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  1. ['Laryngeal neuropathy' and 'irritable larynx syndrome': synonyms or distinct entities?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, S; Ptok, M

    2012-10-01

    The term 'laryngeal neuropathy' (LN) has first been used in veterinary medicine to describe an idiopathic and typically exercise induced inspiratory noise in horses.Nowadays, the term is often used in relation with intermittent vocal cord pareses in humans. Some authors use the term 'irritable larynx syndrome' (ILS) in a similar context. This article reviews the state of knowledge regarding LN and ILS and discusses the somewhat confusing terminology.For this systematic review a selective literature research in PubMed has been carried out.35 articles were found, which report on LN in animals and 17 articles reported on humans. 4 of these articles used the term 'irritable larynx syndrome'.Laryngeal neuropathy in horses usually affects the left recurrent laryngeal nerve and results in decreased vocal cord abduction and an inspiratory roaring or whistling noise, particularly during exercise. In dogs LN has been reported to also occur bilaterally. In association with humans LN has not been defined clearly in the literature. The term ILS on the other hand has only been used in relation to humans. The term describes a hypersensitivity of the laryngeal structures towards external stimuli, which causes symptoms such as dyspnea or cough among others. Sufficient knowledge does not exist for either of the 2 diseases, ILS or LN. As of yet, the term LN should not be used in human medicine to describe according symptoms of unknown aetiology. The term 'laryngeal movement disorder' seems a lot more appropriate. The symptom oriented term irritable larynx syndrome also seems suitable to describe laryngeal hypersensitivity appropriately. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Evaluation of pre-existing neuropathy and bortezomib retreatment as risk factors to develop severe neuropathy in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruna, Jordi; Alé, Albert; Velasco, Roser; Jaramillo, Jessica; Navarro, Xavier; Udina, Esther

    2011-09-01

    Pre-existing neuropathy, a not uncommon feature in oncologic patients, is a potential but non-confirmed risk factor to develop early or severe chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. The main goal of this study is to evaluate the role of pre-existing neuropathy induced by vincristine (VNC) or bortezomib (BTZ) as a risk factor to develop more severe BTZ-induced neuropathy in a mouse model. VNC, at doses of 1 and 1.5 mg/kg given twice per week for 4 weeks, induced a moderate and severe sensory-motor neuropathy, primarily axonal, with predominant involvement of myelinated sensory axons. The neuropathy induced by BTZ at dose of 1 mg/kg given twice per week for 6 weeks was a mild axonal sensory neuropathy involving myelinated and unmyelinated fibers. The neuropathy in mice previously treated and retreated with the same schedule of BTZ after 4 weeks of washout period was similar in profile and severity to the one observed after the first treatment. When basal neuropathy was classified as moderate (most of BTZ-treated animals) or severe (all VNC-treated animals and two BTZ-treated animals), there was a more marked decline in sensory nerve function during BTZ retreatment in the group with basal severe neuropathy (-86%) than in the groups with basal mild (-57%) or without neuropathy (-52%; p < 0.001). Histopathological findings supported the functional results. Therefore, this study shows that the presence of a severe neuropathy previous to treatment with an antitumoral agent, such as BTZ, results in a more marked involvement of peripheral nerves. © 2011 Peripheral Nerve Society.

  3. [Diabetic neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudzik, Wiesław; Kaczorowska, Beata; Przybyła, Monika; Chudzik, Bartosz; Gałka, Małgorzata

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is most common chronic complication of diabetes mellitus. It is responsible for substantial morbidity, increased mortality and impaired quality of life. Patogenesis of diabetic neuropathy is complex. Chronic hyperglycemia is a major factor induces nerve fibers injury. High level of glucose stimulate the polyol pathway causing osmotic stress and enhance reactive oxygen species generation, as well as it play an important role in diabetic angiopathy development. Distal symmetric polineuropathy is most common type of diabetic neuropathy. Many patient may develop combinations of neuropathies concerning somatic and autonomic system. Early diagnosis and administered suitable treatment are necessary to reduce severe complication of diabetic neuropathy as well as strict glycemic control and risk factor increased.

  4. Distinct TrkA and Ret modulated negative and positive neuropathic behaviors in a mouse model of resiniferatoxin-induced small fiber neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yu-Lin; Kan, Hung-Wei; Chiang, Hao; Lee, Yi-Chen; Hsieh, Sung-Tsang

    2018-02-01

    Neurotrophic factors and their corresponding receptors play key roles in the maintenance of different phenotypic dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, the axons of which degenerate in small fiber neuropathy, leading to various neuropathic manifestations. Mechanisms underlying positive and negative symptoms of small fiber neuropathy have not been systematically explored. This study investigated the molecular basis of these seemingly paradoxical neuropathic behaviors according to the profiles of TrkA and Ret with immunohistochemical and pharmacological interventions in a mouse model of resiniferatoxin (RTX)-induced small fiber neuropathy. Mice with RTX neuropathy exhibited thermal hypoalgesia and mechanical allodynia, reduced skin innervation, and altered DRG expression profiles with decreased TrkA(+) neurons and increased Ret(+) neurons. RTX neuropathy induced the expression of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3), and ATF3(+) neurons were colocalized with Ret but not with TrkA (P<0.001). As a neuroprotectant, 4-Methylcatechol (4MC) promoted skin reinnervation partially with correlated reversal of the neuropathic behaviors and altered neurochemical expression. Gambogic amide, a selective TrkA agonist, normalized thermal hypoalgesia, and GW441756, a TrkA kinase inhibitor, induced thermal hypoalgesia, which was already reversed by 4MC. Mechanical allodynia was reversed by a Ret kinase inhibitor, AST487, which induced thermal hyperalgesia in naïve mice. The activation of Ret signaling by XIB4035 induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hypoalgesia in RTX neuropathy mice in which the neuropathic behaviors were previously normalized by 4MC. Distinct neurotrophic factor receptors, TrkA and Ret, accounted for negative and positive neuropathic behaviors in RTX-induced small fiber neuropathy, respectively: TrkA for thermal hypoalgesia and Ret for mechanical allodynia and thermal hypoalgesia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Infectious neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson-Papp, Jessica

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this review is to address bacterial, viral, and other infectious causes of neuropathy or neuronopathy, with an emphasis on clinical manifestations and treatment. Most infectious neuropathies have been well described for some time and treatments are well established. An exception is HIV-associated distal symmetric polyneuropathy, which is an area of active research. Current work in this area focuses on epidemiology, risk factors, and underlying mechanisms. Infectious diseases are an important part of the differential diagnosis of peripheral nerve disorders because they are among the most amenable to treatment. However, diagnosis of infectious peripheral neuropathy may be challenging because of variability in a number of factors, including the pattern of deficits, geographic distribution of pathogens, length of time from the onset of infection to the development of neuropathy, and mechanism of nerve injury.

  6. The development and validation of a neuropathy- and foot ulcer-specific quality of life instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vileikyte, Loretta; Peyrot, Mark; Bundy, Christine; Rubin, Richard R; Leventhal, Howard; Mora, Pablo; Shaw, Jonathan E; Baker, Paul; Boulton, Andrew J M

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a questionnaire that measures patients' perceptions of the impact of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and foot ulcers on their quality of life and to assess the psychometric properties of this instrument in a sample of patients with varying severity and symptomatology of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The neuropathy- and foot ulcer-specific quality of life instrument (NeuroQoL), generated from interviews with patients with (n = 47) and without (n = 15) diabetic peripheral neuropathy, was administered to 418 consecutive patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (35% with foot ulcer history) attending either U.K. (n = 290) or U.S. (n = 128) diabetes centers. Psychometric tests of NeuroQoL included factor analyses and internal consistency of scales; a series of multivariate analyses were performed to establish its criterion, construct, and incremental validity. Results were compared with those obtained using the Short Form (SF)-12 measure of health-related functioning. Factor analyses of NeuroQoL revealed three physical symptom measures and two psychosocial functioning measures with good reliability (alpha = 0.86-0.95). NeuroQoL was more strongly associated with measures of neuropathic severity than SF-12, more fully mediated the relationship of diabetic peripheral neuropathy with overall quality of life, and significantly increased explained variance in overall quality of life over SF-12. NeuroQoL reliably captures the key dimensions of the patients' experience of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and is a valid tool for studying the impact of neuropathy and foot ulceration on quality of life.

  7. Serum micronutrients and prealbumin during development and recovery of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Roser; Santos, Cristina; Soler, Gemma; Gil-Gil, Miguel; Pernas, Sonia; Galan, Maica; Palmero, Ramon; Bruna, Jordi

    2016-09-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a frequent adverse event. Nutritional status can become impaired in cancer patients, potentially contributing to neuropathy's evolution. Our aim was to evaluate serum micronutrients and prealbumin in a cohort of 113 solid-cancer patients receiving platinum and taxane compounds during the development and recovery of neuropathy, up to 1 year after finishing treatment. CIPN was graded according to Total Neuropathy Score(©) and NCI.CTCv3 at T0 (baseline), T1 (1-3 months), and T12 (12 months) after chemotherapy. CIPN was classified as asymptomatic (< grade 2) or symptomatic (≥2). CIPN recovery was defined as ≥1 grade improvement at T12. Symptomatic CIPN developed in 52% of patients. Symptomatic patients presented a higher increase in TNSc (p < 0.001), in TNSr(©) (p < 0.001), and decrease in sural (p < 0.001) and radial nerve conduction (p < 0.001). No significant differences with any of the micronutrients were observed along T0-T1 period between severity or chemotherapy groups. By T12, symptomatic patients without recovery had a decrease in vitamin E levels (p = 0.019) and prealbumin (p = 0.062) compared with those symptomatic that improved. A correlation between the variation of vitamin E and prealbumin at T0-T1 (r = 0.626, p = 0.001) and T1-T12 (r = 0.411, p = 0.06) was observed. After chemotherapy treatment, the improvement of patients displaying symptomatic neuropathy is related to vitamin E and prealbumin serum levels. Our results suggest that nutritional status can play a role in CIPN recovery. © 2016 Peripheral Nerve Society.

  8. Entrepreneurship research in Spain: developments and distinctiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, José C; Gutiérrez, Andrea

    2011-08-01

    This article presents a review of research on entrepreneurship in Spain, paying particular attention to its beginnings, nature and main focus of interest. We have developed a database based on the review of 471 works produced between 1977 and 2009, including articles published in national and international journals and dissertations (read in Spain) that allowed us to extract the following results. There is a preference for qualitative methods, conceptual contributions and the entrepreneurial process as the privileged research theme. There is also a strong focus of interest on micro and small enterprises. These characteristics of Spanish research in areas of entrepreneurship can make a distinctive contribution to international research. However, the dissemination of knowledge and inadequate strategies for international publication limit the diffusion of Spanish research in entrepreneurship. Lastly, we discuss the implications for future research.

  9. Lysine Acetylation and Deacetylation in Brain Development and Neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapias, Alicia; Wang, Zhao-Qi

    2017-02-01

    Embryonic development is critical for the final functionality and maintenance of the adult brain. Brain development is tightly regulated by intracellular and extracellular signaling. Lysine acetylation and deacetylation are posttranslational modifications that are able to link extracellular signals to intracellular responses. A wealth of evidence indicates that lysine acetylation and deacetylation are critical for brain development and functionality. Indeed, mutations of the enzymes and cofactors responsible for these processes are often associated with neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. Lysine acetylation and deacetylation are involved in all levels of brain development, starting from neuroprogenitor survival and proliferation, cell fate decisions, neuronal maturation, migration, and synaptogenesis, as well as differentiation and maturation of astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, to the establishment of neuronal circuits. Hence, fluctuations in the balance between lysine acetylation and deacetylation contribute to the final shape and performance of the brain. In this review, we summarize the current basic knowledge on the specific roles of lysine acetyltransferase (KAT) and lysine deacetylase (KDAC) complexes in brain development and the different neurodevelopmental disorders that are associated with dysfunctional lysine (de)acetylation machineries. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Peripheral Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arsenic can cause peripheral neuropathy. In addition, certain insecticides and solvents have also been known to cause ... ranges from clinical studies of the genetics and natural history of hereditary neuropathies to basic science investigations ...

  11. Diabetic Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of diabetic neuropathy may become severe enough to cause depression in some patients. x Prognosis The prognosis for ... of diabetic neuropathy may become severe enough to cause depression in some patients. View Full Prognosis Clinical Trials ...

  12. Auditory Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with auditory neuropathy have greater impairment in speech perception than hearing health experts would predict based upon their degree of hearing loss on a hearing test. For example, a person with auditory neuropathy may be able to hear ...

  13. Hereditary Neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and autonomic neuropathy. The most common type is Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, one of the hereditary motor and sensory ... and autonomic neuropathy. The most common type is Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, one of the hereditary motor and sensory ...

  14. Propylthiouracil and peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Van Boekel

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral neuropathy is a rare manifestation in hyperthyroidism. We describe the neurological manifestations of a 38 year old female with Graves' disease who developed peripheral neuropathy in the course of her treatment with propylthiouracil. After the drug was tapered off, the neurological signs disappeared. Therefore, we call attention for a possible toxic effect on peripheral nervous system caused by this drug.

  15. Development profile in a patient with monosomy 10q and Dup(17p) associated with a peripheral neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellegrino, J.E.; Spinner, N.B.; Zackai, E.H. [Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-02-02

    We report on a patient with dup(17p) and monosomy (10q) resulting from a familial translocation. Manifestations typical of both syndromes were present. The overall development of this patient was better by comparison with similar reported cases of either anomaly. Our evaluation detected severe gross motor delay and signs of a demyelinating peripheral neuropathy. This patient is trisomic for the region of 17p which includes the peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP-22) gene, known to be duplicated in Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 1A (CMT1A). Our analysis in this patient suggests that trisomy for the PMP-22 gene led to the demyelinating neuropathy and contributed to his severe motor development delay. 33 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Autonomic neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, P. A.

    1998-01-01

    A limited autonomic neuropathy may underlie some unusual clinical syndromes, including the postural tachycardia syndrome, pseudo-obstruction syndrome, heat intolerance, and perhaps chronic fatigue syndrome. Antibodies to autonomic structures are common in diabetes, but their specificity is unknown. The presence of autonomic failure worsens prognosis in the diabetic state. Some autonomic neuropathies are treatable. Familial amyloid polyneuropathy may respond to liver transplantation. There are anecdotal reports of acute panautonomic neuropathy responding to intravenous gamma globulin. Orthostatic hypotension may respond to erythropoietin or midodrine.

  17. Natural history of corneal nerve morphology in mild neuropathy associated with type 1 diabetes: development of a potential measure of diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani, Cirous; Pritchard, Nicola; Edwards, Katie; Vagenas, Dimitrios; Russell, Anthony W; Malik, Rayaz A; Efron, Nathan

    2014-11-18

    To investigate longitudinal changes of subbasal nerve plexus (SNP) morphology and its relationship with conventional measures of neuropathy in individuals with diabetes. A cohort of 147 individuals with type 1 diabetes and 60 age-balanced controls underwent detailed assessment of clinical and metabolic factors, neurologic deficits, quantitative sensory testing, nerve conduction studies, and corneal confocal microscopy at baseline and four subsequent annual visits. The SNP parameters included corneal nerve fiber density (CNFD), branch density (CNBD), and fiber length (CNFL), and were quantified using a fully automated algorithm. Linear mixed models were fitted to examine the changes in corneal nerve parameters over time. At baseline, 27% of the participants had mild diabetic neuropathy. All SNP parameters were significantly lower in the neuropathy group compared with controls (P nerve/mm(2), P = 0.01) in the neuropathy group compared with controls, which was associated with age (β = -0.06, P = 0.04) and duration of diabetes (β = -0.08, P = 0.03). In the neuropathy group, absolute changes of CNBD and CNFL showed moderate correlations with peroneal conduction velocity and cold sensation threshold, respectively (r, 0.38 and 0.40, P damage at the SNP, thus providing justification for our ongoing efforts to establish corneal nerve morphology as an appropriate adjunct to conventional measures of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  18. Non-obese diabetic mice rapidly develop dramatic sympathetic neuritic dystrophy: a new experimental model of diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Robert E; Dorsey, Denise A; Beaudet, Lucie N; Frederick, Kathy E; Parvin, Curtis A; Plurad, Santiago B; Levisetti, Matteo G

    2003-11-01

    To address the pathogenesis of diabetic autonomic neuropathy, we have examined the sympathetic nervous system in non-obese diabetic (NOD) and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice, two models of type 1 diabetes, and the db/db mouse, a model of type 2 diabetes. After only 3 to 5 weeks of diabetes, NOD mice developed markedly swollen axons and dendrites ("neuritic dystrophy") in the prevertebral superior mesenteric and celiac ganglia (SMG-CG), similar to the pathology described in diabetic STZ- and BBW-rat and man. Comparable changes failed to develop in the superior cervical ganglia of the NOD mouse or in the SMG-CG of non-diabetic NOD siblings. STZ-induced diabetic mice develop identical changes, although at a much slower pace and to a lesser degree than NOD mice. NOD-SCID mice, which are genetically identical to NOD mice except for the absence of T and B cells, do not develop diabetes or neuropathology comparable to diabetic NOD mice. However, STZ-treated NOD-SCID mice develop severe neuritic dystrophy, evidence against an exclusively autoimmune pathogenesis for autonomic neuropathy in this model. Chronically diabetic type 2 db/db mice fail to develop neuritic dystrophy, suggesting that hyperglycemia alone may not be the critical and sufficient element. The NOD mouse appears to be a valuable model of diabetic sympathetic autonomic neuropathy with unambiguous, rapidly developing neuropathology which corresponds closely to the characteristic pathology of other rodent models and man.

  19. Ischemic neuropathy and rhabdomyolysis as presenting symptoms of postpartum cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmich, Rick C. G.; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W. M.; Schoonderwaldt, Hennie C.; Janssen, Mirian C. H.

    2009-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis and peripheral neuropathy are two distinct disease entities which are rarely encountered in combination. We present a woman with rhabdomyolysis and peripheral neuropathy 3 weeks postpartum. Her symptoms were caused by bilateral femoral artery thrombosis due to postpartum

  20. Assessing Autophagy in Sciatic Nerves of a Rat Model that Develops Inflammatory Autoimmune Peripheral Neuropathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Brun

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The rat sciatic nerve has attracted widespread attention as an excellent model system for studying autophagy alterations in peripheral neuropathies. In our laboratory, we have developed an original rat model, which we used currently in routine novel drug screening and to evaluate treatment strategies for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP and other closely related diseases. Lewis rats injected with the S-palmitoylated P0(180-199 peptide develop a chronic, sometimes relapsing-remitting type of disease. Our model fulfills electrophysiological criteria of demyelination with axonal degeneration, confirmed by immunohistopathology and several typical features of CIDP. We have set up a series of techniques that led us to examine the failures of autophagy pathways in the sciatic nerve of these model rats and to follow the possible improvement of these defects after treatment. Based on these newly introduced methods, a novel area of investigation is now open and will allow us to more thoroughly examine important features of certain autophagy pathways occurring in sciatic nerves.

  1. Channelopathies, painful neuropathy, and diabetes: which way does the causal arrow point?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Faber, Catharina G; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Waxman, Stephen G

    2014-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus, a major global health problem, is commonly associated with painful peripheral neuropathy, which can substantially erode quality of life. Despite its clinical importance, the pathophysiology of painful diabetic neuropathy is incompletely understood. It has traditionally been thought that diabetes may cause neuropathy in patients with appropriate genetic makeup. Here, we propose a hypothesis whereby painful neuropathy is not a complication of diabetes, but rather occurs as a result of mutations that, in parallel, confer vulnerability to injury in pancreatic β cells and pain-signaling dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. We suggest that mutations of sodium channel NaV1.7, which is present in both cell types, may increase susceptibility for development of diabetes via β cell injury and produce painful neuropathy via a distinct effect on DRG neurons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The neuropathic oesophagus. A radiographic and manometric study on the evolution of megaoesophagus in dogs with developing axonal neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satchell, P.M.

    1990-01-01

    Dogs given the neurotoxin acrylamide develop peripheral neuropathy and megaoesophagus. Sequential radiographic and manometric studies on the oesophagus demonstrated that the initial abnormalities consisted of a progressive decrease in the proportion of swallows that initiated peristalsis and a gradual increase in oesophageal calibre. Regurgitation, peristaltic failure and oesophageal dilatation all appeared within three days. The eating behaviour and gait abnormalities quickly resolved on stopping the neurotoxin, but the oesophagus remained dilated for longer. Previous studies have suggested that the abnormalities present in dogs which are developing a distal axonal neuropathy or in some dogs with idiopathic megaoesophagus may be limited to the proprioceptive elements of the oesophageal innervation. The present study suggests that the progressive inefficiency in the transmission of swallows and changes in oesophageal calibre in dogs with evolving megaoesophagus may be a consequence of damage to these proprioceptive elements

  3. Glycoconjugates as target antigens in peripheral neuropathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubica Suturkova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Identification and characterization of antigens present at the human peripheral nerve is a great challenge in the field of neuroimmunology. The latest investigations are focused on the understanding of the biology of glycoconjugates present at the peripheral nerve, and their immunological reactivity. Increased titers of antibodies that recognize carbohydrate determinants of glycoconjugates (glycolipids and glycoproteins are associated with distinct neuropathic syndromes. There is considerable cross-reactivity among anti-ganglioside antibodies, resulting from shared oligosaccharide epitopes, possibly explaining the overlap in syndromes observed in many affected patients. Sera from patients with neuropathies (GBS, chronic inflammatory demielynating polyneuropathy - CIDP, multifocal motor neuropathy - MMN, cross-react with glycoproteins isolated from human peripheral nerve and from Campylobacter jejuni O:19. The frequency of occurrence of antibodies against these glycoproteins is different, depending of the type of neuropathy. Identification of the cross-reactive glycoproteins and possible additional auto antigens could be useful in laboratory evaluation of peripheral neuropathies and help to develop a more effective therapeutic approach.

  4. Peripheral Neuropathy: Symptoms and Signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the body—in both hands or in both feet. Some types of peripheral neuropathy develop suddenly, while others progress more slowly over many years. The symptoms of peripheral neuropathy often include: ... sleeping because of feet and leg pain Loss of balance and coordination ...

  5. Differences and similarities in development of corneal nerve damage and peripheral neuropathy and in diet-induced obesity and type 2 diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Eric P; Coppey, Lawrence J; Kardon, Randy H; Yorek, Mark A

    2014-03-03

    Peripheral neuropathy has been shown to exist in prediabetic and diabetic patients and animal models. However, the development of peripheral neuropathy in prediabetes and posthyperglycemia is likely different. The purpose of this study was to examine the progression of peripheral neuropathy in diet-induced obese rats and high-fat-fed rats treated with a low dose of streptozotocin, a model for type 2 diabetes, using standard endpoints as well as corneal sensitivity and innervation. Diet-induced obese rats and high-fat/low-dose streptozotocin diabetic rats were used to examine standard peripheral neuropathy endpoints and innervation of the cornea and corneal epithelium using corneal and standard confocal microscopy, respectively, and corneal sensitivity using a Cochet-Bonnet esthesiometer at three different time points. Obese rats and to a greater extent diabetic rats were insulin resistant. Obese and diabetic rats had developed sensory nerve deficits, but only diabetic rats had motor nerve dysfunction as determined by measuring nerve conduction velocity, thermal nociception, and intraepidermal nerve fiber density. In the cornea there was a decrease in corneal nerve fiber length, innervation of the corneal epithelium, and corneal sensitivity in both diet-induced obese and diabetic rats. These studies demonstrate that changes in corneal nerve innervation and sensitivity occur in both obese and type 2 diabetic rat models that are consistent with development of peripheral neuropathy. Examination of corneal nerve changes may be valuable endpoints for exploring potential treatments for peripheral neuropathy in both prediabetes with insulin resistance and diabetes.

  6. Recommendations to enable drug development for inherited neuropathies: Charcot-Marie-Tooth and Giant Axonal Neuropathy [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3am

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Sames

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 1 in 2500 Americans suffer from Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT disease. The underlying disease mechanisms are unique in most forms of CMT, with many point mutations on various genes causing a toxic accumulation of misfolded proteins. Symptoms of the disease often present within the first two decades of life, with CMT1A patients having reduced compound muscle and sensory action potentials, slow nerve conduction velocities, sensory loss, progressive distal weakness, foot and hand deformities, decreased reflexes, bilateral foot drop and about 5% become wheelchair bound. In contrast, the ultra-rare disease Giant Axonal Neuropathy (GAN is frequently described as a recessively inherited condition that results in progressive nerve death. GAN usually appears in early childhood and progresses slowly as neuronal injury becomes more severe and leads to death in the second or third decade. There are currently no treatments for any of the forms of CMTs or GAN. We suggest that further clinical studies should analyse electrical impedance myography as an outcome measure for CMT. Further, additional quality of life (QoL assessments for these CMTs are required, and we need to identify GAN biomarkers as well as develop new genetic testing panels for both diseases. We propose that using the Global Registry of Inherited Neuropathy (GRIN could be useful for many of these studies. Patient advocacy groups and professional organizations (such as the Hereditary Neuropathy Foundation (HNF, Hannah's Hope Fund (HHF, The Neuropathy Association (TNA and the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM can play a central role in educating clinicians and patients. Undertaking these studies will assist in the correct diagnosis of disease recruiting patients for clinical studies, and will ultimately improve the endpoints for clinical trials. By addressing obstacles that prevent industry investment in various forms of inherited neuropathies

  7. Distinct development of the cerebral cortex in platypus and echidna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwell, Ken W S; Hardman, Craig D

    2012-01-01

    Both lineages of the modern monotremes have distinctive features in the cerebral cortex, but the developmental mechanisms that produce such different adult cortical architecture remain unknown. Similarly, nothing is known about the differences and/or similarities between monotreme and therian cortical development. We have used material from the Hill embryological collection to try to answer key questions concerning cortical development in monotremes. Our findings indicate that gyrencephaly begins to emerge in the echidna brain shortly before birth (crown-rump length 12.5 mm), whereas the cortex of the platypus remains lissencephalic throughout development. The cortices of both monotremes are very immature at the time of hatching, much like that seen in marsupials, and both have a subventricular zone (SubV) within both the striatum and pallium during post-hatching development. It is particularly striking that in the platypus, this region has an extension from the palliostriatal angle beneath the developing trigeminoreceptive part of the somatosensory cortex of the lateral cortex. The putative SubV beneath the trigeminal part of S1 appears to accommodate at least two distinct types of cell and many mitotic figures and (particularly in the platypus) appears to be traversed by large numbers of thalamocortical axons as these grow in. The association with putative thalamocortical fibres suggests that this region may also serve functions similar to the subplate zone of Eutheria. These findings suggest that cortical development in each monotreme follows distinct paths from at least the time of birth, consistent with a long period of independent and divergent cortical evolution. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. The prevalence, patterns and predictors of diabetic peripheral neuropathy in a developing country

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    Katulanda Prasad

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM has reached epidemic proportions in Sri Lanka. Presently there are studies on the community prevalence of distal peripheral neuropathy (DPN in Sri Lanka. We describe prevalence, patterns and predictors of DPN in patients with DM in Sri Lanka. Data were collected as part of a national study on DM. In new cases DPN was assessed using the Diabetic-Neuropathy-Symptom (DNS score, while in those with established diabetes both DNS and Toronto-Clinical-Scoring-System (TCSS were used. A binary logistic-regression analysis was performed with ‘presence of DPN’ as the dichomatous dependent variable and other independent co-variants. The study included 528 diabetic patients (191-new cases, with a mean age of 55.0 ± 12.4 years and 37.3% were males, while 18% were from urban areas. Prevalence of DPN according to DNS score among all patients, patients with already established diabetes and newly diagnosed patients were 48.1%, 59.1% and 28.8% respectively. Prevalence of DPN in those with established DM as assessed by TCSS was 24% and the majority had mild DPN (16.6%. The remainder of the abstract is based on subjects with established DM. The prevalence of DPN in males and female was 20.0% and 26.4% respectively. The mean age of those with and without DPN was 62.1 ± 10.8 and 55.1 ± 10.8 years respectively (p 

  9. Acute nutritional axonal neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Johanna; Logigian, Eric L

    2018-01-01

    This study describes clinical, laboratory, and electrodiagnostic features of a severe acute axonal polyneuropathy common to patients with acute nutritional deficiency in the setting of alcoholism, bariatric surgery (BS), or anorexia. Retrospective analysis of clinical, electrodiagnostic, and laboratory data of patients with acute axonal neuropathy. Thirteen patients were identified with a severe, painful, sensory or sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy that developed over 2-12 weeks with sensory ataxia, areflexia, variable muscle weakness, poor nutritional status, and weight loss, often with prolonged vomiting and normal cerebrospinal fluid protein. Vitamin B6 was low in half and thiamine was low in all patients when obtained before supplementation. Patients improved with weight gain and vitamin supplementation, with motor greater than sensory recovery. We suggest that acute or subacute axonal neuropathy in patients with weight loss or vomiting associated with alcohol abuse, BS, or dietary deficiency is one syndrome, caused by micronutrient deficiencies. Muscle Nerve 57: 33-39, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Additional Types of Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stop bone destruction and aid healing. Cranial Neuropathy Cranial neuropathy affects the 12 pairs of nerves that are connected with the brain and control sight, eye movement, hearing, and taste. Most often, cranial neuropathy affects the nerves that control the eye ...

  11. Initial sensorimotor and delayed autonomic neuropathy in acute thallium poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordentoft, T; Andersen, E B; Mogensen, P H

    1998-06-01

    In a 27-year old male with acute thallium poisoning, signs of initially severe sensorimotor neuropathy with complete remission after two weeks were demonstrated. Signs of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy were initially absent, but developed after a latency period of one week with marked improvement after seven months. Delayed autonomic neuropathy may be caused by a late affection of small unmyelinated autonomic nerve fibers.

  12. The role of foot self-care behavior on developing foot ulcers in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Yen-Fan; Liang, Jersey; Wang, Woan-Shyuan; Hsu, Brend Ray-Sea; Huang, Tzu-Ting

    2014-12-01

    Although foot self-care behavior is viewed as beneficial for the prevention of diabetic foot ulceration, the effect of foot self-care behavior on the development of diabetic foot ulcer has received little empirical investigation. To explore the relationship between foot self-care practice and the development of diabetic foot ulcers among diabetic neuropathy patients in northern Taiwan. A longitudinal study was conducted at one medical center and one teaching hospital in northern Taiwan. A total of 295 diabetic patients who lacked sensitivity to a monofilament were recruited. Five subjects did not provide follow-up data; thus, only the data of 290 subjects were analyzed. The mean age was 67.0 years, and 72.1% had six or fewer years of education. Data were collected by a modified version of the physical assessment portion of the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument and the Diabetes Foot Self-Care Behavior Scale. Cox regression was used to analyze the predictive power of foot self-care behaviors. A total of 29.3% (n=85) of diabetic neuropathy patients developed a diabetic foot ulcer by the one-year follow-up. The total score on the Diabetes Foot Self-Care Behavior Scale was significantly associated with the risk of developing foot ulcers (HR=1.04, 95% CI=1.01-1.07, p=0.004). After controlling for the demographic variables and the number of diabetic foot ulcer hospitalizations, however, the effect was non-significant (HR=1.03, 95% CI=1.00-1.06, p=0.061). Among the foot self-care behaviors, lotion-applying behavior was the only variable that significantly predicted the occurrence of diabetic foot ulcer, even after controlling for demographic variables and diabetic foot ulcer predictors (neuropathy severity, number of diabetic foot ulcer hospitalizations, insulin treatment, and peripheral vascular disease; HR=1.19, 95% CI=1.04-1.36, p=0.012). Among patients with diabetic neuropathy, foot self-care practice may be insufficient to prevent the occurrence of diabetic

  13. Daspsone Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P A Sarojini

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available A 24 year old lady being treated with 300 mg of dapsone daily for dermatitits herpetiformis, developed weakness and wasting of muscles of feet with claw hand deformity and t drop, 2 months tater. Neurological examination and nerve conduction studies conformed the presence of a peripheral motor neuropathy. Dapsone was discontinued and the patient was treated with cotrimatoxazole, gluten-free diet and supportive therapy. This satisfactorily controlled the dermatological lesion without adversely affecting the resolution of her neuropthy. Symptomatic improvement reported by the patient was confirmed by EMG and nerve conduction studies.

  14. National Identity and Distinctiveness: Developing a Common Identity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this article is to argue that distinctiveness is at the core of national identity and nationalism. After a brief assessment of mainstream theories of nationalism with an emphasis on civic and primordialist approaches, the following question is posed: How important is the association of national identity to the stability of ...

  15. Visual Distinctiveness and the Development of Children's False Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Mark L.

    2008-01-01

    Distinctiveness effects in children's (5-, 7-, and 11-year-olds) false memory illusions were examined using visual materials. In Experiment 1, developmental trends (increasing false memories with age) were obtained using Deese-Roediger-McDermott lists presented as words and color photographs but not line drawings. In Experiment 2, when items were…

  16. Restoration of optic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You SW

    2017-03-01

    . Many genes, such as Bcl-2, PTEN, and mTOR, are crucial in cell proliferation, axon guidance, and growth during development, and play important roles in the regeneration and extension of RGC axons. With transgenic mice and related gene regulations, robust regeneration of RGC axons has been observed after ON injury in laboratories. Although various means of experimental treatments such as cell transplantation and gene therapy have achieved significant progress in neuronal survival, axonal regeneration, and restoration of the visual function after ON injury, many unresolved scientific problems still exist for their clinical applications. Therefore, we still need to overcome hurdles before developing effective therapy to treat optic neuropathy diseases in patients. Keywords: retinal ganglion cells, optic nerve injury, neuronal survival, axonal regeneration, vision restoration

  17. Genetically determined optic neuropathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milea, Dan; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Reynier, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    The present review focuses on recent advances in the knowledge of hereditary optic neuropathies resulting from retinal ganglion cell degeneration, mostly due to mitochondrial dysfunctions.......The present review focuses on recent advances in the knowledge of hereditary optic neuropathies resulting from retinal ganglion cell degeneration, mostly due to mitochondrial dysfunctions....

  18. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auer-Grumbach Michaela

    2008-03-01

    neuropathy, or decaying skin tumours like amelanotic melanoma. Management of HSN I follows the guidelines given for diabetic foot care (removal of pressure to the ulcer and eradication of infection, followed by the use of specific protective footwear and starts with early and accurate counselling of patients about risk factors for developing foot ulcerations. The disorder is slowly progressive and does not influence life expectancy but is often severely disabling after a long duration of the disease.

  19. Divergent effects of T cell costimulation and inflammatory cytokine production on autoimmune peripheral neuropathy provoked by Aire deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiaopei L; Nagavalli, Anil; Smith, Colin-Jamal; Howard, James F; Su, Maureen A

    2013-04-15

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy results from autoimmune destruction of the peripheral nervous system and is a component of the multiorgan autoimmunity syndrome that results from Aire gene mutations in humans. In parallel, peripheral nervous system autoimmunity resembling chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy develops spontaneously in NOD mice with a partial loss of Aire function (NOD.Aire(GW/+) mice) and is a T cell-mediated disease. In this study, we analyze how key aspects of T cell activation and function modulate disease development in Aire-deficient mice. We show that genetic ablation of the Th1 cytokine IFN-γ completely prevents clinical and electrophysiological evidence of neuropathy in NOD.Aire(GW/+) mice. IFN-γ deficiency is associated with absence of immune infiltration and decreased expression of the T cell chemoattractant IP-10 in sciatic nerves. Thus, IFN-γ is absolutely required for the development of autoimmune peripheral neuropathy in NOD.Aire(GW/+) mice. Because IFN-γ secretion is enhanced by B7-CD28 costimulation of T cells, we sought to determine the effects of these costimulatory molecules on neuropathy development. Surprisingly, B7-2 deficiency accelerated neuropathy development in NOD.Aire(GW/+) mice, and Ab blockade of both B7-1 and B7-2 resulted in fulminant, early-onset neuropathy. Thus, in contrast to IFN-γ, B7-2 alone and B7-1/B7-2 in combination function to ameliorate neuropathy development in NOD.Aire(GW/+) mice. Together, these findings reveal distinct and opposing effects of the T cell costimulatory pathway and IFN-γ production on the pathogenesis of autoimmune peripheral neuropathy.

  20. [Peripheral neuropathy caused by thallium poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubis, N; Talamon, C; Smadja, D; Said, G

    1997-10-01

    A 20-year-old man developed over three weeks a sensory and painful neuropathy associated with diffuse alopecia. There was motor weakness, and superficial and deep hypoesthesia of the inferior limbs. Deep tendon reflexes were normal. Electrophysiological study mainly showed axonal motor neuropathy. This patient was admitted six weeks after the first symptoms. The clinical picture suggested thallium poisoning, which was confirmed by thallium concentrations in plasma, urine, hair and nails. After search, thallium was identified in a rat poison.

  1. N-hexane neuropathy in offset printers.

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, C M; Yu, C W; Fong, K Y; Leung, S Y; Tsin, T W; Yu, Y L; Cheung, T F; Chan, S Y

    1993-01-01

    In an offset printing factory with 56 workers, 20 (36%) developed symptomatic peripheral neuropathy due to exposure to n-hexane. Another 26 workers (46%) were found to have subclinical neuropathy. The initial change in the nerve conduction study was reduced amplitude of the sensory action potentials, followed by reduced amplitude of the motor action potentials, reduction in motor conduction velocities and increase in distal latencies. These changes indicate primary axonal degeneration with se...

  2. Suboccipital neuropathy after bone conduction device placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, H T; de Ru, J A

    2013-01-01

    To describe the clinical characteristics of a 70-year-old female with occipital neuropathy following bone conduction device surgery. A 65-year-old woman underwent bone conduction device placement surgery on the left temporal bone. Postoperatively she progressively developed chronic pain at the implantation site. The pain led to minimal neck movement, which resulted in complaints of the shoulder and arm on the left side. She was treated by an orthopaedic surgeon for a frozen shoulder. Pain medication and occipital nerve blocking had no sustained effect on the pain. Occipital neuropathy is a syndrome with continuous aching involving the occipital and parietal scalp caused by trauma or peripheral compression of the occipital nerves. The most common causes of occipital neuropathy are probably direct trauma to the nerve and hypertrophic fibrosis of subcutaneous tissue surrounding the nerve. Scar formation after surgery may therefore cause entrapment of the nerve. We describe a case of occipital neuropathy as a complication of BAHA surgery.

  3. Distinct Biochemical Activities of Eyes absent During Drosophila Eye Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Meng; Mardon, Graeme

    2016-01-01

    Eyes absent (Eya) is a highly conserved transcriptional coactivator and protein phosphatase that plays vital roles in multiple developmental processes from Drosophila to humans. Eya proteins contain a PST (Proline-Serine-Threonine)-rich transactivation domain, a threonine phosphatase motif (TPM), and a tyrosine protein phosphatase domain. Using a genomic rescue system, we find that the PST domain is essential for Eya activity and Dac expression, and the TPM is required for full Eya function. We also find that the threonine phosphatase activity plays only a minor role during Drosophila eye development and the primary function of the PST and TPM domains is transactivation that can be largely substituted by the heterologous activation domain VP16. Along with our previous results that the tyrosine phosphatase activity of Eya is dispensable for normal Eya function in eye formation, we demonstrate that a primary function of Eya during Drosophila eye development is as a transcriptional coactivator. Moreover, the PST/TPM and the threonine phosphatase activity are not required for in vitro interaction between retinal determination factors. Finally, this work is the first report of an Eya-Ey physical interaction. These findings are particularly important because they highlight the need for an in vivo approach that accurately dissects protein function. PMID:26980695

  4. Multifocal Motor Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of finding ways to prevent, treat, and, ultimately, cure them. Show More Show Less ... Definition Multifocal motor neuropathy is a progressive muscle disorder characterized by muscle weakness in the hands, with differences from one side of the body ...

  5. Painful Traumatic Trigeminal Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafael, Benoliel; Sorin, Teich; Eli, Eliav

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses neuropathic pain of traumatic origin affecting the trigeminal nerve. This syndrome has been termed painful traumatic trigeminal neuropathy by the International Headache Society and replaces atypical odontalgia, deafferentation pain, traumatic neuropathy, and phantom toothache. The discussion emphasizes the diagnosis and the early and late management of injuries to the trigeminal nerve and subsequent painful conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Spectrum of peripheral neuropathies associated with surgical interventions; A neurophysiological assessment

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Saidha, Shiv

    2010-04-19

    Abstract Background We hypothesized that a wide range of surgical procedures may be complicated by neuropathies, not just in close proximity but also remote from procedural sites. The aim of this study was to classify post-operative neuropathies and the procedures associated with them. Methods We retrospectively identified 66 patients diagnosed with post-procedure neuropathies between January 2005 and June 2008. We reviewed their referral cards and medical records for patient demographics, information on procedures, symptoms, as well as clinical and neurophysiological findings. Results Thirty patients (45.4%) had neuropathies remote from procedural sites and 36 patients (54.5%) had neuropathies in close proximity to procedural sites. Half of the remote neuropathies (15\\/30) developed following relatively short procedures. In 27% of cases (8\\/30) remote neuropathies were bilateral. Seven patients developed neuropathies remote from operative sites following hip arthroplasties (7\\/30: 23.3%), making hip arthroplasty the most common procedure associated with remote neuropathies. Sciatic neuropathies due to hip arthroplasty (12\\/36, 33.3%) accounted for the majority of neuropathies occurring in close proximity to operative sites. Five medial cutaneous nerve of forearm neuropathies occurred following arterio-venous fistula (AVF) formation. Conclusions An array of surgical procedures may be complicated by neuropathy. Almost half of post-procedure neuropathies occur remote from the site of procedure, emphasizing the need to try to prevent not just local, but also remote neuropathies. Mechanical factors and patient positioning should be considered in the prevention of post-operative neuropathies. There is a possible association between AVF formation and medial cutaneous nerve of forearm neuropathy, which requires further study for validation.

  7. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and vitamin B12 deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pott, Jan Willem R.; Wong, Kwok H.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited optic neuropathy caused by mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). It is also believed that several epigenetic factors have an influence on the development of LHON. Methods: A case series was observed. Results: Three

  8. Muscular atrophy in diabetic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H; Gadeberg, P C; Brock, B

    1997-01-01

    Diabetic patients with polyneuropathy develop motor dysfunction. To establish whether motor dysfunction is associated with muscular atrophy the ankle dorsal and plantar flexors of the non-dominant leg were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging in 8 patients with symptomatic neuropathy, in 8 non...... confirmed that the atrophy predominated distally. We conclude that muscular atrophy underlies motor weakness at the ankle in diabetic patients with polyneuropathy and that the atrophy is most pronounced in distal muscles of the lower leg indicating that a length dependent neuropathic process explains...

  9. [Autonomic peripheral neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, David; Cauquil, Cecile; Lozeron, Pierre

    2012-11-01

    The mechanisms of dysautonomic disturbances are varied and mostly acquired. They can result from lesions of sympathetic or parasympathetic vegetative fibers located in the peripheral contingent, or in the somatic contingent by demyelination or axonal loss; or more rarely by cellular bodies in the sympathetic or parasympathetic ganglia. Several chronic peripheral neuropathies can be associated with dysautonomia. Only some causes need to be known because they can be clinically significant. Dysautonomia may be seen during chronic acquired neuropathies but also acute or subacute ones. The most frequent cause in the world is the dysautonomia of the diabetes; it affects all the systems; the cardiovascular dysfunction has an impact on the prognosis for survival when it is severe. Hereditary autonomic neuropathies are rare; they can declare themselves very early during the Riley-Day syndrome or very late during amyloid polyneuropathies due to transthyretin gene mutation. The diagnosis can be confirmed by molecular biology. The dysautonomia is frequent and often severe. These neuropathies justify symptomatic treatment to improve quality of life. For some of them, a specific treatment can be proposed to treat the causal affection to try to stop the progression of the disease. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  10. [Idiopathic autonomic neuropathy (pandysautonomia)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowicz, E; Drozdowski, W; Pogumirski, J

    2001-01-01

    On the basis of current literature, clinical and neuropathologic features of idiopathic autonomic neuropathy is presented. Idiopathic autonomic neuropathy is a disease characterized by acute or subacute onset, monophasic course over a period of several years, it is often preceded by an infection. The spectrum of autonomic changes ranges from cholinergic or adrenergic dysfunction to pandysautonomia, leading to heterogeneity of its clinical features. Possible sympathetic system abnormalities found in autonomic neuropathy are: poor pupillary response to light in darkness, orthostatic hypotension leading to syncope, hypotension without compensatory tachycardia, ejaculation disturbances and vasomotor instability. Possible parasympathetic dysfunctions are: salivation and lacrimation disturbances, absent pupillary constriction to light and near gaze, gastrointestinal tract immobility and impairment of gastrointestinal function, atonic bladder with large residual volume, erectile impotence. Pandysautonomia is thought to result from an immune mediated mechanism and responds well to plasmaferesis and intravenous immunoglobin therapy leading to gradual, sometimes not full, recovery. Moreover in this article we pay attention to the clinical value of many tests like cardiovascular or pharmacological studies in the diagnosis of pandysautonomia and in differentiation of pre- and postganglionic changes. In order to diagnose idiopathic autonomic neuropathy one has to rule out a large number of diseases with autonomic dysfunction e.g.: diabetes, malignant neoplasms, acute intermittent porphyria, Shy-Drager syndrome, Riley-Day's dysautonomia, Parkinson's disease, amyloidosis and others.

  11. Phenotyping animal models of diabetic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biessels, G J; Bril, V; Calcutt, N A

    2014-01-01

    of statistically different values between diabetic and control animals in 2 of 3 assessments (nocifensive behavior, nerve conduction velocities, or nerve structure). The participants propose that this framework would allow different research groups to compare and share data, with an emphasis on data targeted......NIDDK, JDRF, and the Diabetic Neuropathy Study Group of EASD sponsored a meeting to explore the current status of animal models of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The goal of the workshop was to develop a set of consensus criteria for the phenotyping of rodent models of diabetic neuropathy....... The discussion was divided into five areas: (1) status of commonly used rodent models of diabetes, (2) nerve structure, (3) electrophysiological assessments of nerve function, (4) behavioral assessments of nerve function, and (5) the role of biomarkers in disease phenotyping. Participants discussed the current...

  12. Emerging Mitochondrial Therapeutic Targets in Optic Neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Sanchez, M I G; Crowston, J G; Mackey, D A; Trounce, I A

    2016-09-01

    Optic neuropathies are an important cause of blindness worldwide. The study of the most common inherited mitochondrial optic neuropathies, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) has highlighted a fundamental role for mitochondrial function in the survival of the affected neuron-the retinal ganglion cell. A picture is now emerging that links mitochondrial dysfunction to optic nerve disease and other neurodegenerative processes. Insights gained from the peculiar susceptibility of retinal ganglion cells to mitochondrial dysfunction are likely to inform therapeutic development for glaucoma and other common neurodegenerative diseases of aging. Despite it being a fast-evolving field of research, a lack of access to human ocular tissues and limited animal models of mitochondrial disease have prevented direct retinal ganglion cell experimentation and delayed the development of efficient therapeutic strategies to prevent vision loss. Currently, there are no approved treatments for mitochondrial disease, including optic neuropathies caused by primary or secondary mitochondrial dysfunction. Recent advances in eye research have provided important insights into the molecular mechanisms that mediate pathogenesis, and new therapeutic strategies including gene correction approaches are currently being investigated. Here, we review the general principles of mitochondrial biology relevant to retinal ganglion cell function and provide an overview of the major optic neuropathies with mitochondrial involvement, LHON and ADOA, whilst highlighting the emerging link between mitochondrial dysfunction and glaucoma. The pharmacological strategies currently being trialed to improve mitochondrial dysfunction in these optic neuropathies are discussed in addition to emerging therapeutic approaches to preserve retinal ganglion cell function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Laser Doppler Flare Imaging and Quantitative Thermal Thresholds Testing Performance in Small and Mixed Fiber Neuropathies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alon Abraham

    Full Text Available Small fiber neuropathy might be a part of typical mixed small and large fiber neuropathy, or a distinct entity, affecting exclusively small nerve fibers.Explore the utility of small nerve fiber testing in patients with clinical presentation suggesting small fiber neuropathy, with and without evidence for concomitant large fiber neuropathy.Patients attending the neuromuscular clinic from 2012 to 2015 with a clinical presentation suggesting small nerve fiber impairment, who had Laser Doppler flare imaging (LDIFlare and quantitative thermal testing (QTT were evaluated for this study. Patients with clinical or electrophysiological evidence for concomitant large fiber neuropathy were not excluded.The sensitivities of LDIFlare, cooling and heat threshold testing were 64%, 36%, and 0% respectively for clinically highly suggestive small fiber neuropathy, 64%, 56%, and 19% respectively for mixed fiber neuropathy, and 86%, 79%, and 29% respectively for diabetic mixed fiber neuropathy.LDIFlare and cooling thresholds testing are non-invasive small nerve fiber testing modalities, with moderate performance in patients with small and mixed fiber neuropathy, and excellent performance in diabetic mixed fiber neuropathy.

  14. Dealing with Distinctiveness. Development of Chinese in the "Australian Curriculum: Languages"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrimgeour, Andrew; Foster, Marnie; Mao, Weifeng

    2013-01-01

    This article explores some of the distinctive challenges in Chinese language education in schools and discusses how the development of the "Australian Curriculum: Chinese" has responded to these challenges. It details how the curriculum framework outlined in the "Shape of the Australian Curriculum: Languages" (ACARA, 2011)…

  15. Development of the Distinct Multiple Intelligences in Primary Students through Interest Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueñas Macías, Fredy Alonso

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on an action research study that focused on developing the distinct multiple intelligences of an English class of fifth graders through interest centers at a Colombian school. A multiple intelligences questionnaire, an open-ended observation form, and a student mini-report sheet were used to collect data. Findings revealed…

  16. Suboccipital neuropathy after bone conduction device placement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, H.T.; Ru, J.A. de

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical characteristics of a 70-year-old female with occipital neuropathy following bone conduction device surgery. DESCRIPTION: A 65-year-old woman underwent bone conduction device placement surgery on the left temporal bone. Postoperatively she progressively developed

  17. Glucose control and diabetic neuropathy: lessons from recent large clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Lynn; Jaiswal, Mamta; Martin, Catherine; Pop-Busui, Rodica

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral and autonomic neuropathies are common complications of diabetes with broad spectrums of clinical manifestations and high morbidity. Studies using various agents to target the pathways implicated in the development and progression of diabetic neuropathy were promising in animal models. In humans, however, randomized controlled studies have failed to show efficacy on objective measures of neuropathy. The complex anatomy of the peripheral and autonomic nervous systems, the multitude of pathogenic mechanisms involved, and the lack of uniformity of neuropathy measures have likely contributed to these failures. To date, tight glycemic control is the only strategy convincingly shown to prevent or delay the development of neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes and to slow the progression of neuropathy in some patients with type 2 diabetes. Lessons learned about the role of glycemic control on distal symmetrical polyneuropathy and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy are discussed in this review.

  18. Vasculitic peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Amini

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Primary systemic vasculitis in pre-capillary arteries is associated with peripheral neuropathy. In some types of systematic vasculitis about 60 % of patients have peripheral nervous system (PNS involvement. In vasculitic peripheral neuropathies (VPN a necrotizing and inflammatory process leads to narrowing of vasa nervorum lumen and eventually the appearance of ischemic lesions in peripheral nerves. Some features might be suggestive of VPN, like: axonal nerve degeneration, wallerian-like degeneration, and diameter irregularity of nerve. Peripheral nervous system (PNS destruction during systemic vasculitides should be considered, due to its frequency and early occurrence in vasculitis progression. The first line treatment of non systematic VPNs is corticosteroid agents, but these drugs might worsen the VPNs or systemic vasculitis.

  19. Distinct Function of Estrogen Receptor α in Smooth Muscle and Fibroblast Cells in Prostate Development

    OpenAIRE

    Vitkus, Spencer; Yeh, Chiuan-Ren; Lin, Hsiu-Hsia; Hsu, Iawen; Yu, Jiangzhou; Chen, Ming; Yeh, Shuyuan

    2012-01-01

    Estrogen signaling, through estrogen receptor (ER)α, has been shown to cause hypertrophy in the prostate. Our recent report has shown that epithelial ERα knockout (KO) will not affect the normal prostate development or homeostasis. However, it remains unclear whether ERα in different types of stromal cells has distinct roles in prostate development. This study proposed to elucidate how KO of ERα in the stromal smooth muscle or fibroblast cells may interrupt cross talk between prostate stromal...

  20. Painful peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUN Bo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Painful peripheral neuropathy (PPN is characterized by neuropathic pain (NP, which is accompanied by dysfunction of motor, sensory and autonomic nervous system. It always involves small nerve fibers, including A δ and C fibers. PPN can be classified into two types according to etiology: hereditary and acquired. Pain of PPN can manifest as spontaneous pain and stimulus-evoked pain (allodynia, hyperalgesia and hyperpathia. The manifestation of typical cases is length-dependent, which firstly involves the feet, and then progresses proximally and to the hands, presenting a glove-stock pattern. PPN can be either an isolated disease entity or part of other diseases. The former indicates idiopathic small fiber neuropathy (SFN, while the latter contains various diseases involving peripheral nerve fibers, including systemic diseases such as diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy with other causes. The accessory examinations of PPN include quantitative sensory testing (QST, intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD, sympathetic skin response (SSR, etc. Among them, IENFD is the "golden standard" for SFN. The major therapeutic methods are to control primary diseases and relieve pain. Medications alleviating neuropathic pain consist of carbamazepine, pregabalin, gabapentin and amitriptyline, etc.

  1. status and insulin resistance in diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taslima Akter

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Complication of diabetes mellitus includes peripheral neuropathy which causes ischemic foot ulceration. Hyperglycemia and insulin resistance may accelerate the development of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Objective: To assess the glycaemic status and insulin resistance for development of peripheral neuropathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: This control case control study was conducted in the Department of Physiology, Dhaka Medical College, Dhaka from July 2014 to June 2015. A total number of 150 Type 2 diabetic patients of both sexes were selected with age ranging 40 to 50 years. Among them, 75 patients with peripheral neuropathy were included in study group and 75 patients without peripheral neuropathy were control. For evaluation of glycaemic status, fasting serum glucose (FSG, Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c and to calculate insulin resistance by homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, fasting serum insulin (FSI, were estimated. For statistical analysis, unpaired Student’s ‘t’ test was done. Results: In this study, significant increase in FSG, HbA1c, FSI, HOMA-IR were found in diabetic subjects with peripheral neuropathy in comparison to control group. Conclusion: From the study results, it is concluded that poor glycaemic control and greater insulin resistance may be associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

  2. Analysis of distinctions of the development of education of the Russian macro-regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skripnik, Oksana

    2017-10-01

    The methodical approach to the analysis of distinctions of development of educational sphere in macro-regions, the federal administrative districts of Russia, is offered in the article. Feature of methodical approach consists in the choice, calculation and ranging of relative indicators of an assessment of preschool, general, professional and higher education in the macro-regions, and also in carrying out the analysis of variability of the specified indicators by application of methods of statistics.

  3. Drug-induced peripheral neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilholm, Ole Jakob; Christensen, Alex Alban; Zedan, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy can be caused by medication, and various descriptions have been applied for this condition. In this MiniReview, the term 'drug-induced peripheral neuropathy' (DIPN) is used with the suggested definition: Damage to nerves of the peripheral nervous system caused by a chemical ...

  4. Delayed radiation neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagashima, Toshiko; Miyamoto, Kazuto; Beppu, Hirokuni; Hirose, Kazuhiko; Yamada, Katsuhiro

    1981-01-01

    A case of cervical plexus neuropathy was reported in association with chronic radio-dermatitis, myxedema with thyroid adenoma and epiglottic tumor. A 38-year-old man has noticed muscle weakness and wasting of the right shoulder girdle since age 33. A detailed history taking revealed a previous irradiation to the neck because of the cervical lymphadenopathy at age 10 (X-ray 3,000 rads), keroid skin change at age 19, obesity and edema since 26, and hoarseness at 34. Laryngoscopic examination revealed a tumor on the right vocal cord, diagnosed as benign papilloma by histological study. In addition, there were chronic radio-dermatitis around the neck, primary hypothyroidism with a benign functioning adenoma on the right lobe of the thyroid, the right phrenic nerve palsy and the right recurrent nerve palsy. All these lesions were considered to be the late sequellae of radiation to the neck in childhood. Other neurological signs were weakness and amyotrophy of the right shoulder girdle with patchy sensory loss, and areflexia of the right arm. Gross power was fairly well preserved in the right hand. EMG showed neurogenic changes in the tested muscles, suggesting a peripheral nerve lesion. Nerve conduction velocities were normal. No abnormal findings were revealed by myelography and spinal CT. The neurological findings of the patient were compatible with the diagnosis of middle cervical plexus palsy apparently due to late radiation effect. In the literature eight cases of post-radiation neuropathy with a long latency have been reported. The present case with the longest latency after the radiation should be included in the series of the reported cases of ''delayed radiation neuropathy.'' (author)

  5. Delayed radiation neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagashima, T.; Miyamoto, K.; Beppu, H.; Hirose, K.; Yamada, K. (Tokyo Metropolitan Neurological Hospital (Japan))

    1981-07-01

    A case of cervical plexus neuropathy was reported in association with chronic radio-dermatitis, myxedema with thyroid adenoma and epiglottic tumor. A 38-year-old man has noticed muscle weakness and wasting of the right shoulder girdle since age 33. A detailed history taking revealed a previous irradiation to the neck because of the cervical lymphadenopathy at age 10 (X-ray 3,000 rads), keroid skin change at age 19, obesity and edema since 26, and hoarseness at 34. Laryngoscopic examination revealed a tumor on the right vocal cord, diagnosed as benign papilloma by histological study. In addition, there were chronic radio-dermatitis around the neck, primary hypothyroidism with a benign functioning adenoma on the right lobe of the thyroid, the right phrenic nerve palsy and the right recurrent nerve palsy. All these lesions were considered to be the late sequellae of radiation to the neck in childhood. Other neurological signs were weakness and amyotrophy of the right shoulder girdle with patchy sensory loss, and areflexia of the right arm. Gross power was fairly well preserved in the right hand. EMG showed neurogenic changes in the tested muscles, suggesting a peripheral nerve lesion. Nerve conduction velocities were normal. No abnormal findings were revealed by myelography and spinal CT. The neurological findings of the patient were compatible with the diagnosis of middle cervical plexus palsy apparently due to late radiation effect. In the literature eight cases of post-radiation neuropathy with a long latency have been reported. The present case with the longest latency after the radiation should be included in the series of the reported cases of ''delayed radiation neuropathy.'' (author).

  6. Development of distinction method of production area of ginsengs by using a neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Youngjin; Chung, Yongsam; Sim, Chulmuu; Sun, Gwangmin; Lee, Yuna; Yoo, Sangho

    2011-01-15

    During the last 2 years of the project, we have tried to develop the technology to make a distinction of the production areas for Korean ginsengs cultivated in the various provinces in Korea and foreign countries. It will contribute to secure the health food safety for public and stability of its market. In this year, we collected ginseng samples cultivated in the northeastern province in Chinese mainland such as Liaoning province, Jilin province and Baekdu mountain within Jilin province. 10 ginseng samples were collected at each province. The elemental concentrations in the ginseng were analyzed by using a neutron activation analysis technique at the HANARO research reactor. The distinction of production area was made by using a statistical software. As a result, the Chinese Korean ginsengs were certainly differentiated from those cultivated in the famous province in Korea though there was a limitation that the number of our sample we analyzed is very small.

  7. Development of distinction method of production area of ginsengs by using a neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Youngjin; Chung, Yongsam; Sim, Chulmuu; Sun, Gwangmin; Lee, Yuna; Yoo, Sangho

    2011-01-01

    During the last 2 years of the project, we have tried to develop the technology to make a distinction of the production areas for Korean ginsengs cultivated in the various provinces in Korea and foreign countries. It will contribute to secure the health food safety for public and stability of its market. In this year, we collected ginseng samples cultivated in the northeastern province in Chinese mainland such as Liaoning province, Jilin province and Baekdu mountain within Jilin province. 10 ginseng samples were collected at each province. The elemental concentrations in the ginseng were analyzed by using a neutron activation analysis technique at the HANARO research reactor. The distinction of production area was made by using a statistical software. As a result, the Chinese Korean ginsengs were certainly differentiated from those cultivated in the famous province in Korea though there was a limitation that the number of our sample we analyzed is very small

  8. Childhood adversity and neural development: deprivation and threat as distinct dimensions of early experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Katie A; Sheridan, Margaret A; Lambert, Hilary K

    2014-11-01

    A growing body of research has examined the impact of childhood adversity on neural structure and function. Advances in our understanding of the neurodevelopmental consequences of adverse early environments require the identification of dimensions of environmental experience that influence neural development differently and mechanisms other than the frequently-invoked stress pathways. We propose a novel conceptual framework that differentiates between deprivation (absence of expected environmental inputs and complexity) and threat (presence of experiences that represent a threat to one's physical integrity) and make predictions grounded in basic neuroscience principles about their distinct effects on neural development. We review animal research on fear learning and sensory deprivation as well as human research on childhood adversity and neural development to support these predictions. We argue that these previously undifferentiated dimensions of experience exert strong and distinct influences on neural development that cannot be fully explained by prevailing models focusing only on stress pathways. Our aim is not to exhaustively review existing evidence on childhood adversity and neural development, but to provide a novel framework to guide future research.

  9. Prophylactic L-arginine and ibuprofen delay the development of tactile allodynia and suppress spinal miR-155 in a rat model of diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Lithy, Ghada M; El-Bakly, Wesam M; Matboli, Marwa; Abd-Alkhalek, Hadwa A; Masoud, Somaia I; Hamza, May

    2016-11-01

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is a common complication of diabetes mellitus that is hardly reversible at the late stages. Since treatment of neuropathic pain is predominantly symptomatic, a prophylactic measure would be useful. Both ibuprofen and L-arginine exert antiallodynic effects on chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced cold allodynia. Furthermore, ibuprofen is effective in CCI-induced mechanical allodynia. The aim of the study was to assess the antiallodynic effect of prophylactic ibuprofen and L-arginine in streptozotocin-induced DN in rats and to further investigate the role of spinal miR-155 and nitric oxide (NO) in this effect. Tactile allodynia was assessed weekly by von Frey filaments. Oral daily administration of ibuprofen, L-arginine and their combination, for 4 weeks starting 1 week after streptozotocin injection (ie, before the development of tactile allodynia), resulted in a significant decrease of tactile allodynia compared with the control diabetic group. This was evident in the fifth week of the experiment. The 3 treatments prevented the decrease in muscle fiber diameter and epidermal thickness, seen in the control diabetic group. Furthermore, ibuprofen, L-arginine and their combination prevented the increase in the spinal NO level and miRNA-155, seen in the control diabetic group. In conclusion, both ibuprofen and L-arginine delayed the development of behavioral and histologic changes of DN, with concomitant suppression of spinal miR-155 and NO level. L-arginine being tolerable may be useful prophylactically in diabetic patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. African Mitochondrial DNA Subhaplogroups and Peripheral Neuropathy during Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canter, Jeffrey A.; Robbins, Gregory K.; Selph, Doug; Clifford, David B.; Kallianpur, Asha R.; Shafer, Robert; Levy, Shawn; Murdock, Deborah G.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Haas, David W.; Hulgan, Todd

    2010-01-01

    Susceptibility to peripheral neuropathy during antiretroviral therapy with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) was previously associated with a European mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroup among non-Hispanic white persons. To determine if NRTI-associated peripheral neuropathy was related to mtDNA variation in non-Hispanic black persons, we sequenced mtDNA of participants from AIDS Clinical Trials Group study 384. Of 156 non-Hispanic blacks with genomic data, 51 (33%) developed peripheral neuropathy. In a multivariate model, African mtDNA subhaplogroup L1c was an independent predictor of peripheral neuropathy (OR=3.7, 95% CI 1.1-12.0). An African mtDNA subhaplogroup is for the first time implicated in susceptibility to NRTI-associated toxicity. PMID:20402593

  11. Distinct function of estrogen receptor α in smooth muscle and fibroblast cells in prostate development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitkus, Spencer; Yeh, Chiuan-Ren; Lin, Hsiu-Hsia; Hsu, Iawen; Yu, Jiangzhou; Chen, Ming; Yeh, Shuyuan

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen signaling, through estrogen receptor (ER)α, has been shown to cause hypertrophy in the prostate. Our recent report has shown that epithelial ERα knockout (KO) will not affect the normal prostate development or homeostasis. However, it remains unclear whether ERα in different types of stromal cells has distinct roles in prostate development. This study proposed to elucidate how KO of ERα in the stromal smooth muscle or fibroblast cells may interrupt cross talk between prostate stromal and epithelial cells. Smooth muscle ERαKO (smERαKO) mice showed decreased glandular infolding with the proximal area exhibiting a significant decrease. Fibroblast ERαKO mouse prostates did not exhibit this phenotype but showed a decrease in the number of ductal tips. Additionally, the amount of collagen observed in the basement membrane was reduced in smERαKO prostates. Interestingly, these phenotypes were found to be mutually exclusive among smERαKO or fibroblast ERαKO mice. Compound KO of ERα in both fibroblast and smooth muscle showed combined phenotypes from each of the single KO. Further mechanistic studies showed that IGF-I and epidermal growth factor were down-regulated in prostate smooth muscle PS-1 cells lacking ERα. Together, our results indicate the distinct functions of fibroblast vs. smERα in prostate development.

  12. Docetaxel-induced neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckhoff, Lise; Feddersen, Søren; Knoop, Ann

    2015-01-01

    neuropathy (DIPN). The main purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of genetic variants in GSTP1 and ABCB1 on DIPN. Material and methods. DNA was extracted from whole blood from 150 patients with early-stage breast cancer who had received adjuvant docetaxel from February 2011 to May 2012. Two...... polymorphisms in GSTP1 and three in ABCB1 were selected for the primary analysis, and a host of other candidate genes was explored and compared between 75 patients with clinician-reported DIPN grade ≥ 2 and 75 patients without DIPN. Results. Patients with the genetic variants GSTP1 rs1138272 C/T or T/T (114Ala...

  13. Diffusion MR Imaging of Postoperative Bilateral Acute Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannan, Anusha; Srinivasan, Sivasubramanian [Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, Singapore (Singapore)

    2012-09-15

    We read with great interest, the case report on ischemic optic neuropathy (1). We would like to add a few points concerning the blood supply of the optic nerve and the correlation with the development of post-operative ischemic neuropathy. Actually, the perioperative or post-operative vision loss (postoperative ischemic neuropathy) is most likely due to ischemic optic neuropathy. Ischemic optic neuropathy (2) is classified as an anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) and posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION). This classification is based on the fact that blood supply (2) to the anterior segment of the optic nerve (part of the optic nerve in the scleral canal and the optic disc) is supplied by short posterior ciliary vessels or anastamotic ring branches around the optic nerve. The posterior part of the optic canal is relatively less perfused, and is supplied by ophthalmic artery and central fibres are perfused by a central retinal artery. So, in the post-operative period, the posterior part of the optic nerve is more vulnerable for ischemia, especially, after major surgeries (3), one of the theories being hypotension or anaemia (2) and resultant decreased perfusion. The onset of PION is slower than the anterior ischemic optic neuropathy. AION on the other hand, is usually spontaneous (idiopathic) or due to arteritis, and is usually sudden in its onset. The reported case is most likely a case of PION. The role of imaging, especially the diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, is very important because the ophthalmoscopic findings in early stages of PION is normal, and it may delay the diagnosis. On the other hand, edema of the disc is usually seen in the early stages of AION.

  14. Dyslipidemia as a contributory factor in etiopathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhir S Al-Ani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The pathogenesis of neuropathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus is multifactorial.Dyslipidemia may contribute to the development of diabetic neuropathy. This study aimed to assess the atherogenic lipid indices in type 2 diabetic patients with neuropathy.Material and Methods: Fifty-one patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 31 healthy subjects were studied in the Unit of Neurophysiology at the University Hospital of Medical College, Al-Nahrin University in Baghdad, Iraq, from January 2002 to January 2003. Neuropathy total symptom score (NTSS, neuropathy impairment score in the lower leg (NIS-LL, and electrophysiological study of sensory (ulnar and sural and motor (ulnar and common peroneal nerves were used to assess nerve function. Fasting venous blood was obtained from each participant for determination of lipid profile and atherogenic lipid ratios. Results: The frequency of high blood pressure was significantly higher in neuropathic patients. The electrophysiology study revealed significant decrease in conduction velocity of ulnar (sensory and motor components, sural, and common peroneal nerves. The minimum F-wave latency of motor nerve was significantly prolonged. Among the lipid fractions, only high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol was significantly reduced by 14% of healthy participant′s value. Atherogenic lipid ratios were significantly higher in diabetic patients than corresponding healthy ratios. Conclusion: Metabolic lipid disturbances in terms of atherogenicity co-existwith neuropathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus, irrespective of duration of disease.

  15. WNK1/HSN2 mutation in human peripheral neuropathy deregulates KCC2 expression and posterior lateral line development in zebrafish (Danio rerio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Bercier

    Full Text Available Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 2 (HSNAII is a rare pathology characterized by an early onset of severe sensory loss (all modalities in the distal limbs. It is due to autosomal recessive mutations confined to exon "HSN2" of the WNK1 (with-no-lysine protein kinase 1 serine-threonine kinase. While this kinase is well studied in the kidneys, little is known about its role in the nervous system. We hypothesized that the truncating mutations present in the neural-specific HSN2 exon lead to a loss-of-function of the WNK1 kinase, impairing development of the peripheral sensory system. To investigate the mechanisms by which the loss of WNK1/HSN2 isoform function causes HSANII, we used the embryonic zebrafish model and observed strong expression of WNK1/HSN2 in neuromasts of the peripheral lateral line (PLL system by immunohistochemistry. Knocking down wnk1/hsn2 in embryos using antisense morpholino oligonucleotides led to improper PLL development. We then investigated the reported interaction between the WNK1 kinase and neuronal potassium chloride cotransporter KCC2, as this transporter is a target of WNK1 phosphorylation. In situ hybridization revealed kcc2 expression in mature neuromasts of the PLL and semi-quantitative RT-PCR of wnk1/hsn2 knockdown embryos showed an increased expression of kcc2 mRNA. Furthermore, overexpression of human KCC2 mRNA in embryos replicated the wnk1/hsn2 knockdown phenotype. We validated these results by obtaining double knockdown embryos, both for wnk1/hsn2 and kcc2, which alleviated the PLL defects. Interestingly, overexpression of inactive mutant KCC2-C568A, which does not extrude ions, allowed a phenocopy of the PLL defects. These results suggest a pathway in which WNK1/HSN2 interacts with KCC2, producing a novel regulation of its transcription independent of KCC2's activation, where a loss-of-function mutation in WNK1 induces an overexpression of KCC2 and hinders proper peripheral sensory nerve

  16. Catecholamines and diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1995-01-01

    of plasma catecholamine measurements is not due to changes in the clearance of catecholamines in diabetic autonomic neuropathy. The physiological responses to infused adrenaline and to noradrenaline are enhanced, for noradrenaline mainly cardiovascular responses. Adrenoceptors (alpha and beta adrenoceptors...

  17. Autonomic Neuropathy in Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Verrotti, Alberto; Prezioso, Giovanni; Scattoni, Raffaella; Chiarelli, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN) is a serious and common complication of diabetes, often overlooked and misdiagnosed. It is a systemic-wide disorder that may be asymptomatic in the early stages. The most studied and clinically important form of DAN is cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy defined as the impairment of autonomic control of the cardiovascular system in patients with diabetes after exclusion of other causes. The reported prevalence of DAN varies widely depending on inconsistent ...

  18. ANTIOXIDANT STATUS IN DIABETIC NEUROPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giriraja Vrushabaiah Kanakapura

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diabetic neuropathy, retinopathy and nephropathy are the chronic complications of diabetes mellitus. Neuropathy, retinopathy and nephropathy are microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus. Antioxidant status is reduced in DM-induced retinopathy and nephropathy. Present study is undertaken to evaluate the degree of oxidative stress in diabetic neuropathy patients. The aim of the study is to study on oxidative stress as measured by lipid peroxidation marker, malondialdehyde and antienzyme status in type II DM patients with neuropathy and compared them with a controlled nondiabetic group. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study included 100 subjects from Sapthagiri Medical College, Bangalore, from January 1, 2015, to December 31, 2015, of age group 50 to 70 yrs. out of which 50 patients were non-insulin-dependent DM with neuropathy and rest 50 age and sex matched apparently healthy individuals (control group. Antioxidant status was assessed by measuring superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, glutathione reductase (GR, Catalase and Reduced Glutathione (GSH. RESULTS It showed a significant increase p<0.001 in FBS, PPBS, TC, TG, LDL, VLDL, CAT, MDA, while HDL, GSH, GPX, GR and SOD were found to be decreased significantly (p 0.001. CONCLUSION MDA was significantly elevated in diabetic group, whereas antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and reduced glutathione were significantly decreased, which might be helpful in risk assessment of various complications of DM. The data suggests that alteration in antioxidant status and MDA may help to predict the risk of diabetic neuropathy.

  19. Scientific research on diseases: the distinct profile of developed and developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yegros-Yegros, A.; Rafols, I.; Abad-Garcia, M.F.; Mugnaini, R.; Meijer, I.

    2016-07-01

    In most of the countries across the globe, health is seen as a priority. The European Commission (2013), for example, considers health as a precondition for economic prosperity given that people’s health influences economic outcomes in terms of productivity, labor supply, human capital and public spending. Accordingly, the Commission places health in one of the big Societal Challenges (‘health, demographic change and wellbeing’) in Horizon 2020. Part of the investment on research and development is devoted to specific diseases. In order to assess whether scientific research is targeting the most pressing diseases, some studies have tried to analyze the degree of alignment between the funding allocated to specific diseases and the burden of disease (e.g. Gillum et al, 2011; Kingel et al, 2014). Others, like Evans et al (2014), focus on the relationship between research outputs dealing with specific diseases and the burden of disease. (Author)

  20. From shared lineage to distinct functions: the development of the inner ear and epibranchial placodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladher, Raj K; O'Neill, Paul; Begbie, Jo

    2010-06-01

    The inner ear and the epibranchial ganglia constitute much of the sensory system in the caudal vertebrate head. The inner ear consists of mechanosensory hair cells, their neurons, and structures necessary for sound and balance sensation. The epibranchial ganglia are knots of neurons that innervate and relay sensory signals from several visceral organs and the taste buds. Their development was once thought to be independent, in line with their independent functions. However, recent studies indicate that both systems arise from a morphologically distinct common precursor domain: the posterior placodal area. This review summarises recent studies into the induction, morphogenesis and innervation of these systems and discusses lineage restriction and cell specification in the context of their common origin.

  1. A randomised, placebo-controlled trial assessing the efficacy of an oral B group vitamin in preventing the development of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloss, Janet M; Colosimo, Maree; Airey, Caroline; Masci, Paul; Linnane, Anthony W; Vitetta, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a debilitating side effect resulting from neurotoxic chemotherapeutic agents. This study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of an oral B group vitamin compared to placebo, in preventing the incidence of CIPN in cancer patients undergoing neurotoxic chemotherapy. A pilot, randomised, placebo-controlled trial was conducted. Newly diagnosed cancer patients prescribed with taxanes, oxaliplatin or vincristine were invited to participate. A total of 71 participants (female 68 %, male 32 %) were enrolled into the study and randomised to the B group vitamin (n = 38) arm or placebo (n = 33). The data from 47 participants were eligible for analysis (B group vitamins n = 27, placebo n = 22). The primary outcome measure was the total neuropathy score assessed by an independent neurologist. Secondary outcome measures included serum vitamin B levels, quality of life, pain inventory and the patient neurotoxicity questionnaires. Outcome measures were conducted at baseline, 12, 24 and 36 weeks. The total neuropathy score (TNS) demonstrated that a B group vitamin did not significantly reduce the incidence of CIPN compared to placebo (p = 0.73). Statistical significance was achieved for patient perceived sensory peripheral neuropathy (12 weeks p = 0.03; 24 weeks p = 0.005; 36 weeks p = 0.021). The risk estimate for the Patient Neurotoxicity Questionnaire (PNQ) was also statistically significant (OR = 5.78, 95 % CI = 1.63-20.5). The European Organisation of Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) quality of life, total pain score and pain interference showed no significance (p = 0.46, p = 0.9, p = 0.37 respectively). A trend was observed indicating that vitamin B12 may reduce the onset and severity of CIPN. An oral B group vitamin as an adjunct to neurotoxic chemotherapy regimens was not superior to placebo (p > 0.05) for the prevention of CIPN. Patients taking the B group vitamin perceived a

  2. Activated Ras alters lens and corneal development through induction of distinct downstream targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reneker Lixing

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian Ras genes regulate diverse cellular processes including proliferation and differentiation and are frequently mutated in human cancers. Tumor development in response to Ras activation varies between different tissues and the molecular basis for these variations are poorly understood. The murine lens and cornea have a common embryonic origin and arise from adjacent regions of the surface ectoderm. Activation of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF signaling pathway induces the corneal epithelial cells to proliferate and the lens epithelial cells to exit the cell cycle. The molecular mechanisms that regulate the differential responses of these two related tissues have not been defined. We have generated transgenic mice that express a constitutively active version of human H-Ras in their lenses and corneas. Results Ras transgenic lenses and corneal epithelial cells showed increased proliferation with concomitant increases in cyclin D1 and D2 expression. This initial increase in proliferation is sustained in the cornea but not in the lens epithelial cells. Coincidentally, cdk inhibitors p27Kip1 and p57Kip2 were upregulated in the Ras transgenic lenses but not in the corneas. Phospho-Erk1 and Erk2 levels were elevated in the lens but not in the cornea and Spry 1 and Spry 2, negative regulators of Ras-Raf-Erk signaling, were upregulated more in the corneal than in the lens epithelial cells. Both lens and corneal differentiation programs were sensitive to Ras activation. Ras transgenic embryos showed a distinctive alteration in the architecture of the lens pit. Ras activation, though sufficient for upregulation of Prox1, a transcription factor critical for cell cycle exit and initiation of fiber differentiation, is not sufficient for induction of terminal fiber differentiation. Expression of Keratin 12, a marker of corneal epithelial differentiation, was reduced in the Ras transgenic corneas. Conclusions Collectively, these

  3. Two Lotus japonicus symbiosis mutants impaired at distinct steps of arbuscule development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groth, Martin; Kosuta, Sonja; Gutjahr, Caroline; Haage, Kristina; Hardel, Simone Liesel; Schaub, Miriam; Brachmann, Andreas; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Findlay, Kim; Wang, Trevor L; Parniske, Martin

    2013-07-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) fungi form nutrient-acquiring symbioses with the majority of higher plants. Nutrient exchange occurs via arbuscules, highly branched hyphal structures that are formed within root cortical cells. With a view to identifying host genes involved in AM development, we isolated Lotus japonicus AM-defective mutants via a microscopic screen of an ethyl methanesulfonate-mutagenized population. A standardized mapping procedure was developed that facilitated positioning of the defective loci on the genetic map of L. japonicus, and, in five cases, allowed identification of mutants of known symbiotic genes. Two additional mutants representing independent loci did not form mature arbuscules during symbiosis with two divergent AM fungal species, but exhibited signs of premature arbuscule arrest or senescence. Marker gene expression patterns indicated that the two mutants are affected in distinct steps of arbuscule development. Both mutants formed wild-type-like root nodules upon inoculation with Mesorhizobium loti, indicating that the mutated loci are essential during AM but not during root nodule symbiosis. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Development of emergency medicine as academic and distinct clinical discipline in Bosnia & Herzegovina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihefendic, Nizama; Zildzic, Muharem; Masic, Izet; Hadziahmetovic, Zoran; Vasic, Dusko

    2011-01-01

    Emergency medicine is a new academic discipline, as well as a recent independent clinical specialization with the specific principles of practice, education and research. It is also a very important segment of the overall health care and health system. Emergency medicine as a distinct specialty was introduced in the U.S. in 1970. Ten years later and relatively quickly emergency medicine was introduced in the health system in Bosnia and Herzegovina as a specialty with a special education program for specialist and a final exam. Compare the development of emergency medicine in Bosnia and Herzegovina with the trends of development of this discipline in the world as a specialization and an academic discipline. Identify specific problems and possible solutions and learn lessons from other countries. Reviewed are the literature data on the development of emergency medicine in the world, programs of undergraduate and postgraduate teaching, the organizational scheme of emergency centers and residency. This is then compared with data of the current status of emergency medicine as an academic discipline and a recognized specialization, in Bosnia and Herzegovina. There are substantial differences in the development of emergency medicine in the United States, European Union and Bosnia and Herzegovina. Although Bosnia and Herzegovina relatively early recognized specialty of emergency medicine in academia, it failed to mach the academic progress with the practical implementation. A&E departments in the Community Health Centers failed to meet the desired objectives even though they were led by specialists in emergency medicine. The main reason being the lack of space and equipment as well as staff needed to meet set standards of good clinical practice, education and research. Furthermore the Curriculum of undergraduate education and specialization does not match modern concept of educational programs that meet the principles set out in emergency medicine and learning through

  5. Epidemic optic neuropathy in Cuba. Eye findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadun, A A; Martone, J F; Muci-Mendoza, R; Reyes, L; DuBois, L; Silva, J C; Roman, G; Caballero, B

    1994-05-01

    To characterize and establish a clinical definition of the optic neuropathy that appeared in epidemic form in Cuba in 1992 and 1993. At the invitation of the Cuban Ministry of Health, Havana, members of ORBIS International and the Pan American Health Organization, assembled teams that traveled to Cuba in May 1993. We were initially briefed by Cuban national experts in the areas of virology, nutrition, toxicology, ophthalmology, neurology, and public health. We then examined 20 patients on our own. Thirteen of these patients underwent a comprehensive neuro-ophthalmologic examination, including neurologic examination, ophthalmologic examination, visual fields, optic nerve function studies, contrast sensitivity studies, and funduscopy. We returned 4 months later to perform an additional 12 comprehensive neuro-ophthalmologic and follow-up examinations. Only seven of the 13 patients who were alleged to have the optic form of the epidemic and who were rigorously and systematically examined on the first visit demonstrated a bilateral optic neuropathy. These seven patients had several features that included decreased visual acuity, poor color vision, central scotomas, decreased contrast sensitivity, saccadic eye movements, and most prominent and distinctive of all, nerve fiber layer wedge defects of the papillomacular bundle. Our clinical definition was then implemented by the Cuban ophthalmologists and epidemiologists. On returning 4 months later, we found that all newly presented patients were correctly diagnosed to have the epidemic disease. With the new case definition and the application of a few simple psychophysical tests, the false-positive rate of diagnosis became much lower. After vitamin therapy, we reexamined the patients seen on our initial visit, and all showed marked improvement. The Cuban epidemic was characterized by an optic neuropathy with features that were similar to those of tobacco/alcohol amblyopia and Leber's optic atrophy. Recent political

  6. Intraspinal serotonergic neurons consist of two, temporally distinct populations in developing zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Jacob E; Wiggin, Timothy D; Rivera-Perez, Luis M; Lillesaar, Christina; Masino, Mark A

    2016-06-01

    Zebrafish intraspinal serotonergic neuron (ISN) morphology and distribution have been examined in detail at different ages; however, some aspects of the development of these cells remain unclear. Although antibodies to serotonin (5-HT) have detected ISNs in the ventral spinal cord of embryos, larvae, and adults, the only tryptophan hydroxylase (tph) transcript that has been described in the spinal cord is tph1a. Paradoxically, spinal tph1a is only expressed transiently in embryos, which brings the source of 5-HT in the ISNs of larvae and adults into question. Because the pet1 and tph2 promoters drive transgene expression in the spinal cord, we hypothesized that tph2 is expressed in spinal cords of zebrafish larvae. We confirmed this hypothesis through in situ hybridization. Next, we used 5-HT antibody labeling and transgenic markers of tph2-expressing neurons to identify a transient population of ISNs in embryos that was distinct from ISNs that appeared later in development. The existence of separate ISN populations may not have been recognized previously due to their shared location in the ventral spinal cord. Finally, we used transgenic markers and immunohistochemical labeling to identify the transient ISN population as GABAergic Kolmer-Agduhr double-prime (KA″) neurons. Altogether, this study revealed a novel developmental paradigm in which KA″ neurons are transiently serotonergic before the appearance of a stable population of tph2-expressing ISNs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Nicotinamide Riboside Opposes Type 2 Diabetes and Neuropathy in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trammell, Samuel A J; Weidemann, Benjamin J; Chadda, Ankita; Yorek, Matthew S; Holmes, Amey; Coppey, Lawrence J; Obrosov, Alexander; Kardon, Randy H; Yorek, Mark A; Brenner, Charles

    2016-05-27

    Male C57BL/6J mice raised on high fat diet (HFD) become prediabetic and develop insulin resistance and sensory neuropathy. The same mice given low doses of streptozotocin are a model of type 2 diabetes (T2D), developing hyperglycemia, severe insulin resistance and diabetic peripheral neuropathy involving sensory and motor neurons. Because of suggestions that increased NAD(+) metabolism might address glycemic control and be neuroprotective, we treated prediabetic and T2D mice with nicotinamide riboside (NR) added to HFD. NR improved glucose tolerance, reduced weight gain, liver damage and the development of hepatic steatosis in prediabetic mice while protecting against sensory neuropathy. In T2D mice, NR greatly reduced non-fasting and fasting blood glucose, weight gain and hepatic steatosis while protecting against diabetic neuropathy. The neuroprotective effect of NR could not be explained by glycemic control alone. Corneal confocal microscopy was the most sensitive measure of neurodegeneration. This assay allowed detection of the protective effect of NR on small nerve structures in living mice. Quantitative metabolomics established that hepatic NADP(+) and NADPH levels were significantly degraded in prediabetes and T2D but were largely protected when mice were supplemented with NR. The data justify testing of NR in human models of obesity, T2D and associated neuropathies.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: small fiber neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sodium channel. Sodium channels transport positively charged sodium atoms (sodium ions) into cells and play a key ... Resources (5 links) Cleveland Clinic: Neuropathy Johns Hopkins Medicine: Peripheral Neuropathy MalaCards: sodium channelopathy-related small fiber ...

  9. Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder (ANSD) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder (ANSD) KidsHealth / For Parents / Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum ... is done while the child is sleeping. Otoacoustic emission (OAE): This test measures how well the outer ...

  10. Hypothyroidism: Can It Cause Peripheral Neuropathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hypothyroidism: Can it cause peripheral neuropathy? Can hypothyroidism cause peripheral neuropathy and, if so, how is it treated? Answers from Todd B. Nippoldt, M.D. Hypothyroidism — a condition in which your ...

  11. Endoneurial pressure in hexachlorophene neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, H C; Myers, R R; Zweifach, B W; Lampert, P W

    1978-02-20

    Increased endoneurial pressure of up to 17.0 cm H2O was recorded in the peripheral nerves of rats fed hexachlorophene in their laboratory diet. The pressure was measured using a micropressure transducer developed for recording pressure in the microcirculation. The results were correlated with morphologic findings. Teased nerve fibers and araldite-embedded specimens of hexachlorophene damaged sciatic nerve revealed the characteristic severe intramyelinic edema due to splits in the minor dense lines of compact myelin giving rise to wide interlamellar spaces as shown in previous studies. The endoneurial pressure of rats exposed to hexachlorophene for 11 days and subsequently fed a normal diet returned to normal (0.2-3.0 cm H2O) after 12 days, and morphologic examination showed few residual abnormalities. Prolonged exposure to hexachlorophene for up to 4 weeks caused widespread axonal degeneration in addition to intramyelinic edema. Animals treated with hexachlorophene for 21 days followed by a normal diet for 14 days showed degenerated axons, phagocytosis of myelin as well as interstitial edema and elevated endoneurial pressure. It is suggested that axonal degeneration in hexachlorophene neuropathy is caused by increased endoneurial pressure.

  12. NON-GLAUCOMATOUS OPTIC NEUROPATHY IN IBADAN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Though, optic neuropathy is not a diagnosis in itself, as it results from various aetiologies3, some cases of optic neuropathy are amenable to treatment with good visual outcome4,5. Optic neuropathy is a significant cause of visual impairment among Nigerians6. A study in the Low. Vision Clinic in Ibadan showed that the third.

  13. Peripheral nerves are pathologically small in cerebellar ataxia neuropathy vestibular areflexia syndrome: a controlled ultrasound study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelosi, L; Mulroy, E; Leadbetter, R; Kilfoyle, D; Chancellor, A M; Mossman, S; Wing, L; Wu, T Y; Roxburgh, R H

    2018-04-01

    Sensory neuronopathy is a cardinal feature of cerebellar ataxia neuropathy vestibular areflexia syndrome (CANVAS). Having observed that two patients with CANVAS had small median and ulnar nerves on ultrasound, we set out to examine this finding systematically in a cohort of patients with CANVAS, and compare them with both healthy controls and a cohort of patients with axonal neuropathy. We have previously reported preliminary findings in seven of these patients with CANVAS and seven healthy controls. We compared the ultrasound cross-sectional area of median, ulnar, sural and tibial nerves of 14 patients with CANVAS with 14 healthy controls and 14 age- and gender-matched patients with acquired primarily axonal neuropathy. We also compared the individual nerve cross-sectional areas of patients with CANVAS and neuropathy with the reference values of our laboratory control population. The nerve cross-sectional area of patients with CANVAS was smaller than that of both the healthy controls and the neuropathy controls, with highly significant differences at most sites (P CANVAS. Small nerves in CANVAS probably reflect nerve thinning from loss of axons due to ganglion cell loss. This is distinct from the ultrasound findings in axonal neuropathy, in which nerve size was either normal or enlarged. Our findings indicate a diagnostic role for ultrasound in CANVAS sensory neuronopathy and in differentiating neuronopathy from neuropathy. © 2018 EAN.

  14. [Optic neuropathy in multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrescu, Simona; Pascu, Ruxandra; Panea, Cristina; Voinea, Liliana; Badarau, Anca; Nanea, Mariana; Romanitan, Oana; Ciuluvica, R

    2008-01-01

    The inflammation of the optic nerve called optic neuropathy could be an onset marker of multiple sclerosis. The authors review the place of optic neuropathy (neuritis) in the inflammatory demyelinating disease continuum, especially as the onset symptom of multiple sclerosis. We present the clinical symptoms, the aetiology of optic neuritis and the adjacent methods used to investigate optic neuritis. In the article are presented the actual criteria used to establish the multiple sclerosis diagnosis and the revised criteria for optic neuromyelitis, with emphasis on the differential diagnosis between these diseases.

  15. Neurotrophin-3 is increased in skin in human diabetic neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, A; Wellmer, A; Facer, P; Saldanha, G; Kopelman, P; Lindsay, R; Anand, P

    1998-01-01

    Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), a member of the neurotrophin family, has been shown to be necessary for the development of muscle spindle and Merkel cell afferent nerve fibres in animal models.The presence of NT-3 in the suprabasal epidermis, where many unmyelinated sensory fibres terminate, has been shown for the first time. As these fibres are affected in early diabetic neuropathy and a clinical trial of recombinant human NT-3 in diabetic neuropathy is in progress, the concentrations of endogenous NT-3 in skin of 24 patients at different stages of diabetic polyneuropathy have been investigated. NT-3 concentrations, measured with a specific immunoassay, were significantly higher in affected skin biopsies from patients with diabetic neuropathy than matched control skin (diabetic skin 6.32(1.18) pg/mg v control skin 1.28 (0.05) (mean (SEM)); p<0.004, Mann-Whitney U test), particularly in the later stages. The optical density of NT-3-immunostaining was also significantly greater in the epidermis in diabetic patients (diabetic epidermis 0.30(0.06) v controls 0.24 (0.01); p<0.02). No correlation was found between individual quantitative sensory tests and the increase of NT-3 concentration. The increase of NT-3 seems to reflect the degree of skin denervation in diabetic neuropathy, and may represent a compensatory mechanism. The concentrations of NT-3 in other peripheral targets deserve study in diabetic neuropathy.

 PMID:9728960

  16. Cardiac remodeling in the mouse model of Marfan syndrome develops into two distinctive phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tae, Hyun-Jin; Petrashevskaya, Natalia; Marshall, Shannon; Krawczyk, Melissa; Talan, Mark

    2016-01-15

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a systemic disorder of connective tissue caused by mutations in fibrillin-1. Cardiac dysfunction in MFS has not been characterized halting the development of therapies of cardiac complication in MFS. We aimed to study the age-dependent cardiac remodeling in the mouse model of MFS FbnC1039G+/- mouse [Marfan heterozygous (HT) mouse] and its association with valvular regurgitation. Marfan HT mice of 2-4 mo demonstrated a mild hypertrophic cardiac remodeling with predominant decline of diastolic function and increased transforming growth factor-β canonical (p-SMAD2/3) and noncanonical (p-ERK1/2 and p-p38 MAPK) signaling and upregulation of hypertrophic markers natriuretic peptides atrium natriuretic peptide and brain natriuretic peptide. Among older HT mice (6-14 mo), cardiac remodeling was associated with two distinct phenotypes, manifesting either dilated or constricted left ventricular chamber. Dilatation of left ventricular chamber was accompanied by biochemical evidence of greater mechanical stress, including elevated ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK phosphorylation and higher brain natriuretic peptide expression. The aortic valve regurgitation was registered in 20% of the constricted group and 60% of the dilated group, whereas mitral insufficiency was observed in 40% of the constricted group and 100% of the dilated group. Cardiac dysfunction was not associated with the increase of interstitial fibrosis and nonmyocyte proliferation. In the mouse model fibrillin-1, haploinsufficiency results in the early onset of nonfibrotic hypertrophic cardiac remodeling and dysfunction, independently from valvular abnormalities. MFS heart is vulnerable to stress-induced cardiac dilatation in the face of valvular regurgitation, and stress-activated MAPK signals represent a potential target for cardiac management in MFS.

  17. Development of two distinct dendritic-like APCs in the context of splenic stroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravin ePeriasamy

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Murine splenic stroma has been found to provide an in vitro niche for hematopoiesis of dendritic-like APCs (APC. Two distinct cell types have been characterised. The novel ‘L-DC’ subset, has cross presenting capacity leading to activation of CD8+ T cells, but do not activate CD4+ T cells consistent with their CD11cloCD11bhiMHC-II- phenotype. For L-DC, an equivalent tissue-specific APC has been found only in spleen. A second population of CD11chiCD11bloMHC-II+ cells resembling conventional dendritic cells (cDC can activate both CD4 and CD8 T cells. Production of L-DC but not cDC-like cells is now shown to be dependent on contact between the L-DC progenitor and stroma such that the presence of a Transwell membrane can prevent L-DC development. Since L-DC can be produced continuously in vitro in stromal co-cultures overlaid with bone marrow (BM progenitors, it was hypothesised that L-DC progenitors are self-renewing. The L-DC progenitor is shown here to be defined by the Flt3-c-kit+Lin-Sca-1+ (F-KLS subset of adult BM which contains primitive HSC. Since the less primitive F+KLS HSC subset also contains L-DC progenitors, Flt3 does not appear to be a defining marker for this progenitor. Precursors of the cDC-like subset are found only within the F+KLS subset and seed production of a transient population of APC. All data identify differentiation of L-DC from HSC, and of cDC-like cells from DC precursors, which occurs independently of inflammatory signals and is dependent on a splenic stromal microenvironment.

  18. Tectonically Undulating Terrestrial Geospheres and Concordant Development of Two Distinct Somatic Types of Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    The human organisms in microgravity conditions loss Ca or become less dense. But variously dense men also develop on Earth due to varying tectonics. As any celestial body, Earth is not a billiard-ball but is complexly warped by a number of standing waves imprinted in the geoid shape. The fundamental wave (long 2π R, R- planet radius) makes tectonic dichotomy (an opposition of the eastern and western oceanic hemispheres), the first overtone (π R) makes sectoring: on the continental eastern hemisphere, for example, around the Pamirs-Hindukush converge 4 sectors. They are 2 opposed differently uplifted (African ++, Asian +) separated by 2 opposed differently subsided (Eurasian -, Indoceanic - -). In rotating Earth the alternating uplifts (++, +) and subsidences (- -, -) require materials of different densities: less dense for uplifts and denser for subsidences. This requirement concerns all geospheres including anthroposphere. The long development of Homo sapiens adapting to graviconditions of uplifting and subsiding blocks produced two distinct somatic types of man: long and narrow (slim) leptosomes and short and broad eirisomes. As shows F. Weidenreich [1], this fundamental division appeared very early in the human history and is observed in all great human races and even in apes. A block uplifting (an increase of the planetary radius) requires diminishing density. This is achieved by distributing the man's weight by the longer stature. Thus appears long and slim leptosome. On the contrary, a block subsidence (diminishing radius) requires increasing density: man is shorter and broader (eirisome). A long existence on intensively moving (up or down) blocks makes these somatic types characteristic of races. Thus, many African tribes developing on intensively moving up continent (more than one kilometer in a few mln. y. ) are leptosomatic; on the contrary, Indians of subsiding western hemisphere are typically eirisomatic with high Rohrer's index; Polynesians of

  19. MRI in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthews, Lucy; Enzinger, Christian; Fazekas, Franz

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and a multiple sclerosis (MS)-like illness appear to coexist 50 times more frequently than would be expected by chance. This association of LHON and MS (LMS) raises an important question about whether there could be a common pathophysiological...... mechanism involving mitochondrial dysfunction. OBJECTIVE: The primary aim was to define MRI features of LMS and LHON, and to assess the proportions of individuals displaying features typical of MS. Secondarily, we investigated the effect of gender on the risk of developing white matter lesions...

  20. Clinical peripheral neuropathy associated with diabetes mellitus in 3 dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, Megan J.; Vite, Charles H.; Radhakrishnan, Anant; Hess, Rebecka S.

    2008-01-01

    Clinical and electrodiagnostic findings in 3 spontaneously diabetic dogs with clinical peripheral neuropathy (PN) are reported. Clinical signs of a PN may develop in diabetic dogs with adequate glycemic control. In addition, laryngeal paralysis may develop in association with diabetes mellitus in dogs with clinical PN.

  1. Clinical peripheral neuropathy associated with diabetes mellitus in 3 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Megan J; Vite, Charles H; Radhakrishnan, Anant; Hess, Rebecka S

    2008-06-01

    Clinical and electrodiagnostic findings in 3 spontaneously diabetic dogs with clinical peripheral neuropathy (PN) are reported. Clinical signs of a PN may develop in diabetic dogs with adequate glycemic control. In addition, laryngeal paralysis may develop in association with diabetes mellitus in dogs with clinical PN.

  2. DNA testing in hereditary neuropathies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Sinéad M

    2013-01-01

    The inherited neuropathies are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders in which there have been rapid advances in the last two decades. Molecular genetic testing is now an integral part of the evaluation of patients with inherited neuropathies. In this chapter we describe the genes responsible for the primary inherited neuropathies. We briefly discuss the clinical phenotype of each of the known inherited neuropathy subgroups, describe algorithms for molecular genetic testing of affected patients and discuss genetic counseling. The basic principles of careful phenotyping, documenting an accurate family history, and testing the available genes in an appropriate manner should identify the vast majority of individuals with CMT1 and many of those with CMT2. In this chapter we also describe the current methods of genetic testing. As advances are made in molecular genetic technologies and improvements are made in bioinformatics, it is likely that the current time-consuming methods of DNA sequencing will give way to quicker and more efficient high-throughput methods, which are briefly discussed here.

  3. Molecular approach of auditory neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Magali Aparecida Orate Menezes da; Piatto, Vânia Belintani; Maniglia, Jose Victor

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the otoferlin gene are responsible for auditory neuropathy. To investigate the prevalence of mutations in the mutations in the otoferlin gene in patients with and without auditory neuropathy. This original cross-sectional case study evaluated 16 index cases with auditory neuropathy, 13 patients with sensorineural hearing loss, and 20 normal-hearing subjects. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes, and the mutations in the otoferlin gene sites were amplified by polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphism. The 16 index cases included nine (56%) females and seven (44%) males. The 13 deaf patients comprised seven (54%) males and six (46%) females. Among the 20 normal-hearing subjects, 13 (65%) were males and seven were (35%) females. Thirteen (81%) index cases had wild-type genotype (AA) and three (19%) had the heterozygous AG genotype for IVS8-2A-G (intron 8) mutation. The 5473C-G (exon 44) mutation was found in a heterozygous state (CG) in seven (44%) index cases and nine (56%) had the wild-type allele (CC). Of these mutants, two (25%) were compound heterozygotes for the mutations found in intron 8 and exon 44. All patients with sensorineural hearing loss and normal-hearing individuals did not have mutations (100%). There are differences at the molecular level in patients with and without auditory neuropathy. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Distribution of Disease-Associated Copy Number Variants across Distinct Disorders of Cognitive Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pescosolido, Matthew F.; Gamsiz, Ece D.; Nagpal, Shailender; Morrow, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the present study was to discover the extent to which distinct "DSM" disorders share large, highly recurrent copy number variants (CNVs) as susceptibility factors. We also sought to identify gene mechanisms common to groups of diagnoses and/or specific to a given diagnosis based on associations with CNVs. Method:…

  5. Understanding the distinct experience of rural interprofessional collaboration in developing palliative care programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudet, A; Kelley, M L; Williams, A M

    2014-01-01

    Palliative care is one component of rural generalist practice that requires interprofessional collaboration (IPC) amongst practitioners. Previous research on developing rural palliative care has created a four-phase capacity development model that included interprofessional rural palliative care teams; however, the details of rural team dynamics had not been previously explored and defined. A growing body of literature has produced models for interprofessional collaborative practice and identified core competencies required by professionals to work within these contexts. An Ontario College of Family Physicians discussion paper identifies seven essential elements for successful IPC: responsibility and accountability, coordination, communication, cooperation, assertiveness, autonomy, and mutual trust and respect. Despite the fact that IPC may be well conceptualized in the literature, evidence to support the transferability of these elements into rural health care practice or rural palliative care practice is lacking. The purpose of this research is to bridge the knowledge gap that exists with respect to rural IPC, particularly in the context of developing rural palliative care. It examines the working operations of these teams and highlights the elements that are important to rural collaborative processes. For the purpose of this qualitative study, naturalistic and ethnographic research strategies were employed to understand the experience of rural IPC in the context of rural palliative care team development. Purposive sampling was used to recruit key informants as participants who were members of rural palliative care teams. The seven elements of interprofessional collaboration, as outline above, provided a preliminary analytic framework to begin exploring the data. Analysis progressed using a process of interpretive description to embrace new ideas and conceptualizations that emerged from the patterns and themes of the rural health providers' narratives. The

  6. Lifestyle risk factors for ulnar neuropathy and ulnar neuropathy-like symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Poul; Johnsen, Birger; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: We examined whether lifestyle factors differ between patients with ulnar neuropathy confirmed by electroneurography (ENG) and those with ulnar neuropathy-like symptoms with normal ulnar nerve ENG. Methods: Among patients examined by ENG for suspected ulnar neuropathy, we identified...... 546 patients with ulnar neuropathy and 633 patients with ulnar neuropathy-like symptoms. These groups were compared with 2 separate groups of matched community referents and to each other. Questionnaire information on lifestyle was obtained. The electrophysiological severity of neuropathy was also...

  7. Evaluation and Prevention of Diabetic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pajouhi M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetic neuropathy is an incapacitating disease that afflicts almost 50 percent of patients with diabetes. A late finding in type 1 diabetes, diabetic neuropathy can be an early finding in non insulin-dependent diabetes. Diabetic neuropathies are divided primarily into two groups, sensorimotor and autonomic. Patients may acquire only one type of diabetic neuropathy or may present with combinations of neuropathies, such as autonomic neuropathy or distal symmetric polyneuropathy, the latter of which the most common form. Motor deficits, orthostatic hypotension, silent cardiac ischemia, hyperhidrosis, vasomotor instability, gastroparesis, bladder dysfunction, and sexual dysfunction can also result from diabetic neuropathy. Strict control of blood sugar, combined with proper daily foot care, is essential to avoid the complications of this disorder. With the potential to afflict any part of the nervous system, diabetic neuropathy should be suspected in all patients with type 2 diabetes as well as patients who have had type 1 diabetes for over five years. Although some patients with diabetic neuropathy notice few symptoms, upon physical examination mild to moderately severe sensory loss may be noted by the physician. Idiopathic neuropathy has been known to precede the onset of type 2 diabetes.

  8. Prevalence, self-care behaviors, and self-care activities for peripheral neuropathy symptoms of HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Patrice K; Voss, Joachim; Wantland, Dean; Lindgren, Teri; Huang, Emily; Holzemer, William L; Cuca, Yvette; Moezzi, Shahnaz; Portillo, Carmen; Willard, Suzanne; Arudo, John; Kirksey, Kenn; Corless, Inge B; Rosa, María E; Robinson, Linda; Hamilton, Mary J; Sefcik, Elizabeth; Human, Sarie; Rivero-Mendez, Marta; Maryland, Mary; Nokes, Kathleen M; Eller, Lucille; Kemppainen, Jeanne; Dawson-Rose, Carol; Brion, John M; Bunch, Elli H; Shannon, Maureen; Nicholas, Thomas P; Viamonte-Ros, Ana; Bain, Catherine A

    2010-03-01

    As part of a larger randomized controlled trial examining the efficacy of an HIV/AIDS symptom management manual (n = 775), this study examined the prevalence of peripheral neuropathy in HIV-infected individuals at 12 sites in the USA, Puerto Rico, and Africa. Neuropathy was reported by 44% of the sample; however, only 29.4% reported initiating self-care behaviors to address the neuropathy symptoms. Antiretroviral therapy was found to increase the frequency of neuropathy symptoms, with an increased mean intensity of 28%. A principal axis factor analysis with Promax rotation was used to assess the relationships in the frequency of use of the 18 self-care activities for neuropathy, revealing three distinct factors: (i) an interactive self-care factor; (ii) a complementary medicine factor; and (iii) a third factor consisting of the negative health items of smoking, alcohol, and street drugs. The study's results suggest that peripheral neuropathy is a common symptom and the presence of neuropathy is associated with self-care behaviors to ameliorate HIV symptoms. The implications for nursing practice include the assessment and evaluation of nursing interventions related to management strategies for neuropathy.

  9. Computer aided diagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekh, Viktor; Soliz, Peter; McGrew, Elizabeth; Barriga, Simon; Burge, Mark; Luan, Shuang

    2014-03-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) refers to the nerve damage that can occur in diabetes patients. It most often affects the extremities, such as the feet, and can lead to peripheral vascular disease, deformity, infection, ulceration, and even amputation. The key to managing diabetic foot is prevention and early detection. Unfortunately, current existing diagnostic techniques are mostly based on patient sensations and exhibit significant inter- and intra-observer differences. We have developed a computer aided diagnostic (CAD) system for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The thermal response of the feet of diabetic patients following cold stimulus is captured using an infrared camera. The plantar foot in the images from a thermal video are segmented and registered for tracking points or specific regions. The temperature recovery of each point on the plantar foot is extracted using our bio-thermal model and analyzed. The regions that exhibit abnormal ability to recover are automatically identified to aid the physicians to recognize problematic areas. The key to our CAD system is the segmentation of infrared video. The main challenges for segmenting infrared video compared to normal digital video are (1) as the foot warms up, it also warms up the surrounding, creating an ever changing contrast; and (2) there may be significant motion during imaging. To overcome this, a hybrid segmentation algorithm was developed based on a number of techniques such as continuous max-flow, model based segmentation, shape preservation, convex hull, and temperature normalization. Verifications of the automatic segmentation and registration using manual segmentation and markers show good agreement.

  10. Spinal MRI of vincristine neuropathy mimicking Guillain-Barre syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yun Woo; Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Cho, Jae Min [Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Centre, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Irwon-dong, Kangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea); Sung, Ki Woong [Department of Paediatrics, Samsung Medical Centre, Seoul 135-710 (Korea)

    2003-11-01

    A 4.3-year-old girl with acute leukaemia, who was being treated with chemotherapy (including vincristine), developed paraplegia. Spinal MRI showed diffusely enhancing nerve roots on contrast-enhanced images. Spinal fluid analysis showed a normal protein level. Vincristine neuropathy mimicking Guillain-Barre syndrome is thought to be the cause of the MRI abnormalities. (orig.)

  11. Spinal MRI of vincristine neuropathy mimicking Guillain-Barre syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Yun Woo; Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Cho, Jae Min; Sung, Ki Woong

    2003-01-01

    A 4.3-year-old girl with acute leukaemia, who was being treated with chemotherapy (including vincristine), developed paraplegia. Spinal MRI showed diffusely enhancing nerve roots on contrast-enhanced images. Spinal fluid analysis showed a normal protein level. Vincristine neuropathy mimicking Guillain-Barre syndrome is thought to be the cause of the MRI abnormalities. (orig.)

  12. Development of Distinction Method of Production Area of Ginsengs by Using a Neutron Activation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Jin; Chung, Yong Sam; Sun, Gwang Min; Lee, Yu Na; Yoo, Sang Ho [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    Distinction of production area of Korean ginsengs has been tried by using neutron activation techniques such as an instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and a prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA). A distribution of elements has varied according to the part of plant clue to the difference of enrichment effect and influence from a soil where the plants have been grown. So correlation study between plants and soil has been an Issue. In this study, the distribution of trace elements within a Korean ginseng was investigated by using an instrumental neutron activation analysis

  13. Distinct roles of extracellular polymeric substances in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Hu, Yifan; Liu, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria form surface attached biofilm communities as one of the most important survival strategies in nature. Biofilms consist of water, bacterial cells and a wide range of self‐generated extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Biofilm formation is a dynamic self‐assembly process and several...... differentiation remain largely unknown. The distinct roles of different EPS have been addressed in the present report. Both Pel and Psl polysaccharides are required for type IV pilus‐independent microcolony formation in the initial stages of biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Both Pel and Psl...

  14. New Generation Antidepressants in Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Gutiérrez-Álvarez, Ángela-María; Moreno, Carlos B

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of diabetic neuropathy increases with the duration of diabetes and the degree of hyperglycaemia. Pain is one of the most common and incapacitating symptoms of diabetic neuropathy and its pharmacological control is complex. The effectiveness of antidepressive agents has been described in different types of neuropathic pain, but their effectiveness, when used as analgesics in painful diabetic neuropathy, still remains controversial. Objective: To review the possible role of new-ge...

  15. Penicillamin-induced neuropathy in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, P B; Hogenhaven, H

    1990-01-01

    A case of penicillamin-induced severe polyradiculopathy in rheumatoid arthritis is presented. The neuropathy was of demyelinating type, purely motor, proximal and clinically fully reversible when the drug ceased. In case of a progressive neuropathy, during penicillamin treatment, this adverse eff...... effect should be born in mind, and discontinuation of the drug considered.......A case of penicillamin-induced severe polyradiculopathy in rheumatoid arthritis is presented. The neuropathy was of demyelinating type, purely motor, proximal and clinically fully reversible when the drug ceased. In case of a progressive neuropathy, during penicillamin treatment, this adverse...

  16. Imaging of neuropathies about the hip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinoli, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.martinoli@unige.it [Radiologia – DISC, Università di Genova, Largo Rosanna Benzi 8, I-16132 Genoa (Italy); Miguel-Perez, Maribel [Unit of Human Anatomy and Embryology, Department of Pathology and Experimental Therapy, Faculty of Medicine (C Bellvitge), University of Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Padua, Luca [Fondazione Don Gnocchi Onlus and Department of Neurology, Policlinico “A. Gemelli”, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome (Italy); Gandolfo, Nicola [IM2S – Institut Monégasque de Médecine and Chirurgie Sportive, Montecarlo (Monaco); Zicca, Anna [Radiologia – DISC, Università di Genova, Largo Rosanna Benzi 8, I-16132 Genoa (Italy); Tagliafico, Alberto [Radiologia – National Institute for Cancer Research, Genoa (Italy)

    2013-01-15

    Neuropathies about the hip may be cause of chronic pain and disability. In most cases, these conditions derive from mechanical or dynamic compression of a segment of a nerve within a narrow osteofibrous tunnel, an opening in a fibrous structure, or a passageway close to a ligament or a muscle. Although the evaluation of nerve disorders primarily relies on neurological examination and electrophysiology, diagnostic imaging is currently used as a complement to help define the site and aetiology of nerve compression and exclude other disease possibly underlying the patient’ symptoms. Diagnosis of entrapment neuropathies about the hip with US and MR imaging requires an in-depth knowledge of the normal imaging anatomy and awareness of the anatomic and pathologic factors that may predispose or cause a nerve injury. Accordingly, the aim of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of hip neuropathies with an emphasis on the relevant anatomy, aetiology, clinical presentation, and their imaging appearance. The lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathy (meiralgia paresthetica), femoral neuropathy, sciatic neuropathy, obturator neuropathy, superior and inferior gluteal neuropathies and pudendal neuropathy will be discussed.

  17. Vasculitic neuropathy following exposure to minocycline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratta, John M; Dyck, P James B; Brand, Patricio; Thaisetthawatkul, Pariwat; Dyck, Peter J; Engelstad, JaNean K; Goodman, Brent; Karam, Chafic

    2016-02-01

    To report 3 patients with minocycline-induced autoimmunity resulting in peripheral nerve vasculitis. We report 3 patients who, during minocycline treatment for acne vulgaris, developed subacute onset of pain and weakness caused by vasculitis in single and multiple mononeuropathy patterns. Each patient underwent either a nerve or muscle biopsy that confirmed vasculitis. One patient additionally developed systemic symptoms (including fever, fatigue, and night sweats) and another had a posterior circulation stroke. Symptoms developed with either early or prolonged use of minocycline. Despite withdrawal of minocycline, patients needed long-term immunotherapy to gain neurologic improvement. Our findings suggest that the typical neuropathy associated with minocycline use is painful single or multiple mononeuropathy due to peripheral nerve vasculitis, which may also be accompanied by presumed CNS vasculitis (presenting as stroke).

  18. Familial childhood onset neuropathy and cirrhosis with the 4977bp mitochondrial DNA deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, D G M; McMenamin, J B; Farrell, M A; Droogan, O; Green, A J

    2002-08-01

    The common 4977 base pair mitochondrial deletion has been identified in association with a number of distinct clinical phenotypes. These include the Kearns-Sayre syndrome, the Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome, and chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia. We report the clinical and pathological findings in two siblings in whom the 4977 base pair mitochondrial DNA deletion was identified in muscle-derived mitochondrial DNA. One sibling manifested early onset liver and renal failure, and both developed prominent peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy. These clinical findings have not been previously described in association with the 4977bp mtDNA deletion and thus represent a further expansion of the spectrum of mitochondrial disease. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Neuropathies in the setting of Neurofibromatosis tumor syndromes: Complexities and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Alexander; Grafe, Peter; Hagel, Christian; Bäumer, Philipp; Morrison, Helen; Mautner, Victor-Felix; Farschtschi, Said

    2018-01-01

    The term 'Neurofibromatosis' (NF) comprises a group of rare diseases with related clinical presentations but distinct genetic conditions. All currently known types - NF1, NF2 and Schwannomatosis - predispose afflicted individuals to the development of glial cell-derived (gliogenic) tumors. Furthermore, the occurrence of neuropathic symptoms, which add to the overall neurologic disability of patients, has been described in all disease entities. We show that neuropathic symptoms are a common and clinically important, yet infrequently studied feature in the NF spectrum. However, the clinical relevance and respective underlying pathogenesis, varies greatly among the different NF types. In this review, we summarize and interpret the latest basic research findings, as well as clinical observations, in respect of Neurofibromatosis-associated neuropathies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Acute Fulminant Uremic Neuropathy Following Coronary Angiography Mimicking Guillain?Barre Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Priti, Kumari; Ranwa, Bhanwar

    2017-01-01

    A 55-year-old diabetic woman suffered a posterior wall ST-elevation myocardial infarction. She developed contrast-induced nephropathy following coronary angiography. Acute fulminant uremic neuropathy was precipitated which initially mimicked Guillan?Barre Syndrome, hence reported.

  1. Acute Fulminant Uremic Neuropathy Following Coronary Angiography Mimicking Guillain-Barre Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priti, Kumari; Ranwa, Bhanwar

    2017-01-01

    A 55-year-old diabetic woman suffered a posterior wall ST-elevation myocardial infarction. She developed contrast-induced nephropathy following coronary angiography. Acute fulminant uremic neuropathy was precipitated which initially mimicked Guillan-Barre Syndrome, hence reported.

  2. [Diabetic neuropathy: therapeutic nihilism is no longer acceptable].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslbeck, Manfred

    2007-05-21

    The repeatedly expressed doubts about the value of an effective therapy for diabetic neuropathies are no longer acceptable. Today a number of excellent longitudinal and cross-sectional studies, i.e. DCCT, Steno 2, DCCT/EDIC, European Diabetes Prospective Complications Study, are available. The attending physician should make every effort to diagnose diabetic neuropathies as soon as possible with all their multivarious manifestations. Treatment must be promptly, aggressively and multifactorially as described in evidence-based guidelines. In principle, the same risk factors apply to neuropathy in type 1 and type 2 diabetes as for macro-angiopathy and microangiopathy. Therapy focuses on establishing near-normal diabetes and blood pressure control, lipid management, intensive patient education, avoidance of exogenous noxae such as alcohol and nicotine and if necessary, an effective therapy of neuropathic pain. The objective of all diagnostic and preventive efforts must be always to avoid the development of the diabetic neuropathic foot syndrome, which is the most important end stage of somatic and autonomic diabetic neuropathy.

  3. Acute Motor Axonal Neuropathy in Association with Hepatitis E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araz Al-Saffar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS is an acute peripheral neuropathy that develops as a result of post-infectious immune-mediated nerve injury. It can be classified into classic and variant GBS. Acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN is a subtype of GBS with the key clinical features of pure motor weakness, areflexia, absence of sensory symptoms, and lack of neurophysiologic evidence of demyelination. We reported a case of acute motor axonal neuropathy in association with hepatitis E infection. A young woman was referred to us after a period of nausea, fever, and diarrhea. She had unexplained muscle weakness at admission and has been diagnosed with acute hepatitis E infection. A rigorous clinical neurological assessment revealed bilateral symmetrical weakness, which affects the lower limbs more than the upper limbs, with no evidence of sensory involvement. Neurophysiological measurements indicated acute axonal injury without clues to demyelination. A diagnosis of acute motor axonal neuropathy subtype has been made, to which she only received supportive therapy. The symptoms resolved spontaneously and full recovery of motor function was attained after 35 days of weakness onset with complete normalization of neurophysiologic parameters.

  4. Uncovering sensory axonal dysfunction in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic neuropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Ying Sung

    Full Text Available This study investigated sensory and motor nerve excitability properties to elucidate the development of diabetic neuropathy. A total of 109 type 2 diabetes patients were recruited, and 106 were analyzed. According to neuropathy severity, patients were categorized into G0, G1, and G2+3 groups using the total neuropathy score-reduced (TNSr. Patients in the G0 group were asymptomatic and had a TNSr score of 0. Sensory and motor nerve excitability data from diabetic patients were compared with data from 33 healthy controls. Clinical assessment, nerve conduction studies, and sensory and motor nerve excitability testing data were analyzed to determine axonal dysfunction in diabetic neuropathy. In the G0 group, sensory excitability testing revealed increased stimulus for the 50% sensory nerve action potential (P<0.05, shortened strength-duration time constant (P<0.01, increased superexcitability (P<0.01, decreased subexcitability (P<0.05, decreased accommodation to depolarizing current (P<0.01, and a trend of decreased accommodation to hyperpolarizing current in threshold electrotonus. All the changes progressed into G1 (TNSr 1-8 and G2+3 (TNSr 9-24 groups. In contrast, motor excitability only had significantly increased stimulus for the 50% compound motor nerve action potential (P<0.01 in the G0 group. This study revealed that the development of axonal dysfunction in sensory axons occurred prior to and in a different fashion from motor axons. Additionally, sensory nerve excitability tests can detect axonal dysfunction even in asymptomatic patients. These insights further our understanding of diabetic neuropathy and enable the early detection of sensory axonal abnormalities, which may provide a basis for neuroprotective therapeutic approaches.

  5. Development of soft magnetic amorphous alloys with distinctly high Fe content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, PingBo; Wang, AnDing; Zhao, ChengLiang; He, AiNa; Wang, Gang; Chang, ChunTao; Wang, XinMin; Liu, Chain-Tsuan

    2017-10-01

    This paper reports on the preparation of Fe82.7-85.7Si2-4.9B9.2-11.2P1.5-2.7C0.8 soft magnetic amorphous alloys with a distinctly high Fe content of 93.5-95.5 wt.% by component design and composition adjustment. All alloys can be readily fabricated into completely amorphous ribbon samples with good surface quality by the single copper roller melt-spinning method. These alloys show good bending ductility and excellent magnetic properties after annealing, i.e., low coercivity ( H c) of 3.3-5.9 A/m, high permeability ( μ e) of 5000-10000 and high flux saturation density ( B s) of 1.63-1.66 T. The mechanism of the good glass forming ability (GFA) and soft-magnetic properties are explored. The amorphous alloys with the high Fe content comparable to that of the desired high Si alloy can be promising candidates for the potential application in electric devices.

  6. Testing for autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1984-01-01

    of the disease, and may be nonspecific. A number of recently developed quantifiable and reproducible autonomic nerve function tests are reviewed, with emphasis on the physiological basis of the tests and on practical applicability. Finally, diagnostic criteria, based on autonomic nerve function tests...

  7. Sensory neuropathy in two Border collie puppies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeersch, K; Van Ham, L; Braund, K G; Bhatti, S; Tshamala, M; Chiers, K; Schrauwen, E

    2005-06-01

    A peripheral sensory neuropathy was diagnosed in two Border collie puppies. Neurological, electrophysiological and histopathological examinations suggested a purely sensory neuropathy with mainly distal involvement. Urinary incontinence was observed in one of the puppies and histological examination of the vagus nerve revealed degenerative changes. An inherited disorder was suspected.

  8. Penicillamin-induced neuropathy in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, P B; Hogenhaven, H

    1990-01-01

    A case of penicillamin-induced severe polyradiculopathy in rheumatoid arthritis is presented. The neuropathy was of demyelinating type, purely motor, proximal and clinically fully reversible when the drug ceased. In case of a progressive neuropathy, during penicillamin treatment, this adverse...

  9. Dietary reversal of neuropathy in a murine model of prediabetes and metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy M. Hinder

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Patients with metabolic syndrome, which is defined as obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT, can develop the same macro- and microvascular complications as patients with type 2 diabetes, including peripheral neuropathy. In type 2 diabetes, glycemic control has little effect on the development and progression of peripheral neuropathy, suggesting that other metabolic syndrome components may contribute to the presence of neuropathy. A parallel phenomenon is observed in patients with prediabetes and metabolic syndrome, where improvement in weight and dyslipidemia more closely correlates with restoration of nerve function than improvement in glycemic status. The goal of the current study was to develop a murine model that resembles the human condition. We examined longitudinal parameters of metabolic syndrome and neuropathy development in six mouse strains/genotypes (BKS-wt, BKS-Leprdb/+, B6-wt, B6-Leprdb/+, BTBR-wt, and BTBR-Lepob/+ fed a 54% high-fat diet (HFD; from lard. All mice fed a HFD developed large-fiber neuropathy and IGT. Changes appeared early and consistently in B6-wt mice, and paralleled the onset of neuropathy. At 36 weeks, B6-wt mice displayed all components of the metabolic syndrome, including obesity, IGT, hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia and oxidized low density lipoproteins (oxLDLs. Dietary reversal, whereby B6-wt mice fed a HFD from 4-20 weeks of age were switched to standard chow for 4 weeks, completely normalized neuropathy, promoted weight loss, improved insulin sensitivity, and restored LDL cholesterol and oxLDL by 50% compared with levels in HFD control mice. This dietary reversal model provides the basis for mechanistic studies investigating peripheral nerve damage in the setting of metabolic syndrome, and ultimately the development of mechanism-based therapies for neuropathy.

  10. MR imaging of trigeminal neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Si Yeon; Yoon, Pyeong Ho; Chung, Jin Il; Lee, Seung Ik; Kim, Dong Ik [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the largest of the cranial nerves and has both sensory and motor functions. It can be divided into proximal (brainstem, preganglionic, gasserian ganglion, and cavernous sinus) and distal (extracranial opthalmic, maxillary, and mandibular) segments. Patients with trigeminal neuropathy present with a wide variety of symptoms, and lesions producing those symptoms may occur anywhere along the protracted course of the trigeminal nerve, from its distal facial branches to its nuclear columns in the brainstem. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the normal anatomy of the trigeminal nerve and associated various pathologic conditions. These are arranged anatomically according to their site of interaction with it.

  11. The role of aberrant mitochondrial bioenergetics in diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Subir K Roy; Smith, Darrell R; Fernyhough, Paul

    2013-03-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a neurological complication of diabetes that causes significant morbidity and, because of the obesity-driven rise in incidence of type 2 diabetes, is becoming a major international health problem. Mitochondrial phenotype is abnormal in sensory neurons in diabetes and may contribute to the etiology of diabetic neuropathy where a distal dying-back neurodegenerative process is a key component contributing to fiber loss. This review summarizes the major features of mitochondrial dysfunction in neurons and Schwann cells in human diabetic patients and in experimental animal models (primarily exhibiting type 1 diabetes). This article attempts to relate these findings to the development of critical neuropathological hallmarks of the disease. Recent work reveals that hyperglycemia in diabetes triggers nutrient excess in neurons that, in turn, mediates a phenotypic change in mitochondrial biology through alteration of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) signaling axis. This vital energy sensing metabolic pathway modulates mitochondrial function, biogenesis and regeneration. The bioenergetic phenotype of mitochondria in diabetic neurons is aberrant due to deleterious alterations in expression and activity of respiratory chain components as a direct consequence of abnormal AMPK/PGC-1α signaling. Utilization of innovative respirometry equipment to analyze mitochondrial function of cultured adult sensory neurons from diabetic rodents shows that the outcome for cellular bioenergetics is a reduced adaptability to fluctuations in ATP demand. The diabetes-induced maladaptive process is hypothesized to result in exhaustion of the ATP supply in the distal nerve compartment and induction of nerve fiber dissolution. The role of mitochondrial dysfunction in the etiology of diabetic neuropathy is compared with other types of neuropathy with a distal dying-back pathology such as Friedreich

  12. Distinctive Roles of Canonical and Noncanonical Wnt Signaling in Human Embryonic Cardiomyocyte Development

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    Silvia Mazzotta

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Wnt signaling is a key regulator of vertebrate heart development; however, specific roles for human cardiomyocyte development remain uncertain. Here we use human embryonic stem cells (hESCs to analyze systematically in human cardiomyocyte development the expression of endogenous Wnt signaling components, monitor pathway activity, and dissect stage-specific requirements for canonical and noncanonical Wnt signaling mechanisms using small-molecule inhibitors. Our analysis suggests that WNT3 and WNT8A, via FZD7 and canonical signaling, regulate BRACHYURY expression and mesoderm induction; that WNT5A/5B, via ROR2 and noncanonical signaling, regulate MESP1 expression and cardiovascular development; and that later in development WNT2, WNT5A/5B, and WNT11, via FZD4 and FZD6, regulate functional cardiomyocyte differentiation via noncanonical Wnt signaling. Our findings confirm in human development previously proposed roles for canonical Wnt signaling in sequential stages of vertebrate cardiomyogenesis, and identify more precise roles for noncanonical signaling and for individual Wnt signal and Wnt receptor genes in human cardiomyocyte development.

  13. Structurally distinct polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons induce differential transcriptional responses in developing zebrafish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodale, Britton C.; Tilton, Susan C.; Corvi, Margaret M.; Wilson, Glenn R.; Janszen, Derek B.; Anderson, Kim A.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    changes induced by developmental exposure to PAHs • Determined PAH body burdens following developmental exposure • Genes uniquely induced by benz(a)anthracene included targets of the AHR and RELA • Dibenzothiophene and pyrene perturbed a distinct RELA network • Transcriptional networks reveal differential mechanisms of PAH toxicity

  14. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy: Risk factors, diagnosis and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Serhiyenko, Victoria A; Serhiyenko, Alexandr A

    2018-01-01

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) that is strongly associated with approximately five-fold increased risk of cardiovascular mortality. CAN manifests in a spectrum of things, ranging from resting tachycardia and fixed heart rate (HR) to development of “silent” myocardial infarction. Clinical correlates or risk markers for CAN are age, DM duration, glycemic control, hypertension, and dyslipidemia (DLP), development of other microvascular comp...

  15. The Caucasian Triangle (Georgia, Azerbaijan, Armenia – Tourism Development and Threats to General and Distinctive Interests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nino Roistomashvili

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The Caucasus triangle is one of the most interesting regions in the world firstly, with its geo-political location and also being a part of post-social space. These involve a number of factors determining existence and development of these three states. The world order today from economic and political point of view require readiness from certain states for establishing themselves in this big space. It especially concerns developing and semi-developed countries and the countries having less experience of being a state, which in fact are in the process of creating the institutes which will determine their independence and co-existence with the democratic world having more experience in this respect.Study on the Caucasus triangle arises great interest. The actuality of this issue is also determined by the political and economic dynamic changes taking place inside these states (evolution of Soviet space. Their political choice is determined by the less-stable environment and weakness of state, political partners and political and economic interests generally and towards one another. Unpredictable situation within the triangle is more important as it is a live process with new and changeable threats. For this reason it is very interesting for the scientists to study the development of this kind of countries. Ambition of these countries to establish themselves in the field of tourism is very important for us and that is why it is necessary to follow the process in dynamics, analyze and evaluate their development in this respect.

  16. Autonomic neuropathy in diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto eVerrotti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN is a serious and common complication of diabetes, often overlooked and misdiagnosed. It is a systemic-wide disorder that may be asymptomatic in the early stages. The most studied and clinically important form of DAN is cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN defined as the impairment of autonomic control of the cardiovascular system in patients with diabetes after exclusion of other causes. The reported prevalence of DAN varies widely depending on inconsistent definition, different diagnostic method, different patient cohorts studied. The pathogenesis is still unclear and probably multifactorial. Once DAN becomes clinically evident, no form of therapy has been identified which can effectively stop or reverse it. Prevention strategies are based on strict glycemic control with intensive insulin treatment, multifactorial intervention and lifestyle modification including control of hypertension, dyslipidemia, stop smoking, weight loss and adequate physical exercise. The present review summarizes the latest knowledge regarding clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathogenesis and management of DAN, with some mention to childhood and adolescent population.

  17. Distinct functional and temporal requirements for zebrafish Hdac1 during neural crest-derived craniofacial and peripheral neuron development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myron S Ignatius

    Full Text Available The regulation of gene expression is accomplished by both genetic and epigenetic means and is required for the precise control of the development of the neural crest. In hdac1(b382 mutants, craniofacial cartilage development is defective in two distinct ways. First, fewer hoxb3a, dlx2 and dlx3-expressing posterior branchial arch precursors are specified and many of those that are consequently undergo apoptosis. Second, in contrast, normal numbers of progenitors are present in the anterior mandibular and hyoid arches, but chondrocyte precursors fail to terminally differentiate. In the peripheral nervous system, there is a disruption of enteric, DRG and sympathetic neuron differentiation in hdac1(b382 mutants compared to wildtype embryos. Specifically, enteric and DRG-precursors differentiate into neurons in the anterior gut and trunk respectively, while enteric and DRG neurons are rarely present in the posterior gut and tail. Sympathetic neuron precursors are specified in hdac1(b382 mutants and they undergo generic neuronal differentiation but fail to undergo noradrenergic differentiation. Using the HDAC inhibitor TSA, we isolated enzyme activity and temporal requirements for HDAC function that reproduce hdac1(b382 defects in craniofacial and sympathetic neuron development. Our study reveals distinct functional and temporal requirements for zebrafish hdac1 during neural crest-derived craniofacial and peripheral neuron development.

  18. Functional groups show distinct differences in nitrogen cycling during early stand development: implications for forest management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doug P. Aubrey; David R. Coyle; Mark D. Coleman

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Nutrient acquisition of forest stands is controlled by soil resource availability and belowground production, but tree species are rarely compared in this regard. Here, we examine ecological and management implications of nitrogen (N) dynamics during early forest stand development in productive commercial tree species with narrow (Populus...

  19. Regulators of the proteasome pathway, Uch37 and Rpn13, play distinct roles in mouse development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Al-Shami

    Full Text Available Rpn13 is a novel mammalian proteasomal receptor that has recently been identified as an amplification target in ovarian cancer. It can interact with ubiquitin and activate the deubiquitinating enzyme Uch37 at the 26S proteasome. Since neither Rpn13 nor Uch37 is an integral proteasomal subunit, we explored whether either protein is essential for mammalian development and survival. Deletion of Uch37 resulted in prenatal lethality in mice associated with severe defect in embryonic brain development. In contrast, the majority of Rpn13-deficient mice survived to adulthood, although they were smaller at birth and fewer in number than wild-type littermates. Absence of Rpn13 produced tissue-specific effects on proteasomal function: increased proteasome activity in adrenal gland and lymphoid organs, and decreased activity in testes and brain. Adult Rpn13(-/- mice reached normal body weight but had increased body fat content and were infertile due to defective gametogenesis. Additionally, Rpn13(-/- mice showed increased T-cell numbers, resembling growth hormone-mediated effects. Indeed, serum growth hormone and follicular stimulating hormone levels were significantly increased in Rpn13(-/- mice, while growth hormone receptor expression was reduced in the testes. In conclusion, this is the first report characterizing the physiological roles of Uch37 and Rpn13 in murine development and implicating a non-ATPase proteasomal protein, Rpn13, in the process of gametogenesis.

  20. Waardenburg syndrome: a rare cause of inherited neuropathy due to SOX10 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanova-Mihaylova, Petya; Alexander, Michael D; Murphy, Raymond P J; Murphy, Sinéad M

    2017-09-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare disorder comprising sensorineural deafness and pigmentation abnormalities. Four distinct subtypes are defined based on the presence or absence of additional symptoms. Mutations in six genes have been described in WS. SOX10 mutations are usually associated with a more severe phenotype of WS with peripheral demyelinating neuropathy, central dysmyelinating leukodystrophy, and Hirschsprung disease. Here we report a 32-year-old man with a novel heterozygous missense variant in SOX10 gene, who presented with congenital deafness, Hirschsprung disease, iris heterochromia, foot deformity, and intermediate conduction velocity length-dependent sensorimotor neuropathy. This case highlights that the presence of other non-neuropathic features in a patient with presumed hereditary neuropathy should alert the clinician to possible atypical rare causes. © 2017 Peripheral Nerve Society.

  1. Functional groups show distinct differences in nitrogen cycling during early stand development: implications for forest management.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubrey, Doug, P.; Coyle, David, R. Coleman, Mark, D.

    2011-08-26

    Nutrient acquisition of forest stands is controlled by soil resource availability and belowground production, but tree species are rarely compared in this regard. Here, we examine ecological and management implications of nitrogen (N) dynamics during early forest stand development in productive commercial tree species with narrow (Populus deltoides Bartr. and Platanus occidentalis L.) and broad (Liquidambar styraciflua L. and Pinus taeda L.) site requirements while grown with a range of nutrient and water resources. We constructed N budgets by measuring N concentration ([N]) and N content (N{sub C}) of above- and belowground perennial and ephemeral tissues, determined N uptake (N{sub UP}), and calculated N use efficiency (NUE). Forest stands regulated [N] within species-specific operating ranges without clear temporal or treatment patterns, thus demonstrating equilibrium between tissue [N] and biomass accumulation. Forest stand N{sub C} and N{sub UP} increased with stand development and paralleled treatment patterns of biomass accumulation, suggesting productivity is tightly linked to N{sub UP}. Inclusion of above- and belowground ephemeral tissue turnover in N{sub UP} calculations demonstrated that maximum N demand for narrow-sites adapted species exceeded 200 kg N ha{sup -1} year{sup -1} while demand for broad-site adapted species was below this level. NUE was species dependent but not consistently influenced by N availability, suggesting relationships between NUE and resource availability were species dependent. Based on early stand development, species with broad site adaptability are favored for woody cropping systems because they maintain high above- and belowground productivity with minimal fertilization requirements due to higher NUE than narrow site adapted species.

  2. A Spatially Distinct History of the Development of California Groundfish Fisheries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Rebecca R.; Field, John C.; Santora, Jarrod A.; Schroeder, Isaac D.; Huff, David D.; Key, Meisha; Pearson, Don E.; MacCall, Alec D.

    2014-01-01

    During the past century, commercial fisheries have expanded from small vessels fishing in shallow, coastal habitats to a broad suite of vessels and gears that fish virtually every marine habitat on the globe. Understanding how fisheries have developed in space and time is critical for interpreting and managing the response of ecosystems to the effects of fishing, however time series of spatially explicit data are typically rare. Recently, the 1933–1968 portion of the commercial catch dataset from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife was recovered and digitized, completing the full historical series for both commercial and recreational datasets from 1933–2010. These unique datasets include landing estimates at a coarse 10 by 10 minute “grid-block” spatial resolution and extends the entire length of coastal California up to 180 kilometers from shore. In this study, we focus on the catch history of groundfish which were mapped for each grid-block using the year at 50% cumulative catch and total historical catch per habitat area. We then constructed generalized linear models to quantify the relationship between spatiotemporal trends in groundfish catches, distance from ports, depth, percentage of days with wind speed over 15 knots, SST and ocean productivity. Our results indicate that over the history of these fisheries, catches have taken place in increasingly deeper habitat, at a greater distance from ports, and in increasingly inclement weather conditions. Understanding spatial development of groundfish fisheries and catches in California are critical for improving population models and for evaluating whether implicit stock assessment model assumptions of relative homogeneity of fisheries removals over time and space are reasonable. This newly reconstructed catch dataset and analysis provides a comprehensive appreciation for the development of groundfish fisheries with respect to commonly assumed trends of global fisheries patterns that are

  3. Epidemiology of Peripheral Neuropathy: An Indian Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Sweety; Pandit, Alak; Ganguly, Goutam; Das, Shyamal Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy (PN) is a common disorder and presents as diagnostic and therapeutic challenge to physicians and neurologists. In epidemiological studies from India from various regions the overall prevalence of PN varied from 5 to 2400 per 10,000 population in various community studies. India is composed of a multiethnic, multicultural population who are exposed to different adverse environmental factors such as arsenic and lead. Use of different chemotherapeutic agents with propensity to affect peripheral nerves, increasing methods of diagnosis of connective tissue disorders and use of immunomodulating drugs, growing aging population is expected to change the spectrum and burden of peripheral neuropathy in the community. The other important aspect of peripheral neuropathies is in terms of the geographical and occupational distribution especially of toxic neuropathies like arsenic which is common in eastern belt; lead, mercury and organo-phosphorous compounds where occupational exposures are major sources. Inflammatory neuropathies either due to vasculitis or G B Syndrome, chronic inflammatory polyradiculopathies are another major group of neuropathies which is increasing due to increase longevity of Indian subjects and immunological impairment, also adds to morbidity of the patients and are potentially treatable. Leprous neuropathy is common in India and although its frequency is significantly decreasing because of national control program yet pure neuritic form still remains a cause of concern and similar is the case with another infective cause like diptheric neurpathy. Thus this article is an attempt to cover major categories and also highlight the areas where further studies are needed.

  4. Two Distinct Pathways to Development of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Vulva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Y.; Enomoto, T.; Kimura, T.; Yoshino, K.; Fujita, M.; Kimura, T.

    2011-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) accounts for approximately 95% of the malignant tumors of the vaginal vulva and is mostly found in elderly women. The future numbers of patients with vulva r SCC is expected to rise, mainly because of the proportional increase in the average age of the general population. Two different pathways for vulva r SCC have been put forth. The first pathway is triggered by infection with a high-risk-type Human Papillomavirus (HPV). Integration of the HPV DNA into the host genome leads to the development of a typical vulva r intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN), accompanied with overexpression ofP14 A RF and P16 I NK4A . This lesion subsequently forms a warty- or basaloid-type SCC. The HPV vaccine is a promising new tool for prevention of this HPV related SCC of the vulva. The second pathway is HPV-independent. Keratinizing SCC develops within a background of lichen sclerosus (LS) through a differentiated VIN. It has a different set of genetic alterations than those in the first pathway, including p53 mutations, allelic imbalances (AI), and microsatellite instability (MSI). Further clinical and basic research is still required to understand and prevent vulvar SCC. Capsule. Two pathway for pathogenesis of squamous cell carcinoma of the value are reviewed.

  5. Immunocytochemical distinction between primary and secondary granule formation in developing human neutrophils: correlations with Romanowsky stains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pryzwansky, K.B.; Rausch, P.G.; Spitznagel, J.K.; Herion, J.C.

    1979-02-01

    Electron-microscopic studies with peroxidase cytochemistry have shown that primary (azurophilic) granules in human neutrophils are synthesized in promyelocytes, while secondary (specific) granules are formed in myelocytes. However, these studies were limited by the lack of specific markers for secondary granules and by the inability to make direct comparisons of electron-microscopic morphology with the light-microscopic appearance of the same cell. Thus secondary granules cannot be identified reliably and the relevance of these findings to the light-microscopic interpretation of clinical bone marrow specimens cannot be evaluated. To circumvent these problems, we developed a method to permit immunofluorescent demonstration of primary and secondary granule markers in cells stained with Romanowsky agents. Normal human marrow cells were stained with May-Gruenwald-Giemsa and photographed. The slides were decolorized in buffered glycerine and saline for 24 hr and then stained with fluorescein- and rhodamine-conjugated monospecific antisera to human granulocyte myeloperoxidase, cathepsin G, elastas, lysozyme, and lactoferrin. The same cells were then located and examined for conjugate binding. Double stains with fluorescein- and rhodamine-labeled antisera offered the additional advantage of simultaneous identification of primary and secondary granules. This approach confirmed the partition of primary and secondary granule proteins and related their appearance to the maturation of developing neutrophils in normal human bone marrow.

  6. The developing schistosome worms elicit distinct immune responses in different tissue regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliam, Hamish E G; Driguez, Patrick; Piedrafita, David; Maupin, Kevin A; Haab, Brian B; McManus, Donald P; Meeusen, Els N T

    2013-08-01

    Schistosome parasites follow a complex migration path through various tissues, changing their antigenic profile as they develop. A thorough understanding of the antibody response in each tissue region could help unravel the complex immunology of these developing parasites and aid vaccine design. Here we used a novel strategy for analysing the local antibody responses induced by Schistosoma japonicum infection at each site of infection. Cells from rat lymph nodes draining the sites of larval migration (the skin and lungs), the liver-lymph nodes where adults reside and the spleens were cultured to allow the in vivo-induced antibody-secreting cells to release antibody into the media. The amount and isotype of antibodies secreted in the supernatants differed significantly in the different lymph nodes and spleen, corresponding with the migration path of the schistosome worms. In addition, there were significant differences in binding specificity, as determined by surface labelling, western blots and by screening a glycan array. Through capturing the local antibody response, this study has revealed dramatic differences in the quality and specificity of the immune response at different tissue sites, and highlighted the existence of stage-specific protein and carbohydrate antigens. This will provide a valuable tool for the isolation of novel vaccine targets against the larval stages of schistosomes.

  7. Two Distinct Pathways to Development of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Vulva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Ueda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC accounts for approximately 95% of the malignant tumors of the vaginal vulva and is mostly found in elderly women. The future numbers of patients with vulvar SCC is expected to rise, mainly because of the proportional increase in the average age of the general population. Two different pathways for vulvar SCC have been put forth. The first pathway is triggered by infection with a high-risk-type Human Papillomavirus (HPV. Integration of the HPV DNA into the host genome leads to the development of a typical vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN, accompanied with overexpression of p14ARF and p16INK4A. This lesion subsequently forms a warty- or basaloid-type SCC. The HPV vaccine is a promising new tool for prevention of this HPV related SCC of the vulva. The second pathway is HPV-independent. Keratinizing SCC develops within a background of lichen sclerosus (LS through a differentiated VIN. It has a different set of genetic alterations than those in the first pathway, including p53 mutations, allelic imbalances (AI, and microsatellite instability (MSI. Further clinical and basic research is still required to understand and prevent vulvar SCC. Capsule. Two pathway for pathogenesis of squamous cell carcinoma of the value are reviewed.

  8. Distinct development of the trigeminal sensory nuclei in platypus and echidna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwell, Ken W S; Hardman, Craig D

    2012-01-01

    Both lineages of the modern monotremes have been reported to be capable of electroreception using the trigeminal pathways and it has been argued that electroreception arose in an aquatic platypus-like ancestor of both modern monotreme groups. On the other hand, the trigeminal sensory nuclear complex of the platypus is highly modified for processing tactile and electrosensory information from the bill, whereas the trigeminal sensory nuclear complex of the short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus) is not particularly specialized. If the common ancestor for both platypus and echidna were an electroreceptively and trigeminally specialized aquatic feeder, one would expect the early stages of development of the trigeminal sensory nuclei in both species to show evidence of structural specialization from the outset. To determine whether this is the case, we examined the development of the trigeminal sensory nuclei in the platypus and short-beaked echidna using the Hill and Hubrecht embryological collections. We found that the highly specialized features of the platypus trigeminal sensory nuclei (i.e. the large size of the principal nucleus and oral part of the spinal trigeminal nuclear complex, and the presence of a dorsolateral parvicellular segment in the principal nucleus) appear around the time of hatching in the platypus, but are never seen at any stage in the echidna. Our findings support the proposition that the modern echidna and platypus are derived from a common ancestor with only minimal trigeminal specialization and that the peculiar anatomy of the trigeminal sensory nuclei in the modern platypus emerged in the ornithorhynchids after divergence from the tachyglossids. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. The development of grammatical case distinctions in the use of personal pronouns by Spanish-speaking preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R T

    1998-04-01

    Data on personal pronoun development in Spanish-speaking children was obtained in this study. Forty monolingual Puerto Rican Spanish-speaking children between the ages of 2;0 and 3;11 participated in the investigation. Two tasks were designed to obligate production of nominative and object pronouns in both reflexive and non-reflexive forms. Productive use and error analysis data were obtained and compared to previous data on pronoun development in English. By contrast with the order of productive use of grammatical case distinctions reported in the literature for English-speaking children, the children in the present study demonstrated a pattern in which nominative pronoun use preceded object case use. Implications of these findings for developmental theories that have been presented to explain pronoun development are discussed.

  10. Cranial Neuropathy in Multiple Sclerosis

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    Mine Hayriye Sorgun

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: It has been reported that cranial neuropathy findings could be seen in the neurologic examination of multiple sclerosis (MS patients, although brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI may not reveal any lesion responsible for the cranial nerve involvement. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of brainstem and cranial nerve involvement, except for olfactory and optic nerves, during MS attacks, and to investigate the rate of an available explanation for the cranial neuropathy findings by lesion localization on brain MRI. METHODS: Ninety-five attacks of 86 MS patients were included in the study. The patients underwent a complete neurological examination, and cranial nerve palsies (CNP were determined during MS attacks. RESULTS: CNP were found as follows: 3rd CNP in 7 (7.4%, 4th CNP in 1 (1.1%, 5th CNP in 6 (6.3%, 6th CNP in 12 (12.6%, 7th CNP in 5 (5.3%, 8th CNP in 4 (4.2%, and 9th and 10th CNP in 2 (2.1% out of 95 attacks. Internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO was detected in 5 (5.4%, nystagmus in 37 (38.9%, vertigo in 9 (6.3%, and diplopia in 14 (14.7% out of 95 attacks. Pons, mesencephalon and bulbus lesions were detected in 58.7%, 41.5% and 21.1% of the patients, respectively, on the brain MRI. Cranial nerve palsy findings could not be explained by the localization of the lesions on brainstem MRI in 5 attacks; 2 of them were 3rd CNP (1 with INO, 2 were 6th CNP and 1 was a combination of 6th, 7th and 8th CNP. CONCLUSION: The most frequently affected cranial nerve and brainstem region in MS patients is the 6th cranial nerve and pons, respectively. A few of the MS patients have normal brainstem MRI, although they have cranial neuropathy findings in the neurologic examination.

  11. Cranial Neuropathy in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mine Hayriye Sorgun

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: It has been reported that cranial neuropathy findings could be seen in the neurologic examination of multiple sclerosis (MS patients, although brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI may not reveal any lesion responsible for the cranial nerve involvement. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of brainstem and cranial nerve involvement, except for olfactory and optic nerves, during MS attacks, and to investigate the rate of an available explanation for the cranial neuropathy findings by lesion localization on brain MRI. METHODS: Ninety-five attacks of 86 MS patients were included in the study. The patients underwent a complete neurological examination, and cranial nerve palsies (CNP were determined during MS attacks. RESULTS: CNP were found as follows: 3rd CNP in 7 (7.4%, 4th CNP in 1 (1.1%, 5th CNP in 6 (6.3%, 6th CNP in 12 (12.6%, 7th CNP in 5 (5.3%, 8th CNP in 4 (4.2%, and 9th and 10th CNP in 2 (2.1% out of 95 attacks. Internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO was detected in 5 (5.4%, nystagmus in 37 (38.9%, vertigo in 9 (6.3%, and diplopia in 14 (14.7% out of 95 attacks. Pons, mesencephalon and bulbus lesions were detected in 58.7%, 41.5% and 21.1% of the patients, respectively, on the brain MRI. Cranial nerve palsy findings could not be explained by the localization of the lesions on brainstem MRI in 5 attacks; 2 of them were 3rd CNP (1 with INO, 2 were 6th CNP and 1 was a combination of 6th, 7th and 8th CNP. CONCLUSION: The most frequently affected cranial nerve and brainstem region in MS patients is the 6th cranial nerve and pons, respectively. A few of the MS patients have normal brainstem MRI, although they have cranial neuropathy findings in the neurologic examination

  12. Diagnostic capability of retinal thickness measures in diabetic peripheral neuropathy

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    Sangeetha Srinivasan

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: The GCC FLV can differentiate individuals with diabetic neuropathy from healthy controls, while the inferior RNFL thickness is able to differentiate those with greater degrees of neuropathy from those with mild or no neuropathy, both with an acceptable level of accuracy. Optical coherence tomography represents a non-invasive technology that aids in detection of retinal structural changes in patients with established diabetic neuropathy. Further refinement of the technique and the analytical approaches may be required to identify patients with minimal neuropathy.

  13. Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy precipitated by acute primary angle closure

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    Choudhari Nikhil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 59-year-old man with a history of longstanding systemic hypotension developed asymmetric non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION apparently precipitated by bilateral sequential acute primary angle closure. NAION is very rarely reported in association with raised intraocular pressure. In contrast to optical coherence tomography, the failure of scanning laser polarimetry to detect axonal swelling was another interesting finding. Possible reasoning for these observations is discussed.

  14. Neuronal involvement in cisplatin neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup-Hansen, A; Helweg-Larsen, Susanne Elisabeth; Schmalbruch, H

    2007-01-01

    Although it is well known that cisplatin causes a sensory neuropathy, the primary site of involvement is not established. The clinical symptoms localized in a stocking-glove distribution may be explained by a length dependent neuronopathy or by a distal axonopathy. To study whether the whole neuron...... higher than 300 mg/m2 the patients lost distal tendon and H-reflexes and displayed reduced vibration sense in the feet and the fingers. The amplitudes of sensory nerve action potentials (SNAP) from the fingers innervated by the median nerve and the dorsolateral side of the foot innervated by the sural...... of the foot evoked by a tactile probe showed similar changes to those observed in SNAPs evoked by electrical stimulation. At these doses, somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) from the tibial nerve had increased latencies of peripheral, spinal and central responses suggesting loss of central processes...

  15. Neuronal involvement in cisplatin neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup-Hansen, A; Helweg-Larsen, Susanne Elisabeth; Schmalbruch, H

    2007-01-01

    Although it is well known that cisplatin causes a sensory neuropathy, the primary site of involvement is not established. The clinical symptoms localized in a stocking-glove distribution may be explained by a length dependent neuronopathy or by a distal axonopathy. To study whether the whole neuron...... nerve were 50-60% reduced, whereas no definite changes occurred at lower doses. The SNAP conduction velocities were reduced by 10-15% at cumulative doses of 400-700 mg/m2 consistent with loss of large myelinated fibres. SNAPs from primarily Pacinian corpuscles in digit 3 and the dorsolateral side...... of large dorsal root ganglion cells. Motor conduction studies, autonomic function and warm and cold temperature sensation remained unchanged at all doses of cisplatin treatment. The results of these studies are consistent with degeneration of large sensory neurons whereas there was no evidence of distal...

  16. Low Levels of NDRG1 in Nerve Tissue Are Predictive of Severe Paclitaxel-Induced Neuropathy.

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    Raghav Sundar

    Full Text Available Sensory peripheral neuropathy caused by paclitaxel is a common and dose limiting toxicity, for which there are currently no validated predictive biomarkers. We investigated the relationship between the Charcot-Marie-Tooth protein NDRG1 and paclitaxel-induced neuropathy.Archived mammary tissue specimen blocks of breast cancer patients who received weekly paclitaxel in a single centre were retrieved and NDRG1 immunohistochemistry was performed on normal nerve tissue found within the sample. The mean nerve NDRG1 score was defined by an algorithm based on intensity of staining and percentage of stained nerve bundles. NDRG1 scores were correlated with paclitaxel induced neuropathy.111 patients were studied. 17 of 111 (15% developed severe paclitaxel-induced neuropathy. The mean nerve NDRG1 expression score was 5.4 in patients with severe neuropathy versus 7.7 in those without severe neuropathy (p = 0.0019. A Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis of the mean nerve NDRG1 score revealed an area under the curve of 0.74 (p = 0.0013 for the identification of severe neuropathy, with a score of 7 being most discriminative. 13/54 (24% subjects with an NDRG1 score 7 (p = 0.017.Low NDRG1 expression in nerve tissue present within samples of surgical resection may identify subjects at risk for severe paclitaxel-induced neuropathy. Since nerve biopsies are not routinely feasible for patients undergoing chemotherapy for early breast cancer, this promising biomarker strategy is compatible with current clinical workflow.

  17. Side Effects: Nerve Problems (Peripheral Neuropathy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerve problems, such as peripheral neuropathy, can be caused by cancer treatment. Learn about signs and symptoms of nerve changes. Find out how to prevent or manage nerve problems during cancer treatment.

  18. Pharmacological Treatment Of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Kenneth; Shinkazh, Nataliya; Frank, Jerry; Israel, Igor; Fellner, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Pain modulation is a key treatment goal for diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients. Guidelines have recommended antidepressant, anticonvulsant, analgesic, and topical medications—both approved and off-label—to reduce pain in this population.

  19. Profil electroneuromyographique des neuropathies dans une ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    différentes neuropathies dans une population de diabétiques. Nous avons réalisé une étude descriptive portant sur 110 patients diabétiques admis dans le laboratoire de Neurophysiologie du CHU de Limoges de janvier 2004 à juin 2006. Le diagnostic EMG des neuropathies démyélinisantes était basé sur les critères de ...

  20. Cucumber SUPERMAN has conserved function in stamen and fruit development and a distinct role in floral patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianyu; Liu, Meiling; Jiang, Li; Ding, Lian; Yan, Shuang Shuang; Zhang, Juan; Dong, Zhaobin; Ren, Huazhong; Zhang, Xiaolan

    2014-01-01

    The Arabidopsis SUPERMAN (SUP) gene encodes a C2H2 type zinc finger protein that is required for maintaining the boundaries between stamens and carpels, and for regulating development of ovule outer integument. Orthologs of SUP have been characterized in bisexual flowers as well as dioecious species, but it remains elusive in monoecious plants with unisexual flowers on the same individual. Here we isolate the SUP ortholog in Cucumis sativus L (CsSUP), a monoecious vegetable. CsSUP is predominantly expressed in female specific organs: the female flower buds and ovules. Ectopic expression of CsSUP in Arabidopsis can partially complement the fruit development in sup-5 mutant, and its over-expression in wide-type leads to reduced silique length, suppressed stamen development and distorted petal patterning. Our data suggest that CsSUP plays conserved as well as distinct roles during flower and fruit development, and it may function in the boundaries and ovules to balance petal patterning, stamen and ovule development in Arabidopsis.

  1. Cucumber SUPERMAN has conserved function in stamen and fruit development and a distinct role in floral patterning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianyu Zhao

    Full Text Available The Arabidopsis SUPERMAN (SUP gene encodes a C2H2 type zinc finger protein that is required for maintaining the boundaries between stamens and carpels, and for regulating development of ovule outer integument. Orthologs of SUP have been characterized in bisexual flowers as well as dioecious species, but it remains elusive in monoecious plants with unisexual flowers on the same individual. Here we isolate the SUP ortholog in Cucumis sativus L (CsSUP, a monoecious vegetable. CsSUP is predominantly expressed in female specific organs: the female flower buds and ovules. Ectopic expression of CsSUP in Arabidopsis can partially complement the fruit development in sup-5 mutant, and its over-expression in wide-type leads to reduced silique length, suppressed stamen development and distorted petal patterning. Our data suggest that CsSUP plays conserved as well as distinct roles during flower and fruit development, and it may function in the boundaries and ovules to balance petal patterning, stamen and ovule development in Arabidopsis.

  2. Coexistence of two chronic neuropathies in a young child: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Wilson; Funayama, Carolina A R; Secchin, Juliana B; Lourenço, Charles M; Gouvêa, Silmara P; Marques, Vanessa D; Bastos, Patricia G; Barreira, Amilton A

    2010-10-01

    We report an 18-month-old Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A (CMT1A) patient who developed a rapid-onset neuropathy, with proximal and distal weakness, and non-uniform nerve conduction studies. The neuropathy responded well to immunomodulation, confirming the coexistence of an inherited and an inflammatory neuropathy. Unexpected clinical and/or electrophysiological manifestations in CMT1A patients should alert clinicians to concomitant inflammatory neuropathy. In addition, this association raises reflections about disease mechanism in CMT1A.

  3. Clinical diagnosis of diabetic polyneuropathy with the diabetic neuropathy symptom and diabetic neuropathy examination scores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, J.W.; Lefrandt, J.D.; Links, T.P.; Smit, J.A.; Stewart, R.E.; van der Hoeven, J.H.; Hoogenberg, K.

    OBJECTIVE - To evaluate the discriminative power of the Diabetic Neuropathy Symptom (DNS) and Diabetic Neuropathy Examination (DNE) scores for diagnosing diabetic polyneuropathy (PNP), as well as their relation with cardiovascular autonomic function testing (cAFT) and electro-diagnostic studies

  4. Pharmacological intervention of early neuropathy in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Min Jee; Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Kim, TaeSoo; Lee, Sung Bae

    2017-05-01

    Extensive studies have reported the significant roles of numerous cellular features and processes in properly maintaining neuronal morphology and function throughout the lifespan of an animal. Any alterations in their homeostasis appear to be strongly associated with neuronal aging and the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases, even before the occurrence of prominent neuronal death. However, until recently, the primary focus of studies regarding many neurodegenerative diseases has been on the massive cell death occurring at the late stages of disease progression. Thus, our understanding on early neuropathy in these diseases remains relatively limited. The complicated nature of various neuropathic features manifested early in neurodegenerative diseases suggests the involvement of a system-wide transcriptional regulation and epigenetic control. Epigenetic alterations and consequent changes in the neuronal transcriptome are now begun to be extensively studied in various neurodegenerative diseases. Upon the catastrophic incident of neuronal death in disease progression, it is utterly difficult to reverse the deleterious defects by pharmacological treatments, and therefore, therapeutics targeting the system-wide transcriptional dysregulation associated with specific early neuropathy is considered a better option. Here, we review our current understanding on the system-wide transcriptional dysregulation that is likely associated with early neuropathy shown in various neurodegenerative diseases and discuss the possible future developments of pharmaceutical therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Effects of Ethanol Exposure During Distinct Periods of Brain Development on Oxidative Stress in the Adult Rat Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocardo, Patricia S; Gil-Mohapel, Joana; Wortman, Ryan; Noonan, Athena; McGinnis, Eric; Patten, Anna R; Christie, Brian R

    2017-01-01

    The consumption of alcohol during pregnancy can result in abnormal fetal development and impaired brain function in humans and experimental animal models. Depending on the pattern of consumption, the dose, and the period of exposure to ethanol (EtOH), a variety of structural and functional brain deficits can be observed. This study compared the effects of EtOH exposure during distinct periods of brain development on oxidative damage and endogenous antioxidant status in various brain regions of adult female and male Sprague Dawley rats. Pregnant dams and neonatal rats were exposed to EtOH during one of the following time windows: between gestational days (GDs) 1 and 10 (first trimester equivalent); between GDs 11 and 21 (second trimester equivalent); or between postnatal days (PNDs) 4 and 10 (third trimester equivalent). EtOH exposure during any of the 3 trimester equivalents significantly increased lipid peroxidation in both the cornus ammonis (CA) and dentate gyrus (DG) subregions of the hippocampus, while also decreasing the levels of the endogenous antioxidant glutathione in the hippocampal CA and DG subregions as well as the prefrontal cortex of young adult animals (PND 60). These results indicate that EtOH exposure during restricted periods of brain development can have long-term consequences in the adult brain by dysregulating its redox status. This dysfunction may underlie, at least in part, the long-term alterations in brain function associated with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. Copyright © 2016 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  6. MR neurography in ulnar neuropathy as surrogate parameter for the presence of disseminated neuropathy.

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    Philipp Bäumer

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Patients with ulnar neuropathy of unclear etiology occasionally present with lesion extension from elbow to upper arm level on MRI. This study investigated whether MRI thereby distinguishes multifocal neuropathy from focal-compressive neuropathy at the elbow. METHODS: This prospective study was approved by the institutional ethics committee and written informed consent was obtained from all participants. 122 patients with ulnar mononeuropathy of undetermined localization and etiology by clinical and electrophysiological examination were assessed by MRI at upper arm and elbow level using T2-weighted fat-saturated sequences at 3T. Twenty-one patients were identified with proximal ulnar nerve lesions and evaluated for findings suggestive of disseminated neuropathy (i subclinical lesions in other nerves, (ii unfavorable outcome after previous decompressive elbow surgery, and (iii subsequent diagnosis of inflammatory or other disseminated neuropathy. Two groups served as controls for quantitative analysis of nerve-to-muscle signal intensity ratios: 20 subjects with typical focal ulnar neuropathy at the elbow and 20 healthy subjects. RESULTS: In the group of 21 patients with proximal ulnar nerve lesion extension, T2-w ulnar nerve signal was significantly (p<0.001 higher at upper arm level than in both control groups. A cut-off value of 1.92 for maximum nerve-to-muscle signal intensity ratio was found to be sensitive (86% and specific (100% to discriminate this group. Ten patients (48% exhibited additional T2-w lesions in the median and/or radial nerve. Another ten (48% had previously undergone elbow surgery without satisfying outcome. Clinical follow-up was available in 15 (71% and revealed definitive diagnoses of multifocal neuropathy of various etiologies in four patients. In another eight, diagnoses could not yet be considered definitive but were consistent with multifocal neuropathy. CONCLUSION: Proximal ulnar nerve T2 lesions at upper

  7. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and peripheral neuropathy

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    Gupta Prem

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is the fourth leading cause of death world-wide and a further increase in the prevalence as well as mortality of the disease is predicted for coming decades. There is now an increased appreciation for the need to build awareness regarding COPD and to help the thousands of people who suffer from this disease and die prematurely from COPD or its associated complication(s. Peripheral neuropathy in COPD has received scanty attention despite the fact that very often clinicians come across COPD patients having clinical features suggestive of peripheral neuropathy. Electrophysiological tests like nerve conduction studies are required to distinguish between axonal and demyelinating type of disorder that cannot be analyzed by clinical examination alone. However, various studies addressing peripheral neuropathy in COPD carried out so far have included patients with COPD having markedly varying baseline characteristics like severe hypoxemia, elderly patients, those with long duration of illness, etc. that are not uniform across the studies and make it difficult to interpret the results to a consistent conclusion. Almost one-third of COPD patients have clinical evidence of peripheral neuropathy and two-thirds have electrophysiological abnormalities. Some patients with no clinical indication of peripheral neuropathy do have electrophysiological deficit suggestive of peripheral neuropathy. The more frequent presentation consists of a polyneuropathy that is subclinical or with predominantly sensory signs, and the neurophysiological and pathological features of predominantly axonal neuropathy. The presumed etiopathogenic factors are multiple: chronic hypoxia, tobacco smoke, alcoholism, malnutrition and adverse effects of certain drugs.

  8. Definition and diagnosis of small fiber neuropathy: consensus from the Peripheral Neuropathy Scientific Department of the Brazilian Academy of Neurology

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    Francisco de Assis Aquino Gondim

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to describe the results of a Brazilian Consensus on Small Fiber Neuropathy (SFN. Fifteen neurologists (members of the Brazilian Academy of Neurology reviewed a preliminary draft. Eleven panelists got together in the city of Fortaleza to discuss and finish the text for the manuscript submission. Small fiber neuropathy can be defined as a subtype of neuropathy characterized by selective involvement of unmyelinated or thinly myelinated sensory fibers. Its clinical picture includes both negative and positive manifestations: sensory (pain/dysesthesias/pruritus or combined sensory and autonomic complaints, associated with an almost entirely normal neurological examination. Standard electromyography is normal. A growing list of medical conditions is associated with SFN. The classification of SFN may also serve as a useful terminology to uncover minor discrepancies in the normal values from different neurophysiology laboratories. Several techniques may disclose sensory and/or autonomic impairment. Further studies are necessary to refine these techniques and develop specific therapies.

  9. Prevention and treatment of peripheral neuropathy after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnicki, Stacy A

    2010-01-01

    Given the ever-increasing problem of obesity, it is not surprising that the number of patients who undergo bariatric surgery continues to rise. For patients who have gastric banding, the amount of food they can consume is limited, and nausea and vomiting may further limit nutritional intake early on. More extensive procedures, such as the Roux-en-Y or biliopancreatic diversion with or without a duodenal switch, not only restrict intake but also limit absorption in the small intestine. As a result, deficiencies in vitamins, minerals, and trace elements may develop, leading to a variety of neurologic complications. The peripheral neuropathies best described with a clear-cut cause are an acute, frequently painful neuropathy or polyradiculoneuropathy associated with thiamine deficiency, and an isolated neuropathy or myeloneuropathy associated with deficiencies of either vitamin B12 or copper. Thiamine deficiency tends to occur in the first weeks or months after surgery, vitamin B12 deficiency may develop at any time from a few years to many years after surgery, and copper deficiency tends to be a fairly late complication, developing several years to many years following surgery. Patients who have undergone bariatric surgery may also have an increased risk of developing focal neuropathies, though these are less clearly related to specific nutritional deficiencies.Ideally, one would like to prevent these neuropathies, but there is no consensus of opinion as to what vitamins and micronutrients need to be taken following bariatric surgery. In addition, many patients who take supplements early on fail to maintain the regimen even though some of the neuropathies can occur fairly late. Supplements frequently recommended include a multivitamin, iron, vitamin D, folic acid, calcium citrate, and vitamin B12. Although thiamine is typically included in a multivitamin, the amount is fairly small, so I recommend adding 100 mg daily for at least the first year. Some have suggested

  10. Peroneal neuropathy after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, J S; Gwak, M S; Yang, M; Kim, G S; Kwon, C H; Joh, J W; Lee, S K; Kim, S J

    2008-10-01

    The incidence of peroneal neuropathy (PN), occurring predominantly in the left leg, increases after the incorporation of intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) devices among adult liver transplantation (OLT) recipients in our hospital. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible risk factors for PN and the reason for the left-leg predominance. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 501 OLT recipients. The patients were first divided into 2 groups, PN (n = 33) and non-PN (n = 468), to assess possible risk factors. The patients were then categorized into IPC (n = 262) and non-IPC (n = 239) groups according to the use of IPC devices. In a subsequent prospective study, we measured the degree and duration of the tilt of the operating table during OLT to investigate their relationship to the predominant left-leg PN. The rate of IPC device use was significantly greater among the PN than non-PN group (78.8% vs 50.4%, P table were greater and longer than the right tilt. The use of IPC devices during OLT increased the occurrence of PN and the left tilt of the operating table was strongly related to the predominant left-leg PN. Careful protection of the vulnerable point and minimization of the tilting of the operating table is advised during OLT, especially when IPC devices are used.

  11. Intralimb Coordination Patterns in Absent, Mild, and Severe Stages of Diabetic Neuropathy: Looking Beyond Kinematic Analysis of Gait Cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Chiao Yi

    Full Text Available Diabetes Mellitus progressively leads to impairments in stability and joint motion and might affect coordination patterns, mainly due to neuropathy. This study aims to describe changes in intralimb joint coordination in healthy individuals and patients with absent, mild and, severe stages of neuropathy.Forty-seven diabetic patients were classified into three groups of neuropathic severity by a fuzzy model: 18 without neuropathy (DIAB, 7 with mild neuropathy (MILD, and 22 with moderate to severe neuropathy (SVRE. Thirteen healthy subjects were included as controls (CTRL. Continuous relative phase (CRP was calculated at each instant of the gait cycle for each pair of lower limb joints. Analysis of Variance compared each frame of the CRP time series and its standard deviation among groups (α = 5%.For the ankle-hip CRP, the SVRE group presented increased variability at the propulsion phase and a distinct pattern at the propulsion and initial swing phases compared to the DIAB and CTRL groups. For the ankle-knee CRP, the 3 diabetic groups presented more anti-phase ratios than the CTRL group at the midstance, propulsion, and terminal swing phases, with decreased variability at the early stance phase. For the knee-hip CRP, the MILD group showed more in-phase ratio at the early stance and terminal swing phases and lower variability compared to all other groups. All diabetic groups were more in-phase at early the midstance phase (with lower variability than the control group.The low variability and coordination differences of the MILD group showed that gait coordination might be altered not only when frank evidence of neuropathy is present, but also when neuropathy is still incipient. The ankle-knee CRP at the initial swing phase showed distinct patterns for groups from all degrees of neuropathic severity and CTRLs. The ankle-hip CRP pattern distinguished the SVRE patients from other diabetic groups, particularly in the transitional phase from stance to

  12. Development of a porcine skeletal muscle cDNA microarray: analysis of differential transcript expression in phenotypically distinct muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stear Michael

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray profiling has the potential to illuminate the molecular processes that govern the phenotypic characteristics of porcine skeletal muscles, such as hypertrophy or atrophy, and the expression of specific fibre types. This information is not only important for understanding basic muscle biology but also provides underpinning knowledge for enhancing the efficiency of livestock production. Results We report on the de novo development of a composite skeletal muscle cDNA microarray, comprising 5500 clones from two developmentally distinct cDNA libraries (longissimus dorsi of a 50-day porcine foetus and the gastrocnemius of a 3-day-old pig. Clones selected for the microarray assembly were of low to moderate abundance, as indicated by colony hybridisation. We profiled the differential expression of genes between the psoas (red muscle and the longissimus dorsi (white muscle, by co-hybridisation of Cy3 and Cy5 labelled cDNA derived from these two muscles. Results from seven microarray slides (replicates correctly identified genes that were expected to be differentially expressed, as well as a number of novel candidate regulatory genes. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR on selected genes was used to confirm the results from the microarray. Conclusion We have developed a porcine skeletal muscle cDNA microarray and have identified a number of candidate genes that could be involved in muscle phenotype determination, including several members of the casein kinase 2 signalling pathway.

  13. Hypertension-induced peripheral neuropathy and the combined effects of hypertension and diabetes on nerve structure and function in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Joshua A; Jolivalt, Corinne G; Goor, Jared; Mizisin, Andrew P; Calcutt, Nigel A

    2012-10-01

    Diabetic neuropathy includes damage to neurons, Schwann cells and blood vessels. Rodent models of diabetes do not adequately replicate all pathological features of diabetic neuropathy, particularly Schwann cell damage. We, therefore, tested the hypothesis that combining hypertension, a risk factor for neuropathy in diabetic patients, with insulin-deficient diabetes produces a more pertinent model of peripheral neuropathy. Behavioral, physiological and structural indices of neuropathy were measured for up to 6 months in spontaneously hypertensive and age-matched normotensive rats with or without concurrent streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Hypertensive rats developed nerve ischemia, thermal hyperalgesia, nerve conduction slowing and axonal atrophy. Thinly myelinated fibers with supernumerary Schwann cells indicative of cycles of demyelination and remyelination were also identified along with reduced nerve levels of myelin basic protein. Similar disorders were noted in streptozotocin-diabetic rats, except that thinly myelinated fibers were not observed and expression of myelin basic protein was normal. Superimposing diabetes on hypertension compounded disorders of nerve blood flow, conduction slowing and axonal atrophy and increased the incidence of thinly myelinated fibers. Rats with combined insulinopenia, hyperglycemia and hypertension provide a model for diabetic neuropathy that offers an opportunity to study mechanisms of Schwann cell pathology and suggests that hypertension may contribute to the etiology of diabetic neuropathy.

  14. Plasma dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG) as an index of diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, N J; Dejgaard, Anders; Hilsted, J

    1988-01-01

    Forearm venous plasma noradrenalin and dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG) concentrations were measured in eight diabetic patients with and eight diabetic patients without neuropathy. Plasma noradrenalin was on average the same in patients with and without neuropathy and correlated to serum creatinine...

  15. F wave index: A diagnostic tool for peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G R Sathya

    2017-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: Our results showed that F wave index in upper limb was significantly lower in patients with peripheral neuropathy than the healthy controls, and could be used for early detection of peripheral neuropathy.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... link) PubMed OMIM (2 links) NEURONOPATHY, DISTAL HEREDITARY MOTOR, TYPE VA NEURONOPATHY, DISTAL HEREDITARY MOTOR, TYPE VB Sources ...

  17. Nutritional optic neuropathy following bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicka-Pierko, Anna; Obuchowska, Iwona; Hady, Razak Hady; Mariak, Zofia; Dadan, Jacek

    2014-12-01

    Bariatric procedures, associated with gastrointestinal malabsorption of vitamins and microelements, may constitute a risk factor for nutritional optic neuropathy (NON). We present a case of a 34-year-old female patient who developed bilateral NON after sleeve gastrectomy. Despite postoperative ophthalmological supervision, 10 months after the procedure the woman presented with a bilateral decrease in visual acuity down to 0.8, bilateral visual field loss and abnormal visual evoked potential recordings. Laboratory abnormalities included decreased serum concentration of vitamin B12 (161 pg/ml). Treatment was based on intramuscular injections of vitamin B12 (1000 units per day). After 1 week of the treatment, we observed more than a three-fold increase in the serum concentration of vitamin B12 and resolution of the bilateral symptoms of NON. The incidence of NON is likely to increase due to the growing number of these bariatric procedures performed worldwide. Therefore, all persons subjected to such surgery should receive long-term ophthalmological follow-up and supplementation with vitamins and microelements.

  18. Toxic optic neuropathy: An unusual cause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hema L Ramkumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 60-year-old woman with a history of chronic alcoholism and tobacco use presented with the complaint of a painless decrease in vision in both eyes. She lost vision first in the left eye then in the right eye. She admitted consuming at least one 16 ounce bottle of over the counter mouthwash daily and denied consumption of any other alcohols, methanol, or antifreeze. She stated that her vision had been continuing to deteriorate in both eyes. Her best-corrected visual acuity was 4/200 in each eye. Color vision was nil in each eye. Her pupils were sluggish bilaterally, and her optic discs were flat and hyperemic with peripapillary hemorrhages. Her visual fields revealed central scotomas bilaterally. The magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and lumbar puncture were within normal limits. Antinuclear antibody, human leukocyte antigen-B27 genotyping, and B12 were normal; serum thiamine was low. While continuing to ingest mouthwash, her vision decreased to count fingers at 2 feet, and maculopapillary bundle pallor developed. She was started on folate and thiamine supplementation. Once she discontinued mouthwash, her vision improved to 20/400 bilaterally, and her central scotomas improved. This case demonstrates an alcohol-induced toxic optic neuropathy from mouthwash ingestion with some visual recovery after discontinuation of the offending agent.

  19. The neural signature of self-concept development in adolescence: The role of domain and valence distinctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Cruijsen, R; Peters, S; van der Aar, L P E; Crone, E A

    2017-11-22

    Neuroimaging studies in adults showed that cortical midline regions including medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and posterior parietal cortex (PPC) are important in self-evaluations. The goals of this study were to investigate the contribution of these regions to self-evaluations in late childhood, adolescence, and early adulthood, and to examine whether these differed per domain (academic, physical and prosocial) and valence (positive versus negative). Also, we tested whether this activation changes across adolescence. For this purpose, participants between ages 11-21-years (N=150) evaluated themselves on trait sentences in an fMRI session. Behaviorally, adolescents rated their academic traits less positively than children and young adults. The neural analyses showed that evaluating self-traits versus a control condition was associated with increased activity in mPFC (domain-general effect), and positive traits were associated with increased activity in ventral mPFC (valence effect). Self-related mPFC activation increased linearly with age, but only for evaluating physical traits. Furthermore, an adolescent-specific decrease in striatum activation for positive self traits was found. Finally, we found domain-specific neural activity for evaluating traits in physical (dorsolateral PFC, dorsal mPFC) and academic (PPC) domains. Together, these results highlight the importance of domain distinctions when studying self-concept development in late childhood, adolescence, and early adulthood. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Multiple cranial neuropathies without limb involvements: guillain-barre syndrome variant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ju Young; Jung, Han Young; Kim, Chang Hwan; Kim, Hyo Sang; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2013-10-01

    Acute multiple cranial neuropathies are considered as variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome, which are immune-mediated diseases triggered by various cases. It is a rare disease which is related to infectious, inflammatory or systemic diseases. According to previous case reports, those affected can exhibit almost bilateral facial nerve palsy, then followed by bulbar dysfunctions (cranial nerves IX and X) accompanied by limb weakness and walking difficulties due to motor and/or sensory dysfunctions. Furthermore, reported cases of the acute multiple cranial neuropathies show electrophysiological abnormalities compatible with the typical Guillain-Barre syndromes (GBS). We recently experienced a patient with a benign infectious disease who subsequently developed symptoms of variant GBS. Here, we describe the case of a 48-year-old male patient who developed multiple symptoms of cranial neuropathy without limb weakness. His laboratory findings showed a positive result for anti-GQ1b IgG antibody. As compared with previously described variants of GBS, the patient exhibited widespread cranial neuropathy, which included neuropathies of cranial nerves III-XII, without limb involvement or ataxia.

  1. Subacute peripheral and optic neuropathy syndrome with no evidence of a toxic or nutritional cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, D; Riordan-Eva, P; Paterson, R W; Hadden, R D M

    2013-08-01

    The syndrome of subacute simultaneous peripheral neuropathy and bilateral optic neuropathy is known to occur in tropical countries, probably due to malnutrition or toxicity, but not often seen in developed countries. We report seven patients in London who were not malnourished or alcoholic, and in whom no clear cause was found. We retrospectively reviewed the case notes and arranged some further investigations. All patients developed peripheral and bilateral optic neuropathy within 6 months. Patients were aged 30-52, and all of Jamaican birth and race but lived in the UK. Most had subacute, painful ataxic sensory axonal neuropathy or neuronopathy, some with myelopathy. Nerve conduction studies revealed minor demyelinating features in two cases. The optic neuropathy was symmetrical, subacute and monophasic, usually with marked reduction in visual acuity. CSF protein concentration was usually elevated but other laboratory investigations were normal. Patients showed only modest improvement at follow-up. These patients share a common clinical and electrophysiological phenotype, age, ethnicity and elevated CSF protein, but otherwise normal laboratory investigations. The syndrome is a cause of significant morbidity in young people. The cause remains uncertain despite thorough investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Anesthesia Management in Diabetic Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feride Karacaer

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy is frequently observed in patients with diabetes mellitus and encompasses damage to the autonomic nerve fibers, resulting in abnormalities in heart rate control and vascular dynamics. There is an increased mortality and morbidity rate among these patients. A series of cardiovascular reflex tests known as Ewing's battery tests are used for diagnosis cardiac autonomic neuropathy and provide valuable information to the clinical assessment of these patients. As anesthesia has a major influence on perioperative autonomic function, the interplay between cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and anesthesia may result in unexpected haemodynamic instability during surgery and postoperative recovery. A comprehensive preoperative assessment and perioperative cautious monitoring are necessary for successful anesthesia management. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(2.000: 140-151

  3. Blood pressure regulation in diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1985-01-01

    Defective blood pressure responses to standing, exercise and epinephrine infusions have been demonstrated in diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy. The circulatory mechanisms underlying blood pressure responses to exercise and standing up in these patients are well characterized: In both...... which may contribute to exercise hypotension in these patients. During hypoglycemia, blood pressure regulation seems intact in patients with autonomic neuropathy. This is probably due to release of substantial amounts of catecholamines during these experiments. During epinephrine infusions a substantial...... blood pressure fall ensues in patients with autonomic neuropathy, probably due to excessive muscular vasodilation. It is unresolved why blood pressure regulation is intact during hypoglycemia and severely impaired--at similar catecholamine concentrations--during epinephrine infusions....

  4. Neuropathies optiques héréditaires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milea, D; Verny, C

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary optic neuropathies are a group of heterogeneous conditions affecting both optic nerves, with an autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-related or mitochondrial transmission. The two most common non-syndromic hereditary optic neuropathies (Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and aut...

  5. Tadalafil Promotes the Recovery of Peripheral Neuropathy in Type II Diabetic Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wang

    Full Text Available We previously demonstrated that treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy with the short (4 hours half-life phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5 inhibitor, sildenafil, improved functional outcome in diabetic db/db mice. To further examine the effect of PDE5 inhibition on diabetic peripheral neuropathy, we investigated the effect of another potent PDE5 inhibitor, tadalafil, on diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Tadalafil is pharmacokinetically distinct from sildenafil and has a longer half-life (17+hours than sildenafil. Diabetic mice (BKS.Cg-m+/+Leprdb/J, db/db at age 20 weeks were treated with tadalafil every 48 hours for 8 consecutive weeks. Compared with diabetic mice treated with saline, tadalafil treatment significantly improved motor and sensory conduction velocities in the sciatic nerve and peripheral thermal sensitivity. Tadalafil treatment also markedly increased local blood flow and the density of FITC-dextran perfused vessels in the sciatic nerve concomitantly with increased intraepidermal nerve fiber density. Moreover, tadalafil reversed the diabetes-induced reductions of axon diameter and myelin thickness and reversed the diabetes-induced increased g-ratio in the sciatic nerve. Furthermore, tadalafil enhanced diabetes-reduced nerve growth factor (NGF and platelet-derived growth factor-C (PDGF-C protein levels in diabetic sciatic nerve tissue. The present study demonstrates that tadalafil increases regional blood flow in the sciatic nerve tissue, which may contribute to the improvement of peripheral nerve function and the amelioration of diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

  6. Persisting nutritional neuropathy amongst former war prisoners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, G V; Bell, D R

    1982-01-01

    Of 898 former Far East prisoners of war, assessed between 1968 and 1981, 49 (5.5%) had evidence of persisting symptomatic neurological disease dating back to their periods of malnutrition in captivity. The commonest syndromes were peripheral neuropathy (often of "burning foot" type), optic atrophy, and sensori-neural deafness. Though nutritional neuropathies disappeared soon after release in most ex-Far East prisoners of war, in some they have persisted up to 36 years since exposure to the nutritional insult. PMID:6292369

  7. Ambulatory screening of diabetic neuropathy and predictors of its severity in outpatient settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, M S; Iqbal, M; Zahoor, S; Ali, J; Javed, M U

    2017-04-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is one of the most common causes of chronic neuropathic symptomatology and the most disabling and difficult-to-treat diabetic microangiopathic complication. The neuropathies associated with diabetes are typically classified into generalized, focal and multifocal varieties. There exists a scarcity of literature studying the correlation of different patient- and disease-related variables with severity of neuropathy. This study aims to delineate the prevalence of diabetic neuropathy in type 2 diabetes, describe its characteristics and find out predictors of its severity. Eight hundred consecutive diabetic patients presenting to outpatient department (OPD) of Khan Research Labs (KRL) General Hospital and Centre for Diabetes and Liver diseases, Islamabad, during March-June, 2015 were made to complete a self-administered questionnaire (Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument-MNSI) and underwent a thorough physical examination according to MNSI protocols. A score of >2 was considered to be diagnostic for DPN. Patient and disease variables were noted. MNSI score was used as an index of severity of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Correlation of several patient- and disease-related variables with the severity of DPN was determined using multivariate regression. Out of a total 800 patients screened, 90 (11.25%) were found to have diabetic neuropathy. Of these 90, 45.5% were males, the median age was 54.47 ± 10.87 years and the median duration of diabetes was 11.12 ± 9.8 years. The most common symptom was found to be numbness (63.6%) followed by generalized body weakness (61.5%). The common findings on physical examination were dry skin/callus (38.7%) and deformities (14.7%). Duration of diabetes was found to be the strongest predictor for development and severity of diabetic neuropathy followed by glycemic controls (HbA1c values) and age. Duration of diabetes rather than diabetic controls predicts better the development and severity of

  8. The role of insulin resistance in diabetic neuropathy in Koreans with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a 6-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yu Na; Lee, Kee Ook; Jeong, Julie; Park, Hyung Jun; Kim, Seung-Min; Shin, Ha Young; Hong, Ji-Man; Ahn, Chul Woo; Choi, Young-Chul

    2014-05-01

    We previously reported that insulin resistance, low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and glycaemic exposure Index are independently associated with peripheral neuropathy in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. We followed the patients who participated in that study in 2006 for another 6 years to determine the relationship between insulin resistance and neuropathy. This study involved 48 of the original 86 Korean patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who were referred to the Neurology clinic for the assessment of diabetic neuropathy from January 2006 to December 2006. These 48 patients received management for glycaemic control and prevention of diabetic complications in the outpatient clinic up to 2012. We reviewed blood test results and the nerve conduction study findings of these patients, taken over a 6-year period. Low HDL cholesterol and high triglycerides significantly influenced the development of diabetic neuropathy. Kitt value (1/insulin resistance) in the previous study affected the occurrence of neuropathy, despite adequate glycaemic control with HbA1c resistance affected the development of diabetic neuropathy after 6 years: insulin resistance in 2006 showed a positive correlation with a change in sural sensory nerve action potential in 2012. Diabetic neuropathy can be affected by previous insulin resistance despite regular glycaemic control. Dyslipidaemia should be controlled in patients who show high insulin resistance because HDL cholesterol and triglycerides are strongly correlated with later development of diabetic neuropathy.

  9. Evaluation of Effect of Nishamalaki on STZ and HFHF Diet Induced Diabetic Neuropathy in Wistar Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawane, Jayshree Shriram; Pandit, Vijaya Anil; Bhosale, Madhura Shirish Kumar; Khatavkar, Pallawi Shashank

    2016-10-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is one of the most common complications affecting 50% of diabetic patients. Neuropathic pain is the most difficult types of pain to treat. There is no specific treatment for neuropathy. Nishamalaki (NA), combination of Curcuma longa and Emblica officinalis used to treat Diabetes Mellitus (DM). So, efforts were made to test whether NA is useful in prevention of diabetic neuropathy. To evaluate the effect of NA on diabetic neuropathy in type 2 diabetic wistar rats. Group I (Control) vehicle treated consists of 6 rats. Diabetes induced in 36 wistar rats with Streptozotocin (STZ) (35mg/kg) intra-peritoneally followed by High Fat High Fructose diet. After confirmation of development of diabetes; rats divided into six groups (n=6). Group II - VII Diabetic Control, NA low dose, NA High dose, Glibenclamide, Pioglitazone and Epalrestat. Animals received drug treatment for next 12 weeks. Monitoring of Blood Sugar Level (BSL) done every 15 days and lipid profile at the end. Eddy's hot plate and tail immersion test performed to assess thermal hyperalgesia and cold allodynia. Walking function test performed to assess motor function. Diabetic rats exhibited significant (pdiabetic neuropathy.

  10. Carboplatin-paclitaxel-induced leukopenia and neuropathy predict progression-free survival in recurrent ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C K; Gurney, H; Brown, C; Sorio, R; Donadello, N; Tulunay, G; Meier, W; Bacon, M; Maenpaa, J; Petru, E; Reed, N; Gebski, V; Pujade-Lauraine, E; Lord, S; Simes, R J; Friedlander, M

    2011-07-26

    We assess the prognostic value of chemotherapy-induced leukopenia and sensory neuropathy in the CALYPSO trial patients treated with carboplatin-paclitaxel (CP) or carboplatin-liposomal doxorubicin (CPLD). We performed a landmark analysis at first month after randomisation to correlate leukopenia (nadir white blood cell leukopenia. Leukopenia was prognostic for PFS in those receiving CP (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 0.66, P=0.01). Carboplatin-liposomal doxorubicin was more effective than CP in patients without leukopenia (aHR 0.51, P=0.001), but not those experiencing leukopenia (aHR 0.93, P=0.54; interaction P=0.008).Of 949 patients, 32% (CP=62%, CPLD=28%) reported neuropathy during landmark. Neuropathy was prognostic for PFS in the CP group only (aHR 0.77, P=0.02). Carboplatin-liposomal doxorubicin appeared to be more effective than CP among patients without neuropathy (aHR 0.70, Pleukopenia and neuropathy were prognostic for patients treated with CP. Efficacy of CP treatment was similar to CPLD in patients who developed leukopenia. These findings support further research to understand the mechanisms of treatment-related toxicity.

  11. Carboplatin–paclitaxel-induced leukopenia and neuropathy predict progression-free survival in recurrent ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C K; Gurney, H; Brown, C; Sorio, R; Donadello, N; Tulunay, G; Meier, W; Bacon, M; Maenpaa, J; Petru, E; Reed, N; Gebski, V; Pujade-Lauraine, E; Lord, S; Simes, R J; Friedlander, M

    2011-01-01

    Background: We assess the prognostic value of chemotherapy-induced leukopenia and sensory neuropathy in the CALYPSO trial patients treated with carboplatin–paclitaxel (CP) or carboplatin–liposomal doxorubicin (CPLD). Methods: We performed a landmark analysis at first month after randomisation to correlate leukopenia (nadir white blood cell leukopenia. Leukopenia was prognostic for PFS in those receiving CP (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 0.66, P=0.01). Carboplatin–liposomal doxorubicin was more effective than CP in patients without leukopenia (aHR 0.51, P=0.001), but not those experiencing leukopenia (aHR 0.93, P=0.54; interaction P=0.008). Of 949 patients, 32% (CP=62%, CPLD=28%) reported neuropathy during landmark. Neuropathy was prognostic for PFS in the CP group only (aHR 0.77, P=0.02). Carboplatin–liposomal doxorubicin appeared to be more effective than CP among patients without neuropathy (aHR 0.70, Pleukopenia and neuropathy were prognostic for patients treated with CP. Efficacy of CP treatment was similar to CPLD in patients who developed leukopenia. These findings support further research to understand the mechanisms of treatment-related toxicity. PMID:21750553

  12. [Association between neuropathy and peripheral vascular insufficiency in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán-Guerrero, Rebeca O; Vásquez, Clemente; Isaís-Millán, Sara; Trujillo-Hernández, Benjamín; Caballero-Hoyos, Ramiro

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) can present complications of neuropathy and peripheral arterial disease with high risk for developing foot ulcers and consequent amputations. To identify the association between peripheral vascular disease, and neuropathy in type 2 Diabetes mellitus patients from the Hospital General de Zona No. 1 IMSS in Colima, Mexico. Cross-sectional study of 80 patients with diabetes mellitus evaluated by means of the Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire, Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument, ankle-arm index, Motor Nerve Conduction Velocity and H-reflex. 51 women and 29 men were studied. Mean age was 53.9 +/- 9.6 years, mean diabetes mellitus progression was 8 +/- 6.6 years and mean glucose level was 283 +/- 110 mg/mL. Neuropathy presented in 65 patients (81.2%). Ankle/arm index revealed 19% of patients presented with moderate peripheral vascular insufficiency. Motor Nerve Conduction Velocity was abnormal in 40% of patients and H-reflex was absent in 70%. Grade 2 motor-sensitive polyneuropathy was found in 70-80% of patients and moderate peripheral vascular insufficiency in 19%. It can thus be inferred that the complication of diabetic neuropathy appears before that of peripheral vessel damage.

  13. Wegener granulomatosis causing compressive optic neuropathy in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aakalu, Vinay K; Ahmad, Amjad Z

    2009-01-01

    Wegener granulomatosis is an uncommon illness in children that is known to cause myriad ophthalmic complications, but it is rarely a cause of compressive optic neuropathy. A 17-year-old Hispanic boy with Wegener granulomatosis developed unilateral loss of vision, pain, and proptosis of the left eye. CT findings revealed enlargement of bilateral lacrimal glands with compression of the left optic nerve. The patient was admitted for high-dose intravenous corticosteroids and daily oral cyclophosphamide treatment. The patient's vision, pain, and proptosis improved dramatically, and he is now stable on mycophenolate mofetil and prednisone.

  14. Chronic orbital inflammatory disease and optic neuropathy associated with long-term intranasal cocaine abuse: 2 cases and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemerink, Martin J; Freling, Nicole J M; Saeed, Peerooz

    2017-10-01

    Orbital inflammatory disease and secondary optic neuropathy is a rare but devastating complication of long-term intranasal cocaine abuse. We describe 2 patients with a history of intranasal cocaine consumption who presented with subacute onset of unilateral vision loss from optic neuropathy and limitation of abduction in the affected eye. Magnetic resonance imaging findings included an orbital mass in combination with absent nasal septum and partial destruction of the paranasal sinuses. Biopsies and histopathologic examination of the nasal cavity and the orbital mass revealed chronic inflammation. Both patients were treated with oral corticosteroids, ocular movements completely normalized but no improvement of visual acuity was noted. Intranasal cocaine abuse can cause orbital complications from chronic sinonasal inflammatory disease and these patients are at risk to develop optic neuropathy. Optic neuropathy may be caused by compression, infiltration, or ischaemia.

  15. Neuropathy: mobility and quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schie, Carine H. M.

    2008-01-01

    In summary, diabetes is increasingly becoming a disease of elderly people. Some of the under-appreciated complications such as impaired physical functioning, increased risk for falls and fractures need to be more addressed in the future. When evaluating a patient with peripheral neuropathy, it is

  16. Diabetic cachectic neuropathy: An uncommon neurological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diabetic patients can be affected by a wide variety of neurological complications which may involve the peripheral or autonomic nervous system, or both. These complications significantly impair the quality of life of patients, with impact on morbidity and mortality outcomes. Diabetic cachectic neuropathy, also called diabetic ...

  17. Habitual Physical Activity, Peripheral Neuropathy, Foot Deformities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Habitual physical activity index (3.2 ± 0.83) was highest in work-related activities; 69 (26.1 %) patients presented with peripheral neuropathy and 52 (19. 7%) had the lowest limb function. Pes planus was the most prevalent foot deformity (20.1%). Significant differences existed in physical activity indices across ...

  18. Amitriptyline and sertraline in diabetic neuropathy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    2008-06-01

    Jun 1, 2008 ... Jawaid et al. Amitriptyline and sertraline in diabetic neuropathy. Int J Health Res, June 2008; 1(2):. 71. Reprinted from. International Journal of. Health Research. Peer-reviewed Online Journal http://www.ijhr.org. PORACOM. Academic Publishers ...

  19. Idiopathic trigeminal neuropathy in a poodle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Aparicio

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A seven years old, male poodle is examined presenting acute mandible paralysis (dropped jaw, drooling and difficulty for the apprehension and chewing; not evidence of an other alteration of cranial nerves. The muscular biopsy rules out a myositisof masticatory muscles. The disorder is resolved completely in 3 weeks confirming diagnosis of idiopathic trigeminal neuropathy.

  20. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathies: an integrative review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talita Cassanta Costa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify scientific studies and to deepen the knowledge of peripheral neuropathies induced by chemotherapy antineoplastic, seeking evidence for assistance to cancer patients. METHOD: Integrative review of the literature conducted in the databases Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences (LILACS, Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO, Medical Literature Analysis (PubMed/MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library and the Spanish Bibliographic Index Health Sciences (IBECS. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 15 studies published between 2005-2014 that met the inclusion criteria. Studies showed aspects related to advanced age, main symptoms of neuropathy and chemotherapy agents as important adverse effect of neuropathy. CONCLUSION: We identified a small number of studies that addressed the topic, as well as low production of evidence related to interventions with positive results. It is considered important to develop new studies proposed for the prevention and/or treatment, enabling adjustment of the patient's cancer chemotherapy and consequently better service.

  1. Cardiac arrest after anesthetic management in a patient with hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ergül Yakup

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV is a rare disorder with an autosomal recessive transmission and characterized by self-mutilation due to a lack in pain and heat sensation. Recurrent hyperpyrexia and anhydrosis are seen in patients as a result of a lack of sweat gland innervation. Self-mutilation and insensitivity to pain result in orthopedic complications and patients undergone recurrent surgical interventions with anesthesia. However, these patients are prone to perioperative complications such as hyperthermia, hypothermia, and cardiac complications like bradycardia and hypotension. We report a 5-year-old boy with hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV, developing hyperpyrexia and cardiac arrest after anesthesia.

  2. Vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy in a neonate with congenital acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Steven K; Lipson, David M

    2010-04-01

    We report the case of a 46-day-old boy with a fulminant vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy after treatment for congenital acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Flaccid paralysis developed at the end of the first phase of induction, requiring intubation and ventilation for 51 days. Treatment was initiated with levocarnitine, N-acetylcysteine, and pyridoxine and progressive reversal of the neuropathy occurred over the next 4 months. Potential differences in pathogenesis and presentation of vincristine neurotoxicity and Guillian-Barre syndrome in the neonate are discussed.

  3. MR Angiography for the Evaluation of Non-Systemic Vasculitic Neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanada, M.; Terada, M.; Yasuda, H. [Shiga Univ. of Medical Science (Japan). Div. of Neurology; Suzuki, E.; Kashiwagi, A. [Shiga Univ. of Medical Science (Japan). Div. of Endocrinology and Metabolism

    2003-05-01

    Peripheral neuropathy due to vasculitis without any complications of vasculitis in other organs was first reported in 1987. This condition was termed non-systemic vasculitic neuropathy (NSVN). Although vasculitis is believed to develop in small arteries and arterioles in this disease, the level of vascular involvement has not been fully established. We present a case of NSVN followed up by MR angiography, which was thought to be useful to assess the level as well as the state of vascular lesions in this condition.

  4. Persistence of docetaxel-induced neuropathy and impact on quality of life among breast cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckhoff, L.; Knoop, A.; Jensen, M. B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study evaluates persistence and severity of docetaxel-induced neuropathy (peripheral neuropathy (PN)) and impact on health related quality of life in survivors from early-stage breast cancer. METHODS: One thousand and thirty-one patients with early-stage breast cancer, who received...... of Life Questionnaire (QLQ)-C30) after 1-3years. FINDINGS: Upon completion of docetaxel treatment, 241 patients (23%) reported PN, grades 2-4. PN persisted for 1-3years among 81 (34%) while PN regressed to grades 0-1 among 160 (66%). Among 790 patients (77%) without PN, 76 (10%) developed PN 1-3years...

  5. Hyperbaric oxygenation was effective in a case of radiation-induced optic neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saitoh, Ayumi; Dake, Yoshinori; Amemiya, Tsugio

    1995-01-01

    A 68-year-old female underwent radiation treatment followed by surgical extirpation for olfactory neuroblastoma in the left ethmoidal sinus. Acute optic neuropathy developed 16 months later in her left eye. The visual acuity was reduced to finger counting at 30 cm. Treatment with systemic corticosteroid and hyperbaric oxygenation for 2 months resulted in improvement in fundus findings and improvement of visual acuity to 0.5. The findings show the potential effectiveness of hyperbaric oxygen therapy for radiation-induced optic neuropathy. (author)

  6. N-hexane neuropathy in screen printers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, V; Chaudhry, N; Tatke, M

    2007-01-01

    To study the clinical and electrophysiological profile of n-hexane neuropathy in a tertiary care center of India. Twenty five screen printers from five different factories, with peripheral neuropathy were included in the study. A detailed general physical, systemic and neurological examination was conducted Visual acuity, color vision and field charting was done in all the subjects. All patients were subjected to Folstein mini mental scale examination. Electrophysiological evaluation included motor and sensory conduction studies of the conventionally studied nerves of upper and lower limbs, Needle EMG of various distal and proximal muscles and patterned visual evoked responses. The electrophysiological profile was repeated every three months till one year. Sural nerve biopsy was studied in six patients. The patients were followed for a maximum of 4 years. Twenty three [92%] patients had sensory- motor neuropathy, while pure sensory neuropathy was seen in two. The sensory conductions were affected almost equally in upper as well as the lower limbs, while the motor conductions were affected more in the lower limbs than the upper limbs. The sensory conductions were not recordable in both the upper and the lower limbs in 18 [72%] patients. Motor conduction studies revealed an asymmetric and patchy involvement. Proximal conduction block was seen in 3 patients [12%]. On needle EMG features of denervation were seen in all patients. P100 latency was normal in all. Sural nerve biopsy showed a selective decrease in large myelinated axons with demyelination. Axonal swelling with focal areas of demyelination was observed in two patients. The electrophysiological patterns as well as the histopathology reflect the pathophysiology of n-hexane neuropathy.

  7. Role of sigma 1 receptor in high fat diet-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tieying; Zhao, Jianhui; Ma, Xiaojing; Zhang, Zaiwang; Jiang, Bo; Yang, Yunliang

    2017-09-26

    The neurobiological mechanisms of obesity-induced peripheral neuropathy are poorly understood. We evaluated the role of Sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) and NMDA receptor (NMDARs) in the spinal cord in peripheral neuropathy using an animal model of high fat diet-induced diabetes. We examined the expression of Sig-1R and NMDAR subunits GluN2A and GluN2B along with postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95) in the spinal cord after 24-week HFD treatment in both wild-type and Sig-1R-/- mice. Finally, we examined the effects of repeated intrathecal administrations of selective Sig-1R antagonists BD1047 in HFD-fed wild-type mice on peripheral neuropathy. Wild-type mice developed tactile allodynia and thermal hypoalgesia after 24-week HFD treatment. HFD-induced peripheral neuropathy correlated with increased expression of GluN2A and GluN2B subunits of NMDARs, PDS-95, and Sig-1R, as well as increased Sig-1R-NMDAR interaction in the spinal cord. In contrast, Sig-1R-/- mice did not develop thermal hypoalgesia or tactile allodynia after 24-week HFD treatment, and the levels of GluN2A, GluN2B, and PSD-95 were not altered in the spinal cord of HFD-fed Sig-1R-/- mice. Finally, repeated intrathecal administrations of selective Sig-1R antagonists BD1047 in HFD-fed wild-type mice attenuated peripheral neuropathy. Our results suggest that obesity-associated peripheral neuropathy may involve Sig-1R-mediated enhancement of NMDAR expression in the spinal cord.

  8. HIV-related neuropathy: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schütz SG

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sonja G Schütz, Jessica Robinson-Papp Department of Neurology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Distal symmetric polyneuropathy (DSP related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is one of the most common neurologic complications of HIV, possibly affecting as many as 50% of all individuals infected with HIV. Two potentially neurotoxic mechanisms have been proposed to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of HIV DSP: neurotoxicity resulting from the virus and its products; as well as adverse neurotoxic effects of medications used in the treatment of HIV. Clinically, HIV DSP is characterized by a combination of signs and symptoms that include decreased deep tendon reflexes at the ankles and decreased sensation in the distal extremities as well as paresthesias, dysesthesias, and pain in a symmetric stocking–glove distribution. These symptoms are generally static or slowly progressive over time, and depending on the severity, may interfere significantly with the patient's daily activities. In addition to the clinical picture, nerve conduction studies and skin biopsies are often pursued to support the diagnosis of HIV DSP. Anticonvulsants, antidepressants, topical agents, and nonspecific analgesics may help relieve neuropathic pain. Specifically, gabapentin, lamotrigine, pregabalin, amitriptyline, duloxetine, and high-dose topical capsaicin patches have been used in research and clinical practice. Further research is needed to elucidate the pathogenesis of HIV DSP, thus facilitating the development of novel treatment strategies. This review discusses the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical findings, diagnosis, and management of DSP in the setting of HIV. Keywords: neuropathy, human immunodeficiency virus, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, AIDS, distal symmetric polyneuropathy, DSP, pain

  9. Chemotherapy-Induced Neuropathy in Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miaskowski, Christine; Mastick, Judy; Paul, Steven M; Topp, Kimberly; Smoot, Betty; Abrams, Gary; Chen, Lee-May; Kober, Kord M; Conley, Yvette P; Chesney, Margaret; Bolla, Kay; Mausisa, Grace; Mazor, Melissa; Wong, Melisa; Schumacher, Mark; Levine, Jon D

    2017-08-01

    Evidence suggests that chemotherapy-induced neuropathy (CIN) is a significant problem for cancer survivors. However, a detailed phenotypic characterization of CIN in cancer survivors is not available. To evaluate between-group differences in demographic and clinical characteristics, as well as in measures of sensation, function, and postural control, in a sample of cancer survivors who received a platinum and/or a taxane-based CTX regimen and did (n = 426) and did not (n = 197) develop CIN. Survivors completed self-report questionnaires and underwent objective testing (i.e., light touch, pain sensation, cold sensation, vibration, muscle strength, grip strength, Purdue Pegboard test, Timed Get Up and Go test, Fullerton Advanced Balance test). Parametric and nonparametric statistics were used to compare between-group differences in study outcomes. Of the 426 survivors with CIN, 4.9% had CIN only in their upper extremities, 27.0% only in their lower extremities, and 68.1% in both their upper and lower extremities. Demographic and clinical characteristics associated with CIN included the following: older age, lower annual income, higher body mass index, a higher level of comorbidity, being born prematurely, receipt of a higher cumulative dose of chemotherapy, and a poorer functional status. Survivors with CIN had worse outcomes for all of the following objective measures: light touch, pain, temperature, vibration, upper and lower extremity function, and balance. This study is the first to provide a detailed phenotypic characterization of CIN in cancer survivors who received a platinum and/or a taxane compound. These data can serve as a benchmark for future studies of CIN in cancer survivors. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy heralding accelerated chediak-higashi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Ingrid Vasconcellos; Prota, Joana Rosa Marques; Martinez, Alberto Rolim Muro; Nucci, Anamarli; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia; Júnior, Marcondes Cavalcante França

    2017-05-01

    Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is a very rare autosomal recessive disorder (gene CHS1/LYST) characterized by partial albinism, recurrent infections, and easy bruising. Survivors develop a constellation of slowly progressive neurological manifestations. We describe clinical, laboratory, electrophysiological, and genetic findings of a patient who developed an immune-mediated demyelinating neuropathy as the main clinical feature of CHS. The patient presented with subacute flaccid paraparesis, absent reflexes, and reduced vibration sense. Protein and immunoglobulins (Igs) were elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid. Electrodiagnostic tests indicated an acquired chronic demyelinating polyneuropathy. Intravenous Ig and immunosuppressant treatment resulted in neurological improvement. The patient later developed organomegaly and pancytopenia. Bone-marrow smear revealed giant azurophilic granules pathognomonic for CHS. Two novel mutations in the LYST gene were identified through whole exome sequencing [c.7786C>T and c.9106 + 1G>T]. This case expands the clinical phenotype of CHS and highlights inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy as a manifestation of the disease. Muscle Nerve 55: 756-760, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Prevalence of Sensory Neuropathy in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Its Correlation with Duration of Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, D B; Yadava, S K; Pant, S; Thusa, N; Dangol, E; Ghimire, S

    2016-01-01

    Background Peripheral neuropathy is one of the most common and distressing late complication of diabetes mellitus. Ignorance of the complications may develop foot ulcers and gangrene requiring amputation. Objective The main objective of this study is to find out the prevalence of sensory neuropathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus and to compare it with the duration of disease. Method Two hundred seventy one patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus of both gender age 30 years and above willing to participate were included in this study. Patients having hypothyroidism, rheumatoid arthritis, B12 deficiency, cerebrovascular disease, chronic musculoskeletal disease, Parkinson's disease, alcohol abuse, chronic renal or liver failure and cancer were excluded from the study. Touch, pin prick and vibration sensation were tested. Vibration perception threshold was recorded from six different sites of the sole of each foot using Biothesiometer. Result Two hundreds seventy one type 2 diabetic outpatients were studied. The mean age was 59.81±22.85 years. The overall prevalence of diabetic sensory neuropathy in the study population was 58.70%. A rising trend of diabetic sensory neuropathy with increasing age and duration of diabetes was observed. Neuropathy was found more in patients having urinary microalbuminuria. Burning and pins and needles sensation were most common symptoms. Conclusion The overall prevalence of diabetic sensory neuropathy in the study population was 58.70% (mean age 59.81±22.85 yrs), and its prevalence increased with duration of diabetes and increasing age. Its prevalence was found more in patients having microalbuminuria.

  12. Motor Neuropathy in Hypothyroidism: Clinical and Electrophysiological Findings

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    Sabina Yeasmin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypothyroidism is a clinical condition associated with low levels of thyroid hormones with raised TSH. Peripheral neuropathy may be associated with hypothyroidism which usually develops insidiously over a long period of time due to irregular taking of drugs or lack of thyroid hormone replacement. Objectives: The present study was done to evaluate the clinical and electro-physiological findings in hypothyroid patients in order to evaluate the neuromuscular dysfunction as well as motor neuropathy. Method: In this study, 70 subjects with the age range from 20 to 50 years of both sexes were included of whom 40 hypothyroids were taken in study group (B with the duration of 6 months to 5 years and 30 healthy euthyroid subjects were taken as control (Group A. On the basis of their TSH level, group B was further divided into group B1 with TSH level <60 MIU /L (less severe and group B2 with TSH >60 MIU /L (severe group. The d latency and NCV for motor nerve function were measured by NCV machine in median and ulnar nerve for upper limb and in common peroneal nerve for lower limb. TT3, TT4 were measured by RIA and TSH by IRMA method. All these parameters were measured on the day 1 (one of their first visit. Data were analysed statistically by ANOVA and Z test. Result: Both TT3, TT4 levels were significantly (P<0.01 lower in hypothyroids in comparison to those of control. Diminished or absence of most of the deep tendon reflexes were found in all the hypothyroids. Most of the patients (67.5% showed significantly higher (P <0.01 motor distal latencies (MDL with lower (P> 0.001 conduction velocities (MNCV and all these changes were more marked in group B2. Conclusion: So, the study revealed that motor neuropathy may be a consequence of hypothyroidism.DOI: 10.3329/bsmmuj.v1i1.3692 Key Words: Hypothyroidism; neuropathy; electrophysiology BSMMU J 2008; 1(1: 15-18

  13. Application of Multiscale Entropy in Assessing Plantar Skin Blood Flow Dynamics in Diabetics with Peripheral Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuyuan Liao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU is a common complication of diabetes mellitus, while tissue ischemia caused by impaired vasodilatory response to plantar pressure is thought to be a major factor of the development of DFUs, which has been assessed using various measures of skin blood flow (SBF in the time or frequency domain. These measures, however, are incapable of characterizing nonlinear dynamics of SBF, which is an indicator of pathologic alterations of microcirculation in the diabetic foot. This study recruited 18 type 2 diabetics with peripheral neuropathy and eight healthy controls. SBF at the first metatarsal head in response to locally applied pressure and heating was measured using laser Doppler flowmetry. A multiscale entropy algorithm was utilized to quantify the regularity degree of the SBF responses. The results showed that during reactive hyperemia and thermally induced biphasic response, the regularity degree of SBF in diabetics underwent only small changes compared to baseline and significantly differed from that in controls at multiple scales (p < 0.05. On the other hand, the transition of regularity degree of SBF in diabetics distinctively differed from that in controls (p < 0.05. These findings indicated that multiscale entropy could provide a more comprehensive assessment of impaired microvascular reactivity in the diabetic foot compared to other entropy measures based on only a single scale, which strengthens the use of plantar SBF dynamics to assess the risk for DFU.

  14. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is associated with mitochondrial ND6 T14502C mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Fuxin; Guan, Minqiang; Zhou, Xiangtian; Yuan, Meixia; Liang, Ming; Liu, Qi; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Yongmei; Yang, Li; Tong, Yi; Wei, Qi-Ping; Sun, Yan-Hong; Qu, Jia

    2009-01-01

    We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of three Chinese families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). There were variable severity and age of onset in visual impairment among these families. Strikingly, there were extremely low penetrances of visual impairment in these Chinese families. Sequence analysis of complete mitochondrial genomes in these pedigrees showed the homoplasmic T14502C (I58V) mutation, which localized at a highly conserved isoleucine at position 58 of ND6, and distinct sets of mtDNA polymorphisms belonging to haplogroups M10a, F1a1, and H2. The occurrence of T14502C mutation in these several genetically unrelated subjects affected by visual impairment strongly indicates that this mutation is involved in the pathogenesis of visual impairment. Here, mtDNA variants I187T in the ND1, A122V in CO1, S99A in the A6, and V254I in CO3 exhibited an evolutionary conservation, indicating a potential modifying role in the development of visual impairment associated with T14502C mutation in those families. Furthermore, nuclear modifier gene(s) or environmental factor(s) may play a role in the phenotypic manifestation of the LHON-associated T14502C mutation in these Chinese families.

  15. Surgery for nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickersin, K; Manheimer, E

    2000-01-01

    Nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy is characterized by sudden and painless loss of vision in one eye, accompanied by pallid swelling of the optic disc. Although various medical interventions, such as corticosteroids and phenytoin sodium, have been used to treat nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy, no therapy has been proven effective. The objective of this review is to assess the safety and efficacy of surgical treatment compared with other treatment or usual care in people with nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy. We searched the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register - Central and MEDLINE. The most recent searches were performed in December 1997. We included randomized trials comparing surgery to no surgery in people with nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy. We obtained full copies of all potentially relevant articles. Only one article described a randomized trial of surgery and it was eligible for inclusion. No formal assessment of quality was done. One reviewer extracted data. No synthesis was required, as there was only one trial. The one trial identified randomized 258 patients. The only published report with outcomes data for that trial presents preliminary results from 244 patients who had achieved six months of follow-up at the time of the report. Participants assigned to surgery did no better than participants assigned to careful follow-up regarding improved visual acuity of three or more lines of vision at six months: 32.6% of the surgery group improved compared with 42.7% of the careful follow-up group. The adjusted odds ratio (OR), adjusted for baseline visual acuity and diabetes, comparing the two groups for three or more lines improvement was 0.74 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.39 to 1. 38) (surgery group improvement was worse than careful follow-up). In addition, participants receiving surgery had a significantly greater risk of losing three or more lines of vision at six months: 23.9% in the surgery group worsened compared with 12.4% in

  16. Acute Fulminant Uremic Neuropathy Following Coronary Angiography Mimicking Guillain–Barre Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priti, Kumari; Ranwa, Bhanwar

    2017-01-01

    A 55-year-old diabetic woman suffered a posterior wall ST-elevation myocardial infarction. She developed contrast-induced nephropathy following coronary angiography. Acute fulminant uremic neuropathy was precipitated which initially mimicked Guillan–Barre Syndrome, hence reported. PMID:28706599

  17. Genetic Factors Underlying the Risk of Thalidomide-Related Neuropathy in Patients With Multiple Myeloma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, David C.; Corthals, Sophie L.; Walker, Brian A.; Ross, Fiona M.; Gregory, Walter M.; Dickens, Nicholas J.; Lokhorst, Henk M.; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Davies, Faith E.; Durie, Brian G. M.; Van Ness, Brian; Child, J. Anthony; Sonneveld, Pieter; Morgan, Gareth J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To indentify genetic variation that can modulate and predict the risk of developing thalidomide-related peripheral neuropathy (TrPN). Patients and Methods We analyzed DNA from 1,495 patients with multiple myeloma. Using a custom-built single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, we tested the

  18. [A case of acute motor acsonal neuropathy in patient after removal of giant adenoma of hypophysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Authors described a case of development of Acute Motor Acsonal Neuropathy (AMAN)--the one of variations of Guillian-Barre syndrome. They discuss clinical and diagnostic peculiarities of AMAN. Treatment by specific immunoglobulins is a method of choice for patients with this pathology.

  19. Radiation optic neuropathy after external beam radiation therapy for acromegaly : report of two cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bergh, ACM; Hoving, MA; Links, TP; Dullaart, RPF; Ranchor, AV; ter Weeme, CA; Canrinus, AA; Szabo, BG; Pott, JWR

    For diagnosing radiation optic neuropathy (RON) ophthalmological and imaging data were evaluated from 63 acromegalic patients, irradiated between 1967 and 1998. Two patients developed RON: one patient in one optic nerve 10 years and another patient in both optic nerves 5 months after radiation

  20. Results of examination of patients with vascular optical and glaucoma neuropathy by means of Eysenck questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Lysenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Eysenck questionnaire was offered to 45 patients with vascular optical and glaucomaous neuropathy. The results showed that 40 patients (88.9 % had melancholic temperament. These patients are demonstrated isolation, lability of the nervous system, instability in stressful situations and propensity to development of neuroses.

  1. Hormonal shifts and intensity of free radical oxidation in the blood of patients with facial nerve neuropathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Govorova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathochemical characteristic features of facial nerve neuropathy (FNN have been more accurately defined. Heterogeneous patochemical pattern of facial nerve neuropathy has been shown to be dependent on the severity of the disease, intensity of free radical oxidation processes, and hormonal status of the patient. We have found reliable distinctions in dynamics of free radical oxidation processes, and hormo-nal status in the blood of the patients with moderately severe and severe forms of facial nerve neuropathies. In facial nerve neuropathies we observed regulatory effects of cortisol and somatotropic hormone; in facial nerve neuropathywith moderate severity the hormones of thyroid group were seen to be switching off, falling out the processes regulating metabolism. Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH and luteinizing hormone (LH were found to have regulating effects, especially in the acute phase of the disease. Different dynamics of the hormones in patients with high and low free radical oxidation levels suggests that the oxidative stress intensity could be associated with regulatory effects of the hormones . The results of correlation analysis confirm the reliable distinctions in free radical oxidation characteristics andand cortisole levels, STH, FSH and LH levels.

  2. Hansen Neuropathy: Still a Possible Diagnosis in the Investigation of a Peripheral Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Andreia; Costa, Alexandre; Taipa, Ricardo; Guimarães, António; Pires, Manuel Melo

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy is still one of the most frequent causes of peripheral neuropathy. Although regarded as eradicated in Portugal, is still documented in neuropathological study of patients with clinical peripheral neuropathy without proper diagnosis. Review of the cases of Hansen disease neuropathy diagnosed in Neuropathology Unit of Centro Hospitalar do Porto between 1978 and 2013, atending to gender, age, clinical manifestations and neuropathological findings. Twenty one patients were identified with neuropathological diagnosis of Hansenâs disease neuropathy, predominantly male. The mean age at diagnosis was 52 years, and sensory symptoms predominate as neurological manifestation of disease. Interval between symptoms and diagnosis was 1-38 years. In most nerve samples tuberculoid type of disease was identified. Bacilli were detected in skin and nerve in 44% of cases. Mononeuritis is the most common presentation of leprosy but other clinical manifestations are possible, including skin lesions. Infection with M. leprae injures myelinated and unmyelinated fibres, with replacement of nerve tissue by collagen fibrosis. The diagnosis of leprosy is only achieved by neuropathological study of skin lesions and / or peripheral nerve, supported by the identification of the bacillus. Hansen disease remains a public health problem in tropical areas and, although rare, still described in Western countries reason why should still be considered as a diagnostic possibility in the investigation of peripheral neuropathy.

  3. Peroxynitrite and protein nitration in the pathogenesis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavniichuk, Roman; Shevalye, Hanna; Lupachyk, Sergey; Obrosov, Alexander; Groves, John T; Obrosova, Irina G; Yorek, Mark A

    2014-11-01

    Peroxynitrite, a product of the reaction of superoxide with nitric oxide, causes oxidative stress with concomitant inactivation of enzymes, poly(ADP-ribosylation), mitochondrial dysfunction and impaired stress signalling, as well as protein nitration. In this study, we sought to determine the effect of preventing protein nitration or increasing peroxynitrite decomposition on diabetic neuropathy in mice after an extended period of untreated diabetes. C57Bl6/J male control and diabetic mice were treated with the peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst Fe(III) tetramesitylporphyrin octasulfonate (FeTMPS, 10 mg/kg/day) or protein nitration inhibitor (-)-epicatechin gallate (20 mg/kg/day) for 4 weeks, after an initial 28 weeks of hyperglycaemia. Untreated diabetic mice developed motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity deficits, thermal and mechanical hypoalgesia, tactile allodynia and loss of intraepidermal nerve fibres. Both FeTMPS and epicatechin gallate partially corrected sensory nerve conduction slowing and small sensory nerve fibre dysfunction without alleviation of hyperglycaemia. Correction of motor nerve conduction deficit and increase in intraepidermal nerve fibre density were found with FeTMPS treatment only. Peroxynitrite injury and protein nitration are implicated in the development of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The findings indicate that both structural and functional changes of chronic diabetic peripheral neuropathy can be reversed and provide rationale for the development of a new generation of antioxidants and peroxynitrite decomposition catalysts for treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Published in 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  4. Cramps and small-fiber neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopate, Glenn; Streif, Elizabeth; Harms, Matthew; Weihl, Christopher; Pestronk, Alan

    2013-08-01

    Muscle cramps are a common complaint and are thought to arise from spontaneous discharges of the motor nerve terminal. Polyneuropathy is often causative, but small-fiber neuropathy (SFN) has not been assessed. We performed skin biopsies on consecutive patients with cramps but without neuropathic complaints. Twelve patients were biopsied, 8 with normal small-fiber sensation. Seven patients had decreased intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD), 2 with non-length-dependent loss. A cause for neuropathy was found in 1 patient with cramp-fasciculation syndrome. Creatine kinase was elevated in 8 patients, 4 with decreased IENFD. Muscle biopsy, performed in 8 patients, but was diagnostic in only 1, with McArdle disease. Our data show that 60% of patients with muscle cramps who lack neuropathic complaints have SFN, as documented by decreased IENFD. Cramps may originate as local mediators of inflammation released by damaged small nerve that excite intramuscular nerves. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. [Hereditary ataxia and sensory-motor neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miladinović, Ksenija; Hodzić, Samiha; Zjuzin, Nadezda; Lokmic, Eldan

    2003-01-01

    The authors presented this case because of the determined characteristics in the clinical picture and electrophysiologic finding which refer to spinocerebral degeneration and neuropathia of the hereditary type, and give the possibility of the classification into two nosologic entities. One is Roussey Levy's syndrome, what is the advisable diagnosis of our patient, and another Freidreich's ataxia. Regardless to the impossibility of the establishing of diagnosis by means the specific enzimatic and genetic tests, the authors on the basis of the clinical picture, electromioncurographic findings and data from the literature of the diagnostic ally decided for Freidreich's ataxya. The neuropathy have classified into the hereditary motor sensor neuropathy--HMSN type II and presented its characteristics.

  6. [Assessment of a patient with optic neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roceanu, Adina; Romaniţan, Oana; Antochi, Florina; Tiu, Cristina; Băjenaru, Ovidiu; Pascu, Ruxandra; Alexandrescu, Cristina; Nanea, Mariana; Voinea, Liliana

    2010-01-01

    Optic neuropathy (ON) is defined as the reduction of vision due to inflammatory lesion of the optic nerve. The patient with ON has to be evaluated clinically but also with complex techniques (magnetic resonance imaging, visual evoked potentials, cerebrospinal fluid examination) because ON could be the presenting symptom in multiple sclerosis patients. Corticosteroids should be administrated intravenous and the patient should be followed by the neurologist in order to signal the appearance of new neurological signs.

  7. Somatic DNA Damages in Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Supriya Simon, A.; Dinesh Roy, D.; Jayapal, V.; Vijayakumar, T.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is one of the most clinically significant complications of diabetes mellitus. Even though many ethological factors have been attributed for the pathogenesis of this disease no attempts were made to correlate DNA damage as a causative factor. Hence the present study was undertaken to asses the extent of somatic DNA damages by cytokinesis-block micronuclei assay (CBMN). An attempt is also being made to correlate the habits and/or risk factors and socioe...

  8. Saturday Morning Palsy: Closed Traumatic Peripheral Neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    NN Wazir

    2007-01-01

    Traumatic peripheral neuropathy can occur following fracture, dislocation, forceful reduction or direct compression. During the emergency medical relief mission for earthquake victims in Pakistan, between 30th Oct and 14th Nov 2005, four patients presented with wrist drop and two others with foot drop, all with no underlying fracture or dislocation. All of them were attended by medical teams two to three days for the first time due to difficult rescue work and hard terrain. They were seen in ...

  9. Recurrent painful ophthalmoplegic neuropathy; A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Semra Saygi; Tulun Savas; ilknur Erol

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent painful ophthalmoplegic neuropathy, typically seen as a serious childhood migraine attack which is followed by ptosis and diplopia due to oculomotor nerve palsy. This is regarded as a form of migraine in the previous classifications but according to the latest classification of the International Headache Society has been recognized as cranial neuralgia. Due to the poor pathological and radiological findings of oculomotor nerve during attack, it is difficult to make differential diag...

  10. The prevalence of peripheral neuropathy in patients with anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, J R; LaBan, M M; Sackeyfio, A H

    1989-11-01

    A prospective, controlled study was conducted to determine the prevalence of peripheral neuropathy (PN) in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN). Fifty-one patients (49 females, 2 males) between the ages of 12 and 47 (means = 22.5) who met the criteria for AN of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Third Edition, were randomly selected from an inpatient eating disorders unit during 15 months. Fifty healthy volunteers (41 females, 9 males) between the ages of 17 and 50 (means = 26.5) served as controls. After a neurologic history, all patients were evaluated by physical examination and standardized electrodiagnostic testing. Chi-square contingency testing was used to assess data. Four study group patients (8%) had electrodiagnostic evidence of a sensorimotor PN compared with none in the control group. This is approaching statistical significance (p = 0.13). Three of four patients with AN for at least ten years were among those with PN. The prevalence of subjective symptoms among the study group (65%) as compared to the control group (4%) was of marked significance (p = 5.62 x 10(-10]. In addition, three anorexic patients were found to have an isolated peroneal nerve palsy. We conclude that PN is a notable complication of AN, particularly in long-standing cases. The PN is most likely a product of chronic malnutrition rather than a specific nutrient deficiency. Patients with AN also appear to be at increased risk for developing localized compression neuropathies secondary to subcutaneous tissue loss.

  11. Neuroprotection by resveratrol in diabetic neuropathy: concepts & mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, A; Negi, G; Sharma, S S

    2013-01-01

    Resveratrol is a naturally occurring phytoalexin found in many plants, nuts and fruits and is abundant in grapes and red wine. Resveratrol possesses a wide range of biological activities which include antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, chemoprotective, chemopreventive etc. Resveratrol has been investigated extensively in diabetes and its complications which suggest its anti-diabetic activity and protective effect against various diabetic complications. Neurons are extremely susceptible to oxidant-induced damage which may be due to their high rate of oxygen consumption and low levels of antioxidant defence enzymes. Traditionally, it was thought that the protective actions of resveratrol in diabetic neuropathy are due to its intrinsic radical scavenger properties. However, recently many other associated or separate mechanisms like upregulation of Nrf2, SIRT1 and inhibition of NF-κB, AP-1 have been proposed for its beneficial effect against nerve dysfunction. This present review discusses the neuroprotective effects of resveratrol that have been observed in experimental diabetic neuropathy and possible mechanistic explanations, as these effects may provide directions for the development of newer therapies. Futuristic therapies can be based on either resveratrol or its analogs with better bioavailability, or combining the resveratrol with existing therapies.

  12. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy in patients with diabetes mellitus: current perspectives

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    Fisher VL

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Victoria L Fisher,1 Abd A Tahrani2–4 1School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, 2Institute of Metabolism and Systems Research, University of Birmingham, 3Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Birmingham Heartlands Hospital, 4Centre for Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Birmingham Health Partners, Birmingham, UK Abstract: Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN is a common and often-underdiagnosed complication of diabetes mellitus (DM. CAN is associated with increased mortality, cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, and morbidity in patients with DM, but despite these significant consequences CAN often remains undiagnosed for a prolonged period. This is commonly due to the disease being asymptomatic until the later stages, as well as a lack of easily available screening strategies. In this article, we review the latest developments in the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, consequences, and treatments of CAN in patients with DM. Keywords: cardiovascular, autonomic, neuropathy, orthostatic hypotension, postural hypotension, hyperglycemia, heart-rate variability, sympathetic, parasympathetic, deep breathing, Valsalva ratio, 30:15 ratio, Ewing tests, Ewing criteria

  13. The Satellite Cell in Male and Female, Developing and Adult Mouse Muscle: Distinct Stem Cells for Growth and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Alice; Boldrin, Luisa; Morgan, Jennifer Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Satellite cells are myogenic cells found between the basal lamina and the sarcolemma of the muscle fibre. Satellite cells are the source of new myofibres; as such, satellite cell transplantation holds promise as a treatment for muscular dystrophies. We have investigated age and sex differences between mouse satellite cells in vitro and assessed the importance of these factors as mediators of donor cell engraftment in an in vivo model of satellite cell transplantation. We found that satellite cell numbers are increased in growing compared to adult and in male compared to female adult mice. We saw no difference in the expression of the myogenic regulatory factors between male and female mice, but distinct profiles were observed according to developmental stage. We show that, in contrast to adult mice, the majority of satellite cells from two week old mice are proliferating to facilitate myofibre growth; however a small proportion of these cells are quiescent and not contributing to this growth programme. Despite observed changes in satellite cell populations, there is no difference in engraftment efficiency either between satellite cells derived from adult or pre-weaned donor mice, male or female donor cells, or between male and female host muscle environments. We suggest there exist two distinct satellite cell populations: one for muscle growth and maintenance and one for muscle regeneration. PMID:22662253

  14. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyerson C

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cherise Meyerson, Greg Van Stavern, Collin McClelland Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA Abstract: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON is one of the most common inherited optic neuropathies causing bilateral central vision loss. The disorder results from point mutations in mitochondrial DNA and subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction. The primary cell type that is lost in LHON is the retinal ganglion cell, which is highly susceptible to disrupted ATP production and oxidative stress. Inheritance of LHON follows that of mitochondrial genetics, and it has a highly variable clinical phenotype, as other genetic and environmental factors also play a role. Although LHON usually presents with isolated vision loss, some patients suffer other neurological sequelae. For ill-defined reasons, male LHON mutation carriers are more affected than females. Most LHON patients remain legally blind, but a small proportion can experience spontaneous partial recovery, often within the first year of symptom onset. Unfortunately, at this time there are no established curative interventions and treatment is largely supportive. Patients should be offered low vision services and counseled on mitigating risk factors for additional vision loss, such as smoking and consuming alcohol. Encouraging treatments currently undergoing investigation includes ubiquinone analogs, such as idebenone, as well as gene therapy and stem cells to restore ATP synthesis and provide neuroprotection to surviving retinal ganglion cells. Keywords: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, mitochondria, neuro-ophthalmology, mitochondrial DNA

  15. Fuzzy expert system for diagnosing diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani Katigari, Meysam; Ayatollahi, Haleh; Malek, Mojtaba; Kamkar Haghighi, Mehran

    2017-02-15

    To design a fuzzy expert system to help detect and diagnose the severity of diabetic neuropathy. The research was completed in 2014 and consisted of two main phases. In the first phase, the diagnostic parameters were determined based on the literature review and by investigating specialists' perspectives ( n = 8). In the second phase, 244 medical records related to the patients who were visited in an endocrinology and metabolism research centre during the first six months of 2014 and were primarily diagnosed with diabetic neuropathy, were used to test the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the fuzzy expert system. The final diagnostic parameters included the duration of diabetes, the score of a symptom examination based on the Michigan questionnaire, the score of a sign examination based on the Michigan questionnaire, the glycolysis haemoglobin level, fasting blood sugar, blood creatinine, and albuminuria. The output variable was the severity of diabetic neuropathy which was shown as a number between zero and 10, had been divided into four categories: absence of the disease, (the degree of severity) mild, moderate, and severe. The interface of the system was designed by ASP.Net (Active Server Pages Network Enabled Technology) and the system function was tested in terms of sensitivity (true positive rate) (89%), specificity (true negative rate) (98%), and accuracy (a proportion of true results, both positive and negative) (93%). The system designed in this study can help specialists and general practitioners to diagnose the disease more quickly to improve the quality of care for patients.

  16. Optic neuropathy in a patient with pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Small, Juan E. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Gonzalez, Guido E. [Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Clinica Alemana de Santiago, Departmento de Imagenes, Santiago (Chile); Nagao, Karina E.; Walton, David S. [Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Harvard Medical School, Department of Ophthalmology, Boston, MA (United States); Caruso, Paul A. [Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2009-10-15

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) deficiency is a genetic disorder of mitochondrial metabolism. The clinical manifestations range from severe neonatal lactic acidosis to chronic neurodegeneration. Optic neuropathy is an uncommon clinical sequela and the imaging findings of optic neuropathy in these patients have not previously been described. We present a patient with PDH deficiency with bilateral decreased vision in whom MRI demonstrated bilateral optic neuropathy and chiasmopathy. (orig.)

  17. Selective accumulation of germ-line associated gene products in early development of the sea star and distinct differences from germ-line development in the sea urchin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresques, Tara; Zazueta-Novoa, Vanesa; Reich, Adrian; Wessel, Gary M

    2014-04-01

    Echinodermata is a diverse phylum, a sister group to chordates, and contains diverse organisms that may be useful to understand varied mechanisms of germ-line specification. We tested 23 genes in development of the sea star Patiria miniata that fall into five categories: (1) Conserved germ-line factors; (2) Genes involved in the inductive mechanism of germ-line specification; (3) Germ-line associated genes; (4) Molecules involved in left-right asymmetry; and (5) Genes involved in regulation and maintenance of the genome during early embryogenesis. Overall, our results support the contention that the posterior enterocoel is a source of the germ line in the sea star P. miniata. The germ line in this organism appears to be specified late in embryogenesis, and in a pattern more consistent with inductive interactions amongst cells. This is distinct from the mechanism seen in sea urchins, a close relative of the sea star clad. We propose that P. miniata may serve as a valuable model to study inductive mechanisms of germ-cell specification and when compared with germ-line formation in the sea urchin S. purpuratus may reveal developmental transitions that occur in the evolution of inherited and inductive mechanisms of germ-line specification. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Acupuncture Treatment of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy in an American Indian Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Bailey

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN develops in 30% of type 2 diabetes patients, increases the risk for foot ulcers and amputation, and is a significant source of disability and medical costs. Treatment remains challenging, propelling research to focus on therapeutic methods that aim to improve blood circulation or ameliorate oxidative stress that drives development of DPN. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture treatment for DPN symptoms and lower extremity arterial circulation in people with type 2 diabetes. Twenty-five patients seen at a Southern California Tribal Health Center who reported a threshold level of diabetic neuropathy symptoms in the lower extremities during the previous 4 weeks received acupuncture treatment once per week over a 10-week period between 2011 and 2013. The Neuropathy Total Symptom Scale (NTSS-6, Neuropathy Disability Score (NDS, and laser Doppler fluxmetry (LDF were used for assessment at baseline and 10 weeks. A total of 19 of 25 study participants completed the study and reported a significant reduction in the NTSS symptoms of aching pain, burning pain, prickling sensation, numbness, and allodynia. Lancinating pain did not decrease significantly. LDF measures improved but not significantly. Acupuncture may effectively ameliorate selected DPN symptoms in these American Indian patients.

  19. Multifocal visual evoked potential in optic neuritis, ischemic optic neuropathy and compressive optic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manju Jayaraman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the effect of optic neuritis (ON, ischemic optic neuropathy (ION and compressive optic neuropathy (CON on multifocal visual evoked potential (mfVEP amplitudes and latencies, and to compare the parameters among three optic nerve disorders. Materials and Methods: mfVEP was recorded for 71 eyes of controls and 48 eyes of optic nerve disorders with subgroups of optic neuritis (ON, n = 21 eyes, ischemic optic neuropathy (ION, n = 14 eyes, and compressive optic neuropathy (CON, n = 13 eyes. The size of defect in mfVEP amplitude probability plots and relative latency plots were analyzed. The pattern of the defect in amplitude probability plot was classified according to the visual field profile of optic neuritis treatment trail (ONTT. Results: Median of mfVEP amplitude (log SNR averaged across 60 sectors were reduced in ON (0.17 (0.13-0.33, ION (0.14 (0.12-0.21 and CON (0.21 (0.14-0.30 when compared to controls. The median mfVEP relative latencies compared to controls were significantly prolonged in ON and CON group of 10.53 (2.62-15.50 ms and 5.73 (2.67-14.14 ms respectively compared to ION group (2.06 (-4.09-13.02. The common mfVEP amplitude defects observed in probability plots were diffuse pattern in ON, inferior altitudinal defect in ION and temporal hemianopia in CON eyes. Conclusions: Optic nerve disorders cause reduction in mfVEP amplitudes. The extent of delayed latency noted in ischemic optic neuropathy was significantly lesser compared to subjects with optic neuritis and compressive optic neuropathy. mfVEP amplitudes can be used to objectively assess the topography of the visual field defect.

  20. Reduced risk of compressive optic neuropathy using orbital radiotherapy in patients with active thyroid eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Pari N; Ma, Roy; Pickles, Tom; Rootman, Jack; Dolman, Peter J

    2014-06-01

    To compare the risk of developing compressive optic neuropathy in patients with active thyroid eye disease (TED) treated with corticosteroids with or without orbital radiotherapy. Retrospective single-center case-control study. The clinical charts of 351 patients with active TED who received corticosteroids with or without orbital radiotherapy between 1999 and 2010 were reviewed. Patients with compressive optic neuropathy at the time of presentation were excluded. Group 1 received corticosteroids only and Group 2 received corticosteroids as well as orbital radiotherapy. The primary outcome measure was the development of compressive optic neuropathy. Secondary outcome measures were changes in other parameters indicating the activity of TED, including soft tissue inflammation, diplopia, ocular motility restriction, and appearance. There were 144 cases in Group 1 and 105 in Group 2. Both groups were matched for age, sex, and stability of thyroid function. The 2 groups differed only in the modality of treatment for active TED. The main indication for treatment in both groups was soft tissue inflammation. Corticosteroids were initiated an average of 2.6 months following symptom onset in Group 1 and 2.5 months in Group 2. Group 2 received orbital radiotherapy on average 4.2 months following the initiation of corticosteroid therapy and 8% (9/105) were intolerant to corticosteroids. At an average of 3.2 years follow-up, compressive optic neuropathy had developed in 17% (25/144) of Group 1 and 0% of Group 2 (P disease progression and the development of compressive optic neuropathy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Protective effect of oryzanol isolated from crude rice bran oil in experimental model of diabetic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsuvra B. Ghatak

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have implicated the involvement of poor glycemic control and oxidative/nitrosative stress in the development of diabetic neuropathic pain, an important microvascular complication affecting more than 50% of diabetic patients. However, lack of understanding of the underlying etiology, development of tolerance, inadequate relief and possible toxicity associated with classical analgesics warrant the investigation of the novel agents. Therefore, the present study was carried out to investigate the effect of oryzanol (OZ, a commercially-important potent antioxidant component isolated from from crude rice bran oil (cRBO, in streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic neuropathy in rats. After eight weeks, diabetic rats developed neuropathy which was evident from decreased tail-flick latency (thermal hyperalgesia and increased nociceptive behavior during the formalin test. This was accompanied by decreased motor coordination based on the evaluation of neuromuscular strength. Na+ K+ ATPase, a biochemical marker associated with the development of diabetic neuropathy, was significantly inhibited in the sciatic nerve of diabetic animals. The activities of antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation levels were significantly elevated in diabetic rats, indicating the involvement of oxidative stress in diabetic neuropathy. Chronic treatment with oryzanol (OZ (50 and 100 mg/kg per oral (p.o. and standard drug glibenclamide (Gl (10 mg/kg, p.o. significantly attenuated the behavioral as well as biochemical changes associated with diabetic neuropathy. The findings provide experimental evidence to the protective effects of OZ on hyperglycemia-induced thermal hyperalgesia and oxidative stress which might be responsible for diabetes induced nerve damage.

  2. Protective effect of oryzanol isolated from crude rice bran oil in experimental model of diabetic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsuvra B. Ghatak

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have implicated the involvement of poor glycemic control and oxidative/nitrosative stress in the development of diabetic neuropathic pain, an important microvascular complication affecting more than 50% of diabetic patients. However, lack of understanding of the underlying etiology, development of tolerance, inadequate relief and possible toxicity associated with classical analgesics warrant the investigation of the novel agents. Therefore, the present study was carried out to investigate the effect of oryzanol (OZ, a commercially-important potent antioxidant component isolated from from crude rice bran oil (cRBO, in streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic neuropathy in rats. After eight weeks, diabetic rats developed neuropathy which was evident from decreased tail-flick latency (thermal hyperalgesia and increased nociceptive behavior during the formalin test. This was accompanied by decreased motor coordination based on the evaluation of neuromuscular strength. Na+ K+ ATPase, a biochemical marker associated with the development of diabetic neuropathy, was significantly inhibited in the sciatic nerve of diabetic animals. The activities of antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation levels were significantly elevated in diabetic rats, indicating the involvement of oxidative stress in diabetic neuropathy. Chronic treatment with oryzanol (OZ (50 and 100 mg/kg per oral (p.o. and standard drug glibenclamide (Gl (10 mg/kg, p.o. significantly attenuated the behavioral as well as biochemical changes associated with diabetic neuropathy. The findings provide experimental evidence to the protective effects of OZ on hyperglycemia-induced thermal hyperalgesia and oxidative stress which might be responsible for diabetes induced nerve damage.

  3. Clinicopathological study of vasculitic peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-fang DONG

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To summarize the clinical features and neuropathological characteristics in patients with vasculitic peripheral neuropathy (VPN. Methods Clinical manifestations, laboratory examination and neuromuscular biopsy characteristics of 11 patients with VPN were retrospectively analyzed. The lesion of nerve, muscle and skin was observed under optical and electron microscope. Immunohistochemical analyses were carried out to detect neurofilament (NF, myelin basic protein (MBP, peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22 and S-100 protein (S-100 and further observing the neuropathy of neuraxon, myelin sheath and Schwann cells, and to detect human leukocyte antigen DR (HLA-DR, CD68, CD3 and CD20 to observe inflammatory cell infiltration. Immunofluorescent staining was used to detect the deposition of IgA, IgM, IgG and addiment C3 on vascular wall. The staining of periodic acid-Schiff (PAS, NADH-tetrazolium reductase (NADH-TR and modified Gomori trichrome (MGT were used to judge the myopathy. Results 1 Angiopathies were mainly manifested by small vessels of epineurium and perineurium, and infiltrated inflammatory cells were mainly CD3 + T cells. Three patients had active vasculitis, and 8 patients had non-active vasculitis. Among these 8 patients, 4 patients mainly presented fibrous obliteration of blood vessel, with slight inflammatroy cell infiltration, and the other 4 patients mainly showed perivascular inflammation. 2 Neuropathy: 6 patients had axon degeneration, and 5 patients had axon degeneration associated with demyelination. All of them demonstrated a reduction in myelinated fibers, mainly large diameter myelinated fibers, even on end-stage. 3 Muscle biopsy showed neurogenic atrophy. 4 Clinicopathologic diagnosis: among these 11 patients, 8 patients were diagnosed as systemic vasculitic peripheral neuropathy (SVPN, among whom 5 patients were diagnosed as primary systemic vasculitis [including 1 patient as Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS, 2 patients as

  4. Longitudinal analyses of expressive language development reveal two distinct language profiles among young children with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tek, Saime; Mesite, Laura; Fein, Deborah; Naigles, Letitia

    2014-01-01

    Although children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) show significant variation in language skills, research on what type(s) of language profiles they demonstrate has been limited. Using growth-curve analyses, we investigated how different groups of young children with ASD show increases in the size of their lexicon, morpho-syntactic production as measured by Brown's 14 grammatical morphemes, and wh-question complexity, compared to TD children, across six time points. Children with ASD who had higher verbal skills were comparable to TD children on most language measures, whereas the children with ASD who had low verbal skills had flatter trajectories in most language measures. Thus, two distinct language profiles emerged for children with ASD.

  5. Single Sensor Gait Analysis to Detect Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: A Proof of Principle Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Esser

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the potential utility of gait analysis using a single sensor unit (inertial measurement unit [IMU] as a simple tool to detect peripheral neuropathy in people with diabetes. Seventeen people (14 men aged 63±9 years (mean±SD with diabetic peripheral neuropathy performed a 10-m walk test instrumented with an IMU on the lower back. Compared to a reference healthy control data set (matched by gender, age, and body mass index both spatiotemporal and gait control variables were different between groups, with walking speed, step time, and SDa (gait control parameter demonstrating good discriminatory power (receiver operating characteristic area under the curve >0.8. These results provide a proof of principle of this relatively simple approach which, when applied in clinical practice, can detect a signal from those with known diabetes peripheral neuropathy. The technology has the potential to be used both routinely in the clinic and for tele-health applications. Further research should focus on investigating its efficacy as an early indicator of or effectiveness of the management of peripheral neuropathy. This could support the development of interventions to prevent complications such as foot ulceration or Charcot's foot.

  6. Single Sensor Gait Analysis to Detect Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: A Proof of Principle Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, Patrick; Collett, Johnny; Maynard, Kevin; Steins, Dax; Hillier, Angela; Buckingham, Jodie; Tan, Garry D; King, Laurie; Dawes, Helen

    2018-02-01

    This study explored the potential utility of gait analysis using a single sensor unit (inertial measurement unit [IMU]) as a simple tool to detect peripheral neuropathy in people with diabetes. Seventeen people (14 men) aged 63±9 years (mean±SD) with diabetic peripheral neuropathy performed a 10-m walk test instrumented with an IMU on the lower back. Compared to a reference healthy control data set (matched by gender, age, and body mass index) both spatiotemporal and gait control variables were different between groups, with walking speed, step time, and SDa (gait control parameter) demonstrating good discriminatory power (receiver operating characteristic area under the curve >0.8). These results provide a proof of principle of this relatively simple approach which, when applied in clinical practice, can detect a signal from those with known diabetes peripheral neuropathy. The technology has the potential to be used both routinely in the clinic and for tele-health applications. Further research should focus on investigating its efficacy as an early indicator of or effectiveness of the management of peripheral neuropathy. This could support the development of interventions to prevent complications such as foot ulceration or Charcot's foot. Copyright © 2018 Korean Diabetes Association.

  7. Safety of BTZ retreatment for patients with low-grade peripheral neuropathy during the initial treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidisheva, Aleksandra P; Wang, James; Spektor, Tanya M; Bitran, Jacob D; Lutzky, Jose; Tabbara, Imad A; Ye, Joseph Z; Ailawadhi, Sikander; Stampleman, Laura V; Steis, Ronald G; Moezi, Mehdi M; Swift, Regina A; Maluso, Tina M; Udd, Kyle A; Eshaghian, Shahrooz; Nassir, Youram; Berenson, James R

    2017-10-01

    Neuropathy is an important complication that may limit treatment options for patients with multiple myeloma. Previous studies have focused on treatment efficacy and have shown that retreatment with bortezomib (BTZ) is an effective treatment option. The goal of this study was to focus on the clinical manifestations of peripheral neuropathy (PN) and to retrospectively compare the incidence and severity of PN between the initial BTZ regimen and upon retreatment. Furthermore, this study evaluated how certain factors affect BIPN, which will help determine what conditions should be considered prior to retreatment. Charts were reviewed from 93 patients who were retreated with a BTZ-containing regimen after previously being treated with this drug. Among the patients who developed PN, most patients in the study had low-grade neuropathy during the initial BTZ treatment (n = 52, 68%). The results showed no evidence of cumulative toxicity, and there was no significant difference in the incidence and severity of PN upon retreatment. Factors such as the presence of baseline PN, number of prior treatments, dose of BTZ, and comorbidities did not increase the severity of PN upon retreatment. The lapse of time between the two regimens also did not affect the severity of PN. The results suggest that retreatment with BTZ may be a feasible option, without additional risks of PN, for MM patients even with peripheral neuropathy during their initial treatment with this drug.

  8. Neuroinflammation and Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Neuropathy: Futuristic Strategies Based on These Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddemma Sandireddy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In Diabetes, the chronic hyperglycemia and associated complications affecting peripheral nerves are one of the most commonly occurring microvascular complications with an overall prevalence of 50–60%. Among the vascular complications of diabetes, diabetic neuropathy is the most painful and disabling, fatal complication affecting the quality of life in patients. Several theories of etiologies surfaced down the lane, amongst which the oxidative stress mediated damage in neurons and surrounding glial cell has gained attention as one of the vital mechanisms in the pathogenesis of neuropathy. Mitochondria induced ROS and other oxidants are responsible for altering the balance between oxidants and innate antioxidant defence of the body. Oxidative-nitrosative stress not only activates the major pathways namely, polyol pathway flux, advanced glycation end products formation, activation of protein kinase C, and overactivity of the hexosamine pathway, but also initiates and amplifies neuroinflammation. The cross talk between oxidative stress and inflammation is due to the activation of NF-κB and AP-1 and inhibition of Nrf2, peroxynitrite mediate endothelial dysfunction, altered NO levels, and macrophage migration. These all culminate in the production of proinflammatory cytokines which are responsible for nerve tissue damage and debilitating neuropathies. This review focuses on the relationship between oxidative stress and neuroinflammation in the development and progression of diabetic neuropathy.

  9. Systemic Amyloidosis and Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy Associated with Waldenstrom’s Macroglobulinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aasems Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 73-year-old male with long-standing Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia complicated with systemic amyloidosis presented with a witnessed syncopal episode. He had complaints of orthostatic dizziness and palpitations for few months. Orthostatic hypotension and peripheral neuropathy were demonstrated on physical examination. EKG, 24-hour Holter monitoring, and 2D echocardiogram were unremarkable. MRI of the brain ruled out stroke. Patients with amyloidosis can develop cardiovascular disease through amyloid cardiomyopathy, small vessel disease, conduction defects, pericardial effusion, or autonomic denervation. After ruling out other life-threatening causes, Ewing’s battery of tests was done to rule out cardiac autonomic neuropathy. Two heart rate tests and one blood pressure test were abnormal which indicated severe cardiac autonomic neuropathy. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy can mask symptoms of acute coronary syndrome and hence early diagnosis using the simple bedside maneuver is beneficial. The test is also important for prognostication. Absence of augmentation of cardiac output from inadequate autonomic stimulation will lead to postural hypotension, exercise intolerance, and tachycardia. There may be no change in heart rate with Valsalva or deep breathing both of which increase parasympathetic tone. As the condition progresses, it may result in cardiac denervation which can result in silent myocardial infarction, syncope, and sudden death.

  10. Unilateral Optic Neuropathy and Acute Angle-Closure Glaucoma following Snake Envenomation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Okan Olcaysu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We aimed to describe a unique case in which a patient developed unilateral optic neuritis and angle-closure glaucoma as a result of snake envenomation. Case Report. Approximately 18 hours after envenomation, a 67-year-old female patient described visual impairment and severe pain in her left eye (LE. The patient’s best corrected visual acuity was 10/10 in the RE and hand motion in the LE. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging showed signs of neuropathy in the left optic nerve. In the LE, corneal haziness, closure of the iridocorneal angle, and mild mydriasis were observed and pupillary light reflex was absent. Intraocular pressure was 25 mmHg and 57 mmHg in the RE and LE, respectively. The patient was diagnosed with acute angle-closure glaucoma in the LE. Optic neuropathy was treated with intravenous pulse methylprednisolone. Left intraocular pressure was within normal range starting on the fourth day. One month after the incident, there was no sign of optic neuropathy; relative afferent pupillary defect and optic nerve swelling disappeared. Conclusions. Patients with severe headache and visual loss after snake envenomation must be carefully examined for possible optic neuropathy and angle-closure glaucoma. Early diagnosis and treatment of these cases are necessary to prevent permanent damage to optic nerves.

  11. Exacerbation of Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2E neuropathy following traumatic nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalón, Eric; Dale, Jeffrey M; Jones, Maria; Shen, Hailian; Garcia, Michael L

    2015-11-19

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. CMT disease signs include distal limb neuropathy, abnormal gait, sensory defects, and deafness. We generated a novel line of CMT2E mice expressing hNF-L(E397K), which displayed muscle atrophy of the lower limbs without denervation, proximal reduction in large caliber axons, and decreased nerve conduction velocity. In this study, we challenged wild type, hNF-L and hNF-L(E397K) mice with crush injury to the sciatic nerve. We analyzed functional recovery by measuring toe spread and analyzed gait using the Catwalk system. hNF-L(E397K) mice demonstrated reduced recovery from nerve injury consistent with increased susceptibility to neuropathy observed in CMT patients. In addition, hNF-L(E397K) developed a permanent reduction in their ability to weight bear, increased mechanical allodynia, and premature gait shift in the injured limb, which led to increasingly disrupted interlimb coordination in hNF-L(E397K). Exacerbation of neuropathy after injury and identification of gait alterations in combination with previously described pathology suggests that hNF-L(E397K) mice recapitulate many of clinical signs associated with CMT2. Therefore, hNF-L(E397K) mice provide a model for determining the efficacy of novel therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Serum levels of TGF-β1 in patients of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and its correlation with nerve conduction velocity in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Gauhar; Rizvi, S Aijaz Abbas; Singhal, Sangeeta; Zubair, Mohammad; Ahmad, Jamal

    2016-01-01

    To correlate serum levels of TGF-β1 with motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities in patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus The study was conducted in diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus patients which were divided in patients with clinically detectable peripheral neuropathy of shorter duration (n=37) and longer duration (n=27). They were compared with patients without clinical neuropathy (n=22). Clinical diagnosis was based on neuropathy symptom score (NSS) and Neuropathy disability score (NDS) for signs. Blood samples were collected for baseline investigations and estimation of serum TGF-β1. Nerve conduction velocity was measured in both upper and lower limbs. Median, Ulnar, Common Peroneal and Posterior Tibial nerves were selected for motor nerve conduction study and Median and Sural nerves were selected for sensory nerve conduction study In patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus with clinically detectable and serum TGF-β1 showed positive correlation with nerve conduction velocities High level of TGF-β1 in serum of T2DM patients with neuropathy show possible contribution in development of neuropathy. Due to its independent association this cytokine might be used as biomarker for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Copyright © 2015 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Central pain processing in chronic chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine G Boland

    Full Text Available Life expectancy in multiple myeloma has significantly increased. However, a high incidence of chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN can negatively influence quality of life during this period. This study applied functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to compare areas associated with central pain processing in patients with multiple myeloma who had chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy (MM-CIPN with those from healthy volunteers (HV. Twenty-four participants (n = 12 MM-CIPN, n = 12 HV underwent Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent (BOLD fMRI at 3T whilst noxious heat-pain stimuli were applied to the foot and then thigh. Patients with MM-CIPN demonstrated greater activation during painful stimulation in the precuneus compared to HV (p = 0.014, FWE-corrected. Patients with MM-CIPN exhibited hypo-activation of the right superior frontal gyrus compared to HV (p = 0.031, FWE-corrected. Significant positive correlation existed between the total neuropathy score (reduced version and activation in the frontal operculum (close to insular cortex during foot stimulation in patients with MM-CIPN (p = 0.03, FWE-corrected; adjusted R2 = 0.87. Painful stimuli delivered to MM-CIPN patients evoke differential activation of distinct cortical regions, reflecting a unique pattern of central pain processing compared with healthy volunteers. This characteristic activation pattern associated with pain furthers the understanding of the pathophysiology of painful chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy. Functional MRI provides a tool for monitoring cerebral changes during anti-cancer and analgesic treatment.

  14. From stem cells to human development: a distinctly human perspective on early embryology, cellular differentiation and translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, April M; Johnson, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Over 100 scientists with common interests in human development, disease and regeneration gathered in late September 2016 for The Company of Biologists' second 'From Stem Cells to Human Development' meeting held in historic Southbridge. In this Meeting Review, we highlight some of the exciting new findings that were presented, and discuss emerging themes and convergences in human development and disease that arose during these discussions. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Treatment of diabetic neuropathy in the lower limb

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The classification of diabetic neuropathy can be done in several ways: clinical presentation (symmetrical, focal or multifocal, or painful, paralytic and ataxic), type of fibres affected (motor, sensory, autonomic), or painful or non-painful. The commonest presentation of peripheral neuropathy in diabetes is that of chronic ...

  16. Rhesus anti-D immunoglobulin in chronic autoimmune neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jager, AEJ; van der Hoeven, JH

    Objective - To investigate the effect of Rhesus anti-D immunoglobulin (anti-D) in patients with an autoimmune demyelinating neuropathy. Material and methods - Three patients with an autoimmune mediated neuropathy received 1000 IU anti-D weekly for 2 months. Results - Two patients worsened gradually

  17. Acute toxic neuropathy mimicking guillain barre syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Jasim Abdul Jalal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Case: A 30 year old male presented with numbness of palms and soles followed by weakness of upper limbs and lower limbs of 5 days duration, which was ascending and progressive. Three months back he was treated for oral and genital ulcers with oral steroids. His ulcers improved and shifted to indigenous medication. His clinical examination showed polyneuropathy. CSF study did not show albuminocytological dissociation. Nerve conduction study showed demyelinating polyneuropathy. His blood samples and the ayurvedic drug samples were sent for toxicological analysis. Inference: Acute toxic neuropathy - Arsenic

  18. Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy following dengue fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Reshma; Shrivastava, Saurabh; Deshpande, Shrikant; Patkar, Priyanka

    2016-01-01

    Dengue fever is caused by a flavivirus. This infection is endemic in the tropics and warm temperate regions of the world. Ocular manifestations of dengue fever include subconjunctival, vitreous, and retinal haemorrhages; posterior uveitis; optic neuritis; and maculopathies, haemorrhage, and oedema. However anterior ischemic optic neuropathy is a rare presentation. Optic nerve ischemia most frequently occurs at the optic nerve head, where structural crowding of nerve fibers and reduction of the vascular supply may combine to impair perfusion to a critical degree and produce optic disc oedema. Here we present a case of anterior ischemic optic neurapathy associated with dengue fever.

  19. Saturday Morning Palsy: Closed Traumatic Peripheral Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NN Wazir

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic peripheral neuropathy can occur following fracture, dislocation, forceful reduction or direct compression. During the emergency medical relief mission for earthquake victims in Pakistan, between 30th Oct and 14th Nov 2005, four patients presented with wrist drop and two others with foot drop, all with no underlying fracture or dislocation. All of them were attended by medical teams two to three days for the first time due to difficult rescue work and hard terrain. They were seen in field hospital on their follow up at four to five weeks.

  20. Recurrent painful ophthalmoplegic neuropathy; A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Saygi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent painful ophthalmoplegic neuropathy, typically seen as a serious childhood migraine attack which is followed by ptosis and diplopia due to oculomotor nerve palsy. This is regarded as a form of migraine in the previous classifications but according to the latest classification of the International Headache Society has been recognized as cranial neuralgia. Due to the poor pathological and radiological findings of oculomotor nerve during attack, it is difficult to make differential diagnosis. In this manuscript we report 11-year-old female patient with ophtalmoplegic migraine. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(4.000: 938-941

  1. [Diabetic Retinopathy and Neuropathy: New in 2015].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henzen, Christoph

    2015-06-03

    In 2014 interesting new results were published in the field of diabetic microangiopathy: (1) In tensive treatment of type 1 diabetes for a mean of 6,5 years confers a lifelong reduction of the risk of diabetic retinopathy; (2) although the rates of diabetes-related complication have declined since 1990, the burden of disease persists because the prevalence of diabetes tripled during the same time; (3) subjects with diabetic neuropathy have structural brain changes, i.e. gray matter loss, findings with possible implications for the prognosis; (4) over 80% of type 2 diabetics who consider their feet to be normal have serious foot pathology.

  2. Metabolic and cardiovascular responses to epinephrine in diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Richter, E; Madsbad, S

    1987-01-01

    Norepinephrine-induced vasoconstriction, which is mediated by alpha-adrenergic receptors, is accentuated in patients with autonomic neuropathy. In contrast, responses mediated by beta-adrenergic receptors, including vasodilatation and metabolic changes, have not been evaluated in these patients....... To study these responses, we administered epinephrine in a graded intravenous infusion (0.5 to 5 micrograms per minute) to seven diabetic patients without neuropathy, seven diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy, and seven normal subjects. Mean arterial pressure decreased significantly in the patients...... with autonomic neuropathy than in the other groups (P less than 0.05). These findings indicate that several beta-receptor-mediated responses to epinephrine are enhanced in patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy. The underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated....

  3. Electrical cataract and optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biro, Z; Pamer, Z

    1994-01-01

    We report on a 20 year old male, who developed mature cataract (Electrical Cataract) on both eyes after a severe electric shock from high voltage. Both of his hands and the left foot had to be amputated, because of the severe injury. Although electrical cataract due to high voltage or lightning is rare, they may still occur after industrial or home electric accidents. Even if extracapsular cataract extraction with intraocular lens implantation is successfully performed, the final visual acuity will depend on other ocular damage due to the electric current.

  4. AINTEGUMENTA-LIKE genes have partly overlapping functions with AINTEGUMENTA but make distinct contributions to Arabidopsis thaliana flower development

    OpenAIRE

    Krizek, Beth A.

    2015-01-01

    AINTEGUMENTA (ANT) is an important regulator of Arabidopsis flower development that has overlapping functions with the related AINTEGUMENTA-LIKE6 (AIL6) gene in floral organ initiation, identity specification, growth, and patterning. Two other AINTEGUMENTA-LIKE (AIL) genes, AIL5 and AIL7, are expressed in developing flowers in spatial domains that partly overlap with those of ANT. Here, it is shown that AIL5 and AIL7 also act in a partially redundant manner with ANT. The results demonstrate t...

  5. Nutritional Optic Neuropathy Caused by Copper Deficiency After Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapoport, Yuna; Lavin, Patrick J M

    2016-06-01

    A 47-year-old woman developed severe bilateral visual loss 4 years after a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and 24 years after vertical banded gastroplasty. Her serum copper level was 35 μg/dL (normal, 80-155 μg/dL). She was prescribed elemental copper tablets. Because her methylmalonic acid was slightly elevated, she received vitamin B12 injections as well. Five weeks later, she reported that her vision had improved and, at 10 months, her vision had recovered from 20/400 bilaterally to 20/25 in each eye. This case highlights the importance of checking copper levels in addition to the "more routine" vitamin levels, such as B1, B6, B12, E, and serum folate in patients with suspected nutritional optic neuropathy after bariatric surgery, particularly if it involved a bypass procedure.

  6. N-hexane exposure: a cause of small fiber neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães-Costa, Raquel; Schoindre, Yoland; Metlaine, Arnaud; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; Camdessanché, Jean-Philippe; Maisonobe, Thierry; Léger, Jean-Marc

    2018-03-15

    A 59-year-old woman presented with progressive paresthesias of all of her limbs for 4 years, associated with neuropathic pain, tingling in the tongue and allodynia, consistent with small fiber neuropathy (SFN). Several systemic symptoms and signs were found on clinical examination and laboratory work-up. Neurological investigations including neurophysiologic test and skin biopsy supported the diagnosis of SFN. Chronic exposure to N-hexane was then disclosed and suspected to be the cause of the disease. Following the discontinuation of chronic N-hexane exposure, the patient had a progressive improvement of all signs and symptoms, reinforcing the correlation between exposure to N-hexane, and development of SFN. Exposure to N-hexane may be considered as a novel reversible cause of SFN, which underlines the need to look for toxic etiologies in the diagnosis of SFN. © 2018 Peripheral Nerve Society.

  7. Distinct development of peripheral trigeminal pathways in the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) and short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwell, Ken W S; Hardman, Craig D; Giere, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The extant monotremes (platypus and echidnas) are believed to all be capable of electroreception in the trigeminal pathways, although they differ significantly in the number and distribution of electroreceptors. It has been argued by some authors that electroreception was first developed in an aquatic environment and that echidnas are descended from a platypus-like ancestor that invaded an available terrestrial habitat. If this were the case, one would expect the developmental trajectories of the trigeminal pathways to be similar in the early stages of platypus and short-beaked echidna development, with structural divergence occurring later. We examined the development of the peripheral trigeminal pathway from snout skin to trigeminal ganglion in sectioned material in the Hill and Hubrecht collections to test for similarities and differences between the two during the development from egg to adulthood. Each monotreme showed a characteristic and different pattern of distribution of developing epidermal sensory gland specializations (electroreceptor primordia) from the time of hatching. The cross-sectional areas of the trigeminal divisions and the volume of the trigeminal ganglion itself were also very different between the two species at embryonic ages, and remained consistently different throughout post-hatching development. Our findings indicate that the trigeminal pathways in the short-beaked echidna and the platypus follow very different developmental trajectories from the earliest ages. These findings are more consistent with the notion that the platypus and echidna have both diverged from an ancestor with rudimentary electroreception and/or trigeminal specialization, rather than the contention that the echidna is derived from a platypus-like ancestor. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. IL-7R expression and IL-7 signaling confer a distinct phenotype on developing human B-lineage cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nodland, Sonja E.; Berkowska, Magdalena A.; Bajer, Anna A.; Shah, Nisha; de Ridder, Dick; van Dongen, Jacques J. M.; LeBien, Tucker W.; van Zelm, Menno C.

    2011-01-01

    IL-7 is an important cytokine for lymphocyte differentiation. Similar to what occurs in vivo, human CD19(+) cells developing in human/murine xenogeneic cultures show differential expression of the IL-7 receptor alpha (IL-7R alpha) chain (CD127). We now describe the relationship between CD127

  9. Human syndromes of immunodeficiency and dysregulation are characterized by distinct defects in T-cell receptor repertoire development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    X. Yu (Xiaomin); J.R. Almeida (Jorge); S. Darko (Sam); M. van der Burg (Mirjam); S.S. Deravin (Suk See); H. Malech (Harry); A.R. Gennery (Andrew); I. Chinn (Ivan); M.L. Markert (Mary Louise); D.C. Douek (Daniel ); J.D. Milner (Joshua)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground Human immunodeficiencies characterized by hypomorphic mutations in critical developmental and signaling pathway genes allow for the dissection of the role of these genes in the development of the T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire and the correlation of alterations of the TCR

  10. The Distinction between Moral Judgment Development and Verbal Ability: Some Relevant Data Using Socio-Political Outcome Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Stephen J.; Derryberry, Pitt; Narvaez, Darcia

    2009-01-01

    Critics of moral judgment measures question whether the obtained pattern of relationships between moral judgment scores and outcome variables might be better explained by verbal/general ability. To address this concern, we assess the degree to which moral judgment development reduces to verbal ability using the Defining Issues Test (DIT). Our…

  11. Development of a molecular assay for the general detection of tospoviruses and the distinction between tospoviral species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bald-Blume, Niklas; Bergervoet, Jan H.W.; Maiss, Edgar

    2017-01-01

    A Luminex xTAG-based assay for plant-infecting tospoviruses was developed. The test enables the detection of tospoviruses in general and the differentiation of the four important member species of this genus: Tomato spotted wilt virus, Impatiens necrotic spot virus, the proposed ‘Capsicum chlorosis

  12. Episodic neurological dysfunction in hereditary peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish Baburao Kulkarni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Episodic transient neurological symptoms are an important set of problems presenting to a neurologist in his routine practice. Occasionally, detailed clinical history including past and family history supplemented with focused examination can bring out a rare cause for such symptoms. We describe in this report in a young male presenting with episodic focal neurological dysfunction, with family history of similar episodes in mother and brother. Examination showed features of pes cavus and peripheral neuropathy for which patient was asymptomatic. Mother and brother were established cases of hereditary neuropathy. Imaging on multiple occasions showed reversible white matter abnormalities. Clinical suspicion of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 (CMT1X was confirmed with detection of mutation in Gap Junction B1 (GJB1 gene, which codes for connexin 32 protein (c.425G>A; p.R142Q hemizygous mutation. Though this mutation has been already reported in CMTX patients, it has not been associated with transient neurological dysfunctions. This is probably the first reported case of CMTX patient with transient neurological dysfunction from India, whose family members had similar episodes.

  13. Genetic Characterization of Coenzyme A Biosynthesis Reveals Essential Distinctive Functions during Malaria Parasite Development in Blood and Mosquito

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    Robert J. Hart

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Coenzyme A (CoA is an essential universal cofactor for all prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. In nearly all non-photosynthetic cells, CoA biosynthesis depends on the uptake and phosphorylation of vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid or pantothenate. Recently, putative pantothenate transporter (PAT and pantothenate kinases (PanKs were functionally characterized in P. yoelii. PAT and PanKs were shown to be dispensable for blood stage development, but they were essential for mosquito stages development. Yet, little is known about the cellular functions of the other enzymes of the CoA biosynthesis pathway in malaria parasite life cycle stages. All enzymes of this pathway were targeted for deletion or deletion/complementation analyses by knockout/knock-in plasmid constructs to reveal their essential roles in P. yoelii life cycle stages. The intermediate enzymes PPCS (Phosphopantothenylcysteine Synthase, PPCDC (Phosphopantothenylcysteine Decarboxylase were shown to be dispensable for asexual and sexual blood stage development, but they were essential for oocyst development and the production of sporozoites. However, the last two enzymes of this pathway, PPAT (Phosphopantetheine Adenylyltransferase and DPCK (Dephospho-CoA Kinase, were essential for blood stage development. These results indicate alternative first substrate requirement for the malaria parasite, other than the canonical pantothenate, for the synthesis of CoA in the blood but not inside the mosquito midgut. Collectively, our data shows that CoA de novo biosynthesis is essential for both blood and mosquito stages, and thus validates the enzymes of this pathway as potential antimalarial targets.

  14. Genetic Characterization of Coenzyme A Biosynthesis Reveals Essential Distinctive Functions during Malaria Parasite Development in Blood and Mosquito.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Robert J; Abraham, Amanah; Aly, Ahmed S I

    2017-01-01

    Coenzyme A (CoA) is an essential universal cofactor for all prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. In nearly all non-photosynthetic cells, CoA biosynthesis depends on the uptake and phosphorylation of vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid or pantothenate). Recently, putative pantothenate transporter (PAT) and pantothenate kinases (PanKs) were functionally characterized in P. yoelii . PAT and PanKs were shown to be dispensable for blood stage development, but they were essential for mosquito stages development. Yet, little is known about the cellular functions of the other enzymes of the CoA biosynthesis pathway in malaria parasite life cycle stages. All enzymes of this pathway were targeted for deletion or deletion/complementation analyses by knockout/knock-in plasmid constructs to reveal their essential roles in P. yoelii life cycle stages. The intermediate enzymes PPCS (Phosphopantothenylcysteine Synthase), PPCDC (Phosphopantothenylcysteine Decarboxylase) were shown to be dispensable for asexual and sexual blood stage development, but they were essential for oocyst development and the production of sporozoites. However, the last two enzymes of this pathway, PPAT (Phosphopantetheine Adenylyltransferase) and DPCK (Dephospho-CoA Kinase), were essential for blood stage development. These results indicate alternative first substrate requirement for the malaria parasite, other than the canonical pantothenate, for the synthesis of CoA in the blood but not inside the mosquito midgut. Collectively, our data shows that CoA de novo biosynthesis is essential for both blood and mosquito stages, and thus validates the enzymes of this pathway as potential antimalarial targets.

  15. 40LoVe and Samba are involved in Xenopus neural development and functionally distinct from hnRNP AB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Andreou

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs comprise a large group of modular RNA-binding proteins classified according to their conserved domains. This modular nature, coupled with a large choice of alternative splice variants generates functional diversity. Here, we investigate the biological differences between 40LoVe, its splice variant Samba and its pseudoallele hnRNP AB in neural development. Loss of function experiments lead to defects in neural development with reduction of eye size, which stem primarily from increased apoptosis and reduced proliferation in neural tissues. Despite very high homology between 40LoVe/Samba and hnRNP AB, these proteins display major differences in localization, which appear to be in part responsible for functional differences. Specifically, we show that the 40Love/Samba carboxy-terminal domain (GRD enables nucleocytoplasmic shuttling behavior. This domain is slightly different in hnRNP AB, leading to nuclear-restricted localization. Finally, we show that shuttling is required for 40LoVe/Samba function in neural development.

  16. 40LoVe and Samba are involved in Xenopus neural development and functionally distinct from hnRNP AB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreou, Maria; Yan, Chao Yun Irene; Skourides, Paris A

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) comprise a large group of modular RNA-binding proteins classified according to their conserved domains. This modular nature, coupled with a large choice of alternative splice variants generates functional diversity. Here, we investigate the biological differences between 40LoVe, its splice variant Samba and its pseudoallele hnRNP AB in neural development. Loss of function experiments lead to defects in neural development with reduction of eye size, which stem primarily from increased apoptosis and reduced proliferation in neural tissues. Despite very high homology between 40LoVe/Samba and hnRNP AB, these proteins display major differences in localization, which appear to be in part responsible for functional differences. Specifically, we show that the 40Love/Samba carboxy-terminal domain (GRD) enables nucleocytoplasmic shuttling behavior. This domain is slightly different in hnRNP AB, leading to nuclear-restricted localization. Finally, we show that shuttling is required for 40LoVe/Samba function in neural development.

  17. The two α-dox genes of Nicotiana attenuata: overlapping but distinct functions in development and stress responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steppuhn Anke

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant fatty acid α-dioxygenases (α-DOX are oxylipin-forming enzymes induced by biotic and abiotic stresses, which also participate in developmental processes. In Nicotiana attenuata, herbivory strongly induces the expression of an α-dox1 gene. To determine its role, we silenced its expression using Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation with an inverted repeat construct. More than half of the transformed lines showed a severe dwarf growth phenotype that was very similar to the phenotype of tomato plants mutated at a second α-dox isoform. This led us to identify the corresponding α-dox2 gene in N. attenuata and examine the regulation of both α-dox genes as well as the consequences of their silencing in plant development and anti-herbivore defense. Results The transformed lines exhibiting a dwarf growth phenotype are co-silenced for both α-dox genes resulting in a nearly complete suppression of α-DOX activity, which is associated with increases in ABA, JA and anthocyanin levels, all metabolic signatures of oxidative stress. The other lines, only silenced for α-dox1, developed similarly to wild-type plants, exhibited a 40% reduction of α-DOX activity resulting in a 50% reduction of its main product in planta (2-HOT and showed no signs of oxidative stress. In contrast to α-dox1, the expression of α-dox2 gene is not induced by wounding or elicitors in the oral secretions of Manduca sexta. Instead, α-dox2 is expressed in roots and flowers which lack α-dox1 expression, but both genes are equally regulated during leaf maturation. We transiently silenced α-dox gene copies with gene-specific constructs using virus induced gene silencing and determined the consequences for plant development and phytohormone and 2-HOT levels. While individual silencing of α-dox1 or α-dox2 had no effects on plant growth, the co-suppression of both α-dox genes decreased plant growth. Plants transiently silenced for both α-dox genes

  18. Differentiating the Preterm Phenotype: Distinct Profiles of Cognitive and Behavioral Development Following Late and Moderately Preterm Birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samantha; Waheed, Ghazala; Manktelow, Bradley N; Field, David J; Marlow, Neil; Draper, Elizabeth S; Boyle, Elaine M

    2018-02-01

    To explore patterns of comorbidity in cognitive and behavioral outcomes at 2 years' corrected age among children born late or moderately preterm (LMPT) and to identify predictors of different patterns of comorbidity. Geographical, prospective population-based cohort study of 1139 infants born LMPT (32 0/7 to 36 6/7 weeks' gestation) and 1255 infants born at term (37 0/7 to 42 6/7 weeks' gestation). Parent questionnaires were obtained to identify impaired cognitive and language development, behavioral problems, delayed social-emotional competence, autistic features, and clinically significant eating difficulties at 24 months corrected age for 638 (57%) children born LMPT and 765 (62%) children born at term. Latent class analysis revealed 2 profiles of development among the term group: optimal (84%) and a profile of social, emotional, and behavioral impairments termed "nonoptimal" (16%). These 2 profiles were also identified among the LMPT group (optimal: 67%; nonoptimal: 26%). In the LMPT group, a third profile was identified (7%) that was similar to the phenotype previously identified in infants born very preterm. Nonwhite ethnicity, socioeconomic risk, and not receiving breast milk at hospital discharge were risk factors for nonoptimal outcomes in both groups. Male sex, greater gestational age, and pre-eclampsia were only associated with the preterm phenotype. Among children born LMPT with parent-reported cognitive or behavioral impairments, most had problems similar to the profile of difficulties observed in children born at term. A smaller proportion of children born LMPT had impairments consistent with the "very preterm phenotype" which are likely to have arisen through a preterm pathway. These results suggest that prematurity may affect development through several etiologic pathways in the late and moderately preterm population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Treatment strategies for inherited optic neuropathies: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu-Wai-Man, P; Votruba, M; Moore, A T; Chinnery, P F

    2014-05-01

    Bilateral visual loss secondary to inherited optic neuropathies is an important cause of registrable blindness among children and young adults. The two prototypal disorders seen in clinical practice are Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (DOA). About 90% of LHON cases are due to one of three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations: m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A, and m.14484T>C, which affect critical complex I subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The majority of patients with DOA harbour pathogenic mutations within OPA1, a nuclear gene that codes for a multifunctional inner mitochondrial membrane protein. Despite their contrasting genetic basis, LHON and DOA share overlapping pathological and clinical features that serve to highlight the striking tissue-specific vulnerability of the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) layer to disturbed mitochondrial function. In addition to severe visual loss secondary to progressive optic nerve degeneration, a subgroup of patients will also develop a more aggressive syndromic phenotype marked by significant neurological deficits. The management of LHON and DOA remains largely supportive, but major advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning RGC loss in these two disorders are paving the way for novel forms of treatment aimed at halting or reversing visual deterioration at different stages of the disease process. In addition to neuroprotective strategies for rescuing RGCs from irreversible cell death, innovative in vitro fertilisation techniques are providing the tantalising prospect of preventing the germline transmission of pathogenic mtDNA mutations, eradicating in so doing the risk of disease in future generations.

  20. Pinceau Organization in the Cerebellum Requires Distinct Functions of Neurofascin in Purkinje and Basket Neurons During Postnatal Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttermore, Elizabeth D.; Piochon, Claire; Wallace, Michael L.; Philpot, Benjamin D.; Hansel, Christian; Bhat, Manzoor A.

    2012-01-01

    Basket axon collaterals synapse onto the Purkinje soma/axon initial segment (AIS) area to form specialized structures, the pinceau, which are critical for normal cerebellar function. Mechanistic details of how the pinceau become organized during cerebellar development are poorly understood. Loss of cytoskeletal adaptor protein Ankyrin G (AnkG) results in mislocalization of the cell adhesion molecule Neurofascin (Nfasc) at the Purkinje AIS and abnormal organization of the pinceau. Loss of Nfasc in adult Purkinje neurons leads to slow disorganization of the Purkinje AIS and pinceau morphology. Here we utilized mouse conditional knockout techniques to show that selective loss of Nfasc specifically in Purkinje neurons during early development prevented maturation of the AIS and resulted in loss of Purkinje neuron spontaneous activity and pinceau disorganization. Loss of Nfasc in both Purkinje and basket neurons caused abnormal basket axon collateral branching and targeting to Purkinje soma/AIS, leading to extensive pinceau disorganization, Purkinje neuron degeneration and severe ataxia. Our studies reveal that the Purkinje Nfasc is required for AIS maturation and for maintaining stable contacts between basket axon terminals and the Purkinje AIS during pinceau organization, while the basket neuron Nfasc in combination with Purkinje Nfasc is required for proper basket axon collateral outgrowth and targeting to Purkinje soma/AIS. Thus, cerebellar pinceau organization requires coordinated mechanisms involving specific Nfasc functions in both Purkinje and basket neurons. PMID:22492029

  1. Glucocorticoids Distinctively Modulate the CFTR Channel with Possible Implications in Lung Development and Transition into Extrauterine Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laube, Mandy; Bossmann, Miriam; Thome, Ulrich H

    2015-01-01

    During fetal development, the lung is filled with fluid that is secreted by an active Cl- transport promoting lung growth. The basolateral Na+,K+,2Cl- cotransporter (NKCC1) participates in Cl- secretion. The apical Cl- channels responsible for secretion are unknown but studies suggest an involvement of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). CFTR is developmentally regulated with a high expression in early fetal development and a decline in late gestation. Perinatal lung transition is triggered by hormones that stimulate alveolar Na+ channels resulting in fluid absorption. Little is known on how hormones affect pulmonary Cl- channels. Since the rise of fetal cortisol levels correlates with the decrease in fetal CFTR expression, a causal relation may be assumed. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of glucocorticoids on pulmonary Cl- channels. Alveolar cells from fetal and adult rats, A549 cells, bronchial Calu-3 and 16HBE14o- cells, and primary rat airway cells were studied with real-time quantitative PCR and Ussing chambers. In fetal and adult alveolar cells, glucocorticoids strongly reduced Cftr expression and channel activity, which was prevented by mifepristone. In bronchial and primary airway cells CFTR mRNA expression was also reduced, whereas channel activity was increased which was prevented by LY-294002 in Calu-3 cells. Therefore, glucocorticoids strongly reduce CFTR expression while their effect on CFTR activity depends on the physiological function of the cells. Another apical Cl- channel, anoctamin 1 showed a glucocorticoid-induced reduction of mRNA expression in alveolar cells and an increase in bronchial cells. Furthermore, voltage-gated chloride channel 5 and anoctamine 6 mRNA expression were increased in alveolar cells. NKCC1 expression was reduced by glucocorticoids in alveolar and bronchial cells alike. The results demonstrate that glucocorticoids differentially modulate pulmonary Cl- channels and are likely

  2. Role of stretch therapy in comprehensive physical habilitation of patients with Charcot–Marie–Tooth hereditary neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Shnayder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Charcot–Marie–Tooth hereditary neuropathy (Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease, CMT is the most common form of hereditary neuropathies, accompanied by sensory disorders, progressive muscle weakness with the formation of disabling contractures of the limbs. Currently, the main treatment program is effective CMT habilitation, which can prevent the development of limb deformities and thereby improve the life quality of the patient. Stretch therapy is one of the most effective methods of prevention and treatment of contractures in patients with CMT. This article provides a brief review of the literature regarding the use of stretching as physical therapy program of CMT habilitation.

  3. Tamoxifen Isomers and Metabolites Exhibit Distinct Affinity and Activity at Cannabinoid Receptors: Potential Scaffold for Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Benjamin M; Franks, Lirit N; Radominska-Pandya, Anna; Prather, Paul L

    2016-01-01

    Tamoxifen (Tam) is a selective estrogen receptor (ER) modulator (SERM) that is an essential drug to treat ER-positive breast cancer. Aside from known actions at ERs, recent studies have suggested that some SERMs like Tam also exhibit novel activity at cannabinoid subtype 1 and 2 receptors (CB1R and CB2Rs). Interestingly, cis- (E-Tam) and trans- (Z-Tam) isomers of Tam exhibit over a 100-fold difference in affinity for ERs. Therefore, the current study assessed individual isomers of Tam and subsequent cytochrome P450 metabolic products, 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4OHT) and 4-hydroxy-N-desmethyl tamoxifen (End) for affinity and activity at CBRs. Results showed that Z-4OHT, but not Z-Tam or Z-End, exhibits higher affinity for both CB1 and CB2Rs relative to the E-isomer. Furthermore, Z- and E-isomers of Tam and 4OHT show slightly higher affinity for CB2Rs, while both End isomers are relatively CB1R-selective. When functional activity was assessed by G-protein activation and regulation of the downstream effector adenylyl cyclase, all isomers examined act as full CB1 and CB2R inverse agonists. Interestingly, Z-Tam appears to be more efficacious than the full inverse agonist AM630 at CB2Rs, while both Z-Tam and Z-End exhibit characteristics of insurmountable antagonism at CB1 and CB2Rs, respectively. Collectively, these results suggest that the SERMs Tam, 4OHT and End elicit ER-independent actions via CBRs in an isomer-specific manner. As such, this novel structural scaffold might be used to develop therapeutically useful drugs for treatment of a variety of diseases mediated via CBRs.

  4. Tamoxifen Isomers and Metabolites Exhibit Distinct Affinity and Activity at Cannabinoid Receptors: Potential Scaffold for Drug Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M Ford

    Full Text Available Tamoxifen (Tam is a selective estrogen receptor (ER modulator (SERM that is an essential drug to treat ER-positive breast cancer. Aside from known actions at ERs, recent studies have suggested that some SERMs like Tam also exhibit novel activity at cannabinoid subtype 1 and 2 receptors (CB1R and CB2Rs. Interestingly, cis- (E-Tam and trans- (Z-Tam isomers of Tam exhibit over a 100-fold difference in affinity for ERs. Therefore, the current study assessed individual isomers of Tam and subsequent cytochrome P450 metabolic products, 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4OHT and 4-hydroxy-N-desmethyl tamoxifen (End for affinity and activity at CBRs. Results showed that Z-4OHT, but not Z-Tam or Z-End, exhibits higher affinity for both CB1 and CB2Rs relative to the E-isomer. Furthermore, Z- and E-isomers of Tam and 4OHT show slightly higher affinity for CB2Rs, while both End isomers are relatively CB1R-selective. When functional activity was assessed by G-protein activation and regulation of the downstream effector adenylyl cyclase, all isomers examined act as full CB1 and CB2R inverse agonists. Interestingly, Z-Tam appears to be more efficacious than the full inverse agonist AM630 at CB2Rs, while both Z-Tam and Z-End exhibit characteristics of insurmountable antagonism at CB1 and CB2Rs, respectively. Collectively, these results suggest that the SERMs Tam, 4OHT and End elicit ER-independent actions via CBRs in an isomer-specific manner. As such, this novel structural scaffold might be used to develop therapeutically useful drugs for treatment of a variety of diseases mediated via CBRs.

  5. Monitoring Spongospora subterranea Development in Potato Roots Reveals Distinct Infection Patterns and Enables Efficient Assessment of Disease Control Methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamilarasan Thangavel

    Full Text Available Spongospora subterranea is responsible for significant potato root and tuber disease globally. Study of this obligate (non-culturable pathogen that infects below-ground plant parts is technically difficult. The capacity to measure the dynamics and patterns of root infections can greatly assist in determining the efficacy of control treatments on disease progression. This study used qPCR and histological analysis in time-course experiments to measure temporal patterns of pathogen multiplication and disease development in potato (and tomato roots and tubers. Effects of delayed initiation of infection and fungicidal seed tuber and soil treatments were assessed. This study found roots at all plant developmental ages were susceptible to infection but that delaying infection significantly reduced pathogen content and resultant disease at final harvest. The pathogen was first detected in roots 15-20 days after inoculation (DAI and the presence of zoosporangia noted 15-45 DAI. Following initial infection pathogen content in roots increased at a similar rate regardless of plant age at inoculation. All fungicide treatments (except soil-applied mancozeb which had a variable response suppressed pathogen multiplication and root and tuber disease. In contrast to delayed inoculation, the fungicide treatments slowed disease progress (rate rather than delaying onset of infection. Trials under suboptimal temperatures for disease expression provided valuable data on root infection rate, demonstrating the robustness of monitoring root infection. These results provide an early measure of the efficacy of control treatments and indicate two possible patterns of disease suppression by either delayed initiation of infection which then proceeds at a similar rate or diminished epidemic rate.

  6. In vitro resistance selection with doravirine (MK-1439), a novel nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor with distinct mutation development pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Meizhen; Wang, Deping; Grobler, Jay A; Hazuda, Daria J; Miller, Michael D; Lai, Ming-Tain

    2015-01-01

    Doravirine (DOR, formerly known as MK-1439) is a human immunodeficiency type 1 virus (HIV-1) nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) that is currently in phase 2b clinical trials. In vitro resistance selection of subtype B virus (MT4-green fluorescent protein [GFP] cells), as well as subtype A and C viruses (MT4-GFP/CCR5 cells) was conducted with DOR, rilpivirine (RPV), and efavirine (EFV) under low-multiplicity-of-infection conditions in a 96-well format. Resistance selection was performed with escalating concentrations of the NNRTIs ranging from the 95% effective concentration (1 × EC(95)) to 1,000 × EC(95) in the presence of 10% fetal bovine serum. In the resistance selection of subtype B virus with DOR, a V106A mutant virus led to two mutation pathways, followed by the emergence separately of either F227L or L234I. In the resistance selection of subtype A and C viruses, similar mutation development pathways were detected, in which a V106A or V106M mutant was also the starting virus in the pathways. Mutations that are commonly associated with RPV and EFV in clinical settings were also identified in subtype B viruses such as the E138K and K103N mutants, respectively, in this in vitro resistance selection study. The susceptibility of subtype B mutant viruses selected by DOR, RPV, and EFV to NNRTIs was evaluated. Results suggest that mutant viruses selected by DOR are susceptible to RPV and EFV and mutants selected by RPV and EFV are susceptible to DOR. When the replication capacity of the V106A mutant was compared with that of the wild-type (WT) virus, the mutant virus was 4-fold less fit than the WT virus. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Monitoring Spongospora subterranea Development in Potato Roots Reveals Distinct Infection Patterns and Enables Efficient Assessment of Disease Control Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangavel, Tamilarasan; Tegg, Robert S; Wilson, Calum R

    2015-01-01

    Spongospora subterranea is responsible for significant potato root and tuber disease globally. Study of this obligate (non-culturable) pathogen that infects below-ground plant parts is technically difficult. The capacity to measure the dynamics and patterns of root infections can greatly assist in determining the efficacy of control treatments on disease progression. This study used qPCR and histological analysis in time-course experiments to measure temporal patterns of pathogen multiplication and disease development in potato (and tomato) roots and tubers. Effects of delayed initiation of infection and fungicidal seed tuber and soil treatments were assessed. This study found roots at all plant developmental ages were susceptible to infection but that delaying infection significantly reduced pathogen content and resultant disease at final harvest. The pathogen was first detected in roots 15-20 days after inoculation (DAI) and the presence of zoosporangia noted 15-45 DAI. Following initial infection pathogen content in roots increased at a similar rate regardless of plant age at inoculation. All fungicide treatments (except soil-applied mancozeb which had a variable response) suppressed pathogen multiplication and root and tuber disease. In contrast to delayed inoculation, the fungicide treatments slowed disease progress (rate) rather than delaying onset of infection. Trials under suboptimal temperatures for disease expression provided valuable data on root infection rate, demonstrating the robustness of monitoring root infection. These results provide an early measure of the efficacy of control treatments and indicate two possible patterns of disease suppression by either delayed initiation of infection which then proceeds at a similar rate or diminished epidemic rate.

  8. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lelia Gonçalves Rocha Martin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral neuropathy is a common side effect in patients undergoing cancer treatment with chemotherapy. This condition can affect patients in several different ways, interfering in their activities of daily living and autonomy. The present study aimed to review the literature on chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy and its treatment or other possible interventions. The findings reveal that chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy is a common condition that affects patients undergoing treatment with some specific drugs. Besides, several different substances have been used to treat or control this condition, although no significant evidence could be found in these studies.

  9. Spheniodal mucocele causing bilateral optic neuropathy and ophthalmoplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambika Selvakumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sphenoid sinus mucocele comprises only 2% of all paranasal sinus mucoceles. In literature, there is a case report on sphenoidal mucocele causing bilateral optic neuropathy, with unilateral partial recovery and cranial nerve palsy, but we did not come across any literature with bilateral optic neuropathy and ophthalmoplegia together caused by spheno-ethmoidal mucocele. We present such a rare case of spheno-ethmoidal mucocele causing bilateral optic neuropathy and unilateral sixth nerve palsy who had postsurgery, unilateral good vision recovery, and complete resolution of sixth nerve palsy.

  10. Sciatic neuropathy as first sign of metastasising prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Møller; Rastiemadabadi, Zoreh; Smith, Torben Aagaard

    2010-01-01

    idiopathic neuropathy. Here we describe a patient who was initially diagnosed with idiopathic sciatic neuropathy but who was eventually diagnosed with prostate cancer. This is an uncommon manifestation of prostate cancer, and the diagnostic was difficult because prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was normal...... and the positron emission tomography scan negative. Changes in PSA should always raise the suspicion of prostate cancer, just as idiopathic progressive neuropathy should always raise the suspicion of an underlying malignancy, even when standard diagnostics fail to explain the patient's symptoms....

  11. Does Peripheral Neuropathy Associate with Cranial Nerves Neuropathy in Type 2 diabetes Patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walaa Fadhil Jalal

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN is the most common complication of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Cranial neuropathies is usually presenting as mononeuropathies coexist with DPN either presented clinically or in subclinical form. The aim of this study is to detect cranial neuropathy in diabetic patients. Eighty three patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM with an age range of 30-69 years were included in the study. The study also involved normal healthy persons whose age and gender are harmonized with that of our patients that were deliberated as control group (60 persons. Diabetic patients with DPN had significant difference in age, highly significant difference in the duration of the disease and highly significance difference in BMI had poor glycemic control reflected by high FBS and HbA1c, while lipid profile picture showed insignificant difference when compared with diabetic patients without DPN. Nerve conduction study (sensory and motor showed a significant difference regarding latency, amplitude, and conduction velocity between diabetic patients with DPN and those without DPN. The results of blink reflex showed highly significant difference between diabetic patients and controls.

  12. Influence of dose-time relationship on the pathogenesis of peripheral neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kogelnik, H.D.; Vienna Univ.

    1977-01-01

    The development of peripheral neutopathies of cranial nerves and of the brachial plexus following curative doses of irradiation is closely related with the total dose applied, the number and size of the individual doses per fraction and the overall time. Additional important factors for the occurrence of these late complications are the volume of tissue irradiated and the stage of disease. In the pathogenesis of peripheral neuropathy a combined effect of different factors seems likely. (orig.) [de

  13. Peripheral neuropathy: pathogenic mechanisms and alternative therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Kathleen A

    2006-12-01

    Peripheral neuropathy (PN), associated with diabetes, neurotoxic chemotherapy, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/antiretroviral drugs, alcoholism, nutrient deficiencies, heavy metal toxicity, and other etiologies, results in significant morbidity. Conventional pain medications primarily mask symptoms and have significant side effects and addiction profiles. However, a widening body of research indicates alternative medicine may offer significant benefit to this patient population. Alpha-lipoic acid, acetyl-L-carnitine, benfotiamine, methylcobalamin, and topical capsaicin are among the most well-researched alternative options for the treatment of PN. Other potential nutrient or botanical therapies include vitamin E, glutathione, folate, pyridoxine, biotin, myo-inositol, omega-3 and -6 fatty acids, L-arginine, L-glutamine, taurine, N-acetylcysteine, zinc, magnesium, chromium, and St. John's wort. In the realm of physical medicine, acupuncture, magnetic therapy, and yoga have been found to provide benefit. New cutting-edge conventional therapies, including dual-action peptides, may also hold promise.

  14. Inspection methods progression of diabetic optic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Sun

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Increasing incidence of diabetes, diet restructuring with excessive intake of high-calorie foods closely related with this. Currently diabetes prevalence rate increased from 7% in 2003 to 14% in 2010. Diabetes can cause a variety of eye diseases, such as corneal ulcers, glaucoma, vitreous hemorrhage and so on. Diabetic retinopathy and cataract are the most common and greater impact on patients. At present, study for diabetic retinopathy(DRis wider than diabetes optic neuropathy(DON. Clinical manifestations of DON are not specific, but DON occurred extensively, also contributed to an important cause of blindness.In this paper, we collected a variety of inspection and early diagnosis methods, try to achieve early detection, interventional therapy and good treatment for this disease. Here to make a presentation on the various types of inspection methods.

  15. A case of presumed radiation optic neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atsumi, Osamu; Sakuraba, Tomoki; Kimura, Satoru; Narita, Kiyoharu; Maeda, Syuji

    1991-01-01

    A case of a 37-year-old woman with radiation optic neuropathy was reported. She had undergone subtotal removal of the right orbital tumor (adenoid cystic carcinoma) by frontal craniotomy, followed by radiation therapy (64 Gy). She had been quite well until she noticed a gradual loss of vision in her right eye 18 months later. Her visual acuity was 0.2 in the right eye and 1.5 in the left eye with right relative afferent pupillary defect and dense central scotoma. Funduscopy revealed optic disc swelling with surrounding retinal edema and small hemorrhage in the right eye. Fluorescein angiography revealed a hypoperfusion area and obstruction of the small retinal vessels in the posterior pole, but this was not large enough to explain the dense central scotoma. Although prednisolone therapy gave temporary improvement, the visual function gradually deteriorated. (author)

  16. Review of Critical Illness Myopathy and Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Starane; Batra, Ayush; Lerner, David P

    2017-01-01

    Critical illness myopathy (CIM) and neuropathy are underdiagnosed conditions within the intensive care setting and contribute to prolonged mechanical ventilation and ventilator wean failure and ultimately lead to significant morbidity and mortality. These conditions are often further subdivided into CIM, critical illness polyneuropathy (CIP), or the combination-critical illness polyneuromyopathy (CIPNM). In this review, we discuss the epidemiology and pathophysiology of CIM, CIP, and CIPNM, along with diagnostic considerations such as detailed clinical examination, electrophysiological studies, and histopathological review of muscle biopsy specimens. We also review current available treatments and prognosis. Increased awareness and early recognition of CIM, CIP, and CIPNM in the intensive care unit setting may lead to earlier treatments and rehabilitation, improving patient outcomes.

  17. Chronic Pain and Neuropathy Following Adjuvant Chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ventzel, Lise; Madsen, Caspar S; Karlsson, Páll

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine symptoms and characteristics of chronic sensory neuropathy in patients treated with oxaliplatin and docetaxel, including patterns of somatosensory abnormalities, pain descriptors, and psychological functioning. Design: A retrospective cross-sectional study. Setting......: A chronic pain research center. Subjects: Thirty-eight patients with chronic peripheral pain and/or dysesthesia following chemotherapy. Methods:  Sensory profiles, psychological functioning, and quality of life were assessed using standardized questionnaires. In addition, standardized quantitative sensory...... with decreased mechanical and vibration detection thresholds. A high frequency of abnormalities in thermal sensory limen and the presence of paradoxical heat sensation seem to be sensitive markers of small fiber loss. Both groups had mainly sensory, axonal large fiber or mixed fiber polyneuropathy, which tended...

  18. A case of presumed radiation optic neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atsumi, Osamu; Sakuraba, Tomoki; Kimura, Satoru; Narita, Kiyoharu; Maeda, Syuji (Hirosaki Univ., Aomori (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1991-05-01

    A case of a 37-year-old woman with radiation optic neuropathy was reported. She had undergone subtotal removal of the right orbital tumor (adenoid cystic carcinoma) by frontal craniotomy, followed by radiation therapy (64 Gy). She had been quite well until she noticed a gradual loss of vision in her right eye 18 months later. Her visual acuity was 0.2 in the right eye and 1.5 in the left eye with right relative afferent pupillary defect and dense central scotoma. Funduscopy revealed optic disc swelling with surrounding retinal edema and small hemorrhage in the right eye. Fluorescein angiography revealed a hypoperfusion area and obstruction of the small retinal vessels in the posterior pole, but this was not large enough to explain the dense central scotoma. Although prednisolone therapy gave temporary improvement, the visual function gradually deteriorated. (author).

  19. Chikungunya fever presenting with acute optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohite, Abhijit Anand; Agius-Fernandez, Adriana

    2015-07-28

    Chikungunya fever is a vector borne virus that typically causes a self-limiting systemic illness with fever, skin rash and joint aches 2 weeks after infection. We present the case of a 69-year-old woman presenting with an acute unilateral optic neuropathy as a delayed complication of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection contracted during a recent trip to the West Indies. She presented to our ophthalmology department with acute painless visual field loss in the right eye and a recent flu-like illness. She was found to have a right relative afferent pupillary defect (RAPD) with unilateral optic disc swelling. Serology confirmed recent CHIKV infection. Treatment with intravenous methylprednisolone was delayed while awaiting MRI scans and serology results. At 5-month follow-up, there was a persistent right RAPD and marked optic atrophy with a corresponding inferior scotoma in the visual field. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  20. Genome-wide identification of binding sites defines distinct functions for Caenorhabditis elegans PHA-4/FOXA in development and environmental response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Zhong

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors are key components of regulatory networks that control development, as well as the response to environmental stimuli. We have established an experimental pipeline in Caenorhabditis elegans that permits global identification of the binding sites for transcription factors using chromatin immunoprecipitation and deep sequencing. We describe and validate this strategy, and apply it to the transcription factor PHA-4, which plays critical roles in organ development and other cellular processes. We identified thousands of binding sites for PHA-4 during formation of the embryonic pharynx, and also found a role for this factor during the starvation response. Many binding sites were found to shift dramatically between embryos and starved larvae, from developmentally regulated genes to genes involved in metabolism. These results indicate distinct roles for this regulator in two different biological processes and demonstrate the versatility of transcription factors in mediating diverse biological roles.

  1. Exercise-mediated improvements in painful neuropathy associated with prediabetes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groover, Anna L; Ryals, Janelle M; Guilford, Brianne L; Wilson, Natalie M; Christianson, Julie A; Wright, Douglas E

    2013-12-01

    Recent research suggests that exercise can be effective in reducing pain in animals and humans with neuropathic pain. To investigate mechanisms in which exercise may improve hyperalgesia associated with prediabetes, C57Bl/6 mice were fed either standard chow or a high-fat diet for 12 weeks and were provided access to running wheels (exercised) or without access (sedentary). The high-fat diet induced a number of prediabetic symptoms, including increased weight, blood glucose, and insulin levels. Exercise reduced but did not restore these metabolic abnormalities to normal levels. In addition, mice fed a high-fat diet developed significant cutaneous and visceral hyperalgesia, similar to mice that develop neuropathy associated with diabetes. Finally, a high-fat diet significantly modulated neurotrophin protein expression in peripheral tissues and altered the composition of epidermal innervation. Over time, mice that exercised normalized with regards to their behavioral hypersensitivity, neurotrophin levels, and epidermal innervation. These results confirm that elevated hypersensitivity and associated neuropathic changes can be induced by a high-fat diet and exercise may alleviate these neuropathic symptoms. These findings suggest that exercise intervention could significantly improve aspects of neuropathy and pain associated with obesity and diabetes. Additionally, this work could potentially help clinicians determine those patients who will develop painful versus insensate neuropathy using intraepidermal nerve fiber quantification. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Exercise-Mediated Improvements in Painful Neuropathy Associated with Pre-Diabetes in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groover, Anna L.; Ryals, Janelle M.; Guilford, Brianne L.; Wilson, Natalie M.; Christianson, Julie A.; Wright, Doug E.

    2013-01-01

    Recent research suggests that exercise can be effective in reducing pain in animals and humans with neuropathic pain. To investigate mechanisms in which exercise may improve hyperalgesia associated with prediabetes, C57Bl/6 mice were fed either standard chow or a high-fat diet for 12 weeks and were provided access to running wheels (exercised) or without access (sedentary). The high-fat diet induced a number of prediabetic symptoms, including increased weight, blood glucose, and insulin levels. Exercise reduced but did not restore these metabolic abnormalities to normal levels. In addition, mice fed a high-fat diet developed significant cutaneous and visceral hyperalgesia, similar to mice that develop neuropathy associated with diabetes. Finally, a high-fat diet significantly modulated neurotrophin protein expression in peripheral tissues and altered the composition of epidermal innervation. Over time, mice that exercised normalized with regards to their behavioral hypersensitivity, neurotrophin levels, and epidermal innervation. These results confirm that elevated hypersensitivity and associated neuropathic changes can be induced by a high-fat diet and exercise may alleviate these neuropathic symptoms. These findings suggest that exercise intervention could significantly improve aspects of neuropathy and pain associated with obesity and diabetes. Additionally, this work could potentially help clinicians determine those patients which will develop painful versus insensate neuropathy using intraepidermal nerve fiber quantification. PMID:23932909

  3. Linezolid-Associated Optic Neuropathy in Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis Patients in Mumbai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Salil; Das, Mrinalini; Laxmeshwar, Chinmay; Jonckheere, Sylvie; Thi, Sein Sein; Isaakidis, Petros

    2016-01-01

    Patients on linezolid-containing drug-resistant TB (DR-TB) regimen often develop adverse-events, particularly peripheral and optic neuropathy. Programmatic data and experiences of linezolid-associated optic neuropathy from high DR-TB burden settings are lacking. The study aimed to determine the frequency of and risk-factors associated with linezolid-associated optic neuropathy and document the experiences related to treatment/care of DR-TB patients on linezolid-containing regimens. This was a retrospective cohort study using routine clinical and laboratory data in Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) HIV/DR-TB clinic in collaboration with Lilavati Hospital & Research Center, Mumbai, India. All DR-TB patients on linezolid-containing treatment regimens were included in the study and underwent routine evaluations for systemic and/or ocular complaints. Ophthalmological evaluation by a consultant ophthalmologist included visual-acuity screening, slit-lamp examination and dilated fundus examination. During January 2013-April 2016, 86 of 136 patients (with/without HIV co-infection) initiated linezolid-containing DR-TB treatment. The median age of these 86 patients was 25 (20-35) years and 47% were males. 20 percent of them had HIV co-infection. Of 86, 24 (27.9%) had at least one episode of ocular complaints (the majority blurred-vision) and among them, five (5.8%) had optic neuropathy. Patients received appropriate treatment and improvements were observed. None of the demographic/clinical factors were associated with optic neuropathy in Poissons or multivariate binary logistic-regression models. This is the first report focusing on optic neuropathy in a cohort of complex DR-TB patients, including patients co-infected with HIV, receiving linezolid-containing regimens. In our study, one out of four patients on linezolid had at least one episode of ocular complaints; therefore, systematic monitoring of patients by primary physicians/nurses, and access to specialized diagnostic

  4. Expression of neurotrophic factors in diabetic muscle--relation to neuropathy and muscle strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreassen, C S; Jakobsen, J; Flyvbjerg, A; Andersen, H

    2009-10-01

    Diabetic polyneuropathy can lead to atrophy and weakness of distally located striated muscles due to denervation. Lack of neurotrophic support is believed to contribute to the development of diabetic neuropathy. In this study, we measured the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin 3 (NT-3), neurotrophin 4 (NT-4) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) in muscle biopsies taken from the gastrocnemic and deltoid muscles in 42 diabetic patients and 20 healthy control subjects. To express the distal neuropathic gradient and to reduce interindividual variation, a distal/proximal ratio between expression levels in the gastrocnemic and deltoid muscles was calculated for all neurotrophic factors. Neuropathic status was determined by clinical examination, electrophysiological studies and quantitative sensory examination in diabetic patients, and muscle strength at both the shoulder and ankle was assessed by isokinetic dynamometry. Distal/proximal ratios for NT-3 were lower in diabetic patients [median (range) 110.7 (39.8-546.8)] than in controls [157.6 (63.3-385.4); (P < 0.05)], and in neuropathic diabetic patients [107.1 (39.8-326.0)] versus patients without neuropathy [134.5 (46.6-546.8); (P < 0.005)]. Further, ratios for NT-3 were related to muscle strength (r(s) = 0.41, P < 0.01) and showed a tendency towards a negative relationship to the combined score of all measures of neuropathy [Neuropathy rank-sum score (NRSS)] (r(s) = -0.27, P = 0.09). Similar trends were observed for ratios for NT-4. Ratios for NGF (r(s) = -0.32, P < 0.05) and BDNF (r(s) = -0.32, P < 0.05) were related to NRSS, but not to muscle strength. Ratios for CNTF were higher in diabetic patients [64.6 (23.7-258.7)] compared with controls [50.2 (27.2-186.4); (P < 0.05)], but showed no relationship to neither NRSS nor muscle strength. Our results show that the expression of NT-3 is reduced in striated muscles in diabetic patients and is related to

  5. The count-mass distinction in typically developing and grammatically specifically language impaired children: new evidence on the role of syntax and semantics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froud, Karen; van der Lely, Heather K J

    2008-01-01

    By the age of three, typically developing children can draw conceptual distinctions between "kinds of individual" and "kinds of stuff" on the basis of syntactic structures. They differ from adults only in the extent to which syntactic knowledge can be over-ridden by semantic properties of the referent. However, the relative roles of syntax and semantics in determining the nature of the count-mass distinction in language acquisition are still not well-understood. This paper contributes to this debate by studying novel noun acquisition in a subgroup of children, aged 8-15 years, with specific language impairment, whose core deficits are limited to within the grammatical system (G-SLI), We conducted two experiments: a production task and a word extension task. Such children might be expected to rely to a greater extent than their age-matched peers on semantic properties of referents in order to assign noun interpretations, since by hypothesis they have greater difficulty in accessing and utilizing syntactic category distinctions than typically developing children. In the production task, the Children with G-SLI demonstrated rigid over-application of a pluralization rule which masked even basic knowledge of semantic information about individuated objects versus non-individuated substances. Age-matched control children only performed in this way when all syntactic and conceptual/perceptual cues were neutralized. In the word extension task, which required a non-verbal response, the Children with G-SLI showed evidence of only very limited abilities to use syntactic or semantic information for word-learning. Thus, developmental deficits in the grammatical system can be seen to impact on lexical acquisition as well as syntactic development. As a result of this activity, the reader will be able to: (1) describe how syntactic (grammatical) impairment affects the ability to use syntactic cues for lexical acquisition, resulting in difficulties representing the structure of even

  6. Predictive risk factors for radiation retinopathy and optic neuropathy after proton beam therapy for uveal melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibel, Ira; Cordini, Dino; Hager, Annette; Tillner, Johanna; Riechardt, Aline I; Heufelder, Jens; Davids, Anja M; Rehak, Matus; Joussen, Antonia M

    2016-09-01

    This study was performed in order to evaluate the incidence of radiation retinopathy and optic neuropathy occurring after proton beam therapy for uveal melanoma. Included in this study were all patients who had been treated with primary proton beam therapy for uveal melanoma at the oncology service between May 1998 and June 2014 with a minimum follow-up of 12 months. Excluded were all patients who underwent re-irradiation, or vitrectomy due to exudative retinal detachment or for tumor-resection. During this period, 1127 patients matched the inclusion criteria, of whom 768 (68.1 %) and 463 (41.0 %) developed radiation retinopathy and optic neuropathy after a median time of 18.9 months (2.0-99.84 months) and 19.8 months (0.2-170.4 months), respectively. Mean follow-up was 53.4 months (12-170.4 months). Included were 558 men (49.5 %) and 569 women (50.5 %). Mean age was 61 years (16-89 years). Visual acuity slightly decreased from initial levels of 0.3 logMAR-0.4 logMAR in patients without developing any radiation-induced complication but severely decreased to 1.0 logMAR or 1.5 logMAR in the case of developing radiation retinopathy only or optic neuropathy, respectively. Independent risk factors for radiation retinopathy were a centrally (<2.5 mm from sensitive structures) located tumor or a thick tumor located more than 2.5 mm from sensitive structures, while those for radiation optic neuropathy comprised a short distance and applied dose to the optic disk. The risk for radiation retinopathy is higher in central uveal melanoma. Mid-/peripheral tumors are at high risk for radiation retinopathy and maculopathy if presenting with increased thickness.

  7. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is associated with mitochondrial ND6 T14502C mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Fuxin [School of Ophthalmology and Optometry, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325003 (China); Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325003 (China); Guan, Minqiang [Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325003 (China); Zhou, Xiangtian [School of Ophthalmology and Optometry, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325003 (China); Yuan, Meixia; Liang, Ming [School of Ophthalmology and Optometry, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325003 (China); Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325003 (China); Liu, Qi [Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325003 (China); Liu, Yan; Zhang, Yongmei [School of Ophthalmology and Optometry, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325003 (China); Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325003 (China); Yang, Li [Division of Human Genetics, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States); Tong, Yi [School of Ophthalmology and Optometry, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325003 (China); The First Affiliated Hospital, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350005 (China); Wei, Qi-Ping; Sun, Yan-Hong [Department of Ophthalmology, Dongfang Hospital, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine and Pharmacology, Beijing 100078 (China); Qu, Jia, E-mail: jqu@wzmc.net [School of Ophthalmology and Optometry, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325003 (China); Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325003 (China); and others

    2009-11-20

    We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of three Chinese families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). There were variable severity and age of onset in visual impairment among these families. Strikingly, there were extremely low penetrances of visual impairment in these Chinese families. Sequence analysis of complete mitochondrial genomes in these pedigrees showed the homoplasmic T14502C (I58V) mutation, which localized at a highly conserved isoleucine at position 58 of ND6, and distinct sets of mtDNA polymorphisms belonging to haplogroups M10a, F1a1, and H2. The occurrence of T14502C mutation in these several genetically unrelated subjects affected by visual impairment strongly indicates that this mutation is involved in the pathogenesis of visual impairment. Here, mtDNA variants I187T in the ND1, A122V in CO1, S99A in the A6, and V254I in CO3 exhibited an evolutionary conservation, indicating a potential modifying role in the development of visual impairment associated with T14502C mutation in those families. Furthermore, nuclear modifier gene(s) or environmental factor(s) may play a role in the phenotypic manifestation of the LHON-associated T14502C mutation in these Chinese families.

  8. Diabetic neuropathy: structural analysis of nerve hydration by Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffey, R.H.; Eaton, P.; Sibbitt, R.R.; Sibbitt, W.L. Jr.; Bicknell, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The water content of the sural nerve of diabetic patients was quantitatively defined by magnetic resonance proton imaging as a putative reflection of activity of the aldose-reductase pathway. Thirty-nine patients were evaluated, comparing group A, symptomatic diabetic men with sensory neuropathy; group B, similarly symptomatic diabetic men treated aldose-reductase inhibition; group C, neurologically asymptomatic diabetic men; and group D, control nondiabetic men. Marked increase in hydration of the sural nerve was seen in more than half of the symptomatic diabetic patients. Two of 11 neurologically asymptomatic diabetics had increased nerve hydration, suggesting a presymptomatic alteration of the nerve. Symptomatic diabetics treated with aldose-reductase inhibitors had normal nerve water levels. Increased level of peripheral nerve water represents a new finding in diabetes mellitus. It seems to be related to aldose-reductase activity, involved in the development of neuropathy, and similar to events that occur in other target tissue in human diabetes

  9. The effects of capillary dysfunction on oxygen and glucose extraction in diabetic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Leif; Finnerup, Nanna B; Terkelsen, Astrid J

    2015-01-01

    experimental diabetes, and of unaffected blood flow when early histological signs of neuropathy first develop in humans. We recently showed that disturbances in capillary flow patterns, so-called capillary dysfunction, can reduce the amount of oxygen and glucose that can be extracted by the tissue for a given...... blood flow. In fact, tissue blood flow must be adjusted to ensure sufficient oxygen extraction as capillary dysfunction becomes more severe, thereby changing the normal relationship between tissue oxygenation and blood flow. This review examines the evidence of capillary dysfunction in diabetic...... neuropathy, and whether the observed relation between endoneurial blood flow and nerve function is consistent with increasingly disturbed capillary flow patterns. The analysis suggests testable relations between capillary dysfunction, tissue hypoxia, aldose reductase activity, oxidative stress, tissue...

  10. Medial arterial calcification in diabetes and its relationship to neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeffcoate, W J; Rasmussen, Lars Melholt; Hofbauer, L C

    2009-01-01

    Calcification of the media of arterial walls is common in diabetes and is particularly associated with distal symmetrical neuropathy. Arterial calcification also complicates chronic kidney disease and is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. The term calcification......, such as calcitonin gene-related peptide, which are inherently protective. The association between distal symmetrical neuropathy and calcification of the arterial wall highlights the fact that neuropathy may be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular mortality.......Calcification of the media of arterial walls is common in diabetes and is particularly associated with distal symmetrical neuropathy. Arterial calcification also complicates chronic kidney disease and is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. The term calcification...

  11. Prevalence of diabetic autonomic neuropathy measured by simple bedside tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrberg, Torben Bech; Benn, Jette; Christiansen, J S

    1981-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of diabetic autonomic neuropathy, five simple bedside tests, beat-to-beat variation during quiet respiration, beat-to-beat variation during forced respiration, heart rate and blood pressure response to standing, heart rate response to exercise, and heart rate response....... The prevalence of diabetic autonomic neuropathy in the whole diabetic population indicated by abnormal response in beat-to-beat variation during forced respiration was 27%. Diabetic autonimic neuropathy increased in frequency with duration of disease. Patients with nephropathy or proliferative retinopathy had...... a significantly higher prevalence of diabetic autonomic neuropathy as indicated by abnormal beat-to-beat variation during forced respirations (p less than 0.01) than patients without these complications....

  12. Genetics Home Reference: distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... neuropathy, type II change single protein building blocks ( amino acids ) in the protein sequence. If either protein is altered, they may be more likely to cluster together and form clumps (aggregates). Aggregates of heat shock proteins may ...

  13. Antioxidant Strategies in the Management of Diabetic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayodeji Babatunde Oyenihi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hyperglycaemia (an abnormally high glucose concentration in the blood resulting from defects in insulin secretion/action, or both, is the major hallmark of diabetes in which it is known to be involved in the progression of the condition to different complications that include diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic neuropathy (diabetes-induced nerve damage is the most common diabetic complication and can be devastating because it can lead to disability. There is an increasing body of evidence associating diabetic neuropathy with oxidative stress. Oxidative stress results from the production of oxygen free radicals in the body in excess of its ability to eliminate them by antioxidant activity. Antioxidants have different mechanisms and sites of actions by which they exert their biochemical effects and ameliorate nerve dysfunction in diabetes by acting directly against oxidative damage. This review will examine different strategies for managing diabetic neuropathy which rely on exogenous antioxidants.

  14. [Peripheral neuropathy during Infliximab therapy: a case study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinebi, Ali; Akhouad, Youssef; Rkiouak, Adil; Reggad, Ahmed; Kasmy, Zohour; Boudlal, Mostafa; Rabhi, Monsef; Ennibi, Khalid; Chaari, Jilali

    2016-01-01

    Anti TNF alpha treatments are wide spectrum therapies. Multiple side effects have been reported in recent years, particularly peripheral neuropathies. We report a case of axonal neuropathy occurring three months after starting treatment with Infliximab. Our study focused on a 60-year old female patient treated for therapy-resistant hemorrhagic rectocolitis, requiring treatment with infliximab. Three months later, the patient had sensory axonal neuropathy. Etiologic assessment remained negative and dose reduction was accompanied by an improvement in symptoms. The time between initiation of treatment with Infliximab and the onset of clinical manifestations as well as improvement after dose reduction advocate the responsibility of infliximab in the occurrence of sensory neuropathy. Its management is not standardized and should be discussed case by case.

  15. Activity-Dependent Excitability Changes Suggest Na[superscript +]/K[superscript +] Pump Dysfunction in Diabetic Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Arun V.; Lin, Cindy S.-Y.; Kiernan, Matthew C.

    2008-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the role of Na[superscript +]/K[superscript +] pump dysfunction in the development of diabetic neuropathy (DN). Nerve excitability techniques, which provide information about membrane potential and axonal ion channel function, were undertaken in 15 patients with established DN and in 10 patients with…

  16. Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (HRT3) in Population-based Epidemiology : Normative Values and Criteria for Glaucomatous Optic Neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramdas, Wishal D.; Wolfs, Roger C. W.; Hofman, Albert; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Jansonius, Nomdo M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To establish normative values for Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (HRT3) variables and to develop HRT3-based criteria for glaucomatous optic neuropathy for epidemiological research in a white population. Methods: Consecutive participants in the Rotterdam Study were examined with HRT and

  17. Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (HRT3) in population-based epidemiology: normative values and criteria for glaucomatous optic neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramdas, Wishal D.; Wolfs, Roger C. W.; Hofman, Albert; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Jansonius, Nomdo M.

    2011-01-01

    To establish normative values for Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (HRT3) variables and to develop HRT3-based criteria for glaucomatous optic neuropathy for epidemiological research in a white population. Consecutive participants in the Rotterdam Study were examined with HRT and simultaneous stereoscopic

  18. Peripheral neuropathy following intentional inhalation of naphtha fumes.

    OpenAIRE

    Tenenbein, M; deGroot, W; Rajani, K R

    1984-01-01

    Two adolescent native Canadians who presented with peripheral neuropathy secondary to the abuse of volatile hydrocarbons are described. They were initially thought to have been sniffing leaded gasoline fumes, but public health investigation revealed that they had been sniffing naphtha fumes. Naphtha contains a significant amount of n-hexane, a known inducer of neuropathy. Nerve conduction studies and nerve biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of naphtha abuse. These cases emphasize the need to spec...

  19. Mobile phone generated vibrations used to detect diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Jonathan David; Morris, Matthew William John

    2017-12-01

    In the current United Kingdom population the incidence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy is increasing. The presence of diabetic neuropathy affects decision making and treatment options. This study seeks to evaluate if the vibrations generated from a mobile phone can be used to screen patients for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. This study comprised of 61 patients; a control group of 21 patients; a lower limb injury group of 19 patients; a diabetic peripheral neuropathy group of 21 patients. The control and injury group were recruited randomly from fracture clinics. The diabetic peripheral neuropathy group were randomly recruited from the diabetic foot clinic. The 61 patients were examined using a 10g Semmes-Weinstein monofilament, a 128Hz tuning fork and a vibrating mobile phone. The points tested were, index finger, patella, lateral malleoli, medial malleoli, heel, first and fifth metatarsal heads. The most accurate location of all the clinical tests was the head of the 1st metatarsal at 0.86. The overall accuracy of the tuning fork was 0.77, the ten gram monofilament 0.79 and the mobile phone accuracy was 0.88. The control group felt 420 of 441 tests (95%). The injury group felt 349 of 399 tests (87%). The neuropathic group felt 216 of 441 tests (48%). There is a significant difference in the number of tests felt between the control and both the injury and neuropathic groups. pmobile phone is an accurate screening tool for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The most accurate location to test for diabetic peripheral neuropathy is the head of the 1st metatarsal. Screening for diabetic peripheral neuropathy in the index finger and patella were inaccurate. An injury to the lower limb affects the patient's vibration sensation, we would therefore recommend screening the contralateral limb to the injury. This study represents level II evidence of a new diagnostic investigation. Copyright © 2016 European Foot and Ankle Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Does this patient with diabetes have large-fiber peripheral neuropathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanji, Jamil N; Anglin, Rebecca E S; Hunt, Dereck L; Panju, Akbar

    2010-04-21

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy predisposes patients to foot ulceration that heals poorly and too often leads to amputation. Large-fiber peripheral neuropathy (LFPN), one common form of diabetic neuropathy, when detected early prompts aggressive measures to prevent progression to foot ulceration and its associated morbidity and mortality. To systematically review the literature to determine the clinical examination findings predictive of asymptomatic LFPN before foot ulceration develops. MEDLINE (January 1966-November 2009) and EMBASE (1980-2009 [week 50]) databases were searched for articles on bedside diagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Included studies compared elements of history or physical examination with nerve conduction testing as the reference standard. Of 1388 articles, 9 on diagnostic accuracy and 3 on precision met inclusion criteria. The prevalence of diabetic LFPN ranged from 23% to 79%. A score greater than 4 on a symptom questionnaire developed by the Italian Society of Diabetology increases the likelihood of LFPN (likelihood ratio [LR], 4.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.9-5.6; negative LR, 0.19; 95% CI, 0.10-0.38). The most useful examination findings were vibration perception with a 128-Hz tuning fork (LR range, 16-35) and pressure sensation with a 5.07 Semmes-Weinstein monofilament (LR range, 11-16). Normal results on vibration testing (LR range, 0.33-0.51) or monofilament (LR range, 0.09-0.54) make LFPN less likely. Combinations of signs did not perform better than these 2 individual findings. Physical examination is most useful in evaluating for LFPN in patients with diabetes. Abnormal results on monofilament testing and vibratory perception (alone or in combination with the appearance of the feet, ulceration, and ankle reflexes) are the most helpful signs.

  1. Morphologic Changes in Autonomic Nerves in Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heung Yong Jin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic neuropathy is one of the major complications of diabetes, and it increases morbidity and mortality in patients with both type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Because the autonomic nervous system, for example, parasympathetic axons, has a diffuse and wide distribution, we do not know the morphological changes that occur in autonomic neural control and their exact mechanisms in diabetic patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN. Although the prevalence of sympathetic and parasympathetic neuropathy is similar in T1DM versus T2DM patients, sympathetic nerve function correlates with parasympathetic neuropathy only in T1DM patients. The explanation for these discrepancies might be that parasympathetic nerve function was more severely affected among T2DM patients. As parasympathetic nerve damage seems to be more advanced than sympathetic nerve damage, it might be that parasympathetic neuropathy precedes sympathetic neuropathy in T2DM, which was Ewing's concept. This could be explained by the intrinsic morphologic difference. Therefore, the morphological changes in the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves of involved organs in T1DM and T2DM patients who have DAN should be evaluated. In this review, evaluation methods for morphological changes in the epidermal nerves of skin, and the intrinsic nerves of the stomach will be discussed.

  2. Potential risk factors for diabetic neuropathy: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nooraei Mahdi

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes mellitus type II afflicts at least 2 million people in Iran. Neuropathy is one of the most common complications of diabetes and lowers the patient's quality of life. Since neuropathy often leads to ulceration and amputation, we have tried to elucidate the factors that can affect its progression. Methods In this case-control study, 110 diabetic patients were selected from the Shariati Hospital diabetes clinic. Michigan Neuropathic Diabetic Scoring (MNDS was used to differentiate cases from controls. The diagnosis of neuropathy was confirmed by nerve conduction studies (nerve conduction velocity and electromyography. The multiple factors compared between the two groups included consumption of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI, blood pressure, serum lipid level, sex, smoking, method of diabetes control and its quality. Results Statistically significant relationships were found between neuropathy and age, gender, quality of diabetes control and duration of disease (P values in the order: 0.04, 0.04, Conclusion In this study, hyperglycemia was the only modifiable risk factor for diabetic neuropathy. Glycemic control reduces the incidence of neuropathy, slows its progression and improves the diabetic patient's quality of life. More attention must be paid to elderly male diabetic patients with poor diabetes control with regard to regular foot examinations and more practical education.

  3. Abnormalities of plantar pressure distribution in early, intermediate, and late stages of diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, Isabel C N; Hamamoto, Adriana N; Tonicelli, Lucas M G; Watari, Ricky; Ortega, Neli R S; Sartor, Cristina D

    2014-09-01

    Inconsistent findings with regard to plantar pressure while walking in the diabetic population may be due to the heterogeneity of the studied groups resulting from the classification/grouping criteria adopted. The clinical diagnosis and classification of diabetes have inherent uncertainties that compromise the definition of its onset and the differentiation of its severity stages. A fuzzy system could improve the precision of the diagnosis and classification of diabetic neuropathy because it takes those uncertainties into account and combines different assessment methods. Here, we investigated how plantar pressure abnormalities evolve throughout different severity stages of diabetic polyneuropathy (absent, n=38; mild, n=20; moderate, n=47; severe, n=24). Pressure distribution was analysed over five areas while patients walked barefoot. Patients with mild neuropathy displayed an increase in pressure-time integral at the forefoot and a lower peak pressure at the heel. The peak and pressure-time integral under the forefoot and heel were aggravated in later stages of the disease (moderate and severe) compared with early stages of the disease (absent and mild). In the severe group, lower pressures at the lateral forefoot and hallux were observed, which could be related to symptoms that develop with the aggravation of neuropathy: atrophy of the intrinsic foot muscles, reduction of distal muscle activity, and joint stiffness. Although there were clear alterations over the forefoot and in a number of plantar areas with higher pressures within each severity stage, they did not follow the aggravation evolution of neuropathy classified by the fuzzy model. Based on these results, therapeutic interventions should begin in the early stages of this disease to prevent further consequences of the disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Expression of cell adhesion molecules in normal nerves, chronic axonal neuropathies and Schwann cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, P H; Figarella-Branger, D; Daniel, L; Bianco, N; Pellet, W; Pellissier, J F

    1997-10-22

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) play a role in the normal development and regeneration of tissues as well as in the biological behaviour of tumors. We studied the immunohistochemical expression of various CAMs, such as neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), its polysialylated isoform (PSA-NCAM), epithelial (E-) cadherin, and beta1 integrins (alpha2beta1, alpha5beta1, alpha6beta1) in a series of frozen specimens of 10 normal nerves, 5 axonal neuropathies, 26 benign Schwannomas and 2 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MNST). NCAM was expressed by non-myelinating Schwann cells from normal nerves and overexpressed by Schwann cells from patients with chronic axonal neuropathies and Schwannomas. The expression was lower in MNST. Expression of PSA-NCAM was heterogeneously displayed by Schwann cells from the various tissues studied. Anti E-cadherin immunoreactivity was present in myelin sheath in normal nerves and axonopathies. It was expressed in some Schwannomas especially in vestibular Schwannomas. Integrins VLA alpha2 and VLA alpha6 were widely expressed by Schwann cells from normal nerves, axonal neuropathies and Schwannomas but their expression was low in MNST. VLA alpha5 was not expressed by Schwann cells from normal nerve and Schwannomas but present in chronic axonal neuropathies and MNST. In addition VLA alpha6 was strongly expressed by perineurial cells. These data show that CAMs have a characteristic pattern of expression in normal nerve. Also, some CAMs are always expressed by Schwann cells but the expression of others differs in normal nerves versus axonopathies or tumors, suggesting a role of the microcellular environment in the regulation of CAM expression. Schwannomas have different pattern of expression than MNST.

  5. Recessive Mutations in RTN4IP1 Cause Isolated and Syndromic Optic Neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angebault, Claire; Guichet, Pierre-Olivier; Talmat-Amar, Yasmina; Charif, Majida; Gerber, Sylvie; Fares-Taie, Lucas; Gueguen, Naig; Halloy, François; Moore, David; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Manes, Gael; Hebrard, Maxime; Bocquet, Béatrice; Quiles, Mélanie; Piro-Mégy, Camille; Teigell, Marisa; Delettre, Cécile; Rossel, Mireille; Meunier, Isabelle; Preising, Markus; Lorenz, Birgit; Carelli, Valerio; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Kaplan, Josseline; Roubertie, Agathe; Barakat, Abdelhamid; Bonneau, Dominique; Reynier, Pascal; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Bomont, Pascale; Hamel, Christian P.; Lenaers, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive optic neuropathies are rare blinding conditions related to retinal ganglion cell (RGC) and optic-nerve degeneration, for which only mutations in TMEM126A and ACO2 are known. In four families with early-onset recessive optic neuropathy, we identified mutations in RTN4IP1, which encodes a mitochondrial ubiquinol oxydo-reductase. RTN4IP1 is a partner of RTN4 (also known as NOGO), and its ortholog Rad8 in C. elegans is involved in UV light response. Analysis of fibroblasts from affected individuals with a RTN4IP1 mutation showed loss of the altered protein, a deficit of mitochondrial respiratory complex I and IV activities, and increased susceptibility to UV light. Silencing of RTN4IP1 altered the number and morphogenesis of mouse RGC dendrites in vitro and the eye size, neuro-retinal development, and swimming behavior in zebrafish in vivo. Altogether, these data point to a pathophysiological mechanism responsible for RGC early degeneration and optic neuropathy and linking RTN4IP1 functions to mitochondrial physiology, response to UV light, and dendrite growth during eye maturation. PMID:26593267

  6. [A patient of sensorimotor neuropathy with small cell lung carcinoma and anti-GM1 antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itou, Takashi; Enomoto, Setsu; Makita, Yoshihiro; Enomoto, Hiroyuki; Kuroda, Kenji; Kimura, Takashi; Hashimoto, Kazuki; Yahara, Osamu

    2002-09-01

    We reported a 62-year-old woman had sensorimotor neuropathy with small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) and anti-GM1 antibody. She was admitted with several months history of progressive numbness, walking disturbance and anorexia. Neurologic examination revealed severe numbness and deep sensory disturbance of extremities and body, and mild weakness of distal extremities. Deep tendon reflexes were absent. Her limbs were ataxic. Nerve conduction studies showed no sensory evoked responses. CSF protein was elevated. Sural nerve biopsy revealed severe loss of myelinated fibers and perivascular mononuclear cells surrounding the perineurial vessel. Vasculitic neuropathy was diagnosed, and prednisolone was started, with no benefit. In the clinical course, she developed cough attacks and was found the lymphnode swelling in the mediastinum and supraclavicular fossa, which was diagnosed SCLC. Although anti-Hu antibody were not detected, anti-GM1 antibody was positive. She was treated with intravenous immunoglobulin, with transient improvement. The rare case of the paraneoplastic peripheral neuropathy with SCLC and anti-GM1 antibody was reported.

  7. The use of antioxidant agents for chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy treatment in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Larissa F; Silva, Ana Maria F; Carvalho, Adriana A

    2017-10-01

    Antineoplastic drugs such as cisplatin, oxaliplatin, paclitaxel and vincristin are widely used in the treatment of several solid and blood tumours. However, the severity of peripheral neuropathy caused by these agents can affect the patient's quality of life. The major symptoms of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) involve: sensory loss, paresthesia, dysesthaesia, numbness, tingling, temperature sensitivity, allodynia and hyperalgesia, in a "stocking and glove" distribution. Why many different chemotherapeutic agents result in similar neuropathy profiles is unclear. Many drug classes such as antidepressants, anticonvulsants, antispastic agents and others have been used in clinical practice, but there is no scientific evidence to prove their effectiveness. But drugs as the antioxidant have shown a protective effect against free radical damage. In order to find out a successful treatment for CIPN, animal studies (ie pharmacological and mechanical tests and histopathological immunohistochemical analyses) have been developed to try to determinate the action of the antioxidant agents. This review provides an overview of the major antioxidant agents recently investigated to treat CIPN and the animal models used for this purpose. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Dorsal root ganglia microenvironment of female BB Wistar diabetic rats with mild neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zochodne, D W; Ho, L T; Allison, J A

    1994-12-01

    Abnormalities in the microenvironment of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) might play a role in the pathogenesis of sensory abnormalities in human diabetic neuropathy. We examined aspects of DRG microenvironment by measuring local blood flow and oxygen tension in the L4 dorsal root ganglia of female BB Wistar (BBW) diabetic rats with mild neuropathy. The findings were compared with concurrent measurements of local sciatic endoneurial blood flow and oxygen tension. Diabetic rats were treated with insulin and underwent electrophysiological, blood flow and oxygen tension measurements at either 7-11 or 17-23 weeks after the development of glycosuria. Nondiabetic female BB Wistar rats from the same colony served as controls. At both ages, BBW diabetic rats had significant abnormalities in sensory, but not motor conduction compared to nondiabetic controls. Sciatic endoneurial blood flow in the diabetic rats of both ages was similar to control values, but the older (17-23 week diabetic) BBW diabetic rats had a selective reduction in DRG blood flow. Sciatic endoneurial oxygen tensions were not significantly altered in the diabetic rats. DRG oxygen tension appeared lowered in younger (7-11 week diabetic) but not older (17-23 week diabetic) BBW rats. Our findings indicate that there are important changes in the DRG microenvironment of diabetic rats with selective sensory neuropathy.

  9. Bilateral Femoral Neuropathy Following Psoas Muscle Hematomas Caused by Enoxaparin Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macauley, Precious; Soni, Parita; Akkad, Isaac; Demir, Selma; Shankar, Shyam; Kakar, Parul; Bhardwaj, Sharonlin

    2017-08-29

    BACKGROUND Femoral neuropathy as a result of retroperitoneal hemorrhage most commonly occurs following pelvic and lower extremity trauma, but has been described to develop as a less frequent complication of anticoagulation. CASE REPORT We present the case of a 64-year-old white woman who was being treated for pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis with enoxaparin. In the course of her treatment, she was noted to be hypotensive, with a sudden drop in hematocrit. She had been previously ambulatory, but noted an inability to move her bilateral lower extremities. A diagnosis of bilateral femoral neuropathy as a result of psoas hematomas caused by enoxaparin was made. Anticoagulation was discontinued and she was treated conservatively, with an excellent outcome. At the time of discharge to a rehabilitation center, she had regained most of the motor strength in her lower extremities. CONCLUSIONS We believe this is the first reported case of bilateral femoral nerve neuropathy following use of enoxaparin. A full neurological examination should always be performed when there is sudden loss of function. The constellation of bilateral groin pain, loss of lower extremity mobility, and decreased hematocrit raised the suspicion of massive blood loss into the cavity/compartment. Thus, a high index of suspicion should be maintained by clinicians when presented with such symptoms and signs, as there can be significant morbidity and mortality when prompt diagnosis is not made.

  10. More than just a conference : the European Particule Accelerator Conference, EPAC, has developped a distinctive role on the world stage, explains Christine Petit-Jean-Genaz, the EPAC conferences coordinator

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    More than just a conference : the European Particule Accelerator Conference, EPAC, has developped a distinctive role on the world stage, explains Christine Petit-Jean-Genaz, the EPAC conferences coordinator

  11. Peripheral Neuropathy in Chlamydia Reactive Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Syniachenko

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Relevance. Peripheral neuropathy (PNP in urogenital chlamydia reactive arthritis (CRA is described as single observations, and many clinical and pathogenetic aspects of this lesion of the nervous system remain unclear. Objective of the study: to evaluate the incidence and nature of the clinical course of PNP in CRA, the connection of the nerve and joint injuries, to explore the questions of pathogenetic constructions of this neuropathy, to identify risk factors. Material and methods. We observed 101 patients with CRA, mean age of them was 32 years, disease duration — 4 years, and the male to female ratio — 1 : 1. In 90 % of CRA cases, Chlamydia trochamatis was found in prostatic secretions, in scraps from the urethra, the cervix, the vaginal wall, in 83 % — positive serologic tests for chlamydia infection. Results. Signs of PNP in CRA were in 19 % of patients in the ratio of mononeuropathy to polyneuropathy as 1 : 1, with motor, sensory and mixed disorders in a ratio of 1 : 3 : 6, the presence of autonomic changes in every second patient and more frequent distal localization of the process in the hands, which is influenced by the severity of the articular syndrome, high levels of antichlamydia antibodies in the blood, and the axonal and demyelinating indicators of electroneuromyography — by the severity of urogenital lesions and the presence of Guillain-Barre syndrome. A high rate of arthritis progression is a prognosis-negative sign of PNP course in patients with CRA. The pathogenic constructions of PNP involve the inflammatory immune proteins, disturbances of vascular endothelial function and physicochemical surface rheological pro­perties of the serum. Conclusion. PNP takes place in every fifth patient with CRA, correlates with clinical and laboratory signs of joint disease, and in the future will be useful to identify actively this pathology of the nervous system for the subsequent timely rehabilitation, and CRA

  12. Peripheral neuropathy in a diabetic child treated with linezolid for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Aravind; du Cros, Philipp; Seddon, James A; Mirgayosieva, Shamsiya; Asladdin, Rajabov; Dusmatova, Zulfiya

    2017-06-12

    Extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB) and multidrug resistant (MDR)-TB with additional resistance to injectable agents or fluoroquinolones are challenging to treat due to lack of available, effective drugs. Linezolid is one of the few drugs that has shown promise in treating these conditions. Long-term linezolid use is associated with toxicities such as peripheral and optic neuropathies. Diabetes mellitus (DM), especially when uncontrolled, can also result in peripheral neuropathy. The global burden of DM is increasing, and DM has been associated with a three-fold increased risk of developing TB disease. TB and DM can be a challenging combination to treat. DM can inhibit the host immune response to tuberculosis infection; and TB and some anti-TB drugs can worsen glycaemic control. A child experiencing neuropathy that is a possible complication of both DM and linezolid used to treat TB has not been reported previously. We report peripheral neuropathy in a 15-year-old boy with type 1 DM, diagnosed with MDR-TB and additional resistance to injectable TB medications. The boy was treated with a linezolid-based regimen, but after 8 months developed peripheral neuropathy. It was unclear whether the neuropathy was caused by the DM or the linezolid therapy. He had clinical improvement following cessation of linezolid and was declared cured following 21 months of treatment. Following completion of treatment, nerve conduction studies demonstrated significant improvement in neuropathy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of peripheral neuropathy reported in a diabetic child on long-term linezolid therapy for tuberculosis. This case study underlines the importance of stringent follow-up for side effects of linezolid, especially when associated with co-morbidity such as DM that increases the chances of adverse effects. The presence of both DM and TB should alert a physician to strive for optimal glycaemic control to minimize the risk of

  13. Frequency of sensory motor neuropathy in type 2 diabetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ather, N.A.; Sattar, R.A.; Ara, J.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the frequency of sensory motor neuropathy in type 2 diabetics at the time of presentation to the hospital. The study was conducted at Medical Unit-1, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Center, Karachi, from November 2005 to April 2006. Patients of different ages and either gender with history of confirmed diabetes for ten years and above, on regular follow up were included. Those with non-diabetic causes of hyperglycemia or neuropathy were excluded. Relevant features like age, gender, treatment, symptoms , signs, nerve conduction study (NCS) results, duration of Diabetes mellitus (DM), fasting blood sugar (FBS) and serum values of glycosylated hemoglobin (HB1Ac) were recorded. Out of a total of 300 patients, there were 111 female and 189 male patients. Mean age was 58 +- 11.23 years. Mean duration of diabetes was 13.6+-5.48 years. One hundred and twenty three patients had symptoms of neuropathy. Clinical examination revealed mixed sensory and motor signs in 135 (45%) patients. Nerve conduction studies revealed abnormalities in 159 (53%) patients. Among patients having an abnormal NCS, the fasting blood glucose (FBS) was 120mg/dl in 147 (91%) patients. The glycosylated hemoglobin ranged from 4-15% with mean of 8.1% and standard deviation of 2.5%. This showed significant association (p <0.001) of peripheral neuropathy with abnormal FBS, HB1Ac and duration of diabetes. NCS diagnosed the neuropathy in more than half of the total number of patients, including both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. Majority of the patients revealed symmetrical and a mixed type (motor and sensory) polyneuropathy. This shows that nerve conduction may not be concordant with the clinical signs and symptoms. NCS detects neuropathy much earlier, before it becomes evident clinically. The neuropathy is associated with abonromal fasting blood sugar, HBIAC and duration of diabetes. (author)

  14. [Atypical Guillain-Barré syndrome: multiple cranial neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, J M; Alañá-García, M; Cacabelos-Pérez, P; Ortín-Castaño, A; Ciudad-Bautista, J; López-Alburquerque, J T

    Multiple cranial neuropathy is a condition rarely seen in everyday clinical practice. It has many different causes, and in spite of careful clinical investigation many cases remain of unknown aetiology. It is also considered to be an atypical variant, topographically circumscribed, of the Guillan Barr syndrome (GBS). A 23 years old man developed a progressive illness over ten days. He complained of diplopia, facial diplegia and a nasal voice. Subsequently, he also developed weakness of the neck and tongue muscles, dysphagia, abolition of reflexes of the left arm and right triceps reflex but without involvement of the respiratory muscles or other limbs. CSF studies showed slightly raised protein with no cells. Neurophysiological studies showed a demyelinating disorder with secondary axonal damage. In spite of further studies, no aetiological agent was found. These observations suggested this case is of a topographical variant of GBS. Such cases have also been classified as the Miller Fisher syndrome, pharyngo cervico brachial paralysis, are flexic paraparesia and bilateral lumbar polyradiculopathy. In view of the diversity of the clinical and biological characteristics of the cases reviewed, which may mean different aetiopathogeneses, we consider that a thorough search should be made for the aetiology before these conditions are labelled as atypical variants of GBS.

  15. Malignant mental nerve neuropathy: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán Gil, Sónnica; Peñarrocha Diago, Maria; Peñarrocha Diago, Miguel

    2008-10-01

    Malignant mental neuropathy (MMN) is a neurological manifestation of cancer, characterized by the presence of hypoesthesia or anesthesia restricted to the territory of the mental branch of the mandibular nerve. A systematic review of the literature has been made on MMN, analyzing the etiology, pathogeny, clinical characteristics, complementary tests and the prognosis. Sixteen studies, providing 136 cases were selected. Breast cancer and lymphomas were the most frequently associated malignant diseases. The most frequent pathogenic mechanisms producing neurological involvement were: peripherally, mandibular lesions; and centrally, tumors at the base of the cranium. Regarding clinical characteristics, manifestation of MMN was the primary symptom of malignant disease in 27.7% of cases, and a first symptom of recurrence in 37.7%. The group of selected studies included 50 orthopantomographs, 9 mandibular computed tomographies and 50 radiographic examinations of the cranial region. The most affected region was the mandible. The appearance of MMN is an ominous prognosis for the progression of the disease, with a mortality of 78.5% within a mean of 6.9 months.

  16. Painful diabetic neuropathy: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartemann, A; Attal, N; Bouhassira, D; Dumont, I; Gin, H; Jeanne, S; Said, G; Richard, J-L

    2011-11-01

    The prevalence of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (PDN) is about 20% in patients with type 2 diabetes and 5% in those with type 1. Patients should be systematically questioned concerning suggestive symptoms, as they are not usually volunteers. As PDN is due to small-fibre injury, the 10 g monofilament pressure test as well as the standard electrophysiological procedures may be normal. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings: type of pain (burning discomfort, electric shock-like sensation, aching coldness in the lower limbs); time of occurrence (mostly at rest and at night); and abnormal sensations (such as tingling or numbness). The DN4 questionnaire is an easy-to-use validated diagnostic tool. Three classes of drugs are of equal value in treating PDN: tricyclic antidepressants; anticonvulsants; and selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors. These compounds may be prescribed as first-line therapy following pain assessment using a visual analogue scale. If the initial drug at its maximum tolerated dose does not lead to a decrease in pain of at least 30%, another drug class should be prescribed; if the pain is decreased by 30% but remains greater than 3/10, a drug from a different class may be given in association. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy: clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayannis, Georgios; Giamouzis, Gregory; Cokkinos, Dennis V; Skoularigis, John; Triposkiadis, Filippos

    2012-06-01

    Diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (DCAN), the impairment of the autonomic balance of the cardiovascular system in the setting of diabetes mellitus (DM), is frequently observed in both Type 1 and 2 DM, has detrimental effects on the quality of life and portends increased mortality. Clinical manifestations include: resting heart rate disorders, exercise intolerance, intraoperative cardiovascular lability, orthostatic alterations in heart rate and blood pressure, QT-interval prolongation, abnormal diurnal and nocturnal blood pressure variation, silent myocardial ischemia and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Clinical tests for autonomic nervous system evaluation, heart rate variability analysis, autonomic innervation imaging techniques, microneurography and baroreflex analysis are the main diagnostic tools for DCAN detection. Aldose reductase inhibitors and antioxidants may be helpful in DCAN therapy, but a regular, more generalized and multifactorial approach should be adopted with inclusion of lifestyle modifications, strict glycemic control and treatment of concomitant traditional cardiovascular risk factors, in order to achieve the best therapeutic results. In the present review, the authors provide aspects of DCAN pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and an algorithm regarding the evaluation and management of DCAN in DM patients.

  18. "Isolated" Suprascapular Neuropathy: Compression, Traction, or Inflammation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Hanneur, Malo; Maldonado, Andres A; Howe, Benjamin M; Mauermann, Michelle L; Spinner, Robert J

    2018-02-26

    Several hypotheses have been proposed for the pathophysiology of suprascapular nerve (SSN) palsy, including compression, traction, and nerve inflammation. To provide insight into the pathophysiology of isolated nontraumatic SSN palsy by performing critical reinterpretations of electrodiagnostic (EDX) studies and magnetic resonance (MR) images of patients with such diagnosis. We retrospectively reviewed all patients referred to our institution for the past 20 yr with a diagnosis of nontraumatic isolated suprascapular neuropathy who had an upper extremity EDX study and a shoulder or brachial plexus MR scan. Patient charts were reviewed to analyze their initial clinical examination, and their original EDX study and MR images were reinterpreted by an experienced neurologist and a musculoskeletal radiologist, respectively, both blinded from the authors' hypothesis and from each other's findings. Fifty-nine patients were included. Fifty of them (85%) presented with at least 1 finding that was inconsistent with an isolated SSN palsy. Forty patients (68%) had signs on physical examination beyond the SSN distribution. Thirty-one patients (53%) had abnormalities on their EDX studies not related to the SSN. Twenty-two patients (37%) had denervation atrophy in other muscles than the spinati, or neural hyperintensity in other nerves than the SSN on their MR scans, without any evidence of SSN extrinsic compression. The great majority of patients with presumed isolated SSN palsy had clinical, electrophysiological, and/or imaging evidence of a more diffuse pattern of neuromuscular involvement. These data strongly support an inflammatory pathophysiology in many cases of "isolated" SSN palsy.

  19. The Importance of Rare Subtypes in Diagnosis and Treatment of Peripheral Neuropathy: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, Brian C; Price, Raymond S; Chen, Kevin S; Feldman, Eva L

    2015-12-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a prevalent condition that usually warrants a thorough history and examination but has limited diagnostic evaluation. However, rare localizations of peripheral neuropathy often require more extensive diagnostic testing and different treatments. To describe rare localizations of peripheral neuropathy, including the appropriate diagnostic evaluation and available treatments. References were identified from PubMed searches conducted on May 29, 2015, with an emphasis on systematic reviews and randomized clinical trials. Articles were also identified through the use of the authors' own files. Search terms included common rare neuropathy localizations and their causes, as well as epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Diffuse, nonlength-dependent neuropathies, multiple mononeuropathies, polyradiculopathies, plexopathies, and radiculoplexus neuropathies are rare peripheral neuropathy localizations that often require extensive diagnostic testing. Atypical neuropathy features, such as acute/subacute onset, asymmetry, and/or motor predominant signs, are frequently present. The most common diffuse, nonlength-dependent neuropathies are Guillain-Barré syndrome, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, multifocal motor neuropathy, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Effective disease-modifying therapies exist for many diffuse, nonlength-dependent neuropathies including Guillain-Barré syndrome, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, multifocal motor neuropathy, and some paraprotein-associated demyelinating neuropathies. Vasculitic neuropathy (multiple mononeuropathy) also has efficacious treatment options, but definitive evidence of a treatment effect for IgM anti-MAG neuropathy and diabetic amyotrophy (radiculoplexus neuropathy) is lacking. Recognition of rare localizations of peripheral neuropathy is essential given the implications for diagnostic testing and treatment. Electrodiagnostic studies are an important

  20. Subclinical peripheral neuropathy in type 1 diabetic adolescents and its relationship with metabolic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajić Silvija

    2005-01-01

    DSMN and improved HbA1c, although a numeric distinction did exist. On the clinical aspect, there was a significant relationship between insulin dosage and age (p<0.01, sig. 0.007. This data demonstrates the influence of metabolic regulation on neuropathy. Better metabolic control can slow the progression of subclinical peripheral neural dysfunction (DSMN in diabetic children.

  1. Structural and Functional Abnormalities of the Neuromuscular Junction in the Trembler-J Homozygote Mouse Model of Congenital Hypomyelinating Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scurry, Alexandra N; Heredia, Dante J; Feng, Cheng-Yuan; Gephart, Gregory B; Hennig, Grant W; Gould, Thomas W

    2016-04-01

    Mutations in peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) result in the most common form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, CMT1A. This hereditary peripheral neuropathy is characterized by dysmyelination of peripheral nerves, reduced nerve conduction velocity, and muscle weakness. APMP22 point mutation in L16P (leucine 16 to proline) underlies a form of human CMT1A as well as the Trembler-J mouse model of CMT1A. Homozygote Trembler-J mice (Tr(J)) die early postnatally, fail to make peripheral myelin, and, therefore, are more similar to patients with congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy than those with CMT1A. Because recent studies of inherited neuropathies in humans and mice have demonstrated that dysfunction and degeneration of neuromuscular synapses or junctions (NMJs) often precede impairments in axonal conduction, we examined the structure and function of NMJs in Tr(J)mice. Although synapses appeared to be normally innervated even in end-stage Tr(J)mice, the growth and maturation of the NMJs were altered. In addition, the amplitudes of nerve-evoked muscle endplate potentials were reduced and there was transmission failure during sustained nerve stimulation. These results suggest that the severe congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy that characterizes Tr(J)mice results in structural and functional deficits of the developing NMJ. © 2016 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessment of sensory neuropathy in patients with diabetic foot problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Nather

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Our aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of three different modalities for testing sensory neuropathy in diabetic patients with and without diabetic foot problems. The three devices used included the pin-prick testing using the Neurotip® (PPT, the Semmes–Weinstein 5.07/10 g monofilament testing (SWMT, and the rapid-current perception threshold (R-CPT measurements using the Neurometer® testing. Our study population consisted of 54 patients (108 feet with diabetic foot problems treated at the National University Hospital in Singapore by our multi-disciplinary diabetic foot care team. Our results showed no difference in sensory neuropathy detected by PPT and 5.07/10 g SWMT in both the pathological and normal foot. In the pathological foot, there was significant increase in sensory neuropathy detected by the Neurometer® device at both the big toe and ankle sites as compared to PPT and 5.07/10 g SWMT. In the normal foot, there was a significant increase in sensory neuropathy detected by the Neurometer® device at the big toe site only as compared to PPT and 5.07/10 g SWMT. Finally, the Neurometer® measurements detected a statistically higher proportion of feet with sensory neuropathy as compared to detection by the PPT or 5.07/10 g SWMT.

  3. [Toronto clinical scoring system in diabetic peripheral neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Mao, Ji-Ping; Yan, Xiang

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate the application value of Toronto clinical scoring system (TCSS) and its grading of neuropathy for diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), and to explore the relationship between TCSS grading of neuropathy and the grading of diabetic nephropathy and diabetic retinopathy. A total of 209 patients of Type 2 diabtes (T2DM) underwent TCSS. Taking electrophysiological examination as a gold standard for diagnosing DPN, We compared the results of TCSS score > or = 6 with electrophysiological examination, and tried to select the optimal cut-off points of TCSS. The corresponding accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of TCSS score > or = 6 were 76.6%, 77.2%, and 75.6%, respectively.The Youden index and Kappa were 0.53 and 0.52, which implied TCSS score > or = 6 had a moderate consistency with electrophysiological examination. There was a linear positive correlation between TCSS grading of neuropathy and the grading of diabetic nephropathy and diabetic retinopathy (P<0.05). The optimal cut-off point was 5 or 6 among these patients. TCSS is reliable in diagnosing DPN and its grading of neuropathy has clinical value.

  4. Vasculitis syndromes : Peripheral neuropathy in AAV--when vasculitis hits a nerve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutgers, Abraham; Kallenberg, Cornelis

    Peripheral neuropathy can be a manifestation of small-vessel vasculitides such as antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis. Diagnosing vasculitic neuropathy is, however, difficult in many cases. Early treatment focused on achieving remission of the underlying vasculitic process is

  5. Electrophysiological evidence for hyperalgesia in the peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Y K; Xiao, W H

    1990-06-01

    A peripheral neuropathy was produced in adult rats by placing loosely constrained ligature around the common sciatic nerve. At the ligature region of the nerve, demyelination developed. The postoperative behavior of these rats indicated that hyperalgesia and allodynia were produced. The electrical activity pattern of the damaged fibers was remarkably different from those of normal nerves: there were some abnormal spontaneous afferent firings from the injured fibers; multi-impulse responses of C-fiber to single shock was recorded; a lasting firing was elicited after the injured region was gently pressed or by oil drops at 40 degrees C; an antidromic electric stimulus to the injured region, stimulations of L5 sympathetic ganglion or systemic administration of noradrenaline, all caused an increase in on-going spontaneous discharges of the injured fibers or brought the silent fibers into firing. Stimulation of the dorsal roots of the sciatic nerve produced no effect on their activities or caused a pause of the on-going discharges of them. Phentolamine, an alpha receptor blocker, ceased the abnormal firing, but did not affect the normal fiber firings. It is hypothesized that noradrenaline released by the sympathetic nerve would be an important factor responsible for both hyperalgesia and allodynia following injury of peripheral nerve.

  6. Diabetic neuropathies: update on definitions, diagnostic criteria, estimation of severity, and treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tesfaye, Solomon; Boulton, Andrew J M; Dyck, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    Preceding the joint meeting of the 19th annual Diabetic Neuropathy Study Group of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (NEURODIAB) and the 8th International Symposium on Diabetic Neuropathy in Toronto, Canada, 13-18 October 2009, expert panels were convened to provide updates on cla...... on classification, definitions, diagnostic criteria, and treatments of diabetic peripheral neuropathies (DPNs), autonomic neuropathy, painful DPNs, and structural alterations in DPNs....

  7. Development of an RT-qPCR assay for the specific detection of a distinct genetic lineage of the infectious bursal disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomás, Gonzalo; Hernández, Martín; Marandino, Ana; Techera, Claudia; Grecco, Sofia; Hernández, Diego; Banda, Alejandro; Panzera, Yanina; Pérez, Ruben

    2017-04-01

    The infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is a major health threat to the world's poultry industry despite intensive controls including proper biosafety practices and vaccination. IBDV (Avibirnavirus, Birnaviridae) is a non-enveloped virus with a bisegmented double-stranded RNA genome. The virus is traditionally classified into classic, variant and very virulent strains, each with different epidemiological relevance and clinical implications. Recently, a novel worldwide spread genetic lineage was described and denoted as distinct (d) IBDV. Here, we report the development and validation of a reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) assay for the specific detection of dIBDVs in the global poultry industry. The assay employs a TaqMan-MGB probe that hybridizes with a unique molecular signature of dIBDV. The assay successfully detected all the assessed strains belonging to the dIBDV genetic lineage, showing high specificity and absence of cross-reactivity with non-dIBDVs, IBDV-negative samples and other common avian viruses. Using serial dilutions of in vitro-transcribed RNA we obtained acceptable PCR efficiencies and determination coefficients, and relatively small intra- and inter-assay variability. The assay demonstrated a wide dynamic range between 10 3 and 10 8 RNA copies/reaction. This rapid, specific and quantitative assay is expected to improve IBDV surveillance and control worldwide and to increase our understanding of the molecular epidemiology of this economically detrimental poultry pathogen.

  8. The use of global transcriptional analysis to reveal the biological and cellular events involved in distinct development phases of Trichophyton rubrum conidial germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Guohui

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conidia are considered to be the primary cause of infections by Trichophyton rubrum. Results We have developed a cDNA microarray containing 10250 ESTs to monitor the transcriptional strategy of conidial germination. A total of 1561 genes that had their expression levels specially altered in the process were obtained and hierarchically clustered with respect to their expression profiles. By functional analysis, we provided a global view of an important biological system related to conidial germination, including characterization of the pattern of gene expression at sequential developmental phases, and changes of gene expression profiles corresponding to morphological transitions. We matched the EST sequences to GO terms in the Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD. A number of homologues of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes related to signalling pathways and some important cellular processes were found to be involved in T. rubrum germination. These genes and signalling pathways may play roles in distinct steps, such as activating conidial germination, maintenance of isotropic growth, establishment of cell polarity and morphological transitions. Conclusion Our results may provide insights into molecular mechanisms of conidial germination at the cell level, and may enhance our understanding of regulation of gene expression related to the morphological construction of T. rubrum.

  9. Computational visual distinctness metric

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martínez-Baena, J.; Toet, A.; Fdez-Vidal, X.R.; Garrido, A.; Rodríguez-Sánchez, R.

    1998-01-01

    A new computational visual distinctness metric based on principles of the early human visual system is presented. The metric is applied to quantify (1) the visual distinctness of targets in complex natural scenes and (2) the perceptual differences between compressed and uncompressed images. The new

  10. [Pseudo-conduction block in nonsystemic vasculitic neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabón Meneses, R M; Gila, L; Urriza, J; Imirizaldu, L; Arrechea, M; Lacruz, F

    2009-01-01

    Introduction. Nonsystemic vasculitic neuropathy (NSVN) is an inflammatory disorder of the vasa nervorum which usually is expressed as a mononeuritis multiplex. We present a patient with NSVN with histological confirmination focused on the neurophysiological findings at the early stages. A 36 years-old woman presented with paresthesia and weakness in her right hand followed by left footdrop. The first neurophysiologic examination showed low amplitude of the right median nerve (RMN) CMAP with proximal stimulation. A second examination showed signs of axonal damage in several nerves, including the RMN. The acute ischemic damage of a nerve can give a pattern of conduction block in the electroneurographic study as in the RMN of the presented case. This phenomenon is referred as "pseudo-conduction block", since it is transient and evolves towards a definite pattern of axonal neuropathy. When a vasculitic neuropathy is suspected, repeated neurophysiologic studies are necessary in order to ensure a proper (appropriate) characterization of the lesional patterns.

  11. Verrucous lesions arising in lymphedema and diabetic neuropathy: Elephantiasis nostras verrucosa or verrucous skin lesions on the feet of patients with diabetic neuropathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Eri; Asai, Jun; Okuzawa, Yasutaro; Hanada, Keiji; Nomiyama, Tomoko; Takenaka, Hideya; Katoh, Norito

    2016-03-01

    Verrucous skin lesions on the feet in diabetic neuropathy (VSLDN) develop in areas with sensory loss in diabetic patients. Although various types of chronic stimulation, such as pressure or friction, are considered an important factor in the development of such lesions, the precise pathogenesis of VSLDN remains obscure, and there is currently no established treatment for this disease. Here, we present a case of VSLDN on the dorsum of the right foot. However, because lymphedema was also observed at the same site, this lesion could also be diagnosed as elephantiasis nostras verrucosa arising in diabetic neuropathy. The lesion was successfully treated with a combination of elastic stocking and mixed killed bacterial suspension and hydrocortisone ointment, which suggested that VSLDN might have been exacerbated by the pre-existing lymphedema. Because various types of chronic stimulation can trigger VSLDN, treatment plans should be devised on a case-by-case basis. Therefore, it is important to investigate the presence of factors that can induce or exacerbate chronic inflammatory stimulation, such as lymphedema in our case, in each patient with VSLDN. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  12. The Physcomitrella patens exocyst subunit EXO70.3d has distinct roles in growth and development, and is essential for completion of the moss life cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Anamika; Brejšková, Lucie; Hála, Michal; Cvrčková, Fatima; Žárský, Viktor

    2017-10-01

    The exocyst, an evolutionarily conserved secretory vesicle-tethering complex, spatially controls exocytosis and membrane turnover in fungi, metazoans and plants. The exocyst subunit EXO70 exists in multiple paralogs in land plants, forming three conserved clades with assumed distinct roles. Here we report functional analysis of the first moss exocyst subunit to be studied, Physcomitrella patens PpEXO70.3d (Pp1s97_91V6), from the, as yet, poorly characterized EXO70.3 clade. Following phylogenetic analysis to confirm the presence of three ancestral land plant EXO70 clades outside angiosperms, we prepared and phenotypically characterized loss-of-function Ppexo70.3d mutants and localized PpEXO70.3d in vivo using green fluorescent protein-tagged protein expression. Disruption of PpEXO70.3d caused pleiotropic cell elongation and differentiation defects in protonemata, altered response towards exogenous auxin, increased endogenous IAA concentrations, along with defects in bud and gametophore development. During mid-archegonia development, an abnormal egg cell is formed and subsequently collapses, resulting in mutant sterility. Mutants exhibited altered cell wall and cuticle deposition, as well as compromised cytokinesis, consistent with the protein localization to the cell plate. Despite some functional redundancy allowing survival of moss lacking PpEXO70.3d, this subunit has an essential role in the moss life cycle, indicating sub-functionalization within the moss EXO70 family. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  13. Distinct metabolic changes between wheat embryo and endosperm during grain development revealed by 2D-DIGE-based integrative proteome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hui; He, Miao; Zhu, Chong; Yuan, Linlin; Dong, Liwei; Bian, Yanwei; Zhang, Wenying; Yan, Yueming

    2016-05-01

    Two Chinese bread wheat cultivars, Jinghua 9 and Zhongmai 175, distinct in grain weight and dough quality, were used to study proteome changes in the embryo and endosperm during grain development using a two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE)-based proteomics approach. In total, 138 and 127 differentially expressed protein (DEP) spots representing 116 and 113 unique DEPs were identified in the embryo and endosperm, respectively. Among them, 54 (31%) DEPs were commonly present in both organs while 62 (35%) and 59 (34%) DEPs occurred only in the embryo and endosperm, respectively. Embryonic DEPs are primarily stress-related proteins and involved in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, while those from the endosperm are related primarily to carbohydrate metabolism and storage. Principal component analysis (PCA) indicated that the proteome differences in the endosperm caused by different cultivars were greater than those by development stages, while the differences in the embryo showed the opposite pattern. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) analysis revealed a complex network centered primarily on enzymes involved in carbohydrate and protein metabolism. The transcriptional levels of fourteen important DEPs encoding genes showed high similarity between organs and cultivars. In particular, some key DEPs of the endosperm, such as phosphoglucomutase, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase), and sucrose synthase (SUS), showed significantly upregulated expression, indicating their key roles in starch biosynthesis and grain yield. Moreover, upregulated expression of some storage proteins in the endosperm could improve wheat bread-making quality. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Painful neuropathies: the emerging role of sodium channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Brigitte A; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Gerrits, Monique M; Waxman, Stephen G; Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Faber, Catharina G

    2014-06-01

    Pain is a frequent debilitating feature reported in peripheral neuropathies with involvement of small nerve (Aδ and C) fibers. Voltage-gated sodium channels are responsible for the generation and conduction of action potentials in the peripheral nociceptive neuronal pathway where NaV 1.7, NaV 1.8, and NaV 1.9 sodium channels (encoded by SCN9A, SCN10A, and SCN11A) are preferentially expressed. The human genetic pain conditions inherited erythromelalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder were the first to be linked to gain-of-function SCN9A mutations. Recent studies have expanded this spectrum with gain-of-function SCN9A mutations in patients with small fiber neuropathy and in a new syndrome of pain, dysautonomia, and small hands and small feet (acromesomelia). In addition, painful neuropathies have been recently linked to SCN10A mutations. Patch-clamp studies have shown that the effect of SCN9A mutations is dependent upon the cell-type background. The functional effects of a mutation in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and sympathetic neuron cells may differ per mutation, reflecting the pattern of expression of autonomic symptoms in patients with painful neuropathies who carry the mutation in question. Peripheral neuropathies may not always be length-dependent, as demonstrated in patients with initial facial and scalp pain symptoms with SCN9A mutations showing hyperexcitability in both trigeminal ganglion and DRG neurons. There is some evidence suggesting that gain-of-function SCN9A mutations can lead to degeneration of peripheral axons. This review will focus on the emerging role of sodium channelopathies in painful peripheral neuropathies, which could serve as a basis for novel therapeutic strategies. © 2014 Peripheral Nerve Society.

  15. Propionic acidemia and optic neuropathy: a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Carolina; Raimann, Erna; Peredo, Pilar; Cabello, Juan Francisco; Castro, Gabriela; Valiente, Alf; de la Parra, Alicia; Bravo, Paulina; Okuma, Cecilia; Cornejo, Verónica

    2014-01-01

    Propionic acidemia is a metabolic disease produced by a deficiency of the enzyme propionyl-CoA carboxylase. It can lead to coma, with severe neurologic encephalopathy or present later in life with vomiting, hypotonia, and seizures. An early diagnosis with adequate treatment helps to prevent the sequelae. Among the described complications is optic neuropathy, although not commonly reported, it is very disabling. To describe two patients with propionic acidemia and optic neuropathy. Patient 1: 16 years old, male, parents without consanguinity. He was diagnosed at 5 months of age because of hypotonia and seizures. Until the age of 9 years, he evolved satisfactorily; therefore, he stopped treatment. At 13 years, he presented bilateral optic neuropathy. Patient 2: 20 years, female, parents without consanguinity. She was diagnosed with PA at 11 months of age because of hypotonia and seizures. She evolved satisfactorily until the age of 9 years when she presented a metabolic decompensation followed by a bad metabolic control. At 18 years, she presented bilateral progressive optic neuropathy. Both patients have psychometric scores with borderline IQ 84-75 (WISC-R) beside optic neuropathy. They were evaluated by an ophthalmologist and also by neuroimaging (MRI of optic pathway). Pathophysiology of optic neuropathy is not completely understood. There is evidence that the damage is due to an accumulation of neurotoxic compounds secondary to the metabolic block increasing the oxidative stress. We suggest an annual ophthalmologic evaluation in the long-term follow-up of organic acidurias with visual loss, in order to detect this disabling sequela at an earlier stage.

  16. Reversible optic neuropathy with OPA1 exon 5b mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornille, K.; Milea, D.; Amati-Bonneau, P.

    2008-01-01

    A new c.740G>A (R247H) mutation in OPA1 alternate spliced exon 5b was found in a patient presenting with bilateral optic neuropathy followed by partial, spontaneous visual recovery. R247H fibroblasts from the patient and his unaffected father presented unusual highly tubular mitochondrial network......, significant increased susceptibility to apoptosis, oxidative phosphorylation uncoupling, and altered OPA1 protein profile, supporting the pathogenicity of this mutation. These results suggest that the clinical spectrum of the OPA1-associated optic neuropathies may be larger than previously described......, and that spontaneous recovery may occur in cases harboring an exon 5b mutation Udgivelsesdato: 2008/5...

  17. The significance of computed tomography in optic neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awai, Tsugumi; Yasutake, Hirohide; Ono, Yoshiko; Kumagai, Kazuhisa; Kairada, Kensuke

    1981-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT scan) has become one of the important and useful modes of examination for ophthalmological and neuro-ophthalmological disorders. CT scan (EMI scan) was performed on 21 patients with optic neuropathy in order to detect the cause. Of these 21 patients, the CT scan was abnormal in six. These six patients were verified, histopathologically, as having chromophobe pituitary adenoma, craniopharyngioma, plasmocytoma from sphenoidal sinus, optic nerve glioma and giant aneurysma of anterior communicating artery. The practical diagnostic value of CT scan for optic neuropathy is discussed. (author)

  18. Clinical course of uremic neuropathy in long-term hemodialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Jurčić, Dragan; Bilić, Ante; Schwarz, Dragan; Oršanić, Dubravka; Gabrić, Maruška; Špoljarić, Ljubica; Mihanović, Mate

    2008-01-01

    One hundred and thirty-one patients on long-term hemodialysis were examined for the presence of clinical symptoms and signs, and for the effects of dialytic age, age and sex on uremic neuropathy. According to dialysis age, the patients were divided into three subgroups: low dialysis age, 10 years of dialysis (n=34). Two patient subgroups were differentiated according to mean age of 53.2 years: younger (n=57) and older (n=74). Clinical grading of uremic neuropathy was based on Niel...

  19. Treatment strategies for inherited optic neuropathies: past, present and future

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Wai-Man, P; Votruba, M; Moore, A T; Chinnery, P F

    2014-01-01

    Bilateral visual loss secondary to inherited optic neuropathies is an important cause of registrable blindness among children and young adults. The two prototypal disorders seen in clinical practice are Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (DOA). About 90% of LHON cases are due to one of three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations: m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A, and m.14484T>C, which affect critical complex I subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain...

  20. MRI of suprascapular neuropathy in a weight lifter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiss, J; Woldenberg, L S; Saddemi, S R; Ebraheim, N A

    1993-01-01

    Suprascapular neuropathy results from abnormal compression of the suprascapular nerve, typically at the suprascapular or spinoglenoid notch. This may be produced by either mass effect such as ganglion cyst or by certain repetitive shoulder motions producing wide scapular excursion (e.g., hyperabduction), which causes traction upon the nerve. Certain sports activities such as weight lifting predispose to this type of neuropathy. The clinical presentation is frequently not specific and the patient may be sent for MR evaluation to rule out rotator cuff tear or other more common shoulder abnormalities. This entity should be suspected if MR images demonstrate selective atrophy of the spinatus muscles with a structurally intact rotator cuff.

  1. Diffusion MR Imaging of Postoperative Bilateral Acute Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ju Young; Lee, In Ho; Song, Chang June [Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Hee Youn [Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon(Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    A 57-year-old woman experienced bilateral acute ischemic optic neuropathy after spine surgery. Routine MR imaging sequence, T2-weighted image, showed subtle high signal intensity on bilateral optic nerves. A contrast-enhanced T1 weighted image showed enhancement along the bilateral optic nerve sheath. Moreover, diffusion-weighted image (DWI) and an apparent diffusion coefficient map showed markedly restricted diffusion on bilateral optic nerves. Although MR findings of T2-weighted and contrast enhanced T1-weighted images may be nonspecific, the DWI finding of cytotoxic edema of bilateral optic nerves will be helpful for the diagnosis of acute ischemic optic neuropathy after spine surgery.

  2. Hereditary neuropathies: systematization and diagnostics (clinical case of hereditary motor and sensor neuropathy of the IA type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolokolova A.M.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to study the value of routine methods (clinical symptoms, electrophysiological findings and results of DNA analysis in diagnostics of hereditary motor sensory neuropathy type IA in outpatient clinics. Material and Methods. The review of foreign literature is represented. The phenotypic polymorphism, genetic heterogeneity and the difficulties of diagnostics are identified. A family with hereditary motor sensory neuropathy of lAtype is presented, which was diagnosed on the base of available methods in outpatient practice (clinical symptoms, genealogical method, electro-physiological findings and DNA analysis results. Results. Routine algorithm (consistent valuation of clinical symptoms, neurophysiologic findings and the results of DNA analysis helped to verify the diagnosis of hereditary motor sensory neuropathy of lAtype in outpatient practice after more than 20 years of the onset of the disease. Conclusion. The neurologists of outpatient clinics and other specialists must be informed about the availability of diagnostics of hereditary diseases of nervous system.

  3. Comparing of Cox model and parametric models in analysis of effective factors on event time of neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargarian-Marvasti, Sadegh; Rimaz, Shahnaz; Abolghasemi, Jamileh; Heydari, Iraj

    2017-01-01

    Cox proportional hazard model is the most common method for analyzing the effects of several variables on survival time. However, under certain circumstances, parametric models give more precise estimates to analyze survival data than Cox. The purpose of this study was to investigate the comparative performance of Cox and parametric models in a survival analysis of factors affecting the event time of neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes. This study included 371 patients with type 2 diabetes without neuropathy who were registered at Fereydunshahr diabetes clinic. Subjects were followed up for the development of neuropathy between 2006 to March 2016. To investigate the factors influencing the event time of neuropathy, significant variables in univariate model ( P Cox and parametric models ( P Cox and parametric models, ethnicity, high-density lipoprotein and family history of diabetes were identified as predictors of event time of neuropathy ( P Cox and parametric models. According to the results of comparison of survival receiver operating characteristics curves, log-normal model was considered as the most efficient and fitted model.

  4. Calcium channel blockers reduce oxaliplatin-induced acute neuropathy: a retrospective study of 69 male patients receiving modified FOLFOX6 therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsushima, Yoko; Egashira, Nobuaki; Narishige, Yuri; Fukui, Shiori; Kawashiri, Takehiro; Yamauchi, Yui; Oishi, Ryozo

    2013-02-01

    Oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy has been widely used for colorectal cancer. However, it causes severe acute and chronic peripheral neuropathies. Recently, we reported that calcium channel blockers prevent the oxaliplatin-induced cold hyperalgesia in rats. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the treatment with calcium channel blockers prevents the peripheral neuropathy during oxaliplatin therapy. The electronic medical charts for patients who received modified FOLFOX6 regimen from January 2008 to December 2010 were evaluated. Of the 200 patients who received modified FOLFOX6 therapy, 84 patients were excluded due to the exclusion criteria. Calcium channel blockers had been taken by 26 of 69 male patients, but only three of 47 female patients. Therefore, in the present analysis, the male data of the groups with and without calcium channel blockers (n=26 and 43, respectively) were compared. The cumulative incidence curve of acute neuropathy was significantly lower in the group with calcium channel blockers (P=0.0438, log-rank test), whereas there was no difference between these groups in the cumulative incidence curve of chronic neuropathy (P=0.4919, log-rank test). The present study indicated that calcium channel blockers inhibit the development of acute peripheral neuropathy in patients receiving modified FOLFOX6 therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Osmotic stress- and indole-3-butyric acid-induced NO generation are partially distinct processes in root growth and development in Pisum sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbert, Zsuzsanna; Bartha, Bernadett; Erdei, László

    2008-06-01

    In this work, the effects of osmotic stress and exogenous auxin (indole-3-butyric acid, IBA) on root morphology and nitric oxide (NO) generation in roots were compared in pea plants. Five-day-old plants were treated with 0, 10(-3), 10(-4), 10(-5), 10(-6), 10(-7), 10(-8) or 10(-9) M IBA or with PEG 6000 at concentrations that determined 0, 50, 100, 200 or 400 mOsm in the medium, during 5 days. NO generation was examined by in situ and in vivo fluorescence method. Increasing concentrations of PEG as well as IBA resulted in shortening of primary root (PR), enhancement of lateral root (LR) number and significant increase of NO generation. Time-dependent investigations revealed that in the case of IBA treatments, the LR number increased in parallel with an intensified NO generation, while elongation of PR was not followed by changes in NO levels. Under osmotic stress, the time curve of NO development was distinct compared with that of IBA-treated roots, because significantly, the appearance of lateral initials was preceded by a transient burst of NO. This early phase of NO generation under osmotic stress was clearly distinguishable from that which accompanied LR initiation. It is concluded that osmotic stress and the presence of exogenous auxin resulted in partly similar root architecture but different time courses of NO synthesis. We suppose that the early phase of NO generation may fulfill a role in the osmotic stress-induced signalization process leading to the modification of root morphology.

  6. Mutations in PRPS1, which encodes the phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase enzyme critical for nucleotide biosynthesis, cause hereditary peripheral neuropathy with hearing loss and optic neuropathy (cmtx5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Jin; Sohn, Kwang-Min; Shy, Michael E; Krajewski, Karen M; Hwang, Miok; Park, June-Hee; Jang, Sue-Yon; Won, Hong-Hee; Choi, Byung-Ok; Hong, Sung Hwa; Kim, Byoung-Joon; Suh, Yeon-Lim; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Soo-Youn; Kim, Sun-Hee; Kim, Jong-Won

    2007-09-01

    We have identified missense mutations at conserved amino acids in the PRPS1 gene on Xq22.3 in two families with a syndromic form of inherited peripheral neuropathy, one of Asian and one of European descent. The disease is inherited in an X-linked recessive manner, and the affected male patients invariably develop sensorineural hearing loss of prelingual type followed by gating disturbance and visual loss. The family of European descent was reported in 1967 as having Rosenberg-Chutorian syndrome, and recently a Korean family with the same symptom triad was identified with a novel disease locus CMTX5 on the chromosome band Xq21.32-q24. PRPS1 (phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase 1) is an isoform of the PRPS gene family and is ubiquitously expressed in human tissues, including cochlea. The enzyme mediates the biochemical step critical for purine metabolism and nucleotide biosynthesis. The mutations identified were E43D, in patients with Rosenberg-Chutorian syndrome, and M115T, in the Korean patients with CMTX5. We also showed decreased enzyme activity in patients with M115T. PRPS1 is the first CMT gene that encodes a metabolic enzyme, shedding a new light on the understanding of peripheral nerve-specific metabolism and also suggesting the potential of PRPS1 as a target for drugs in prevention and treatment of peripheral neuropathy by antimetabolite therapy.

  7. Peripheral neuropathy in persons with tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold T Mafukidze

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral neuropathy (PN is a serious condition affecting the nerves that is commonly seen in patients with tuberculosis (TB. Causes of PN in patients with TB are multiple, and can include TB itself, other co-morbid conditions, such as Human Immune-deficiency virus (HIV disease, malnutrition, or diabetes mellitus (DM, and several anti-tuberculous medications. The condition can manifest with a variety of symptoms, and a diagnosis can usually be made on a clinical basis. Treatment and prognosis of PN vary depending on the underlying cause, but often the condition can lead to permanent disability in individuals with TB. For this reason, primary prevention is key as is early identification and management of symptoms. Treatment can include withdrawal of possible offending agents, vitamin supplementation, physical therapy, analgesics, and targeted agents, including tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and gabapentin. Additional research is needed to better describe the morbidity and disability associated with PN in persons with TB and to improve management strategies for persons at risk for and affected by this condition. Case review: RM is a 47 year-old man who is in his third month of treatment for drug-resistant TB (DR-TB. His treatment regimen consists of kanamycin (1 gm intramuscular daily, levofloxacin (1000 mg by mouth daily, cycloserine (750 mg by mouth daily, ethionamide (750 mg by mouth daily, pyrazinamide (1500 mg by mouth daily, and Para-Amino Salicylate (12 gm by mouth daily. He is HIV-infected with a CD4 count of 470 cell/µl and on a stable antiretroviral therapy regimen of tenofovir, lamivudine, and efavirenz, which he started 8 weeks ago. He works in a platinum mine, denies smoking, reports drinking beer “on the weekend” and denies other drugs. He presents for his 3 month clinical visit for his DR-TB follow-up and states he is doing well, but he does report some

  8. Clinical evaluation and mitochondrial DNA sequence analysis in three Chinese families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Yaping; Zhou Xiangtian; Hu Yongwu; Tong Yi; Li Ronghua; Lu Fan; Yang Huanming; Mo Junqin; Qu Jia; Guan Minxin

    2005-01-01

    We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of three Chinese families (WZ4, WZ5, and WZ6) with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). Clinical and genetic evaluations revealed the variable severity and age-of-onset in visual impairment in these families. Penetrances of visual impairment in these Chinese families were 33.3%, 35.7%, and 35.5%, respectively, with an average 34.8%. Furthermore, the average age-at-onset in those Chinese families was 17, 20, and 18 years. In addition, the ratios between affected male and female matrilineal relatives in these Chinese families were 3:0, 1:1, and 1.2:1, respectively. Sequence analysis of the complete mitochondrial genomes in these pedigrees showed the distinct sets of mtDNA polymorphism, in addition to the identical G11778A mutation associated with LHON in many families. The fact that mtDNA of those pedigrees belonged to different haplogroups F1, D4, and M10 suggested that the G11778A mutation occurred sporadically and multiplied through evolution of the mtDNA in China. However, there was the absence of functionally significant mutations in tRNA and rRNAs or secondary LHON mutations in these Chinese families. The I187T mutation in the ND1, the S99A mutation in the A6, the V254I in CO3, and I58V in ND6 mutation, showing high evolutional conservation, may contribute to the phenotypic expression of the G11778A mutation in the WZ6 pedigree. By contrast, none of mtDNA variants are evolutionarily conserved and implicated to have significantly functional consequence in WZ4 and WZ5 pedigrees. Apparently, these variants do not have a potential modifying role in the development of visual impairment associated with G11778A mutation in those two families. Thus, nuclear modifier gene(s) or environmental factor(s) seem to account for the penetrance and expressivity of LHON in these three Chinese families carrying the G11778A mutation

  9. Psychometrics evaluation of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Neuropathy Score (CMTNSv2) second version, using Rasch analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadjadi, Reza; Reilly, Mary M; Shy, Michael E; Pareyson, Davide; Laura, Matilde; Murphy, Sinead; Feely, Shawna M E; Grider, Tiffany; Bacon, Chelsea; Piscosquito, Giuseppe; Calabrese, Daniela; Burns, Ted M

    2014-09-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth Neuropathy Score second version (CMTNSv2) is a validated clinical outcome measure developed for use in clinical trials to monitor disease impairment and progression in affected CMT patients. Currently, all items of CMTNSv2 have identical contribution to the total score. We used Rasch analysis to further explore psychometric properties of CMTNSv2, and in particular, category response functioning, and their weight on the overall disease progression. Weighted category responses represent a more accurate estimate of actual values measuring disease severity and therefore could potentially be used in improving the current version. © 2014 Peripheral Nerve Society.

  10. Isolated spinal accessory neuropathy and intracisternal schwannomas of the spinal accessory nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M. Al-Ajmi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a 40-year-old female patient presenting with isolated left spinal accessory neuropathy that developed insidiously over 6 years. She complained of ill-defined deep neck and shoulder pain. On examination, prominent sternocleidomastoid and trapezoid muscle weakness and atrophy, shoulder instability, and lateral scapular winging were observed. MRI identified a small mass of the cisternal portion of the spinal accessory nerve. Its appearance was typical of schwannoma. Surgical treatment was not offered because of the small tumor size, lack of mass effect and the questionable functional recovery in the presence of muscular atrophy.

  11. Early exposure to distinct sources of lipids affects differently the development and hepatic inflammatory profiles of 21-day-old rat offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mennitti LV

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Laís Vales Mennitti,1 Lila Missae Oyama,2 Aline Boveto Santamarina,1 Claudia Maria da Penha Oller do Nascimento,2 Luciana Pellegrini Pisani3 1PhD Program ‘Interdisciplinar in Health Sciences’, Federal University of São Paulo (UNIFESP, Santos, SP, Brazil; 2Department of Physiology, Discipline of Nutrition Physiology, Federal University of São Paulo (UNIFESP, São Paulo, SP, Brazil; 3Department of Biosciences, Institute of Health and Society, Federal University of São Paulo (UNIFESP, Santos, SP, Brazil Introduction: Maternal diet composition of fatty acids during pregnancy and lactation seems to modify the fetal programming, epigenetic pattern and offspring phenotype. Aim: Herein, we investigated the effects of maternal consumption of normal-fat diets with distinct lipid sources during pregnancy and lactation on the somatic development and proinflammatory status of 21-day-old rat offspring. Materials and Methods: On the first day of pregnancy, female Wistar rats were divided into four groups as follows: soybean oil (M-SO, lard (M-L, hydrogenated vegetable fat (M-HVF and fish oil (M-FO. Diets were maintained during pregnancy and lactation. Male offspring constituted the SO, L, HVF and FO groups. Pups were weighed and measured weekly. Lipopolysaccharide serum concentration was determined. Tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin (IL-6 and IL-10 in the liver were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Liver gene expressions were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Protein expressions in the liver were analyzed by Western blotting. Results: We observed an increase in body weight and adiposity in L and HVF groups. Moreover, HVF group showed an increase in the toll-like receptor 4 mRNA levels, IL10Rα and phosphorylated form of IκB kinase (IKK; p-IKKα+β protein expression. The FO group presented a decrease in body weight, relative weight of retroperitoneal adipose tissue, ADIPOR2 gene expression, lipopolysaccharide

  12. Sight-threatening optic neuropathy is associated with paranasal lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiko Hayashi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Takahiko Hayashi1, Ken Watanabe2, Yukio Tsuura3, Gengo Tsuji4, Shingo Koyama4, Jun Yoshigi4, Naoko Hirata1, Shin Yamane1, Yasuhito Iizima5, Shigeo Toyota6, Satoshi Takeuchi11Department of Ophthalmology, Yokosuka Kyosai Hospital, Japan; 2Department of Hematology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan; 3Department of Pathology, Yokosuka Kyosai Hospital, Japan; 4Department of Radiology, Yokosuka Kyosai Hospital, Japan; 5Department of Ophthalmology, Yokohama City University, Japan; 6Department of Internal Medicine, Yokosuka Kyosai Hospital, JapanAbstract: Malignant lymphoma around the orbit is very rare. We present a rare case of optic neuropathy caused by lymphoma. A 61-year-old Japanese woman was referred to our hospital for evaluation of idiopathic optic neuropathy affecting her right eye. The patient was treated with steroid pulse therapy (methyl-predonisolone 1 g daily for 3 days with a presumed diagnosis of idiopathic optic neuritis. After she had been switched to oral steroid therapy, endoscopic sinus surgery had been performed, which revealed diffuse large B cell lymphoma of the ethmoidal sinus. Although R-CHOP therapy was immediately started, prolonged optic nerve compression resulted in irreversible blindness. Accordingly, patients with suspected idiopathic optic neuritis should be carefully assessed when they show a poor response, and imaging of the orbits and brain should always be done for initial diagnosis because they may have compression by a tumor.Keywords: optic neuropathy, malignant lymphoma, paranasal lymphoma, rhinogenic optic neuropathy

  13. Neuropathy in hepatic disorders. A clinical, electrophysiological and histopathological appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chari, V R; Katiyar, B C; Rastogi, B L; Bhattacharya, S K

    1977-01-01

    The present study deals with 30 patients with cirrhosis of the liver and 12 patients with infective hepatitis who were studied clinically, neurophysiologically and histopathologically for the presence of neuropathy. Simultaneously, 13 healthy individuals were evaluated as controls. Clinical evidence of neuropathy was found in 63.3% of the patients with hepatic cirrhosis and in 16.6% of the patients with infective hepatitis. In hepatic cirrhosis, the conduction velocities were abnormal in 33.3% and histopathological demyelination was found in 80% of the patients. In infective hepatitis, on the other hand, altered nerve conduction velocities were found in 41.6% and segmental demyelination in 75% of the patients. Our data reveal that peripheral nerve involvement is seen both in chronic and acute liver disorders. The neuropathy in hepatic cirrhosis is unrelated to diabetes, alchoholism or portacaval shunt and may be due to unknown metabolic abnormality or to toxins. In infective hepatitis, the neuropathy may either be due to some acute metabolic derangement or may be purely viral in origin.

  14. Peripheral Neuropathy: Not a Feature of Childhood Thalassemia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sedat Işıkay

    an iron chelator, used for transfusion dependent thalassemia patients has been associated with sensorineural and sensorimotor neurotoxicity.[7,8] However, the data in literature regarding the peripheral neuropathy and beta thalassemia is limited. Moreover, there is a gap in literature about the factors that have a role in.

  15. Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculo-neuropathy following Antirabies Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu M

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Newer generation cell culture anti-rabies vaccines have become the preferred choice because of the paucity of the neurological complications. We report a case of acute inflammatory polyradiculo-neuropathy following the administration of purified chick embryo cell culture anti-rabies baccine for post exposure prophylaxis.

  16. Treatment of diabetic neuropathy in the lower limb: Signs and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is defined as 'the presence of symptoms and/or signs of peripheral nerve dysfunction in people with diabetes after exclusion of other causes: the diagnosis cannot be made without a clinical examination'. In fact, many of these symptoms and signs may precede the onset of diabetes.

  17. Unusual recovery from acute panautonomic neuropathy after immunoglobulin therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, A. A.; Vermeulen, M.; Koelman, J. H.; Wieling, W.

    1997-01-01

    A 33-year-old woman with acute idiopathic postganglionic panautonomic neuropathy experienced prompt recovery of all dysautonomic symptoms after receiving high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. Her recovery was complete within 6 months after onset of disease. This unusually rapid and complete

  18. Machado-Joseph disease presenting as severe asymmetric proximal neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schaik, I. N.; Jöbsis, G. J.; Vermeulen, M.; Keizers, H.; Bolhuis, P. A.; de Visser, M.

    1997-01-01

    Despite much effort, a 74 year old man with progressive proximal weakness and sensory disturbances due to axonal neuropathy remained a diagnostic problem. Investigation of his family disclosed an additional patient with a cerebellar syndrome and a family member with mainly pyramidal features.

  19. Calf enlargement in hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Visser, M.; Hoogendijk, J. E.; Ongerboer, B. W.; Verbeeten, B. J.

    1990-01-01

    Six members originating from two families with hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (hypertrophic and neuronal types) were noted to have enlarged calf muscles. Muscle computed tomography revealed that muscle enlargement in the propositus of the family with the hypertrophic type of HMSN was due to

  20. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type II

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is found in the cells of the nervous system, including sensory neurons. The mutations involved in HSAN2A result in ... Samuels M, Rouleau GA. Mutations in the nervous system--specific HSN2 exon of WNK1 cause hereditary sensory neuropathy type II. J Clin Invest. 2008 Jul; ...

  1. Vasculitic neuropathy in panarteritis nodosa: clinical and ultrastructural findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussone, G; La Mantia, L; Frediani, F; Tredici, G; Petruccioli Pizzini, M G

    1986-04-01

    Clinical involvement of the peripheral nervous system in panarteritis nodosa is common, but the histological aspects are little known. We describe the sural nerve, muscle and skin biopsy findings in a patient with panarteritis nodosa, affected by mononeuritis multiplex. The data are compared to those reported in other types of vasculitis neuropathy.

  2. Non-glaucomatous optic neuropathy in Ibadan: Extrapolations to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NGON as a major cause of visual disability among neuro-ophthalmic patients in this setting. Diagnostic constraints must be addressed, to facilitate neuroophthalmology patient care, within our limited resources. Key words: Optic atrophy, Non-glaucomatous optic neuropathy, Neuroophthalmology, Aetiology, Healthcare ...

  3. “Symptomatic” Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy Using Two Methods

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Presence of symptoms of peripheral neuropathy (PN) in diabetes mellitus (DM) does not invariably indicate presence of underlying PN. Objective: To evaluate the objectivity of the symptoms of PN among DM subjects using two objective diagnostic instruments for PN – the United Kingdom Screening Test ...

  4. Diabetic Neuropathy | Enesi | Journal of the Obafemi Awolowo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disorder characterized by persistent hyperglycaemia. The prevalence of diabetes is increasing in epidemic proportions worldwide. Diabetic neuropathy is a common clinical complication of Diabetes mellitus, as almost all of diabetic patients will have some form of nerve damage. Majority are ...

  5. Peripheral Neuropathy: Not a Feature of Childhood Thalassemia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Chronic anemia in thalassemia patients may cause multiple complications such as bone deformities, growth retardation, and peripheral neuropathy. Aim: To examine the presence of possible electrophysiological changes in children diagnosed with thalassemia and to investigate the clinical factors affecting the ...

  6. Progress in the treatment of small fiber peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Ming-Chang; Tseng, Ming-Tsung; Pan, Chun-Liang; Chao, Chi-Chao; Hsieh, Sung-Tsang

    2015-03-01

    Small fiber neuropathy is a syndrome of diverse disease etiology because of multiple pathophysiologic mechanisms with major presentations of neuropathic pain and autonomic symptoms. Over the past decade, there has been substantial progress in the treatments for neuropathic pain, dysautonomia and disease-modifying strategy. In particular, anticonvulsants and antidepressants alleviate neuropathic pain based on randomized clinical trials.

  7. Reappraising entrapment neuropathies--mechanisms, diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Annina B; Nee, Robert J; Coppieters, Michel W

    2013-12-01

    The diagnosis of entrapment neuropathies can be difficult because symptoms and signs often do not follow textbook descriptions and vary significantly between patients with the same diagnosis. Signs and symptoms which spread outside of the innervation territory of the affected nerve or nerve root are common. This Masterclass provides insight into relevant mechanisms that may account for this extraterritorial spread in patients with entrapment neuropathies, with an emphasis on neuroinflammation at the level of the dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord, as well as changes in subcortical and cortical regions. Furthermore, we describe how clinical tests and technical investigations may identify these mechanisms if interpreted in the context of gain or loss of function. The management of neuropathies also remains challenging. Common treatment strategies such as joint mobilisation, neurodynamic exercises, education, and medications are discussed in terms of their potential to influence certain mechanisms at the site of nerve injury or in the central nervous system. The mechanism-oriented approach for this Masterclass seems warranted given the limitations in the current evidence for the diagnosis and management of entrapment neuropathies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Houlden H, King R, Blake J, Groves M, Love S, Woodward C, Hammans S, Nicoll J, Lennox G, O'Donovan DG, Gabriel C, Thomas PK, Reilly MM. Clinical, pathological and genetic characterization of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 (HSAN I). Brain. 2006 Feb;129(Pt 2):411-25. Epub ...

  9. Nephropathy and Neuropathy in Diabetic Patients with Chronic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nephropathy and Neuropathy in Diabetic Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection. ... M Aziz, M El-Bendary, M El-Arman. Abstract. Introduction: Several reports described an association between type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Chronic HCV infection is prevalent in Egypt.

  10. Acrodystrophic neuropathy of Bureau and Barriere in Sudanese ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... to show Keratinized tissue. The condition as mentioned is extremely rare, where misdiagnosed as Epidermolysis Bullosa Dystrophica. Keywords: Acrodystrophic neuropathy of Bureau and Barriere, Ulcerative-mutilating acropathy, Bureau-Barriere syndrome, Sudan. Sudanese Journal of Dermatology Vol. 5 (2) 2008: pp.

  11. Small fiber neuropathy : a disabling and underrecognized syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voortman, Mareye; Fritz, Daan; Vogels, Oscar J M; Eftimov, Filip; van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Drent, Marjolein

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To discuss cause, clinical manifestations, diagnostics, and treatment of small fiber neuropathy (SFN). The diagnosis is difficult and can be easily missed. RECENT FINDINGS: SFN causes high morbidity with disabling symptoms and impact on quality of life. Patients may benefit from

  12. Small fiber neuropathy: a disabling and underrecognized syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voortman, Mareye; Fritz, Daan; Vogels, Oscar J. M.; Eftimov, Filip; van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Drent, Marjolein

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review To discuss cause, clinical manifestations, diagnostics, and treatment of small fiber neuropathy (SFN). The diagnosis is difficult and can be easily missed. Recent findings SFN causes high morbidity with disabling symptoms and impact on quality of life. Patients may benefit from

  13. Peripheral Neuropathy in Military Aircraft Maintenance Workers in Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guest, Maya; Attia, John R.; D'Este, Catherine A.; Boggess, May M.; Brown, Anthony M.; Gibson, Richard E.; Tavener, Meredith A.; Ross, James; Gardner, Ian; Harrex, Warren

    Objective: This study aimed to examine possible persisting peripheral neuropathy in a group who undertook fuel tank repairs on F-111 aircraft, relative to two contemporaneous comparison groups. Methods: Vibration perception threshold (VPT) was tested using biothesiometry in 614 exposed personnel,

  14. The role of serum methylglyoxal on diabetic peripheral and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, C. S.; Jensen, T.M.; Jensen, J S

    2015-01-01

    -detected Type 2 diabetes (duration ~ 5.8 years). METHODS: The patients were well controlled with regard to HbA(1c), lipids and blood pressure. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy was assessed by measures of resting heart rate variability and cardiovascular autonomic reflex tests. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy...... and cardiovascular autonomic reflex tests or any measures of diabetic peripheral neuropathy or painful diabetic neuropathy were observed. However, a positive association between methylglyoxal and several heart rate variability indices was observed, although these associations were not statistically significant when......AIMS: Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and diabetic peripheral neuropathy are common diabetic complications and independent predictors of cardiovascular disease. The glucose metabolite methylglyoxal has been suggested to play a causal role in the pathogeneses of diabetic peripheral neuropathy...

  15. Toxic neuropathies: Mechanistic insights based on a chemical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoPachin, Richard M; Gavin, Terrence

    2015-06-02

    2,5-Hexanedione (HD) and acrylamide (ACR) are considered to be prototypical among chemical toxicants that cause central-peripheral axonopathies characterized by distal axon swelling and degeneration. Because the demise of distal regions was assumed to be causally related to the onset of neurotoxicity, substantial effort was devoted to deciphering the respective mechanisms. Continued research, however, revealed that expression of the presumed hallmark morphological features was dependent upon the daily rate of toxicant exposure. Indeed, many studies reported that the corresponding axonopathic changes were late developing effects that occurred independent of behavioral and/or functional neurotoxicity. This suggested that the toxic axonopathy classification might be based on epiphenomena related to dose-rate. Therefore, the goal of this mini-review is to discuss how quantitative morphometric analyses and the establishment of dose-dependent relationships helped distinguish primary, mechanistically relevant toxicant effects from non-specific consequences. Perhaps more importantly, we will discuss how knowledge of neurotoxicant chemical nature can guide molecular-level research toward a better, more rational understanding of mechanism. Our discussion will focus on HD, the neurotoxic γ-diketone metabolite of the industrial solvents n-hexane and methyl-n-butyl ketone. Early investigations suggested that HD caused giant neurofilamentous axonal swellings and eventual degeneration in CNS and PNS. However, as our review will point out, this interpretation underwent several iterations as the understanding of γ-diketone chemistry improved and more quantitative experimental approaches were implemented. The chemical concepts and design strategies discussed in this mini-review are broadly applicable to the mechanistic studies of other chemicals (e.g., n-propyl bromine, methyl methacrylate) that cause toxic neuropathies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. An improved experimental model for peripheral neuropathy in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Q.M.; Rossaneis, A.C.; Fais, R.S.; Prado, W.A. [Departamento de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2013-03-15

    A modification of the Bennett and Xie chronic constriction injury model of peripheral painful neuropathy was developed in rats. Under tribromoethanol anesthesia, a single ligature with 100% cotton glace thread was placed around the right sciatic nerve proximal to its trifurcation. The change in the hind paw reflex threshold after mechanical stimulation observed with this modified model was compared to the change in threshold observed in rats subjected to the Bennett and Xie or the Kim and Chung spinal ligation models. The mechanical threshold was measured with an automated electronic von Frey apparatus 0, 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, and this threshold was compared to that measured in sham rats. All injury models produced significant hyperalgesia in the operated hind limb. The modified model produced mean ± SD thresholds in g (19.98 ± 3.08, 14.98 ± 1.86, and 13.80 ± 1.00 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively) similar to those obtained with the spinal ligation model (20.03 ± 1.99, 13.46 ± 2.55, and 12.46 ± 2.38 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively), but less variable when compared to the Bennett and Xie model (21.20 ± 8.06, 18.61 ± 7.69, and 18.76 ± 6.46 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively). The modified method required less surgical skill than the spinal nerve ligation model.

  17. An improved experimental model for peripheral neuropathy in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q.M. Dias

    Full Text Available A modification of the Bennett and Xie chronic constriction injury model of peripheral painful neuropathy was developed in rats. Under tribromoethanol anesthesia, a single ligature with 100% cotton glace thread was placed around the right sciatic nerve proximal to its trifurcation. The change in the hind paw reflex threshold after mechanical stimulation observed with this modified model was compared to the change in threshold observed in rats subjected to the Bennett and Xie or the Kim and Chung spinal ligation models. The mechanical threshold was measured with an automated electronic von Frey apparatus 0, 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, and this threshold was compared to that measured in sham rats. All injury models produced significant hyperalgesia in the operated hind limb. The modified model produced mean ± SD thresholds in g (19.98 ± 3.08, 14.98 ± 1.86, and 13.80 ± 1.00 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively similar to those obtained with the spinal ligation model (20.03 ± 1.99, 13.46 ± 2.55, and 12.46 ± 2.38 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively, but less variable when compared to the Bennett and Xie model (21.20 ± 8.06, 18.61 ± 7.69, and 18.76 ± 6.46 at 2, 7, and 14 days after surgery, respectively. The modified method required less surgical skill than the spinal nerve ligation model.

  18. A comparative study of brachial plexus sonography and magnetic resonance imaging in chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy and multifocal motor neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedee, H S; Jongbloed, B A; van Asseldonk, J.T.H.; Hendrikse, J; Vrancken, A F J E; Franssen, H; Nikolakopoulos, S; Visser, L H; van der Pol, W L; van den Berg, L H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To compare the performance of neuroimaging techniques, i.e. high-resolution ultrasound (HRUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), when applied to the brachial plexus, as part of the diagnostic work-up of chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal

  19. Organophosphate-induced delayed neuropathy: case report Neuropatia tardia por organofosforado: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Felipe R Vasconcellos

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphate induced delayed neuropathy (OPIDN is an uncommon clinical condition. It occurs in association with the ingestion of great amounts of organophosphate after the stimulation of cholinergic receptor. The clinical picture is characterized by a distal paresis in lower limbs associated with sensitive symptoms. Electrodiagnostic studies show a motor axonal neuropathy. Involvement of the central nervous system may occur. We describe a 39 years-old female patient who developed hyperesthesia associated with lower limbs paresis, fourteen days after she had ingested a Dichlorvos-based insecticide. Electrophysiological study was characterized by an axonal polyneuropathy pattern. Pyramidal tract dysfunction was observed later in upper limbs. Considering that both peripheral and central nervous systems are involved we believe that the more appropriated term would be organophosphate induced delayed neuropathy (OPIDN instead of organophosphate induced delayed polyneuropathy (OPIDP.A neuropatia tardia dos organofosforados (NTOF é condição clinica incomum. Geralmente ocorre após a intoxicação aguda por organofosforados, seguindo-se a fase de hiperestimulação colinérgica. O quadro clínico é caracterizado por déficit motor distal nos membros inferiores associado a sintomas sensitivos. O estudo eletroneuromiográfico tem demonstrado padrão axonal motor na maioria dos casos. Podem ocorrer sinais de comprometimento do sistema nervoso central. Descrevemos o caso de uma paciente de 39 anos que ingeriu inseticida a base de Dichlorvos e quatorze dias após apresentou quadro de hiperestesia associado a paresia distal nos membros inferiores. Realizou eletroneuromiografia que se caracterizou por padrão compatível com polineuropatia axonal. Sinais piramidais, de aparecimento mais tardio, foram observados nos membros superiores. Diante do comprometimento do sistema nervoso periférico e central, também consideramos o termo neuropatia tardia por

  20. Quantitative sensory testing in type 1 diabetic patients with painful and painless diabetic neuropathy

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    Ahmed T Alahmar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism underlying the development of painful diabetic neuropathy (DN is unknown. The aim of this study was to compare quantitative sensory testing (QST characteristics of patients with painful and painless DN and to correlate QST measures with DN pain. Fifty type 1 diabetic patients with DN (30 with painful DN and 20 with painless DN and 32 age-matched non-diabetic controls were included in this study. For all patients and controls, a detailed assessment of DN was performed which comprised McGill visual analogue scale (McGill VAS for pain, neuropathy symptom profile and neuropathy disability score (NDS, quantitative sensory testing in form of cold, warm and vibration perception thresholds, nerve conduction studies (NCS, deep-breathing hear rate variability and Neuropad staining scores. Measures of QST, NCS and DB-HRV were correlated with McGill VAS for pain. There were no significant differences in cold, warm and vibration perception thresholds, NCS, DB-HRV and Neuropad scores between patients with painful and painless DN. Cold (r=-0.57, P=0.005, warm (r=0.47, P=0.026 and DB-HRV (r=0.50, P=0.023, however, correlated significantly with McGill VAS scores of pain. In conclusion, Quantitative sensory testing is a helpful tool to identify small nerve fibres damage of DN, correlates with pain intensity but cannot differentiate between painful and painless DN. Both central and peripheral neural injury could be implicated in the genesis of DN pain. [Dis Mol Med 2016; 4(3.000: 24-30

  1. Relationships between Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity and Peripheral Neuropathy in Type 2 Diabetes

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    Byung Kil Ha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundBrachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV is known to be a good surrogate marker of clinical atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is a major predictor for developing neuropathy. The goal of this study was to determine the relationship between baPWV and diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN in patients with type 2 diabetes.MethodsA retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted involving 692 patients with type 2 diabetes. The correlation between increased baPWV and DPN, neurological symptoms, and neurological assessment was analyzed. DPN was examined using the total symptom score (TSS, ankle reflexes, the vibration test, and the 10-g monofilament test. DPN was defined as TSS ≥2 and an abnormal neurological assessment. Data were expressed as means±standard deviation for normally distributed data and as median (interquartile range for non-normally distributed data. Independent t-tests or chi-square tests were used to make comparisons between groups, and a multiple logistic regression test was used to evaluate independent predictors of DPN. The Mantel-Haenszel chi-square test was used to adjust for age.ResultsPatients with DPN had higher baPWV and systolic blood pressure, and were more likely to be older and female, when compared to the control group. According to univariate analysis of risk factors for DPN, the odds ratio of the baPWV ≥1,600 cm/sec was 1.611 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.072 to 2.422; P=0.021 and the odds ratio in female was 1.816 (95% CI, 1.195 to 2.760; P=0.005.ConclusionIncreased baPWV was significantly correlated with peripheral neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  2. Immunotherapy for IgM anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein paraprotein-associated peripheral neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, Michael Pt; Nobile-Orazio, Eduardo

    2016-10-04

    eligible trials (236 participants), which tested intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), interferon alfa-2a, plasma exchange, cyclophosphamide and steroids, and rituximab. Two trials of IVIg (22 and 11 participants, including 20 with antibodies against MAG), had comparable interventions and outcomes, but both were short-term trials. We also included two trials of rituximab with comparable interventions and outcomes.There were very few clinical or statistically significant benefits of the treatments used on the outcomes predefined for this review, but not all the predefined outcomes were used in every included trial and more responsive outcomes are being developed. A well-performed trial of IVIg, which was at low risk of bias, showed a statistical benefit in terms of improvement in mRS at two weeks and 10-metre walk time at four weeks, but these short-term outcomes are of questionable clinical significance. Cyclophosphamide failed to show any benefit in the single trial's primary outcome, and showed a barely significant benefit in the primary outcome specified here, but some toxic adverse events were identified.Two trials of rituximab (80 participants) have been published, one of which (26 participants) was at high risk of bias. In the meta-analysis, although the data are of low quality, rituximab is beneficial in improving disability scales (Inflammatory Neuropathy Cause and Treatment (INCAT) improved at eight to 12 months (risk ratio (RR) 3.51, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.30 to 9.45; 73 participants)) and significantly more participants improve in the global impression of change score (RR 1.86, 95% CI 1.27 to 2.71; 70 participants). Other measures did not improve significantly, but wide CIs do not preclude some effect. Reported adverse effects of rituximab were few, and mostly minor.There were few serious adverse events in the other trials. There is inadequate reliable evidence from trials of immunotherapies in anti-MAG paraproteinaemic neuropathy to form an evidence base

  3. Heterogeneity in diabetic distal neuropathy and differential approach to its treatment

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    O E Khutornaya

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To determine the prevalence of painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN, to evaluate the composition and efficacy of pharmacotherapy and to develop a differential algorithm for symptomatic treatment of PDN.Materials and Methods. 4494 outpatient subjects participated in this study. Severity of pain syndrome was assessed with DN4 question- naire (supplemented with NTSS-9 scale and visual analogue scale (VAS. After initial examination, a pharmacological evaluation of treatment was performed.Results. Based on our data, prevalence of diabetic neuropathy was estimated at 54%, with painful form reaching 6.4%. Median age was 57.2±12.1, duration of diabetes mellitus – 16.5±10.6 years. Type 1 / type 2 ratio equaled 32.4% : 67.6%, male/female – 29.7%: 70.3%. Median HbA1c level was 8.4±1.6%. Ratio of chronic/acute forms of neuropathy was 267 : 20. Pain severity (as measured by VAS distribution was as following: 15.6% – severe, 40.6% – moderate, 12.3% – mild, and 31.3% – no pain symptoms. We did not find PDN to be associated with any parameters but sensory deficit (NTSS-9 and NDS: r=0.4; p <0.001. 21% of patients with chronic painful neuropathy (CPN demonstrated allodynia and hyperalgesia besides typical symptoms. 97.9% of patients were previ- ously treated with “pathogenetic” agents, 2.1% received anticonvulsants; overall efficiency was estimated at 22%. Patients with CPN and allodynia did not respond to treatment with alpha-lipoic acid (ALA, but pregabalin was efficient. After the examination treatment composition was adjusted as follows: treatment was ceased in 23% of patients, 11.9% received ALA, 53.6% – anticonvulsants, and11.5% – antidepressants; overall efficiency was estimated at 75%.Conclusion. Prevalence of PDN is relatively low. 15.6% of patients suffer from severe pain. Neuropathic pain intensity correlates only with sensory deficit and is not dependent on any other parameters. CPN consists of two forms with higher and lower

  4. A case of nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy of a male with family history of the disease after receiving sildenafil

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    Felekis T

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available T Felekis1, I Asproudis1, K Katsanos2, EV Tsianos21University Eye Clinic of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece; 2First Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of Ioannina, Ioannina, GreeceAbstract: A 51-year-old male was referred to the University Eye Clinic of Ioannina with nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION 12 hours after receiving sildenafil citrate (Viagra®. Examination for possible risk factors revealed mild hypercholesterolemia. Family history showed that his father had suffered from bilateral NAION. Although a cause-and-effect relationship is difficult to prove, there are reports indicating an association between the use of erectile dysfunction agents and the development of NAION. Physicians might need to investigate the presence of family history of NAION among systemic or vascular predisposing risk factors before prescribing erectile dysfunction drugs.Keywords: sildenafil, nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, erectile dysfunction drugs, family history

  5. Giant iliopectineal bursitis presenting as neuropathy and severe edema of the lower limb: case illustration and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Takahiro; Nozawa, Satoshi; Ohashi, Minoru; Sakai, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Katsuji

    2013-05-01

    We report a 61-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis (RA: Steinblocker stage III, class 3) who developed severe swelling and neuropathy of the right lower limb caused by an iliopectineal bursa associated with destruction of the hip joint. Physical examination revealed an inguinal mass and groin pain. X-ray examination indicated destruction of the hip joint. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed the bursa connected with the hip joint and a markedly compressed external iliac vein among the inguinal ligament, pubis, and bursa. The patient underwent partial synovial resection and total hip arthroplasty for recovery of hip function, and this led to successful resolution of the symptoms and bursa. We present the characteristic images from this case and review all previously reported cases of RA iliopsoas bursitis causing leg swelling or neuropathy, and summarize the background. Since this lesion may cause various symptoms, clinical awareness that iliopsoas bursitis may present with unique clinical symptoms may aid correct diagnosis.

  6. A community-based epidemiological study of peripheral neuropathies in Assiut, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, Mahmoud R; Darwish, Esam S; Khedr, Eman M; Sabry, Mahmoud M; Abdulah, Mohamed A

    2012-12-01

    There is very little published information about the prevalence, patterns, and predictors of peripheral neuropathies. The current study is a community-based survey was conducted in the Assiut Governorate to estimate their prevalence and clinical profile. A door-to-door study was carried out on 42,223 persons from rural and urban communities in the Assiut Governorate, Egypt. There were 13,288 (31.5%) subjects from the urban and 28,935 (68·5%) from the rural area. All subjects filled in a questionnaire designed specifically for diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy. Positive cases were then given a complete medical and neurological examination, routine laboratory tests, neurophysiology, and neuroimaging (magnetic resonance). The crude prevalence rate (CPR) of peripheral neuropathy was 3181/100,000 inhabitants. There was a significantly higher prevalence in the rural compared with the urban population (3795 versus 1844/100,000) and in females than males (4473 versus 1943/100,000; Psyndrome (1686/100,000). Diabetic neuropathy was the most common non-compressive neuropathy with a CPR of 649/100,000. Type II diabetes was recorded in 241 patients with a CPR of 571/100,000. Compressive radiculopathy had a crude prevalence of 358/100,000; traumatic and iatrogenic radiculopathy had a prevalence rate of 149/100,000. Less common conditions were: uremic neuropathy (21/100,000) hepatic neuropathy (14/100,000), Bell's palsy (28/100,000), Guillian-Barre' syndrome (12/100,000), chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (12/100,000), hereditary sensory motor neuropathy (12/100,000), and idiopathic neuropathy (92/100,000). The overall prevalence of peripheral neuropathies was high in comparison to other studies. Entrapment neuropathy, diabetic neuropathy, and spondylotic radiculopathy were the most common. Overall, the prevalence of peripheral neuropathy was higher in the rural than in the urban population.

  7. Clinically apparent eating disorders in young diabetic women: associations with painful neuropathy and other complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, J M; Young, R J; Lloyd, G G; Clarke, B F

    1987-04-04

    Of 208 young women with insulin dependent diabetes, 15 (7%) had a clinically apparent eating disorder (anorexia nervosa or bulimia), a much higher prevalence than reported in non-diabetic women. Most, but not all, of these patients had a long history of poor glycaemic control. In contrast with previous suggestions, control did not deteriorate after the onset of the eating disorder. There was a high incidence and an early onset of diabetic complications. Eleven of the 15 patients had retinopathy, six with proliferative changes; six had nephropathy; and six neuropathy. Most strikingly, four patients with anorexia nervosa developed acute painful polyneuropathy. In each case pain started when the eating disorder developed, almost coinciding with the peak of weight reduction. Remission of pain occurred as weight was regained. The symptoms were accompanied by abnormalities in peripheral nerve electrophysiology and autonomic nerve function, some improvements in which accompanied weight recovery. It is suggested that nutritional factors may contribute to the high rate of early onset diabetic complications, particularly neuropathy.

  8. Hypothesis: Human papillomavirus vaccination syndrome--small fiber neuropathy and dysautonomia could be its underlying pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Lavín, Manuel

    2015-07-01

    Vaccination has been one of the most effective public health measures in the history of medicine. However, seemingly inexplicit adverse reactions have been described after the injection of the newer vaccines vs. human papillomavirus (HPV). The symptoms more often reported are chronic pain with paresthesias, headaches, fatigue, and orthostatic intolerance. Adverse reactions appear to be more frequent after HPV vaccination when compared to other type of immunizations. Different isolated cases and small series have described the development of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS), and fibromyalgia after HPV vaccination. These are illnesses often difficult to diagnose that have overlapping clinical features. Sympathetic nervous system dysfunction seems to play a major role in the pathogenesis of these syndromes. Also, small fiber neuropathy has been recently recognized in CRPS, POTS, and fibromyalgia. This article forwards the hypothesis that small fiber neuropathy and dysautonomia could be the common underlying pathogenesis to the group of rare, but severe reactions that follow HPV vaccination. Clinicians should be aware of the possible association between HPV vaccination and the development of these difficult to diagnose painful dysautonomic syndromes.

  9. Nerve ultrasound as follow-up tool in treated multifocal motor neuropathy.

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    Rattay, T W; Winter, N; Décard, B F; Dammeier, N M; Härtig, F; Ceanga, M; Axer, H; Grimm, A

    2017-09-01

    High-resolution ultrasound is a valuable tool in supporting the diagnosis of multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) but longitudinal data under therapy are lacking. The change in peripheral nerve ultrasound pattern in patients with MMN was assessed over time. Patients with MMN received a thorough initial examination and follow-up over a period of 6-12 months using high-resolution ultrasound of the cervical roots and the nerves of the arms and legs, nerve conduction studies, Medical Research Council Sum Score (MRCSS) and Rotterdam Inflammatory Neuropathy Cause and Treatment Group (INCAT) score to evaluate changes under treatment. The Ultrasound Pattern Sum Score (UPSS) was used as standardized peripheral nerve ultrasound protocol. Seventeen patients with MMN received initial examinations of whom 12 were successfully followed up. All patients with MMN showed at least localized but often multifocal peripheral nerve enlargement. An enlarged overall cross-sectional area as well as enlarged single fascicles (>3 mm²) in clinically and electrophysiologically affected (>90%) and unaffected (>70%) nerves were found. The UPSS did not correlate with clinical disability at both visits. However, the change in clinical disability (evaluated as difference in MRCSS) and the change in UPSS correlated significantly inversely (P = 0.004). High-resolution sonography of peripheral nerves revealed multifocal nerve enlargement in MMN. Distinct enlargement patterns may support the diagnosis. Ultrasound findings did not correlate well with clinical severity or electrophysiological findings at initial presentation. As changes in UPSS correlated significantly with the clinical course in terms of muscle strength (MRCSS), sonographic assessment may represent a useful tool for therapeutic monitoring. © 2017 EAN.

  10. Evaluation of PMI-5011, an ethanolic extract of Artemisia dracunculus L., on peripheral neuropathy in streptozotocin-diabetic mice.

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    Watcho, Pierre; Stavniichuk, Roman; Tane, Pierre; Shevalye, Hanna; Maksimchyk, Yury; Pacher, Pal; Obrosova, Irina G

    2011-03-01

    We previously reported that PMI-5011, an ethanolic extract of Artemisia dracunculus L., alleviates peripheral neuropathy in high fat diet-fed mice, a model of prediabetes and obesity developing oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory changes in the peripheral nervous system. This study evaluated PMI-5011 on established functional, structural, and biochemical changes associated with Type I diabetic peripheral neuropathy. C57Bl6/J mice with streptozotocin-induced diabetes of a 12-week duration, developed motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity deficits, thermal and mechanical hypoalgesia, tactile allodynia, and intra-epidermal nerve fiber loss. PMI-5011 (500 mg/kg/day for 7 weeks) alleviated diabetes-induced nerve conduction slowing, small sensory nerve fiber dysfunction, and increased intra-epidermal nerve fiber density. PMI-5011 blunted sciatic nerve and spinal cord 12/15-lipoxygenase activation and oxidative-nitrosative stress, without ameliorating hyperglycemia or reducing sciatic nerve sorbitol pathway intermediate accumulation. In conclusion, PMI-5011, a safe and non-toxic botanical extract, may find use in the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

  11. Posterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy Following Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

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    Mohammad Pakravan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    PURPOSE: To report a case of posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION following percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL. CASE REPORT: A 57-year-old man with history of diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia and mild anemia underwent PCNL for treatment of nephrolithiasis. He noticed painless visual loss in both eyes immediately after the procedure. Visual acuity was light perception, however ophthalmologic examinations were unremarkable and the optic discs were pink with no swelling. Visual fields were severely affected, but neuro-imaging was normal. Within three months, visual acuity and visual fields improved dramatically but the optic discs became slightly pale. CONCLUSION: This is the first report of PION following PCNL. PION is a rare cause of severe visual loss following surgery. Severe blood loss, hypotension, anemia and body position during surgery are the most important risk factors. Ophthalmologists, urologists and anesthesiologists should be aware of this condition and this rare possibility should be considered prior to surgery.

  1. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy in patients with diabetes mellitus: current perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Victoria L; Tahrani, Abd A

    2017-01-01

    Victoria L Fisher,1 Abd A Tahrani2–4 1School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, 2Institute of Metabolism and Systems Research, University of Birmingham, 3Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Birmingham Heartlands Hospital, 4Centre for Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Birmingham Health Partners, Birmingham, UK Abstract: Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is a common and often-underdiagnosed complication of diabetes mellitus (DM). CAN is associated with inc...

  2. Penetrating orbital trauma by stiletto causing complex cranial neuropathies

    OpenAIRE

    Cleary, G; Nischal, K K; Jones, C A

    2006-01-01

    Penetrating orbital injuries pose a serious threat to vision, ocular motility, and in some cases, life. Long, sharp stiletto objects may penetrate deeply, causing catastrophic damage to orbital structures, despite seemingly trivial entry wounds. The authors present two cases of penetrating orbital injuries by stiletto objects, both entering via small eyelid wounds. Traumatic optic neuropathy occurred in both cases, and was treated with corticosteroids, however the globes escaped direct injury...

  3. Biofeedback for foot offloading in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pataky, Z; de León Rodriguez, D; Allet, L; Golay, A; Assal, M; Assal, J-P; Hauert, C-A

    2010-01-01

    The reduction of high plantar pressure in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy is mandatory for prevention of foot ulcers and amputations. We used a new biofeedback-based method to reduce the plantar pressure at an at-risk area of foot in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy. Thirteen diabetic patients (age 60.8 +/- 12.3 years, body mass index 29.0 +/- 5.0 kg/m(2)) with peripheral neuropathy of the lower limbs were studied. Patients with memory impairment were excluded. The portable in-shoe foot pressure measurement system (PEDAR) was used for foot offloading training by biofeedback. The learning procedure consisted in sequences of walking (10 steps), each followed by a subjective estimation of performance and objective feedback. The goal was to achieve three consecutive walking cycles of 10 steps, with a minimum of seven steps inside the range of 40-80% of the baseline peak plantar pressure. The peak plantar pressure was assessed during the learning period and at retention tests. A significant difference in peak plantar pressure was recorded between the beginning and the end of the learning period (when the target for plantar pressure was achieved) (262 +/- 70 vs. 191 +/- 53 kPa; P = 0.002). The statistically significant difference between the beginning of learning and all retention tests persisted, even at the 10-day follow-up. Terminal augmented feedback training may positively affect motor learning in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy and could possibly lead to suitable foot offloading. Additional research is needed to confirm the maintenance of offloading in the long term.

  4. Human dorsal root ganglion in vivo morphometry and perfusion in Fabry painful neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godel, Tim; Bäumer, Philipp; Pham, Mirko; Köhn, Anja; Muschol, Nicole; Kronlage, Moritz; Kollmer, Jennifer; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Mautner, Victor-Felix

    2017-09-19

    To evaluate functional and morphometric magnetic resonance neurography of the dorsal root ganglion and peripheral nerve segments in patients with Fabry painful neuropathy. In this prospective study, the lumbosacral dorsal root ganglia and proximal peripheral nerve segments of the lower extremity were examined in 11 male patients with Fabry disease by a standardized 3T magnetic resonance neurography protocol. Volumes of L3 to S2 dorsal root ganglia, perfusion parameters of L5-S1 dorsal root ganglia and the spinal nerve L5, and the cross-sectional area of the proximal sciatic nerve were compared to healthy controls. Dorsal root ganglia of patients with Fabry disease were symmetrically enlarged by 78% (L3), 94% (L4), 122% (L5), 115% (S1), and 119% (S2) ( p Fabry disease and controls ( p = 0.7). The sciatic nerve of patients with Fabry disease at the thigh level showed an increase in cross-sectional area by 48% ( p Fabry disease have severely enlarged dorsal root ganglia with dysfunctional perfusion. This may be due to glycolipid accumulation in the dorsal root ganglia mediating direct neurotoxic effects and decreased neuronal blood supply. These alterations were less pronounced in peripheral nerve segments. Thus, the dorsal root ganglion might play a key pathophysiologic role in the development of neuropathy and pain in Fabry disease. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  5. Acute Hypoglycemia Induces Painful Neuropathy and the Treatment of Coenzyme Q10

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    Yan Ping Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic neuropathic pain is reduced with tight glycemic control. However, strict control increases the risk of hypoglycemic episodes, which are themselves linked to painful neuropathy. This study explored the effects of hypoglycemia-related painful neuropathy. Pretreatment with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 was performed to explore the preventive effect of CoQ10 on hypoglycemia-related acute neuropathic pain. Two strains of mice were used and 1 unit/kg of insulin was given to induce hypoglycemia. Mechanical sensitivity of hindpaw withdrawal thresholds was measured using von Frey filaments. Blood glucose levels were clamped at normal levels by joint insulin and glucose injection to test whether insulin itself induced hypersensitivity. Results suggest that the increased mechanical sensitivity after insulin injection is related to decreased blood glucose levels. When blood glucose levels remained at a normal level by the linked administration of insulin and glucose, mice demonstrated no significant change in mechanical sensitivity. Pretreatment with CoQ10 prevented neuropathic pain and the expression of the stress factor c-Fos. These results support the concept that pain in the diabetic scenario can be the result of hypoglycemia and not insulin itself. Additionally, pretreatment with CoQ10 may be a potent preventive method for the development of neuropathic pain.

  6. Unilateral optic neuropathy from possible sphenoidal sinus barotrauma after recreational scuba diving: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, David J; O'Hagan, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    A case report is presented of a 35-year-old woman who developed a progressive right optic neuropathy while surfacing from a series of four recreational dives on the Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia. The patient reported severe sudden onset blurred vision in the right eye associated with a mild headache and epistaxis on surfacing from diving. The patient had her first medical review the day after returning from her trip. At this time visual acuity in the right eye was 20/80, with left eye 20/20. There was a relative afferent pupillary defect in the right eye. A high-resolution computed tomography scan showed fluid in the right sphenoid sinus. Computed perimetry revealed patchy visual field loss in the right eye. The provisional diagnosis of sphenoidal sinus barotrauma-induced optic neuropathy was made. Over 10 days of observation, the visual acuity returned to 20/20 in the right eye and visual field changes resolved. This case highlights a very unusual cause of visual loss associated with diving.

  7. Neurological monitoring reduces the incidence of bortezomib-induced peripheral neuropathy in multiple myeloma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Roser; Petit, Josep; Clapés, Victoria; Verdú, Enric; Navarro, Xavier; Bruna, Jordi

    2010-03-01

    Bortezomib (BTZ) is a proteasome inhibitor approved in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM). Bortezomib-induced peripheral neuropathy (BIPN) is an unpredictable dose-limiting adverse event in one-third of patients. In the present study, 58 relapsed/refractory MM patients treated with BTZ were analyzed. The study's aim was to compare BIPN incidence and severity between both groups and to identify risk factors of BIPN. Twenty-four MM patients were evaluated by a neurologist periodically during BTZ treatment in order to prevent high-grade BIPN. Thirty-five MM patients previously treated with BTZ were reviewed. Seven (29%) patients in the monitored group and 19 (56%) in the historical cohort developed BIPN (p = 0.044). In the univariate analysis, factors related to BIPN in the whole series were age, number of vincristine and BTZ cycles, lactate dehydrogenase and neurological monitoring. Multivariate analysis revealed that absence of neurological monitoring (Hazard Ratio [HR]: 4.94 IC 95% [1.31-18.68], p = 0.019) and prior treatment with vincristine (HR: 1.34 IC 95% [1.04-1.74], p = 0.026) were associated with greater risk of BIPN. Baseline total neuropathy score-clinical version (TNSc) was a good predictor of BIPN, with higher risk for patients with TNSc >2 (p = 0.038). Neurological monitoring is useful for diminishing BIPN. Neurological monitoring of patients with baseline TNSc >2 should be considered.

  8. Cutaneous nociceptors lack sensitisation, but reveal μ-opioid receptor-mediated reduction in excitability to mechanical stimulation in neuropathy

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    Schmidt Yvonne

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peripheral nerve injuries often trigger a hypersensitivity to tactile stimulation. Behavioural studies demonstrated efficient and side effect-free analgesia mediated by opioid receptors on peripheral sensory neurons. However, mechanistic approaches addressing such opioid properties in painful neuropathies are lacking. Here we investigated whether opioids can directly inhibit primary afferent neuron transmission of mechanical stimuli in neuropathy. We analysed the mechanical thresholds, the firing rates and response latencies of sensory fibres to mechanical stimulation of their cutaneous receptive fields. Results Two weeks following a chronic constriction injury of the saphenous nerve, mice developed a profound mechanical hypersensitivity in the paw innervated by the damaged nerve. Using an in vitro skin-nerve preparation we found no changes in the mechanical thresholds and latencies of sensory fibres from injured nerves. The firing rates to mechanical stimulation were unchanged or reduced following injury. Importantly, μ-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5]-ol-enkephalin (DAMGO significantly elevated the mechanical thresholds of nociceptive Aδ and C fibres. Furthermore, DAMGO substantially diminished the mechanically evoked discharges of C nociceptors in injured nerves. These effects were blocked by DAMGO washout and pre-treatment with the selective μ-opioid receptor antagonist Cys2-Tyr3-Orn5-Pen7-amide. DAMGO did not alter the responses of sensory fibres in uninjured nerves. Conclusions Our findings suggest that behaviourally manifested neuropathy-induced mechanosensitivity does not require a sensitised state of cutaneous nociceptors in damaged nerves. Yet, nerve injury renders nociceptors sensitive to opioids. Prevention of action potential generation or propagation in nociceptors might represent a cellular mechanism underlying peripheral opioid-mediated alleviation of mechanical hypersensitivity in neuropathy.

  9. Evidence for small fiber neuropathy in early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgorny, Peter J; Suchowersky, Oksana; Romanchuk, Kenneth G; Feasby, Thomas E

    2016-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is neurodegenerative movement disorder affecting primarily the central nervous system with several recognized non-motor symptoms that can occur at various stages of the disease. Recently it has been shown that patients with PD may be prone to peripheral nervous system pathology in the form of a peripheral neuropathy (PN). It is unclear if PN is an inherent feature of PD or if it is an iatrogenic effect of the mainstay PD treatment Levodopa. To determine if peripheral neuropathy occurs in early untreated PD we employed a case-control study design using gold standard tests for PN, including neurological examination according to the Utah Early Neuropathy Scale (UENS) and nerve conduction studies, as well as new, more sensitive and informative tests for PN including the skin biopsy and corneal confocal microscopy (CCM). We studied 26 patients with PD and 22 controls using the neurological examination and nerve conduction studies (NCS) and found no significant difference between groups except for some reduced vibration sense in the PD group. Epidermal nerve densities in the skin biopsies were similar between our cohorts. However, using CCM - a more sensitive test and a surrogate marker of small fiber damage in PN, we found that patients with PD had significantly reduced corneal nerve fiber densities and lengths as compared to controls. We conclude that our positive CCM results provide evidence of preclinical PN in newly diagnosed PD patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Protection of Trigonelline on Experimental Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

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    Ji-Yin Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms leading to diabetic peripheral neuropathy are complex and there is no effective drug to treat it. As an active component of several traditional Chinese medicines, trigonelline has beneficial effects on diabetes with hyperlipidemia. The protective effects and the mechanism of trigonelline on diabetic peripheral neuropathy were evaluated in streptozotocin- and high-carbohydrate/high-fat diet-induced diabetic rats. Rats were divided into four groups at the end of week 2: control, diabetes, diabetes + trigonelline (40 mg/kg, and diabetes + sitagliptin (4 mg/kg. After 48-week treatment, technologies of nerve conduction, cold and hot immersion test, transmission electron microscopy, real-time PCR, and Western blotting were applied. Serum glucose, serum insulin, insulin sensitivity index, lipid parameters, body weight, sciatic nerve conduction velocity, nociception, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor mRNA and protein, total and phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases protein expression, malonaldehyde content, and superoxide dismutase activity were altered in diabetic rats, and were near control levels treated with trigonelline. Slight micropathological changes existed in sciatic nerve of trigonelline-treated diabetic rats. These findings suggest that trigonelline has beneficial effects for diabetic peripheral neuropathy through glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor/p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases signaling pathway, nerve conduction velocity, antioxidant enzyme activity, improving micropathological changes of sciatic nerve and decreasing lipid peroxidation.

  11. Iatrogenic axillary neuropathy after intramuscular injection of the deltoid muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Loren T; Carter, Gregory T; Kilmer, David D; Han, Jay J

    2007-06-01

    A previously healthy 26-yr-old male presented for an electrodiagnostic evaluation with complaints of significant right deltoid muscle atrophy and shoulder abduction weakness after receiving an intramuscular (IM) deltoid injection of an antiemetic 4 wk earlier. Electrodiagnostic evaluation confirmed an acute axillary neuropathy. We hypothesize that direct mechanical trauma to the anterior branch of the axillary nerve resulted in axillary mononeuropathy with axonal loss, although chemically induced nerve injury cannot be excluded. Injections in and about the shoulder complex are performed routinely for the purposes of vaccination, IM medication administration, deltoid trigger-point injections, and intra-articular and bursal steroid injections. Although such injections are considered routine office procedures, there is increased risk of neurovascular injury if they are performed incorrectly. The purpose of this brief report is to make practitioners aware of the potential for axillary neuropathy with such procedures, to review the salient anatomy, and to propose a potential guideline for clinical practice to minimize iatrogenic axillary neuropathy.

  12. Pathological Confirmation of Optic Neuropathy in Familial Dysautonomia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Jose-Alberto; Hedges, Thomas R.; Laver, Nora V.; Farhat, Nada; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Clinical data suggest that optic neuropathy and retinal ganglion cell loss are the main cause of visual decline in patients with familial dysautonomia, but this has not previously been confirmed by pathological analyses. We studied retinas and optic nerves in 6 eyes from 3 affected patients obtained at autopsy. Analyses included routine neurohistology and immunohistochemistry for neurofilaments, cytochrome c oxidase (COX), and melanopsin-containing ganglion cells. We observed profound axon loss in the temporal portions of optic nerves with relative preservation in the nasal portions; this correlated with clinical and optical coherence tomography findings in 1 patient. Retinal ganglion cell layers were markedly reduced in the central retina, whereas melanopsin-containing ganglion cells were relatively spared. COX staining was reduced in the temporal portions of the optic nerve indicating reduced mitochondrial density. Axonal swelling with degenerating lysosomes and mitochondria were observed by electron microscopy. These findings support the concept that there is a specific optic neuropathy and retinopathy in patients with familial dysautonomia similar to that seen in other optic neuropathies with mitochondrial dysfunction. This raises the possibility that defective expression of the IkB kinase complex-associated protein (IKAP) resulting from mutations in IKBKAP affects mitochondrial function in the metabolism-dependent retinal parvocellular ganglion cells in this condition. PMID:28395083

  13. Bilateral optic neuropathy in acute cr yptococcal meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Zhe Ngoo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We reported a case of cryptococcal meningitis presenting with bilateral optic neuropathy in an immunocompetent patient. A 64-year-old Malay gentleman with no medical comorbidities presented with acute bilateral blurring of vision for a week, which was associated with generalised throbbing headache and low grade fever. He also had somnolence and altered consciousness. Visual acuity in both eyes was no perception of light with poor pupillary reflexes. Extraocular muscle movements were normal. Anterior segments were unremarkable bilaterally. Fundoscopy revealed bilateral optic disc swelling. CT scan of the brain showed multifocal infarct, but no meningeal enhancement or mass. Cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure was normal, while its culture grew Cryptococcus neoformans. A diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis with bilateral optic neuropathy was made. Patient was treated with a six-week course of intravenous fluconazole and started concomitantly on a fortnight's course of intravenous amphotericin B. After that, his general condition improved, but there was still no improvement in his visual acuity. On reviewing at two months post-initiation of treatment, fundi showed bilateral optic atrophy. Bilateral optic neuropathy secondary to cryptococcal meningitis was rare. The prognosis was guarded due to the sequelae of optic atrophy. Anti-fungal medication alone may not be sufficient to manage this condition. However, evidence for other treatment modalities is still lacking and further clinical studies are required.

  14. Japanese neuropathy patients with peripheral myelin protein-22 gene aneuploidy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebo, R.V.; Li, L.Y.; Flandermeyer, R.R. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Peripheral myelin protein (PMP-22) gene aneuploidy results in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Type 1A (CMT1A) and the Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsy (HNPP) in Japanese patients as well as Caucasian Americans. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), the most common genetic neuropathy, results when expression of one of at least seven genes is defective. CMT1A, about half of all CMT mutations, is usually associated with a duplication spanning the peripheral myelin protein-22 gene on distal chromosome band 17p11.2. Autosomal dominant HNPP (hereditary pressure and sensory neuropathy, HPSN) results from a deletion of the CMT1A gene region. Multicolor in situ hybridization with PMP-22 gene region probe characterized HNPP deletion reliably and detected all different size duplications reported previously. In summary, 72% of 28 Japanese CMT1 (HMSNI) patients tested had the CMT1A duplication, while none of the CMT2 (HMSNII) or CMT3 (HMSNIII) patients had a duplication. Three cases of HNPP were identified by deletion of the CMT1A gene region on chromosome 17p. HNPP and CMT1A have been reported to result simultaneously from the same unequal recombination event. The lower frequency of HNPP compared to CMT1A suggests that HNPP patients have a lower reproductive fitness than CMT1A patients. This result, along with a CMT1A duplication found in an Asian Indian family, demonstrates the broad geographic distribution and high frequency of PMP-22 gene aneuploidy.

  15. A dietary intervention for chronic diabetic neuropathy pain: a randomized controlled pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Bunner, A E; Wells, C L; Gonzales, J; Agarwal, U; Bayat, E; Barnard, N D

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetic neuropathy is a common and often debilitating condition for which available treatments are limited. Because a low-fat plant-based diet has been shown to improve glycemic control in individuals with type 2 diabetes, we hypothesized that such a diet would reduce painful symptoms of diabetic neuropathy. Methods: In this 20-week pilot study, individuals with type 2 diabetes and painful diabetic neuropathy were randomly assigned to two groups. The intervention group was asked ...

  16. Role of nitrosative and oxidative stress in neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwan S Al-Nimer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : Evidences of oxidative and/or nitrosative stress in type 2 diabetes mellitus were demonstrated in experimental and human studies. This study is aimed to assess the serum peroxynitrite and oxidized lipoproteins in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus presented with clinical and laboratory evidences of peripheral neuropathy. Materials and Methods : Eighty four patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (51 of them had neuropathy and 31 apparent healthy subjects were studied in the unit of neurophysiology at the University Hospital of Medical College, Al-Nahrin University in Baghdad, Iraq. Neuropathy total symptom score (NTSS, neuropathy impairment score in the lower leg (NIS-LL, and nerve conduction velocity of sensory (ulnar and sural and motor (ulnar and common peroneal nerves were used to assess the neuropathy. Fasting venous blood was obtained from each participant for the determination of serum glucose and oxidized lipoproteins. Results: The electrophysiology study revealed significant decrease in conduction velocity of ulnar (sensory and motor components, sural, and common peroneal nerves in diabetic neuropathy compared to diabetics without neuropathy and healthy subjects. Significant high level of serum peroxynitrite was found in diabetic patients with or without neuropathy compared with non-diabetics. The changes in serum-oxidized lipoproteins in patients with diabetics with or without neuropathy were non-significantly differed from healthy subjects. Neither nitrosative stress nor oxidative stress indices correlated with the variables that are related to the neuropathy. Conclusion: It concludes that evidence of nitrosative and to less extent the oxidative stress is associated with neuropathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus and their indices not correlated with variables related to neuropathy.

  17. An Analysis of the Symptomatic Domains Most Relevant to Charcot Marie Tooth Neuropathy (CMT) Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-09

    Charcot Marie Tooth Disease (CMT); Hereditary Sensory and Motor Neuropathy; Nerve Compression Syndromes; Tooth Diseases; Congenital Abnormalities; Genetic Diseases, Inborn; Heredodegenerative Disorders, Nervous System

  18. No response of pancreatic hormones to hypoglycemia in diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Madsbad, S; Krarup, T

    1982-01-01

    The responses of pancreatic hormones (i.e. glucagon, pancreatic polypeptide, and somatostatin) to insulin-induced hypoglycemia were investigated in 18 insulin-dependent diabetics without residual beta-cell function and in 6 normal subjects. Nine of the diabetics had autonomic neuropathy, and 9 had...... no neuropathy. After hypoglycemia, no significant increase in any of the 3 pancreatic hormones was found in the diabetics with autonomic neuropathy, whereas significant increments were found in the diabetics without neuropathy and in the normal subjects. These results suggest that autonomic nervous activity...... is of major importance for pancreatic hormone release during hypoglycemia in man....

  19. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy: Conventional cardiovascular laboratory testing and new developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieling, W.; Smith, A. A. J.; Karemaker, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    Cardiovascular reflex tests remain the investigational cornerstone for the assessment of patients in the clinical autonomic laboratory. Three cardiovagal tests have been found suitable for testing: the instantaneous heart rate responses induced by deep breathing, Valsalva's manoeuvre and standing

  20. Expression of AmHNF6, a sea star orthologue of a transcription factor with multiple distinct roles in sea urchin development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otim, Ochan; Hinman, Veronica F; Davidson, Eric H

    2005-02-01

    The sea urchin transcription factor SpHNF6 is an early activator of differentiation genes in skeletogenic lineages and regulatory genes in the oral ectoderm. We report here the cloning and the expression of an orthologue of this gene, AmHNF6, from the sea star Asterina miniata. The vertebrate and the echinoderm hnf6 and onecut genes belong to the novel ONECUT homeo domain class of transcription factors. In blastula stage sea star embryos, AmHNF6 is expressed everywhere except around the vegetal pole. As is observed in sea urchin, by the end of gastrulation, the expression of AmHNF6 is distinctly localized to the ciliary bands. This terminal phase of expression has remained unchanged since the divergence of these two taxa half a billion years ago.

  1. PMP22 related neuropathies: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A and Hereditary Neuropathy with liability to Pressure Palsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    PMP22 related neuropathies comprise (1) PMP22 duplications leading to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A), (2) PMP22 deletions, leading to Hereditary Neuropathy with liability to Pressure Palsies (HNPP), and (3) PMP22 point mutations, causing both phenotypes. Overall prevalence of CMT is usually reported as 1:2,500, epidemiological studies show that 20-64% of CMT patients carry the PMP22 duplication. The prevalence of HNPP is not well known. CMT1A usually presents in the first two decades with difficulty walking or running. Distal symmetrical muscle weakness and wasting and sensory loss is present, legs more frequently and more severely affected than arms. HNPP typically leads to episodic, painless, recurrent, focal motor and sensory peripheral neuropathy, preceded by minor compression on the affected nerve. Electrophysiological evaluation is needed to determine whether the polyneuropathy is demyelinating. Sonography of the nerves can be useful. Diagnosis is confirmed by finding respectively a PMP22 duplication, deletion or point mutation. Differential diagnosis includes other inherited neuropathies, and acquired polyneuropathies. The mode of inheritance is autosomal dominant and de novo mutations occur. Offspring of patients have a chance of 50% to inherit the mutation from their affected parent. Prenatal testing is possible; requests for prenatal testing are not common. Treatment is currently symptomatic and may include management by a rehabilitation physician, physiotherapist, occupational therapist and orthopaedic surgeon. Adult CMT1A patients show slow clinical progression of disease, which seems to reflect a process of normal ageing. Life expectancy is normal. PMID:24646194

  2. Cellular neuroprotection as a modern treatment approach for optic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Borzenok

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To develop technology to create 3D-spheroid multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MMSC of limbal cadaveric human eyes, capable of safe and long-term secretion of nerve growth factor (NGF and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF.Materials and methods. MMSC were obtained by cultivation of limbal fragments, released from cadaveric donor human eye. Cultivation was carried out in DMEM/F12 medium, supplemented with L-glutamine, penicillin, streptomycin, amphotericin B, HEPES, insulin, dexamethasone and 10 vol.% FBS under standard conditions (5% СО2, 37 °C, medium change was performed every 3 days. To determine the phenotype of the received cell culture the method of immunophenotyping by marker proteins to MMSC (CD73, CD105, CD19, CD90, CD133 was used. Stimulation of neurotrophic factor secretion was performed via a twostep procedure. 3D-cell spheroids were created with the help of agarous plates for three groups of comparison, where group I was control group, spheroids of intact 2D-culture MMSK; group II – spheroids of previously induced 2D-culture MMSC; group III – spheroids of 2D-MMSC induced on the 1st day of cultivation. Cell cultures supernatants were selected in different periods for NGF and BDNF follow-up study by ELISA procedure.Results. Induction of 3D-spheroids of limbal MMSC promotes short-term increase of the level of BDNF and NGF, but further, the secretion of these factors significantly decreases. Induction leads to a change in the morphology of spheroids: loss of compactness and emergence of «fringed» (debris. Such changes indicate of frailty of received constructions. Spheroids from previously induced MMSC are capable of stable NTF secretion, but the level of secretion is much less as compared to the control group.Conclusion. 3D-cell culture of intact 2Dculture of limbal MMSC can be considered as cellular medication for a safe and long-term neuroprotection in optic neuropathy treatment.

  3. A clinical and electrophysiological study of peripheral neuropathies in predialysis chronic kidney disease patients and relation of severity of peripheral neuropathy with degree of renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dushyanth Babu Jasti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the prevalence, clinical features, electrophysiological features, and severity of peripheral neuropathy in predialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD patients with respect to severity of renal failure and presence of diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods: Between May 2015 and December 2016, 200 predialysis CKD patients were assessed prospectively. Results: The prevalence of peripheral neuropathy in predialysis CKD patients in the present study was 45% based on clinical symptoms and 90% electrophysiologically. Mean age of 200 predialysis CKD patients who participated in the study was 53.2 ± 13.2 years. One hundred and thirty-six (68% patients were male and 64 (32% patients were female. Mean duration of disease was 2.2 ± 1.6 years. Nearly 45% patients of patients had asymptomatic peripheral neuropathy in the present study, which was more common in mild-to-moderate renal failure group. One hundred twenty-six patients (63% had definite damage and 54 patients (27% had early damage. In mild-to-moderate renal failure (n = 100 and severe renal failure patients (n = 100, 88% and 92% had significant peripheral neuropathy, respectively. Most common nerves involved were sural nerve, median sensory nerve, and ulnar sensory nerve. Diabetic patients (97% showed more severe and high prevalence of peripheral neuropathy when compared to nondiabetic patients (83%. Most common patterns were pure axonal sensorimotor neuropathy and mixed sensorimotor neuropathy. Conclusion: Peripheral neuropathy is common in predialysis patients, prevalence and severity of which increases as renal failure worsens. Predialysis patients with diabetes show higher prevalence and severity of peripheral neuropathy when compared with nondiabetics.

  4. Role of insulin signaling impairment, adiponectin and dyslipidemia in peripheral and central neuropathy in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J. Anderson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the tissues or organs affected by diabetes is the nervous system, predominantly the peripheral system (peripheral polyneuropathy and/or painful peripheral neuropathy but also the central system with impaired learning, memory and mental flexibility. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the pre-diabetic or diabetic condition caused by a high-fat diet (HFD can damage both the peripheral and central nervous systems. Groups of C57BL6 and Swiss Webster mice were fed a diet containing 60% fat for 8 months and compared to control and streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic groups that were fed a standard diet containing 10% fat. Aspects of peripheral nerve function (conduction velocity, thermal sensitivity and central nervous system function (learning ability, memory were measured at assorted times during the study. Both strains of mice on HFD developed impaired glucose tolerance, indicative of insulin resistance, but only the C57BL6 mice showed statistically significant hyperglycemia. STZ-diabetic C57BL6 mice developed learning deficits in the Barnes maze after 8 weeks of diabetes, whereas neither C57BL6 nor Swiss Webster mice fed a HFD showed signs of defects at that time point. By 6 months on HFD, Swiss Webster mice developed learning and memory deficits in the Barnes maze test, whereas their peripheral nervous system remained normal. In contrast, C57BL6 mice fed the HFD developed peripheral nerve dysfunction, as indicated by nerve conduction slowing and thermal hyperalgesia, but showed normal learning and memory functions. Our data indicate that STZ-induced diabetes or a HFD can damage both peripheral and central nervous systems, but learning deficits develop more rapidly in insulin-deficient than in insulin-resistant conditions and only in Swiss Webster mice. In addition to insulin impairment, dyslipidemia or adiponectinemia might determine the neuropathy phenotype.

  5. Clinical Spectrum, Therapeutic Outcomes, and Prognostic Predictors in Sjogren's Syndrome-associated Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivadasan, Ajith; Muthusamy, Karthik; Patel, Bimal; Benjamin, Rohit Ninan; Prabhakar, A T; Mathew, Vivek; Aaron, Sanjith; Alexander, Mathew

    2017-01-01

    There are limited data regarding long-term follow-up and therapeutic outcomes in Sjogren's syndrome (SS)-associated peripheral neuropathy. In this study, we aim to study the clinical, electrophysiological spectrum and therapeutic responses among the different subtypes of SS-associated neuropathy. The predictors of suboptimal treatment response will be identified. The study included a retrospective cohort of patients with SS-associated neuropathy between January 2012 and November 2015. Baseline clinical, laboratory, electrophysiological data and details of treatment were noted. Therapeutic outcomes were assessed at follow-up and compared among the different subtypes. Prognostic predictors were determined using logistic regression analysis. Fifty-four patients were included in the study. Sensory ataxic neuropathy (17, including 9 with sensory ganglionopathy) and radiculoneuropathy (11) were the main subtypes. Notable atypical presentations included acute neuropathies, pure motor neuropathies, and hypertrophic neuropathy. Concomitant autoimmune disorders were present in 24 (44.4%) patients. Most presentations were subacute-chronic (51, 94.4%). Minor salivary gland biopsy had a higher yield compared to serological markers (81.5 vs. 44.4%). Sensory ataxic neuropathy was associated with greater severity and autonomic dysfunction. Improvement was noted in 33 (61%) patients. Cranial neuropathy and radiculoneuropathy subtypes were associated with the best treatment responses. Chronicity, orthostatic hypotension, baseline severity, and marked axonopathy (nerve biopsy) were predictive of a suboptimal therapeutic response. The study highlights the heterogeneous spectrum, atypical presentations, and differential therapeutic responses. SS-associated neuropathy remains underdiagnosed. Early diagnosis and prompt initiation of immunotherapy before worsening axonal degeneration is paramount. SS-associated neuropathy need not necessarily be associated with a poor prognosis.

  6. Integrated neurorehabilitation with paraproteinassociated peripheral neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    A. A. Alexey; M. V. Yakovleva; A. G. Smochilin

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, treatment of paraproteinemic polyneuropathy is a fairly complex interdisciplinary process. The main method of therapy is still the use of chemotherapeutic drugs as means of pathogenetic treatment of the underlying disease. However, the use of chemotherapy with neurotoxicity can cause development of toxic polyneuropathy which increases neurological deficit. Any comprehensive neurorehabilitation program for patients with these forms of polyneuropathies have not been developed to date....

  7. Neuropatia auditiva: alerta aos pediatras Auditory neuropathy: alert to pediatricians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Varela Capone

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Alertar os pediatras sobre a neuropatia auditiva, doença descrita recentemente e ainda desconhecida por muitos médicos. Descrever seus fatores de risco, características clínicas e diagnósticas, com a finalidade de possibilitar uma intervenção terapêutica precoce e eficaz. FONTES DE DADOS: Realizada pesquisa nas bases de dados PubMed, Lilacs e SciELO utilizando os descritores "neuropatia auditiva" e "auditory neuropathy", entre os anos de 1996 e 2010. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: A neuropatia auditiva, também conhecida como dessincronia auditiva, descrita em 1996, caracteriza-se clinicamente pela dificuldade na compreensão das palavras, mesmo em casos de perdas auditivas leves ou moderadas. Foi relacionada a diversas neuropatias generalizadas e fatores de risco neonatais, como internação em terapia intensiva, hiperbilirrubinemia, sepse e hipóxia. Após suspeita clínica, o diagnóstico é confirmado pela presença das emissões otoacústicas associada a um potencial evocado auditivo de tronco encefálico ausente ou alterado. Sua terapêutica permanece controversa, tendo como opções a protetização auditiva, o acompanhamento fonoterápico para habilitação ou reabilitação da linguagem e, em casos de insucesso, há relatos de resultados satisfatórios com o implante coclear. CONCLUSÕES: Enfatiza-se a importância do reconhecimento pelo pediatra da neuropatia auditiva, entidade ainda pouco citada na literatura latino-americana da especialidade.OBJECTIVE: To alert pediatricians about the auditory neuropathy, a disease that has been only recently described and is still unknown by many physicians, and to describe its risk factors, clinical and diagnostic features in order to enable an early and effective therapeutic intervention. DATA SOURCE: A literature search using terms such as "auditory neuropathy" and "neuropatia auditiva" has been conducted in the PubMed, Lilacs and SciELO databases between 1996 and 2010. DATA SYNTHESIS

  8. The sympathetic skin response in diabetic neuropathy and its relationship to autonomic symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Moallem, Mansour A.; Zaidan, Radwan M.; Alkali, Nura H.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to examine the utility of the sympathetic skin response (SSR) as a measure of impaired autonomic function among diabetic patients in Saudi Arabia. In this case-control study, baseline SSR was obtained from 18 healthy subjects, followed by nerve conduction studies and SSR testing on a consecutive cohort of 50 diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy. The SSR in diabetic patients was compared between those with autonomic neuropathy and those without autonomic neuropathy. This study was conducted at the King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from June 2006 to June 2007. The SSR was present in all healthy subjects and in 32 diabetic patients. Among 16 patients with autonomic neuropathy, the SSR was absent in 14 and present in 2, while 4 of 34 patients lacking evidence of autonomic neuropathy had absent SSR. Using Fisher's exact test, we found a strong association between absent SSR and autonomic neuropathy (p<0.001), however, not with age or duration of diabetes mellitus. As a diagnostic test of autonomic neuropathy, the SSR had a sensitivity of 87.5%, a specificity of 88.2%, a positive predictive value of 77.8%, and a negative predictive value of 93.7%. Absence of the SSR is a reliable indicator of autonomic neuropathy among patients with diabetes mellitus in Saudi Arabia. (author)

  9. Phenotypic spectrum of dynamin 2 mutations in Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claeys, Kristl G.; Züchner, Stephan; Kennerson, Marina; Berciano, José; Garcia, Antonio; Verhoeven, Kristien; Storey, Elsdon; Merory, John R.; Bienfait, Henriette M. E.; Lammens, Martin; Nelis, Eva; Baets, Jonathan; de Vriendt, Els; Berneman, Zwi N.; de Veuster, Ilse; Vance, Jefferey M.; Nicholson, Garth; Timmerman, Vincent; de Jonghe, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type B is caused by mutations in dynamin 2. We studied the clinical, haematological, electrophysiological and sural nerve biopsy findings in 34 patients belonging to six unrelated dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type B

  10. Painless ulcers and fissures of toes: Hereditary sensory neuropathy, not leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angoori Gnaneshwar Rao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary sensory neuropathies (HSN are rare genetically determined neuropathies. They often manifest as painless injuries in children. We present HSN in a 5-year-old boy who presented with recurrent fissuring and ulceration involving both great toes.

  11. High-dose thalidomide increases the risk of peripheral neuropathy in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-xia Xue

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thalidomide is an effective drug for the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis but might induce peripheral neuropathy. This major adverse reaction has attracted much concern. The current study aimed to observe the incidence of thalidomide-induced peripheral neuropathy among ankylosing spondylitis patients for 1 year after treatment. In this study, 207 ankylosing spondylitis cases received thalidomide treatment, while 116 ankylosing spondylitis cases received other treatments. Results showed that the incidence of thalidomide-induced peripheral neuropathy in the thalidomide group was higher than that in the non-thalidomide group. There was no significant difference in the incidence of neuropathy between the < 6 months medication and ≥ 6 months medication groups. There were no differences in the mean age, gender, or daily dose between the two groups. The incidence of peripheral neuropathy among patients receiving 25, 50, 75, or 100 mg thalidomide per day was 4.6%, 8.5%, 17.1%, 21.7%, respectively. The incidence was significantly different between the groups receiving 25 mg and 100 mg thalidomide. In conclusion, thalidomide can induce peripheral neuropathy within 1 year after treatment of ankylosing spondylitis; however, age and gender have no obvious impact on the incidence of peripheral neuropathy. The incidence of peripheral neuropathy is associated with increasing daily doses of thalidomide.

  12. Spectrum of peripheral neuropathies associated with surgical interventions; A neurophysiological assessment.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Saidha, Shiv

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesized that a wide range of surgical procedures may be complicated by neuropathies, not just in close proximity but also remote from procedural sites. The aim of this study was to classify post-operative neuropathies and the procedures associated with them.

  13. Melanopsin retinal ganglion cells are resistant to neurodegeneration in mitochondrial optic neuropathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    La Morgia, C; Ross-Cisneros, F.N.; Sadun, A.A.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial optic neuropathies, that is, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and dominant optic atrophy, selectively affect retinal ganglion cells, causing visual loss with relatively preserved pupillary light reflex. The mammalian eye contains a light detection system based on a subset of retina...

  14. Phenotypic spectrum of dynamin 2 mutations in Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claeys, K.G.; Zuchner, S.; Kennerson, M.; Berciano, J.; Garcia, A.; Verhoeven, K.; Storey, E.; Merory, J.R.; Bienfait, H.M.; Lammens, M.M.Y.; Nelis, E.; Baets, J.; Vriendt, E. De; Berneman, Z.N.; Veuster, I. De; Vance, J.M.; Nicholson, G.; Timmerman, V.; Jonghe, P. de

    2009-01-01

    Dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type B is caused by mutations in dynamin 2. We studied the clinical, haematological, electrophysiological and sural nerve biopsy findings in 34 patients belonging to six unrelated dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type B

  15. Cochlear neuropathy and the coding of supra-threshold sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadwaj, Hari M; Verhulst, Sarah; Shaheen, Luke; Liberman, M Charles; Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara G

    2014-01-01

    Many listeners with hearing thresholds within the clinically normal range nonetheless complain of difficulty hearing in everyday settings and understanding speech in noise. Converging evidence from human and animal studies points to one potential source of such difficulties: differences in the fidelity with which supra-threshold sound is encoded in the early portions of the auditory pathway. Measures of auditory subcortical steady-state responses (SSSRs) in humans and animals support the idea that the temporal precision of the early auditory representation can be poor even when hearing thresholds are normal. In humans with normal hearing thresholds (NHTs), paradigms that require listeners to make use of the detailed spectro-temporal structure of supra-threshold sound, such as selective attention and discrimination of frequency modulation (FM), reveal individual differences that correlate with subcortical temporal coding precision. Animal studies show that noise exposure and aging can cause a loss of a large percentage of auditory nerve fibers (ANFs) without any significant change in measured audiograms. Here, we argue that cochlear neuropathy may reduce encoding precision of supra-threshold sound, and that this manifests both behaviorally and in SSSRs in humans. Furthermore, recent studies suggest that noise-induced neuropathy may be selective for higher-threshold, lower-spontaneous-rate nerve fibers. Based on our hypothesis, we suggest some approaches that may yield particularly sensitive, objective measures of supra-threshold coding deficits that arise due to neuropathy. Finally, we comment on the potential clinical significance of these ideas and identify areas for future investigation.

  16. HDAC6 inhibition effectively reverses chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krukowski, Karen; Ma, Jiacheng; Golonzhka, Olga; Laumet, Geoffroy O; Gutti, Tanuja; van Duzer, John H; Mazitschek, Ralph; Jarpe, Matthew B; Heijnen, Cobi J; Kavelaars, Annemieke

    2017-06-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy is one of the most common dose-limiting side effects of cancer treatment. Currently, there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment available. Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is a microtubule-associated deacetylase whose function includes regulation of α-tubulin-dependent intracellular mitochondrial transport. Here, we examined the effect of HDAC6 inhibition on established cisplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy. We used a novel HDAC6 inhibitor ACY-1083, which shows 260-fold selectivity towards HDAC6 vs other HDACs. Our results show that HDAC6 inhibition prevented cisplatin-induced mechanical allodynia, and also completely reversed already existing cisplatin-induced mechanical allodynia, spontaneous pain, and numbness. These findings were confirmed using the established HDAC6 inhibitor ACY-1215 (Ricolinostat), which is currently in clinical trials for cancer treatment. Mechanistically, treatment with the HDAC6 inhibitor increased α-tubulin acetylation in the peripheral nerve. In addition, HDAC6 inhibition restored the cisplatin-induced reduction in mitochondrial bioenergetics and mitochondrial content in the tibial nerve, indicating increased mitochondrial transport. At a later time point, dorsal root ganglion mitochondrial bioenergetics also improved. HDAC6 inhibition restored the loss of intraepidermal nerve fiber density in cisplatin-treated mice. Our results demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of HDAC6 completely reverses all the hallmarks of established cisplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy by normalization of mitochondrial function in dorsal root ganglia and nerve, and restoration of intraepidermal innervation. These results are especially promising because one of the HDAC6 inhibitors tested here is currently in clinical trials as an add-on cancer therapy, highlighting the potential for a fast clinical translation of our findings.

  17. Therapeutische Überlegungen bei sensomotorischer diabetischer Neuropathie

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    Bührlen M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Der Begriff der sensomotorischen diabetischen Neuropathie beschreibt einen heterogenen Beschwerdekomplex, der auf einer diabetesbedingten Schädigung des peripheren Nervensystems beruht. Bis zu 50 % der Menschen mit Diabetes mellitus leiden im Verlauf ihrer Erkrankung an Symptomen einer sensomotorischen Neuropathie. Chronische Schmerzen, Dysund Parästhesien sowie die Komplikation des diabetischen Fußsyndroms stellen für die Betroffenen gravierende Folgen dar. Die Optimierung der metabolischen Kontrolle stellt eine wichtige Basismaßnahme dar. Andere, zweifelsfrei gesicherte Möglichkeiten der Prävention oder kausalen Therapie sind nicht bekannt. Bei Auftreten einer schmerzhaften Neuropathie sollte eine gezielte analgetische Therapie möglichst früh begonnen werden. Mit den trizyklischen Antidepressiva, Duloxetin, Gabapentin und Pregabalin stehen Wirkstoffe zur Verfügung, die eine spezifische Therapie neuropathischer Schmerzen ermöglichen. Dabei ist zu beachten, dass in der Regel keine Schmerzfreiheit erreicht werden kann. Entscheidend ist das Erreichen eines für den Patienten tolerablen Schmerzniveaus unter Minimierung medikamentenassoziierter Nebenwirkungen. Das individuelle Ansprechen auf ein Medikament und die optimale Dosis können nicht vorhergesagt, sondern müssen individuell erprobt werden. Bei leichten Schmerzen können die Nicht-Opioid- Analgetika Paracetamol und Metamizol eingesetzt werden. Fehlen Therapiealternativen, dann stellen Opioide eine weitere Möglichkeit der Therapie starker Schmerzen dar. Aufgrund einer zusätzlichen Monoamin-Wiederaufnahmehemmerwirkung nehmen Tramadol und Tapentadol in dieser Gruppe eine Sonderstellung ein. In der Risiko- Nutzen-Abwägung darf das Nebenwirkungs- und Abhängigkeitspotenzial der Opioide in der Langzeittherapie nicht unterschätzt werden. Für andere medikamentöse Therapien oder alternative Therapiemethoden liegt keine ausreichende wissenschaftliche Evidenz vor. Sie können aber im

  18. A 70-year-old male with peripheral neuropathy, ataxia and antigliadin antibodies shows improvement in neuropathy, but not ataxia, after intravenous immunoglobulin and gluten-free diet

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    Dharshan Anandacoomaraswamy

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Dharshan Anandacoomaraswamy1, Jagdeesh Ullal2, Aaron I Vinik21Department of Internal Medicine, Coney Island Hospital, Brooklyn, NY, USA; 2Strelitz Diabetes Center, Department of Internal Medicine, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, VA, USAAbstract: This is a case of a 70-year-old man with severe peripheral neuropathy, type 2 diabetes and progressively worsening cerebellar ataxia. He was found to have circulating antigliadin and antireticulin antibodies compatible with celiac disease in the absence of intestinal pathology. The peripheral neuropathy improved with a gluten-free diet, antioxidants and intravenous immunoglobulin, whereas the ataxia did not. This case illustrates the need to test for celiac disease in patients with idiopathic ataxia and peripheral neuropathy and the need for alternative therapies for ataxia. Keywords: celiac disease, peripheral neuropathy, autoimmune disease, cerebellar ataxia, type 2 diabetes

  19. Integrated neurorehabilitation with paraproteinassociated peripheral neuropathy

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    A. A. Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, treatment of paraproteinemic polyneuropathy is a fairly complex interdisciplinary process. The main method of therapy is still the use of chemotherapeutic drugs as means of pathogenetic treatment of the underlying disease. However, the use of chemotherapy with neurotoxicity can cause development of toxic polyneuropathy which increases neurological deficit. Any comprehensive neurorehabilitation program for patients with these forms of polyneuropathies have not been developed to date. The article presents data of clinical observations of 26 patients with paraproteinemic polyneuropathy which had undergone a course of neurorehabilitation treatment, both medical and nondrug technologies, including the methods of kinesiotherapy and physiotherapy.

  20. Optic neuropathy secondary to cat scratch disease: case report

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    Ricardo Evangelista Marrocos de Aragão

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Optic neuropathy due to cat scratch disease is a relatively infrequent occurrence associated with macular star formation and is characterized by sudden painless loss of vision mostly unilateral. Bartonella henselae is well recognized as the etiologic agent in cat scratch disease. Ocular complications of the disease occur in up to 10% of patients and include neuroretinitis. Ocular bartonelosis is usually self-limited with complete or near-complete recovery of vision in otherwise healthy patients. A case of a boy with neuroretinitis caused by B. henselae is reported.

  1. Subcutaneous versus intravenous immunoglobulin in multifocal motor neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harbo, T; Andersen, Henning; Hess, A

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: For treatment of multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), we hypothesized that (i) infusion of equivalent dosages of subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG) is as effective as intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and that (ii) subcutaneous infusion at home is associated with a better...... at the injection sites for a few weeks. All other adverse effects during SCIG were mild and transient. No differences between treatments of health-related quality of life occurred. Conclusion: In MMN, short-term subcutaneous infusion of immunoglobulin is feasible, safe and as effective as intravenous infusion...

  2. The ECG vertigo in diabetes and cardiac autonomic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voulgari, Christina; Tentolouris, Nicholas; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2011-01-01

    The importance of diabetes in the epidemiology of cardiovascular diseases cannot be overemphasized. About one third of acute myocardial infarction patients have diabetes, and its prevalence is steadily increasing. The decrease in cardiac mortality in people with diabetes is lagging behind that of the general population. Cardiovascular disease is a broad term which includes any condition causing pathological changes in blood vessels, cardiac muscle or valves, and cardiac rhythm. The ECG offers a quick, noninvasive clinical and research screen for the early detection of cardiovascular disease in diabetes. In this paper, the clinical and research value of the ECG is readdressed in diabetes and in the presence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy.

  3. Suspected hypothyroid-associated neuropathy in a female rottweiler dog

    OpenAIRE

    Rushton, James Oliver; Leschnik, Michael; Nell, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    A 7-year-old, 46-kg spayed female rottweiler dog was presented with sudden onset of disorientation, bilateral convergent strabismus, and enophthalmos. Diagnostic workup revealed hypothyroid-associated cranial neuropathy. Symptoms abated considerably upon treatment with levothyroxine-sodium (T4) at an initial dose of 800 μg/kg body weight (BW), PO, q12h, which was reduced 3 days later to 600 μg/kg BW, q12h due to severe agitation and panting. Two weeks later the dosage of the levothyroxine-sod...

  4. Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating Neuropathy : Immunoglobulin And Immune Complex Profile

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    Shripad A

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Serum immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA and IgM and immune complexes IgG (IcG were measured in 58 cases of acute inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy, popularly known as Guillian Barre′ syndrome, and in 30 healthy controls using single radial immunodiffusion assay. Immunoglobulin and immune complex levels were significantly elevated in patients as compared to controls. The increased levels of immunoglobulins and immune complexes may contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease and provide rationale for therapeutic plasmapheresis.

  5. Unilateral pure trigeminal motor nerve neuropathy: A rare case report

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    Nishant K Srivastava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Unilateral pure trigeminal motor nerve neuropathy is an extremely rare and unique condition, characterized by atrophy of the muscles, innervated by the motor branch of the trigeminal nerve. We report such a case in a 25-year-old male patient. The diagnosis was made on the basis of clinical and radiological examinations. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI proved to be the key for establishing the diagnosis, which showed atrophy and fatty infiltration over the affected side of the muscles of mastication. We were unable to establish the cause of the condition even after performing a brain MRI.

  6. Syringomyelia presenting with unilateral optic neuropathy: a case report

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    Ngoo QZ

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Qi Zhe Ngoo, Evelyn Li Min Tai, Wan Hazabbah Wan Hitam Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kubang Kerian, Malaysia Purpose: In this case report, we present two cases of syringomyelia with optic neuropathy.Findings: In Case 1, a 36-year-old Malay lady presented to our clinic with acute onset of blurring of vision in her left eye that she experienced since past 1 month. She was diagnosed with syringomyelia 12 years ago and was on conservative management. Her visual acuity was 6/6 in the right eye and counting fingers at 1 m in the left. There was a positive relative afferent pupillary defect in her left eye. Optic nerve functions of her left eye were reduced. Visual field showed a left inferior field defect. Her extraocular muscle movements were full. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and spine showed syringomyelia at the level of C2–C6 and T2–T9. Both of her optic nerves were normal. Her condition improved with intravenous and oral corticosteroids. In Case 2, a 44-year-old Malay lady presented to our clinic with a progressive central scotoma in her right eye that she experienced since past 1 month. She had previous history of recurrent episodes of weakness in both of her lower limbs from past 8 months. Visual acuity in her right and left eye was 6/9 and 6/6, respectively. The relative afferent pupillary defect in her right eye was positive. Optic nerve functions of her right eye were affected. Visual field showed a central scotoma in her right eye. Her extraocular muscle movements were full. Fundoscopy of her right eye showed a pale optic disc. Her left eye fundus was normal. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and spine showed syringomyelia at T3–T6. Both of her optic nerves were normal. A diagnosis of syringomyelia with right optic atrophy was performed. Her condition improved with intravenous and oral corticosteroids.Conclusion: Optic neuropathy is a rare neuro

  7. Dose–Volume Modeling of Brachial Plexus-Associated Neuropathy After Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Findings From a Prospective Screening Protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Allen M.; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Daly, Megan E.; Cui, Jing; Hall, William H.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Phillips, Theodore L.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Purdy, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Data from a prospective screening protocol administered for patients previously irradiated for head-and-neck cancer was analyzed to identify dosimetric predictors of brachial plexus-associated neuropathy. Methods and Materials: Three hundred fifty-two patients who had previously completed radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were prospectively screened from August 2007 to April 2013 using a standardized self-administered instrument for symptoms of neuropathy thought to be related to brachial plexus injury. All patients were disease-free at the time of screening. The median time from radiation therapy was 40 months (range, 6-111 months). A total of 177 patients (50%) underwent neck dissection. Two hundred twenty-one patients (63%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Fifty-one patients (14%) reported brachial plexus-related neuropathic symptoms with the most common being ipsilateral pain (50%), numbness/tingling (40%), and motor weakness and/or muscle atrophy (25%). The 3- and 5-year estimates of freedom from brachial plexus-associated neuropathy were 86% and 81%, respectively. Clinical/pathological N3 disease (P<.001) and maximum radiation dose to the ipsilateral brachial plexus (P=.01) were significantly associated with neuropathic symptoms. Cox regression analysis revealed significant dose–volume effects for brachial plexus-associated neuropathy. The volume of the ipsilateral brachial plexus receiving >70 Gy (V70) predicted for symptoms, with the incidence increasing with V70 >10% (P<.001). A correlation was also observed for the volume receiving >74 Gy (V74) among patients treated without neck dissection, with a cutoff of 4% predictive of symptoms (P=.038). Conclusions: Dose–volume guidelines were developed for radiation planning that may limit brachial plexus-related neuropathies

  8. Dose–Volume Modeling of Brachial Plexus-Associated Neuropathy After Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Findings From a Prospective Screening Protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Allen M., E-mail: amchen@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Wang, Pin-Chieh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Daly, Megan E.; Cui, Jing; Hall, William H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Vijayakumar, Srinivasan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi School of Medicine, Jackson, Mississippi (United States); Phillips, Theodore L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Farwell, D. Gregory [Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of California, Davis, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Purdy, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Data from a prospective screening protocol administered for patients previously irradiated for head-and-neck cancer was analyzed to identify dosimetric predictors of brachial plexus-associated neuropathy. Methods and Materials: Three hundred fifty-two patients who had previously completed radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were prospectively screened from August 2007 to April 2013 using a standardized self-administered instrument for symptoms of neuropathy thought to be related to brachial plexus injury. All patients were disease-free at the time of screening. The median time from radiation therapy was 40 months (range, 6-111 months). A total of 177 patients (50%) underwent neck dissection. Two hundred twenty-one patients (63%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Fifty-one patients (14%) reported brachial plexus-related neuropathic symptoms with the most common being ipsilateral pain (50%), numbness/tingling (40%), and motor weakness and/or muscle atrophy (25%). The 3- and 5-year estimates of freedom from brachial plexus-associated neuropathy were 86% and 81%, respectively. Clinical/pathological N3 disease (P<.001) and maximum radiation dose to the ipsilateral brachial plexus (P=.01) were significantly associated with neuropathic symptoms. Cox regression analysis revealed significant dose–volume effects for brachial plexus-associated neuropathy. The volume of the ipsilateral brachial plexus receiving >70 Gy (V70) predicted for symptoms, with the incidence increasing with V70 >10% (P<.001). A correlation was also observed for the volume receiving >74 Gy (V74) among patients treated without neck dissection, with a cutoff of 4% predictive of symptoms (P=.038). Conclusions: Dose–volume guidelines were developed for radiation planning that may limit brachial plexus-related neuropathies.

  9. All-trans retinoic acid induces nerve regeneration and increases serum and nerve contents of neural growth factor in experimental diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Pedro, Norma; Ordóñez, Graciela; Ortiz-Plata, Alma; Palencia-Hernández, Guadalupe; García-Ulloa, Ana Cristina; Flores-Estrada, Diana; Sotelo, Julio; Arrieta, Oscar

    2008-07-01

    Local diminution of the neural growth factor (NGF) contributes to the apparition of diabetic neuropathy. All-trans retinoic acid (RA) increases the expression of neural growth factor and its receptor participating in translation pathways. This study evaluates RA as a treatment of diabetic neuropathy: 120 mice were assigned randomly to 4 groups. Group A (n = 30) was taken as control; group B (n = 30) received 50 mg/kg intraperitoneal streptozotocin (STZ); group C (n = 30) received STZ, and after diabetic neuropathy developed, they were treated with subcutaneous RA 20 mg/kg daily during 60 days; and group D (n = 30) only received RA. Plasma glucose, thermosensitive tests, serum, and the nerve contents of NGF were measured in all animals. Evaluation by electron microscopy was performed in search of morphologic changes secondary to neuropathy and nerve regeneration. Diabetic mice had an increased threshold to pain. Treatment with RA in diabetic mice reverted changes in sensitivity as compared with diabetic mice that received placebo (P pain threshold among controls, RA, and diabetes mellitus (DM) + RA groups were found. Glucose levels were not affected by the treatment with RA. NGF diminished significantly in the sciatic nerve in diabetic mice as compared with controls and with the RA group. Animals with DM + RA had a significant increase of NGF in nerves as compared with the other groups. RA also regressed the ultrastructural changes induced by diabetes that showed increased neural regeneration. RA can revert functional and ultrastructural changes and induce neural regeneration after the establishment of diabetic neuropathy, possibly because of the increased of NGF concentrations in nerve terminals.

  10. Delayed autonomic neuropathy in a patient with diethylene glycol poisoning: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, Hiroki; Suzuki, Hideaki; Yamamoto, Saori; Nomura, Ryosuke; Kushimoto, Shigeki

    2017-07-01

    A 72-year-old man presented to our hospital after ingesting insecticide containing approximately 2 mL/kg diethylene glycol, which exceeded the lethal dose of 1 mL/kg. The patient recovered from critical symptoms on acute phase until day 3, but received artificial ventilation for muscle weakness secondary to sensorimotor neuropathy on days 11-54. Even after marked improvement from sensorimotor neuropathy, the patient continued to complain of orthostatic hypotension. Autonomic neuropathy was identified by positive result of a head-up tilt test, and reduction in coefficient of variation of R-R intervals and cardiac iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine uptake for the assessment of cardiac sympathetic activity. The patient's symptoms fully recovered 2 years after the exposure to diethylene glycol. This case shows the first report of delayed autonomic neuropathy after recovery from severe sensorimotor neuropathy, and suggests the importance of continuous monitoring for late-onset neurological complications.

  11. Bilateral Simultaneous Nonarteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy after Ingestion of Sildenafil for Erectile Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Tarantini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To describe a patient who developed bilateral, simultaneous nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION after ingestion of Sildenafil citrate (Viagra for erectile dysfunction. Methods. Observational case report. Results. A 60-year-old diabetic man noted sudden decrease of vision in both eyes 16 hours after his third consecutive 50 mg daily Sildenafil ingestion. A diagnosis of bilateral NAION was made and he was treated for three days with methylprednisolone 1 g/d intravenously, followed by oral prednisone 75 mg/d. Final visual acuity was 20/50 right eye (OD and 20/20 left eye (OS. He had preexisting diabetes. Conclusion. This is the first reported case of simultaneous bilateral NAION occurred in a diabetic patient early after Sildenafil intake. Patients with predisposing conditions such as diabetes have to be warned against the use of PDE inhibitors.

  12. Bilateral non-arteritic ischemic optic neuropathy in a transsexual woman using excessive estrogen dosage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierckx, Katrien; De Zaeytijd, Julie; Elaut, Els; Heylens, Gunter; T'Sjoen, Guy

    2014-02-01

    We present a case report on a 53-year-old transsexual woman who developed acute painless vision loss in both eyes during cross-sex hormone treatment. After 10 months of cross-sex hormone treatment, she experienced total vision loss of the right eye and, 6 months later, vision loss to 20/63 in the left eye. After a full ophthalmic exam, bilateral sequential non-arteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NA-ION) was diagnosed. Extensive etiological work-up revealed no cardiac abnormalities or inherited blood-clotting disorders. A manifest self-administered overdose of transdermal estrogen treatment with serum estradiol levels of 5,765 pg/ml was possibly related to the sequential bilateral NA-ION resulting in nearly total vision loss in this transsexual woman.

  13. Linezolid-induced optic neuropathy in XDR pulmonary TB: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Anand; Kshetrimayum, Silpa; Gupta, Sanjiv Kumar; Kant, Surya

    2017-04-01

    Optic neuropathy has been reported as a side effect of long-term use of linezolid. This is particularly seen in cases of extensively drug resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) where treatment with linezolid may continue for about 24-30 months. We, hereby, report two cases of XDR-TB treated patients with a regimen containing linezolid who developed progressive painless loss of vision during the course of treatment. In both the cases, the visual symptoms resolved completely on withdrawing linezolid. Early recognition of this rare side effect and timely withdrawal may salvage the eyesight of such patients. Copyright © 2016 Tuberculosis Association of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Fibromyalgia and neuropathic pain - differences and similarities. A comparison of 3057 patients with diabetic painful neuropathy and fibromyalgia

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    Tölle Thomas R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with diabetic neuropathy (DPN and fibromyalgia differ substantially in pathogenetic factors and the spatial distribution of the perceived pain. We questioned whether, despite these obvious differences, similar abnormal sensory complaints and pain qualities exist in both entities. We hypothesized that similar sensory symptoms might be associated with similar mechanisms of pain generation. The aims were (1 to compare epidemiological features and co-morbidities and (2 to identify similarities and differences of sensory symptoms in both entities. Methods The present multi-center study compares epidemiological data and sensory symptoms of a large cohort of 1434 fibromyalgia patients and 1623 patients with painful diabetic neuropathy. Data acquisition included standard demographic questions and self-report questionnaires (MOS sleep scale, PHQ-9, PainDETECT. To identify subgroups of patients with characteristic combinations of symptoms (sensory profiles a cluster analysis was performed using all patients in both cohorts. Results Significant differences in co-morbidities (depression, sleep disturbance were found between both disorders. Patients of both aetiologies chose very similar descriptors to characterize their sensory perceptions. Burning pain, prickling and touch-evoked allodynia were present in the same frequency. Five subgroups with distinct symptom profiles could be detected. Two of the subgroups were characteristic for fibromyalgia whereas one profile occurred predominantly in DPN patients. Two profiles were found frequently in patients of both entities (20-35%. Conclusions DPN and fibromyalgia patients experience very similar sensory phenomena. The combination of sensory symptoms - the sensory profile - is in most cases distinct and almost unique for each one of the two entities indicating aetiology-specific mechanisms of symptom generation. Beside the unique aetiology-specific sensory profiles an overlap of

  15. Fibromyalgia and neuropathic pain - differences and similarities. A comparison of 3057 patients with diabetic painful neuropathy and fibromyalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with diabetic neuropathy (DPN) and fibromyalgia differ substantially in pathogenetic factors and the spatial distribution of the perceived pain. We questioned whether, despite these obvious differences, similar abnormal sensory complaints and pain qualities exist in both entities. We hypothesized that similar sensory symptoms might be associated with similar mechanisms of pain generation. The aims were (1) to compare epidemiological features and co-morbidities and (2) to identify similarities and differences of sensory symptoms in both entities. Methods The present multi-center study compares epidemiological data and sensory symptoms of a large cohort of 1434 fibromyalgia patients and 1623 patients with painful diabetic neuropathy. Data acquisition included standard demographic questions and self-report questionnaires (MOS sleep scale, PHQ-9, PainDETECT). To identify subgroups of patients with characteristic combinations of symptoms (sensory profiles) a cluster analysis was performed using all patients in both cohorts. Results Significant differences in co-morbidities (depression, sleep disturbance) were found between both disorders. Patients of both aetiologies chose very similar descriptors to characterize their sensory perceptions. Burning pain, prickling and touch-evoked allodynia were present in the same frequency. Five subgroups with distinct symptom profiles could be detected. Two of the subgroups were characteristic for fibromyalgia whereas one profile occurred predominantly in DPN patients. Two profiles were found frequently in patients of both entities (20-35%). Conclusions DPN and fibromyalgia patients experience very similar sensory phenomena. The combination of sensory symptoms - the sensory profile - is in most cases distinct and almost unique for each one of the two entities indicating aetiology-specific mechanisms of symptom generation. Beside the unique aetiology-specific sensory profiles an overlap of sensory profiles can be

  16. Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsies Masked by Previous Gunshots and Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Gencik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Although hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP presents with a distinct phenotype on history, clinical exam, and nerve conduction studies, it may be masked if diagnostic work-up suggests other causes. Case Report. In a 37-year-old male with pseudoradicular lumbar pain, neurological exam revealed sore neck muscles, peripheral facial nerve palsy, right anacusis and left hypoacusis, hemihypesthesia of the right face, mild distal quadriparesis, diffuse wasting, and generally reduced tendon reflexes. He had a history of skull fracture due to a gunshot behind the right ear and tuberculosis for which he had received adequate treatment for 3 years; MRI revealed a disc prolapse at C6/7 and Th11/12. Nerve conduction studies were indicative of demyelinating polyneuropathy with conduction blocks. Despite elevated antinuclear antibodies and elevated CSF-protein, HNPP was diagnosed genetically after having excluded vasculitis, CIDP, radiculopathy, and the side effects of antituberculous treatment. Conclusions. HNPP may manifest with mild, painless, distal quadriparesis. The diagnosis of HNPP may be blurred by a history of tuberculosis, tuberculostatic treatment, hepatitis, and the presence of elevated CSF-protein.

  17. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is associated with mitochondrial ND1 T3394C mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Min; Guan, Minqiang; Zhao, Fuxing; Zhou, Xiangtian; Yuan, Meixia; Tong, Yi; Yang, Li; Wei, Qi-Ping; Sun, Yan-Hong; Lu, Fan; Qu, Jia

    2009-01-01

    We report here the clinical, genetic and molecular characterization of four Chinese families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). There were variable severity and age-of-onset in visual impairment among these families. Strikingly, there were extremely low penetrances of visual impairment in these Chinese families. Sequence analysis of complete mitochondrial genomes in these pedigrees showed the homoplasmic T3394C (Y30H) mutation, which localized at a highly conserved tyrosine at position 30 of ND1, and distinct sets of mtDNA polymorphisms belonging to haplogroups D4b and M9a. The occurrence of T3394C mutation in these several genetically unrelated subjects affected by visual impairment strongly indicates that this mutation is involved in the pathogenesis of visual impairment. However, there was the absence of functionally significant mtDNA mutations in these four Chinese pedigrees carrying the T3394C mutation. Therefore, nuclear modifier gene(s) or environmental factor(s) may play a role in the phenotypic expression of the LHON-associated T3394C mutation.

  18. Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies or Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazir, Meriem; Hamadouche, Tarik; Nouioua, Sonia; Mathis, Stephane; Vallat, Jean-Michel

    2014-12-15

    Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies (HMSN) or Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) diseases are the most common degenerative disorders of the peripheral nervous system. However, the frequency of the different subtypes varies within distinct populations. Although more than seventy clinical and genetic forms are known to date, more than 80% of CMT patients in Western countries have genetic abnormalities associated with PMP22, MPZ, MFN2 and GJB1. Given the considerable genetic heterogeneity of CMT, we emphasize the interest of both clinical and pathological specific features such that focused genetic testing could be performed. In this regard, peripheral nerve lesions in GDAP1 mutations (AR CMT1A), such as mitochondrial abnormalities, have been newly demonstrated. Otherwise, while demyelinating autosomal recessive CMT used to be classified as CMT4 (A, B, C …), we propose a simplified classification such as AR CMT1 (A, B, C …), and AR CMT2 for axonal forms. Also, we stress that next generation sequencing techniques, now considered to be the most efficient methods of genetic testing in CMT, will be helpful in molecular diagnosis and research of new genes involved. Finally, while no effective therapy is known to date, ongoing new therapeutic trials such as PXT3003 (a low dose combination of the three already approved drugs baclofen, naltrexone, and D-sorbitol) give hopes for potential curative treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Ghrelin reverses experimental diabetic neuropathy in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyoraku, Itaru; Shiomi, Kazutaka [Division of Neurology, Respirology, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Kiyotake, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan); Kangawa, Kenji [Department of Biochemistry, National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute, Osaka 565-8565 (Japan); Nakazato, Masamitsu, E-mail: nakazato@med.miyazaki-u.ac.jp [Division of Neurology, Respirology, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Kiyotake, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan)

    2009-11-20

    Ghrelin, an acylated peptide produced in the stomach, increases food intake and growth hormone secretion, suppresses inflammation and oxidative stress, and promotes cell survival and proliferation. We investigated the pharmacological potential of ghrelin in the treatment of polyneuropathy in uncontrolled streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in mice. Ghrelin or desacyl-ghrelin was administered daily for 4 weeks after STZ-induced diabetic polyneuropathy had developed. Ghrelin administration did not alter food intake, body weight gain, blood glucose levels, or plasma insulin levels when compared with mice given saline or desacyl-ghrelin administration. Ghrelin administration ameliorated reductions in motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities in diabetic mice and normalized their temperature sensation and plasma concentrations of 8-isoprostaglandin {alpha}, an oxidative stress marker. Desacyl-ghrelin failed to have any effect. Ghrelin administration in a mouse model of diabetes ameliorated polyneuropathy. Thus, ghrelin's effects represent a novel therapeutic paradigm for the treatment of this otherwise intractable disorder.

  20. Neuropathy associated with etonogestrel implant insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Matthew; Britton, John

    2012-11-01

    The etonogestrel contraceptive implant (Implanon®) is an effective, long-acting subdermal method of hormonal contraception for women. We describe a case of forearm pain and hypoesthesia associated with the insertion of the Implanon® contraceptive implant in a healthy 26-year-old female. These symptoms were due to direct implant contact with the medial cutaneous nerve of the forearm. The importance of correct insertion technique is discussed. Care should be taken to avoid nerve injury during insertion of subdermal contraceptive implants. An understanding of regional anatomy and the correct insertion technique will prevent insertion-related complications. Nexplanon® has been developed to replace Implanon®. It has a redesigned applicator intended to increase insertion accuracy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Development of a Shared E-Learning Resource across Three Distinct Programmes Based at Universities in England, Ireland and Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Abbey; McGarry, Julie; Thompson, Sue; Wilkie, Kay; Aubeeluck, Aimee

    2015-01-01

    Recent discourses embedded in higher education policies advocate institutional collaboration and globalisation, while inter-professional learning and student-centred learning have each found favour as good practice in educational delivery. In this article, we detail the process of developing a novel innovation that operationalized components of…

  2. HIV-related neuropathy: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütz, Sonja G; Robinson-Papp, Jessica

    2013-09-11

    Distal symmetric polyneuropathy (DSP) related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is one of the most common neurologic complications of HIV, possibly affecting as many as 50% of all individuals infected with HIV. Two potentially neurotoxic mechanisms have been proposed to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of HIV DSP: neurotoxicity resulting from the virus and its products; as well as adverse neurotoxic effects of medications used in the treatment of HIV. Clinically, HIV DSP is characterized by a combination of signs and symptoms that include decreased deep tendon reflexes at the ankles and decreased sensation in the distal extremities as well as paresthesias, dysesthesias, and pain in a symmetric stocking-glove distribution. These symptoms are generally static or slowly progressive over time, and depending on the severity, may interfere significantly with the patient's daily activities. In addition to the clinical picture, nerve conduction studies and skin biopsies are often pursued to support the diagnosis of HIV DSP. Anticonvulsants, antidepressants, topical agents, and nonspecific analgesics may help relieve neuropathic pain. Specifically, gabapentin, lamotrigine, pregabalin, amitriptyline, duloxetine, and high-dose topical capsaicin patches have been used in research and clinical practice. Further research is needed to elucidate the pathogenesis of HIV DSP, thus facilitating the development of novel treatment strategies. This review discusses the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical findings, diagnosis, and management of DSP in the setting of HIV.

  3. Is there treatment for nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, David M; Trobe, Jonathan D

    2015-11-01

    Nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) is the most common cause of an acute optic neuropathy over the age 50 with an annual incidence of 2-10/100 000. Most patients are left with a permanent decrease in visual acuity and visual field loss. No approved treatment has conclusively reversed the process or prevented a second event that typically involves the previously unaffected eye. Many medical and surgical treatments have been proposed with conflicting results. The goal of this review is to present current data in order to permit clinicians and patients to make an educated decision about treatment. Recently, there has been a flurry of case reports, small clinical trials and testing in animal models of NAION for various treatments for NAION and this review attempts to present the data concisely with the authors' opinions about the reliability of the data. To date, there is no class I evidence of benefit for the treatment of NAION; however, the aphorism attributed to Carl Sagan, PhD aptly applies: 'Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence'.

  4. Multifocal motor neuropathy: a review of pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawson VH

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Victoria H Lawson,1 W David Arnold1,2 1Division of Neuromuscular Disorders, Department of Neurology, 2Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Wexner Medical Center at The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA Abstract: Multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN is an uncommon, purely motor neuropathy associated with asymmetric deficits with predilection for upper limb involvement. Even in the early descriptions of MMN, the associations of anti-GM1 antibodies and robust response to immunomodulatory treatment were recognized. These features highlight the likelihood of an underlying autoimmune etiology of MMN. The clinical presentation of MMN can closely mimic several neurological conditions including those with more malignant prognoses such as motor neuron disease. Therefore early and rapid recognition of MMN is critical. Serological evidence of anti GM-1 antibodies and electrodiagnostic findings of conduction block are helpful diagnostic clues for MMN. Importantly, these diagnostic features are not universally present, and patients lacking these characteristic findings can demonstrate similar robust response to immunodulatory treatment. In the current review, recent research in the areas of diagnosis, pathogenesis, and treatment of MMN and needs for the future are discussed. The characteristic findings of MMN and treatment implications are reviewed and contrasted with other mimicking disorders. Keywords: autoimmune, conduction block, electrodiagnosis, motor neuron, nerve, inflammatory

  5. Auditory Neuropathy: Findings of Behavioral, Physiological and Neurophysiological Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Farhadi

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Auditory neuropathy (AN can be diagnosed by abnormal auditory brainstem response (ABR, in the presence of normal cochlear microphonic (CM and otoacoustic emissions (OAEs.The aim of this study was to investigate the ABR and other electrodiagnostic test results of 6 patients suspicious to AN with problems in speech recognition. Materials and Methods: this cross sectional study was conducted on 6 AN patients with different ages evaluated by pure tone audiometry, speech discrimination score (SDS , immittance audiometry. ElectroCochleoGraphy , ABR, middle latency response (MLR, Late latency response (LLR, and OAEs. Results: Behavioral pure tone audiometric tests showed moderate to profound hearing loss. SDS was so poor which is not in accordance with pure tone thresholds. All patients had normal tympanogram but absent acoustic reflexes. CMs and OAEs were within normal limits. There was no contra lateral suppression of OAEs. None of cases had normal ABR or MLR although LLR was recorded in 4. Conclusion: All patients in this study are typical cases of auditory neuropathy. Despite having abnormal input, LLR remains normal that indicates differences in auditory evoked potentials related to required neural synchrony. These findings show that auditory cortex may play a role in regulating presentation of deficient signals along auditory pathways in primary steps.

  6. Peripheral neuropathy in a copper-deficient goat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdir Morais de Almeida

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This report aimed to describe a case of peripheral neuropathy in a copper-deficient goat, and highlights the clinical, and pathological features of the disease. The goat had low body score, hyporexia, alopecia, achromotrichia, left hindlimb protraction, paralysis with dragging of digit and difficulty to stand up and microcytic normochromic anemia. Copper concentration in serum was markedly lower (2.0µmol L-1 whereas the iron serum content was significantly increased (51.0µmol L-1. The main gross alteration was the reduction of the quadriceps vastus laterallis muscle volume. Histologically, there was atrophy of the quadriceps vastus laterallis muscle and presence of satellite cells, infiltration of lymphocytes, macrophages and replacement of the fibers by connective tissue. In the femoral nerve, there was axonal degeneration with myelin sheath expansion and presence of vacuoles, usually in chains and containing axonal debris or macrophages. Clinical, laboratorial and pathologic findings are consistent with peripheral neuropathy due to a severy copper deficiency.

  7. Autophagy as an Emerging Common Pathomechanism in Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Haidar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPNs comprise a growing list of genetically heterogeneous diseases. With mutations in more than 80 genes being reported to cause IPNs, a wide spectrum of functional consequences is expected to follow this genotypic diversity. Hence, the search for a common pathomechanism among the different phenotypes has become the holy grail of functional research into IPNs. During the last decade, studies on several affected genes have shown a direct and/or indirect correlation with autophagy. Autophagy, a cellular homeostatic process, is required for the removal of cell aggregates, long-lived proteins and dead organelles from the cell in double-membraned vesicles destined for the lysosomes. As an evolutionarily highly conserved process, autophagy is essential for the survival and proper functioning of the cell. Recently, neuronal cells have been shown to be particularly vulnerable to disruption of the autophagic pathway. Furthermore, autophagy has been shown to be affected in various common neurodegenerative diseases of both the central and the peripheral nervous system including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Huntington’s diseases. In this review we provide an overview of the genes involved in hereditary neuropathies which are linked to autophagy and we propose the disruption of the autophagic flux as an emerging common pathomechanism. We also shed light on the different steps of the autophagy pathway linked to these genes. Finally, we review the concept of autophagy being a therapeutic target in IPNs, and the possibilities and challenges of this pathway-specific targeting.

  8. Polycomb Group Gene OsFIE2 Regulates Rice (Oryza sativa) Seed Development and Grain Filling via a Mechanism Distinct from Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallamilli, Babi Ramesh Reddy; Zhang, Jian; Mujahid, Hana; Malone, Brandon M.; Bridges, Susan M.; Peng, Zhaohua

    2013-01-01

    Cereal endosperm represents 60% of the calories consumed by human beings worldwide. In addition, cereals also serve as the primary feedstock for livestock. However, the regulatory mechanism of cereal endosperm and seed development is largely unknown. Polycomb complex has been shown to play a key role in the regulation of endosperm development in Arabidopsis, but its role in cereal endosperm development remains obscure. Additionally, the enzyme activities of the polycomb complexes have not been demonstrated in plants. Here we purified the rice OsFIE2-polycomb complex using tandem affinity purification and demonstrated its specific H3 methyltransferase activity. We found that the OsFIE2 gene product was responsible for H3K27me3 production specifically in vivo. Genetic studies showed that a reduction of OsFIE2 expression led to smaller seeds, partially filled seeds, and partial loss of seed dormancy. Gene expression and proteomics analyses found that the starch synthesis rate limiting step enzyme and multiple storage proteins are down-regulated in OsFIE2 reduction lines. Genome wide ChIP–Seq data analysis shows that H3K27me3 is associated with many genes in the young seeds. The H3K27me3 modification and gene expression in a key helix-loop-helix transcription factor is shown to be regulated by OsFIE2. Our results suggest that OsFIE2-polycomb complex positively regulates rice endosperm development and grain filling via a mechanism highly different from that in Arabidopsis. PMID:23505380

  9. The Physcomitrella patens exocyst subunit EXO70.3d has distinct roles in growth and development, and is essential for completion of the moss life cycle

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rawat, Anamika; Brejšková, Lucie; Hála, Michal; Cvrčková, F.; Žárský, Viktor

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 216, č. 2 (2017), s. 438-454 ISSN 0028-646X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-14886S Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LO1417 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : auxin * cytokinesis * egg cell development * exo70 * exocyst * phylogeny * Physcomitrella patens * secretory pathway Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 7.330, year: 2016

  10. Gfi1 and Gfi1b act equivalently in haematopoiesis, but have distinct, non-overlapping functions in inner ear development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiolka, Katharina; Hertzano, Ronna; Vassen, Lothar; Zeng, Hui; Hermesh, Orit; Avraham, Karen B; Dührsen, Ulrich; Möröy, Tarik

    2006-03-01

    Gfi1 is a transcriptional repressor essential for haematopoiesis and inner ear development. It shares with its paralogue Gfi1b an amino-terminal SNAG repressor domain and six carboxy-terminal zinc-finger motifs, but differs from Gfi1b in sequences separating these domains. Here, we describe two knock-in mouse models, in which the N-terminal SNAG repressor domain was mutated or in which the Gfi1 coding region was replaced by Gfi1b. Mouse mutants without an intact SNAG domain show the full phenotype of Gfi1 null mice. However, Gfi1:Gfi1b knock-in mice show almost normal pre-T-cell and neutrophil development, but lack properly formed inner ear hair cells. Hence, our findings show that an intact SNAG domain is essential for all functions of Gfi1 and that Gfi1b can replace Gfi1 functionally in haematopoiesis but, surprisingly, not in inner ear hair cell development, demonstrating that Gfi1 and Gfi1b have equivalent and domain-dependent, cell type-specific functions.

  11. Pupillometric evaluation of the melanopsin containing retinal ganglion cells in mitochondrial and non-mitochondrial optic neuropathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ba-Ali, Shakoor; Lund-Andersen, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    of pupillary light reflex is primarily driven by the ipRGCs. Optic neuropathies i.e. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA), nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION), glaucoma, optic neuritis and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) are among...... the diseases, which have been subject to pupillometric studies. The ipRGCs are differentially affected in these various optic neuropathies. In mitochondrial optic neuropathies, the ipRGCs are protected against degeneration, whereas in glaucoma, NAION, optic neuritis and IIH the ipRGCs are damaged. Here, we...

  12. Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with hypertrophy of the cauda equina and concomitant demyelinating white matter lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertl-Wagner, B.B.; Staebler, A.; Reiser, M.

    2005-01-01

    Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) is thought to almost exclusively affect the peripheral nervous system. We report the case of a 48-year-old patient with a longstanding history of HMSN type I who developed signs and symptoms of a cauda equina compression and of a central nervous system relapsing-remitting demyelinating white matter disease. Gross enlargement of the cauda equina fibers was detected by MR imaging of the lumbar spine. Cranial MR imaging revealed demyelinating white matter lesions. This case suggests that peripheral neuropathic mechanisms may also affect the central myelin in HMSN type I

  13. Defining multiple, distinct, and shared spatiotemporal patterns of DNA replication and endoreduplication from 3D image analysis of developing maize (Zea mays L.) root tip nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Hank W; Hoffman, Gregg G; Lee, Tae-Jin; Wear, Emily E; Joseph, Stacey R; Allen, George C; Hanley-Bowdoin, Linda; Thompson, William F

    2015-11-01

    Spatiotemporal patterns of DNA replication have been described for yeast and many types of cultured animal cells, frequently after cell cycle arrest to aid in synchronization. However, patterns of DNA replication in nuclei from plants or naturally developing organs remain largely uncharacterized. Here we report findings from 3D quantitative analysis of DNA replication and endoreduplication in nuclei from pulse-labeled developing maize root tips. In both early and middle S phase nuclei, flow-sorted on the basis of DNA content, replicative labeling was widely distributed across euchromatic regions of the nucleoplasm. We did not observe the perinuclear or perinucleolar replicative labeling patterns characteristic of middle S phase in mammals. Instead, the early versus middle S phase patterns in maize could be distinguished cytologically by correlating two quantitative, continuous variables, replicative labeling and DAPI staining. Early S nuclei exhibited widely distributed euchromatic labeling preferentially localized to regions with weak DAPI signals. Middle S nuclei also exhibited widely distributed euchromatic labeling, but the label was preferentially localized to regions with strong DAPI signals. Highly condensed heterochromatin, including knobs, replicated during late S phase as previously reported. Similar spatiotemporal replication patterns were observed for both mitotic and endocycling maize nuclei. These results revealed that maize euchromatin exists as an intermingled mixture of two components distinguished by their condensation state and replication timing. These different patterns might reflect a previously described genome organization pattern, with "gene islands" mostly replicating during early S phase followed by most of the intergenic repetitive regions replicating during middle S phase.

  14. Threshold dose for peripheral neuropathy following intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in a large animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsella, T.J.; DeLuca, A.M.; Barnes, M.; Anderson, W.; Terrill, R.; Sindelar, W.F.

    1991-01-01

    Radiation injury to peripheral nerve is a dose-limiting toxicity in the clinical application of intraoperative radiotherapy, particularly for pelvic and retroperitoneal tumors. Intraoperative radiotherapy-related peripheral neuropathy in humans receiving doses of 20-25 Gy is manifested as a mixed motor-sensory deficit beginning 6-9 months following treatment. In a previous experimental study of intraoperative radiotherapy-related neuropathy of the lumbro-sacral plexus, an approximate inverse linear relationship was reported between the intraoperative dose (20-75 Gy range) and the time to onset of hind limb paresis (1-12 mos following intraoperative radiotherapy). The principal histological lesion in irradiated nerve was loss of large nerve fibers and perineural fibrosis without significant vascular injury. Similar histological changes in irradiated nerves were found in humans. To assess peripheral nerve injury to lower doses of intraoperative radiotherapy in this same large animal model, groups of four adult American Foxhounds received doses of 10, 15, or 20 Gy to the right lumbro-sacral plexus and sciatic nerve using 9 MeV electrons. The left lumbro-sacral plexus and sciatic nerve were excluded from the intraoperative field to allow each animal to serve as its own control. Following treatment, a complete neurological exam, electromyogram, and nerve conduction studies were performed monthly for 1 year. Monthly neurological exams were performed in years 2 and 3 whereas electromyogram and nerve conduction studies were performed every 3 months during this follow-up period. With follow-up of greater than or equal to 42 months, no dog receiving 10 or 15 Gy IORT shows any clinical or laboratory evidence of peripheral nerve injury. However, all four dogs receiving 20 Gy developed right hind limb paresis at 8, 9, 9, and 12 mos following intraoperative radiotherapy

  15. Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy, Sexual Dysfunction, and Urinary Incontinence in Women With Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Aruna V.; Patel, Darshan P.; Braffett, Barbara H.; Cleary, Patricia A.; Feldman, Eva; Herman, William H.; Martin, Catherine L.; Jacobson, Alan M.; Wessells, Hunter; Pop-Busui, Rodica

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study evaluated associations among cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN), female sexual dysfunction (FSD), and urinary incontinence (UI) in women with type I diabetes mellitus (T1DM). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We studied 580 women with T1DM in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications Study (DCCT/EDIC). CAN was defined as: 1) R-R variation 2) R-R variation of 15–19.9 plus Valsalva ratio ≤1.5 or a supine-to-standing drop of 10 mmHg in diastolic blood pressure. A Sandvik Severity Index of 3–12 defined UI, and a Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI-R) score ≥22.75 defined FSD. Multivariable models estimated associations among CAN, FSD, and UI. RESULTS At EDIC year 17, FSD was observed in 41% of women and UI in 30%. No statistically significant associations were observed between measures of CAN at DCCT closeout and subsequent report of FSD or UI. At EDIC year 16/17, there was a 53% increased odds of having UI with a Valsalva ratio ≤1.5. At both EDIC year 13/14 and EDIC year 16/17, a 5-unit increase in R-R variation was associated with a 1.11 greater odds of having FSD. CONCLUSIONS In women with T1DM in the DCCT/EDIC, we found significant increased odds of FSD and UI with specific measures of CAN. In long-standing T1DM, CAN may predict development of FSD and may be a useful surrogate for generalized diabetic autonomic neuropathy. PMID:27352953

  16. Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy, Sexual Dysfunction, and Urinary Incontinence in Women With Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotaling, James M; Sarma, Aruna V; Patel, Darshan P; Braffett, Barbara H; Cleary, Patricia A; Feldman, Eva; Herman, William H; Martin, Catherine L; Jacobson, Alan M; Wessells, Hunter; Pop-Busui, Rodica

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated associations among cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN), female sexual dysfunction (FSD), and urinary incontinence (UI) in women with type I diabetes mellitus (T1DM). We studied 580 women with T1DM in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications Study (DCCT/EDIC). CAN was defined as: 1) R-R variation 2) R-R variation of 15-19.9 plus Valsalva ratio ≤1.5 or a supine-to-standing drop of 10 mmHg in diastolic blood pressure. A Sandvik Severity Index of 3-12 defined UI, and a Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI-R) score ≥22.75 defined FSD. Multivariable models estimated associations among CAN, FSD, and UI. At EDIC year 17, FSD was observed in 41% of women and UI in 30%. No statistically significant associations were observed between measures of CAN at DCCT closeout and subsequent report of FSD or UI. At EDIC year 16/17, there was a 53% increased odds of having UI with a Valsalva ratio ≤1.5. At both EDIC year 13/14 and EDIC year 16/17, a 5-unit increase in R-R variation was associated with a 1.11 greater odds of having FSD. In women with T1DM in the DCCT/EDIC, we found significant increased odds of FSD and UI with specific measures of CAN. In long-standing T1DM, CAN may predict development of FSD and may be a useful surrogate for generalized diabetic autonomic neuropathy. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association.

  17. Acute motor axonal neuropathy associated with anal carcinoma: Paraneoplastic neurological syndrome or coincidence?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, J. L.; Amezcua, S.; Pascual, J.; Algara, M.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Assessment of the association of an acute motor axonal neuropathy with a squamous cell anal carcinoma. Background: Paraneoplastic neurologic syndromes are not a direct consequence of neither primary tumor nor its metastasis. They often parallel the course of the malignancy but may be the presenting sign of an occult cancer. Sometimes it is very difficult to distinguish if it is a paraneoplastic syndrome or just a coincidence. Materials and methods: We report a 60-year-old man that presented with an acute motor deficit of the four limbs. Clinical examination found a pure and severe motor deficit in the four limbs. No sensory abnormality was found and all motor nerves were unexcitable. Electromyography suggested the diagnosis of acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN). Four months after developing the AMAN, blood in the stool revealed anal carcinoma. The patient was treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Radiation was given to the tumor and to the pelvis, including inguinal nodes, over a five-week period plus fluorouracil and mitomycin. We investigated the presence of anti ganglioside antibodies as studies suggest that carcinomas can express antigens shared with Schwann cells. Results: Anti-GM1 IgG antibodies were detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. Other antibodies, including antinuclear nucleoprotein antibody (anti-Hu), anti-Tr, anti-Ri, anti-CV2, anti-amphiphysin and anti-Yo, were negative. Clinical improvement of the motor state was observed at the fourth week of oncologic treatment. Conclusion: The presence of anti-GM1 IgG antibodies and the clinical improvement of the motor state after concurrent chemoradiotherapy lead us to believe there is an association between anal carcinoma and this severe impairment. (authors)

  18. [Regional anaesthesia for labor adn delivery in a parturient with neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (tomaculous neuropathy)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdai, S; Benhamou, D

    2004-10-01

    Tomaculous neuropathy (or hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy [HNLPP]) is a rare and hereditary disease which incidence has probably been underestimated. It is characterised by demyelination resulting in numbness and weakness after nerve pressure, injury or stretch. Despite a well-documented genetic pathophysiologic mechanism, implications for anaesthesia in patients with HNLPP are only speculative and the use of regional anaesthesia is debatable. We report here the case of a patient with HNLPP who was followed during two consecutive pregnancies in the same hospital and for whom an expert of the SOS-RA hotline service was consulted before each delivery. For the first delivery, epidural analgesia was performed for labour pain control but a caesarean section was necessary because of failure to progress (0.0625% bupivacaine with 0.2 microg/ml sufentanil for labour then 2% lidocaine with adrenaline for surgery). Two years later, the patient was again seen for a preanaesthetic visit because elective Caesarean section was planned. Spinal anaesthesia using hyperbaric bupivacaine and sufentanil was used. Both deliveries were uneventful and there were no neurologic complaints in the postpartum periods.

  19. Analysis of youtube as a source of information for peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Harsh V; Lee, Ricky W; Raina, Sunil K; Behrle, Brian L; Hinduja, Archana; Mittal, Manoj K

    2016-01-01

    YouTube is an important resource for patients. No study has evaluated the information on peripheral neuropathy disseminated by YouTube videos. In this study, our aim was to perform a systematic review of information on YouTube regarding peripheral neuropathy. The Web site (www.youtube.com) was searched between September 19 and 21, 2014, for the terms "neuropathy," "peripheral neuropathy," "diabetic neuropathy," "neuropathy causes," and "neuropathy treatment." Two hundred videos met the inclusion criteria. Healthcare professionals accounted for almost half of the treatment videos (41 of 92; 44.6%), and most came from chiropractors (18 of 41; 43.9%). Alternative medicine was cited most frequently among the treatment discussions (54 of 145, 37.2%), followed by devices (38 of 145, 26.2%), and pharmacological treatments (23 of 145, 15.9%). Approximately half of the treatment options discussed in the videos were not evidence-based. Caution should be exercised when YouTube videos are used as a patient resource. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Recurrence Quantification Analysis of F-Waves and the Evaluation of Neuropathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris A. Fisher

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrodiagnostic (EDX patterns of neuropathic dysfunction have been based on axonal/demyelinating criteria requiring prior assumptions. This has not produced classifications of desired sensitivity or specificity. Furthermore, standard nerve conduction studies have limited reproducibility. New methodologies in EDX seem important. Recurrent Quantification Analysis (RQA is a nonlinear method for examining patterns of recurrence. RQA might provide a unique method for the EDX evaluation of neuropathies. RQA was used to analyze F-wave recordings from the abductor hallucis muscle in 61 patients with neuropathies. Twenty-nine of these patients had diabetes as the sole cause of their neuropathies. In the other 32 patients, the etiologies of the neuropathies were diverse. Commonly used EDX variables were also recorded. RQA data could separate the 29 patients with diabetic neuropathies from the other 32 patients (P<0.009. Statistically significant differences in two EDX variables were also present: compound muscle action potential amplitudes (P<0.007 and F-wave persistence (P<0.001. RQA analysis of F-waves seemed able to distinguish diabetic neuropathies from the other neuropathies studied, and this separation was associated with specific physiological abnormalities. This study would therefore support the idea that RQA of F-waves can distinguish between types of neuropathic dysfunction based on EDX data alone without prior assumptions.