by the simulation used in this work. Different number of each type of blocks and sources can be used. The main difference observed between the final measurement and simulation results might be due to the difference in composition of paraffin blocks used in assembling the pile. In order to confirm the thermal neutron field and fluence rate in the central chamber (inside the channel) that will be used to irradiate small neutron detectors, it is necessary to use another quantification method such as the gold foils activation with measurement traceability. It will be performed in a future stage. (authors)

  17. A basic evaluated neutronic data file for elemental scandium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.B.; Meadows, J.W.; Howerton, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    This report documents an evaluated neutronic data file for elemental scandium, presented in the ENDF/B-VI format. This file should provide basic nuclear data essential for neutronic calculations involving elemental scandium. No equivalent file was previously available

  18. Characterization of the secondary neutron field produced during treatment of an anthropomorphic phantom with x-rays, protons and carbon ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessa, C La; Berger, T; Kaderka, R; Schardt, D; Burmeister, S; Labrenz, J; Reitz, G; Durante, M

    2014-04-21

    Short- and long-term side effects following the treatment of cancer with radiation are strongly related to the amount of dose deposited to the healthy tissue surrounding the tumor. The characterization of the radiation field outside the planned target volume is the first step for estimating health risks, such as developing a secondary radioinduced malignancy. In ion and high-energy photon treatments, the major contribution to the dose deposited in the far-out-of-field region is given by neutrons, which are produced by nuclear interaction of the primary radiation with the beam line components and the patient's body. Measurements of the secondary neutron field and its contribution to the absorbed dose and equivalent dose for different radiotherapy technologies are presented in this work. An anthropomorphic RANDO phantom was irradiated with a treatment plan designed for a simulated 5 × 2 × 5 cm³ cancer volume located in the center of the head. The experiment was repeated with 25 MV IMRT (intensity modulated radiation therapy) photons and charged particles (protons and carbon ions) delivered with both passive modulation and spot scanning in different facilities. The measurements were performed with active (silicon-scintillation) and passive (bubble, thermoluminescence ⁶LiF:Mg, Ti (TLD-600) and ⁷LiF:Mg, Ti (TLD-700)) detectors to investigate the production of neutral particles both inside and outside the phantom. These techniques provided the whole energy spectrum (E ≤ 20 MeV) and corresponding absorbed dose and dose equivalent of photo neutrons produced by x-rays, the fluence of thermal neutrons for all irradiation types and the absorbed dose deposited by neutrons with 0.8 neutrons is observed for photons and, among ions, for passively modulated beams. For the treatment with high-energy x-rays, the contribution of secondary neutrons to the dose equivalent is of the same order of magnitude as the primary radiation. In carbon therapy delivered with raster

  19. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy on neutron irradiated MgB2 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Capua, Roberto; Salluzzo, Marco; Vaglio, Ruggero; Ferdeghini, Carlo; Ferrando, Valeria; Putti, Marina; Xi Xiaoxing; Aebersold, Hans U.

    2007-01-01

    Neutron irradiation was performed on MgB 2 thin films grown by hybrid physical chemical vapor deposition. Samples irradiated with different neutron fluences, having different critical temperatures, were studied by scanning tunneling spectroscopy in order to investigate the effect of the introduced disorder on the superconducting and spectroscopic properties. A monotonic increase of the π gap with increasing disorder was found

  20. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy on neutron irradiated MgB{sub 2} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Capua, Roberto [University of Napoli and CNR-INFM/Coherentia, Via Cinthia, Naples I-80126 (Italy)], E-mail: rdicapua@na.infn.it; Salluzzo, Marco; Vaglio, Ruggero [University of Napoli and CNR-INFM/Coherentia, Via Cinthia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); Ferdeghini, Carlo [CNR-INFM/LAMIA, Via Dodecaneso 33, Genova I-16146 (Italy); Ferrando, Valeria [CNR-INFM/LAMIA, Via Dodecaneso 33, Genova I-16146 (Italy); Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Putti, Marina [CNR-INFM/LAMIA, Via Dodecaneso 33, Genova I-16146 (Italy); Xi Xiaoxing [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Aebersold, Hans U. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen CH-5232 (Switzerland)

    2007-09-01

    Neutron irradiation was performed on MgB{sub 2} thin films grown by hybrid physical chemical vapor deposition. Samples irradiated with different neutron fluences, having different critical temperatures, were studied by scanning tunneling spectroscopy in order to investigate the effect of the introduced disorder on the superconducting and spectroscopic properties. A monotonic increase of the {pi} gap with increasing disorder was found.

  1. Topics in orbit equivalence

    CERN Document Server

    Kechris, Alexander S

    2004-01-01

    This volume provides a self-contained introduction to some topics in orbit equivalence theory, a branch of ergodic theory. The first two chapters focus on hyperfiniteness and amenability. Included here are proofs of Dye's theorem that probability measure-preserving, ergodic actions of the integers are orbit equivalent and of the theorem of Connes-Feldman-Weiss identifying amenability and hyperfiniteness for non-singular equivalence relations. The presentation here is often influenced by descriptive set theory, and Borel and generic analogs of various results are discussed. The final chapter is a detailed account of Gaboriau's recent results on the theory of costs for equivalence relations and groups and its applications to proving rigidity theorems for actions of free groups.

  2. Influence of target-scattered neutrons on cross-section measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesiecki, H.; Cosack, M.; Siebert, B.R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Monoenergetic neutrons produced with accelerators are usually accompanied by degraded and secondary neutrons which arise from reactions of source neutrons in the material of the target construction. A Monte Carlo code was written which takes into account the kinematics and the angular source strength of the neutron producing reaction and the interactions of the neutrons with the material in the immediate vicinity of their production. The calculation of the spectral distribution of the neutron fluence is compared with the result of a time-of-flight measurement. (author)

  3. Determination of spallation neutron flux through spectral adjustment techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, M. A.; Engle, J. W.; Jackman, K. R.; Nortier, F. M.; Birnbaum, E. R.

    2016-08-01

    The Los Alamos Isotope Production Facility (IPF) creates medical isotopes using a proton beam impinged on a target stack. Spallation neutrons are created in the interaction of the beam with target. The use of these spallation neutrons to produce additional radionuclides has been proposed. However, the energy distribution and magnitude of the flux is not well understood. A modified SAND-II spectral adjustment routine has been used with radioactivation foils to determine the differential neutron fluence for these spallation neutrons during a standard IPF production run.

  4. Determination of spallation neutron flux through spectral adjustment techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosby, M.A., E-mail: mosbym@lanl.gov; Engle, J.W.; Jackman, K.R.; Nortier, F.M.; Birnbaum, E.R.

    2016-08-15

    The Los Alamos Isotope Production Facility (IPF) creates medical isotopes using a proton beam impinged on a target stack. Spallation neutrons are created in the interaction of the beam with target. The use of these spallation neutrons to produce additional radionuclides has been proposed. However, the energy distribution and magnitude of the flux is not well understood. A modified SAND-II spectral adjustment routine has been used with radioactivation foils to determine the differential neutron fluence for these spallation neutrons during a standard IPF production run.

  5. Neutron irradiation studies of avalanche photodiodes using californium-252

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reucroft, S.; Rusack, R.; Ruuska, D.; Swain, J.

    1997-02-01

    Californium-252 is a convenient and copious source of neutrons of energies around 1 MeV, and provides many advantages over reactors for neutron irradiation studies of detector components. We describe here an experimental setup at Oak Ridge National Laboratory which has been constructed to study the performance of avalanche photodiodes in neutron fluences up to 10 13 neutrons/cm 2, similar to what is expected in parts of the CMS detector at the LHC. An irradiation study of some avalanche photodiodes is discussed, followed by a brief summary of results obtained.

  6. Experimental characterization of semiconductor-based thermal neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedogni, R., E-mail: roberto.bedogni@lnf.infn.it [IFNF—LNF, via E. Fermi n. 40, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Bortot, D.; Pola, A.; Introini, M.V.; Lorenzoli, M. [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Energia, via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); INFN—Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Gómez-Ros, J.M. [IFNF—LNF, via E. Fermi n. 40, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Sacco, D. [IFNF—LNF, via E. Fermi n. 40, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); INAIL—DIT, Via di Fontana Candida 1, 00040 Monteporzio Catone (Italy); Esposito, A.; Gentile, A.; Buonomo, B. [IFNF—LNF, via E. Fermi n. 40, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Palomba, M.; Grossi, A. [ENEA Triga RC-1C.R. Casaccia, via Anguillarese 301, 00060 S. Maria di Galeria, Roma (Italy)

    2015-04-21

    In the framework of NESCOFI@BTF and NEURAPID projects, active thermal neutron detectors were manufactured by depositing appropriate thickness of {sup 6}LiF on commercially available windowless p–i–n diodes. Detectors with different radiator thickness, ranging from 5 to 62 μm, were manufactured by evaporation-based deposition technique and exposed to known values of thermal neutron fluence in two thermal neutron facilities exhibiting different irradiation geometries. The following properties of the detector response were investigated and presented in this work: thickness dependence, impact of parasitic effects (photons and epithermal neutrons), linearity, isotropy, and radiation damage following exposure to large fluence (in the order of 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2})

  7. Neutron and gamma-ray transport experiments in liquid air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farley, W.E.

    1976-01-01

    Accurate estimates of neutron and gamma radiations from a nuclear explosion and their subsequent transport through the atmosphere are vital to nuclear-weapon employment studies: i.e., for determining safety radii for aircraft crews, casualty and collateral-damage risk radii for tactical weapons, and the kill range from a high-yield defensive burst for a maneuvering reentry vehicle. Radiation transport codes, such as the Laboratory's TARTNP, are used to calculate neutron and gamma fluences. Experiments have been performed to check and update these codes. Recently, a 1.3-m-radius liquid-air (21 percent oxygen) sphere, with a pulsed source of 14-MeV neutrons at its center, was used to measure the fluence and spectra of emerging neutrons and secondary gamma rays. Comparison of measured radiation dose with TARTNP showed agreement within 10 percent

  8. Measurement of peak fluence of neutron beams using Bi-fission ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 78; Issue 3 ... Department of Physics, School of Basic & Applied Sciences, Shobhit University, Meerut 250 110, India; Department of Applied Science (Physics), Vidya College of Engineering, Meerut 250 010, India; Physics Department, M.S. University of Baroda, ...

  9. Measurement of peak fluence of neutron beams using Bi-fission ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Damage track detectors are useful for personal dosimeters and for flux/dose determination of high-energy particles from accelerators or cosmic rays. ... Services, APAT, via V. Brancati-48, 00144, Rome, Italy; High Energy Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005, India ...

  10. Measurement of peak fluence of neutron beams using Bi-fission ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [11] M Mosconi, E Musonza, A Buffler, R Nolte, S Röttger and F D Smit, Radiat. Meas. 45, 1342. (2010). [12] R K Jain, A V Prokofiev, A N Smirnov and L Tommasino, Radiat. Meas. 34, 129 (2001). [13] A N Smirnov and V P Eismont, Pribory iTekhnika Eksperimenta (Instr. Exp. Techn.) (USSR). 6, 5 (1983) (in Russian). [14] V P ...

  11. Measurement of the neutron fluence on the spallation source at Dubna

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adam, Jindřich; Barashenkov, V. S.; Ganesan, S.; Golovatiouk, S.; Krivopustov, M. I.; Kumar, V.; Kumawat, H.; Palsania, HS.; Pronskikh, V. S.; Sharma, A.; Tsoupko-Sitnikov, V. M.; Vladimirova, NM.; Westmeier, W.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 3 (2005), s. 127-132 ISSN 0932-3902 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1P04LA213 Keywords : beams Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.378, year: 2005

  12. INFLUENCE OF SCATTERED NEUTRON RADIATION ON METROLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF АТ140 NEUTRON CALIBRATION FACILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Komar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Today facilities with collimated radiation field are widely used as reference in metrological support of devices for neutron radiation measurement. Neutron fields formed by radionuclide neutron sources. The aim of this research was to study characteristics of experimentally realized neutron fields geometries on АТ140 Neutron Calibration Facility using Monte Carlo method.For calibration, we put a device into neutron field with known flux density or ambient equivalent dose rate. We can form neutron beam from radionuclide fast-neutron source in different geometries. In containercollimator of АТ140 Neutron Calibration Facility we can install special inserts to gather fast-neutron geometry or thermal-neutron geometry. We need to consider neutron scattering from air and room’s walls. We can conduct measurements of neutron field characteristics in several points and get the other using Monte Carlo method.Thermal neutron collimator forms a beam from radionuclide source with a significant amount of neutrons with thermal energies. From found relationship between full neutron flux and distance to neutron source we see that inverse square law is violated. Scattered radiation contribution into total flux increases when we are moving away from neutron source and significantly influences neutron fields characteristics. While source is exposed in shadow-cone geometry neutron specter has pronounced thermal component from wall scattering.In this work, we examined main geometry types used to acquire reference neutron radiation using radionuclide sources. We developed Monte Carlo model for 238Pu-Be neutron source and АТ140 Neutron Calibration Facility’s container-collimator. We have shown the most significant neutron energy distribution factor to be scattered radiation from room’s walls. It leads to significant changes of neutron radiation specter at a distance from the source. When planning location, and installing the facility we should consider

  13. A feasibility study of a deuterium-deuterium neutron generator-based boron neutron capture therapy system for treatment of brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Mindy; Liu, Yingzi; Mostafaei, Farshad; Poulson, Jean M; Nie, Linda H

    2017-02-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary treatment modality that uses high LET particles to achieve tumor cell killing. Deuterium-deuterium (DD) compact neutron generators have advantages over nuclear reactors and large accelerators as the BNCT neutron source, such as their compact size, low cost, and relatively easy installation. The purpose of this study is to design a beam shaping assembly (BSA) for a DD neutron generator and assess the potential of a DD-based BNCT system using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The MC model consisted of a head phantom, a DD neutron source, and a BSA. The head phantom had tally cylinders along the centerline for computing neutron and photon fluences and calculating the dose as a function of depth. The head phantom was placed at 4 cm from the BSA. The neutron source was modeled to resemble the source of our current DD neutron generator. A BSA was designed to moderate and shape the 2.45-MeV DD neutrons to the epithermal (0.5 eV to 10 keV) range. The BSA had multiple components, including moderator, reflector, collimator, and filter. Various materials and configurations were tested for each component. Each BSA layout was assessed in terms of the in-air and in-phantom parameters. The maximum brain dose was limited to 12.5 Gray-Equivalent (Gy-Eq) and the skin dose to 18 Gy-Eq. The optimized BSA configuration included 30 cm of lead for reflector, 45 cm of LiF, and 10 cm of MgF 2 for moderator, 10 cm of lead for collimator, and 0.1 mm of cadmium for thermal neutron filter. Epithermal flux at the beam aperture was 1.0 × 10 5  n epi /cm 2 -s; thermal-to-epithermal neutron ratio was 0.05; fast neutron dose per epithermal was 5.5 × 10 -13  Gy-cm 2 /φ epi , and photon dose per epithermal was 2.4 × 10 -13  Gy-cm 2 /φ epi . The AD, AR, and the advantage depth dose rate were 12.1 cm, 3.7, and 3.2 × 10 -3  cGy-Eq/min, respectively. The maximum skin dose was 0.56 Gy-Eq. The DD neutron yield that is needed to

  14. The Meteoroid Fluence at Mars Due to Comet Siding Spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorhead, Althea V.

    2014-01-01

    Long-period comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) is headed for a close encounter with Mars on 2014 Oct 19. A collision between the comet and the planet has been ruled out, but the comets coma may envelop Mars and its man-made satellites. We present an analytic model of the dust component of cometary comae that describes the spatial distribution of cometary dust and meteoroids and their size distribution. If the coma reaches Mars, we estimate a total incident particle fluence on the planet and its satellites of 0.01 particles per square meter. We compare our model with numerical simulations, data from past comet missions, and recent Siding Spring observations.

  15. Swelling in simple ferritic alloys irradiated to high fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.; Meinecke, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    A series of Fe-Cr-C-Mo simple alloys has been measured for density change as a function of irradiation in EBR-II over the temperature range 400 to 650 0 C to fluences as high as 2.13 x 10 23 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) or 105 dpa. The highest swelling was found in a Fe-12Cr binary alloy, 4.72 percent, after 1.87 x 10 23 n/cm 2 or 95 dpa at 425 0 C, which corresponds to a swelling rate of 0.06%/dpa. This peak swelling rate value can be used to define swelling predictions for commercial ferritic alloys to 40 MWy/m 2

  16. Intermediate neutron detection by thermoluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, E.N. dos; Muccillo, R.

    1979-01-01

    Thermoluminescent (TL) studies were carried out in cold-pressed CaSO 4 :Dy + Dy 2 O 3 + KCl and CaF 2 + Dy 2 O 3 + KCl polycrystalline samples exposed to mixed neutron-gamma fields, for the detection of intermediate neutrons which is based on the evaluation of the TL signal of the specimens stored for 24 hours after being exposed to a mixed neutron-gamma field and thermally annealed to erase the total radiation-induced TL. The addition of Dy 2 O 3 to CaSO 4 :Dy in the proportion 1:2 increased the neutron response by a factor of 160 relative to that of CaSO 4 :Dy. 180 mg of CaSO 4 :Dy + Dy 2 O 3 + KCl in the proportion 2:1:3 showed to be an appropriate detector of intermediate neutrons; the minimum detectable fluence was estimated to be 3.5 x 10 5 neutrons/cm 2 . (Author) [pt

  17. Neutron detection methods based on fission fragment track counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posta, S.

    2004-12-01

    The report deals with the development and application of a simple computer-controlled videomicroscope for fission fragment track counting. The principle of the SSFTD (Solid State Fission Track Detector) method, development of image processing methods, and track counting principles are outlined. Focus is on the application of the method to neutron flux density and fluence determination in reactor dosimetry. The procedures developed were applied to neutron parameter measurements in a VVER-1000 mockup in the LR-0 research reactor. (author)

  18. Measurement of AC electrical conductivity of single crystal Al2O3 during spallation-neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, J.C. III; Farnum, E.H.; Sommer, W.F.; Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Samples of single crystal Al 2 O 3 , commonly known as sapphire, and polycrystalline Al 2 O 3 were irradiated with spallation neutrons at the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) under various temperature conditions and with a continuously applied alternating electric field. This paper describes the results of measurements on the sapphire samples. Neutron fluence and flux values are estimated values pending recovery and analysis of dosimetry packages. The conductivity increased approximately with the square root of the neutron flux at fluences less than 3 x 10 21 n/m 2 . The increase in conductivity reached saturated levels as high as 2 x 10 -2 (ohm-m) -1 at fluences as low as 2 x 10 22 n/m 2 . Frequency swept impedance measurements indicated a change in the electrical properties from capacitive to resistive behavior with increasing fluence

  19. Change in properties of superconducting magnet materials by fusion neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Arata; Nishijima, Shigehiro; Takeuchi, Takao; Nishitani, Takeo

    2007-01-01

    A fusion reactor will generate a lot of high energy neutron and much energy will be taken out of the neutrons by a blanket system. Since some neutrons will stream out of a plasma vacuum vessel through neutral beam injection ports and penetrate a blanket system, a superconducting magnet system, which provides high magnetic field to confirm high energy particles, will be irradiated by a certain amount of neutrons. By developing the new NBI system or by reducing the penetration, the neutron fluence to the superconducting magnet will be able to be reduced. However, it is not easy to achieve the lower streaming and penetration at the present. Therefore, investigations on irradiation behavior of superconducting magnet materials are desired and some novel researches have been performed from 1970s. In general, the critical current of the superconducting wire increases under fast neutron environment comparing with that of the non-irradiated wire, and then decreased to almost zero as an increase of neutron fluence. On the other hand, the critical temperature of the wire starts to get down around 10 22 n/m 2 of neutron fluence and the temperature margin will be decreased during the operation by the neutron irradiation. In this paper, some aspects of irradiated materials will be overviewed and general tendency will be discussed focussing on knock-on effect of fast neutron and long range ordering of A15 compounds

  20. Spectral correction factors for conventional neutron dosemeters used in high-energy neutron environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K W; Sheu, R J

    2015-04-01

    High-energy neutrons (>10 MeV) contribute substantially to the dose fraction but result in only a small or negligible response in most conventional moderated-type neutron detectors. Neutron dosemeters used for radiation protection purpose are commonly calibrated with (252)Cf neutron sources and are used in various workplace. A workplace-specific correction factor is suggested. In this study, the effect of the neutron spectrum on the accuracy of dose measurements was investigated. A set of neutron spectra representing various neutron environments was selected to study the dose responses of a series of Bonner spheres, including standard and extended-range spheres. By comparing (252)Cf-calibrated dose responses with reference values based on fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients, this paper presents recommendations for neutron field characterisation and appropriate correction factors for responses of conventional neutron dosemeters used in environments with high-energy neutrons. The correction depends on the estimated percentage of high-energy neutrons in the spectrum or the ratio between the measured responses of two Bonner spheres (the 4P6_8 extended-range sphere versus the 6″ standard sphere). © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Spectral correction factors for conventional neutron dosemeters used in high-energy neutron environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.W.; Sheu, R.J.

    2015-01-01

    High-energy neutrons (>10 MeV) contribute substantially to the dose fraction but result in only a small or negligible response in most conventional moderated-type neutron detectors. Neutron dosemeters used for radiation protection purpose are commonly calibrated with 252 Cf neutron sources and are used in various workplace. A workplace-specific correction factor is suggested. In this study, the effect of the neutron spectrum on the accuracy of dose measurements was investigated. A set of neutron spectra representing various neutron environments was selected to study the dose responses of a series of Bonner spheres, including standard and extended-range spheres. By comparing 252 Cf-calibrated dose responses with reference values based on fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients, this paper presents recommendations for neutron field characterisation and appropriate correction factors for responses of conventional neutron dosemeters used in environments with high-energy neutrons. The correction depends on the estimated percentage of high-energy neutrons in the spectrum or the ratio between the measured responses of two Bonner spheres (the 4P6-8 extended-range sphere versus the 6'' standard sphere). (authors)

  2. Fluorescence spectra of Rhodamine 6G for high fluence excitation laser radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Hung, J; Olaizola, A M

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescence spectral changes of Rhodamine 6G in ethanol and glycerol solutions and deposited as a film on a silica surface have been studied using a wide range of pumping field fluence at 532 nm at room temperature. Blue shift of the fluorescence spectra and fluorescence quenching of the dye molecule in solution are observed at high excitation fluence values. Such effects are not reported for the film sample. The effects are interpreted as the result of population redistribution in the solute-solvent molecular system induced by the high fluence field and the fluence dependence of the radiationless decay mechanism.

  3. Heavy Ion Irradiation Fluence Dependence for Single-Event Upsets of NAND Flash Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dakai; Wilcox, Edward; Ladbury, Raymond; Kim, Hak; Phan, Anthony; Seidleck, Christina; LaBel, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the single-event effect (SEE) susceptibility of the Micron 16 nm NAND flash, and found the single-event upset (SEU) cross section varied inversely with fluence. The SEU cross section decreased with increasing fluence. We attribute the effect to the variable upset sensitivities of the memory cells. The current test standards and procedures assume that SEU follow a Poisson process and do not take into account the variability in the error rate with fluence. Therefore, heavy ion irradiation of devices with variable upset sensitivity distribution using typical fluence levels may underestimate the cross section and on-orbit event rate.

  4. Hign sensitivity neutron rem counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Jinling; Wen Youqin; Xie Jianlun; Chen Changmao

    1986-01-01

    The constructions of two counters (NR1 and NR2) and their characteristics are presented. In the region from thermal energy to 17 MeV, the detectable dose equivalent values range from 10 -4 to 10 2 mrem.h -1 and the neutron dose equivalent sensitivity is approximately 140 cps/mrem.h -1 for the counter NR1; the detectable dose equivalent values range from 10 -4 to 65 mrem.h -1 and the dose equivalent sensitivity approx.= 209 cps/mrem.h -1 for the counter NR2 in the energy range from thermal energy to 7 MeV. Compared with the rem counter SIUDSVIK 2202D, their dose equivalent readings are consistent within +- 10% when neutron beams are approximatly perpendicular to the counter axis

  5. Calculations on neutron irradiation damage in reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sone, Kazuho; Shiraishi, Kensuke

    1976-01-01

    Neutron irradiation damage calculations were made for Mo, Nb, V, Fe, Ni and Cr. Firstly, damage functions were calculated as a function of neutron energy with neutron cross sections of elastic and inelastic scatterings, and (n,2n) and (n,γ) reactions filed in ENDF/B-III. Secondly, displacement damage expressed in displacements per atom (DPA) was estimated for neutron environments such as fission spectrum, thermal neutron reactor (JMTR), fast breeder reactor (MONJU) and two fusion reactors (The Conceptual Design of Fusion Reactor in JAERI and ORNL-Benchmark). then, damage cross section in units of dpa. barn was defined as a factor to convert a given neutron fluence to the DPA value, and was calculated for the materials in the above neutron environments. Finally, production rates of helium and hydrogen atoms were calculated with (n,α) and (n,p) cross sections in ENDF/B-III for the materials irradiated in the above reactors. (auth.)

  6. Neutron Spectra and H*(10) in a 15 MV Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benites, J.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Hernandez-Davila, V. M.; Rivera, T.; Carrillo, A.; Mondragon, R.

    2010-01-01

    Neutron spectra and the ambient dose equivalent were calculated inside the bunker of a 15 MV Varian linac model CLINAC iX. Calculations were carried out using Monte Carlo methods. Neutron spectra in the vicinity of isocentre show the presence of evaporation and knock-on neutrons produced by the source term, while epithermal and thermal neutron remain constant regardless the distance respect to isocentre, due to room return. Along the maze neutron spectra becomes softer as the detector moves along the maze. The ambient dose equivalent is decreased but do not follow the 1/r 2 rule due to changes in the neutron spectra.

  7. A study of neutron doses in water and sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou-Taleb, W.M.; Abou El-Khier, A.A.; Fawzy Salem, M.A.; Gaber, M.; El-Khatib, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental measurements have been carried out to determine the neutron flux from a compact D-T neutron generator in tissue equivalent mediums like water and sea water, and NaCl. The measurements were performed by using neutron activation foils as neutron detectors of successive threshold energies. The flux-dose conversion factors, as well as related quality factors averaged over the selected energy ranges, were used to determine equivalent dose and adsorbed dose rates, respectively. The experimental and calculated results were found to be in a good agreement. Besides, dose buildup factors were determined. The contribution of thermal and intermediate neutron dose is relatively lower than that for fast neutrons. (author)

  8. Results on Neutron and Gamma Irradiation of Electrolytic Tilmeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderon, A.; Calvo, E.; Figueroa, C. F.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Vila, I.; Virto, A. L.; Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J. M.; Fernando, A.; Fuentes, J.; Josa, M. I.; Luque, J. M.; Molinero, A.; Navarrate, J.; Valdivieso, P.; Fenyvesi, A.; Molnar, J.

    2004-01-01

    We report on irradiation studies done to a sample of high precision electrolytic tiltmeters with gamma-rays, up to a maximum dose of 150 kGy, an neutrons, up to a maximum fluence 1.5x10''14 cm''2. The effect of the irradiation on their performance is discussed. (Author) 19 refs

  9. Results on Neutron and Gamma Irradiation of Electrolytic Tilmeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calderon, A.; Calvo, E.; Figueroa, C. F.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Vila, I.; Virto, A. L.; Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J. M.; Fernando, A.; Fuentes, J.; Josa, M. I.; Luque, J. M.; Molinero, A.; Navarrate, J.; Valdivieso, P.; Fenyvesi, A.; Molnar, J.

    2004-07-01

    We report on irradiation studies done to a sample of high precision electrolytic tiltmeters with gamma-rays, up to a maximum dose of 150 kGy, an neutrons, up to a maximum fluence 1.5x10''14 cm''2. The effect of the irradiation on their performance is discussed. (Author) 19 refs.

  10. Impact of lamp shadowing and reflection on the fluence rate distribution in a multiple low-pressure UV lamp array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shanshan; Linden, Karl G; Ducoste, Joel; Liu, Dong

    2005-07-01

    Use of mathematical modeling for determination of ultraviolet (UV) fluence in disinfection reactors requires accurate knowledge of the fluence rate distribution in a multiple lamp array. A method for measuring the fluence rate among a multiple lamp array was demonstrated using spherical actinometry. A matrix of four low-pressure UV lamps in air were investigated to evaluate the potential for shadowing and reflection to impact the fluence rate within and surrounding the lamp array. Two fluence rate distribution models were tested to determine the ability to predict the fluence rate distribution measured by the actinometers. Shadowing proved to attenuate UV light. Reflection from the lamp surface added 3-9% to the fluence rate, depending upon position in the reactor. These effects, as well as the fluence rate at various points in the lamp matrix were effectively modeled using RAD-LSI and UVCalc3D fluence rate distribution models. At fluence rates above 8mWcm(-2), the actinometry measured fluence rate was lower than the modeled rate, presumably from saturation of the actinometer solution at high fluence rates (close to the lamp). With multiple lamp reactors, the impact of shadowing can significantly affect fluence rate distribution and thus the level of microbial inactivation. If shadowing is not included in fluence rate distribution models, the fluence rate will be over predicted in the shadow zone of a neighboring lamp, falsely skewing model inactivation predictions.

  11. Radiation-induced modification of titanium nickelide with fast neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhomenko, V. D.; Dubinin, S. F.

    2012-07-01

    We present a review of the investigations of the effect of fast neutrons on the structure and properties of titanium nickelide that were performed by the authors on an IVV-2M atomic reactor (Zarechnyi). It has been established that at small fluences of fast neutrons atomic disordering of crystals is observed; as the fluence increases, the material becomes partially amorphized; and at fluences higher than 1 × 1020 cm-2, the material transforms completely into the amorphous state. It has been shown that the amorphous state produced by neutron irradiation differs substantially from the amorphous state of materials obtained by conventional methods. In particular, if a single-crystal specimen is subjected to "neutron" amorphization (most of the investigations were carried out using single crystals), after annealing of radiation-induced defects the single crystal is restored with the initial orientation and perfection. The structural studies were conducted by the methods of neutron and X-ray diffraction. Based on these studies, as well as on the results of small-angle neutron scattering and dilatometric and resistivity measurements, the "defect" state of irradiated materials has been examined in detail. The radiation resistance of titanium nickelide has been estimated.

  12. Bubble Detector Neutron Measurements on JET High Performance Discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gherendi, M.; Craciunescu, T.; Pantea, A.; Zoita, V. [Association EURATOM-MEdC, National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Bucharest (Romania); Conroy, S.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Hellesen, C. [Association EURATOM-VR, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Edlington, T.; Kiptily, V.; Popovichev, S. [Association EURATOM-CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Murari, A. [Association EURATOM-ENEA, RFX, Padova (Italy)

    2011-07-01

    A neutron diagnostics technique based on the bubble detectors has been successfully used for measurements during the JET experimental campaigns of 2008 and 2009. The main aim of these measurements was the determination of the neutron field characteristics in high performance discharges which employ high neutral beam powers ({approx}20 MW) and produce neutron yields in the range (3-5)*10{sup 16} neutrons per pulse. The neutron field parameters at a specific location above a narrow collimating channel in the ceiling of the JET Torus Hall have been measured simultaneously by two independent techniques (super-heated fluid detectors or 'bubble detectors' and time-of-flight). The bubble detector measurement location is situated at the end of a vertical collimated line of sight, behind the TOFOR time-of-flight spectrometer. The field-of-view of the neutron detectors can be varied by means of a pre-collimator. Spatial (radial and toroidal) distributions of the neutron fluence have been obtained using two-dimensional arrays containing up to 10 bubble detectors. The operation of the bubble detector array as a neutron pinhole camera having a radial resolution at the JET vacuum chamber mid-plane of about 55 mm was demonstrated in measurements using various openings of the pre-collimator. The comparison of the area integrated fluence determined by the bubble detector array with the TOFOR neutron flux has shown a good correlation factor of about 0.99. (authors)

  13. Evolution of the microstructure of a French reactor pressure vessel steel under neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H.F.; Radiguet, B.; Pareige, P. [Groupe de physique des materiaux, UMR CNRS 6634, Universite et INSA de Rouen, avenue de l' Universite, 76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France); Todeschini, P. [EDF, Materials and Mechanics of Component Department, Site des Renardieres-Ecuelles, 77818 Moret-sur-Loing cedex (France); Chas, G. [EDF, Production and Engineering Branch, CEIDRE/DLAB, CNPE de Chinon, BP 23, 37420 Avoine (France)

    2011-07-01

    The microstructure of a low copper French reactor pressure vessel steel, neutron irradiated within the frame of the EDF Surveillance Program of a production reactor, was characterised by atom probe tomography. Specimens were irradiated at low flux (2*10{sup 15} m{sup -2}/s), at 4 different fluences up to 7.6*10{sup 23} m{sup -2}. Atom Probe experiments have revealed the presence of roughly spherical clusters enriched in nickel, manganese, silicon and, in a lesser extent, phosphorus and copper at all irradiation fluences. The chemical composition of these clusters shows no evolution with fluence, as well as their diameter, close to 3 nm. On the contrary, their number density increases linearly with the neutron fluence. Continuous segregation of the elements found in the clusters is also observed along dislocation lines, with similar enrichments. (authors)

  14. How Many Equivalent Resistances?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is straightforward to construct the set of equiv- alent resistance for circuits constructed from a bunch of four or five equal resistors. But as the bunch size increases it becomes difficult to find the order of the set of equivalent resistances. Even the computer programs runs out of mem- ory. Here we present an analytical result ...

  15. How Many Equivalent Resistances?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    http://www.prenhall.com/boylestad/. [3]. Antoni Amengual, The intriguing properties of the equivalent resistances of n equal resistors combined in series and in parallel, American Journal of Physics, Vol.68, No.2, pp.175–179, 2000. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/. 10.1119/1.19396. [4]. Neil J A Sloane (Ed.), The On-Line Encyclopedia ...

  16. Radioactive waste equivalence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlowski, S.; Schaller, K.H.

    1990-01-01

    The report reviews, for the Member States of the European Community, possible situations in which an equivalence concept for radioactive waste may be used, analyses the various factors involved, and suggests guidelines for the implementation of such a concept. Only safety and technical aspects are covered. Other aspects such as commercial ones are excluded. Situations where the need for an equivalence concept has been identified are processes where impurities are added as a consequence of the treatment and conditioning process, the substitution of wastes from similar waste streams due to the treatment process, and exchange of waste belonging to different waste categories. The analysis of factors involved and possible ways for equivalence evaluation, taking into account in particular the chemical, physical and radiological characteristics of the waste package, and the potential risks of the waste form, shows that no simple all-encompassing equivalence formula may be derived. Consequently, a step-by-step approach is suggested, which avoids complex evaluations in the case of simple exchanges

  17. The principle of equivalence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unnikrishnan, C.S.

    1994-01-01

    Principle of equivalence was the fundamental guiding principle in the formulation of the general theory of relativity. What are its key elements? What are the empirical observations which establish it? What is its relevance to some new experiments? These questions are discussed in this article. (author). 11 refs., 5 figs

  18. Mass Equivalent Dyads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wijk, V.; Bai, Shaoping; Ceccarelli, Marco

    2015-01-01

    In this paper it is shown how a general 2-DoF dyad can be designed mass equivalent to a general (1-DoF) link element. This is useful in the synthesis of balanced mechanisms, for instance to increase or reduce the number of DoFs of a balanced mechanism maintaining its balance. Also it can be used as

  19. Influence of neutron scattering and source extent on the measurement of neutron energy spectra at ASDEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebner, K.; Baetzner, R.; Roos, M.; Robouch, B.V.; Ingrosso, L.; Wurz, H.

    1987-08-01

    The problem of nuclear emulsion measurements at ASDEX is considered. Besides the application of the VINIA-3DAMC software, this needs a description of the plasma neutron source, a model of the ASDEX structure, and calculation of the response of the nuclear emulsion to the incoming spectral neutron fluence. The latter is essential for comparing the numerical results with measurements at ASDEX. To treat this part, the NEPMC software was developed. The aim of the present work is to demonstrate the feasibility, reliability and usefulness of the method. Therefore simplified treatments for the ASDEX model, the plasma neutron source and the track statistics in the NEPMC software were used. Such calculations are of interest not only for nuclear emulsion measurements as well as any other neutron diagnostics, but also for all problems of neutron shielding for other diagnostics. (orig./GG)

  20. Correspondences. Equivalence relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouligand, G.M.

    1978-03-01

    We comment on sections paragraph 3 'Correspondences' and paragraph 6 'Equivalence Relations' in chapter II of 'Elements de mathematique' by N. Bourbaki in order to simplify their comprehension. Paragraph 3 exposes the ideas of a graph, correspondence and map or of function, and their composition laws. We draw attention to the following points: 1) Adopting the convention of writting from left to right, the composition law for two correspondences (A,F,B), (U,G,V) of graphs F, G is written in full generality (A,F,B)o(U,G,V) = (A,FoG,V). It is not therefore assumed that the co-domain B of the first correspondence is identical to the domain U of the second (EII.13 D.7), (1970). 2) The axiom of choice consists of creating the Hilbert terms from the only relations admitting a graph. 3) The statement of the existence theorem of a function h such that f = goh, where f and g are two given maps having the same domain (of definition), is completed if h is more precisely an injection. Paragraph 6 considers the generalisation of equality: First, by 'the equivalence relation associated with a map f of a set E identical to (x is a member of the set E and y is a member of the set E and x:f = y:f). Consequently, every relation R(x,y) which is equivalent to this is an equivalence relation in E (symmetrical, transitive, reflexive); then R admits a graph included in E x E, etc. Secondly, by means of the Hilbert term of a relation R submitted to the equivalence. In this last case, if R(x,y) is separately collectivizing in x and y, theta(x) is not the class of objects equivalent to x for R (EII.47.9), (1970). The interest of bringing together these two subjects, apart from this logical order, resides also in the fact that the theorem mentioned in 3) can be expressed by means of the equivalence relations associated with the functions f and g. The solutions of the examples proposed reveal their simplicity [fr

  1. Small-angle scattering from neutron-irradiated amorphous Pd80Si20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, K.; Kayano, H.; Masumoto, T.

    1978-01-01

    Small-angle scattering intensities were observed for amorphous Pd 80 Si 20 which was irradiated by fast neutrons to a fluence of 5 X 10 20 neutrons cm -2 . A broad hump was observed at 2 sin theta/lambda = 0.05 A -1 . The structure inhomogeneities produced by the neutron irradiation are discussed with the aid of the results of wide-angle scattering measurements. (Auth.)

  2. A monitor for neutron flux measurements up to 20 MeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohrn, A; Blomgren, J; Park, H; Khurana, S; Nolte, R; Schmidt, D; Wilhelmsen, K

    2007-01-01

    A liquid scintillation detector aimed for neutron energy and fluence measurements in the energy region neutron fields. Careful measurements of the proton light output function and the response matrix have been performed allowing for the application of unfolding techniques using existing codes. The response matrix is used to characterise monoenergetic neutron fields produced by the T(d,n) at a low-energy deuteron accelerator installed at the Swedish Defense Research Agency (FOI).

  3. Neutron detectors for nuclear reactor control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchene, Jean; Verdant, Robert.

    1974-01-01

    In view of the importance of in-core measurements the distinction is made between detectors used outside and inside the core. In the former case proportional counters, fission chambers and boron chambers are reviewed in turn. The only in-core detectors considered are those giving a direct measurement, i.e. supplying an electric signal representative of the neutron fluence rate while in the measurement position at the point given. Two kinds of detectors are used for direct measurements: miniature fission chambers and collectors, known also as neutron-electron converters [fr

  4. Neutron-transmutation-doped germanium bolometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palaio, N.P.; Rodder, M.; Haller, E.E.; Kreysa, E.

    1983-02-01

    Six slices of ultra-pure germanium were irradiated with thermal neutron fluences between 7.5 x 10 16 and 1.88 x 10 18 cm - 2 . After thermal annealing the resistivity was measured down to low temperatures ( 0 exp(δ/T) in the hopping conduction regime. Also, several junction FETs were tested for noise performance at room temperature and in an insulating housing in a 4.2K cryostat. These FETs will be used as first stage amplifiers for neutron-transmutation-doped germanium bolometers

  5. On the neutron jet prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherkasov, A.S.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Fast neutrons are proposed to use, in a deep space, as a recoil mass for low-thrust nuclear fission (or fusion) rocket engine instead of hydrogen heated in nuclear reactor up to 2300 - 2700 o C [1, 2]. In particularly, such neutron engines with a long-term operation as well as nuclear powerful or micro-explosions can be used for ensuring of the astronomical safety for the Earth from asteroids in diameter more 50 m. For production of attractive force of 9.81N the propellant expenditure of hydrogen jet with the system specific impulse of ∼ 9000 m s -1 is ∼ 94 kg a day. For fast 1.8 MeV-neutron jet - 45.8 g per day (directed or collimated neutron fluxes). J=10 16 cm -2 s -1 if a cross-section of rocket nozzle is 1m 2 [2]. So, to produce powerful directed or collimated fast neutron fluxes high intensity controlled neutron sources are required (they are, basically, the novel high-flux research reactors, for example, HFRR (Osaka University, Japan), 400 MW (th) and ψ=10 16 cm -2 s -1 ). The most suitable neutron jet prototype is the B-2 facility of the fast reactor BR-5 (SSC RF Obninsk, Russia). This is a 'mono directional disk' with a diameter of 0.25 m; for neutrons with energies > (2, 3) MeV the collimated neutron flux is 10 10 cm -2 s -1 at the reactor power of 5 MW [3]. The intensification of fast neutron fluences may be up to ∼ 21 for the volume fast neutron source (the fast reactor with a diameter of ∼ 0.8 m) and ∼ 39 for point one by using an iron reflecting tube one side of which is closed (end wall - the effects of a n eutron searchlight ) [4]. The thickness of walls is 40 cm [5]. The additional intensification is possible by using 6 LiD-thermal neutron-flux converter into ∼ 14 MeV-neutrons from (dT), ( 6 LiT)-fusion reactions [6

  6. Combined Bulk and Surface Radiation Damage Effects at Very High Fluences in Silicon Detectors: Measurements and TCAD Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Moscatelli, F; Morozzi, A; Mendicino, R; Dalla Betta, G F; Bilei, G M

    2016-01-01

    In this work we propose a new combined TCAD radiation damage modelling scheme, featuring both bulk and surface radiation damage effects, for the analysis of silicon detectors aimed at the High Luminosity LHC. In particular, a surface damage model has been developed by introducing the relevant parameters (NOX, NIT) extracted from experimental measurements carried out on p-type substrate test structures after gamma irradiations at doses in the range 10-500 Mrad(Si). An extended bulk model, by considering impact ionization and deep-level cross-sections variation, was included as well. The model has been validated through the comparison of the simulation findings with experimental measurements carried out at very high fluences (2×1016 1 MeV equivalent n/cm2) thus fostering the application of this TCAD approach for the design and optimization of the new generation of silicon detectors to be used in future HEP experiments.

  7. Neutron spectrometry and dosimetry with ANNs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H. R.; Hernandez D, V. M. [Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Cipres 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Gallego, E.; Lorente, A. [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain)], e-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com

    2009-10-15

    Artificial neural networks technology has been applied to unfold the neutron spectra and to calculate the effective dose, the ambient equivalent dose, and the personal dose equivalent for {sup 252}Cf and {sup 241}AmBe neutron sources. A Bonner sphere spectrometry with a {sup 6}LiI(Eu) scintillator was utilized to measure the count rates of the spheres that were utilized as input in two artificial neural networks, one for spectrometry and another for dosimetry. Spectra and the ambient dose equivalent were also obtained with BUNKIUT code and the UTA4 response matrix. With both procedures spectra and ambient dose equivalent agrees in less than 10%. (author)

  8. Neutron scattering in concrete and wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facure, A.; Silva, A. X.; Falcao, R. C.; Crispim, V. R.

    2006-01-01

    In this work, the energy spectra of photoneutrons, scattered by ordinary, high-density concrete and wood barriers, have been evaluated using the MCNP4B code. These spectra were calculated for different scattering angles, and for incident neutron energies varying between 0.1 and 10 MeV. The results presented are required to simulate typical photoneutron fluence, produced by medical accelerators, which is scattered by the room walls and reaches the door. It was found that the mean energy of the scattered neutrons does not depend on the scattering angle. Furthermore, it was found that the scattered neutron energies are lower in wood and baryte concrete, which indicates that these materials can be used for lining the maze walls in order to reduce neutron dose at the room door. These data will help to estimate the personal dose received by the patient and staff in radiotherapy facilities. (authors)

  9. Gain and time resolution of 45 μm thin Low Gain Avalanche Detectors before and after irradiation up to a fluence of 1015 neq/cm2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, J.; Carulla, M.; Cavallaro, E.; Chytka, L.; Davis, P. M.; Flores, D.; Förster, F.; Grinstein, S.; Hidalgo, S.; Komarek, T.; Kramberger, G.; Mandić, I.; Merlos, A.; Nozka, L.; Pellegrini, G.; Quirion, D.; Sykora, T.

    2017-05-01

    Low Gain Avalanche Detectors (LGADs) are silicon sensors with a built-in charge multiplication layer providing a gain of typically 10 to 50. Due to the combination of high signal-to-noise ratio and short rise time, thin LGADs provide good time resolutions. LGADs with an active thickness of about 45 μm were produced at CNM Barcelona. Their gains and time resolutions were studied in beam tests for two different multiplication layer implantation doses, as well as before and after irradiation with neutrons up to 1015 neq/cm2. The gain showed the expected decrease at a fixed voltage for a lower initial implantation dose, as well as for a higher fluence due to effective acceptor removal in the multiplication layer. Time resolutions below 30 ps were obtained at the highest applied voltages for both implantation doses before irradiation. Also after an intermediate fluence of 3×1014 neq/cm2, similar values were measured since a higher applicable reverse bias voltage could recover most of the pre-irradiation gain. At 1015 neq/cm2, the time resolution at the maximum applicable voltage of 620 V during the beam test was measured to be 57 ps since the voltage stability was not good enough to compensate for the gain layer loss. The time resolutions were found to follow approximately a universal function of gain for all implantation doses and fluences.

  10. Performance of n-in-p pixel detectors irradiated at fluences up to $5x10^{15} n_{eq}/cm^{2}$ for the future ATLAS upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00219560; La Rosa, A.; Nisius, R.; Pernegger, H.; Richter, R.H.; Weigell, P.

    We present the results of the characterization of novel n-in-p planar pixel detectors, designed for the future upgrades of the ATLAS pixel system. N-in-p silicon devices are a promising candidate to replace the n-in-n sensors thanks to their radiation hardness and cost effectiveness, that allow for enlarging the area instrumented with pixel detectors. The n-in-p modules presented here are composed of pixel sensors produced by CiS connected by bump-bonding to the ATLAS readout chip FE-I3. The characterization of these devices has been performed with the ATLAS pixel read-out systems, TurboDAQ and USBPIX, before and after irradiation with 25 MeV protons and neutrons up to a fluence of 5x10**15 neq /cm2. The charge collection measurements carried out with radioactive sources have proven the feasibility of employing this kind of detectors up to these particle fluences. The collected charge has been measured to be for any fluence in excess of twice the value of the FE-I3 threshold, tuned to 3200 e. The first result...

  11. Ge nano-layer fabricated by high-fluence low-energy ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Tiecheng; Dun Shaobo; Hu Qiang; Zhang Songbao; An Zhu; Duan Yanmin; Zhu Sha; Wei Qiangmin; Wang Lumin

    2006-01-01

    A Ge nano-layer embedded in the surface layer of an amorphous SiO 2 film was fabricated by high-fluence low-energy ion implantation. The component, phase, nano-structure and luminescence properties of the nano-layer were studied by means of Rutherford backscattering, glancing incident X-ray diffraction, laser Raman scattering, transmission electron microscopy and photoluminescence. The relation between nano-particle characteristics and ion fluence was also studied. The results indicate that nano-crystalline Ge and nano-amorphous Ge particles coexist in the nano-layer and the ratio of nano-crystalline Ge to nano-particle Ge increases with increasing ion fluence. The intensity of photoluminescence from the nano-layer increases with increasing ion fluence also. Prepared with certain ion fluences, high-density nano-layers composed of uniform-sized nano-particles can be observed

  12. From equivalence to adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Borowczyk

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to illustrate in which cases the translators use the adaptation when they are confronted with a term related to sociocultural aspects. We will discuss the notions of equivalence and adaptation and their limits in the translation. Some samples from Arte TV news and from the American film Shrek translated into Polish, German and French will be provided as a support for this article.

  13. Pinned equivalence relations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zapletal, Jindřich

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 3 (2011), s. 559-564 ISSN 1073-2780 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100190902; GA MŠk MEB060909; GA MŠk MEB051006 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : equivalence relations Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.743, year: 2011 http://intlpress.com/site/pub/pages/journals/items/mrl/content/vols/0018/0003/a015/index.html

  14. The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Spallation Neutron Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicki, Suzanne F.; Wender, Stephen A.; Mocko, Michael

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides the scientific community with intense sources of neutrons, which can be used to perform experiments supporting civilian and national security research. These measurements include nuclear physics experiments for the defense program, basic science, and the radiation effect programs. This paper focuses on the radiation effects program, which involves mostly accelerated testing of semiconductor parts. When cosmic rays strike the earth's atmosphere, they cause nuclear reactions with elements in the air and produce a wide range of energetic particles. Because neutrons are uncharged, they can reach aircraft altitudes and sea level. These neutrons are thought to be the most important threat to semiconductor devices and integrated circuits. The best way to determine the failure rate due to these neutrons is to measure the failure rate in a neutron source that has the same spectrum as those produced by cosmic rays. Los Alamos has a high-energy and a low-energy neutron source for semiconductor testing. Both are driven by the 800-MeV proton beam from the LANSCE accelerator. The high-energy neutron source at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility uses a bare target that is designed to produce fast neutrons with energies from 100 keV to almost 800 MeV. The measured neutron energy distribution from WNR is very similar to that of the cosmic-ray-induced neutrons in the atmosphere. However, the flux provided at the WNR facility is typically 5×107 times more intense than the flux of the cosmic-ray-induced neutrons. This intense neutron flux allows testing at greatly accelerated rates. An irradiation test of less than an hour is equivalent to many years of neutron exposure due to cosmic-ray neutrons. The low-energy neutron source is located at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center. It is based on a moderated source that provides useful neutrons from subthermal energies to ∼100 keV. The characteristics of these sources, and

  15. Materials International Space Station Experiment-6 (MISSE-6) Atomic Oxygen Fluence Monitor Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Miller, Sharon K.; Waters, Deborah L.

    2010-01-01

    An atomic oxygen fluence monitor was flown as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment-6 (MISSE-6). The monitor was designed to measure the accumulation of atomic oxygen fluence with time as it impinged upon the ram surface of the MISSE 6B Passive Experiment Container (PEC). This was an active experiment for which data was to be stored on a battery-powered data logger for post-flight retrieval and analysis. The atomic oxygen fluence measurement was accomplished by allowing atomic oxygen to erode two opposing wedges of pyrolytic graphite that partially covered a photodiode. As the wedges of pyrolytic graphite erode, the area of the photodiode that is illuminated by the Sun increases. The short circuit current, which is proportional to the area of illumination, was to be measured and recorded as a function of time. The short circuit current from a different photodiode, which was oriented in the same direction and had an unobstructed view of the Sun, was also to be recorded as a reference current. The ratio of the two separate recorded currents should bear a linear relationship with the accumulated atomic oxygen fluence and be independent of the intensity of solar illumination. Ground hyperthermal atomic oxygen exposure facilities were used to evaluate the linearity of the ratio of short circuit current to the atomic oxygen fluence. In flight, the current measurement circuitry failed to operate properly, thus the overall atomic oxygen mission fluence could only be estimated based on the physical erosion of the pyrolytic graphite wedges. The atomic oxygen fluence was calculated based on the knowledge of the space atomic oxygen erosion yield of pyrolytic graphite measured from samples on the MISSE 2. The atomic oxygen fluence monitor, the expected result and comparison of mission atomic oxygen fluence based on the erosion of the pyrolytic graphite and Kapton H atomic oxygen fluence witness samples are presented in this paper.

  16. Calculated characteristics of subcritical assembly with anisotropic transport of neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorin, N.V.; Lipilina, E.N.; Lyutov, V.D.; Saukov, A.I.

    2003-01-01

    There was considered possibility of creating enough sub-critical system that multiply neutron fluence from a primary source by many orders. For assemblies with high neutron tie between parts, it is impossible. That is why there was developed a construction consisting of many units (cascades) having weak feedback with preceding cascades. The feedback attenuation was obtained placing layers of slow neutron absorber and moderators between the cascades of fission material. Anisotropy of fast neutron transport through the layers was used. The system consisted of many identical cascades aligning one by another. Each cascade consists of layers of moderator, fissile material and absorber of slow neutrons. The calculations were carried out using the code MCNP.4a with nuclear data library ENDF/B5. In this construction neutrons spread predominantly in one direction multiplying in each next fissile layer, and they attenuate considerably in the opposite direction. In a calculated construction, multiplication factor of one cascade is about 1.5 and multiplication factor of whole construction composed of n cascades is 1.5 n . Calculated keff value is 0.9 for one cascade and does not exceed 0.98 for a system containing any number of cascades. Therefore the assembly is always sub-critical and therefore it is safe in respect of criticality. There was considered using such a sub-critical assembly to create a powerful neutron fluence for neutron boron-capturing therapy. The system merits and demerits were discussed. (authors)

  17. Detection of spallation neutrons and protons using the natCd activation technique in transmutation experiments at Dubna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manolopoulou, M.; Stoulos, S.; Fragopoulou, M.; Brandt, R.; Westmeier, W.; Krivopustov, M.; Sosnin, A.; Zamani, M.

    2006-01-01

    Various spallation sources have been used to transmute long-lived radioactive waste, mostly making use of the wide energy neutron fluence. In addition to neutrons, a large number of protons and gamma rays are also emitted from these sources. In this paper nat Cd is proved to be a useful activation detector for determining both thermal-epithermal neutron as well as secondary proton fluences. The fluences measured with nat Cd compared with other experimental data and calculations of DCM-DEM code were found to be in reasonable agreement. An accumulation of therma-epithermal neutrons around the center of the target (i.e. after approx. 10 cm) and of secondary protons towards the end of the target is observed

  18. Measurements of 60Co in spoons activated by neutrons during the JCO criticality accident at Tokai-mura in 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparro, J.; Hult, M.; Komura, K.; Arnold, D.; Holmes, L.; Johnston, P.N.; Laubenstein, M.; Neumaier, S.; Reyss, J.-L.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Tagziria, H.; Van Britsom, G.; Vasselli, R.

    2004-01-01

    Neutron activated items from the vicinity of the place where the JCO criticality accident occurred have been used to determine the fluence of neutrons around the facility and in nearby residential areas. By using underground laboratories for measuring the activation products, it is possible to extend the study to also cover radionuclides with very low activities from long-lived radionuclides. The present study describes γ-ray spectrometry measurements undertaken in a range of underground laboratories for the purpose of measuring 60 Co more than 2 years after the criticality event. The measurements show that neutron fluence determined from 60 Co activity is in agreement with previous measurements using the short-lived radionuclides 51 Cr and 59 Fe. Limits on contamination of the samples with 60 Co are evaluated and shown to not greatly affect the utility of neutron fluence determinations using 60 Co activation

  19. Measurements of 60Co in spoons activated by neutrons during the JCO criticality accident at Tokai-mura in 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparro, J; Hult, M; Komura, K; Arnold, D; Holmes, L; Johnston, P N; Laubenstein, M; Neumaier, S; Reyss, J-L; Schillebeeckx, P; Tagziria, H; Van Britsom, G; Vasselli, R

    2004-01-01

    Neutron activated items from the vicinity of the place where the JCO criticality accident occurred have been used to determine the fluence of neutrons around the facility and in nearby residential areas. By using underground laboratories for measuring the activation products, it is possible to extend the study to also cover radionuclides with very low activities from long-lived radionuclides. The present study describes gamma-ray spectrometry measurements undertaken in a range of underground laboratories for the purpose of measuring (60)Co more than 2 years after the criticality event. The measurements show that neutron fluence determined from (60)Co activity is in agreement with previous measurements using the short-lived radionuclides (51)Cr and (59)Fe. Limits on contamination of the samples with (60)Co are evaluated and shown to not greatly affect the utility of neutron fluence determinations using (60)Co activation.

  20. Structural characterization of nanoscale intermetallic precipitates in highly neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprouster, D.J.; Sinsheimer, J.; Dooryhee, E.; Ghose, S.K.; Wells, P.; Stan, T.; Almirall, N.; Odette, G.R.; Ecker, L.E.

    2016-01-01

    Massive, thick-walled pressure vessels are permanent nuclear reactor structures that are exposed to a damaging flux of neutrons from the adjacent core. The neutrons cause embrittlement of the vessel steel that grows with dose (fluence), as manifested by an increasing ductile-to-brittle fracture transition temperature. Extending reactor life requires demonstrating that large safety margins against brittle fracture are maintained at the higher neutron fluence associated with beyond 60 years of service. Here synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction and small angle x-ray scattering measurements are used to characterize highly embrittling nm-scale Mn–Ni–Si precipitates that develop in the irradiated steels at high fluence. These precipitates lead to severe embrittlement that is not accounted for in current regulatory models. Application of the complementary techniques has, for the very first time, successfully identified the crystal structures of the nanoprecipitates, while also yielding self-consistent compositions, volume fractions and size distributions.

  1. Neutron sources in a 24-MV medical linear accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRiviere, P D

    1985-01-01

    During the assembly of the prototype Clinac 2500, a unique opportunity arose to measure the cumulative total neutron yield of the machine as the major subassemblies were added, section by section. Differentiation of the results led to an inventory of the relative strength of the several neutron sources identified. The method utilized the fact that the scattered neutron fluence in a cavity in concrete is nearly uniform throughout the space and proportional to the fast neutron source strength. When normalized to the neutron output of the guide with bend magnet vacuum chamber, the relative neutron source strengths found were target, 1.9; primary collimator, 2.4; steel filter, 0.6; tungsten filter, 1.5; and jaw system, 0.8 open and approximately 2.0 closed. There is reasonable agreement between these measurements and published estimates of the yields from the major components of the treatment head.

  2. Neutrons and fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maynard, C.W.

    1976-01-01

    The production of energy from fusion reactions does not require neutrons in the fundamental sense that they are required in a fission reactor. Nevertheless, the dominant fusion reaction, that between deuterium and tritium, yields a 14 MeV neutron. To contrast a fusion reactor based on this reaction with the fission case, 3 x 10 20 such neutrons produced per gigawatt of power. This is four times as many neutrons as in an equivalent fission reactor and they carry seven times the energy of the fission neutrons. Thus, they dominate the energy recovery problem and create technological problems comparable to the original plasma confinement problem as far as a practical power producing device is concerned. Further contrasts of the fusion and fission cases are presented to establish the general role of neutrons in fusion devices. Details of the energy deposition processes are discussed and those reactions necessary for producing additional tritium are outlined. The relatively high energy flux with its large intensity will activate almost any materials of which the reactor may be composed. This activation is examined from the point of view of decay heat, radiological safety, and long-term storage. In addition, a discussion of the deleterious effects of neutron interactions on materials is given in some detail; this includes the helium and hydrogen producing reactions and displacement rate of the lattice atoms. The various materials that have been proposed for structural purposes, for breeding, reflecting, and moderating neutrons, and for radiation shielding are reviewed from the nuclear standpoint. The specific reactions of interest are taken up for various materials and finally a report is given on the status and prospects of data for fusion studies

  3. Neutron irradiation effects on silicon detectors structure, electrical and mechanical characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabinovich, E.; Golan, G.; Axelevich, A.; Inberg, A.; Oksman, M.; Rosenwaks, I.; Lubarsky, G.; Seidman, A.; Croitoru, N.; Rancoita, P.G.; Rattaggi, M.

    1999-01-01

    Neutron irradiation effects on (p-n) and Schottky-junction silicon detectors were studied. It was shown that neutron interactions with monocrystalline silicon create specific types of microstructure defects with morphology differing according to the level of neutron fluences (Φ). The isolated dislocation loops, formed by interstitial atoms were observed in microstructure images for 10 10 ≤ Φ ≤ 10 12 n/cm 2 . A strong change in the dislocation loops density and a cluster formation was observed for Φ ≥ 10 13 n/cm 2 . A drastic silicon damage was found for fluences over 10 14 n/cm 2 . These fluences created zones enriched with all types of dislocations, covering more than 50 % of the total surface area. A mechanical fragility appeared in that fluence range in a form of microcracks. 10 14 n/cm 2 appears to be a critical value of neutron irradiation because of the radiation damage described above and because the characteristics I f -V f of silicon detectors can be differentiated from those obtained at low fluences. (A.C.)

  4. General Electric PETtrace cyclotron as a neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosko, Andrey

    This research investigates the use of a PETtrace cyclotron produced by General Electric (GE) as a neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The GE PETtrace was chosen for this investigation because this type of cyclotron is popular among nuclear pharmacies and clinics in many countries; it is compact and reliable; it produces protons with energies high enough to produce neutrons with appropriate energy and fluence rate for BNCT and it does not require significant changes in design to provide neutrons. In particular, the standard PETtrace 18O target is considered. The cyclotron efficiency may be significantly increased if unused neutrons produced during radioisotopes production could be utilized for other medical modalities such as BNCT at the same time. The resulting dose from the radiation emitted from the target is evaluated using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP at several depths in a brain phantom for different scattering geometries. Four different moderating materials of various thicknesses were considered: light water, carbon, heavy water, arid Fluental(TM). The fluence rate tally was used to calculate photon and neutron dose, by applying fluence rate-to-dose conversion factors. Fifteen different geometries were considered and a 30-cm thick heavy water moderator was chosen as the most suitable for BNCT with the GE PETtrace cyclotron. According to the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) protocol, the maximum dose to the normal brain is set to 12.5 RBEGy, which for the conditions of using a heavy water moderator, assuming a 60 muA beam current, would be reached with a treatment time of 258 min. Results showed that using a PETtrace cyclotron in this configuration provides a therapeutic ratio of about 2.4 for depths up to 4 cm inside a brain phantom. Further increase of beam current proposed by GE should significantly improve the beam quality or the treatment time and allow treating tumors at greater depths.

  5. Neutron emission from TFTR supershots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, J.D.; Bell, M.G.; Bitter, M.; Budny, R.; Hawryluk, R.; Hill, K.W.; Hsuan, H.; Jassby, D.L.; Johnson, L.C.; LeBlanc, B.; Mansfield, D.; Meade, D.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Mueller, D.; Park, H.; Ramsey, A.; Scott, S.; Synakowski, E.; Taylor, G.; Marmer, E.; Snipes, J.; Terry, J.

    1992-10-01

    Empirical scaling relations are deduced describing the neutron emission from TFTR supershots using a data base that includes all of the supershot plasmas (525) from the 1990 campaign. A physics-based scaling for the neutron emission is derived from the dependence of the central plasma parameters on machine settings and the energy confinement time. This scaling has been used to project the fusion rate for equivalent DT plasmas in TFTR, and to explore machine operation space which optimizes the fusion rate. Increases in neutron emission are possible by either increasing the toroidal magnetic field or further improving the limiter conditioning

  6. Neutron dosimetry using aqueous solutions of lithium acetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakovan, L.J.

    1996-01-01

    A thermal neutron dosimetry system using the 6 Li(n,α) 3 H reaction and liquid scintillation counting of tritium was developed. Lithium acetate was chosen to supply the 6 Li in the aqueous dosimetry solutions. Neutron irradiations were completed using The Ohio State University Research Reactor. After two sets of samples were irradiated, variables in the system such as the mass of lithium acetate in the solutions and the counting window of the liquid scintillation counter used to analyze the sample were chosen. The system was evaluated by completing two sets of 23 minute irradiations with the reactor at 500 kW, 50 kW, 5 kW, and one irradiation at 500 W. The samples irradiated at 500 W were below the threshold of the system, and could not be used. Prompt analysis was essential due to loss of detectable emissions in the dosimetry solutions over time. The thermal neutron fluences calculated with the data from the samples were compared to the fluences determined from gold wire irradiations. The fluence values differed at most by 6%. The fluence values calculated from the samples were consistently less than those determined from the gold wires

  7. Comments on TNT Equivalence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, P.W.

    1994-07-01

    The term ``TNT Equivalence`` is used throughout the explosives and related industries to compare the effects of the output of a given explosive to that of TNT. This is done for technical design reasons in scaling calculation such as for the prediction of blast waves, craters, and structural response, and is also used as a basis for government regulations controlling the shipping, handling and storage of explosive materials, as well as for the siting and design of explosive facilities. TNT equivalence is determined experimentally by several different types of tests, the most common of which include: plate dent, ballistic mortar, trauzl, sand crush, and air blast. All of these tests do not necessarily measure the same output property of the sample explosive. As examples of this, some tests depend simply upon the CJ pressure, some depend upon the PV work in the CJ zone and in the Taylor wave behind the CJ plane, some are functions of the total work which includes that from secondary combustion in the air mixing region of the fireball and are acutely effected by the shape of the pressure-time profile of the wave. Some of the tests incorporate systematic errors which are not readily apparent, and which have a profound effect upon skewing the resultant data. Further, some of the tests produce different TNT Equivalents for the same explosive which are a function of the conditions at which the test is run. This paper describes the various tests used, discusses the results of each test and makes detailed commentary on what the test is actually measuring, how the results may be interpreted, and if and how these results can be predicted by first principals based calculations. Extensive data bases are referred to throughout the paper and used in examples for each point in the commentaries.

  8. Ultra-fast fluence optimization for beam angle selection algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangert, M.; Ziegenhein, P.; Oelfke, U.

    2014-03-01

    Beam angle selection (BAS) including fluence optimization (FO) is among the most extensive computational tasks in radiotherapy. Precomputed dose influence data (DID) of all considered beam orientations (up to 100 GB for complex cases) has to be handled in the main memory and repeated FOs are required for different beam ensembles. In this paper, the authors describe concepts accelerating FO for BAS algorithms using off-the-shelf multiprocessor workstations. The FO runtime is not dominated by the arithmetic load of the CPUs but by the transportation of DID from the RAM to the CPUs. On multiprocessor workstations, however, the speed of data transportation from the main memory to the CPUs is non-uniform across the RAM; every CPU has a dedicated memory location (node) with minimum access time. We apply a thread node binding strategy to ensure that CPUs only access DID from their preferred node. Ideal load balancing for arbitrary beam ensembles is guaranteed by distributing the DID of every candidate beam equally to all nodes. Furthermore we use a custom sorting scheme of the DID to minimize the overall data transportation. The framework is implemented on an AMD Opteron workstation. One FO iteration comprising dose, objective function, and gradient calculation takes between 0.010 s (9 beams, skull, 0.23 GB DID) and 0.070 s (9 beams, abdomen, 1.50 GB DID). Our overall FO time is < 1 s for small cases, larger cases take ~ 4 s. BAS runs including FOs for 1000 different beam ensembles take ~ 15-70 min, depending on the treatment site. This enables an efficient clinical evaluation of different BAS algorithms.

  9. Ultra-fast fluence optimization for beam angle selection algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangert, M; Ziegenhein, P; Oelfke, U

    2014-01-01

    Beam angle selection (BAS) including fluence optimization (FO) is among the most extensive computational tasks in radiotherapy. Precomputed dose influence data (DID) of all considered beam orientations (up to 100 GB for complex cases) has to be handled in the main memory and repeated FOs are required for different beam ensembles. In this paper, the authors describe concepts accelerating FO for BAS algorithms using off-the-shelf multiprocessor workstations. The FO runtime is not dominated by the arithmetic load of the CPUs but by the transportation of DID from the RAM to the CPUs. On multiprocessor workstations, however, the speed of data transportation from the main memory to the CPUs is non-uniform across the RAM; every CPU has a dedicated memory location (node) with minimum access time. We apply a thread node binding strategy to ensure that CPUs only access DID from their preferred node. Ideal load balancing for arbitrary beam ensembles is guaranteed by distributing the DID of every candidate beam equally to all nodes. Furthermore we use a custom sorting scheme of the DID to minimize the overall data transportation. The framework is implemented on an AMD Opteron workstation. One FO iteration comprising dose, objective function, and gradient calculation takes between 0.010 s (9 beams, skull, 0.23 GB DID) and 0.070 s (9 beams, abdomen, 1.50 GB DID). Our overall FO time is < 1 s for small cases, larger cases take ∼ 4 s. BAS runs including FOs for 1000 different beam ensembles take ∼ 15–70 min, depending on the treatment site. This enables an efficient clinical evaluation of different BAS algorithms.

  10. Relating Solar Energetic Particle Event Fluences to Peak Intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, Stephen W.; Ling, Alan G.

    2018-02-01

    Recently we (Kahler and Ling, Solar Phys. 292, 59, 2017: KL) have shown that time-intensity profiles [I(t)] of 14 large solar energetic particle (SEP) events can be fitted with a simple two-parameter fit, the modified Weibull function, which is characterized by shape and scaling parameters [α and β]. We now look for a simple correlation between an event peak energy intensity [Ip] and the time integral of I(t) over the event duration: the fluence [F]. We first ask how the ratio of F/Ip varies for the fits of the 14 KL events and then examine that ratio for three separate published statistical studies of SEP events in which both F and Ip were measured for comparisons of those parameters with various solar-flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) parameters. The three studies included SEP energies from a 4 - 13 MeV band to E > 100 MeV. Within each group of SEP events, we find a very robust correlation (CC > 0.90) in log-log plots of F versus Ip over four decades of Ip. The ratio increases from western to eastern longitudes. From the value of Ip for a given event, F can be estimated to within a standard deviation of a factor of {≤} 2. Log-log plots of two studies are consistent with slopes of unity, but the third study shows plot slopes of { 10 MeV to {>} 100 MeV. This difference is not explained.

  11. Small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering studies of supraatomic structure of synthetic quartz irradiated by fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, V.M.; Lebedev, V.T.; Orlov, S.P.; Golubkov, V.V.; Pevzner, B.Z.; Tolstikhin, I.N.

    2008-01-01

    Quartz nanostructures have been simulated for the investigation into diffusion of gases in the Earth crust. The nanostructure of synthetic quartz irradiated by fast neutrons with energy E n >0.1 MeV was studied by neutron and X-ray small-angle scattering. The range of neutron fluence is of 10 17 cm -2 up to 2x10 -2 0 cm -2 . In the irradiated samples the different kinds of defects such as point-like, extended linear (dislocations) and globular (size ∼100 nm, amorphous phase nuclei) were observed. The density of highly irradiated quartz (fluence 2x10 20 cm -2 ) is shown to decrease by 0.39 g/cm 2 and reach the magnitude of 2.260 g/cm 2 corresponding to 100% metamict phase. The first results of model structures helium saturation have been received [ru

  12. Production and aging of paramagnetic point defects in P-doped floating zone silicon irradiated with high fluence 27 MeV electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joita, A. C.; Nistor, S. V.

    2018-04-01

    Enhancing the long term stable performance of silicon detectors used for monitoring the position and flux of the particle beams in high energy physics experiments requires a better knowledge of the nature, stability, and transformation properties of the radiation defects created over the operation time. We report the results of an electron spin resonance investigation in the nature, transformation, and long term stability of the irradiation paramagnetic point defects (IPPDs) produced by high fluence (2 × 1016 cm-2), high energy (27 MeV) electrons in n-type, P-doped standard floating zone silicon. We found out that both freshly irradiated and aged (i.e., stored after irradiation for 3.5 years at 250 K) samples mainly contain negatively charged tetravacancy and pentavacancy defects in the first case and tetravacancy defects in the second one. The fact that such small cluster vacancy defects have not been observed by irradiation with low energy (below 5 MeV) electrons, but were abundantly produced by irradiation with neutrons, strongly suggests the presence of the same mechanism of direct formation of small vacancy clusters by irradiation with neutrons and high energy, high fluence electrons, in agreement with theoretical predictions. Differences in the nature and annealing properties of the IPPDs observed between the 27 MeV electrons freshly irradiated, and irradiated and aged samples were attributed to the presence of a high concentration of divacancies in the freshly irradiated samples, defects which transform during storage at 250 K through diffusion and recombination processes.

  13. Equivalences of coisotropic submanifolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaetz, Florian; Zambon, Marco

    We study the role that Hamiltonian and symplectic diffeomorphisms play in the deformation problem of coisotropic submanifolds. We prove that the action by Hamiltonian diffeomorphisms corresponds to the gauge-action of the $L_\\infty$-algebra of Oh and Park. Moreover we introduce the notion of exte...... of extended gauge-equivalence and show that in the case of Oh and Park's $L_\\infty$-algebra one recovers the action of symplectic isotopies on coisotropic submanifolds. Finally, we consider the transversally integrable case in detail....

  14. Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Neutron Irradiated Cold-worked Al-1050 and Al-6063 Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munitz, A.; Cotler, A; Talianker, M.

    1998-01-01

    The impact of neutron irradiation on the internal microstructure, mechanical properties and fracture morphology of cold-worked Al-1050 and Al-6063 alloys was studied, using scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and tensile measurements. Specimens consisting of 50 mm long and 6 mm wide gauge sections, were punched out from Al-1050 and Al-6063 23% cold-worked tubes. They were exposed to prolonged neutron irradiation of up to 4.5x10 25 and 8x10 25 thermal neutrons/m 2 (E -3 s -1 . In general, the uniform and total elongation, the yield stress, and the ultimate tensile strength increase as functions of fluence. However, for Al-1050 a decrease in the ultimate tensile strength and yield stress was observed up to a fluence of 1x10 25 thermal neutrons/m 2 which then increase with thermal neutrons fluence. Metallographic examination and fractography for Al-6063 revealed a decrease in the local area reduction of the final fracture necking. This reduction is accompanied by a morphology transition from ductile transgranular shear rupture to a combination of transgranular shear with intergranular dimpled rupture. The intergranular rupture area increases with fluence. In contrast, for Al-1050, fracture morphology remains ductile transgranular shear rupture and the final local area reduction remains almost constant No voids could be observed in either alloy up to the maximum fluence. The dislocation density of cold-worked Al was found to decrease with the thermal neutron fluence. Prolonged annealing of unirradiated cold-worked Al-6063 at 52 degree led to similar results. Thus, it appears that, under our irradiation conditions, whereby the temperature encompassing the samples increases the exposure to this thermal field is the major factor influencing the mechanical properties and microstructure of aluminum alloys

  15. A {mu}TPC detector for the characterization of low energy neutron fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golabek, C., E-mail: cedric.golabek@irsn.fr [Laboratoire de Metrologie et de Dosimetrie des Neutrons, IRSN Cadarache, 13115 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Billard, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut Polytechnique de Grenoble, 53 rue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble (France); Allaoua, A. [Laboratoire de Metrologie et de Dosimetrie des Neutrons, IRSN Cadarache, 13115 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Bosson, G.; Bourrion, O.; Grignon, C.; Guillaudin, O. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut Polytechnique de Grenoble, 53 rue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble (France); Lebreton, L., E-mail: lena.lebreton@irsn.fr [Laboratoire de Metrologie et de Dosimetrie des Neutrons, IRSN Cadarache, 13115 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Mayet, F. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut Polytechnique de Grenoble, 53 rue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble (France); Petit, M. [Laboratoire de Metrologie et de Dosimetrie des Neutrons, IRSN Cadarache, 13115 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Richer, J.-P.; Santos, D. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut Polytechnique de Grenoble, 53 rue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble (France)

    2012-06-21

    The AMANDE facility produces monoenergetic neutron fields from 2 keV to 20 MeV for metrological purposes. To be considered as a reference facility, fluence and energy distributions of neutron fields have to be determined by primary measurement standards. For this purpose, a micro Time Projection Chamber is being developed to be dedicated to measure neutron fields with energy ranging from 8 keV up to 1 MeV. In this work we present simulations showing that such a detector, which allows the measurement of the ionization energy and the 3D reconstruction of the recoil nucleus, provides the determination of neutron energy and fluence of these neutron fields.

  16. Determination of neutron flux densities in WWR-S reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomasek, F.

    1989-04-01

    The method is described of determining neutron flux densities and neutron fluences using activation detectors. The basic definitions and relations for determining reaction rates, fluence and neutron flux as well as the characteristics of some reactions and of sitable activation detectors are reported. The flux densities were determined of thermal and fast neutrons and of gamma quanta in the WWR-S reactor core. The data measured in the period 1984-1987 are tabulated. Cross sections for the individual reactions were determined from spectra measurements processed using program SAND-II and cross section library ENDF-B IV. Neutron flux densities were also measured for the WWR-S reactor vertical channels. (E.J.). 10 figs., 8 tabs., 111 refs

  17. Neutron response study using PADC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Badry, B.A; Hegazy, T.M; Morsy, A.A.; Zaki, M.F.

    2007-01-01

    The results of an experimental work aimed at improving the performances of the Cr-39 nuclear track detector for neutron dosimetry applications. So, a set of Cr-39 plastic detectors was exposed to 252 Cf neutron source, which has the emission rate of 0.68 x 10 8 s ( -1), and neutron dose equivalent rate 1m apart from the source is equal to 3.8 mrem/h. The detection of fast neutrons performed with Cr-39 detector foils, subsequent chemical etching and evaluation of the etched tracks by an automatic track counting system was studied. It is found that the track density grows with the increase of neutron dose and etching time. These results. are compared with previous work. It is found that there is a matching and good agreement with their investigations

  18. Development of simple neutron counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, S.; Hirota, K.

    2014-01-01

    Position sensitive neutron detectors are used for neutron scattering, neutron imaging, and neutron radiography. Developments in neutron detectors are mainly focused on spatial resolution and high counting rate in these fields. After the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster, many simple radiation counters are now marketed in Japan and are useful for estimating the radiation level. However, no simple, equivalent device exists for neutron measurements. In this work, we have developed simple neutron counters (LiM counter and HeM counter) with the following features. In the LiM counter, a 6 Li glass scintillator is employed as a neutron converter for a large dynamic range. A silicon photon MPPC (multi-pixel photon counter) detector is used separately for photon counting, thus reducing the size of the device. In the HeM counter, a 3 He neutron detector is employed. Both counters employ a pulse-height analysis function for ensuring reliable data and display the pulse-height distribution on a graphical liquid crystal display (G-LCD). The LiM counter can be used for about 6 h using a battery, operating at 264 mA and 5.1 V. (author)

  19. Experimental evaluation of dual multiple aperture devices for fluence field modulated x-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, A. J.; Gang, G.; Levinson, R.; Zbijewski, W.; Kawamoto, S.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Stayman, J. W.

    2017-03-01

    Acquisition of CT images with comparable diagnostic power can potentially be achieved with lower radiation exposure than the current standard of care through the adoption of hardware-based fluence-field modulation (e.g. dynamic bowtie filters). While modern CT scanners employ elements such as static bowtie filters and tube-current modulation, such solutions are limited in the fluence patterns that they can achieve, and thus are limited in their ability to adapt to broad classes of patient morphology. Fluence-field modulation also enables new applications such as region-of-interest imaging, task specific imaging, reducing measurement noise or improving image quality. The work presented in this paper leverages a novel fluence modulation strategy that uses "Multiple Aperture Devices" (MADs) which are, in essence, binary filters, blocking or passing x-rays on a fine scale. Utilizing two MAD devices in series provides the capability of generating a large number of fluence patterns via small relative motions between the MAD filters. We present the first experimental evaluation of fluence-field modulation using a dual-MAD system, and demonstrate the efficacy of this technique with a characterization of achievable fluence patterns and an investigation of experimental projection data.

  20. Biphasic Fluence-Response Curves for Phytochrome-Mediated Kalanchoë Seed Germination 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rethy, Roger; Dedonder, Andrée; De Petter, Edwin; Van Wiemeersch, Luc; Fredericq, Henri; De Greef, Jan; Steyaert, Herman; Stevens, Hilde

    1987-01-01

    The fluence-response curves for the effect of two red pulses separated by 24 hours on the germination of Kalanchoe blossfeldiana Poelln. cv Vesuv seeds, incubated on gibberellic acid (GA3) are biphasic for suboptimal concentrations. The response in the low fluence range corresponds with a classical red/far-red reversible phytochrome mediated reaction. GA3 induces an additional response in the very low fluence range, which is also phytochrome mediated. The sensitivity to phytochrome-far-red absorbing form (Pfr), however, is increased about 20,000-fold, so that even far-red fluences become saturating. Both in the very low and low fluence response range, the maximal responses induced by saturating fluences are modulated by the GA3 concentration. GA3 having no direct influence on the phytochrome phototransformations, alters the Pfr requirement and determines the responding seed population fraction in the very low and low fluence range. The effet of GA3 appears to be on the transduction chain of the phytochrome signal. PMID:16665187

  1. Investigation on the neutron beam characteristics for boron neutron capture therapy with 3D and 2D transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodeli, I.; Diop, C.M.; Nimal, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    In the framework of future Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) experiments, where cells and animals irradiations are planned at the research reactor of Strasbourg University, the feasibility to obtain a suitable epithermal neutron beam is investigated. The neutron fluence and spectra calculations in the reactor are performed using the 3D Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI-3 and the 2D SN code TWODANT. The preliminary analysis of Al 2 O 3 and Al-Al 2 O 3 filters configurations are carried out in an attempt to optimize the flux characteristics in the beam tube facility. 7 figs., 7 refs

  2. Incorporating the effects of lateral spread of the primary fluence, into compensator design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reece, P.J.; Hoban, P.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: In this study we extended ideas developed by Faddegon and Pfalzner on the construction of patient specific compensating filters. Their research was essentially focused on formulating a general method for creating compensators using a 3D planning system. In their work Faddegon and Pfalzner utilized a simple attenuation model to convert transmission arrays into filter thickness arrays. The compensators constructed from these arrays produce the primary fluence required to give a uniform dose distribution at a specified depth. This technique does not account for local geometric variations hi compensator scattering conditions. Therefore we have devised a method to incorporate the effects of lateral spread of the primary fluence passing through the compensating filter. A 2D Gaussian kernel, generated from Monte Carlo measurements, was used to model the spread of the primary fluence in the compensating filter. A 'maximum likelihood' optimisation algorithm was employed to deconvolve the kernel from the desired primary fluence to produce a more realistic incident fluence and compensator thickness array. The CMS FOCUS planning system was used to generate transmission maps corresponding to the desired influence of the compensating filter. Two compensating filters were constructed for each map, one using the standard attenuation method and the other with our method. For each method, an assessment was made using film dosimetry, on the degree of correlation between the desired primary fluence and the primary fluence produced by the compensating filter. Our results indicate that for compensating filters which are relatively uniform in thickness, there is good agreement between desired and delivered fluence maps for both methods. For non-uniform compensating filters the attenuation method deviates more notably from the desired fluence map. As expected, both methods also show significant deviations around the edges of the filter. It is anticipated that the work done here

  3. Activation measurements for thermal neutrons. Part J. Evaluation of thermal neutron transmission factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egbert, Stephen D.

    2005-01-01

    In order to relate thermal neutron activation measurements in samples to the calculated free-in-air thermal neutron activation levels given in Chapter 3, use is made of sample transmission factors. Transmission factors account for the modification of the fluence and activation at each sample's in situ location. For the purposes of this discussion, the transmission factor (TF) is defined as the ratio of the in situ sample activation divided by the free-in-air (FIA) activation at a height of 1 m above ground at the same ground range. The procedures for calculation of TF's and example results are presented in this section. (author)

  4. Activation measurements for fast neutrons. Part E. Evaluation of fast neutron 63Ni transmission factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egbert, Stephen D.

    2005-01-01

    The 63 Ni measurements for fast neutrons in copper samples are compared to the calculated free-in-air 63 Ni neutron activation given in Chapter 3 by use of transmission factors. Transmission factors were calculated to account for the modification of the fluence and activation at each sample's in situ location. For the purposes of this discussion, the transmission factor (TF) is defined as the ratio of the in situ sample activation divided by the untilted free-in-air (FIA) activation at a height of 1 m above ground at the same ground range. Examples of the application of TF's will be provided in this section. (author)

  5. Effects of neutron irradiation on resistivity of reactor pressure vessel steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengliang; Shu, Guogang; Liu, Yi; Huang, Yili; Chen, Jun; Duan, Yuangang; Liu, Wei

    2018-02-01

    The embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel owing to fast-neutron irradiation is one of its primary failure mechanisms. In this work, neutron irradiation tests were performed on an RPV steel at a high temperature (565 K) using a neutron irradiation test reactor. In addition, resistivity measurements were performed on the RPV steel both before and after irradiation in a hot laboratory using the four-probe method. The results showed that the resistivity of the RPV steel exhibits nonlinear behaviour with respect to the radiation fluence and that the nonlinearity becomes more pronounced with an increase in the radiation fluence. For instance, when the radiation fluence is 0.1540 dpa and the excitation current is increased from 0.2 mA to 200 mA, the resistivity of the RPV steel decreases by as much as 67.12%. During irradiation embrittlement, the resistivity increases with the fluence. When the radiation fluence is greater than 0.116 dpa, the increase in the resistivity accelerates. When the radiation fluence is less than 0.116 dpa and when an excitation current of 2 mA or 20 mA is used, the relationship between the resistivity and the radiation fluence for the RPV steel is a quadratic one, whereas that between the rate of change in the resistivity and the radiation fluence is a linear one. Thus, the resistivity of RPV steel can be used to characterise its degree of irradiation embrittlement, and resistivity measurements can be employed as a nondestructive evaluation technique for monitoring the degree of irradiation damage experienced by in-service RPV steel.

  6. Time-resolved angular distributions of plume ions from silver at low and medium laser fluence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Schou, Jørgen

    Even at moderate fluence (0.6 -2.4 J/cm2) laser impact on metals in the UV regime results in a significant number of ions emitted from the surface. The ablated particles are largely neutrals at the lowest fluence, but the fraction of ions increases strongly with fluence. We have irradiated silver...... in a vacuum chamber (~ 10-7 mbar) with a Nd:YAG laser at a wavelength of 355 nm and made detailed measurements of the time-resolved angular distribution. The ion flow in different directions has been measured with a hemispherical array of Langmuir probes, by which the time-of-flight spectra, as well...

  7. Water equivalent phantom materials for 192Ir brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Andreas A.; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn; Chofor, Ndimofor

    2015-12-01

    Several solid phantom materials have been tested regarding their suitability as water substitutes for dosimetric measurements in brachytherapy with 192Ir as a typical high energy photon emitter. The radial variations of the spectral photon fluence, of the total, primary and scattered photon fluence and of the absorbed dose to water in the transversal plane of the tested cylindrical phantoms surrounding a centric and coaxially arranged Varian GammaMed afterloading 192Ir brachytherapy source were Monte-Carlo simulated in EGSnrc. The degree of water equivalence of a phantom material was evaluated by comparing the radial dose-to-water profile in the phantom material with that in water. The phantom size was varied over a large range since it influences the dose contribution by scattered photons with energies diminished by single and multiple Compton scattering. Phantom axis distances up to 10 cm were considered as clinically relevant. Scattered photons with energies reaching down into the 25 keV region dominate the photon fluence at source distances exceeding 3.5 cm. The tested phantom materials showed significant differences in the degree of water equivalence. In phantoms with radii up to 10 cm, RW1, RW3, Solid Water, HE Solid Water, Virtual Water, Plastic Water DT, and Plastic Water LR phantoms show excellent water equivalence with dose deviations from a water phantom not exceeding 0.8%, while Original Plastic Water (as of 2015), Plastic Water (1995), Blue Water, polyethylene, and polystyrene show deviations up to 2.6%. For larger phantom radii up to 30 cm, the deviations for RW1, RW3, Solid Water, HE Solid Water, Virtual Water, Plastic Water DT, and Plastic Water LR remain below 1.4%, while Original Plastic Water (as of 2015), Plastic Water (1995), Blue Water, polyethylene, and polystyrene produce deviations up to 8.1%. PMMA plays a separate role, with deviations up to 4.3% for radii not exceeding 10 cm, but below 1% for radii up to 30 cm. As suggested by

  8. Establishing Substantial Equivalence: Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovegrove, Alison; Salt, Louise; Shewry, Peter R.

    Wheat is a major crop in world agriculture and is consumed after processing into a range of food products. It is therefore of great importance to determine the consequences (intended and unintended) of transgenesis in wheat and whether genetically modified lines are substantially equivalent to those produced by conventional plant breeding. Proteomic analysis is one of several approaches which can be used to address these questions. Two-dimensional PAGE (2D PAGE) remains the most widely available method for proteomic analysis, but is notoriously difficult to reproduce between laboratories. We therefore describe methods which have been developed as standard operating procedures in our laboratory to ensure the reproducibility of proteomic analyses of wheat using 2D PAGE analysis of grain proteins.

  9. Neutron guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Geoffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    A neutron guide in which lengths of cylindrical glass tubing have rectangular glass plates properly dimensioned to allow insertion into the cylindrical glass tubing so that a sealed geometrically precise polygonal cross-section is formed in the cylindrical glass tubing. The neutron guide provides easier alignment between adjacent sections than do the neutron guides of the prior art.

  10. Energetic identification of ions of very low fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mut C, D.A.; Balcazar, M.

    2005-01-01

    The calibration of 2 types of plastics is presented (cellulose nitrate and polycarbonate) that detect and identify the energy of helium slight ions (1.5 to 10 MeV) and protons (0.3 to 6 MeV) in flows so low of a single particle /cm 2 . This methodology is of importance in radiological protection to identify the actinides 232 Th, 241 Am, 238 U, 235 U, 237 Np by means of its alpha emissions, or to carry out neutron spectroscopy in an ignored energy field by protons retrocession. The ion identification is adjusted for all the cases to a simple expression of the exponential type. The comparison is achieved among detection efficiencies for the detectors. (Author)

  11. A slow neutron polarimeter for the measurement of parity-odd neutron rotary power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, W. M.; Anderson, E.; Bass, T. D.; Dawkins, J. M.; Fry, J.; Haddock, C.; Horton, J. C.; Luo, D.; Micherdzinska, A. M.; Walbridge, S. B. [Indiana University and Center for the Exploration of Energy and Matter, 2401 Milo B. Sampson Lane, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States); Barrón-Palos, L.; Maldonado-Velázquez, M. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad de México, D.F. 04510, México (Mexico); Bass, C. D. [LeMoyne College, 1419 Salt Springs Road, Syracuse, New York 13214 (United States); Crawford, B. E. [Gettysburg College, 300 North Washington Street, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania 17325 (United States); Crawford, C. [University of Kentucky, 177 Chem.-Phys. Building, 505 Rose Street, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0055 (United States); Esposito, D. [University of Dayton, 300 College Park, Dayton, Ohio 45469 (United States); Gardiner, H. [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Gan, K. [The George Washington University, 2121 I Street N.W., Washington, District of Columbia 20052 (United States); Heckel, B. R.; Swanson, H. E., E-mail: swanson@npl.washington.edu [University of Washington/Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, Box 354290, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); and others

    2015-05-15

    We present the design, description, calibration procedure, and an analysis of systematic effects for an apparatus designed to measure the rotation of the plane of polarization of a transversely polarized slow neutron beam as it passes through unpolarized matter. This device is the neutron optical equivalent of a crossed polarizer/analyzer pair familiar from light optics. This apparatus has been used to search for parity violation in the interaction of polarized slow neutrons in matter. Given the brightness of existing slow neutron sources, this apparatus is capable of measuring a neutron rotary power of dϕ/dz = 1 × 10{sup −7} rad/m.

  12. Synovectomy by Neutron capture; Sinovectomia por captura de neutrones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H.R.; Torres M, C. [Centro Regional de Estudios Nucleares, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, C. Cipres 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    1998-12-31

    The Synovectomy by Neutron capture has as purpose the treatment of the rheumatoid arthritis, illness which at present does not have a definitive curing. This therapy requires a neutron source for irradiating the articulation affected. The energy spectra and the intensity of these neutrons are fundamental since these neutrons induce nuclear reactions of capture with Boron-10 inside the articulation and the freely energy of these reactions is transferred at the productive tissue of synovial liquid, annihilating it. In this work it is presented the neutron spectra results obtained with moderator packings of spherical geometry which contains in its center a Pu{sup 239} Be source. The calculations were realized through Monte Carlo method. The moderators assayed were light water, heavy water base and the both combination of them. The spectra obtained, the average energy, the neutron total number by neutron emitted by source, the thermal neutron percentage and the dose equivalent allow us to suggest that the moderator packing more adequate is what has a light water thickness 0.5 cm (radius 2 cm) and 24.5 cm heavy water (radius 26.5 cm). (Author)

  13. Aging and Embrittlement of High Fluence Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Was, gary; Jiao, Zhijie; der ven, Anton Van; Bruemmer, Stephen; Edwards, Dan

    2012-12-31

    Irradiation of austenitic stainless steels results in the formation of dislocation loops, stacking fault tetrahedral, Ni-Si clusters and radiation-induced segregation (RIS). Of these features, it is the formation of precipitates which is most likely to impact the mechanical integrity at high dose. Unlike dislocation loops and RIS, precipitates exhibit an incubation period that can extend from 10 to 46 dpa, above which the cluster composition changes and a separate phase, (G-phase) forms. Both neutron and heavy ion irradiation showed that these clusters develop slowly and continue to evolve beyond 100 dpa. Overall, this work shows that the irradiated microstructure features produced by heavy ion irradiation are remarkably comparable in nature to those produced by neutron irradiation at much lower dose rates. The use of a temperature shift to account for the higher damage rate in heavy ion irradiation results in a fairly good match in the dislocation loop microstructure and the precipitate microstructure in austenitic stainless steels. Both irradiations also show segregation of the same elements and in the same directions, but to achieve comparable magnitudes, heavy ion irradiation must be conducted at a much higher temperature than that which produces a match with loops and precipitates. First-principles modeling has confirmed that the formation of Ni-Si precipitates under irradiation is likely caused by supersaturation of solute to defect sinks caused by highly correlated diffusion of Ni and Si. Thus, the formation and evolution of Ni-Si precipitates at high dose in austenitic stainless steels containing Si is inevitable.

  14. Stuttering Equivalence for Parity Games

    OpenAIRE

    Cranen, Sjoerd; Keiren, Jeroen J. A.; Willemse, Tim A. C.

    2011-01-01

    We study the process theoretic notion of stuttering equivalence in the setting of parity games. We demonstrate that stuttering equivalent vertices have the same winner in the parity game. This means that solving a parity game can be accelerated by minimising the game graph with respect to stuttering equivalence. While, at the outset, it might not be clear that this strategy should pay off, our experiments using typical verification problems illustrate that stuttering equivalence speeds up sol...

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of neutron tomography for palm weevil detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alghamdi, A.A.

    2012-01-01

    The use of neutron for Non Destructive Imaging (NDI) techniques has many advantages over other (NDI) methods. Using well-established X-ray imaging techniques can provide easy and direct results with some limitations where the sensitivity for light elements is very low. On the other hand, neutron is highly sensitive to water content and can provide extra qualitative information. Comparing the results of the two imaging techniques are investigated in this work with the aim of identifying the palm weevil. At larva stage of the weevil's life it is characterized by highly water content in the trunk of the palm tree which itself composed of spongy watery texture in some types of palm tree. MCNPX 2.5.0 code with neutron radiography tally was used to obtain the 2D projection then reconstructed to 3D tomography image using OSCaR post processing package. The neutron and photon mesh tallies is utilized to study the neutron and photon fluences from monoenergetic thermal neutron beam and neutron spectrum. There are fundamental difficulties in neutron detection which result in misleading information arises from neutron scattering when constructing cone beam CT neutron images, however, neutron radiography provide better methods for the weevil detection from 2D projection. (author)

  16. The neutron and low-energy gamma operational dosimetry in Melox plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devita, A.D.

    2006-01-01

    M.E.L.O.X., subsidiary of A.R.E.V.A., produce M.O.X. fuels, a mixture of uranium and plutonium oxides. With the use in the process of plutonium oxide, there is a risk of external exposure to neutrons and low -energy gamma rays. By their characteristics, both these types of radiation are difficult to measure. The difficulty in measuring neutron doses lies in the fact that the fluence -to-dose equivalent conversion factor varies with the neutron energy level. In low -energy gamma (between 20 and 60 keV) dose measurement, the problem is detection using an electronic system. Just some years ago, very few industrial players were tempted to develop dosimeters in these areas in view of the poor demand and market prospects. Furthermore, radiation protection specialists needed a highly functional and robust direct reading dosimeters or, in other words, a device that was simple, reliable, inexpensive, small, and quick and easy to use in a wide range of working environments that could vary in terms of both the workstation and external exposure. In addition, at sites such as Melox, where company employees work alongside personnel from outside companies, the same types of dosimeters must be used so that dose -related data can be managed globally in one data base. Two technical solutions are available for neutron operational dosimetry - spectrometer-dosimeters and calibration dosimeters. Melox has opted for the use of calibration dosimeters. The reasons for this choice (technical, financial and organizational criteria) are given in this presentation. Before and during the various campaigns of M.O.X. fuels, the spectral characteristics relating to neutron fluence at different workstations and representative of personnel exposure levels were determined. A reference spectrometer was then used to determine the transfer function between fluence and dose in order to calibrate passive and operational dosimeters appropriately.The methodology to be set up should guarantee good

  17. What is an acceptably smoothed fluence? Dosimetric and delivery considerations for dynamic sliding window IMRT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Clivio

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study summarised in this report aimed to investigate the interplay between fluence complexity, dose calculation algorithms, dose calculation spatial resolution and delivery characteristics (monitor units, effective field width and dose delivery against dose prediction agreement was investigated. A sample set of complex planning cases was selected and tested using a commercial treatment planning system capable of inverse optimisation and equipped with tools to tune fluence smoothness. Methods A set of increasingly smoothed fluence patterns was correlated to a generalised expression of the Modulation Index (MI concept, in nature independent from the specific planning system used that could therefore be recommended as a predictor to score fluence "quality" at a very early stage of the IMRT QA process. Fluence complexity was also correlated to delivery accuracy and characteristics in terms of number of MU, dynamic window width and agreement between calculation and measurement (expressed as percentage of field area with a γ > 1 (%FA when comparing calculated vs. delivered modulated dose maps. Different resolutions of the calculation grid and different photon dose algorithms (pencil beam and anisotropic analytical algorithm were used for the investigations. Results and Conclusion i MI can be used as a reliable parameter to test different approaches/algorithms to smooth fluences implemented in a TPS, and to identify the preferable default values for the smoothing parameters if appropriate tools are implemented; ii a MI threshold set at MI

  18. Optical properties tailoring by high fluence implantation of Ag ions on sapphire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, C.; Silva, R.C. da; Wemans, A.; Maneira, M.J.P.; Kozanecki, A.; Alves, E.

    2006-01-01

    Optical and structural properties of single crystalline α-Al 2 O 3 were changed by the implantation of high fluences of Ag ions. Colourless transparent (101-bar 0) sapphire samples were implanted at room temperature with 160keV silver ions and fluences up to 1x10 17 Agcm -2 . Surface amorphization is observed at the fluence of 6x10 16 Agcm -2 . Except for the lower fluences (below 6x10 16 Agcm -2 ) the optical absorption spectra reveal the presence of a band peaking in the region 450-500nm, depending on the retained fluence. This band has been attributed to the presence of silver colloids, being thus 1x10 16 Agcm -2 below the threshold for colloid formation during the implantation. Annealing in oxidizing atmosphere promotes the recrystallization along with segregation of Ag followed by loss through evaporation. Recrystallization is retarded for annealing in reducing atmosphere and the Ag profile displays now a double peak structure after evaporation. Playing with the implantation fluence, temperature and annealing atmosphere controllable shifts of the position and intensity of the optical bands in the visible were achieved

  19. Two solar proton fluence models based on ground level enhancement observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raukunen, Osku; Vainio, Rami; Tylka, Allan J.; Dietrich, William F.; Jiggens, Piers; Heynderickx, Daniel; Dierckxsens, Mark; Crosby, Norma; Ganse, Urs; Siipola, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) constitute an important component of the radiation environment in interplanetary space. Accurate modeling of SEP events is crucial for the mitigation of radiation hazards in spacecraft design. In this study we present two new statistical models of high energy solar proton fluences based on ground level enhancement (GLE) observations during solar cycles 19-24. As the basis of our modeling, we utilize a four parameter double power law function (known as the Band function) fits to integral GLE fluence spectra in rigidity. In the first model, the integral and differential fluences for protons with energies between 10 MeV and 1 GeV are calculated using the fits, and the distributions of the fluences at certain energies are modeled with an exponentially cut-off power law function. In the second model, we use a more advanced methodology: by investigating the distributions and relationships of the spectral fit parameters we find that they can be modeled as two independent and two dependent variables. Therefore, instead of modeling the fluences separately at different energies, we can model the shape of the fluence spectrum. We present examples of modeling results and show that the two methodologies agree well except for a short mission duration (1 year) at low confidence level. We also show that there is a reasonable agreement between our models and three well-known solar proton models (JPL, ESP and SEPEM), despite the differences in both the modeling methodologies and the data used to construct the models.

  20. The Production of Low-energy Neutrons in Solar Flares and the Importance of Their Detection in the Inner Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, R. J.; Kozlovsky, B.; Share, G. H.

    2012-09-01

    Neutron detectors on spacecraft in the inner heliosphere can observe the low-energy (computer code incorporating updated neutron-production cross sections for the proton and α-particle reactions with heavier elements at all ion energies, especially at low energies (E ion Mercury has such a detector. We conclude that a full understanding of ion acceleration, transport, and interaction at the Sun requires observation of both neutrons and gamma rays with detectors of comparable sensitivity. We find that the neutron-capture line fluence at 1 AU is comparable to the 1-10 MeV neutron fluence at 0.5 AU, and therefore as effective for revealing low-energy ion acceleration. However, as the distance from the Sun to the neutron detector decreases, the tremendous increase of the low-energy neutron flux allows exploration of ion acceleration in weak flares not previously observable and may reveal acceleration at other sites not previously detected where low-energy neutrons could be the only high-energy signature of ion acceleration. Also, a measurement of the low-energy neutron spectrum will provide important information about the accelerated-ion spectrum that is not available from the capture line fluence measurement alone.

  1. Dosimetry in mixed neutron-gamma fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remec, I.

    1998-04-01

    The gamma field accompanying neutrons may, in certain circumstances, play an important role in the analysis of neutron dosimetry and even in the interpretation of radiation induced steel embrittlement. At the High Flux Isotope Reactor pressure vessel the gamma induced reactions dominate the responses of 237 Np and 238 U dosimeters, and 9 Be helium accumulation fluence monitors. The gamma induced atom displacement rate in steel is higher than corresponding neutron rate, and is the cause of ''accelerated embrittlement'' of HFIR materials. In a large body of water, adjacent to a fission plate, photofissions contribute significantly to the responses of fission monitors and need to be taken into account if the measurements are used for the qualification of the transport codes and cross-section libraries

  2. New recommendations for dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, G.

    1985-01-01

    In its report 39, the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), has defined four new quantities for the determination of dose equivalents from external sources: the ambient dose equivalent, the directional dose equivalent, the individual dose equivalent, penetrating and the individual dose equivalent, superficial. The rationale behind these concepts and their practical application are discussed. Reference is made to numerical values of these quantities which will be the subject of a coming publication from the International Commission on Radiological Protection, ICRP. (Author)

  3. Recent development of instruments at IRSN for neutron spectrometry at medical facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacoste, V.; Serre, S.; Asselineau, B.; Gressier, V.; Guerre-Chaley, J.F.; Lebreton, L.; Martin, A.; Pelcot, G.; Pepino, M.; Vanryckeghem, L.; Monnin Parietti, C.; Amgarou, K.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Cancer constitutes the major human epidemic and its incidence on the public health is very considerable. Fortunately and thanks to the incessant progress in medicine, more than half of cases in France could be cured now. Indeed, radiotherapy, using for instance high-energy linear accelerators (LINACs) to irradiate tumor tissues with direct mono-energetic electrons or with Bremsstrahlung photon spectra, is one of the most effective medical treatments for this malign illness. The present status of the national radiotherapy services is represented by more than 180 facilities and their application is in continuous evolution. However, the majority of these LINACs operates at acceleration potentials above 10 MV; so that, they are able to generate secondary neutrons via photonuclear (γ, n) and electronuclear (e,e'n) giant dipole resonance reactions with the gantry heavy material components. This parasite radiation, which is approximately isotropic and not confined within the primary beam field, undergoes further interactions with the accelerator structure as well as with the concrete walls and other furniture in the treatment room, including the patient. Consequently, whole-body exposure both to neutrons and to the subsequent induced radioactivity may suppose a potential hazard to the patient himself and to the working staff. Besides photon and electron beams, proton or heavier charged particles are increasingly used for cancer treatment as they allow local and efficient irradiation of the well-defined melanoma volume, without compromising the neighboring healthy organs. In these cases, the energy of the primary beams can be quite high, up to several hundred's of MeV's. Under these conditions, a secondary high energy radiation field, consisting mainly of neutrons, is generated by the interactions of the protons or charged particles with the beam line materials and the patient. The experimental determination of the neutron fluence energy distribution is of

  4. Neutron physics

    CERN Document Server

    Reuss, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Originally just an offshoot of nuclear physics, neutron physics soon became a branch of physics in its own right. It deals with the movement of neutrons in nuclear reactors and ail the nuclear reactions they trigger there, particularly the fission of heavy nuclei which starts a chain reaction to produce energy. Neutron Physics covers the whole range of knowledge of this complex science, discussing the basics of neutron physics and some principles of neutron physics calculations. Because neutron physics is the essential part of reactor physics, it is the main subject taught to students of Nuclear Engineering. This book takes an instructional approach for that purpose. Neutron Physics is also intended for ail physicists and engineers involved in development or operational aspects of nuclear power.

  5. Two-group Current-equivalent Parameters for Control Rod Cells. Autocode Programme CRCC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norinder, O.; Nyman, K.

    1962-06-15

    In two-group neutron diffusion calculations there is mostly necessary to describe the influence of control rods by equivalent homogeneous two-group parameters in regions about the control rods. The problem is solved for a control rod in a medium characterized by two-group parameters. The property of fast and thermal neutr. on current equivalence is selected to obtain equivalent two-group parameters for a homogeneous cell with the same radius as the control rod cell. For the parameters determined one obtains the same fast and thermal neutron current into the rod cell and the equivalent cell independent of the fast and thermal flux amplitudes on the cell boundaries. The equivalent parameters are obtained as a solution of a system of transcendental equations. A Ferranti Mercury Autocode performing the solution is described. Calculated equivalent parameters for control rods in a heavy water lattice are given for some representative cases.

  6. Neutron irradiation effects on spark plasma sintered boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buyuk, B.; Cengiz, M.; Tugrul, A.; Ozer, S.; Yucel, O.; Goller, G.; Sahin, F.C.; Lastovski, S.B.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, spark plasma sintered boron carbide (B 4 C) was examined against neutrons. The specimens were ir-radiated by reactor neutrons (include both thermal and fast neutrons) up to fluence of 1.37x10 21 n*m -2 . Thermal and fast neutrons cause swelling by different interactions with boron ( 10 B) atoms in the related materials. X-Ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images were investigated for initial and irradiated samples. In addition, lattice parameters and unit cell volumes were calculated for the samples. The swelling percentages were calculated to be within a range of 0.49-3.80 % (average 1.70 %) for the outer surface of the materials for applied neutron irradiation doses. (authors)

  7. Neutron Electric Dipole Moment on the Lattice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Boram

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available For the neutron to have an electric dipole moment (EDM, the theory of nature must have T, or equivalently CP, violation. Neutron EDM is a very good probe of novel CP violation in beyond the standard model physics. To leverage the connection between measured neutron EDM and novel mechanism of CP violation, one requires the calculation of matrix elements for CP violating operators, for which lattice QCD provides a first principle method. In this paper, we review the status of recent lattice QCD calculations of the contributions of the QCD Θ-term, the quark EDM term, and the quark chromo-EDM term to the neutron EDM.

  8. Neutron Electric Dipole Moment on the Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Boram; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Gupta, Rajan

    2018-03-01

    For the neutron to have an electric dipole moment (EDM), the theory of nature must have T, or equivalently CP, violation. Neutron EDM is a very good probe of novel CP violation in beyond the standard model physics. To leverage the connection between measured neutron EDM and novel mechanism of CP violation, one requires the calculation of matrix elements for CP violating operators, for which lattice QCD provides a first principle method. In this paper, we review the status of recent lattice QCD calculations of the contributions of the QCD Θ-term, the quark EDM term, and the quark chromo-EDM term to the neutron EDM.

  9. Studies of neutron irradiation of avalanche photodiodes using sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf

    CERN Document Server

    Musienko, Y; Ruuska, D; Swain, J D

    2000-01-01

    Results on the radiation hardness of photodiodes to fast neutrons are presented. Four photodiodes (three avalanche photodiodes from two manufacturers, and one PIN photodiode) were exposed to neutrons from a sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The effects of this radiation on many parameters such as gain, intrinsic dark current, quantum efficiency, noise, capacitance, and voltage and temperature coefficients of the gain for these devices for fluences up to approx 2x10 sup 1 sup 3 neutrons/cm sup 2 are shown and discussed. While degradation of APDs occurred during neutron irradiation, they remained photosensitive devices with gain.

  10. Neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, Eiichi

    1988-01-01

    The thermal neutron absorption coefficient is essentially different from the X-ray absorption coefficient. Each substance has a characteristic absorption coefficient regardless of its density. Neutron deams have the following features: (1) neutrons are not transmitted efficiently by low molecular weight substances, (2) they are transmitted efficiently by heavy metals, and (3) the transmittance differs among isotopes. Thus, neutron beams are suitable for cheking for foreign matters in heavy metals and testing of composites consisting of both heavy and light materials. A neutron source generates fast neutrons, which should be converted into thermal neutrons by reducing their energy. Major neutron souces include nuclear reactors, radioisotopes and particle accelerators. Photographic films and television systems are mainly used to observe neutron transmission images. Computers are employed for image processing, computerized tomography and three-dimensional analysis. The major applications of neutron radiography include inspection of neclear fuel; evaluation of material for airplane; observation of fuel in the engine and oil in the hydraulic systems in airplanes; testing of composite materials; etc. (Nogami, K.)

  11. Measurements of {sup 60}Co in spoons activated by neutrons during the JCO criticality accident at Tokai-mura in 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasparro, J.; Hult, M. E-mail: mikael.hult@irmm.jrc.be; Komura, K.; Arnold, D.; Holmes, L.; Johnston, P.N.; Laubenstein, M.; Neumaier, S.; Reyss, J.-L.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Tagziria, H.; Van Britsom, G.; Vasselli, R

    2004-07-01

    Neutron activated items from the vicinity of the place where the JCO criticality accident occurred have been used to determine the fluence of neutrons around the facility and in nearby residential areas. By using underground laboratories for measuring the activation products, it is possible to extend the study to also cover radionuclides with very low activities from long-lived radionuclides. The present study describes {gamma}-ray spectrometry measurements undertaken in a range of underground laboratories for the purpose of measuring {sup 60}Co more than 2 years after the criticality event. The measurements show that neutron fluence determined from {sup 60}Co activity is in agreement with previous measurements using the short-lived radionuclides {sup 51}Cr and {sup 59}Fe. Limits on contamination of the samples with {sup 60}Co are evaluated and shown to not greatly affect the utility of neutron fluence determinations using {sup 60}Co activation.

  12. Effects of the neutronic irradiation on the impact tests. Efectos de la irradiacion neutronica sobre los ensayos de resiliencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapea, J.; Perosanz, F.J.; Hernandez, M.T.

    1993-01-01

    The changes that the Charpy curves suffer when steel is exposed to neutronic fluence are studied. Three steels with different chemical composition were chosen, two of them (JPF and JPJ) being treated at only one neutronic fluence, while the last one (JRQ) was irradiated at three fluences. In this way, it was possible to compare the effect of increasing the neutronic dose, and to study the experimental results as a function of the steel chemical composition. Two characteristic facts have been observed: the displacement of the curve at higher temperatures, and decrease of the upper shelf energy (USE). The mechanical recovery of the materials after two different thermal treatments is also described, and a comparation between the experimental results obtained and the damage prediction formulas given by different regulatory international organisms in the nuclear field is established. Author. 11 refs.

  13. Fast neutron response of coumarin in water and heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, D.; Kher, R.K.; Gopakumar, K.; Bhandari, N.S.

    1979-01-01

    Response of coumarin in aqueous solution has been studied earlier for gamma rays and fast neutrons by fluorescence measurement. For further fast neutron studies, two systems viz coumarin in H 2 0 and coumarin in D 2 0, were irradiated with fast neutrons in SNIF facility in the swimming pool type APSARA reactor at Trombay. Neutron fluence was estimated by measuring induced activity in sulphur pellet and associated gamma radiation was estimated using CaS0 4 :Dy TLD powder. The KERMA values were calculated for H 2 0 and D 2 0, assuming modified fission spectrum for fast neutron in SNIF position, and they were in the ratio of 2:1. Response of a chemical dosimetric system is expected to be proportional to the absorbed dose in the respective system for the same neutron fluence. This was experimentally found to be the case for coumarin in H 2 0 or D 2 0. These results are likely to be true in general for any aqueous chemical system. The limitations of using such a dual system for dosimetry in a mixed field is discussed. (author)

  14. Method to determine the strength of a neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H.R.; Manzanares A, E.; Hernandez D, V.M.; Chacon R, A.; Mercado, G.A. [UAZ, A.P. 336, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico); Gallego, E.; Lorente, A. [Depto. Ingenieria Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    The use of a gamma-ray spectrometer with a 3 {phi} x 3 NaI(Tl) detector, with a moderator sphere has been studied in the aim to measure the neutron fluence rate and to determine the source strength. Moderators with a large amount of hydrogen are able to slowdown and thermalize neutrons; once thermalized there is a probability that thermal neutron to be captured by hydrogen producing 2.22 MeV prompt gamma-ray. The pulse-height spectrum collected in a multicharmel analyzer shows a photopeak around 2.22 MeV whose net area is proportional to total neutron fluence rate and to the neutron source strength. The characteristics of this system were determined by a Monte Carlo study using the MCNP 4C code, where a detailed model of the Nal(Tl) was utilized. As moderators 3, 5, and 10 inches-diameter spheres where utilized and the response was calculated for monoenergetic and isotopic neutrons sources. (Author)

  15. Personnel neutron dosimetry using TLD elements at PNC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiguro, Hideharu

    1985-01-01

    The evaluation method of neutron dose equivalent was studied on the basis of the albedo type neutron dosimetory to design the personnel dosimeter. The dosimeter was composed of three 6 Li 2 10 B 4 O 7 (Cu) TL elements and one 7 Li 2 11 B 4 O 7 (Cu) element. The equations for assessing thermal, epithermal and fast neutron dose equivalents were derived by 252 Cf, 241 Am-Be and PuO 2 neutron sources. The minimum detectable amount of 6 Li 2 10 B 4 O 7 (Cu) element to thermal neutron was 0.02 m rem. The neutron dose equivalent and the gamma one were evaluated separately within about 20 % error in the mixed radiation field. (author)

  16. SU-F-T-289: MLC Fluence Sonogram Based Delivery Quality Assurance for Bilateral Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiyagarajan, Rajesh; Karrthick, KP; Kataria, Tejinder; Mahendran, Ramu; Selvan, Tamil; Duraikannu, Palani [Division of Radiation Oncology, Medanta The Medicity, Gurgaon, Haryana (India); Raj, Nambi [Department of Physics, School of Advanced sciences, VIT University, Vellore (India); Arunai, N

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Performing DQA for Bilateral (B-L) breast tomotherapy is a challenging task due to the limitation of any commercially available detector array or film. Aim of this study is to perform DQA for B-L breast tomotherapy plan using MLC fluence sinogram. Methods: Treatment plan was generated on Tomotherapy system for B-L breast tumour. B-L breast targets were given 50.4 Gy prescribed over 28 fractions. Plan is generated with 6 MV photon beam & pitch was set to 0.3. As the width of the total target is 39 cm (left & right) length is 20 cm. DQA plan delivered without any phantom on the mega voltage computed tomography (MCVT) detector system. The pulses recorded by MVCT system were exported to the delivery analysis software (Tomotherapy Inc.) for reconstruction. The detector signals are reconstructed to a sonogram and converted to MLC fluence sonogram. The MLC fluence sinogram compared with the planned fluence sinogram. Also point dose measured with cheese phantom and ionization chamber to verify the absolute dose component Results: Planned fluence sinogram and reconstructed MLC fluence sinogram were compared using Gamma metric. MLC positional difference and intensity of the beamlet were used as parameters to evaluate gamma. 3 mm positional difference and 3% beamlet intensity difference were used set for gamma calculation. A total of 26784 non-zero beamlets were included in the analysis out of which 161 beamlets had gamma more than 1. The gamma passing rate found to be 99.4%. Point dose measurements were within 1.3% of the calculated dose. Conclusion: MLC fluence sinogram based delivery quality assurance performed for bilateral breast irradiation. This would be a suitable alternate for large volume targets like bilateral breast, Total body irradiation etc. However conventional method of DQA should be used to validate this method periodically.

  17. Neutron detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Andrew C [Knoxville, TN; Jardret,; Vincent, D [Powell, TN

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  18. Fusion neutronics

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yican

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a systematic and comprehensive introduction to fusion neutronics, covering all key topics from the fundamental theories and methodologies, as well as a wide range of fusion system designs and experiments. It is the first-ever book focusing on the subject of fusion neutronics research. Compared with other nuclear devices such as fission reactors and accelerators, fusion systems are normally characterized by their complex geometry and nuclear physics, which entail new challenges for neutronics such as complicated modeling, deep penetration, low simulation efficiency, multi-physics coupling, etc. The book focuses on the neutronics characteristics of fusion systems and introduces a series of theories and methodologies that were developed to address the challenges of fusion neutronics, and which have since been widely applied all over the world. Further, it introduces readers to neutronics design’s unique principles and procedures, experimental methodologies and technologies for fusion systems...

  19. A High Temperature-Tolerant and Radiation-Resistant In-Core Neutron Sensor for Advanced Reactors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Lei; Miller, Don

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this project are to develop a small and reliable gallium nitride (GaN) neutron sensor that is capable of withstanding high neutron fluence and high temperature, isolating gamma background, and operating in a wide dynamic range. The first objective will be the understanding of the fundamental materials properties and electronic response of a GaN semiconductor materials and device in an environment of high temperature and intense neutron field. To achieve such goal, an in-situ study of electronic properties of GaN device such as I-V, leakage current, and charge collection efficiency (CCE) in high temperature using an external neutron beam will be designed and implemented. We will also perform in-core irradiation of GaN up to the highest yet fast neutron fluence and an off-line performance evaluation.

  20. Theoretical and experimental study of the dark signal in CMOS image sensors affected by neutron radiation from a nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yuanyuan; Wang, Zujun; He, Baoping; Yao, Zhibin; Liu, Minbo; Ma, Wuying; Sheng, Jiangkun; Dong, Guantao; Jin, Junshan

    2017-12-01

    The CMOS image sensors (CISs) are irradiated with neutron from a nuclear reactor. The dark signal in CISs affected by neutron radiation is studied theoretically and experimentally. The Primary knock-on atoms (PKA) energy spectra for 1 MeV incident neutrons are simulated by Geant4. And the theoretical models for the mean dark signal, dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU) and dark signal distribution versus neutron fluence are established. The results are found to be in good agreement with the experimental outputs. Finally, the dark signal in the CISs under the different neutron fluence conditions is estimated. This study provides the theoretical and experimental evidence for the displacement damage effects on the dark signal CISs.

  1. Theoretical and experimental study of the dark signal in CMOS image sensors affected by neutron radiation from a nuclear reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Xue

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The CMOS image sensors (CISs are irradiated with neutron from a nuclear reactor. The dark signal in CISs affected by neutron radiation is studied theoretically and experimentally. The Primary knock-on atoms (PKA energy spectra for 1 MeV incident neutrons are simulated by Geant4. And the theoretical models for the mean dark signal, dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU and dark signal distribution versus neutron fluence are established. The results are found to be in good agreement with the experimental outputs. Finally, the dark signal in the CISs under the different neutron fluence conditions is estimated. This study provides the theoretical and experimental evidence for the displacement damage effects on the dark signal CISs.

  2. A High Temperature-Tolerant and Radiation-Resistant In-Core Neutron Sensor for Advanced Reactors. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Lei [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Miller, Don [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2015-01-23

    The objectives of this project are to develop a small and reliable gallium nitride (GaN) neutron sensor that is capable of withstanding high neutron fluence and high temperature, isolating gamma background, and operating in a wide dynamic range. The first objective will be the understanding of the fundamental materials properties and electronic response of a GaN semiconductor materials and device in an environment of high temperature and intense neutron field. To achieve such goal, an in-situ study of electronic properties of GaN device such as I-V, leakage current, and charge collection efficiency (CCE) in high temperature using an external neutron beam will be designed and implemented. We will also perform in-core irradiation of GaN up to the highest yet fast neutron fluence and an off-line performance evaluation.

  3. Neutron H*(10) inside a proton therapy facility: comparison between Monte Carlo simulations and WENDI-2 measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Smet, V.; Stichelbaut, F.; Mathot, G.; Vanaudenhove, T.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dubus, A.; Pauly, N.; Gerardy, I.

    2014-01-01

    Inside an IBA proton therapy centre, secondary neutrons are produced due to nuclear interactions of the proton beam with matter mainly inside the cyclotron, the beam line, the treatment nozzle and the patient. Accurate measurements of the neutron ambient dose equivalent H*(10) in such a facility require the use of a detector that has a good sensitivity for neutrons ranging from thermal energies up to 230 MeV, such as for instance the WENDI-2 detector. WENDI-2 measurements have been performed at the Westdeutsches Protonentherapiezentrum Essen, at several positions around the cyclotron room and around a gantry treatment room operated in two different beam delivery modes: Pencil Beam Scanning and Double Scattering. These measurements are compared with Monte Carlo simulation results for the neutron H*(10) obtained with MCNPX 2.5.0 and GEANT4 9.6. In proton therapy, proton beams with energies up to typically 230 MeV are used to treat cancerous tumours very efficiently while sparing surrounding healthy tissues as much as possible. Due to nuclear interactions of the proton beams with matter, mainly inside the cyclotron, the beam line, the treatment nozzle and the patient, secondary neutrons with energies up to 230 MeV are unfortunately produced, as well as photons up to ∼10 MeV. Behind the thick concrete shielding walls which are necessary to attenuate the stray radiation fields, the total ambient dose equivalent H*(10) is very large due to the neutron component. In shielding studies for proton therapy facilities, the neutron H*(10) component is often evaluated using the Monte Carlo codes MCNPX(5), FLUKA(6) or PHITS(7). Recent benchmark simulations performed with GEANT4 have shown that this code would also be a suitable tool for the shielding studies of proton therapy centres. The experimental validation of such shielding studies requires the use of a detector with a good sensitivity for neutrons ranging from thermal energies up to 230 MeV, such as for example the

  4. Equivalence principle and gravitational redshift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohensee, Michael A; Chu, Steven; Peters, Achim; Müller, Holger

    2011-04-15

    We investigate leading order deviations from general relativity that violate the Einstein equivalence principle in the gravitational standard model extension. We show that redshift experiments based on matter waves and clock comparisons are equivalent to one another. Consideration of torsion balance tests, along with matter-wave, microwave, optical, and Mössbauer clock tests, yields comprehensive limits on spin-independent Einstein equivalence principle-violating standard model extension terms at the 10(-6) level.

  5. New Neutron Dosimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    CERN has been operating an Individual Dosimetry Service for neutrons for about 35 years. The service was based on nuclear emulsions in the form of film packages which were developed and scanned in the Service. In 1999, the supplier of theses packages informed CERN that they will discontinue production of this material. TIS-RP decided to look for an external service provider for individual neutron dosimetry. After an extensive market survey and an invitation for tender, a supplier that met the stringent technical requirements set up by CERN's host states for personal dosimeters was identified. The new dosimeter is based on a track-etching technique. Neutrons have the capability of damaging plastic material. The microscopic damage centres are revealed by etching them in a strong acid. The resulting etch pits can be automatically counted and their density is proportional to dose equivalent from neutrons. On the technical side, the new dosimeter provides an improved independence of its response from energy and th...

  6. Neutron spectrometry with artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega C, H.R.; Hernandez D, V.M.; Manzanares A, E.; Rodriguez, J.M.; Mercado S, G.A.; Iniguez de la Torre Bayo, M.P.; Barquero, R.; Arteaga A, T.

    2005-01-01

    An artificial neural network has been designed to obtain the neutron spectra from the Bonner spheres spectrometer's count rates. The neural network was trained using 129 neutron spectra. These include isotopic neutron sources; reference and operational spectra from accelerators and nuclear reactors, spectra from mathematical functions as well as few energy groups and monoenergetic spectra. The spectra were transformed from lethargy to energy distribution and were re-bin ned to 31 energy groups using the MCNP 4C code. Re-binned spectra and UTA4 response matrix were used to calculate the expected count rates in Bonner spheres spectrometer. These count rates were used as input and the respective spectrum was used as output during neural network training. After training the network was tested with the Bonner spheres count rates produced by a set of neutron spectra. This set contains data used during network training as well as data not used. Training and testing was carried out in the Mat lab program. To verify the network unfolding performance the original and unfolded spectra were compared using the χ 2 -test and the total fluence ratios. The use of Artificial Neural Networks to unfold neutron spectra in neutron spectrometry is an alternative procedure that overcomes the drawbacks associated in this ill-conditioned problem. (Author)

  7. Neutron spectrometry with artificial neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H.R.; Hernandez D, V.M.; Manzanares A, E.; Rodriguez, J.M.; Mercado S, G.A. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, A.P. 336, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico); Iniguez de la Torre Bayo, M.P. [Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid (Spain); Barquero, R. [Hospital Universitario Rio Hortega, Valladolid (Spain); Arteaga A, T. [Envases de Zacatecas, S.A. de C.V., Zacatecas (Mexico)]. e-mail: rvega@cantera.reduaz.mx

    2005-07-01

    An artificial neural network has been designed to obtain the neutron spectra from the Bonner spheres spectrometer's count rates. The neural network was trained using 129 neutron spectra. These include isotopic neutron sources; reference and operational spectra from accelerators and nuclear reactors, spectra from mathematical functions as well as few energy groups and monoenergetic spectra. The spectra were transformed from lethargy to energy distribution and were re-bin ned to 31 energy groups using the MCNP 4C code. Re-binned spectra and UTA4 response matrix were used to calculate the expected count rates in Bonner spheres spectrometer. These count rates were used as input and the respective spectrum was used as output during neural network training. After training the network was tested with the Bonner spheres count rates produced by a set of neutron spectra. This set contains data used during network training as well as data not used. Training and testing was carried out in the Mat lab program. To verify the network unfolding performance the original and unfolded spectra were compared using the {chi}{sup 2}-test and the total fluence ratios. The use of Artificial Neural Networks to unfold neutron spectra in neutron spectrometry is an alternative procedure that overcomes the drawbacks associated in this ill-conditioned problem. (Author)

  8. Testing statistical hypotheses of equivalence

    CERN Document Server

    Wellek, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Equivalence testing has grown significantly in importance over the last two decades, especially as its relevance to a variety of applications has become understood. Yet published work on the general methodology remains scattered in specialists' journals, and for the most part, it focuses on the relatively narrow topic of bioequivalence assessment.With a far broader perspective, Testing Statistical Hypotheses of Equivalence provides the first comprehensive treatment of statistical equivalence testing. The author addresses a spectrum of specific, two-sided equivalence testing problems, from the

  9. Identification of neutron irradiation induced strain rate sensitivity change using inverse FEM analysis of Charpy test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haušild, Petr; Materna, Aleš; Kytka, Miloš

    2015-04-01

    A simple methodology how to obtain additional information about the mechanical behaviour of neutron-irradiated WWER 440 reactor pressure vessel steel was developed. Using inverse identification, the instrumented Charpy test data records were compared with the finite element computations in order to estimate the strain rate sensitivity of 15Ch2MFA steel irradiated with different neutron fluences. The results are interpreted in terms of activation volume change.

  10. Identification of neutron irradiation induced strain rate sensitivity change using inverse FEM analysis of Charpy test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haušild, Petr, E-mail: petr.hausild@fjfi.cvut.cz [Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Department of Materials, Trojanova 13, 120 00 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); Materna, Aleš [Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Department of Materials, Trojanova 13, 120 00 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); Kytka, Miloš [Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Department of Materials, Trojanova 13, 120 00 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institut, ÚJV Řež, a.s., Hlavní 130, Řež, 250 68 Husinec (Czech Republic)

    2015-04-15

    A simple methodology how to obtain additional information about the mechanical behaviour of neutron-irradiated WWER 440 reactor pressure vessel steel was developed. Using inverse identification, the instrumented Charpy test data records were compared with the finite element computations in order to estimate the strain rate sensitivity of 15Ch2MFA steel irradiated with different neutron fluences. The results are interpreted in terms of activation volume change.

  11. Active on-line detector for in-room radiotherapy neutron measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, F., E-mail: faustino.gomez@usc.e [Dpt. Fisica de Particulas, Facultad de Fisica, Campus Sur, Univ. Santiago de Compostela, Santiago 15782 (Spain); Sanchez-Doblado, F. [Dpt. de Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Univ. Sevilla, Sevilla (Spain); Hospital Virgen Macarena, Sevilla (Spain); Iglesias, A. [Dpt. Fisica de Particulas, Facultad de Fisica, Campus Sur, Univ. Santiago de Compostela, Santiago 15782 (Spain); Domingo, C. [Dpt. Fisica, Univ. Autonoma Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-12-15

    The measurement of the neutron fluence produced inside a radiotherapy installation has been a matter of concern specially in the photon high megavoltage modalities. Until now, due to the pulsed nature of the beam and the high photon fluence inside the radiotherapy room, only passive methods were considered reliable. In this work we describe a neutron detector, based on neutron sensitive SRAM devices, that can operate inside the treatment room and is insensitive to the scattered photon fluence. This device has been used to estimate the neutron production and the patient exposure to neutrons in several clinical installations with different linac commercial models. The detection principle is based on the production of Single Event Upset (SEU) of memory states on modern sub-micron technology SRAMs. Spectral sensitivity was initially studied using low energy neutron shielding (boron and cadmium layers) and later using dedicated calibration neutron beams. With a 3 mm thick flex-boron shield, the SEU rate was reduced to around 5% of the unshielded rate, demonstrating that the dominant contribution of the SEU cross section of the chosen SRAM was due to low energy neutrons. The total memory size was scaled to obtain a response repeatability with relative typical uncertainty of about 2% for 1000 Monitor Units (MU) in a 15 MV accelerator facility with excellent linearity with MU. The sensitivity of this digital detector is around 0.3 {mu}Sv H{sup *}(10) per event and considering the signal to fluence ratio around 2 x 10{sup -4} event cm{sup 2}.

  12. The neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheetham, A.K.

    1990-01-01

    In 1932, when Chadwick obtained the first unambiguous evidence for the existence of the neutron, his discovery confirmed the widely held belief that there existed a particle with zero charge and a mass similar to that of the proton. Indeed, as early as 1920, Lord Rutherford had suggested such a possibility in a lecture to the Royal Society. The discovery of the neutron had an immediate and dramatic impact in several areas. The nucleus, which had hitherto been regarded, somewhat unsatisfactorily, as a combination of protons and electrons, was now seen as comprising of protons and neutrons. This in turn lead to a proper understanding of the nature of isotopes and provided a fresh basis for nuclear theories. This paper examines the nature and properties of the neutron, and describes some facets of its remarkable role in contemporary science and technology. The aspects covered are its properties, the production and detection of neutrons, the reactions between neutrons and nuclei, fission reactions, neutron scattering, pulsed neutron scattering and neutron spectroscopy. (author)

  13. Atmospheric neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preszler, A.M.; Moon, S.; White, R.S.

    1976-01-01

    Additional calibrations of the University of California double-scatter neutron and additional analysis corrections lead to the slightly changed neutron fluxes reported here. The theoretical angular distributions of Merker (1975) are in general agreement with our experimental fluxes but do not give the peaks for vertical upward and downward moving neutrons. The theoretical neutron escape current J 2 /sub pi/ (Merker, 1972; Armstrong et al., 1973) is in agreement with the experimental values from 10 to 100 MeV. Our experimental fluxes agree with those of the Kanbach et al. (1974) in the overlap region from 70 to 100 MeV

  14. Prospects for a new cold neutron beam measurement of the neutron lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, Geoffrey L [ORNL; Snow, William M [ORNL; Dewey, M. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD; Gilliam, D [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD; Nico, Jeffrey S [ORNL; Coakley, K [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder; Yue, A [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Laptev, A [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Wietfeldt, F [Tulane University

    2009-01-01

    In the most accurate cold neutron beam determination of the neutron lifetime based on the absolute counting of decay protons, the largest uncertainty was attributed to the absolute determination of the capture flux of the cold neutron beam. Currently an experimental effort is underway at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) that will significantly reduce this contribution to the uncertainty in the lifetime determination. The next largest source of uncertainty is the determination of the absolute count rate of decay protons, which contributes to the experimental uncertainty approximately at the 1 s level. Experience with the recent neutron radiative decay experiment, which used the neutron lifetime apparatus, has provided valuable insights into ways to reduce other uncertainties. In addition, the cold neutron fluence rate at NIST is presently 1.5 times greater than in the 2003 measurement, and there is the prospect for a significantly higher rate with the new guide hall expansion. This paper discusses an approach for achieving a determination of the neutron lifetime with an accuracy of approximately 1 s.

  15. Prospects for a new cold neutron beam measurement of the neutron lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, M.; Coakley, K.; Gilliam, D.; Greene, G.; Laptev, A.; Nico, J.; Snow, W.; Wietfeldt, F.; Yue, A.

    2009-12-01

    In the most accurate cold neutron beam determination of the neutron lifetime based on the absolute counting of decay protons, the largest uncertainty was attributed to the absolute determination of the capture flux of the cold neutron beam. Currently an experimental effort is underway at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) that will significantly reduce this contribution to the uncertainty in the lifetime determination. The next largest source of uncertainty is the determination of the absolute count rate of decay protons, which contributes to the experimental uncertainty approximately at the 1 s level. Experience with the recent neutron radiative decay experiment, which used the neutron lifetime apparatus, has provided valuable insights into ways to reduce other uncertainties. In addition, the cold neutron fluence rate at NIST is presently 1.5 times greater than in the 2003 measurement, and there is the prospect for a significantly higher rate with the new guide hall expansion. This paper discusses an approach for achieving a determination of the neutron lifetime with an accuracy of approximately 1 s.

  16. Prospects for a new cold neutron beam measurement of the neutron lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, M., E-mail: mdewey@nist.go [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Coakley, K., E-mail: kevin.coakley@nist.go [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Gilliam, D., E-mail: david.gilliam@nist.go [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Greene, G., E-mail: greenegl@ornl.go [Department of Physics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Lab, Building 6010, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Laptev, A., E-mail: alaptev@nist.go [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Nico, J., E-mail: jnico@nist.go [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Snow, W., E-mail: wsnow@indiana.ed [Indiana University/IUCF, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Wietfeldt, F., E-mail: few@tulane.ed [Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Yue, A., E-mail: ayue@nist.go [Department of Physics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2009-12-11

    In the most accurate cold neutron beam determination of the neutron lifetime based on the absolute counting of decay protons, the largest uncertainty was attributed to the absolute determination of the capture flux of the cold neutron beam. Currently an experimental effort is underway at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) that will significantly reduce this contribution to the uncertainty in the lifetime determination. The next largest source of uncertainty is the determination of the absolute count rate of decay protons, which contributes to the experimental uncertainty approximately at the 1 s level. Experience with the recent neutron radiative decay experiment, which used the neutron lifetime apparatus, has provided valuable insights into ways to reduce other uncertainties. In addition, the cold neutron fluence rate at NIST is presently 1.5 times greater than in the 2003 measurement, and there is the prospect for a significantly higher rate with the new guide hall expansion. This paper discusses an approach for achieving a determination of the neutron lifetime with an accuracy of approximately 1 s.