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  1. Neuropsychiatric Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Alexandra; Kao, Amy H

    2011-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) is the least understood, yet perhaps the most prevalent manifestation of lupus. The pathogenesis of NPSLE is multifactorial and involves various inflammatory cytokines, autoantibodies, and immune complexes resulting in vasculopathic, cytotoxic and autoantibody-mediated neuronal injury. The management of NPSLE is multimodal and has not been subjected to rigorous study. Different treatment regimens include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, anticoagulation, and immunosuppressives such as cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, and methotrexate. For refractory NPSLE, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), plasmapheresis, and rituximab have been used. Adjunctive symptomatic treatment complements these therapies by targeting mood disorders, psychosis, cognitive impairment, seizures or headaches. Several new biological agents are being tested including Belimumab, a human monoclonal antibody that targets B lymphocyte stimulator. This review focuses on the pathophysiology, treatment, and new potential therapies for neuropsychiatric manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:22379459

  2. Neuropsychiatric Lupus in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Alessi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a chronic autoimmune disease involving multiple organs, characterized by the production of autoantibodies and the development of tissue injury. The etiology of SLE is partially known, involving multiple genetic and environmental factors. As many as 50% of patients with SLE have neurological involvement during the course of their disease. Neurological manifestations are associated with impaired quality of life, and high morbidity and mortality rates. Nineteen neuropsychiatric syndromes have been identified associated with SLE, and can be divided into central and peripheral manifestations. This article reviews major neuropsychiatric manifestations in patients with SLE and discusses their clinical features, radiological findings and treatment options.

  3. Gestational outcomes in patients with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    de Jesus, G R; Rodrigues, B C; Lacerda, M I; Dos Santos, F C; de Jesus, N R; Klumb, E M; Levy, R A

    2017-04-01

    This study analyzed maternal and fetal outcomes of pregnancies of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus patients followed in a reference unit. This retrospective cohort study included 26 pregnancies of patients seen between 2011 and 2015 included with history and/or active neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus among 135 pregnancies. Three patients had active neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus at conception, but only one remained with neurological activity during gestation, characteristically related to the inadvertent suspension of medications. Twenty six percent of the newborns were small for gestational age and 40% of live births were premature, with no neonatal death or early complications of prematurity. Preeclampsia was diagnosed in nine pregnancies, with two cases of early severe form that resulted in intrauterine fetal death. Patients with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus had more prematurity and preeclampsia compared to patients without neuropsychiatric disease. However, when concomitant lupus nephritis was excluded, the gestational results of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus patients were more favorable.

  4. Brain MRI findings of neuropsychiatric lupus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jang-Wook; Kwon, Bae Ju; Lee, Seung-Ro; Hahm, Chang-Kok; Moon, Won Jin; Jeon, Eui Yong; Bae, Sang-Chul

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the brain MRI findings in patients with neuropsychiatric lupus. In 26 patients (M:F = 2:24 ; aged 9-48 years) in whom the presence of systemic lupus erythematosus was clinically or pathologically proven and in whom neuropsychiatric lupus was also clinically diagnosed, the findings of brain MRI were retrospectively evaluated. MR images were analyzed with regard to the distribution, location, size and number of lesions due to cerebral ischemia or infarction, the presence of cerebral atrophy, and the extent and degree of brain parenchymal and intravascular enhancement. The most common MRI findings were lesions due to cerebral ischemia or infarction occurring in 18 patients (69%), and located within deep periventricular white matter (n=10), subcortical white matter (n=8), the cerebral cortex (n=7), basal ganglia (n=7), or brain stem or cerebellum (n=2). The lesions were single (n=3) or multiple (n=15), and in 17 patients were less than 1cm in diameter in regions other than the cerebral cortex. In six of these patients, lesions of 1-4cm in diameter in this region were combined, and one occurred in the cerebral cortex only. Cerebral atrophy was seen in 16 patients (62%), in ten of whom there was no past history of treatment with steroids for more than six months. In 15 patients (58%), contrast-enhanced MR image revealed diffuse enhancement of the basal ganglia or intravascular enhancement. In no case were MRI findings normal. The primary mainfestations of neuropsychiatric lupus are multifocal ischemia or infarctions in the cerebral cortex, and subcortical and deep white matter, and the cerebral atrophy. Contrast-enhanced MR images also demonstrated diffuse enhancement of the basal ganglia and intravascular enhancement, both thought to be related to the congestion due to the stagnation of cerebral blood flow

  5. [NEUROPSYCHIATRIC MANIFESTATIONS OF SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS].

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    Stryjer, Rafael; Shriki Tal, Liron; Gizunterman, Alex; Amital, Daniela; Amital, Howard; Kotler, Moshe

    2017-12-01

    This review deals with the neuropsychiatric disorders resulting from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). SLE is a chronic autoimmune disease that impacts all systems in the human body, including the central nervous system. Neuropsychiatric symptoms in SLE are a common complication of the disease. This complication has significant implications for the severity of the illness. In most cases no thorough psychiatric assessment is performed during initial evaluation of the disease and no protocol or clear guidelines for treating the psychiatric symptoms in SLE are available. Early diagnosis of the psychiatric symptoms in SLE is critical since absence of treatment may result in severe psychiatric complications. Clinical pharmacological studies are needed in order to develop guidelines for treating psychiatric symptoms in SLE.

  6. Circulating microparticles in neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    Crookston, Kendall P; Sibbitt, Wilmer L; Chandler, Wayne L; Qualls, Clifford R; Roldan, Carlos A

    2013-02-01

    Phosphatidylserine-rich microparticles derived from endothelial cells, platelets and leukocytes have been implicated as surrogate markers of cellular activation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Because microparticles have also been associated with many primary neurologic diseases, this study investigated whether cellular-derived microparticles are also implicated in neuropsychiatric SLE (NPSLE). Plasma microparticles were measured in 51 SLE patients and 22 age- and gender-matched controls. Acute NPSLE was defined as major NPSLE (acute stroke, transient ischemic attack, psychosis, isolated seizures, major cognitive disorder, or acute confusional state) and NPSLE disease activity was measured with the neurologic components of the SLE Disease Activity Index (Neuro-SLEDAI). Neuro-SLEDAI levels varied widely in SLE patients, consistent with variable NPSLE activity. When considering all patients with SLE, there was no difference in total microparticles relative to matched controls, 2158/μL (interquartile range [IQR] 1214-3463) versus 2782/μL (IQR 1586-2990; P = 0.57) nor differences in microparticles derived from either platelets (P = 0.40), monocytes (P = 0.15) or endothelial cells (P = 0.32). However, levels of circulating monocyte-derived microparticles significantly and independently correlated with NPSLE (r = -0.28; P = 0.045), corticosteroid dosage (r = -0.38; P = 0.006) and levels of circulating C5a (r = 0.54; P microparticles. Circulating cell-derived microparticles are reduced in active NPSLE, although the relative contribution of reduced microparticle production, increased consumption or intravascular sequestration, remain uncertain. © 2013 The Authors International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases © 2013 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Nitrated nucleosome levels and neuropsychiatric events in systemic lupus erythematosus;

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Isabel; Croca, Sara; Raimondo, Maria Gabriella

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) there is no serological test that will reliably distinguish neuropsychiatric (NP) events due to active SLE from those due to other causes. Previously we showed that serum levels of nitrated nucleosomes (NN) were elevated in a small n...

  8. Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus - Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Almeida

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease of unknown etiology, with episodic course. It is characterized by periods of relative quiescence and periods of exacerbations which may involve any organ or system. About a young woman with a clinical delirium state, we revised the clinical neuropsychiatric features of SLE in the literature.

  9. Risk factors for neuropsychiatric manifestations in children with systemic lupus erythematosus: case-control study.

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    Zuniga Zambrano, Yenny Carolina; Guevara Ramos, Juan David; Penagos Vargas, Nathalia Elena; Benitez Ramirez, Diana Carol; Ramirez Rodriguez, Sandra Milena; Vargas Niño, Adriana Carolina; Izquierdo Bello, Alvaro Hernando

    2014-09-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms in children with systemic lupus erythematosus cause high morbidity and disability. This study analyzed risk factors associated with neuropsychiatric presentation in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus aged lupus erythematosus who were hospitalized with or without neuropsychiatric symptoms was collected between March 2007 and January 2012. Clinical variables, laboratory examinations, neuroimages, and disease activity (Systemic Erythematosus Lupus Disease Activity Index) and damage (Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics) indices were analyzed. A total of 90 patients were selected, 30 with neuropsychiatric symptoms. The patients' average age was 12.2 years. The most common neuropsychiatric symptoms were seizures, migraine, and depression. The average Systemic Erythematosus Lupus Disease Activity Index was 19.86 (S.D. 10.83) and the average Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics index was 2.02 (S.D. 2.43), with higher values in patients with neuropsychiatric symptoms (P = 0.001). The levels of complement C3 and C4 were significantly higher in patients with a neuropsychiatric disorder (P = 0.003). Lupus anticoagulant was found in 51.5% of patients with neuropsychiatric symptoms (odds ratio, 3.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-10.0). Immunosuppression with azathioprine, rituximab, or cyclophosphamide delayed the time to neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus development by 18.5 months (95% confidence interval, 10.6-26.5) compared to patients who did not receive these agents. The presence of lupus anticoagulant was a risk factor in our patients. The use of immunosuppressants, such as cyclophosphamide, rituximab, and azathioprine, delayed the presentation of neuropsychiatric manifestations of lupus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Outcomes of neuropsychiatric events in systemic lupus erythematosus based on clinical phenotypes; prospective data from the Leiden NP SLE cohort.

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    Magro-Checa, C; Beaart-van de Voorde, L J J; Middelkoop, H A M; Dane, M L; van der Wee, N J; van Buchem, M A; Huizinga, T W J; Steup-Beekman, G M

    2017-04-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to assess whether clinical and patient's reported outcomes are associated with a different pathophysiological origin of neuropsychiatric events presenting in systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods A total of 232 neuropsychiatric events presenting in 131 systemic lupus erythematosus patients were included. Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus diagnosis was established per event by multidisciplinary evaluation. All neuropsychiatric events were divided according to a suspected underlying pathophysiological process into one of the following: non-neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus related, inflammatory and ischaemic neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus. The clinical outcome of all neuropsychiatric events was determined by a physician-completed four-point Likert scale. Health-related quality of life was measured with the subscales of the patient-generated Short Form 36 (SF-36) health survey questionnaire. The change between scores at paired visits of all domain scores, mental component summary (SF-36 MCS) and physical component summary (SF-36 PCS) scores were retrospectively calculated and used as patient-reported outcome. The association among these outcomes and the different origin of neuropsychiatric events was obtained using multiple logistic regression analysis. Results The clinical status of 26.8% non-neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus events, 15.8% ischaemic neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus and 51.6% inflammatory neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus improved after re-assessment. Almost all SF-36 domains had a positive change at re-assessment in all groups independently of the origin of neuropsychiatric events. Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus ( B = 0.502; p lupus erythematosus ( B = 0.827; p lupus erythematosus ( B = 5.783; p lupus erythematosus ( B = 11.133; p lupus erythematosus events have better clinical outcome and

  11. Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus: association with global disease activity.

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    Morrison, E; Carpentier, S; Shaw, E; Doucette, S; Hanly, J G

    2014-04-01

    To determine whether patients with neuropsychiatric (NP) events attributed to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have more global disease activity than patients with NP events not attributed to SLE. Patients were recruited from an academic lupus clinic. Global disease activity was measured with the SLE Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K) and organ damage with the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC)/American College of Rheumatology (ACR) damage index (SDI). NP disease was defined using the ACR case definitions and decision rules for attribution of NP events to SLE and non-SLE causes. There were 68 patients (age (mean ± SD) 40.8 ± 15.2 years, 85% female, 94% Caucasians) with 126 NP events. SLEDAI-2K scores in patients with NP events attributed to SLE were higher than in patients with NP events attributed to non-SLE causes even when NP variables were removed from the SLEDAI-2K (mean ± SD: SLE NP = 7.36 ± 5.42 vs non-SLE NP = 5.53 ± 4.57, P = 0.042). Patients with CNS and diffuse NP events, rather that PNS and focal events, accounted for the group differences in SLEDAI-2K scores. There were no significant differences in total SDI scores comparing NP events due to SLE vs. non-SLE causes (mean ± SD: 2.1 ± 1.8 vs. 1.7 ± 1.7; p = 0.28) even when NP variables were omitted. Increased global SLE disease activity is associated with concurrent NP events attributed to SLE, particularly for diffuse NP and CNS NP events. The findings have diagnostic and therapeutic implications for SLE patients with NP events and inform pathogenetic mechanisms underlying NPSLE.

  12. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and neuropsychiatric manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    Shulman, S; Shorer, R; Wollman, J; Dotan, G; Paran, D

    2017-11-01

    Background Cognitive impairment is frequent in systemic lupus erythematosus. Atrophy of the corpus callosum and hippocampus have been reported in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, and diffusion tensor imaging studies have shown impaired white matter integrity, suggesting that white matter damage in systemic lupus erythematosus may underlie the cognitive impairment as well as other neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, as assessed by optical coherence tomography, has been suggested as a biomarker for white matter damage in neurologic disorders such as multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Retinal nerve fiber layer thinning may occur early, even in patients with mild clinical symptoms. Aim The objective of this study was to assess the association of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, as a biomarker of white matter damage in systemic lupus erythematosus patients, with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations, including cognitive impairment. Methods Twenty-one consecutive patients with systemic lupus erythematosus underwent neuropsychological testing using a validated computerized battery of tests as well as the Rey-Auditory verbal learning test. All 21 patients, as well as 11 healthy, age matched controls, underwent optical coherence tomography testing to assess retinal nerve fiber layer thickness. Correlations between retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and results in eight cognitive domains assessed by the computerized battery of tests as well as the Rey-Auditory verbal learning test were assessed in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, with and without neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus, and compared to retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in healthy controls. Results No statistically significant correlation was found between retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus as compared to healthy

  13. Differential activation mechanisms of serum C5a in lupus nephritis and neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    Sakuma, Yuko; Nagai, Tatsuo; Yoshio, Taku; Hirohata, Shunsei

    2017-03-01

    To explore the role of C5a in the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) and lupus nephritis (LN). Sera were obtained from 29 patients with NPSLE, 25 with LN, 26 without NPSLE or LN [SLE alone], and 21 healthy donors. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was obtained from 29 NPSLE patients. C5a and C5 were measured by ELISA. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) function was evaluated by Q albumin ([CSF albumin/serum albumin] × 10 3 ). Serum C5a, but not C5, was significantly increased in SLE compared with healthy control. Serum C5a, but not C5, was significantly higher in NPSLE and in LN than in SLE alone. Serum C4, but not C3, was lower in LN than in NPSLE. Q albumin was significantly higher in diffuse NPSLE than in focal NPSLE, whereas there were no significant differences in CSF or serum C5a between both groups. Notably, CSF C5 and C5a were significantly correlated with Q albumin, whereas serum C5a, but not C5, appeared to be inversely correlated with Q albumin. These results disclosed that serum C5a was elevated not only in NPSLE but also in LN through different mechanisms. Moreover, it is suggested that C5a might be consumed during BBB damages.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging in neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus: current state of the art and novel approaches.

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    Postal, M; Lapa, A Tamires; Reis, F; Rittner, L; Appenzeller, S

    2017-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic, inflammatory, immune-mediated disease affecting 0.1% of the general population. Neuropsychiatric manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus have been more frequently recognized and reported in recent years, occurring in up to 75% of patients during the disease course. Magnetic resonance imaging is known to be a useful tool for the detection of structural brain abnormalities in neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus patients because of the excellent soft-tissue contrast observed with MRI and the ability to acquire multiplanar images. In addition to conventional magnetic resonance imaging techniques to evaluate the presence of atrophy and white matter lesions, several different magnetic resonance imaging techniques have been used to identify microstructural or functional abnormalities. This review will highlight different magnetic resonance imaging techniques, including the advanced magnetic resonance imaging methods used to determine central nervous system involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus.

  15. Neuropsychiatric manifestations and associated autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus patients from Western India.

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    Pradhan, Vandana; Patwardhan, Manisha; Rajadhyaksha, Anjali; Dhawale, Nivedita; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2015-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus with neuropsychiatric involvement (NPSLE) can be diagnosed clinically, but there is no definite serological biomarker established. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the neuropsychiatric involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and to detect the autoantibodies associated with them. Sixty NPSLE patients along with sixty SLE patients without neuropsychiatric involvement from Maharashtra, India, were included. All patients were clinically diagnosed using the American College of Rheumatology criteria. Disease activity was assessed using the systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index. Antinuclear antibodies (ANA), anti-dsDNA, anti-neuronal antibodies were detected by indirect immunofluorescence test. Anti-ribosomal antibodies (anti-Rib-P) were tested by ELISA. NPSLE was diagnosed in age group ranging between 10 and 20 years compared with SLE patients without neuropsychiatric involvement (21-30 years). The most frequent symptoms were psychosis (75%), followed by seizures (58%), lupus headache (40%), cognitive dysfunction (36%), mood disorder (30%), cerebrovascular disease (20%), and anxiety (18%). ANA were present in all. The prevalence of anti-Rib-P was 26.6% in NPSLE and 16.6% in SLE patients without neuropsychiatric involvement. Anti-neuronal antibodies were found in 56.7% in NPSLE and 43.4% in SLE patients without neuropsychiatric involvement. Anti-neuronal antibodies were found to be highest in the patients of psychosis (66.6%) followed by central nerve system disease (63.63 %) and seizures (56.25%). There was an early onset of neuropsychiatric involvement. Anti-Rib-P antibodies as well as anti-neuronal antibodies did not show statistically significant correlation with neuropsychiatric manifestations in NPSLE patients.

  16. Lupus induced by medicaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canas D, Carlos Alberto; Perafan B, Pablo Eduardo

    2001-01-01

    We describe a 55 years old female patient who consulted by fever syndrome, artralgias and the presence of high tittles positives antinuclear antibodies. She had arterial hypertension in treatment with captopril. We suspected the clinical diagnoses of drug-induced lupus; the withdraw of captopril was associated with the remission of the clinical and laboratory manifestations

  17. A case of neuropsychiatric lupus with myelopathy successfully ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This report describes a 16-year old female patient who presented with acute paresis in both lower limbs, acute urinary retention , blurred vision and arthritis. The patient was diagnosed as having systemic lupus erythematosus with myelitis and bilateral abducent nerves palsy. The administration of steroids resulted in marked ...

  18. Clinical neuropsychiatric and neuromuscular manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    Omdal, R; Mellgren, S I; Husby, G

    1988-01-01

    Thirty patients with SLE were studied retrospectively and subjected to clinical neurological examination. The accumulated neurological manifestations from the beginning of the disease until the time of examination were thus collected. Twenty-five patients (83%) had experienced neuropsychiatric manifestations while 11 patients (37%) had neuromuscular manifestations. The most frequent single symptom was migraine which had occurred in 40% of the patients. This was followed by severe protracted headache in 20%, vertigo in 20%, and psychiatric problems in 17%. Carpal tunnel syndrome and muscular weakness both occurring in 23% of the patients were the most prevalent neuromuscular manifestations, followed by myositis in 10%.

  19. A Distinct T Follicular Helper Cell Subset Infiltrates the Brain in Murine Neuropsychiatric Lupus.

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    Jain, Shweta; Stock, Ariel; Macian, Fernando; Putterman, Chaim

    2018-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are not uncommon, yet the mechanisms underlying disease initiation and progression in the brain are incompletely understood. Although the role of T cells in other lupus target organs such as the kidney is well defined, which T cells contribute to the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric SLE is not known. The present study was aimed at characterizing the CD4 T cell populations that are present in the choroid plexus (CP) of MRL/MpJ-fas lpr mice, the primary site of brain infiltration in this classic lupus mouse model which exhibits a prominent neurobehavioral phenotype. T cells infiltrating the CP of MRL/MpJ-fas lpr mice were characterized and subset identification was done by multiparameter flow cytometry. We found that the infiltrating CD4 T cells are activated and have an effector phenotype. Importantly, CD4 T cells have a T follicular helper cell (T FH ) like phenotype, as evidenced by their surface markers and signature cytokine, IL-21. In addition, CD4 T FH cells also secrete significant levels of IFN-γ and express Bcl-6, thereby conforming to a potentially pathogenic T helper population that can drive the disease progression. Interestingly, the regulatory axis comprising CD4 T regulatory cells is diminished. These results suggest that accumulation of CD4 T FH in the brain of MRL/MpJ-fas lpr mice may contribute to the neuropsychiatric manifestations of SLE, and point to this T cell subset as a possible novel therapeutic candidate.

  20. A Distinct T Follicular Helper Cell Subset Infiltrates the Brain in Murine Neuropsychiatric Lupus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Jain

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuropsychiatric symptoms in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE are not uncommon, yet the mechanisms underlying disease initiation and progression in the brain are incompletely understood. Although the role of T cells in other lupus target organs such as the kidney is well defined, which T cells contribute to the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric SLE is not known. The present study was aimed at characterizing the CD4 T cell populations that are present in the choroid plexus (CP of MRL/MpJ-faslpr mice, the primary site of brain infiltration in this classic lupus mouse model which exhibits a prominent neurobehavioral phenotype. T cells infiltrating the CP of MRL/MpJ-faslpr mice were characterized and subset identification was done by multiparameter flow cytometry. We found that the infiltrating CD4 T cells are activated and have an effector phenotype. Importantly, CD4 T cells have a T follicular helper cell (TFH like phenotype, as evidenced by their surface markers and signature cytokine, IL-21. In addition, CD4 TFH cells also secrete significant levels of IFN-γ and express Bcl-6, thereby conforming to a potentially pathogenic T helper population that can drive the disease progression. Interestingly, the regulatory axis comprising CD4 T regulatory cells is diminished. These results suggest that accumulation of CD4 TFH in the brain of MRL/MpJ-faslpr mice may contribute to the neuropsychiatric manifestations of SLE, and point to this T cell subset as a possible novel therapeutic candidate.

  1. Serum neuron specific enolase - a novel indicator for neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus?

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    Hawro, T; Bogucki, A; Krupińska-Kun, M; Maurer, M; Woźniacka, A

    2015-12-01

    Neuropsychiatric (NP) lupus, a common manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), is still insufficiently understood, in part, because of the lack of specific biomarkers. Neuron specific enolase (NSE), an important neuronal glycolytic enzyme, shows increased serum levels following acute brain injury, and decreased serum levels in several chronic disorders of the nervous system, including multi infarct dementia, multiple sclerosis and depression. The aim of the study was to evaluate serum NSE levels in SLE patients with and without nervous system involvement, and in healthy controls, and to assess the correlation of NSE serum levels of patients with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) with clinical parameters. The study comprised 47 SLE patients and 28 controls. SLE activity was assessed using the Systemic Lupus Activity Measure (SLAM). A neurologist and a psychiatrist examined all patients. NP involvement was diagnosed according to strict NPSLE criteria proposed by Ainiala and coworkers, as modification to American College of Rheumatology (ACR) nomenclature and case definitions. NSE serum levels were determined by use of an immunoassay. Mean NSE serum concentrations in patients with NPSLE were significantly lower than in non-NPSLE patients (6.3 ± 2.6 µg/L vs. 9.7 ± 3.3 µg/L, p manifestations diagnosed (-0.37; p = 0.001). Decreased serum concentrations of NSE may reflect chronic neuronal damage with declined metabolism of the nervous tissue in patients with NPSLE. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. MR manifestations of the brain in neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus patients

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    Oh, Kyu Chan; Byun, Woo Mok; Jang, Han Won; Kim, Kum Rae [College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-01-15

    The primary goal of this study was to evaluate the MR findings of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients with neuropsychiatric symptoms. The MR images of 38 patients with SLE were evaluated based on the presence of the following abnormal lesions: the locations of the abnormal signal intensity lesions in the white matter, infarctions, a small vessel vasculopathy, leukoencephalopathy, hemorrhage, abscess, and other lesions. The MR images showed an abnormality in 22 of 38 (58%) episodes. Abnormal signal intensities were noted in the subcortical and periventricular white matter in six cases, acute territorial infarctions in five cases, multiple small acute embolic infarctions in four cases and a brain abscess in two cases. A reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy was found in one case. In addition, another patient had vasogenic edema with focal central cytotoxic edema at the pons. The entire cerebral and corpus callosum volumes were significantly smaller in four patients with SLE as compared to the volumes in healthy control subjects. SLE may induce variable MR imaging findings of the CNS. Recognition of the variable findings is helpful for easy diagnosis and prompt treatment.

  3. Neuropsychiatric events attributed to systemic lupus erythematosus: a single center study form pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mumtaz, S.; Rasheed, U.; Zammurrad, S.; Aziz, W.

    2017-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) is a relatively common and potentially serious manifestation of SLE. This study was designed to collect evidence about clinical and demographic characteristics of patients with NPSLE in a Pakistani lupus cohort. ethodology: This cross-sectional study was conducted at Department of Rheumatology, Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad, Pakistan between July 2016 and December 2016. Patients fulfilling diagnostic criteria for SLE as defined by ACR were enrolled. For detection of neuropsychiatric involvement the One-Hour Neuropsychological Battery proposed by the ACR was performed. Neuropsychiatric manifestations were classified into major and minor. Relationship of presence and severity of individual neuropsychiatric manifestations to disease duration in years and organ damage using SLICC/ACR-DI was studied. esults: Out of 100 SLE patients, there were 96 females and 4 males (female to male ratio of 24:1). Mean age of all participants was 30.99 years (range 17-72 years) and average disease duration at the time of enrolment was 3.89 years. Neuropsychiatric manifestations were observed in 84 patients. 20 out of these 84 patients (23.8%) had major neurological manifestations including seizures (13 patients), altered consciousness (10 patients) and cerebro-vascular accident (5 patients). While 7 out of these 84 patients (8.3%) had major psychiatric manifestations including psychosis (5 patients) and depression with suicidal ideation (2 patients). All major neurological manifestations occurred beyond and major psychiatric manifestations occurred within 2 years of diagnosis of SLE. Minor psychiatric manifestations observed included severe anxiety (52 patients), cognitive impairment (43 patients) and mood disorder (25 patients). No statistically significant difference in mean SLICC/ACR-DI score was observed between NPSLE patients and non-NPSLE patients when points received for neurologically related damage were

  4. Novel anti-suprabasin antibodies may contribute to the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    Ichinose, Kunihiro; Ohyama, Kaname; Furukawa, Kaori; Higuchi, Osamu; Mukaino, Akihiro; Satoh, Katsuya; Nakane, Shunya; Shimizu, Toshimasa; Umeda, Masataka; Fukui, Shoichi; Nishino, Ayako; Nakajima, Hideki; Koga, Tomohiro; Kawashiri, Shin-Ya; Iwamoto, Naoki; Tamai, Mami; Nakamura, Hideki; Origuchi, Tomoki; Yoshida, Mari; Kuroda, Naotaka; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2017-11-21

    Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) is often difficult to diagnose and distinguish from other diseases, because no NPSLE-specific antibodies have been identified. We developed a novel proteomic strategy for identifying and profiling antigens in immune complexes in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and applied this strategy to 26 NPSLE patients. As controls, we also included 25 SLE patients without neuropsychiatric manifestations (SLE), 15 with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) and 10 with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). We identified immune complexes of suprabasin (SBSN) in the CSF of the NPSLE group. The titer of anti-SBSN antibodies was significantly higher in the CSF of the NPSLE group compared to those of the SLE, MS and NPH groups. Microarray data showed that the senescence and autophagy pathways were significantly changed in astrocytes exposed to anti-SBSN antibodies. Our findings indicate that SBSN could be a novel autoantibody for the evaluation of suspected NPSLE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Drug-induced lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kidney inflammation (nephritis) can develop with drug-induced lupus caused by TNF inhibitors or with ANCA vasculitis due to hydralazine or levamisole. Nephritis may require treatment with prednisone and immunosuppressive medicines. Avoid taking the ...

  6. Lymphopenia is associated with neuropsychiatric manifestations and disease activity in paediatric systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, H-H; Wang, L-C; Lee, J-H; Lee, C-C; Yang, Y-H; Chiang, B-L

    2007-09-01

    To investigate if lymphopenia is associated with clinical manifestations, disease activity and prognosis in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The charts of 186 paediatric patients with SLE diagnosed between 1985 and 2006 in a medical centre were retrospectively reviewed. Lymphocyte counts were recorded at the time of SLE diagnosis and SLE flares. Global disease activity was quantified by the SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI). Cumulative organ damage was assessed by the ACR/Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) damage index. Lymphopenia (oral ulcers, leucopenia, anti-dsDNA antibodies and C4 decrease. At the time of flares, lymphopenia was significantly associated with anti-dsDNA antibodies, methylprednisolone pulse therapy, disease activity and organ damage. Using multivariate logistic regression, marked lymphopenia was independently associated with neuropsychiatric manifestations [odds ratio (OR) 7.41, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.99-27.0], and protective from LN (OR 0.13, 95% CI 0.03-0.53). Lymphopenia at SLE flares is associated with disease activity and organ damage. Marked lymphopenia is independently associated with neuropsychiatric manifestations.

  7. [Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (2nd part). Diagnostic and treatment tools in psychiatric or central nervous system manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, G; Zéphir, H; Michelin, E; Semah, F; Warembourg, F; Pruvo, J-P; Hachulla, E; Lenfant, P; Dubucquoi, S; Vermersch, P; Hatron, P-Y; Prin, L; Launay, D

    2012-09-01

    Neurological and psychiatric manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus are a heterogeneous set of clinical manifestations grouped under the term of "neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus". The classification of these manifestations published in 1999 has harmonized the definitions cases used in the studies but did not help the clinician to positively identify a specific manifestation of lupus or a neurological or psychiatric event occurred independently of the disease. Published cases series help us to identify neurological or psychiatric manifestations of lupus but modern diagnosis tools contribution have to be evaluated in order to optimize diagnosis management of such manifestations and to distinguish specific events related to lupus and independent manifestations. In this second part of our literature review about neuropsychiatric lupus, we propose to identify arguments, which could be in favor of lupus responsibility in front of a neurological or psychiatric event, and immunosuppressive treatments which are recommended. Copyright © 2012 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Nitrated nucleosome levels and neuropsychiatric events in systemic lupus erythematosus; a multi-center retrospective case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Isabel; Croca, Sara; Raimondo, Maria Gabriella

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) there is no serological test that will reliably distinguish neuropsychiatric (NP) events due to active SLE from those due to other causes. Previously we showed that serum levels of nitrated nucleosomes (NN) were elevated in a small n...

  9. CT scan findings and EEG in systemic lupus erythematodes patients with neuro-psychiatric disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, Rumiko; Hagiwara, Mariko; Katayose, Keiko; Yashima, Yuko; Kumashiro, Hisashi

    1988-01-01

    In 14 patients with systemic lupus erythematodes presenting with neuro-psychiatric disorders, CT scans were compared with encephalographic (EEG) findings. CT findings were markedly abnormal in 6, slight with a sulcal enlargement in 3, and normal in 5. In the group of markedly abnormal CT findings, focal abnormal low density areas were detected in 2, severe generalized cerebral atrophy in one, and severe atrophy of the right hemisphere in one. EEG findings included focal paroxysmal abnormality of high voltage slow burst at the left frontal dominance and positive spike on the right hemisphere. Epileptic seizure and depressed sensorium seemed to be related to CT abnormality. In 3 patients with epileptic seizures, their symptoms were closely related to CT abnormality. Parkinsonisms and depressed sensorium were also related to CT abnormality. (Namekawa, K)

  10. Management of Neuropsychiatric Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Current Approaches and Future Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magro-Checa, César; Zirkzee, Elisabeth J; Huizinga, Tom W; Steup-Beekman, Gerda M

    2016-03-01

    Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) is a generic definition referring to a series of neurological and psychiatric symptoms directly related to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). NPSLE includes heterogeneous and rare neuropsychiatric (NP) manifestations involving both the central and peripheral nervous system. Due to the lack of a gold standard, the attribution of NP symptoms to SLE represents a clinical challenge that obligates the strict exclusion of any other potential cause. In the acute setting, management of these patients does not differ from other non-SLE subjects presenting with the same NP manifestation. Afterwards, an individualized therapeutic strategy, depending on the presenting manifestation and severity of symptoms, must be started. Clinical trials in NPSLE are scarce and most of the data are extracted from case series and case reports. High-dose glucocorticoids and intravenous cyclophosphamide remain the cornerstone for patients with severe symptoms that are thought to reflect inflammation or an underlying autoimmune process. Rituximab, intravenous immunoglobulins, or plasmapheresis may be used if response is not achieved. When patients present with mild to moderate NP manifestations, or when maintenance therapy is warranted, azathioprine and mycophenolate may be considered. When symptoms are thought to reflect a thrombotic underlying process, anticoagulation and antiplatelet agents are the mainstay of therapy, especially if antiphospholipid antibodies or antiphospholipid syndrome are present. Recent trials on SLE using new biologicals, based on newly understood SLE mechanisms, have shown promising results. Based on what we currently know about its pathogenesis, it is tempting to speculate how these new therapies may affect the management of NPSLE patients. This article provides a comprehensive and critical review of the literature on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of NPSLE. We describe the most

  11. Immune function and brain abnormalities in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus without overt neuropsychiatric manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozora, E; Filley, C M; Zhang, L; Brown, M S; Miller, D E; Arciniegas, D B; Pelzman, J L; West, S G

    2012-04-01

    This study examined the relationship between immune, cognitive and neuroimaging assessments in subjects with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) without histories of overt neuropsychiatric (NP) disorders. In total, 84 subjects with nonNPSLE and 37 healthy controls completed neuropsychological testing from the American College of Rheumatology SLE battery. Serum autoantibody and cytokine measures, volumetric magnetic resonance imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy data were collected on a subset of subjects. NonNPSLE subjects had lower scores on measures of visual/complex attention, visuomotor speed and verbal memory compared with controls. No clinically significant differences between nonNPSLE patients and controls were found on serum measures of lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin antibodies, beta 2-glycoproteins, or pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, interferon alpha (IFN-alpha), and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma)). Higher scores on a global cognitive impairment index and a memory impairment index were correlated with lower IFN-alpha. Few associations between immune functions and neuroimaging parameters were found. Results indicated that nonNPSLE patients demonstrated cognitive impairment but not immune differences compared with controls. In these subjects, who were relatively young and with mild disease, no relationship between cognitive dysfunction, immune parameters, or previously documented neuroimaging abnormalities were noted. Immune measures acquired from cerebrospinal fluid instead of serum may yield stronger associations.

  12. Valvular heart disease is associated with nonfocal neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldan, Carlos A; Gelgand, Erika A; Qualls, Clifford R; Sibbitt, Wilmer L

    2006-02-01

    Central nonfocal neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) manifests as cognitive dysfunction, acute confusional state, seizures, and psychosis. Valvular heart disease (VHD) is currently not a causal consideration of nonfocal NPSLE. The objective of this study was to determine whether VHD is associated with nonfocal NPSLE. Twenty-eight patients with SLE underwent: 1) clinical and laboratory evaluations; 2) neuropsychiatric evaluation; 3) brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); and 4) transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). Their findings were compared with those of 28 age- and-sex matched healthy volunteers. Eighteen patients (64%) had nonfocal NPSLE. Cerebral infarcts on MRI were more common in patients with than without NPSLE (50% vs 10%, P=0.048) and antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) were associated with old cerebral infarcts (P=0.03). Valvular heart disease was detected in 20 patients (71%) of whom 20 (71%) had valve thickening, 17 (61%) had valve regurgitation, and 15 (53%) had valve vegetations (12 on the mitral valve). Mitral valve vegetations were more common in patients with than without nonfocal NPSLE and in those with old cerebral infarcts (61% vs 10% and 75% vs 30%, respectively, Pneuropsychiatric syndromes, 4 (15%) had MRI abnormalities, and 3 (11%) had VHD (all P

  13. Brain glucose utilization in systemic lupus erythematosus with neuropsychiatric symptoms: a controlled positron emission tomography study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otte, A. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland)]|[Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Weiner, S.M. [Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Peter, H.H. [Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Mueller-Brand, J. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Goetze, M. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Moser, E. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Gutfleisch, J. [Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Hoegerle, S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Juengling, F.D. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Nitzsche, E.U. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany)

    1997-07-01

    In contrast to morphological imaging [such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography], functional imaging may be of advantage in the detection of brain abnormalities in cases of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Therefore, we studied 13 patients (aged 40{+-}14 years, 11 female, 2 male) with neuropsychiatric SLE who met four of the American Rheumatism Association criteria for the classification of SLE. Ten clinically and neurologically healthy volunteers served as controls (aged 40{+-}12 years, 5 female, 5 male). Both groups were investigated using fluorine-18-labelled fluorodeoxyglucose brain positron emission tomography (PET) and cranial MRI. The normal controls and 11 of the 13 patients showed normal MRI scans. However, PET scan was abnormal in all 13 SLE patients. Significant group-to-group differences in the glucose metabolic index (GMI=region of interest uptake/global uptake at the level of the basal ganglia and thalamus) were found in the parieto-occipital region on both sides: the GMI of the parieto-occipital region on the right side was 0.922{+-}0.045 in patients and 1.066{+-}0.081 in controls (P<0.0001, Mann Whitney U test), while on the left side it was 0.892{+-}0.060 in patients and 1.034{+-}0.051 in controls (P=0.0002). Parieto-occipital hypometabolism is a conspicuous finding in mainly MRI-negative neuropsychiatric SLE. As the parieto-occipital region is located at the boundary of blood supply of all three major arteries, it could be the most vulnerable zone of the cerebrum and may be affected at an early stage of the cerebrovascular disease. (orig.). With 1 fig., 1 tab.

  14. EULAR recommendations for the management of systemic lupus erythematosus with neuropsychiatric manifestations : report of a task force of the EULAR standing committee for clinical affairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertsias, G. K.; Ioannidis, J. P. A.; Aringer, M.; Bollen, E.; Bombardieri, S.; Bruce, I. N.; Cervera, R.; Dalakas, M.; Doria, A.; Hanly, J. G.; Huizinga, T. W. J.; Isenberg, D.; Kallenberg, C.; Piette, J. C.; Schneider, M.; Scolding, N.; Smolen, J.; Stara, A.; Tassiulas, I.; Tektonidou, M.; Tincani, A.; van Buchem, M. A.; van Vollenhoven, R.; Ward, M.; Gordon, C.; Boumpas, D. T.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To develop recommendations for the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) manifestations. Methods The authors compiled questions on prevalence and risk factors, diagnosis and monitoring, therapy and prognosis of NPSLE. A systematic

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Neuropsychiatric Lupus [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5eh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae Sarbu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuropsychiatric lupus is a major diagnostic challenge, and a main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is, by far, the main tool for assessing the brain in this disease. Conventional and advanced MRI techniques are used to help establishing the diagnosis, to rule out alternative diagnoses, and recently, to monitor the evolution of the disease. This review explores the neuroimaging findings in SLE, including the recent advances in new MRI methods.

  16. Behavioral Deficits Are Accompanied by Immunological and Neurochemical Changes in a Mouse Model for Neuropsychiatric Lupus (NP-SLE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yan; Eskelund, Amanda; Zhou, H

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms of systemic lupus erythematosus (NP-SLE) have been understudied compared to end-organ failure and peripheral pathology. Neuropsychiatric symptoms, particularly affective and cognitive indications, may be among the earliest manifestations of SLE. Among the potential...... pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for NP-SLE are increased peripheral pro-inflammatory cytokines, subsequent induction of indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and activation of the kynurenine pathway. In the MRL/MpJ-Faslpr (MRL/lpr) murine model of lupus, depression-like behavior and cognitive dysfunction...... is evident before significant levels of autoantibody titers and nephritis are present. We examined the behavioral profile of MRL/lpr mice and their congenic controls, a comprehensive plasma cytokine and chemokine profile, and brain levels of serotonin and kynurenine pathway metabolites. Consistent...

  17. Therapeutic strategies in severe neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus: experience from a tertiary referral centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. De Leonardis

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The management of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE still remains empirical and based on clinical experience due to the lack of randomized controlled trials. Objective: to report the experience accumulated in a single tertiary referral centre about treatment of severe cases of NPSLE patients and to discuss therapeutic strategies on the background of EULAR recommendations. Methods: retrospective analysis of all consecutive cases of severe NPSLE treated in our centre since 1990 to 2010, satisfying the 1999 ACR criteria. Results: among 633 SLE patients who consecutively attended our centre, 231 (36% displayed at least one neuropsychiatric (NP manifestation for a total of 408 events attributable to SLE. Thirty-one patients (4.8%, 27 females and 4 males, experienced 35 major NP events requiring immunosuppressive therapy (including 3 relapses and 1 new event. An aggressive immunosuppressive strategy was applied to those patients with an immune mediated inflammatory NP event and to those patients with an increased disease activity as judged by ECLAM and SLEDAI scores. Overall at the end of the therapy 74% of the patients reached clinical remission or significant improvement of their symptoms measured by mean SLEDAI (from 10.09±1.09 to 2.04±0.52, PConclusions: the prevalence of NP involvement, described in our case series, is similar to those reported in literature as well as the treatment strategies applied. Nowadays, it is not possible to establish a standardized approach for each single NPSLE manifestation, and different therapeutic strategies must be tailored taking into account the most probable pathogenic mechanism involved, the general disease activity background, the co-morbidities, the type and the stage of the systemic involvement.

  18. Neuropsychiatric Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Involvement: Towards a Tailored Approach to Our Patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Faria

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropsychiatric involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE is a complex condition that remains poorly understood, and includes heterogeneous manifestations involving both the central and peripheral nervous system, with disabling effects. There are several models to improve NPSLE diagnosis when a neurological syndrome is present. In the last couple of years, the growing knowledge of the role of cytokines and antibodies in NPSLE, as well as the development of new functional imaging techniques, has brought some insights into the physiopathology of the disease, but their validation for clinical use remains undetermined. Furthermore, besides the classic clinical approach, a new tool for screening the 19 NPSLE syndromes has also been developed. Regarding NPSLE therapeutics, there is still no evidence-based treatment approach, but some data support the safety of biological medication when classic treatment fails. Despite the tendency to reclassify SLE patients in clinical and immunological subsets, we hope that these data will inspire medical professionals to approach NPSLE in a manner more tailored to the individual patient.

  19. Valvular heart disease by transthoracic echocardiography is associated with focal brain injury and central neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldan, Carlos A; Gelgand, Erika A; Qualls, Clifford R; Sibbitt, Wilmer L

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies using transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) report an association of valvular heart disease (VHD) with cerebral infarcts and central neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE). However, TEE cannot be routinely used. To determine if VHD detected by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is associated with focal brain injury on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and secondarily with central NPSLE. Sixty-nine patients with systemic lupus erythematosus underwent general clinical, neuropsychiatric and laboratory evaluations followed by MRI of the brain and TTE. Forty-one patients (59%) had NPSLE (stroke, transient ischemic attack, cognitive dysfunction, acute confusional state, seizures or psychosis); 46 (67%) had focal brain injury on MRI (cerebral infarcts, white matter lesions or small punctate lesions); 38 (55%) had VHD (vegetations, thickening or regurgitation). VHD was more common in patients with than in those without focal brain injury and NPSLE (all p < 0.05); focal brain lesions were more common in patients with than in those without NPSLE (all p < 0.04); and VHD was an independent predictor of focal brain lesions and NPSLE (both p < 0.04). In patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, VHD detected by TTE is associated with focal brain injury and NPSLE. (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Hyperuricemia in systemic lupus erythematosus: is it associated with the neuropsychiatric manifestations of the disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Sheikh

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives: To assess the association between hyperuricemia and different neuropsychiatric manifestations and stroke risk factors in systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE patients. Methods: This study was conducted on 204 SLE patients who were admitted to a tertiary referral center. A standardized questionnaire was completed for all the participants and the medical records were reviewed regarding the occurrence of arterial or venous thrombotic events, stroke, seizure, depression, headache, psychosis, and peripheral neuropathy. In addition blood samples were drawn to obtain serum uric acid, triglyceride (TG, high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol, and total cholesterol levels. Results: Hyperuricemia (serum uric acid ≥6 mg/dl for women and ≥7 mg/dl for men was detected in 16.1% of SLE patients and was significantly associated with the occurrence of stroke (OR, 2.38; 95%CI, 1.2-7.24, and peripheral neuropathy (OR, 3.49; 95% CI, 1.52-12.23, independent of hypertension and hyperlipidemia. Hyperuricemia was also significantly associated with hypertension (OR, 7.76; 95% CI, 2.72-15.76, hyperlipidemia (OR, 5.05; 95% CI, 1.59-11.32, and history of arterial thrombosis (OR, 4.95; 95% CI, 1.98-15.34, independent of age and body mass index. Conclusions: Hyperuricemia in SLE patients is independently associated with the occurrence of stroke and peripheral neuropathy. It is also independently associated with hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and history of arterial thrombosis, which are the major stroke and myocardial infarction risk factors in SLE patients.

  1. FDG-PET in the diagnosis of neuropsychiatric Lupus erythematosus and comparison with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoppe, G.; Wildhagen, K.; Meyer, G.J.; Schober, O.

    1989-01-01

    Central nervous system involvement has been found in 30-75% of all cases of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Up to now, clinical diagnosis is difficult and there are no markers for disease activity. We have compared cranial computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) using fluorodesoxyglucose (FDG) in two cases. FDG-PET is shown to be the most sensitive method demonstrating even reversible deficits and a better correlation with other neurological findings. MRI seems to be more sensitive than CT. A survey of the literature concerning imaging methods in neuropsychiatric SLE is given. The special problem of neuronal desactivation by antineuronal activity is discussed. (orig.) [de

  2. Non-invasive imaging to monitor lupus nephritis and neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5gh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Thurman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disease that can affect multiple different organs, including the kidneys and central nervous system (CNS. Conventional radiological examinations in SLE patients include volumetric/ anatomical computed tomography (CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and ultrasound (US. The utility of these modalities is limited, however, due to the complexity of the disease. Furthermore, CT and MRI contrast agents are contraindicated in patients with renal impairment. Various radiologic methods are currently being developed to improve disease characterization in patients with SLE beyond simple anatomical endpoints. Physiological non-contrast MRI protocols have been developed to assess tissue oxygenation, glomerular filtration, renal perfusion, interstitial diffusion, and inflammation-driven fibrosis in lupus nephritis (LN patients. For neurological symptoms, vessel size imaging (VSI, an MRI approach utilizing T2-relaxing iron oxide nanoparticles has shown promise as a diagnostic tool. Molecular imaging probes (mostly for MRI and nuclear medicine imaging have also been developed for diagnosing SLE with high sensitivity, and for monitoring disease activity. This paper reviews the challenges in evaluating disease activity in patients with LN and neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE. We describe novel MRI and positron-emission tomography (PET molecular imaging protocols using targeted iron oxide nanoparticles and radioactive ligands, respectively, for detection of SLE-associated inflammation.

  3. Proton pump inhibitor-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandholdt, L H; Laurinaviciene, R; Bygum, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) has been known in the literature since 1985 and is increasingly recognized.......Drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) has been known in the literature since 1985 and is increasingly recognized....

  4. Autoantibody profiling on human proteome microarray for biomarker discovery in cerebrospinal fluid and sera of neuropsychiatric lupus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaojun Hu

    Full Text Available Autoantibodies in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF from patients with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE may be potential biomarkers for prediction, diagnosis, or prognosis of NPSLE. We used a human proteome microarray with~17,000 unique full-length human proteins to investigate autoantibodies associated with NPSLE. Twenty-nine CSF specimens from 12 NPSLE, 7 non-NPSLE, and 10 control (non-systemic lupus erythematosuspatients were screened for NPSLE-associated autoantibodies with proteome microarrays. A focused autoantigen microarray of candidate NPSLE autoantigens was applied to profile a larger cohort of CSF with patient-matched sera. We identified 137 autoantigens associated with NPSLE. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that these autoantigens were enriched for functions involved in neurological diseases (score = 43.Anti-proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA was found in the CSF of NPSLE and non-NPSLE patients. The positive rates of 4 autoantibodies in CSF specimens were significantly different between the SLE (i.e., NPSLE and non-NPSLE and control groups: anti-ribosomal protein RPLP0, anti-RPLP1, anti-RPLP2, and anti-TROVE2 (also known as anti-Ro/SS-A. The positive rate for anti-SS-A associated with NPSLE was higher than that for non-NPSLE (31.11% cf. 10.71%; P = 0.045.Further analysis showed that anti-SS-A in CSF specimens was related to neuropsychiatric syndromes of the central nervous system in SLE (P = 0.009. Analysis with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient indicated that the titers of anti-RPLP2 and anti-SS-A in paired CSF and serum specimens significantly correlated. Human proteome microarrays offer a powerful platform to discover novel autoantibodies in CSF samples. Anti-SS-A autoantibodies may be potential CSF markers for NPSLE.

  5. Course of Neuropsychiatric Symptoms during Flares of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth Garrett

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a seventeen-year-old girl who presents with an interesting course of neuropsychiatric symptoms during several flares of SLE. The patient was diagnosed at the age of thirteen and has had four flares in total. The latter two flares included cutaneous and neuropsychiatric symptoms. The most recent flare occurred when she was aged seventeen. She had cutaneous symptoms which coincided with an episode of hypomania. Her mental state further deteriorated following steroid treatment. She exhibited affective and psychotic symptoms. Treatment with cyclophosphamide and olanzapine was associated with an improvement in both cutaneous and neuropsychiatric symptoms. Previously aged sixteen the patient had presented with cutaneous symptoms and a moderate depressive episode which was also exacerbated by steroid treatment. The patient’s mood improved when the dose of oral steroids was reduced to a daily dose of 15–20 mg prednisolone.

  6. Drug-induced cutaneous lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurinaviciene, Rasa; Holm Sandholdt, Linda; Bygum, Anette

    2017-01-01

    : To determine the proportion of patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) whose drugs are an inducing or aggravating factor. MATERIALS & METHODS: We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients diagnosed with CLE at a dermatological department over a 21-year period. We registered clinical......BACKGROUND: An increasing number of drugs have been linked to drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (DI-SCLE). The recognition and management of DI-SCLE can be challenging, as the condition may be triggered by different classes of drugs after variable lengths of time. OBJECTIVES......, serological, and histological data with a focus on drug intake. RESULTS: Of 775 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of lupus erythematosus (LE) or suspected LE, a diagnosis of CLE could be confirmed in 448 patients. A total of 130 patients had a drug intake that could suggest DI-SCLE. In 88 cases, a drug...

  7. Modeling Neuropsychiatric and Neurodegenerative Diseases With Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

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    Elizabeth A. LaMarca

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs have revolutionized our ability to model neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases, and recent progress in the field is paving the way for improved therapeutics. In this review, we discuss major advances in generating hiPSC-derived neural cells and cutting-edge techniques that are transforming hiPSC technology, such as three-dimensional “mini-brains” and clustered, regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats (CRISPR-Cas systems. We examine specific examples of how hiPSC-derived neural cells are being used to uncover the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and Parkinson’s disease, and consider the future of this groundbreaking research.

  8. Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    What is lupus? Lupus is an autoimmune disease. This means that your immune system attacks healthy cells and tissues by mistake. This can ... vessels, and brain. There are several kinds of lupus Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the most common ...

  9. SF-36 summary and subscale scores are reliable outcomes of neuropsychiatric events in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanly, J. G.; Urowitz, M. B.; Jackson, D.; Bae, S.C.; Gordon, C.; Wallace, D.J.; Clarke, A.; Bernatsky, S.; Vasudevan, A.; Isenberg, D.; Rahman, A.; Sanchez-Guerrero, J.; Romero-Diaz, J.; Merrill, J. T.; Fortin, P.R.; Gladman, D.D.; Bruce, I. N.; Steinsson, K.; Khamashta, M.; Alarcón, G.S.; Fessler, B.; Petri, M.; Manzi, S.; Nived, O.; Sturfelt, G.; Ramsey-Goldman, R.; Dooley, M.A.; Aranow, C.; Van Vollenhoven, R.; Ramos-Casals, M.; Zoma, A.; Kalunian, K.; Farewell, V.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine change in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in association with clinical outcomes of neuropsychiatric (NP) events in SLE. Methods An international study evaluated newly diagnosed SLE patients for NP events attributed to SLE and non-SLE causes. Outcome of events was determined by physician-completed 7-point scale and compared to patient-completed SF-36 questionnaires. Statistical analysis used linear mixed-effects regression models with patient specific random effects. Results 274 patients (92% female; 68% Caucasian), from a cohort of 1400, had ≥ 1 NP event where the interval between assessments was 12.3 ± 2 months. The overall difference in change between visits in mental component summary (MCS) scores of the SF-36 was significant (p<0.0001) following adjustments for gender, ethnicity, center and previous score. A consistent improvement in NP status (N=295) was associated with an increase in the mean(SD) adjusted MCS score of 3.66(0.89) in SF-36 scores. Between paired visits where NP status consistently deteriorated (N=30), the adjusted MCS score decreased by 4.00(1.96). For the physical component summary (PCS) scores the corresponding changes were +1.73(0.71) and −0.62(1.58) (p<0.05) respectively. Changes in SF-36 subscales were in the same direction (p<0.05; with the exception of role physical). Sensitivity analyses confirmed these findings. Adjustment for age, education, medications, SLE disease activity, organ damage, disease duration, attribution and characteristics of NP events did not substantially alter the results. Conclusion Changes in SF-36 summary and subscale scores, in particular those related to mental health, are strongly associated with the clinical outcome of NP events in SLE patients. PMID:21342917

  10. Contemplating stem cell therapy for epilepsy-induced neuropsychiatric symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao G

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Gautam Rao, Sherwin Mashkouri, David Aum, Paul Marcet, Cesar V Borlongan Department of Neurosurgery and Brain Repair, Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair, University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, FL, USA Abstract: Epilepsy is a debilitating disease that impacts millions of people worldwide. While unprovoked seizures characterize its cardinal symptom, an important aspect of epilepsy that remains to be addressed is the neuropsychiatric component. It has been documented for millennia in paintings and literature that those with epilepsy can suffer from bouts of aggression, depression, and other psychiatric ailments. Current treatments for epilepsy include the use of antiepileptic drugs and surgical resection. Antiepileptic drugs reduce the overall firing of the brain to mitigate the rate of seizure occurrence. Surgery aims to remove a portion of the brain that is suspected to be the source of aberrant firing that leads to seizures. Both options treat the seizure-generating neurological aspect of epilepsy, but fail to directly address the neuropsychiatric components. A promising new treatment for epilepsy is the use of stem cells to treat both the biological and psychiatric components. Stem cell therapy has been shown efficacious in treating experimental models of neurological disorders, including Parkinson’s disease, and neuropsychiatric diseases, such as depression. Additional research is necessary to see if stem cells can treat both neurological and neuropsychiatric aspects of epilepsy. Currently, there is no animal model that recapitulates all the clinical hallmarks of epilepsy. This could be due to difficulty in characterizing the neuropsychiatric component of the disease. In advancing stem cell therapy for treating epilepsy, experimental testing of the safety and efficacy of allogeneic and autologous transplantation will require the optimization of cell dosage, delivery, and timing of transplantation in a

  11. Evaluation of cerebral perfusion in patients with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus using 123I-IMP SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Atsuko; Shishido, Fumio; Kato, Kazuo; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Seino, Osamu

    2007-01-01

    In the course of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), central nervous system (CNS) complications occur at a high frequency. An accurate diagnosis of CNS lupus, differentiated from secondary CNS involvement, is difficult. CNS lupus is indicative of advancing primary disease and is treated by steroid pulse therapy or increased dosage of steroids. In contrast, if symptoms are caused by secondary CNS complications, it is possible to observe or treat these complications using symptomatic therapy. We examined whether quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) measured using cerebral perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can be used to differentiate CNS lupus from secondary CNS involvement. We divided 18 SLE patients with CNS symptoms into a CNS lupus group and a non-CNS lupus group, and then compared the mean cerebral blood flow (mCBF) of each group of patients. SPECT was performed with N-isopropyl-p-[ 123 I] iodoamphetamine (IMP), with quantitation carried out by table look-up and autoradiographic methods. The mCBF of both groups was decreased; however, the mCBF of patients with CNS lupus was significantly lower than that of non-CNS lupus patients. Quantitative CBF may provide a useful tool to distinguish CNS lupus from non-CNS lupus. (author)

  12. White matter lesions and brain atrophy in systemic lupus erythematosus patients: correlation to cognitive dysfunction in a cohort of systemic lupus erythematosus patients using different definition models for neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannerfelt, B; Nystedt, J; Jönsen, A; Lätt, J; van Westen, D; Lilja, A; Bengtsson, A; Nilsson, P; Mårtensson, J; Sundgren, P C

    2018-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent of white matter lesions, atrophy of the hippocampus and corpus callosum, and their correlation with cognitive dysfunction (CD), in patients diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods Seventy SLE patients and 25 healthy individuals (HIs) were included in the study. To evaluate the different SLE and neuropsychiatric SLE (NPSLE) definition schemes, patients were grouped both according to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) definition, as well as the more stringent ACR-Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics definition. Patients and HIs underwent a 3 Tesla brain MRI and a standardized neuropsychological test. MRI data were evaluated for number and volume of white matter lesions and atrophy of the hippocampus and corpus callosum. Differences between groups and subgroups were evaluated for significance. Number and volume of white matter lesions and atrophy of the hippocampus and corpus callosum were correlated to cognitive dysfunction. Results The total volume of white matter lesions was significantly larger in SLE patients compared to HIs ( p = 0.004). However, no significant differences were seen between the different SLE subgroups. Atrophy of the bilateral hippocampus was significantly more pronounced in patients with NPSLE compared to those with non-NPSLE (right: p = 0.010; left p = 0.023). Significant negative correlations between cognitive test scores on verbal memory and number and volume of white matter lesions were present. Conclusion SLE patients have a significantly larger volume of white matter lesions on MRI compared to HIs and the degree of white matter lesion volume correlates to cognitive dysfunction, specifically to verbal memory. No significant differences in the number or volume of white matter lesions were identified between subgroups of SLE patients regardless of the definition model used.

  13. FDG-PET in the diagnosis of neuropsychiatric Lupus erythematosus and comparison with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Einsatz der FDG-PET bei der Diagnostik des zentralnervoesen Lupus erythematodes und Vergleich mit CT und MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoppe, G. (Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany, F.R.). Neurologische Klinik mit Klinischer Neurophysiologie); Wildhagen, K. (Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany, F.R.). Abt. Immunologie und Transfusionsmedizin); Meyer, G.J. (Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany, F.R.). Abt. Nuklearmedizin und Spezielle Biophysik); Schober, O. (Muenster Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin)

    1989-10-01

    Central nervous system involvement has been found in 30-75% of all cases of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Up to now, clinical diagnosis is difficult and there are no markers for disease activity. We have compared cranial computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) using fluorodesoxyglucose (FDG) in two cases. FDG-PET is shown to be the most sensitive method demonstrating even reversible deficits and a better correlation with other neurological findings. MRI seems to be more sensitive than CT. A survey of the literature concerning imaging methods in neuropsychiatric SLE is given. The special problem of neuronal desactivation by antineuronal activity is discussed. (orig.).

  14. Minocycline induced lupus with yellow colored chylous exudative pleural effusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Starobin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ninety years old male was admitted to hospital due to breathlessness. The prominent findings were extensive blue-grey skin pigmentation and large left chylothorax. Drug induced lupus was diagnosed due to either minocycline chronic treatment or no alternative illness to explain his sub-acute disease. Minocycline therapy was stopped with gradual improvement of pleural effusion and skin discoloration. This case is the first presentation of minocycline induced lupus with chylothorax.

  15. NMDA receptor activity in neuropsychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaheen E Lakhan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors play a variety of physiologic roles and their proper signaling is essential for cellular homeostasis. Any disruption in this pathway, leading to either enhanced or decreased activity, may result in the manifestation of neuropsychiatric pathologies such as schizophrenia, mood disorders, substance induced psychosis, Huntington's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus. Here, we explore the notion that the overlap in activity of at least one biochemical pathway, the NMDA receptor pathway, may be the link to understanding the overlap in psychotic symptoms between diseases. This review intends to present a broad overview of those neuropsychiatric disorders for which alternations in NMDA receptor activity is prominent thus suggesting that continued direction of pharmaceutical intervention to this pathway may present a viable option for managing symptoms.

  16. MRI and 2D-CSI MR spectroscopy of the brain in the evaluation of patients with acute onset of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundgren, P.C.; Jennings, J.; Gebarski, S.; Pang, Y.; Maly, P.; Attwood, J.T.; McCune, W.J.; Nan, B.

    2005-01-01

    MRI and 2D-CSI spectroscopy were performed in eight patients with systemic lupus erythematosus who presented with acute onset of neuropsychiatric lupus (NP-SLE), and in seven normal controls to evaluate for differences in metabolic peaks and metabolic ratios between the two groups. Also, the interval change of the metabolic peaks and their ratios during treatment in the NP-SLE patient group was evaluated. Metabolic peaks for N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), choline (Cho), creatine (Cr), and lactate/lipids (LL) and their ratios (NAA/Cr, NAA/Cho, Cho/Cr, LL/Cr) were determined at initial presentation and 3 and 6 months later. In the eight lupus patients compared to the seven normal controls, NAA/Cho ratios were lower at presentation (1.05 vs 1.25; p = 0.004) and decreased even further at the three month follow-up (0.92 vs 1.05; p = 0.008). In contrast, both Cho/Cr (1.42 vs 1.26; p = 0.026) and LL/Cr ratios (0.26 vs 0.19; p = 0.002) were higher in the lupus patients at presentation compared to the controls and did not significantly change at three and six months follow-up. The NAA/Cr ratios were lower in the lupus patients compared to the controls at presentation but the difference was not statistically significant. However, the mean NAA/Cr significantly decreased from the initial examination to the three month follow-up (1.42 vs 1.32; p = 0.049) but did not significantly change from the three to the six month follow-up examinations. The NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr, and NAA/Cho ratios varied significantly (p < 0.05, p < 0.05, p < 0.05, respectively) between the 17 different locations measured in the brain in all eight patients and seven controls. Both the NAA/Cr ratios and the Cho/Cr ratios were also significantly lower in the gray matter than in the white matter (p < 0.0001) in both patients and controls, whereas the LL/Cr and NAA/Cho ratios were not significantly different. In conclusion, 2D-CSI MR spectroscopy may be useful in the early detection of metabolic CNS changes in NP

  17. Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Things That Help Feelings Expert Answers Q&A Movies & More for Teens Teens site Sitio para adolescentes ... out of their control, like: gender: Many more women get lupus than men; for every 1 man ...

  18. Impaired Functional Connectivity in the Prefrontal Cortex: A Mechanism for Chronic Stress-Induced Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Negrón-Oyarzo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic stress-related psychiatric diseases, such as major depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and schizophrenia, are characterized by a maladaptive organization of behavioral responses that strongly affect the well-being of patients. Current evidence suggests that a functional impairment of the prefrontal cortex (PFC is implicated in the pathophysiology of these diseases. Therefore, chronic stress may impair PFC functions required for the adaptive orchestration of behavioral responses. In the present review, we integrate evidence obtained from cognitive neuroscience with neurophysiological research with animal models, to put forward a hypothesis that addresses stress-induced behavioral dysfunctions observed in stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders. We propose that chronic stress impairs mechanisms involved in neuronal functional connectivity in the PFC that are required for the formation of adaptive representations for the execution of adaptive behavioral responses. These considerations could be particularly relevant for understanding the pathophysiology of chronic stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders.

  19. Episcleritis Related to Drug-Induced Lupus Erythematosus following Infliximab Therapy: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Chatziralli, Irini P.; Kanonidou, Evgenia; Chatzirallis, Alexandros; Dimitriadis, Prodromos; Keryttopoulos, Petros

    2011-01-01

    Drug-induced lupus erythematosus is defined as a lupus-like syndrome temporally related to continuous drug exposure which resolves after discontinuation of the offending drug. Herein, we describe a patient with distinct clinical manifestations of anti-TNF-associated DILE related to infliximab therapy. The patient exhibited clinical and laboratory findings of lupus-like illnesses as well as ocular disorders, such as episcleritis. The main message is that the symptoms of DILE should not be over...

  20. Oral manifestations of patients with lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Michael T; Valerin, Manuel A; Napeñas, Joel J; Lockhart, Peter B

    2005-01-01

    Lupus erythematosus manifests as cutaneous variants, such as discoid lupus erythematosus or systemic lupus erythematosus. Systemic lupus erythematosus is a multisystem autoimmune disease characterized by general autoantibody production and a wide range of mucocutaneous, renal, neuropsychiatric, cardiovascular, infectious, and hematologic manifestations. This article discusses the prevalence of and considerations for oral mucosal lesions in lupus erythematosus and the impact of the various disease manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus on dental management.

  1. Animal Models for Elucidation of the Mechanisms of Neuropsychiatric Disorders Induced by Sleep and Dietary Habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaoita, Fukie

    2016-01-01

    Numerous changes in human lifestyle in modern life increase the risk of disease. Especially, modern sleep and dietary habits are crucial factors affecting lifestyle disease. In terms of sleep, decreases in total sleep time and in rapid eye movement sleep time have been observed in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) patients. From a dietary perspective, mastication during eating has several good effects on systemic, mental, and physical functions of the body. However, few animal experiments have addressed the influence of this decline in sleep duration or of long-term powdered diet feeding on parameters reflecting systemic health. In our studies, we examined both the influence of intermittent sleep deprivation (SD) treatment and long-term powdered diet feeding on emotional behavior in mice, and focused on the mechanisms underlying these impaired behaviors. Our findings were as follows: SD treatment induced hypernoradrenergic and hypodopaminergic states within the frontal cortex. Furthermore, hyperactivity and an explosive number of jumps were observed. Both the hypernoradrenergic state and the jumps were improved by treatment with ADHD therapeutic drugs. On the other hand, long-term powdered diet feeding increased social interaction behaviors. The feeding affected the dopaminergic function of the frontal cortex. In addition, the long-term powdered diet fed mice presented systemic illness signs, such as elevations of blood glucose, and hypertension. This review, describing the SD mice and long-term powdered diet fed mice can be a useful model for elucidation of the mechanism of neuropsychiatric disorders or the discovery of new therapeutic targets in combatting effects of the modern lifestyle.

  2. Episcleritis Related to Drug-Induced Lupus Erythematosus following Infliximab Therapy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irini P. Chatziralli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced lupus erythematosus is defined as a lupus-like syndrome temporally related to continuous drug exposure which resolves after discontinuation of the offending drug. Herein, we describe a patient with distinct clinical manifestations of anti-TNF-associated DILE related to infliximab therapy. The patient exhibited clinical and laboratory findings of lupus-like illnesses as well as ocular disorders, such as episcleritis. The main message is that the symptoms of DILE should not be overlooked, although sometimes other systematic conditions may underlie them. As a result, it is very important for the clinicians to evaluate the symptoms of DILE and manage appropriately these cases.

  3. Recovery from UV-induced potentially lethal damage in systemic lupus erythematosus skin fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamansky, G.B.

    1986-01-01

    The repair of ultraviolet light-induced potentially lethal damage was investigated in density-inhibited skin fibroblast cell strains derived from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. The effect of exposure to polychromatic ultraviolet light composed of environmentally relevant wavelengths or to the more commonly studied, short wavelength (254 nm) ultraviolet light was studied. Systemic lupus erythematosus cells, which are hypersensitive to ultraviolet light under growth promoting conditions, were able to repair potentially lethal damage as well as normal cells. (author)

  4. Epstein-Barr virus-induced systemic lupus erythematosus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ngou J. Graafland H, Segondy M. Antibodies against polypeptides of purified. Epstein-Barr virus in sera grown from patients with connective tissue diseases'. J Autoimmun 1992; 5: 243-249. 4. Stancek D, Rovensky J. Enhancement of Epstein-Barr virus antibody production in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

  5. Systemic lupus erythematosus induced by anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha therapy: a French national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bandt, Michel; Sibilia, Jean; Le Loët, Xavier; Prouzeau, Sebastian; Fautrel, Bruno; Marcelli, Christian; Boucquillard, Eric; Siame, Jean Louis; Mariette, Xavier

    2005-01-01

    The development of drug-induced lupus remains a matter of concern in patients treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) alpha. The incidence of such adverse effects is unknown. We undertook a retrospective national study to analyse such patients. Between June and October 2003, 866 rheumatology and internal medicine practitioners from all French hospital centres prescribing anti-TNF in rheumatic diseases registered on the website of the 'Club Rhumatismes et Inflammation' were contacted by email to obtain the files of patients with TNF-induced systemic lupus erythematosus. Twenty-two cases were collected, revealing two aspects of these manifestations. Ten patients (six patients receiving infliximab, four patients receiving etanercept) only had anti-DNA antibodies and skin manifestations one could classify as 'limited skin lupus' or 'toxidermia' in a context of autoimmunity, whereas 12 patients (nine patients receiving infliximab, three patients receiving etanercept) had more complete drug-induced lupus with systemic manifestations and at least four American Congress of Rheumatology criteria. One patient had central nervous system manifestations. No patients had lupus nephritis. The signs of lupus occurred within a mean of 9 months (range 3-16 months) in patients treated with infliximab and within a mean of 4 months (range 2-5 months) in patients treated with etanercept. In all cases after diagnosis was determined, anti-TNF was stopped and specific treatment introduced in eight patients: two patients received intravenous methylprednisolone, four patients received oral steroids (15-35 mg/day), and two patients received topical steroids. Lupus manifestations abated within a few weeks (median 8 weeks, standard deviation 3-16) in all patients except one with longer-lasting evolution (6 months). At that time, cautious estimations (unpublished data from Schering Plough Inc. and Wyeth Inc.) indicated that about 7700 patients had been exposed to infliximab and 3000 to

  6. Parvovirus B19 induced lupus-like syndrome with nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georges, Elodie; Rihova, Zuzana; Cmejla, Radek; Decleire, Pierre-Yves; Langen, Corinne

    2016-12-01

    We report a case of a 65-year-old man who developed an acute illness with fever, arthralgia and nephritic syndrome. Antinuclear antibodies were slightly positive and complement levels were low. Renal biopsy showed exudative diffuse proliferative endocapillary glomerulonephritis with diffuse immunoglobulin (IgG, IgA, IgM) and complement deposition (C3d, C4d, C1q) on immunofluorescence. The patient was first treated with corticosteroids and mycophenolate mofetil for suspected lupus with WHO class IV glomerulonephritis. The diagnosis was questioned and a diagnosis of parvovirus B19-associated nephritis was made based on elevation of serum IgM antibodies for parvovirus B19 and detection of parvovirus B19 DNA on renal biopsy. The immunosuppressive treatment was stopped and progressive spontaneous regression of clinical and laboratory abnormalities was observed. We conclude that human parvovirus B19 infection should be considered as a cause of lupus-like symptomatology and acute glomerulonephritis.

  7. Microparticles from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus induce production of reactive oxygen species and degranulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winberg, Line Kjær; Jacobsen, Søren; Nielsen, Claus H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The interaction of circulating microparticles (MPs) with immune cells in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is sparsely investigated. We examined the ability of MPs from SLE patients to induce production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and degranulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes...

  8. In vivo modeling of neuronal function, axonal impairment and connectivity in neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders using induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korecka, J A; Levy, S; Isacson, O

    2016-06-01

    Modeling neurological diseases using human embryonic or patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) improves the understanding of molecular and cellular changes underlying these diseases and can lead to new, potentially personalized therapies. Changes in expression of axon guidance cues and altered cytoskeletal maintenance have been implicated in neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. To date, most of the iPSC patient-derived cellular dysfunction and phenotypic studies have been performed in vitro. To study the intrinsic axonal impairments and neuronal connectivity deficits in human disease iPSC-derived neurons we propose to graft these cells into the physiological three-dimensional multi-structural environment of the central nervous system of rodent models to obtain relevant in vivo data. Such human iPSC in vivo chimeric models can allow for neuronal maturation, capture neuropathological phenotypes of axonal and connectivity impairments, and serve as target engagement and drug validation studies using human cells, thus highly relevant for advancement of the drug development process in the late pre-clinical stages. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Systemic lupus erythematosus induced by anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha therapy: a French national survey

    OpenAIRE

    De Bandt, Michel; Sibilia, Jean; Le Lo?t, Xavier; Prouzeau, Sebastian; Fautrel, Bruno; Marcelli, Christian; Boucquillard, Eric; Siame, Jean Louis; Mariette, Xavier; ,

    2005-01-01

    The development of drug-induced lupus remains a matter of concern in patients treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) alpha. The incidence of such adverse effects is unknown. We undertook a retrospective national study to analyse such patients. Between June and October 2003, 866 rheumatology and internal medicine practitioners from all French hospital centres prescribing anti-TNF in rheumatic diseases registered on the website of the 'Club Rhumatismes et Inflammation' were contacted by...

  10. DRUG REACTION WITH HERBAL SUPPLEMENT: A POSSIBLE CASE OF DRUG INDUCED LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AZIZ NA

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 24-year-old lady presented with four days history of fever, non-pruritic rash, ankle pain and swelling. She had consumed herbal supplement five days before the onset of symptoms. Examinations revealed erythematous maculo-papular lesions of varying sizes on sun exposed areas. Patient was suspected to have Drug Induced Lupus Erythematosus (DILE and subsequently symptoms subsided rapidly on withholding the herbal medication.

  11. [DRUG-INDUCED LUPUS CAUSED BY LONG TERM MINOCYCLINE TREATMENT FOR ACNE VULGARIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanai, Shunichiro; Sato, Takeo; Takeda, Koichi; Nagatani, Katsuya; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Minota, Seiji

    2015-09-01

    An 18-year-old Japanese girl had received oral minocycline 200mg daily for treatment of acne vulgaris since 16 years old. She had a fever three months before admission, followed by joint pains in her knees, elbows and several proximal interphalangeal joints one month before admission. She was referred to our hospital because of a high serum level of anti-DNA antibody. She had already discontinued oral minocycline five weeks before admission, because she missed her medication refilled. On admission, the arthralgia and fever spontaneously resolved, and there were no laboratory evidence of hypocomplementemia and cytopenia. She had neither erythema nor internal organ involvements. Because her symptoms subsided spontaneously after the cessation of minocycline, she was considered to have drug-induced lupus. Both the arthralgia and fever did not relapse, and anti-ds DNA antibody returned to normal during a follow-up period without treatment. There are few reports of drug-induced lupus caused by minocycline in Japan. This case highlights the importance of considering minocycline-induced lupus.

  12. Effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on IL-17/IL-23 axis, IFN-γ and IL-4 expression in systemic lupus erythematosus induced mice model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Faraji

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: Our findings showed that vitamin D3 supplementation in lupus induced mice through modulating the expression rate of some inflammatory cytokines diminished the inflammatory conditions in SLE.

  13. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine-induced lupus vulgaris in a child adopted from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Amber; Browning, John; Campbell, Judith; Metry, Denise

    2007-01-01

    Lupus vulgaris is a rare form of cutaneous mycobacterial infection that can occur from mycobacterial exposure and even more rarely from exposure to the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine. We report a child who received this vaccination in China and then developed lupus vulgaris shortly after being adopted in the United States. After histopathologic confirmation, the infection was successfully treated with a combination of antibiotics. This occurrence demonstrates the need for heightened surveillance of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine-induced lupus vulgaris, given the increasing numbers of overseas adoptions taking place in the United States. To our knowledge, this is the first reported instance of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin immunization-induced lupus vulgaris in the United States.

  14. Immunomodulation Effects of Bryophyllum Pinnatum on Pregnant Pristane-Induced Lupus Mice Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurdiana Nurdiana

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the effect of Bryophyllum pinnatum treatment in modulating immune response and the pregnancy outcomes of pregnant pristane-induced lupus mice model. Methods: Sixteen Balb/c mice were intraperitoneally injected with single 0.5 cc pristane to induce lupus manifestations. After 12 weeks of injection, mice were mated and considered as gestational day 0 (GD0. Mice were divided into 4 groups based on the dosages of Bryophyllum pinnatum: control (no treatment, B1 (10.5 mg/kg, B2 (21 mg/kg, and B3 (42 mg/kg. The treatment was given orally every day started from GD9 until 9 days. At the end of the study, blood pressure and fetal size were measured. Serum anti-dsDNA and urine albumin levels were measured by ELISA. Spleen T helper (Th and mature B cells percentages were measured by flow cytometry. Results: Administration of Bryophyllum pinnatum reduced the percentages of Th1 (p=0.006, Th2 (p=0.005, Th17 (p=0.000, and mature B cells (p=0.007 in dose-dependent manner. B1 and B2 had significantly lower of systolic blood pressure compared to control (p=0.026 and p=0.022 respectively. Significantly lower of anti-dsDNA levels were found in B1 group compared to control (p=0.014. However, no significantly different of urine albumin levels were found between groups. Bryophyllum pinnatum also significantly increased the fetus body weight in dose-dependent manner (p=0.000. Conclusion: Treatment of Bryophyllum pinnatum could improve the pregnancy outcome and modulate the immune response in pregnant pristane-induced lupus mice. Therefore, Bryophyllum pinnatum is a potential herb which can be developed as an immunosuppressive agent in the future.

  15. Diverse patterns of anti-TNF-α-induced lupus: case series and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shovman, Ora; Tamar, Shalev; Amital, Howard; Watad, Abdulla; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2018-02-01

    The induction of autoantibodies is common following therapy with anti-TNF-α agents. However, anti-TNF-α-induced lupus (ATIL) is rare. We assessed the clinical characteristics of three patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who were treated with infliximab and developed distinct subsets of ATIL. Also, we searched for similar cases in the published literature. We describe three patients with ATIL. The first patient had a classical drug-induced lupus (DIL) presented by thrombocytopenia that resolved after infliximab discontinuation. The second case experienced symmetric polyarthritis of 14 joints in rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-like distribution accompanied by lymphopenia. The third one had a severe serositis including ascites and pleural and pericardial effusions along with pancytopenia. In this patient, ATIL coexisted with anti-TNF-α-induced hepatitis. The second and third patients met the American College of Rheumatology classification criteria for SLE. Nevertheless, all three cases exhibited ANA and anti-dsDNA positivity, and only the second patient had anticardiolipin (aCL IgG) and anti-histone antibodies. The coexistence of both lupus-like syndrome and hepatitis following anti-TNF-α therapy in the same patient is very rare, and to the best of our knowledge, only four such case reports are mentioned in literature. Patients with mild ATIL may tolerate another anti-TNF-α agent without recurrence of the disease. Rheumatologists should be aware of the distinct clinical presentations of ATIL and its coexistence with other rare anti-TNF-alpha complications such as hepatitis.

  16. Kallikrein genes are associated with lupus and glomerular basement membrane–specific antibody–induced nephritis in mice and humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kui; Li, Quan-Zhen; Delgado-Vega, Angelica M.; Abelson, Anna-Karin; Sánchez, Elena; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Li, Li; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Jinchun; Yan, Mei; Ye, Qiu; Liu, Shenxi; Xie, Chun; Zhou, Xin J.; Chung, Sharon A.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo; Witte, Torsten; de Ramón, Enrique; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Barizzone, Nadia; Sebastiani, Gian Domenico; Merrill, Joan T.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Gilkeson, Gary G.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Kim, Il; D’Alfonso, Sandra; Martin, Javier; Harley, John B.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Wakeland, Edward K.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Mohan, Chandra

    2009-01-01

    Immune-mediated nephritis contributes to disease in systemic lupus erythematosus, Goodpasture syndrome (caused by antibodies specific for glomerular basement membrane [anti-GBM antibodies]), and spontaneous lupus nephritis. Inbred mouse strains differ in susceptibility to anti-GBM antibody–induced and spontaneous lupus nephritis. This study sought to clarify the genetic and molecular factors that may be responsible for enhanced immune-mediated renal disease in these models. When the kidneys of 3 mouse strains sensitive to anti-GBM antibody–induced nephritis were compared with those of 2 control strains using microarray analysis, one-fifth of the underexpressed genes belonged to the kallikrein gene family, which encodes serine esterases. Mouse strains that upregulated renal and urinary kallikreins exhibited less evidence of disease. Antagonizing the kallikrein pathway augmented disease, while agonists dampened the severity of anti-GBM antibody–induced nephritis. In addition, nephritis-sensitive mouse strains had kallikrein haplotypes that were distinct from those of control strains, including several regulatory polymorphisms, some of which were associated with functional consequences. Indeed, increased susceptibility to anti-GBM antibody–induced nephritis and spontaneous lupus nephritis was achieved by breeding mice with a genetic interval harboring the kallikrein genes onto a disease-resistant background. Finally, both human SLE and spontaneous lupus nephritis were found to be associated with kallikrein genes, particularly KLK1 and the KLK3 promoter, when DNA SNPs from independent cohorts of SLE patients and controls were compared. Collectively, these studies suggest that kallikreins are protective disease-associated genes in anti-GBM antibody–induced nephritis and lupus. PMID:19307730

  17. Endogenous interleukin (IL)-17A promotes pristane-induced systemic autoimmunity and lupus nephritis induced by pristane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, S A; Odobasic, D; Khouri, M B; Steinmetz, O M; Yang, Y; Holdsworth, S R; Kitching, A R

    2014-06-01

    Interleukin (IL)-17A is increased both in serum and in kidney biopsies from patients with lupus nephritis, but direct evidence of pathogenicity is less well established. Administration of pristane to genetically intact mice results in the production of autoantibodies and proliferative glomerulonephritis, resembling human lupus nephritis. These studies sought to define the role of IL-17A in experimental lupus induced by pristane administration. Pristane was administered to wild-type (WT) and IL-17A(-/-) mice. Local and systemic immune responses were assessed after 6 days and 8 weeks, and autoimmunity, glomerular inflammation and renal injury were measured at 7 months. IL-17A production increased significantly 6 days after pristane injection, with innate immune cells, neutrophils (Ly6G(+)) and macrophages (F4/80(+)) being the predominant source of IL-17A. After 8 weeks, while systemic IL-17A was still readily detected in WT mice, the levels of proinflammatory cytokines, interferon (IFN)-γ and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) were diminished in the absence of endogenous IL-17A. Seven months after pristane treatment humoral autoimmunity was diminished in the absence of IL-17A, with decreased levels of immunoglobulin (Ig)G and anti-dsDNA antibodies. Renal inflammation and injury was less in the absence of IL-17A. Compared to WT mice, glomerular IgG, complement deposition, glomerular CD4(+) T cells and intrarenal expression of T helper type 1 (Th1)-associated proinflammatory mediators were decreased in IL-17A(-/-) mice. WT mice developed progressive proteinuria, but functional and histological renal injury was attenuated in the absence of IL-17A. Therefore, IL-17A is required for the full development of autoimmunity and lupus nephritis in experimental SLE, and early in the development of autoimmunity, innate immune cells produce IL-17A. © 2014 British Society for Immunology.

  18. Regulatory Effect of Melatonin on Cytokine Disturbances in the Pristane-Induced Lupus Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-ling Zhou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE develops in relation to many environmental factors. In our opinion, it is more important to investigate the effect of melatonin on the environmental- related SLE. In the present study, 0.5 ml pristane were used to induce SLE in female BALB/c mice. Melatonin (0.01, 0.1, 1.0 mg/kg was orally administered immediately after pristane-injection for 24 weeks. IgM anti ssDNA and histone antibodies were detected after 0, 1, 2, 4, 8 weeks pristane injection. The levels of IL-2, IL-6 and IL-13 were detected after 24 weeks. Renal lesions were also observed. The results showed that melatonin antagonized the increasing levels of IgM anti ssDNA and histone autoantibodies. Melatonin could also decrease the IL-6 and IL-13 production and increase the IL-2 production. Besides, melatonin could lessen the renal lesions caused by pristane. These results suggested that melatonin has a beneficial effect on pristane-induced lupus through regulating the cytokines disturbances.

  19. Adalimumab (TNFα Inhibitor Therapy Exacerbates IgA Glomerulonephritis Acute Renal Injury and Induces Lupus Autoantibodies in a Psoriasis Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Wei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adalimumab (Humira is a tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα inhibitor that is approved for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, Crohn's disease, ankylosing spondylitis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (Sullivan and Preda (2009, Klinkhoff (2004, and Medicare Australia. Use of TNFα inhibitors is associated with the induction of autoimmunity (systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitis, and sarcoidosis or sarcoid-like granulomas (Ramos-Casals et al. (2010. We report a patient with extensive psoriasis presenting with renal failure and seropositive lupus markers without classical lupus nephritis after 18 months treatment with adalimumab. He has renal biopsy proven IgA nephritis instead. Renal biopsy is the key diagnostic tool in patients presenting with adalimumab induced nephritis and renal failure. He made a remarkable recovery after adalimumab cessation and steroid treatment. To our knowledge, this is a unique case of a psoriasis patient presenting with seropositive lupus markers without classical lupus nephritis renal failure and had renal biopsy proven IgA glomerulonephritis after receiving adalimumab.

  20. The pathway of estradiol-induced apoptosis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastin, Maryam; Hatef, Mohammad Reza; Tabasi, Nafisseh; Mahmoudi, Mahmoud

    2012-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a disease with unknown etiology. The pathologic role of sex hormones and apoptosis in SLE has often been discussed. We studied the effects of estradiol in the pathway of induced apoptosis in Iranian SLE patients. T lymphocytes from 35 SLE patients and 20 age-matched controls were isolated and cultured in the presence of 10(-8) M 17-β estradiol. The expression levels of Fas, Fas ligand (FasL), Bcl-2, caspase-8, and caspase-9 mRNAs were determined semiquantitatively in comparison to the expression level of beta actin RNA. Estradiol exposure did not have any significant effects on the expression levels of Fas, Bcl-2, and caspase-9 in SLE patients and controls. However, the expression levels of FasL and caspase-8 were significantly increased in SLE patients, but not in controls. This suggests the probable involvement of extrinsic apoptosis pathway in estradiol-induced apoptosis in SLE.

  1. Clinical utility of circulating anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunits NR2A/B antibody for the diagnosis of neuropsychiatric syndromes in systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren's syndrome: An updated meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Sen Hee; Fairhurst, Anna-Marie; Mak, Anselm

    2017-02-01

    Neuropsychiatric (NP) events are found in patients with rheumatic diseases, commonly in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Sjögren's syndrome (SS). The standard nomenclature and case definitions for 19 NPSLE syndromes by the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) Committee on Research cover a wide range of NP events seen in both SLE and SS. Despite advances in the understanding of SLE and SS, NP syndromes continue to pose diagnostic challenges. Correct attribution of NP events is critical in determining the correct treatment and prognosis. Anti-N-methyl- d -aspartate receptor subunits NR2A/B (anti-NR2A/B) antibodies have been demonstrated in the sera of SLE and SS patients and have been associated with collective or specific NP syndromes, though not consistently. Interpretation of anti-NR2A/B antibody data in the medical literature is rendered difficult by small sample size of patient groups. By combining different studies to generate a pooled effect size, a meta-analysis can increase the power to detect differences in the presence or absence of NP syndromes. Hence, we set out to perform a meta-analysis to assess the association between anti-NR2A/B antibodies and NP syndromes in SLE and SS. A literature search was conducted using PubMed and other databases from inception to June 2016. We abstracted data relating to anti-NR2A/B antibodies from the identified studies. The random effects model was used to calculate overall combined odds ratio (OD) with its corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) to evaluate the relationship between anti-NR2A/B antibodies and NP syndromes in SLE and SS patients with and without NP events. We also included our own cohort of 57 SLE patients fulfilling the ACR 1997 revised classification criteria and 58 healthy controls (HCs). In total, 17 studies with data on anti-NR2A/B antibodies in 2212 SLE patients, 66 SS patients, 99 disease controls (DCs) (e.g. antiphospholipid syndrome, myasthenia gravis and autoimmune polyendocrine

  2. Catatonia due to systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco de Assis Pinto Cabral Júnior Rabello

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Discuss neuropsychiatric aspects and differential diagnosis of catatonic syndrome secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE in a pediatric patient. Methods Single case report. Result A 13-year-old male, after two months diagnosed with SLE, started to present psychotic symptoms (behavioral changes, hallucinations and delusions that evolved into intense catatonia. During hospitalization, neuroimaging, biochemical and serological tests for differential diagnosis with metabolic encephalopathy, neurological tumors and neuroinfections, among other tests, were performed. The possibility of neuroleptic malignant syndrome, steroid-induced psychosis and catatonia was also evaluated. A complete reversal of catatonia was achieved after using benzodiazepines in high doses, associated with immunosuppressive therapy for lupus, which speaks in favor of catatonia secondary to autoimmune encephalitis due to lupus. Conclusion Although catatonia rarely is the initial clinical presentation of SLE, the delay in recognizing the syndrome can be risky, having a negative impact on prognosis. Benzodiazepines have an important role in the catatonia resolution, especially when associated with parallel specific organic base cause treatment. The use of neuroleptics should be avoided for the duration of the catatonic syndrome as it may cause clinical deterioration.

  3. Manifestações neuropsiquiátricas em crianças e adolescentes com lúpus eritematoso sistêmico juvenil: associação com anticorpos antifosfolípide? Neuropsychiatric manifestations of children and adolescents with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus: is there an association with antiphospholipid antibodies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássia Maria Passarelli Lupoli Barbosa

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: estudar a freqüência de anticorpos antifosfolípide (aFL em pacientes com lúpus eritematoso sistêmico juvenil (LESJ e sua possível associação com manifestações neuropsiquiátricas. MÉTODOS: análise retrospectiva de prontuários de 64 pacientes com LESJ, de acordo com os critérios do American College of Rheumatology (ACR, acompanhados por um período mínimo de seis meses. Foram consideradas manifestações neuropsiquiátricas: cefaléia, convulsão, acidente vascular cerebral (AVC, coréia, neuropatia medular e periférica, além de alterações do comportamento, com ou sem psicose. Duas dosagens de anticorpos anticardiolipina foram realizadas com intervalo de dois meses e foram considerados positivos os títulos de IgG maiores que 20 e de IgM maiores que 12. O anticoagulante lúpico foi dosado em 32 pacientes. A análise estatística foi realizada através do teste de Fisher com nível de significância OBJECTIVE: to study the frequency of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL in patients with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE and the possible association to neuropsychiatric manifestations. METHODS: retrospective analysis of charts of 64 JSLE patients according to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR classification criteria, followed for at least six months. The neuropsychiatric manifestations were defined by the presence of: headache, seizure, cerebrovascular accident (CVA, chorea, medular or peripheral neuropathy and behavior disturbances with psichosis or not. The aPL were tested in two occasions with an interval of two months. Values greater than 20 for IgG or 12 for IgM were considered as positive. The lupus anticoagulant was tested in 32 patients. The statistical analysis was performed using the Fisher’s exact test with a significance level of 0,05. RESULTS: 38 (59.4% out of 64 JSLE patients had neuropsychiatric manifestations. APL antibodies were presented in 29 patients (45.3%. We did not observe a

  4. [Central nervous system involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus - diagnosis and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmyrka, Magdalena

    Nervous system involvement in lupus belongs to its severe complications and significantly impacts its prognosis. Neuropsychiatric lupus includes 19 disease manifestations concerning both central and peripheral nervous system. This paper presents clinical aspects of central nervous system involvement in lupus. It reviews its epidemiology, risk factors and principles of diagnosis and therapy.

  5. Development of pristane induced mice model for lupus with atherosclerosis and analysis of TLR expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoqing; Cui, RanRan; Li, Rongda; Lin, Huili; Huang, Ziyang; Lin, Ling

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to establish a murine model of lupus with atherosclerosis, and to investigate the expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the aorta and kidney. The 9-week-old female ApoE-/- and C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into a ApoE-/- pristane treated group (group A), ApoE-/- control group (group B), C57BL/6 pristane treated group (group C) and C57BL/6 control group (group D). Each mouse was given either a single intraperitoneal injection of 0.5 ml pristane or saline. We observed that group A mice specifically had poor spirit, less activity, obvious hair loss, splenomegalia and renomegaly. Levels of ANA, anti-ds-DNA and anti-Sm antibodies were significantly higher than those in other groups. The group A and B mice generally displayed intimal hyperplasia and atherosclerosis mottling in the lumen of the aorta. The kidney tissues from group A, B and C mice showed increased expression levels of TLR2, TLR4, TLR7 and TLR9 proteins in comparison to group D. However, Group A mice did not show any significant difference in TLR2 and TLR4 protein expression levels when compared to group B and C, but displayed higher TLR7 expression than group B and higher TLR9 expression than group B and C mice. In contrast, the group A and B mice apparently expressed TLR2 and TLR4. We concluded that pristane treated apoE-/- mice exhibited lupus-like phenotype and developed atherosclerosis. The pristane treatment also induced abnormally high expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in the aorta and TLR2, TLR4, TLR7 and TLR9 in the kidney of apoE-/- mice.

  6. [Lupus profundus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macotela Ruíz, E; Gómez Alvarez, E M; Suárez de la Torre, R S

    1977-01-01

    Seven cases of lupus erythematosus profundus are described (chronic discoid lupus erythematosus with athrophic panniculitis) with dissemination of one of them. All patients were females. The authors stress their opinion that it should not be called as lupus profundus, the cases of lupus erythematosus disseminated with erythema nodosum neither the cases of L.E.S. preceded or associated with the so called Weber-Christian's type of panniculitis. Six of the cases had athrophic alopecia of scalp by lupus discoid.

  7. [Case of systemic lupus erythematosus occurring after induced abortion and drug eruption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Nobuhito; Baba, Shunu; Takahashi, Susumu; Itou, Harumasa; Kowada, Kouko; Shikanai, Toshiki; Nakamura, Yutaka; Yamauchi, Kohei; Inoue, Hiroshi; Sawai, Takashi

    2008-07-01

    We describe a19 year-old woman who was diagnosed as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) after abortion. She had taken anti-convulsants for epilepsy since she was 8 years old. Induced abortion surgery was performed at six weeks in her pregnancy. She showed pyrexia and a general rash 2 days after the abortion. She was introduced to our hospital because the administration of antibiotics was not effective. Since the anti-convulsants had been changed after pregnancy, we returned to those administered before pregnancy and followed her up. Her eruption improved, but she became aware of thirstiness and dry eye. She was diagnosed as Sjögren syndrome by ophthalmologic examination, lip biopsy, and elevation of an anti-SS-A antibody and an anti-SS-B antibody in the serum. Since we could not rule out SLE because of the low concentration of complement activity in blood, we followed her up carefully by checking serum markers of SLE. Protein urine developed after the improvement of the eruption 2 weeks later. Low complement activity was recognized and double stranded (ds)-DNA antibody became positive. In addition to these findings, she had an episode of hypersensitivity to sunlight and was therefore diagnosed as SLE. Since induced abortion and drug eruption might be associated with the onset of SLE, the case is thought to be a valuable from the view point of understanding the mechanism of SLE onset.

  8. Drug-induced lupus: simvastatin or amiodarone? A case report in elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Turrin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Reports of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE seen during treatment with amiodarone are rare in the literature. SLE or immunological abnormalities induced by treatment with statins are more frequent. In this issue we report a case of a 81-year-old male who, after a 2-year therapy with amiodarone, developed a clinical and serologic picture of drug-induced SLE (DILE. He was admitted for congestive heart failure in mechanical aortic valve prosthesis, permanent atrial fibrillation (anticoagulation with warfarin, hypercholesterolaemia, and hypothyroidism. Amiodarone was started two years earlier for polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, statin and L-thyroxine the following year. At admission he presented pleuro-pericardical effusion detected by CT-scan (also indicative of interstitial lung involvement and echocardiography. Serological main indicative findings were: elevation of inflammatory markers, ANA (Anti-Nuclear Antibodies titers = 1:320 (indirect immune-fluorescence – IIF – assay on HEp-2, homogeneous/fine speckled pattern, anti-dsDNA titers = 1:80 (IIF on Crithidia luciliae, negative ENA (Extractable Nuclear Antigens and antibodies anti-citrulline, rheumatoid factor = 253 KU/l, normal C3-C4, negative HbsAg and anti-HCV, negative anticardiolipin antibodies IgG and IgM, negative anti-beta2GPI IgG and IgM. Amiodarone was discontinued and methylprednisolone was started, since the patient was severely ill. At discharge, after a month, the patient was better and pleuro-pericardical effusion was reduced. Readmitted few weeks later for bradyarithmia and worsening of dyspnoea, pericardial effusion was further reduced but he died for refractory congestive heart failure and pneumonia. Clinical picture (sierositis, neither skin nor kidney involvement, other typical side effects of amiodarone (hypothyroidism and lung interstitial pathology and serological findings are suggestive of amiodarone-induced SLE.

  9. Basophils contribute to pristane-induced Lupus-like nephritis model

    OpenAIRE

    Dema, Barbara; Lamri, Yasmine; Pellefigues, Christophe; Pacreau, Emeline; Saidoune, Fanny; Bidault, Caroline; Karasuyama, Hajime; Sacr?, Karim; Daugas, Eric; Charles, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    International audience; Lupus nephritis (LN), one of the most severe outcomes of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), is initiated by glomerular deposition of immune-complexes leading to an inflammatory response and kidney failure. Autoantibodies to nuclear antigens and autoreactive B and T cells are central in SLE pathogenesis. Immune mechanisms amplifying this autoantibody production drive flares of the disease. We previously showed that basophils were contributing to LN development in a spo...

  10. Normal mitogen-induced suppression of the interleukin-6 (IL-6) response and its deficiency in systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warrington, R.J.; Rutherford, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    A low-frequency suppressor-cell population in normal peripheral blood inhibits the B-cell CESS response to IL-6, following pokeweed mitogen stimulation. The suppression of IL-6 responsiveness is radiation sensitive, directed against CESS targets and not mediated by inhibition of IL-6 production, and associated with nonspecific cytotoxic activity against CESS targets. The generation of these cytolytic cells is also radiation sensitive. A correlation was found between PWM-induced cytotoxicity against CESS and the suppression of IL-6-dependent IgG production. But cytotoxicity toward CESS targets is not responsible for this suppression because IL-2 induces equivalent or greater nonspecific cytotoxicity against CESS in the total absence of suppression of CESS-derived IgG production and suppression is also induced by mitogen-activated PBL separated from CESS targets by a cell-impermeable membrane. This suppression was not mediated by TNF alpha/beta or IFN-gamma. In systemic lupus erythematosus, suppression of IL-6-dependent IgG production is impaired in patients with active disease (29.2 +/- 13.7%) compared to patients with inactive disease (70 +/- 19.5%) or normal controls (82.8 +/- 9.2%). There is also a defect in mitogen-induced nonspecific cytotoxicity in active SLE (specific lysis 15.1 +/- 3.5%, compared to 34 +/- 4% in normals). Pokeweed mitogen-activated PBL can therefore normally induce suppression of B-cell IL-6 responses and this response is deficient in lupus

  11. Diagnosing Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may seem unrelated to lupus. article Lupus symptom checklist PDF Download Complete this checklist and talk with your doctor if you suspect ... Now Looking for support near you? Locate an office or support group to connect with. Find Support ...

  12. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (Lupus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is also more common among African American, Hispanic, Asian, and Native American women. Genes play an important role in lupus, but ... is also more common in African American, Hispanic, Asian, and Native American women than in Caucasian women. What are the symptoms? ...

  13. Autoantibodies in Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Hoffmann

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the etiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. The identification of autoantibodies targeting the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R, which causes neurological and psychiatric symptoms, has reinvigorated the hypothesis that other patient subgroups may also suffer from an underlying autoimmune condition. In recent years, a wide range of neuropsychiatric diseases and autoantibodies targeting ion-channels or neuronal receptors including NMDA-R, voltage gated potassium channel complex (VGKC complex, α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPA-R, γ-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABA-R and dopamine receptor (DR were studied and conflicting reports have been published regarding the seroprevalence of these autoantibodies. A clear causative role of autoantibodies on psychiatric symptoms has as yet only been shown for the NMDA-R. Several other autoantibodies have been related to the presence of certain symptoms and antibody effector mechanisms have been proposed. However, extensive clinical studies with large multicenter efforts to standardize diagnostic procedures for autoimmune etiology and animal studies are needed to confirm the pathogenicity of these autoantibodies. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge of neuronal autoantibodies in the major neuropsychiatric disorders: psychotic, major depression, autism spectrum, obsessive-compulsive and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorders.

  14. Altering endoplasmic reticulum stress in a model of blast-induced traumatic brain injury controls cellular fate and ameliorates neuropsychiatric symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aric Flint Logsdon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal injury following blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI increases the risk for neuropsychiatric disorders, yet the pathophysiology remains poorly understood. Blood-brain-barrier (BBB disruption, endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, and apoptosis have all been implicated in bTBI. Microvessel compromise is a primary effect of bTBI and is postulated to cause subcellular secondary effects such as ER stress. What remains unclear is how these secondary effects progress to personality disorders in humans exposed to head trauma. To investigate this we exposed male rats to a clinically relevant bTBI model we have recently developed. The study examined initial BBB disruption using Evan’s blue, ER stress mechanisms, apoptosis and impulsive-like behavior measured with elevated plus maze (EPM. Large BBB openings were observed immediately following bTBI, and persisted for at least 6 h. Data showed increased mRNA abundance of stress response genes at 3 h, with subsequent increases in the ER stress markers C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP and growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible protein 34 (GADD34 at 24 h. Caspase-12 and Caspase-3 were both cleaved at 24 h following bTBI. The ER stress inhibitor, salubrinal (SAL, was administered (1mg/kg i.p. to investigate its’ effects on neuronal injury and impulsive-like behavior associated with bTBI. SAL reduced CHOP protein expression, and diminished Caspase-3 cleavage, suggesting apoptosis attenuation. Interestingly, SAL also ameliorated impulsive-like behavior indicative of head trauma. These results suggest SAL plays a role in apoptosis regulation and the pathology of chronic disease. These observations provide evidence that bTBI involves ER stress and that the UPR is a promising molecular target for the attenuation of neuronal injury.

  15. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine- induced lupus vulgaris in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najem, Nabeel M; Zadeh, Valid Bagher; Al-Abdulrazzaq, Adel H; Al-Otaibi, Sultan R; Kadyan, S; Joneja, Munish

    2009-12-01

    Lupus vulgaris (LV) is a rare form of cutaneous mycobacterial infection in children. Most cases follow hematogenous or lymphatic seeding, and more rarely from exposure to bacillus Calmette- Guérin (BCG) vaccine. We report a child that received BCG vaccination and developed LV 2 months later.

  16. The Neuropsychiatric Inventory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kørner, Alex; Lauritzen, Lise; Lolk, Annette

    2008-01-01

    Assessment of neuropsychiatric symptoms in dementia has great clinical importance. The aim of the study was validation of the Danish version of the NPI, using assessments of 72 demented and 29 non-demented of age 65+ years and their caregivers at three visits. The NPI was administered by the same...... psychiatric nurse interviewing the same caregiver. At visits 1 and 3, a psychogeriatrician assessed the participant using the ICD-10, the Geriatric Deterioration Scale (GDS) and the Clinical Global Impression (CGI) as well as the NPI in a visual analogue scale (VAS) version. These scores were blindly...

  17. Galectin-9 ameliorates clinical severity of MRL/lpr lupus-prone mice by inducing plasma cell apoptosis independently of Tim-3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Moritoki

    Full Text Available Galectin-9 ameliorates various murine autoimmune disease models by regulating T cells and macrophages, although it is not known what role it may have in B cells. The present experiment shows that galectin-9 ameliorates a variety of clinical symptoms, such as proteinuria, arthritis, and hematocrit in MRL/lpr lupus-prone mice. As previously reported, galectin-9 reduces the frequency of Th1, Th17, and activated CD8(+ T cells. Although anti-dsDNA antibody was increased in MRL/lpr lupus-prone mice, galectin-9 suppressed anti-dsDNA antibody production, at least partly, by decreasing the number of plasma cells. Galectin-9 seemed to decrease the number of plasma cells by inducing plasma cell apoptosis, and not by suppressing BAFF production. Although about 20% of CD19(-/low CD138(+ plasma cells expressed Tim-3 in MRL/lpr lupus-prone mice, Tim-3 may not be directly involved in the galectin-9-induced apoptosis, because anti-Tim-3 blocking antibody did not block galectin-9-induced apoptosis. This is the first report of plasma cell apoptosis being induced by galectin-9. Collectively, it is likely that galectin-9 attenuates the clinical severity of MRL lupus-prone mice by regulating T cell function and inducing plasma cell apoptosis.

  18. TGF-β-Induced CD8+CD103+Regulatory T Cells Show Potent Therapeutic Effect on Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease Lupus by Suppressing B Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Haowen; Liu, Ya; Xu, Zhenjian; Liang, Peifeng; Yang, Hui; Zhang, Xiao; Zhao, Jun; Chen, Junzhen; Fu, Sha; Tang, Ying; Lv, Jun; Wang, Julie; Olsen, Nancy; Xu, Anping; Zheng, Song Guo

    2018-01-01

    Lupus nephritis is one of most severe complications of systemic erythematosus lupus and current approaches are not curative for lupus nephritis. Although CD4 + Foxp3 + regulatory T cells (Treg) are crucial for prevention of autoimmunity, the therapeutic effect of these cells on lupus nephritis is not satisfactory. We previously reported that CD8 + CD103 + Treg induced ex vivo with TGF-β1 and IL-2 (CD8 + CD103 + iTreg), regardless of Foxp3 expression, displayed potent immunosuppressive effect on Th cell response and had therapeutic effect on Th cell-mediated colitis. Here, we tested whether CD8 + CD103 + iTreg can ameliorate lupus nephritis and determined potential molecular mechanisms. Adoptive transfer of CD8 + CD103 + iTreg but not control cells to chronic graft-versus-host disease with a typical lupus syndrome showed decreased levels of autoantibodies and proteinuria, reduced renal pathological lesions, lowered renal deposition of IgG/C3, and improved survival. CD8 + CD103 + iTreg cells suppressed not only T helper cells but also B cell responses directly that may involve in both TGF-β and IL-10 signals. Using RNA-seq, we demonstrated CD8 + CD103 + iTreg have its own unique expression profiles of transcription factors. Thus, current study has identified and extended the target cells of CD8 + CD103 + iTreg and provided a possible application of this new iTreg subset on lupus nephritis and other autoimmune diseases.

  19. Coexisting Bacillus Calmette-Guérin-Induced Lupus Vulgaris Involving the Vaccination Site and Lichen Scrofulosorum in an Immunocompetent Boy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angoori, Gnaneshwar Rao

    2016-09-01

    The coexistence of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-induced lupus vulgaris involving the site of vaccination with lichen scrofulosorum is rare. Herein we report a 3-year-old boy who presented with lupus vulgaris at the vaccination site 3 weeks after neonatal BCG vaccination followed by the development of lichen scrofulosorum approximately 2.5 years later. Characteristic clinical morphology, typical histopathology, and positive DNA polymerase chain reaction for Mycobacterium bovis confirmed the clinical diagnosis. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Metabolic alkalosis induced by plasmapheresis in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, M. Y.; Lee, J. D.; Lee, S. H.; Park, I. S.; Woo, J. Y.; Choi, E. J.; Chang, Y. S.; Bang, B. K.

    1993-01-01

    We report a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), who had developed metabolic alkalosis during plasmapheresis. The metabolic alkalosis could be promptly corrected by reducing the amount of citrate load. The development of metabolic alkalosis can be explained by the citrate load during plasmapheresis. Careful monitoring of acid base status is mandatory in patients with limited renal function and the reduction of citrate load may be advisable in plasmapheresis. PMID:8240751

  1. Lupus nephritis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-03-02

    Mar 2, 1991 ... Hill GS, Hing1ais N, Tron F, Bach JF. Systemic lupus erythematosus: morphologic correlations with immunologic and clinical data at the time of biopsy. AmJ Med 1978; 64: 61-79. 13. Studenski S, Alien NB, Caldwell DS, Rice JR, Polisson RP. Survival in systemic lupus erythematosus. Arthritis Rheum 1987 ...

  2. lupus anticoagulants: pathophysiology, clinical

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2003-11-02

    Nov 2, 2003 ... report. East Afr. Med. J. 1998; 75:619-620. procainamide induced lupus anticoagulant. Acta Haematol. 13. Mateo, 1., Oliver, A., Borell, M. et al. Laboratory evaluation 1989; 82:50-52. and clinical characteristics of 2, 132 consecutive unselected 29. Rai, R., Cohen H., Dave M., and Regan, L. Randomised.

  3. Neuropsychiatric aspects of concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Rajiv; Garakani, Amir; Gross, Lawrence S; Goin, Marcia K; Pine, Janet; Slaby, Andrew E; Sumner, Calvin R; Baron, David A

    2016-12-01

    Over the past decade, concussion has become the most widely discussed injury in contact sports. However, concussions also occur in several other settings, such as non-contact sports, elderly individuals, young children, military personnel, and victims of domestic violence. Concussion is frequently undiagnosed as a cause of psychiatric morbidity, especially when the patient has no history of loss of consciousness or direct head trauma. Almost all of the extant literature focuses on traumatic brain injury and assumes that concussion is merely a mild form of traumatic brain injury, which has resulted in a lack of understanding about what concussion is, and how to diagnose, monitor, and treat its varied neuropsychiatric symptoms. In this Review, we address key issues so that the psychiatric clinician can better understand and treat patients with a clinical phenotype that might be the direct result of, or be exacerbated by, concussion. Future research needs to focus on prospective clinical trials in all affected patient populations (ie, those affected by concussion and those affected by various degrees of traumatic brain injury), the identification of reliable biomarkers that can be used to assist with diagnosis and treatment response, and the development of effective treatment interventions. Clearly differentiating concussion from traumatic brain injury is essential to achieve reliable and clinically relevant outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Successful Use of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus-Induced Diffuse Alveolar Haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faye Pais

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse alveolar haemorrhage (DAH is a catastrophic pulmonary complication of systemic lupus erythematosus. It can result in refractory hypoxaemia despite mechanical ventilation. Increasing lung compliance and worsening pulmonary hypertension can potentiate cardiogenic shock from acute right ventricular failure. In such patients with cardiopulmonary collapse, veno-arterial (V-A ECMO maybe a viable option that can provide the required haemodynamic support. However, the use of V-A ECMO in such patients is limited due to an associated increased risk of bleeding. Our case report describes the successful use of V-A ECMO without the use of systemic anticoagulation in a patient with DAH. Despite the absence of systemic anticoagulation, no thrombotic complications within the circuit were noted.

  5. Neuropsychiatric lupus in a Nigerian teenager | Ojo | African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    She also had a history of fatigue, myalgia, weight loss, facial swelling, cough and hair loss. She had persistent headache, anxiety, confusion and generalized tonic clonic seizures. Essential findings on examination were those of distress on account of pain and difficulty with breathing, bilateral inguinal lymphadenopathy and ...

  6. Reversible blindness in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neuropsychiatric manifestations can occur in majority of patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). We describe a patient who presented with acute onset binocular visual loss and was found to have inflammation of optic chiasma on imaging. The patient was treated with immunosuppression. She responded ...

  7. Discoid lupus erythematosus involving gingiva

    OpenAIRE

    Kranti, K.; Seshan, Hema; Juliet, J.

    2012-01-01

    Desquamative gingival lesions are non-plaque induced inflammatory gingival lesions. It is a clinical description and not a diagnosis. These desquamative lesions represent oral manifestations of various dermatoses. Discoid lupus erythematosus is one of the rare dermatoses which show desquamative lesions as oral manifestations. This article presents a rare case report of discoid lupus erythematosus with oral lesions involving gingiva of a 66-year-old female patient.

  8. Mood Disorders in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanly, John G; Su, Li; Urowitz, Murray B

    2015-01-01

    disorders (4 types, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition) and 18 other neuropsychiatric events. Global disease activity scores (SLE Disease Activity Index 2000 [SLEDAI-2K]), damage scores (Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College...... was associated with Asian race/ethnicity (P = 0.01) and treatment with immunosuppressive drugs (P = 0.003). Mood disorders were associated with lower mental health and mental component summary scores but not with the SLEDAI-2K, SDI, or lupus autoantibodies. Among the 232 patients with depression, 168 (72......OBJECTIVE: To examine the frequency, characteristics, and outcome of mood disorders, as well as clinical and autoantibody associations, in a multiethnic/racial, prospective inception cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). METHODS: Patients were assessed annually for mood...

  9. Biomarkers for CNS involvement in pediatric lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Tamar B; Putterman, Chaim; Goilav, Beatrice

    2015-01-01

    CNS disease, or central neuropsychiatric lupus erythematosus (cNPSLE), occurs frequently in pediatric lupus, leading to significant morbidity and poor long-term outcomes. Diagnosing cNPSLE is especially difficult in pediatrics; many current diagnostic tools are invasive and/or costly, and there are no current accepted screening mechanisms. The most complicated aspect of diagnosis is differentiating primary disease from other etiologies; research to discover new biomarkers is attempting to address this dilemma. With many mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of cNPSLE, biomarker profiles across several modalities (molecular, psychometric and neuroimaging) will need to be used. For the care of children with lupus, the challenge will be to develop biomarkers that are accessible by noninvasive measures and reliable in a pediatric population. PMID:26079959

  10. Systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayakumar N

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Desquamative gingival lesions are non-plaque induced inflammatory gingival lesions. It is a clinical description and not a diagnosis. These desquamative lesions represent oral manifestations of various dermatoses. Systemic lupus erythematous (SLE, one of the rare dermatoses shows desquamative lesions as the oral manifestation. We here with report a case of SLE with oral lesions involving gingiva of a 36 year old female patient. The clinical presentation, histological features, and investigatory findings are discussed.

  11. Children & Teens (with Lupus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on the Impacts of Lupus Young Adults with Lupus Exercise and Nutrition Financial Resources: Healthcare Finding the Right Doctor Flares ... invisible and some very visible. article Diet and nutrition with lupus In general, you should always try to eat ...

  12. Different Types of Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Donate Share on Twitter Facebook Pinterest Email Print Different types of lupus Lupus Foundation of America September 18, 2017 Resource Content There are four different types of lupus. Learn more about each type ...

  13. Discoid Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Name: Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Discoid Lupus Erythematosus Share | Discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) is a chronic skin condition of ... occur. A small percentage of patients with discoid lupus can develop disease of the internal organs, which ...

  14. Lupus nephritis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-03-02

    Mar 2, 1991 ... will benefit from immunosuppressive therapy. Our study found hypertension, which persisted at the most recent follow-up, to be associated with a poor outcome, as was poor renal function both at biopsy and follow-up. Leaker er al. I found that survival in lupus nephritis is unaffected by age, sex, nephrotic ...

  15. Lupus panniculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondello, Eduardo; Vega, Alejandro de la; Eyheremendy, EduardoP.

    2002-01-01

    Lupus panniculitis (LP) is a benign entity. To our knowledge LP has not been reported in the radiology literature. Our objective is to describe imaging findings as previous articles have not focused on this aspect. Computed Tomography and MR imaging demonstrate lipoatrophy and isolated areas with inflammatory activity in the subcutaneous tissue. (author)

  16. Haematological manifestations of lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayyaz, Anum; Igoe, Ann; Kurien, Biji T; Danda, Debashish; James, Judith A; Stafford, Haraldine A; Scofield, R Hal

    2015-01-01

    Our purpose was to compile information on the haematological manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), namely leucopenia, lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA), thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and myelofibrosis. During our search of the English-language MEDLINE sources, we did not place a date-of-publication constraint. Hence, we have reviewed previous as well as most recent studies with the subject heading SLE in combination with each manifestation. Neutropenia can lead to morbidity and mortality from increased susceptibility to infection. Severe neutropenia can be successfully treated with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. While related to disease activity, there is no specific therapy for lymphopenia. Severe lymphopenia may require the use of prophylactic therapy to prevent select opportunistic infections. Isolated idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura maybe the first manifestation of SLE by months or even years. Some manifestations of lupus occur more frequently in association with low platelet count in these patients, for example, neuropsychiatric manifestation, haemolytic anaemia, the antiphospholipid syndrome and renal disease. Thrombocytopenia can be regarded as an important prognostic indicator of survival in patients with SLE. Medical, surgical and biological treatment modalities are reviewed for this manifestation. First-line therapy remains glucocorticoids. Through our review, we conclude glucocorticoids do produce a response in majority of patients initially, but sustained response to therapy is unlikely. Glucocorticoids are used as first-line therapy in patients with SLE with AIHA, but there is no conclusive evidence to guide second-line therapy. Rituximab is promising in refractory and non-responding AIHA. TTP is not recognised as a criteria for classification of SLE, but there is a considerable overlap between the presenting features of TTP and SLE, and a few patients with SLE have concurrent

  17. Total glucosides of paeony induces regulatory CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells by increasing Foxp3 demethylation in lupus CD4(+) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming; Liang, Gong-ping; Tang, Mei-ni; Luo, Shuang-yan; Zhang, Jing; Cheng, Wen-jing; Chan, Tak-mao; Lu, Qian-jin

    2012-05-01

    Total glucosides of paeony (TGP), an active compound extracted from Paeony root, has been used in therapy for autoimmune diseases. However the molecular mechanism of TGP in the prevention of autoimmune response remains unclear. In this study, we found that TGP treatment significantly increased the percentage and number of Treg cells in lupus CD4(+) T cells. Further investigation revealed that treatment with TGP increased the expression of Foxp3 in lupus CD4(+) T cells by down-regulating Foxp3 promoter methylation levels. However, we couldn't observe similar results in healthy control CD4(+) T cells treated by TGP. Moreover, our results also showed that IFN-γ and IL-2 expression was enhanced in TGP-treated lupus CD4(+) T cells. These findings indicate that TGP inhibits autoimmunity in SLE patients possibly by inducing Treg cell differentiation, which may in turn be due to its ability to regulate the methylation status of the Foxp3 promoter and activate IFN-γ and IL-2 signaling. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Interleukin-17 expression positively correlates with disease severity of lupus nephritis by increasing anti-double-stranded DNA antibody production in a lupus model induced by activated lymphocyte derived DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenke Wen

    Full Text Available Lupus nephritis is one of the most serious manifestations and one of the strongest predictors of a poor outcome in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Recent evidence implicated a potential role of interlukin-17 (IL-17 in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis. However, the correlation between IL-17 expression level and the severity of lupus nephritis still remains incompletely understood. In this study, we found that serum IL-17 expression level was associated with the severity of lupus nephritis, which was evaluated by histopathology of kidney sections and urine protein. Of note, we showed that enforced expression of IL-17 using adenovirus construct that expresses IL-17 could enhance the severity of lupus nephritis, while blockade of IL-17 using neutralizing antibody resulted in decreased severity of lupus nephritis. Consistently, we observed an impaired induction of lupus nephritis in IL-17-deficient mice. Further, we revealed that IL-17 expression level was associated with immune complex deposition and complement activation in kidney. Of interest, we found that IL-17 was crucial for increasing anti-double-stranded DNA (dsDNA antibody production in SLE. Our results suggested that IL-17 expression level positively correlated with the severity of lupus nephritis, at least in part, because of its contribution to anti-dsDNA antibody production. These findings provided a novel mechanism for how IL-17 expression level correlated with disease pathogenesis and suggested that management of IL-17 expression level was a potential and promising approach for treatment of lupus nephritis.

  19. Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandman-Goddard, Gisele; Levy, Yair; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2005-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease with diverse manifestations. We suggest that intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy may be beneficial and safe for various manifestations in SLE. A structured literature search of articles published on the efficacy of IVIg in the treatment of SLE between 1983 and 2005 was conducted. We searched the terms "IVIg," "intravenous immunoglobulin," "lupus," "SLE," and "systemic lupus erythematosus." The various clinical manifestations of SLE that were reported to be successfully treated by IVIg in case reports include autoimmune hemolytic anemia, acquired factor VIII inhibitors, acquired von Willebrand disease, pure red cell aplasia, thrombocytopenia, pancytopenia, myelofibrosis, pneumonitis, pleural effusion, pericarditis, myocarditis, cardiogenic shock, nephritis, end-stage renal disease, encephalitis, neuropsychiatric lupus, psychosis, peripheral neuropathy, polyradiculoneuropathy, and vasculitis. The most extensive experience is with lupus nephritis. There are only a few case series of IVIg use in patients with SLE with various manifestations, in which the response rate to IVIg therapy ranged from 33 to 100%. We suggest that IVIg devoid of sucrose, at a dose of 2 g/kg over a 5-d period given uniformly and at a slow infusion rate in patients without an increased risk for thromboembolic events or renal failure, is a safe and beneficial adjunct therapy for cases of SLE that are resistant to or refuse conventional treatment. The duration of therapy is yet to be established. Controlled trials are warranted.

  20. The Unknown Aspect of BAFF: Inducing IL-35 Production by a CD5+CD1dhiFcγRIIbhiRegulatory B-Cell Subset in Lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yamin; Li, Jun; Zhou, Nuoya; Zhang, Yi; Wu, Min; Xu, Jian; Shen, Chen; An, Xiangjie; Shen, Guanxin; Yang, Ming; Zhang, Chun; Tao, Juan

    2017-12-01

    IL-35 is a critical immunosuppressive cytokine that plays an important role in various autoimmune diseases. The purpose of this study was to determine whether BAFF, a key pathogenic factor in systemic lupus erythematosus, also a dichotomous regulator for B-cell immune responses, has an effect on IL-35-producing regulatory B cells and their underlying mechanisms in lupus. We found that exogenous BAFF could induce IL-35 production by splenic B cells from MRL-Fas lpr/lpr mice. BAFF-induced IL-35-producing B cells were mainly from the marginal zone B-cell subset and exhibited a CD5 + CD1d hi FcγRIIb hi phenotype. These IL-35-producing regulatory B-cell subsets exhibited regulatory effects on both CD4 + CD25 - T cells and CD4 + CD25 + regulatory T cells. We further identified that BAFF-TACI interaction could induce the production of IL-35 through the classical NF-κB1 pathway. In vivo study also showed that BAFF could facilitate IL-35 secretion in marginal zone B cells, whereas anti-BAFF treatment could decrease the frequency of IL-35-producing CD5 + CD1d hi FcγRIIb hi B cells in MRL-Fas lpr/lpr mice. We showed that BAFF could induce IL-35 production by a unique CD5 + CD1d hi FcγRIIb hi regulatory B-cell subset mainly through TACI activation in lupus, providing an advanced understanding of the regulatory effect of BAFF in autoimmune diseases. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Oxidized Hemoglobin Is Antigenic and Immunogenic in Lupus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Jain

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hemolysis-associated anemia is characteristic of diseases such as atherosclerosis, lupus, malaria, and leishmaniasis; the toxic effects of free hemoglobin (Hb have been extensively described. This study was based on the premise that release of this sequestered, inflammatory molecule can result in deleterious immunological consequences, particularly in the context of pre-existing lupus. IgG anti-Hb responses were detected in the sera of lupus patients. Lupus-prone mice exhibited heightened plasma Hb levels, and ferric (Fe3+ Hb triggered preferential release of lupus-associated cytokines from splenocytes derived from aging lupus-prone mice. Anti-Hb B cell precursor frequencies were heightened in such mice, which also expressed increased titers of anti-Hb antibodies in serum and in kidney eluates. Fe3+ Hb preferentially increased the functional maturation of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs from lupus-prone mice, effects abrogated upon the inhibition of Stat3. Hb interacted with lupus-associated autoantigens extruded during apoptosis and coincubation of Hb and apoptotic blebs had additional maturation-inducing effects on lupus BMDCs. Immunization with Hb in lupus-prone mice induced antigen spreading to lupus-associated moieties; Hb-interacting autoantigens were preferentially targeted and increased complement deposition and glomerulosclerosis were observed. Hb therefore demonstrates both antigenicity and immunogenicity and triggers specific immuno-pathological effects in a lupus milieu.

  2. Cannabidiol, neuroprotection and neuropsychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Alline C; Fogaça, Manoela V; Sonego, Andreza B; Guimarães, Francisco S

    2016-10-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a non-psychotomimetic phytocannabinoid derived from Cannabis sativa. It has possible therapeutic effects over a broad range of neuropsychiatric disorders. CBD attenuates brain damage associated with neurodegenerative and/or ischemic conditions. It also has positive effects on attenuating psychotic-, anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors. Moreover, CBD affects synaptic plasticity and facilitates neurogenesis. The mechanisms of these effects are still not entirely clear but seem to involve multiple pharmacological targets. In the present review, we summarized the main biochemical and molecular mechanisms that have been associated with the therapeutic effects of CBD, focusing on their relevance to brain function, neuroprotection and neuropsychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) induces cell-surface Ro/SSA antigen expression by human keratinocytes in vitro: a possible mechanism for the UVR induction of cutaneous lupus lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, S.K.

    1992-01-01

    Antinuclear antibodies are useful markers of connective tissue disease. In this study, UVB but not UVA induced the expression of Ro/SSA antigen on keratinocyte surfaces in vitro. This expression was also found with the extractable nuclear antigens RnP and Sm, but not with single or double-stranded DNA. The expression was prevented by blocking protein synthesis, suggesting that it was an active process. The results suggest that UVB exposure may result in the expression of Ro/SSA antigen on the surfaces of basal keratinocytes in vivo. This antigen could then bind circulating antibody leading to the cutaneous lesions in neonatal and subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus. (Author)

  4. Ultraviolet light converts propranolol, a nonselective β-blocker and potential lupus-inducing drug, into a proinflammatory AhR ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorgham, Karim; Amoura, Zahir; Parizot, Christophe; Arnaud, Laurent; Frances, Camille; Pionneau, Cédric; Devilliers, Hervé; Pinto, Sandra; Zoorob, Rima; Miyara, Makoto; Larsen, Martin; Yssel, Hans; Gorochov, Guy; Mathian, Alexis

    2015-11-01

    UV light and some medications are known to trigger lupus erythematosus (LE). A common mechanism underlying the immunopathologic effect, resulting from exposure to these two seemingly unrelated factors, remains unknown. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) plays a key role in the regulation of IL-22 production in humans and can be activated by both xenobiotics and naturally occurring photoproducts. A significant expansion of Th17 and Th22 cells was observed in the peripheral blood of active systemic LE (SLE) patients, compared to inactive patients and controls. We also show that propranolol, a potential lupus-inducing drug, induced stronger AhR activation in PBMCs of SLE patients than in those of controls. AhR agonist activity of propranolol was enhanced by UV light exposure. MS analysis of irradiated propranolol revealed the generation of a proinflammatory photoproduct. This compound behaves like the prototypic AhR ligand 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole, a cutaneous UV light-induced tryptophan metabolite, both promoting IL-22, IL-8, and CCL2 secretion by T-cells and macrophages. Finally, LE patients exhibit signs of cutaneous AhR activation that correlate with lesional expression of the same proinflammatory cytokines, suggesting a role for photometabolites in the induction of skin inflammation. The AhR might therefore represent a target for therapeutic intervention in LE. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood clots - lupus anticoagulants; DVT - anticoagulants ... Most often, lupus anticoagulants and aPL are found in people with diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Lupus anticoagulants and ...

  6. [Neuropsychiatric manifestations ushering pernicious anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrabet, S; Ellouze, F; Ellini, S; Mrad, M F

    2015-12-01

    Biermer disease or pernicious anemia is an autoimmune atrophic gastritis characterized by the lack of secretion of gastric intrinsic factor. This leads to an insufficient absorption of vitamin B12 in the ileum. Clinical manifestations are mainly hematologic. Neuropsychiatric manifestations are known but are less frequent especially early in the disease. Inaugural neuropsychiatric arrays are rare and various thus making diagnosis difficult. In this article, we report through two clinical cases different neuropsychiatric manifestations revealing pernicious anemia. Mrs. C.O., aged 56, presented after surgery for gallstones, an acute psychiatric array associated with gait disorders. She had no history of neurological or psychiatric problems. The psychiatric interview revealed delirious syndrome, depressive symptoms and anxiety. Neurological examination noted a flaccid paraplegia with peripheral neuropathic syndrome and myoclonus in the upper limbs. At the full blood count, a macrocytosis (VGM: 112.2fl) without anemia was found. The level of vitamin B12 in the blood was low. Cerebro-spinal MRI was suggestive of a neuro-Biermer and showed hyper signal in the cervical cord on T2-weighted sagittal section. In axial section, hyper signal appears at the posterior columns in the form of V. There were no brain abnormalities. A sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy was diagnosed. The patient received vitamin B12 intramuscularly for ten days associated with neuroleptic treatment. Mrs. R.M., aged 40, was brought to the psychiatry consultation for acute behavioral disorders progressively worsening over a month. An anxiety syndrome, depressive syndrome and delirious syndrome were identified. Neurological examination showed a posterior cordonal syndrome with quadripyramidal syndrome. Full blood count showed a macrocytic anemia. Serum B12 level was collapsed. Cerebro-spinal MRI was normal. She received vitamin B12 with clinical and biological improvement. Features of pernicious anemia

  7. Ultraviolet light and cutaneous lupus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, Marc; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    2006-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light is one of the major factors known to trigger cutaneous disease activity in (systemic) lupus erythematosus patients. UV light, UVB in particular, is a potent inducer of apoptosis. Currently, disturbed clearance of apoptotic cells is one of the concepts explaining

  8. Kluver–Bucy syndrome in one case with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Fen Lin

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Kluver–Bucy syndrome (KBS is a collection of neuropsychiatric symptoms, including visual agnosia (prosopagnosia, hypermetamorphosis, placidity, hypersexuality, and hyperorality. Although neuropsychiatric manifestation is prevalent in cases with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, only one literature reported a case with SLE that had KBS previously. In this article, a 37-year-old woman with SLE who developed KBS and other neuropsychiatric symptoms is presented. Brain imaging proved the relevant structural lesion. The possible explanation of pathogenesis of KBS in SLE is discussed.

  9. Animal Models of Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestler, Eric J.; Hyman, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    Modeling of human neuropsychiatric disorders in animals is extremely challenging given the subjective nature of many key symptoms, the lack of biomarkers and objective diagnostic tests, and the early state of the relevant neurobiology and genetics. Nonetheless, progress in understanding pathophysiology and in treatment development would benefit greatly from improved animal models. Here we review the current state of animal models of mental illness, with a focus on schizophrenia, depression, and bipolar disorder. We argue for areas of focus that might increase the likelihood of creating more useful models, at least for some disorders, and for explicit guidelines when animal models are reported. PMID:20877280

  10. Intestinal worms eating neuropsychiatric disorders? Apparently so.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Henry H; Parker, William

    2018-02-02

    A number of factors in Western society, including inflammatory diets, sedentary lifestyles, vitamin D deficiency and chronic psychological stress, are known to induce inflammation and to be associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. One factor that is emerging as a potential inflammation inducing factor is biota depletion, or loss of biodiversity from the ecosystem of the human body as a result of industrialization. Originally known as the "hygiene hypothesis", biota alteration theory describes the effects of biota alteration on the human immune system. Work on this topic has pinpointed depletion of helminths as a key loss to the body's ecosystem in Western society, and suggests that some exposure to helminths, ubiquitous prior to the modern era, may be necessary for normal immune system development. Socio-medical studies of humans "self-treating" with helminths as well as limited studies in animal models strongly suggest that helminth therapy may be a productive approach toward treating a range of neuropsychiatric disorders, including chronic fatigue, migraine headaches, depression and anxiety disorders. However, helminth therapy faces some daunting hurdles, including the lack of a financial incentive for development, despite a tremendous potential market for the organisms. It is argued that benevolent donation for early trials as well as changes in regulatory policy to accommodate helminth therapy may be important for the field to develop. It is hoped that future success with some high-profile trials can propel the field, now dominated more by self-treatment than by clinical trials, forward into the main stream of medicine. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Increased risk of systemic lupus erythematosus in pregnancy-induced hypertension: A nationwide population-based retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li-Te; Wang, Peng-Hui; Tsui, Kuan-Hao; Cheng, Jiin-Tsuey; Cheng, Jin-Shiung; Huang, Wei-Chun; Tang, Pei-Ling; Hu, Li-Yu

    2016-07-01

    Dysregulation of the immune system plays a role in the pathogenesis of both, pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It is well known that SLE predisposes to be complicated with PIH. However, few studies have attempted to investigate whether PIH increased subsequent SLE risk.The objectives of this study were to assess the association between PIH and subsequent SLE risk and identify predictive risk factors.Patients with newly diagnosed PIH were selected from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) and compared with a matched cohort without PIH based on age and the year of delivery. The incidence of new-onset SLE was evaluated in both cohorts. The overall observational period was from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2013.Among the 23.3 million individuals registered in the NHIRD, 29,091 patients with PIH and 116,364 matched controls were identified. The incidence of SLE was higher among patients with PIH than in the matched controls (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 4.02, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.98-4.05, P < 0.0001). The IRR for subsequent SLE development remained significantly higher in all stratifications during the follow-up years. The multivariate Cox regression model was performed and the results showed that PIH may be an independent risk factors for the development of subsequent SLE (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.87, 95% CI 2.07-3.98, P < 0.0001). Moreover, multivariate Cox regression model was used again among the PIH cohort only in order to identify the possible risk factors for subsequent SLE in the population with PIH.Patients with PIH may have higher risk of developing newly diagnosed SLE than those without PIH. In addition, among individuals who have experienced PIH, those younger than 30 years, having experienced preeclampsia/eclampsia, single parity, preterm birth, or chronic kidney disease, may display an increased subsequent risk of SLE.

  12. Kutan lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandreva, Tatjana; Voss, Anne; Bygum, Anette

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE) is an autoimmune disease. The most common clinical forms are acute cutaneous LE (ACLE), subacute cutaneous LE (SCLE) and discoid LE (DLE). Cutaneous LE, mainly ACLE, can be the first sign of systemic LE (SLE). DLE and SCLE are less associated with development...... of SLE, however, up to 85% of patients with SLE have cutaneous manifestations. The aetiology is multifactorial. Drugs such as proton pump inhibitors can induce SCLE, while UV-light and smoking can worsen the lesions. Treatment includes preventive strategies in addition to topical steroids and systemic...

  13. Dengue fever triggering systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talib SH

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available SH Talib, SR Bhattu, R Bhattu, SG Deshpande, DB Dahiphale Department of Medicine and Nephrology, MGM Medical College and Hospital, Aurangabad, Maharashtra, India Abstract: We report a rare case of dengue fever triggering systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis. The patient presented herself during a large outbreak of dengue fever in December 2012 in Maharashtra, India. The diagnosis of dengue fever was confirmed by the presence of NS-1 antigen during the first few days of febrile illness. Eight weeks later, kidney tissue biopsy studies revealed evidence of lupus nephritis on microscopic examination and immunofluorescence. The report interpreted it as focal proliferative glomerulonephritis and segmental sclerosis (Stage IIIC. The case was also found positive for perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence assay. An active and effective management of a case essentially calls for clear perception of differentiating dengue-induced lupus flare, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-related nephropathy, and/or dengue-induced de-novo lupus disease. Dengue viremia may be the trigger for immune complex formation in patients who are predisposed to developing autoimmune diseases. The present case explains the importance of considering the diagnosis of dengue-related lupus nephritis as an atypical occurrence in appropriate situations, as in this case. It would not be improper to regard this escalating disease as an expanded feature of dengue. Keywords: kidney biopsy, glomerulonephritis, segmental sclerosis, lupus flare, dengue viremia, autoimmune, de-novo lupus nephritis

  14. Análise de prevalência e evolução das manifestações neuropsiquiátricas moderadas e graves em pacientes com lúpus eritematoso sistêmico internados no serviço de reumatologia do Hospital Geral de Fortaleza Prevalence and follow-up analysis of evolution of severe and moderate neuropsychiatric manifestations in hospitalized systemic lupus erythematosus in the rheumatology service of the Hospital General de Fortaleza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walber Pinto Vieira

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a prevalência e a resposta terapêutica das manifestações neuropsiquiátricas (MNP moderadas ou graves em pacientes lúpicos internados no Hospital Geral de Fortaleza (HGF. MÉTODOS: Durante dois anos, 110 pacientes de internações consecutivas com lúpus eritematoso sistêmico, segundo os critérios do Colégio Americano de Reumatologia, foram avaliados para MNP moderadas ou graves. Nestes pacientes estudou-se: causa da internação, presença de auto-anticorpos, liquor, imagens radiológicas, análise retrospectiva dos prontuários e terapêutica utilizada. RESULTADOS: A prevalência de MNP foi de 16,4% (18/110, em 17 mulheres e um homem, com idade média de 29 anos; por ocasião do internamento, 33% (6/18 dos pacientes apresentavam apenas MNP. A ocorrência da primeira MNP foi de 11% (2/18 antes do diagnóstico, 33% (6/18 por ocasião do diagnóstico e 56% (10/18 pós-diagnóstico. A mortalidade foi de 11% (2/18. As principais MNP foram: convulsões e cefaléia (50%, psicose (22%, acidente vascular cerebral (17% e síncope e depressão maior (11%. Resposta terapêutica: 28% (5/18 pacientes responderam à corticoterapia oral, 17% (3/18 realizaram pulso de metilprednisolona e 56% (10/18 pulso de ciclofosfamida. CONCLUSÃO: A prevalência de MNP na população estudada encontra-se no limite inferior da literatura. Na ausência de estudos clínicos controlados, a abordagem destes pacientes é fundamentada em séries de casos e na experiência profissional do serviço.OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the prevalence and therapy outcome of moderate and severe neuropsychiatric manifestations (NPM in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus admitted at the Hospital Geral de Fortaleza. METHODS: During two years, 110 patients with consecutive hospitalizations suffering from systemic lupus erythematosus, according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria, were evaluated for moderate and severe NPM. The following parameters were studied

  15. Activation of Type I Interferon Pathway in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Association with Distinct Clinical Phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karageorgas, Theophanis P.; Tseronis, Dimitrios D.; Mavragani, Clio P.

    2011-01-01

    Growing evidence over the last few years suggests a central role of type I IFN pathway in the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune disorders. Data from clinical and genetic studies in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus-prone mouse models, indicates that the type I interferon system may play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of several lupus and associated clinical features, such as nephritis, neuropsychiatric and cutaneous lupus, premature atherosclerosis as well as lupus-specific autoantibodies particularly against ribonucleoproteins. In the current paper, our aim is to summarize the latest findings supporting the association of type I IFN pathway with specific clinical manifestations in the setting of SLE providing insights on the potential use of type I IFN as a therapeutic target. PMID:22162633

  16. Mycophenolate mofetil in the treatment of lupus nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick FK Yong

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Patrick FK Yong1,2, David P D’Cruz21Department of Clinical Immunology, Kings College Hospital; 2The Lupus Research Unit, St Thomas’ Hospital, London, UKAbstract: Lupus nephritis is a complication of systemic lupus erythematosus, which has significant morbidity and mortality. The accepted standard of treatment for severe lupus nephritis is cyclophosphamide for induction of remission. This has significant adverse effects including severe infection and amenorrhea. In addition, although cyclophosphamide induces remission, long-term mortality does not seem to be altered. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF is an immunosuppressive agent originally used in solid organ transplantation, which has been compared with cyclophosphamide in trials for lupus nephritis. Randomized trials with MMF have been relatively small, although pooled data seem to suggest that it is at least as effective as cyclophosphamide in inducing remission. In addition, MMF has also been associated with a reduced risk of infection and amenorrhea, although this finding is not universal. MMF appears to be associated with more diarrhea compared with cyclophosphamide. MMF is likely to be a useful treatment for lupus nephritis, although available trial data are limited due to the small size of previous studies. A large trial (the Aspreva Lupus Management Study is currently underway to attempt to establish the place of MMF in treatment of lupus nephritis.Keywords: mycophenolate mofetil, lupus nephritis, systemic lupus erythematosus

  17. Treatment of lupus nephritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolff, Sebastian; Berden, Jo H. M.; Bijl, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Renal involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus patients is a severe disease manifestation characterized by various clinical and histopathological alterations The revised International Society of Nephrology/Renal Pathology Society 2003 classification defines the subclasses of lupus nephritis (LN)

  18. Living with Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to coping with lupus article Medication and care tracker PDF Download PDF How to get the support ... Many people with lupus are sensitive to the sun and other sources of ultraviolet (UV) light. Q & ...

  19. Association between myasthaenia gravis and systemic lupus erythematosus: three case reports and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrejón, I; Shum, K; Tseng, C-E; Askanase, A

    2011-11-01

    The coexistence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and myasthaenia gravis (MG) has been reported previously. Because of their shared clinical characteristics and autoantibody-mediated pathogenesis, an SLE expert panel decided to include MG as one of the 19 neuropsychiatric SLE syndromes. This study reports a cluster of three cases of SLE/MG overlap from our cohort and a review of the published data concerning this overlap of SLE and MG. A systematic Medline review revealed 13 cases described in eight publications from 1994 to 2009. In summary, 12 of the 16 patients (three from our cohort and 13 from the reported cases) were women with an average age of 34 years. The most common SLE manifestations were polyarthritis (15 out of 16 patients), skin rashes (5/16), serositis (5/16), and cytopaenias (10/16). All of the patients were anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) positive and 15/16 were anti-dsDNA positive. Proximal muscle weakness was the most frequent MG-related symptom (9/16), while 11/16 patients were anti-acetylcholine receptor (anti-AChR) antibody positive and 9/16 had diagnostic electromyography (EMG). These data suggest that MG should to be included in the differential diagnosis of lupus patients with fatigue and muscular weakness together with inflammatory and drug-induced myopathy.

  20. Lupus nephritis: current update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Lupus nephritis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. The general consensus is that 60% of lupus patients will develop clinically relevant nephritis at some time in the course of their illness. Prompt recognition and treatment of renal disease is important, as early response to therapy is correlated with better outcome. The present review summarizes our current understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying lupus nephritis and how the disease is currently diagnosed and treated. PMID:22078716

  1. Lupus Activity in Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Clowse, Megan E. B.

    2007-01-01

    Pregnancy in a woman with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) can be complicated by both lupus activity and pregnancy mishaps. The majority of recent studies demonstrate an increase in lupus activity during pregnancy, perhaps exacerbated by hormonal shifts required to maintain pregnancy. Increased lupus activity, in turn, prompts an elevated risk for poor pregnancy outcomes, including stillbirth, preterm birth, low birth weight, and preeclamspsia. Fortunately, the majority of pregnancies in wo...

  2. Cutting edge: Leptin-induced RORγt expression in CD4+ T cells promotes Th17 responses in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yiyun; Liu, Yaoyang; Shi, Fu-Dong; Zou, Hejian; Matarese, Giuseppe; La Cava, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    Th17 CD4(+) cells promote inflammation and autoimmunity. In this study, we report that Th17 cell frequency is reduced in ob/ob mice (that are genetically deficient in the adipokine leptin) and that the administration of leptin to ob/ob mice restored Th17 cell numbers to values comparable to those found in wild-type animals. Leptin promoted Th17 responses in normal human CD4(+) T cells and in mice, both in vitro and in vivo, by inducing RORγt transcription. Leptin also increased Th17 responses in (NZB × NZW)F1 lupus-prone mice, whereas its neutralization in those autoimmune-prone mice inhibited Th17 responses. Because Th17 cells play an important role in the development and maintenance of inflammation and autoimmunity, these findings envision the possibility to modulate abnormal Th17 responses via leptin manipulation, and they reiterate the link between metabolism/nutrition and susceptibility to autoimmunity.

  3. Neuropsychiatric Burden in Huntington's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoli, Ricardo Augusto; Botturi, Andrea; Ciammola, Andrea; Silani, Vincenzo; Prunas, Cecilia; Lucchiari, Claudio; Zugno, Elisa; Caletti, Elisabetta

    2017-06-16

    Huntington's disease is a disorder that results in motor, cognitive, and psychiatric problems. The symptoms often take different forms and the presence of disturbances of the psychic sphere reduces patients' autonomy and quality of life, also impacting patients' social life. It is estimated that a prevalence between 33% and 76% of the main psychiatric syndromes may arise in different phases of the disease, often in atypical form, even 20 years before the onset of chorea and dementia. We present a narrative review of the literature describing the main psychopathological patterns that may be found in Huntington's disease, searching for a related article in the main database sources (Medline, ISI Web of Knowledge, Scopus, and Medscape). Psychiatric conditions were classified into two main categories: affective and nonaffective disorders/symptoms; and anxiety and neuropsychiatric features such as apathy and irritability. Though the literature is extensive, it is not always convergent, probably due to the high heterogeneity of methods used. We summarize main papers for pathology and sample size, in order to present a synoptic vision of the argument. Since the association between Huntington's disease and psychiatric symptoms was demonstrated, we argue that the prevalent and more invalidating psychiatric components should be recognized as early as possible during the disease course in order to best address psychopharmacological therapy, improve quality of life, and also reduce burden on caregivers.

  4. Fetal programming of neuropsychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faa, Gavino; Manchia, Mirko; Pintus, Roberta; Gerosa, Clara; Marcialis, Maria Antonietta; Fanos, Vassilios

    2016-09-01

    Starting from the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) hypotheses proposed by David Barker, namely fetal programming, in the past years, there is a growing evidence of the major role played by epigenetic factors during the intrauterine life and the perinatal period. Furthermore, it has been assessed that these factors can affect the health status in infancy and even in adulthood. In this review, we focus our attention on the fetal programming of the brain, analyzing the most recent literature concerning the epigenetic factors that can influence the development of neuropsychiatric disorders such as bipolar disorders, major depressive disorders, and schizophrenia. The perinatal epigenetic factors have been divided in two main groups: maternal factors and fetal factors. The maternal factors include diet, smoking, alcoholism, hypertension, malnutrition, trace elements, stress, diabetes, substance abuse, and exposure to environmental toxicants, while the fetal factors include hypoxia/asphyxia, placental insufficiency, prematurity, low birth weight, drugs administered to the mother or to the baby, and all factors causing intrauterine growth restriction. A better comprehension of the possible mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of these diseases may help researchers and clinicians develop new diagnostic tools and treatments to offer these patients a tailored medical treatment strategy to improve their quality of life. Birth Defects Research (Part C) 108:207-223, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. [Unmet needs in systemic lupus erythematosus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Kunihiro

    2017-01-01

      Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease involving multiple lesions that cause inflammation and the production of autoantibodies. Lupus nephritis (LN) and neuropsychiatric SLE (NPSLE) are common organ-threatening manifestations of SLE and result in significant morbidity and mortality. In the last 30 years, steroids and immunosuppressive drugs have improved the prognosis of patients with SLE, and today the 5-year survival rate exceeds 90%. However, the treatment of SLE still largely depends on these medications and sometimes results in death due to complications. In recent years, biologic agents and low-molecular-weight compounds have emerged that are expected to be effective against refractory LN and NPSLE. For the diagnosis of SLE, the classification revised in 1997 proposed by the American College of Rheumatology and the classification standards of the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics 2012 classification criteria have been used, but they are not necessarily useful for early diagnosis. New biomarkers are needed for the early diagnosis of SLE. In this article, we summarize the unmet needs of diagnosis and treatment with SLE, especially those with LN and NPSLE, with data from our own experiences.

  6. Misdiagnoses of a hydrocephaly induced neuropsychiatric disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espy, John C; Hipskind, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    The use of shunting for hydrocephalus has a long history of improvements made through basic science, clinical innovations and biomedical engineering. Neuroshunting has dramatically changed the outlook of patients with hydrocephalus, with many of these patients now having normal life expectancies and maintaining intelligence within normal limits. The use of shunts, however, has created many unique problems of shunt dependence with frequent shunt revisions and adjustments being a fundamental part of the lives of hydrocephalic patients. However shunt dependent patients, despite the improvement in mortality and intellectual functioning, are prone to multiple difficulties related to shunt dependency including periodic malfunction. Just as our present level of knowledge is due to a combination of science and clinical observations, future progress in treating hydrocephalus will be realized through continued research into mechanisms of neurological fluid-dynamics and neuro-peristalsis, as well as advances in the use of high resolution imaging such as brain-dedicated Neuro SPECT technology (au)

  7. Kyphoplasty for Intractable Pain Due to Glucocorticosteroid-induced Osteoporotic Vertebra Fracture of a 9-Year-Old Patient With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: 8-Year Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanatli, Ulunay; Ataoğlu, Baybars; Özer, Mustafa; Şenköylü, Alpaslan; Çetinkaya, Mehmet

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis is approximately 50% in patients treated for >6 months, and in the long-term usage fracture risk is approximately 34%. The awareness of pediatric vertebral fractures due to glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis is increasing. Although most of these fractures are asymptomatic, a small number of children may have severe pain. In this case report we are presenting long-term result of a 9-year-old patient with intractable pain due to glucocorticoid-induced osteoporotic vertebral fracture managed by kyphoplasty. Case report. Case report of a 9-year-old girl who had L3 vertebral fracture due to glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis treated by kyphoplasty. The patient was a 9-year-old girl with severe back pain, and lupus nephritis. Glucocorticoid-induced L3 vertebral fracture was detected and the case was resistant to conservative treatment. Seeing this, we have performed balloon kyphoplasty procedure to L3 vertebrae. No complication and pain was observed after the operation although L3 vertebral height could not restored. On the 8-year control, L3 vertebral height was almost totally restored with a compression index of 10% without any clinical problem. To the best of the authors' knowledge, the patient sample of this case report is the first and the youngest patient who was treated with kyphoplasty for vertebral compression fracture intractable pain due to glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, mentioned in literature. During the 8-year follow-up, no adverse effect was reported that was related to kyphoplasty procedure. This case report indicates that kyphoplasty can be an alternative method for selective pediatric intractable painful vertebral glucocorticoid-induced osteoporotic fractures, but it should be performed after careful consideration in pediatric group. We do not advise routine usage of kyphoplasty for pediatric vertebral fractures.

  8. HIV: Neuropsychiatric Aspects of Infection and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rute Alves

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Since its recognition in the 80s, HIV infection has reached 65 million people worldwide. The presence of the virus in CNS occurs in most patients, increasingly being identified neuropsychiatric disorders associated with infection and / or treatment with ARV. This article intends to briefly review the neuro-pathogenesis and neuropsychiatric disorders associated with HIV infection and treatment with HAART, as well as its therapeutic approach.

  9. Neuropsychiatric Manifestations of Parkinson`s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Peixinho

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease affects about 1% of the world population older than 65 years. It’s most frequently considered a movement disorder, but the neuropsychiatric manifestations associated with the disease and/or its treatment may be of equal or greater significance in some patients. We will discuss briefly the epidemiology, physiopathology and diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease, highlighting the neuropsychiatric manifestations: depression, anxiety, psychosis, dementia, sleep disorders, dopamine dysregulation syndrome.

  10. Diet and Nutrition With Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on Twitter Facebook Pinterest Email Print Diet and nutrition with lupus Lupus Foundation of America April 19, ... newsletter Related Resources Diet and Lupus ABCs of nutrition Thinking about drinking? Read this first. Stick to ...

  11. Living with Lupus (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Living With Lupus KidsHealth / For Parents / Living With Lupus What's in ... disease for both doctors and their patients. About Lupus A healthy immune system produces proteins called antibodies ...

  12. Histopathological changes in exocrine glands of murine transplantation chimeras. I: The development of Sjögren's syndrome-like changes secondary to GVH induced lupus syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Inger; Ussing, Anne Phaff; Prause, J.U.

    1992-01-01

    Autoimmune disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, chronic graft-versus-host reaction, renal insufficiency, Sjögren's syndrome, inbred mouse strains......Autoimmune disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, chronic graft-versus-host reaction, renal insufficiency, Sjögren's syndrome, inbred mouse strains...

  13. Prolactin has a pathogenic role in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara, Luis J; Medina, Gabriela; Saavedra, Miguel A; Vera-Lastra, Olga; Torres-Aguilar, Honorio; Navarro, Carmen; Vazquez Del Mercado, Monica; Espinoza, Luis R

    2017-04-01

    Prolactin, a 23-kDa peptide hormone, is produced by the anterior pituitary gland and extrapituitary sites including the immune cells. Prolactin (PRL) participates in innate and adaptive immune response. PRL stimulates the immune cells by binding to receptor (PRL-R). Binding of PRL to its receptor activates the Janus kinase-signal transducer (JAK-STAT). Activation of these cascades results in endpoints such as immunoestimulator and immunosupressor action. Prolactin belongs to the network of immune-neuroendocrine interaction. Hyperprolactinemia has been found in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and new evidence has confirmed a significant correlation between serum PRL levels and disease activity. PRL participates in activation of SLE during pregnancy and in pathogenesis of lupus nephritis, neuropsychiatric, serosal, hematologic, articular, and cutaneous involvement. Hyperprolactinemia was associated with increase IgG concentrations, anti-DNA antibodies, immune complex, glomerulonephritis, and accelerated mortality in murine lupus. Bromocriptine, a dopamine analog that suppresses PRL secretion, was associated with decreased lupus activity, prolonged lifespan, and restoration of immune competence in experimental model. In clinical trials, bromocriptine and derivative drugs showed beneficial therapeutic effect in treating human lupus, including pregnancy. Taken together, clinical and experimental results leave little doubt that PRL indeed contributes to the pathogenesis and clinical expression of SLE.

  14. Neuropsychiatric movement disorders following streptococcal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, K G; Lawrenson, J; Wilmshurst, J M

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study was to describe post-streptococcal movement disorders that form part of the acute rheumatic fever complex. The clinical records of patients diagnosed with Sydenham's chorea were analyzed retrospectively to investigate epidemiology, the significance of socioeconomic deprivation, clinical manifestations, treatments, outcomes, long-term morbidity, and disease evolution. Forty-two patients (21 males, 21 females) were diagnosed with Sydenham's chorea. The median presentation age was 9 years 8 months (range 3y 5mo to 13y 2mo). Nineteen patients were of indigenous African ancestry; 23 were of mixed ancestry. All patients lived in poverty and had poor access to medical care. Twelve of the total group had disabling symptoms for longer than 2 years; six of these patients developed paediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorder associated with Streptococcus (Paediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorder associated with Streptococcus [PANDAS]), five Tourette syndrome (TS), and one learning difficulties. Poor outcome was significantly more prevalent in patients of mixed ancestry, in those with a positive family history, previous behavioural problems, or a failure to complete 10 days of penicillin and 'bed-rest'/hospitalization. Sydenham's chorea is one manifestation of post-streptococcal neuropsychiatric movement disorders. This study demonstrates that patients can present with one diagnosis and evolve other neuropsychiatric conditions such as TS and PANDAS. In the South African context, it is important to delineate neuropsychiatric movement disorders associated with streptococcal infections. The potential genetic susceptibility should be explored.

  15. Missing and Possible Link between Neuroendocrine factors, Neuropsychiatric Disorders and Microglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro A. Kato

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine systems have long been suggested to be on of the important factors in neuropsychiatric disorders, while the underlying mechanisms have not been well understood. Traditionally, neuropsychiatric disorders have been mainly considered the consequence of abnormal conditions in neural circuitry. Beyond the neuronal doctrine, microglia, one of the glial cells with inflammatory/immunological functions in the CNS, have recently been suggested to play important roles in neuropsychiatric disorders. However, the crosstalk between neuroendocrine factors, neuropsychiatric disorders and microglia has been unsolved. Therefore, we herein introduce and discuss a missing and possible link between these three factors; especially highlighting the following hormones; (1 Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA axis-related hormones such as corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH and glucocorticoids, (2 sex-related hormones such as estrogen and progesterone, and (3 oxytocin. A growing body of evidence has suggested that these hormones have a direct effect on microglia. We hypothesize that hormone-induced microglial activation and the following microglia-derived mediators may lead to maladaptive neuronal networks including synaptic dysfunctions, causing neuropsychiatric disorders. Future investigations to clarify the correlation between neuroendocrine factors and microglia may contribute to a novel understanding of the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  16. Aiolos Overexpression in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus B Cell Subtypes and BAFF-Induced Memory B Cell Differentiation Are Reduced by CC-220 Modulation of Cereblon Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Yumi; Kosek, Jolanta; Capone, Lori; Hur, Eun Mi; Schafer, Peter H; Ringheim, Garth E

    2017-10-01

    BAFF is a B cell survival and maturation factor implicated in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this in vitro study, we describe that soluble BAFF in combination with IL-2 and IL-21 is a T cell contact-independent inducer of human B cell proliferation, plasmablast differentiation, and IgG secretion from circulating CD27 + memory and memory-like CD27 - IgD - double-negative (DN) B cells, but not CD27 - IgD + naive B cells. In contrast, soluble CD40L in combination with IL-2 and IL-21 induces these activities in both memory and naive B cells. Blood from healthy donors and SLE patients have similar circulating levels of IL-2, whereas SLE patients exhibit elevated BAFF and DN B cells and reduced IL-21. B cell differentiation transcription factors in memory, DN, and naive B cells in SLE show elevated levels of Aiolos, whereas Ikaros levels are unchanged. Treatment with CC-220, a modulator of the cullin ring ligase 4-cereblon E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, reduces Aiolos and Ikaros protein levels and BAFF- and CD40L-induced proliferation, plasmablast differentiation, and IgG secretion. The observation that the soluble factors BAFF, IL-2, and IL-21 induce memory and DN B cell activation and differentiation has implications for extrafollicular plasmablast development within inflamed tissue. Inhibition of B cell plasmablast differentiation by reduction of Aiolos and Ikaros may have utility in the treatment of SLE, where elevated levels of BAFF and Aiolos may prime CD27 + memory and DN memory-like B cells to become Ab-producing plasmablasts in the presence of BAFF and proinflammatory cytokines. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  17. Lupus erythematosus cell phenomenon in pediatric bronchoalveolar lavages: possible manifestation of early radioadaptive response in radiation induced alveolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunic, S

    2013-01-01

    A ten-year (December 1992 - December 2002) evaluation of 225 pediatric bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) differential cell counts showed appearance of the cells corresponding to the cytological entity - lupus erythematosus cell (LEC) in 47 specimens of which not a single case was associated with the coexistent autoimmune disease. There was a significant increase in the percentage of LEC in BAL samples of the examinees during the first 6 months after the bombing of targets in Serbia (July-December 1999) in comparison to the period 1992 to March 24, 1999, and after the bombing of targets in Serbia (2000-2002). Maintaining the character of occurrence of LEC in BAL as nonspecific (Zunic et al. 1996), the devastating power of alpha particles (originated from uranium decay) gives an opportunity to discuss this phenomenon more comprehensibly and perceive a new vista related to the pathogenesis of LEC phenomenon in BAL. Since the period after 1991 corresponds to the time after the first Gulf War, and later the bombing of targets in Bosnia, the possibility of occurrence of LEC in BAL as a manifestation of radiation alveolitis due to contamination by air transferred depleted uranium (DU) particles could not be excluded.

  18. A neurometabolite study of chronic daily headache in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus using magnetic resonance spectroscopy: comparison with fibromyalgia patients and healthy controls

    OpenAIRE

    Son, Chang-Nam; Kim, Sang-Hyon; Chang, Hyuk Won; Kim, Ji-Min

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) includes a broad spectrum of neurologic and psychiatric manifestations. One of the most commonly observed neuropsychiatric symptoms is headache. However, the lack of specific clinical distinctions for headache in SLE has made it difficult to elucidate its pathophysiology. The aim of this study is to evaluate the neurometabolic changes using Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (1H-MRS) in patients with SLE who suffer from c...

  19. Neuropsychiatric complications of 500 cases of hyperthyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moetamedi M

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthyroidism is often accompanied by diverse types of neuropychiatric complications. To demonstrate these complications we studied 500 hyperthyroid patients, who developed neuropsychiatric complications of hyperthyroidism for which other causes of these neuropsychiatric findings were carefully excluded. The patients were 15 to 65 years old (female to male ratio was 5:1, most of the cases were in third and fourth decades of life. Nervousness, tense dysphoria, insomnia and anxiousness were among the most common psychiatric complications, and tremor, hyperreflexia, thyrotoxic myopathy, thyrotoxic periodic paralysis were the most common neurologic complications. Therefore any physician, wether he or she is a general practitioner or a specialist must be aware of these diverse complications, because these neuropsychiatric complications can lead to the diagnosis of hyperthyroidism and treatment of these potentially serious complications.

  20. Studying the Role for CD4+ T Cell Subsets in Human Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    cells are accompanied by FoxP3+ Treg cells decrease in patients with lupus nephritis . Rheumatol Int (2011). 19. Puwipirom, H. et al. Increased...of lupus patients (22, 23). Similarly, the ilb gene was detected in the nephritis tissues from lupus -prone mice (24–26). Additionally, Th17 cell...mice with lupus -like disease (22–26). In an experi- mental mouse model of lupus induced by injecting anti–dsDNA mAbs, nephritis was less severe in IL-1b

  1. Urinary Biomarkers in Lupus Nephritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Thomas, Joyce; Blanco, Irene

    2010-01-01

    Renal involvement in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus in the form of severe lupus nephritis is associated with a significant burden of morbidity and mortality. Conventional laboratory biomarkers in current use have not been very successful in anticipating disease flares, predicting renal histology, or decreasing unwanted outcomes. Since early treatment is associated with improved clinical results, it is thus essential to identify new biomarkers with substantial predictive power to reduce the serious sequelae of this difficult to control lupus manifestation. Indeed, considerable efforts and progress have been made over the last few years in the search for novel biomarkers. Since urinary biomarkers are more easily obtainable with much less risk to the patient than repeat renal biopsies, and these may more accurately discern between renal disease and other organ manifestations than their serum counterparts, there has been tremendous interest in studying new candidate urine biomarkers. Below, we review several promising urinary biomarkers under investigation, including total proteinuria and microalbuminuria, urinary proteomic signatures, and the individual inflammatory mediators interleukin-6, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, CXCL16, IP-10, and tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis. PMID:20127204

  2. Central nervous system lupus erythematosus in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, Shumpei; Kimura, Kazue; Yoshida, Naotaka; Mitsuda, Toshihiro; Ibe, Masa-aki; Shimizu, Hiroko

    1989-01-01

    Clinical features of central nervous system (CNS) invlvement in childhood systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was investigated. Neuropsychiatric manifestations including seizures, chorea, headache, overt psychosis, tremor, increase of muscle spastisity, and disturbed memory were found in 47% of 15 patients with SLE. There was a well correlatin between CNS abnormalities and SLE disease activity judged by serum complement levels and anti-nuclear antibody and anti-DNA antibody titers. The administration of Prednisolon was effective for the treatment of these CNS abnormalities and steroid psychosis was rare in the present study. EEG abnormalities involving diffuse slowing and slowing bursts were found in 73% of the patients. Cranial CT scan revealed basel ganglia calcifications in 2 patients, and marked brain atrophy in 3 patients. This study indicated that in the long term following of SLE children CNS abnormalities need to be serially checked by EEG and cranial CT scans as well as serological investigations. (author)

  3. Methyl salicylate 2-O-β-D-lactoside alleviates the pathological progression of pristane-induced systemic lupus erythematosus-like disease in mice via suppression of inflammatory response and signal transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He YY

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Yang-Yang He,1,2,* Yu Yan,1,3,* Hui-Fang Zhang,1,3 Yi-Huang Lin,3 Yu-Cai Chen,1,3 Yi Yan,4 Ping Wu,1,3 Jian-Song Fang,5 Shu-Hui Yang,2 Guan-Hua Du1,3 1Beijing Key Laboratory of Drug Target Identification and Drug Screening, Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, 2State Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease, Fuwai Hospital, National Center for Cardiovascular Diseases, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, 3State Key Laboratory of Bioactive Substance and Function of Natural Medicines, Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, 4Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 5Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Guangzhou University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, with a high incidence rate and insufficient therapy worldwide, is a complex disease involving multiple organs characterized primarily by inflammation due to deposition of immunocomplexes formed by production of autoantibodies. The mechanism of SLE remains unclear, and the disease still cannot be cured. We used pristane to induce SLE in female BALB/c mice. Methyl salicylate 2-O-β-D-lactoside (MSL; 200, 400, and 800 mg/kg was orally administered 45 days after pristane injection for 4.5 months. The results showed that MSL antagonized the increasing levels of multiple types of antibodies and cytokines in lupus mice. MSL was found to suppress joint swelling and have potent inhibitory effect on arthritis-like symptoms. MSL also significantly decreased the spleen index and expression of inflammatory markers in the lupus mice. MSL protected the kidneys of lupus mice from injury through inhibiting the expression of inflammatory cytokines and reducing the Ig

  4. Neuropsychiatric Complications Associated with Interferon - Alpha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several adverse effects have been associated with interferon alpha 2b treatment and neuropsychiatric effects have also been commonly reported. Psychosis and mood disorders have been described in the literature. This case report is of a 30 year old man with malignant melanoma stage 3a who was receiving adjuvant ...

  5. Neuropsychiatric symptoms in patients with thymoma- associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    patients. Symptoms of moderate or severe depression and anxiety were present in around 30%. ... Conclusion. Although no association with thyoma was found, this study shows that neuropsychiatric conditions may be underdiagnosed ... at a young age, those with severe disease and those with a long duration of illness.

  6. Neuropsychiatric symptoms in patients with thymomaassociated and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Around 10 - 15% of patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) have a thymoma, and non-motor symptoms are more frequent in these patients. We hypothesised that neuropsychiatric symptoms would also be more frequent. Methods. A cross-sectional study of 30 consecutive MG patients attending a clinic at Groote ...

  7. Tolerance induced by anti-DNA Ig peptide in (NZB×NZW)F1 lupus mice impinges on the resistance of effector T cells to suppression by regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yiyun; Liu, Yaoyang; Shi, Fu-Dong; Zou, Hejian; Hahn, Bevra H; La Cava, Antonio

    2012-03-01

    We have previously shown that immune tolerance induced by the anti-DNA Ig peptide pCons in (NZB×NZW)F(1) (NZB/W) lupus mice prolonged survival of treated animals and delayed the appearance of autoantibodies and glomerulonephritis. Part of the protection conferred by pCons could be ascribed to the induction of regulatory T cells (T(Reg)) that suppressed the production of anti-DNA antibodies in a p38 MAPK-dependent fashion. Here we show that another effect of pCons in the induction of immune tolerance in NZB/W lupus mice is the facilitation of effector T cell suppression by T(Reg). These new findings indicate that pCons exerts protective effects in NZB/W lupus mice by differentially modulating the activity of different T cell subsets, implying new considerations in the design of T(Reg)-based approaches to modulate T cell autoreactivity in SLE. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Central nervous system systemic lupus erythematosus in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborn, A.G.; Boyer, R.S.

    1989-01-01

    Ischemic neurologic events and neuropsychiatric disorders occur in approximately 70% of patients with systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The CT and MR findings in adults with central nervous system (CNS) SLE have been described, but to the authors' knowledge no pediatric series has been reported. The MR and CT findings in four children with CNS SLE are compared with those reported in adults. Large infarcts are less frequent in children than in adults with CNS SLE, while multiple small infarctions and white matter lesions are more common. These findings in children who have no obvious source of emboli, intracardiac shunt, or history of trauma should raise the suspicion of SLE

  9. Th17/Treg imbalance induced by increased incidence of atherosclerosis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mengya; Mo, Hanyou; Li, Dong; Luo, Xiaohong; Zhang, Lihua

    2013-07-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate whether the immunological factors in patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) and a high incidence of atherosclerosis correlate with a Th17/Treg imbalance. All cases were recruited from the Affiliated Hospital of Guilin Medical University: a random sample of 42 cases with SLE and atherosclerosis, 39 positive control cases with SLE alone with no anomalies detected via coronary artery angiography or carotid color Doppler ultrasound examination, as well as 45 normal controls based on physical examination were included. The serum expression levels of IL-10, IL-17, IL-6, TNF-α, Th17, Th17 cell transcription factor RORγt, and Treg cell transcription factor Foxp3 were measured in each group of patients. Correlations among Th17/Treg, their secreted cell factors, transcription factors, SLE, and SLE with concurrent atherosclerosis (SLE + AS) were analyzed. The results are as follows: (1) total cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels in the SLE and SLE + AS groups were higher than those in the control group (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01); (2) serum IL-10 in the SLE + AS group was lower than the SLE and control groups; however, serum IL-17 and IL-6 levels in the SLE + AS group were elevated compared to the SLE and control groups (average P < 0.01); (3) the percentage of Treg cells in the SLE + AS patients was lower than those found in the SLE and control groups; in contrast, percentages of serum Th17 cells in SLE + AS patients were higher than the SLE and control groups (average P < 0.01); (4) FoxP3 expression in the SLE + AS group was lower than levels observed in the SLE and control groups (average P < 0.05); in contrast, RORγt expression in the SLE + AS group was higher than levels found in the SLE and control groups (average P < 0.05). The abnormal balance between Th17 cells and Treg cells in SLE + AS patients has obvious implications for Th17 migration. The results suggest that Th17 cell proportion and function can be

  10. DEPRESSION--A FELLOW TRAVELER WITH SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojocaru, Doina-Clementina; Costin, Melania; Bădeanu, Lucia Elena; Negru, R D; Aursulesei, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic multisystem inflammatory disorder that occurs primarily in women of childbearing age, immunologic abnormalities being a prominent feature of the disease. Psychiatric disorders frequently coexist, depression being the most common mood disorder in neuropsychiatric lupus. This literature review was performed through searching MEDLINE database for full-text English-language articles--original research, systematic review and updates published in the last five years (2010-2015), using the keywords "depression and systemic lupus erythematosus". The main outcomes identified were prevalence and predictors of depression in various cultural and ethnic groups, depression-related clinical issues (suicidal ideation, cognitive impairment, altered body image, sleep and sexual disturbances, influence of SLE treatment), and influence on quality of life. A multidisciplinary approach that takes into account the polymorphism and individual variability of the SLE clinical manifestations helps to improve early detection of depression, which is responsible for the increased risk of comorbidities, suicidal attempts, decreased treatment adherence, and impaired quality of life. Physicians across all specialties involved in the care for lupus patients should be aware of the major prevalence of this condition, while helping patients to cope with their disabling disease.

  11. Current and emerging treatment options in the management of lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Natasha; D’Cruz, David

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease with variable clinical manifestations. While the clearest guidelines for the treatment of SLE exist in the context of lupus nephritis, patients with other lupus manifestations such as neuropsychiatric, hematologic, musculoskeletal, and severe cutaneous lupus frequently require immunosuppression and/or biologic therapy. Conventional immunosuppressive agents such as mycophenolate mofetil, azathioprine, and cyclophosphamide are widely used in the management of SLE with current more rationalized treatment regimens optimizing the use of these agents while minimizing potential toxicity. The advent of biologic therapies has advanced the treatment of SLE particularly in patients with refractory disease. The CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab and the anti-BLyS agent belimumab are now widely in use in clinical practice. Several other biologic agents are in ongoing clinical trials. While immunosuppressive and biologic agents are the foundation of inflammatory disease control in SLE, the importance of managing comorbidities such as cardiovascular risk factors, bone health, and minimizing susceptibility to infection should not be neglected. PMID:27529058

  12. Cryptococcal Meningitis Presenting with Isolated Sixth Cranial Nerve Palsy in a Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Seung-Ki; Seo, Soo-Hong; Ju, Ji Hyeon; Yoon, Chong-Hyeon; Park, Soo Chul; Kim, Bum Soo; Kim, Ho-Youn

    2008-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is a rare complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The nonspecific neurologic findings associated with this infection delays accurate diagnosis because initial neuropsychiatric manifestations of SLE are in instances indistinguishable from that of crytococcal meningitis. We report a case of cryptococcal meningitis presenting with unilateral sixth cranial nerve palsy in a male patient with SLE, which was successfully treated with antifungal agents. PMID:18303219

  13. Hemorrhage listerial encephalitis in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosis: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Gyu; Lee, Ji Young; Lee, Young Jun; Kim, Young Seo; Kim, Hyun Young; Sung, Won Jae [Hanyang University Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    A 31-year-old female with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) presented with fever, headache, seizures and mental status changes. Brain MRI showed T2 hyperintense lesions in the cerebellum and frontal white matter and a lesion in the cerebellum exhibited hemorrhagic changes and peripheral ring enhancement. The MRI features of listerial encephalitis are difficult to differentiate from those of neuropsychiatric SLE and various other diseases. Here, we report a case of hemorrhagic listerial encephalitis in a patient with SLE.

  14. Hemorrhage listerial encephalitis in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosis: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyun Gyu; Lee, Ji Young; Lee, Young Jun; Kim, Young Seo; Kim, Hyun Young; Sung, Won Jae

    2017-01-01

    A 31-year-old female with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) presented with fever, headache, seizures and mental status changes. Brain MRI showed T2 hyperintense lesions in the cerebellum and frontal white matter and a lesion in the cerebellum exhibited hemorrhagic changes and peripheral ring enhancement. The MRI features of listerial encephalitis are difficult to differentiate from those of neuropsychiatric SLE and various other diseases. Here, we report a case of hemorrhagic listerial encephalitis in a patient with SLE

  15. Lúpus induzido por drogas: da imunologia básica à aplicada Drug-induced lupus: from basic to spplied immunology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Licia Maria Henrique da Mota

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available O lúpus induzido por drogas (LID é descrito como o desenvolvimento de sintomas semelhantes ao do lúpus eritematoso sistêmico idiopático, temporalmente relacionado à exposição a drogas, havendo, comumente, a resolução do quadro com a suspensão do medicamento desencadeante. A associação mais clássica é feita com a procainamida e a hidralazina. Recentemente, com a introdução de novas drogas na prática clínica, tem sido relatado um aumento no número de medicamentos implicados como causadores da doença, e a lista atual inclui quase uma centena de drogas relacionadas à ocorrência de LID. Embora descrito há mais de 60 anos, o mecanismo imunológico básico do LID ainda não está totalmente compreendido. Há várias hipóteses para o processo de indução de auto-imunidade pelas drogas, e o fenômeno geralmente é interpretado como uma inapropriada ativação do sistema imunitário. Entre as diversas teorias propostas, as mais aceitas são: a inibição da metilação do ácido desoxirribonucléico (DNA por algumas drogas, o que permitiria a ativação das células T; a oxidação de certas substâncias pelos monócitos, gerando metabólitos ativos que ocasionariam ativação das células apresentadoras de antígenos e/ou a interferência dos metabólitos de determinadas drogas com a tolerância do sistema imune. Novos estudos são necessários para a melhor compreensão da imunopatogenia do LID, objetivando desenvolver tratamentos específicos com base no melhor conhecimento dos mecanismos patogênicos.Drug-induced lupus (DIL has been described as the development of idiopathic systemic lupus erythematous-like symptoms, temporarily associated to the exposition to drugs, and as a rule, the condition is improved with the suspension of the triggering medication. The most classical association is with procainamide and hydralazine. Recently, with the introduction of new drugs in the clinical practice, an increase on the number of

  16. Detailed features of hematological involvement and medication-induced cytopenia in systemic lupus erythematosus patients: single center results of 221 patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teke, Hava Üsküdar; Cansu, Döndü Üsküdar; Korkmaz, Cengiz

    2017-01-01

    Objective Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) may affect a number of systems, with the hematological system being one of the most common. Our aim is to determine the existence of cytopenia at diagnosis or during follow-up of our SLE patients as well as the associated factors. Material and Methods A cohort of SLE patients that had been followed-up in the Department of Rheumotology from 1998 to 2015 was retrospectively assessed. Clinical and laboratory findings about the patients were recorded. Results Out of 221 patients composing the cohort, cytopenia was already present in 83.3% (n=184) at the time of diagnosis. Anemia was detected in 56.1% (n=124), leukopenia in 28.9% (n=64), lymphopenia in 76% (n=168), neutropenia in 4.5% (n=10), and thrombocytopenia in 17.2% (n=38) of patients. The proportion of patients with cumulative cytopenia was 90% (n=199). Cumulative cytopenia was disease-related in 83.4% (n=166) and medication-related in 16.6% (n=33) of the patients. In cases of drug-induced cytopenia, azathioprine was the most frequently prescribed drug. In patients with cytopenia at the time of diagnosis, erythrocyte sedimentation rates (ESR) were higher, C3 and C4 hypocomplementemia was more prevalent, and they were positive for anti-ds-DNA at a greater proportion (p0.05). Conclusion The most common hematological disorders in SLE patients are lymphopenia and anemia, and patients must be further examined for APS and renal involvement if they suffer cytopenia. PMID:28638678

  17. Multicentric lupus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandra S

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available A 60 year old female patient presented with disseminated tuberculosis. She had multicentric lupus vulgaris and her joints, bones, lymph nodes and lungs were also affected. Haematogenous dissemination was because of her poor health.

  18. Renal cell apoptosis in human lupus nephritis: a histological study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, M; Penkowa, Milena; Andersen, C B

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear autoantigens from apoptotic cells are believed to drive the immunological response in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Conflicting data exist as to the possible renal origin of apoptotic cells in SLE patients with nephritis. We assessed the level of renal cell apoptosis in kidney...... biopsies from 35 patients with lupus nephritis by means of terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase (TdT)-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP)-digoxigenin nick end labeling (TUNEL). Five samples of normal kidney tissue served as control specimens. We did not observe apoptotic glomerular cells in any...... cells constitute a quantitatively important source of auto-antibody-inducing nuclear auto-antigens in human lupus nephritis....

  19. Serum interleukin-17 levels are associated with nephritis in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peliçari, Karina de Oliveira; Postal, Mariana; Sinicato, Nailú Angelica; Peres, Fernando Augusto; Fernandes, Paula Teixeira; Marini, Roberto; Costallat, Lilian Tereza Lavras; Appenzeller, Simone

    2015-05-01

    To determine the serum interleukin-17 (IL-17) levels in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients and to evaluate the association between IL-17 and clinical manifestations, disease activity, laboratory findings and treatment. We included 67 consecutive childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients [61 women; median age 18 years (range 11-31)], 55 first-degree relatives [50 women; median age 40 years (range 29-52)] and 47 age- and sex-matched healthy controls [42 women; median age 19 years (range 6-30)]. The childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients were assessed for clinical and laboratory systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations, disease activity [Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI)], cumulative damage [Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology (ACR) Damage Index] and current drug use. Serum IL-17 levels were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using commercial kits. The median serum IL-17 level was 36.3 (range 17.36-105.92) pg/mL in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients and 29.47 (15.16-62.17) pg/mL in healthy controls (p=0.009). We observed an association between serum IL-17 levels and active nephritis (p=0.01) and migraines (p=0.03). Serum IL-17 levels were not associated with disease activity (p=0.32), cumulative damage (p=0.34), or medication use (p=0.63). IL-17 is increased in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus and may play a role in the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric and renal manifestations. Longitudinal studies are necessary to determine the role of IL-17 in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus.

  20. Serum interleukin-17 levels are associated with nephritis in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina de Oliveira Peliçari

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine the serum interleukin-17 (IL-17 levels in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients and to evaluate the association between IL-17 and clinical manifestations, disease activity, laboratory findings and treatment. METHODS: We included 67 consecutive childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients [61 women; median age 18 years (range 11-31], 55 first-degree relatives [50 women; median age 40 years (range 29-52] and 47 age- and sex-matched healthy controls [42 women; median age 19 years (range 6-30]. The childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients were assessed for clinical and laboratory systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations, disease activity [Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI], cumulative damage [Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology (ACR Damage Index] and current drug use. Serum IL-17 levels were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using commercial kits. RESULTS: The median serum IL-17 level was 36.3 (range 17.36-105.92 pg/mL in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients and 29.47 (15.16-62.17 pg/mL in healthy controls (p=0.009. We observed an association between serum IL-17 levels and active nephritis (p=0.01 and migraines (p=0.03. Serum IL-17 levels were not associated with disease activity (p=0.32, cumulative damage (p=0.34, or medication use (p=0.63. CONCLUSION: IL-17 is increased in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus and may play a role in the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric and renal manifestations. Longitudinal studies are necessary to determine the role of IL-17 in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus.

  1. Redox Modulations, Antioxidants, and Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraunberger, Erik A.; Laliberté, Victoria L. M.; Duong, Angela; Andreazza, Ana C.

    2016-01-01

    Although antioxidants, redox modulations, and neuropsychiatric disorders have been widely studied for many years, the field would benefit from an integrative and corroborative review. Our primary objective is to delineate the biological significance of compounds that modulate our redox status (i.e., reactive species and antioxidants) as well as outline their current role in brain health and the impact of redox modulations on the severity of illnesses. Therefore, this review will not enter into the debate regarding the perceived medical legitimacy of antioxidants but rather seek to clarify their abilities and limitations. With this in mind, antioxidants may be interpreted as natural products with significant pharmacological actions in the body. A renewed understanding of these often overlooked compounds will allow us to critically appraise the current literature and provide an informed, novel perspective on an important healthcare issue. In this review, we will introduce the complex topics of redox modulations and their role in the development of select neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26640614

  2. Small Molecules: Therapeutic Application in Neuropsychiatric and Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavone, Stefania; Trabace, Luigia

    2018-02-13

    In recent years, an increasing number of studies have been published, focusing on the potential therapeutic use of small catalytic agents with strong biological properties. So far, most of these works have only regarded specific clinical fields, such as oncology, infectivology and general pathology, in particular with respect to the treatment of significant inflammatory processes. However, interesting data on possible therapeutic applications of small molecules for the treatment of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative illnesses are emerging, especially with respect to the possibility to modulate the cellular redox state. Indeed, a crucial role of redox dysregulation in the pathogenesis of these disorders has been widely demonstrated by both pre-clinical and clinical studies, being the reduction of the total amount of free radicals a promising novel therapeutic approach for these diseases. In this review, we focused our interest on studies published during the last ten years reporting therapeutic potential of small molecules for the treatment of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders, also based on the biological efficiency of these compounds in detecting intracellular disturbances induced by increased production of reactive oxygen species.

  3. Increased Set1 binding at the promoter induces aberrant epigenetic alterations and up-regulates cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate response element modulator alpha in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing; Ding, Shu; Zhang, Huilin; Long, Hai; Wu, Haijing; Zhao, Ming; Chan, Vera; Lau, Chak-Sing; Lu, Qianjin

    2016-01-01

    Up-regulated cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate response element modulator α (CREMα) which can inhibit IL-2 and induce IL-17A in T cells plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This research aimed to investigate the mechanisms regulating CREMα expression in SLE. From the chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) microarray data, we found a sharply increased H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) amount at the CREMα promoter in SLE CD4+ T cells compared to controls. Then, by ChIP and real-time PCR, we confirmed this result. Moreover, H3K4me3 amount at the promoter was positively correlated with CREMα mRNA level in SLE CD4+ T cells. In addition, a striking increase was observed in SET domain containing 1 (Set1) enrichment, but no marked change in mixed-lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1) enrichment at the CREMα promoter in SLE CD4+ T cells. We also proved Set1 enrichment was positively correlated with both H3K4me3 amount at the CREMα promoter and CREMα mRNA level in SLE CD4+ T cells. Knocking down Set1 with siRNA in SLE CD4+ T cells decreased Set1 and H3K4me3 enrichments, and elevated the levels of DNMT3a and DNA methylation, while the amounts of H3 acetylation (H3ac) and H4 acetylation (H4ac) didn't alter greatly at the CREMα promoter. All these changes inhibited the expression of CREMα, then augmented IL-2 and down-modulated IL-17A productions. Subsequently, we observed that DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) 3a enrichment at the CREMα promoter was down-regulated significantly in SLE CD4+ T cells, and H3K4me3 amount was negatively correlated with both DNA methylation level and DNMT3a enrichment at the CREMα promoter in SLE CD4+ T cells. In SLE CD4+ T cells, increased Set1 enrichment up-regulates H3K4me3 amount at the CREMα promoter, which antagonizes DNMT3a and suppresses DNA methylation within this region. All these factors induce CREMα overexpression, consequently result in IL-2 under-expression and IL-17A overproduction, and

  4. Chronic lupus peritonitis with ascites.

    OpenAIRE

    Kaklamanis, P; Vayopoulos, G; Stamatelos, G; Dadinas, G; Tsokos, G C

    1991-01-01

    A 28 year old woman with systemic lupus erythematosus who developed chronic lupus peritonitis and ascites is described. Lupus peritonitis appeared with abdominal fullness, postprandial abdominal discomfort, and painless ascites. Four months later the patient developed vertigo, headaches, visual disturbances, serositis, and glomerulonephritis. Lupus peritonitis and the other disease manifestations responded to treatment with intravenous pulse methylprednisolone (four 1 g/m2 injections at one w...

  5. High incidence of potentially virus-induced malignancies in systemic lupus erythematosus: a long-term followup study in a Danish cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyer, Lene; Faurschou, Mikkel; Mogensen, Mette

    2011-01-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) seem to experience an increased prevalence of oncogenic virus infections. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether SLE patients have an increased risk of virus-associated malignancies, defined as malignancies potentially caused by vi...

  6. Lupus vulgaris of external nose

    OpenAIRE

    Bhandary, Satheesh Kumar; Ranganna, B. Usha

    2008-01-01

    Lupus vulgaris is the commonest form of cutaneous tuberculosis which commonly involve trunk and buttocks. Lupus vulgaris affecting nose and face, are rarely reported in India. This study reports an unusual case of lupus vulgaris involving the external nose that showed dramatic outcome after six months of anti- tubercular treatment.

  7. Up regulation of serum tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand in juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus: relations with disease activity, antibodies to double -stranded DNA, nephritis and neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzat, Mohamed H M; El-Gammasy, Tarek M A; Shaheen, Kareem Y A; El-Mezdawi, Ramzi A M; Youssef, Mervat S M

    2013-06-01

    Apoptosis is induced by binding of death receptor ligands, members of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily, to their cognate receptors. It is suggested that TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) is involved in pathogenesis of juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE). This study aimed to assess TRAIL concentrations in sera of JSLE children and to determine their potential relationship with disease activity, anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) levels, neutropenia and renal involvement. Circulating levels of TRAIL were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in serum samples obtained from 40 JSLE patients (20 with active and 20 with inactive disease) and 20 controls. The mean (SEM) serum TRAIL concentration in JSLE was 1750.7 (440.2) pg/mL. Serum TRAIL concentrations in patients were higher than those in controls (P nephritis compared to classes I and II nephritis (1970 [512] vs. 1330 [331] pg/mL; P lupus nephritis. © 2013 The Authors International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases © 2013 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Flow-Induced Dispersion Analysis for Probing Anti-dsDNA Antibody Binding Heterogeneity in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Nicklas N; Pedersen, Morten E; Østergaard, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    , specificity, and accuracy with established assays. Also, existing methodologies for quantification of autoantibodies are challenging to transfer to a point-of-care setting. Here we present the use of flow-induced dispersion analysis (FIDA) for rapid (minutes) measurement of autoantibodies against ds......DNA. The assay is based on Taylor dispersion analysis (TDA) and is fully automated with the use of standard capillary electrophoresis (CE) based equipment employing fluorescence detection. It is robust toward matrix effects as demonstrated by the direct analysis of samples composed of up to 85% plasma derived...... from human blood samples, and it allows for flexible exchange of the DNA sequences used to probe for the autoantibodies. Plasma samples from SLE positive patients were analyzed using the new FIDA methodology as well as by standard indirect immunofluorescence and solid-phase immunoassays. Interestingly...

  9. 75 FR 35492 - Guidance for Industry on Lupus Nephritis Caused By Systemic Lupus Erythematosus-Developing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-22

    ... biological products, and medical devices for the treatment of lupus nephritis (LN) caused by systemic lupus...] Guidance for Industry on Lupus Nephritis Caused By Systemic Lupus Erythematosus--Developing Medical... entitled ``Lupus Nephritis Caused By Systemic Lupus Erythematosus--Developing Medical Products for...

  10. Cognitive Function in Children with Lupus Nephritis: A Cross-Sectional Comparison with Children with Other Glomerular Chronic Kidney Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Andrea; Kogon, Amy J; Matheson, Matthew B; Warady, Bradley A; Furth, Susan L; Hooper, Stephen R

    2017-10-01

    To identify factors contributing to cognitive impairment in children with lupus nephritis. A cross-sectional analysis of a large multicenter national cohort of children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) using standardized measures to determine baseline neuropsychiatric function and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in children with lupus nephritis (n = 34), and to compare baseline function with that in children with other forms of glomerular CKD (gCKD; n = 171). We used inverse probability weighting via a logistic model for propensity score analysis to achieve balance between children with lupus nephritis and those with other glomerular causes of CKD, adjusting for known confounders. We used linear regression models to compare neurocognitive outcomes between exposure groups, adjusting for current prednisone use and testing for an interaction between current prednisone use and lupus nephritis, and to test for an association between cognitive function and HRQoL. Current prednisone use was independently associated with worse attention (P children with lupus nephritis on prednisone (P = .047). Better parent-reported HRQoL was associated with better visual memory (P = .01), and better child-reported HRQoL was associated with better attention (P Children with lupus nephritis have comparable or better cognitive function than their peers with other gCKDs, which is reassuring given the multiorgan and lifelong complications associated with lupus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Environmental Factors, Toxicants and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anselm Mak

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an immune-complex-mediated multi-systemic autoimmune condition of multifactorial etiology, which mainly affects young women. It is currently believed that the onset of SLE and lupus flares are triggered by various environmental factors in genetically susceptible individuals. Various environmental agents and toxicants, such as cigarette smoke, alcohol, occupationally- and non-occupationally-related chemicals, ultraviolet light, infections, sex hormones and certain medications and vaccines, have been implicated to induce SLE onset or flares in a number case series, case-control and population-based cohort studies and very few randomized controlled trials. Here, we will describe some of these recognized environmental lupus triggering and perpetuating factors and explain how these factors potentially bias the immune system towards autoimmunity through their interactions with genetic and epigenetic alterations. Further in-depth exploration of how potentially important environmental factors mechanistically interact with the immune system and the genome, which trigger the onset of SLE and lupus flares, will certainly be one of the plausible steps to prevent the onset and to decelerate the progress of the disease.

  12. Influence of gut microbiota on neuropsychiatric disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenit, María Carmen; Sanz, Yolanda; Codoñer-Franch, Pilar

    2017-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed a growing appreciation of the fundamental role played by an early assembly of a diverse and balanced gut microbiota and its subsequent maintenance for future health of the host. Gut microbiota is currently viewed as a key regulator of a fluent bidirectional dialogue between the gut and the brain (gut-brain axis). A number of preclinical studies have suggested that the microbiota and its genome (microbiome) may play a key role in neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. Furthermore, alterations in the gut microbiota composition in humans have also been linked to a variety of neuropsychiatric conditions, including depression, autism and Parkinson’s disease. However, it is not yet clear whether these changes in the microbiome are causally related to such diseases or are secondary effects thereof. In this respect, recent studies in animals have indicated that gut microbiota transplantation can transfer a behavioral phenotype, suggesting that the gut microbiota may be a modifiable factor modulating the development or pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric conditions. Further studies are warranted to establish whether or not the findings of preclinical animal experiments can be generalized to humans. Moreover, although different communication routes between the microbiota and brain have been identified, further studies must elucidate all the underlying mechanisms involved. Such research is expected to contribute to the design of strategies to modulate the gut microbiota and its functions with a view to improving mental health, and thus provide opportunities to improve the management of psychiatric diseases. Here, we review the evidence supporting a role of the gut microbiota in neuropsychiatric disorders and the state of the art regarding the mechanisms underlying its contribution to mental illness and health. We also consider the stages of life where the gut microbiota is more susceptible to the effects of environmental stressors

  13. Congenital lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taseer Ahmed Bhatt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal lupus erythematosus (NLE is an autoimmune disease affecting the fetus as a result of transplacental transfer of anti-Ro autoantibodies. Typically, it presents in the first few months of life with an annular form of subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus. We report an unusual case of NLE presenting at birth with scaly erythematous telangiectatic patches and macules with skin atrophy involving the face, head, and upper trunk. Thrombocytopenia was discovered on laboratory investigations. Histopathology of skin biopsy was consistent with subacute cutaneous lupus. The mother was clinically free of disease and had no family history of autoimmune disease. Serology (extra-nuclear antigens was positive in both the baby and the mother. This is a rare presentation of a rare disease.

  14. Type I Interferon in the Pathogenesis of Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Mary K.

    2014-01-01

    Investigations of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have applied insights from studies of the innate immune response to define type I interferon (IFN-I), with IFN-α the dominant mediator, as central to the pathogenesis of this prototype systemic autoimmune disease. Genetic association data identify regulators of nucleic acid degradation and components of TLR-independent, endosomal TLR-dependent, and IFN-I signaling pathways as contributors to lupus disease susceptibility. Together with a gene expression signature characterized by IFNI-induced gene transcripts in lupus blood and tissue, those data support the conclusion that many of the immunologic and pathologic features of this disease are a consequence of a persistent self-directed immune reaction driven by IFN-I and mimicking a sustained anti-virus response. This expanding knowledge of the role of IFN-I and the innate immune response suggests candidate therapeutic targets that are being tested in lupus patients. PMID:24907379

  15. Sleep Patterns and Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Hospitalized Patients with Dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Tanev, Kaloyan S.; Winokur, Andrew; Pitman, Roger K.

    2017-01-01

    We studied 28 dementia inpatients receiving treatment as usual. We measured beginning-to-end differences in neuropsychiatric symptoms and actigraphic sleep patterns. Using a mixed model, we regressed neuropsychiatric symptoms on average sleep minutes (between-subjects effect) and each night's deviation from average (within-subject effect). Sleep did not significantly differ from beginning to end of participation, whereas neuropsychiatric symptoms did. Average sleep minutes predicted average n...

  16. Psoriasiform lupus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmavathy, L; Rao, L Lakshmana; Ethirajan, N; Dhanlaklshmi, M

    2008-04-01

    Tuberculosis is a major public health problem in both developing and developed countries. Cutaneous Tuberculosis constitutes a minor proportion of extra-pulmonary manifestations of Tuberculosis. Lupus Vulgaris (LV) is one of the clinical variants of Cutaneous Tuberculosis. A case of a large plaque type psoriasiform lesion of lupus vulgaris on the thigh, of 15 years' duration, in an 18-year-old girl is reported. This case highlights the ignorance level among the patients and consequent failure to avail proper anti-tuberculous treatment despite campaign in print and audio visual media.

  17. Anti-ganglioside antibodies in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and neurological manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrador-Horrillo, M; Martinez-Valle, F; Gallardo, E; Rojas-Garcia, R; Ordi-Ros, J; Vilardell, M

    2012-05-01

    Anti-ganglioside antibodies (AGA) have been associated with several peripheral neuropathies, such as Miller-Fisher syndrome, Guillain-Barré syndrome and multifocal motor neuropathy. They have also been studied in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), focusing on neuropsychiatric manifestations and peripheral neuropathy, but the results are contradictory. To study the presence of AGA in a large cohort of patients with SLE and neuropsychiatric manifestations. Serum from 65 consecutive patients with SLE and neuropsychiatric manifestations, collected from 1985 to 2009, was tested for the presence of AGA antibodies (GM1, GM2, GM3, asialo-GM1 GD1a, GD1b, GD3, GT1b, GQ1b) using a standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay ELISA test (INCAT 1999) and thin layer chromatography (TLC). Positive results for asialo-GM1 (IgM) were found in 10 patients, 6 were positive for asialo-GM1 (IgM and IgG), and 4 were positive for other AGA such as GM1, GM2, GM3, GD1b, GT1b, GD3, (mainly IgM). Clinical and statistical studies showed no correlation between AGA and neuropsychiatric manifestations of SLE. Although some patients showed reactivity to AGA, these antibodies are not a useful marker of neuropsychiatric manifestations in SLE patients.

  18. Ectopic Axillary Breast during Systemic Lupus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besma Ben Dhaou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many breast changes may occur in systemic lupus erythematosus. We report a 41-year-old woman with lupus who presented three years after the onset of lupus an ectopic mammary gland confirmed by histological study.

  19. Environmental Exposures and Neuropsychiatric Disorders: What Role Does the Gut-Immune-Brain Axis Play?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Shannon; Hornig, Mady

    2018-02-08

    Evidence is growing that environmental exposures-including xenobiotics as well as microbes-play a role in the pathogenesis of many neuropsychiatric disorders. Underlying mechanisms are likely to be complex, involving the developmentally sensitive interplay of genetic/epigenetic, detoxification, and immune factors. Here, we review evidence supporting a role for environmental factors and disrupted gut-immune-brain axis function in some neuropsychiatric conditions. Studies suggesting the involvement of an altered microbiome in triggering CNS-directed autoimmunity and neuropsychiatric disturbances are presented as an intriguing example of the varied mechanisms by which environmentally induced gut-immune-brain axis dysfunction may contribute to adverse brain outcomes. The gut-immune-brain axis is a burgeoning frontier for investigation of neuropsychiatric illness. Future translational research to define individual responses to exogenous exposures in terms of microbiome-dependent skew of the metabolome, immunity, and brain function may serve as a lens for illumination of pathways involved in the development of CNS disease and fuel discovery of novel interventions.

  20. Lupus vulgaris on keloid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jena S

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A 28-year-old man presented with multicentric lupus vulgaris on keloids over chest, axilla, neck and back for last 6 months. He had pulmonary tuberculosis. All the laboratory investigations were in favour of clinical diagnosis. The patient responded to antituberculosis therapy.

  1. Kutan lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandreva, Tatjana; Voss, Anne; Bygum, Anette

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE) is an autoimmune disease. The most common clinical forms are acute cutaneous LE (ACLE), subacute cutaneous LE (SCLE) and discoid LE (DLE). Cutaneous LE, mainly ACLE, can be the first sign of systemic LE (SLE). DLE and SCLE are less associated with development...

  2. Psychological distress in corticosteroid-naive patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: A prospective cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, K; Omori, M; Katsumata, Y; Sato, E; Kawaguchi, Y; Harigai, M; Yamanaka, H; Ishigooka, J

    2016-04-01

    Psychological distress, such as depression and anxiety, has been intensively studied in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, those studies have mostly included patients who were treated with corticosteroids, which might themselves induce mood disturbances. We investigated psychological distress in corticosteroid-naive patients with SLE who did not exhibit any overt neuropsychiatric manifestations. Forty-three SLE in-patients with no current or past abnormal neuropsychiatric history participated in the study. Patients and 30 healthy control subjects with similar demographic and personality characteristics were administered a comprehensive battery of psychological/neuropsychological tests. The Profile of Mood States (POMS) was used to assess depression and anxiety. Results of clinical, laboratory, and neurological tests were compared with regard to their presence. Prevalence of depression was higher in patients (n = 11, 25.6%) than in controls (n = 2, 6.7%; p = 0.035), although prevalence of anxiety did not differ across groups (patients: 34.9%, n = 15; controls: 16.7%, n = 5; p = 0.147). Using multiple logistic regression analysis, we identified avoidance coping methods (OR, 1.3; 95% CI 1.030-1.644; p = 0.027) as an independent risk factor for depression. Our results indicate that depression presents more frequently in corticosteroid-naive patients with early-stage, active SLE than in the normal population, but anxiety does not. Depression may be related to psychological reactions to suffering from the disease. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. OSTEOPOROSIS IN SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N V Seredavkina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE form a high risk group osteoporosis (OP. Its main causes are autoimmune inflammation, concomitant pathology, and their treatment. When OP occurs in SLE, bone mass loss is shown to occur early and is associated with the use of glucocorticosteroids (GC. To prevent OP, all patients with SLE should modify their lifestyle. To verify bone changes, densitometry is performed in patients who have risk factors of OP and/or a menopause. Calcium preparations and vitamin D are used to prevent OP; bisphosphonates that significantly reduce the risk of fractures of the vertebral column and femoral neck are employed for therapy of OP. A SLE patient with gluco-corticoid-induced OP and a good effect of bisphophonate treatment is described.

  4. Lupus cystitis: An unusual presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mukhopadhyay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lupus cystitis is a rare complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and occurs in association with gastrointestinal symptoms. This rare disorder has been reported mainly from Japan. We report a 20 year old female who diagnosed as having SLE associated with paralytic ileus and chronic interstitial cystitis. Treatment with intravenous methylprednisolone, cyclophosphamide pulse therapy followed by oral prednisolone and azathioprine led to amelioration of manifestations. Later she developed lupus nephritis which was treated with mycophenolate mofetil.

  5. Lupus cystitis: An unusual presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, S; Jana, S; Roy, M K; Chatterjee, A; Sarkar, A; Mazumdar, S; Mukherjee, P; Mukhopadhyay, J

    2014-09-01

    Lupus cystitis is a rare complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and occurs in association with gastrointestinal symptoms. This rare disorder has been reported mainly from Japan. We report a 20 year old female who diagnosed as having SLE associated with paralytic ileus and chronic interstitial cystitis. Treatment with intravenous methylprednisolone, cyclophosphamide pulse therapy followed by oral prednisolone and azathioprine led to amelioration of manifestations. Later she developed lupus nephritis which was treated with mycophenolate mofetil.

  6. Lupus nephritis susceptibility loci in women with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sharon A; Brown, Elizabeth E; Williams, Adrienne H; Ramos, Paula S; Berthier, Celine C; Bhangale, Tushar; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E; Behrens, Timothy W; Criswell, Lindsey A; Graham, Deborah Cunninghame; Demirci, F Yesim; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Gaffney, Patrick M; Harley, John B; Jacob, Chaim O; Kamboh, M Ilyas; Kelly, Jennifer A; Manzi, Susan; Moser-Sivils, Kathy L; Russell, Laurie P; Petri, Michelle; Tsao, Betty P; Vyse, Tim J; Zidovetzki, Raphael; Kretzler, Matthias; Kimberly, Robert P; Freedman, Barry I; Graham, Robert R; Langefeld, Carl D

    2014-12-01

    Lupus nephritis is a manifestation of SLE resulting from glomerular immune complex deposition and inflammation. Lupus nephritis demonstrates familial aggregation and accounts for significant morbidity and mortality. We completed a meta-analysis of three genome-wide association studies of SLE to identify lupus nephritis-predisposing loci. Through genotyping and imputation, >1.6 million markers were assessed in 2000 unrelated women of European descent with SLE (588 patients with lupus nephritis and 1412 patients with lupus without nephritis). Tests of association were computed using logistic regression adjusting for population substructure. The strongest evidence for association was observed outside the MHC and included markers localized to 4q11-q13 (PDGFRA, GSX2; P=4.5×10(-7)), 16p12 (SLC5A11; P=5.1×10(-7)), 6p22 (ID4; P=7.4×10(-7)), and 8q24.12 (HAS2, SNTB1; P=1.1×10(-6)). Both HLA-DR2 and HLA-DR3, two well established lupus susceptibility loci, showed evidence of association with lupus nephritis (P=0.06 and P=3.7×10(-5), respectively). Within the class I region, rs9263871 (C6orf15-HCG22) had the strongest evidence of association with lupus nephritis independent of HLA-DR2 and HLA-DR3 (P=8.5×10(-6)). Consistent with a functional role in lupus nephritis, intra-renal mRNA levels of PDGFRA and associated pathway members showed significant enrichment in patients with lupus nephritis (n=32) compared with controls (n=15). Results from this large-scale genome-wide investigation of lupus nephritis provide evidence of multiple biologically relevant lupus nephritis susceptibility loci. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  7. Diagnosis, Monitoring, and Treatment of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Systematic Review of Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnicliffe, David J; Singh-Grewal, Davinder; Kim, Siah; Craig, Jonathan C; Tong, Allison

    2015-10-01

    Management of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is complex and variability in practices exists. Guidelines have been developed to help improve the management of SLE patients, but there has been no formal evaluation of these guidelines. This study aims to compare the scope, quality, and consistency of clinical practice guidelines on the diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment of patients with SLE. Electronic databases were searched up to April 2014. The Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) II instrument and textual synthesis was used to appraise and compare recommendations. Nine clinical practice guidelines and 5 consensus statements were identified, which covered 7 topics: diagnosis, monitoring, treatment, neuropsychiatric SLE, lupus nephritis, antiphospholipid syndrome, and other manifestations of lupus. The methodological quality of the guidelines was variable, with the overall mean AGREE II scores ranging from 31% to 75%, out of a maximum 100%. Scores were consistently low for applicability, with only 1 guideline scoring above 50%. There was substantial variability in the treatments recommended for class II and V lupus nephritis, the recommended duration of maintenance therapy for class III/IV lupus nephritis (from 1 to 4 years), and timing of ophthalmologic examination for patients taking corticosteroids. Published guidelines on SLE cover a complex area of clinical care, but the methodological quality, scope, and recommendations varied substantially. Collaborative and multidisciplinary efforts to develop comprehensive, high-quality evidence-based guidelines are needed to promote best treatment and health outcomes for patients with SLE. © 2015, American College of Rheumatology.

  8. Association of Sweet's Syndrome and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Barton

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sweet's syndrome is an acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis which usually presents as an idiopathic disorder but can also be drug induced, associated with hematopoetic malignancies and myelodysplastic disorders, and more, infrequently, observed in autoimmune disorders. Sweet's syndrome has been reported in three cases of neonatal lupus, three cases of hydralazine-induced lupus in adults, and in nine pediatric and adult systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE patients. We describe three additional adult cases of Sweet's associated with SLE and provide a focused review on nondrug-induced, nonneonatal SLE and Sweet's. In two of three new cases, as in the majority of prior cases, the skin rash of Sweet's paralleled underlying SLE disease activity. The pathogenesis of Sweet's remains elusive, but evidence suggests that cytokine dysregulation may be central to the clinical and pathological changes in this condition, as well as in SLE. Further research is needed to define the exact relationship between the two conditions.

  9. Neuropsychiatric manifestations in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: A study from Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Hajighaemi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: We identified NPSLE manifestations in 21.7% of patients; headache and CVD were the most frequent neurological manifestations. Continued studies into the pathogenesis of neurological involvement in patients with SLE are warranted.

  10. Lupus Nephritis: The Evolving Role of Novel Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovin, Brad H.; Parikh, Samir V.

    2014-01-01

    Immune complex accumulation in the kidney is the hallmark of lupus nephritis and triggers a series of events that result in kidney inflammation and injury. Cytotoxic agents and corticosteroids are standard of care for lupus nephritis treatment, but are associated with considerable morbidity and suboptimal outcomes. Recently, there has been interest in using novel biologic agents and small molecules to treat lupus nephritis. These therapies can be broadly categorized as anti-inflammatory (laquinamod, anti–tumor necrosis factor–like weak inducer of apotosis, anti-C5, and retinoids), antiautoimmunity (anti-CD20, anti–interferon α, and costimulatory blockers), or both (anti–interleukin 6 and proteasome inhibitors). Recent lupus nephritis clinical trials applied biologics or small molecules of any category to induction treatment, seeking short-term end points of complete renal response. These trials in general have not succeeded. When lupus nephritis comes to clinical attention during the inflammatory stage of the disease, the autoimmune stage leading to kidney inflammation will have been active for some time. The optimal approach for using novel therapies may be to initially target kidney inflammation to preserve renal parenchyma, followed by suppression of autoimmunity. In this review, we discuss novel lupus nephritis therapies and how they fit into a combinatorial treatment strategy based on the pathogenic stage. PMID:24411715

  11. Neuropsychiatric symptoms and diagnosis of grey matter heterotopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms can be related to less common underlying neuropsychiatric conditions – in this case report, the condition discussed is that of grey matter heterotopia (GMH). The patient presented with a history of prominent aggression, impulsivity and manipulative and attention-seeking behaviour. Episodes of ...

  12. Profile of clinically-diagnosed dementias in a neuropsychiatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Many subjects with dementia present primarily to neuropsychiatric practices because of behavioural and psychological symptoms (BPSD). This study reviewed the profile of clinically-diagnosed dementias and BPSD seen in a pioneer neuropsychiatric practice in Abeokuta, southwestern Nigeria over a ten year ...

  13. Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients: a multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Sakamoto

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN in a large population of childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE patients. Methods: Multicenter study including 852 cSLE patients followed in Pediatric Rheumatology centers in São Paulo, Brazil. SJS was defined as epidermal detachment below 10% of body surface area (BSA, overlap SJS-TEN 10-30% and TEN greater than 30% of BSA. Results: SJS and TEN was observed in 5/852 (0.6% cSLE female patients, three patients were classified as SJS and two patients were classified as overlap SJS-TEN; TEN was not observed. The mean duration of SJS and overlap SJS-TEN was 15 days (range 7-22 and antibiotics induced four cases. Regarding extra-cutaneous manifestations, hepatomegaly was observed in two cSLE patients, nephritis in two and neuropsychiatric involvement and conjunctivitis were observed respectively in one patient. Hematological involvement included lymphopenia in four, leucopenia in three and thrombocytopenia in two patients. The mean SLEDAI-2K score was 14.8 (range 6-30. Laboratory analysis showed low C3, C4 and/or CH50 in two patients and the presence of anti-dsDNA autoantibody in two patients. One patient had lupus anticoagulant and another one had anticardiolipin IgG. All patients were treated with steroids and four needed additional treatment such as intravenous immunoglobulin in two patients, hydroxychloroquine and azathioprine in two and intravenous cyclophosphamide in one patient. Sepsis was observed in three cSLE patients. Two patients required intensive care and death was observed in one patient. Conclusion: Our study identified SJS and overlap SJS-TEN as rare manifestations of active cSLE associated with severe multisystemic disease, with potentially lethal outcome.

  14. Parkinson's Disease: The Quintessential Neuropsychiatric Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, Daniel; Burn, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Although diagnosed by characteristic motor features, Parkinson's disease may be preceded, and is frequently accompanied by, a wide range of cognitive and neuropsychiatric features. In addition to the most commonly studied disorders of dementia, depression, and psychosis, other relatively common and clinically significant psychiatric complications include impulse control disorders, anxiety symptoms, disorders of sleep and wakefulness, and apathy. These problems may be underrecognized and are frequently undertreated. The emergent focus on nonmotor aspects of Parkinson's disease over the past quarter of a century is highlighted by a nonlinear increase in the number of articles published devoted to this topic. Although the development of newer antidepressants, atypical antipsychotics, and cholinesterase inhibitors in recent years has had a positive benefit on the management of these troublesome and distressing symptoms, responses are frequently suboptimal, and this remains an area of major unmet therapeutic need. PMID:21626547

  15. Contraception for adolescents with lupus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner-Weiner Linda

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sexually active adolescents, including young women with lupus, are at high risk for unplanned pregnancy. Unplanned pregnancy among teens with lupus is associated with an elevated risk of poor maternal and fetal outcomes. The provision of effective contraception is a crucial element of care for a sexually-active young woman with lupus. Unfortunately, providers may be hesitant to prescribe contraception to this group due to concerns about increasing the risk of lupus complications. This article reviews the risks and benefits of currently-available contraceptives for young women with lupus. Providers are encouraged to consider long-term, highly-effective contraception, such as implantables and intrauterine devices, for appropriately selected adolescents with lupus.

  16. Lupus vulgaris: difficulties in diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Julia; Caccetta, Tony Philip; Tait, Clare

    2013-05-01

    Lupus vulgaris is one of the most common forms of cutaneous tuberculosis. It presents a diagnostic challenge due to its paucibacillary nature. This is a report of a case of a delayed diagnosis of lupus vulgaris, presenting as perianal and peristomal plaques, followed by a review of the diagnostic tools for lupus vulgaris and their limitations. © 2012 The Authors. Australasian Journal of Dermatology © 2012 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  17. Lupus Nephritis: An Overview of Recent Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zubiria Salgado, Alberto; Herrera-Diaz, Catalina

    2012-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is one of the most serious complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) since it is the major predictor of poor prognosis. In susceptible individuals suffering of SLE, in situ formation and deposit of immune complexes (ICs) from apoptotic bodies occur in the kidneys as a result of an amplified epitope immunological response. IC glomerular deposits generate release of proinflammatory cytokines and cell adhesion molecules causing inflammation. This leads to monocytes and polymorphonuclear cells chemotaxis. Subsequent release of proteases generates endothelial injury and mesangial proliferation. Presence of ICs promotes adaptive immune response and causes dendritic cells to release type I interferon. This induces maturation and activation of infiltrating T cells, and amplification of Th2, Th1 and Th17 lymphocytes. Each of them, amplify B cells and activates macrophages to release more proinflammatory molecules, generating effector cells that cannot be modulated promoting kidney epithelial proliferation and fibrosis. Herein immunopathological findings of LN are reviewed. PMID:22536486

  18. Brain diffusion tensor MRI in systematic lupus erythematosus: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costallat, Beatriz Lavras; Ferreira, Daniel Miranda; Lapa, Aline Tamires; Rittner, Letícia; Costallat, Lilian Tereza Lavras; Appenzeller, Simone

    2018-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) maps the brain's microstructure by measuring fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD). This systematic review describes brain diffusion tensor Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).The literature was reviewed following the PRISMA guidelines and using the terms "lupus", "systemic lupus erythematosus", "SLE", "diffusion tensor imaging", "DTI", "white matter" (WM), "microstructural damage", "tractography", and "fractional anisotropy"; the search included articles published in English from January 2007 to April 2017. The subjects included in the study were selected according to the ACR criteria and included 195 SLE patients with neuropsychiatric manifestation (NPSLE), 299 without neuropsychiatric manifestation (non-NPSLE), and 423 healthy controls (HC). Most studies identified significantly reduced FA and increased MD values in several WM regions of both NPSLE and non-NPSLE patients compared to HC. Subclinical microstructural changes were observed in either regional areas or the entire brain in both the non-NPSLE and NPSLE groups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cognitive functions and autoantibodies in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Bogaczewicz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Autoantibodies may occur in the course of various diseases. In the case of systemic lupus erythematosus the presence of specific autoantibodies is included in the classification criteria of the disease. The aim of the study was to investigate whether the presence of the serologic markers of systemic lupus erythematosus, i.e. anti-dsDNA, anti-Sm and anticardiolipin antibodies of the class IgM and IgG are linked with the results of neuropsychological tests evaluating selected cognitive functions in patients without overt neuropsychiatric lupus and without antiphospholipid syndrome. Material and methods: The study included 22 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. For the assessment of anti-dsDNA, anti-Sm and anticardiolipin antibodies the immunoenzymatic method was used. For neuropsychological estimation of the selected cognitive functions the attention switching test and the choice reaction time were applied, in which the results are expressed as the average delay i.e. mean correct latency, using the computer-based Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB. Results: The results of attention switching test in patients with anti-Sm antibodies were lower, but not significantly different from those obtained by the patients without such antibodies: 75.0 (73.12–88.12 vs. 92.5 (85–95. Choice reaction time was significantly longer in patients with anti-Sm antibodies in comparison to the patients without antiSm antibodies: 614.9 (520.6–740.8 vs. 476.7 (396.6–540 (p = 0.01. No significant difference was demonstrated in the results of attention switching test and choice reaction time with regard to the presence of anti-dsDNA antibodies. The results of attention switching test and choice reaction time were not different between the groups of patients with and without anticardiolipin antibodies in the IgM and IgG class. Conclusions: Anti-Sm antibodies seem to contribute to

  20. Juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelowo, O O; Olaosebikan, B H; Animashaun, B A; Akintayo, R O

    2017-03-01

    Juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE) is a complex multisystemic autoimmune disorder of unknown cause. It accounts for about one in five cases of SLE. The tendency for SLE to run a fulminant course when it starts in childhood has made JSLE a potentially more severe disease than adult SLE. Reports of JSLE from sub-Saharan Africa are scanty in spite of the increasing reports of adult SLE. We conducted a 4-year retrospective study of JSLE cases seen at the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital between January 2010 and December 2014. Out of the 12 patients studied, eight were girls and four were boys. All patients had positive antinuclear antibody and extractable nuclear antibody tests. Anti-dsDNA antibody was positive in 10 patients. Eight patients had renal disease while four patients had neuropsychiatric manifestations. Haematological abnormalities and constitutional symptoms were present in all patients. Patients were treated with pulse methylprednisolone, oral prednisolone, hydroxychloroquine and azathioprine. Three patients also received rituximab. In conclusion, JSLE exists in Nigeria and exhibits clinical and immunological characteristics similar to its pattern in other parts of the world. It is, however, diagnosed late and is possibly being underdiagnosed as there is no paediatric rheumatologist in the country.

  1. 77 FR 38305 - Guidance for Industry on Lupus Nephritis Caused by Systemic Lupus Erythematosus-Developing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-27

    ... ``Lupus Nephritis Caused By Systemic Lupus Erythematosus--Developing Medical Products for Treatment... of medical products for the treatment of lupus nephritis. Dated: June 22, 2012. Leslie Kux, Assistant...] Guidance for Industry on Lupus Nephritis Caused by Systemic Lupus Erythematosus--Developing Medical...

  2. Lung and lupus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Mukta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lupus vulgaris is chronic, postprimary, paucibacillary cutaneous tuberculosis found in individuals with moderate immunity and high degree of tuberculin sensitivity. Eighty percent of the lesions are on the head and neck. We present the case of a 38 year old lady who was admitted with complaints of worsening breathlessness and low grade fever of one month duration. Examination showed multiple, nontender skin ulcers on bilateral lumbar areas, two oozing serosanguinous discharge and others scarred in the centre. Respiratory system examination and chest X-ray revealed right sided pleural effusion. On investigation, pleural fluid was tuberculous in nature. Skin biopsy from the edge of ulcer was also suggestive of tuberculosis. Patient is doing well on antituberculous drugs . This case highlights the importance of cutaneous manifestations of systemic disease and is an example of the unusual presentation of lupus vulgaris in a case of pleural effusion.

  3. Lung and lupus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukta, V; Jayachandran, K

    2011-04-01

    Lupus vulgaris is chronic, postprimary, paucibacillary cutaneous tuberculosis found in individuals with moderate immunity and high degree of tuberculin sensitivity. Eighty percent of the lesions are on the head and neck. We present the case of a 38 year old lady who was admitted with complaints of worsening breathlessness and low grade fever of one month duration. Examination showed multiple, nontender skin ulcers on bilateral lumbar areas, two oozing serosanguinous discharge and others scarred in the centre. Respiratory system examination and chest X-ray revealed right sided pleural effusion. On investigation, pleural fluid was tuberculous in nature. Skin biopsy from the edge of ulcer was also suggestive of tuberculosis. Patient is doing well on antituberculous drugs. This case highlights the importance of cutaneous manifestations of systemic disease and is an example of the unusual presentation of lupus vulgaris in a case of pleural effusion.

  4. Kidney disease in lupus is not always 'lupus nephritis'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Anders (Hans-Joachim); J.J. Weening (Jan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn lupus erythematosus, elevated serum creatinine levels and urinary abnormalities implicate a kidney disorder, which may not always be lupus nephritis as defined by the current classification of the International Society of Nephrology/Renal Pathology Society. The signs of renal

  5. Influenza vaccination can induce new onset anticardiolipins but not β2-glycoprotein-I antibodies among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vista, Evan S.; Crowe, Sherry R.; Thompson, Linda F.; Air, Gillian M.; Robertson, Julie M.; Guthridge, Joel M.; James, Judith A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Antiphospholipid syndrome is characterized by autoantibodies against cardiolipins (aCL), lupus anticoagulant, and independent β2-glycoprotein (β2GPI). Controversy exists as to whether vaccination triggers the development of anti-phospholipid antibodies (aPL) in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. Methods SLE patients (101) and matched controls (101) were enrolled from 2005 to 2009 and received seasonal influenza vaccinations. Sera were tested by ELISA for aCL at baseline, 2, 6, and 12 weeks after vaccination. Vaccine responses were ranked according to an overall anti-influenza antibody response index. Individuals with positive aCL were further tested for β2GPI antibodies. Results SLE patients and healthy controls developed new onset aCL post-vaccination (12/101 cases and 7/101 controls, OR 1.81, p=0.34). New onset moderate aCL are slightly enriched in African American SLE patients (5/36 cases; p=0.094). The optical density (OD) measurements for aCL reactivity in patients were significantly higher than baseline at 2 weeks (pvaccination. No new β2GPI antibodies were detected among patients with new aCL reactivity. Vaccine response was not different between patients with and without new onset aCL reactivity (p=0.43). Conclusions This study shows transient increases in aCL, but not anti-β2GPI responses, after influenza vaccination. PMID:22235049

  6. Influenza vaccination can induce new-onset anticardiolipins but not β2-glycoprotein-I antibodies among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vista, E S; Crowe, S R; Thompson, L F; Air, G M; Robertson, J M; Guthridge, J M; James, J A

    2012-02-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is characterized by autoantibodies against cardiolipins (aCL), lupus anticoagulant, and independent β2-glycoprotein (β2GPI). Controversy exists as to whether vaccination triggers the development of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Patients with SLE (101) and matched controls (101) were enrolled from 2005-2009 and received seasonal influenza vaccinations. Sera were tested by ELISA for aCL at baseline, 2, 6, and 12 weeks after vaccination. Vaccine responses were ranked according to an overall anti-influenza antibody response index. Individuals with positive aCL were further tested for β2GPI antibodies. Patients with SLE and healthy controls can develop new-onset aCL post vaccination, although at rates which do not differ between patients and controls (12/101 cases and 7/101 controls, OR 1.81, p = 0.34). New-onset moderate aCL are slightly enriched in African American SLE patients (5/36 cases; p = 0.094). The optical density measurements for aCL reactivity in patients were significantly higher than baseline at 2 weeks (p vaccination. No new β2GPI antibodies were detected among patients with new aCL reactivity. Vaccine response was not different between patients with and without new-onset aCL reactivity (p = 0.43). This study shows transient increases in aCL, but not anti-β2GPI responses, after influenza vaccination.

  7. Neuropsychiatric symptoms and the use of complementary and alternative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Maulik P; Wells, Rebecca Erwin; Zafonte, Ross D; Davis, Roger B; Phillips, Russell S

    2013-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use by U.S. adults reporting neuropsychiatric symptoms and whether this prevalence changes based on the number of symptoms reported. Additional objectives include identifying patterns of CAM use, reasons for use, and disclosure of use with conventional providers in U.S. adults with neuropsychiatric symptoms. Secondary database analysis of a prospective survey. A total of 23,393 U.S. adults from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey. We compared CAM use between adults with and without neuropsychiatric symptoms. Symptoms included self-reported anxiety, depression, insomnia, headaches, memory deficits, attention deficits, and excessive sleepiness. CAM use was defined as use of mind-body therapies (eg, meditation), biological therapies (eg, herbs), or manipulation therapies (eg, massage) or alternative medical systems (eg, Ayurveda). Statistical analysis included bivariable comparisons and multivariable logistical regression analyses. The prevalence of CAM use among adults with neuropsychiatric symptoms within the previous 12 months and the comparison of CAM use between those with and without neuropsychiatric symptoms. Adults with neuropsychiatric symptoms had a greater prevalence of CAM use compared with adults who did not have neuropsychiatric symptoms (43.8% versus 29.7%, P increased with an increasing number of symptoms (trend, P increasing number of symptoms was associated with an increased likelihood of CAM use. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Neuropsychiatric Symptoms and the Use of Mind-Body Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Maulik P.; Wells, Rebecca Erwin; Zafonte, Ross; Davis, Roger B.; Yeh, Gloria Y.; Phillips, Russell S.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Neuropsychiatric symptoms affect 37% of US adults and present in many important diagnoses including post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, and chronic pain. However, these symptoms are difficult to treat with standard treatments and patients may seek alternative options. In this study, we examined the use of mind-body therapies by adults with neuropsychiatric symptoms. Methods We compared mind-body therapy use (use of ≥1 therapy of meditation, yoga, acupuncture, deep-breathing exercises, hypnosis, progressive relaxation therapy, qi gong, and tai chi) between adults with and without neuropsychiatric symptoms (anxiety, depression, insomnia, headaches, memory deficits, attention deficits, and excessive daytime sleepiness) using the 2007 National Health Interview Survey (n=23,393). We examined prevalence and reasons for mind-body therapy use in adults with neuropsychiatric symptoms. We performed logistic regression to examine the association between neuropsychiatric symptoms and mind-body therapy use to adjust for sociodemographic and clinical factors. Results Adults with ≥1 neuropsychiatric symptoms used mind-body therapies more than adults without symptoms (25.3%vs.15.0%, pineffective or too expensive (30.2%). Most adults (70%) with ≥1 symptom did not discuss their mind-body therapy use with a conventional provider. Conclusions Adults with ≥1 neuropsychiatric symptom use mind-body therapies frequently; more symptoms are associated with increased use. Future research is needed to understand the efficacy of these therapies. PMID:23842021

  9. Headache in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanly, John G; Urowitz, Murray B; O'Keeffe, Aidan G

    2013-01-01

    To examine the frequency and characteristics of headaches and their association with global disease activity and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).......To examine the frequency and characteristics of headaches and their association with global disease activity and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)....

  10. Lupus Vulgaris Following Bcg Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R K Pandhi

    1982-01-01

    Full Text Available Three cases of lupus vulgaris developing at the site of BCG vaccination are reported. All the patients had lesions starting before the age of 15 years. Clinically and histologically the lesions ′were indistinguishable from spontaneous lupus vulgarism Treatment with streptomycin and isonicotinic acid hydrazide for 1 year produced complete resolution of lesions.

  11. Prognostic factors in lupus nephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, Mikkel; Starklint, Henrik; Halberg, Poul

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the prognostic significance of clinical and renal biopsy findings in an unselected cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and nephritis.......To evaluate the prognostic significance of clinical and renal biopsy findings in an unselected cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and nephritis....

  12. Pro: Cyclophosphamide in lupus nephritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    Based on efficacy and toxicity considerations, both low-dose pulse cyclophosphamide as part of the Euro-Lupus Nephritis protocol and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) with corticosteroids may be considered for induction of remission in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis. The long-term follow-up

  13. The 52 000 MW Ro/SS-A autoantigen in Sjögren's syndrome/systemic lupus erythematosus (Ro52) is an interferon-γ inducible tripartite motif protein associated with membrane proximal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Davd A; Ihrke, Gudrun; Reinicke, Anna T; Malcherek, Georg; Towey, Michael; Isenberg, David A; Trowsdale, John

    2002-01-01

    The 52 000 MW Ro/SS-A (Ro52) protein is a major target of autoantibodies in autoimmune conditions such as systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren's syndrome. Recent genomic and bioinformatic studies have shown that Ro52 belongs to a large family of related RING/Bbox/coiled-coil (RBCC) tripartite motif proteins sharing overall domain structure and 40–50% identity at the amino acid level. Ro52 also has a B30.2 domain at the C-terminus. Using the human genome draft sequence, the genomic organization of the Ro52 gene on human chromosome 11p15.5 has been deduced and related to the protein domain structure. We show that the steady-state levels of Ro52 mRNA are normally very low but are induced by cell activation with interferon-γ. In transient transfection of HeLa cells, epitope-tagged Ro52 protein was localized to unidentified membrane proximal rod-like structures. Using in vitro coupled transcription/translation followed by immunoprecipitation, the autoimmune response to Ro52 protein was investigated and two distinct interactions were resolved. The Ro52 C-terminal B30.2 domain interacts with human immunoglobulin independently of antibody specificities. Sera derived from patients with Sjögren's syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus, in addition, contained specific autoantibodies directed towards the rest of the Ro52 molecule. The majority of these autoimmune sera also immunoprecipitated the Ro52-related molecule RNF15. A possible role for Ro52 protein in alterations of plasma membranes during cellular activation or apoptosis is discussed. PMID:12047754

  14. Human iPSC-derived neurons and lymphoblastoid cells for personalized medicine research in neuropsychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurwitz, David

    2016-09-01

    The development and clinical implementation of personalized medicine crucially depends on the availability of high-quality human biosamples; animal models, although capable of modeling complex human diseases, cannot reflect the large variation in the human genome, epigenome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome. Although the biosamples available from public biobanks that store human tissues and cells may represent the large human diversity for most diseases, these samples are not always sufficient for developing biomarkers for patient-tailored therapies for neuropsychiatric disorders. Postmortem human tissues are available from many biobanks; nevertheless, collections of neuronal human cells from large patient cohorts representing the human diversity remain scarce. Two tools are gaining popularity for personalized medicine research on neuropsychiatric disorders: human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons and human lymphoblastoid cell lines. This review examines and contrasts the advantages and limitations of each tool for personalized medicine research.

  15. Neuropsychiatric complications associated with interferon - alpha -2b treatment of malignant melanoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Enudi, W

    2009-08-01

    Several adverse effects have been associated with interferon alpha 2b treatment and neuropsychiatric effects have also been commonly reported. Psychosis and mood disorders have been described in the literature. This case report is of a 30 year old man with malignant melanoma stage 3a who was receiving adjuvant alpha 2b interferon and developed a manic episode two weeks post switching after one month of treatment on a high dose to a low dose. There was no previous psychiatric illness and no known family history of mental illness. This is in keeping with previous reports that mania has been observed in patients undergoing interferon treatment especially after significant dose-reduction or treatment breaks. Mania induced by interferon responds well to antimanic drugs .Since interferon alpha 2b is now commonly used in the treatment of malignant melanoma and other conditions, the need to be aware of its neuropsychiatric complications is essential.

  16. Neuropsychiatric complications associated with interferon - alpha -2b treatment of malignant melanoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Enudi, W

    2012-02-01

    Several adverse effects have been associated with interferon alpha 2b treatment and neuropsychiatric effects have also been commonly reported. Psychosis and mood disorders have been described in the literature. This case report is of a 30 year old man with malignant melanoma stage 3a who was receiving adjuvant alpha 2b interferon and developed a manic episode two weeks post switching after one month of treatment on a high dose to a low dose. There was no previous psychiatric illness and no known family history of mental illness. This is in keeping with previous reports that mania has been observed in patients undergoing interferon treatment especially after significant dose-reduction or treatment breaks. Mania induced by interferon responds well to antimanic drugs .Since interferon alpha 2b is now commonly used in the treatment of malignant melanoma and other conditions, the need to be aware of its neuropsychiatric complications is essential.

  17. Rapid lupus autoantigen relocalization and reactive oxygen species accumulation following ultraviolet irradiation of human keratinocytes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lawley, W.; Doherty, A; Denniss, S; Chauhan, D; Pruijn, G.J.M.; Venrooij, W.J.W. van; Lunec, J; Herbert, K

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In vitro treatment with ultraviolet B (UVB) induces relocalization of lupus autoantigens to the cell surface. We have addressed the relationship between autoantigen relocalization, accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the induction of apoptosis following UVA and

  18. A rare case of transition to membranous lupus nephritis from diffuse proliferative lupus nephritis

    OpenAIRE

    Nishi, Hitomi; Sugimoto, Keisuke; Fujita, Shinsuke; Miyazawa, Tomoki; Enya, Takuji; Izu, Akane; Wada, Norihisa; Okada, Mitsuru; Takemura, Tsukasa

    2014-01-01

    [Abstract] Lupus nephritis is an important complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) that affects the prognosis. A rare type of lupus nephritis, class V, shows histological findings resembling those of membranous nephropathy. While most diffuse proliferative lupus nephritis is associated with other SLE disease activity, class V lupus nephritis can occur without systemic activity. Furthermore, Class V is less responsive to steroid therapy than other forms of lupus nephritis. We treate...

  19. Sexual abuse allegations by children with neuropsychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindblad, Frank; Lainpelto, Katrin

    2011-03-01

    All Swedish court cases from 2004 and 2006 concerning alleged child sexual abuse (sexual harassment excluded) were identified through criminal registers. Fourteen cases (one boy) concerned a child with a neuropsychiatric disorder. The diagnostic groups were mental retardation (10 cases), autism (three cases), and ADHD (one case). Psychiatric experts were engaged in only two cases. When experts were involved, the courts focused on credibility issues. When the courts applied neuropsychiatric arguments in the absence of an expert, they used developmental arguments. When the authors found that significant neuropsychiatric issues were not discussed by the court it concerned interpretations of symptoms and developmental standpoints. The results illustrate the complexity and pitfalls of drawing conclusions about associations between symptoms and personality characteristics on one side and accuracy of sexual abuse allegations on the other. Moreover, the results highlight the importance of a high quality system for providing courts with adequate neuropsychiatric knowledge.

  20. Clinical and subclinical neuropsychiatric abnormalities in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman M Khedr

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion Cognitive impairment, depression, anxiety and peripheral neuropathy are common in RA patients. Early diagnosis and management of neuropsychiatric disorders in RA patients may greatly improve the patients′ health-related quality of life.

  1. Neuropsychiatric and psychologic effects of A-bomb radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Michiko; Sasaki, Hideo

    1992-01-01

    Few studies have assessed the influences of A-bombing from both psychiatric and psychologic points of view. This chapter deals with the knowledge of neuropsychiatric and psychologic influences of A-bombing. Many A-bomb survivors were exposed not only to radiation but also to rapid environmental alterations, such as death of family members and destruction of living. In addition, they suffered from sequelae and anxiety. Naturally, these were considered to cause psychological disturbance including autonomic imbalance and neurosis. Psychological survey, made immediately after A-bombing, is presented, with special attention to behavioral patterns in 54 A-bomb survivors by dividing them into 5 stimulation groups. Radiation syndrome occurring early after exposure and leukemia or cancer occurring later were referred to as 'Genbaku-sho' (A-bomb disease). A-bomb survivors' physically eventful conditions tended to induce mental anxiety or the contrary. Depression and phobia seemed to have correlated with physical conditions. In addition to 'A-bomb disease', mass media, dealing with 'A-bomb neurosis,' 'marriage in A-bomb survivors,' 'suicide in A-bomb survivors,' 'A-bomb survivors orphan,' and 'lonely old A-bomb survivors,' had a great impact on A-bomb survivors. For in uterus exposed and infantile A-bomb survivors, there was no significant difference between the exposed and non-exposed groups, although the incidence of eye tremor and sleeping disorder is found to be higher in the in uterus exposed group than the control group. (N.K.)

  2. Hypersexuality as a Neuropsychiatric Disorder: The neurobiology and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidi, Hatta; Asiff, Muna; Kumar, Jaya; Das, Srijit; Hatta, Nurul Hazwani; Alfonso, Cesar

    2017-03-21

    Hypersexuality refers to abnormally increased or extreme involvement in any sexual activity. It is clinically challenging, presents trans-diagnostically and there is extensive medical literature addressing nosology, pathogenesis and neuropsychiatric aspects. Classification includes deviant behaviours, diagnosable entities related to impulsivity, and obsessional phenomena. Some clinicians view an increase in sexual desire as 'normal' while psychodynamic theorists consider it ego-defensive at times alleviating unconscious anxiety rooted in intrapsychic conflicts. We highlight the hypersexuality as multi-dimensional involving an increase in sexual activity that is associated with distress and functional impairment. The aetiology of hypersexuality is multi-factorial with differential diagnoses that include major psychiatric disorders (e.g. bipolar disorder), adverse effects of treatments (e.g. levodopa-treatment), substance-induced disorders (e.g. amphetamine substance use), neuropathological disorders (e.g. frontal lobe syndrome), among others. Numerous neurotransmitters are implicated in its pathogenesis, with dopamine and noradrenaline playing a crucial role in the neural reward pathways and emotionally-regulated limbic system neural circuits. The management of hypersexuality is determined by the principle of de causa effectu evanescent, if the causes are treated, the effect may disappear. We aim to review the role of pharmacological agents causing hypersexuality and centrally acting agents treating the associated underlying medical conditions. Bio-psycho-social determinants are pivotal in embracing the understanding and guiding management of this complex and multi-determined clinical syndrome. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Sunlight triggers cutaneous lupus through a CSF-1-dependent mechanism in MRL-Fas(lpr) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, Julia; Hsu, Mei-Yu; Byrne, Katelyn T; Lucas, Julie A; Rabacal, Whitney A; Croker, Byron P; Zong, Xiao-Hua; Stanley, E Richard; Kelley, Vicki R

    2008-11-15

    Sunlight (UVB) triggers cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) and systemic lupus through an unknown mechanism. We tested the hypothesis that UVB triggers CLE through a CSF-1-dependent, macrophage (Mø)-mediated mechanism in MRL-Fas(lpr) mice. By constructing mutant MRL-Fas(lpr) strains expressing varying levels of CSF-1 (high, intermediate, none), and use of an ex vivo gene transfer to deliver CSF-1 intradermally, we determined that CSF-1 induces CLE in lupus-susceptible MRL-Fas(lpr) mice, but not in lupus-resistant BALB/c mice. UVB incites an increase in Møs, apoptosis in the skin, and CLE in MRL-Fas(lpr), but not in CSF-1-deficient MRL-Fas(lpr) mice. Furthermore, UVB did not induce CLE in BALB/c mice. Probing further, UVB stimulates CSF-1 expression by keratinocytes leading to recruitment and activation of Møs that, in turn, release mediators, which induce apoptosis in keratinocytes. Thus, sunlight triggers a CSF-1-dependent, Mø-mediated destructive inflammation in the skin leading to CLE in lupus-susceptible MRL-Fas(lpr) but not lupus-resistant BALB/c mice. Taken together, CSF-1 is envisioned as the match and lupus susceptibility as the tinder leading to CLE.

  4. Selective value of computed tomography of the brain in Cerebritis due to systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaylis, N.B.; Altman, R.D.; Ostrov, S.; Quencer, R. (Miami Univ., FL (USA). School of Medicine)

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and steroid effects on the brain were measured by computed tomography (CT). Of 14 patients with SLE cerebritis, 10 (71%) had marked cortical atrophy and 4 (29%) minimal atrophy. None were normal by CT. Controls included 22 patients with SLE without cerebritis receiving cortiocosteroids; this group had normal CT scans in 16 (73%) and minimal cortical atrophy in the remaining 6 (27%). Follow-up CT on 5 patients with cerebritis was unchanged. CT of the brain is a minimally invasive technique for documenting SLE cerebritis. CT may also help differentiate cerebritis from the neuropsychiatric side effects of corticosteroids.

  5. The selective value of computed tomography of the brain in Cerebritis due to systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaylis, N.B.; Altman, R.D.; Ostrov, S.; Quencer, R.

    1982-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and steroid effects on the brain were measured by computed tomography (CT). Of 14 patients with SLE cerebritis, 10 (71%) had marked cortical atrophy and 4 (29%) minimal atrophy. None were normal by CT. Controls included 22 patients with SLE without cerebritis receiving cortiocosteroids; this group had normal CT scans in 16 (73%) and minimal cortical atrophy in the remaining 6 (27%). Follow-up CT on 5 patients with cerebritis was unchanged. CT of the brain is a minimally invasive technique for documenting SLE cerebritis. CT may also help differentiate cerebritis from the neuropsychiatric side effects of corticosteroids

  6. Systemic lupus erythematosus serositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Low, V.H.S.; Robins, P.D.; Sweeney, D.J. [Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, WA (Australia). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    1995-08-01

    The imaging appearances of a case of systemic lupus erythematosus, which manifested initially as a serositis, is described. Barium small bowel study showed segments of spiculation with tethering, angulation, and obstruction. Computed tomography scan of the abdomen confirmed ascites. It was also useful in demonstrating free fluid, bowel wall oedema, and serosal thickening . Follow up scanning to demonstrate resolution of changes may also be of value. The definitive diagnosis was made on the basis of marked elevation of antinuclear and anti-double stranded DNA antibodies. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Filaments in Lupus I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Satoko; Rodon, J.; De Gregorio-Monsalvo, I.; Plunkett, A.

    2017-06-01

    The mechanisms behind the formation of sub-stellar mass sources are key to determine the populations at the low-mass end of the stellar distribution. Here, we present mapping observations toward the Lupus I cloud in C18O(2-1) and 13CO(2-1) obtained with APEX. We have identified a few velocity-coherent filaments. Each contains several substellar mass sources that are also identified in the 1.1mm continuum data (see also SOLA catalogue presentation). We will discuss the velocity structure, fragmentation properties of the identified filaments, and the nature of the detected sources.

  8. The Pathogenesis of Lupus Nephritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    Lupus nephritis is an immune complex GN that develops as a frequent complication of SLE. The pathogenesis of lupus nephritis involves a variety of pathogenic mechanisms. The extrarenal etiology of systemic lupus is based on multiple combinations of genetic variants that compromise those mechanisms normally assuring immune tolerance to nuclear autoantigens. This loss of tolerance becomes clinically detectable by the presence of antinuclear antibodies. In addition, nucleic acids released from netting or apoptotic neutrophils activate innate and adaptive immunity via viral nucleic acid-specific Toll-like receptors. Therefore, many clinical manifestations of systemic lupus resemble those of viral infection. In lupus, endogenous nuclear particles trigger IFN-α signaling just like viral particles during viral infection. As such, dendritic cells, T helper cells, B cells, and plasma cells all contribute to the aberrant polyclonal autoimmunity. The intrarenal etiology of lupus nephritis involves antibody binding to multiple intrarenal autoantigens rather than the deposition of circulating immune complexes. Tertiary lymphoid tissue formation and local antibody production add to intrarenal complement activation as renal immunopathology progresses. Here we provide an update on the pathogenic mechanisms that lead to lupus nephritis and provide the rationale for the latest and novel treatment strategies. PMID:23929771

  9. Differences between male and female systemic lupus erythematosus in a multiethnic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tze Chin; Fang, Hong; Magder, Laurence S; Petri, Michelle A

    2012-04-01

    Male patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are thought to be similar to female patients with SLE, but key clinical characteristics may differ. Comparisons were made between male and female patients with SLE in the Hopkins Lupus Cohort. A total of 1979 patients in the Hopkins Lupus Cohort were included in the analysis. The cohort consisted of 157 men (66.2% white, 33.8% African American) and 1822 women (59.8% white, 40.2% African American). The mean followup was 6.02 years (range 0-23.73). Men were more likely than women to have disability, hypertension, thrombosis, and renal, hematological, and serological manifestations. Men were more likely to be diagnosed at an older age and to have a lower education level. Women were more likely to have malar rash, photosensitivity, oral ulcers, alopecia, Raynaud's phenomenon, or arthralgia. Men were more likely than women to have experienced end organ damage including neuropsychiatric, renal, cardiovascular, peripheral vascular disease, and myocardial infarction, and to have died. In general, differences between males and females were more numerous and striking in whites, especially with respect to lupus nephritis, abnormal serologies, and thrombosis. Our study suggests that there are major clinical differences between male and female patients with SLE. Differences between male and female patients also depend on ethnicity. Future SLE studies will need to consider both ethnicity and gender to understand these differences.

  10. Outcomes of 847 childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients in three age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, S R M; Gormezano, N W S; Gomes, R C; Aikawa, N E; Pereira, R M R; Terreri, M T; Magalhães, C S; Ferreira, J C; Okuda, E M; Sakamoto, A P; Sallum, A M E; Appenzeller, S; Ferriani, V P L; Barbosa, C M; Lotufo, S; Jesus, A A; Andrade, L E C; Campos, L M A; Bonfá, E; Silva, C A

    2017-08-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to assess outcomes of childhood systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE) in three different age groups evaluated at last visit: group A early-onset disease (Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index (SLICC/ACR-DI) (0 (0-9) vs 0 (0-6) vs 0 (0-7), p = 0.065) was comparable in the three groups. Further analysis of organ/system damage revealed that frequencies of neuropsychiatric (21% vs 10% vs 7%, p = 0.007), skin (10% vs 1% vs 3%, p = 0.002) and peripheral vascular involvements (5% vs 3% vs 0.3%, p = 0.008) were more often observed in group A compared to groups B and C. Frequencies of severe cumulative lupus manifestations such as nephritis, thrombocytopenia, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia were similar in all groups ( p > 0.05). Mortality rate was significantly higher in group A compared to groups B and C (15% vs 10% vs 6%, p = 0.028). Out of 69 deaths, 33/69 (48%) occurred within the first two years after diagnosis. Infections accounted for 54/69 (78%) of the deaths and 38/54 (70%) had concomitant disease activity. Conclusions This large multicenter study provided evidence that early-onset cSLE group had distinct outcomes. This group was characterized by higher mortality rate and neuropsychiatric/vascular/skin organ damage in spite of comparable frequencies of severe cumulative lupus manifestations. We also identified that overall death in cSLE patients was an early event mainly attributed to infection associated with disease activity.

  11. The endocannabinoid system in critical neurodevelopmental periods: sex differences and neuropsychiatric implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viveros, M P; Llorente, R; Suarez, J; Llorente-Berzal, A; López-Gallardo, M; de Fonseca, F Rodriguez

    2012-01-01

    This review focuses on the endocannabinoid system as a crucial player during critical periods of brain development, and how its disturbance either by early life stressful events or cannabis consumption may lead to important neuropsychiatric signs and symptoms. First we discuss the advantages and limitations of animal models within the framework of neuropsychiatric research and the crucial role of genetic and environmental factors for the establishment of vulnerable phenotypes. We are becoming aware of important sex differences that have emerged in relation to the psychobiology of cannabinoids. We will discuss sexual dimorphisms observed within the endogenous cannabinoid system, as well as those observed with exogenously administered cannabinoids. We start with how the expression of cannabinoid CB(1) receptors is regulated throughout development. Then, we discuss recent results showing how an experimental model of early maternal deprivation, which induces long-term neuropsychiatric symptoms, interacts in a sex-dependent manner with the brain endocannabinoid system during development. This is followed by a discussion of differential vulnerability to the pathological sequelae stemming from cannabinoid exposure during adolescence. Next we talk about sex differences in the interactions between cannabinoids and other drugs of abuse. Finally, we discuss the potential implications that organizational and activational actions of gonadal steroids may have in establishing and maintaining sex dependence in the neurobiological actions of cannabinoids and their interaction with stress.

  12. Lupus cystitis: An unusual presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Jana, S.; Roy, M. K.; Chatterjee, A.; Sarkar, A.; Mazumdar, S.; Mukherjee, P.; Mukhopadhyay, J.

    2014-01-01

    Lupus cystitis is a rare complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and occurs in association with gastrointestinal symptoms. This rare disorder has been reported mainly from Japan. We report a 20 year old female who diagnosed as having SLE associated with paralytic ileus and chronic interstitial cystitis. Treatment with intravenous methylprednisolone, cyclophosphamide pulse therapy followed by oral prednisolone and azathioprine led to amelioration of manifestations. Later she develop...

  13. Psychosocial difficulties from the perspective of persons with neuropsychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coenen, Michaela; Cabello, Maria; Umlauf, Silvia; Ayuso-Mateos, José Luis; Anczewska, Marta; Tourunen, Jouni; Leonardi, Matilde; Cieza, Alarcos

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine whether persons with neuropsychiatric disorders experience a common set of psychosocial difficulties using qualitative data from focus groups and individual interviews. The study was performed in five European countries (Finland, Italy, Germany, Poland and Spain) using the focus groups and individual interviews with persons with nine neuropsychiatric disorders (dementia, depression, epilepsy, migraine, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, stroke and substance dependence). Digitally recorded sessions were analysed using a step-by-step qualitative and quantitative methodology resulting in the compilation of a common set of psychosocial difficulties using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) as a framework. Sixty-seven persons participated in the study. Most persons with neuropsychiatric disorders experience difficulties in emotional functions, sleeping, carrying out daily routine, working and interpersonal relationships in common. Sixteen out of 33 psychosocial difficulties made up the common set. This set includes mental functions, pain and issues addressing activities and participation and provides first evidence for the hypothesis of horizontal epidemiology of psychosocial difficulties in neuropsychiatric disorders. This study provides information about psychosocial difficulties that should be covered in the treatment and rehabilitation of persons with neuropsychiatric disorders regardless of clinical diagnoses. Emotional problems, work and sleep problems should be addressed in all the treatments of neuropsychiatric disorders regardless of their specific diagnosis, etiology and severity. Personality issues should be targeted in the treatment for neurological disorders, whereas communication skill training may also be useful for mental disorders. The effects of medication and social environment on patient's daily life should be considered in all the

  14. Systemic lupus erythematosus in the Fars Province of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarinia, M A; Ghaffarpasand, F; Shamsdin, A; Karimi, A A; Abbasi, N; Amiri, A

    2008-03-01

    Clinical features of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have been described from different geographical regions in the world. However, data from many Middle East countries, including Iran, are scarce. This study aims to demonstrate the demographic, clinical, and laboratory characteristics in Iranian patients with SLE. In this prospective study, all the patients referring to Shiraz educational hospitals (Nemazi-Hafez) with SLE (American College of Rheumatology criteria) during a 5-year period (2001 to 2006) were included. A complete history was taken; physical examination and routine hematological, serological, and immunological tests were done for each patient. There were 356 women and 54 men with an average age of 30.27 years at the onset of disease. Of the patients, 78% had hematological abnormalities, 65.5% had articular involvement, 54.5% had photosensitivity, and 60.5% had malar rash. Serositis occurred in 38% of patients of whom 12% had pericarditis and 26% had pleuritis. Nephritis was diagnosed in 48% of the cases and consisted always of glomerular nephritis. Biopsy-proven lupus nephritis was in most cases class IV(49.7% of all the biopsies). Oral ulcers were observed in 28% of patients. Neuropsychiatric manifestations, gastrointestinal involvement, and lymphadenopathy were observed in 31.5%, 8.3%, and 14.2% of patients, respectively. In all, 93% of patients were positive for antinuclear antibodies, whereas antidouble-stranded DNA was positive in 83% of patients. Coomb's positive hemolytic anemia appeared in 12.4% of the cases. Rheumatoid factor was detected in 9.7% of patients, and lupus erythematosus cell was seen in 32.5% of them. In all, 196 (47.8%) patients represented hypocomplementemia. Regarding hematological manifestations, 74.5% had microcytic hypochromic anemia, 64.6% had leukopenia, and 44.6% had thrombocytopenia; 18 (4.4%) patients died during the study period of which eight (2%) died because of cardiopulmonary involvement. Generally, there was

  15. Lupus among Asians and Hispanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... threatening. According to recent studies supported by CDC, Asian women and Hispanic women are more likely to be ... Francisco were funded later to estimate how many Asian and Hispanic women and men have lupus. These two new studies— ...

  16. Arrhythmias presenting in neonatal lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucato, A; Previtali, E; Ramoni, V; Ghidoni, S

    2010-09-01

    Perfusion of human foetal heart with anti-Ro/SSA antibodies induces transient heart block. Anti-Ro/SSA antibodies may cross-react with T- and L-type calcium channels, and anti-p200 antibodies may cause calcium to accumulate in rat heart cells. These actions may explain a direct electrophysiological effect of these antibodies. Congenital complete heart block is the more severe manifestation of so-called "Neonatal Lupus". In clinical practice, it is important to distinguish in utero complete versus incomplete atrioventricular (AV) block, as complete AV block to date is irreversible, while incomplete AV block has been shown to be potentially reversible after fluorinated steroid therapy. Another issue is the definition of congenital AV block, as cardiologists have considered congenital blocks detected months or years after birth. We propose as congenital blocks detected in utero or within the neonatal period (0-27 days after birth). The possible detection of first degree AV block in utero, with different techniques, might be a promising tool to assess the effects of these antibodies. Other arrhythmias have been described in NL or have been linked to anti-Ro/SSA antibodies: first degree AV block, in utero and after birth, second degree (i.e. incomplete block), sinus bradycardia and QT prolongation, both in infants and in adults, ventricular arrhythmias (in adults). Overall, these arrhythmias have not a clinical relevance, but are important for research purposes.

  17. Current status of lupus nephritis

    OpenAIRE

    Jaryal, Ajay; Vikrant, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic disease of unknown aetiology with variable course and prognosis. Lupus nephritis (LN) is one of the important disease manifestations of SLE with considerable influence on patient outcomes. Immunosuppression therapy has made it possible to control the disease with improved life expectancy and quality of life. In the last few decades, various studies across the globe have clarified the role, dose and duration of immunosuppression currently in use...

  18. Lupus erythematosus panniculitis in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Gondane

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of lupus erythematosus (LE panniculitis in pregnancy without any lesions of discoid LE or systemic LE is being reported. There were no systemic symptoms. Her ANA, anti-dsDNA, anti-Ro/SSA, and anti-La/SSB antibodies were within normal limits. Diagnosis of lupus panniculitis was considered on clinical and histopathological grounds. The condition responded favorably to systemic steroid therapy.

  19. Assessment of neuropsychiatric symptoms in dementia: Toward improving accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florindo Stella

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The issue of this article concerned the discussion about tools frequently used tools for assessing neuropsychiatric symptoms of patients with dementia, particularly Alzheimer's disease. The aims were to discuss the main tools for evaluating behavioral disturbances, and particularly the accuracy of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory - Clinician Rating Scale (NPI-C. The clinical approach to and diagnosis of neuropsychiatric syndromes in dementia require suitable accuracy. Advances in the recognition and early accurate diagnosis of psychopathological symptoms help guide appropriate pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions. In addition, recommended standardized and validated measurements contribute to both scientific research and clinical practice. Emotional distress, caregiver burden, and cognitive impairment often experienced by elderly caregivers, may affect the quality of caregiver reports. The clinician rating approach helps attenuate these misinterpretations. In this scenario, the NPI-C is a promising and versatile tool for assessing neuropsychiatric syndromes in dementia, offering good accuracy and high reliability, mainly based on the diagnostic impression of the clinician. This tool can provide both strategies: a comprehensive assessment of neuropsychiatric symptoms in dementia or the investigation of specific psychopathological syndromes such as agitation, depression, anxiety, apathy, sleep disorders, and aberrant motor disorders, among others.

  20. Neuropsychiatric phenomena in the medieval text Cantigas de Santa Maria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondim, Francisco De Assis Aquino; Griesbach, Sarah H; Thomas, Florian P

    2015-05-12

    To discuss the neuropsychiatric phenomena described in Cantigas de Santa Maria (Canticles of St. Mary [CSM]). CSM is a collection of 427 canticles composed in Galician-Portuguese between 1252 and 1284 at the Court of King Alfonso X the Wise of Spain (1221-1284). The canticles (of which 9 are repeated) include devotional and liturgical poems and 353 narrative stories consisting mainly of depictions of Marian miracles. Most are set to music and many are illustrated. We reviewed the canticles for description of miracles and other neuropsychiatric phenomena. Two neurologists reached a consensus about the descriptions. Of the 353 miracles, 279 medically relevant facts (from 187 canticles) and 25 instances of resurrection were reported. Possible neuropsychiatric conditions were described in 98 canticles. Physicians were mentioned in 16 narratives. The most common neurologic conditions detailed were blindness (n = 17), dystonia, weakness, and deformities (n = 20). Other common conditions included psychosis (n = 15), speech disorder/deaf-mutism (n = 12), infections (n = 15), sexual dysfunction/infertility/obstetrical-gynecologic issues (n = 18), head trauma (n = 5), ergotism/St. Anthony's fire (n = 7), and others. There were 9 instances of prodromic mystical experiences/hallucinations heralding death. While limited by retrospection and interpretation of neuropsychiatric phenomena in the medieval context, these short accounts are among the first descriptions of neuropsychiatric conditions in early Portuguese/Galician. They reflect how medieval societies used rational and irrational approaches to understand occurrences in their lives. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  1. "Bound" globulin in the skin of patients with chronic discoid lupus erythematosus and systemic lupus erythematosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cormane, R.H.

    1964-01-01

    In what respect chronic discoid lupus erythematosus is related to systemic lupus erythematosus is still uncertain. In discoid lupus the lupus-erythematosus (L.E.) phenomenon is negative, and the history does not suggest vascular lesions or involvement of serous membranes. In both diseases the

  2. Chinese SLE Treatment and Research group (CSTAR) registry: V. gender impact on Chinese patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S; Su, J; Li, X; Zhang, X; Liu, S; Wu, L; Ma, L; Bi, L; Zuo, X; Sun, L; Huang, C; Zhao, J; Li, M; Zeng, X

    2015-10-01

    Many studies have shown that differences were observed between male and female lupus patients. Although systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) affects mostly females (female:male ratio 9:1), male SLE patients show higher mortality due to kidney and neurological disease. Currently there are limited epidemiological data concerning lupus in the Chinese population. As such, the Chinese SLE Treatment and Research group (CSTAR) developed the first online registry of Chinese lupus patients in 2009, and represents a multicenter observational study that attempts to describe and compile the major clinical characteristics of lupus in Chinese patients. To investigate the effect of gender on the phenotypes of Chinese SLE patients. Data for 2104 SLE patients were prospectively collected and included in the CSTAR registry. Patients fulfilled the 1997 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) SLE classification criteria. We conducted a cross-sectional case-control study to analyze patient clinical and laboratory data at onset and at enrollment. SLE disease activity scores (SLEDAI) were also measured at enrollment. This study included 1914 women and 190 men. Males and females showed no differences in mean ages at onset, delay of diagnosis and disease duration. Males presented more frequently with fever (p = 0.003), while musculoskeletal involvement (p = 0.001) and cytopenia (p = 0.017) was more common in females as the initial manifestation at onset of SLE. For manifestations at enrollment, males presented more frequently with fever (p = 0.005), renal disease (p = 0.019), vasculitis (p = 0.032) and neuropsychiatric lupus (p = 0.007). For cumulative manifestations at enrollment, males presented more frequently with discoid rash (p lupus (p = 0.036), while less frequently with arthritis (p = 0.011). However, the laboratory data showed no significant differences between the two groups at enrollment. Males also had higher SLEDAI scores at enrollment (p

  3. Ultraviolet-A1 irradiation therapy for systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, H

    2017-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus, SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies, which bind to antigens and are deposited within tissues to fix complement, resulting in widespread systemic inflammation. The studies presented herein are consistent with hyperpolarized, adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-deficient mitochondria being central to the disease process. These hyperpolarized mitochondria resist the depolarization required for activation-induced apoptosis. The mitochondrial ATP deficits add to this resistance to apoptosis and also reduce the macrophage energy that is needed to clear apoptotic bodies. In both cases, necrosis, the alternative pathway of cell death, results. Intracellular constituents spill into the blood and tissues, eliciting inflammatory responses directed at their removal. What results is "autoimmunity." Ultraviolet (UV)-A1 photons have the capacity to remediate this aberrancy. Exogenous exposure to low-dose, full-body, UV-A1 radiation generates singlet oxygen. Singlet oxygen has two major palliative actions in patients with lupus and the UV-A1 photons themselves have several more. Singlet oxygen depolarizes the hyperpolarized mitochondrion, triggering non-ATP-dependent apoptosis that deters necrosis. Next, singlet oxygen activates the gene encoding heme oxygenase (HO-1), a major governor of systemic homeostasis. HO-1 catalyzes the degradation of the oxidant heme into biliverdin (converted to bilirubin), Fe, and carbon monoxide (CO), the first three of these exerting powerful antioxidant effects, and in conjunction with a fourth, CO, protecting against injury to the coronary arteries, the central nervous system, and the lungs. The UV-A1 photons themselves directly attenuate disease in lupus by reducing B cell activity, preventing the suppression of cell-mediated immunity, slowing an epigenetic progression toward SLE, and ameliorating discoid and subacute cutaneous lupus. Finally, a combination of these

  4. Systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Gitelman, M S; Miller, M L

    1996-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) of childhood is a complex and challenging disease which can occur at any age. Identification of disease early in it's course and aggressive, appropriate management leads to improved outcome for an individual child. The history of SLE indicates how much progress has been made in the last quarter century. A discussion of the etiopathogenesis of SLE demonstrates the complexity of the syndrome. This is followed by a description of clinical manifestations, including diagnostic criteria, differential diagnosis and suggested methods for eliciting important symptoms to make the diagnosis. Evaluation of specific organs is next reviewed highlighting critical organ manifestations that are significant for future prognosis. Treatment of SLE includes a variety of medications, including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications, steroids and immuno-suppressive drugs. Attention to physical activity, stress and nutrition is equally important. Signs and symptoms that indicate disease flare or infection are described. Lastly, related syndromes are reviewed.

  5. Historia del Lupus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Rodríguez Gama

    2004-09-01

    Se encontrarán los lectores con una gran cantidad y calidad de biografías sobre investigaciones, médicos y científicos que han enfrentado el reto de tratar de entender y tratar el lupus, desde los médicos clásicos como Hipócrates, Galeno y Celso, los protodermatólogos Daniel Turner, Jean Astruc, Antoine Lorry y Josef von Plenk; el primer dematológo Robert Willam y médicos de los siglos XVIII y XIX como Thomas Bateman, Jean Lous Alibert, Theódore Biett, Olive Rayer, Pierre Cazenave, Antoine Bazin, Ferdinand von Hebra, Moriz Kaposi, Ernest Besnier, Alfred Fournier, Louis Brocq, Jean Darier, el clasificador Jonathan Hutchinson, Paul Unna, William Osler, Emanuel Libman, George Baehr y así decenas de colosos de la ciencia médica, cuyas historias son descritas minuciosamente por el Dr. Iglesias...

  6. Seizures associated with Lupus during pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Aoki, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Natsuko; Mochimaru, Aya; Takahashi, Tsuneo; Hirahara, Fumiki

    2016-01-01

    Key Clinical Message A sudden flare of previously stable SLE may give rise to CNS lupus. During pregnancy, seizures associated with CNS lupus can cause hypoxic?ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) in the infant.

  7. Lupus, discoid on a child's face (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The round or disk shaped (discoid) rash of lupus produces red, raised patches with scales. The pores ( ... The majority (approximately 90%) of individuals with discoid lupus have only skin involvement as compared to more ...

  8. Verrucous (Hypertrophic) Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus: A Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Verrucous (Hypertrophic) Lupus Erythematosus (LE) represents a rare but distinct, variant of chronic discoid lupus erythematosus. We report a case of LE with verrucous lesions for its rarity and peculiar location posing a diagnostic dilemma.

  9. Tumor Necrosis Factor-Like Weak Inducer of Apoptosis Accelerates the Progression of Renal Fibrosis in Lupus Nephritis by Activating SMAD and p38 MAPK in TGF-β1 Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqin Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aim was to explore the effects of tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK in lupus nephritis and its potential underlying mechanisms. MRL/lpr mice were used for in vivo experiments and human proximal tubular cells (HK2 cells were used for in vitro experiments. Results showed that MRL/lpr mice treated with vehicle solution or LV-Control shRNA displayed significant proteinuria and severe renal histopathological changes. LV-TWEAK-shRNA treatment reversed these changes and decreased renal expressions of TWEAK, TGF-β1, p-p38 MAPK, p-Smad2, COL-1, and α-SMA proteins. In vitro, hTWEAK treatment upregulated the expressions of TGF-β1, p-p38 MAPK, p-SMAD2, α-SMA, and COL-1 proteins in HK2 cells and downregulated the expressions of E-cadherin protein, which were reversed by cotreatment with anti-TWEAK mAb or SB431542 treatment. These findings suggest that TWEAK may contribute to chronic renal changes and renal fibrosis by activating TGF-β1 signaling pathway, and phosphorylation of Smad2 and p38 MAPK proteins was also involved in this signaling pathway.

  10. Short-term add-on tocilizumab and intravenous cyclophosphamide exhibited a remission-inducing effect in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus with refractory multiorgan involvements including massive pericarditis and glomerulonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Atsuko; Naniwa, Taio; Tamechika, Shinya; Maeda, Shinji

    2017-05-01

    We report on a 41-year-old woman with refractory systemic lupus erythematosus with massive pericarditis, macrophage activation syndrome, and glomerulonephritis despite high-dose glucocorticoids and tacrolimus. Tocilizumab dramatically improved pericarditis, and glomerulonephritis was controlled after adding cyclophosphamide. We had to halt tocilizumab and cyclophosphamide due to possible pneumocystis infection after five and three infusions of tocilizumab and intravenous cyclophosphamide, respectively. Nevertheless, no lupus flare had been observed on glucocorticoid monotherapy and enabled further rapid tapering prednisolone.

  11. Anatomical brain images alone can accurately diagnose chronic neuropsychiatric illnesses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Bansal

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Diagnoses using imaging-based measures alone offer the hope of improving the accuracy of clinical diagnosis, thereby reducing the costs associated with incorrect treatments. Previous attempts to use brain imaging for diagnosis, however, have had only limited success in diagnosing patients who are independent of the samples used to derive the diagnostic algorithms. We aimed to develop a classification algorithm that can accurately diagnose chronic, well-characterized neuropsychiatric illness in single individuals, given the availability of sufficiently precise delineations of brain regions across several neural systems in anatomical MR images of the brain. METHODS: We have developed an automated method to diagnose individuals as having one of various neuropsychiatric illnesses using only anatomical MRI scans. The method employs a semi-supervised learning algorithm that discovers natural groupings of brains based on the spatial patterns of variation in the morphology of the cerebral cortex and other brain regions. We used split-half and leave-one-out cross-validation analyses in large MRI datasets to assess the reproducibility and diagnostic accuracy of those groupings. RESULTS: In MRI datasets from persons with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Schizophrenia, Tourette Syndrome, Bipolar Disorder, or persons at high or low familial risk for Major Depressive Disorder, our method discriminated with high specificity and nearly perfect sensitivity the brains of persons who had one specific neuropsychiatric disorder from the brains of healthy participants and the brains of persons who had a different neuropsychiatric disorder. CONCLUSIONS: Although the classification algorithm presupposes the availability of precisely delineated brain regions, our findings suggest that patterns of morphological variation across brain surfaces, extracted from MRI scans alone, can successfully diagnose the presence of chronic neuropsychiatric disorders

  12. Lupus and Pregnancy: Complex Yet Manageable

    OpenAIRE

    Dhar, Josephine Patricia; Sokol, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic multi-system autoimmune disease that occurs predominantly in women of childbearing age. The risk of complications and adverse fetal outcomes in pregnant women with lupus is high. Moreover, pregnancy can cause flares of lupus disease activity necessitating maternal immunosuppressive intervention. Interestingly, many potential complications of pregnancy present as symptoms of lupus making diagnosis and treatment a challenge.Advancing technology and bett...

  13. An unusual presentation of juvenile lupus nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malleshwar Bottu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of juvenile lupus varies widely ranging between 4 and 250 per 100,000 population. Most common organ involvement in juvenile lupus is kidney. Neurological, cutaneous and hematological involvements are also involved. Skeletal muscle involvement in the form of myositis is rare. Myositis as presenting manifestation in juvenile lupus is also unusual. Herein, we report one such case wherein myositis preceded the onset of lupus nephritis

  14. Neuropsychiatric findings in Cushing syndrome and exogenous glucocorticoid administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkman, Monica N

    2013-09-01

    This article reviews the neuropsychiatric presentations elicited by spontaneous hypercortisolism and exogenous supraphysiologic glucocorticoids. Patients with Cushing disease and syndrome develop a depressive syndrome: irritable and depressed mood, decreased libido, disrupted sleep and cognitive decrements. Exogenous short-term glucocorticoid administration may elicit a hypomanic syndrome with mood, sleep and cognitive disruptions. Treatment options are discussed. Brain imaging and neuropsychological studies indicate elevated cortisol and other glucocorticoids are especially deleterious to hippocampus and frontal lobe. The research findings also shed light on neuropsychiatric abnormalities in conditions that have substantial subgroups exhibiting elevated and dysregulated cortisol: aging, major depressive disorder and Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Huntington's disease: psychiatric issues of a paradigmatic neuropsychiatric disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Ribeiro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Huntington's Disease (HD can be considered a paradigmatic neuropsychiatric disorder that has three components: motor, cognitive and behavioral symptoms. The author synthetizes research developed on epidemiology and etipathogeny of HD and makes reference to more usual symptoms, emphasizing psychiatric symptoms, often the first manifestation of HD. About a clinical case, the author points out rhe great phenotypic variability of this disease, reflects about ways to develop the knowledge of the neuropsychiatric manifestations in order to achieve new treatment strategies in this area, finallt, ameliorate the comprehension of cerebral function.

  16. Micro spies from the brain to the periphery: new clues from studies on microRNAs in neuropsychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta eMaffioletti

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available microRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs (20-22 nucleotides playing a major role in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. miRNAs are predicted to regulate more than 50% of all the protein-coding genes. Increasing evidence indicates that they may play key roles in the biological pathways that regulate neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity, as well as in neurotransmitter homeostasis in the adult brain. In this article we review recent studies suggesting that miRNAs may be involved in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders and in the action of CNS drugs, in particular by analyzing the contribution of genomic studies in patients' peripheral tissues. Alterations in miRNA expression have been observed in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and other neuropsychiatric conditions. In particular, intriguing findings concern the identification of disease-associated miRNA signatures in patients' peripheral tissues, or modifications in miRNA profiles induced by drug treatments. Furthermore, genetic variations in miRNA sequences and miRNA-related genes have been described in neuropsychiatric diseases. Overall, though still at a preliminary stage, several lines of evidence indicate an involvement of miRNAs in both the pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy of neuropsychiatric disorders. In this regard, the data obtained in patients' peripheral tissues may provide further insights into the etiopathogenesis of several brain diseases and contribute to identify new biomarkers for diagnostic assessment improvement and treatment personalization.

  17. Genetics and pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Chandra; Putterman, Chaim

    2015-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disorder that has a broad spectrum of effects on the majority of organs, including the kidneys. Approximately 40-70% of patients with SLE will develop lupus nephritis. Renal assault during SLE is initiated by genes that breach immune tolerance and promote autoantibody production. These genes might act in concert with other genetic factors that augment innate immune signalling and IFN-I production, which in turn can generate an influx of effector leucocytes, inflammatory mediators and autoantibodies into end organs, such as the kidneys. The presence of cognate antigens in the glomerular matrix, together with intrinsic molecular abnormalities in resident renal cells, might further accentuate disease progression. This Review discusses the genetic insights and molecular mechanisms for key pathogenic contributors in SLE and lupus nephritis. We have categorized the genes identified in human studies of SLE into one of four pathogenic events that lead to lupus nephritis. We selected these categories on the basis of the cell types in which these genes are expressed, and the emerging paradigms of SLE pathogenesis arising from murine models. Deciphering the molecular basis of SLE and/or lupus nephritis in each patient will help physicians to tailor specific therapies.

  18. How Does Lupus Affect the Blood?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affects white blood cells Blood test may indicate lupus nephritis activity U.S. English español Medically reviewed on June 20, 2013 you might also be interested in I Have Lupus How Lupus Affects the Body Site Footer Need ...

  19. Sexual Abuse Allegations by Children with Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindblad, Frank; Lainpelto, Katrin

    2011-01-01

    All Swedish court cases from 2004 and 2006 concerning alleged child sexual abuse (sexual harassment excluded) were identified through criminal registers. Fourteen cases (one boy) concerned a child with a neuropsychiatric disorder. The diagnostic groups were mental retardation (10 cases), autism (three cases), and ADHD (one case). Psychiatric…

  20. Neuropsychiatric comorbidity in obesity: role of inflammatory processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie eCastanon

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Neuropsychiatric symptoms are frequent in obesity. In addition to their substantial economic and health impact, these symptoms significantly interfere with the quality of life and social function of obese individuals. While the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying obesity-related neuropsychiatric symptoms are still under investigation and remain to be clearly identified, there is increasing evidence for a role of inflammatory processes. Obesity is characterized by a chronic low-grade inflammatory state that is likely to influence neuropsychiatric status given the well-known and highly documented effects of inflammation on brain activity/function and behavior. This hypothesis is supported by recent findings emanating from clinical investigations in obese subjects and from experimentations conducted in animal models of obesity. These studies converge to show that obesity-related inflammatory processes, originating either from the adipose tissue or gut microbiota environment, spread to the brain where they lead to substantial changes in neurocircuitry, neuroendocrine activity, neurotransmitter metabolism and activity, and neurogenesis. Together, these alterations contribute to shape the propitious bases for the development of obesity-related neuropsychiatric comorbidities.

  1. Erythropoietin treatment may improve cognition in neuropsychiatric disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Kristian Skov; Hageman, Ida; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is a core feature in a range of neuropsychiatric disorders which reduces patients' workforce capacity - the largest socio-economic cost of these disorders. Nevertheless, there is no clinically available medical treatment with robust and enduring efficacy on cognitive deficits...

  2. Measuring behaviour in rodents: towards translational neuropsychiatric research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homberg, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    Rodent behavioural tasks are indispensable to advance the understanding of gene x environment interactions in neuropsychiatric disorders and the discovery of new therapeutic strategies. Yet, the actual translation of rodent data to humans, and thereby the understanding of the pathophysiology of

  3. Multisensory cortical processing and dysfunction across the neuropsychiatric spectrum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hornix, Betty E; Havekes, Robbert; Kas, Martien J H

    2018-01-01

    Sensory processing is affected in multiple neuropsychiatric disorders like schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders. Genetic and environmental factors guide the formation and fine-tuning of brain circuitry necessary to receive, organize, and respond to sensory input in order to behave in a

  4. An evaluation of neuropsychiatric symptoms in Parkinson's disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: We aimed to examine neuropsychiatric symptoms of patients with early and advanced stage Parkinson's disease (PD). Materials and Methods: The study was performed at Kocatepe University Neurology Department in Turkey, comprised 46 PD patients and 46 controls. Hoehn-Yahr (HY) scale was used to ...

  5. An Evaluation of Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Parkinson's Disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-14

    Sep 14, 2017 ... Objective: We aimed to examine neuropsychiatric symptoms of patients with early and advanced stage Parkinson's disease (PD). Materials and Methods: The study was performed at Kocatepe University Neurology Department in Turkey, comprised. 46 PD patients and 46 controls. Hoehn-Yahr (HY) scale ...

  6. Sex differences in the brain, behavior, and neuropsychiatric disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bao, Ai-Min; Swaab, Dick F.

    2010-01-01

    Sex differences in the brain are reflected in behavior and in the risk for neuropsychiatric disorders. The fetal brain develops in the male direction due to a direct effect of testosterone on the developing neurons, or in the female direction due to the absence of such a testosterone surge. Because

  7. Lupus vulgaris associated with Scrofuloderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isha Preet Tuli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lupus vulgaris is a rare manifestation of tuberculosis. It is even rarer for it to complicate scrofuloderma. We report a case of a 27-year-old man who had undergone a successful treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis presenting with scrofuloderma with lesions of lupus on the overlying skin. The Mantoux test was positive and initial chest X-ray did not show any active features of tuberculosis. Discharge from the lesion stained positive for acid fast bacilli. Multiple fine needle aspirations were inconclusive. However the histopathology of biopsied lesion revealed tuberculoid granuloma with Langhans giant cells. TThe patient improved with antitubercular therapy. We are presenting this case as a rare coexistence of scrofuloderma with lupus vulgaris.

  8. Lupus panniculitis involving the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabate, Josep M.; Gomez, Antonio; Torrubia, Sofia; Salinas, Teresa; Clotet, Montse; Lerma, Enrique

    2006-01-01

    Lupus panniculitis is an unusual immunological disease that characteristically affects the subcutaneous fat and occurs in 2% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. We report a case of lupus panniculitis involving the breast, which represents a very uncommon location. Mammographically, it presented as a suspicious irregular mass involving the subcutaneous fat pad with skin thickening. High echogenicity constituted the most relevant sonographic finding. To the best of our knowledge, the magnetic resonance (MR) features have not been previously described. High signal intensity was found on both T1- and T2-weighted precontrast MR images. A dynamic contrast-enhanced study revealed a suspicious focal mass with irregular margins and rim enhancement, with a type 3 time-signal intensity curve. Differential diagnosis with carcinoma and fat necrosis and the value of core biopsy are discussed. (orig.)

  9. Anti-ribosomal P antibodies related to depression in early clinical course of systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoor Karimifar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diagnosis and treatment of neuropsychiatric lupus is still a major challenge in clinical practice. We investigated the association between depression and anti-ribosomal P (anti-P antibodies in a sample of Iranian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on adult patients with SLE referring to a referral out-patient clinic of rheumatology. Demographic data and clinical data with regards to measuring disease activity with the systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index were gathered. Anti-P antibodies were measured with the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. Depression severity was measured by the Beck Depression Inventory-II. Results: One hundred patients (80% female and 20% male, age = 34.8 ± 10.9 years were included. Anti-P antibodies were present more frequently in depressed than non-depressed patients (30% vs. 10%, P = 0.015. Depression severity was correlated with anti-P antibodies level only in patients with disease duration of less than 2 years (r = 0.517, P = 0.019. There was no association between the depression severity and disease activity. Binary logistic regression analysis showed age (B = 0.953, CI 95%: 0.914-0.993 and positive anti-P antibodies (B = 4.30, CI 95%: 1.18-15.59 as factors that independently associated with depression. Conclusion: We found an association between depression and presence of anti-P antibodies, and also strong correlation between depression severity and anti-P antibodies level in newly diagnosed SLE patients. Depression severity in newly diagnosed SLE patients may reflect a neuropsychiatric involvement, and in later phases, it is more affected by the chronicity of the disease as well as other environmental factors.

  10. BERTAHAN DENGAN LUPUS: GAMBARAN RESILIENSI PADA ODAPUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anggun Resdasari Prasetyo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lupus is a chronic, autoimmune disease in which an abnormal immune system can cause inflammation on several organ or body systems. The risk of mortality rate caused by Lupus is high and late diagnosis is also prevalent which impact the psychological aspect of individual affected with Lupus (so-called Odapus. Therefore, resiliency is needed; that is individual ability to survive and keep optimistic attitude towards recovery. This study aims to describe the resiliency of the affected individuals with Lupus. This is a qualitative study. Eight persons affected with Lupus who were still coping with Lupus participated in this study. The results indicated that subjects developed a negatives constructs to adapt with Lupus. Therefore, psychological intervention is needed to improve their resiliency.

  11. Interferon Alpha in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy B. Niewold

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The pleiotropic cytokine interferon alpha is involved in multiple aspects of lupus etiology and pathogenesis. Interferon alpha is important under normal circumstances for antiviral responses and immune activation. However, heightened levels of serum interferon alpha and expression of interferon response genes are common in lupus patients. Lupus-associated autoantibodies can drive the production of interferon alpha and heightened levels of interferon interfere with immune regulation. Several genes in the pathways leading to interferon production or signaling are associated with risk for lupus. Clinical and cellular manifestations of excess interferon alpha in lupus combined with the genetic risk factors associated with interferon make this cytokine a rare bridge between genetic risk and phenotypic effects. Interferon alpha influences the clinical picture of lupus and may represent a therapeutic target. This paper provides an overview of the cellular, genetic, and clinical aspects of interferon alpha in lupus.

  12. Lupus nephritis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafeez, F.; Tarar, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the clinicopathological pattern of lupus nephritis in paediatric nephrology patients. Twenty six patients upto the age 16 years of either gender, with a mean age of 12.4 +- 1.90 years having primary SLE with renal involvement in the form of oedema, hypertension, haematuria and proteinuria were included. Twenty one were females. Percutaneous renal biopsy was performed. Histological lesion was classified according to WHO classification. Patients were treated with immunosuppressive therapy and their clinical course was followed for at least one year. The mean duration of follow up was 1.77 years. Renal involvement was seen in 92.30% within 2 years of the onset of primary disease. Diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis was the commonest histological lesion (n=14) followed by membranous nephropathy (n=6). The commonest clinical manifestation was oedema (80.76%) followed by hypertension (46.15%). Proteinuria was present in 100% of cases, haematuria in 38.46% and azotemia in 19.33% of patients. Nephrotic range proteinuria was more common in class III and IV, while azotemia was observed only in class IV. The disease was well controlled in 73.07% , relapse was seen in 3.8% of patients, 15.38% died of infections and uremic encephalopathy while 7.69% were lost to follow-up. Diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis is the commonest histological lesion in our set-up. Renal involvement is mostly seen within first two years of the primary disease which can be controlled satisfactorily with immunosuppressive therapy. (author)

  13. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lateef, Aisha; Petri, Michelle

    2017-05-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with a strong female predilection. Pregnancy remains a commonly encountered but high-risk situation in this setting. Both maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity are still significantly increased despite improvements in outcomes. Maternal morbidity includes higher risk of disease flares, preeclampsia and other pregnancy-related complications. Fetal issues include higher rates of preterm birth, intrauterine growth restriction, and neonatal lupus syndromes. Treatment options during pregnancy are also limited and maternal benefit has to be weighed against fetal risk. A coordinated approach, with close monitoring by a multidisciplinary team, is essential for optimal outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. ["Lupus anticoagulant" in immune hyperthyroidism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, G; Alexopoulos, A; Hasler, K; Kerp, L

    1990-10-05

    A 56-year-old woman with autoimmune hyperthyroidism (Basedow) whose blood coagulation had at first been normal developed prolonged partial thromboplastin time (PTT) of 48 s and a fall in prothrombin time (Quick value) to 52%. At the same time, total activity of factor VIII was reduced to 18% and factor IX to 16%. These values not having changed after the addition of normal plasma, it is assumed that an acquired inhibitor of plasmatic coagulation was responsible. Such inhibitors were first described in lupus erythematodes and therefore called lupus anticoagulant, but later also demonstrated in other autoimmune diseases.

  15. Clinical, laboratory and neuroimage findings in juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus presenting involvement of the nervous system Achados clínicos, laboratoriais e de imagem no lupus eritematoso sistêmico juvenil com comprometimento do sistema nervoso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Jaques Spinosa

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To characterize neurological involvement in juvenile systemic lupus erythe-matosus. METHOD: The charts of all patients with the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus before the age of 16 years, followed at the Rheumatology Unit of Pequeno Príncipe Hospital, from January 1992 to January 2006, were retrospectively reviewed, highlighting neuropsychiatric aspects. RESULTS: Forty-seven patients were included. Neuropsychiatric syndromes were found 29 (61.7%: seizures (17 / 36.2%, intractable headache (7 / 14.9%, mood disorders (5 / 10.6%, cerebrovascular disease (4 / 8.5%, acute confusional state (3 / 6.4%, aseptic meningitis (3 / 6.4%, psychosis (3 / 6.4%, chorea (3 / 6.4%, Guillain-Barré syndrome (2 / 4.3% and cranial neuropathy (1 / 2.1%. Morbidity indexes (SLEDAI and SLICC were higher among patients with neuropsychiatric manifestations (pOBJETIVO: Caracterizar o comprometimento neurológico no lupus eritematoso sistêmico juvenil. MÉTODO: Os prontuários dos pacientes com o diagnóstico de lupus eritematoso sistêmico antes dos 16 anos de idade, em acompanhamento na Unidade de Reumatologia do Hospital Pequeno Príncipe, de janeiro de 1992 a janeiro de 2006, foram revisados retrospectivamente enfatizando aspectos neuropsiquiátricos. RESULTADOS: Quarenta e sete pacientes foram incluídos. Síndromes neuropsiquiátricas foram encontradas em 29 (61,7%: crises convulsivas (17 / 36,2%, cefaléia intratável (7 / 14,9%, distúrbios do humor (5 / 10,6%, doença cerebrovascular (4 / 8,5%, estado confusional agudo (3 / 6,4%, meningite asséptica (3 / 6,4%, psicose (3 / 6,4%, coréia (3 / 6,4%, síndrome de Guillain-Barré (2 / 4,3% e neuropatia craniana (1 / 2,1%. Índices de morbidade (SEDAI e SLICC foram maiores em pacientes com manifestações neuropsiquiátricas (p<0,05. CONCLUSÃO: Síndromes neuropsiquiátricas são um achado freqüente que acrescenta morbidade significativa ao lupus eritematoso sistêmico juvenil.

  16. Genetic polymorphisms of dsRNA ligating pattern recognition receptors TLR3, MDA5, and RIG-I. Association with systemic lupus erythematosus and clinical phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevold, C; Kjaer, Lasse; Nielsen, Claus Henrik

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to demonstrate possible associations between genetic polymorphisms in Toll-like receptor 3, interferon induced with helicase C domain 1 (IFIH1) and DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box polypeptide 58 and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), including the phenotypes lupus nephritis and malar...

  17. Typing TREX1 gene in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

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    M. Fredi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available An impaired expression of interferon-α regulated genes has been reported in patients with either systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS, a rare monogenic encephalopathy with onset in infancy. One of mutations causing AGS is located in the TREX1 gene on chromosome 3. Heterozygous mutations in TREX1 were reported in SLE patients. TREX1 is a DNA exonuclease with specificity for ssDNA. An impairment of its activity may result in the accumulation of nucleid acid. A recent study described a significant association between a haplotype including several common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of TREX1 and neurological manifestations in European SLE patients. Fifty-one SLE patients were screened for TREX1 gene, and the corresponding data were collected from clinical charts. A novel heterozygous variant (p.Asp130Asn was identified in one patient and in none of 150 controls. A missense variation was located in one of the three active sites of the gene and was classified as probably damaging. Variations of SNP rs11797 were detected in 33 SLE patients and a variation of rs3135944 in one. A significantly higher rate of the minor allele (T nucleotide of SNP rs11797 was found in SLE patients with neuropsychiatric manifestations [12/16 (75% vs 28/86 (32.5% O=0.002, odds ratio=6.42 95% confidence interval (1.7-26.2]. Only 1 out of 8 patients (12.5% with neuropsychiatric SLE carried the wild-type form in homozygosity. Although we analyzed a small number of patients, we found a novel variation of TREX1, which may be pathogenic. The polymorphism of rs11797 was more frequent in SLE patients with neurological manifestations.

  18. What People with Lupus Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What People With Lupus Need to Know About Osteoporosis What Is Lupus? Lupus is an autoimmune disease, ... Management Strategies Resources For Your Information What Is Osteoporosis? Osteoporosis is a condition in which the bones ...

  19. Cytokines in relation to autoantibodies before onset of symptoms for systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, C; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, S

    2014-06-01

    A number of cytokines and chemokines were analysed and related to autoantibodies in blood samples pre-dating the onset of symptoms of systemic lupus erythematosus. Thirty-five patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (American College of Rheumatology criteria) were identified as having donated blood samples, prior to symptom onset, to the Biobank of northern Sweden. Altogether, 140 age- and sex-matched controls were also identified. The concentrations of interferon-α, interleukin-4, interleukin-9, interleukin-10, interferon inducible protein-10 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 were analysed using multiplex technology and related to autoantibodies (ANA, ENA, anti-dsDNA and anti-histone antibodies) analysed from the same blood sample. The interferon-γ inducible protein-10 levels were higher in the pre-symptomatic individuals than in controls (p lupus erythematosus. An increased concentration of interferon-γ inducible protein-10 pre-dated the onset of systemic lupus erythematosus and was related to autoantibodies before the onset of disease. The levels of interferon-γ inducible protein-10 and interferon-α were correlated. These findings support the proposal that the interferon system is important early in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and autoantibody formation. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  20. Dynamics of gut microbiota in autoimmune lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Husen; Liao, Xiaofeng; Sparks, Joshua B; Luo, Xin M

    2014-12-01

    Gut microbiota has been recognized as an important environmental factor in health, as well as in metabolic and immunological diseases, in which perturbation of the host gut microbiota is often observed in the diseased state. However, little is known on the role of gut microbiota in systemic lupus erythematosus. We investigated the effects of host genetics, sex, age, and dietary intervention on the gut microbiome in a murine lupus model. In young, female lupus-prone mice resembling women at childbearing age, a population with the highest risk for lupus, we found marked depletion of lactobacilli, and increases in Lachnospiraceae and overall diversity compared to age-matched healthy controls. The predicted metagenomic profile in lupus-prone mice showed a significant enrichment of bacterial motility- and sporulation-related pathways. Retinoic acid as a dietary intervention restored lactobacilli that were downregulated in lupus-prone mice, and this correlated with improved symptoms. The predicted metagenomes also showed that retinoic acid reversed many lupus-associated changes in microbial functions that deviated from the control. In addition, gut microbiota of lupus-prone mice were different between sexes, and an overrepresentation of Lachnospiraceae in females was associated with an earlier onset of and/or more severe lupus symptoms. Clostridiaceae and Lachnospiraceae, both harboring butyrate-producing genera, were more abundant in the gut of lupus-prone mice at specific time points during lupus progression. Together, our results demonstrate the dynamics of gut microbiota in murine lupus and provide evidence to suggest the use of probiotic lactobacilli and retinoic acid as dietary supplements to relieve inflammatory flares in lupus patients. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Dyslipidemia in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Melinda Zsuzsanna; Szodoray, Peter; Kiss, Emese

    2017-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Accelerated atherosclerosis is related to traditional (age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, obesity, smoking, and positive family history) and non-traditional, disease-related factors. Traditional risk factors are still more prominent in patients with lupus, as both hypertension and hypercholesterinemia were independently associated with premature atherosclerosis in several SLE cohorts. In this work, the authors summarize the epidemiology of dyslipidemia in lupus patients and review the latest results in the pathogenesis of lipid abnormalities. The prevalence of dyslipidemia, with elevations in total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), triglyceride (TG), and apolipoprotein B (ApoB), and a reduction in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels are about 30% at the diagnosis of SLE rising to 60% after 3 years. Multiple pathogenetic mechanism is included, C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) can suppress HDL and increase TG, auto-antibodies can cause the injury of the endothelium, lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity can be reduced by circulating inflammatory mediators and antibodies, and increased oxidative stress may trigger a wide range of pro-atherogenic lipid modifications. As a major risk factor, dyslipidemia should be treated aggressively to minimize the risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events. Randomized controlled trials with statins are controversial in the detention of atherosclerosis progression, but can be favorable by inhibiting immune activation that is the arterial wall and by decreasing lupus activity.

  2. [Systemic lupus erythematosus and pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz-da-Costa, Teresa; Centeno, Mónica; Pinto, Luísa; Marques, Aurora; Mendes-Graça, Luís

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic inflammatory disease, resulting from an auto-immune dysfunction. The etiology of this disease is unknown. It frequently occurs in women of childbearing age. Pregnancy in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus may be associated with several complications (maternal, obstetrical and fetal). The prognosis for both mother and child is better when systemic lupus erythematosus has been quiescent for at least six months before pregnancy. Thus, preconceptional assessment and management is crucial for helping women to achieve a period of disease remission before pregnancy as well as for allowing an adjustment of therapy. Maternal health and fetal development should be closely monitored during pregnancy. These patients should be surveilled by a multidisciplinary team (obstetrician, rheumatologist or internist, nephrologist if necessary and a pediatrician), in a tertiary care hospital. Antiphospholipid syndrome, positivity for anti-SSA/Ro or anti-SSB/LA antibodies, hypertension or renal involvement are associated with an increase of adverse pregnancy outcomes. In this article the authors review the main aspects of Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and pregnancy.

  3. Porokeratosis Masquerading As Lupus Vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Sudip

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Porokeratosis is a specific disorder of kerstinization characterized histologically by cornoid lamella. Lesions of porokeratosis present varied features, often mimicking other dermatological disorders. Herein, we report a case of porokeratosis of Mibelli presenting with verrucous lesions simulating lupus vulgaris.

  4. Systemisk lupus erythematosus og graviditet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, Karen; Lykke, Jacob Alexander; Nielsen, Henriette Svarre

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease which most often affects women of childbearing age. Pregnancy is therefore an important issue for the patient and the responsible physician. Pregnancy outcomes in women with SLE has improved significantly over the latest decades...

  5. Systemic lupus erythematosus in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, A; Green, A; Junker, P

    1998-01-01

    A population based cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was recruited from a for epidemiological purposes representative Danish region. Patients were ascertained from 4 different sources with a high degree of completeness as estimated by using capture-recapture analysis...

  6. Derivation and validation of the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics classification criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petri, Michelle; Orbai, Ana-Maria; Alarcón, Graciela S

    2012-01-01

    The Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) group revised and validated the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) classification criteria in order to improve clinical relevance, meet stringent methodology requirements, and incorporate new...

  7. Outcome of Pregnancy in Lupus

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    Syeda Sayeeda

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pregnancy in patients with SLE is associated with a high risk of maternal disease exacerbation in active disease state and adverse fetal outcome. Objective: To analyse maternal and fetal outcome in pregnant lupus patients as well as to identify influence of disease activity on it. Methods: This retrospective observational cross sectional study was done on 27 pregnant lupus patients in feto-maternal medicine wing of the department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, BSMMU from April 2007 to March 2011. For statistical analysis ‘z’ test of proportion and student’s ‘t’ test was used. Results: Mean age of the patients was 26.6 years. At booking, 8 (29.63% had active lupus while 19 (70.37% was in remission. As complications of SLE, lupus flare was found in 11.1%, lupus nephritis in 25.9% and skin rash in 7.4%. Regarding obstetric complications, PIH was developed in 3.7% and preeclampsia in 11.1% of the patients. Average gestational age at delivery was 34.8 weeks. Birth weight was <2.5kg in 45.8% of neonates. There was IUGR in 33.3% of the cases and 25% of the neonates needed admission in neonatal ICU. There was no neonatal death and none of the 24 neonates had neonatal lupus. In this study there was no maternal mortality. Patients who were in active disease state, most (55.5% delivered preterm, spontaneous abortion occurred in two and IUD in one of the patients. Average birth weight was lower (1.9+.47kg in patients with active SLE than those of with remission (2.3+.68kg. Lupus flare developed in 66.6% with active disease, while in 33.3% with remission. Conclusion: Pregnancy is relatively safe with SLE in remission but considered as high risk in terms of fetal loss and spontaneous abortion. Disease activity influences pregnancy outcome.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3329/bsmmuj.v5i1.10995 BSMMU J 2012; 5(1:18-23

  8. A patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis: A 12-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Nataša

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a chronic immunological disease causing a significant morbidity and mortality in younger women and involving several organs and systems, most often the kidneys, being consequently the incidence of lupus nephritis (LN about 60%. Case report. We reported a 57 year-old patient with the diagnosed SLE in 1995. Pathohistological analysis of kidney biopsy revealed LN type V. The patient was treated with corticosteroid pulses and azathioprine during one year. A remission was achieved and maintained with prednisone, 15 mg daily. Nephrotic relapse was diagnosed in 2006 and the second kidney biopsy revealed recent kidney infarction due to extensive vasculitis. Soon, a cerebrovascul insult developed and CT-scan revealed endocranial infarctus. The patient was treated with corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide pulses (totally VI monthly pulses, and also with low-molecular heparine, anticoagulants and salicylates because of the right leg phlebothrombosis. After the pulses, the patient was adviced to take prednisone 20 mg daily and azothioprine 100 mg daily, and 6 months later mycophenolate mofetil because of persistent active serological immunological findings (ANA 1 : 320 and nephrotic syndrome. Mycophenolate mofetil was efficient in inducing and maintaining remission of nephrotic syndrome. Conclusion. The aim of LN treatment is to achieve and maintain remission, improve patients’ outcome, reduce the toxicity of immunosuppressive drugs and the incidence of relapses. Mycophenolate mofetil was shown to be efficient in inducing and maintaining remission of nephrotic syndrome in the frame of LN.

  9. The Neuropsychiatric Inventory--NPI. Validation of the Danish version

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korner, A.; Lauritzen, Lotte; Lolk, A.

    2008-01-01

    Assessment of neuropsychiatric symptoms in dementia has great clinical importance. The aim of the study was validation of the Danish version of the NPI, using assessments of 72 demented and 29 non-demented of age 65+ years and their caregivers at three visits. The NPI was administered by the same...... NPI and NPI-VAS were high; only two domains had coefficients below 0.60: depression and agitation/aggression. NPI-total scores increase with increasing severity of dementia. The NPI did not fulfil the scalability assessed by the Mokken and Loevinger coefficients. The NPI Danish version is valid...... and reliable in assessing neuropsychiatric symptoms in dementia but not fully scalable. The use of single item scores and not total sum score is recommended Udgivelsesdato: 2008...

  10. Epigenetic Treatment of Neuropsychiatric Disorders: Autism and Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moos, Walter H; Maneta, Eleni; Pinkert, Carl A; Irwin, Michael H; Hoffman, Michelle E; Faller, Douglas V; Steliou, Kosta

    2016-03-01

    Neuropsychiatric disorders are a heterogeneous group of conditions that often share underlying mitochondrial dysfunction and biological pathways implicated in their pathogenesis, progression, and treatment. To date, these disorders have proven notoriously resistant to molecular-targeted therapies, and clinical options are relegated to interventional types, which do not address the core symptoms of the disease. In this review, we discuss emerging epigenetic-driven approaches using novel acylcarnitine esters (carnitinoids) that act on master regulators of antioxidant and cytoprotective genes and mitophagic pathways. These carnitinoids are actively transported, mitochondria-localizing, biomimetic coenzyme A surrogates of short-chain fatty acids, which inhibit histone deacetylase and may reinvigorate synaptic plasticity and protect against neuronal damage. We outline these neuroprotective effects in the context of treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in an Inpatient Parkinson’s Disease Sample

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    Nicole C. R. McLaughlin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Neuropsychiatric symptoms are common in idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD, and hospitalization for delirium, depression, psychosis, and anxiety is sometimes required. A minimal amount of data exists on these patients. Methods. Charts of all patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital between 2006 and 2009 with a diagnosis of PD were reviewed. Forty-three met entry criteria and were reviewed. Initial and discharge diagnoses, comorbid psychiatric diagnoses, length of stay, and living arrangements before and after hospitalization are described. Results. Consistent with previous research, this study showed evidence of comorbid psychiatric disorders within PD. Conclusions. The long-term goal of this area of study would be to reduce neuropsychiatric symptoms and improve quality of life in order to reduce inpatient hospital stays.

  12. Neuropsychiatric Symptoms of Dementia: Consent, Quality of Life, and Dignity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Passmore

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Degenerative forms of dementia are progressive, incurable, fatal, and likely to cause suffering in conjunction with personal incapacity. Timely diagnostic disclosure and counseling can facilitate important advance care planning. The risk of harm associated with neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS of dementia often has to be balanced against the risk of harm associated with medication management of NPS. A palliative care framework can help preserve autonomy, quality of life, comfort, and dignity for patients with NPS.

  13. Huntington's disease: psychiatric issues of a paradigmatic neuropsychiatric disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Raquel

    2006-01-01

    Huntington's Disease (HD) can be considered a paradigmatic neuropsychiatric disorder that has three components: motor, cognitive and behavioral symptoms. The author synthetizes research developed on epidemiology and etipathogeny of HD and makes reference to more usual symptoms, emphasizing psychiatric symptoms, often the first manifestation of HD. About a clinical case, the author points out rhe great phenotypic variability of this disease, reflects about ways to develop the knowledge of the ...

  14. Neuropsychiatric side effects related to treatment with felbamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, H; Snyder, P J; Duffy, J D; Weilburg, J; Valeriano, J; Brillman, J; Cress, K; Cavalier, J

    1996-01-01

    Seven patients with refractory seizure disorders and neuropsychiatric symptoms believed secondary to felbamate are presented. Five were on concomitant valproic acid (and other agents). Anergia, apathy, bradyphrenia, and increased irritability were prominent. One patient on felbamate monotherapy had a new-onset psychosis. Felbamate's NMDA receptor antagonism and GABA potentiation (perhaps enhanced by valproic acid use) are discussed as possible mechanisms of these side effects.

  15. Hepatic venous outflow block in a young patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

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    Ali Ghavidel

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hepatic venous outflow block or Budd-Chiari syndrome is a severe liver disease with a 3 years survival rate of 50%. Several conditions have been implicated as a cause of Budd-Chiari syndrome, including myeloproliferative disorders, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, the presence of lupus anti-coagulant, oral contraceptives, pregnancy, and others. In a small number of cases, Budd-Chiari syndrome is associated with the presence of lupus anticoagulant. Anticardiolipin antibodies (ACA are similar to lupus anti-coagulant antiphospholipid antibodies (APLAs, which have been described in patients with recurrent arterial and venous thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, fetal loss, or miscarriage. Case Report: A 23-year-old woman is reported with Budd-Chiari syndrome in whom lupus anticoagulant and anticardiolipin antibodies were shown; 9 months after diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE treatment with steroids admitted with gastrointestinal problems, abdominal pain and ascites and treated oral anticoagulants induced a considerable improvement. This treatment was continued after 1 year, but interruption was followed by redevelopment of ascites. Further treatment with anticoagulants was continued for 5 years with noticeable improvement. Conclusion: Patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome should be tested for lupus anticoagulants and anticardiolipin antibodies, Budd-Chiari syndrome resulting from this cause may have a good response to treatment with oral anticoagulants; this treatment should be maintained permanently, and pregnancy in such patients may initiate serious difficulties. The condition of the patient at follow-up was good.

  16. Activation of sigma-1 receptor chaperone in the treatment of neuropsychiatric diseases and its clinical implication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Hashimoto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum (ER protein sigma-1 receptor represents unique chaperone activity in the central nervous system, and it exerts a potent influence on a number of neurotransmitter systems. Several lines of evidence suggest that activation of sigma-1 receptor plays a role in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric diseases, as well as in the mechanisms of some therapeutic drugs and neurosteroids. Preclinical studies showed that some selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs; fluvoxamine, fluoxetine, excitalopram, donepezil, and ifenprodil act as sigma-1 receptor agonists. Furthermore, sigma-1 receptor agonists could improve the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA antagonist phencyclidine (PCP-induced cognitive deficits in mice. A study using positron emission tomography have demonstrated that an oral administration of fluvoxamine or donepezil could bind to sigma-1 receptor in the healthy human brain, suggesting that sigma-1 receptor might be involved in the therapeutic mechanisms of these drugs. Moreover, case reports suggest that sigma-1 receptor agonists, including fluvoxamine, and ifenprodil, may be effective in the treatment of cognitive impairment in schizophrenia, delirium in elderly people, and flashbacks in post-traumatic stress disorder. In this review article, the author would like to discuss the clinical implication of sigma-1 receptor agonists, including endogenous neurosteroids, in the neuropsychiatric diseases.

  17. Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Posterior Cortical Atrophy and Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-González, Aida; Crutch, Sebastian J; Franco-Macías, Emilio; Gil-Néciga, Eulogio

    2016-03-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a rare neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by early progressive visual dysfunction in the context of relative preservation of memory and a pattern of atrophy mainly involving the posterior cortex. The aim of the present study is to characterize the neuropsychiatric profile of PCA. The Neuropsychiatric Inventory was used to assess 12 neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) in 28 patients with PCA and 34 patients with typical Alzheimer disease (AD) matched by age, disease duration, and illness severity. The most commonly reported NPS in both groups were depression, anxiety, apathy, and irritability. However, aside from a trend toward lower rates of apathy in patients with PCA, there were no differences in the percentage of NPS presented in each group. All those patients presenting visual hallucinations in the PCA group also met diagnostic criteria for dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Auditory hallucinations were only present in patients meeting diagnosis criteria for DLB. Prevalence of the 12 NPS examined was similar between patients with PCA and AD. Hallucinations in PCA may be helpful in the differential diagnosis between PCA-AD and PCA-DLB. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Multisensory cortical processing and dysfunction across the neuropsychiatric spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornix, Betty E; Havekes, Robbert; Kas, Martien J H

    2018-02-26

    Sensory processing is affected in multiple neuropsychiatric disorders like schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders. Genetic and environmental factors guide the formation and fine-tuning of brain circuitry necessary to receive, organize, and respond to sensory input in order to behave in a meaningful and consistent manner. During certain developmental stages the brain is sensitive to intrinsic and external factors. For example, disturbed expression levels of certain risk genes during critical neurodevelopmental periods may lead to exaggerated brain plasticity processes within the sensory circuits, and sensory stimulation immediately after birth contributes to fine-tuning of these circuits. Here, the neurodevelopmental trajectory of sensory circuit development will be described and related to some example risk gene mutations that are found in neuropsychiatric disorders. Subsequently, the flow of sensory information through these circuits and the relationship to synaptic plasticity will be described. Research focusing on the combined analyses of neural circuit development and functioning are necessary to expand our understanding of sensory processing and behavioral deficits that are relevant across the neuropsychiatric spectrum. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Disseminated lupus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Taru; Ramchander; Shrihar, Rashmi; Gupta, Tanvi Pal; Aggarwal, Shilpi

    2011-01-01

    follicular plugging and multiple epithelioid cell granulomas, rimmed by lymphocytes in the deeper portion of the dermis, mainly peri-appendageal. Stain for acid-fast bacteria was negative. Cultures from the skin lesions were negative. The patient was diagnosed as having lupus vulgaris with multiple lesions of varying morphology at different sites with pulmonary tuberculosis and healed lymph node involvement.

  20. [Psychiatric Disorders in Pediatric Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in a Reference Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuñiga Zambrano, Yenny Carolina; Vásquez, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    To describe the psychiatric manifestations in pediatric patients with systemic erythematous lupus seen in the Fundación Hospital de la Misericordia. Observational descriptive study. Medical charts and test results of inpatients and outpatients between 2007 and2013 were reviewed; 39 patients were selected. SPSS 19 was used for statistical analysis. Statistical significance was considered with P=.05. Mean age was 13.7 (2.33), with 78.9% female. The most frequent psychiatric manifestation was anxiety (52.6%), followed by adjustment disorder and depression (36.8% each one), psychosis (10%), conversion disorder (7.9%), and obsessive compulsive disorder (5.3%). The mean SLICC score was 2.76 (2.8), and the mean SLEDAI score was 20.81 (20.82). Antinuclear antibodies were positive in 81.25%. Neuropsychiatric lupus was diagnosed in 65.8% of patients; seizures were observed in 23.7%, headache in 36.8%, stroke in 13.2%, vasculitis, chorea 5.3%, and meningitis 5.3% of patients. The mean time from lupus diagnosis was 20.47 (22.2) months, with the shortest period for adjustment disorder and the longest period in patients with conversion disorder (pseudo-seizures) being 15 months and 31 months, respectively. The highest SLEDAI score was in patients with psychosis (35.5 [16.21] vs 19.08 [13.72]; P=.032), and also the highest disease damage (SLICC, 4.25 [4.03] vs 2.58 [2.67]; P=.27) in comparison with the other manifestations. The most frequent psychiatric manifestations were anxiety, depression, and adjustment disorder, with a higher frequency than other studies, and with lupus activity principally in patients with psychosis. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. The Role of Cytokine in the Lupus Nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasunori Iwata

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lupus nephritis (LN is a major clinical manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Although numerous abnormalities of immune system have been proposed, cytokine overexpression plays an essential role in the pathogenesis of LN. In the initial phase of the disease, the immune deposits and/or autoantibodies induce cytokine production in renal resident cells, leading to further inflammatory cytokine/chemokine expression and leukocyte infiltration and activation. Then, infiltrate leukocytes, such as macrophages (Mφ and dendritic cells (DCs, secrete a variety of cytokines and activate naïve T cells, leading the cytokine profile towards T helper (Th1, Th2, and/or Th17. Recent studies revealed these inflammatory processes in experimental animal models as well as human LN. The cytokine targeted intervention may have the therapeutic potentials for LN. This paper focuses on the expression of cytokine and its functional role in the pathogenesis of LN.

  2. Association of caregiver demographic variables with neuropsychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer's disease patients for distress on the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Godinho

    Full Text Available Abstract Behavioral symptoms are frequently observed in Alzheimer's disease patients and are associated to higher distress for patients and caregivers, early institutionalization, worst prognosis and increased care. Objectives: The objective of the present study was to evaluate the frequency of neuropsychiatric symptoms in a sample of Alzheimer's disease patients and to analyze association between caregiver demographic characteristics and patient symptoms. Methods: Sixty Alzheimer's disease patients (NINCDS-ADRDA and their caregivers were consecutively included in the investigation by the Dementia Outpatient clinic of Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre. The Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI was applied to evaluate behavioral symptoms and their impact upon caregivers. Age, sex, educational attainment, relationship to the patient, and time as caregiver were obtained from all caregivers. Results: Apathy was the symptom responsible for the highest distress level, followed by agitation and aggression. A significant correlation between total severity NPI and distress NPI was observed. None of the caregiver demographic data showed association to distress. The most frequent symptoms were apathy and aberrant motor behavior. Patients' relatives also considered apathy as the most severe symptom, followed by depression and agitation. Conclusions: Apathy was the most frequent and severe neuropsychiatric symptom. No relationship between caregiver demographic characteristics and distress was observed.

  3. The multifaceted aspects of refractory lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroni, Gabriella; Ponticelli, Claudio

    2015-02-01

    The term refractory lupus nephritis is generally used to indicate cases that do not respond to traditional treatment. However, the clinical presentation of lupus nephritis is variable and the time to response depends on the typology of the underlying renal syndrome. The criteria and the time for response are different in lupus patients with nephritic flares, in those with nephrotic syndrome, and in those with asymptomatic renal disease. In this paper, we will focus on the clinical characteristics, the consequences, and the possible therapeutic approaches for patients with different forms of refractory lupus nephritis, defined on the basis of renal syndrome at presentation.

  4. Lupus cystitis in an Omani girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Shibli Amar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disease characterized by multiple organs involvement. Bladder involvement (Lupus cystitis is a rare manifestation of SLE, and occurs in association with gastrointestinal manifestations. We report a case of lupus inters-titial cystitis with bladder irritation and bilateral hydroureteronephrosis in an adolescent female who was treated with intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy followed by oral pred-nisolone and mycofenolate mofetil (MMF. Her symptoms ameliorated, and the hydrouretero-nephrosis improved. She was presented again with systemic flare up of the disease together with hydrouretronephrosis, but without bladder irritation symptoms. The diagnosis of lupus cystitis was confirmed by radiographic abnormalities, cystoscopy and bladder biopsy.

  5. Leptin-induced RORγt expression in CD4+ T cells promotes Th17 responses in systemic lupus erythematosus1

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Yiyun; Liu, Yaoyang; Shi, Fu-Dong; Zou, Hejian; Matarese, Giuseppe; Cava, Antonio La

    2013-01-01

    Th17 CD4+ cells promote inflammation and autoimmunity. Here we report that Th17 cell frequency is reduced in ob/ob mice that are genetically deficient in the adipokine leptin, and that the administration of leptin to ob/ob mice restored Th17 cell numbers to values comparable to those found in wild type animals. Leptin promoted Th17 responses in normal human CD4+ T cells and in mice, both in vitro and in vivo, by inducing RORγt transcription. Leptin also increased Th17 responses in (NZB × NZW)...

  6. Temperament and character in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Arash; Rostami, Anahita; Aflaki, Elham; Ravanfar, Parsa

    2018-01-01

    In addition to identified neuropsychiatric characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), changes in personality seem to occur in patients with SLE. Even in absence of an axis I psychiatric diagnosis, personality variations play important role in general wellbeing of these patients. This study investigated personality features in patients with SLE using Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). In this case-control study personality features of 59 patients with confirmed diagnosis of SLE were evaluated using Persian version of TCI-125 questionnaire. Collected data from patients with SLE were statistically compared with normative data for Iranian population. Among four subscales of temperament, reward dependence (RD) and harm-avoidance (HA) were significantly lower than general population. Self-directedness (SD) character dimension was significantly lower in SLE patients compared to normative data. No significant difference was noted in novelty-seeking (NS) and persistence (PS) temperament scales and cooperativeness (CO) and self-transcendence (ST) character scales. Personality changes in SLE is characterized by higher HA and RD along with low SD. These features are associated with higher anxiety, social withdrawal and lower resourcefulness and purposefulness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Myelitis in the course of systemic lupus erythematosus: review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łukjanowicz, Małgorzata; Brzosko, Marek

    2009-01-01

    Myelopathy manifested clinically as acute longitudinal or transverse myelitis constitutes one of the most severe and rare neuropsychiatric manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (1-3% of patients). Myelitis has been observed less commonly in other connective tissue diseases, mostly in antiphospholipid syndrome, and rarely in Sjögren's syndrome, Behçet's disease and mixed connective tissue disease. Acute transverse myelitis (ATM) may also be present in diseases of various etiology, including multiple sclerosis, sarcoidosis, infectious diseases and malignancies. Myelitis in SLE is manifested as a dramatic spinal cord injury leading to paralysis or muscular paresis, sensory deficits, and smooth muscle dysfunction usually in the form of sphincter dysfunction. The imaging technique of choice in case of suspected ATM is magnetic resonance imaging with intravenous contrast agent (gadolinium diethylenetriamine-pentaacid). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination in patients with ATM in the course of SLE indicate usually pleocytosis with prevalence of granulocytes, increased protein levels, low glucose levels, significantly hindering differential diagnosis in the early stage of the disease. Observations made by the authors (2 female patients with SLE) show that antibodies specific to SLE can be found in the CSF collected in the acute phase of myelitis. These observations have not yet been confirmed by other researchers. Early introduction of intravenous immunosuppression with large doses of cyclophosphamide and glucocorticosteroids improves the long-term prognosis. Other therapeutic approaches have been also used in more severe cases. Even with appropriate therapy, prognosis in this disease is uncertain.

  8. Current status of lupus nephritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaryal, Ajay; Vikrant, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic disease of unknown aetiology with variable course and prognosis. Lupus nephritis (LN) is one of the important disease manifestations of SLE with considerable influence on patient outcomes. Immunosuppression therapy has made it possible to control the disease with improved life expectancy and quality of life. In the last few decades, various studies across the globe have clarified the role, dose and duration of immunosuppression currently in use and also provided evidence for new agents such as mycophenolate mofetil, calcineurin inhibitors and rituximab. However, there is still a need to develop new and specific therapy with less adverse effects. In this review, the current evidence of the treatment of LN and its evolution, and new classification criteria for SLE have been discussed. Also, rationale for low-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide as induction agent followed by azathioprine as maintenance agent has been provided with emphasis on individualized and holistic approach. PMID:28639592

  9. Malignant change in lupus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Girdhar

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Two cases developed squamous cell carcinoma over the lupus vulgaris lesions. The first patient was a, 14 year male with a gradually developing painless, hypertrophic lesion just below the left knee for 6 years. Four years later a cauliflower growth developed over it. He was on antitubercular therapy for 3 months without any improvement. The second patient was 42 year male with a painless, growing lesion behind the right knee for 25 years. About 9 months back a rapidly progressive painful ulcerated mass developed over it which used to bleed easily o n slight trauma. Histopathological findings in both the cases were compatible with lupus vulgaris and squamous cell carcinoma. None of the cases had recurrence following excision and subsequent antitubercular therapy.

  10. Oseltamivir and Neuropsychiatric Behaviors – A Case Report on an Adolescent Teen and Evaluation of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsz-Yin SO

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To illustrate a case of oseltamivir induced neuropsychiatric behaviors in an adolescent teen. CASE SUMMARY: A 15-year-old previously healthy adolescent presented to the emergency department with acute onset of altered mental status after taking two doses of oseltamivir prescribed to him by his primary care physician for presumed influenza infection. A thorough examination at the hospital, which included a urine drug screen, complete blood count, complete metabolic panel, urine and blood cultures, head computed tomography, and chest radiograph, did not indicate any other clinical conditions that could explain his abnormal behaviors. No other medications were given to him in the hospital. About 20 hours after the last dose of oseltamivir, he awoke from a nap and his mental status was completely back to baseline. He had no memory of the events transpired in the past 24 hours and was discharged home with no further incidence.DISSCUSION: Oseltamivir is an anti-viral agent that is often used as treatment and prophylaxis for influenza infection. Neuropsychiatric adverse events such as hallucination and delirium can potentially occur with this agent. This rare adverse event may be due to the binding of the medication to the enzyme sialidase causing increase in dopamine activity. Most of the reports were in young Japanese children less than 16 years old. Some studies have shown a causal relationship with oseltamivir leading to this adverse event, while some have failed to do so, probably due to flaws in their analytical method. The Naranjo ADR probability scale showed a possible causality between neuropsychiatric behaviors and oseltamivir administration in this patient.CONCLUSIONS: Oseltamivir is an effective anti-viral for influenza infection if started early in the course of the illness. Clinicians should monitor for neuropsychiatric symptoms when starting patients on this medication.

  11. Periodontitis and systemic lupus erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Sete, Manuela Rubim Camara; Figueredo, Carlos Marcelo da Silva; Sztajnbok, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A large number of studies have shown a potential association between periodontal and autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Similar mechanisms of tissue destruction concerning periodontitis and other autoimmune diseases have stimulated the study of a possible relationship between these conditions. This study aims to review the literature about this potential association and their different pathogenic mechanisms. Considering that peri...

  12. Managing lupus patients during pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lateef, Aisha; Petri, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease, primarily affecting young females. Pregnancy in a woman with SLE remains a high risk situation with higher maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. Although live births are achieved in majority of the pregnancies, active disease and major organ involvement can negatively affect the outcomes. Higher risk of fetal loss, pre-term birth, intra-uterine growth restriction and neonatal lupus syndromes are major fetal issues. Mothers are faced with disease flares, pre-eclampsia and other complications. Disease flares during SLE pregnancy pose the unique issue of recognition and differentiation between physiologic changes and disease state. Similarly pre-eclampsia and lupus nephritis may lead to diagnostic confusion. Treatment choices during pregnancy are limited to a few safe drugs, further restricting the options. Refractory pregnancy loss associated with anti-phospholipid antibodies and complete heart block associated with anti-Ro antibodies remain unresolved issues. A multidisciplinary approach, with close monitoring, is essential for optimal outcomes. PMID:24238698

  13. Validation of the Lupus Nephritis Clinical Indices in Childhood-Onset Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mina, Rina; Abulaban, Khalid; Klein-Gitelman, Marisa S; Eberhard, Barbara A; Ardoin, Stacy P; Singer, Nora; Onel, Karen; Tucker, Lori; O'neil, Kathleen; Wright, Tracey; Brooks, Elizabeth; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly; Jung, Lawrence; Imundo, Lisa; Rovin, Brad; Witte, David; Ying, Jun; Brunner, Hermine I

    2016-02-01

    To validate clinical indices of lupus nephritis activity and damage when used in children against the criterion standard of kidney biopsy findings. In 83 children requiring kidney biopsy, the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index renal domain (SLEDAI-R), British Isles Lupus Assessment Group index renal domain (BILAG-R), Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) renal activity score (SLICC-RAS), and SLICC Damage Index renal domain (SDI-R) were measured. Fixed effects and logistic models were calculated to predict International Society of Nephrology/Renal Pathology Society (ISN/RPS) class; low-to-moderate versus high lupus nephritis activity (National Institutes of Health [NIH] activity index [AI]) score: ≤10 versus >10; tubulointerstitial activity index (TIAI) score: ≤5 versus >5; or the absence versus presence of lupus nephritis chronicity (NIH chronicity index) score: 0 versus ≥1. There were 10, 50, and 23 patients with ISN/RPS class I/II, III/IV, and V, respectively. Scores of the clinical indices did not differentiate among patients by ISN/RPS class. The SLEDAI-R and SLICC-RAS but not the BILAG-R differed with lupus nephritis activity status defined by NIH-AI scores, while only the SLEDAI-R scores differed between lupus nephritis activity status based on TIAI scores. The sensitivity and specificity of the SDI-R to capture lupus nephritis chronicity was 23.5% and 91.7%, respectively. Despite being designed to measure lupus nephritis activity, SLICC-RAS and SLEDAI-R scores significantly differed with lupus nephritis chronicity status. Current clinical indices of lupus nephritis fail to discriminate ISN/RPS class in children. Despite its shortcomings, the SLEDAI-R appears best for measuring lupus nephritis activity in a clinical setting. The SDI-R is a poor correlate of lupus nephritis chronicity. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  14. Sunlight Triggers Cutaneous Lupus through a Colony Stimulating Factor-1 (CSF-1) Dependent Mechanism in MRL-Faslpr mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, Julia; Hsu, Mei-Yu; Byrne, Katelyn T.; Lucas, Julie A.; Rabacal, Whitney A.; Croker, Byron P.; Zong, Xiao-Hua; Stanley, E. Richard; Kelley, Vicki R.

    2008-01-01

    Sunlight (UVB) triggers cutaneous (CLE) and systemic lupus through an unknown mechanism. We tested the hypothesis that UVB triggers CLE through a CSF-1-dependent, macrophage (Mø) -mediated mechanism in MRL-Faslpr mice. By constructing mutant MRL-Faslpr strains expressing varying levels of CSF-1 (high, intermediate, none), and use of an ex-vivo gene transfer to deliver CSF-1 intra-dermally, we determined that CSF-1 induces CLE in lupus-susceptible, MRL-Faslpr mice, but not in lupus-resistant, BALB/c mice. Notably, UVB incites an increase in Mø, apoptosis in the skin and CLE in MRL-Faslpr, but not in CSF-1-deficient MRL-Faslpr mice. Furthermore, UVB did not induce CLE in BALB/c mice. Probing further, UVB stimulates CSF-1 expression by keratinocytes leading to recruitment and activation of Mø that, in turn, release mediators, which induce apoptosis in keratinocytes. Thus, sunlight triggers a CSF-1-dependent, Mø-mediated destructive inflammation in the skin leading to CLE in lupus-susceptible MRL-Faslpr, but not lupus-resistant BALB/c mice. Taken together, we envision CSF-1 as the “match” and lupus-susceptibility as the “tinder” leading to CLE. PMID:18981160

  15. B cells regulate thymic CD8+T cell differentiation in lupus-prone mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Chen; Zhu, Gaizhi; Xiao, He; Fang, Ying; Liu, Xiaoling; Han, Gencheng; Chen, Guojiang; Hou, Chunmei; Shen, Beifen; Li, Yan; Ma, Ning; Wang, Renxi

    2017-10-27

    Previous studies have shown that under normal physiological conditions thymic B cells play a critical function in T cell negative selection. We tested the effect of thymic B cells on thymic T-cell differentiation in autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We found that thymic B cells and CD8 - CD4 + and CD4 - CD8 + T cells increased, whereas CD4 + CD8 + T cells decreased in lupus-prone mice. Once B cells were reduced, the change was reversed. Furthermore, we found that B cells blocked thymic immature single positive (ISP) CD4 - CD8 + CD3 lo/- RORγt - T cells progression into CD4 + CD8 + T cells. Interestingly, we found a novel population of thymic immature T cells (CD4 - CD8 + CD3 lo RORγt + ) that were induced into mature CD4 - CD8 + CD3 + RORγt + T cells by B cells in lupus-prone mice. Importantly, we found that IgG, produced by thymic B cells, played a critical role in the differentiation of thymic CD8 + ISP and mature RORγt + CD8 + T cells in lupus-prone mice. In conclusion, B cells blocked the differentiation from thymic CD8 + ISP and induced the differentiation of a novel immature CD4 - CD8 + CD3 lo RORγt + T cells into mature RORγt + CD8 + T cells by secreting IgG antibody in lupus-prone mice.

  16. Neuropsychiatric comorbidities in adults with phenylketonuria: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilder, Deborah A; Kobori, Joyce A; Cohen-Pfeffer, Jessica L; Johnson, Erin M; Jurecki, Elaina R; Grant, Mitzie L

    2017-05-01

    Adults with phenylketonuria (PKU) may experience neurologic and psychiatric disorders, including intellectual disability, anxiety, depression, and neurocognitive dysfunction. Identifying the prevalence and prevalence ratios of these conditions will inform clinical treatment. This nested, case-controlled study used International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes from the MarketScan® insurance claims databases from 2006 to 2012 and healthcare claims data for US-based employer and government-sponsored health plans. Prevalence and prevalence ratio calculations of neuropsychiatric comorbidities for adults (≥20years old) with PKU were compared with two groups [diabetes mellitus (DM) and general population (GP)] matched by age, gender, geographic location, and insurance type. Age cohorts (i.e., 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, and 70+years, and a combined subset of 20-39) were used to stratify data. The PKU cohort experienced significantly higher rates of several comorbid neurologic, psychiatric and developmental conditions. Compared to GP, PKU was associated with significantly higher prevalence for numerous neuropsychiatric conditions, most notably for intellectual disability (PR=7.9, 95% CI: 6.4-9.9), autism spectrum disorder (PR=6.1, 95% CI: 3.6-10.4), Tourette/tic disorders (PR=5.4, 95% CI: 2.1-14.1), and eating disorders (4.0, 95% CI: 3.2-5.0). Rates of fatigue/malaise, epilepsy/convulsions, sleep disturbance, personality disorders, phobias, psychosis, and migraines among those with PKU exceeded rates for the GP but were comparable to those with DM, with significantly lower rates of concomitant disorders occurring in younger, compared to older, adults with PKU. Lifelong monitoring and treatment of co-occurring neuropsychiatric conditions are important for effective PKU management. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cognitive training for impaired neural systems in neuropsychiatric illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradov, Sophia; Fisher, Melissa; de Villers-Sidani, Etienne

    2012-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric illnesses are associated with dysfunction in distributed prefrontal neural systems that underlie perception, cognition, social interactions, emotion regulation, and motivation. The high degree of learning-dependent plasticity in these networks-combined with the availability of advanced computerized technology-suggests that we should be able to engineer very specific training programs that drive meaningful and enduring improvements in impaired neural systems relevant to neuropsychiatric illness. However, cognitive training approaches for mental and addictive disorders must take into account possible inherent limitations in the underlying brain 'learning machinery' due to pathophysiology, must grapple with the presence of complex overlearned maladaptive patterns of neural functioning, and must find a way to ally with developmental and psychosocial factors that influence response to illness and to treatment. In this review, we briefly examine the current state of knowledge from studies of cognitive remediation in psychiatry and we highlight open questions. We then present a systems neuroscience rationale for successful cognitive training for neuropsychiatric illnesses, one that emphasizes the distributed nature of neural assemblies that support cognitive and affective processing, as well as their plasticity. It is based on the notion that, during successful learning, the brain represents the relevant perceptual and cognitive/affective inputs and action outputs with disproportionately larger and more coordinated populations of neurons that are distributed (and that are interacting) across multiple levels of processing and throughout multiple brain regions. This approach allows us to address limitations found in earlier research and to introduce important principles for the design and evaluation of the next generation of cognitive training for impaired neural systems. We summarize work to date using such neuroscience-informed methods and indicate some

  18. Neuropsychiatric symptoms in Vascular Cognitive Impairment: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Tiel

    Full Text Available Neuropsychiatric symptoms or Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD are common and invariably appear at some point during the course of the disease, mediated both by cerebrovascular disease and neurodegenerative processes. Few studies have compared the profiles of BPSD in Vascular Cognitive Impairment (VCI of different subtypes (subcortical or cortical and clinical stages (Vascular Cognitive Impairment No Dementia [VaCIND] and Vascular Dementia [VaD].Objective:To review the BPSD associated with different subtypes and stages of VCI using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI.Methods:Medline, Scielo and Lilacs databases were searched for the period January 2000 to December 2014, with the key words: "BPSD AND Vascular Dementia, "NPI AND Vascular Dementia" and "NPI AND VCI. Qualitative analysis was performed on studies evaluating BPSD in VCI, using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI.Results:A total of 82 studies were retrieved of which 13 were eligible and thus included. Among the articles selected, 4 compared BPSD in Subcortical Vascular Dementia (SVaD versus Cortical-Subcortical Vascular Dementia (CSVaD, 3 involved comparisons between SVaD and VaCIND, 1 study analyzed differences between CSVaD and VaCIND, while 5 studies assessed BPSD in CSVaD. Subcortical and Cortical-Subcortical VaD were associated predominantly with Apathy and Depression. VaCIND may present fewer behavioral symptoms than VaD.Conclusion:The profile of BPSD differs for different stages of VCI. Determining the most prevalent BPSD in VCI subtypes might be helpful for improving early diagnosis and management of these symptoms.

  19. A clinical update on paediatric lupus | Spittal | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The presenting manifestations of childhood-onset lupus are variable and many systems are involved. Children with lupus often present late with severe disease, and in South African (SA) children severe lupus nephritis occurs commonly at presentation. The investigations for lupus should be performed in a three-step ...

  20. Aspects of animal models for major neuropsychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lefter Radu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We will review the main animal models for the major neuropsychiatric disorders, focusing on schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, depression, anxiety and autism. Although these mental disorders are specifically human pathologies and therefore impossible to perfectly replicate in animals, the use of experimental animals is based on the physiological and anatomical similarities between humans and animals such as the rat, and mouse, and on the fact that 99% of human and murine genomes are shared. Pathological conditions in animals can be assessed by manipulating the metabolism of neurotransmitters, through various behavioral tests, and by determining biochemical parameters that can serve as important markers of disorders.

  1. Exosomal MicroRNAs as Potential Biomarkers in Neuropsychiatric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Gabriel R; Quevedo, Joao

    2018-01-01

    This chapter will discuss the potential use of microRNAs, particularly those located in peripherally-isolated exosomes, as biomarkers in neuropsychiatric disorders. These extracellular vesicles are released as a form of cell-to-cell communication and may mediate the soma-to-germline transmission of brain-relevant information, thereby potentially contributing to the inter- or transgenerational transmission of behavioral traits. Recent novel methods allow for the enrichment of peripheral exosomes specifically released by neurons and astrocytes and may provide valuable brain-relevant biosignatures of disease.

  2. Neonatal lupus erythematosus in a Nigerian infant

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-06-15

    Jun 15, 2017 ... persisted unchanged after 14 days of antibiotics. A skin snip was taken for histology and a diagnosis of neonatal lupus erythematosus was made. Key words: neonatal lupsus erythematosus, infant .... anti-Rho (SSA) antibody which is present in 95% of cases of Neonatal lupus is fundamental.8,9 The signifi-.

  3. Breast Cancer in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tessier Cloutier, B; Clarke, A E; Ramsey-Goldman, R

    2013-01-01

    Evidence points to a decreased breast cancer risk in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We analyzed data from a large multisite SLE cohort, linked to cancer registries.......Evidence points to a decreased breast cancer risk in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We analyzed data from a large multisite SLE cohort, linked to cancer registries....

  4. Sporotrichoid lupus vulgaris: A rare presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Anshul; Tiwari, Siddhi; Mathur, Deepak K; Bhargava, Puneet

    2015-01-01

    Lupus vulgaris is the most common presentation of cutaneous tuberculosis in India and can present as papular, nodular, plaque, ulcerative, vegetating, and tumid forms. Unusual variants include the frambesiform, gangrenous, ulcerovegetating, lichen simplex chronicus, myxomatous, and sporotrichoid types. We describe a rare sporotrichoid presentation of lupus vulgaris on the leg of a 28-year-old female of 12 years duration.

  5. A clinical update on paediatric lupus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords were the following: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; SLE;. Children; Update ... Systemic lupus erythematosus in children is a life-threatening chronic disease that is being increasingly recognised. More black African children .... oral corticosteroids in conjunction with disease-modifying agents as discussed above.

  6. ENDOCARDITIS IN SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AMEL Harzallah

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Endocarditis is one of the most prevalent forms of cardiac involvement in patients with lupus, as it is considered as one a life-threatening complication. Libman-Sacks endocarditis is common. Infective endocarditis can also cause complications within immunocompromised patients. The aim of this study is to determine particularities of endocarditis in patients with lupus and to look for distinguishing features between infectious or immunological origin. A retrospective study was conducted on patients with lupus presenting endocarditis. Lupus was diagnosed according to the American college of rheumatology criteria. The diagnosis of endocarditis was made based on the modified Duke criteria. The present case report studies seven cases of endocarditis. Six of these patients are women and the other one is a man. They are aged meanly of 29.4 years (extremes: 20-36. Fever was present in all the cases with a new cardiac murmur in six cases and a modification of its intensity in one case. Biologic inflammatory syndrome was present in six cases. Cardiac ultrasound performed in six cases made the diagnosis of endocarditis which involved the left heart valves in five cases and the right heart valves in one case. Valvular insufficiency was identified in six patients. The valve involvement was mitral in two cases, mitro-aortic in two others, aortic in the fifth one and tricuspid in the sixth one. Endocarditis was infectious in 4 cases, thanks to positive blood culture. The germs identified were gram negative bacilli in two cases, anaerobic organism in one case and gram positive cocci in one case. Candida albicans was isolated in one case. Libman-Sacks endocarditis was objectified in three cases. A combination of Libman-Sacks endocarditis with infectious endocarditis was diagnosed in one case. The treatment consisted of antibiotics in four cases with surgery in two cases. The outcome was favorable in five cases and fatal in the two others. Endocarditis in lupus

  7. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a patient with lupus nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Kadikoy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is characterized by acute onset of headache, nausea, focal neurological deficits or seizures along with radiological findings of white matter defects in the parietal and occipital lobes. Causes of PRES include uremia, hypertensive encephalopathy, eclampsia and immunosuppressive medications. Usually, the treat-ment of choice involves correcting the underlying abnormality. We describe an unusual case of recurrent PRES caused by uremia during a lupus flare in a patient with biopsy-proven Class IV Lupus Nephritis (LN with vasculitis. PRES in systemic lupus erythematosis (SLE is a rare clin-ical phenomenon and, when reported, it is associated with hypertensive encephalopathy. Our patient did not have hypertensive crisis, but had uremic encephalopathy. The patient′s PRES-related symptoms resolved after initiation of hemodialysis. The temporal correlation of the correc-tion of the uremia and the resolution of the symptoms of PRES show the etiology to be uremic encephalopathy, making this the first reported case of uremia-induced PRES in Class IV LN with vasculitis.

  8. Gastrointestinal symptomatology as first manifestation of systemic erythematous lupus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačević Zoran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Systemic lupus erithematodes (SLE is chronic, often febrile, multisystemic disease unknown origin and relapsing course which affects connective tissue of the skin, joints, kidney and serous membranes. Gastrointestinal manifestations are rarely the first sign of systemic lupus erythematosus. Case report. We presented a female patient, 35 years old, whose first symptoms of SLE were paralitic ileus (chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction and polyserositis (pleural effusion and ascites. Except for high parameters of inflammation, leucopenia and thrombocytopenia, all immunological and laboratory tests for SLE were negative in the onset of the disease. During next six months the patient had clinical signs of paralitic ileus several times and was twice operated with progressive malabsorptive syndrome. The full picture of SLE was manifested seven months later associated with lupus nephritis. Treatment with cyclophosphamide, corticosteroids and total parenteral nutrition (30 days induced stable remission of the disease. Conclusion. The SLE can be initially manifested with gastroenterological symptoms without any other clinical and immunologic parameters of the disease. If in patients with SLE and gastrointestinal tract involvement malabsorption syndrom is developed, a treatment success depends on both immunosupressive therapy and total parenteral nutrition.

  9. [Gastrointestinal symptomatology as first manifestation of systemic erythematous lupus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacević, Zoran; Rabrenović, Violeta; Jovanović, Dragan; Petrović, Marijana; Rabrenović, Milorad; Matunović, Radomir

    2009-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematodes (SLE) is chronic, often febrile, multisystemic disease unknown origin and relapsing course which affects connective tissue of the skin, joints, kidney and serous membranes. Gastrointestinal manifestations are rarely the first sign of systemic lupus erythematosus. We presented a female patient, 35 years old, whose first symptoms of SLE were paralitic ileus (chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction) and polyserositis (pleural effusion and ascites). Except for high parameters of inflammation, leucopenia and thrombocytopenia, all immunological and laboratory tests for SLE were negative in the onset of the disease. During next six months the patient had clinical signs of paralitic ileus several times and was twice operated with progressive malabsorptive syndrome. The full picture of SLE was manifested seven months later associated with lupus nephritis. Treatment with cyclophosphamide, corticosteroids and total parenteral nutrition (30 days) induced stable remission of the disease. The SLE can be initially manifested with gastroenterological symptoms without any other clinical and immunologic parameters of the disease. If in patients with SLE and gastrointestinal tract involvement malabsorption syndrom is developed, a treatment success depends on both immunosupressive therapy and total parenteral nutrition.

  10. Gastrointestinal system manifestations in juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sönmez, Hafize Emine; Karhan, Asuman Nur; Batu, Ezgi Deniz; Bilginer, Yelda; Gümüş, Ersin; Demir, Hülya; Yüce, Aysel; Özen, Seza

    2017-07-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease which may involve gastrointestinal system (GIS). The aim of this study was to present GIS manifestations of pediatric SLE patients. The medical files of 69 children with SLE followed between January 2011 and January 2016 were reviewed. All fulfilled the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics criteria. All patients (≤18 years of age) with GIS manifestations were included. GIS manifestations were observed in 19 (27.5%) out of 69 SLE patients and present at the time of SLE diagnosis in 13 (68.4%). The GIS manifestations due to SLE were autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) (n = 8) and lupus enteritis (n = 1). Manifestations associated with SLE were hepatomegaly and hypertransaminasemia due to macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) (n = 3) and hepatic steatosis (n = 1). GIS manifestations as a result of the adverse events of drugs were as follows: toxic hepatitis (n = 3; associated with methotrexate and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in one, methotrexate in another, and azathioprine in another patient), azathioprine-induced cholestatic hepatitis (n = 1), and gastritis associated with corticosteroid (n = 1). In one patient, acute appendicitis occurred as a coincidence. In this study, one of every five pediatric SLE patients had GIS-related manifestations. GIS involvement may occur as an initial manifestation of the disease.

  11. Biomarkers for Lupus Nephritis: A Critical Appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Chiu Mok

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Kidney disease is one of the most serious manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Despite the improvement in the medical care of SLE in the past two decades, the prognosis of lupus nephritis remains unsatisfactory. Besides exploring more effective but less toxic treatment modalities that will further improve the remission rate, early detection and treatment of renal activity may spare patients from intensive immunosuppressive therapies and reduce renal damage. Conventional clinical parameters such as creatinine clearance, proteinuria, urine sediments, anti-dsDNA, and complement levels are not sensitive or specific enough for detecting ongoing disease activity in the lupus kidneys and early relapse of nephritis. Thus, novel biomarkers are necessary to enhance the diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity of lupus renal disease, prognostic stratification, monitoring of treatment response, and detection of early renal flares. This paper reviews promising biomarkers that have recently been evaluated in longitudinal studies of lupus nephritis.

  12. Lupus vulgaris with squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motswaledi, Mojakgomo Hendrick; Doman, Chantal

    2007-12-01

    Tuberculosis is still a significant problem in developing countries. Cutaneous forms of tuberculosis account for approximately 10% of all cases of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Cutaneous tuberculosis may be because of true infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis or because of tuberculids. Tuberculids are immunological reactions to haematogenously spread antigenic components of M. tuberculosis. True cutaneous tuberculosis may be because of inoculation or haematogenous spread of M. tuberculosis to the skin. Lupus vulgaris is the commonest form of true cutaneous tuberculosis. Other forms of true cutaneous tuberculosis are tuberculous chancre, tuberculosis verrucosa cutis, scrofuloderma, periorificial tuberculosis and miliary tuberculosis of the skin. Lupus vulgaris is usually chronic and progressive. It occurs in patients with moderate to high immunity against M. tuberculosis as evidenced by strongly positive tuberculin test. Long-standing cases of lupus vulgaris may be complicated by squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We describe a patient who had undiagnosed lupus vulgaris for 35 years until she developed SCC on the lesion of lupus vulgaris.

  13. Th Subset Balance in Lupus Nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhisa Miyake

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lupus nephritis, which has various histological patterns and variable clinical outcomes, is one of the most important complications of systemic lupus nephritis (SLE. This pathogenetic mechanism in each histologically different type of lupus nephritis (LN remains unclear. Although SLE is suggested to be a Th2-driven disease, elevation of both Th1 and Th2 cytokines occurs in both humans and mice, suggesting that SLE is a complex disease driven by different lymphocyte subsets with high heterogeneity of clinical manifestations and organ involvement. Recent findings in LN elucidate an essential role for the Th1, IL-17 producing T cells and Th17 cells in the development of diffuse proliferative lupus nephritis (DPLN, and Th2 cytokine in that of membranous lupus nephritis (MLN. These data support the hypothesis that individual Th1/Th2 balance is one of the critical determinants for histopathology of LN.

  14. [Pulmonary manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincze, Krisztina; Odler, Balázs; Müller, Veronika

    2016-07-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is the most common connective tissue disease that is associated with pulmonary manifestations. Although lupus has the potential to affect any organ, lung involvement is observed during the course of the disease in most cases and it is prognostic for outcome. Pulmonary manifestations in lupus can be classified into five groups based on the anatomical involvement: pleura, lung parenchyma, bronchi and bronchioli, lung vasculature and respiratory muscles can be involved. The most common respiratory manifestations attributable to lupus are pleuritis with or without pleural effusion, pulmonary vascular disease, upper and lower airway dysfunction, parenchymal disease, and diaphragmatic dysfunction (shrinking lung syndrome). In this article the authors summarize lung involvement of lupus, its diagnosis, therapy and prognosis. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(29), 1154-1160.

  15. Lupus mastitis - peculiar radiological and pathological features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wani, Abdul Majid; Hussain, Waleed Mohd; Fatani, Mohamed I; Shakour, Bothaina Abdul

    2009-01-01

    Lupus mastitis is a form of lupus profundus that is seen in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. It usually presents as a swelling (or swellings) in the breasts, with or without pain. The condition is recurrent and progresses along with the underlying disease, with fat necrosis, calcification, fibrosis, scarring, and breast atrophy. Lupus mastitis is often confused with malignancy and lymphoma and, in our part of the world, with tuberculosis. Confusion is especially likely when it occurs in an unusual clinical setting. In this article, we present a case that presented with unique radiological, pathological, and clinical features. Awareness of the various manifestations of lupus mastitis is essential if unnecessary interventions such as biopsies and surgeries, and their consequences, are to be avoided

  16. Impaired awareness of deficits and neuropsychiatric symptoms in early Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Asmus; Waldorff, Frans Boch; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2010-01-01

    Impaired awareness may be associated with increased neuropsychiatric symptoms in moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease, but relatively little is known about the association in early Alzheimer's disease. The aim of this study was to investigate if impaired awareness was associated with a higher...... frequency of neuropsychiatric symptoms in early Alzheimer's disease. In a Danish multicenter study, 321 patients with MMSE score > or =20 were evaluated. Patients with poor insight had significantly more neuropsychiatric symptoms than patients with full insight. When patients had increasing neuropsychiatric...

  17. D-Serine in Neuropsychiatric Disorders: New Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea R. Durrant

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available D-Serine (DSR is an endogenous amino acid involved in glia-synapse interactions that has unique neurotransmitter characteristics. DSR acts as obligatory coagonist at the glycine site associated with the N-methyl-D-aspartate subtype of glutamate receptors (NMDAR and has a cardinal modulatory role in major NMDAR-dependent processes including NMDAR-mediated neurotransmission, neurotoxicity, synaptic plasticity, and cell migration. Since either over- or underfunction of NMDARs may be involved in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders; the pharmacological manipulation of DSR signaling represents a major drug development target. A first generation of proof-of-concept animal and clinical studies suggest beneficial DSR effects in treatment-refractory schizophrenia, movement, depression, and anxiety disorders and for the improvement of cognitive performance. A related developing pharmacological strategy is the indirect modification of DSR synaptic levels by use of compounds that alter the function of main enzymes responsible for DSR production and degradation. Accumulating data indicate that, during the next decade, we will witness important advances in the understanding of DSR role that will further contribute to elucidating the causes of neuropsychiatric disorders and will be instrumental in the development of innovative treatments.

  18. Severity of Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Nursing Home Residents

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    Anne-Sofie Helvik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed at assessing time shift in the severity of neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS in nursing home residents between 2004/2005 and 2010/2011 and associations between NPS and socio-demographic variables, physical health status, dementia severity, and the use of psychotropic drugs. The Neuropsychiatric Inventory Nursing Home Version was used in 2004/2005 (n = 1,163 and 2010/2011 (n = 1,858. Linear mixed model analysis was applied. There was no time shift in the severity of apathy, psychosis, and affective symptoms, but agitation did exhibit a time shift. Agitation was less severe in 2010/2011 than in 2004/2005 in residents with a Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR sum of boxes score ≤4, and more severe in residents with a CDR sum of boxes score >16. Higher CDR sum of boxes scores and use of psychotropic medication were associated with more severe apathy, agitation, psychosis, and affective symptoms. Poor physical health was associated with more severe apathy, psychosis, and affective symptoms. Women had more severe agitation and less severe affective symptoms than men. A longer stay in a nursing home was associated with more severe agitation and less severe affective symptoms. In conclusion, agitation was less severe in 2010/2011 than in 2004/2005 among nursing home residents with a milder degree of dementia, and more severe in residents with severe dementia.

  19. Neuropsychiatric symptoms predict hypometabolism in preclinical Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kok Pin; Pascoal, Tharick A; Mathotaarachchi, Sulantha; Chung, Chang-Oh; Benedet, Andréa L; Shin, Monica; Kang, Min Su; Li, Xiaofeng; Ba, Maowen; Kandiah, Nagaendran; Rosa-Neto, Pedro; Gauthier, Serge

    2017-05-09

    To identify regional brain metabolic dysfunctions associated with neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) in preclinical Alzheimer disease (AD). We stratified 115 cognitively normal individuals into preclinical AD (both amyloid and tau pathologies present), asymptomatic at risk for AD (either amyloid or tau pathology present), or healthy controls (no amyloid or tau pathology present) using [ 18 F]florbetapir PET and CSF phosphorylated tau biomarkers. Regression and voxel-based regression models evaluated the relationships between baseline NPS measured by the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) and baseline and 2-year change in metabolism measured by [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET. Individuals with preclinical AD with higher NPI scores had higher [ 18 F]FDG uptake in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), ventromedial prefrontal cortex, and right anterior insula at baseline. High NPI scores predicted subsequent hypometabolism in the PCC over 2 years only in individuals with preclinical AD. Sleep/nighttime behavior disorders and irritability and lability were the components of the NPI that drove this metabolic dysfunction. The magnitude of NPS in preclinical cases, driven by sleep behavior and irritability domains, is linked to transitory metabolic dysfunctions within limbic networks vulnerable to the AD process and predicts subsequent PCC hypometabolism. These findings support an emerging conceptual framework in which NPS constitute an early clinical manifestation of AD pathophysiology. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  20. Traumatic brain injury–Modeling neuropsychiatric symptoms in rodents

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    Oz eMalkesman

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Each year in the United States, approximately 1.5 million people sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI. Victims of TBI can suffer from chronic post-TBI symptoms, such as sensory and motor deficits, cognitive impairments including problems with memory, learning, and attention, and neuropsychiatric symptoms such as depression, anxiety, irritability, aggression, and suicidal rumination. Although partially associated with the site and severity of injury, the biological mechanisms associated with many of these symptoms—and why some patients experience differing assortments of persistent maladies—are largely unknown. The use of animal models is a promising strategy for elucidation of the mechanisms of impairment and treatment, and learning, memory, sensory and motor tests have widespread utility in rodent models of TBI and psychopharmacology. Comparatively, behavioral tests for the evaluation of neuropsychiatric symptomatology are rarely employed in animal models of TBI and, as determined in this review, the results have been inconsistent. Animal behavioral studies contribute to the understanding of the biological mechanisms by which TBI is associated with neurobehavioral symptoms and offer a powerful means for pre-clinical treatment validation. Therefore, further exploration of the utility of animal behavioral tests for the study of injury mechanisms and therapeutic strategies for the alleviation of emotional symptoms are relevant and essential.

  1. Rituximab in systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckwith, Hannah; Lightstone, Liz

    2014-01-01

    Treatment options for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis (LN) have high associated morbidity and mortality. Side effects, particularly from long-term corticosteroid usage, limit patient adherence, with subsequent impacts on treatment efficacy. In addition, a subset of patients with SLE/LN fails to respond to current standard immunotherapy. There is an urgent need to develop steroid-sparing treatment regimens as well as novel therapies for the management of refractory disease. Rituximab is a chimeric mouse/human monoclonal antibody directed against the B cell CD20 receptor. It has been used in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma for over 30 years and has an excellent safety profile. Recent work has demonstrated a role for B cell depletion therapy in the management of autoimmune disease, and the efficacy of rituximab in many observational studies in SLE and LN has been noted. Unfortunately, two large randomised controlled trials evaluating rituximab for the treatment of renal and non-renal lupus failed to meet their primary endpoints. Reasons for this have been discussed extensively within the medical community with a general consensus that trial design (steroid use, trial size and endpoints used) was the principal reason for the failures. Despite the lack of trial evidence, clinical experience means many physicians firmly believe in the value of rituximab in SLE/LN treatment and have continued to use it in their clinical practice. Recent work has demonstrated the efficacy of rituximab as a steroid-sparing agent and as an alternative therapeutic option for refractory SLE/LN. There are two further rituximab randomised controlled trials planned/started in LN – one using a steroid-minimising regimen with rituximab for induction and one evaluating rituximab for LN refractory to 6 months standard of care treatment. Rituximab remains a problematic drug in lupus and LN – it is a biologically plausible agent with a huge amount of supportive

  2. 75 FR 35493 - Guidance for Industry on Systemic Lupus Erythematosus-Developing Medical Products for Treatment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-22

    ... ``Lupus Nephritis Caused by Systemic Lupus Erythematosus--Developing Medical Products for Treatment... entitled ``Systemic Lupus Erythematosus--Developing Medical Products for Treatment.'' This guidance... medical devices for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This guidance finalizes the draft...

  3. Improving Outcomes in Patients with Lupus and End Stage Renal Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Inda-Filho, Antonio; Neugarten, Joel; Putterman, Chaim; Broder, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The development of lupus-related end stage renal disease (ESRD) confers the highest mortality rates among individuals with lupus. Lupus-related ESRD is also associated with higher morbidity and mortality rates compared with non-lupus ESRD.

  4. HLA-G genotype and HLA-G expression in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzo, R; Hviid, T V F; Govoni, M

    2008-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease mainly mediated by the deposit of immune complexes and defects in T lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells along with a high production of T-helper 2 cytokines. A tolerance-inducible function of nonclassical class Ib human leukocyte...

  5. Lupus anticoagulant is significantly associated with inflammatory reactions in patients with suspected deep vein thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidelmann, Johannes Jakobsen; Sjøland, Jonas A.; Gram, Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Lupus anticoagulant (LA) and antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) are suggested as risk factors for development of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) among patients without systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Other conditions, e.g. inflammation, are reported to induce LA and it is uncertain whether...... the association between LA and DVT is causal. In this study the associations between aPL, LA and inflammation were investigated in 170 consecutive patients without SLE, but with a tentative diagnosis of DVT. MATERIAL AND METHODS: DVT was diagnosed in 64 patients. LA was determined according to the criteria...

  6. Renal expression of polyomavirus large T antigen is associated with nephritis in human systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenton, Kristin Andreassen; Mjelle, Janne Erikke; Jacobsen, Søren

    2008-01-01

    ) that these complexes bound induced anti-nucleosome antibodies and finally (iv) that they associated with glomerular membranes as immune complexes. This process may be relevant for human lupus nephritis, since productive polyomavirus infection is associated with this organ manifestation. Here, we compare nephritis...... to the evolution of lupus nephritis in human SLE....... in the T-ag transgenic mouse with nephritis in human SLE. Glomerular sections were analysed by transmission electron microscopy, immune electron microscopy (IEM) and by co-localization IEM and TUNEL IEM assays to compare morphological changes, composition of immune complexes and formation of nucleosome...

  7. Mucormycosis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Chi Chiu; Que, Tak Lun; Tsui, Edmund Yik Kong; Lam, Wing Yin

    2003-10-01

    To describe a case of mucormycosis in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and to review other patients reported in the English literature. A Medline search for articles about mucormycosis in SLE published between 1970 and 2002 was performed by using the key words "lupus," "mucormycosis," "zygomycosis," "Mucorales," "Rhizopus," and "Mucor." Cases were pooled for analysis, and the mycology, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of mucormycosis in SLE was reviewed. Eight cases of mucormycosis in SLE were identified (female:male = 7:1). The mean age at the time of infection was 31.8 +/- 7.6 years and the mean duration of SLE was 6.3 +/- 3.9 years. All except 1 patient had active lupus and all were receiving high-dose corticosteroids. Concomitant cytotoxic agents were used in 4 patients. Additional predisposing factors for opportunistic infection included hypocomplementemia, nephrotic syndrome, uremia, leukopenia, and diabetes mellitus. The disseminated form of mucormycosis was the most common presentation and the diagnosis often was made only at autopsy (63%). For cases with positive culture results, Rhizopus was the causative species. In 4 patients, manifestations of the fungal infection mimicked those of active SLE. The overall mortality of mucormycosis was very high (88%) and, in most cases, was probably a function of delayed diagnosis and treatment. The cutaneous form appeared to have the best prognosis with combined medical and surgical treatment. Mucormycosis is a rare but usually fatal fungal infection in SLE. Judicious use of immunosuppressive agents, a high index of suspicion, early diagnosis, and combination treatment with amphotericin B and surgical debridement may improve the prognosis of this serious infection.

  8. Neurodevelopmental disorders in children born to mothers with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinet, É; Pineau, C A; Clarke, A E; Fombonne, É; Platt, R W; Bernatsky, S

    2014-10-01

    Children born to women with systemic lupus erythematosus seem to have a potentially increased risk of neurodevelopmental disorders compared to children born to healthy women. Recent experimental data suggest in utero exposure to maternal antibodies and cytokines as important risk factors for neurodevelopmental disorders. Interestingly, women with systemic lupus erythematosus display high levels of autoantibodies and cytokines, which have been shown, in animal models, to alter fetal brain development and induce behavioral anomalies in offspring. Furthermore, subjects with systemic lupus erythematosus and neurodevelopmental disorders share a common genetic predisposition, which could impair the fetal immune response to in utero immunologic insults. Moreover, systemic lupus erythematosus pregnancies are at increased risk of adverse obstetrical outcomes and medication exposures, which have been implicated as potential risk factors for neurodevelopmental disorders. In this article, we review the current state of knowledge on neurodevelopmental disorders and their potential determinants in systemic lupus erythematosus offspring. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  9. Lupus vulgaris of the auricle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojat Eftekhari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays despite decrease in the tuberculosis (TB incidence around the world with standard anti tubercular treatment, atypical forms of TB is increasing due to extensive use of immunosuppressive therapy for autoimmune diseases and increasing prevalence of HIV infection, so early diagnosis of pulmonary and extra pulmonary TB in these patients is very important. Cutaneous TB could be a great imitator and confused with other granulomatous lesions. It has different morphological patterns. Lupus vulgaris (LV is the most common type of cutaneous TB which usually involves head and neck. We present herein a case of LV in auricular region without apparent systemic involvement.

  10. Global Cognitive Impairment in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients: A Structural MRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Nicolle; Corrêa, Diogo Goulart; Kubo, Tadeu Almodovar; Netto, Tania Maria; Pereira, Denis Batista; Fonseca, Rochele Paz; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro

    2017-03-01

    This study investigated differences in subcortical brain volumes of SLE patients with cognitive deficits (SLE-CD) and SLE patients with normal cognitive performance (SLE-CN), regardless of the presence of other neuropsychiatric symptoms. We studied 40 patients divided into two-matched groups (SLE-CD n = 20; SLE-CN n = 20), with age ranging from 21 to 63 years old (100 % female) and 14.73 ± 10.18 years of diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging exams were performed on a 1.5 T scanner. A neuropsychological flexible battery was applied individually, including reasoning/problem-solving, praxis, episodic and working memory, processing speed, language/fluency, executive functions (inhibition and flexibility), and sustained attention. Z score ≤ - 2.0 in any dimension was considered as a cut-off for being considered to possess cognitive deficits. One-way analyses of covariance (ANCOVA) were performed to compare the brain structure volumes between groups. The analyses were controlled for the effects of lupus-related neuropsychiatric disorders. SLE patients with cognitive deficits had significantly smaller volumes in the left hippocampus, amygdala, and the right hippocampus than SLE patients without cognitive deficits. SLE patients with cognitive deficits appeared to have reduced temporal lobe structures when compared with SLE without cognitive deficits. These results corroborate a systems vulnerability model that investigated temporal lobe vulnerability during normal aging and in other neurological disorders.

  11. Systemic lupus erythematosus in the multiethnic Malaysian population: disease expression and ethnic differences revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmin, R; Sockalingam, S; Cheah, T E; Goh, K J

    2013-08-01

    Ethnic differences in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have been previously described in the multiethnic Malaysian population. However, there have since been many demographic and socioeconomic changes in the country. The aim of this study is to re-examine the clinical and immunological profiles of Malaysian SLE patients of different ethnic backgrounds. Consecutive follow-up patients at the University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC) from July 2010 until March 2011 were included in the study. The most common clinical manifestations were malar rash (61.3%), arthritis (52.3%), haematological disease (51.6%), oral ulcers (51%) and renal disease (40.6%). Ethnic Indians had fewer malar and discoid rashes but were at higher risk of arthritis, serositis, renal and neuropsychiatric disease compared to Malays and Chinese Malaysians. Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) was less common in Chinese. A longer duration of SLE correlated with a lower SLEDAI score. Overall, the spectrum disease expression was similar to the earlier Malaysian study but the frequency of the more severe disease manifestations, viz. renal, haematological, neuropsychiatric involvements and serositis, were lower. This study further emphasises differences primarily between ethnic Indians and the other races in Malaysia.

  12. Central nervous system involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus. The application of cranial computed tomography

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    Nagaoka, S.; Ishigatsubo, Y.; Katou, K.; Sakamoto, H.; Chiba, J. (Yokohama City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1982-06-01

    Cranial computed tomography scans were performed on 47 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Abnormal findings in the computed tomograms (CT) were observed in 17 patients (36.2%). Cerebral atrophy was the most common feature (eight cases), followed by abnormal high density areas (five cases), abnormal low density areas (three cases), sulcal enlargement (two cases), intracranial hemorrhage (one case) and others (two cases). The abnormal cranial CT group of SLE was associated with a significantly higher incidence of urinary casts and of thrombocytopenia. In particular, the frequency of urinary casts was greater in the group with cerebral atrophy than in the group with normal CT findings, and there was a higher incidence of alopecia, leukopenia and thrombocytopenia in the group with intracranial calcifications. Neuropsychiatric involvements were noted in 70.6% of patients with CT abnormalities, but neuropsychiatric features (20.7%) and electroencephalographic abnormalities (44.8%) were also observed in patients with normal CT findings. The age at onset of SLE, the mean duration of the disease and the survival rate were not significantly different between the groups with and without CT abnormalities, but the mortality rate was significantly greater in the group with CT abnormalities, especially among those with brain atrophy. Concerning the relationship between the findings of cranial CT and corticosteroid treatment, there was no significant difference in either the total dose or the mean duration of prednisolone therapy. Although SLE patients with cerebral atrophy were taking a larger maintenance dose of corticosteroids, the differences were not statistically significant.

  13. Cross-fostering in gray wolves (Canis lupus lupus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharis, Inger; Amundin, Mats

    2015-01-01

    Cross-fostering in canids, with captive-bred pups introduced into endangered wild populations, might aid conservation efforts by increasing genetic diversity and lowering the risk of inbreeding depression. The gray wolf (Canis lupus lupus) population in Scandinavia suffers from severe inbreeding due to a narrow genetic base and geographical isolation. This study aimed at evaluating the method to cross-foster wolf pups from zoo-born to zoo-born litters. The following was assessed: female initial acceptance of foster pups, growth rate in relation to age difference between foster pups and pups in recipient litters and survival over the first 33 weeks. The study included four litters added by two foster pups in each. The age differences between the foster pups and the recipient litters were 2-8 days. After augmentation, all four females accepted the foster pups, demonstrated by her moving the entire litter to a new den site. Growth rate was dependent on the age difference of the pups in the foster litters, with a considerably slower growth rate in the 8 days younger pups. However, these pups later appeared to be at no disadvantage. Foster pups had a higher survival rate than females' pups, however, the causes of death were probably not kin or non-kin related. The results indicate that cross-fostering works in gray wolves and that this might be a plausible way to increase genetic variation in the wild population. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Incidence of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Marie-Louise From; Lindhardsen, Jesper; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine the incidence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and SLE with concomitant or subsequent lupus nephritis (LN) in Denmark during 1995.2011, using data from the Danish National Patient Registry (NPR).  Methods. To assess the incidence of SLE, we identified all persons aged...... with or after first SLE registration.  Results. The overall annual incidence rate per 100,000 for SLE was 2.35 (95% CI 2.24.2.49); 0.69 (95% CI 0.60.0.78) for men and 3.96 (95% CI 3.75.4.17) for women. For LN, the mean annual incidence rate per 100,000 was estimated to be 0.45 (95% CI 0.38.0.53); 0.20 (95% CI 0...... (December 31, 2011) per 100,000 was 45.2 (95% CI 43.3.47.4) and 6.4 (95% CI 5.7.7.2) for SLE and LN, respectively.  Conclusion. Our Danish population-based data showed a stable incidence of SLE and LN. As expected, we found higher incidence rates among women than among men, particularly in younger persons....

  15. Do Asian patients have worse lupus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, M Y; Li, W L

    2010-10-01

    The predisposition to and clinical phenotype of systemic lupus erythematosus, an autoimmune disease that is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, are affected by genetic and environmental factors. This article aims to examine whether Asians have worse lupus by reviewing the literature on genetic predisposition and clinical outcomes, including major organ involvement, damage score and mortality in Asian populations compared with other ethnicities. A number of lupus nephritis susceptibility genes have been identified in Asians and White patients, with further variations among different Asian populations. Meta-analysis studies on various Fcγ receptor subtypes revealed that FcγRIIIA-F158 allele, which is associated with low binding affinity to IgG1 and IgG3, predisposed to lupus nephritis in Asian patients. Asian patients were reported to have higher rates of lupus nephritis-associated autoantibodies, lupus nephritis and more active glomerulonephritis compared with White patients. Renal outcome and the level of immunosuppressant use in Asians were comparable to Afro-American Blacks in some studies. Asians were also found to have higher overall damage scores compared with Whites. The difference in mortality between Asian patients and other ethnicities in different geographical regions was found to vary depending on socioeconomic factors such as access to health care. Poverty, education level, cultural and behavioural factors are confounders to ethnicity in determining clinical outcome of systemic lupus erythematosus.

  16. Lupus vulgaris in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and persistent IgG deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düzgün, N; Duman, M; Sonel, B; Peksari, Y; Erdem, C; Tokgöz, G

    1997-01-01

    We present the case of a patient with juvenile onset systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who developed a persistent, acquired hypogammaglobulinaemia with IgG deficiency. The hypogammaglobulinaemia was probably a complication of high dose corticosteroid treatment. The serum IgG level remained subnormal despite intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. Lupus vulgaris, which developed on the nasal cartilage in this patient with SLE, is not an expected finding. This patient is probably the first reported case of SLE associated with lupus vulgaris.

  17. Identifying elders with neuropsychiatric problems in a clinical setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Sadanand

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Multiple health problems among the elderly necessitate a comprehensive enquiry to detect problems early and also initiate treatment. We utilized available validated instruments to comprehensively identify older persons with neuro-psychiatric problems including dementia and comorbid medical ailments in the screening desk of the geriatric clinic. Materials and Methods: Individuals aged 60 years and above seeking outpatient care at NIMHANS during a 2-year period (October 2008-September 2010 participated. We used General Health Questionnaire (12-item, AD8, questions to identify psychoses and neurological problems and a checklist of common medical ailments. A probable clinical diagnosis was made at the end by medical personnel based on ICD-10. Results: A total of 5,260 individuals were screened and more than one-third (36.7% were women. About 50% had psychological distress (≥2 on GHQ-12, 20.1% had probable cognitive impairment (≥2 on AD8 and about 17% had symptoms suggestive of psychoses (≥1 on Psychoses screener. More than 65% had either a neurological or neurosurgical problems (≥1 on Neurological screener and headache was the commonest complaint. At probable diagnosis, more than 50% had a neurological problem and over 30% had psychiatric disorders. Of these the most common psychiatric illnesses were psychotic disorders (22.0%, mood disorders (21.4% and dementia (14.4%. The most common medical comorbidity included hypertension (36.4%, visual impairment (31.8% and joint pains (30.5%. Nearly 80% had one or more medical comorbidity in addition to psychiatric illness. The overall set of instruments took about 15-20 minutes. It systematically and comprehensively guided in evaluating the elderly for neuropsychiatric problems and hence was collated to constitute the Instruments for Comprehensive Evaluation of the Elderly (ICE-E. Conclusions: ICE-E was brief, easy to administer and improved decision making even by personnel from a non

  18. Childhood-onset bullous systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, D M R; Gomes, R Cunha; Aikawa, N E; Campos, L M A; Romiti, R; Silva, C A

    2014-11-01

    Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus has rarely been described in pediatric lupus population and the real prevalence of childhood-onset bullous systemic lupus erythematosus has not been reported. From January 1983 to November 2013, 303 childhood-onset SLE (c-SLE) patients were followed at the Pediatric Rheumatology Unit of the Childreńs Institute of Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina Universidade da Universidade de São Paulo, three of them (1%) diagnosed as childhood-onset bullous systemic lupus erythematosus. All three cases presented tense vesiculobullous lesions unassociated with lupus erythematosus lesions, with the median duration of 60 days (30-60). All patients fulfilled bullous systemic lupus erythematosus criteria. Two had nephritis and serositis and presented specific autoantibodies. The histological pattern demonstrated subepidermal blisters with neutrophils-predominant infiltrates within the upper dermis. Direct immunofluorescence (DIF) showed deposits of IgG and complement along the epidermal basement membrane, in the presence or absence of IgA and/or IgM. A positive indirect immunofluorescence on salt-split skin demonstrating dermal binding was observed in two cases. All of them had moderate/severe disease activity at diagnosis with median Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K) of 18 (14-24). Two patients received dapsone and one with severe nephritis received immunosuppressive drugs. In conclusion, in the last 30 years the prevalence of bullous lupus in childhood-onset lupus population was low (1%) in our tertiary University Hospital. A diagnosis of SLE should always be considered in children with recurrent tense vesiculobullous lesions with or without systemic manifestations. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  19. Antilymphocyte Antibodies in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Association with Disease Activity and Lymphopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We analyzed the prevalence, clinical correlation, and the functional significance of ALA in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Methods. ALA IgG was detected by indirect immunofluorescence in the serum of 130 SLE patients, 75 patients with various rheumatic diseases, and 45 healthy controls (HC. Results. The sensitivity and specificity of ALA IgG in SLE were 42.3% and 96.7%, respectively. ALA was observed in 55.6% (50/90 of patients with lymphopenia, which was significantly higher than in patients with normal lymphocytes (5/40, 12.5%; P<0.001. Patients with active SLE showed higher ALA positivity (60.9% than those with inactive disease (24.2%; χ2 = 17.925; P<0.001. ALA correlated significantly with hypocomplementemia, anti-dsDNA antibodies, and higher SLEDAI scores. The incidences of ALA in SLE patients who were seronegative for anti-dsDNA, anti-Sm, or both antibodies were 32.9% (26/79, 41.0% (43/105, and 32.4% (22/68, respectively. The ALA-positive group also had higher incidences of neuropsychiatric SLE (NPSLE and lupus nephritis (LN. In multivariate analyses, ALA was independently associated with lymphopenia, higher SLEDAI scores, and increased risk for LN. ALA titers significantly decreased as clinical disease was ameliorated following treatment. Conclusions. ALA occurred more frequently in patients with active SLE and was independently associated with lymphopenia, disease activity, and LN.

  20. Update on the pathogenesis and treatment of childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couture, Julie; Silverman, Earl D

    2016-09-01

    This article will provide an update of studies published in the last year regarding epidemiology, pathogenesis, major disease manifestations and outcomes, and therapies in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE). Recent studies on cSLE epidemiology supported previous findings that cSLE patients have more severe disease and tend to accumulate damage rapidly. Lupus nephritis remains frequent and is still a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. In the past year unfortunately there were no new reproducible, biomarker studies to help direct therapy of renal disease. However, some progress was made in neuropsychiatric disease assessment, with a new and promising automated test to screen for cognitive dysfunction reported. There were no prospective interventional treatment trials designed for patients with cSLE published in the last year, but some studies involving children are currently active and might improve the therapeutic options for patients with cSLE. There is a need to get a better understanding of pathogenesis and identify new biomarkers in cSLE to more accurately predict outcomes. New insights into characterization of different clinical manifestations may enable to optimize individual interventions and influence the prognosis.

  1. Mycophenolate mofetil in the treatment of non-renal manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus: recent insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali SAHIN

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF is an immunosuppressive agent that has been shown to beeffective in transplant patients. It is also efficacious in the management of lupus nephritis, anduseful in the treatment of autoimmune conditions as its mechanisms of action target the T- andB – lymphocytes, leading to suppression of the cell-mediated 3immune responses and antibodyformation. It has been used successfully in immune-mediated conditions like myasthenia gravis,autoimmune hepatitis and immune cytopenias. However, its optimal use in non-renalmanifestations (hematological, neuropsychiatric, myocardial, pulmonary, cutaneous etc. inlupus patients is unclear. There are yet to be randomised controlled trials to guide the optimaldoses and durations of MMF in such situations. MMF is well tolerated and safe to use, thoughthere are reports of serious adverse effects like urticaria, myopathy, Epstein-Barr virus-associatedB-cell lymphoma, cytomegalovirus infections and disseminated varicella zoster. Another areaof concern for patients is the increased cost of using long-term MMF.Key words: systemic lupus erythematosus, mycophenolate mofetil, treatment.

  2. Hypertrophic lupus vulgaris: an unusual presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Vijay K; Aggarwal, Kamal; Jain, Sarika; Singh, Sunita

    2009-07-01

    Lupus vulgaris is the most common form of cutaneous tuberculosis occurring in previously sensitized individuals with a high degree of tuberculin sensitivity. Various forms including plaque, ulcerative, hypertrophic, vegetative, papular, and nodular forms have been described. A 30-year-old male patient presented with a very large hypertrophic lupus vulgaris lesion over left side of chest since 22 years. Histopathological examination showed granulomatous infiltration without caseation necrosis. The Mantoux reaction was strongly positive. Hypertrophic lupus vulgaris of such a giant size and that too at an unusual site is extremely rare and hence is being reported.

  3. Environmental correlates of neuropsychiatric symptoms in nursing home patients with dementia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, S.U.; Jonghe, J.F.M. de; Verhey, F.R.J.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to estimate the influence of environmental correlates of neuropsychiatric symptoms in nursing home patients with dementia. METHODS: 1289 patients in 56 Dementia Special Care Units (SCUs) in the Netherlands were assessed using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Nursing

  4. Prevalence and predictors of neuropsychiatric symptoms in cognitively impaired nursing home patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, S.U.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Verhey, F.R.J.

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms and the influence of predictive factors in cognitively impaired nursing home patients were reviewed. Articles were identified by means of a MEDLINE and PsychInfo literature search. Neuropsychiatric symptoms were present in more than 80% of the cognitively

  5. Neuropsychiatric manifestations of alkali metal deficiency and excess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yung, C.Y.

    1984-01-01

    The alkali metals from the Group IA of the periodic table (lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium and francium) are reviewed. The neuropsychiatric aspects of alkali metal deficiencies and excesses (intoxications) are described. Emphasis was placed on lithium due to its clinical uses. The signs and symptoms of these conditions are characterized by features of an organic brain syndrome with delirium and encephalopathy prevailing. There are no clinically distinctive features that could be reliably used for diagnoses. Sodium and potassium are two essential alkali metals in man. Lithium is used as therapeutic agent in bipolar affective disorders. Rubidium has been investigated for its antidepressant effect in a group of psychiatric disorders. Cesium is under laboratory investigation for its role in carcinogenesis and in depressive illness. Very little is known of francium due to its great instability for experimental study.

  6. Identifying phenotypic signatures of neuropsychiatric disorders from electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyalina, Svetlana; Percha, Bethany; LePendu, Paea; Iyer, Srinivasan V; Altman, Russ B; Shah, Nigam H

    2013-12-01

    Mental illness is the leading cause of disability in the USA, but boundaries between different mental illnesses are notoriously difficult to define. Electronic medical records (EMRs) have recently emerged as a powerful new source of information for defining the phenotypic signatures of specific diseases. We investigated how EMR-based text mining and statistical analysis could elucidate the phenotypic boundaries of three important neuropsychiatric illnesses-autism, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. We analyzed the medical records of over 7000 patients at two facilities using an automated text-processing pipeline to annotate the clinical notes with Unified Medical Language System codes and then searching for enriched codes, and associations among codes, that were representative of the three disorders. We used dimensionality-reduction techniques on individual patient records to understand individual-level phenotypic variation within each disorder, as well as the degree of overlap among disorders. We demonstrate that automated EMR mining can be used to extract relevant drugs and phenotypes associated with neuropsychiatric disorders and characteristic patterns of associations among them. Patient-level analyses suggest a clear separation between autism and the other disorders, while revealing significant overlap between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. They also enable localization of individual patients within the phenotypic 'landscape' of each disorder. Because EMRs reflect the realities of patient care rather than idealized conceptualizations of disease states, we argue that automated EMR mining can help define the boundaries between different mental illnesses, facilitate cohort building for clinical and genomic studies, and reveal how clear expert-defined disease boundaries are in practice.

  7. Cluster analysis of autoantibodies in 852 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus from a single center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artim-Esen, Bahar; Çene, Erhan; Şahinkaya, Yasemin; Ertan, Semra; Pehlivan, Özlem; Kamali, Sevil; Gül, Ahmet; Öcal, Lale; Aral, Orhan; Inanç, Murat

    2014-07-01

    Associations between autoantibodies and clinical features have been described in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Herein, we aimed to define autoantibody clusters and their clinical correlations in a large cohort of patients with SLE. We analyzed 852 patients with SLE who attended our clinic. Seven autoantibodies were selected for cluster analysis: anti-DNA, anti-Sm, anti-RNP, anticardiolipin (aCL) immunoglobulin (Ig)G or IgM, lupus anticoagulant (LAC), anti-Ro, and anti-La. Two-step clustering and Kaplan-Meier survival analyses were used. Five clusters were identified. A cluster consisted of patients with only anti-dsDNA antibodies, a cluster of anti-Sm and anti-RNP, a cluster of aCL IgG/M and LAC, and a cluster of anti-Ro and anti-La antibodies. Analysis revealed 1 more cluster that consisted of patients who did not belong to any of the clusters formed by antibodies chosen for cluster analysis. Sm/RNP cluster had significantly higher incidence of pulmonary hypertension and Raynaud phenomenon. DsDNA cluster had the highest incidence of renal involvement. In the aCL/LAC cluster, there were significantly more patients with neuropsychiatric involvement, antiphospholipid syndrome, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and thrombocytopenia. According to the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics damage index, the highest frequency of damage was in the aCL/LAC cluster. Comparison of 10 and 20 years survival showed reduced survival in the aCL/LAC cluster. This study supports the existence of autoantibody clusters with distinct clinical features in SLE and shows that forming clinical subsets according to autoantibody clusters may be useful in predicting the outcome of the disease. Autoantibody clusters in SLE may exhibit differences according to the clinical setting or population.

  8. Lupus cystitis in Korean patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: risk factors and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, J H; Lee, J; Jung, S M; Ju, J H; Park, S-H; Kim, H-Y; Kwok, S-K

    2015-10-01

    This study was performed to investigate the clinical characteristics of lupus cystitis and determine the risk factors and clinical outcomes of lupus cystitis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We retrospectively reviewed 1064 patients at Seoul St. Mary's Hospital in Seoul, Korea, from 1998 to 2013. Twenty-four patients had lupus cystitis. Lupus cystitis was defined as unexplained ureteritis and/or cystitis as detected by imaging studies, cystoscopy, or bladder histopathology without urinary microorganisms or stones. Three-fourths of patients with lupus cystitis had concurrent lupus mesenteric vasculitis (LMV). The initial symptoms were gastrointestinal in nature for most patients (79.2%). High-dose methylprednisolone was initially administered to most patients (91.7%) with lupus cystitis. Two patients (8.3%) died of urinary tract infections. Sixty-five age- and sex-matched patients with SLE who were admitted with other manifestations were included as the control group. Patients with lupus cystitis showed a lower C3 level (p = 0.031), higher SLE Disease Activity Index score (p = 0.006), and higher ESR (p = 0.05) upon admission; more frequently had a history of LMV prior to admission (p lupus (p = 0.031) than did patients with SLE but without lupus cystitis. The occurrence of lupus cystitis was associated with a history of LMV (OR, 21.794; 95% CI, 4.061-116.963). The median follow-up period was 3.4 years, and the cumulative one-year mortality rate was 20%. Complications developed in 33.3% of patients with lupus cystitis and were related to survival (log-rank p = 0.021). Our results suggest that the possibility of lupus cystitis should be considered when a patient with SLE and history of LMV presents with gastrointestinal symptoms or lower urinary tract symptoms. Development of complications in patients with lupus cystitis can be fatal. Thus, intensive treatment and follow-up are needed, especially in the presence of

  9. Systemic lupus erythematosus and Raynaud's phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimovski, Flavia Emilie; Simioni, Juliana A; Skare, Thelma Larocca

    2015-01-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus seem to belong to different serological and clinical subgroups of the disease. Genetic background can cause the appearance of these subgroups. To determine whether Brazilian patients who have systemic lupus erythematosus and Raynaud's phenomenon differ from those who do not. Retrospective analysis of 373 medical records of systemic lupus erythematosus patients studied for demographic, clinical and serological data. A comparative analysis was performed of individuals with and without RP. There was a positive association between Raynaud's phenomenon and age at diagnosis (p=0.02), presence of anti-Sm (p=0.01) antibodies and anti-RNP (pRaynaud's phenomenon and hemolysis (p=0.01), serositis (p=0.01), glomerulonephritis (p=0.0004) and IgM aCL (p=0.004) antibodies. Raynaud's phenomenon patients appear to belong to a systemic lupus erythematosus subset with a spectrum of clinical manifestations located in a more benign pole of the disease.

  10. Lupus, discoid on the face (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by red, raised patches with adherent scales. The skin pores (follicles) may be plugged, and scarring often occurs in older lesions. Approximately 90% of individuals with discoid lupus have only skin involvement as compared to more generalized involvement in ...

  11. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Presenting as Acute Adrenal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    hereby report such a case of SLE presenting as acute adrenal insufficiency. ... Kidney function tests, Liver function tests, serum calcium, and ... renal involvement. Patient was successfully managed with steroids and improved clinically. Keywords: Addison's disease, Autoimmune diseases, Systemic lupus erythematosus.

  12. Lupus vulgaris with tuberculosis verrucosa cutis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad PVS

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available 26 years old male presented with two large plaques of lupus vulgaris and a lesion of tuberculosis verrucosa cutis on the right thigh and foot, respectively. Both the lesions were confirmed by histopathological examinations.

  13. Systemisk lupus erythematosus i Fyns Amt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, A B; Green, A; Junker, P

    1999-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has never been investigated in Denmark, whereas international studies have reached divergent results. In the study patients were ascertained from diagnosis-based registers of inpatients and outpatients, notifications from physicians...

  14. Onset of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus During Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Jie Yang

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available When systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is first suspected during pregnancy, though rare, the diagnostic criteria are not different from those for nonpregnant women. The pregnancy outcome is good if treatment with adequate immunosuppressive agents starts as soon as the diagnosis is made. There are 4 cases in this report who had SLE onset during pregnancy. Although 2 of them suffered from preeclampsia, all 4 pregnancies resulted in favorable outcomes after the lupus was controlled by medical treatment.

  15. Biomarkers for kidney involvement in pediatric lupus

    OpenAIRE

    Goilav, Beatrice; Putterman, Chaim; Rubinstein, Tamar B

    2015-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN), the renal involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus, is currently diagnosed by histopathology obtained by percutaneous renal biopsy and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in both adults and children. LN is more prevalent and severe in children, requiring aggressive and prolonged immunosuppression. The consequences of the diagnosis and its treatment have devastating long-term effects on the growth, well-being and quality of life of affected children. T...

  16. Radiological changes in systemic lupus erythematosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritsch, R.; Freyschmidt, J.; Suedhof-Mueller, G.; Menninger, H.; Medizinische Hochschule Hannover

    1981-01-01

    In a study of 50 patients with systemic lupus erythematosis, radiologically demonstrable lung changes and pleural effusions were found in 50%. Changes in the peripheral skeleton, such as osteoporosis, erosions or mutilations, were seen in only two patients. Our radiological analysis has shown that systemic lupus erythematosis does not produce changes in the joints, but is responsible for abnormalities in the lungs, as well as for pericardial and pleural effusions. (orig.) [de

  17. Antiphospholipid Antibodies in Lupus Nephritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Parodis

    Full Text Available Lupus nephritis (LN is a major manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. It remains unclear whether antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL alter the course of LN. We thus investigated the impact of aPL on short-term and long-term renal outcomes in patients with LN. We assessed levels of aPL cross-sectionally in SLE patients diagnosed with (n = 204 or without (n = 294 LN, and prospectively in 64 patients with active biopsy-proven LN (52 proliferative, 12 membranous, before and after induction treatment (short-term outcomes. Long-term renal outcome in the prospective LN cohort was determined by the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR and the Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD stage, after a median follow-up of 11.3 years (range: 3.3-18.8. Cross-sectional analysis revealed no association between LN and IgG/IgM anticardiolipin or anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies, or lupus anticoagulant. Both aPL positivity and levels were similar in patients with active LN and non-renal SLE. Following induction treatment for LN, serum IgG/IgM aPL levels decreased in responders (p<0.005 for all, but not in non-responders. Both at active LN and post-treatment, patients with IgG, but not IgM, aPL had higher creatinine levels compared with patients without IgG aPL. Neither aPL positivity nor levels were associated with changes in eGFR from either baseline or post-treatment through long-term follow-up. Moreover, aPL positivity and levels both at baseline and post-treatment were similar in patients with a CKD stage ≥3 versus 1-2 at the last follow-up. In conclusion, neither aPL positivity nor levels were found to be associated with the occurrence of LN in SLE patients. However, IgG aPL positivity in LN patients was associated with a short-term impairment of the renal function while no effect on long-term renal outcome was observed. Furthermore, IgG and IgM aPL levels decreased following induction treatment only in responders, indicating that aPL levels are

  18. Juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus: onset patterns and short-term outcome in Egyptian children, a single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Hafez, M A; Abdel-Nabi, H

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this article is to define disease onset pattern and understand the response to therapy in children with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in Egypt. A prospective cohort of 41 Egyptian children diagnosed with SLE was analyzed. SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) score was used to record disease activity at onset, and renal biopsy was performed to define the stage of lupus nephritis. Response to therapy over a follow-up period ranging from 10 to 50 months was evaluated. The mean age at diagnosis was 12.12 ± 3.45 years. Thirty-six (87.8%) patients were females. Most patients had multiple manifestations at onset. The most common presenting symptoms were pallor and fever (51.2% and 43.9%, respectively). Lupus nephritis was found in 27 (65.9%) children. International Society of Nephrology (ISN) classes I and III were the most common findings on renal biopsy. Neuropsychiatric manifestations were present at disease onset in 19 patients (46.3%) with a bad prognostic course. At diagnosis, high SLEDAI scores were recorded (mean: 29.95 ± 2.06). The mean renal SLEDAI score was 10.2 ± 4. At follow-up 16 (39.02%) patients were in complete remission, 10 (24.39%) were in partial remission, two (4.87%) had active disease, five (12.9%) had relapsed, four (9.75%) had died and four (9.75%) patients were lost to follow-up. Egyptian children with SLE appear to have severe disease on presentation with high SLEDAI scores and high prevalence of lupus nephritis, but respond well to therapy with a favorable short-term prognosis. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Hydroxychloroquine and pregnancy on lupus flares in Korean patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, J H; Ko, H S; Kwok, S-K; Ju, J H; Park, S-H

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the clinical and laboratory characteristics of pregnancies with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and identified lupus flare predictors during pregnancy. Additionally, we examined lupus activity and pregnancy outcomes in SLE patients who continued, discontinued or underwent no hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) treatment during pregnancy. We retrospectively analyzed 179 pregnancies in 128 SLE patients at Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, Korea, between 1998 and 2012 and then assessed the clinical profiles and maternal and fetal outcomes. Overall, 90.5% of pregnancies resulted in a successful delivery and were divided into two groups: those who experienced lupus flares (80 pregnancies, 44.7%) and those who did not (99 pregnancies, 55.3%). Increased preeclampsia, preterm births, low birth weight, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), and low 1-minute Apgar scores occurred in pregnancies with lupus flares compared to pregnancies in quiescent disease. Lupus flares were predicted by HCQ discontinuation, a history of lupus nephritis, high pre-pregnancy serum uric acid and low C4 levels. Our study indicates that achieving pre-pregnancy remission and continuing HCQ treatment during pregnancy are important for preventing lupus flares. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  20. Predicting eventual development of lupus nephritis at the time of diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Oh Chan; Lee, Jung Sun; Ghang, Byeongzu; Kim, Yong-Gil; Lee, Chang-Keun; Yoo, Bin; Hong, Seokchan

    2018-02-23

    To investigate factors predictive of future lupus nephritis development when systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is diagnosed. Patients with newly diagnosed SLE without renal manifestations were followed for development of lupus nephritis, comparing findings at baseline between those who did or did not develop nephritis. Albumin-to-globulin ratio (AGR) was calculated as albumin/(total protein-albumin). Cox proportional hazard model was used to identify predictors of lupus nephritis. Of 278 patients, 241 did not and 37 did develop lupus nephritis during follow-up. On univariate analysis, young age, low C3, low C4, high anti-dsDNA titre, anti-Sm antibody, anti-RNP antibody and low AGR were associated with a higher risk of lupus nephritis. On multivariate analysis, factors predictive of nephritis were age [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 0.928, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.895-0.961, p lupus nephritis development. Young age, low C3, high anti-dsDNA titre and presence of anti-Sm antibody at diagnosis of SLE were associated with a risk of future lupus nephritis, but the hazard was greatest with a low AGR value, suggesting that a greater proportion of immunoglobulin relative to total protein is associated with the development of nephritis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cutaneous lupus erythematosus and systemic lupus erythematosus are associated with clinically significant cardiovascular risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesselvig, J Halskou; Ahlehoff, O; Dreyer, L

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a well-known cardiovascular risk factor. Less is known about cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) and the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). Therefore, we investigated the risk of mortality and adverse cardiovascular events in patients diagnosed...

  2. Pregnancy complications in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Helene; Jacobsen, Søren; Tvede, Niels

    2014-01-01

    A woman with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis had two pregnancies which both resulted in complications known to be associated with SLE, i.e. late abortion, preterm delivery and pre-eclampsia. We conclude that disease quiescence is important for a successful outcome...

  3. Graviditetskomplikationer hos en patient med systemisk lupus erythematosus og lupus nefritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Helene; Jacobsen, Søren; Tvede, Niels

    2014-01-01

    A woman with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis had two pregnancies which both resulted in complications known to be associated with SLE, i.e. late abortion, preterm delivery and pre-eclampsia. We conclude that disease quiescence is important for a successful outcome...

  4. Evans syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus: clinical presentation and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costallat, Guilherme Lavras; Appenzeller, Simone; Costallat, Lilian Tereza Lavras

    2012-07-01

    To review the clinical, laboratory and outcome features of Evans syndrome (ES) in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. We reviewed the charts of 953 SLE patients followed up regularly at our service. ES was defined as the presence of hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia concomitantly or sequentially. Clinical and laboratory manifestations occurring during the disease course, as well as concomitant diseases and survival was carefully reviewed. We identified ES in 26 of 953 (2.7%) SLE patients. Twenty-three were women with mean age at SLE diagnosis of 25.7 years. Four (15%) patients had disease onset before the age of 16. In the majority of patients (92%), immune thrombocytopenia and AIHA appeared simultaneously at the beginning of SLE. Active features of SLE were a frequent finding concomitant to ES, especially arthritis (77%), malar rash (61.5%), photosensitivity (57.6%), oral ulcers (34.6%), nephritis (73%), serositis (54%), neuropsychiatric (19%) and pulmonary (15%) manifestations. In addition to this multisystemic disease, 34.6% of our patients had an association with another autoimmune disease such as antiphospholipid syndrome. Recurrence of ES was observed in only four (15%) patients. After follow-up time of 8.72 years, 19 patients (73%) were in remission and seven (27%) patients died. ES is a rare manifestation in SLE, occurring in patients with severe multisystemic SLE manifestations. Treatment strategies frequently used in SLE contribute to longer disease remission and less frequent exacerbation than observed in the general population with ES. Copyright © 2011 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Disease characterization of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients in Quebec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, R; Bernatsky, S; Rahme, E

    2017-08-01

    Objective Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by an array of organ manifestations that can appear during flares and disappear during remissions. The objectives of this study were: (i) to examine SLE manifestation groups longitudinally in an SLE cohort; and (ii) to assess the association between early antimalarial treatment and renal manifestations. Methods Seven SLE manifestation groups-cutaneous, hematologic, lung, musculoskeletal, neuropsychiatric, serositis, renal-were tracked using Kaplan-Meier survival curves in an incident SLE cohort from Quebec health administrative data ( n = 2010). A subgroup with provincial drug insurance coverage was followed over time to examine the association between early antimalarial treatment (within three months after SLE diagnosis) and renal manifestations using a Cox proportional hazards survival model. Results Cutaneous manifestations was the most common manifestation at SLE diagnosis (30.0%, 95% CI: 27.7-32.2%). About two-thirds (66.2%, 95% CI: 63.4-68.9%) of patients had evidence of at least one SLE manifestation at diagnosis, which increased to 87.2% (95% CI: 84.2-90.3%) by the end of follow-up. After adjusting for age, sex, early concomitant systemic steroid therapy, Charlson comorbidity index, primary care visits in the year prior and other SLE manifestations at baseline, no statistically significant association was established between antimalarial therapy and renal manifestations. Conclusion This study provides insight regarding organ manifestations within a population-based sample. Most patients identified with SLE had other diagnostic evidence that supports an underlying diagnosis of SLE. No protective effects for antimalarial agents against renal manifestations could be established in this population-based cohort.

  6. Lymphoma risk in systemic lupus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernatsky, Sasha; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Joseph, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    to cyclophosphamide and to higher cumulative steroids in lymphoma cases than the cancer-free controls. CONCLUSIONS: In this large SLE sample, there was a suggestion of higher lymphoma risk with exposure to cyclophosphamide and high cumulative steroids. Disease activity itself was not clearly associated with lymphoma......OBJECTIVE: To examine disease activity versus treatment as lymphoma risk factors in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). METHODS: We performed case-cohort analyses within a multisite SLE cohort. Cancers were ascertained by regional registry linkages. Adjusted HRs for lymphoma were generated...... (SLEDAI-2K) over time, and drugs were treated both categorically (ever/never) and as estimated cumulative doses. RESULTS: We studied 75 patients with lymphoma (72 non-Hodgkin, three Hodgkin) and 4961 cancer-free controls. Most lymphomas were of B-cell origin. As is seen in the general population, lymphoma...

  7. Pain and systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Di Franco

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disease characterized by heterogeneous clinical manifestations involving virtually the entire body. The pain in SLE can have different causes. The SLE classification criteria include mainly the musculoskeletal manifestations of pain, which are commonly reported as initial symptoms of SLE, such as arthralgia, arthritis and/or myalgia. Chronic widespread pain, which is typical of fibromyalgia (FM, is frequently associated with SLE. The aim of this review is to describe widespread pain and fatigue in SLE, and the association of SLE and FM. Although secondary FM is not correlated with the disease activity, it may interfere with the daily activities of SLE patients. Therefore it is necessary to identify its symptoms and treat them promptly to improve the quality of life of patients. In conclusion, it is essential to identify the origin of pain in SLE in order to avoid dangerous over-treatment in patients with co-existing widespread pain and FM.

  8. Breast cancer in systemic lupus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernatsky, S.; Ramsey-Goldman, R.; Petri, M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective There is a decreased breast cancer risk in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) versus the general population. We assessed a large sample of SLE patients, evaluating demographic and clinical characteristics and breast cancer risk. Methods We performed case-cohort analyses within a multi......-center international SLE sample. We calculated the breast cancer hazard ratio (HR) in female SLE patients, relative to demographics, reproductive history, family history of breast cancer, and time-dependent measures of anti-dsDNA positivity, cumulative disease activity, and drugs, adjusted for SLE duration. Results...... There were 86 SLE breast cancers and 4498 female SLE cancer-free controls. Patients were followed on average for 7.6 years. Versus controls, SLE breast cancer cases tended to be white and older. Breast cancer cases were similar to controls regarding anti-dsDNA positivity, disease activity, and most drug...

  9. Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Parkinson's Disease with Mild Cognitive Impairment and Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iracema Leroi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropsychiatric symptoms commonly complicate Parkinson’s disease (PD, however the presence of such symptoms in mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI specifically has not yet been well described. The objective of this study was to examine and compare the prevalence and profile of neuropsychiatric symptoms in patients with PD-MCI (n = 48 to those with PD and no cognitive impairment (PD-NC, n = 54 and to those with dementia in PD (PDD, n = 25. PD-MCI and PDD were defined using specific consensus criteria, and neuropsychiatric symptoms were assessed with the 12-item Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI. Self-rated apathy, depression, and anxiety rating scales were also administered. Over 79% of all participants reported at least one neuropsychiatric symptom in the past month. The proportion in each group who had total NPI scores of ≥4 (“clinically significant” was as follows: PD-NC, 64.8%; PD-MCI, 62%; PDD 76%. Apathy was reported in almost 50% of those with PD-MCI and PDD, and it was an important neuropsychiatric symptom differentiating PD-MCI from PD-NC. Psychosis (hallucinations and delusions increased from 12.9% in PD-NC group; 16.7% in PD-MCI group; and 48% in PDD group. Identifying neuropsychiatric symptoms in PD-MCI may have implications for ascertaining conversion to dementia in PD.

  10. Neuropsychiatric symptoms of the elderly with Alzheimer's disease and the family caregivers' distress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Baldin Storti

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to analyze the relationship between the distress of the family caregiver and the presence of neuropsychiatric symptoms in elderly patients with Alzheimer's disease or mixed dementia. Method: a descriptive, cross-sectional study conducted in the Geriatric and Dementias Clinic of a general tertiary hospital, with 96 elderly people with Alzheimer's disease or mixed dementia and their family caregivers. Questionnaires to characterize the elderly and caregivers, and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory were used. Descriptive statistics and Pearson correlation test were performed. Results: 68.7% of the elderly were women, average age 80.8 years, 56.2% had Alzheimer's disease and 43.7%, mixed dementia. Among caregivers, 90.6% were women, average age 56, 70.8% took care of parents and 64.6% lived with the elderly. There was a strong (r = 0.82 and significant (p <0.01 correlation between the total score on the Neuropsychiatric Inventory and the total score on the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Distress and strong (r = 0.80 and significant (p <0 01 correlation between the total score on the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Distress and the number of neuropsychiatric symptoms, i.e., the higher the number, frequency and severity of these symptoms in the elderly, the more intense is the caregiver distress. Conclusion: the presence of neuropsychiatric symptoms in the elderly was related to increased distress in caregivers.

  11. The involvement of secondary neuronal damage in the development of neuropsychiatric disorders following brain insults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun eChen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuropsychiatric disorders are one of the leading causes of disability worldwide and affect the health of billions of people. Previous publications have demonstrated that neuropsychiatric disorders can cause histomorphological damage in particular regions of the brain. By using a clinical symptom-comparing approach, 55 neuropsychiatric signs or symptoms related usually to 14 types of acute and chronic brain insults were identified and categorized in the present study. Forty percent of the 55 neuropsychiatric signs and symptoms have been found to be commonly shared by the 14 brain insults. A meta-analysis supports existence of the same neuropsychiatric signs or symptoms in all brain insults. The results suggest that neuronal damage might be occurring in the same or similar regions or structures of the brain. Neuronal cell death, neural loss and axonal degeneration in some parts of the brain (the limbic system, basal ganglia system, brainstem, cerebellum, and cerebral cortex might be the histomorphological basis that is responsible for the neuropsychiatric symptom clusters. These morphological alterations may be the result of secondary neuronal damage (a cascade of progressive neural injury and neuronal cell death that is triggered by the initial insult. Secondary neuronal damage causes neuronal cell death and neural injury in not only the initial injured site but also remote brain regions. It may be a major contributor to subsequent neuropsychiatric disorders following brain insults.

  12. Neuropsychiatric symptoms and their impact on quality of life in multiple system atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ceponiene

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multiple system atrophy (MSA is a sporadic neurodegenerative disorder characterized by severe dysautonomia and atypical Parkinsonism or cerebellar dysfunction. Disease-modifying treatment is not available and the mainstream of care is supportive. Neuropsychiatric symptoms are frequent in MSA and their successful management can improve patients’ quality of life (QOL. This study aimed to define a comprehensive neuropsychiatric profile in MSA patients in relation to QOL. Methods: In 48 MSA patients and 40 controls neuropsychiatric symptoms were assessed using Neuropsychiatric Inventory. MSA patients completed Beck Depression Inventory and QOL questionnaire (SF12, including Mental and Physical subscales. Results: Eighty-seven percent of MSA patients had neuropsychiatric symptoms as compared with 10.4% of controls. Depression (56%, apathy (48%, anxiety (27%, and agitation (27% predominated. The Physical SF-12 scores were lower in the patients as compared with the controls. Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI scores did not correlate with QOL measures. Depression, as reflected by the BDI, correlated with the mental component score of the SF-12 in MSA patients. Conclusions: Neuropsychiatric symptoms are very frequent in patients with MSA and are dominated by depression and apathy. They appear independent from physical disability and loosely map onto the known brain pathology of MSA. Only depression, as reflected by the BDI, negatively affected mental QOL. The discrepancy between the BDI and NPI-depression scores likely stems from the different approaches to symptoms by these questionnaires.

  13. A 12-year retrospective review of bullous systemic lupus erythematosus in cutaneous and systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanprapaph, K; Sawatwarakul, S; Vachiramon, V

    2017-10-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical features, laboratory findings, systemic manifestations, treatment and outcome of patients with bullous systemic lupus erythematosus in a tertiary care center in Thailand. Methods We performed a retrospective review from 2002 to 2014 of all patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for bullous systemic lupus erythematosus to evaluate for the clinical characteristics, extracutaneous involvement, histopathologic features, immunofluorescence pattern, serological abnormalities, internal organ involvement, treatments and outcome. Results Among 5149 patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus and/or systemic lupus erythematosus, 15 developed vesiculobullous lesions. Ten patients had validation of the diagnosis of bullous systemic lupus erythematosus, accounting for 0.19%. Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus occurred after the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus in six patients with a median onset of 2.5 months (0-89). Four out of 10 patients developed bullous systemic lupus erythematosus simultaneously with systemic lupus erythematosus. Hematologic abnormalities and renal involvement were found in 100% and 90%, respectively. Polyarthritis (40%) and serositis (40%) were less frequently seen. Systemic corticosteroids, immunosuppressants, antimalarials and dapsone offered resolution of cutaneous lesions. Conclusion Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus is an uncommon presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus. Blistering can occur following or simultaneously with established systemic lupus erythematosus. We propose that clinicians should carefully search for systemic involvement, especially hematologic and renal impairment, in patients presenting with bullous systemic lupus erythematosus.

  14. Humor in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Cristiano S; Li, Rui; Lawrie, Sarah; Bar-Or, Amit; Clarke, Ann E; Da Costa, Deborah; Banerjee, Devi; Bernatsky, Sasha; Lee, Jennifer L; Pineau, Christian A

    2015-03-01

    Humor has neurophysiological effects influencing the release of cortisol, which may have a direct impact on the immune system. Laughter is associated with a decreased production of inflammatory cytokines both in the general population and in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Our objective was to explore the effects of humor on serum cytokines [particularly interleukin-6 (IL-6)] and cortisol levels in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), after a standard intervention (120 min of visual comedy). We enrolled 58 females with SLE from consecutive patients assessed in the Montreal General Hospital lupus clinic. The subjects who consented to participate were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to the intervention (watching 120 min of comedy) or control group (watching a 120 min documentary). Measurements of cytokine and serum cortisol levels as well as 24-h urine cortisol were taken before, during, and after the interventions. We compared serum cytokine levels and serum and 24-h urine cortisol levels in the humor and control groups and performed regression analyses of these outcomes, adjusting for demographics and the current use of prednisone. There were no significant differences between the control and humor groups in demographics or clinical variables. Baseline serum levels of IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and B-cell activating factor were also similar in both groups. There was no evidence of a humor effect in terms of decreasing cytokine levels, although there was some suggestion of lowered cortisol secretion in the humor group based the 24-h urinary cortisol levels in a subgroup. In contrast to what has been published for RA, we saw no clear effects of humor in altering cytokine levels in SLE, although interesting trends were seen for lower cortisol levels after humor intervention compared with the control group.

  15. Lupus vulgaris of nose — a case report

    OpenAIRE

    M, Sadarudheen Ahmed; Vinayakumar, A. R.; Mathai, John; Nair, P. Prathapan

    1999-01-01

    Lupus vulgaris which is a mucocutaneous form of Tuberculosis is not an uncommon condi-tion. But the disease resulting in excessive destruction is rare today. We report a case of lupus vulgaris which almost completely destroyed the nose.

  16. ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISEASE AS THE DEBUT OF SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Ischenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus — a chronic autoimmune disease that is often associated with infectious processes. The paper presents two clinical cases of systemic lupus erythematosus , debuted with acute respiratory infection.

  17. Assessment of the neuropsychiatric comorbidities in Chinese children with epilepsy using the MINI-KID tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Taoli; Zhou, Hao; Li, Yijie; Li, Chunpei; Zhang, Yunjian; Zhou, Yuanfeng; Wang, Yi

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to assess neuropsychiatric comorbidities and analyze risk factors in Chinese children with epilepsy. Children with epilepsy aged between 6 and 16 years from the Children's Hospital of Fudan University were included. Children with asthma and typically developing children were matched for age and gender, and served as control groups. Neuropsychiatric disorders were assessed by interviewing the parents or guardians using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview for children (MINI-KID) (parent version). Basic information and clinical data were also collected using an author designed questionnaire. Multiple logistic regression analysis was done to identify the risk factors associated with neuropsychiatric comorbidities. In this study, 140 children with epilepsy, 70 children with asthma and 70 typically developing children were recruited. Neuropsychiatric disorders were significantly more common in children with epilepsy (41.4%) as compared with the asthma group (15.7%) and the control group (10.0%). Of the 58 children with epilepsy who had neuropsychiatric comorbidities, only 29.3% had been diagnosed before our study. Multivariate analysis revealed that a younger age at seizure onset (OR=0.877, 95%CI: 0.773∼0.996), seizures occurring more than once monthly during the past year (OR=3.526, 95%CI: 1.177∼10.562), polytherapy (OR=2.632, 95%Cl: 1.066∼6.501) were all significantly associated with neuropsychiatric comorbidities in children with epilepsy. In conclusion, children with epilepsy are more likely to have neuropsychiatric comorbidities, and up to 70% of them were undiagnosed. Early screening, diagnosis and treatment of neuropsychiatric comorbidities in children with epilepsy may improve the long-term prognosis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Clinical Features of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients Complicated With Evans Syndrome: A Case-Control, Single Center Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lili; Wu, Xiuhua; Wang, Laifang; Li, Jing; Chen, Hua; Zhao, Yan; Zheng, Wenjie

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the clinical features of systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) complicated with Evans syndrome (ES). We conducted a retrospective case-control study to compare the clinical and laboratory features of age- and gender-matched lupus patients with and without ES in 1:3 ratios. In 5724 hospitalized SLE patients, we identified 27 (0.47%, 22 women and 5 men, average age 34.2 years) SLE patients complicated with ES. Fifteen patients (55.6%) presented with hematologic abnormalities initially, including 6 (22.2%) cases of isolated ITP, 4 (14.8%) cases of isolated AIHA, and 5 (18.5%) cases of classical ES. The median intervals between hematological presentations the diagnosis of SLE was 36 months (range 0-252). ES developed after the SLE diagnosis in 4 patients (14.8%), and concomitantly with SLE diagnosis in 8 patients (29.6%). Systemic involvements are frequently observed in SLE patients with ES, including fever (55.6%), serositis (51.9%), hair loss (40.7%), lupus nephritis (37%), Raynaud phenomenon (33.3%), neuropsychiatric (33.3%) and pulmonary involvement (25.9%), and photosensitivity (25.9%). The incidence of photosensitivity, hypocomplementemia, elevated serum IgG level, and lupus nephritis in patients with ES or without ES was 25.9% vs 6.2% (P = 0.007), 88.9% vs 67.1% (P = 0.029), 48.1% vs 24.4% (P = 0.021), and 37% vs 64.2% (P = 0.013), respectively. Twenty-five (92.6%) patients achieved improvement following treatment of glucocorticoids and immunosuppressants as well as splenectomy, whereas 6 patients experienced the relapse and 1 patient died from renal failure during the follow-up. ES is a relatively rare complication of SLE. Photosensitivity, hypocomplementemia, and elevated serum IgG level were frequently observed in ES patients, but lupus nephritis was less observed. More than half of patients presented with hematological manifestation at onset, and progress to typical lupus over months to years. Therefore

  19. Long-term neuropsychiatric consequences of aseptic meningitis in adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damsgaard, Jesper; Hjerrild, Simon; Andersen, Henning; Leutscher, Peter Derek Christian

    2015-06-01

    Aseptic meningitis is considered a benign and self-limiting clinical condition. In contrast to viral encephalitis and bacterial meningitis, the prognosis is usually good. The existing literature is scarce on the potential long-term neuropsychiatric consequences of aseptic meningitis. Previous studies have primarily been retrospective and differences in methodologies make it difficult to draw conclusions regarding the prevalence and nature of neuropsychiatric manifestations. However, studies have reported decreased psychomotor speed and impaired executive and visuo-constructive functions following aseptic meningitis. Larger controlled prospective studies are urgently needed to elucidate the neuropsychiatric complications of aseptic meningitis.

  20. Mycophenolate mofetil in the treatment of lupus nephritis

    OpenAIRE

    Yong, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Patrick FK Yong1,2, David P D’Cruz21Department of Clinical Immunology, Kings College Hospital; 2The Lupus Research Unit, St Thomas’ Hospital, London, UKAbstract: Lupus nephritis is a complication of systemic lupus erythematosus, which has significant morbidity and mortality. The accepted standard of treatment for severe lupus nephritis is cyclophosphamide for induction of remission. This has significant adverse effects including severe infection and amenorrhea. In addition...

  1. Combat veterans and the death penalty: a forensic neuropsychiatric perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortzel, Hal S; Arciniegas, David B

    2010-01-01

    With our nation's present conflicts, a new generation of veterans are returning home, many of whom have substantial psychopathology and are encountering significant barriers in accessing care. Headlines from around the nation reflect that some of these wounded warriors go on to commit offenses that are potentially punishable by death. Existing circumstances speak to the urgency with which the subject of combat veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), traumatic brain injury (TBI), or both facing capital crimes ought to be addressed. This publicity has led to a recent call for a legislatively or judicially enacted, narrow, categorical exclusion for combat veterans who were affected by either PTSD or TBI at the time of their capital offenses. In the present article, we illustrate the reality that combat veterans who commit capital offenses may face execution, summarize legal arguments offered in favor of a categorical exclusion, and provide a neuropsychiatric perspective on PTSD, TBI, and aggression, to help inform further dialogue on this weighty subject.

  2. [Beyond Cognitive Impairment: Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Neurodegenerative Dementias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahunca Velásquez, Luisa Fernanda

    2017-10-01

    As life expectancy increases, the number of people diagnosed with neurodegenerative dementia also increases. Although cognitive impairment is central in dementia, neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) are very important because they increase both direct and indirect costs by generating greater morbidity, caregiver distress, use of medication and institutionalisation. Furthermore, it is important to understand the nature of NPS, since they can vary across the different types of dementia and may provide useful clinical information regarding the aetiology of cognitive impairment. The first-line management of NPS in dementia is non-pharmacological; internal and external causes should first be identified and strategies developed to modify the behavioural patterns of the patient and their caregiver. In addition, changes in the patient's surroundings that may improve patient performance and behaviour should be encouraged. If these practices are not satisfactory, a pharmacological treatment approach is adopted that includes anti-dementia drugs, antipsychotics, antidepressants, mood stabilisers and benzodiazepines. However, psychoactive drugs do not offer sufficient efficacy and most of them have significant adverse effects, so each patient should be individually assessed, together with the implementation of non-pharmacological strategies, before deciding on pharmacological treatment for the management of NPS in dementia. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. Findings of psychopathology and computerized tomography in neuropsychiatric diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, G.; Huber, G.; Schuettler, R.

    1982-08-01

    1978-1980 we examined 451 patients of the Psychiatric University Clinic of Bonn by computerized tomography. From 260 patients with characterized diseases of the brain and brain damages, 78 patients had neuropsychiatric diseases of old age, i.e. cerebro-vascular processes (average age of 63.7 years) and 9 patients had primary degenerative processes of the brain (average age of 62.1 years). Patients with diseases of the cerebral vessels showed irreversible psychopathological syndromes in 87%. The rate of pathological findings in CT increases in relation to degree of severity of the chronic (irreversible) organic psychosyndromes from 76% in pseudoneurasthenics syndromes to 93% in patients with organic changes of personality and to 100% in patients with dementia. The ambiguity of the conception of the multi-infarct-dementia is discussed. Only 19% of the sample with irreversible psychopathological changes showed localized neurological deficits and infarctions in CT, but none of them more than one. In all patients with dementia a cortical atrophy was found. There is a significant positive correlation between cerebral atrophy in CT and irreversible organic psychosyndrome. These findings with computerized tomography demonstrate in accordance with earlier pneumoencephalographic findings that distinct types of irreversible psychosyndromes can be correlated to distinct types of cerebral atrophy. But these statistical correlations between the degree of the severity of the loss of psychic functions and the reduction of cerebral tissue are not necessarily valid for any single case.

  4. Findings of psychopathology and computerized tomography in neuropsychiatric diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, G.; Huber, G.; Schuettler, R.

    1982-01-01

    1978-1980 we examined 451 patients of the Psychiatric University Clinic of Bonn by computerized tomography. From 260 patients with characterized diseases of the brain and brain damages 78 patients had neuropsychiatric diseases of old age, i.e. cerebro-vascular processes (average age of 63.7 years) and 9 patients had primary degenerative processes of the brain (average age of 62.1 years). Patients with diseases of the cerebral vessels showed irreversible psychopathological syndromes in 87%. The rate of pathological findings in CT increases in relation to degree of severity of the chronic (irreversible) organic psychosyndromes from 76% in pseudoneurasthenics syndromes to 93% in patients with organic changes of personality and to 100% in patients with dementia. The ambiguity of the conception of the multi-infarct-dementia is discussed. Only 19% of the sample with irreversible psychopathological changes showed localized neurological deficits and infarctions in CT, but none of them more than one. In all patients with dementia a cortical atrophy was found. There is a significant positive correlation between cerebral atrophy in CT and irreversible organic psychosyndrome. These findings with computerized tomography demonstrate in accordance with earlier pneumoencephalographic findings that distinct types of irreversible psychosyndromes can be correlated to distinct types of cerebral atrophy. But these statistical correlations between the degree of the severity of the loss of psychic functions and the reduction of cerebral tissue are not necessarily valid for any single case. (orig.) [de

  5. Lupus vulgaris: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniacka, Anna; Schwartz, Robert A; Sysa-Jedrzejowska, Anna; Borun, Marta; Arkuszewska, Cecylia

    2005-04-01

    Although there has been a steady decline in the incidence of tuberculosis in recent years, it persists in some regions, and where AIDS is especially prevalent, the number of new cases has been increasing. Thus, cutaneous tuberculosis has re-emerged in areas with a high incidence of HIV infection and multidrug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis. Lupus vulgaris has been and remains the most common form of cutaneous tuberculosis. Cutaneous manifestations of disseminated tuberculosis are unusual, being seen in less than 0.5% of cases. Scrofuloderma, tuberculosis verrucosa cutis and lupus vulgaris comprise most cutaneous tuberculosis cases. Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is derived from an attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis and is employed beneficially as a relatively safe vaccination in Poland and other countries in which the prevalence of tuberculosis is high. However, BCG vaccination may produce complications, including disseminated BCG and lupus vulgaris, the latter seen in one of our two patients in whom lupus vulgaris at the inoculation site followed a second vaccination with BCG 12 years after the initial one. A similar phenomenon has been described after immunotherapy with BCG vaccination. Re-infection (secondary) inoculation cutaneous tuberculosis may also occur as a result of BCG vaccination, producing either lupus vulgaris or tuberculosis verrucosa cutis, probably depending upon the patient's degree of cell-mediated immunity. However, most lupus vulgaris cases are not associated with vaccination with BCG, as occurred in our first patient. For those who do develop lupus vulgaris, it can be persistent for a long period, in some cases for many decades. In the second patient we describe a lengthy duration and cutaneous reactivation at distant sites after more than 40 years.

  6. Pericarditis as initial clinical manifestation of systemic lupus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    antiphospholipid syndrome. Rheumatology 2002;41:924-929. 19. Ruiz-Irastorza G, Egurbide MV, Pijoan JI, et al. Effect of antimalarials on thrombosis and survival in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Lupus. 2006;15:577-583. Lupus pericarditis rarely occurs without the other well-known diagnostic features of SLE.

  7. Dutch guidelines for diagnosis and therapy of proliferative lupus nephritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tellingen, A; Voskuyl, A E; Vervloet, M G; Bijl, M; de Sévaux, R G L; Berger, S P; Derksen, R H W M; Berden, J H M

    2012-01-01

    Proliferative lupus nephritis is a strong predictor of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Despite improvements in the management of lupus nephritis, a significant number of the patients do not respond to immunosuppressive therapy and progress to end-stage renal

  8. Dutch guidelines for diagnosis and therapy of proliferative lupus nephritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tellingen, A. van; Voskuyl, A.E.; Vervloet, M.G.; Bijl, M. van der; Sevaux, R.G.L. de; Berger, S.P.; Derksen, R.H.W.M.; Berden, J.H.M.

    2012-01-01

    Proliferative lupus nephritis is a strong predictor of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Despite improvements in the management of lupus nephritis, a significant number of the patients do not respond to immunosuppressive therapy and progress to end-stage renal

  9. PATHOPHYSIOLOGY OF LUPUS NEPHRITIS : THE ROLE OF NUCLEOSOMES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANBRUGGEN, MCJ; KRAMERS, C; HYLKEMA, MN; SMEENK, RJT; BERDEN, JHM; Hylkema, Machteld

    1994-01-01

    Lupus nephritis is regarded as an immune complex mediated disease. Since anti-DNA antibodies are present in the circulation and in diseased glomeruli of patients with lupus nephritis, these antibodies have been assigned a pivotal role in the initiation of lupus nephritis. It remains however unclear

  10. Dutch guidelines for diagnosis and therapy of proliferative lupus nephritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tellingen, A.; Voskuyl, A. E.; Vervloet, M. G.; Bijl, M.; de Sevaux, R. G. L.; Berger, S. P.; Derksen, R. H. W. M.; Berden, J. H. M.

    Proliferative lupus nephritis is a strong predictor of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Despite improvements in the management of lupus nephritis, a significant number of the patients do not respond to immunosuppressive therapy and progress to end-stage renal

  11. Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Carpal tunnel syndrome Depression Irritable bowel syndrome Migraine Thyroid disease Urinary tract infections All A-Z health topics ... Carpal tunnel syndrome Depression Irritable bowel syndrome Migraine Thyroid disease Urinary tract infections All A-Z health topics ...

  12. Severe Tissue Trauma Triggers the Autoimmune State Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in the MRL/++ Lupus-Prone Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    progression of renal disease in lupus -prone mice. Following sham- treatment and burn injury, we monitored urine protein levels on a weekly basis as an...glomerulonephritis, membranous nephropathy, and lupus nephritis . Kidney Int 1997; 51: 270-276. 61 Bijl M, Dijstelbloem HM, Oost WW, et al. IgG subclass... Lupus (2009) 18, 318-331 http://lup.sagepub.com PAPER Severe tissue trauma triggers the autoimmune state systemic lupus erythematosus in the MRL

  13. Changes in Histidine Decarboxylase, Histamine N-Methyltransferase and Histamine Receptors in Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shan, Ling; Bao, Ai-Min; Swaab, Dick F

    2017-01-01

    Compared to other monoamine neurotransmitters, information on the association between the histaminergic system and neuropsychiatric disorders is scarce, resulting in a lack of histamine-related treatment for these disorders. The current chapter tries to combine information obtained from genetic

  14. Drug Repurposing Is a New Opportunity for Developing Drugs against Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeong-Min Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Better the drugs you know than the drugs you do not know. Drug repurposing is a promising, fast, and cost effective method that can overcome traditional de novo drug discovery and development challenges of targeting neuropsychiatric and other disorders. Drug discovery and development targeting neuropsychiatric disorders are complicated because of the limitations in understanding pathophysiological phenomena. In addition, traditional de novo drug discovery and development are risky, expensive, and time-consuming processes. One alternative approach, drug repurposing, has emerged taking advantage of off-target effects of the existing drugs. In order to identify new opportunities for the existing drugs, it is essential for us to understand the mechanisms of action of drugs, both biologically and pharmacologically. By doing this, drug repurposing would be a more effective method to develop drugs against neuropsychiatric and other disorders. Here, we review the difficulties in drug discovery and development in neuropsychiatric disorders and the extent and perspectives of drug repurposing.

  15. Neuropsychiatric Disturbances and Hypopituitarism After Traumatic Brain Injury in an Elderly Man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Cheng Chang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropsychiatric or cognitive disturbances are common complications after traumatic brain injury. They are commonly regarded as irreversible sequelae of organic brain injuries. We report a case of hypopituitarism in a 77-year-old man who presented with long-term neuropsychiatric disturbances, including cognitive impairment, disturbed sleep patterns, personality change, loss of affect, and visual and auditory hallucinations after a traumatic subdural hemorrhage. The treatment response to hormone replacement therapy was nearly complete. Hypopituitarism is rarely considered in patients who sustain traumatic brain injury and the neuropsychiatric manifestations of posttraumatic hypopituitarism have rarely been reported. This case highlights the importance of hypopituitarism as a potential reversible cause of neuropsychiatric disturbances after traumatic brain injury.

  16. B cell signature during inactive systemic lupus is heterogeneous: toward a biological dissection of lupus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Claude Garaud

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosous (SLE is an autoimmune disease with an important clinical and biological heterogeneity. B lymphocytes appear central to the development of SLE which is characterized by the production of a large variety of autoantibodies and hypergammaglobulinemia. In mice, immature B cells from spontaneous lupus prone animals are able to produce autoantibodies when transferred into immunodeficient mice, strongly suggesting the existence of intrinsic B cell defects during lupus. In order to approach these defects in humans, we compared the peripheral B cell transcriptomas of quiescent lupus patients to normal B cell transcriptomas. When the statistical analysis is performed on the entire group of patients, the differences between patients and controls appear quite weak with only 14 mRNA genes having a false discovery rate ranging between 11 and 17%, with 6 underexpressed genes (PMEPA1, TLR10, TRAF3IP2, LDOC1L, CD1C and EGR1. However, unforced hierarchical clustering of the microarrays reveals a subgroup of lupus patients distinct from both the controls and the other lupus patients. This subgroup has no detectable clinical or immunological phenotypic peculiarity compared to the other patients, but is characterized by 1/an IL-4 signature and 2/the abnormal expression of a large set of genes with an extremely low false discovery rate, mainly pointing to the biological function of the endoplasmic reticulum, and more precisely to genes implicated in the Unfolded Protein Response, suggesting that B cells entered an incomplete BLIMP1 dependent plasmacytic differentiation which was undetectable by immunophenotyping. Thus, this microarray analysis of B cells during quiescent lupus suggests that, despite a similar lupus phenotype, different biological roads can lead to human lupus.

  17. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment ameliorates lupus nephritis through the expansion of regulatory T cells.

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    Yan, Ji-Jing; Jambaldorj, Enkthuya; Lee, Jae-Ghi; Jang, Joon Young; Shim, Jung Min; Han, Miyeun; Koo, Tai Yeon; Ahn, Curie; Yang, Jaeseok

    2016-11-15

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) can induce regulatory T cells (Tregs) as well as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Despite the immune modulatory effects of G-CSF, results of G-CSF treatment in systemic lupus erythematosus are still controversial. We therefore investigated whether G-CSF can ameliorate lupus nephritis and studied the underlying mechanisms. NZB/W F1 female mice were treated with G-CSF or phosphate-buffered saline for 5 consecutive days every week from 24 weeks of age, and were analyzed at 36 weeks of age. G-CSF treatment decreased proteinuria and serum anti-dsDNA, increased serum complement component 3 (C3), and attenuated renal tissue injury including deposition of IgG and C3. G-CSF treatment also decreased serum levels of BUN and creatinine, and ultimately decreased mortality of NZB/W F1 mice. G-CSF treatment induced expansion of CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + Tregs, with decreased renal infiltration of T cells, B cells, inflammatory granulocytes and monocytes in both kidneys and spleen. G-CSF treatment also decreased expression levels of MCP-1, IL-6, IL-2, and IL-10 in renal tissues as well as serum levels of MCP-1, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-17. When Tregs were depleted by PC61 treatment, G-CSF-mediated protective effects on lupus nephritis were abrogated. G-CSF treatment ameliorated lupus nephritis through the preferential expansion of CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + Tregs. Therefore, G-CSF has a therapeutic potential for lupus nephritis.

  18. Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal Infections: Role of Otolaryngologist

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    Emrah Kara

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections, refers to a disorder in children who manifest symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder and/or tic disorders associated with acute exacerbations. Although autoimmune responses following infections with streptococcus have been hypothesized to be responsible, there is still controversies about the pathophysiology and treatment. In this article, the treatment methods of pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections and the role of otolaryngologist were discussed.

  19. Neuropsychiatric disorders among Syrian and Iraqi refugees in Jordan: a retrospective cohort study 2012-2013.

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    McKenzie, Erica D; Spiegel, Paul; Khalifa, Adam; Mateen, Farrah J

    2015-01-01

    The burden of neuropsychiatric disorders in refugees is likely high, but little has been reported on the neuropsychiatric disorders that affect Syrian and Iraqi refugees in a country of first asylum. This analysis aimed to study the cost and burden of neuropsychiatric disorders among refugees from Syria and Iraq requiring exceptional, United Nations-funded care in a country of first asylum. The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees works with multi-disciplinary, in-country exceptional care committees to review refugees' applications for emergency or exceptional medical care. Neuropsychiatric diagnoses among refugee applicants were identified through a retrospective review of applications to the Jordanian Exceptional Care Committee (2012-2013). Diagnoses were made using International Classification of Disease-10(th) edition codes rendered by treating physicians. Neuropsychiatric applications accounted for 11% (264/2526) of all Exceptional Care Committee applications, representing 223 refugees (40% female; median age 35 years; 57% Syrian, 36% Iraqi, 7% other countries of origin). Two-thirds of neuropsychiatric cases were for emergency care. The total amount requested for neuropsychiatric disorders was 925,674 USD. Syrian refugees were significantly more likely to request neurotrauma care than Iraqis (18/128 vs. 3/80, p = 0.03). The most expensive care per person was for brain tumor (7,905 USD), multiple sclerosis (7,502 USD), and nervous system trauma (6,466 USD), although stroke was the most frequent diagnosis. Schizophrenia was the most costly and frequent diagnosis among the psychiatric disorders (2,269 USD per person, 27,226 USD total). Neuropsychiatric disorders, including those traditionally considered outside the purview of refugee health, are an important burden to health among Iraqi and Syrian refugees. Possible interventions could include stroke risk factor reduction and targeted medication donations for multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, and

  20. Pathways of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Utilization: Implications for Brain Function in Neuropsychiatric Health and Disease

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    Liu, Joanne J.; Green, Pnina; Mann, J. John; Rapoport, Stanley I.; Sublette, M. Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have profound effects on brain development and function. Abnormalities of PUFA status have been implicated in neuropsychiatric diseases such as major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Pathophysiologic mechanisms could involve not only suboptimal PUFA intake, but also metabolic and genetic abnormalities, defective hepatic metabolism, and problems with diffusion and transport. This article provides an overview of physiologic factors regulating PUFA utilization, highlighting their relevance to neuropsychiatric disease. PMID:25498862

  1. Attenuation of neuropsychiatric symptoms and caregiver burden in Alzheimer's disease by motor intervention: a controlled trial

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    Florindo Stella

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the effects of motor intervention on the neuropsychiatric symptoms of Alzheimer's disease and on the caregivers' burden. DESIGN: This is a controlled trial evaluating the effects of a motor intervention program on the neuropsychiatric symptoms. SETTING: The intervention was performed on community patients from two university centers specializing in physical exercise for the elderly. SUBJECTS: Patients with Alzheimer's disease were divided into two groups: sixteen received the motor intervention and sixteen controls (five controls were excluded because of clinical intercurrences. INTERVENTIONS: Aerobic exercises (flexibility, strength, and agility and functional balance exercises were conducted over six months for 60 minutes three times per week. MAIN MEASURES: Psychopathological features of patients were evaluated with the Neuropsychiatric Inventory and Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia. Caregivers were evaluated using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Distress and Burden Interview. A two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA was applied to observe interactions (pre- vs. post-intervention; participants vs. controls. RESULTS: Patients from the intervention presented a significant reduction in neuropsychiatric conditions when compared to controls (Neuropsychiatric Inventory: F: 11.12; p = 0.01; Cornell Depression scale: F: 11.97; p = 0.01. The burden and stress of caregivers responsible for patients who participated in the intervention significantly decreased when compared to caregivers responsible for controls (Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Distress: F: 9.37; p = 0.01; Burden Interview: F: 11.28; p = 0.01. CONCLUSIONS: Aerobic exercise was associated with a reduction in the neuropsychiatric symptoms and contributed to attenuate the caregivers' burden. However, the researchers were not blinded to the patient's intervention status, which constitutes an important limitation of this study.

  2. Whole genome association studies of neuropsychiatric disease: An emerging era of collaborative genetic discovery

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    Keller, Margaret A; Gwinn, Katrina; Nash, Josefina; Horsford, Jonathan; Zhang, Ran; Rich, Stephen S; Corriveau, Roderick A

    2007-01-01

    Family history, which includes both common environmental and genetic effects, is associated with an increased risk for many neuropsychiatric diseases. Investigators have identified several disease-causing mutations for specific neuropsychiatric disorders that display Mendelian segregation. Such discoveries can lead to more rational drug design and improved intervention from a better understanding of the underlying biological mechanisms. However, a key challenge of genetic discovery in human c...

  3. Subtle neuropsychiatric and neurocognitive changes in hereditary gelsolin amyloidosis (AGel amyloidosis).

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    Kantanen, Mari; Kiuru-Enari, Sari; Salonen, Oili; Kaipainen, Markku; Hokkanen, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary gelsolin amyloidosis (AGel amyloidosis) is an autosomal dominant form of systemic amyloidosis caused by a c.640G>A or c.640G>T mutation in the gene coding for gelsolin. Principal clinical manifestations include corneal lattice dystrophy, cranial neuropathy and cutis laxa with vascular fragility. Signs of minor CNS involvement have also been observed, possibly related to cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). To investigate further if AGel amyloidosis carries a risk for a specific neuropsychological or psychiatric symptomatology we studied 35 AGel patients and 29 control subjects. Neuropsychological tests showed abnormalities in visuocontructional and -spatial performance in AGel patients, also some indication of problems in processing efficacy was found. At psychiatric evaluation the patient group showed more psychiatric symptomatology, mainly depression. In brain MRI, available in 16 patients and 14 controls, we found microhemorrhages or microcalcifications only in the patient group, although the number of findings was small. Our study shows that AGel amyloidosis can be associated with visuoconstructional problems and depression, but severe neuropsychiatric involvement is not characteristic. The gelsolin mutation may even induce cerebrovascular fragility, but further epidemiological and histopathological as well as longitudinal follow-up studies are needed to clarify gelsolin-related vascular pathology and its clinical consequences.

  4. Subtle neuropsychiatric and neurocognitive changes in hereditary gelsolin amyloidosis (AGel amyloidosis

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    Mari Kantanen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary gelsolin amyloidosis (AGel amyloidosis is an autosomal dominant form of systemic amyloidosis caused by a c.640G>A or c.640G>T mutation in the gene coding for gelsolin. Principal clinical manifestations include corneal lattice dystrophy, cranial neuropathy and cutis laxa with vascular fragility. Signs of minor CNS involvement have also been observed, possibly related to cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA. To investigate further if AGel amyloidosis carries a risk for a specific neuropsychological or psychiatric symptomatology we studied 35 AGel patients and 29 control subjects. Neuropsychological tests showed abnormalities in visuocontructional and -spatial performance in AGel patients, also some indication of problems in processing efficacy was found. At psychiatric evaluation the patient group showed more psychiatric symptomatology, mainly depression. In brain MRI, available in 16 patients and 14 controls, we found microhemorrhages or microcalcifications only in the patient group, although the number of findings was small. Our study shows that AGel amyloidosis can be associated with visuoconstructional problems and depression, but severe neuropsychiatric involvement is not characteristic. The gelsolin mutation may even induce cerebrovascular fragility, but further epidemiological and histopathological as well as longitudinal follow-up studies are needed to clarify gelsolin-related vascular pathology and its clinical consequences.

  5. Neuropsychiatric and psychosocial issues of patients with hepatitis C infection: a selective literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modabbernia, Amirhossein; Poustchi, Hossein; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2013-01-01

    We briefly reviewed the evidence on the association of hepatitis C (HCV) infection with several aspects of mental and psychosocial health. Medline was searched with appropriate keywords. The primary sources were the systematic reviews. If systematic reviews were not available for a subject, then the most relevant and methodologically sound original studies were selected. HCV infection is associated with poorer health-related quality of life, and physical, mental, and social health. A part of impaired health of these patients is related to cirrhosis, intravenous drug use, co morbid psychiatric disorders, stigmatization, poor social support, alcohol abuse, and interferon treatment. However, HCV itself is also associated with poorer health status particularly in the physical and cognitive domains, which might be related to brain alterations induced by the virus. Interferon treatment is an important cause of depression in HCV patients and sometimes is associated with irritability, manic episode, or acute confusional state. Social health of HCV patients is significantly impaired by stigmatization, poor social support, psychiatric comorbidties, and impaired coping. Psychosocial impairment of HCV patients significantly impairs their treatment adherence. A supportive and nonjudgmental multidisciplinary team is required for optimal management of these patients. Patients with HCV infection had complex neuropsychiatric and psychosocial problems. These problems are challenges for management of HCV infection, affect the patient's care significantly, and might alter the course of the disease. A multidisciplinary approach, a supportive environment, and a nonjudgmental healthcare team are required for optimal medical and psychosocial management of patients with HCV.

  6. Voxel-based morphometry findings in Alzheimer's disease: neuropsychiatric symptoms and disability correlations - preliminary results

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    Luciano de Gois Vasconcelos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The role of structural brain changes and their correlations with neuropsychiatric symptoms and disability in Alzheimer's disease are still poorly understood. OBJECTIVE: To establish whether structural changes in grey matter volume in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease are associated with neuropsychiatric symptoms and disability METHODS: Nineteen Alzheimer's disease patients (9 females; total mean age =75.2 y old +4.7; total mean education level =8.5 y +4.9 underwent a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI examination and voxel-based morphometry analysis. T1-weighted images were spatially normalized and segmented. Grey matter images were smoothed and analyzed using a multiple regression design. The results were corrected for multiple comparisons. The Neuropsychiatric Inventory was used to evaluate the neuropsychiatric symptoms, and the Functional Activities Questionnaire and Disability Assessment for Dementia were used for functional evaluation RESULTS: A significant negative correlation was found between the bilateral middle frontal gyri, left inferior temporal gyrus, right orbitofrontal gyrus, and Neuropsychiatric Inventory scores. A negative correlation was found between bilateral middle temporal gyri, left hippocampus, bilateral fusiform gyri, and the Functional Activities Questionnaire. There was a positive correlation between the right amygdala, bilateral fusiform gyri, right anterior insula, left inferior and middle temporal gyri, right superior temporal gyrus, and Disability Assessment for Dementia scores CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that the neuropsychiatric symptoms observed in Alzheimer's disease patients could be mainly due to frontal structural abnormalities, whereas disability could be associated with reductions in temporal structures.

  7. Voxel-based morphometry findings in Alzheimer's disease: neuropsychiatric symptoms and disability correlations - preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Luciano de Gois; Jackowski, Andrea Parolin; Oliveira, Maira Okada de; Flor, Yoná Mayara Ribeiro; Bueno, Orlando Francisco Amodeo; Brucki, Sonia Maria Dozzi

    2011-01-01

    The role of structural brain changes and their correlations with neuropsychiatric symptoms and disability in Alzheimer's disease are still poorly understood. To establish whether structural changes in grey matter volume in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease are associated with neuropsychiatric symptoms and disability Nineteen Alzheimer's disease patients (9 females; total mean age =75.2 y old +4.7; total mean education level =8.5 y +4.9) underwent a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination and voxel-based morphometry analysis. T1-weighted images were spatially normalized and segmented. Grey matter images were smoothed and analyzed using a multiple regression design. The results were corrected for multiple comparisons. The Neuropsychiatric Inventory was used to evaluate the neuropsychiatric symptoms, and the Functional Activities Questionnaire and Disability Assessment for Dementia were used for functional evaluation A significant negative correlation was found between the bilateral middle frontal gyri, left inferior temporal gyrus, right orbitofrontal gyrus, and Neuropsychiatric Inventory scores. A negative correlation was found between bilateral middle temporal gyri, left hippocampus, bilateral fusiform gyri, and the Functional Activities Questionnaire. There was a positive correlation between the right amygdala, bilateral fusiform gyri, right anterior insula, left inferior and middle temporal gyri, right superior temporal gyrus, and Disability Assessment for Dementia scores The results suggest that the neuropsychiatric symptoms observed in Alzheimer's disease patients could be mainly due to frontal structural abnormalities, whereas disability could be associated with reductions in temporal structures.

  8. [Auto-immune disorders as a possible cause of neuropsychiatric syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Martinez, P; Molenaar, P C; Losen, M; Hoffmann, C; Stevens, J; de Witte, L D; van Amelsvoort, T; van Os, J; Rutten, B P F

    2015-01-01

    Changes that occur in the behaviour of voltage-gated ion channels and ligand-gated receptor channels due to gene mutations or auto-immune attack are the cause of channelopathies in the central and peripheral nervous system. Although the relation between molecular channel defects and clinical symptoms has been explained in the case of many neuromuscular channelopathies, the pathophysiology of auto-immunity in neuropsychiatric syndromes is still unclear. To review recent findings regarding neuronal auto-immune reactions in severe neuropsychiatric syndromes. Using PubMed, we consulted the literature published between 1990 and August 2014 relating to the occurrence of auto-immune antibodies in severe and persistent neuropsychiatric syndromes. Auto-antibodies have only limited access to the central nervous system, but if they do enter the system they can, in some cases, cause disease. We discuss recent findings regarding the occurrence of auto-antibodies against ligand-activated receptor channels and potassium channels in neuropsychiatric and neurological syndromes, including schizophrenia and limbic encephalitis. Although the occurrence of several auto-antibodies in schizophrenia has been confirmed, there is still no proof of a causal relationship in the syndrome. We still have no evidence of the prevalence of auto-immunity in neuropsychiatric syndromes. The discovery that an antibody against an ion channel is associated with some neuropsychiatric disorders may mean that in future it will be possible to treat patients by means of immunosuppression, which could lead to an improvement in a patient's cognitive abilities.

  9. A case of mistaken identity: When lupus masquerades as primary myelofibrosis

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    Edy Hasrouni

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Autoimmune myelofibrosis is an uncommon hematologic disease characterized by anemia, bone marrow myelofibrosis, and an autoimmune feature. Myelofibrosis is often associated with other conditions, including infections, nutritional/endocrine dysfunction, toxin/drug exposure, and connective tissue diseases, including scleroderma and systemic lupus erythematosus. Absence of clonal markers ( JAK2 and heterogeneity of the symptoms often complicate the diagnosis. Case presentation: Here, we present two cases of systemic lupus erythematosus–induced autoimmune myelofibrosis. The first case is of a 36-year-old African American female with diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus at the age of 12 years. The second patient is a 44-year-old African American male with family history of systemic lupus erythematosus who developed anemia and constitutional symptoms later on. Both patients showed hypercellularity and fibrotic changes of the bone marrow. Moreover, mutational analysis showed that both patients were wild type for JAK2 (V617F and exon 12 and MPL (exon 10. Conclusions: These two cases illustrate that anemic patients with fibrotic changes in the bone marrow without other clinicopathologic features associated with primary myelofibrosis in the presence of clinical manifestations and history of an autoimmune disease should suggest an autoimmune myelofibrosis. These cases demonstrate that a good clinical history combined with molecular technologies and pathomorphologic criteria are helpful in distinguishing between primary myelofibrosis and a nonclonal myelofibrosis from an associated condition.

  10. Assessment of clinical manifestations, disease activity and organ damage in 996 Korean patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: comparison with other Asian populations.

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    Joo, Young Bin; Bae, Sang Cheol

    2015-02-01

    To describe the clinical manifestations, disease activity and organ damage in Korean patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria, SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI), and Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/ACR damage index (SDI) were assessed in patients with SLE from 1998 to 2012. A total of 996 SLE patients were analyzed. The common accrual of ACR criteria included: immunologic (93%), hematologic (93%), arthritic (66%) and nephritic (50%). In the inception cohort over 10 years of follow-up (n = 120), the number of ACR criteria increased significantly (5.0 ± 1.2 to 5.7 ± 1.3), and nephritis, serositis and neuropsychiatric symptoms tended to increase continuously over time. SLEDAI-2K decreased significantly (5.6 ± 3.4 to 4.1 ± 1.2), but the percentage of patients with SLEDAI scores ≥ 12 did not decrease over time. The common organ damages were musculoskeletal (14.9%) and renal (11.1%). The mean SDI score increased significantly (0.4 ± 0.8 to 1.1 ± 1.6) and renal damage had two peaks in 1 and 6-10 years, musculoskeletal and neuropsychiatric damage were predominant from 1 to 5 years, and ophthalmic damage increased sharply over 10 years. Compared to other Asian cohorts, disease activity was lower and organ damage was less in our Korean cohort. Nephritis, serositis and neuropsychiatric symptoms increased continuously over time. Overall disease activity decreased significantly, but a small portion of severe disease activity continued during the disease course. The most common organ damage was musculoskeletal. The time in organ damage development varied, which reflects the possible causality, such as disease itself and/or treatment. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. European evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus: the SHARE initiative.

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    Groot, Noortje; de Graeff, Nienke; Avcin, Tadej; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Brogan, Paul; Dolezalova, Pavla; Feldman, Brian; Kone-Paut, Isabelle; Lahdenne, Pekka; Marks, Stephen D; McCann, Liza; Ozen, Seza; Pilkington, Clarissa; Ravelli, Angelo; Royen-Kerkhof, Annet van; Uziel, Yosef; Vastert, Bas; Wulffraat, Nico; Kamphuis, Sylvia; Beresford, Michael W

    2017-11-01

    Childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE) is a rare, multisystem and potentially life-threatening autoimmune disorder with significant associated morbidity. Evidence-based guidelines are sparse and management is often based on clinical expertise. SHARE (Single Hub and Access point for paediatric Rheumatology in Europe) was launched to optimise and disseminate management regimens for children and young adults with rheumatic diseases like cSLE. Here, we provide evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of cSLE. In view of extent and complexity of cSLE and its various manifestations, recommendations for lupus nephritis and antiphospholipid syndrome will be published separately. Recommendations were generated using the EULAR (European League Against Rheumatism) standard operating procedure. An expert committee consisting of paediatric rheumatologists and representation of paediatric nephrology from across Europe discussed evidence-based recommendations during two consensus meetings. Recommendations were accepted if >80% agreement was reached. A total of 25 recommendations regarding key approaches to diagnosis and treatment of cSLE were made. The recommendations include 11 on diagnosis, 9 on disease monitoring and 5 on general treatment. Topics included: appropriate use of SLE classification criteria, disease activity and damage indices; adequate assessment of autoantibody profiles; secondary macrophage activation syndrome; use of hydroxychloroquine and corticosteroid-sparing regimens; and the importance of addressing poor adherence. Ten recommendations were accepted regarding general diagnostic strategies and treatment indications of neuropsychiatric cSLE. The SHARE recommendations for cSLE and neuropsychiatric manifestations of cSLE have been formulated by an evidence-based consensus process to support uniform, high-quality standards of care for children with cSLE. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the

  12. Understanding and Managing Pregnancy in Patients with Lupus

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    de Jesus, Guilherme Ramires; Mendoza-Pinto, Claudia; de Jesus, Nilson Ramires; dos Santos, Flávia Cunha; Klumb, Evandro Mendes; Carrasco, Mario García; Levy, Roger Abramino

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multisystemic autoimmune disease that occurs predominantly in women of fertile age. The association of SLE and pregnancy, mainly with active disease and especially with nephritis, has poorer pregnancy outcomes, with increased frequency of preeclampsia, fetal loss, prematurity, growth restriction, and newborns small for gestational age. Therefore, SLE pregnancies are considered high risk condition, should be monitored frequently during pregnancy and delivery should occur in a controlled setting. Pregnancy induces dramatic immune and neuroendocrine changes in the maternal body in order to protect the fetus from immunologic attack and these modifications can be affected by SLE. The risk of flares depends on the level of maternal disease activity in the 6–12 months before conception and is higher in women with repeated flares before conception, in those who discontinue useful medications and in women with active glomerulonephritis at conception. It is a challenge to differentiate lupus nephritis from preeclampsia and, in this context, the angiogenic and antiangiogenic cytokines are promising. Prenatal care of pregnant patients with SLE requires close collaboration between rheumatologist and obstetrician. Planning pregnancy is essential to increase the probability of successful pregnancies. PMID:26246905

  13. Understanding and Managing Pregnancy in Patients with Lupus

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    Guilherme Ramires de Jesus

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a chronic, multisystemic autoimmune disease that occurs predominantly in women of fertile age. The association of SLE and pregnancy, mainly with active disease and especially with nephritis, has poorer pregnancy outcomes, with increased frequency of preeclampsia, fetal loss, prematurity, growth restriction, and newborns small for gestational age. Therefore, SLE pregnancies are considered high risk condition, should be monitored frequently during pregnancy and delivery should occur in a controlled setting. Pregnancy induces dramatic immune and neuroendocrine changes in the maternal body in order to protect the fetus from immunologic attack and these modifications can be affected by SLE. The risk of flares depends on the level of maternal disease activity in the 6–12 months before conception and is higher in women with repeated flares before conception, in those who discontinue useful medications and in women with active glomerulonephritis at conception. It is a challenge to differentiate lupus nephritis from preeclampsia and, in this context, the angiogenic and antiangiogenic cytokines are promising. Prenatal care of pregnant patients with SLE requires close collaboration between rheumatologist and obstetrician. Planning pregnancy is essential to increase the probability of successful pregnancies.

  14. Fatal evolution of systemic lupus erythematosus associated with Crohn's disease

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    CHEBLI Júlio M. Fonseca

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe the case of a young Brazilian woman who was treated of ileocolonic Crohn's disease sparing rectum, as confirmed by colonoscopy and histopathological examination. After a 4-year course of sulfasalazine treatment, she presented with skin facial lesions in vespertilio, fever, arthralgias and high titers of anti-ANA and LE cells. A sulfasalazine-induced lupus syndrome was diagnosed, because after sulfasalazine withdrawal and a short course of prednisone, the clinical symptoms disappeared and the laboratory tests returned to normal. Mesalazine 3 g/day was started and the patient remained well for the next 3 years, when she was again admitted with fever, weakness, arthralgias, diplopy, strabismus and hypoaesthesia in both hands and feet, microhematuria, haematic casts, hypocomplementemia and high titers of autoimmune antibodies. A diagnosis of associated systemic lupus erythematosus was made. Although a pulsotherapy with methylprednisolone was started, no improvement was noticed. A cyclophosphamide trial was tried and again no positive results occurred. The patient evolved to severe clinical manifestations of general vasculitis affecting the central and peripheral nervous system and lungs, having a fatal evolution after 2 weeks. Although uncommon, the association of both disease may occur, and the authors call attention to this possibility, making a brief review of literature.

  15. Urinary CXCL10: a marker of nephritis in lupus patients

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    M. A. Marie

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a connective tissue disease characterized by the formation of autoantibodies and immune complexes. Lupus nephritis is one of the hallmark features of SLE. CXCL10 is a chemokine secreted by IFNg- stimulated endothelial cells and has been shown to be involved in the pathological processes of autoimmune diseases. The objective was to measure urinary CXCL10 in SLE patients, to compare levels between nephritis and non-nephritis groups and to study its correlation with other variables. Sixty lupus patients were enrolled in our trial. Thirty patients had lupus nephritis and the other 30 were without evidence of lupus nephritis. Thirty healthy subjects were willing to participate as a healthy control group. Renal biopsy was performed for lupus nephritis group. Urinary CXCL10 was measured using the ELISA technique. Serum creatinine, C3, C4 and 24 h urinary proteins were measured. Lupus activity was assessed using systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index (SLEDAI scoring system. Renal activity was measured using renal activity scoring system. CXCL10 was significantly higher in lupus nephritis patients than in lupus patients without nephritis. CXCL10 was significantly correlated with renal activity score, 24 hours urinary proteins and the SLEDAI score. It is highly valid predictor of SLE nephritis with high sensitivity and specificity. CXCL 10 a highly sensitive and specific non-invasive diagnostic tool for lupus nephritis patients.

  16. Lupus cystitis and repercussions of delayed diagnosis

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    Joana Abelha-Aleixo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of a young female with lupus that complained about suprapubic pain, dysuria, fever and vomits, symptoms first interpreted as pyelonephritis, despite negative cultures and imaging studies showing hydroureteronephrosis with inflammatory changes. When she developed malar rash, anasarca and nephrotic syndrome, the diagnosis of lupus cystitis with stage IV nephropathy was made, and she started immunosuppressive induction treatment with three pulses of corticosteroids followed by oral prednisolone (60 mg/d and mycophenolate (1.5 g/d. One month later she was admitted again with blood exams compatible with thrombotic microangiopathy, requiring aggressive immunosuppression and plasma exchange. After overcoming multiple complications, the patient gradually improved, and was discharged with close surveillance. This case poses the question: if the urogenital involvement had been recognized and treated in time, would it prevent the onset of lupus nephritis and other complications?

  17. A case of giant lupus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adil, Mohammad; Amin, Syed Suhail; Saeed, Noora; Mohtashim, Mohd; Priya, Annu; Alam, Mahtab

    2018-01-01

    Lupus vulgaris, the commonest form of tuberculosis of the skin, presents with a plaque that enlarges slowly with advancing edges while showing atrophy at other areas. It may be acquired by the blood stream, via lymph, by contiguous spread or from external inoculation. We describe a case of lupus vulgaris with a large erythematous-scaly plaque of 44 × 26 cm over the back and a similar 7 × 5 cm plaque over the right thigh. The plaque over the back was gradually progressive for the previous ten years and showed scarring and atrophy at places. Histopathology of the area showed caseating granulomas with Langhans giant cells, epitheloid cells and lymphocytes. A diagnosis of lupus vulgaris was made. This case is being presented owing to the large size of the lesion.

  18. The Clinicopathological Study of Lupus Nephritis

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    Raouf Rahim Merza

    2014-08-01

    Results: The current study shows female predominance 32(71.1% compared with 13(28.9% male. Class IV 15(33.3% nephritis was the most common type followed by class III 9(20.9%.The male patients develop nephritis early in the course of Systemic lupus erythematosis than females, and they were more commonly had hypertension and edema, and the hematological, cardiovascular, pulmonary, and central nervous system were the most common extra renal manifestation in males while mucocutaneous manifestations were the commonest in females, and further more males had more proliferative type of Lupus nephritis than females. Conclusion: Males had more severe type of lupus nephritis than females. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(4.000: 679-688

  19. Neuropsychiatric Disturbances, Self-Mutilation and Malingering in the French Armies during World War I: War Strain or Cowardice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatu, Laurent; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Between 1914 and 1918, war strain appeared under a number of guises and affected, to varying extents, the majority of French soldiers. The most frequent form of war strain was war psychoneurosis, but war strain also induced more paroxystic disorders, such as acute episodes of terror, self-mutilation, induced illnesses and even suicide. Fear was the constant companion of soldiers of the Great War: soldiers were either able to tame it or overwhelmed by an uncontrollable fear. Nonetheless, over the course of the war, some aspects of fear were recognised as syndromes. The French health service poorly anticipated the major consequences of war strain, as with many other types of injuries. After the establishment of wartime neuropsychiatric centres, two main medical stances emerged: listening to soldiers empathetically on the one hand and applying more repressive management on the other. For many physicians, the psychological consequences of this first modern war were synonymous with malingering or cowardice in the face of duty. The stance of French military physicians in relation to their command was not unequivocal and remained ambivalent, swaying between medico-military collusion and empathy towards soldiers experiencing psychological distress. The ubiquity of suspected malingering modified the already porous borders between neuropsychiatric disorders and disobedience. Several war psychoneurotic soldiers were sentenced by councils of war for deserting their posts in the face of the enemy and were shot. Many soldiers suspected of self-mutilation or suffering from induced illnesses were also sentenced and executed without an expert assessment of their wound or their psychological state. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Periodontitis and systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Rubim Camara Sete

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT A large number of studies have shown a potential association between periodontal and autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Similar mechanisms of tissue destruction concerning periodontitis and other autoimmune diseases have stimulated the study of a possible relationship between these conditions. This study aims to review the literature about this potential association and their different pathogenic mechanisms. Considering that periodontal disease is a disease characterized by inflammation influenced by infectious factors, such as SLE, it is plausible to suggest that SLE would influence periodontal disease and vice-versa. However, this issue is not yet fully elucidated and several mechanisms have been proposed to explain this association, as deregulation mainly in innate immune system, with action of phagocytic cells and proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and IL-18 in both conditions’ pathogenesis, leading to tissue destruction. However, studies assessing the relationship between these diseases are scarce, and more studies focused on common immunological mechanisms should be conducted to further understanding.

  1. [Lupus erythematosus in old age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federmann, M; Morell, B

    1994-06-03

    Over a period of 2 months an 88-year-old man developed progressively more severe breathing-related pain under the right shoulder blade, loss of appetite, general weakness, depressive mood, sub-febrile temperature and nocturnal sweating. Various inflammation parameters were raised (sedimentation rate 43 mm in the first hour; C-reactive protein 26 mg/dl; white cell count 12,500/microliters). There also were pleural effusion and signs of mild nonspecific hepatitis. Antibiotics were administered because bacterial pneumonia was suspected. But the patient's condition deteriorated and he developed nightly periods of disorientation. There was no evidence for any advanced malignancy. Immunological tests pointed towards older-onset systemic lupus erythematosus: titre for antinuclear antibodies markedly raised to 1:20 480; anti-DNA titre moderately raised to 1:125 IU/ml. The patient's general condition and the pleuritic pain improved within 2 days under treatment with prednisone (50 mg daily); the depression, disorientation and fever receded within a week. The anti-DNA titre fell to 47 IU/ml after 8 weeks. He was able to resume his usual social activities and was kept on a maintenance prednisone dose of 5.0 mg daily.

  2. Belimumab: in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burness, Celeste B; McCormack, Paul L

    2011-12-24

    Belimumab is a fully human recombinant IgG1λ monoclonal antibody that inhibits the binding of soluble B lymphocyte stimulator to B cells and hence prevents the survival and differentiation of selected B-cell subsets. It is available in the US, the EU and Canada for the treatment of adult patients with active, autoantibody-positive systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with a high degree of disease activity despite receiving standard therapy. At 52 weeks, a significantly greater proportion of belimumab 10 mg/kg than placebo recipients experienced a response as assessed by the SLE Responder Index (primary endpoint) in the randomized, double-blind, multinational, phase III BLISS-52 and BLISS-76 trials in patients with active seropositive SLE receiving standard therapy. A significantly greater proportion of belimumab than placebo recipients achieved a ≥4 point reduction in the SELENA-SLEDAI score at week 52 in both BLISS trials. However, the SLE Responder Index response rate was not significantly different between belimumab and placebo at 76 weeks in BLISS-76. Belimumab was generally well tolerated in the BLISS trials. During the double-blind periods of these trials and the phase II trial, twice as many deaths were reported with belimumab than placebo (six vs three). There were no meaningful differences between the incidence of serious infections and malignancies with belimumab or placebo.

  3. Mannose-binding lectin blunts macrophage polarization and ameliorates lupus nephritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanxing Cai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Deficiency in clearance of self nuclear antigens, including DNA, is the hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, a chronic autoimmnue disease characterized by the production of various autoantibodies, immune complex deposition and severe organ damage. Our previous studies revealed that administration of syngeneic BALB/c mice with activated lymphocyte-derived DNA (ALD-DNA could induce SLE disease. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL, a secreted pattern recognition receptor with binding activity to DNA, has been proved to be a modulator of inflammation, but whether MBL takes responsibility for DNA clearance, modulates the DNA-mediated immune responses, and is involved in the development of DNA-induced SLE disease remain poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The levels of serum MBL significantly decreased in lupus mice induced by ALD-DNA and were negatively correlated with SLE disease. MBL blunted macrophage M2b polarization by inhibiting the MAPK and NF-κB signaling while enhancing the activation of CREB. Furthermore, MBL suppressed the ability of ALD-DNA-stimulated macrophages to polarize T cells toward Th1 cells and Th17 cells. Importantly, MBL supplement in vivo could ameliorate lupus nephritis. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest MBL supplement could alleviate SLE disease and might imply a potential therapeutic strategy for DNA-induced SLE, which would further our understanding of the protective role of MBL in SLE disease.

  4. Neuropsychiatric symptoms in nursing home patients: factor structure invariance of the Dutch nursing home version of the neuropsychiatric inventory in different stages of dementia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, S.U.; Jonghe, J.F. de; Verhey, F.R.J.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: To examine the influence of dementia stage and psychoactive medication use on the factor structure of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Nursing Home version (NPI-NH) in Dutch nursing home patients. METHODS: The NPI-NH was administered to a large sample of 1,437 patients with mild to

  5. [B lymphocyte stimulator in systemic lupus erythematosus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, Ulises

    2012-01-01

    The B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) is an essential protein for the growth and survival of B cells. BLyS is expressed on monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. BLyS binds to three receptors on B cells: BAFF-R, BCMA, and TACI. BLyS overexpression in mice leads to lupus-like syndrome, but not in all, whereas BLyS deficient mice results in a block of B cell development. High serum levels of BLyS can be detected in patients with lupus and rheumatoid arthritis. BLyS antagonists are an attractive target for treating autoimmune diseases.

  6. Lupus eritematoso neonatal: reporte de cuatro casos

    OpenAIRE

    Perez,Maria Fernanda; Torres,Maria Eugenia de; Buján,María Marta; Lanoël,Agustina; Cervini,Andrea Bettina; Pierini,Adrián Martín

    2011-01-01

    El lupus eritematoso neonatal es una enfermedad poco frecuente, caracterizada clínica mente por alteraciones cutáneas semejantes al lupus subagudo o discoide y/o bloqueo cardíaco congénito. Generalmente, cuando los pacientes presentan manifestaciones cutáneas, no tienen anormalidades cardiológicas y viceversa, aunque en un 10% de los casos ambas manifestaciones pueden coexistir. Puede acompañarse también de alteraciones hematológicas, hepáticas y neurológicas. Es causado por el pasaje traspla...

  7. Systemic lupus erythematosus in a male patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibarani, H.; Zubir, Z.

    2018-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disorder with a broad spectrum of clinical presentations. Female to male ratio is approximately 9:1.A 20 years old male was admitted to HAM Hospital 3 months ago with chief complaint pain in both knees joint. After anamneses, physical examination and laboratory test the patient was diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus. The patient tested positive for ANA and anti-ds-DNA antibody test. The patient was with giving non-biologic DMARDS @myfortic 360mg, methylprednisolone, chloroquine and other symptomatic drugs.

  8. Amelioration of lupus nephritis by serum amyloid P component gene therapy with distinct mechanisms varied from different stage of the disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijuan Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Our previous study revealed that administration of syngeneic female BALB/c mice with excessive self activated lymphocyte-derived DNA (ALD-DNA could induce systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE disease, indicating that overload of self-DNA might exceed normal clearance ability and comprise the major source of autoantigens in lupus mice. Serum amyloid P component (SAP, an acute-phase serum protein with binding reactivity to DNA in mice, was proved to promote the clearance of free DNA and prevent mice against self-antigen induced autoimmune response. It is reasonable to hypothesize that SAP treatment might contribute to alleviation of SLE disease, whereas its role in ALD-DNA-induced lupus nephritis is not fully understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The ratios of SAP to DNA significantly decreased and were negatively correlated with the titers of anti-dsDNA antibodies in ALD-DNA-induced lupus mice, indicating SAP was relatively insufficient in lupus mice. Herein a pcDNA3-SAP plasmid (pSAP was genetically constructed and intramuscularly injected into BALB/c mice. It was found that SAP protein purified from the serum of pSAP-treated mice bound efficiently to ALD-DNA and inhibited ALD-DNA-mediated innate immune response in vitro. Treatment of ALD-DNA-induced lupus mice with pSAP in the early stage of SLE disease with the onset of proteinuria reversed lupus nephritis via decreasing anti-dsDNA autoantibody production and immune complex (IC deposition. Further administration of pSAP in the late stage of SLE disease that had established lupus nephritis alleviated proteinuria and ameliorated lupus nephritis. This therapeutic effect of SAP was not only attributable to the decreased levels of anti-dsDNA autoantibodies, but also associated with the decreased infiltration of lymphocytes and the reduced production of inflammatory markers. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that SAP administration could effectively alleviated lupus

  9. Patient cost-sharing for ambulatory neuropsychiatric services in Abu Dhabi, UAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidi, Samer; Abouallaban, Yousef; Alhamad, Sultan; Meirambayeva, Aizhan

    2016-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric disorders are of high concern and burden of disease in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The aim of this study is to describe patient cost-sharing patterns, insurance coverage of ambulatory neuropsychiatric disorders, and utilization of neuropsychiatric services in Abu Dhabi. The study utilized the data published by Health Authority-Abu Dhabi (HAAD) and the American Center for Psychiatry and Neurology (ACPN) records in Abu Dhabi. The data were collected from the ACPN to describe patterns of insurance coverage and patient cost-sharing. The data included information on patient visits to the ACPN from January 1, 2010 till May 16, 2013. The data also included insurance coverage, total cost of treatment for each patient and the amount of coinsurances and deductibles paid by each patient. Additionally, the study utilized data published by HAAD on health services utilization, and health insurance plans in 2014. The percentage of total costs paid by patients and insurance were calculated by insurance groups and health service. Insurance plans with different patient cost-sharing arrangements for mental health treatment benefits were divided into three groups. ANOVA and MANOVA analyses were performed to test for differences among three categories of neuropsychiatric services (neurology, psychiatry and psychotherapy) in terms of the total costs and patient cost-sharing. The data were analysed using STATA version 12. About 36 % of the total costs on ambulatory neuropsychiatric services was paid directly by patients; 1 % of total costs was covered by patients as co-insurances and deductibles, and 63 % of total costs was covered by insurance providers. The average cost per visit was about 485 AED ($132), including 304 AED ($83) paid by insurance and 181 AED ($49) paid by patient. About 44 % of total costs was related to psychiatry services, 28 % of total costs was related to neurology services, and 28 % of total costs was related to psychotherapy services

  10. T-helper 17 cell cytokines and interferon type I: Partners in crime in systemic lupus erythematosus?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Brkic (Zana); O.B.J. Corneth (Odilia); C.G. van Helden-Meeuwsen; R.J.E.M. Dolhain (Radboud); M. de Maria; S.M.J. Paulissen (Sandra); N. Davelaar (Nadine); J.P. van Hamburg (Jan Piet); P.L.A. van Daele (Paul); V.A.S.H. Dalm (Virgil); P.M. van Hagen (Martin); J.M.W. Hazes (Mieke); M.A. Versnel (Marjan); E.W. Lubberts (Erik)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: A hallmark of systemic autoimmune diseases like systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the increased expression of interferon (IFN) type I inducible genes, so-called IFN type I signature. Recently, T-helper 17 subset (Th17 cells), which produces IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-21, and

  11. Kallikrein transduced mesenchymal stem cells protect against anti-GBM disease and lupus nephritis by ameliorating inflammation and oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajuan Li

    Full Text Available Previously we have shown that kallikreins (klks play a renoprotective role in nephrotoxic serum induced nephritis. In this study, we have used mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs as vehicles to deliver klks into the injured kidneys and have measured their therapeutic effect on experimental antibody induced nephritis and lupus nephritis. Human KLK-1 (hKLK1 gene was transduced into murine MSCs using a retroviral vector to generate a stable cell line, hKLK1-MSC, expressing high levels of hKLK1. 129/svj mice subjected to anti-GBM induced nephritis were transplanted with 10(6 hKLK1-MSCs and hKLK1 expression was confirmed in the kidneys. Compared with vector-MSCs injected mice, the hKLK1-MSCs treated mice showed significantly reduced proteinuria, blood urea nitrogen (BUN and ameliorated renal pathology. Using the same strategy, we treated lupus-prone B6.Sle1.Sle3 bicongenic mice with hKLK1-MSCs and demonstrated that hKLK1-MSCs delivery also attenuated lupus nephritis. Mechanistically, hKLK1-MSCs reduced macrophage and T-lymphocyte infiltration into the kidney by suppressing the expression of inflammation cytokines. Moreover, hKLK1 transduced MSCs were more resistant to oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. These findings advance genetically modified MSCs as potential gene delivery tools for targeting therapeutic agents to the kidneys in order to modulate inflammation and oxidative stress in lupus nephritis.

  12. Kinesiotherapy for quality of life, pain and muscle strength of rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus patient. Case report

    OpenAIRE

    Myra, Rafaela Simon; DeMarco, Mariângela; Zanin, Caroline; Wibelinger, Lia Mara

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory, chronic and progressive disease. It impairs joint synovial membranes and may induce bone and cartilage destruction. Many diseases may follow rheumatoid arthritis, including systemic lupus erythematosus, an inflammatory, chronic autoimmune disease with multisystemic manifestations, with periods of remission and exacerbation. This study aimed at reporting kinesiotherapy intervention for quality of life, pain and muscle...

  13. Plasma C4d as marker for lupus nephritis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Myriam; Smoląg, Karolina I; Björk, Albin; Gullstrand, Birgitta; Okrój, Marcin; Leffler, Jonatan; Jönsen, Andreas; Bengtsson, Anders A; Blom, Anna M

    2017-12-06

    In the present study, we sought to evaluate the complement activation product C4d as a marker for lupus nephritis in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). C4d levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in plasma samples of patients with established SLE using a novel approach based on detection of a short linear cleavage neoepitope. Cross-sectional associations were studied in 98 patients with SLE with samples taken at lower or higher respective disease activity. Temporal associations were investigated in 69 patients with SLE who were followed longitudinally for up to 5 years. Plasma samples from 77 healthy donors were included as controls. C4d levels were negligible in healthy control subjects and significantly increased in patients with SLE in the cross-sectional study (p Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (p = 0.011) and predominantly with lupus nephritis (p = 0.003), exhibiting a sensitivity of 79% to identify patients with nephritis. High C4d levels together with the presence of anti-dsDNA autoantibodies preceded and thus predicted future lupus nephritis in the longitudinal study (OR 5.4, 95% CI 1.4-21.3). When we considered only patients with renal involvement (19 of 69) during the longitudinal study, we found that high C4d levels alone could forecast recurrence of future lupus nephritis (OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.2-9.6). C4d appears to be a valuable marker for use in monitoring of patients with SLE, particularly for lupus nephritis. Importantly, C4d levels can predict impending flares of lupus nephritis and may thus be useful for informing treatment.

  14. A rare case of unilateral discoid lupus erythematosus mimicking lupus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Parul; Pathania, Sucheta; Kubba, Asha

    2017-11-08

    Discoidlupus erythematosus (DLE) is a chronic type of cutaneous lupus erythematosus which can present in various morphologies, and the diagnosis can be rather confounding. Prompt evaluation and treatment is necessary to prevent disfigurement and systemic involvement associated with DLE. The following case presented a diagnostic dilemma as the lesion mimicked lupus vulgaris. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Heparin-Related Thrombocytopenia Triggered by Severe Status of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Bacterial Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Suzuki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient with severe lupus nephritis developed thrombocytopenia during treatment with high-dose steroids. In addition to viral- or disease-induced cytopenia, the pathology was believed to arise from diverse contributing factors, such as thrombotic microangiopathy and heparin-related thrombocytopenia (HIT. By combining plasma exchange therapy and intravenous cyclophosphamide, we successfully controlled the SLE activity and improved the thrombocytopenia. An antecedent bacterial infection or SLE activity is believed to have contributed to the concurrent HIT.

  16. Illness perceptions in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and proliferative lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daleboudt, G M N; Broadbent, E; Berger, S P; Kaptein, A A

    2011-03-01

    This study investigated the illness perceptions of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and whether perceptions are influenced by type of treatment for proliferative lupus nephritis. In addition, the illness perceptions of SLE patients were compared with those of patients with other chronic illnesses. Thirty-two patients who had experienced at least one episode of proliferative lupus nephritis were included. Patients were treated with either a high or low-dose cyclophosphamide (CYC) regimen (National Institutes of Health [NIH] vs. Euro-Lupus protocol). Illness perceptions were measured with the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (B-IPQ) and a drawing assignment. The low-dose CYC group perceived their treatment as more helpful than the high-dose CYC group. In comparison with patients with asthma, SLE patients showed more negative illness perceptions on five of the eight illness perception domains. Drawings of the kidney provided additional information about perceptions of treatment effectiveness, kidney function and patients' understanding of their illness. Drawing characteristics showed associations with perceptions of consequences, identity, concern and personal control. These findings suggest that the type of treatment SLE patients with proliferative lupus nephritis receive may influence perceptions of treatment effectiveness. In addition, patients' drawings reveal perceptions of damage caused by lupus nephritis to the kidneys and the extent of relief provided by treatment. The finding that SLE is experienced as a more severe illness than other chronic illnesses supports the need to more frequently assess and aim to improve psychological functioning in SLE patients.

  17. Lupus eritematoso neonatal: reporte de cuatro casos Neonatal lupus erythematosus: a report of four cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernanda Perez

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available El lupus eritematoso neonatal es una enfermedad poco frecuente, caracterizada clínica mente por alteraciones cutáneas semejantes al lupus subagudo o discoide y/o bloqueo cardíaco congénito. Generalmente, cuando los pacientes presentan manifestaciones cutáneas, no tienen anormalidades cardiológicas y viceversa, aunque en un 10% de los casos ambas manifestaciones pueden coexistir. Puede acompañarse también de alteraciones hematológicas, hepáticas y neurológicas. Es causado por el pasaje trasplacentario de anticuerpos maternos anti Ro (95%, anti La y menos frecuentemente anti U1RNP. Presentamos cuatro pacientes con hallazgos clínicos, histopatológicos e inmunológicos compatibles con lupus eritematoso neonatal, su tratamiento y evolución.Neonatal lupus erythematosus is a very rare disease, clinically characterized by skin lesions that resemble those of subacute or discoid lupus erythematosus and/or congenital heart block. Generally, when patients have skin manifestations, they have no cardiac defects and vice-versa; however, in 10% of cases these manifestations may coexist. Other findings may include hematologic, hepatic and neurological abnormalities. This condition is caused by the transplacental passage of maternal autoantibodies against Ro (95%, La and, less frequently, U1-ribonucleoprotein (U1-RNP. The present case report describes four patients with clinical, histopathological and immunological findings compatible with neonatal lupus erythematosus, their treatment and progress.

  18. The association between childhood autistic traits and adolescent psychotic experiences is explained by general neuropsychiatric problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederlöf, Martin; Pettersson, Erik; Sariaslan, Amir; Larsson, Henrik; Östberg, Per; Kelleher, Ian; Långström, Niklas; Gumpert, Clara Hellner; Lundström, Sebastian; Lichtenstein, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Studies suggest associations between childhood autistic traits and adolescent psychotic experiences. However, recent research suggests that a general neuropsychiatric problems factor predicts adverse outcomes better than specific diagnostic entities. To examine if the alleged association between autistic traits and psychotic experiences could rather be explained by a general neuropsychiatric problems factor comprising symptoms of ADHD, tic disorder, developmental coordination disorder, and learning disorder, we conducted a prospective cohort study based on the Child and Adolescent Twin Study in Sweden. In addition, we examined the genetic and environmental influences on the associations. A total of 9,282 twins with data on childhood autistic traits and other neuropsychiatric problems, and follow-up data on psychotic experiences at ages 15 and/or 18 years were included. First, psychotic experiences were regressed on autistic traits and second, the general neuropsychiatric problems factor was added to the model. Auditory hallucinations were analyzed separately from the other psychotic experiences. Finally, twin analyses were employed to disentangle genetic from environmental influences in the observed associations. Replicating prior research, significant associations were found between autistic traits in childhood and auditory hallucinations at ages 15 and 18. However, after controlling for the general neuropsychiatric problems factor, the associations between autistic traits and auditory hallucinations disappeared, whereas the association between the general neuropsychiatric problems factor and auditory hallucinations persisted after controlling for autistic traits. Twin analyses revealed that the association between the general neuropsychiatric problems factor and auditory hallucinations was driven by shared genetic influences. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus in Portugal: clinical and immunological patterns of disease expression in a cohort of 56 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Marta; Escobar, Carlos; Conde, Marta; Ramos, Margarida; Melo Gomes, José A

    2013-01-01

    To define the pattern of disease expression and to gain better understanding in patients with juvenile onset systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in Portugal. The features of unselected patients with systemic lupus erythematosus who had disease onset before the age of 18 years were retrospectively analysed in three Portuguese centres with Pediatric Rheumatology Clinic over a 24-year period (1987-2011). Demographic, clinical and laboratory manifestations, therapy and outcome were assessed. A cohort of 56 patients with a mean age at disease onset of 12.6 ± 4.04 years (mean ± 1SD) (range, 1.0-17.0 years) and a mean period of follow-up of 5.5 ± 5.4 years. Forty six (82.1%) patients were female. The most common disease manifestations were musculoskeletal (87.5%), mucocutaneous (80.3%) and haematological abnormalities (75%). Lupus nephritis was diagnosed in 46.4% of patients and consisted of glomerular nephritis in all cases. Neuropsychiatric manifestations occurred in 21.4% but severe central nervous system complications were uncommon, as brain infarcts and organic brain syndrome in 4 (7.1%) patients. Antinuclear antibodies and anti-double stranded DNA were positive in most patients in (98.2% and 71.4% respectively), as well as low C3 and/or C4 were observed frequently (85.7%). Generally, most patients had a good response to therapy as demonstrated by a significant decreasing of SLEDAI score from disease presentation to the last evaluation. The SLEDAI at diagnosis, the maximum SLEDAI and the incidence of complications were significantly higher in patients with neurolupus and/or lupus nephritis. Therapy included oral steroids (87.5%), hydroxychloroquine (85.7%), azathioprine (55.4%), IV cyclophosphamide (28.6%) along with other drugs. Six (10.7%) patients were treated with rituximab. Long-term remission was achieved in 32%, disease was active in 68%, adverse reactions to therapy occurred in 53.6% and complications/severe manifestations in 23.2%. Two patients died, being

  20. Efficacy and safety of anti-CD20 antibody rituximab for patients with refractory systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, S; Saito, K; Hirata, S; Ohkubo, N; Nakayamada, S; Nakano, K; Hanami, K; Kubo, S; Miyagawa, I; Yoshikawa, M; Miyazaki, Y; Yoshinari, H; Tanaka, Y

    2018-04-01

    Objective We examined the efficacy and safety of rituximab in patients with refractory systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods The study enrolled 63 SLE patients who were treated with rituximab between 2002 and 2015. The participants underwent a battery of tests before treatment and at one year. Treatment ranged from two to four times at 500 or 1000 mg. Results Baseline characteristics were males:females = 6:57, age 33.9 years, and disease duration 87.2 months. The primary endpoint: The rate of major clinical response (MCR) was 60% while the partial clinical response (PCR) was 25%. Thirty of 36 (83%) patients with lupus nephritis (WHO II: 2, III: 5, IV: 22, V: 4, IV+V: 2, not assessed: 1) and 22 of 24 patients (92%) with neuropsychiatric SLE, who could be followed at one year, showed changes from BILAG A or B score to C or D score at one year. Multivariate analysis identified high anti-dsDNA antibody and shorter disease duration as significant determinants of MCR at one year. Repeat examination was conducted at five years. Primary failure was recorded in 8.8% and secondary failure in 32.4% (time to relapse: 24.4 months). Rituximab was well tolerated although 65 adverse events, mostly infections, were recorded within one year. Conclusion Rituximab is potentially efficacious for the treatment of patients with refractory SLE.

  1. Lupus: When the Body Attacks Itself | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Lupus Lupus: When the Body Attacks Itself Past Issues / Spring 2014 Table of Contents fast facts 1 Lupus occurs when the body's immune system attacks the ...

  2. Progress Made in Lupus Diagnosis and Treatment | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Lupus Progress Made in Lupus Diagnosis and Treatment Past Issues / Spring 2014 Table ... W. Clark NIAMS For our readers who have lupus or are the loved ones of someone with ...

  3. Systemic lupus erythematosus and Raynaud's phenomenon*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimovski, Flavia Emilie; Simioni, Juliana A.; Skare, Thelma Larocca

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus seem to belong to different serological and clinical subgroups of the disease. Genetic background can cause the appearance of these subgroups. OBJECTIVE To determine whether Brazilian patients who have systemic lupus erythematosus and Raynaud's phenomenon differ from those who do not. METHODS Retrospective analysis of 373 medical records of systemic lupus erythematosus patients studied for demographic, clinical and serological data. A comparative analysis was performed of individuals with and without RP. RESULTS There was a positive association between Raynaud's phenomenon and age at diagnosis (p=0.02), presence of anti-Sm (p=0.01) antibodies and anti-RNP (pRaynaud's phenomenon and hemolysis (p=0.01), serositis (p=0.01), glomerulonephritis (p=0.0004) and IgM aCL (p=0.004) antibodies. CONCLUSION Raynaud's phenomenon patients appear to belong to a systemic lupus erythematosus subset with a spectrum of clinical manifestations located in a more benign pole of the disease. PMID:26734864

  4. Gastrointestinal system involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z; Xu, D; Wang, Z; Wang, Y; Zhang, S; Li, M; Zeng, X

    2017-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem disorder which can affect the gastrointestinal (GI) system. Although GI symptoms can manifest in 50% of patients with SLE, these have barely been reviewed due to difficulty in identifying different causes. This study aims to clarify clinical characteristics, diagnosis and treatment of the four major SLE-related GI system complications: protein-losing enteropathy (PLE), intestinal pseudo-obstruction (IPO), hepatic involvement and pancreatitis. It is a systematic review using MEDLINE and EMBASE databases and the major search terms were SLE, PLE, IPO, hepatitis and pancreatitis. A total of 125 articles were chosen for our study. SLE-related PLE was characterized by edema and hypoalbuminemia, with Technetium 99m labeled human albumin scintigraphy ( 99m Tc HAS) and alpha-1-antitrypsin fecal clearance test commonly used as diagnostic test. The most common site of protein leakage was the small intestine and the least common site was the stomach. More than half of SLE-related IPO patients had ureterohydronephrosis, and sometimes they manifested as interstitial cystitis and hepatobiliary dilatation. Lupus hepatitis and SLE accompanied by autoimmune hepatitis (SLE-AIH overlap) shared similar clinical manifestations but had different autoantibodies and histopathological features, and positive anti-ribosome P antibody highly indicated the diagnosis of lupus hepatitis. Lupus pancreatitis was usually accompanied by high SLE activity with a relatively high mortality rate. Early diagnosis and timely intervention were crucial, and administration of corticosteroids and immunosuppressants was effective for most of the patients.

  5. Systemic lupus erythematosus : a behavioural medicine perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daleboudt, Gabriëlle Mathilde Nicoline

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and its immunosuppressive treatment have a great impact on the patient’s life. Previous studies on SLE have focused on the optimisation of diagnosis and treatment. Less attention has been given to the impact of diagnosis and treatment on patients’ well-being.

  6. Lupus Anticoagulatiuon African Women With Recurrent Abortions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is paucity of information on LA in African women where recurrent abortion and obstetrics complications are still common. Our aim therefore is to determine the prevalence of lupus anticoagulant in Nigerian women with recurrent abortion. Subjects and methods: A total of seventy – three pregnant women were studied.

  7. TUBULAR DYSFUNCTION IN PROLIFERATIVE LUPUS NEPHRITIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TERBORG, E.J.; DEJONG, P.E.; MEIJER, S.S.; Kallenberg, Cees

    1991-01-01

    We prospectively studied renal tubular function during 11 consecutive exacerbations of proliferative glomerulonephritis in 8 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We found a rise in the fractional excretion of beta-2-microglobulin (p less-than-or-equal-to 0.05) and dimercaptosuccinic

  8. Lupus Vulgaris At A Rare Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaduri Gautam

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of lupus vulgaris at a rare site-eyelid is reported here. Delayed diagnosis of the condition affecting the left eyelid in a female patient aged 78 years, led to scarring and fixity of eyelids with resultant exposure keratitis and dimness of vision. Antitubercular therapy improved skin condition but dimness f vision persisted.

  9. Fixed Cutaneous Sporotrichosis Masquerading As Lupus Vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikumar B C

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Sporotrichosis is reported to be rare in India. Fixed cutaneous variety is the most pleomorphic type of sporotrichosis and it may mimick several other dermatoses resulting in difficulty in making a correct diagnosis. Here we are reporting a case of fixed cutaneous sporotrichosis which resembled lupus vulgaris both clinically and histopathologically.

  10. Rhino-oro-ophthalmo-cutaneous Lupus Vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R S Mishra

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available Two unusual modes of presentation of lupus vulgaris are being reported.. In one case the lesion started in the nasal mucosa and spread to the nose, upper lip, gums, palate and naso-lacrimal ducts. In the second case the primary nasal lesion led to perforation of the cartilaginous nasal septum.

  11. Lupus Vulgaris Mimicking Hansen′s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhargava Puneet

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A 40 year old female presented with erythematous infiltrating plaque on the face involving both the ears with destruction of nasal cartilage and satellite lesions on the right shoulder. Clinical diagnosis of Hansen’s disease was later proved to be a case of Lupus vulgaris.

  12. Psoriasiform Lupus Vulgaris : An Unusual Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathi Sanjay K

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A 55 year old woman presented with gradually progressive erythematous scaly plaques, simulating psoriasis, on extremities and face last 20 years. Histology confirmed the diagnosis of lupus vulgaris which is known for its notorious presentations. The case is being reported for its unusual presentation which can cause diagnostic and therapeutic problems.

  13. Autoimmune hepatitis and juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deen, M. E. J.; Porta, G.; Fiorot, F. J.; Campos, L. M. A.; Sallum, A. M. E.; Silva, C. A. A.

    Juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) are both autoimmune disorders that are rare in children and have a widespread clinical manifestation. A few case reports have shown a JSLE-AIH associated disorder. To our knowledge, this is the first study that

  14. Systemic lupus erythematosus. Unusual cutaneous manifestations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stockinger, T.; Richter, L.; Kanzler, M.; Melichart-Kotik, M.; Pas, H.; Derfler, K.; Schmidt, E.; Rappersberger, K.

    2016-01-01

    Various different mucocutaneous symptoms may affect up to 80 % of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. To investigate, various unspecific, but otherwise typical clinical symptoms of skin and mucous membranes that arise in SLE patients other than those defined as SLE criteria such as

  15. Systemic lupus erythematous revealed by cytomegalovirus infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection have been described as exacerbing systemic lupus erythematous (SLE). The role of CMV in starting off SLE remains object of debate. We report a severe presentation of SLE revealed by CMV infection with hemophogocytic syndrome. A 22 old women without a history of systemic disease ...

  16. The frequency and outcome of lupus nephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanly, John G; O'Keeffe, Aidan G; Su, Li

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine nephritis outcomes in a prospective multi-ethnic/racial SLE inception cohort. METHODS: Patients in the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics inception cohort (≤15 months of SLE diagnosis) were assessed annually for estimated glomerular filtration rate (e...

  17. Clinical Characteristics of Patients with Systemic Lupus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a chronic multisystem autoimmune disease with a wide spectrum of manifestations, shows considerable variation across the globe, although there is data from Africa is limited. Quantifying the burden of SLE across Africa can help raise awareness and knowledge about the ...

  18. Structured physical exercise improves neuropsychiatric symptoms in acute dementia care: a hospital-based RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleiner, Tim; Dauth, Hannah; Gersie, Marleen; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Haussermann, Peter

    2017-08-29

    The primary objective of this trial is to investigate the effects of a short-term exercise program on neuropsychiatric signs and symptoms in acute hospital dementia care. Within a hospital-based randomized controlled trial, the intervention group conducted a 2-week exercise program with four 20-min exercise sessions on 3 days per week. The control group conducted a social stimulation program. Effects on neuropsychiatric signs and symptoms were measured via the Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study-Clinical Global Impression of Change, the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, and the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory. The antipsychotic and sedative dosage was quantified by olanzapine and diazepam equivalents. Eighty-five patients were randomized via minimization to an intervention group (IG) and a control group (CG). Seventy patients (82%) (mean age 80 years, 33 females, mean Mini Mental State Examination score 18.3 points) completed the trial. As compared to the CG (n = 35), the IG (n = 35) showed significantly reduced neuropsychiatric signs and symptoms. Especially, agitated behavior and lability improved. There were no between-group differences concerning antipsychotic and benzodiazepine medication. This exercise program is easily applicable in hospital dementia care and significantly reduces neuropsychiatric signs and symptoms in patients suffering from predominantly moderate stages of dementia. German Clinical Trial Register DRKS00006740 . Registered 28 October 2014.

  19. Discoid Lupus Erythematosus Presenting as Upper Eyelid Edema and Erythema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Darjani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Discoid Lupus Erythematosus (DLE is an autoimmune disorder that usually occurs on sun exposed areas of head and neck. Infrequently it could be presented by palpebral involvement and rarely unilateral upper eye lid edema and erythema have been reported as the sole manifestation of DLE. We describe a 38-year-old woman with chronic left upper eye lid edema and erythema from one year ago which was induced by steroid injection for left eyebrow alopecia. Histopathologic and direct immunofluorescent studies were made on palpebral skin tissue and confirmed DLE diagnosis. Antinuclear antibody (ANA titer was 1/160 with speckled pattern. She was treated by oral hydroxychloroquine (400 mg daily with moderate improvement after three months. We should think about DLE in cases with chronic upper eye lid edema and erythema. The aim of this case report is to emphasize that ophthalmologist and dermatologists should be aware of different presentations of DLE in the periorbital area to prevent misdiagnosis.

  20. [Therapy of lupus nephritis with mycophenolate mofetil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celić, Dejan; Ilić, Tatjana; Durdević-Mirković, Tatjana; Mitić, Igor; Milić, Biljana; Curić, Slobodan

    2007-01-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil is an immunosupressive agent used in transplantation and subsequently in a variety of autoimmune conditions. It inhibits both B and T lymphocyte proliferation, and also has nonimmune effects on the kidney. The major experience in systemic lupus erythematosus has focused on proliferative lupus nephritis. In our study we treated 8 female patients with proliferative lupus nefritis with combination therapy of prednisone (1 mg/kg body weight) and mycophenolate mofetil (2 g per day). Complete remission was defined as a value for urinary protein excretion that was less than 0.5 g per 24 hours, with normal urinary sediment, a normal serum albumin concentration and improved or stable serum creatinine. Partial remission was defined as a daily proteinuria below 2 g in a previously nephrotic patient or minimum 30% from starting values, with normal urinary sediment, serum albumin of minimum 30 g/L and stable serum creatinine. Two patients had a complete remission after 7 and 2 months respectively. Five patients had a partial remission after 5.2+/-4.3 months of therapy. One patient did not react on therapy. There were no side effects during the course of therapy. Considering the fact that 7/8 patients have had nephrotic range proteinuria and that 50% of patients were refractory on standard induction therapy, results of this study are good indicator of value of mycophenolate mofetil in the terapy of proliferative forms of lupus nephritis. Mycophenolate mofetil gives satisfactory results in the treatment of proliferative forms of lupus nephritis with minimal side effects.