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Sample records for neurons reveals regulated

  1. Kinase/phosphatase overexpression reveals pathways regulating hippocampal neuron morphology.

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    Buchser, William J; Slepak, Tatiana I; Gutierrez-Arenas, Omar; Bixby, John L; Lemmon, Vance P

    2010-07-01

    Development and regeneration of the nervous system requires the precise formation of axons and dendrites. Kinases and phosphatases are pervasive regulators of cellular function and have been implicated in controlling axodendritic development and regeneration. We undertook a gain-of-function analysis to determine the functions of kinases and phosphatases in the regulation of neuron morphology. Over 300 kinases and 124 esterases and phosphatases were studied by high-content analysis of rat hippocampal neurons. Proteins previously implicated in neurite growth, such as ERK1, GSK3, EphA8, FGFR, PI3K, PKC, p38, and PP1a, were confirmed to have effects in our functional assays. We also identified novel positive and negative neurite growth regulators. These include neuronal-developmentally regulated kinases such as the activin receptor, interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6) and neural leucine-rich repeat 1 (LRRN1). The protein kinase N2 (PKN2) and choline kinase alpha (CHKA) kinases, and the phosphatases PPEF2 and SMPD1, have little or no established functions in neuronal function, but were sufficient to promote neurite growth. In addition, pathway analysis revealed that members of signaling pathways involved in cancer progression and axis formation enhanced neurite outgrowth, whereas cytokine-related pathways significantly inhibited neurite formation.

  2. Staufen2 Regulates Neuronal Target RNAs

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    Jacki E. Heraud-Farlow

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available RNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in directing RNA translation to neuronal synapses. Staufen2 (Stau2 has been implicated in both dendritic RNA localization and synaptic plasticity in mammalian neurons. Here, we report the identification of functionally relevant Stau2 target mRNAs in neurons. The majority of Stau2-copurifying mRNAs expressed in the hippocampus are present in neuronal processes, further implicating Stau2 in dendritic mRNA regulation. Stau2 targets are enriched for secondary structures similar to those identified in the 3′ UTRs of Drosophila Staufen targets. Next, we show that Stau2 regulates steady-state levels of many neuronal RNAs and that its targets are predominantly downregulated in Stau2-deficient neurons. Detailed analysis confirms that Stau2 stabilizes the expression of one synaptic signaling component, the regulator of G protein signaling 4 (Rgs4 mRNA, via its 3′ UTR. This study defines the global impact of Stau2 on mRNAs in neurons, revealing a role in stabilization of the levels of synaptic targets.

  3. Proteomic profiling in Drosophila reveals potential Dube3a regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and neuronal homeostasis.

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    Laura Jensen

    Full Text Available The molecular defects associated with Angelman syndrome (AS and 15q duplication autism are directly correlated to expression levels of the E3 ubiquitin ligase protein UBE3A. Here we used Drosophila melanogaster to screen for the targets of this ubiquitin ligase under conditions of both decreased (as in AS or increased (as in dup(15 levels of the fly Dube3a or human UBE3A proteins. Using liquid phase isoelectric focusing of proteins from whole fly head extracts we identified a total of 50 proteins that show changes in protein, and in some cases transcriptional levels, when Dube3a fluctuates. We analyzed head extracts from cytoplasmic, nuclear and membrane fractions for Dube3a regulated proteins. Our results indicate that Dube3a is involved in the regulation of cellular functions related to ATP synthesis/metabolism, actin cytoskeletal integrity, both catabolism and carbohydrate metabolism as well as nervous system development and function. Sixty-two percent of the proteins were >50% identical to homologous human proteins and 8 have previously be shown to be ubiquitinated in the fly nervous system. Eight proteins may be regulated by Dube3a at the transcript level through the transcriptional co-activation function of Dube3a. We investigated one autism-associated protein, ATPα, and found that it can be ubiquitinated in a Dube3a dependent manner. We also found that Dube3a mutants have significantly less filamentous actin than wild type larvae consistent with the identification of actin targets regulated by Dube3a. The identification of UBE3A targets is the first step in unraveling the molecular etiology of AS and duplication 15q autism.

  4. Regulation of Rap GTPases in mammalian neurons.

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    Shah, Bhavin; Püschel, Andreas W

    2016-10-01

    Small GTPases are central regulators of many cellular processes. The highly conserved Rap GTPases perform essential functions in the mammalian nervous system during development and in mature neurons. During neocortical development, Rap1 is required to regulate cadherin- and integrin-mediated adhesion. In the adult nervous system Rap1 and Rap2 regulate the maturation and plasticity of dendritic spine and synapses. Although genetic studies have revealed important roles of Rap GTPases in neurons, their regulation by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that activate them and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) that inactivate them by stimulating their intrinsic GTPase activity is just beginning to be explored in vivo. Here we review how GEFs and GAPs regulate Rap GTPases in the nervous system with a focus on their in vivo function.

  5. Regulation of neuronal axon specification by glia-neuron gap junctions in C. elegans

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    Meng, Lingfeng; Zhang, Albert; Jin, Yishi; Yan, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Axon specification is a critical step in neuronal development, and the function of glial cells in this process is not fully understood. Here, we show that C. elegans GLR glial cells regulate axon specification of their nearby GABAergic RME neurons through GLR-RME gap junctions. Disruption of GLR-RME gap junctions causes misaccumulation of axonal markers in non-axonal neurites of RME neurons and converts microtubules in those neurites to form an axon-like assembly. We further uncover that GLR-RME gap junctions regulate RME axon specification through activation of the CDK-5 pathway in a calcium-dependent manner, involving a calpain clp-4. Therefore, our study reveals the function of glia-neuron gap junctions in neuronal axon specification and shows that calcium originated from glial cells can regulate neuronal intracellular pathways through gap junctions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19510.001 PMID:27767956

  6. Phenotypic checkpoints regulate neuronal development.

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    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Spitzer, Nicholas C

    2010-11-01

    Nervous system development proceeds by sequential gene expression mediated by cascades of transcription factors in parallel with sequences of patterned network activity driven by receptors and ion channels. These sequences are cell type- and developmental stage-dependent and modulated by paracrine actions of substances released by neurons and glia. How and to what extent these sequences interact to enable neuronal network development is not understood. Recent evidence demonstrates that CNS development requires intermediate stages of differentiation providing functional feedback that influences gene expression. We suggest that embryonic neuronal functions constitute a series of phenotypic checkpoint signatures; neurons failing to express these functions are delayed or developmentally arrested. Such checkpoints are likely to be a general feature of neuronal development and constitute presymptomatic signatures of neurological disorders when they go awry.

  7. [What mirror neurons have revealed: revisited].

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    Murata, Akira; Maeda, Kazutaka

    2014-06-01

    The first paper on mirror neurons was published in 1992. In the span of over two decades since then, much knowledge about the relationship between social cognitive function and the motor control system has been accumulated. Direct matching of visual actions and their corresponding motor representations is the most important functional property of mirror neuron. Many studies have emphasized intrinsic simulation as a core concept for mirror neurons. Mirror neurons are thought to play a role in social cognitive function. However, the function of mirror neurons in the macaque remains unclear, because such cognitive functions are limited or lacking in macaque monkeys. It is therefore important to discuss these neurons in the context of motor function. Rizzolatti and colleagues have stressed that the most important function of mirror neurons in macaques is recognition of actions performed by other individuals. I suggest that mirror neurons in the Macaque inferior pariental lobule might be correlated with body schema. In the parieto-premotor network, matching of corollary discharge and actual sensory feedback is an essential neuronal operation. Recently, neurons showing mirror properties were found in some cortical areas outside the mirror neuron system. The current work would revisit the outcomes of mirror neuron studies to discuss the function of mirror neurons in the monkey.

  8. SnapShot: Neuronal Regulation of Aging.

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    Weir, Heather J; Mair, William B

    2016-07-28

    Aging is characterized by loss of homeostasis across multiple tissues. The nervous system governs whole-body homeostasis by communicating external and internal signals to peripheral tissues. Here, we highlight neuronal mechanisms and downstream outputs that regulate aging and longevity. Targeting these neuronal pathways may be a novel strategy to promote healthy aging. To view this SnapShot, open or download the PDF.

  9. YAP regulates neuronal differentiation through Sonic hedgehog signaling pathway

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    Lin, Yi-Ting; Ding, Jing-Ya [Department of Life Sciences and Institute of Genome Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Li, Ming-Yang [Department of Life Science, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Tien-Shun [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Wang, Tsu-Wei, E-mail: twwang@ntnu.edu.tw [Department of Life Science, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China); Yu, Jenn-Yah, E-mail: jyyu@ym.edu.tw [Department of Life Sciences and Institute of Genome Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Brain Research Center, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China)

    2012-09-10

    Tight regulation of cell numbers by controlling cell proliferation and apoptosis is important during development. Recently, the Hippo pathway has been shown to regulate tissue growth and organ size in Drosophila. In mammalian cells, it also affects cell proliferation and differentiation in various tissues, including the nervous system. Interplay of several signaling cascades, such as Notch, Wnt, and Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) pathways, control cell proliferation during neuronal differentiation. However, it remains unclear whether the Hippo pathway coordinates with other signaling cascades in regulating neuronal differentiation. Here, we used P19 cells, a mouse embryonic carcinoma cell line, as a model to study roles of YAP, a core component of the Hippo pathway, in neuronal differentiation. P19 cells can be induced to differentiate into neurons by expressing a neural bHLH transcription factor gene Ascl1. Our results showed that YAP promoted cell proliferation and inhibited neuronal differentiation. Expression of Yap activated Shh but not Wnt or Notch signaling activity during neuronal differentiation. Furthermore, expression of Yap increased the expression of Patched homolog 1 (Ptch1), a downstream target of the Shh signaling. Knockdown of Gli2, a transcription factor of the Shh pathway, promoted neuronal differentiation even when Yap was over-expressed. We further demonstrated that over-expression of Yap inhibited neuronal differentiation in primary mouse cortical progenitors and Gli2 knockdown rescued the differentiation defect in Yap over-expressing cells. In conclusion, our study reveals that Shh signaling acts downstream of YAP in regulating neuronal differentiation. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer YAP promotes cell proliferation and inhibits neuronal differentiation in P19 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer YAP promotes Sonic hedgehog signaling activity during neuronal differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of Gli2 rescues the Yap

  10. Progranulin regulates neuronal outgrowth independent of Sortilin

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    Gass Jennifer

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Progranulin (PGRN, a widely secreted growth factor, is involved in multiple biological functions, and mutations located within the PGRN gene (GRN are a major cause of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43-positive inclusions (FLTD-TDP. In light of recent reports suggesting PGRN functions as a protective neurotrophic factor and that sortilin (SORT1 is a neuronal receptor for PGRN, we used a Sort1-deficient (Sort1−/− murine primary hippocampal neuron model to investigate whether PGRN’s neurotrophic effects are dependent on SORT1. We sought to elucidate this relationship to determine what role SORT1, as a regulator of PGRN levels, plays in modulating PGRN’s neurotrophic effects. Results As the first group to evaluate the effect of PGRN loss in Grn knockout primary neuronal cultures, we show neurite outgrowth and branching are significantly decreased in Grn−/− neurons compared to wild-type (WT neurons. More importantly, we also demonstrate that PGRN overexpression can rescue this phenotype. However, the recovery in outgrowth is not observed following treatment with recombinant PGRN harboring missense mutations p.C139R, p.P248L or p.R432C, indicating that these mutations adversely affect the neurotrophic properties of PGRN. In addition, we also present evidence that cleavage of full-length PGRN into granulin peptides is required for increased neuronal outgrowth, suggesting that the neurotrophic functions of PGRN are contained within certain granulins. To further characterize the mechanism by which PGRN impacts neuronal morphology, we assessed the involvement of SORT1. We demonstrate that PGRN induced-outgrowth occurs in the absence of SORT1 in Sort1−/− cultures. Conclusion We demonstrate that loss of PGRN impairs proper neurite outgrowth and branching, and that exogenous PGRN alleviates this impairment. Furthermore, we determined that exogenous PGRN induces outgrowth independent of SORT1, suggesting another

  11. Artificial spatiotemporal touch inputs reveal complementary decoding in neocortical neurons.

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    Oddo, Calogero M; Mazzoni, Alberto; Spanne, Anton; Enander, Jonas M D; Mogensen, Hannes; Bengtsson, Fredrik; Camboni, Domenico; Micera, Silvestro; Jörntell, Henrik

    2017-04-04

    Investigations of the mechanisms of touch perception and decoding has been hampered by difficulties in achieving invariant patterns of skin sensor activation. To obtain reproducible spatiotemporal patterns of activation of sensory afferents, we used an artificial fingertip equipped with an array of neuromorphic sensors. The artificial fingertip was used to transduce real-world haptic stimuli into spatiotemporal patterns of spikes. These spike patterns were delivered to the skin afferents of the second digit of rats via an array of stimulation electrodes. Combined with low-noise intra- and extracellular recordings from neocortical neurons in vivo, this approach provided a previously inaccessible high resolution analysis of the representation of tactile information in the neocortical neuronal circuitry. The results indicate high information content in individual neurons and reveal multiple novel neuronal tactile coding features such as heterogeneous and complementary spatiotemporal input selectivity also between neighboring neurons. Such neuronal heterogeneity and complementariness can potentially support a very high decoding capacity in a limited population of neurons. Our results also indicate a potential neuroprosthetic approach to communicate with the brain at a very high resolution and provide a potential novel solution for evaluating the degree or state of neurological disease in animal models.

  12. Methamphetamine Regulation of Firing Activity of Dopamine Neurons.

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    Lin, Min; Sambo, Danielle; Khoshbouei, Habibeh

    2016-10-05

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a substrate for the dopamine transporter that increases extracellular dopamine levels by competing with dopamine uptake and increasing reverse transport of dopamine via the transporter. METH has also been shown to alter the excitability of dopamine neurons. The mechanism of METH regulation of the intrinsic firing behaviors of dopamine neurons is less understood. Here we identified an unexpected and unique property of METH on the regulation of firing activity of mouse dopamine neurons. METH produced a transient augmentation of spontaneous spike activity of midbrain dopamine neurons that was followed by a progressive reduction of spontaneous spike activity. Inspection of action potential morphology revealed that METH increased the half-width and produced larger coefficients of variation of the interspike interval, suggesting that METH exposure affected the activity of voltage-dependent potassium channels in these neurons. Since METH has been shown to affect Ca(2+) homeostasis, the unexpected findings that METH broadened the action potential and decreased the amplitude of afterhyperpolarization led us to ask whether METH alters the activity of Ca(2+)-activated potassium (BK) channels. First, we identified BK channels in dopamine neurons by their voltage dependence and their response to a BK channel blocker or opener. While METH suppressed the amplitude of BK channel-mediated unitary currents, the BK channel opener NS1619 attenuated the effects of METH on action potential broadening, afterhyperpolarization repression, and spontaneous spike activity reduction. Live-cell total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, electrophysiology, and biochemical analysis suggest METH exposure decreased the activity of BK channels by decreasing BK-α subunit levels at the plasma membrane.

  13. Siah regulation of Pard3A controls neuronal cell adhesion during germinal zone exit.

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    Famulski, Jakub K; Trivedi, Niraj; Howell, Danielle; Yang, Yuan; Tong, Yiai; Gilbertson, Richard; Solecki, David J

    2010-12-24

    The brain's circuitry is established by directed migration and synaptogenesis of neurons during development. Although neurons mature and migrate in specific patterns, little is known about how neurons exit their germinal zone niche. We found that cerebellar granule neuron germinal zone exit is regulated by proteasomal degradation of Pard3A by the Seven in Absentia homolog (Siah) E3 ubiquitin ligase. Pard3A gain of function and Siah loss of function induce precocious radial migration. Time-lapse imaging using a probe to measure neuronal cell contact reveals that Pard3A promotes adhesive interactions needed for germinal zone exit by recruiting the epithelial tight junction adhesion molecule C to the neuronal cell surface. Our findings define a Siah-Pard3A signaling pathway that controls adhesion-dependent exit of neuronal progenitors or immature neurons from a germinal zone niche.

  14. TAURINE REGULATION OF VOLTAGE-GATED CHANNELS IN RETINAL NEURONS

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    Rowan, Matthew JM; Bulley, Simon; Purpura, Lauren; Ripps, Harris; Shen, Wen

    2017-01-01

    Taurine activates not only Cl−-permeable ionotropic receptors, but also receptors that mediate metabotropic responses. The metabotropic property of taurine was revealed in electrophysiological recordings obtained after fully blocking Cl−-permeable receptors with an inhibitory “cocktail” consisting of picrotoxin, SR95531, and strychnine. We found that taurine’s metabotropic effects regulate voltage-gated channels in retinal neurons. After applying the inhibitory cocktail, taurine enhanced delayed outward rectifier K+ channels preferentially in Off-bipolar cells, and the effect was completely blocked by the specific PKC inhibitor, GF109203X. Additionally, taurine also acted through a metabotropic pathway to suppress both L- and N-type Ca2+ channels in retinal neurons, which were insensitive to the potent GABAB receptor inhibitor, CGP55845. This study reinforces our previous finding that taurine in physiological concentrations produces a multiplicity of metabotropic effects that precisely govern the integration of signals being transmitted from the retina to the brain. PMID:23392926

  15. Dcc regulates asymmetric outgrowth of forebrain neurons in zebrafish.

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    Jingxia Gao

    Full Text Available The guidance receptor DCC (deleted in colorectal cancer ortholog UNC-40 regulates neuronal asymmetry development in Caenorhabditis elegans, but it is not known whether DCC plays a role in the specification of neuronal polarity in vertebrates. To examine the roles of DCC in neuronal asymmetry regulation in vertebrates, we studied zebrafish anterior dorsal telencephalon (ADt neuronal axons. We generated transgenic zebrafish animals expressing the photo-convertible fluorescent protein Kaede in ADt neurons and then photo-converted Kaede to label specifically the ADt neuron axons. We found that ADt axons normally project ventrally. Knock down of Dcc function by injecting antisense morpholino oligonucleotides caused the ADt neurons to project axons dorsally. To examine the axon projection pattern of individual ADt neurons, we labeled single ADt neurons using a forebrain-specific promoter to drive fluorescent protein expression. We found that individual ADt neurons projected axons dorsally or formed multiple processes after morpholino knock down of Dcc function. We further found that knock down of the Dcc ligand, Netrin1, also caused ADt neurons to project axons dorsally. Knockdown of Neogenin1, a guidance receptor closely related to Dcc, enhanced the formation of aberrant dorsal axons in embryos injected with Dcc morpholino. These experiments provide the first evidence that Dcc regulates polarized axon initiation and asymmetric outgrowth of forebrain neurons in vertebrates.

  16. Overnight fasting regulates inhibitory tone to cholinergic neurons of the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus.

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    Florian Groessl

    Full Text Available The dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (DMH contributes to the regulation of overall energy homeostasis by modulating energy intake as well as energy expenditure. Despite the importance of the DMH in the control of energy balance, DMH-specific genetic markers or neuronal subtypes are poorly defined. Here we demonstrate the presence of cholinergic neurons in the DMH using genetically modified mice that express enhanced green florescent protein (eGFP selectively in choline acetyltransferase (Chat-neurons. Overnight food deprivation increases the activity of DMH cholinergic neurons, as shown by induction of fos protein and a significant shift in the baseline resting membrane potential. DMH cholinergic neurons receive both glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic input, but the activation of these neurons by an overnight fast is due entirely to decreased inhibitory tone. The decreased inhibition is associated with decreased frequency and amplitude of GABAergic synaptic currents in the cholinergic DMH neurons, while glutamatergic synaptic transmission is not altered. As neither the frequency nor amplitude of miniature GABAergic or glutamatergic postsynaptic currents is affected by overnight food deprivation, the fasting-induced decrease in inhibitory tone to cholinergic neurons is dependent on superthreshold activity of GABAergic inputs. This study reveals that cholinergic neurons in the DMH readily sense the availability of nutrients and respond to overnight fasting via decreased GABAergic inhibitory tone. As such, altered synaptic as well as neuronal activity of DMH cholinergic neurons may play a critical role in the regulation of overall energy homeostasis.

  17. The neuropeptide PDF acts directly on evening pacemaker neurons to regulate multiple features of circadian behavior.

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    Lear, Bridget C; Zhang, Luoying; Allada, Ravi

    2009-07-01

    Discrete clusters of circadian clock neurons temporally organize daily behaviors such as sleep and wake. In Drosophila, a network of just 150 neurons drives two peaks of timed activity in the morning and evening. A subset of these neurons expresses the neuropeptide pigment dispersing factor (PDF), which is important for promoting morning behavior as well as maintaining robust free-running rhythmicity in constant conditions. Yet, how PDF acts on downstream circuits to mediate rhythmic behavior is unknown. Using circuit-directed rescue of PDF receptor mutants, we show that PDF targeting of just approximately 30 non-PDF evening circadian neurons is sufficient to drive morning behavior. This function is not accompanied by large changes in core molecular oscillators in light-dark, indicating that PDF RECEPTOR likely regulates the output of these cells under these conditions. We find that PDF also acts on this focused set of non-PDF neurons to regulate both evening activity phase and period length, consistent with modest resetting effects on core oscillators. PDF likely acts on more distributed pacemaker neuron targets, including the PDF neurons themselves, to regulate rhythmic strength. Here we reveal defining features of the circuit-diagram for PDF peptide function in circadian behavior, revealing the direct neuronal targets of PDF as well as its behavioral functions at those sites. These studies define a key direct output circuit sufficient for multiple PDF dependent behaviors.

  18. Regulation of Irregular Neuronal Firing by Autaptic Transmission

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    Guo, Daqing; Wu, Shengdun; Chen, Mingming; Perc, Matjaž; Zhang, Yangsong; Ma, Jingling; Cui, Yan; Xu, Peng; Xia, Yang; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-05-01

    The importance of self-feedback autaptic transmission in modulating spike-time irregularity is still poorly understood. By using a biophysical model that incorporates autaptic coupling, we here show that self-innervation of neurons participates in the modulation of irregular neuronal firing, primarily by regulating the occurrence frequency of burst firing. In particular, we find that both excitatory and electrical autapses increase the occurrence of burst firing, thus reducing neuronal firing regularity. In contrast, inhibitory autapses suppress burst firing and therefore tend to improve the regularity of neuronal firing. Importantly, we show that these findings are independent of the firing properties of individual neurons, and as such can be observed for neurons operating in different modes. Our results provide an insightful mechanistic understanding of how different types of autapses shape irregular firing at the single-neuron level, and they highlight the functional importance of autaptic self-innervation in taming and modulating neurodynamics.

  19. Cdc42 regulates cofilin during the establishment of neuronal polarity

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    Garvalov, Boyan K; Flynn, Kevin C; Neukirchen, Dorothee

    2007-01-01

    The establishment of polarity is an essential process in early neuronal development. Although a number of molecules controlling neuronal polarity have been identified, genetic evidence about their physiological roles in this process is mostly lacking. We analyzed the consequences of loss of Cdc42......, a central regulator of polarity in multiple systems, on the polarization of mammalian neurons. Genetic ablation of Cdc42 in the brain led to multiple abnormalities, including striking defects in the formation of axonal tracts. Neurons from the Cdc42 null animals sprouted neurites but had a strongly......-type, but not of mutant, neurons. Importantly, cofilin knockdown resulted in polarity defects quantitatively analogous to the ones seen after Cdc42 ablation. We conclude that Cdc42 is a key regulator of axon specification, and that cofilin is a physiological downstream effector of Cdc42 in this process....

  20. Neuroanatomical evidence that kisspeptin directly regulates isotocin and vasotocin neurons.

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    Shinji Kanda

    Full Text Available Neuropeptide kisspeptin has been suggested to be an essential central regulator of reproduction in response to changes in serum gonadal steroid concentrations. However, in spite of wide kisspeptin receptor distribution in the brain, especially in the preoptic area and hypothalamus, the research focus has mostly been confined to the kisspeptin regulation on GnRH neurons. Here, by using medaka whose kisspeptin (kiss1 neurons have been clearly demonstrated to be regulated by sex steroids, we analyzed the anatomical distribution of kisspeptin receptors Gpr54-1 and Gpr54-2. Because the both receptors were shown to be activated by kisspeptins (Kiss1 and Kiss2, we analyzed the anatomical distribution of the both receptors by in situ hybridization. They were mainly expressed in the ventral telencephalon, preoptic area, and hypothalamus, which have been suggested to be involved in homeostatic functions including reproduction. First, we found gpr54-2 mRNA expression in nucleus preopticus pars magnocellularis and demonstrated that vasotocin and isotocin (Vasopressin and Oxytocin ortholog, respectively neurons express gpr54-2 by dual in situ hybridization. Given that kisspeptin administration increases serum oxytocin and vasopressin concentration in mammals, the present finding are likely to be vertebrate-wide phenomenon, although direct regulation has not yet been demonstrated in mammals. We then analyzed co-expression of kisspeptin receptors in three types of GnRH neurons. It was clearly demonstrated that gpr54-expressing cells were located adjacent to GnRH1 neurons, although they were not GnRH1 neurons themselves. In contrast, there was no gpr54-expressing cell in the vicinities of neuromodulatory GnRH2 or GnRH3 neurons. From these results, we suggest that medaka kisspeptin neurons directly regulate some behavioral and neuroendocrine functions via vasotocin/isotocin neurons, whereas they do not regulate hypophysiotropic GnRH1 neurons at least in a direct

  1. Neuronal Activity Regulates Hippocampal miRNA Expression

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    Eacker, Stephen M.; Keuss, Matthew J.; Berezikov, Eugene; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal activity regulates a broad range of processes in the hippocampus, including the precise regulation of translation. Disruptions in proper translational control in the nervous system are associated with a variety of disorders that fall in the autistic spectrum. MicroRNA (miRNA) represent a re

  2. FMRP regulates multipolar to bipolar transition affecting neuronal migration and cortical circuitry.

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    La Fata, Giorgio; Gärtner, Annette; Domínguez-Iturza, Nuria; Dresselaers, Tom; Dawitz, Julia; Poorthuis, Rogier B; Averna, Michele; Himmelreich, Uwe; Meredith, Rhiannon M; Achsel, Tilmann; Dotti, Carlos G; Bagni, Claudia

    2014-12-01

    Deficiencies in fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) are the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability, fragile X syndrome (FXS), with symptoms manifesting during infancy and early childhood. Using a mouse model for FXS, we found that Fmrp regulates the positioning of neurons in the cortical plate during embryonic development, affecting their multipolar-to-bipolar transition (MBT). We identified N-cadherin, which is crucial for MBT, as an Fmrp-regulated target in embryonic brain. Furthermore, spontaneous network activity and high-resolution brain imaging revealed defects in the establishment of neuronal networks at very early developmental stages, further confirmed by an unbalanced excitatory and inhibitory network. Finally, reintroduction of Fmrp or N-cadherin in the embryo normalized early postnatal neuron activity. Our findings highlight the critical role of Fmrp in the developing cerebral cortex and might explain some of the clinical features observed in patients with FXS, such as alterations in synaptic communication and neuronal network connectivity.

  3. Hh and Wnt signaling regulate formation of olig2+ neurons in the zebrafish cerebellum.

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    McFarland, Karen A; Topczewska, Jolanta M; Weidinger, Gilbert; Dorsky, Richard I; Appel, Bruce

    2008-06-01

    The cerebellum, which forms from anterior hindbrain, coordinates motor movements and balance. Sensory input from the periphery is relayed and modulated by cerebellar interneurons, which are organized in layers. The mechanisms that specify the different neurons of the cerebellum and direct its layered organization remain poorly understood. Drawing from investigations of spinal cord, we hypothesized that the embryonic cerebellum is patterned on the dorsoventral axis by opposing morphogens. We tested this using zebrafish. Here we show that expression of olig2, which encodes a bHLH transcription factor, marks a distinct subset of neurons with similarities to eurydendroid neurons, the principal efferent neurons of the teleost cerebellum. In combination with other markers, olig2 reveals a dorsoventral organization of cerebellar neurons in embryos. Disruption of Hedgehog signaling, which patterns the ventral neural tube, produced a two-fold increase in the number of olig2(+) neurons. By contrast, olig2(+) neurons did not develop in embryos deficient for Wnt signaling, which patterns dorsal neural tube, nor did they develop in embryos deficient for both Hedgehog and Wnt signaling. Our data indicate that Hedgehog and Wnt work in opposition across the dorsoventral axis of the cerebellum to regulate formation of olig2(+) neurons. Specifically, we propose that Hedgehog limits the range of Wnt signaling, which is necessary for olig2(+) neuron development.

  4. Kif5 regulates mitochondrial movement, morphology, function and neuronal survival.

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    Iworima, Diepiriye G; Pasqualotto, Bryce A; Rintoul, Gordon L

    2016-04-01

    Due to the unique architecture of neurons, trafficking of mitochondria throughout processes to regions of high energetic demand is critical to sustain neuronal health. It has been suggested that compromised mitochondrial trafficking may play a role in neurodegenerative diseases. We evaluated the consequences of disrupted kif5c-mediated mitochondrial trafficking on mitochondrial form and function in primary rat cortical neurons. Morphological changes in mitochondria appeared to be due to remodelling, a phenomenon distinct from mitochondrial fission, which resulted in punctate-shaped mitochondria. We also demonstrated that neurons displaying punctate mitochondria exhibited relatively decreased ROS and increased cellular ATP levels using ROS-sensitive GFP and ATP FRET probes, respectively. Somewhat unexpectedly, neurons overexpressing the dominant negative form of kif5c exhibited enhanced survival following excitotoxicity, suggesting that the impairment of mitochondrial trafficking conferred some form of neuroprotection. However, when neurons were exposed to H2O2, disruption of kif5c exacerbated cell death indicating that the effect on cell viability was dependent on the mode of toxicity. Our results suggest a novel role of kif5c. In addition to mediating mitochondrial transport, kif5c plays a role in the mechanism of regulating mitochondrial morphology. Our results also suggest that kif5c mediated mitochondrial dynamics may play an important role in regulating mitochondrial function and in turn cellular health. Moreover, our studies demonstrate an interesting interplay between the regulation of mitochondrial motility and morphology.

  5. Pituitary Adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide orchestrates neuronal regulation of the astrocytic glutamate-releasing mechanism system xc (.).

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    Kong, Linghai; Albano, Rebecca; Madayag, Aric; Raddatz, Nicholas; Mantsch, John R; Choi, SuJean; Lobner, Doug; Baker, David A

    2016-05-01

    Glutamate signaling is achieved by an elaborate network involving neurons and astrocytes. Hence, it is critical to better understand how neurons and astrocytes interact to coordinate the cellular regulation of glutamate signaling. In these studies, we used rat cortical cell cultures to examine whether neurons or releasable neuronal factors were capable of regulating system xc (-) (Sxc), a glutamate-releasing mechanism that is expressed primarily by astrocytes and has been shown to regulate synaptic transmission. We found that astrocytes cultured with neurons or exposed to neuronal-conditioned media displayed significantly higher levels of Sxc activity. Next, we demonstrated that the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) may be a neuronal factor capable of regulating astrocytes. In support, we found that PACAP expression was restricted to neurons, and that PACAP receptors were expressed in astrocytes. Interestingly, blockade of PACAP receptors in cultures comprised of astrocytes and neurons significantly decreased Sxc activity to the level observed in purified astrocytes, whereas application of PACAP to purified astrocytes increased Sxc activity to the level observed in cultures comprised of neurons and astrocytes. Collectively, these data reveal that neurons coordinate the actions of glutamate-related mechanisms expressed by astrocytes, such as Sxc, a process that likely involves PACAP. A critical gap in modeling excitatory signaling is how distinct components of the glutamate system expressed by neurons and astrocytes are coordinated. In these studies, we found that system xc (-) (Sxc), a glutamate release mechanism expressed by astrocytes, is regulated by releasable neuronal factors including PACAP. This represents a novel form of neuron-astrocyte communication, and highlights the possibility that pathological changes involving astrocytic Sxc may stem from altered neuronal activity.

  6. Reelin secreted by GABAergic neurons regulates glutamate receptor homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Gonzalez Campo

    that reelin is a trans-neuronal messenger secreted by GABAergic neurons that regulates NMDARs homeostasis in postnatal hippocampus. Defects in reelin secretion could play a major role in the development of neuropsychiatric disorders, particularly those associated with deregulation of NMDARs such as schizophrenia.

  7. PDK1-Akt pathway regulates radial neuronal migration and microtubules in the developing mouse neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Yasuhiro; Higuchi, Maiko; Oishi, Koji; Kishi, Yusuke; Okazaki, Tomohiko; Sakai, Hiroshi; Miyata, Takaki; Nakajima, Kazunori; Gotoh, Yukiko

    2016-05-24

    Neurons migrate a long radial distance by a process known as locomotion in the developing mammalian neocortex. During locomotion, immature neurons undergo saltatory movement along radial glia fibers. The molecular mechanisms that regulate the speed of locomotion are largely unknown. We now show that the serine/threonine kinase Akt and its activator phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1) regulate the speed of locomotion of mouse neocortical neurons through the cortical plate. Inactivation of the PDK1-Akt pathway impaired the coordinated movement of the nucleus and centrosome, a microtubule-dependent process, during neuronal migration. Moreover, the PDK1-Akt pathway was found to control microtubules, likely by regulating the binding of accessory proteins including the dynactin subunit p150(glued) Consistent with this notion, we found that PDK1 regulates the expression of cytoplasmic dynein intermediate chain and light intermediate chain at a posttranscriptional level in the developing neocortex. Our results thus reveal an essential role for the PDK1-Akt pathway in the regulation of a key step of neuronal migration.

  8. Hours of high-frequency stimulations reveal intracellular neuronal trends in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brama, H.; Goldental, A.; Vardi, R.; Stern, E. A.; Kanter, I.

    2016-11-01

    The neuronal response to controlled stimulations in vivo has been classically estimated using a limited number of events. Here we show that hours of high-frequency stimulations and recordings of neurons in vivo reveal previously unknown response phases of neurons in the intact brain. Results indicate that for stimulation frequencies below a critical neuronal characteristic frequency, f c, response timings are stabilized to tens-of-microseconds accuracy. For stimulation frequencies exceeding f c the firing frequency is saturated and independent of the stimulation frequency, as a result of random neuronal response failures. This neuronal plasticity, previously shown in vitro, supports a robust mechanism for low firing rates on a network level.

  9. Medial Amygdalar Aromatase Neurons Regulate Aggression in Both Sexes

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    Elizabeth K. Unger

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aromatase-expressing neuroendocrine neurons in the vertebrate male brain synthesize estradiol from circulating testosterone. This locally produced estradiol controls neural circuits underlying courtship vocalization, mating, aggression, and territory marking in male mice. How aromatase-expressing neuronal populations control these diverse estrogen-dependent male behaviors is poorly understood, and the function, if any, of aromatase-expressing neurons in females is unclear. Using targeted genetic approaches, we show that aromatase-expressing neurons within the male posterodorsal medial amygdala (MeApd regulate components of aggression, but not other estrogen-dependent male-typical behaviors. Remarkably, aromatase-expressing MeApd neurons in females are specifically required for components of maternal aggression, which we show is distinct from intermale aggression in pattern and execution. Thus, aromatase-expressing MeApd neurons control distinct forms of aggression in the two sexes. Moreover, our findings indicate that complex social behaviors are separable in a modular manner at the level of genetically identified neuronal populations.

  10. Medial amygdalar aromatase neurons regulate aggression in both sexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Elizabeth K; Burke, Kenneth J; Yang, Cindy F; Bender, Kevin J; Fuller, Patrick M; Shah, Nirao M

    2015-02-03

    Aromatase-expressing neuroendocrine neurons in the vertebrate male brain synthesize estradiol from circulating testosterone. This locally produced estradiol controls neural circuits underlying courtship vocalization, mating, aggression, and territory marking in male mice. How aromatase-expressing neuronal populations control these diverse estrogen-dependent male behaviors is poorly understood, and the function, if any, of aromatase-expressing neurons in females is unclear. Using targeted genetic approaches, we show that aromatase-expressing neurons within the male posterodorsal medial amygdala (MeApd) regulate components of aggression, but not other estrogen-dependent male-typical behaviors. Remarkably, aromatase-expressing MeApd neurons in females are specifically required for components of maternal aggression, which we show is distinct from intermale aggression in pattern and execution. Thus, aromatase-expressing MeApd neurons control distinct forms of aggression in the two sexes. Moreover, our findings indicate that complex social behaviors are separable in a modular manner at the level of genetically identified neuronal populations.

  11. Insm1a Regulates Motor Neuron Development in Zebrafish

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    Jie Gong

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Insulinoma-associated1a (insm1a is a zinc-finger transcription factor playing a series of functions in cell formation and differentiation of vertebrate central and peripheral nervous systems and neuroendocrine system. However, its roles on the development of motor neuron have still remained uncovered. Here, we provided evidences that insm1a was a vital regulator of motor neuron development, and provided a mechanistic understanding of how it contributes to this process. Firstly, we showed the localization of insm1a in spinal cord, and primary motor neurons (PMNs of zebrafish embryos by in situ hybridization, and imaging analysis of transgenic reporter line Tg(insm1a: mCherryntu805. Then we demonstrated that the deficiency of insm1a in zebrafish larvae lead to the defects of PMNs development, including the reduction of caudal primary motor neurons (CaP, and middle primary motor neurons (MiP, the excessive branching of motor axons, and the disorganized distance between adjacent CaPs. Additionally, knockout of insm1 impaired motor neuron differentiation in the spinal cord. Locomotion analysis showed that swimming activity was significantly reduced in the insm1a-null zebrafish. Furthermore, we showed that the insm1a loss of function significantly decreased the transcript levels of both olig2 and nkx6.1. Microinjection of olig2 and nkx6.1 mRNA rescued the motor neuron defects in insm1a deficient embryos. Taken together, these data indicated that insm1a regulated the motor neuron development, at least in part, through modulation of the expressions of olig2 and nkx6.1.

  12. Dendrosomatic Sonic Hedgehog Signaling in Hippocampal Neurons Regulates Axon Elongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petralia, Ronald S.; Ott, Carolyn; Wang, Ya-Xian; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Mattson, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) and its signaling components in the neurons of the hippocampus raises a question about what role the Shh signaling pathway may play in these neurons. We show here that activation of the Shh signaling pathway stimulates axon elongation in rat hippocampal neurons. This Shh-induced effect depends on the pathway transducer Smoothened (Smo) and the transcription factor Gli1. The axon itself does not respond directly to Shh; instead, the Shh signal transduction originates from the somatodendritic region of the neurons and occurs in neurons with and without detectable primary cilia. Upon Shh stimulation, Smo localization to dendrites increases significantly. Shh pathway activation results in increased levels of profilin1 (Pfn1), an actin-binding protein. Mutations in Pfn1's actin-binding sites or reduction of Pfn1 eliminate the Shh-induced axon elongation. These findings indicate that Shh can regulate axon growth, which may be critical for development of hippocampal neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Although numerous signaling mechanisms have been identified that act directly on axons to regulate their outgrowth, it is not known whether signals transduced in dendrites may also affect axon outgrowth. We describe here a transcellular signaling pathway in embryonic hippocampal neurons in which activation of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) receptors in dendrites stimulates axon growth. The pathway involves the dendritic-membrane-associated Shh signal transducer Smoothened (Smo) and the transcription factor Gli, which induces the expression of the gene encoding the actin-binding protein profilin 1. Our findings suggest scenarios in which stimulation of Shh in dendrites results in accelerated outgrowth of the axon, which therefore reaches its presumptive postsynaptic target cell more quickly. By this mechanism, Shh may play critical roles in the development of hippocampal neuronal circuits. PMID:26658865

  13. Necdin regulates p53 acetylation via Sirtuin1 to modulate DNA damage response in cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Koichi; Yoshikawa, Kazuaki

    2008-08-27

    Sirtuin1 (Sirt1), a mammalian homolog of yeast Sir2, deacetylates the tumor suppressor protein p53 and attenuates p53-mediated cell death. Necdin, a p53-interacting protein expressed predominantly in postmitotic neurons, is a melanoma antigen family protein that promotes neuronal differentiation and survival. In mammals, the necdin gene (Ndn) is maternally imprinted, and mutant mice carrying mutated paternal Ndn show abnormalities of neuronal development. Here we report that necdin regulates the acetylation status of p53 via Sirt1 to suppress p53-dependent apoptosis in postmitotic neurons. Double-immunostaining analysis demonstrated that necdin colocalizes with Sirt1 in postmitotic neurons of mouse embryonic forebrain in vivo. Coimmunoprecipitation and in vitro binding analyses revealed that necdin interacts with both p53 and Sirt1 to potentiate Sirt1-mediated p53 deacetylation by facilitating their association. Primary cortical neurons prepared from paternal Ndn-deficient mice have high p53 acetylation levels and are sensitive to the DNA-damaging compounds camptothecin and hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, DNA transfection per se increases p53 acetylation and apoptosis in paternal Ndn-deficient neurons, whereas small interfering RNA-mediated p53 knockdown completely blocks these changes. However, Sirt1 knockdown increases both acetylated p53 level and apoptosis in wild-type neurons but fails to affect them in paternal Ndn-deficient neurons. In organotypic forebrain slice cultures treated with hydrogen peroxide, p53 is accumulated and colocalized with necdin and Sirt1 in cortical neurons. These results suggest that necdin downregulates p53 acetylation levels by forming a stable complex with p53 and Sirt1 to protect neurons from DNA damage-induced apoptosis.

  14. Protein Kinase Pathways That Regulate Neuronal Survival and Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-08-01

    interneurons of the cerebellum, provide a good model for a maximal concentration of IGF-I (50 ng/ml). The phosphor- VOL. 20, 2000 REGULATION OF NEURONAL...Cell 6:233-244. 272:33271-33278. Lyons GE, Micales BK , Schwarz J, Martin JF, Olson EN (1995) Expres- Ornatsky 01, Cox DM, Tangirala P, Andreucci JJ

  15. Galectin-4, a novel neuronal regulator of myelination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stancic, Mirjana; Slijepcevic, Davor; Nomden, Anita; Vos, Michel J.; De Jonge, Jenny C.; Sikkema, Arend H.; Gabius, Hans-J.; Hoekstra, Dick; Baron, Wia

    2012-01-01

    Myelination of axons by oligodendrocytes (OLGs) is essential for proper saltatory nerve conduction, i.e., rapid transmission of nerve impulses. Among others, extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, neuronal signaling, and axonal adhesion regulate the biogenesis and maintenance of myelin membranes, dri

  16. Dab2ip regulates neuronal migration and neurite outgrowth in the developing neocortex.

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    Gum Hwa Lee

    Full Text Available Dab2ip (DOC-2/DAB2 interacting protein is a member of the Ras GTPase-activating protein (GAP family that has been previously shown to function as a tumor suppressor in several systems. Dab2ip is also highly expressed in the brain where it interacts with Dab1, a key mediator of the Reelin pathway that controls several aspects of brain development and function. We found that Dab2ip is highly expressed in the developing cerebral cortex, but that mutations in the Reelin signaling pathway do not affect its expression. To determine whether Dab2ip plays a role in brain development, we knocked down or over expressed it in neuronal progenitor cells of the embryonic mouse neocortex using in utero electroporation. Dab2ip down-regulation severely disrupts neuronal migration, affecting preferentially late-born principal cortical neurons. Dab2ip overexpression also leads to migration defects. Structure-function experiments in vivo further show that both PH and GRD domains of Dab2ip are important for neuronal migration. A detailed analysis of transfected neurons reveals that Dab2ip down- or up-regulation disrupts the transition from a multipolar to a bipolar neuronal morphology in the intermediate zone. Knock down of Dab2ip in neurons ex-vivo indicates that this protein is necessary for proper neurite development and for the expression of several major neuronal microtubule associated proteins (MAPs, which are important for neurite growth and stabilization. Thus, our study identifies, for the first time, a critical role for Dab2ip in mammalian cortical development and begins to reveal molecular mechanisms that underlie this function.

  17. The Complete Genome Sequences, Unique Mutational Spectra, and Developmental Potency of Adult Neurons Revealed by Cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazen, Jennifer L; Faust, Gregory G; Rodriguez, Alberto R; Ferguson, William C; Shumilina, Svetlana; Clark, Royden A; Boland, Michael J; Martin, Greg; Chubukov, Pavel; Tsunemoto, Rachel K; Torkamani, Ali; Kupriyanov, Sergey; Hall, Ira M; Baldwin, Kristin K

    2016-03-16

    Somatic mutation in neurons is linked to neurologic disease and implicated in cell-type diversification. However, the origin, extent, and patterns of genomic mutation in neurons remain unknown. We established a nuclear transfer method to clonally amplify the genomes of neurons from adult mice for whole-genome sequencing. Comprehensive mutation detection and independent validation revealed that individual neurons harbor ∼100 unique mutations from all classes but lack recurrent rearrangements. Most neurons contain at least one gene-disrupting mutation and rare (0-2) mobile element insertions. The frequency and gene bias of neuronal mutations differ from other lineages, potentially due to novel mechanisms governing postmitotic mutation. Fertile mice were cloned from several neurons, establishing the compatibility of mutated adult neuronal genomes with reprogramming to pluripotency and development.

  18. BK channels reveal novel phosphate sensitivity in SNr neurons.

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    Juan Juan Ji

    Full Text Available Whether large conductance Ca(2+-activated potassium (BK channels are present in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr is a matter of debate. Using the patch-clamp technique, we examined the functional expression of BK channels in neurons of the SNr and showed that the channels were activated or inhibited by internal high-energy phosphates (IHEPs at positive and negative membrane potentials, respectively. SNr neurons showed membrane potential hyperpolarization under glucose-deprivation conditions which was attenuated by paxilline, a specific BK channel blocker. In addition, Fluo-3 fluorescence recording detected an increase in the level of internal free calcium ([Ca(2+](i during ischemic hyperpolarization. These results confirm that BK channels are present in SNr neurons and indicate that their unique IHEP sensitivity is requisite in neuronal ischemic responses. Bearing in mind that the K(ATP channel blocker tolbutamide also attenuated the hyperpolarization, we suggest that BK channels may play a protective role in the basal ganglia by modulating the excitability of SNr neurons along with K(ATP channels under ischemic stresses.

  19. Afadin regulates puncta adherentia junction formation and presynaptic differentiation in hippocampal neurons.

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    Daisaku Toyoshima

    Full Text Available The formation and remodeling of mossy fiber-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses in the stratum lucidum of the hippocampus are implicated in the cellular basis of learning and memory. Afadin and its binding cell adhesion molecules, nectin-1 and nectin-3, together with N-cadherin, are concentrated at puncta adherentia junctions (PAJs in these synapses. Here, we investigated the roles of afadin in PAJ formation and presynaptic differentiation in mossy fiber-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses. At these synapses in the mice in which the afadin gene was conditionally inactivated before synaptogenesis by using nestin-Cre mice, the immunofluorescence signals for the PAJ components, nectin-1, nectin-3 and N-cadherin, disappeared almost completely, while those for the presynaptic components, VGLUT1 and bassoon, were markedly decreased. In addition, these signals were significantly decreased in cultured afadin-deficient hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, the interevent interval of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents was prolonged in the cultured afadin-deficient hippocampal neurons compared with control neurons, indicating that presynaptic functions were suppressed or a number of synapse was reduced in the afadin-deficient neurons. Analyses of presynaptic vesicle recycling and paired recordings revealed that the cultured afadin-deficient neurons showed impaired presynaptic functions. These results indicate that afadin regulates both PAJ formation and presynaptic differentiation in most mossy fiber-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses, while in a considerable population of these neurons, afadin regulates only PAJ formation but not presynaptic differentiation.

  20. Afadin Regulates Puncta Adherentia Junction Formation and Presynaptic Differentiation in Hippocampal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoshima, Daisaku; Mandai, Kenji; Maruo, Tomohiko; Supriyanto, Irwan; Togashi, Hideru; Inoue, Takahito; Mori, Masahiro; Takai, Yoshimi

    2014-01-01

    The formation and remodeling of mossy fiber-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses in the stratum lucidum of the hippocampus are implicated in the cellular basis of learning and memory. Afadin and its binding cell adhesion molecules, nectin-1 and nectin-3, together with N-cadherin, are concentrated at puncta adherentia junctions (PAJs) in these synapses. Here, we investigated the roles of afadin in PAJ formation and presynaptic differentiation in mossy fiber-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses. At these synapses in the mice in which the afadin gene was conditionally inactivated before synaptogenesis by using nestin-Cre mice, the immunofluorescence signals for the PAJ components, nectin-1, nectin-3 and N-cadherin, disappeared almost completely, while those for the presynaptic components, VGLUT1 and bassoon, were markedly decreased. In addition, these signals were significantly decreased in cultured afadin-deficient hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, the interevent interval of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents was prolonged in the cultured afadin-deficient hippocampal neurons compared with control neurons, indicating that presynaptic functions were suppressed or a number of synapse was reduced in the afadin-deficient neurons. Analyses of presynaptic vesicle recycling and paired recordings revealed that the cultured afadin-deficient neurons showed impaired presynaptic functions. These results indicate that afadin regulates both PAJ formation and presynaptic differentiation in most mossy fiber-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses, while in a considerable population of these neurons, afadin regulates only PAJ formation but not presynaptic differentiation. PMID:24587018

  1. Nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 1 gene NMNAT1 regulates neuronal dendrite and axon morphogenesis in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Hong; ZHANG Jing-yu; YANGZi-chao; LIU Ming; GANG Bao-zhi; ZHAO Qing-jie

    2011-01-01

    Background Wallerian degeneration is a self-destructive process of axonal degeneration that occurs after an axonal injury or during neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's or Alzheimer's disease.Recent studies have found that the activity of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) synthase enzyme,nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 1 (NMNAT1) can affect the rate of Wallerian degeneration in mice and drosophila.NMNAT1 protects neurons and axons from degeneration.However,the role of NMNAT1 in neurons of central nervous system is still not well understood.Methods We set up the culture of primary mouse neurons in vitro and manipulated the expression level of NMNAT1 by RNA interference and gene overexpression methods.Using electroporation transfection we can up-regulate or down-regulate NMNAT1 in cultured mouse dendrites and axons and study the neuronal morphogenesis by immunocytochemistry.In all functional assays,FK-866 (CAS 658084-64-1),a highly specific non-competitive inhibitor of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase was used as a pharmacological and positive control.Results Our results showed that knocking down NMNAT1 by RNA interference led to a marked decrease in dendrite outgrowth and branching and a significant decrease in axon growth and branching in developing cortical neurons in vitro.Conclusions These findings reveal a novel role for NMNAT1 in the morphogenesis of developing cortical neurons,which indicate that the loss of function of NMNAT1 may contribute to different neurodegenerative disorders in central nervous system.

  2. Dissection of neuronal gap junction circuits that regulate social behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Heeun; Levy, Sagi; Flavell, Steven W.; Mende, Fanny; Latham, Richard; Zimmer, Manuel; Bargmann, Cornelia I.

    2017-01-01

    A hub-and-spoke circuit of neurons connected by gap junctions controls aggregation behavior and related behavioral responses to oxygen, pheromones, and food in Caenorhabditis elegans. The molecular composition of the gap junctions connecting RMG hub neurons with sensory spoke neurons is unknown. We show here that the innexin gene unc-9 is required in RMG hub neurons to drive aggregation and related behaviors, indicating that UNC-9–containing gap junctions mediate RMG signaling. To dissect the circuit in detail, we developed methods to inhibit unc-9–based gap junctions with dominant-negative unc-1 transgenes. unc-1(dn) alters a stomatin-like protein that regulates unc-9 electrical signaling; its disruptive effects can be rescued by a constitutively active UNC-9::GFP protein, demonstrating specificity. Expression of unc-1(dn) in RMG hub neurons, ADL or ASK pheromone-sensing neurons, or URX oxygen-sensing neurons disrupts specific elements of aggregation-related behaviors. In ADL, unc-1(dn) has effects opposite to those of tetanus toxin light chain, separating the roles of ADL electrical and chemical synapses. These results reveal roles of gap junctions in a complex behavior at cellular resolution and provide a tool for similar exploration of other gap junction circuits. PMID:28143932

  3. In actio optophysiological analyses reveal functional diversification of dopaminergic neurons in the nematode C. elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Yuki; Zheng, Ying Grace; Fei, Xianfeng; Fujie, Yukako; Hashimoto, Koichi; Kimura, Koutarou D.

    2016-05-01

    Many neuronal groups such as dopamine-releasing (dopaminergic) neurons are functionally divergent, although the details of such divergence are not well understood. Dopamine in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans modulates various neural functions and is released from four left-right pairs of neurons. The terminal identities of these dopaminergic neurons are regulated by the same genetic program, and previous studies have suggested that they are functionally redundant. In this study, however, we show functional divergence within the dopaminergic neurons of C. elegans. Because dopaminergic neurons of the animals were supposedly activated by mechanical stimulus upon entry into a lawn of their food bacteria, we developed a novel integrated microscope system that can auto-track a freely-moving (in actio) C. elegans to individually monitor and stimulate the neuronal activities of multiple neurons. We found that only head-dorsal pair of dopaminergic neurons (CEPD), but not head-ventral or posterior pairs, were preferentially activated upon food entry. In addition, the optogenetic activation of CEPD neurons alone exhibited effects similar to those observed upon food entry. Thus, our results demonstrated functional divergence in the genetically similar dopaminergic neurons, which may provide a new entry point toward understanding functional diversity of neurons beyond genetic terminal identification.

  4. In actio optophysiological analyses reveal functional diversification of dopaminergic neurons in the nematode C. elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Yuki; Zheng, Ying Grace; Fei, Xianfeng; Fujie, Yukako; Hashimoto, Koichi; Kimura, Koutarou D.

    2016-01-01

    Many neuronal groups such as dopamine-releasing (dopaminergic) neurons are functionally divergent, although the details of such divergence are not well understood. Dopamine in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans modulates various neural functions and is released from four left-right pairs of neurons. The terminal identities of these dopaminergic neurons are regulated by the same genetic program, and previous studies have suggested that they are functionally redundant. In this study, however, we show functional divergence within the dopaminergic neurons of C. elegans. Because dopaminergic neurons of the animals were supposedly activated by mechanical stimulus upon entry into a lawn of their food bacteria, we developed a novel integrated microscope system that can auto-track a freely-moving (in actio) C. elegans to individually monitor and stimulate the neuronal activities of multiple neurons. We found that only head-dorsal pair of dopaminergic neurons (CEPD), but not head-ventral or posterior pairs, were preferentially activated upon food entry. In addition, the optogenetic activation of CEPD neurons alone exhibited effects similar to those observed upon food entry. Thus, our results demonstrated functional divergence in the genetically similar dopaminergic neurons, which may provide a new entry point toward understanding functional diversity of neurons beyond genetic terminal identification. PMID:27193056

  5. Near-Perfect Synaptic Integration by Nav1.7 in Hypothalamic Neurons Regulates Body Weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, Tiago; Tozer, Adam; Magnus, Christopher J; Sugino, Ken; Tanaka, Shinsuke; Lee, Albert K; Wood, John N; Sternson, Scott M

    2016-06-16

    Neurons are well suited for computations on millisecond timescales, but some neuronal circuits set behavioral states over long time periods, such as those involved in energy homeostasis. We found that multiple types of hypothalamic neurons, including those that oppositely regulate body weight, are specialized as near-perfect synaptic integrators that summate inputs over extended timescales. Excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) are greatly prolonged, outlasting the neuronal membrane time-constant up to 10-fold. This is due to the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7 (Scn9a), previously associated with pain-sensation but not synaptic integration. Scn9a deletion in AGRP, POMC, or paraventricular hypothalamic neurons reduced EPSP duration, synaptic integration, and altered body weight in mice. In vivo whole-cell recordings in the hypothalamus confirmed near-perfect synaptic integration. These experiments show that integration of synaptic inputs over time by Nav1.7 is critical for body weight regulation and reveal a mechanism for synaptic control of circuits regulating long term homeostatic functions.

  6. A chemical-genetic strategy reveals distinct temporal requirements for SAD-1 kinase in neuronal polarization and synapse formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokat Kevan M

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurons assemble into a functional network through a sequence of developmental processes including neuronal polarization and synapse formation. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the serine/threonine SAD-1 kinase is essential for proper neuronal polarity and synaptic organization. To determine if SAD-1 activity regulates the establishment or maintenance of these neuronal structures, we examined its temporal requirements using a chemical-genetic method that allows for selective and reversible inactivation of its kinase activity in vivo. Results We generated a PP1 analog-sensitive variant of SAD-1. Through temporal inhibition of SAD-1 kinase activity we show that its activity is required for the establishment of both neuronal polarity and synaptic organization. However, while SAD-1 activity is needed strictly when neurons are polarizing, the temporal requirement for SAD-1 is less stringent in synaptic organization, which can also be re-established during maintenance. Conclusion This study reports the first temporal analysis of a neural kinase activity using the chemical-genetic system. It reveals that neuronal polarity and synaptic organization have distinct temporal requirements for SAD-1.

  7. Neuronal identity genes regulated by super-enhancers are preferentially down-regulated in the striatum of Huntington's disease mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, Mayada; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Keime, Céline; Parmentier, Frédéric; Lejeune, François-Xavier; Boutillier, Anne-Laurence; Néri, Christian; Davidson, Irwin; Merienne, Karine

    2015-06-15

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disease associated with extensive down-regulation of genes controlling neuronal function, particularly in the striatum. Whether altered epigenetic regulation underlies transcriptional defects in HD is unclear. Integrating RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) and chromatin-immunoprecipitation followed by massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq), we show that down-regulated genes in HD mouse striatum associate with selective decrease in H3K27ac, a mark of active enhancers, and RNA Polymerase II (RNAPII). In addition, we reveal that decreased genes in HD mouse striatum display a specific epigenetic signature, characterized by high levels and broad patterns of H3K27ac and RNAPII. Our results indicate that this signature is that of super-enhancers, a category of broad enhancers regulating genes defining tissue identity and function. Specifically, we reveal that striatal super-enhancers display extensive H3K27 acetylation within gene bodies, drive transcription characterized by low levels of paused RNAPII, regulate neuronal function genes and are enriched in binding motifs for Gata transcription factors, such as Gata2 regulating striatal identity genes. Together, our results provide evidence for preferential down-regulation of genes controlled by super-enhancers in HD striatum and indicate that enhancer topography is a major parameter determining the propensity of a gene to be deregulated in a neurodegenerative disease.

  8. Neuronal Activity Regulates Hippocampal miRNA Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eacker, Stephen M.; Keuss, Matthew J.; Berezikov, Eugene; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal activity regulates a broad range of processes in the hippocampus, including the precise regulation of translation. Disruptions in proper translational control in the nervous system are associated with a variety of disorders that fall in the autistic spectrum. MicroRNA (miRNA) represent a relatively recently discovered player in the regulation of translation in the nervous system. We have conducted an in depth analysis of how neuronal activity regulates miRNA expression in the hippocampus. Using deep sequencing we exhaustively identify all miRNAs, including 15 novel miRNAs, expressed in hippocampus of the adult mouse. We identified 119 miRNAs documented in miRBase but less than half of these miRNA were expressed at a level greater than 0.1% of total miRNA. Expression profiling following induction of neuronal activity by electroconvulsive shock demonstrates that most miRNA show a biphasic pattern of expression: rapid induction of specific mature miRNA expression followed by a decline in expression. These results have important implications into how miRNAs influence activity-dependent translational control. PMID:21984899

  9. Neuronal activity regulates hippocampal miRNA expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M Eacker

    Full Text Available Neuronal activity regulates a broad range of processes in the hippocampus, including the precise regulation of translation. Disruptions in proper translational control in the nervous system are associated with a variety of disorders that fall in the autistic spectrum. MicroRNA (miRNA represent a relatively recently discovered player in the regulation of translation in the nervous system. We have conducted an in depth analysis of how neuronal activity regulates miRNA expression in the hippocampus. Using deep sequencing we exhaustively identify all miRNAs, including 15 novel miRNAs, expressed in hippocampus of the adult mouse. We identified 119 miRNAs documented in miRBase but less than half of these miRNA were expressed at a level greater than 0.1% of total miRNA. Expression profiling following induction of neuronal activity by electroconvulsive shock demonstrates that most miRNA show a biphasic pattern of expression: rapid induction of specific mature miRNA expression followed by a decline in expression. These results have important implications into how miRNAs influence activity-dependent translational control.

  10. Alternative Splicing of G9a Regulates Neuronal Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Fiszbein

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin modifications are critical for the establishment and maintenance of differentiation programs. G9a, the enzyme responsible for histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation in mammalian euchromatin, exists as two isoforms with differential inclusion of exon 10 (E10 through alternative splicing. We find that the G9a methyltransferase is required for differentiation of the mouse neuronal cell line N2a and that E10 inclusion increases during neuronal differentiation of cultured cells, as well as in the developing mouse brain. Although E10 inclusion greatly stimulates overall H3K9me2 levels, it does not affect G9a catalytic activity. Instead, E10 increases G9a nuclear localization. We show that the G9a E10+ isoform is necessary for neuron differentiation and regulates the alternative splicing pattern of its own pre-mRNA, enhancing E10 inclusion. Overall, our findings indicate that by regulating its own alternative splicing, G9a promotes neuron differentiation and creates a positive feedback loop that reinforces cellular commitment to differentiation.

  11. Neuronal actin dynamics, spine density and neuronal dendritic complexity are regulated by CAP2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Actin remodeling is crucial for dendritic spine development, morphology and density. CAP2 is a regulator of actin dynamics through sequestering G-actin and severing F-actin. In a mouse model, ablation of CAP2 leads to cardiovascular defects and delayed wound healing. This report investigates the role of CAP2 in the brain using Cap2gt/gt mice. Dendritic complexity, the number and morphology of dendritic spines were altered in Cap2gt/gt with increased number of excitatory synapse. This was accompanied by increased F-actin content and F-actin accumulation in cultured Cap2gt/gt neurons. Moreover, reduced surface GluA1 was observed in mutant neurons under basal condition and after induction of chemical LTP. Additionally, we show an interaction between CAP2 and n-cofilin, presumably mediated through the C-terminal domain of CAP2 and dependent on cofilin ser3 phosphorylation. In vivo, the consequences of this interaction were altered phosphorylated cofilin levels and formation of cofilin aggregates in the neurons. Thus, our studies identify a novel role of CAP2 in neuronal development and neuronal actin dynamics.

  12. A complete developmental sequence of a Drosophila neuronal lineage as revealed by twin-spot MARCM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Hsiang Yu

    Full Text Available Drosophila brains contain numerous neurons that form complex circuits. These neurons are derived in stereotyped patterns from a fixed number of progenitors, called neuroblasts, and identifying individual neurons made by a neuroblast facilitates the reconstruction of neural circuits. An improved MARCM (mosaic analysis with a repressible cell marker technique, called twin-spot MARCM, allows one to label the sister clones derived from a common progenitor simultaneously in different colors. It enables identification of every single neuron in an extended neuronal lineage based on the order of neuron birth. Here we report the first example, to our knowledge, of complete lineage analysis among neurons derived from a common neuroblast that relay olfactory information from the antennal lobe (AL to higher brain centers. By identifying the sequentially derived neurons, we found that the neuroblast serially makes 40 types of AL projection neurons (PNs. During embryogenesis, one PN with multi-glomerular innervation and 18 uniglomerular PNs targeting 17 glomeruli of the adult AL are born. Many more PNs of 22 additional types, including four types of polyglomerular PNs, derive after the neuroblast resumes dividing in early larvae. Although different offspring are generated in a rather arbitrary sequence, the birth order strictly dictates the fate of each post-mitotic neuron, including the fate of programmed cell death. Notably, the embryonic progenitor has an altered temporal identity following each self-renewing asymmetric cell division. After larval hatching, the same progenitor produces multiple neurons for each cell type, but the number of neurons for each type is tightly regulated. These observations substantiate the origin-dependent specification of neuron types. Sequencing neuronal lineages will not only unravel how a complex brain develops but also permit systematic identification of neuron types for detailed structure and function analysis of the

  13. Sprouty2 down-regulation promotes axon growth by adult sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausott, Barbara; Vallant, Natalie; Auer, Maria; Yang, Lin; Dai, Fangping; Brand-Saberi, Beate; Klimaschewski, Lars

    2009-12-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) play a prominent role in axonal growth during development and repair. Treatment with FGF-2 or overexpression of FGF receptors promotes peripheral axon regeneration mainly by activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). The Ras/Raf/ERK pathway is under the control of Sprouty proteins acting as negative feedback inhibitors. We investigated the expression of Sprouty isoforms in adult sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) as well as the effects of Sprouty inhibition on axon growth by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Sprouty2 revealed the highest expression level in DRG neurons. Down-regulation of Sprouty2 promoted elongative axon growth by adult sensory neurons accompanied by enhanced FGF-2-induced activation of ERK and Ras, whereas Sprouty2 overexpression inhibited axon growth. Sprouty2 was not regulated in vivo in response to a sciatic nerve lesion. Together, our results imply that Sprouty2 is highly expressed in adult peripheral neurons and its down-regulation strongly promotes elongative axon growth by activation of the Ras/Raf/ERK pathway.

  14. GDE2 regulates subtype-specific motor neuron generation through inhibition of Notch signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabharwal, Priyanka; Lee, Changhee; Park, Sungjin; Rao, Meenakshi; Sockanathan, Shanthini

    2011-09-22

    The specification of spinal interneuron and motor neuron identities initiates within progenitor cells, while motor neuron subtype diversification is regulated by hierarchical transcriptional programs implemented postmitotically. Here we find that mice lacking GDE2, a six-transmembrane protein that triggers motor neuron generation, exhibit selective losses of distinct motor neuron subtypes, specifically in defined subsets of limb-innervating motor pools that correlate with the loss of force-generating alpha motor neurons. Mechanistically, GDE2 is expressed by postmitotic motor neurons but utilizes extracellular glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase activity to induce motor neuron generation by inhibiting Notch signaling in neighboring motor neuron progenitors. Thus, neuronal GDE2 controls motor neuron subtype diversity through a non-cell-autonomous feedback mechanism that directly regulates progenitor cell differentiation, implying that subtype specification initiates within motor neuron progenitor populations prior to their differentiation into postmitotic motor neurons.

  15. Estrogenic Regulation of the GnRH Neuron

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    Sally eRadovick

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Reproductive function is regulated by the secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH from the pituitary and the steroid hormones from the gonads. The dynamic changes in the levels of the reproductive hormones regulate secondary sex characteristics, gametogenesis, cellular function and behavior. Hypothalamic GnRH neurons, with cell bodies located in the basal hypothalamus, represent the final common pathway for neuronally derived signals to the pituitary. As such, they serve as integrators of a dizzying array of signals including sensory inputs mediating information about circadian, seasonal, behavioral, pheromonal and emotional cues. Additionally, information about peripheral physiological function may also be included in the integrative signal to the GnRH neuron. These signals may communicate information about metabolic status, disease or infection. Gonadal steroid hormones arguably exert the most important effects on GnRH neuronal function. In both males and females, the gonadal steroid hormones exert negative feedback regulation on axis activity at both the level of the pituitary and the hypothalamus. These negative feedback loops regulate homeostasis of steroid hormone levels. In females, a cyclic reversal of estrogen feedback produces a positive feedback loop at both the hypothalamic and pituitary levels. Central positive feedback results in a dramatic increase in GnRH secretion (Sisk and others 2001; Clarke 1993; Moenter, Brand and Karsch 1992; Xia and others 1992. This is coupled with an increase in pituitary sensitivity to GnRH (Turzillo, DiGregorio and Nett 1995; Savoy-Moore and others 1980, which produces the massive surge in secretion of LH that triggers ovulation.

  16. Communities in Neuronal Complex Networks Revealed by Activation Patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Luciano da Fontoura

    2008-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that the communities in neuronal networks of the integrate-and-fire type can be identified by considering patterns containing the beginning times for each cell to receive the first non-zero activation. The received activity was integrated in order to facilitate the spiking of each neuron and to constrain the activation inside the communities, but no time decay of such activation was considered. The present article shows that, by taking into account exponential decays of the stored activation, it is possible to identify the communities also in terms of the patterns of activation along the initial steps of the transient dynamics. The potential of this method is illustrated with respect to complex neuronal networks involving four communities, each of a different type (Erd\\H{o}s-R\\'eny, Barab\\'asi-Albert, Watts-Strogatz as well as a simple geographical model). Though the consideration of activation decay has been found to enhance the communities separation, too intense decays tend to y...

  17. Novel Kidins220/ARMS Splice Isoforms: Potential Specific Regulators of Neuronal and Cardiovascular Development.

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    Nathalie Schmieg

    Full Text Available Kidins220/ARMS is a transmembrane protein playing a crucial role in neuronal and cardiovascular development. Kidins220/ARMS is a downstream target of neurotrophin receptors and interacts with several signalling and trafficking factors. Through computational modelling, we found two potential sites for alternative splicing of Kidins220/ARMS. The first is located between exon 24 and exon 29, while the second site replaces exon 32 by a short alternative terminal exon 33. Here we describe the conserved occurrence of several Kidins220/ARMS splice isoforms at RNA and protein levels. Kidins220/ARMS splice isoforms display spatio-temporal regulation during development with distinct patterns in different neuronal populations. Neurotrophin receptor stimulation in cortical and hippocampal neurons and neuroendocrine cells induces specific Kidins220/ARMS splice isoforms and alters the appearance kinetics of the full-length transcript. Remarkably, alternative terminal exon splicing generates Kidins220/ARMS variants with distinct cellular localisation: Kidins220/ARMS containing exon 32 is targeted to the plasma membrane and neurite tips, whereas Kidins220/ARMS without exon 33 mainly clusters the full-length protein in a perinuclear intracellular compartment in PC12 cells and primary neurons, leading to a change in neurotrophin receptor expression. Overall, this study demonstrates the existence of novel Kidins220/ARMS splice isoforms with unique properties, revealing additional complexity in the functional regulation of neurotrophin receptors, and potentially other signalling pathways involved in neuronal and cardiovascular development.

  18. RP58 regulates the multipolar-bipolar transition of newborn neurons in the developing cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtaka-Maruyama, Chiaki; Hirai, Shinobu; Miwa, Akiko; Heng, Julian Ik-Tsen; Shitara, Hiroshi; Ishii, Rie; Taya, Choji; Kawano, Hitoshi; Kasai, Masataka; Nakajima, Kazunori; Okado, Haruo

    2013-02-21

    Accumulating evidence suggests that many brain diseases are associated with defects in neuronal migration, suggesting that this step of neurogenesis is critical for brain organization. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying neuronal migration remain largely unknown. Here, we identified the zinc-finger transcriptional repressor RP58 as a key regulator of neuronal migration via multipolar-to-bipolar transition. RP58(-/-) neurons exhibited severe defects in the formation of leading processes and never shifted to the locomotion mode. Cre-mediated deletion of RP58 using in utero electroporation in RP58(flox/flox) mice revealed that RP58 functions in cell-autonomous multipolar-to-bipolar transition, independent of cell-cycle exit. Finally, we found that RP58 represses Ngn2 transcription to regulate the Ngn2-Rnd2 pathway; Ngn2 knockdown rescued migration defects of the RP58(-/-) neurons. Our findings highlight the critical role of RP58 in multipolar-to-bipolar transition via suppression of the Ngn2-Rnd2 pathway in the developing cerebral cortex.

  19. Regulation of neuronal differentiation by proteins associated with nuclear bodies.

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    Benjamin Förthmann

    Full Text Available Nuclear bodies are large sub-nuclear structures composed of RNA and protein molecules. The Survival of Motor Neuron (SMN protein localizes to Cajal bodies (CBs and nuclear gems. Diminished cellular concentration of SMN is associated with the neurodegenerative disease Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA. How nuclear body architecture and its structural components influence neuronal differentiation remains elusive. In this study, we analyzed the effects of SMN and two of its interaction partners in cellular models of neuronal differentiation. The nuclear 23 kDa isoform of Fibroblast Growth Factor - 2 (FGF-2(23 is one of these interacting proteins - and was previously observed to influence nuclear bodies by destabilizing nuclear gems and mobilizing SMN from Cajal bodies (CBs. Here we demonstrate that FGF-2(23 blocks SMN-promoted neurite outgrowth, and also show that SMN disrupts FGF-2(23-dependent transcription. Our results indicate that FGF-2(23 and SMN form an inactive complex that interferes with neuronal differentiation by mutually antagonizing nuclear functions. Coilin is another nuclear SMN binding partner and a marker protein for Cajal bodies (CBs. In addition, coilin is essential for CB function in maturation of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs. The role of coilin outside of Cajal bodies and its putative impacts in tissue differentiation are poorly defined. The present study shows that protein levels of nucleoplasmic coilin outside of CBs decrease during neuronal differentiation. Overexpression of coilin has an inhibitory effect on neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, we find that nucleoplasmic coilin inhibits neurite outgrowth independent of SMN binding revealing a new function for coilin in neuronal differentiation.

  20. Different antipsychotics elicit different effects on magnocellular oxytocinergic and vasopressinergic neurons as revealed by Fos immunohistochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiss, A; Bundzikova, J; Pirnik, Z

    2010-01-01

    in autonomic, neuroendocrine, and behavioral processes. This study was focused to reveal the responsiveness of hypothalamic OXY- and AVP- producing magnocellular neurons, in terms of quantitative and topographical distinctions, to antipsychotics displaying different pharmacological profiles. Naive male Wistar...

  1. TDP-43 regulates the microprocessor complex activity during in vitro neuronal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Carlo, Valerio; Grossi, Elena; Laneve, Pietro; Morlando, Mariangela; Dini Modigliani, Stefano; Ballarino, Monica; Bozzoni, Irene; Caffarelli, Elisa

    2013-12-01

    TDP-43 (TAR DNA-binding protein 43) is an RNA-binding protein implicated in RNA metabolism at several levels. Even if ubiquitously expressed, it is considered as a neuronal activity-responsive factor and a major signature for neurological pathologies, making the comprehension of its activity in the nervous system a very challenging issue. TDP-43 has also been described as an accessory component of the Drosha-DGCR8 (DiGeorge syndrome critical region gene 8) microprocessor complex, which is crucially involved in basal and tissue-specific RNA processing events. In the present study, we exploited in vitro neuronal differentiation systems to investigate the TDP-43 demand for the microprocessor function, focusing on both its canonical microRNA biosynthetic activity and its alternative role as a post-transcriptional regulator of gene expression. Our findings reveal a novel role for TDP-43 as an essential factor that controls the stability of Drosha protein during neuronal differentiation, thus globally affecting the production of microRNAs. We also demonstrate that TDP-43 is required for the Drosha-mediated regulation of Neurogenin 2, a master gene orchestrating neurogenesis, whereas post-transcriptional control of Dgcr8, another Drosha target, resulted to be TDP-43-independent. These results implicate a previously uncovered contribution of TDP-43 in regulating the abundance and the substrate specificity of the microprocessor complex and provide new insights into TDP-43 as a key player in neuronal differentiation.

  2. Direct Lineage Reprogramming Reveals Disease-Specific Phenotypes of Motor Neurons from Human ALS Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Lu Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Subtype-specific neurons obtained from adult humans will be critical to modeling neurodegenerative diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Here, we show that adult human skin fibroblasts can be directly and efficiently converted into highly pure motor neurons without passing through an induced pluripotent stem cell stage. These adult human induced motor neurons (hiMNs exhibit the cytological and electrophysiological features of spinal motor neurons and form functional neuromuscular junctions (NMJs with skeletal muscles. Importantly, hiMNs converted from ALS patient fibroblasts show disease-specific degeneration manifested through poor survival, soma shrinkage, hypoactivity, and an inability to form NMJs. A chemical screen revealed that the degenerative features of ALS hiMNs can be remarkably rescued by the small molecule kenpaullone. Taken together, our results define a direct and efficient strategy to obtain disease-relevant neuronal subtypes from adult human patients and reveal their promising value in disease modeling and drug identification.

  3. Direct Lineage Reprogramming Reveals Disease-Specific Phenotypes of Motor Neurons from Human ALS Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meng-Lu; Zang, Tong; Zhang, Chun-Li

    2016-01-05

    Subtype-specific neurons obtained from adult humans will be critical to modeling neurodegenerative diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Here, we show that adult human skin fibroblasts can be directly and efficiently converted into highly pure motor neurons without passing through an induced pluripotent stem cell stage. These adult human induced motor neurons (hiMNs) exhibit the cytological and electrophysiological features of spinal motor neurons and form functional neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) with skeletal muscles. Importantly, hiMNs converted from ALS patient fibroblasts show disease-specific degeneration manifested through poor survival, soma shrinkage, hypoactivity, and an inability to form NMJs. A chemical screen revealed that the degenerative features of ALS hiMNs can be remarkably rescued by the small molecule kenpaullone. Taken together, our results define a direct and efficient strategy to obtain disease-relevant neuronal subtypes from adult human patients and reveal their promising value in disease modeling and drug identification.

  4. APP Metabolism Regulates Tau Proteostasis in Human Cerebral Cortex Neurons

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    Steven Moore

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of Aβ peptide fragments of the APP protein and neurofibrillary tangles of the microtubule-associated protein tau are the cellular hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. To investigate the relationship between APP metabolism and tau protein levels and phosphorylation, we studied human-stem-cell-derived forebrain neurons with genetic forms of AD, all of which increase the release of pathogenic Aβ peptides. We identified marked increases in intracellular tau in genetic forms of AD that either mutated APP or increased its dosage, suggesting that APP metabolism is coupled to changes in tau proteostasis. Manipulating APP metabolism by β-secretase and γ-secretase inhibition, as well as γ-secretase modulation, results in specific increases and decreases in tau protein levels. These data demonstrate that APP metabolism regulates tau proteostasis and suggest that the relationship between APP processing and tau is not mediated solely through extracellular Aβ signaling to neurons.

  5. Regulation of neuronal APL-1 expression by cholesterol starvation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Wiese

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alzheimer's disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the deposition of β-amyloid plaques composed primarily of the amyloid-β peptide, a cleavage product of amyloid precursor protein (APP. While mutations in APP lead to the development of Familial Alzheimer's Disease (FAD, sporadic AD has only one clear genetic modifier: the ε4 allele of the apolipoprotein E (ApoE gene. Cholesterol starvation in Caenorhabditis elegans leads to molting and arrest phenotypes similar to loss-of-function mutants of the APP ortholog, apl-1 (amyloid precursor-like protein 1, and lrp-1 (lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1, suggesting a potential interaction between apl-1 and cholesterol metabolism. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Previously, we found that RNAi knock-down of apl-1 leads to aldicarb hypersensitivity, indicating a defect in synaptic function. Here we find the same defect is recapitulated during lrp-1 knock-down and by cholesterol starvation. A cholesterol-free diet or loss of lrp-1 directly affects APL-1 levels as both lead to loss of APL-1::GFP fluorescence in neurons. However, loss of cholesterol does not affect global transcription or protein levels as seen by qPCR and Western blot. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that cholesterol and lrp-1 are involved in the regulation of synaptic transmission, similar to apl-1. Both are able to modulate APL-1 protein levels in neurons, however cholesterol changes do not affect global apl-1 transcription or APL-1 protein indicating the changes are specific to neurons. Thus, regulation of synaptic transmission and molting by LRP-1 and cholesterol may be mediated by their ability to control APL-1 neuronal protein expression.

  6. Direct regulation of GnRH neuron excitability by arcuate nucleus POMC and NPY neuron neuropeptides in female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roa, Juan; Herbison, Allan E

    2012-11-01

    Hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (NPY) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons act to sense and coordinate the brain's responses to metabolic cues. One neuronal network that is very sensitive to metabolic status is that controlling fertility. In this study, we investigated the impact of neuropeptides released by NPY and POMC neurons on the cellular excitability of GnRH neurons, the final output cells of the brain controlling fertility. The majority (∼70%) of GnRH neurons were activated by α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, and this resulted from the direct postsynaptic activation of melanocortin receptor 3 and melanocortin receptor 4. A small population of GnRH neurons (∼15%) was excited by cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript or inhibited by β-endorphin. Agouti-related peptide, released by NPY neurons, was found to have variable inhibitory (∼10%) and stimulatory (∼25%) effects upon subpopulations of GnRH neurons. A variety of NPY and pancreatic polypeptide analogs was used to examine potential NPY interactions with GnRH neurons. Although porcine NPY (Y1/Y2/Y5 agonist) directly inhibited the firing of approximately 45% of GnRH neurons, [Leu(31),Pro(34)]-NPY (Y1/Y4/Y5 agonist) could excite (56%) or inhibit (19%). Experiments with further agonists indicated that Y1 receptors were responsible for suppressing GnRH neuron activity, whereas postsynaptic Y4 receptors were stimulatory. These results show that the activity of GnRH neurons is regulated in a complex manner by neuropeptides released by POMC and NPY neurons. This provides a direct route through which different metabolic cues can regulate fertility.

  7. Cell Signaling Mechanisms by which Geniposide Regulates Insulin- Degrading Enzyme Expression in Primary Cortical Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yonglan; Xia, Zhining; Liu, Jianhui; Yin, Fei

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of studies have demonstrated that insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) plays an essential role in both the degradation and its activity of β-amyloid (Aβ). Therefore, the regulation of IDE expression and/or modification of IDE-dependent actions are two emerging strategies for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We previously observed that geniposide, a novel agonist of glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R), could attenuate Aβ-induced neurotoxicity by regulating the expression of IDE in primary cortical neurons. However, the signal transduction mechanisms underlying this effect were not elucidated. The present study, therefore examined and explored the cell signaling transduction and molecular mechanisms by which geniposide induces the expression of IDE in primary cortical neurons. The current study revealed that LY294002 (an inhibitor for phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase, PI3K), PP1 (inhibitor for c-Src), GW9662 (antagonist for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, PPARγ), H89 (an inhibitor for protein kinase A, PKA) and AG1478 (an antagonist for epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFR) prohibited the up-regulation of IDE induced by geniposide in primary cortical neurons. Further, geniposide also enhanced the phosphorylation of PPARγ and accelerated the release of phosphorylated FoxO1 (forkhead box O1) from nuclear fraction to the cytosol. Moreover, geniposide directly activated the activity of IDE promoter in PC12 cells, which confirmed the presence of the GLP-1 receptor. Taken together, our findings reveal for the first time the cell signaling transduction pathway of geniposide regulating the expression of IDE in neurons.

  8. Circadian factor BMAL1 in histaminergic neurons regulates sleep architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao; Zecharia, Anna; Zhang, Zhe; Yang, Qianzi; Yustos, Raquel; Jager, Polona; Vyssotski, Alexei L; Maywood, Elizabeth S; Chesham, Johanna E; Ma, Ying; Brickley, Stephen G; Hastings, Michael H; Franks, Nicholas P; Wisden, William

    2014-12-01

    Circadian clocks allow anticipation of daily environmental changes. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) houses the master clock, but clocks are also widely expressed elsewhere in the body. Although some peripheral clocks have established roles, it is unclear what local brain clocks do. We tested the contribution of one putative local clock in mouse histaminergic neurons in the tuberomamillary nucleus to the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle. Histaminergic neurons are silent during sleep, and start firing after wake onset; the released histamine, made by the enzyme histidine decarboxylase (HDC), enhances wakefulness. We found that hdc gene expression varies with time of day. Selectively deleting the Bmal1 (also known as Arntl or Mop3) clock gene from histaminergic cells removes this variation, producing higher HDC expression and brain histamine levels during the day. The consequences include more fragmented sleep, prolonged wake at night, shallower sleep depth (lower nonrapid eye movement [NREM] δ power), increased NREM-to-REM transitions, hindered recovery sleep after sleep deprivation, and impaired memory. Removing BMAL1 from histaminergic neurons does not, however, affect circadian rhythms. We propose that for mammals with polyphasic/nonwake consolidating sleep, the local BMAL1-dependent clock directs appropriately timed declines and increases in histamine biosynthesis to produce an appropriate balance of wake and sleep within the overall daily cycle of rest and activity specified by the SCN.

  9. Regulation of primary spinal neuron lineages after deletion of a major progenitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Betty C; Moody, Sally A

    2004-09-01

    Vertebrate embryos are able to reconstitute the body plan when early blastomeres are deleted, but it is not known whether this is accomplished by cells local to the lesion or by a readjustment of the entire pattern of the embryo. We distinguished between these two possibilities by studying which embryonic cells change primary spinal neuronal fates after deletion of a major spinal cord progenitor. After ablation of the V1.2 blastomere of the 16-cell Xenopus embryo, the spinal cord contained normal numbers of Rohon-Beard neurons and primary motoneurons, indicating that the remaining blastomeres numerically reconstituted these populations. Using lineage-tracing techniques we revealed a global response: 10 out of the 15 remaining blastomeres significantly changed the number of one or both neuronal types they produced. This widespread response indicates that position in the early embryo plays an important role in regulating the production of primary spinal neurons. However, not all cells are influenced solely by position; a vegetal cell transplanted into the position of the deleted V1.2 did not take on the neuronal fate of its new position. Thus, restitution of pattern relies on a combination of positional cues and intrinsic fate restrictions. Copyright 2004 Elsevier SAS

  10. P53 regulates disruption of neuronal development in the adult hippocampus after irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y-Q; Cheng, ZW-C; Liu, SK-W; Aubert, I; Wong, C S

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of hippocampal neurogenesis is implicated in neurocognitive dysfunction after cranial irradiation for brain tumors. How irradiation results in impaired neuronal development remains poorly understood. The Trp53 (p53) gene is known to regulate cellular DNA damage response after irradiation. Whether it has a role in disruption of late neuronal development remains unknown. Here we characterized the effects of p53 on neuronal development in adult mouse hippocampus after irradiation. Different bromodeoxyuridine incorporation paradigms and a transplantation study were used for cell fate mapping. Compared with wild-type mice, we observed profound inhibition of hippocampal neurogenesis after irradiation in mice deficient in p53 despite the absence of acute apoptosis of neuroblasts. The putative neural stem cells were apoptosis resistant after irradiation regardless of p53 genotype. Cell fate mapping using different bromodeoxyuridine incorporation paradigms revealed enhanced activation of neural stem cells and their consequential exhaustion in the absence of p53 after irradiation. Both p53-knockout and wild-type mice demonstrated similar extent of microglial activation in the hippocampus after irradiation. Impairment of neuronal differentiation of neural progenitors transplanted in irradiated hippocampus was not altered by p53 genotype of the recipient mice. We conclude that by inhibiting neural progenitor activation, p53 serves to mitigate disruption of neuronal development after irradiation independent of apoptosis and perturbation of the neural stem cell niche. These findings suggest for the first time that p53 may have a key role in late effects in brain after irradiation.

  11. Capsaicin protects cortical neurons against ischemia/reperfusion injury via down-regulating NMDA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming; Cheng, Gen; Tan, Han; Qin, Rui; Zou, Yimin; Wang, Yun; Zhang, Ying

    2017-09-01

    Capsaicin, the ingredient responsible for the pungent taste of hot chili peppers, is widely used in the study and management of pain. Recently, its neuroprotective effect has been described in multiple studies. Herein, we investigated the underlying mechanisms for the neuroprotective effect of capsaicin. Direct injection of capsaicin (1 or 3nmol) into the peri-infarct area reduced the infarct volume and improved neurological behavioral scoring and motor coordination function in the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)/reperfusion model in rats. The time window of the protective effect of capsaicin was within 1h after reperfusion, when excitotoxicity is the main reason of cell death. In cultured cortical neurons, administration of capsaicin attenuated glutamate-induced excitotoxic injury. With respect to the mechanisms of the neuroprotective effect of capsaicin, reduced calcium influx after glutamate stimulation was observed following capsaicin pretreatment in cortical neurons. Trpv1 knock-out abolished the inhibitory effect of capsaicin on glutamate-induced calcium influx and subsequent neuronal death. Reduced expression of GluN1 and GluN2B, subunits of NMDA receptor, was examined after capsaicin treatment in cortical neurons. In summary, our studies reveal that the neuroprotective effect of capsaicin in cortical neurons is TRPV1-dependent and down-regulation of the expression and function of NMDA receptors contributes to the protection afforded by capsaicin. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Modulation of inositol polyphosphate levels regulates neuronal differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loss, Omar; Wu, Chun Ting; Riccio, Antonella; Saiardi, Adolfo

    2013-01-01

    The binding of neurotrophins to tropomyosin receptor kinase receptors initiates several signaling pathways, including the activation of phospholipase C-γ, which promotes the release of diacylglycerol and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). In addition to recycling back to inositol, IP3 serves as a precursor for the synthesis of higher phosphorylated inositols, such as inositol 1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate (IP5) and inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6). Previous studies on the effect of neurotrophins on inositol signaling were limited to the analysis of IP3 and its dephosphorylation products. Here we demonstrate that nerve growth factor (NGF) regulates the levels of IP5 and IP6 during PC12 differentiation. Furthermore, both NGF and brain-derived neurotrophic factor alter IP5 and IP6 intracellular ratio in differentiated PC12 cells and primary neurons. Neurotrophins specifically regulate the expression of IP5-2 kinase (IP5-2K), which phosphorylates IP5 into IP6. IP5-2K is rapidly induced after NGF treatment, but its transcriptional levels sharply decrease in fully differentiated PC12 cells. Reduction of IP5-2K protein levels by small interfering RNA has an effect on the early stages of PC12 cell differentiation, whereas fully differentiated cells are not affected. Conversely, perturbation of IP5-2K levels by overexpression suggests that both differentiated PC12 cells and sympathetic neurons require low levels of the enzyme for survival. Therefore maintaining appropriate intracellular levels of inositol polyphosphates is necessary for neuronal survival and differentiation. PMID:23864704

  13. Metabolic Interplay between Astrocytes and Neurons Regulates Endocannabinoid Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreu Viader

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG is a retrograde lipid messenger that modulates synaptic function, neurophysiology, and behavior. 2-AG signaling is terminated by enzymatic hydrolysis—a reaction that is principally performed by monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL. MAGL is broadly expressed throughout the nervous system, and the contributions of different brain cell types to the regulation of 2-AG activity in vivo remain poorly understood. Here, we genetically dissect the cellular anatomy of MAGL-mediated 2-AG metabolism in the brain and show that neurons and astrocytes coordinately regulate 2-AG content and endocannabinoid-dependent forms of synaptic plasticity and behavior. We also find that astrocytic MAGL is mainly responsible for converting 2-AG to neuroinflammatory prostaglandins via a mechanism that may involve transcellular shuttling of lipid substrates. Astrocytic-neuronal interplay thus provides distributed oversight of 2-AG metabolism and function and, through doing so, protects the nervous system from excessive CB1 receptor activation and promotes endocannabinoid crosstalk with other lipid transmitter systems.

  14. Fan-Shaped Body Neurons Are Involved in "Period"-Dependent Regulation of Long-Term Courtship Memory in "Drosophila"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Takaomi; Inami, Show; Sato, Shoma; Kitamoto, Toshihiro

    2012-01-01

    In addition to its established function in the regulation of circadian rhythms, the "Drosophila" gene "period" ("per") also plays an important role in processing long-term memory (LTM). Here, we used courtship conditioning as a learning paradigm and revealed that (1) overexpression and knocking down of "per" in subsets of brain neurons enhance and…

  15. Fan-Shaped Body Neurons Are Involved in "Period"-Dependent Regulation of Long-Term Courtship Memory in "Drosophila"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Takaomi; Inami, Show; Sato, Shoma; Kitamoto, Toshihiro

    2012-01-01

    In addition to its established function in the regulation of circadian rhythms, the "Drosophila" gene "period" ("per") also plays an important role in processing long-term memory (LTM). Here, we used courtship conditioning as a learning paradigm and revealed that (1) overexpression and knocking down of "per" in subsets of brain neurons enhance and…

  16. Cooperation between BDNF and glutamate in the regulation of synaptic transmission and neuronal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jean-Luc; Finsterwald, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Ample evidence supports a role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the survival and differentiation of selective populations of neurons in the peripheral and central nervous systems. In addition to its trophic actions, BDNF exerts acute effects on synaptic transmission and plasticity. In particular, BDNF enhances excitatory synaptic transmission through pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms. In this regard, BDNF enhances glutamate release, the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), NMDA receptor activity and the phosphorylation of NMDA receptor subunits. Our recent studies revealed a novel cooperative interaction between BDNF and glutamate in the regulation of dendritic development. Indeed, we found that the effects of BDNF on dendritic growth of cortical neurons require both the stimulation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation by BDNF and the activation of the CREB-regulated transcription coactivator 1 (CRTC1) by glutamate. Together, these studies highlight the importance of the cooperation between BDNF and glutamate in the regulation of synaptic transmission and neuronal development.

  17. Neurons Containing Orexin or Melanin Concentrating Hormone Reciprocally Regulate Wake and Sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roda Rani eKonadhode

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is considerable amount of data on arousal neurons whereas there is a paucity of knowledge regarding neurons that make us fall asleep. Indeed, current network models of sleep-wake regulation list many arousal neuronal populations compared to only one sleep group located in the preoptic area. There are neurons outside the preoptic area that are active during sleep, but they have never been selectively manipulated. Indeed, none of the sleep-active neurons have been selectively stimulated. To close this knowledge gap we used optogenetics to selectively manipulate neurons containing melanin concentrating hormone (MCH. The MCH neurons are located in the posterior hypothalamus intermingled with the orexin arousal neurons. Our data indicated that optogenetic stimulation of MCH neurons in wildtype mice (J Neuroscience, 2013 robustly increased both non-REM and REM sleep. MCH neuron stimulation increased sleep during the animal’s normal active period, which is compelling evidence that stimulation of MCH neurons has a powerful effect in counteracting the strong arousal signal from all of the arousal neurons. The MCH neurons represent the only group of sleep-active neurons that when selectively stimulated induce sleep. From a translational perspective this is potentially useful in sleep disorders, such as insomnia, where sleep needs to be triggered against a strong arousal drive. Our studies indicate that the MCH neurons belong within an overall model of sleep-wake regulation.

  18. Summation of connectivity strengths in the visual cortex reveals stability of neuronal microcircuits after plasticity.

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    Bachatene, Lyes; Bharmauria, Vishal; Cattan, Sarah; Chanauria, Nayan; Rouat, Jean; Molotchnikoff, Stéphane

    2015-10-09

    Within sensory systems, neurons are continuously affected by environmental stimulation. Recently, we showed that, on cell-pair basis, visual adaptation modulates the connectivity strength between similarly tuned neurons to orientation and we suggested that, on a larger scale, the connectivity strength between neurons forming sub-networks could be maintained after adaptation-induced-plasticity. In the present paper, based on the summation of the connectivity strengths, we sought to examine how, within cell-assemblies, functional connectivity is regulated during an exposure-based adaptation. Using intrinsic optical imaging combined with electrophysiological recordings following the reconfiguration of the maps of the primary visual cortex by long stimulus exposure, we found that within functionally connected cells, the summed connectivity strengths remain almost equal although connections among individual pairs are modified. Neuronal selectivity appears to be strongly associated with neuronal connectivity in a "homeodynamic" manner which maintains the stability of cortical functional relationships after experience-dependent plasticity. Our results support the "homeostatic plasticity concept" giving new perspectives on how the summation in visual cortex leads to the stability within labile neuronal ensembles, depending on the newly acquired properties by neurons.

  19. Zebrafish chemical screening reveals the impairment of dopaminergic neuronal survival by cardiac glycosides.

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    Yaping Sun

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the prominent degeneration of dopaminergic (DA neurons among other cell types. Here we report a first chemical screen of over 5,000 compounds in zebrafish, aimed at identifying small molecule modulators of DA neuron development or survival. We find that Neriifolin, a member of the cardiac glycoside family of compounds, impairs survival but not differentiation of both zebrafish and mammalian DA neurons. Cardiac glycosides are inhibitors of Na(+/K(+ ATPase activity and widely used for treating heart disorders. Our data suggest that Neriifolin impairs DA neuronal survival by targeting the neuronal enriched Na(+/K(+ ATPase α3 subunit (ATP1A3. Modulation of ionic homeostasis, knockdown of p53, or treatment with antioxidants protects DA neurons from Neriifolin-induced death. These results reveal a previously unknown effect of cardiac glycosides on DA neuronal survival and suggest that it is mediated through ATP1A3 inhibition, oxidative stress, and p53. They also elucidate potential approaches for counteracting the neurotoxicity of this valuable class of medications.

  20. Thyroid hormone is required for hypothalamic neurons regulating cardiovascular functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittag, Jens; Lyons, David J; Sällström, Johan; Vujovic, Milica; Dudazy-Gralla, Susi; Warner, Amy; Wallis, Karin; Alkemade, Anneke; Nordström, Kristina; Monyer, Hannah; Broberger, Christian; Arner, Anders; Vennström, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid hormone is well known for its profound direct effects on cardiovascular function and metabolism. Recent evidence, however, suggests that the hormone also regulates these systems indirectly through the central nervous system. While some of the molecular mechanisms underlying the hormone's central control of metabolism have been identified, its actions in the central cardiovascular control have remained enigmatic. Here, we describe a previously unknown population of parvalbuminergic neurons in the anterior hypothalamus that requires thyroid hormone receptor signaling for proper development. Specific stereotaxic ablation of these cells in the mouse resulted in hypertension and temperature-dependent tachycardia, indicating a role in the central autonomic control of blood pressure and heart rate. Moreover, the neurons exhibited intrinsic temperature sensitivity in patch-clamping experiments, providing a new connection between cardiovascular function and core temperature. Thus, the data identify what we believe to be a novel hypothalamic cell population potentially important for understanding hypertension and indicate developmental hypothyroidism as an epigenetic risk factor for cardiovascular disorders. Furthermore, the findings may be beneficial for treatment of the recently identified patients that have a mutation in thyroid hormone receptor α1.

  1. Presenilin1 regulates histamine neuron development and behavior in zebrafish, danio rerio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundvik, Maria; Chen, Yu-Chia; Panula, Pertti

    2013-01-23

    Modulatory neurotransmitters, including the histaminergic system, are essential in mediating cognitive functions affected in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The roles of disease genes associated with AD, most importantly the presenilin1 gene (psen1), are poorly understood. We studied the role of psen1 in plasticity of the brain histaminergic system using a novel psen1 mutant zebrafish, Danio rerio. We found that in psen1(-/-) zebrafish, the histaminergic system is altered throughout life. At 7 d postfertilization (dpf) the histamine neuron number was reduced in psen1(-/-) compared with wild-type (WT) fish; at 2 months of age the histamine neuron number was at the same level as that in WT fish. In 1-year-old zebrafish, the histamine neuron number was significantly increased in psen1(-/-) fish compared with WT fish. These changes in histamine neuron number were accompanied by changes in histamine-driven behaviors. Treatment with DAPT, a γ-secretase inhibitor, similarly interfered with the development of the histaminergic neurons. We also assessed the expression of γ-secretase-regulated Notch1a mRNA and β-catenin at different time points. Notch1a mRNA level was reduced in psen1(-/-) compared with WT fish, whereas β-catenin was slightly upregulated in the hypothalamus of psen1(-/-) compared with WT fish at 7 dpf. The results reveal a life-long brain plasticity in both the structure of the histaminergic system and its functions induced by altered Notch1a activity as a consequence of psen1 mutation. The new histaminergic neurons in aging zebrafish brain may arise as a result of phenotypic plasticity or represent newly differentiated stem cells.

  2. STED Nanoscopy Reveals the Ubiquity of Subcortical Cytoskeleton Periodicity in Living Neurons

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    Elisa D’Este

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the axons of cultured hippocampal neurons, actin forms various structures, including bundles, patches (involved in the preservation of neuronal polarity, and a recently reported periodic ring-like structure. Nevertheless, the overlaying organization of actin in neurons and in the axon initial segment (AIS is still unclear, due mainly to a lack of adequate imaging methods. By harnessing live-cell stimulated emission depletion (STED nanoscopy and the fluorescent probe SiR-Actin, we show that the periodic subcortical actin structure is in fact present in both axons and dendrites. The periodic cytoskeleton organization is also found in the peripheral nervous system, specifically at the nodes of Ranvier. The actin patches in the AIS co-localize with pre-synaptic markers. Cytosolic actin organization strongly depends on the developmental stage and subcellular localization. Altogether, the results of this study reveal unique neuronal cytoskeletal features.

  3. Motor-circuit communication matrix from spinal cord to brainstem neurons revealed by developmental origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivetta, Chiara; Esposito, Maria Soledad; Sigrist, Markus; Arber, Silvia

    2014-01-30

    Accurate motor-task execution relies on continuous comparison of planned and performed actions. Motor-output pathways establish internal circuit collaterals for this purpose. Here we focus on motor collateral organization between spinal cord and upstream neurons in the brainstem. We used a newly developed mouse genetic tool intersectionally with viruses to uncover the connectivity rules of these ascending pathways by capturing the transient expression of neuronal subpopulation determinants. We reveal a widespread and diverse network of spinal dual-axon neurons, with coincident input to forelimb motor neurons and the lateral reticular nucleus (LRN) in the brainstem. Spinal information to the LRN is not segregated by motor pool or neurotransmitter identity. Instead, it is organized according to the developmental domain origin of the progenitor cells. Thus, excerpts of most spinal information destined for action are relayed to supraspinal centers through exquisitely organized ascending connectivity modules, enabling precise communication between command and execution centers of movement.

  4. STED nanoscopy reveals the ubiquity of subcortical cytoskeleton periodicity in living neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Este, Elisa; Kamin, Dirk; Göttfert, Fabian; El-Hady, Ahmed; Hell, Stefan W

    2015-03-03

    In the axons of cultured hippocampal neurons, actin forms various structures, including bundles, patches (involved in the preservation of neuronal polarity), and a recently reported periodic ring-like structure. Nevertheless, the overlaying organization of actin in neurons and in the axon initial segment (AIS) is still unclear, due mainly to a lack of adequate imaging methods. By harnessing live-cell stimulated emission depletion (STED) nanoscopy and the fluorescent probe SiR-Actin, we show that the periodic subcortical actin structure is in fact present in both axons and dendrites. The periodic cytoskeleton organization is also found in the peripheral nervous system, specifically at the nodes of Ranvier. The actin patches in the AIS co-localize with pre-synaptic markers. Cytosolic actin organization strongly depends on the developmental stage and subcellular localization. Altogether, the results of this study reveal unique neuronal cytoskeletal features.

  5. Whole-exome sequencing and homozygosity analysis implicate depolarization-regulated neuronal genes in autism.

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    Maria H Chahrour

    Full Text Available Although autism has a clear genetic component, the high genetic heterogeneity of the disorder has been a challenge for the identification of causative genes. We used homozygosity analysis to identify probands from nonconsanguineous families that showed evidence of distant shared ancestry, suggesting potentially recessive mutations. Whole-exome sequencing of 16 probands revealed validated homozygous, potentially pathogenic recessive mutations that segregated perfectly with disease in 4/16 families. The candidate genes (UBE3B, CLTCL1, NCKAP5L, ZNF18 encode proteins involved in proteolysis, GTPase-mediated signaling, cytoskeletal organization, and other pathways. Furthermore, neuronal depolarization regulated the transcription of these genes, suggesting potential activity-dependent roles in neurons. We present a multidimensional strategy for filtering whole-exome sequence data to find candidate recessive mutations in autism, which may have broader applicability to other complex, heterogeneous disorders.

  6. Editing the Neuronal Genome: a CRISPR View of Chromatin Regulation in Neuronal Development, Function, and Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Marty G.; West, Anne E.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic orchestration of gene expression is crucial for the proper differentiation, function, and adaptation of cells. In the brain, transcriptional regulation underlies the incredible diversity of neuronal cell types and contributes to the ability of neurons to adapt their function to the environment. Recently, novel methods for genome and epigenome editing have begun to revolutionize our understanding of gene regulatory mechanisms. In particular, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 system has proven to be a particularly accessible and adaptable technique for genome engineering. Here, we review the use of CRISPR/Cas9 in neurobiology and discuss how these studies have advanced understanding of nervous system development and plasticity. We cover four especially salient applications of CRISPR/Cas9: testing the consequences of enhancer mutations, tagging genes and gene products for visualization in live cells, directly activating or repressing enhancers in vivo, and manipulating the epigenome. In each case, we summarize findings from recent studies and discuss evolving adaptations of the method. PMID:28018138

  7. Metabolic regulation of neuronal plasticity by the energy sensor AMPK.

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    Wyatt B Potter

    Full Text Available Long Term Potentiation (LTP is a leading candidate mechanism for learning and memory and is also thought to play a role in the progression of seizures to intractable epilepsy. Maintenance of LTP requires RNA transcription, protein translation and signaling through the mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR pathway. In peripheral tissue, the energy sensor AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK negatively regulates the mTOR cascade upon glycolytic inhibition and cellular energy stress. We recently demonstrated that the glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG alters plasticity to retard epileptogenesis in the kindling model of epilepsy. Reduced kindling progression was associated with increased recruitment of the nuclear metabolic sensor CtBP to NRSF at the BDNF promoter. Given that energy metabolism controls mTOR through AMPK in peripheral tissue and the role of mTOR in LTP in neurons, we asked whether energy metabolism and AMPK control LTP. Using a combination of biochemical approaches and field-recordings in mouse hippocampal slices, we show that the master regulator of energy homeostasis, AMPK couples energy metabolism to LTP expression. Administration of the glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG or the mitochondrial toxin and anti-Type II Diabetes drug, metformin, or AMP mimetic AICAR results in activation of AMPK, repression of the mTOR pathway and prevents maintenance of Late-Phase LTP (L-LTP. Inhibition of AMPK by either compound-C or the ATP mimetic ara-A rescues the suppression of L-LTP by energy stress. We also show that enhanced LTP via AMPK inhibition requires mTOR signaling. These results directly link energy metabolism to plasticity in the mammalian brain and demonstrate that AMPK is a modulator of LTP. Our work opens up the possibility of using modulators of energy metabolism to control neuronal plasticity in diseases and conditions of aberrant plasticity such as epilepsy.

  8. Regulation of EB1/3 proteins by classical MAPs in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayas, C L; Avila, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are key cytoskeletal elements in developing and mature neurons. MT reorganization underlies the morphological changes that occur during neuronal development. Furthermore, MTs contribute to the maintenance of neuronal architecture, enable intracellular transport and act as scaffolds for signaling molecules. Thus, a fine-tuned regulation of MT dynamics and stability is crucial for the correct differentiation and functioning of neurons. Different types of proteins contribute to the regulation of the MT state, such as plus-end tracking proteins (+TIPs), which interact with the plus-ends of growing microtubules, and classical microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs), which bind along the microtubule lattice. Recent evidence indicates that MAPs interplay with End Binding Proteins (EBs), the core +TIPs, in neuronal cells. This might contribute to the orchestrated regulation of MT dynamics in neurons. In this mini-review article, we address recent research on the neuronal crosstalk between EBs and classical MAPs and speculate on its possible functional relevance.

  9. Neurotoxin-induced selective ubiquitination and regulation of MEF2A isoform in neuronal stress response

    OpenAIRE

    She, Hua; Yang, Qian; Mao, Zixu

    2012-01-01

    The myocyte enhancer factor 2A-D (MEF2) proteins are members of the MCM1-agamous-deficiens-serum (MADS) response factor family of transcription factors. Various MEF2 isoform proteins are enriched in neurons and exhibit distinct patterns of expression in different regions of the brain. In neurons, MEF2 functions as a converging factor to regulate many neuronal functions including survival. MEF2 activities are tightly controlled in neurons in response to stress. Whether stress signal may differ...

  10. Microarray Analysis Reveals Increased Transcriptional Repression and Reduced Metabolic Activity but Not Major Changes in the Core Apoptotic Machinery during Maturation of Sympathetic Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raba, Mikk; Palgi, Jaan; Lehtivaara, Maria; Arumäe, Urmas

    2016-01-01

    Postnatal maturation of the neurons whose main phenotype and basic synaptic contacts are already established includes neuronal growth, refinement of synaptic contacts, final steps of differentiation, programmed cell death period (PCD) etc. In the sympathetic neurons, postnatal maturation includes permanent end of the PCD that occurs with the same time schedule in vivo and in vitro suggesting that the process could be genetically determined. Also many other changes in the neuronal maturation could be permanent and thus based on stable changes in the genome expression. However, postnatal maturation of the neurons is poorly studied. Here we compared the gene expression profiles of immature and mature sympathetic neurons using Affymetrix microarray assay. We found 1310 significantly up-regulated and 1151 significantly down-regulated genes in the mature neurons. Gene ontology analysis reveals up-regulation of genes related to neuronal differentiation, chromatin and epigenetic changes, extracellular factors and their receptors, and cell adhesion, whereas many down-regulated genes were related to metabolic and biosynthetic processes. We show that termination of PCD is not related to major changes in the expression of classical genes for apoptosis or cell survival. Our dataset is deposited to the ArrayExpress database and is a valuable source to select candidate genes in the studies of neuronal maturation. As an example, we studied the changes in the expression of selected genes Igf2bp3, Coro1A, Zfp57, Dcx, and Apaf1 in the young and mature sympathetic ganglia by quantitative PCR and show that these were strongly downregulated in the mature ganglia.

  11. Microarray analysis reveals increased transcriptional repression and reduced metabolic activity but not major changes in the core apoptotic machinery during maturation of sympathetic neurons

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    Mikk eRaba

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Postnatal maturation of the neurons whose main phenotype and basic synaptic contacts are already established includes neuronal growth, refinement of synaptic contacts, final steps of differentiation, programmed cell death period (PCD etc. In the sympathetic neurons, postnatal maturation includes permanent end of the PCD that occurs with the same time schedule in vivo and in vitro suggesting that the process could be genetically determined. Also many other changes in the neuronal maturation could be permanent and thus based on stable changes in the genome expression. However, postnatal maturation of the neurons is poorly studied. Here we compared the gene expression profiles of immature and mature sympathetic neurons using Affymetrix microarray assay. We found 1310 significantly up-regulated and 1151 significantly down-regulated genes in the mature neurons. Gene ontology analysis reveals up-regulation of genes related to neuronal differentiation, chromatin and epigenetic changes, extracellular factors and their receptors, and cell adhesion, whereas many down-regulated genes were related to metabolic and biosynthetic processes. We show that termination of PCD is not related to major changes in the expression of classical genes for apoptosis or cell survival. Our dataset is deposited to the ArrayExpress database and is a valuable source to select candidate genes in the studies of neuronal maturation. As an example, we studied the changes in the expression of selected genes Igf2bp3, Coro1A, Zfp57, Dcx, and Apaf1 in the young and mature sympathetic ganglia by quantitative PCR and show that these were strongly downregulated in the mature ganglia.

  12. Novel hypophysiotropic AgRP2 neurons and pineal cells revealed by BAC transgenesis in zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shainer, Inbal; Buchshtab, Adi; Hawkins, Thomas A.; Wilson, Stephen W.; Cone, Roger D.; Gothilf, Yoav

    2017-01-01

    The neuropeptide agouti-related protein (AgRP) is expressed in the arcuate nucleus of the mammalian hypothalamus and plays a key role in regulating food consumption and energy homeostasis. Fish express two agrp genes in the brain: agrp1, considered functionally homologous with the mammalian AgRP, and agrp2. The role of agrp2 and its relationship to agrp1 are not fully understood. Utilizing BAC transgenesis, we generated transgenic zebrafish in which agrp1- and agrp2-expressing cells can be visualized and manipulated. By characterizing these transgenic lines, we showed that agrp1-expressing neurons are located in the ventral periventricular hypothalamus (the equivalent of the mammalian arcuate nucleus), projecting throughout the hypothalamus and towards the preoptic area. The agrp2 gene was expressed in the pineal gland in a previously uncharacterized subgroup of cells. Additionally, agrp2 was expressed in a small group of neurons in the preoptic area that project directly towards the pituitary and form an interface with the pituitary vasculature, suggesting that preoptic AgRP2 neurons are hypophysiotropic. We showed that direct synaptic connection can exist between AgRP1 and AgRP2 neurons in the hypothalamus, suggesting communication and coordination between AgRP1 and AgRP2 neurons and, therefore, probably also between the processes they regulate. PMID:28317906

  13. Hypoxia-activated microglial mediators of neuronal survival are differentially regulated by tetracyclines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Aaron Y; Todd, Kathryn G

    2006-06-01

    The tetracycline derivatives minocycline (MINO) and doxycycline (DOXY) have been shown to be neuroprotective in in vivo and in vitro models of stroke. This neuroprotection is thought to be due to the suppression of microglial activation. However, the specific molecular parameters in microglia of the tetracyclines' effect are not understood. We subjected cultured rat microglial and neuronal cells to in vitro hypoxia and examined the effects of MINO and DOXY pre-treatments. Our data showed that MINO and DOXY protect against hypoxia-induced neuronal death by a mechanism dependent on regulation of microglial factors, but likely unrelated to regulation of microglial proliferation/viability. Both MINO and DOXY suppressed the hypoxic activation of ED-1, a marker for microglial activation. Morphological analyses of hypoxic microglia using the microglial marker Iba1 revealed that treatment with MINO and DOXY caused a higher percentage of microglia to remain in a non-activated state. MINO suppressed the hypoxic upregulation of pro-inflammatory agents nitric oxide (NO), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1beta), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), while DOXY down-regulated only NO and IL-1beta. In contrast, the hypoxic activation of pro-survival/neuroprotective microglial proteins, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), were unaffected by tetracycline treatments. Taken together, these results suggest that MINO and DOXY may provide neuroprotection against stroke by selectively down-regulating microglial toxic factors while maintaining functional pro-survival factors.

  14. PTEN, a widely known negative regulator of insulin/PI3K signaling, positively regulates neuronal insulin resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Amit; Dey, Chinmoy Sankar

    2012-01-01

    Lipid and protein tyrosine phosphatase, phosphatase and tension homologue (PTEN), is a widely known negative regulator of insulin/phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling. Down-regulation of PTEN is thus widely documented to ameliorate insulin resistance in peripheral tissues such as skeletal muscle and adipose. However, not much is known about its exact role in neuronal insulin signaling and insulin resistance. Moreover, alterations of PTEN in neuronal systems have led to discovery of several unexpected outcomes, including in the neurodegenerative disorder Alzheimer's disease (AD), which is increasingly being recognized as a brain-specific form of diabetes. In addition, contrary to expectations, its neuron-specific deletion in mice resulted in development of diet-sensitive obesity. The present study shows that PTEN, paradoxically, positively regulates neuronal insulin signaling and glucose uptake. Its down-regulation exacerbates neuronal insulin resistance. The positive role of PTEN in neuronal insulin signaling is likely due to its protein phosphatase actions, which prevents the activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), the kinases critically involved in neuronal energy impairment and neurodegeneration. Results suggest that PTEN acting through FAK, the direct protein substrate of PTEN, prevents ERK activation. Our findings provide an explanation for unexpected outcomes reported earlier with PTEN alterations in neuronal systems and also suggest a novel molecular pathway linking neuronal insulin resistance and AD, the two pathophysiological states demonstrated to be closely linked. PMID:22875989

  15. Single neuron transcriptomics identify SRSF/SR protein B52 as a regulator of axon growth and Choline acetyltransferase splicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Boyin; Bossing, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    We removed single identified neurons from living Drosophila embryos to gain insight into the transcriptional control of developing neuronal networks. The microarray analysis of the transcriptome of two sibling neurons revealed seven differentially expressed transcripts between both neurons (threshold: log21.4). One transcript encodes the RNA splicing factor B52. Loss of B52 increases growth of axon branches. B52 function is also required for Choline acetyltransferase (ChAT ) splicing. At the end of embryogenesis, loss of B52 function impedes splicing of ChAT, reduces acetylcholine synthesis, and extends the period of uncoordinated muscle twitches during larval hatching. ChAT regulation by SRSF proteins may be a conserved feature since changes in SRSF5 expression and increased acetylcholine levels in brains of bipolar disease patients have been reported recently. PMID:27725692

  16. The role of GABA in the regulation of GnRH neurons

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    Miho eWatanabe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurons form the final common pathway for the central regulation of reproduction. Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA has long been implicated as one of the major players in the regulation of GnRH neurons. Although GABA is typically an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mature adult central nervous system, most mature GnRH neurons show the unusual characteristic of being excited by GABA. While many reports have provided much insight into the contribution of GABA to the activity of GnRH neurons, the precise physiological role of the excitatory action of GABA on GnRH neurons remains elusive. This brief review presents the current knowledge of the role of GABA signaling in GnRH neuronal activity. We also discuss the modulation of GABA signaling by neurotransmitters and neuromodulators and the functional consequence of GABAergic inputs to GnRH neurons in both the physiology and pathology of reproduction.

  17. Neuronal expression of glucosylceramide synthase in central nervous system regulates body weight and energy homeostasis.

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    Viola Nordström

    Full Text Available Hypothalamic neurons are main regulators of energy homeostasis. Neuronal function essentially depends on plasma membrane-located gangliosides. The present work demonstrates that hypothalamic integration of metabolic signals requires neuronal expression of glucosylceramide synthase (GCS; UDP-glucose:ceramide glucosyltransferase. As a major mechanism of central nervous system (CNS metabolic control, we demonstrate that GCS-derived gangliosides interacting with leptin receptors (ObR in the neuronal membrane modulate leptin-stimulated formation of signaling metabolites in hypothalamic neurons. Furthermore, ganglioside-depleted hypothalamic neurons fail to adapt their activity (c-Fos in response to alterations in peripheral energy signals. Consequently, mice with inducible forebrain neuron-specific deletion of the UDP-glucose:ceramide glucosyltransferase gene (Ugcg display obesity, hypothermia, and lower sympathetic activity. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV-mediated Ugcg delivery to the arcuate nucleus (Arc significantly ameliorated obesity, specifying gangliosides as seminal components for hypothalamic regulation of body energy homeostasis.

  18. Regulation of action potential waveforms by axonal GABAA receptors in cortical pyramidal neurons.

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    Yang Xia

    Full Text Available GABAA receptors distributed in somatodendritic compartments play critical roles in regulating neuronal activities, including spike timing and firing pattern; however, the properties and functions of GABAA receptors at the axon are still poorly understood. By recording from the cut end (bleb of the main axon trunk of layer -5 pyramidal neurons in prefrontal cortical slices, we found that currents evoked by GABA iontophoresis could be blocked by picrotoxin, indicating the expression of GABAA receptors in axons. Stationary noise analysis revealed that single-channel properties of axonal GABAA receptors were similar to those of somatic receptors. Perforated patch recording with gramicidin revealed that the reversal potential of the GABA response was more negative than the resting membrane potential at the axon trunk, suggesting that GABA may hyperpolarize the axonal membrane potential. Further experiments demonstrated that the activation of axonal GABAA receptors regulated the amplitude and duration of action potentials (APs and decreased the AP-induced Ca2+ transients at the axon. Together, our results indicate that the waveform of axonal APs and the downstream Ca2+ signals are modulated by axonal GABAA receptors.

  19. Lin28a regulates neuronal differentiation and controls miR-9 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Jakub S; Choudhury, Nila Roy; de Lima Alves, Flavia; Rappsilber, Juri; Michlewski, Gracjan

    2014-04-11

    microRNAs shape the identity and function of cells by regulating gene expression. It is known that brain-specific miR-9 is controlled transcriptionally; however, it is unknown whether post-transcriptional processes contribute to establishing its levels. Here we show that miR-9 is regulated transcriptionally and post-transcriptionally during neuronal differentiation of the embryonic carcinoma cell line P19. We demonstrate that miR-9 is more efficiently processed in differentiated than in undifferentiated cells. We reveal that Lin28a affects miR-9 by inducing the degradation of its precursor through a uridylation-independent mechanism. Furthermore, we show that constitutively expressed untagged but not GFP-tagged Lin28a decreases differentiation capacity of P19 cells, which coincides with reduced miR-9 levels. Finally, using an inducible system we demonstrate that Lin28a can also reduce miR-9 levels in differentiated P19 cells. Together, our results shed light on the role of Lin28a in neuronal differentiation and increase our understanding of the mechanisms regulating the level of brain-specific microRNAs.

  20. A novel pathway regulates thyroid hormone availability in rat and human hypothalamic neurosecretory neurons.

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    Imre Kalló

    Full Text Available Hypothalamic neurosecretory systems are fundamental regulatory circuits influenced by thyroid hormone. Monocarboxylate-transporter-8 (MCT8-mediated uptake of thyroid hormone followed by type 3 deiodinase (D3-catalyzed inactivation represent limiting regulatory factors of neuronal T3 availability. In the present study we addressed the localization and subcellular distribution of D3 and MCT8 in neurosecretory neurons and addressed D3 function in their axons. Intense D3-immunoreactivity was observed in axon varicosities in the external zone of the rat median eminence and the neurohaemal zone of the human infundibulum containing axon terminals of hypophysiotropic parvocellular neurons. Immuno-electronmicroscopy localized D3 to dense-core vesicles in hypophysiotropic axon varicosities. N-STORM-superresolution-microscopy detected the active center containing C-terminus of D3 at the outer surface of these organelles. Double-labeling immunofluorescent confocal microscopy revealed that D3 is present in the majority of GnRH, CRH and GHRH axons but only in a minority of TRH axons, while absent from somatostatin-containing neurons. Bimolecular-Fluorescence-Complementation identified D3 homodimers, a prerequisite for D3 activity, in processes of GT1-7 cells. Furthermore, T3-inducible D3 catalytic activity was detected in the rat median eminence. Triple-labeling immunofluorescence and immuno-electronmicroscopy revealed the presence of MCT8 on the surface of the vast majority of all types of hypophysiotropic terminals. The presence of MCT8 was also demonstrated on the axon terminals in the neurohaemal zone of the human infundibulum. The unexpected role of hypophysiotropic axons in fine-tuned regulation of T3 availability in these cells via MCT8-mediated transport and D3-catalyzed inactivation may represent a novel regulatory core mechanism for metabolism, growth, stress and reproduction in rodents and humans.

  1. Single-cell RNAseq reveals cell adhesion molecule profiles in electrophysiologically defined neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Földy, Csaba; Darmanis, Spyros; Aoto, Jason; Malenka, Robert C; Quake, Stephen R; Südhof, Thomas C

    2016-08-30

    In brain, signaling mediated by cell adhesion molecules defines the identity and functional properties of synapses. The specificity of presynaptic and postsynaptic interactions that is presumably mediated by cell adhesion molecules suggests that there exists a logic that could explain neuronal connectivity at the molecular level. Despite its importance, however, the nature of such logic is poorly understood, and even basic parameters, such as the number, identity, and single-cell expression profiles of candidate synaptic cell adhesion molecules, are not known. Here, we devised a comprehensive list of genes involved in cell adhesion, and used single-cell RNA sequencing (RNAseq) to analyze their expression in electrophysiologically defined interneurons and projection neurons. We compared the cell type-specific expression of these genes with that of genes involved in transmembrane ion conductances (i.e., channels), exocytosis, and rho/rac signaling, which regulates the actin cytoskeleton. Using these data, we identified two independent, developmentally regulated networks of interacting genes encoding molecules involved in cell adhesion, exocytosis, and signal transduction. Our approach provides a framework for a presumed cell adhesion and signaling code in neurons, enables correlating electrophysiological with molecular properties of neurons, and suggests avenues toward understanding synaptic specificity.

  2. Surface N-glycoproteome patterns reveal key proteins of neuronal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyleckova, Jirina; Valekova, Ivona; Zizkova, Martina; Rakocyova, Michaela; Marsala, Silvia; Marsala, Martin; Gadher, Suresh Jivan; Kovarova, Hana

    2016-01-30

    Pluripotent stem cell-derived committed neural precursors are an important source of cells to treat neurodegenerative diseases including spinal cord injury. There remains an urgency to identify markers for monitoring of neural progenitor specificity, estimation of neural fate and follow-up correlation with therapeutic effect in preclinical studies using animal disease models. Cell surface capture technology was used to uncover the cell surface exposed N-glycoproteome of neural precursor cells upon neuronal differentiation as well as post-mitotic mature hNT neurons. The data presented depict an extensive study of surfaceome during neuronal differentiation, confirming glycosylation at a particular predicted site of many of the identified proteins. Quantitative changes detected in cell surface protein levels reveal a set of proteins that highlight the complexity of the neuronal differentiation process. Several of these proteins including the cell adhesion molecules ICAM1, CHL1, and astrotactin1 as well as LAMP1 were validated by SRM. Combination of immunofluorescence staining of ICAM1 and flow cytometry indicated a possible direction for future scrutiny of such proteins as targets for enrichment of the neuronal subpopulation from mixed cultures after differentiation of neural precursor cells. These surface proteins hold an important key for development of safe strategies in cell-replacement therapies of neuronal disorders. Neural stem and/or precursor cells have a great potential for cell-replacement therapies of neuronal diseases. Availability of well characterised and expandable neural cell lineage specific populations is critical for addressing such a challenge. In our study we identified and relatively quantified several hundred surface N-glycoproteins in the course of neuronal differentiation. We further confirmed the abundant changes for several cell adhesion proteins by SRM and outlined a strategy for utilisation of such N-glycoproteins in antibody based cell

  3. Nitric oxide regulates neuronal activity via calcium-activated potassium channels.

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    Lei Ray Zhong

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is an unconventional membrane-permeable messenger molecule that has been shown to play various roles in the nervous system. How NO modulates ion channels to affect neuronal functions is not well understood. In gastropods, NO has been implicated in regulating the feeding motor program. The buccal motoneuron, B19, of the freshwater pond snail Helisoma trivolvis is active during the hyper-retraction phase of the feeding motor program and is located in the vicinity of NO-producing neurons in the buccal ganglion. Here, we asked whether B19 neurons might serve as direct targets of NO signaling. Previous work established NO as a key regulator of growth cone motility and neuronal excitability in another buccal neuron involved in feeding, the B5 neuron. This raised the question whether NO might modulate the electrical activity and neuronal excitability of B19 neurons as well, and if so whether NO acted on the same or a different set of ion channels in both neurons. To study specific responses of NO on B19 neurons and to eliminate indirect effects contributed by other cells, the majority of experiments were performed on single cultured B19 neurons. Addition of NO donors caused a prolonged depolarization of the membrane potential and an increase in neuronal excitability. The effects of NO could mainly be attributed to the inhibition of two types of calcium-activated potassium channels, apamin-sensitive and iberiotoxin-sensitive potassium channels. NO was found to also cause a depolarization in B19 neurons in situ, but only after NO synthase activity in buccal ganglia had been blocked. The results suggest that NO acts as a critical modulator of neuronal excitability in B19 neurons, and that calcium-activated potassium channels may serve as a common target of NO in neurons.

  4. Coupled electrophysiological recording and single cell transcriptome analyses revealed molecular mechanisms underlying neuronal maturation

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    Xiaoying Chen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The mammalian brain is heterogeneous, containing billions of neurons and trillions of synapses forming various neural circuitries, through which sense, movement, thought, and emotion arise. The cellular heterogeneity of the brain has made it difficult to study the molecular logic of neural circuitry wiring, pruning, activation, and plasticity, until recently, transcriptome analyses with single cell resolution makes decoding of gene regulatory networks underlying aforementioned circuitry properties possible. Here we report success in performing both electrophysiological and whole-genome transcriptome analyses on single human neurons in culture. Using Weighted Gene Coexpression Network Analyses (WGCNA, we identified gene clusters highly correlated with neuronal maturation judged by electrophysiological characteristics. A tight link between neuronal maturation and genes involved in ubiquitination and mitochondrial function was revealed. Moreover, we identified a list of candidate genes, which could potentially serve as biomarkers for neuronal maturation. Coupled electrophysiological recording and single cell transcriptome analysis will serve as powerful tools in the future to unveil molecular logics for neural circuitry functions.

  5. Neuroligin-1 links neuronal activity to sleep-wake regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Helou, Janine; Bélanger-Nelson, Erika; Freyburger, Marlène; Dorsaz, Stéphane; Curie, Thomas; La Spada, Francesco; Gaudreault, Pierre-Olivier; Beaumont, Éric; Pouliot, Philippe; Lesage, Frédéric; Frank, Marcos G.; Franken, Paul; Mongrain, Valérie

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining wakefulness is associated with a progressive increase in the need for sleep. This phenomenon has been linked to changes in synaptic function. The synaptic adhesion molecule Neuroligin-1 (NLG1) controls the activity and synaptic localization of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors, which activity is impaired by prolonged wakefulness. We here highlight that this pathway may underlie both the adverse effects of sleep loss on cognition and the subsequent changes in cortical synchrony. We found that the expression of specific Nlg1 transcript variants is changed by sleep deprivation in three mouse strains. These observations were associated with strain-specific changes in synaptic NLG1 protein content. Importantly, we showed that Nlg1 knockout mice are not able to sustain wakefulness and spend more time in nonrapid eye movement sleep than wild-type mice. These changes occurred with modifications in waking quality as exemplified by low theta/alpha activity during wakefulness and poor preference for social novelty, as well as altered delta synchrony during sleep. Finally, we identified a transcriptional pathway that could underlie the sleep/wake-dependent changes in Nlg1 expression and that involves clock transcription factors. We thus suggest that NLG1 is an element that contributes to the coupling of neuronal activity to sleep/wake regulation. PMID:23716671

  6. Lola regulates Drosophila olfactory projection neuron identity and targeting specificity

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    Giniger Edward

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Precise connections of neural circuits can be specified by genetic programming. In the Drosophila olfactory system, projection neurons (PNs send dendrites to single glomeruli in the antenna lobe (AL based upon lineage and birth order and send axons with stereotyped terminations to higher olfactory centers. These decisions are likely specified by a PN-intrinsic transcriptional code that regulates the expression of cell-surface molecules to instruct wiring specificity. Results We find that the loss of longitudinals lacking (lola, which encodes a BTB-Zn-finger transcription factor with 20 predicted splice isoforms, results in wiring defects in both axons and dendrites of all lineages of PNs. RNA in situ hybridization and quantitative RT-PCR suggest that most if not all lola isoforms are expressed in all PNs, but different isoforms are expressed at widely varying levels. Overexpression of individual lola isoforms fails to rescue the lola null phenotypes and causes additional phenotypes. Loss of lola also results in ectopic expression of Gal4 drivers in multiple cell types and in the loss of transcription factor gene lim1 expression in ventral PNs. Conclusion Our results indicate that lola is required for wiring of axons and dendrites of most PN classes, and suggest a need for its molecular diversity. Expression pattern changes of Gal4 drivers in lola-/- clones imply that lola normally represses the expression of these regulatory elements in a subset of the cells surrounding the AL. We propose that Lola functions as a general transcription factor that regulates the expression of multiple genes ultimately controlling PN identity and wiring specificity.

  7. SIRT1 regulates dendritic development in hippocampal neurons.

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    Juan F Codocedo

    Full Text Available Dendritic arborization is required for proper neuronal connectivity. SIRT1, a NAD+ dependent histone deacetylase, has been associated to ageing and longevity, which in neurons is linked to neuronal differentiation and neuroprotection. In the present study, the role of SIRT1 in dendritic development was evaluated in cultured hippocampal neurons which were transfected at 3 days in vitro with a construct coding for SIRT1 or for the dominant negative SIRT1H363Y, which lacks the catalytic activity. Neurons overexpressing SIRT1 showed an increased dendritic arborization, while neurons overexpressing SIRT1H363Y showed a reduction in dendritic arbor complexity. The effect of SIRT1 was mimicked by treatment with resveratrol, a well known activator of SIRT1, which has no effect in neurons overexpressing SIRT1H363Y indicating that the effect of resveratrol was specifically mediated by SIRT1. Moreover, hippocampal neurons overexpressing SIRT1 were resistant to dendritic dystrophy induced by Aβ aggregates, an effect that was dependent on the deacetylase activity of SIRT1. Our findings indicate that SIRT1 plays a role in the development and maintenance of dendritic branching in hippocampal neurons, and suggest that these effects are mediated by the ROCK signaling pathway.

  8. Autaptic regulation of electrical activities in neuron under electromagnetic induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying; Ying, Heping; Jia, Ya; Ma, Jun; Hayat, Tasawar

    2017-01-01

    Realistic neurons may hold complex anatomical structure, for example, autapse connection to some internuncial neurons, which this specific synapse can connect to its body via a close loop. Continuous exchanges of charged ions across the membrane can induce complex distribution fluctuation of intracellular and extracellular charged ions of cell, and a time-varying electromagnetic field is set to modulate the membrane potential of neuron. In this paper, an autapse-modulated neuron model is presented and the effect of electromagnetic induction is considered by using magnetic flux. Bifurcation analysis and sampled time series for membrane potentials are calculated to investigate the mode transition in electrical activities and the biological function of autapse connection is discussed. Furthermore, the Gaussian white noise and electromagnetic radiation are considered on the improved neuron model, it is found appropriate setting and selection for feedback gain and time delay in autapse can suppress the bursting in neuronal behaviors. It indicates the formation of autapse can enhance the self-adaption of neuron so that appropriate response to external forcing can be selected, this biological function is helpful for encoding and signal propagation of neurons. It can be useful for investigation about collective behaviors in neuronal networks exposed to electromagnetic radiation. PMID:28240314

  9. Autaptic regulation of electrical activities in neuron under electromagnetic induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying; Ying, Heping; Jia, Ya; Ma, Jun; Hayat, Tasawar

    2017-02-01

    Realistic neurons may hold complex anatomical structure, for example, autapse connection to some internuncial neurons, which this specific synapse can connect to its body via a close loop. Continuous exchanges of charged ions across the membrane can induce complex distribution fluctuation of intracellular and extracellular charged ions of cell, and a time-varying electromagnetic field is set to modulate the membrane potential of neuron. In this paper, an autapse-modulated neuron model is presented and the effect of electromagnetic induction is considered by using magnetic flux. Bifurcation analysis and sampled time series for membrane potentials are calculated to investigate the mode transition in electrical activities and the biological function of autapse connection is discussed. Furthermore, the Gaussian white noise and electromagnetic radiation are considered on the improved neuron model, it is found appropriate setting and selection for feedback gain and time delay in autapse can suppress the bursting in neuronal behaviors. It indicates the formation of autapse can enhance the self-adaption of neuron so that appropriate response to external forcing can be selected, this biological function is helpful for encoding and signal propagation of neurons. It can be useful for investigation about collective behaviors in neuronal networks exposed to electromagnetic radiation.

  10. SIRT1 Regulates Dendritic Development in Hippocampal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, Juan A.; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic arborization is required for proper neuronal connectivity. SIRT1, a NAD+ dependent histone deacetylase, has been associated to ageing and longevity, which in neurons is linked to neuronal differentiation and neuroprotection. In the present study, the role of SIRT1 in dendritic development was evaluated in cultured hippocampal neurons which were transfected at 3 days in vitro with a construct coding for SIRT1 or for the dominant negative SIRT1H363Y, which lacks the catalytic activity. Neurons overexpressing SIRT1 showed an increased dendritic arborization, while neurons overexpressing SIRT1H363Y showed a reduction in dendritic arbor complexity. The effect of SIRT1 was mimicked by treatment with resveratrol, a well known activator of SIRT1, which has no effect in neurons overexpressing SIRT1H363Y indicating that the effect of resveratrol was specifically mediated by SIRT1. Moreover, hippocampal neurons overexpressing SIRT1 were resistant to dendritic dystrophy induced by Aβ aggregates, an effect that was dependent on the deacetylase activity of SIRT1. Our findings indicate that SIRT1 plays a role in the development and maintenance of dendritic branching in hippocampal neurons, and suggest that these effects are mediated by the ROCK signaling pathway. PMID:23056585

  11. A C. elegans stretch receptor neuron revealed by a mechanosensitive TRP channel homologue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Feng, Zhaoyang; Sternberg, Paul W; Xu, X Z Shawn

    2006-03-30

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is commonly used as a genetic model organism for dissecting integration of the sensory and motor systems. Despite extensive genetic and behavioural analyses that have led to the identification of many genes and neural circuits involved in regulating C. elegans locomotion behaviour, it remains unclear whether and how somatosensory feedback modulates motor output during locomotion. In particular, no stretch receptors have been identified in C. elegans, raising the issue of whether stretch-receptor-mediated proprioception is used by C. elegans to regulate its locomotion behaviour. Here we have characterized TRP-4, the C. elegans homologue of the mechanosensitive TRPN channel. We show that trp-4 mutant worms bend their body abnormally, exhibiting a body posture distinct from that of wild-type worms during locomotion, suggesting that TRP-4 is involved in stretch-receptor-mediated proprioception. We show that TRP-4 acts in a single neuron, DVA, to mediate its function in proprioception, and that the activity of DVA can be stimulated by body stretch. DVA both positively and negatively modulates locomotion, providing a unique mechanism whereby a single neuron can fine-tune motor activity. Thus, DVA represents a stretch receptor neuron that regulates sensory-motor integration during C. elegans locomotion.

  12. Central brain neurons expressing doublesex regulate female receptivity in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chuan; Pan, Yufeng; Robinett, Carmen C; Meissner, Geoffrey W; Baker, Bruce S

    2014-07-02

    Drosophila melanogaster females respond to male courtship by either rejecting the male or allowing copulation. The neural mechanisms underlying these female behaviors likely involve the integration of sensory information in the brain. Because doublesex (dsx) controls other aspects of female differentiation, we asked whether dsx-expressing neurons mediate virgin female receptivity to courting males. Using intersectional techniques to manipulate the activities of defined subsets of dsx-expressing neurons, we found that activation of neurons in either the pCd or pC1 clusters promotes receptivity, while silencing these neurons makes females unreceptive. Furthermore, pCd and pC1 neurons physiologically respond to the male-specific pheromone cis-vaccenyl acetate (cVA), while pC1 neurons also respond to male courtship song. The pCd and pC1 neurons expressing dsx in females do not express transcripts from the fruitless (fru) P1 promoter. Thus, virgin female receptivity is controlled at least in part by neurons that are distinct from those governing male courtship.

  13. The canonical Notch pathway effector RBP-J regulates neuronal plasticity and expression of GABA transporters in hippocampal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuxi; Wang, Yue; Worley, Paul F; Mattson, Mark P; Gaiano, Nicholas

    2015-05-01

    Activation of the Notch pathway in neurons is essential for learning and memory in various species from invertebrates to mammals. However, it remains unclear how Notch signaling regulates neuronal plasticity, and whether the transcriptional regulator and canonical pathway effector RBP-J plays a role. Here, we report that conditional disruption of RBP-J in the postnatal hippocampus leads to defects in long-term potentiation, long-term depression, and in learning and memory. Using gene expression profiling and chromatin immunoprecipitation, we identified two GABA transporters, GAT2 and BGT1, as putative Notch/RBP-J pathway targets, which may function downstream of RBP-J to limit the accumulation of GABA in the Schaffer collateral pathway. Our results reveal an essential role for canonical Notch/RBP-J signaling in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and suggest that role, at least in part, is mediated by the regulation of GABAergic signaling.

  14. Circadian- and Light-Dependent Regulation of Resting Membrane Potential and Spontaneous Action Potential Firing of Drosophila Circadian Pacemaker Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Sheeba, Vasu; Gu, Huaiyu; Sharma, Vijay K.; O'Dowd, Diane K.; Holmes, Todd C

    2007-01-01

    The ventral lateral neurons (LNvs) of adult Drosophila brain express oscillating clock proteins and regulate circadian behavior. Whole cell current-clamp recordings of large LNvs in freshly dissected Drosophila whole brain preparations reveal two spontaneous activity patterns that correlate with two underlying patterns of oscillating membrane potential: tonic and burst firing of sodium-dependent action potentials. Resting membrane potential and spontaneous action potential firing are rapidly ...

  15. The centrosomal E3 ubiquitin ligase FBXO31-SCF regulates neuronal morphogenesis and migration.

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    Mayur Vadhvani

    Full Text Available Neuronal development requires proper migration, polarization and establishment of axons and dendrites. Growing evidence identifies the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS with its numerous components as an important regulator of various aspects of neuronal development. F-box proteins are interchangeable subunits of the Cullin-1 based E3 ubiquitin ligase, but only a few family members have been studied. Here, we report that the centrosomal E3 ligase FBXO31-SCF (Skp1/Cullin-1/F-box protein regulates neuronal morphogenesis and axonal identity. In addition, we identified the polarity protein Par6c as a novel interaction partner and substrate targeted for proteasomal degradation in the control of axon but not dendrite growth. Finally, we ascribe a role for FBXO31 in dendrite growth and neuronal migration in the developing cerebellar cortex. Taken together, we uncovered the centrosomal E3 ligase FBXO31-SCF as a novel regulator of neuronal development.

  16. The dependence of neuronal encoding efficiency on Hebbian plasticity and homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Faramarz; Moustafa, Ahmed A.

    2015-01-01

    Synapses act as information filters by different molecular mechanisms including retrograde messenger that affect neuronal spiking activity. One of the well-known effects of retrograde messenger in presynaptic neurons is a change of the probability of neurotransmitter release. Hebbian learning describe a strengthening of a synapse between a presynaptic input onto a postsynaptic neuron when both pre- and postsynaptic neurons are coactive. In this work, a theory of homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release by retrograde messenger and Hebbian plasticity in neuronal encoding is presented. Encoding efficiency was measured for different synaptic conditions. In order to gain high encoding efficiency, the spiking pattern of a neuron should be dependent on the intensity of the input and show low levels of noise. In this work, we represent spiking trains as zeros and ones (corresponding to non-spike or spike in a time bin, respectively) as words with length equal to three. Then the frequency of each word (here eight words) is measured using spiking trains. These frequencies are used to measure neuronal efficiency in different conditions and for different parameter values. Results show that neurons that have synapses acting as band-pass filters show the highest efficiency to encode their input when both Hebbian mechanism and homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release exist in synapses. Specifically, the integration of homeostatic regulation of feedback inhibition with Hebbian mechanism and homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release in the synapses leads to even higher efficiency when high stimulus intensity is presented to the neurons. However, neurons with synapses acting as high-pass filters show no remarkable increase in encoding efficiency for all simulated synaptic plasticity mechanisms. This study demonstrates the importance of cooperation of Hebbian mechanism with regulation of neurotransmitter release induced by rapid diffused retrograde

  17. A2 noradrenergic neurons regulate forced swim test immobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Hyungwoo; Kerman, Ilan A

    2016-10-15

    The Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat is a widely used animal model of depression, which is characterized by dysregulation of noradrenergic signaling. We previously demonstrated that WKY rats show a unique behavioral profile on the forced swim test (FST), characterized by high levels of immobility upon initial exposure and a greater learning-like response by further increasing immobility upon re-exposure than the genetically related Wistar rats. In the current study we aimed to determine whether altered activation of brainstem noradrenergic cell groups contributes to this behavioral profile. We exposed WKY and Wistar rats, to either 5min of forced swim or to the standard two-day FST (i.e. 15min forced swim on Day 1, followed by 5min on Day 2). We then stained their brains for FOS/tyrosine hydroxylase double-immunocytochemistry to determine potential differences in the activation of the brainstem noradrenergic cell groups. We detected a relative hyperactivation in the locus coeruleus of WKY rats when compared to Wistars in response to both one- and two-day forced swim. In contrast, within the A2 noradrenergic cell group, WKY rats exhibited diminished levels of FOS across both days of the FST, suggesting their lesser activation. We followed up these observations by selectively lesioning the A2 neurons, using anti-dopamine-β-hydroxylase-conjugated saporin, in Wistar rats, which resulted in increased FST immobility on both days of the test. Together these data indicate that the A2 noradrenergic cell group regulates FST behavior, and that its hypoactivation may contribute to the unique behavioral phenotype of WKY rats.

  18. GABA regulates synaptic integration of newly generated neurons in the adult brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Shaoyu; Goh, Eyleen L. K.; Sailor, Kurt A.; Kitabatake, Yasuji; Ming, Guo-Li; Song, Hongjun

    2006-02-01

    Adult neurogenesis, the birth and integration of new neurons from adult neural stem cells, is a striking form of structural plasticity and highlights the regenerative capacity of the adult mammalian brain. Accumulating evidence suggests that neuronal activity regulates adult neurogenesis and that new neurons contribute to specific brain functions. The mechanism that regulates the integration of newly generated neurons into the pre-existing functional circuitry in the adult brain is unknown. Here we show that newborn granule cells in the dentate gyrus of the adult hippocampus are tonically activated by ambient GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) before being sequentially innervated by GABA- and glutamate-mediated synaptic inputs. GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult brain, initially exerts an excitatory action on newborn neurons owing to their high cytoplasmic chloride ion content. Conversion of GABA-induced depolarization (excitation) into hyperpolarization (inhibition) in newborn neurons leads to marked defects in their synapse formation and dendritic development in vivo. Our study identifies an essential role for GABA in the synaptic integration of newly generated neurons in the adult brain, and suggests an unexpected mechanism for activity-dependent regulation of adult neurogenesis, in which newborn neurons may sense neuronal network activity through tonic and phasic GABA activation.

  19. Reciprocal regulation of epileptiform neuronal oscillations and electrical synapses in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinjo, Erika R; Higa, Guilherme S V; Morya, Edgard; Valle, Angela C; Kihara, Alexandre H; Britto, Luiz R G

    2014-01-01

    Gap junction (GJ) channels have been recognized as an important mechanism for synchronizing neuronal networks. Herein, we investigated the participation of GJ channels in the pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE) by analyzing electrophysiological activity following the blockade of connexins (Cx)-mediated communication. In addition, we examined the regulation of gene expression, protein levels, phosphorylation profile and distribution of neuronal Cx36, Cx45 and glial Cx43 in the rat hippocampus during the acute and latent periods. Electrophysiological recordings revealed that the GJ blockade anticipates the occurrence of low voltage oscillations and promotes a marked reduction of power in all analyzed frequencies.Cx36 gene expression and protein levels remained stable in acute and latent periods, whereas upregulation of Cx45 gene expression and protein redistribution were detected in the latent period. We also observed upregulation of Cx43 mRNA levels followed by changes in the phosphorylation profile and protein accumulation. Taken together, our results indisputably revealed that GJ communication participates in the epileptiform activity induced by pilocarpine. Moreover, considering that specific Cxs undergo alterations through acute and latent periods, this study indicates that the control of GJ communication may represent a focus in reliable anti-epileptogenic strategies.

  20. Sonic Hedgehog Promotes Neurite Outgrowth of Primary Cortical Neurons Through Up-Regulating BDNF Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Weiliang; Cui, Lili; Zhang, Cong; Zhang, Xiangjian; He, Junna; Xie, Yanzhao

    2016-04-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh), a secreted glycoprotein factor, can activate the Shh pathway, which has been implicated in neuronal polarization involving neurite outgrowth. However, little evidence is available about the effect of Shh on neurite outgrowth in primary cortical neurons and its potential mechanism. Here, we revealed that Shh increased neurite outgrowth in primary cortical neurons, while the Shh pathway inhibitor (cyclopamine, CPM) partially suppressed Shh-induced neurite outgrowth. Similar results were found for the expressions of Shh and Patched genes in Shh-induced primary cortical neurons. Moreover, Shh increased the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) not only in lysates and in culture medium but also in the longest neurites of primary cortical neurons, which was partially blocked by CPM. In addition, blocking of BDNF action suppressed Shh-mediated neurite elongation in primary cortical neurons. In conclusion, these findings suggest that Shh promotes neurite outgrowth in primary cortical neurons at least partially through modulating BDNF expression.

  1. microRNAs and the regulation of neuronal plasticity under stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, M; Aschrafi, A; Bielefeld, P; Doxakis, E; Fitzsimons, C P

    2013-06-25

    In the brain, the connection between sensory information triggered by the presence of a stressor and the organism's reaction involves limbic areas such as the hippocampus, amygdala and prefrontal cortex. Consequently, these brain regions are the most sensitive to stress-induced changes in neuronal plasticity. However, the specific effects of stress on neuronal plasticity in these regions largely differ. Despite these regional differences, in many cases the steps leading to brain adaptation to stress involve highly coordinated changes in gene expression affecting cell metabolism, neuronal plasticity and synaptic transmission. In adult life the effects of stress on neuronal plasticity are largely reversible but stress in early life induces persistent changes in neuronal plasticity that increases vulnerability to develop psychopathologies and aging-related cognitive decline, suggesting the involvement of epigenetic mechanisms. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that microRNAs (miRs) are key players in epigenetic regulation. In this forefront review we present a critical look on the literature demonstrating the regulation of neuronal plasticity by miRs and the molecular mechanisms of target specificity in neurons. We propose that further progress in the identification of miR's function beyond single target identification would require a combination of developmental expression studies, bioinformatics and a deeper understanding of large networks of targets involved in epigenetic regulation. This will help to extend our understanding of the role miRs play in the regulation of stress-induced neuronal plasticity. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A small potassium current in AgRP/NPY neurons regulates feeding behavior and enery metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neurons that co-express agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) are indispensable for normal feeding behavior. Firing activities of AgRP/NPY neurons are dynamically regulated by energy status and coordinate appropriate feeding behavior to meet nutritional demands. However, intrinsic m...

  3. The DCR protein TTC3 affects differentiation and Golgi compactness in neurons through specific actin-regulating pathways.

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    Gaia Elena Berto

    Full Text Available In neuronal cells, actin remodeling plays a well known role in neurite extension but is also deeply involved in the organization of intracellular structures, such as the Golgi apparatus. However, it is still not very clear which mechanisms may regulate actin dynamics at the different sites. In this report we show that high levels of the TTC3 protein, encoded by one of the genes of the Down Syndrome Critical Region (DCR, prevent neurite extension and disrupt Golgi compactness in differentiating primary neurons. These effects largely depend on the capability of TTC3 to promote actin polymerization through signaling pathways involving RhoA, ROCK, CIT-N and PIIa. However, the functional relationships between these molecules differ significantly if considering the TTC3 activity on neurite extension or on Golgi organization. Finally, our results reveal an unexpected stage-dependent requirement for F-actin in Golgi organization at different stages of neuronal differentiation.

  4. Neuronal pentraxin 1 negatively regulates excitatory synapse density and synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiro-Silva, Joana; Gruart, Agnès; Clayton, Kevin Bernard; Podlesniy, Petar; Abad, Maria Alba; Gasull, Xavier; Delgado-García, José María; Trullas, Ramon

    2015-04-08

    In mature neurons, the number of synapses is determined by a neuronal activity-dependent dynamic equilibrium between positive and negative regulatory factors. We hypothesized that neuronal pentraxin (NP1), a proapoptotic protein induced by low neuronal activity, could be a negative regulator of synapse density because it is found in dystrophic neurites in Alzheimer's disease-affected brains. Here, we report that knockdown of NP1 increases the number of excitatory synapses and neuronal excitability in cultured rat cortical neurons and enhances excitatory drive and long-term potentiation in the hippocampus of behaving mice. Moreover, we found that NP1 regulates the surface expression of the Kv7.2 subunit of the Kv7 family of potassium channels that control neuronal excitability. Furthermore, pharmacological activation of Kv7 channels prevents, whereas inhibition mimics, the increase in synaptic proteins evoked by the knockdown of NP1. These results indicate that NP1 negatively regulates excitatory synapse number by modulating neuronal excitability and show that NP1 restricts excitatory synaptic plasticity. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/355504-18$15.00/0.

  5. 2-Bromopalmitate modulates neuronal differentiation through the regulation of histone acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueran; Du, Zhaoxia; Shi, Wei; Wang, Chen; Yang, Yang; Wang, Fen; Yao, Yao; He, Kun; Hao, Aijun

    2014-03-01

    In order to evaluate the functional significance of palmitoylation during multi-potent neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation, retinoic acid-induced P19 cells were used in this study as a model system. Cell behaviour was monitored in the presence of the protein palmitoylation inhibitor 2-bromopalmitate (2BP). Here, we observed a significant reduction in neuronal differentiation in the 2BP-treated cell model. We further explored the underlying mechanisms and found that 2BP resulted in the decreased acetylation of histones H3 and H4 and interfered with cell cycle withdrawal and neural stem/progenitor cells' renewal. Our results established a direct link between palmitoylation and the regulation of neural cell fate specification and revealed the epigenetic regulatory mechanisms that are involved in the effects of palmitoylation during neural development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. 2-Bromopalmitate modulates neuronal differentiation through the regulation of histone acetylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueran Chen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the functional significance of palmitoylation during multi-potent neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation, retinoic acid-induced P19 cells were used in this study as a model system. Cell behaviour was monitored in the presence of the protein palmitoylation inhibitor 2-bromopalmitate (2BP. Here, we observed a significant reduction in neuronal differentiation in the 2BP-treated cell model. We further explored the underlying mechanisms and found that 2BP resulted in the decreased acetylation of histones H3 and H4 and interfered with cell cycle withdrawal and neural stem/progenitor cells' renewal. Our results established a direct link between palmitoylation and the regulation of neural cell fate specification and revealed the epigenetic regulatory mechanisms that are involved in the effects of palmitoylation during neural development.

  7. Endocytosis regulates cell soma translocation and the distribution of adhesion proteins in migrating neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer C Shieh

    Full Text Available Newborn neurons migrate from their birthplace to their final location to form a properly functioning nervous system. During these movements, young neurons must attach and subsequently detach from their substrate to facilitate migration, but little is known about the mechanisms cells use to release their attachments. We show that the machinery for clathrin-mediated endocytosis is positioned to regulate the distribution of adhesion proteins in a subcellular region just proximal to the neuronal cell body. Inhibiting clathrin or dynamin function impedes the movement of migrating neurons both in vitro and in vivo. Inhibiting dynamin function in vitro shifts the distribution of adhesion proteins to the rear of the cell. These results suggest that endocytosis may play a critical role in regulating substrate detachment to enable cell body translocation in migrating neurons.

  8. Transcriptional co-regulation of neuronal migration and laminar identity in the neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Kenneth Y; Sestan, Nenad; Anton, E S

    2012-05-01

    The cerebral neocortex is segregated into six horizontal layers, each containing unique populations of molecularly and functionally distinct excitatory projection (pyramidal) neurons and inhibitory interneurons. Development of the neocortex requires the orchestrated execution of a series of crucial processes, including the migration of young neurons into appropriate positions within the nascent neocortex, and the acquisition of layer-specific neuronal identities and axonal projections. Here, we discuss emerging evidence supporting the notion that the migration and final laminar positioning of cortical neurons are also co-regulated by cell type- and layer-specific transcription factors that play concomitant roles in determining the molecular identity and axonal connectivity of these neurons. These transcriptional programs thus provide direct links between the mechanisms controlling the laminar position and identity of cortical neurons.

  9. The dependence of neuronal encoding efficiency on Hebbian plasticity and homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faramarz eFaghihi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Synapses act as information filters by different molecular mechanisms including retrograde messenger that affect neuronal spiking activity. One of the well-known effects of retrograde messenger in presynaptic neurons is a change of the probability of neurotransmitter release. Hebbian learning describe a strengthening of a synapse between a presynaptic input onto a postsynaptic neuron when both pre- and postsynaptic neurons are coactive. In this work, a theory of homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release by retrograde messenger and Hebbian plasticity in neuronal encoding is presented. Encoding efficiency was measured for different synaptic conditions. In order to gain high encoding efficiency, the spiking pattern of a neuron should be dependent on the intensity of the input and show low levels of noise. In this work, we represent spiking trains as zeros and ones (corresponding to non-spike or spike in a time bin, respectively as words with length equal to three. Then the frequency of each word (here eight words is measured using spiking trains. These frequencies are used to measure neuronal efficiency in different conditions and for different parameter values. Results show that neurons that have synapses acting as band-pass filters show the highest efficiency to encode their input when both Hebbian mechanism and homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release exist in synapses. Specifically, the integration of homeostatic regulation of feedback inhibition with Hebbian mechanism and homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release in the synapses leads to even higher efficiency when high stimulus intensity is presented to the neurons. However, neurons with synapses acting as high-pass filters show no remarkable increase in encoding efficiency for all simulated synaptic plasticity mechanisms.

  10. Regulation of persistent sodium currents by glycogen synthase kinase 3 encodes daily rhythms of neuronal excitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Jodi R.; Dewoskin, Daniel; McMeekin, Laura J.; Cowell, Rita M.; Forger, Daniel B.; Gamble, Karen L.

    2016-11-01

    How neurons encode intracellular biochemical signalling cascades into electrical signals is not fully understood. Neurons in the central circadian clock in mammals provide a model system to investigate electrical encoding of biochemical timing signals. Here, using experimental and modelling approaches, we show how the activation of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) contributes to neuronal excitability through regulation of the persistent sodium current (INaP). INaP exhibits a day/night difference in peak magnitude and is regulated by GSK3. Using mathematical modelling, we predict and confirm that GSK3 activation of INaP affects the action potential afterhyperpolarization, which increases the spontaneous firing rate without affecting the resting membrane potential. Together, these results demonstrate a crucial link between the molecular circadian clock and electrical activity, providing examples of kinase regulation of electrical activity and the propagation of intracellular signals in neuronal networks.

  11. Neuronal MHC Class I Expression Is Regulated by Activity Driven Calcium Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Lv

    Full Text Available MHC class I (MHC-I molecules are important components of the immune system. Recently MHC-I have been reported to also play important roles in brain development and synaptic plasticity. In this study, we examine the molecular mechanism(s underlying activity-dependent MHC-I expression using hippocampal neurons. Here we report that neuronal expression level of MHC-I is dynamically regulated during hippocampal development after birth in vivo. Kainic acid (KA treatment significantly increases the expression of MHC-I in cultured hippocampal neurons in vitro, suggesting that MHC-I expression is regulated by neuronal activity. In addition, KA stimulation decreased the expression of pre- and post-synaptic proteins. This down-regulation is prevented by addition of an MHC-I antibody to KA treated neurons. Further studies demonstrate that calcium-dependent protein kinase C (PKC is important in relaying KA simulation activation signals to up-regulated MHC-I expression. This signaling cascade relies on activation of the MAPK pathway, which leads to increased phosphorylation of CREB and NF-κB p65 while also enhancing the expression of IRF-1. Together, these results suggest that expression of MHC-I in hippocampal neurons is driven by Ca2+ regulated activation of the MAPK signaling transduction cascade.

  12. Transient epileptiform signaling during neuronal network development: regulation by external stimulation and bimodal GABAergic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemianek, Jill M; Shultz, Abraham M; Lee, Sangmook; Guaraldi, Mary; Yanco, Holly A; Shea, Thomas B

    2013-04-01

    A predominance of excitatory activity, with protracted appearance of inhibitory activity, accompanies cortical neuronal development. It is unclear whether or not inhibitory neuronal activity is solicited exclusively by excitatory neurons or whether the transient excitatory activity displayed by developing GABAergic neurons contributes to an excitatory threshold that fosters their conversion to inhibitory activity. We addressed this possibility by culturing murine embryonic neurons on multi-electrode arrays. A wave of individual 0.2-0.4 mV signals ("spikes") appeared between approx. 20-30 days in culture, then declined. A transient wave of high amplitude (>0.5 mV) epileptiform activity coincided with the developmental decline in spikes. Bursts (clusters of ≥3 low-amplitude spikes within 0.7s prior to returning to baseline) persisted following this decline. Addition of the GABAergic antagonist bicuculline initially had no effect on signaling, consistent with delayed development of GABAergic synapses. This was followed by a period in which bicuculline inhibited overall signaling, confirming that GABAergic neurons initially display excitatory activity in ex vivo networks. Following the transient developmental wave of epileptiform signaling, bicuculline induced a resurgence of epileptiform signaling, indicating that GABAergic neurons at this point displayed inhibitory activity. The appearance of transition after the developmental and decline of epileptiform activity, rather than immediately after the developmental decline in lower-amplitude spikes, suggests that the initial excitatory activity of GABAergic neurons contributes to their transition into inhibitory neurons, and that inhibitory GABAergic activity is essential for network development. Prior studies indicate that a minority (25%) of neurons in these cultures were GABAergic, suggesting that inhibitory neurons regulate multiple excitatory neurons. A similar robust increase in signaling following cessation of

  13. Synergistic regulation of glutamatergic transmission by serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors in prefrontal cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Eunice Y; Qin, Luye; Wei, Jing; Liu, Wenhua; Liu, Aiyi; Yan, Zhen

    2014-09-05

    The monoamine system in the prefrontal cortex has been implicated in various mental disorders and has been the major target of anxiolytics and antidepressants. Clinical studies show that serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) produce better therapeutic effects than single selective reuptake inhibitors, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we found that low dose SNRIs, by acting on 5-HT(1A) and α2-adrenergic receptors, synergistically reduced AMPA receptor (AMPAR)-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents and AMPAR surface expression in prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons via a mechanism involving Rab5/dynamin-mediated endocytosis of AMPARs. The synergistic effect of SNRIs on AMPARs was blocked by inhibition of activator of G protein signaling 3, a G protein modulator that prevents reassociation of G(i) protein α subunit and prolongs the βγ-mediated signaling pathway. Moreover, the depression of AMPAR-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents by SNRIs required p38 kinase activity, which was increased by 5-HT(1A) and α2-adrenergic receptor co-activation in an activator of G protein signaling 3-dependent manner. These results have revealed a potential mechanism for the synergy between the serotonin and norepinephrine systems in the regulation of glutamatergic transmission in cortical neurons.

  14. A novel subset of enteric neurons revealed by ptf1a:GFP in the developing zebrafish enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, Rosa A; Gu, Tiffany; Bronner, Marianne E

    2016-03-01

    The enteric nervous system, the largest division of the peripheral nervous system, is derived from vagal neural crest cells that invade and populate the entire length of the gut to form diverse neuronal subtypes. Here, we identify a novel population of neurons within the enteric nervous system of zebrafish larvae that express the transgenic marker ptf1a:GFP within the midgut. Genetic lineage analysis reveals that enteric ptf1a:GFP(+) cells are derived from the neural crest and that most ptf1a:GFP(+) neurons express the neurotransmitter 5HT, demonstrating that they are serotonergic. This transgenic line, Tg(ptf1a:GFP), provides a novel neuronal marker for a subpopulation of neurons within the enteric nervous system, and highlights the possibility that Ptf1a may act as an important transcription factor for enteric neuron development.

  15. NPY neuron-specific Y2 receptors regulate adipose tissue and trabecular bone but not cortical bone homeostasis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Chuan Shi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Y2 receptor signalling is known to be important in neuropeptide Y (NPY-mediated effects on energy homeostasis and bone physiology. Y2 receptors are located post-synaptically as well as acting as auto receptors on NPY-expressing neurons, and the different roles of these two populations of Y2 receptors in the regulation of energy homeostasis and body composition are unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We thus generated two conditional knockout mouse models, Y2(lox/lox and NPYCre/+;Y2(lox/lox, in which Y2 receptors can be selectively ablated either in the hypothalamus or specifically in hypothalamic NPY-producing neurons of adult mice. Specific deletion of hypothalamic Y2 receptors increases food intake and body weight compared to controls. Importantly, specific ablation of hypothalamic Y2 receptors on NPY-containing neurons results in a significantly greater adiposity in female but not male mice, accompanied by increased hepatic triglyceride levels, decreased expression of liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT1 and increased expression of muscle phosphorylated acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC. While food intake, body weight, femur length, bone mineral content, density and cortical bone volume and thickness are not significantly altered, trabecular bone volume and number were significantly increased by hypothalamic Y2 deletion on NPY-expressing neurons. Interestingly, in situ hybridisation reveals increased NPY and decreased proopiomelanocortin (POMC mRNA expression in the arcuate nucleus of mice with hypothalamus-specific deletion of Y2 receptors in NPY neurons, consistent with a negative feedback mechanism between NPY expression and Y2 receptors on NPY-ergic neurons. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together these data demonstrate the anti-obesogenic role of Y2 receptors in the brain, notably on NPY-ergic neurons, possibly via inhibition of NPY neurons and concomitant stimulation of POMC-expressing neurons in the arcuate nucleus of

  16. CREB: a multifaceted regulator of neuronal plasticity and protection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sakamoto, Kensuke; Karelina, Kate; Obrietan, Karl

    2011-01-01

    ... changes in neuronal plasticity, which is thought to underlie learning and memory. We also discuss work showing that CREB is a critical component of the neuroprotective transcriptional network, and data indicating that CREB dysregulation contributes to an array of neuropathological conditions.

  17. Arcuate AgRP neurons and the regulation of energy balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline eCansell

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus contains at least two crucial populations of neurons that continuously monitor signals reflecting energy status and promote the appropriate behavioral and metabolic responses to changes in energy demand. Neurons making pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC decrease food intake and increase energy expenditure through activation of G protein-coupled receptors melanocortin receptors (MCR via the release of a-melanocyte stimulating hormone. A prevailing idea until recently was that the neighboring neurons expressing the orexigenic neuropeptides, agouti-related protein (AgRP and neuropeptide Y (NPY (AgRP neurons increased feeding by opposing the anorexigenic actions of the POMC neurons. AgRP neurons activation but not POMC neurons inhibition was recently demonstrated to be necessary and sufficient to promote feeding. AgRP expressing axons were identified in mesolimbic, midbrain and pontine structure where they regulate feeding but also feeding-independent functions such as reward or peripheral nutrient partitioning. Post-synaptic Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA, lasting in a timeline similar to neuromodulation, was identified as the core mechanism by which hunger-activated neurons regulate feeding and non-food related processes in a melanocortin independent manner.

  18. Postembryonic neuronal addition in Zebrafish dorsal root ganglia is regulated by Notch signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGraw Hillary

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sensory neurons and glia of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG arise from neural crest cells in the developing vertebrate embryo. In mouse and chick, DRG formation is completed during embryogenesis. In contrast, zebrafish continue to add neurons and glia to the DRG into adulthood, long after neural crest migration is complete. The molecular and cellular regulation of late DRG growth in the zebrafish remains to be characterized. Results In the present study, we use transgenic zebrafish lines to examine neuronal addition during postembryonic DRG growth. Neuronal addition is continuous over the period of larval development. Fate-mapping experiments support the hypothesis that new neurons are added from a population of resident, neural crest-derived progenitor cells. Conditional inhibition of Notch signaling was used to assess the role of this signaling pathway in neuronal addition. An increase in the number of DRG neurons is seen when Notch signaling is inhibited during both early and late larval development. Conclusions Postembryonic growth of the zebrafish DRG comes about, in part, by addition of new neurons from a resident progenitor population, a process regulated by Notch signaling.

  19. C3G regulates cortical neuron migration, preplate splitting and radial glial cell attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Anne K; Britto, Joanne M; Dixon, Mathew P; Sheikh, Bilal N; Collin, Caitlin; Tan, Seong-Seng; Thomas, Tim

    2008-06-01

    Neuronal migration is integral to the development of the cerebral cortex and higher brain function. Cortical neuron migration defects lead to mental disorders such as lissencephaly and epilepsy. Interaction of neurons with their extracellular environment regulates cortical neuron migration through cell surface receptors. However, it is unclear how the signals from extracellular matrix proteins are transduced intracellularly. We report here that mouse embryos lacking the Ras family guanine nucleotide exchange factor, C3G (Rapgef1, Grf2), exhibit a cortical neuron migration defect resulting in a failure to split the preplate into marginal zone and subplate and a failure to form a cortical plate. C3G-deficient cortical neurons fail to migrate. Instead, they arrest in a multipolar state and accumulate below the preplate. The basement membrane is disrupted and radial glial processes are disorganised and lack attachment in C3G-deficient brains. C3G is activated in response to reelin in cortical neurons, which, in turn, leads to activation of the small GTPase Rap1. In C3G-deficient cells, Rap1 GTP loading in response to reelin stimulation is reduced. In conclusion, the Ras family regulator C3G is essential for two aspects of cortex development, namely radial glial attachment and neuronal migration.

  20. Neurotoxin-induced selective ubiquitination and regulation of MEF2A isoform in neuronal stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Hua; Yang, Qian; Mao, Zixu

    2012-09-01

    The myocyte enhancer factor 2A-D (MEF2) proteins are members of the MCM1-agamous-deficiens-serum response factor family of transcription factors. Various MEF2 isoform proteins are enriched in neurons and exhibit distinct patterns of expression in different regions of the brain. In neurons, MEF2 functions as a converging factor to regulate many neuronal functions including survival. MEF2 activities are tightly controlled in neurons in response to stress. Whether stress signal may differentially regulate MEF2s remains largely unknown. In this work, we showed that MEF2A, but not MEF2C or MEF2D, was modified by ubiquitination in dopaminergic neuronal cell line SN4741 cells. MEF2A was ubiquitinated at its N'-terminus, and the ubiquitination of MEF2A was first detectable in the nuclear compartment and later in the cytoplasm. Ubiquitination of MEF2A correlated with reduced DNA-binding activity and transcriptional activity. More importantly, disturbing the degradation of ubiquitinated MEF2A through proteasome pathway by neurotoxins known to induce Parkinson's disease features in model animals caused accumulation of ubiquitinated MEF2A, reduced MEF2 activity, and impaired cellular viability. Our work thus provides the first evidence to demonstrate an isoforms-specific regulation of MEF2s by ubiquitination-proteasome pathway in dopaminergic neuronal cell by neurotoxins, suggesting that stress signal and cellular context-dependent dysregulation of MEF2s may underlie the loss of neuronal viability.

  1. A role of melanin-concentrating hormone producing neurons in the central regulation of paradoxical sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salin Paul

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peptidergic neurons containing the melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH and the hypocretins (or orexins are intermingled in the zona incerta, perifornical nucleus and lateral hypothalamic area. Both types of neurons have been implicated in the integrated regulation of energy homeostasis and body weight. Hypocretin neurons have also been involved in sleep-wake regulation and narcolepsy. We therefore sought to determine whether hypocretin and MCH neurons express Fos in association with enhanced paradoxical sleep (PS or REM sleep during the rebound following PS deprivation. Next, we compared the effect of MCH and NaCl intracerebroventricular (ICV administrations on sleep stage quantities to further determine whether MCH neurons play an active role in PS regulation. Results Here we show that the MCH but not the hypocretin neurons are strongly active during PS, evidenced through combined hypocretin, MCH, and Fos immunostainings in three groups of rats (PS Control, PS Deprived and PS Recovery rats. Further, we show that ICV administration of MCH induces a dose-dependant increase in PS (up to 200% and slow wave sleep (up to 70% quantities. Conclusion These results indicate that MCH is a powerful hypnogenic factor. MCH neurons might play a key role in the state of PS via their widespread projections in the central nervous system.

  2. Calcium-dependent phosphorylation regulates neuronal stability and plasticity in a highly precise pacemaker nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Andrew A; Macleod, Gregory T; Zakon, Harold H

    2011-07-01

    Specific types of neurons show stable, predictable excitability properties, while other neurons show transient adaptive plasticity of their excitability. However, little attention has been paid to how the cellular pathways underlying adaptive plasticity interact with those that maintain neuronal stability. We addressed this question in the pacemaker neurons from a weakly electric fish because these neurons show a highly stable spontaneous firing rate as well as an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent form of plasticity. We found that basal firing rates were regulated by a serial interaction of conventional and atypical PKC isoforms and that this interaction establishes individual differences within the species. We observed that NMDA receptor-dependent plasticity is achieved by further activation of these kinases. Importantly, the PKC pathway is maintained in an unsaturated baseline state to allow further Ca(2+)-dependent activation during plasticity. On the other hand, the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase calcineurin does not regulate baseline firing but is recruited to control the duration of the NMDA receptor-dependent plasticity and return the pacemaker firing rate back to baseline. This work illustrates how neuronal plasticity can be realized by biasing ongoing mechanisms of stability (e.g., PKC) and terminated by recruiting alternative mechanisms (e.g., calcineurin) that constrain excitability. We propose this as a general model for regulating activity-dependent change in neuronal excitability.

  3. Biphasic coupling of neuronal nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation to the NMDA receptor regulates AMPA receptor trafficking and neuronal cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rameau, Gerald A; Tukey, David S; Garcin-Hosfield, Elsa D; Titcombe, Roseann F; Misra, Charu; Khatri, Latika; Getzoff, Elizabeth D; Ziff, Edward B

    2007-03-28

    Postsynaptic nitric oxide (NO) production affects synaptic plasticity and neuronal cell death. Ca2+ fluxes through the NMDA receptor (NMDAR) stimulate the production of NO by neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). However, the mechanisms by which nNOS activity is regulated are poorly understood. We evaluated the effect of neuronal stimulation with glutamate on the phosphorylation of nNOS. We show that, in cortical neurons, a low glutamate concentration (30 microM) induces rapid and transient NMDAR-dependent phosphorylation of S1412 by Akt, followed by sustained phosphorylation of S847 by CaMKII (calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinase II). We demonstrate that phosphorylation of S1412 by Akt is necessary for activation of nNOS by the NMDAR. nNOS mutagenesis confirms that these phosphorylations respectively activate and inhibit nNOS and, thus, transiently activate NO production. A constitutively active (S1412D), but not a constitutively repressed (S847D) nNOS mutant elevated surface glutamate receptor 2 levels, demonstrating that these phosphorylations can control AMPA receptor trafficking via NO. Notably, an excitotoxic stimulus (150 microM glutamate) induced S1412, but not S847 phosphorylation, leading to deregulated nNOS activation. S1412D did not kill neurons; however, it enhanced the excitotoxicity of a concomitant glutamate stimulus. We propose a swinging domain model for the regulation of nNOS: S1412 phosphorylation facilitates electron flow within the reductase module of nNOS, increasing nNOS sensitivity to Ca2+-calmodulin. These findings suggest a critical role for a kinetically complex and novel series of regulatory nNOS phosphorylations induced by the NMDA receptor for the in vivo control of nNOS.

  4. The histaminergic system regulates wakefulness and orexin/hypocretin neuron development via histamine receptor H1 in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundvik, Maria; Kudo, Hisaaki; Toivonen, Pauliina; Rozov, Stanislav; Chen, Yu-Chia; Panula, Pertti

    2011-12-01

    The histaminergic and hypocretin/orexin (hcrt) neurotransmitter systems play crucial roles in alertness/wakefulness in rodents. We elucidated the role of histamine in wakefulness and the interaction of the histamine and hcrt systems in larval zebrafish. Translation inhibition of histidine decarboxylase (hdc) with morpholino oligonucleotides (MOs) led to a behaviorally measurable decline in light-associated activity, which was partially rescued by hdc mRNA injections and mimicked by histamine receptor H1 (Hrh1) antagonist pyrilamine treatment. Histamine-immunoreactive fibers targeted the dorsal telencephalon, an area that expresses histamine receptors hrh1 and hrh3 and contains predominantly glutamatergic neurons. Tract tracing with DiI revealed that projections from dorsal telencephalon innervate the hcrt and histaminergic neurons. Translation inhibition of hdc decreased the number of hcrt neurons in a Hrh1-dependent manner. The reduction was rescued by overexpression of hdc mRNA. hdc mRNA injection alone led to an up-regulation of hcrt neuron numbers. These results suggest that histamine is essential for the development of a functional and intact hcrt system and that histamine has a bidirectional effect on the development of the hcrt neurons. In summary, our findings provide evidence that these two systems are linked both functionally and developmentally, which may have important implications in sleep disorders and narcolepsy. development via histamine receptor H1 in zebrafish.

  5. AP-2α regulates migration of GN-11 neurons via a specific genetic programme involving the Axl receptor tyrosine kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orso Francesca

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuronal migration is a crucial process that allows neurons to reach their correct target location to allow the nervous system to function properly. AP-2α is a transcription factor essential for neural crest cell migration and its mutation results in apoptosis within this cell population, as demonstrated by genetic models. Results We down-modulated AP-2α expression in GN-11 neurons by RNA interference and observe reduced neuron migration following the activation of a specific genetic programme including the Adhesion Related Kinase (Axl gene. We prove that Axl is able to coordinate migration per se and by ChIP and promoter analysis we observe that its transcription is directly driven by AP-2α via the binding to one or more functional AP-2α binding sites present in its regulatory region. Analysis of migration in AP-2α null mouse embryo fibroblasts also reveals an essential role for AP-2α in cell movement via the activation of a distinct genetic programme. Conclusion We show that AP-2α plays an essential role in cell movement via the activation of cell-specific genetic programmes. Moreover, we demonstrate that the AP-2α regulated gene Axl is an essential player in GN-11 neuron migration.

  6. The cell-autonomous role of excitatory synaptic transmission in the regulation of neuronal structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Bushong, Eric A; Shih, Tiffany P; Ellisman, Mark H; Nicoll, Roger A

    2013-05-08

    The cell-autonomous role of synaptic transmission in the regulation of neuronal structural and electrical properties is unclear. We have now employed a genetic approach to eliminate glutamatergic synaptic transmission onto individual CA1 pyramidal neurons in a mosaic fashion in vivo. Surprisingly, while electrical properties are profoundly affected in these neurons, as well as inhibitory synaptic transmission, we found little perturbation of neuronal morphology, demonstrating a functional segregation of excitatory synaptic transmission from neuronal morphological development.

  7. Efficient induction of dopaminergic neuron differentiation from induced pluripotent stem cells reveals impaired mitophagy in PARK2 neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Sadafumi; Akamatsu, Wado; Kisa, Fumihiko; Sone, Takefumi; Ishikawa, Kei-Ichi; Kuzumaki, Naoko; Katayama, Hiroyuki; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Hattori, Nobutaka; Okano, Hideyuki

    2017-01-29

    Patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) show promise for use as tools for in vitro modeling of Parkinson's disease. We sought to improve the efficiency of dopaminergic (DA) neuron induction from iPSCs by the using surface markers expressed in DA progenitors to increase the significance of the phenotypic analysis. By sorting for a CD184(high)/CD44(-) fraction during neural differentiation, we obtained a population of cells that were enriched in DA neuron precursor cells and achieved higher differentiation efficiencies than those obtained through the same protocol without sorting. This high efficiency method of DA neuronal induction enabled reliable detection of reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and vulnerable phenotypes in PARK2 iPSCs-derived DA neurons. We additionally established a quantitative system using the mt-mKeima reporter system to monitor mitophagy in which mitochondria fuse with lysosomes and, by combining this system with the method of DA neuronal induction described above, determined that mitophagy is impaired in PARK2 neurons. These findings suggest that the efficiency of DA neuron induction is important for the precise detection of cellular phenotypes in modeling Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Fluctuations in Cytosolic Calcium Regulate the Neuronal Malate-Aspartate NADH Shuttle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Satrústegui, Jorgina; Bak, Lasse K

    2015-01-01

    that MAS is regulated by fluctuations in cytosolic Ca(2+) levels, and that this regulation is required to maintain a tight coupling between neuronal activity and mitochondrial respiration and oxidative phosphorylation. At cytosolic Ca(2+) fluctuations below the threshold of the mitochondrial calcium...

  9. Reverse engineering a mouse embryonic stem cell-specific transcriptional network reveals a new modulator of neuronal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cegli, Rossella; Iacobacci, Simona; Flore, Gemma; Gambardella, Gennaro; Mao, Lei; Cutillo, Luisa; Lauria, Mario; Klose, Joachim; Illingworth, Elizabeth; Banfi, Sandro; di Bernardo, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression profiles can be used to infer previously unknown transcriptional regulatory interaction among thousands of genes, via systems biology 'reverse engineering' approaches. We 'reverse engineered' an embryonic stem (ES)-specific transcriptional network from 171 gene expression profiles, measured in ES cells, to identify master regulators of gene expression ('hubs'). We discovered that E130012A19Rik (E13), highly expressed in mouse ES cells as compared with differentiated cells, was a central 'hub' of the network. We demonstrated that E13 is a protein-coding gene implicated in regulating the commitment towards the different neuronal subtypes and glia cells. The overexpression and knock-down of E13 in ES cell lines, undergoing differentiation into neurons and glia cells, caused a strong up-regulation of the glutamatergic neurons marker Vglut2 and a strong down-regulation of the GABAergic neurons marker GAD65 and of the radial glia marker Blbp. We confirmed E13 expression in the cerebral cortex of adult mice and during development. By immuno-based affinity purification, we characterized protein partners of E13, involved in the Polycomb complex. Our results suggest a role of E13 in regulating the division between glutamatergic projection neurons and GABAergic interneurons and glia cells possibly by epigenetic-mediated transcriptional regulation.

  10. Retinoic acid from the meninges regulates cortical neuron generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegenthaler, Julie A; Ashique, Amir M; Zarbalis, Konstantinos; Patterson, Katelin P; Hecht, Jonathan H; Kane, Maureen A; Folias, Alexandra E; Choe, Youngshik; May, Scott R; Kume, Tsutomu; Napoli, Joseph L; Peterson, Andrew S; Pleasure, Samuel J

    2009-10-30

    Extrinsic signals controlling generation of neocortical neurons during embryonic life have been difficult to identify. In this study we demonstrate that the dorsal forebrain meninges communicate with the adjacent radial glial endfeet and influence cortical development. We took advantage of Foxc1 mutant mice with defects in forebrain meningeal formation. Foxc1 dosage and loss of meninges correlated with a dramatic reduction in both neuron and intermediate progenitor production and elongation of the neuroepithelium. Several types of experiments demonstrate that retinoic acid (RA) is the key component of this secreted activity. In addition, Rdh10- and Raldh2-expressing cells in the dorsal meninges were either reduced or absent in the Foxc1 mutants, and Rdh10 mutants had a cortical phenotype similar to the Foxc1 null mutants. Lastly, in utero RA treatment rescued the cortical phenotype in Foxc1 mutants. These results establish RA as a potent, meningeal-derived cue required for successful corticogenesis.

  11. APP metabolism regulates tau proteostasis in human cerebral cortex neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Steven Moore; Evans, Lewis D.B.; Therese Andersson; Erik Portelius; James Smith; Tatyana B. Dias; Nathalie Saurat; Amelia McGlade; Peter Kirwan; Kaj Blennow; John Hardy; Henrik Zetterberg; Frederick J. Livesey

    2015-01-01

    This is the final version. It was first published by Elsevier at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2211124715003599. Accumulation of Aβ peptide fragments of the APP protein and neurofibrillary tangles of the microtubule-associated protein tau are the cellular hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). To investigate the relationship between APP metabolism and tau protein levels and phosphorylation, we studied human-stem-cell-derived forebrain neurons with genetic forms of AD, a...

  12. 17β-estradiol regulation of T-type calcium channels in gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunguang; Bosch, Martha A.; Rick, Elizabeth A.; Kelly, Martin J.; Ronnekleiv, Oline K.

    2009-01-01

    T-type calcium channels are responsible for generating low-threshold spikes that facilitate burst firing and neurotransmitter release in neurons. GnRH neurons exhibit burst firing, but the underlying conductances are not known. Previously, we have found that 17β-estradiol (E2) increases T-type channel expression and excitability of hypothalamic arcuate nucleus neurons. Therefore, we used ovariectomized oil- or E2-treated EGFP-GnRH mice to explore the expression and E2-regulation of T-type channels in GnRH neurons. Based on single cell RT-PCR and real-time PCR quantification of the T-type channel α1-subunits, we found that all three subunits were expressed in GnRH neurons with Cav3.3≥Cav3.2>Cav3.1. The mRNA expression of the three subunits was increased with surge-inducing levels of E2 during the morning. During the afternoon, Cav3.3 mRNA expression remained elevated, whereas Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 were decreased. The membrane estrogen receptor agonist STX increased the expression of Cav3.3, but not Cav3.2 in GnRH neurons. Whole-cell patch recordings in GnRH neurons revealed that E2 treatment significantly augmented T-type current density at both time-points, and increased the rebound excitation during the afternoon. Although E2 regulated the mRNA expression of all three subunits in GnRH neurons, the increased expression combined with the slower inactivation kinetics of the T-type current indicates that Cav3.3 may be the most important for bursting activity associated with the GnRH/LH surge. The E2-induced increase in mRNA expression, which depends in part on membrane-initiated signaling, leads to increased channel function and neuronal excitability, and could be a mechanism by which E2 facilitates burst firing and cyclic GnRH neurosecretion. PMID:19710308

  13. Roundabout 2 Regulates Migration of Sensory Neurons by Signaling In trans

    OpenAIRE

    Kraut, Rachel; Zinn, Kai

    2004-01-01

    Background: Roundabout (Robo) receptors and their ligand Slit are important regulators of axon guidance and cell migration. The development of Drosophila embryonic sense organs provides a neuronal migration paradigm where the in vivo roles of Slit and Robo can be assayed using genetics. Results: Here we show that Slit-Robo signaling controls migration of Drosophila larval sensory neurons that are part of the Chordotonal (Cho) stretch receptor organs. We used live imaging to show that abdo...

  14. Spatio-temporal regulations and functions of neuronal alternative RNA splicing in developing and adult brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Takatoshi; Hidaka, Chiharu; Iijima, Yoko

    2016-08-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing is a fundamental mechanism that generates molecular diversity from a single gene. In the central nervous system (CNS), key neural developmental steps are thought to be controlled by alternative splicing decisions, including the molecular diversity underlying synaptic wiring, plasticity, and remodeling. Significant progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms and functions of alternative pre-mRNA splicing in neurons through studies in invertebrate systems; however, recent studies have begun to uncover the potential role of neuronal alternative splicing in the mammalian CNS. This article provides an overview of recent findings regarding the regulation and function of neuronal alternative splicing. In particular, we focus on the spatio-temporal regulation of neurexin, a synaptic adhesion molecule, by neuronal cell type-specific factors and neuronal activity, which are thought to be especially important for characterizing neural development and function within the mammalian CNS. Notably, there is increasing evidence that implicates the dysregulation of neuronal splicing events in several neurological disorders. Therefore, understanding the detailed mechanisms of neuronal alternative splicing in the mammalian CNS may provide plausible treatment strategies for these diseases.

  15. Tumor necrosis factor expressed by primary hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y cells is regulated by alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renauld, A E; Spengler, R N

    2002-01-15

    Neuron expression of the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF), and the regulation of the levels of TNF by alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor activation were investigated. Adult rat hippocampal neurons and phorbol ester (PMA)-differentiated SH-SY5Y cells were examined. Intracellular levels of TNF mRNA accumulation, as well as TNF protein and that released into the supernatant were quantified by in situ hybridization, immunocytochemistry and bioanalysis, respectively. Both neuron cultures demonstrated constitutive production of TNF. Activation of the alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor increased intracellular levels of TNF mRNA and protein in SH-SY5Y cells after addition of graded concentrations of the selective agonist, Brimonidine (UK-14304) to parallel cultures. Intracellular levels of mRNA were increased in a concentration-dependent fashion within 15 min of UK-14304 addition and were sustained during 24 hr of receptor activation. In addition, the levels of TNF in the supernatant were increased in both types of neuron cultures within 15 min of alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor activation. Furthermore, levels of TNF significantly increased in the supernatants of both neuron cultures after potassium-induced depolarization. A reduction in this depolarization-induced release occurred in hippocampal neuron cultures after exposure to the sympathomimetic tyramine with media replacement to deplete endogenous catecholamines. This finding reveals a role for endogenous catecholamines in the regulation of TNF production. Potassium-induced depolarization resulted in the release of TNF in hippocampal neuron cultures within 15 min but not until 24 hr in SH-SY5Y cultures demonstrating a temporally mediated event dependent upon cell type. Neuron expression of TNF, regulated by alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor activation demonstrates not only how a neuron controls its own production of this pleiotropic cytokine, but also displays a normal role for neurons in directing the many functions of TNF.

  16. Regulation of neuronal lineage decisions by the HES-related bHLH protein REF-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanjuin, Anne; Claggett, Julia; Shibuya, Mayumi; Hunter, Craig P; Sengupta, Piali

    2006-02-01

    Members of the HES subfamily of bHLH proteins play crucial roles in neural patterning via repression of neurogenesis. In C. elegans, loss-of-function mutations in ref-1, a distant nematode-specific member of this subfamily, were previously shown to cause ectopic neurogenesis from postembryonic lineages. However, while the vast majority of the nervous system in C. elegans is generated embryonically, the role of REF-1 in regulating these neural lineage decisions is unknown. Here, we show that mutations in ref-1 result in the generation of multiple ectopic neuron types derived from an embryonic neuroblast. In wild-type animals, neurons derived from this sublineage are present in a left/right symmetrical manner. However, in ref-1 mutants, while the ectopically generated neurons exhibit gene expression profiles characteristic of neurons on the left, they are present only on the right side. REF-1 functions in a Notch-independent manner to regulate this ectopic lineage decision. We also demonstrate that loss of REF-1 function results in defective differentiation of an embryonically generated serotonergic neuron type. These results indicate that REF-1 functions in both Notch-dependent and independent pathways to regulate multiple developmental decisions in different neuronal sublineages.

  17. Shp2 in forebrain neurons regulates synaptic plasticity, locomotion, and memory formation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusakari, Shinya; Saitow, Fumihito; Ago, Yukio; Shibasaki, Koji; Sato-Hashimoto, Miho; Matsuzaki, Yasunori; Kotani, Takenori; Murata, Yoji; Hirai, Hirokazu; Matsuda, Toshio; Suzuki, Hidenori; Matozaki, Takashi; Ohnishi, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    Shp2 (Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2) regulates neural cell differentiation. It is also expressed in postmitotic neurons, however, and mutations of Shp2 are associated with clinical syndromes characterized by mental retardation. Here we show that conditional-knockout (cKO) mice lacking Shp2 specifically in postmitotic forebrain neurons manifest abnormal behavior, including hyperactivity. Novelty-induced expression of immediate-early genes and activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (Erk) were attenuated in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of Shp2 cKO mice, suggestive of reduced neuronal activity. In contrast, ablation of Shp2 enhanced high-K(+)-induced Erk activation in both cultured cortical neurons and synaptosomes, whereas it inhibited that induced by brain-derived growth factor in cultured neurons. Posttetanic potentiation and paired-pulse facilitation were attenuated and enhanced, respectively, in hippocampal slices from Shp2 cKO mice. The mutant mice also manifested transient impairment of memory formation in the Morris water maze. Our data suggest that Shp2 contributes to regulation of Erk activation and synaptic plasticity in postmitotic forebrain neurons and thereby controls locomotor activity and memory formation.

  18. Regulation of Endogenous Conductances in GnRH neurons by Estrogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rønnekleiv, Oline K.; Bosch, Martha A.; Zhang, Chunguang

    2010-01-01

    17β-estradiol (E2) regulates the activity of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons through both presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms, and this ovarian steroid hormone is essential for cyclical GnRH neuronal activity and secretion. E2 has significant actions to modulate the mRNA expression of numerous ion channels in GnRH neurons and/or to enhance (suppress) endogenous conductances (currents) including potassium (KATP, A-type) and calcium low voltage T-type and high voltage L-type currents. Also, it is well documented that E2 can alter the excitability of GnRH neurons via direct action, but the intracellular signaling cascades mediating these actions are not well understood. As an example, KATP channels are critical ion channels needed for maintaining GnRH neurons in a hyperpolarized state for recruiting T-type calcium channels that are important for burst firing in GnRH neurons. E2 modulates the activity of KATP channels via a membrane-initiated signaling pathway in GnRH neurons. Obviously there are other channels, including the small conductance activated K+ (SK) channels, that maybe modulated by this signaling pathway, but the ensemble of mER-, ERα-, and ERβ-mediated effects both pre- and post-synaptic will ultimately dictate the excitability of GnRH neurons. PMID:20816765

  19. Comparison and Regulation of Neuronal Synchronization for Various STDP Rules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhua Ruan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss effects of various experimentally supported STDP learning rules on frequency synchronization of two unidirectional coupled neurons systematically. First, we show that synchronization windows for all STDP rules cannot be enhanced compared to constant connection under the same model. Then, we explore the influence of learning parameters on synchronization window and find optimal parameters that lead to the widest window. Our findings indicate that synchronization strongly depends on the specific shape and the parameters of the STDP update rules. Thus, we give some explanations by analyzing the synchronization mechanisms for various STDP rules finally.

  20. Neurodegeneration in Autoimmune Optic Neuritis Is Associated with Altered APP Cleavage in Neurons and Up-Regulation of p53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Herold

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS. Histopathological and radiological analysis revealed that neurodegeneration occurs early in the disease course. However, the pathological mechanisms involved in neurodegeneration are poorly understood. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE in Brown Norway rats (BN-rats is a well-established animal model, especially of the neurodegenerative aspects of MS. Previous studies in this animal model indicated that loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs, the neurons that form the axons of the optic nerve, occurs in the preclinical phase of the disease and is in part independent of overt histopathological changes of the optic nerve. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify genes which are involved in neuronal cell loss at different disease stages of EAE. Furthermore, genes that are highly specific for autoimmune-driven neurodegeneration were compared to those regulated in RGCs after optic nerve axotomy at corresponding time points. Using laser capture micro dissection we isolated RNA from unfixed RGCs and performed global transcriptome analysis of retinal neurons. In total, we detected 582 genes sequentially expressed in the preclinical phase and 1150 genes in the clinical manifest EAE (P 1.5. Furthermore, using ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA, we identified amyloid precursor protein (APP as a potential upstream regulator of changes in gene expression in the preclinical EAE but neither in clinical EAE, nor at any time point after optic nerve transection. Therefore, the gene pathway analysis lead to the hypothesis that altered cleavage of APP in neurons in the preclinical phase of EAE leads to the enhanced production of APP intracellular domain (AICD, which in turn acts as a transcriptional regulator and thereby initiates an apoptotic signaling cascade via up-regulation of the target gene p

  1. Neuronal Correlates of Cognitive Control during Gaming Revealed by Near-Infrared Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Matthias; Ninaus, Manuel; Kober, Silvia Erika; Neuper, Christa; Wood, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    In everyday life we quickly build and maintain associations between stimuli and behavioral responses. This is governed by rules of varying complexity and past studies have identified an underlying fronto-parietal network involved in cognitive control processes. However, there is only limited knowledge about the neuronal activations during more natural settings like game playing. We thus assessed whether near-infrared spectroscopy recordings can reflect different demands on cognitive control during a simple game playing task. Sixteen healthy participants had to catch falling objects by pressing computer keys. These objects either fell randomly (RANDOM task), according to a known stimulus-response mapping applied by players (APPLY task) or according to a stimulus-response mapping that had to be learned (LEARN task). We found an increased change of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin during LEARN covering broad areas over right frontal, central and parietal cortex. Opposed to this, hemoglobin changes were less pronounced for RANDOM and APPLY. Along with the findings that fewer objects were caught during LEARN but stimulus-response mappings were successfully identified, we attribute the higher activations to an increased cognitive load when extracting an unknown mapping. This study therefore demonstrates a neuronal marker of cognitive control during gaming revealed by near-infrared spectroscopy recordings.

  2. Neuronal Correlates of Cognitive Control during Gaming Revealed by Near-Infrared Spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Witte

    Full Text Available In everyday life we quickly build and maintain associations between stimuli and behavioral responses. This is governed by rules of varying complexity and past studies have identified an underlying fronto-parietal network involved in cognitive control processes. However, there is only limited knowledge about the neuronal activations during more natural settings like game playing. We thus assessed whether near-infrared spectroscopy recordings can reflect different demands on cognitive control during a simple game playing task. Sixteen healthy participants had to catch falling objects by pressing computer keys. These objects either fell randomly (RANDOM task, according to a known stimulus-response mapping applied by players (APPLY task or according to a stimulus-response mapping that had to be learned (LEARN task. We found an increased change of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin during LEARN covering broad areas over right frontal, central and parietal cortex. Opposed to this, hemoglobin changes were less pronounced for RANDOM and APPLY. Along with the findings that fewer objects were caught during LEARN but stimulus-response mappings were successfully identified, we attribute the higher activations to an increased cognitive load when extracting an unknown mapping. This study therefore demonstrates a neuronal marker of cognitive control during gaming revealed by near-infrared spectroscopy recordings.

  3. Functional adaptation to loading of a single bone is neuronally regulated and involves multiple bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sample, Susannah J; Behan, Mary; Smith, Lesley; Oldenhoff, William E; Markel, Mark D; Kalscheur, Vicki L; Hao, Zhengling; Miletic, Vjekoslav; Muir, Peter

    2008-09-01

    Regulation of load-induced bone formation is considered a local phenomenon controlled by osteocytes, although it has also been hypothesized that functional adaptation may be neuronally regulated. The aim of this study was to examine bone formation in multiple bones, in response to loading of a single bone, and to determine whether adaptation may be neuronally regulated. Load-induced responses in the left and right ulnas and humeri were determined after loading of the right ulna in male Sprague-Dawley rats (69 +/- 16 days of age). After a single period of loading at -760-, -2000-, or -3750-microepsilon initial peak strain, rats were given calcein to label new bone formation. Bone formation and bone neuropeptide concentrations were determined at 10 days. In one group, temporary neuronal blocking was achieved by perineural anesthesia of the brachial plexus with bupivicaine during loading. We found right ulna loading induces adaptive responses in other bones in both thoracic limbs compared with Sham controls and that neuronal blocking during loading abrogated bone formation in the loaded ulna and other thoracic limb bones. Skeletal adaptation was more evident in distal long bones compared with proximal long bones. We also found that the single period of loading modulated bone neuropeptide concentrations persistently for 10 days. We conclude that functional adaptation to loading of a single bone in young rapidly growing rats is neuronally regulated and involves multiple bones. Persistent changes in bone neuropeptide concentrations after a single loading period suggest that plasticity exists in the innervation of bone.

  4. Basolateral amygdala regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis and fear-related activation of newborn neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Elizabeth D.; Friedman, Aaron R.; Covarrubias, David; Ying, Carl; Sun, Wayne G.; Goosens, Ki A.; Sapolsky, Robert M.; Kaufer, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Impaired regulation of emotional memory is a feature of several affective disorders, including depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. Such regulation occurs, in part, by interactions between the hippocampus and the basolateral amygdala (BLA). Recent studies have indicated that within the adult hippocampus, newborn neurons may contribute to support of emotional memory, and that regulation of hippocampal neurogenesis is implicated in depressive disorders. How emotional information impacts newborn neurons in adults is not clear. Given the role of the BLA in hippocampus-dependent emotional memory, we investigated whether hippocampal neurogenesis was sensitive to emotional stimuli from the BLA. We show that BLA lesions suppress adult neurogenesis, while lesions of the central nucleus of the amygdala do not. Similarly, we show that reducing BLA activity through viral vector-mediated overexpression of an outwardly rectifying potassium channel suppresses neurogenesis. We also show that BLA lesions prevent selective activation of immature newborn neurons in response to a fear conditioning task. These results demonstrate that BLA activity regulates adult hippocampal neurogenesis and the fear context-specific activation of newborn neurons. Together, these findings denote functional implications for proliferation and recruitment of new neurons into emotional memory circuits. PMID:21670733

  5. FoxO regulates microtubule dynamics and polarity to promote dendrite branching in Drosophila sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, James C; Broihier, Heather T

    2016-10-01

    The size and shape of dendrite arbors are defining features of neurons and critical determinants of neuronal function. The molecular mechanisms establishing arborization patterns during development are not well understood, though properly regulated microtubule (MT) dynamics and polarity are essential. We previously found that FoxO regulates axonal MTs, raising the question of whether it also regulates dendritic MTs and morphology. Here we demonstrate that FoxO promotes dendrite branching in all classes of Drosophila dendritic arborization (da) neurons. FoxO is required both for initiating growth of new branches and for maintaining existing branches. To elucidate FoxO function, we characterized MT organization in both foxO null and overexpressing neurons. We find that FoxO directs MT organization and dynamics in dendrites. Moreover, it is both necessary and sufficient for anterograde MT polymerization, which is known to promote dendrite branching. Lastly, FoxO promotes proper larval nociception, indicating a functional consequence of impaired da neuron morphology in foxO mutants. Together, our results indicate that FoxO regulates dendrite structure and function and suggest that FoxO-mediated pathways control MT dynamics and polarity.

  6. Transcriptional and Epigenetic Regulation in Injury-Mediated Neuronal Dendritic Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Li, Wen-Yuan; Li, Zhi-Gang; Guan, Li-Xin; Deng, Ling-Xiao

    2017-02-01

    Injury to the nervous system induces localized damage in neural structures and neuronal death through the primary insult, as well as delayed atrophy and impaired plasticity of the delicate dendritic fields necessary for interneuronal communication. Excitotoxicity and other secondary biochemical events contribute to morphological changes in neurons following injury. Evidence suggests that various transcription factors are involved in the dendritic response to injury and potential therapies. Transcription factors play critical roles in the intracellular regulation of neuronal morphological plasticity and dendritic growth and patterning. Mounting evidence supports a crucial role for epigenetic modifications via histone deacetylases, histone acetyltransferases, and DNA methyltransferases that modify gene expression in neuronal injury and repair processes. Gene regulation through epigenetic modification is of great interest in neurotrauma research, and an early picture is beginning to emerge concerning how injury triggers intracellular events that modulate such responses. This review provides an overview of injury-mediated influences on transcriptional regulation through epigenetic modification, the intracellular processes involved in the morphological consequences of such changes, and potential approaches to the therapeutic manipulation of neuronal epigenetics for regulating gene expression to facilitate growth and signaling through dendritic arborization following injury.

  7. PGC-1α and PGC-1β Regulate Mitochondrial Density in Neurons*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wareski, Przemyslaw; Vaarmann, Annika; Choubey, Vinay; Safiulina, Dzhamilja; Liiv, Joanna; Kuum, Malle; Kaasik, Allen

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that regulation of cellular oxidative capacity through enhancing mitochondrial biogenesis may be beneficial for neuronal recovery and survival in human neurodegenerative disorders. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) has been shown to be a master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis and cellular energy metabolism in muscle and liver. The aim of our study was to establish whether PGC-1α and PGC-1β control mitochondrial density also in neurons and if these coactivators could be up-regulated by deacetylation. The results demonstrate that PGC-1α and PGC-1β control mitochondrial capacity in an additive and independent manner. This effect was observed in all studied subtypes of neurons, in cortical, midbrain, and cerebellar granule neurons. We also observed that endogenous neuronal PGC-1α but not PGC-1β could be activated through its repressor domain by suppressing it. Results demonstrate also that overexpression of SIRT1 deacetylase or suppression of GCN5 acetyltransferase activates transcriptional activity of PGC-1α in neurons and increases mitochondrial density. These effects were mediated exclusively via PGC-1α, since overexpression of SIRT1 or suppression of GCN5 was ineffective where PGC-1α was suppressed by short hairpin RNA. Moreover, the results demonstrate that overexpression of PGC-1β or PGC-1α or activation of the latter by SIRT1 protected neurons from mutant α-synuclein- or mutant huntingtin-induced mitochondrial loss. These evidences demonstrate that activation or overexpression of the PGC-1 family of coactivators could be used to compensate for neuronal mitochondrial loss and suggest that therapeutic agents activating PGC-1 would be valuable for treating neurodegenerative diseases in which mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage play an important pathogenic role. PMID:19542216

  8. Cholesterol efflux is differentially regulated in neurons and astrocytes: implications for brain cholesterol homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Zhang, Xiaolu; Kusumo, Handojo; Costa, Lucio G.; Guizzetti, Marina

    2012-01-01

    Disruption of cholesterol homeostasis in the central nervous system (CNS) has been associated with neurological, neurodegenerative, and neurodevelopmental disorders. The CNS is a closed system with regard to cholesterol homeostasis, as cholesterol-delivering lipoproteins from the periphery cannot pass the blood-brain-barrier and enter the brain. Different cell types in the brain have different functions in the regulation of cholesterol homeostasis, with astrocytes producing and releasing apolipoprotein E and lipoproteins, and neurons metabolizing cholesterol to 24(S)-hydroxycholesterol. We present evidence that astrocytes and neurons adopt different mechanisms also in regulating cholesterol efflux. We found that in astrocytes cholesterol efflux is induced by both lipid-free apolipoproteins and lipoproteins, while cholesterol removal from neurons is triggered only by lipoproteins. The main pathway by which apolipoproteins induce cholesterol efflux is through ABCA1. By upregulating ABCA1 levels and by inhibiting its activity and silencing its expression, we show that ABCA1 is involved in cholesterol efflux from astrocytes but not from neurons. Furthermore, our results suggest that ABCG1 is involved in cholesterol efflux to apolipoproteins and lipoproteins from astrocytes but not from neurons, while ABCG4, whose expression is much higher in neurons than astrocytes, is involved in cholesterol efflux from neurons but not astrocytes. These results indicate that different mechanisms regulate cholesterol efflux from neurons and astrocytes, reflecting the different roles that these cell types play in brain cholesterol homeostasis. These results are important in understanding cellular targets of therapeutic drugs under development for the treatments of conditions associated with altered cholesterol homeostasis in the CNS. PMID:23010475

  9. Retrograde monosynaptic tracing reveals the temporal evolution of inputs onto new neurons in the adult dentate gyrus and olfactory bulb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Aditi; Bergami, Matteo; Ghanem, Alexander; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus; Lepier, Alexandra; Götz, Magdalena; Berninger, Benedikt

    2013-01-01

    Identifying the connectome of adult-generated neurons is essential for understanding how the preexisting circuitry is refined by neurogenesis. Changes in the pattern of connectivity are likely to control the differentiation process of newly generated neurons and exert an important influence on their unique capacity to contribute to information processing. Using a monosynaptic rabies virus-based tracing technique, we studied the evolving presynaptic connectivity of adult-generated neurons in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus and olfactory bulb (OB) during the first weeks of their life. In both neurogenic zones, adult-generated neurons first receive local connections from multiple types of GABAergic interneurons before long-range projections become established, such as those originating from cortical areas. Interestingly, despite fundamental similarities in the overall pattern of evolution of presynaptic connectivity, there were notable differences with regard to the development of cortical projections: although DG granule neuron input originating from the entorhinal cortex could be traced starting only from 3 to 5 wk on, newly generated neurons in the OB received input from the anterior olfactory nucleus and piriform cortex already by the second week. This early glutamatergic input onto newly generated interneurons in the OB was matched in time by the equally early innervations of DG granule neurons by glutamatergic mossy cells. The development of connectivity revealed by our study may suggest common principles for incorporating newly generated neurons into a preexisting circuit. PMID:23487772

  10. Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Hepcidin Revealed by Hepcidin Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Camaschella

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron is essential for human life, but toxic if present in excess. To avoid iron overload and maintain iron homeostasis, all cells are able to regulate their iron content through the post-transcriptional control of iron genes operated by the cytosolic iron regulatory proteins that interact with iron responsive elements on iron gene mRNA. At the systemic level, iron homeostasis is regulated by the liver peptide hepcidin. Disruption of these regulatory loops leads to genetic diseases characterized by iron deficiency (iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia or iron overload (hemochromatosis. Alterations of the same systems are also found in acquired disorders, such as iron-loading anemias characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis and anemia of chronic diseases (ACD associated with common inflammatory conditions. In ACD, iron is present in the body, but maldistributed, being deficient for erythropoiesis, but sequestered in macrophages. Studies of the hepcidin regulation by iron and inflammatory cytokines are revealing new pathways that might become targets of new therapeutic intervention in iron disorders.

  11. Pacemaker neuron and network oscillations depend on a neuromodulator-regulated linear current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunbing Zhao

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Linear leak currents have been implicated in the regulation of neuronal excitability, generation of neuronal and network oscillations, and network state transitions. Yet, few studies have directly tested the dependence of network oscillations on leak currents or explored the role of leak currents on network activity. In the oscillatory pyloric network of decapod crustaceans neuromodulatory inputs are necessary for pacemaker activity. A large subset of neuromodulators is known to activate a single voltage-gated inward current IMI, which has been shown to regulate the rhythmic activity of the network and its pacemaker neurons. Using the dynamic clamp technique, we show that the crucial component of IMI for the generation of oscillatory activity is only a close-to-linear portion of the current-voltage relationship. The nature of this conductance is such that the presence or the absence of neuromodulators effectively regulates the amount of leak current and the input resistance in the pacemaker neurons. When deprived of neuromodulatory inputs, pyloric oscillations are disrupted; yet, a linear reduction of the total conductance in a single neuron within the pacemaker group recovers not only the pacemaker activity in that neuron, but also leads to a recovery of oscillations in the entire pyloric network. The recovered activity produces proper frequency and phasing that is similar to that induced by neuromodulators. These results show that the passive properties of pacemaker neurons can significantly affect their capacity to generate and regulate the oscillatory activity of an entire network, and that this feature is exploited by neuromodulatory inputs.

  12. [Emotion regulation and pain : Behavioral and neuronal correlates: a transdiagnostic approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konietzny, K; Suchan, B; Kreddig, N; Hasenbring, M I; Chehadi, O

    2016-10-01

    Emotions and emotion regulation are of special importance in the perception and modulation of pain but the mechanisms underlying this reciprocal relationship remain unclear. The transdiagnostic model provides an approach to explain the link between pain and emotion regarding cognitive and neuronal mechanisms and aims to identify mutual processes, which are relevant for both. Structural and functional imaging studies of pain indicate the involvement of specific cortical and subcortical structures, which also play an important role in emotion regulation. While numerous studies have investigated emotion regulation and their correlates in the central nervous system in pathological states, the research on emotion regulation in pain is still young. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of experimental and clinical studies of neuronal and behavioral correlates of pain-related emotion regulation. The current transdiagnostic approach may be able to enhance pain relief in the future.

  13. Polarized axonal surface expression of neuronal KCNQ potassium channels is regulated by calmodulin interaction with KCNQ2 subunit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P Cavaretta

    Full Text Available KCNQ potassium channels composed of KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 subunits give rise to the M-current, a slow-activating and non-inactivating voltage-dependent potassium current that limits repetitive firing of action potentials. KCNQ channels are enriched at the surface of axons and axonal initial segments, the sites for action potential generation and modulation. Their enrichment at the axonal surface is impaired by mutations in KCNQ2 carboxy-terminal tail that cause benign familial neonatal convulsion and myokymia, suggesting that their correct surface distribution and density at the axon is crucial for control of neuronal excitability. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for regulating enrichment of KCNQ channels at the neuronal axon remain elusive. Here, we show that enrichment of KCNQ channels at the axonal surface of dissociated rat hippocampal cultured neurons is regulated by ubiquitous calcium sensor calmodulin. Using immunocytochemistry and the cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4 membrane protein as a trafficking reporter, we demonstrate that fusion of KCNQ2 carboxy-terminal tail is sufficient to target CD4 protein to the axonal surface whereas inhibition of calmodulin binding to KCNQ2 abolishes axonal surface expression of CD4 fusion proteins by retaining them in the endoplasmic reticulum. Disruption of calmodulin binding to KCNQ2 also impairs enrichment of heteromeric KCNQ2/KCNQ3 channels at the axonal surface by blocking their trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum to the axon. Consistently, hippocampal neuronal excitability is dampened by transient expression of wild-type KCNQ2 but not mutant KCNQ2 deficient in calmodulin binding. Furthermore, coexpression of mutant calmodulin, which can interact with KCNQ2/KCNQ3 channels but not calcium, reduces but does not abolish their enrichment at the axonal surface, suggesting that apo calmodulin but not calcium-bound calmodulin is necessary for their preferential targeting to the axonal

  14. Cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptors on Sim1-expressing neurons regulate energy expenditure in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinal, Pierre; Bellocchio, Luigi; Guzmán-Quevedo, Omar; André, Caroline; Clark, Samantha; Elie, Melissa; Leste-Lasserre, Thierry; Gonzales, Delphine; Cannich, Astrid; Marsicano, Giovanni; Cota, Daniela

    2015-02-01

    The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) regulates energy balance by modulating not only food intake, but also energy expenditure (EE) and brown adipose tissue thermogenesis. To test the hypothesis that cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor in PVN neurons might control these processes, we used the Cre/loxP system to delete CB1 from single-minded 1 (Sim1) neurons, which account for the majority of PVN neurons. On standard chow, mice lacking CB1 receptor in Sim1 neurons (Sim1-CB1-knockout [KO]) had food intake, body weight, adiposity, glucose metabolism, and EE comparable with wild-type (WT) (Sim1-CB1-WT) littermates. However, maintenance on a high-fat diet revealed a gene-by-diet interaction whereby Sim1-CB1-KO mice had decreased adiposity, improved insulin sensitivity, and increased EE, whereas feeding behavior was similar to Sim1-CB1-WT mice. Additionally, high-fat diet-fed Sim1-CB1-KO mice had increased mRNA expression of the β3-adrenergic receptor, as well as of uncoupling protein-1, cytochrome-c oxidase subunit IV and mitochondrial transcription factor A in the brown adipose tissue, all molecular changes suggestive of increased thermogenesis. Pharmacological studies using β-blockers suggested that modulation of β-adrenergic transmission play an important role in determining EE changes observed in Sim1-CB1-KO. Finally, chemical sympathectomy abolished the obesity-resistant phenotype of Sim1-CB1-KO mice. Altogether, these findings reveal a diet-dependent dissociation in the CB1 receptor control of food intake and EE, likely mediated by the PVN, where CB1 receptors on Sim1-positive neurons do not impact food intake but hinder EE during dietary environmental challenges that promote body weight gain.

  15. A pair of pharyngeal gustatory receptor neurons regulates caffeine-dependent ingestion in Drosophila larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaekyun Choi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The sense of taste is an essential chemosensory modality that enables animals to identify appropriate food sources and control feeding behavior. In particular, the recognition of bitter taste prevents animals from feeding on harmful substances. Feeding is a complex behavior comprised of multiple steps, and food quality is continuously assessed. We here examined the role of pharyngeal gustatory organs in ingestion behavior. As a first step, we constructed a gustatory receptor-to-neuron map of the larval pharyngeal sense organs, and examined corresponding gustatory receptor neuron projections in the larval brain. Out of 22 candidate bitter compounds, we found 14 bitter compounds that elicit inhibition of ingestion in a dose-dependent manner. We provide evidence that certain pharyngeal gustatory receptor neurons are necessary and sufficient for the ingestion response of larvae to caffeine. Additionally, we show that a specific pair of pharyngeal gustatory receptor neurons, DP1, responds to caffeine by calcium imaging. In this study we show that a specific pair of gustatory receptor neurons in the pharyngeal sense organs coordinates caffeine sensing with regulation of behavioral responses such as ingestion. Our results indicate that in Drosophila larvae, the pharyngeal gustatory receptor neurons have a major role in sensing food palatability to regulate ingestion behavior. The pharyngeal sense organs are prime candidates to influence ingestion due to their position in the pharynx, and they may act as first level sensors of ingested food.

  16. A Small Potassium Current in AgRP/NPY Neurons Regulates Feeding Behavior and Energy Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanlin He

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurons that co-express agouti-related peptide (AgRP and neuropeptide Y (NPY are indispensable for normal feeding behavior. Firing activities of AgRP/NPY neurons are dynamically regulated by energy status and coordinate appropriate feeding behavior to meet nutritional demands. However, intrinsic mechanisms that regulate AgRP/NPY neural activities during the fed-to-fasted transition are not fully understood. We found that AgRP/NPY neurons in satiated mice express high levels of the small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel 3 (SK3 and are inhibited by SK3-mediated potassium currents; on the other hand, food deprivation suppresses SK3 expression in AgRP/NPY neurons, and the decreased SK3-mediated currents contribute to fasting-induced activation of these neurons. Genetic mutation of SK3 specifically in AgRP/NPY neurons leads to increased sensitivity to diet-induced obesity, associated with chronic hyperphagia and decreased energy expenditure. Our results identify SK3 as a key intrinsic mediator that coordinates nutritional status with AgRP/NPY neural activities and animals’ feeding behavior and energy metabolism.

  17. Oxidative stress-mediated down-regulation of bcl-2 promoter in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugazhenthi, Subbiah; Nesterova, Albina; Jambal, Purevsuren; Audesirk, Gerald; Kern, Marcey; Cabell, Leigh; Eves, Eva; Rosner, Marsha R; Boxer, Linda M; Reusch, Jane E-B

    2003-03-01

    Generation of oxidative stress/reactive oxygen species (ROS) is one of the causes of neuronal apoptosis. We have examined the effects of ROS at the transcriptional level in an immortalized hippocampal neuronal cell line (H19-7) and in rat primary hippocampal neurons. Treatment of H19-7 cells with hydrogen peroxide (150 micro m) resulted in a 40% decrease in Bcl-2 protein and a parallel decrease in bcl-2 mRNA levels. H19-7 cells overexpressing bcl-2 were found to be resistant to ROS-induced apoptosis. We had previously shown that bcl-2 promoter activity is positively regulated by the transcription factor cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) in neurons. In the present study, we demonstrate that ROS decreases the activity of luciferase reporter gene driven by a cyclic AMP response element site containing bcl-2 promoter. Exposure of neurons to ROS for 6 h resulted in basal and fibroblast growth factor-2-stimulated phosphorylation/activation of CREB. Chronic 24 h treatment with ROS led to a significant (p < 0.01) decrease in CREB protein and CREB mRNA levels. Adenoviral overexpression of wild type CREB in H19-7 cells resulted in significant (p < 0.01) protection against ROS-induced apoptosis through up-regulation of Bcl-2 expression whereas dominant negative CREB exaggerated the injury. These findings demonstrate that loss of CREB function contributes to oxidative stress-induced neuronal dysfunction.

  18. Pilocarpine-induced seizures trigger differential regulation of microRNA-stability related genes in rat hippocampal neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinjo, Erika R.; Higa, Guilherme S. V.; Santos, Bianca A.; de Sousa, Erica; Damico, Marcio V.; Walter, Lais T.; Morya, Edgard; Valle, Angela C.; Britto, Luiz R. G.; Kihara, Alexandre H.

    2016-01-01

    Epileptogenesis in the temporal lobe elicits regulation of gene expression and protein translation, leading to reorganization of neuronal networks. In this process, miRNAs were described as being regulated in a cell-specific manner, although mechanistics of miRNAs activity are poorly understood. The specificity of miRNAs on their target genes depends on their intracellular concentration, reflecting the balance of biosynthesis and degradation. Herein, we confirmed that pilocarpine application promptly (<30 min) induces status epilepticus (SE) as revealed by changes in rat electrocorticogram particularly in fast-beta range (21–30 Hz). SE simultaneously upregulated XRN2 and downregulated PAPD4 gene expression in the hippocampus, two genes related to miRNA degradation and stability, respectively. Moreover, SE decreased the number of XRN2-positive cells in the hilus, while reduced the number of PAPD4-positive cells in CA1. XRN2 and PAPD4 levels did not change in calretinin- and CamKII-positive cells, although it was possible to determine that PAPD4, but not XRN2, was upregulated in parvalbumin-positive cells, revealing that SE induction unbalances the accumulation of these functional-opposed proteins in inhibitory interneurons that directly innervate distinct domains of pyramidal cells. Therefore, we were able to disclose a possible mechanism underlying the differential regulation of miRNAs in specific neurons during epileptogenesis. PMID:26869208

  19. Disruption of dopamine neuron activity pattern regulation through selective expression of a human KCNN3 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soden, Marta E; Jones, Graham L; Sanford, Christina A; Chung, Amanda S; Güler, Ali D; Chavkin, Charles; Luján, Rafael; Zweifel, Larry S

    2013-11-20

    The calcium-activated small conductance potassium channel SK3 plays an essential role in the regulation of dopamine neuron activity patterns. Here we demonstrate that expression of a human disease-related SK3 mutation (hSK3Δ) in dopamine neurons of mice disrupts the balance between tonic and phasic dopamine neuron activity. Expression of hSK3Δ suppressed endogenous SK currents, reducing coupling between SK channels and NMDA receptors (NMDARs) and increasing permissiveness for burst firing. Consistent with enhanced excitability of dopamine neurons, hSK3Δ increased evoked calcium signals in dopamine neurons in vivo and potentiated evoked dopamine release. Specific expression of hSK3Δ led to deficits in attention and sensory gating and heightened sensitivity to a psychomimetic drug. Sensory-motor alterations and psychomimetic sensitivity were recapitulated in a mouse model of transient, reversible dopamine neuron activation. These results demonstrate the cell-autonomous effects of a human ion channel mutation on dopamine neuron physiology and the impact of activity pattern disruption on behavior.

  20. Slit and Robo regulate dendrite branching and elongation of space-filling neurons in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, Svetla; Reissaus, André; Tavosanis, Gaia

    2008-12-01

    Space-filling neurons extensively sample their receptive fields with fine dendritic branches. In this study we show that a member of the conserved Robo receptor family, Robo, and its ligand Slit regulate the dendritic differentiation of space-filling neurons. Loss of Robo or Slit function leads to faster elongating and less branched dendrites of the complex and space-filling class IV multi-dendritic dendrite-arborization (md-da) neurons in the Drosophila embryonic peripheral nervous system, but not of the simpler class I neurons. The total dendrite length of Class IV neurons is not modified in robo or slit mutant embryos. Robo mediates this process cell-autonomously. Upon Robo over-expression in md-da neurons the dendritic tree is simplified and time-lapse analysis during larval stages indicates that this is due to reduction in the number of newly formed branches. We propose that Slit, through Robo, provides an extrinsic signal to coordinate the growth rate and the branching level of space-filling neurons, thus allowing them to appropriately cover their target field.

  1. Rab, Arf, and Arl-Regulated Membrane Traffic in Cortical Neuron Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bor Luen

    2016-07-01

    The migration of projection neurons from its birthplace in the subventricular zone to their final destination in the cortical plate is a complex process that requires a series of highly coordinated cellular events. Amongst the key factors involved in the processes are modulators of cytoskeletal dynamics, as well as cellular membrane traffic. Members of the small GTPases family responsible for the latter process, the Rabs and Arfs, have been recently implicated in cortical neuron migration. Rab5 and Rab11, which are key modulators of endocytosis and endocytic recycling respectively, ensure proper surface expression and distribution of N-cadherin, a key adhesion protein that tethers migrating neurons to the radial glia fiber tracts during pia-directed migration. Rab7, which is associated with lysosomal biogenesis and function, is important for the final step of terminal translocation when N-cadherin is downregulated by lysosomal degradation. Arf6 activity, which is known to be important in neuronal processes outgrowth, may negatively impact the multipolar-bipolar transition of cortical neurons undergoing radial migration, but the downstream effector of Arf6 in this regard is not yet known. In addition to the above, members of the Arl family which have been recently shown to be important in radial glia scaffold formation, would also be important for cortical neuron migration. In this short review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the importance of membrane traffic regulated by the Rab, Arf, and Arl family members in cortical neuron migration.

  2. Regulation of ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha in sciatic motor neurons following axotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLennan, A J; Devlin, B K; Neitzel, K L; McLaurin, D L; Anderson, K J; Lee, N

    1999-01-01

    Spinal motor neurons are one of the few classes of neurons capable of regenerating axons following axotomy. Injury-induced expression of neurotrophic factors and corresponding receptors may play an important role in this rare ability. A wide variety of indirect data suggests that ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha may critically contribute to the regeneration of injured spinal motor neurons. We used immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization and retrograde tracing techniques to study the regulation of ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha in axotomized sciatic motor neurons. Ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha immunoreactivity, detected with two independent antisera, is increased in a subpopulation of caudal sciatic motor neuron soma one, two and six weeks after sciatic nerve transection and reattachment, while no changes are detected at one day and 15 weeks post-lesion. Ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha messenger RNA levels are augmented in the same classes of neurons following an identical lesion, suggesting that increased synthesis contributes, at least in part, to the additional ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha protein. Separating the proximal and distal nerve stumps with a plastic barrier does not noticeably affect the injury-induced change in ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha regulation, thereby indicating that this injury response is not dependent on signals distal to the lesion traveling retrogradely through the nerve or signals generated by axonal growth through the distal nerve. The prolonged increases in ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha protein and messenger RNA found in regenerating sciatic motor neurons contrast with the responses of non-regenerating central neurons, which are reported to display, at most, a short-lived increase in ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor alpha messenger RNA expression following injury. The present data are the first to demonstrate, in vivo, neuronal regulation of

  3. Transcriptional regulation of gene expression clusters in motor neurons following spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryge, J.; Winther, Ole; Wienecke, J.;

    2010-01-01

    expression profiles. Analysis of these gene clusters identifies early immunological/inflammatory and late developmental responses as well as a regulation of genes relating to neuron excitability that support the development of motor neuron hyper-excitability and the reappearance of plateau potentials...... of modulatory inputs from the brain correlates with the development of spasticity. Results: Here we examine the dynamic transcriptional response of motor neurons to spinal cord injury as it evolves over time to unravel common gene expression patterns and their underlying regulatory mechanisms. For this we use......Background: Spinal cord injury leads to neurological dysfunctions affecting the motor, sensory as well as the autonomic systems. Increased excitability of motor neurons has been implicated in injury-induced spasticity, where the reappearance of self-sustained plateau potentials in the absence...

  4. Dynamic regulation of midbrain dopamine neuron activity: intrinsic, synaptic, and plasticity mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, H; Paladini, C A

    2011-12-15

    Although the roles of dopaminergic signaling in learning and behavior are well established, it is not fully understood how the activity of dopaminergic neurons is dynamically regulated under different conditions in a constantly changing environment. Dopamine neurons must integrate sensory, motor, and cognitive information online to inform the organism to pursue outcomes with the highest reward probability. In this article, we provide an overview of recent advances on the intrinsic, extrinsic (i.e., synaptic), and plasticity mechanisms controlling dopamine neuron activity, mostly focusing on mechanistic studies conducted using ex vivo brain slice preparations. We also hope to highlight some unresolved questions regarding information processing that takes place at dopamine neurons, thereby stimulating further investigations at different levels of analysis.

  5. Serotonin reciprocally regulates melanocortin neurons to modulate food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisler, Lora K; Jobst, Erin E; Sutton, Gregory M; Zhou, Ligang; Borok, Erzsebet; Thornton-Jones, Zoe; Liu, Hong Yan; Zigman, Jeffrey M; Balthasar, Nina; Kishi, Toshiro; Lee, Charlotte E; Aschkenasi, Carl J; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Yu, Jia; Boss, Olivier; Mountjoy, Kathleen G; Clifton, Peter G; Lowell, Bradford B; Friedman, Jeffrey M; Horvath, Tamas; Butler, Andrew A; Elmquist, Joel K; Cowley, Michael A

    2006-07-20

    The neural pathways through which central serotonergic systems regulate food intake and body weight remain to be fully elucidated. We report that serotonin, via action at serotonin1B receptors (5-HT1BRs), modulates the endogenous release of both agonists and antagonists of the melanocortin receptors, which are a core component of the central circuitry controlling body weight homeostasis. We also show that serotonin-induced hypophagia requires downstream activation of melanocortin 4, but not melanocortin 3, receptors. These results identify a primary mechanism underlying the serotonergic regulation of energy balance and provide an example of a centrally derived signal that reciprocally regulates melanocortin receptor agonists and antagonists in a similar manner to peripheral adiposity signals.

  6. Intestinal signaling to GABAergic neurons regulates a rhythmic behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Timothy R.; Luo, Shuo; Round, Elaine K.; Brauner, Martin; Gottschalk, Alexander; Thomas, James H.; Nonet, Michael L.

    2008-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans defecation motor program (DMP) is a highly coordinated rhythmic behavior that requires two GABAergic neurons that synapse onto the enteric muscles. One class of DMP mutants, called anterior body wall muscle contraction and expulsion defective (aex) mutants, exhibits similar defects to those caused by the loss of these two neurons. Here, we demonstrate that aex-2 encodes a G-protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) and aex-4 encodes an exocytic SNAP25 homologue. We found that aex-2 functions in the nervous system and activates a Gsα signaling pathway to regulate defecation. aex-4, on the other hand, functions in the intestinal epithelial cells. Furthermore, we show that aex-5, which encodes a pro-protein convertase, functions in the intestine to regulate the DMP and that its secretion from the intestine is impaired in aex-4 mutants. Activation of the Gsα GPCR pathway in GABAergic neurons can suppress the defecation defect of the intestinal mutants aex-4 and aex-5. Lastly, we demonstrate that activation of GABAergic neurons using the light-gated cation channel channelrhodopsin-2 is sufficient to suppress the behavioral defects of aex-2, aex-4, and aex-5. These results genetically place intestinal genes aex-4 and aex-5 upstream of GABAergic GPCR signaling. We propose a model whereby the intestinal genes aex-4 and aex-5 control the DMP by regulating the secretion of a signal, which activates the neuronal receptor aex-2. PMID:18852466

  7. Induction of delta opioid receptor function by up-regulation of membrane receptors in mouse primary afferent neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walwyn, Wendy; Maidment, Nigel T; Sanders, Matthew; Evans, Christopher J; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Hales, Tim G

    2005-12-01

    It is not clear whether primary afferent neurons express functional cell-surface opioid receptors. We examined delta receptor coupling to Ca2+ channels in mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons under basal conditions and after receptor up-regulation. [D-Ala2,Phe4,Gly5-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO), [D-Ala2,D-Leu5]-enkephalin (DADLE), trans-(+/-)-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-(2-[1-pyrrolidinyl]cyclohexyl) benzene-acetamide methanesulfonate (U-50,488H; 1 microM), and baclofen (50 microM) inhibited Ca2+ currents, whereas the -selective ligands [D-Pen2,Pen5]-enkephalin (DPDPE) and deltorphin II (1 microM) did not. The effect of DADLE (1 microM) was blocked by the mu-antagonist D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTAP; 300 nM) but not by the -antagonist Tyr-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-Phe-Phe-OH (300 nM), implicating mu receptors. Despite a lack of functional delta receptors, flow cytometry revealed cell-surface receptors. We used this approach to identify conditions that up-regulate receptors, including mu receptor gene deletion in dorsal root ganglion neurons of mu-/- mice and 18-h incubation of mu+/+ neurons with CTAP followed by brief (10-min) DPDPE exposure. Under these conditions, the expression of cell-surface delta receptors was up-regulated to 149 +/- 9 and 139 +/- 5%, respectively; furthermore, DPDPE and deltorphin II (1 microM) inhibited Ca2+ currents in both cases. Viral replacement of mu receptors in mu-/- neurons reduced delta receptor expression to mu+/+ levels, restored the inhibition of Ca2+ currents by DAMGO, and abolished receptor coupling. Our observations suggest that receptor-Ca2+ channel coupling in primary afferent fibers may have little functional significance under basal conditions in which mu receptors predominate. However, up-regulation of cell-surface delta receptors induces their coupling to Ca2+ channels. Pharmacological approaches that increase functional delta receptor expression may reveal a novel target for analgesic therapy.

  8. Time course of information representation of macaque AIP neurons in hand manipulation task revealed by information analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Yutaka; Ishida, Fumihiko; Shimizu, Takashi; Murata, Akira

    2010-12-01

    We used mutual information analysis of neuronal activity in the macaque anterior intraparietal area (AIP) to examine information processing during a hand manipulation task. The task was to reach-to-grasp a three-dimensional (3D) object after presentation of a go signal. Mutual information was calculated between the spike counts of individual neurons in 50-ms-wide time bins and six unique shape classifications or 15 one-versus-one classifications of these shapes. The spatiotemporal distribution of mutual information was visualized as a two-dimensional image ("information map") to better observe global profiles of information representation. In addition, a nonnegative matrix factorization technique was applied for extracting its structure. Our major finding was that the time course of mutual information differed significantly according to different classes of task-related neurons. This strongly suggests that different classes of neurons were engaged in different information processing stages in executing the hand manipulation task. On the other hand, our analysis revealed the heterogeneous nature of information representation of AIP neurons. For example, "information latency" (or information onset) varied among individual neurons even in the same neuron class and the same shape classification. Further, some neurons changed "information preference" (i.e., shape classification with the largest amount of information) across different task periods. These suggest that neurons encode different information in the different task periods. Taking the present result together with previous findings, we used a Gantt chart to propose a hypothetical scheme of the dynamic interactions between different types of AIP neurons.

  9. Super-resolution microscopy reveals γ-secretase at both sides of the neuronal synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schedin-Weiss, Sophia; Caesar, Ina; Winblad, Bengt; Blom, Hans; Tjernberg, Lars O

    2016-03-31

    The transmembrane protein assembly γ-secretase is a key protease in regulated intramembrane processing (RIP) of around 100 type-1 transmembrane proteins. Importantly, it has a pathological role in Alzheimer disease (AD) as it generates the neurotoxic amyloid β-peptide from the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Studies on γ-secretase location are therefore crucial both from a biological and a therapeutic perspective. Despite several years of efforts in many laboratories, it is not clear where in the neuron γ-secretase exerts it's activities. Technical challenges include the fact that the active enzyme contains four protein components and that most subcellular compartments cannot be spatially resolved by traditional light microscopy. Here, we have used a powerful combination of the two nanoscopy techniques STORM and STED microscopy to visualize the location of γ-secretase in neurons using an active-site specific probe, with a focus on the synapse. We show that γ-secretase is present in both the pre-and postsynaptic compartments. We further show that the enzyme is enriched very close to the synaptic cleft in the postsynaptic membrane, as well as to NMDA receptors, demonstrating that γ-secretase is present in the postsynaptic plasma membrane. Importantly, the expression of γ-secretase increased in the pre- and postsynaptic compartments with the size of the synapse, suggesting a correlation between γ-secretase activity and synapse maturation. Thus, our data shows the synaptic location with high precision in three dimensions and settles the long-lasting debate on the synaptic location of γ-secretase.

  10. The cell-autonomous role of excitatory synaptic transmission in the regulation of neuronal structure and function

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The cell-autonomous role of synaptic transmission in the regulation of neuronal structural and electrical properties is unclear. We have now employed a genetic approach to eliminate glutamatergic synaptic transmission onto individual CA1 pyramidal neurons in a mosaic fashion in vivo. Surprisingly, while electrical properties are profoundly affected in these neurons, as well as inhibitory synaptic transmission, we found little perturbation of neuronal morphology, demonstrating a functional seg...

  11. Bmi1 is down-regulated in the aging brain and displays antioxidant and protective activities in neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abdouh

    Full Text Available Aging increases the risk to develop several neurodegenerative diseases, although the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Inactivation of the Polycomb group gene Bmi1 in mice results in growth retardation, cerebellar degeneration, and development of a premature aging-like phenotype. This progeroid phenotype is characterized by formation of lens cataracts, apoptosis of cortical neurons, and increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS concentrations, owing to p53-mediated repression of antioxidant response (AOR genes. Herein we report that Bmi1 expression progressively declines in the neurons of aging mouse and human brains. In old brains, p53 accumulates at the promoter of AOR genes, correlating with a repressed chromatin state, down-regulation of AOR genes, and increased oxidative damages to lipids and DNA. Comparative gene expression analysis further revealed that aging brains display an up-regulation of the senescence-associated genes IL-6, p19(Arf and p16(Ink4a, along with the pro-apoptotic gene Noxa, as seen in Bmi1-null mice. Increasing Bmi1 expression in cortical neurons conferred robust protection against DNA damage-induced cell death or mitochondrial poisoning, and resulted in suppression of ROS through activation of AOR genes. These observations unveil that Bmi1 genetic deficiency recapitulates aspects of physiological brain aging and that Bmi1 over-expression is a potential therapeutic modality against neurodegeneration.

  12. The Neuroplastin adhesion molecules: key regulators of neuronal plasticity and synaptic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beesley, Philip W; Herrera-Molina, Rodrigo; Smalla, Karl-Heinz; Seidenbecher, Constanze

    2014-11-01

    The Neuroplastins Np65 and Np55 are neuronal and synapse-enriched immunoglobulin superfamily molecules that play important roles in a number of key neuronal and synaptic functions including, for Np65, cell adhesion. In this review we focus on the physiological roles of the Neuroplastins in promoting neurite outgrowth, regulating the structure and function of both inhibitory and excitatory synapses in brain, and in neuronal and synaptic plasticity. We discuss the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms by which the Neuroplastins exert their physiological effects and how these are dependent upon the structural features of Np65 and Np55, which enable them to bind to a diverse range of protein partners. In turn this enables the Neuroplastins to interact with a number of key neuronal signalling cascades. These include: binding to and activation of the fibroblast growth factor receptor; Np65 trans-homophilic binding leading to activation of p38 MAPK and internalization of glutamate (GluR1) receptor subunits; acting as accessory proteins for monocarboxylate transporters, thus affecting neuronal energy supply, and binding to GABAA α1, 2 and 5 subunits, thus regulating the composition and localization of GABAA receptors. An emerging theme is the role of the Neuroplastins in regulating the trafficking and subcellular localization of specific binding partners. We also discuss the involvement of Neuroplastins in a number of pathophysiological conditions, including ischaemia, schizophrenia and breast cancer and the role of a single nucleotide polymorphism in the human Neuroplastin (NPTN) gene locus in impairment of cortical development and cognitive functions. Neuroplastins are neuronal cell adhesion molecules, which induce neurite outgrowth and play important roles in synaptic maturation and plasticity. This review summarizes the functional implications of Neuroplastins for correct synaptic membrane protein localization, neuronal energy supply, expression of LTP and LTD

  13. Neuronal activity-induced regulation of Lingo-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifunovski, Alexandra; Josephson, Anna; Ringman, Andreas; Brené, Stefan; Spenger, Christian; Olson, Lars

    2004-10-25

    Axonal regeneration after injury can be limited in the adult CNS by the presence of inhibitory proteins such as Nogo. Nogo binds to a receptor complex that consists of Nogo receptor (NgR), p75NTR, and Lingo-1. Nogo binding activates RhoA, which inhibits axonal outgrowth. Here we assessed Lingo-1 and NgR mRNA levels after delivery of BDNF into the rat hippocampal formation, Lingo-1 mRNA levels in rats subjected to kainic acid (KA) and running in running wheels. Lingo-1 mRNA was not changed by running. However, we found that Lingo-1 mRNA was strongly up-regulated while NgR mRNA was down-regulated in the dentate gyrus in both the BDNF and the KA experiments. Our data demonstrate inverse regulation of NgR and Lingo-1 in these situations, suggesting that Lingo-1 up-regulation is one characteristic of activity-induced neural plasticity responses.

  14. Thyroid hormone is required for hypothalamic neurons regulating cardiovascular functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mittag, J.; Lyons, D.J.; Sällström, J.; Vujoviv, M.; Dudazy-Gralla, S.; Warner, A.; Wallis, K.; Alkemade, A.; Nordström, K.; Monyer, H.; Broberger, C.; Arner, A.; Vennström, B.

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid hormone is well known for its profound direct effects on cardiovascular function and metabolism. Recent evidence, however, suggests that the hormone also regulates these systems indirectly through the central nervous system. While some of the molecular mechanisms underlying the hormone’s

  15. Cdk5 regulates PSD-95 ubiquitination in neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchetta, Michael J.; Lam, TuKiet T.; Jones, Stephen N.; Morabito, Maria A.

    2011-01-01

    The kinase Cdk5 and its activator p35 have been implicated in drug addiction, neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, learning and memory, and synapse maturation and plasticity. However the molecular mechanisms by which Cdk5 regulates synaptic plasticity are still unclear. PSD-95 is a major postsynaptic scaffolding protein of glutamatergic synapses that regulates synaptic strength and plasticity. PSD-95 is ubiquitinated by the Ubiquitin E3 Ligase Mdm2, and rapid and transient PSD-95 ubiquitination has been implicated in NMDA receptor-induced AMPA receptor endocytosis. Here we demonstrate that genetic or pharmacological reduction of Cdk5 activity increases the interaction of Mdm2 with PSD-95 and enhances PSD-95 ubiquitination without affecting PSD-95 protein levels in vivo in mice, suggesting a non-proteolytic function of ubiquitinated PSD-95 at synapses. We show that PSD-95 ubiquitination correlates with increased interaction with β-adaptin, a subunit of the clathrin adaptor protein complex AP-2. This interaction is increased by genetic reduction of Cdk5 activity or NMDA receptor stimulation and is dependent on Mdm2. Together these results support a function for Cdk5 in regulating PSD-95 ubiqutination and its interaction with AP-2 and suggest a mechanism by which PSD-95 may regulate NMDA receptor-induced AMPA receptor endocytosis. PMID:21849563

  16. Human iPSC-Derived Neuronal Model of Tau-A152T Frontotemporal Dementia Reveals Tau-Mediated Mechanisms of Neuronal Vulnerability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Catarina Silva

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Frontotemporal dementia (FTD and other tauopathies characterized by focal brain neurodegeneration and pathological accumulation of proteins are commonly associated with tau mutations. However, the mechanism of neuronal loss is not fully understood. To identify molecular events associated with tauopathy, we studied induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC-derived neurons from individuals carrying the tau-A152T variant. We highlight the potential of in-depth phenotyping of human neuronal cell models for pre-clinical studies and identification of modulators of endogenous tau toxicity. Through a panel of biochemical and cellular assays, A152T neurons showed accumulation, redistribution, and decreased solubility of tau. Upregulation of tau was coupled to enhanced stress-inducible markers and cell vulnerability to proteotoxic, excitotoxic, and mitochondrial stressors, which was rescued upon CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeting of tau or by pharmacological activation of autophagy. Our findings unmask tau-mediated perturbations of specific pathways associated with neuronal vulnerability, revealing potential early disease biomarkers and therapeutic targets for FTD and other tauopathies.

  17. Neuronal and endocrine regulation of food intake%摄食的神经及内分泌调节

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙旸; 王鹏源; 刘霞

    2016-01-01

    The neuronal and hormonal regulations of food intake expand our knowledge about energy balance .The cen-tral nervous system integrates endocrine signals to regulate food intake and energy consumption .The nervous system and endo-crine system interact with each other to regulate feeding behavior .This paper was a review of the neuronal and endocrine regu-lation of food intake ,and offered a revealing insight for the study and treatment of metabolic disorders .%摄食的神经调控和激素调节拓展了我们对于能量稳态的认识。中枢神经系统接受中枢和外周的多种内分泌信号,调节摄食和能量消耗,以维持能量代谢平衡。神经系统和内分泌系统相互作用,共同调控机体的摄食行为。本文综述了神经及内分泌系统对于摄食行为的调控机制,望有助于肥胖、代谢性疾病以及其他营养性疾病的研究和治疗。

  18. Euchromatin histone methyltransferase 1 regulates cortical neuronal network development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bart Martens, Marijn; Frega, Monica; Classen, Jessica; Epping, Lisa; Bijvank, Elske; Benevento, Marco; van Bokhoven, Hans; Tiesinga, Paul; Schubert, Dirk; Nadif Kasri, Nael

    2016-01-01

    Heterozygous mutations or deletions in the human Euchromatin histone methyltransferase 1 (EHMT1) gene cause Kleefstra syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disorder that is characterized by autistic-like features and severe intellectual disability (ID). Neurodevelopmental disorders including ID and autism may be related to deficits in activity-dependent wiring of brain circuits during development. Although Kleefstra syndrome has been associated with dendritic and synaptic defects in mice and Drosophila, little is known about the role of EHMT1 in the development of cortical neuronal networks. Here we used micro-electrode arrays and whole-cell patch-clamp recordings to investigate the impact of EHMT1 deficiency at the network and single cell level. We show that EHMT1 deficiency impaired neural network activity during the transition from uncorrelated background action potential firing to synchronized network bursting. Spontaneous bursting and excitatory synaptic currents were transiently reduced, whereas miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents were not affected. Finally, we show that loss of function of EHMT1 ultimately resulted in less regular network bursting patterns later in development. These data suggest that the developmental impairments observed in EHMT1-deficient networks may result in a temporal misalignment between activity-dependent developmental processes thereby contributing to the pathophysiology of Kleefstra syndrome. PMID:27767173

  19. Gastrin-releasing peptide contributes to the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis and neuronal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Noah M; de Koning, Anoek; Xie, Xiuyuan; Shin, Rick; Chen, Qian; Miyake, Shinichi; Tajinda, Katsunori; Gross, Adam K; Kogan, Jeffrey H; Heusner, Carrie L; Tamura, Kouichi; Matsumoto, Mitsuyuki

    2014-09-01

    In the postnatal hippocampus, newly generated neurons contribute to learning and memory. Disruptions in neurogenesis and neuronal development have been linked to cognitive impairment and are implicated in a broad variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders. To identify putative factors involved in this process, we examined hippocampal gene expression alterations in mice possessing a heterozygous knockout of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha heterozygous knockout gene (CaMK2α-hKO), an established model of cognitive impairment that also displays altered neurogenesis and neuronal development. Using this approach, we identified gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) as the most dysregulated gene. In wild-type mice, GRP labels NeuN-positive neurons, the lone exception being GRP-positive, NeuN-negative cells in the subgranular zone, suggesting GRP expression may be relevant to neurogenesis and/or neuronal development. Using a model of in vitro hippocampal neurogenesis, we determined that GRP signaling is essential for the continued survival and development of newborn neurons, both of which are blocked by transient knockdown of GRP's cognate receptor (GRPR). Furthermore, GRP appears to negatively regulate neurogenesis-associated proliferation in neural stem cells both in vitro and in vivo. Intracerebroventricular infusion of GRP resulted in a decrease in immature neuronal markers, increased cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation, and decreased neurogenesis. Despite increased levels of GRP mRNA, CaMK2α-hKO mutant mice expressed reduced levels of GRP peptide. This lack of GRP may contribute to the elevated neurogenesis and impaired neuronal development, which are reversed following exogenous GRP infusion. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that GRP modulates neurogenesis and neuronal development and may contribute to hippocampus-associated cognitive impairment.

  20. CDKL5 and Shootin1 Interact and Concur in Regulating Neuronal Polarization.

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    Mohammad Sarfaraz Nawaz

    Full Text Available In the last years, the X-linked cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5 gene has been associated with epileptic encephalopathies characterized by the early onset of intractable epilepsy, severe developmental delay, autistic features, and often the development of Rett syndrome-like features. Still, the role of CDKL5 in neuronal functions is not fully understood. By way of a yeast two hybrid screening we identified the interaction of CDKL5 with shootin1, a brain specific protein acting as a determinant of axon formation during neuronal polarization. We found evidence that CDKL5 is involved, at least in part, in regulating neuronal polarization through its interaction with shootin1. Indeed, the two proteins interact in vivo and both are localized in the distal tip of outgrowing axons. By using primary hippocampal neurons as model system we find that adequate CDKL5 levels are required for axon specification. In fact, a significant number of neurons overexpressing CDKL5 is characterized by supernumerary axons, while the silencing of CDKL5 disrupts neuronal polarization. Interestingly, shootin1 phosphorylation is reduced in neurons silenced for CDKL5 suggesting that the kinase affects, directly or indirectly, the post-translational modification of shootin1. Finally, we find that the capacity of CDKL5 to generate surplus axons is attenuated in neurons with reduced shootin1 levels, in agreement with the notion that two proteins act in a common pathway. Altogether, these results point to a role of CDKL5 in the early steps of neuronal differentiation that can be explained, at least in part, by its association with shootin1.

  1. Dopamine regulation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone neuron excitability in male and female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinhuai; Herbison, Allan E

    2013-01-01

    Numerous in vivo studies have shown that dopamine is involved in the regulation of LH secretion in mammals. However, the mechanisms through which this occurs are not known. In this study, we used green fluorescent protein-tagged GnRH neurons to examine whether and how dopamine may modulate the activity of adult GnRH neurons in the mouse. Bath-applied dopamine (10-80 μm) potently inhibited the firing of approximately 50% of GnRH neurons. This resulted from direct postsynaptic inhibitory actions through D1-like, D2-like, or both receptors. Further, one third of GnRH neurons exhibited an increase in their basal firing rate after administration of SCH23390 (D1-like antagonist) and/or raclopride (D2-like antagonist) indicating tonic inhibition by endogenous dopamine in the brain slice. The role of dopamine in presynaptic modulation of the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) γ-aminobutyric acid/glutamate input to GnRH neurons was examined. Exogenous dopamine was found to presynaptically inhibit AVPV-evoked γ-aminobutyric acid /glutamate postsynaptic currents in about 50% of GnRH neurons. These effects were, again, mediated by both D1- and D2-like receptors. Neither postsynaptic nor presynaptic actions of dopamine were found to be different between diestrous, proestrous, and estrous females, or males. Approximately 20% of GnRH neurons were shown to receive a dopaminergic input from AVPV neurons in male and female mice. Together, these observations show that dopamine is one of the most potent inhibitors of GnRH neuron excitability and that this is achieved through complex pre- and postsynaptic actions that each involve D1- and D2-like receptor activation.

  2. Monosynaptic Tracing using Modified Rabies Virus Reveals Early and Extensive Circuit Integration of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neurons

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    Shane Grealish

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cell (hESC-derived dopamine neurons are currently moving toward clinical use for Parkinson’s disease (PD. However, the timing and extent at which stem cell-derived neurons functionally integrate into existing host neural circuitry after transplantation remain largely unknown. In this study, we use modified rabies virus to trace afferent and efferent connectivity of transplanted hESC-derived neurons in a rat model of PD and report that grafted human neurons integrate into the host neural circuitry in an unexpectedly rapid and extensive manner. The pattern of connectivity resembled that of local endogenous neurons, while ectopic connections were not detected. Revealing circuit integration of human dopamine neurons substantiates their potential use in clinical trials. Additionally, our data present rabies-based tracing as a valuable and widely applicable tool for analyzing graft connectivity that can easily be adapted to analyze connectivity of a variety of different neuronal sources and subtypes in different disease models.

  3. NeuCode Proteomics Reveals Bap1 Regulation of Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua M. Baughman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We introduce neutron-encoded (NeuCode amino acid labeling of mice as a strategy for multiplexed proteomic analysis in vivo. Using NeuCode, we characterize an inducible knockout mouse model of Bap1, a tumor suppressor and deubiquitinase whose in vivo roles outside of cancer are not well established. NeuCode proteomics revealed altered metabolic pathways following Bap1 deletion, including profound elevation of cholesterol biosynthetic machinery coincident with reduced expression of gluconeogenic and lipid homeostasis proteins in liver. Bap1 loss increased pancreatitis biomarkers and reduced expression of mitochondrial proteins. These alterations accompany a metabolic remodeling with hypoglycemia, hypercholesterolemia, hepatic lipid loss, and acinar cell degeneration. Liver-specific Bap1 null mice present with fully penetrant perinatal lethality, severe hypoglycemia, and hepatic lipid deficiency. This work reveals Bap1 as a metabolic regulator in liver and pancreas, and it establishes NeuCode as a reliable proteomic method for deciphering in vivo biology.

  4. Regulation of Intracellular Free Calcium in Neuronal Cells by Opioids

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-06-19

    effects of chronic opioid treament of NG108-15 and 7315c cells revealed a process involving an initial loss of agonist-induced inhibition of adenylyl...Koenig M., and Smallridge R. Heat shock increase cyctosolic free Ca2+ concentration via Na+-Ca2+ exchange in human epidermoid A 431 cells. Am. J

  5. Neurons secrete miR-132-containing exosomes to regulate brain vascular integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bing; Zhang, Yu; Du, Xu-Fei; Li, Jia; Zi, Hua-Xing; Bu, Ji-Wen; Yan, Yong; Han, Hua; Du, Jiu-Lin

    2017-07-01

    Vascular integrity helps maintain brain microenvironment homeostasis, which is critical for the normal development and function of the central nervous system. It is known that neural cells can regulate brain vascular integrity. However, due to the high complexity of neurovascular interactions involved, understanding of the neural regulation of brain vascular integrity is still rudimentary. Using intact zebrafish larvae and cultured rodent brain cells, we find that neurons transfer miR-132, a highly conserved and neuron-enriched microRNA, via secreting exosomes to endothelial cells (ECs) to maintain brain vascular integrity. Following translocation to ECs through exosome internalization, miR-132 regulates the expression of vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin), an important adherens junction protein, by directly targeting eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase (eef2k). Disruption of neuronal miR-132 expression or exosome secretion, or overexpression of vascular eef2k impairs VE-cadherin expression and brain vascular integrity. Our study indicates that miR-132 acts as an intercellular signal mediating neural regulation of the brain vascular integrity and suggests that the neuronal exosome is a novel avenue for neurovascular communication.

  6. Serotonin 2c receptors in pro-opiomelanocortin neurons regulate energy and glucose homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Energy and glucose homeostasis are regulated by central serotonin 2C receptors. These receptors are attractive pharmacological targets for the treatment of obesity; however, the identity of the serotonin 2C receptor-expressing neurons that mediate the effects of serotonin and serotonin 2C receptor a...

  7. Estrogen receptor-a in medial amygdala neurons regulates body weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrogen receptor–a (ERa) activity in the brain prevents obesity in both males and females. However, the ERa-expressing neural populations that regulate body weight remain to be fully elucidated. Here we showed that single-minded–1 (SIM1) neurons in the medial amygdala (MeA) express abundant levels ...

  8. Down regulation of ribosomal protein mRNAs during neuronal differentiation of human NTERA2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bévort, M; Leffers, H

    2000-10-01

    We have analysed the expression of 32 ribosomal protein (RP) mRNAs during retinoic acid induced neuronal differentiation of human NTERA2 cells. Except for a new S27 variant (S27v), all were down regulated both in selectively replated differentiated neurons and the most differentiated continuous cultures, i.e., non-replated cultures. However, the expression profiles of the individual RP mRNAs were different, most (L3, L7, L8, L10, L13, L23a, L27a, L36a, L39, P0, S2, S3, S3a, S4X, S6, S9, S12, S13, S16, S19, S20, S23, and S27a) exhibited a constant down regulation, whereas a few were either initially constant (L11, L32, S8, and S11) or up regulated (L6, L15, L17, L31, and S27y) and then down regulated. The expression of S27v remained elevated in the most differentiated continuous cultures but was down regulated in replated differentiated neurons. The down regulation of RP mRNAs was variable: the expression levels in differentiated replated neurons were between 10% (S3) and 90% (S11) of the levels in undifferentiated cells. The ratio between rRNA and RP mRNA changed during the differentiation; in differentiated neurons there were, on average, about half the number of RP mRNAs per rRNA as compared to undifferentiated cells. The expression profiles of a few translation-related proteins were also determined. EF1alpha1, EF1beta1, and EF1delta were down regulated, whereas the expression of the neuron and muscle specific EF1alpha2 increased. The reduction in the expression of RP mRNAs was coordinated with a reduction in the expression level of the proliferation marker PCNA. The expression levels of most RP mRNAs were lower in purified differentiated post-mitotic neurons than in the most differentiated continuous cultures, despite similar levels of PCNA, suggesting that both the differentiation state and the proliferative status of the cells affect the expression of RP mRNAs.

  9. Neuronal correlates of view representation revealed by face-view aftereffect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noudoost, Behrad; Esteky, Hossein

    2013-03-27

    Recognition of face-views is a crucial component of our social behavior. However, little is known about the neuronal basis of face-view recognition. Recent psychophysical studies have shown that adaptation to a particular face-view changes perception of other views in humans. To understand the neuronal basis of face-view representation and the mechanisms involved in face-view adaptation, we studied the responses of inferotemporal (IT) cortex neurons before and after face-view adaptation. We first used face-view adaptation to show that monkeys, as well as humans, exhibit face-view aftereffect, suggesting the presence of a view-sensitive representation in primates. Then, we recorded from IT neurons of monkeys and found that changes in responses of these neurons can account for changes in perception of face views attributable to adaptation, indicating IT as a neural correlate of face-view perception. More importantly, we provide evidence that IT neurons with wide-view tuning not only conveyed face-view information but also exhibited neural signatures of view aftereffect before neurons with narrower tuning. Our findings show that view-dependent representation of objects does not necessarily depend on narrow-tuned neurons. The finding that wide-view tuned neurons account for view-specific perceptual changes implies the importance of accumulating sensitivity and tolerance at the level of IT neurons, as the final stage of visual object recognition.

  10. Distribution of neurons in functional areas of the mouse cerebral cortex reveals quantitatively different cortical zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Watson, Charles; Paxinos, George

    2013-01-01

    How are neurons distributed along the cortical surface and across functional areas? Here we use the isotropic fractionator (Herculano-Houzel and Lent, 2005) to analyze the distribution of neurons across the entire isocortex of the mouse, divided into 18 functional areas defined anatomically. We find that the number of neurons underneath a surface area (the N/A ratio) varies 4.5-fold across functional areas and neuronal density varies 3.2-fold. The face area of S1 contains the most neurons, followed by motor cortex and the primary visual cortex. Remarkably, while the distribution of neurons across functional areas does not accompany the distribution of surface area, it mirrors closely the distribution of cortical volumes-with the exception of the visual areas, which hold more neurons than expected for their volume. Across the non-visual cortex, the volume of individual functional areas is a shared linear function of their number of neurons, while in the visual areas, neuronal densities are much higher than in all other areas. In contrast, the 18 functional areas cluster into three different zones according to the relationship between the N/A ratio and cortical thickness and neuronal density: these three clusters can be called visual, sensory, and, possibly, associative. These findings are remarkably similar to those in the human cerebral cortex (Ribeiro et al., 2013) and suggest that, like the human cerebral cortex, the mouse cerebral cortex comprises two zones that differ in how neurons form the cortical volume, and three zones that differ in how neurons are distributed underneath the cortical surface, possibly in relation to local differences in connectivity through the white matter. Our results suggest that beyond the developmental divide into visual and non-visual cortex, functional areas initially share a common distribution of neurons along the parenchyma that become delimited into functional areas according to the pattern of connectivity established later.

  11. Analysis in conditional cannabinoid 1 receptor-knockout mice reveals neuronal subpopulation-specific effects on epileptogenesis in the kindling paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Rüden, E L; Jafari, M; Bogdanovic, R M; Wotjak, C T; Potschka, H

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system serves as a retrograde negative feedback mechanism. It is thought to control neuronal activity in an epileptic neuronal network. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of the endocannabinoid and endovanilloid systems on both epileptogenesis and ictogenesis. Therefore, we modulated the endocannabinoid and endovanilloid systems genetically and pharmacologically, and analyzed the subsequent impact on seizure progression in the kindling model of temporal lobe epilepsy in mice. In addition, the impact of seizures on associated cellular alterations was evaluated. Our principal results revealed that the endocannabinoid system affects seizure and afterdischarge duration dependent on the neuronal subpopulation being modulated. Genetic deletion of CB1-receptors (CB1Rs) from principal neurons of the forebrain and pharmacological antagonism with rimonabant (5 mg/kg) caused longer seizure duration. Deletion of CB1R from GABAergic forebrain neurons resulted in the opposite effect. Along with these findings, the CB1R density was elevated in animals with repetitively induced seizures. However, neither genetic nor pharmacological interventions had any impact on the development of generalized seizures. Other than CB1, genetic deletion or pharmacological blockade with SB366791 (1 mg/kg) of transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) had no effect on the duration of behavioral or electrographic seizure activity in the kindling model. In conclusion, we demonstrate that endocannabinoid, but not endovanilloid, signaling affects termination of seizure activity, without influencing seizure severity over time. These effects are dependent on the neuronal subpopulation. Thus, the data argue that the endocannabinoid system plays an active role in seizure termination but does not regulate epileptogenesis.

  12. α-synuclein and synapsin III cooperatively regulate synaptic function in dopamine neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaltieri, Michela; Grigoletto, Jessica; Longhena, Francesca; Navarria, Laura; Favero, Gaia; Castrezzati, Stefania; Colivicchi, Maria Alessandra; Della Corte, Laura; Rezzani, Rita; Pizzi, Marina; Benfenati, Fabio; Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Missale, Cristina; Spano, PierFranco; Bellucci, Arianna

    2015-07-01

    The main neuropathological features of Parkinson's disease are dopaminergic nigrostriatal neuron degeneration, and intraneuronal and intraneuritic proteinaceous inclusions named Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites, respectively, which mainly contain α-synuclein (α-syn, also known as SNCA). The neuronal phosphoprotein synapsin III (also known as SYN3), is a pivotal regulator of dopamine neuron synaptic function. Here, we show that α-syn interacts with and modulates synapsin III. The absence of α-syn causes a selective increase and redistribution of synapsin III, and changes the organization of synaptic vesicle pools in dopamine neurons. In α-syn-null mice, the alterations of synapsin III induce an increased locomotor response to the stimulation of synapsin-dependent dopamine overflow, despite this, these mice show decreased basal and depolarization-dependent striatal dopamine release. Of note, synapsin III seems to be involved in α-syn aggregation, which also coaxes its increase and redistribution. Furthermore, synapsin III accumulates in the caudate and putamen of individuals with Parkinson's disease. These findings support a reciprocal modulatory interaction of α-syn and synapsin III in the regulation of dopamine neuron synaptic function. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Muscarinic M1 receptors regulate propofol modulation of GABAergic transmission in rat ventrolateral preoptic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Yu, Tian; Liu, Yang; Qian, Kun; Yu, Bu-Wei

    2015-04-01

    GABAergic neurons within the ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO) play an important role in sleep-wakefulness regulation. Propofol, a widely used systemic anesthetic, has lately been reported to excite noradrenaline (NA)-inhibited type of VLPO neurons. Present study tested if acetylcholine system takes part in the propofol modulation of GABAergic spontaneous miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) in mechanically dissociated rat VLPO neurons using a conventional whole-cell patch clamp technique. Propofol reversibly decreased mIPSC frequency without affecting the current amplitude, indicating that propofol acts presynaptically to decrease the probability of spontaneous GABA release. The propofol action on GABAergic mIPSC frequency was completely blocked by atropine, a nonselective muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor antagonist, and pirenzepine, a selective M1 receptor antagonist. These results suggest that propofol acts on M1 receptors on GABAergic nerve terminals projecting to VLPO neurons to inhibit spontaneous GABA release. The M1 receptor-mediated modulation of GABAergic transmission onto VLPO neurons may contribute to the regulation of loss of consciousness induced by propofol.

  14. FoxO1 in dopaminergic neurons regulates energy homeostasis and targets tyrosine hydroxylase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, Khanh V.; Kinyua, Ann W.; Yang, Dong Joo; Ko, Chang Mann; Moh, Sang Hyun; Shong, Ko Eun; Kim, Hail; Park, Sang-Kyu; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Inki; Paik, Ji-Hye; DePinho, Ronald A.; Yoon, Seul Gi; Kim, Il Yong; Seong, Je Kyung; Choi, Yun-Hee; Kim, Ki Woo

    2016-01-01

    Dopaminergic (DA) neurons are involved in the integration of neuronal and hormonal signals to regulate food consumption and energy balance. Forkhead transcriptional factor O1 (FoxO1) in the hypothalamus plays a crucial role in mediation of leptin and insulin function. However, the homoeostatic role of FoxO1 in DA system has not been investigated. Here we report that FoxO1 is highly expressed in DA neurons and mice lacking FoxO1 specifically in the DA neurons (FoxO1 KODAT) show markedly increased energy expenditure and interscapular brown adipose tissue (iBAT) thermogenesis accompanied by reduced fat mass and improved glucose/insulin homoeostasis. Moreover, FoxO1 KODAT mice exhibit an increased sucrose preference in concomitance with higher dopamine and norepinephrine levels. Finally, we found that FoxO1 directly targets and negatively regulates tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression, the rate-limiting enzyme of the catecholamine synthesis, delineating a mechanism for the KO phenotypes. Collectively, these results suggest that FoxO1 in DA neurons is an important transcriptional factor that directs the coordinated control of energy balance, thermogenesis and glucose homoeostasis. PMID:27681312

  15. Sensory deprivation regulates the development of the hyperpolarization-activated current in auditory brainstem neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassfurth, Benjamin; Magnusson, Anna K; Grothe, Benedikt; Koch, Ursula

    2009-10-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated and cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are highly expressed in the superior olivary complex, the primary locus for binaural information processing. This hyperpolarization-activated current (I(h)) regulates the excitability of neurons and enhances the temporally precise analysis of the binaural acoustic cues. By using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we examined the properties of I(h) current in neurons of the lateral superior olive (LSO) and the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) before and after hearing onset. Moreover, we tested the hypothesis that I(h) currents are actively regulated by sensory input activity by performing bilateral and unilateral cochlear ablations before hearing onset, resulting in a chronic auditory deprivation. The results show that after hearing onset, I(h) currents are rapidly upregulated in LSO neurons, but change only marginally in neurons of the MNTB. We also found a striking difference in maximal current density, voltage dependence and activation time constant between the LSO and the MNTB in mature-like animals. Following bilateral cochlear ablations before hearing onset, the I(h) currents were scaled up in the LSO and scaled down in the MNTB. Consequently, in the LSO this resulted in a depolarized resting membrane potential and a lower input resistance of these neurons. This type of activity-dependent homeostatic change could thus result in an augmented response to the remaining inputs.

  16. Neuron-NG2 Cell Synapses: Novel Functions for Regulating NG2 Cell Proliferation and Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian-Kun Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available NG2 cells are a population of CNS cells that are distinct from neurons, mature oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglia. These cells can be identified by their NG2 proteoglycan expression. NG2 cells have a highly branched morphology, with abundant processes radiating from the cell body, and express a complex set of voltage-gated channels, AMPA/kainate, and GABA receptors. Neurons notably form classical and nonclassical synapses with NG2 cells, which have varied characteristics and functions. Neuron-NG2 cell synapses could fine-tune NG2 cell activities, including the NG2 cell cycle, differentiation, migration, and myelination, and may be a novel potential therapeutic target for NG2 cell-related diseases, such as hypoxia-ischemia injury and periventricular leukomalacia. Furthermore, neuron-NG2 cell synapses may be correlated with the plasticity of CNS in adulthood with the synaptic contacts passing onto their progenies during proliferation, and synaptic contacts decrease rapidly upon NG2 cell differentiation. In this review, we highlight the characteristics of classical and nonclassical neuron-NG2 cell synapses, the potential functions, and the fate of synaptic contacts during proliferation and differentiation, with the emphasis on the regulation of the NG2 cell cycle by neuron-NG2 cell synapses and their potential underlying mechanisms.

  17. Ect2, an ortholog of Drosophila Pebble, regulates formation of growth cones in primary cortical neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Takahiro; Higashida, Chiharu; Aoki, Yoshihiko; Islam, Mohammad Saharul; Dohmoto, Mitsuko; Higashida, Haruhiro

    2016-01-01

    In collaboration with Marshall Nirenberg, we performed in vivo RNA interference (RNAi) genome-wide screening in Drosophila embryos. Pebble has been shown to be involved in Drosophila neuronal development. We have also reported that depletion of Ect2, a mammalian ortholog of Pebble, induces differentiation in NG108-15 neuronal cells. However, the precise role of Ect2 in neuronal development has yet to be studied. Here, we confirmed in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells that inhibition of Ect2 expression by RNAi stimulated neurite outgrowth, and in the mouse embryonic cortex that Ect2 was accumulated throughout the ventricular and subventricular zones with neuronal progenitor cells. Next, the effects of Ect2 depletion were studied in primary cultures of mouse embryonic cortical neurons: Loss of Ect2 did not affect the differentiation stages of neuritogenesis, the number of neurites, or axon length, while the numbers of growth cones and growth cone-like structures were increased. Taken together, our results suggest that Ect2 contributes to neuronal morphological differentiation through regulation of growth cone dynamics. PMID:22366651

  18. VPS35 regulates developing mouse hippocampal neuronal morphogenesis by promoting retrograde trafficking of BACE1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Lei Wang

    2012-10-01

    VPS35, a major component of the retromer, plays an important role in the selective endosome-to-Golgi retrieval of membrane proteins. Dysfunction of retromer is a risk factor for neurodegenerative disorders, but its function in developing mouse brain remains poorly understood. Here we provide evidence for VPS35 promoting dendritic growth and maturation, and axonal protein transport in developing mouse hippocampal neurons. Embryonic hippocampal CA1 neurons suppressing Vps35 expression by in utero electroporation of its micro RNAs displayed shortened apical dendrites, reduced dendritic spines, and swollen commissural axons in the neonatal stage, those deficits reflecting a defective protein transport/trafficking in developing mouse neurons. Further mechanistic studies showed that Vps35 depletion in neurons resulted in an impaired retrograde trafficking of BACE1 (β1-secretase and altered BACE1 distribution. Suppression of BACE1 expression in CA1 neurons partially rescued both dendritic and axonal deficits induced by Vps35-deficiency. These results thus demonstrate that BACE1 acts as a critical cargo of retromer in vitro and in vivo, and suggest that VPS35 plays an essential role in regulating apical dendritic maturation and in preventing axonal spheroid formation in developing hippocampal neurons.

  19. Ect2, an ortholog of Drosophila Pebble, regulates formation of growth cones in primary cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Takahiro; Higashida, Chiharu; Aoki, Yoshihiko; Islam, Mohammad Saharul; Dohmoto, Mitsuko; Higashida, Haruhiro

    2012-11-01

    In collaboration with Marshall Nirenberg, we performed in vivo RNA interference (RNAi) genome-wide screening in Drosophila embryos. Pebble has been shown to be involved in Drosophila neuronal development. We have also reported that depletion of Ect2, a mammalian ortholog of Pebble, induces differentiation in NG108-15 neuronal cells. However, the precise role of Ect2 in neuronal development has yet to be studied. Here, we confirmed in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells that inhibition of Ect2 expression by RNAi stimulated neurite outgrowth, and in the mouse embryonic cortex that Ect2 was accumulated throughout the ventricular and subventricular zones with neuronal progenitor cells. Next, the effects of Ect2 depletion were studied in primary cultures of mouse embryonic cortical neurons: Loss of Ect2 did not affect the differentiation stages of neuritogenesis, the number of neurites, or axon length, while the numbers of growth cones and growth cone-like structures were increased. Taken together, our results suggest that Ect2 contributes to neuronal morphological differentiation through regulation of growth cone dynamics.

  20. Fast calcium and voltage-sensitive dye imaging in enteric neurones reveal calcium peaks associated with single action potential discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, K; Michaelis, M; Mazzuoli, G; Mueller, K; Vanden Berghe, P; Schemann, M

    2011-12-15

    Slow changes in [Ca(2+)](i) reflect increased neuronal activity. Our study demonstrates that single-trial fast [Ca(2+)](i) imaging (≥200 Hz sampling rate) revealed peaks each of which are associated with single spike discharge recorded by consecutive voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) imaging in enteric neurones and nerve fibres. Fast [Ca(2+)](i) imaging also revealed subthreshold fast excitatory postsynaptic potentials. Nicotine-evoked [Ca(2+)](i) peaks were reduced by -conotoxin and blocked by ruthenium red or tetrodotoxin. Fast [Ca(2+)](i) imaging can be used to directly record single action potentials in enteric neurones. [Ca(2+)](i) peaks required opening of voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels as well as Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores.

  1. Ion Channel Photoswitch Reveals Crosstalk between Intact and Injured Nociceptive Neurons after Nerve Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Herold, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The development of novel techniques utilizing the advantages of light has created an optical revolution for neuroscience research. Controlling and probing neuronal function with light has provided unprecedented insights by being able to manipulate many neurons simultaneously in intact circuits and living organisms.In my dissertation research, I used novel optical methods to probe the cellular permeability of sensory neuron populations. Primary nociceptive afferents detect, modulate and integr...

  2. Involvement of histone acetylation in the regulation of choline acetyltransferase gene in NG108-15 neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa, Shu; Yamamuro, Yutaka

    2010-03-01

    Post-translational modification of histone such as acetylation of N-terminal of lysine residues influences gene expression by modulating the accessibility of specific transcription factors to the promoter region, and is essential for a wide variety of cellular processes in the development of individual tissues, including the brain. However, few details concerning the acquisition of specific neurotransmitter phenotype have been obtained. In the present study, we investigated the possible involvement of histone acetylation in the gene expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), a specific marker for cholinergic neuron and its function, in NG108-15 neuronal cells as an in vitro model of cholinergic neuron. Treatment with the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA), which induces global histone hyper-acetylation of the cells, resulted in marked increase in the expression of ChAT gene in proliferating NG108-15 cells. Furthermore, RT-PCR analysis using primer pairs for individual variants of ChAT mRNA (R1-4, N1, and M type) revealed that M type, not R1-4 and N1 type, ChAT mRNA were mainly transcribed, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay indicated that the promoter region of M type ChAT gene was highly acetylated, in the dibutyryl cyclic AMP-induced neuronal differentiation of NG108-15 cells. The present findings demonstrate that the acquisition of neurotransmitter phenotype is epigenetically, at least the hyper-acetylation on the core promoter region of ChAT gene, regulated in NG108-15 neuronal cells.

  3. Regulation of GABA Equilibrium Potential by mGluRs in Rat Hippocampal CA1 Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Rajput, Padmesh S; Kumar, Ujendra; Sastry, Bhagavatula R

    2015-01-01

    The equilibrium potential for GABA-A receptor mediated currents (EGABA) in neonatal central neurons is set at a relatively depolarized level, which is suggested to be caused by a low expression of K+/Cl- co-transporter (KCC2) but a relatively high expression of Na+-K+-Cl- cotransporter (NKCC1). Theta-burst stimulation (TBS) in stratum radiatum induces a negative shift in EGABA in juvenile hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. In the current study, the effects of TBS on EGABA in neonatal and juvenile hippocampal CA1 neurons and the underlying mechanisms were examined. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are suggested to modulate KCC2 and NKCC1 levels in cortical neurons. Therefore, the involvement of mGluRs in the regulation of KCC2 or NKCC1 activity, and thus EGABA, following TBS was also investigated. Whole-cell patch recordings were made from Wistar rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, in a slice preparation. In neonates, TBS induces a positive shift in EGABA, which was prevented by NKCC1 antisense but not NKCC1 sense mRNA. (RS)-a-Methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG), a group I and II mGluR antagonist, blocked TBS-induced shifts in both juvenile and neonatal hippocampal neurons. While blockade of mGluR1 or mGluR5 alone could interfere with TBS-induced shifts in EGABA in neonates, only a combined blockade could do the same in juveniles. These results indicate that TBS induces a negative shift in EGABA in juvenile hippocampal neurons but a positive shift in neonatal hippocampal neurons via corresponding changes in KCC2 and NKCC1 expressions, respectively. mGluR activation seems to be necessary for both shifts to occur while the specific receptor subtype involved seems to vary.

  4. Regulation of GABA Equilibrium Potential by mGluRs in Rat Hippocampal CA1 Neurons.

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    Bo Yang

    Full Text Available The equilibrium potential for GABA-A receptor mediated currents (EGABA in neonatal central neurons is set at a relatively depolarized level, which is suggested to be caused by a low expression of K+/Cl- co-transporter (KCC2 but a relatively high expression of Na+-K+-Cl- cotransporter (NKCC1. Theta-burst stimulation (TBS in stratum radiatum induces a negative shift in EGABA in juvenile hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. In the current study, the effects of TBS on EGABA in neonatal and juvenile hippocampal CA1 neurons and the underlying mechanisms were examined. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs are suggested to modulate KCC2 and NKCC1 levels in cortical neurons. Therefore, the involvement of mGluRs in the regulation of KCC2 or NKCC1 activity, and thus EGABA, following TBS was also investigated. Whole-cell patch recordings were made from Wistar rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, in a slice preparation. In neonates, TBS induces a positive shift in EGABA, which was prevented by NKCC1 antisense but not NKCC1 sense mRNA. (RS-a-Methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG, a group I and II mGluR antagonist, blocked TBS-induced shifts in both juvenile and neonatal hippocampal neurons. While blockade of mGluR1 or mGluR5 alone could interfere with TBS-induced shifts in EGABA in neonates, only a combined blockade could do the same in juveniles. These results indicate that TBS induces a negative shift in EGABA in juvenile hippocampal neurons but a positive shift in neonatal hippocampal neurons via corresponding changes in KCC2 and NKCC1 expressions, respectively. mGluR activation seems to be necessary for both shifts to occur while the specific receptor subtype involved seems to vary.

  5. Histone hyperacetylation up-regulates protein kinase Cδ in dopaminergic neurons to induce cell death: relevance to epigenetic mechanisms of neurodegeneration in Parkinson disease.

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    Jin, Huajun; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Harischandra, Dilshan S; Kondru, Naveen; Ghosh, Anamitra; Panicker, Nikhil; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Rana, Ajay; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G

    2014-12-12

    The oxidative stress-sensitive protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ) has been implicated in dopaminergic neuronal cell death. However, little is known about the epigenetic mechanisms regulating PKCδ expression in neurons. Here, we report a novel mechanism by which the PKCδ gene can be regulated by histone acetylation. Treatment with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor sodium butyrate (NaBu) induced PKCδ expression in cultured neurons, brain slices, and animal models. Several other HDAC inhibitors also mimicked NaBu. The chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that hyperacetylation of histone H4 by NaBu is associated with the PKCδ promoter. Deletion analysis of the PKCδ promoter mapped the NaBu-responsive element to an 81-bp minimal promoter region. Detailed mutagenesis studies within this region revealed that four GC boxes conferred hyperacetylation-induced PKCδ promoter activation. Cotransfection experiments and Sp inhibitor studies demonstrated that Sp1, Sp3, and Sp4 regulated NaBu-induced PKCδ up-regulation. However, NaBu did not alter the DNA binding activities of Sp proteins or their expression. Interestingly, a one-hybrid analysis revealed that NaBu enhanced transcriptional activity of Sp1/Sp3. Overexpression of the p300/cAMP-response element-binding protein-binding protein (CBP) potentiated the NaBu-mediated transactivation potential of Sp1/Sp3, but expressing several HDACs attenuated this effect, suggesting that p300/CBP and HDACs act as coactivators or corepressors in histone acetylation-induced PKCδ up-regulation. Finally, using genetic and pharmacological approaches, we showed that NaBu up-regulation of PKCδ sensitizes neurons to cell death in a human dopaminergic cell model and brain slice cultures. Together, these results indicate that histone acetylation regulates PKCδ expression to augment nigrostriatal dopaminergic cell death, which could contribute to the progressive neuropathogenesis of Parkinson disease. © 2014 by The American Society

  6. EphB4 Regulates Self-Renewal, Proliferation and Neuronal Differentiation of Human Embryonic Neural Stem Cells in Vitro

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    Tingting Liu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: EphB4 belongs to the largest family of Eph receptor tyrosine kinases. It contributes to a variety of pathological progresses of cancer malignancy. However, little is known about its role in neural stem cells (NSCs. This study examined whether EphB4 is required for proliferation and differentiation of human embryonic neural stem cells (hNSCs in vitro. Methods: We up- and down-regulated EphB4 expression in hNSCs using lentiviral over-expression and shRNA knockdown constructs and then investigated the influence of EphB4 on the properties of hNSCs. Results: Our results show that shRNA-mediated EphB4 reduction profoundly impaired hNSCs self-renewal and proliferation. Furthermore, detection of differentiation revealed that knockdown of EphB4 inhibited hNSCs differentiation towards a neuronal lineage and promoted hNSCs differentiation to glial cells. In contrast, EphB4 overexpression promoted hNSCs self-renewal and proliferation, further induced hNSCs differentiation towards a neuronal lineage and inhibited hNSCs differentiation to glial cells. Moreover, we found that EphB4 regulates cell proliferation mediated by the Abl-CyclinD1 pathway. Conclusion: These studies provide strong evidence that fine tuning of EphB4 expression is crucial for the proliferation and neuronal differentiation of hNSCs, suggesting that EphB4 might be an interesting target for overcoming some of the therapeutic limitations of neuronal loss in brain diseases.

  7. Huntingtin-associated protein 1 interacts with breakpoint cluster region protein to regulate neuronal differentiation.

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    Pai-Tsang Huang

    Full Text Available Alterations in microtubule-dependent trafficking and certain signaling pathways in neuronal cells represent critical pathogenesis in neurodegenerative diseases. Huntingtin (Htt-associated protein-1 (Hap1 is a brain-enriched protein and plays a key role in the trafficking of neuronal surviving and differentiating cargos. Lack of Hap1 reduces signaling through tropomyosin-related kinases including extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK, resulting in inhibition of neurite outgrowth, hypothalamic dysfunction and postnatal lethality in mice. To examine how Hap1 is involved in microtubule-dependent trafficking and neuronal differentiation, we performed a proteomic analysis using taxol-precipitated microtubules from Hap1-null and wild-type mouse brains. Breakpoint cluster region protein (Bcr, a Rho GTPase regulator, was identified as a Hap1-interacting partner. Bcr was co-immunoprecipitated with Hap1 from transfected neuro-2a cells and co-localized with Hap1A isoform more in the differentiated than in the nondifferentiated cells. The Bcr downstream effectors, namely ERK and p38, were significantly less activated in Hap1-null than in wild-type mouse hypothalamus. In conclusion, Hap1 interacts with Bcr on microtubules to regulate neuronal differentiation.

  8. MicroRNAs regulate neuronal plasticity and are involved in pain mechanisms.

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    Sara eElramah

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs(miRNAs are emerging as master regulators of gene expression in the nervous system where they contribute not only to brain development but also to neuronal network homeostasis and plasticity. Their function is the result of a cascade of events including miRNA biogenesis, target recognition and translation inhibition. It has been suggested that miRNAs are major switches of the genome owing to their ability to regulate multiple genes at the same time. This regulation is essential for normal neuronal activity and, when affected, can lead to drastic pathological conditions. As an example, we illustrate how deregulation of miRNAs can affect neuronal plasticity leading to chronic pain.The origin of pain and its dual role as a key physiological function and a debilitating disease has been highly debated until now. The incidence of chronic pain is estimated to be 20-25% worldwide, thus making it a public health problem. Chronic pain can be considered as a form of maladaptive plasticity. Long-lasting modifications develop as a result of global changes in gene expression, and are thus likely to be controlled by miRNAs. Here, we review the literature on miRNAs and their targets responsible for maladaptive plasticity in chronic pain conditions. In addition, we conduct a retrospective analysis of miRNA expression data published for different pain models, taking into account recent progress in our understanding of the role of miRNAs in neuronal plasticity.

  9. MicroRNAs regulate neuronal plasticity and are involved in pain mechanisms.

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    Elramah, Sara; Landry, Marc; Favereaux, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are emerging as master regulators of gene expression in the nervous system where they contribute not only to brain development but also to neuronal network homeostasis and plasticity. Their function is the result of a cascade of events including miRNA biogenesis, target recognition, and translation inhibition. It has been suggested that miRNAs are major switches of the genome owing to their ability to regulate multiple genes at the same time. This regulation is essential for normal neuronal activity and, when affected, can lead to drastic pathological conditions. As an example, we illustrate how deregulation of miRNAs can affect neuronal plasticity leading to chronic pain. The origin of pain and its dual role as a key physiological function and a debilitating disease has been highly debated until now. The incidence of chronic pain is estimated to be 20-25% worldwide, thus making it a public health problem. Chronic pain can be considered as a form of maladaptive plasticity. Long-lasting modifications develop as a result of global changes in gene expression, and are thus likely to be controlled by miRNAs. Here, we review the literature on miRNAs and their targets responsible for maladaptive plasticity in chronic pain conditions. In addition, we conduct a retrospective analysis of miRNA expression data published for different pain models, taking into account recent progress in our understanding of the role of miRNAs in neuronal plasticity.

  10. Drosophila ATF-2 regulates sleep and locomotor activity in pacemaker neurons.

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    Shimizu, Hideyuki; Shimoda, Masami; Yamaguchi, Terumi; Seong, Ki-Hyeon; Okamura, Tomoo; Ishii, Shunsuke

    2008-10-01

    Stress-activated protein kinases such as p38 regulate the activity of transcription factor ATF-2. However, the physiological role of ATF-2, especially in the brain, is unknown. Here, we found that Drosophila melanogaster ATF-2 (dATF-2) is expressed in large ventral lateral neurons (l-LN(v)s) and also, to a much lesser extent, in small ventral lateral neurons, the pacemaker neurons. Only l-LN(v)s were stained with the antibody that specifically recognizes phosphorylated dATF-2, suggesting that dATF-2 is activated specifically in l-LN(v)s. The knockdown of dATF-2 in pacemaker neurons using RNA interference decreased sleep time, whereas the ectopic expression of dATF-2 increased sleep time. dATF-2 knockdown decreased the length of sleep bouts but not the number of bouts. The ATF-2 level also affected the sleep rebound after sleep deprivation and the arousal threshold. dATF-2 negatively regulated locomotor activity, although it did not affect the circadian locomotor rhythm. The degree of dATF-2 phosphorylation was greater in the morning than at night and was enhanced by forced locomotion via the dp38 pathway. Thus, dATF-2 is activated by the locomotor while it increases sleep, suggesting a role for dATF-2 as a regulator to connect sleep with locomotion.

  11. Mutual regulation between Satb2 and Fezf2 promotes subcerebral projection neuron identity in the developing cerebral cortex.

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    McKenna, William L; Ortiz-Londono, Christian F; Mathew, Thomas K; Hoang, Kendy; Katzman, Sol; Chen, Bin

    2015-09-15

    Generation of distinct cortical projection neuron subtypes during development relies in part on repression of alternative neuron identities. It was reported that the special AT-rich sequence-binding protein 2 (Satb2) is required for proper development of callosal neuron identity and represses expression of genes that are essential for subcerebral axon development. Surprisingly, Satb2 has recently been shown to be necessary for subcerebral axon development. Here, we unravel a previously unidentified mechanism underlying this paradox. We show that SATB2 directly activates transcription of forebrain embryonic zinc finger 2 (Fezf2) and SRY-box 5 (Sox5), genes essential for subcerebral neuron development. We find that the mutual regulation between Satb2 and Fezf2 enables Satb2 to promote subcerebral neuron identity in layer 5 neurons, and to repress subcerebral characters in callosal neurons. Thus, Satb2 promotes the development of callosal and subcerebral neurons in a cell context-dependent manner.

  12. Rapid regulation of depression-related behaviours by control of midbrain dopamine neurons.

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    Chaudhury, Dipesh; Walsh, Jessica J; Friedman, Allyson K; Juarez, Barbara; Ku, Stacy M; Koo, Ja Wook; Ferguson, Deveroux; Tsai, Hsing-Chen; Pomeranz, Lisa; Christoffel, Daniel J; Nectow, Alexander R; Ekstrand, Mats; Domingos, Ana; Mazei-Robison, Michelle S; Mouzon, Ezekiell; Lobo, Mary Kay; Neve, Rachael L; Friedman, Jeffrey M; Russo, Scott J; Deisseroth, Karl; Nestler, Eric J; Han, Ming-Hu

    2013-01-24

    Ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine neurons in the brain's reward circuit have a crucial role in mediating stress responses, including determining susceptibility versus resilience to social-stress-induced behavioural abnormalities. VTA dopamine neurons show two in vivo patterns of firing: low frequency tonic firing and high frequency phasic firing. Phasic firing of the neurons, which is well known to encode reward signals, is upregulated by repeated social-defeat stress, a highly validated mouse model of depression. Surprisingly, this pathophysiological effect is seen in susceptible mice only, with no apparent change in firing rate in resilient individuals. However, direct evidence--in real time--linking dopamine neuron phasic firing in promoting the susceptible (depression-like) phenotype is lacking. Here we took advantage of the temporal precision and cell-type and projection-pathway specificity of optogenetics to show that enhanced phasic firing of these neurons mediates susceptibility to social-defeat stress in freely behaving mice. We show that optogenetic induction of phasic, but not tonic, firing in VTA dopamine neurons of mice undergoing a subthreshold social-defeat paradigm rapidly induced a susceptible phenotype as measured by social avoidance and decreased sucrose preference. Optogenetic phasic stimulation of these neurons also quickly induced a susceptible phenotype in previously resilient mice that had been subjected to repeated social-defeat stress. Furthermore, we show differences in projection-pathway specificity in promoting stress susceptibility: phasic activation of VTA neurons projecting to the nucleus accumbens (NAc), but not to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), induced susceptibility to social-defeat stress. Conversely, optogenetic inhibition of the VTA-NAc projection induced resilience, whereas inhibition of the VTA-mPFC projection promoted susceptibility. Overall, these studies reveal novel firing-pattern- and neural

  13. Respiratory neuron characterization reveals intrinsic bursting properties in isolated adult turtle brainstems (Trachemys scripta)

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    Johnson, Stephen M.; Hedrick, Michael S.; Krause, Bryan M.; Nilles, Jacob P.; Chapman, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    It is not known whether respiratory neurons with intrinsic bursting properties exist within ectothermic vertebrate respiratory control systems. Thus, isolated adult turtle brainstems spontaneously producing respiratory motor output were used to identify and classify respiratory neurons based on their firing pattern relative to hypoglossal (XII) nerve activity. Most respiratory neurons (183/212) had peak activity during the expiratory phase, while inspiratory, post-inspiratory, and novel pre-expiratory neurons were less common. During synaptic blockade conditions, ~10% of respiratory neurons fired bursts of action potentials, with post-inspiratory cells (6/9) having the highest percentage of intrinsic burst properties. Most intrinsically bursting respiratory neurons were clustered at the level of the vagus (X) nerve root. Synaptic inhibition blockade caused seizure-like activity throughout the turtle brainstem, which shows that the turtle respiratory control system is not transformed into a network driven by intrinsically bursting respiratory neurons. We hypothesize that intrinsically bursting respiratory neurons are evolutionarily conserved and represent a potential rhythmogenic mechanism contributing to respiration in adult turtles. PMID:25462012

  14. Trial-to-trial variability of the prefrontal neurons reveals the nature of their engagement in a motion discrimination task.

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    Hussar, Cory; Pasternak, Tatiana

    2010-12-14

    During motion discrimination tasks, many prefrontal cortex (PFC) neurons are strongly modulated by the behavioral context, suggesting their involvement in sensory discriminations. Recent studies suggest that trial-to-trial variability of spiking activity characteristic of cortical neurons could be a source of information about the state of neurons and their participation in behavioral tasks. We tested this hypothesis by examining the variability of putative pyramidal PFC neurons, a likely source of top-down influences. The variability of these neurons was calculated as a ratio of spike count variance to its mean (fano factor, FF), while monkeys compared the directions of two moving stimuli, sample and test, separated by a delay. We found that the FF tracked consecutive components of the task, dropping rapidly with the onset of stimuli being discriminated and declining more slowly before each salient event of the trial: The sample, the test, and the response. These time-dependent signals were less consistent in direction selective neurons and were largely absent during passive fixation. Furthermore, neurons with test responses that reflected the remembered sample decreased their FF well before the test, revealing the predictive nature of response variability, an effect present only during the active task. The FF was also sensitive to behavioral performance, exhibiting different temporal dynamics on error trials. These changes did not depend on firing rates and were often the only metric correlated with task demands. Our results demonstrate that trial-to-trial variability provides a sensitive measure of the engagement of putative pyramidal PFC neurons in circuits subserving discrimination tasks.

  15. Increasing levels of wild-type CREB up-regulates several activity-regulated inhibitor of death (AID genes and promotes neuronal survival

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    Tan Yan-Wei

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CREB (cAMP-response element binding protein is the prototypical signal-regulated transcription factor. In neurons, it is the target of the synaptic activity-induced nuclear calcium-calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase (CaMK IV signaling pathway that controls the expression of genes important for acquired neuroprotection as well as other long-lasting adaptive processes in the nervous system. The function of CREB as a transcriptional activator is controlled by its phosphorylation on serine 133, which can be catalyzed by CaMKIV and leads to the recruitment of the co-activator, CREB binding protein (CBP. Activation of CBP function by nuclear calcium-CaMKIV signaling is a second regulatory step required for CREB/CBP-mediated transcription. Results Here we used recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV to increase the levels of wild type CREB or to overexpress a mutant version of CREB (mCREB containing a serine to alanine mutation at position amino acid 133 in mouse hippocampal neurons. Increasing the levels of CREB was sufficient to boost neuroprotective activity even under basal conditions (i.e., in the absence of stimulation of synaptic activity. In contrast, overexpression of mCREB increased cell death. The ratio of phospho(serine 133CREB to CREB immunoreactivity in unstimulated hippocampal neurons was similar for endogenous CREB and overexpressed wild type CREB and, as expected, dramatically reduced for overexpressed mCREB. A gene expression analysis revealed that increased expression of CREB but not that of mCREB in hippocampal neurons led to elevated expression levels of bdnf as well as that of several members of a previously characterized set of Activity-regulated Inhibitor of Death (AID genes, which include atf3, btg2, gadd45β, and gadd45γ. Conclusions Our findings indicate that the expression levels of wild type CREB are a critical determinant of the ability of hippocampal neurons to survive harmful conditions

  16. Temporal gene expression profiling reveals CEBPD as a candidate regulator of brain disease in prosaposin deficient mice

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    Ran Huimin

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prosaposin encodes, in tandem, four small acidic activator proteins (saposins with specificities for glycosphingolipid (GSL hydrolases in lysosomes. Extensive GSL storage occurs in various central nervous system regions in mammalian prosaposin deficiencies. Results Our hypomorphic prosaposin deficient mouse, PS-NA, exhibited 45% WT levels of brain saposins and showed neuropathology that included neuronal GSL storage and Purkinje cell loss. Impairment of neuronal function was observed as early as 6 wks as demonstrated by the narrow bridges tests. Temporal transcriptome microarray analyses of brain tissues were conducted with mRNA from three prosaposin deficient mouse models: PS-NA, prosaposin null (PS-/- and a V394L/V394L glucocerebrosidase mutation combined with PS-NA (4L/PS-NA. Gene expression alterations in cerebrum and cerebellum were detectable at birth preceding the neuronal deficits. Differentially expressed genes encompassed a broad spectrum of cellular functions. The number of down-regulated genes was constant, but up-regulated gene numbers increased with age. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein delta (CEBPD was the only up-regulated transcription factor in these two brain regions of all three models. Network analyses revealed that CEBPD has functional relationships with genes in transcription, pro-inflammation, cell death, binding, myelin and transport. Conclusion These results show that: 1 Regionally specific gene expression abnormalities precede the brain histological and neuronal function changes, 2 Temporal gene expression profiles provide insights into the molecular mechanism during the GSL storage disease course, and 3 CEBPD is a candidate regulator of brain disease in prosaposin deficiency to participate in modulating disease acceleration or progression.

  17. Cellular model of neuronal atrophy induced by DYNC1I1 deficiency reveals protective roles of RAS-RAF-MEK signaling

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    Zhi-Dong Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neuronal atrophy is a common pathological feature occurred in aging and neurodegenerative diseases. A variety of abnormalities including motor protein malfunction and mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to the loss of neuronal architecture; however, less is known about the intracellular signaling pathways that can protect against or delay this pathogenic process. Here, we show that the DYNC1I1 deficiency, a neuron-specific dynein intermediate chain, causes neuronal atrophy in primary hippocampal neurons. With this cellular model, we are able to find that activation of RAS-RAF-MEK signaling protects against neuronal atrophy induced by DYNC1I1 deficiency, which relies on MEK-dependent autophagy in neuron. Moreover, we further reveal that BRAF also protects against neuronal atrophy induced by mitochondrial impairment. These findings demonstrate protective roles of the RAS-RAF-MEK axis against neuronal atrophy, and imply a new therapeutic target for clinical intervention.

  18. Rett syndrome induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons reveal novel neurophysiological alterations.

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    Farra, N; Zhang, W-B; Pasceri, P; Eubanks, J H; Salter, M W; Ellis, J

    2012-12-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental autism spectrum disorder caused by mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. Here, we describe the first characterization and neuronal differentiation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells derived from Mecp2-deficient mice. Fully reprogrammed wild-type (WT) and heterozygous female iPS cells express endogenous pluripotency markers, reactivate the X-chromosome and differentiate into the three germ layers. We directed iPS cells to produce glutamatergic neurons, which generated action potentials and formed functional excitatory synapses. iPS cell-derived neurons from heterozygous Mecp2(308) mice showed defects in the generation of evoked action potentials and glutamatergic synaptic transmission, as previously reported in brain slices. Further, we examined electrophysiology features not yet studied with the RTT iPS cell system and discovered that MeCP2-deficient neurons fired fewer action potentials, and displayed decreased action potential amplitude, diminished peak inward currents and higher input resistance relative to WT iPS-derived neurons. Deficiencies in action potential firing and inward currents suggest that disturbed Na(+) channel function may contribute to the dysfunctional RTT neuronal network. These phenotypes were additionally confirmed in neurons derived from independent WT and hemizygous mutant iPS cell lines, indicating that these reproducible deficits are attributable to MeCP2 deficiency. Taken together, these results demonstrate that neuronally differentiated MeCP2-deficient iPS cells recapitulate deficits observed previously in primary neurons, and these identified phenotypes further illustrate the requirement of MeCP2 in neuronal development and/or in the maintenance of normal function. By validating the use of iPS cells to delineate mechanisms underlying RTT pathogenesis, we identify deficiencies that can be targeted for in vitro translational screens.

  19. Neuronal RING finger protein 11 (RNF11 regulates canonical NF-κB signaling

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    Pranski Elaine L

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The RING domain-containing protein RING finger protein 11 (RNF11 is a member of the A20 ubiquitin-editing protein complex and modulates peripheral NF-κB signaling. RNF11 is robustly expressed in neurons and colocalizes with a population of α-synuclein-positive Lewy bodies and neurites in Parkinson disease patients. The NF-κB pathway has an important role in the vertebrate nervous system, where the absence of NF-κB activity during development can result in learning and memory deficits, whereas chronic NF-κB activation is associated with persistent neuroinflammation. We examined the functional role of RNF11 with respect to canonical NF-κB signaling in neurons to gain understanding of the tight association of inflammatory pathways, including NF-κB, with the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Methods and results Luciferase assays were employed to assess NF-κB activity under targeted short hairpin RNA (shRNA knockdown of RNF11 in human neuroblastoma cells and murine primary neurons, which suggested that RNF11 acts as a negative regulator of canonical neuronal NF-κB signaling. These results were further supported by analyses of p65 translocation to the nucleus following depletion of RNF11. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments indicated that RNF11 associates with members of the A20 ubiquitin-editing protein complex in neurons. Site-directed mutagenesis of the myristoylation domain, which is necessary for endosomal targeting of RNF11, altered the impact of RNF11 on NF-κB signaling and abrogated RNF11’s association with the A20 ubiquitin-editing protein complex. A partial effect on canonical NF-κB signaling and an association with the A20 ubiquitin-editing protein complex was observed with mutagenesis of the PPxY motif, a proline-rich region involved in Nedd4-like protein interactions. Last, shRNA-mediated reduction of RNF11 in neurons and neuronal cell lines elevated levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 and

  20. HDAC2 selectively regulates FOXO3a-mediated gene transcription during oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death.

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    Peng, Shengyi; Zhao, Siqi; Yan, Feng; Cheng, Jinbo; Huang, Li; Chen, Hong; Liu, Qingsong; Ji, Xunming; Yuan, Zengqiang

    2015-01-21

    All neurodegenerative diseases are associated with oxidative stress-induced neuronal death. Forkhead box O3a (FOXO3a) is a key transcription factor involved in neuronal apoptosis. However, how FOXO3a forms complexes and functions in oxidative stress processing remains largely unknown. In the present study, we show that histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) forms a physical complex with FOXO3a, which plays an important role in FOXO3a-dependent gene transcription and oxidative stress-induced mouse cerebellar granule neuron (CGN) apoptosis. Interestingly, we also found that HDAC2 became selectively enriched in the promoter region of the p21 gene, but not those of other target genes, and inhibited FOXO3a-mediated p21 transcription. Furthermore, we found that oxidative stress reduced the interaction between FOXO3a and HDAC2, leading to an increased histone H4K16 acetylation level in the p21 promoter region and upregulated p21 expression in a manner independent of p53 or E2F1. Phosphorylation of HDAC2 at Ser 394 is important for the HDAC2-FOXO3a interaction, and we found that cerebral ischemia/reperfusion reduced phosphorylation of HDAC2 at Ser 394 and mitigated the HDAC2-FOXO3a interaction in mouse brain tissue. Our study reveals the novel regulation of FOXO3a-mediated selective gene transcription via epigenetic modification in the process of oxidative stress-induced cell death, which could be exploited therapeutically.

  1. Unkempt is negatively regulated by mTOR and uncouples neuronal differentiation from growth control.

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    Amélie Avet-Rochex

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal differentiation is exquisitely controlled both spatially and temporally during nervous system development. Defects in the spatiotemporal control of neurogenesis cause incorrect formation of neural networks and lead to neurological disorders such as epilepsy and autism. The mTOR kinase integrates signals from mitogens, nutrients and energy levels to regulate growth, autophagy and metabolism. We previously identified the insulin receptor (InR/mTOR pathway as a critical regulator of the timing of neuronal differentiation in the Drosophila melanogaster eye. Subsequently, this pathway has been shown to play a conserved role in regulating neurogenesis in vertebrates. However, the factors that mediate the neurogenic role of this pathway are completely unknown. To identify downstream effectors of the InR/mTOR pathway we screened transcriptional targets of mTOR for neuronal differentiation phenotypes in photoreceptor neurons. We identified the conserved gene unkempt (unk, which encodes a zinc finger/RING domain containing protein, as a negative regulator of the timing of photoreceptor differentiation. Loss of unk phenocopies InR/mTOR pathway activation and unk acts downstream of this pathway to regulate neurogenesis. In contrast to InR/mTOR signalling, unk does not regulate growth. unk therefore uncouples the role of the InR/mTOR pathway in neurogenesis from its role in growth control. We also identified the gene headcase (hdc as a second downstream regulator of the InR/mTOR pathway controlling the timing of neurogenesis. Unk forms a complex with Hdc, and Hdc expression is regulated by unk and InR/mTOR signalling. Co-overexpression of unk and hdc completely suppresses the precocious neuronal differentiation phenotype caused by loss of Tsc1. Thus, Unk and Hdc are the first neurogenic components of the InR/mTOR pathway to be identified. Finally, we show that Unkempt-like is expressed in the developing mouse retina and in neural stem

  2. Evidence that dendritic mitochondria negatively regulate dendritic branching in pyramidal neurons in the neocortex.

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    Kimura, Toshiya; Murakami, Fujio

    2014-05-14

    The precise branching patterns of dendritic arbors have a profound impact on information processing in individual neurons and the brain. These patterns are established by positive and negative regulation of the dendritic branching. Although the mechanisms for positive regulation have been extensively investigated, little is known about those for negative regulation. Here, we present evidence that mitochondria located in developing dendrites are involved in the negative regulation of dendritic branching. We visualized mitochondria in pyramidal neurons of the mouse neocortex during dendritic morphogenesis using in utero electroporation of a mitochondria-targeted fluorescent construct. We altered the mitochondrial distribution in vivo by overexpressing Mfn1, a mitochondrial shaping protein, or the Miro-binding domain of TRAK2 (TRAK2-MBD), a truncated form of a motor-adaptor protein. We found that dendritic mitochondria were preferentially targeted to the proximal portion of dendrites only during dendritic morphogenesis. Overexpression of Mfn1 or TRAK2-MBD depleted mitochondria from the dendrites, an effect that was accompanied by increased branching of the proximal portion of the dendrites. This dendritic abnormality cannot be accounted for by changes in the distribution of membrane trafficking organelles since the overexpression of Mfn1 did not alter the distributions of the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, or endosomes. Additionally, neither did these constructs impair neuronal viability or mitochondrial function. Therefore, our results suggest that dendritic mitochondria play a critical role in the establishment of the precise branching pattern of dendritic arbors by negatively affecting dendritic branching.

  3. 5-HT6 receptor blockade regulates primary cilia morphology in striatal neurons.

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    Brodsky, Matthew; Lesiak, Adam J; Croicu, Alex; Cohenca, Nathalie; Sullivan, Jane M; Neumaier, John F

    2017-04-01

    The 5-HT6 receptor has been implicated in a variety of cognitive processes including habitual behaviors, learning, and memory. It is found almost exclusively in the brain, is expressed abundantly in striatum, and localizes to neuronal primary cilia. Primary cilia are antenna-like, sensory organelles found on most neurons that receive both chemical and mechanical signals from other cells and the surrounding environment; however, the effect of 5-HT6 receptor function on cellular morphology has not been examined. We confirmed that 5-HT6 receptors were localized to primary cilia in wild-type (WT) but not 5-HT6 knockout (5-HT6KO) in both native mouse brain tissue and primary cultured striatal neurons then used primary neurons cultured from WT or 5-HT6KO mice to study the function of these receptors. Selective 5-HT6 antagonists reduced cilia length in neurons cultured from wild-type mice in a concentration and time-dependent manner without altering dendrites, but had no effect on cilia length in 5-HT6KO cultured neurons. Varying the expression levels of heterologously expressed 5-HT6 receptors affected the fidelity of ciliary localization in both WT and 5-HT6KO neurons; overexpression lead to increasing amounts of 5-HT6 localization outside of the cilia but did not alter cilia morphology. Introducing discrete mutations into the third cytoplasmic loop of the 5-HT6 receptor greatly reduced, but did not entirely eliminate, trafficking of the 5-HT6 receptor to primary cilia. These data suggest that blocking 5-HT6 receptor activity reduces the length of primary cilia and that mechanisms that regulate trafficking of 5-HT6 receptors to cilia are more complex than previously thought. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Neuron-specific specificity protein 4 bigenomically regulates the transcription of all mitochondria- and nucleus-encoded cytochrome c oxidase subunit genes in neurons.

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    Johar, Kaid; Priya, Anusha; Dhar, Shilpa; Liu, Qiuli; Wong-Riley, Margaret T T

    2013-11-01

    Neurons are highly dependent on oxidative metabolism for their energy supply, and cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is a key energy-generating enzyme in the mitochondria. A unique feature of COX is that it is one of only four proteins in mammalian cells that are bigenomically regulated. Of its thirteen subunits, three are encoded in the mitochondrial genome and ten are nuclear-encoded on nine different chromosomes. The mechanism of regulating this multisubunit, bigenomic enzyme poses a distinct challenge. In recent years, we found that nuclear respiratory factors 1 and 2 (NRF-1 and NRF-2) mediate such bigenomic coordination. The latest candidate is the specificity factor (Sp) family of proteins. In N2a cells, we found that Sp1 regulates all 13 COX subunits. However, we discovered recently that in primary neurons, it is Sp4 and not Sp1 that regulates some of the key glutamatergic receptor subunit genes. The question naturally arises as to the role of Sp4 in regulating COX in primary neurons. The present study utilized multiple approaches, including chromatin immunoprecipitation, promoter mutational analysis, knockdown and over-expression of Sp4, as well as functional assays to document that Sp4 indeed functionally regulate all 13 subunits of COX as well as mitochondrial transcription factors A and B. The present study discovered that among the specificity family of transcription factors, it is the less known neuron-specific Sp4 that regulates the expression of all 13 subunits of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (COX) enzyme in primary neurons. Sp4 also regulates the three mitochondrial transcription factors (TFAM, TFB1M, and TFB2M) and a COX assembly protein SURF-1 in primary neurons.

  5. GABAergic RIP-Cre neurons in the arcuate nucleus selectively regulate energy expenditure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Dong; Tong, Qingchun; Ye, Chianping; Koda, Shuichi; Fuller, Patrick M; Krashes, Michael J; Vong, Linh; Ray, Russell S; Olson, David P; Lowell, Bradford B

    2012-10-26

    Neural regulation of energy expenditure is incompletely understood. By genetically disrupting GABAergic transmission in a cell-specific fashion, and by combining this with selective pharmacogenetic activation and optogenetic mapping techniques, we have uncovered an arcuate-based circuit that selectively drives energy expenditure. Specifically, mice lacking synaptic GABA release from RIP-Cre neurons have reduced energy expenditure, become obese and are extremely sensitive to high-fat diet-induced obesity, the latter due to defective diet-induced thermogenesis. Leptin's ability to stimulate thermogenesis, but not to reduce feeding, is markedly attenuated. Acute, selective activation of arcuate GABAergic RIP-Cre neurons, which monosynaptically innervate PVH neurons projecting to the NTS, rapidly stimulates brown fat and increases energy expenditure but does not affect feeding. Importantly, this response is dependent upon GABA release from RIP-Cre neurons. Thus, GABAergic RIP-Cre neurons in the arcuate selectively drive energy expenditure, contribute to leptin's stimulatory effect on thermogenesis, and protect against diet-induced obesity.

  6. Alternative Splicing of Neuronal Differentiation Factor TRF2 Regulated by HNRNPH1/H2

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    Ioannis Grammatikakis

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available During neuronal differentiation, use of an alternative splice site on the rat telomere repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2 mRNA generates a short TRF2 protein isoform (TRF2-S capable of derepressing neuronal genes. However, the RNA-binding proteins (RBPs controlling this splicing event are unknown. Here, using affinity pull-down analysis, we identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins H1 and H2(HNRNPH as RBPs specifically capable of interacting with the spliced RNA segment (exon 7 of Trf2 pre-mRNA. HNRNPH proteins prevent the production of the short isoform of Trf2 mRNA, as HNRNPH silencing selectively elevates TRF2-S levels. Accordingly, HNRNPH levels decline while TRF2-S levels increase during neuronal differentiation. In addition, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated deletion of hnRNPH2 selectively accelerates the NGF-triggered differentiation of rat pheochromocytoma cells into neurons. In sum, HNRNPH is a splicing regulator of Trf2 pre-mRNA that prevents the expression of TRF2-S, a factor implicated in neuronal differentiation.

  7. Developmental Wiring of Specific Neurons Is Regulated by RET-1/Nogo-A in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torpe, Nanna; Nørgaard, Steffen; Høye, Anette M; Pocock, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Nogo-A is a membrane-bound protein that functions to inhibit neuronal migration, adhesion, and neurite outgrowth during development. In the mature nervous system, Nogo-A stabilizes neuronal wiring to inhibit neuronal plasticity and regeneration after injury. Here, we show that RET-1, the sole Nogo-A homolog in Caenorhabditis elegans, is required to control developmental wiring of a specific subset of neurons. In ret-1 deletion mutant animals, specific ventral nerve cord axons are misguided where they fail to respect the ventral midline boundary. We found that ret-1 is expressed in multiple neurons during development, and, through mosaic analysis, showed that ret-1 controls axon guidance in a cell-autonomous manner. Finally, as in mammals, ret-1 regulates ephrin expression, and dysregulation of the ephrin ligand VAB-2 is partially responsible for the ret-1 mutant axonal defects. Together, our data present a previously unidentified function for RET-1 in the nervous system of C. elegans. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  8. Laser speckle contrast reveals cerebral blood flow dynamics evoked by optogenetically controlled neuronal activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Thakor, Nitish V.; Pelled, Galit

    2013-03-01

    As a critical basis of functional brain imaging, neurovascular coupling describes the link between neuronal and hemodynamic changes. The majority of in vivo neurovascular coupling studies was performed by inducing sensory stimulation via afferent inputs. Unfortunately such an approach results in recruiting of multiple types of cells, which confounds the explanation of neuronal roles in stimulus evoked hemodynamic changes. Recently optogenetics has emerged to provide immediate control of neurons by exciting or inhibiting genetically engineered neurons expressing light sensitive proteins. However, there is a need for optical methods capable of imaging the concurrent hemodynamic changes. We utilize laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) to obtain high resolution display of cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the vicinity of the targeted neural population. LSCI is a minimally invasive method for imaging CBF in microvessels through thinned skull, and produces images with high spatiotemporal resolution, wide field of view. In the integrated system light sources with different wavelengths and band-passing/blocking filters were used to allow simultaneous optical manipulation of neuronal activities and optical imaging of corresponding CBF. Experimental studies were carried out in a rodent model expressing channalrhodopsin (ChR2) in excitatory neurons in the somatosensory cortex (S1). The results demonstrated significant increases of CBF in response to ChR2 stimulation (exciting neuronal firing) comparable to the CBF response to contralateral forepaw stimulation. The approach promises to be an exciting minimally invasive method to study neurovascular coupling. The complete system provides a novel approach for broad neuroscience applications.

  9. Homeostatic regulation of excitatory synapses on striatal medium spiny neurons expressing the D2 dopamine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Dominic; Giguère, Nicolas; Loustalot, Fabien; Bourque, Marie-Josée; Ducrot, Charles; El Mestikawy, Salah; Trudeau, Louis-Éric

    2016-05-01

    Striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) are contacted by glutamatergic axon terminals originating from cortex, thalamus and other regions. The striatum is also innervated by dopaminergic (DAergic) terminals, some of which release glutamate as a co-transmitter. Despite evidence for functional DA release at birth in the striatum, the role of DA in the establishment of striatal circuitry is unclear. In light of recent work suggesting activity-dependent homeostatic regulation of glutamatergic terminals on MSNs expressing the D2 DA receptor (D2-MSNs), we used primary co-cultures to test the hypothesis that stimulation of DA and glutamate receptors regulates the homeostasis of glutamatergic synapses on MSNs. Co-culture of D2-MSNs with mesencephalic DA neurons or with cortical neurons produced an increase in spines and functional glutamate synapses expressing VGLUT2 or VGLUT1, respectively. The density of VGLUT2-positive terminals was reduced by the conditional knockout of this gene from DA neurons. In the presence of both mesencephalic and cortical neurons, the density of synapses reached the same total, compatible with the possibility of a homeostatic mechanism capping excitatory synaptic density. Blockade of D2 receptors increased the density of cortical and mesencephalic glutamatergic terminals, without changing MSN spine density or mEPSC frequency. Combined blockade of AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptors increased the density of cortical terminals and decreased that of mesencephalic VGLUT2-positive terminals, with no net change in total excitatory terminal density or in mEPSC frequency. These results suggest that DA and glutamate signaling regulate excitatory inputs to striatal D2-MSNs at both the pre- and postsynaptic level, under the influence of a homeostatic mechanism controlling functional output of the circuit.

  10. In vitro ischemia triggers a transcriptional response to down-regulate synaptic proteins in hippocampal neurons.

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    Joana Fernandes

    Full Text Available Transient global cerebral ischemia induces profound changes in the transcriptome of brain cells, which is partially associated with the induction or repression of genes that influence the ischemic response. However, the mechanisms responsible for the selective vulnerability of hippocampal neurons to global ischemia remain to be clarified. To identify molecular changes elicited by ischemic insults, we subjected hippocampal primary cultures to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD, an in vitro model for global ischemia that resulted in delayed neuronal death with an excitotoxic component. To investigate changes in the transcriptome of hippocampal neurons submitted to OGD, total RNA was extracted at early (7 h and delayed (24 h time points after OGD and used in a whole-genome RNA microarray. We observed that at 7 h after OGD there was a general repression of genes, whereas at 24 h there was a general induction of gene expression. Genes related with functions such as transcription and RNA biosynthesis were highly regulated at both periods of incubation after OGD, confirming that the response to ischemia is a dynamic and coordinated process. Our analysis showed that genes for synaptic proteins, such as those encoding for PICK1, GRIP1, TARPγ3, calsyntenin-2/3, SAPAP2 and SNAP-25, were down-regulated after OGD. Additionally, OGD decreased the mRNA and protein expression levels of the GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit as well as the GluN2A and GluN2B subunits of NMDA receptors, but increased the mRNA expression of the GluN3A subunit, thus altering the composition of ionotropic glutamate receptors in hippocampal neurons. Together, our results present the expression profile elicited by in vitro ischemia in hippocampal neurons, and indicate that OGD activates a transcriptional program leading to down-regulation in the expression of genes coding for synaptic proteins, suggesting that the synaptic proteome may change after ischemia.

  11. Sleep-deprivation regulates α-2 adrenergic responses of rat hypocretin/orexin neurons.

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    Aaron Uschakov

    Full Text Available We recently demonstrated, in rat brain slices, that the usual excitation by noradrenaline (NA of hypocretin/orexin (hcrt/orx neurons was changed to an inhibition following sleep deprivation (SD. Here we describe that in control condition (CC, i.e. following 2 hours of natural sleep in the morning, the α(2-adrenergic receptor (α(2-AR agonist, clonidine, had no effect on hcrt/orx neurons, whereas following 2 hours of SD (SDC, it hyperpolarized the neurons by activating G-protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK channels. Since concentrations of clonidine up to a thousand times (100 µM higher than those effective in SDC (100 nM, were completely ineffective in CC, a change in the availability of G-proteins is unlikely to explain the difference between the two conditions. To test whether the absence of effect of clonidine in CC could be due to a down-regulation of GIRK channels, we applied baclofen, a GABA(B agonist known to also activate GIRK channels, and found that it hyperpolarized hcrt/orx neurons in that condition. Moreover, baclofen occluded the response to clonidine in SDC, indicating that absence of effect of clonidine in CC could not be attributed to down-regulation of GIRK channels. We finally tested whether α(2-ARs were still available at the membrane in CC and found that clonidine could reduce calcium currents, indicating that α(2-ARs associated with calcium channels remain available in that condition. Taken together, these results suggest that a pool of α(2-ARs associated with GIRK channels is normally down-regulated (or desensitized in hcrt/orx neurons to only become available for their inhibition following sleep deprivation.

  12. Neuron-microglia crosstalk up-regulates neuronal FGF-2 expression which mediates neuroprotection against excitotoxicity via JNK1/2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Catarina; Pais, Teresa F; Gomes, João R; Chatterjee, Sukalyan

    2008-10-01

    Glial cells and neurons are in constant reciprocal signalling both under physiological and neuropathological conditions. Microglial activation is often associated with neuronal death during inflammation of the CNS, although microglial cells are also known to exert a neuroprotective role. In this work, we investigated the interplay between cerebellar granule neurons (CGN) and microglia in the perspective of CGN survival to an excitotoxic stimulus, quinolinic acid (QA), a catabolite of the tryptophan degradation pathway. We observed that CGN succumb to QA challenge via extracellular signal regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK) activation. Our data with transgenic mice expressing the natural inhibitor of calpains, calpastatin, indicate that together with cathepsins they mediate QA-induced toxicity acting downstream of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-ERK pathway. Microglial cells are not only resistant to QA but can rescue neurons from QA-mediated toxicity when they are mixed in culture with neurons or by using mixed culture-conditioned medium (MCCM). This effect is mediated via fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) present in MCCM. FGF-2 is transcriptionally up-regulated in neurons and secreted in the MCCM as a result of neuron-microglia crosstalk. The neuroprotection is associated with the retention of cathepsins in the lysosomes and with transactivation of inducible heat-shock protein 70 downstream of FGF-2. Furthermore, FGF-2 upon release by neurons activates c-jun N-terminal kinase 1 and 2 pathway which also contributes to neuronal survival. We suggest that FGF-2 plays a pivotal role in neuroprotection against QA as an outcome of neuron-microglia interaction.

  13. Rassf5 and Ndr kinases regulate neuronal polarity through Par3 phosphorylation in a novel pathway.

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    Yang, Rui; Kong, Eryan; Jin, Jing; Hergovich, Alexander; Püschel, Andreas W

    2014-08-15

    The morphology and polarized growth of cells depend on pathways that control the asymmetric distribution of regulatory factors. The evolutionarily conserved Ndr kinases play important roles in cell polarity and morphogenesis in yeast and invertebrates but it is unclear whether they perform a similar function in mammalian cells. Here, we analyze the function of mammalian Ndr1 and Ndr2 (also known as STK38 or STK38L, respectively) in the establishment of polarity in neurons. We show that they act downstream of the tumor suppressor Rassf5 and upstream of the polarity protein Par3 (also known as PARD3). Rassf5 and Ndr1 or Ndr2 are required during the polarization of hippocampal neurons to prevent the formation of supernumerary axons. Mechanistically, the Ndr kinases act by phosphorylating Par3 at Ser383 to inhibit its interaction with dynein, thereby polarizing the distribution of Par3 and reinforcing axon specification. Our results identify a novel Rassf5-Ndr-Par3 signaling cascade that regulates the transport of Par3 during the establishment of neuronal polarity. Their role in neuronal polarity suggests that Ndr kinases perform a conserved function as regulators of cell polarity.

  14. DCC Expression by Neurons Regulates Synaptic Plasticity in the Adult Brain

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    Katherine E. Horn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The transmembrane protein deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC and its ligand, netrin-1, regulate synaptogenesis during development, but their function in the mature central nervous system is unknown. Given that DCC promotes cell-cell adhesion, is expressed by neurons, and activates proteins that signal at synapses, we hypothesized that DCC expression by neurons regulates synaptic function and plasticity in the adult brain. We report that DCC is enriched in dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons in wild-type mice, and we demonstrate that selective deletion of DCC from neurons in the adult forebrain results in the loss of long-term potentiation (LTP, intact long-term depression, shorter dendritic spines, and impaired spatial and recognition memory. LTP induction requires Src activation of NMDA receptor (NMDAR function. DCC deletion severely reduced Src activation. We demonstrate that enhancing NMDAR function or activating Src rescues LTP in the absence of DCC. We conclude that DCC activation of Src is required for NMDAR-dependent LTP and certain forms of learning and memory.

  15. Distinct regulation of activity-dependent transcription of immediate early genes in cultured rat cortical neurons.

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    Fukuchi, Mamoru; Sanabe, Tomofumi; Watanabe, Toshifumi; Kubota, Takane; Tabuchi, Akiko; Tsuda, Masaaki

    2017-08-26

    The activity-regulated expression of immediate early genes (IEGs) contributes to long-lasting neuronal functions underlying long-term memory. However, their response properties following neuronal activity are unique and remain poorly understood. To address this knowledge gap, here we further investigated the response properties of two representative IEGs, c-fos and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf). Treatment of cultured cortical cells with KCl produces a depolarization process that results in the increase of intracellular calcium concentration in a KCl concentration-dependent manner. Consistent with this increase, c-fos expression was induced in a KCl concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, however, Bdnf expression was optimally activated by both 25 and 50 mM concentration of KCl. Similar results were observed when the cells were treated with okadaic acid, which inhibits protein phosphatases and elicits the hyper-phosphorylation of signaling molecules. Thus, Bdnf expression is strictly regulated by a neuronal activity threshold in an all or nothing manner, whereas c-fos expression is activated in a neuronal activity-dependent manner. Our findings also suggest that these differential responses might be due to the presence or absence of a TATA box. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Neuronal activity rapidly induces transcription of the CREB-regulated microRNA-132, in vivo.

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    Nudelman, Aaron S; DiRocco, Derek P; Lambert, Talley J; Garelick, Michael G; Le, Josh; Nathanson, Neil M; Storm, Daniel R

    2010-04-01

    Activity-dependent changes in gene-expression are believed to underlie the molecular representation of memory. In this study, we report that in vivo activation of neurons rapidly induces the CREB-regulated microRNA miR-132. To determine if production of miR-132 is regulated by neuronal activity its expression in mouse brain was monitored by quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). Pilocarpine-induced seizures led to a robust, rapid, and transient increase in the primary transcript of miR-132 (pri-miR-132) followed by a subsequent rise in mature microRNA (miR-132). Activation of neurons in the hippocampus, olfactory bulb, and striatum by contextual fear conditioning, odor-exposure, and cocaine-injection, respectively, also increased pri-miR-132. Induction kinetics of pri-miR-132 were monitored and found to parallel those of immediate early genes, peaking at 45 min and returning to basal levels within 2 h of stimulation. Expression levels of primary and mature-miR-132 increased significantly between postnatal Days 10 and 24. We conclude that miR-132 is an activity-dependent microRNA in vivo, and may contribute to the long-lasting proteomic changes required for experience-dependent neuronal plasticity.

  17. Regnase-1 in microglia negatively regulates high mobility group box 1-mediated inflammation and neuronal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Xi; Wang, Chen; Huang, Shao-Fei; Chen, Qiong; Hu, Ya-Fang; Zhou, Liang; Gu, Yong

    2016-04-05

    Extracellular high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) has been demonstrated to function as a proinflammatory cytokine and induces neuronal injury in response to various pathological stimuli in central nervous system (CNS). However, the regulatory factor involved in HMGB1-mediated inflammatory signaling is largely unclear. Regulatory RNase 1 (Regnase-1) is a potent anti-inflammation enzyme that can degrade a set of mRNAs encoding proinflammatory cytokines. The present study aims to determine the role of Regnase-1 in the regulation of HMGB1-mediated inflammatory injury in CNS. Cultured microglia and rat brain were treated with recombinant HMGB1 to examine the induction of Regnase-1 expression. Moreover, the role of Regnase-1 in modulating the expression of inflammatory cytokines and neuronal injury was then investigated in microglia by specific siRNA knockdown upon HMGB1 treatment. Results showed that HMGB1 could significantly induce the de novo synthesis of Regnase-1 in cultured microglia. Consistently, Regnase-1 was elevated and found to be co-localized with microglia marker in the brain of rat treated with HMGB1. Silencing Regnase-1 in microglia enhanced HMGB1-induced expression of proinflammatory cytokines and exacerbated neuronal toxicity. Collectively, these results suggest that Regnase-1 can be induced by HMGB1 in microglia and negatively regulates HMGB1-mediated neuroinflammation and neuronal toxicity.

  18. Differential regulation of the zebrafish orthopedia1 gene during fate determination of diencephalic neurons

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    Tarallo Raffaella

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The homeodomain transcription factor Orthopedia (Otp is essential in restricting the fate of multiple classes of secreting neurons in the neuroendocrine hypothalamus of vertebrates. However, there is little information on the intercellular factors that regulate Otp expression during development. Results Here, we identified two otp orthologues in zebrafish (otp1 and otp2 and explored otp1 in the context of the morphogenetic pathways that specify neuroectodermal regions. During forebrain development, otp1 is expressed in anterior groups of diencephalic cells, positioned in the preoptic area (PO (anterior alar plate and the posterior tuberculum (PT (posterior basal plate. The latter structure is characterized by Tyrosine Hydroxylase (TH-positive cells, suggesting a role for otp1 in the lineage restriction of catecholaminergic (CA neurons. Disruptions of Hedgehog (HH and Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF pathways point to the ability of SHH protein to trigger otp1 expression in PO presumptive neuroblasts, with the attenuating effect of Dzip1 and FGF8. In addition, our data disclose otp1 as a determinant of CA neurons in the PT, where otp1 activity is strictly dependent on Nodal signaling and it is not responsive to SHH and FGF. Conclusion In this study, we pinpoint the evolutionary importance of otp1 transcription factor in cell states of the diencephalon anlage and early neuronal progenitors. Furthermore, our data indicate that morphogenetic mechanisms differentially regulate otp1 expression in alar and basal plates.

  19. Neuronal activity rapidly induces transcription of the CREB-regulated microRNA-132, in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nudelman, Aaron Samuel; DiRocco, Derek P; Lambert, Talley J

    2010-01-01

    of stimulation. Expression levels of primary and mature-miR-132 increased significantly between postnatal Days 10 and 24. We conclude that miR-132 is an activity-dependent microRNA in vivo, and may contribute to the long-lasting proteomic changes required for experience-dependent neuronal plasticity.......Activity-dependent changes in gene-expression are believed to underlie the molecular representation of memory. In this study, we report that in vivo activation of neurons rapidly induces the CREB-regulated microRNA miR-132. To determine if production of miR-132 is regulated by neuronal activity its...... expression in mouse brain was monitored by quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). Pilocarpine-induced seizures led to a robust, rapid, and transient increase in the primary transcript of miR-132 (pri-miR-132) followed by a subsequent rise in mature microRNA (miR-132). Activation of neurons in the hippocampus...

  20. [Regulation of neurogenesis: factors affecting of new neurons formation in adult mammals brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respondek, Michalina; Buszman, Ewa

    2015-12-31

    Neurogenesis is a complex and multi-step process of generating completely functional neurons. This process in adult brain is based on pluripotentional neuronal stem cells (NSC), which are able to proliferation and differentiation into mature neurons or glial cells. NSC are located in subgranular zone inside hippocampus and in subventricular zone. The new neurons formation depends on many endo- and exogenous factors which modulate each step of neurogenesis. This article describes the most important regulators of adult neurogenesis, mainly: neurotrophins, growth factors, hormones, neurotransmitters and microenvironment of NSC. Some drugs, especially antipsychotics, antidepressants and normothymics may affect the neurogenic properties of adult brain. Moreover pathological processes such as neuroinflammation, stroke or epilepsy are able to induce proliferation of NSC. The proneurogenic effects of psychotropic drugs and pathological processes are associated with their ability to increase some hormones and neurotrophins level, as well as with rising the expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein and metalloproteinase MMP-2. Additionaly, some drugs, for example haloperidol, are able to block prolactin and dopaminergic neuroblasts receptors. Down-regulation of adult neurogenesis is associated with alcohol abuse and high stress level. Negative effect of many drugs, such as cytostatics, COX-2 inhibitors and opioides was also observed. The proneurogenic effect of described factors suggest their broad therapeutic potential and gives a new perspective on an effective and modern treatment of many neuropsychiatric disorders. This effect can also help to clarify the pathogenesis of disorders associated with proliferation and degeneration of adult brain cells.

  1. Regulation of Müller glial dependent neuronal regeneration in the damaged adult zebrafish retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorsuch, Ryne A; Hyde, David R

    2014-06-01

    This article examines our current knowledge underlying the mechanisms involved in neuronal regeneration in the adult zebrafish retina. Zebrafish, which has the capacity to regenerate a wide variety of tissues and organs (including the fins, kidney, heart, brain, and spinal cord), has become the premier model system to study retinal regeneration due to the robustness and speed of the response and the variety of genetic tools that can be applied to study this question. It is now well documented that retinal damage induces the resident Müller glia to dedifferentiate and reenter the cell cycle to produce neuronal progenitor cells that continue to proliferate, migrate to the damaged retinal layer and differentiate into the missing neuronal cell types. Increasing our understanding of how these cellular events are regulated and occur in response to neuronal damage may provide critical information that can be applied to stimulating a regeneration response in the mammalian retina. In this review, we will focus on the genes/proteins that regulate zebrafish retinal regeneration and will attempt to critically evaluate how these factors may interact to correctly orchestrate the definitive cellular events that occur during regeneration.

  2. Phosphoproteome Profiling Reveals Circadian Clock Regulation of Posttranslational Modifications in the Murine Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Cheng-Kang; Xu, Bo; Mehta, Neel; Mayne, Janice; Sun, Warren Y. L.; Cheng, Kai; Ning, Zhibin; Dong, Jing; Zou, Hanfa; Cheng, Hai-Ying Mary; Figeys, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous oscillator that drives daily rhythms in physiology, behavior, and gene expression. The underlying mechanisms of circadian timekeeping are cell-autonomous and involve oscillatory expression of core clock genes that is driven by interconnecting transcription–translation feedback loops (TTFLs). Circadian clock TTFLs are further regulated by posttranslational modifications, in particular, phosphorylation. The hippocampus plays an important role in spatial memory and the conversion of short- to long-term memory. Several studies have reported the presence of a peripheral oscillator in the hippocampus and have highlighted the importance of circadian regulation in memory formation. Given the general importance of phosphorylation in circadian clock regulation, we performed global quantitative proteome and phosphoproteome analyses of the murine hippocampus across the circadian cycle, applying spiked-in labeled reference and high accuracy mass spectrometry (MS). Of the 3,052 proteins and 2,868 phosphosites on 1,368 proteins that were accurately quantified, 1.7% of proteins and 5.2% of phosphorylation events exhibited time-of-day-dependent expression profiles. The majority of circadian phosphopeptides displayed abrupt fluctuations at mid-to-late day without underlying rhythms of protein abundance. Bioinformatic analysis of cyclic phosphorylation events revealed their diverse distribution in different biological pathways, most notably, cytoskeletal organization and neuronal morphogenesis. This study provides the first large-scale, quantitative MS analysis of the circadian phosphoproteome and proteome of the murine hippocampus and highlights the significance of rhythmic regulation at the posttranslational level in this peripheral oscillator. In addition to providing molecular insights into the hippocampal circadian clock, our results will assist in the understanding of genetic factors that underlie rhythms-associated pathological states of

  3. Size-dependent regulation of synchronized activity in living neuronal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hideaki; Kubota, Shigeru; Chida, Yudai; Morita, Mayu; Moriya, Satoshi; Akima, Hisanao; Sato, Shigeo; Hirano-Iwata, Ayumi; Tanii, Takashi; Niwano, Michio

    2016-07-01

    We study the effect of network size on synchronized activity in living neuronal networks. Dissociated cortical neurons form synaptic connections in culture and generate synchronized spontaneous activity within 10 days in vitro. Using micropatterned surfaces to extrinsically control the size of neuronal networks, we show that synchronized activity can emerge in a network as small as 12 cells. Furthermore, a detailed comparison of small (˜20 cells), medium (˜100 cells), and large (˜400 cells) networks reveal that synchronized activity becomes destabilized in the small networks. A computational modeling of neural activity is then employed to explore the underlying mechanism responsible for the size effect. We find that the generation and maintenance of the synchronized activity can be minimally described by: (1) the stochastic firing of each neuron in the network, (2) enhancement in the network activity in a positive feedback loop of excitatory synapses, and (3) Ca-dependent suppression of bursting activity. The model further shows that the decrease in total synaptic input to a neuron that drives the positive feedback amplification of correlated activity is a key factor underlying the destabilization of synchrony in smaller networks. Spontaneous neural activity plays a critical role in cortical information processing, and our work constructively clarifies an aspect of the structural basis behind this.

  4. Area-specific development of distinct projection neuron subclasses is regulated by postnatal epigenetic modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harb, Kawssar; Magrinelli, Elia; Nicolas, Céline S; Lukianets, Nikita; Frangeul, Laura; Pietri, Mariel; Sun, Tao; Sandoz, Guillaume; Grammont, Franck; Jabaudon, Denis; Studer, Michele; Alfano, Christian

    2016-01-27

    During cortical development, the identity of major classes of long-distance projection neurons is established by the expression of molecular determinants, which become gradually restricted and mutually exclusive. However, the mechanisms by which projection neurons acquire their final properties during postnatal stages are still poorly understood. In this study, we show that the number of neurons co-expressing Ctip2 and Satb2, respectively involved in the early specification of subcerebral and callosal projection neurons, progressively increases after birth in the somatosensory cortex. Ctip2/Satb2 postnatal co-localization defines two distinct neuronal subclasses projecting either to the contralateral cortex or to the brainstem suggesting that Ctip2/Satb2 co-expression may refine their properties rather than determine their identity. Gain- and loss-of-function approaches reveal that the transcriptional adaptor Lmo4 drives this maturation program through modulation of epigenetic mechanisms in a time- and area-specific manner, thereby indicating that a previously unknown genetic program postnatally promotes the acquisition of final subtype-specific features.

  5. Regulation of PINK1 by NR2B-containing NMDA receptors in ischemic neuronal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Yuexin; Liu, Baosong; Li, Lijun; Chang, Ning; Li, Lei; Wang, Hanbin; Wang, Dianshi; Feng, Hua; Cheung, Carol; Liao, Mingxia; Cui, Tianyuan; Sugita, Shuzo; Wan, Qi

    2009-12-01

    Dysfunction of PTEN-induced kinase-1 (PINK1) is implicated in neurodegeneration. We report here that oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), an in vitro insult mimicking ischemic neuron injury, resulted in a significant reduction of PINK1 protein expression in cultured cortical neurons. The decrease of PINK1 expression was blocked by the antagonists of NMDA receptors. We revealed that the overactivation of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors (NR2BRs) was responsible for the OGD-induced PINK1 reduction. The overactivated NR2BRs also inhibited the phosphorylation, but not the protein expression, of the cell survival-promoting kinase Akt after OGD insult, indicating that OGD-induced reduction of PINK1 protein is specific in the injury paradigm. We further showed that enhancing the protein expression of PINK1 antagonized OGD-induced reduction of Akt phosphorylation, suggesting that Akt may be a downstream target of PINK1 in ischemic neuron injury. Importantly, we provided evidence that both NR2BR antagonist and PINK1 over-expression protected against OGD-induced neuronal death. These results suggest that the overactivation of NR2BRs may contribute to ischemic neuron death through suppressing PINK1-dependent survival signaling. Thus, selectively antagonizing NR2BR signal pathway-induced neurotoxicity may be a potential neuroprotection strategy.

  6. Size-dependent regulation of synchronized activity in living neuronal networks.

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    Yamamoto, Hideaki; Kubota, Shigeru; Chida, Yudai; Morita, Mayu; Moriya, Satoshi; Akima, Hisanao; Sato, Shigeo; Hirano-Iwata, Ayumi; Tanii, Takashi; Niwano, Michio

    2016-07-01

    We study the effect of network size on synchronized activity in living neuronal networks. Dissociated cortical neurons form synaptic connections in culture and generate synchronized spontaneous activity within 10 days in vitro. Using micropatterned surfaces to extrinsically control the size of neuronal networks, we show that synchronized activity can emerge in a network as small as 12 cells. Furthermore, a detailed comparison of small (∼20 cells), medium (∼100 cells), and large (∼400 cells) networks reveal that synchronized activity becomes destabilized in the small networks. A computational modeling of neural activity is then employed to explore the underlying mechanism responsible for the size effect. We find that the generation and maintenance of the synchronized activity can be minimally described by: (1) the stochastic firing of each neuron in the network, (2) enhancement in the network activity in a positive feedback loop of excitatory synapses, and (3) Ca-dependent suppression of bursting activity. The model further shows that the decrease in total synaptic input to a neuron that drives the positive feedback amplification of correlated activity is a key factor underlying the destabilization of synchrony in smaller networks. Spontaneous neural activity plays a critical role in cortical information processing, and our work constructively clarifies an aspect of the structural basis behind this.

  7. Geometry and dynamics of activity-dependent homeostatic regulation in neurons.

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    Olypher, Andrey V; Prinz, Astrid A

    2010-06-01

    To maintain activity in a functional range, neurons constantly adjust membrane excitability to changing intra- and extracellular conditions. Such activity-dependent homeostatic regulation (ADHR) is critical for normal processing of the nervous system and avoiding pathological conditions. Here, we posed a homeostatic regulation problem for the classical Morris-Lecar (ML) model. The problem was motivated by the phenomenon of the functional recovery of stomatogastric neurons in crustaceans in the absence of neuromodulation. In our study, the regulation of the ionic conductances in the ML model depended on the calcium current or the intracellular calcium concentration. We found an asymptotic solution to the problem under the assumption of slow regulation. The solution provides a full account of the regulation in the case of correlated or anticorrelated changes of the maximal conductances of the calcium and potassium currents. In particular, the solution shows how the target and parameters of the regulation determine which perturbations of the conductances can be compensated by the ADHR. In some cases, the sets of compensated initial perturbations are not convex. On the basis of our analysis we formulated specific questions for subsequent experimental and theoretical studies of ADHR.

  8. Voltage-gated potassium channels involved in regulation of physiological function in MrgprA3-specific itch neurons.

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    Tang, Min; Wu, Guanyi; Wang, Zhongli; Yang, Niuniu; Shi, Hao; He, Qian; Zhu, Chan; Yang, Yan; Yu, Guang; Wang, Changming; Yuan, Xiaolin; Liu, Qin; Guan, Yun; Dong, Xinzhong; Tang, Zongxiang

    2016-04-01

    Itch is described as an unpleasant or irritating skin sensation that elicits the desire or reflex to scratch. MrgprA3, one of members of the Mrgprs family, is specifically expressed in a subpopulation of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). These MrgprA3-expressing DRG neurons have been identified as itch-specific neurons. They can be activated by the compound, chloroquine, which is used as a drug to treat malaria. In the present study, we labeled these itch-specific neurons using the method of molecular genetic markers, and then studied their electrophysiological properties. We also recorded the cutaneous MrgprA3(-) neurons retrogradely labeled by Dil dye (MrgprA3(-)-Dil). We first found that MrgprA3(+) neurons have a lower excitability than MrgprA3(-) neurons (MrgprA3(-)-non-Dil and MrgprA3(-)-Dil). The number of action potential (AP) was reduced more obviously in MrgprA3(+) neurons than that of in MrgprA3(-) neurons. In most cases, MrgprA3(+) neurons only generated single AP; however, in MrgprA3(-) neurons, the same stimulation could induce multiple AP firing due to the greater voltage-gated potassium (Kv) current existence in MrgprA3(+) than in MrgprA3(-) neurons. Thus, Kv current plays an important role in the regulation of excitability in itch-specific neurons.

  9. Bcl11a (Ctip1) Controls Migration of Cortical Projection Neurons through Regulation of Sema3c.

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    Wiegreffe, Christoph; Simon, Ruth; Peschkes, Katharina; Kling, Carolin; Strehle, Michael; Cheng, Jin; Srivatsa, Swathi; Liu, Pentao; Jenkins, Nancy A; Copeland, Neal G; Tarabykin, Victor; Britsch, Stefan

    2015-07-15

    During neocortical development, neurons undergo polarization, oriented migration, and layer-type-specific differentiation. The transcriptional programs underlying these processes are not completely understood. Here, we show that the transcription factor Bcl11a regulates polarity and migration of upper layer neurons. Bcl11a-deficient late-born neurons fail to correctly switch from multipolar to bipolar morphology, resulting in impaired radial migration. We show that the expression of Sema3c is increased in migrating Bcl11a-deficient neurons and that Bcl11a is a direct negative regulator of Sema3c transcription. In vivo gain-of-function and rescue experiments demonstrate that Sema3c is a major downstream effector of Bcl11a required for the cell polarity switch and for the migration of upper layer neurons. Our data uncover a novel Bcl11a/Sema3c-dependent regulatory pathway used by migrating cortical neurons.

  10. In Vivo Profiling Reveals a Competent Heat Shock Response in Adult Neurons: Implications for Neurodegenerative Disorders.

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    Alisia Carnemolla

    Full Text Available The heat shock response (HSR is the main pathway used by cells to counteract proteotoxicity. The inability of differentiated neurons to induce an HSR has been documented in primary neuronal cultures and has been proposed to play a critical role in ageing and neurodegeneration. However, this accepted dogma has not been demonstrated in vivo. We used BAC transgenic mice generated by the Gene Expression Nervous System Atlas project to investigate the capacity of striatal medium sized spiny neurons to induce an HSR as compared to that of astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. We found that all cell populations were competent to induce an HSR upon HSP90 inhibition. We also show the presence and relative abundance of heat shock-related genes and proteins in these striatal cell populations. The identification of a competent HSR in adult neurons supports the development of therapeutics that target the HSR pathway as treatments for neurodegenerative disorders.

  11. Unique aspects of transcriptional regulation in neurons – nuances in NFκB and Sp1-related factors

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    Chen Yuzhi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The unique physiology and function of neurons create differences in their cellular physiology, including their regulation of gene expression. We began several years ago exploring the relationships between the NFκB transcription factor, neuronal survival, and glutamate receptor activation in telencephalic neurons. These studies led us to conclude that this population of cells is nearly incapable of activating the NFκB that is nonetheless expressed at reasonable levels. A subset of the κB cis elements are instead bound by members of the Sp1 family in neurons. Also surprising was our discovery that Sp1 itself, typically described as ubiquitous, is severely restricted in expression within forebrain neurons; Sp4 seems to be substituted during neuronal differentiation. These findings and their implications for neuronal differentiation – as well as potential dedifferentiation during degenerative processes – are discussed here.

  12. A Subset of Autism-associated Genes Regulate the Structural Stability of Neurons

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    Yu-Chih Lin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder (ASD comprises a range of neurological conditions that affect individuals’ ability to communicate and interact with others. People with ASD often exhibit marked qualitative difficulties in social interaction, communication, and behavior. Alterations in neurite arborization and dendritic spine morphology, including size, shape, and number, are hallmarks of almost all neurological conditions, including ASD. As experimental evidence emerges in recent years, it becomes clear that although there is broad heterogeneity of identified autism risk genes, many of them converge into similar cellular pathways, including those regulating neurite outgrowth, synapse formation and spine stability, and synaptic plasticity. These mechanisms together regulate the structural stability of neurons and are vulnerable targets in ASD. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of those autism risk genes that affect the structural connectivity of neurons. We sub-categorize them into 1 cytoskeletal regulators, e.g. motors and small RhoGTPase regulators; 2 adhesion molecules, e.g. cadherins, NCAM, and neurexin superfamily; 3 cell surface receptors, e.g. glutamatergic receptors and receptor tyrosine kinases; 4 signaling molecules, e.g. protein kinases and phosphatases; and 5 synaptic proteins, e.g. vesicle and scaffolding proteins. Although the roles of some of these genes in maintaining neuronal structural stability are well studied, how mutations contribute to the autism phenotype is still largely unknown. Investigating whether and how the neuronal structure and function are affected when these genes are mutated will provide insights toward developing effective interventions aimed at improving the lives of people with autism and their families.

  13. Neurons that detect interocular conflict during binocular rivalry revealed with EEG.

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    Katyal, Sucharit; Engel, Stephen A; He, Bin; He, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    When the two eyes view incompatible images, perception alternates between them. What neural computations underlie this binocular rivalry? Perceptual alternations may simply reflect competition between the sets of monocular neurons that respond to each image, with the stronger driving perception. Here, we test an alternative hypothesis, that the computations that resolve rivalry make use of an active signal that reflects interocular conflict. Images presented to each eye were flickered at different frequencies while we measured steady-state visually evoked potentials (SSVEP). Signals at frequencies that are combinations of the two input frequencies can arise only from binocular neurons. In a first experiment, we measured energy at these "intermodulation" frequencies during binocular rivalry and found it to be highest immediately before rivalry restarted following a period of incomplete resolution of rivalry (a "mixed" percept). This suggests that the intermodulation signals may arise from neurons important for resolving the conflict between the two eyes' inputs. In a second experiment, we tested whether the intermodulation signal arose from neurons that measure interocular conflict by parametrically increasing conflict while simultaneously reducing image contrast. The activity of neurons that receive input from both eyes but are not sensitive to conflict should reduce monotonically as contrast decreases. The intermodulation response, however, peaked at intermediate levels of conflict, suggesting that it arises in part from neurons that respond to interocular conflict. Binocular rivalry appears to depend on an active mechanism that detects interocular conflict, whose levels of activity can be measured by the intermodulation frequencies of the SSVEP.

  14. Circuit Architecture of VTA Dopamine Neurons Revealed by Systematic Input-Output Mapping.

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    Beier, Kevin T; Steinberg, Elizabeth E; DeLoach, Katherine E; Xie, Stanley; Miyamichi, Kazunari; Schwarz, Lindsay; Gao, Xiaojing J; Kremer, Eric J; Malenka, Robert C; Luo, Liqun

    2015-07-30

    Dopamine (DA) neurons in the midbrain ventral tegmental area (VTA) integrate complex inputs to encode multiple signals that influence motivated behaviors via diverse projections. Here, we combine axon-initiated viral transduction with rabies-mediated trans-synaptic tracing and Cre-based cell-type-specific targeting to systematically map input-output relationships of VTA-DA neurons. We found that VTA-DA (and VTA-GABA) neurons receive excitatory, inhibitory, and modulatory input from diverse sources. VTA-DA neurons projecting to different forebrain regions exhibit specific biases in their input selection. VTA-DA neurons projecting to lateral and medial nucleus accumbens innervate largely non-overlapping striatal targets, with the latter also sending extensive extra-striatal axon collaterals. Using electrophysiology and behavior, we validated new circuits identified in our tracing studies, including a previously unappreciated top-down reinforcing circuit from anterior cortex to lateral nucleus accumbens via VTA-DA neurons. This study highlights the utility of our viral-genetic tracing strategies to elucidate the complex neural substrates that underlie motivated behaviors.

  15. Amygdala EphB2 Signaling Regulates Glutamatergic Neuron Maturation and Innate Fear.

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    Zhu, Xiao-Na; Liu, Xian-Dong; Zhuang, Hanyi; Henkemeyer, Mark; Yang, Jing-Yu; Xu, Nan-Jie

    2016-09-28

    The amygdala serves as emotional center to mediate innate fear behaviors that are reflected through neuronal responses to environmental aversive cues. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the initial neuron responses is poorly understood. In this study, we monitored the innate defensive responses to aversive stimuli of either elevated plus maze or predator odor in juvenile mice and found that glutamatergic neurons were activated in amygdala. Loss of EphB2, a receptor tyrosine kinase expressed in amygdala neurons, suppressed the reactions and led to defects in spine morphogenesis and fear behaviors. We further found a coupling of spinogenesis with these threat cues induced neuron activation in developing amygdala that was controlled by EphB2. A constitutively active form of EphB2 was sufficient to rescue the behavioral and morphological defects caused by ablation of ephrin-B3, a brain-enriched ligand to EphB2. These data suggest that kinase-dependent EphB2 intracellular signaling plays a major role for innate fear responses during the critical developing period, in which spinogenesis in amygdala glutamatergic neurons was involved. Generation of innate fear responses to threat as an evolutionally conserved brain feature relies on development of functional neural circuit in amygdala, but the molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. We here identify that EphB2 receptor tyrosine kinase, which is specifically expressed in glutamatergic neurons, is required for the innate fear responses in the neonatal brain. We further reveal that EphB2 mediates coordination of spinogenesis and neuron activation in amygdala during the critical period for the innate fear. EphB2 catalytic activity plays a major role for the behavior upon EphB-ephrin-B3 binding and transnucleus neuronal connections. Our work thus indicates an essential synaptic molecular signaling within amygdala that controls synapse development and helps bring about innate fear emotions in the postnatal

  16. Regulation of the Na,K-ATPase gamma-subunit FXYD2 by Runx1 and Ret signaling in normal and injured non-peptidergic nociceptive sensory neurons.

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    Stéphanie Ventéo

    Full Text Available Dorsal root ganglia (DRGs contain the cell bodies of sensory neurons which relay nociceptive, thermoceptive, mechanoceptive and proprioceptive information from peripheral tissues toward the central nervous system. These neurons establish constant communication with their targets which insures correct maturation and functioning of the somato-sensory nervous system. Interfering with this two-way communication leads to cellular, electrophysiological and molecular modifications that can eventually cause neuropathic conditions. In this study we reveal that FXYD2, which encodes the gamma-subunit of the Na,K-ATPase reported so far to be mainly expressed in the kidney, is induced in the mouse DRGs at postnatal stages where it is restricted specifically to the TrkB-expressing mechanoceptive and Ret-positive/IB4-binding non-peptidergic nociceptive neurons. In non-peptidergic nociceptors, we show that the transcription factor Runx1 controls FXYD2 expression during the maturation of the somato-sensory system, partly through regulation of the tyrosine kinase receptor Ret. Moreover, Ret signaling maintains FXYD2 expression in adults as demonstrated by the axotomy-induced down-regulation of the gene that can be reverted by in vivo delivery of GDNF family ligands. Altogether, these results establish FXYD2 as a specific marker of defined sensory neuron subtypes and a new target of the Ret signaling pathway during normal maturation of the non-peptidergic nociceptive neurons and after sciatic nerve injury.

  17. Comparison of the D2 receptor regulation and neurotoxicant susceptibility of nigrostriatal dopamine neurons in wild-type and CB1/CB2 receptor knockout mice.

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    Simkins, Tyrell J; Janis, Kelly L; McClure, Alison K; Behrouz, Bahareh; Pappas, Samuel S; Lehner, Andreas; Kaminski, Norbert E; Goudreau, John L; Lookingland, Keith J; Kaplan, Barbara L F

    2012-09-01

    Motor dysfunctions of Parkinson Disease (PD) are due to the progressive loss of midbrain nigrostriatal dopamine (NSDA) neurons. Evidence suggests a role for cannabinoid receptors in the neurodegeneration of these neurons following neurotoxicant-induced injury. This work evaluates NSDA neurons in CB1/CB2 knockout (KO) mice and tests the hypothesis that CB1/CB2 KO mice are more susceptible to neurotoxicant exposure. NSDA neuronal indices were assessed using unbiased stereological cell counting, high pressure liquid chromatography coupled with electrochemical detection or mass spectrometry, and Western blot. Results reveal that CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptor signaling is not necessary for the maintenance of a normally functioning NSDA neuronal system. Mice lacking CB1 and CB2 receptors were found to be equally susceptible to the neurotoxicant 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6- tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). These studies support the use of CB1/CB2 KO mice for investigating the cannabinoid receptor-mediated regulation of the NSDA neuronal system in models of PD.

  18. High throughput screening for inhibitors of REST in neural derivatives of human embryonic stem cells reveals a chemical compound that promotes expression of neuronal genes.

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    Charbord, Jérémie; Poydenot, Pauline; Bonnefond, Caroline; Feyeux, Maxime; Casagrande, Fabrice; Brinon, Benjamin; Francelle, Laetitia; Aurégan, Gwenaelle; Guillermier, Martine; Cailleret, Michel; Viegas, Pedro; Nicoleau, Camille; Martinat, Cécile; Brouillet, Emmanuel; Cattaneo, Elena; Peschanski, Marc; Lechuga, Marc; Perrier, Anselme L

    2013-09-01

    Decreased expression of neuronal genes such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is associated with several neurological disorders. One molecular mechanism associated with Huntington disease (HD) is a discrete increase in the nuclear activity of the transcriptional repressor REST/NRSF binding to repressor element-1 (RE1) sequences. High-throughput screening of a library of 6,984 compounds with luciferase-assay measuring REST activity in neural derivatives of human embryonic stem cells led to identify two benzoimidazole-5-carboxamide derivatives that inhibited REST silencing in a RE1-dependent manner. The most potent compound, X5050, targeted REST degradation, but neither REST expression, RNA splicing nor binding to RE1 sequence. Differential transcriptomic analysis revealed the upregulation of neuronal genes targeted by REST in wild-type neural cells treated with X5050. This activity was confirmed in neural cells produced from human induced pluripotent stem cells derived from a HD patient. Acute intraventricular delivery of X5050 increased the expressions of BDNF and several other REST-regulated genes in the prefrontal cortex of mice with quinolinate-induced striatal lesions. This study demonstrates that the use of pluripotent stem cell derivatives can represent a crucial step toward the identification of pharmacological compounds with therapeutic potential in neurological affections involving decreased expression of neuronal genes associated to increased REST activity, such as Huntington disease.

  19. Gene Expression Profiling with Cre-Conditional Pseudorabies Virus Reveals a Subset of Midbrain Neurons That Participate in Reward Circuitry.

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    Pomeranz, Lisa E; Ekstrand, Mats I; Latcha, Kaamashri N; Smith, Gregory A; Enquist, Lynn W; Friedman, Jeffrey M

    2017-04-12

    The mesolimbic dopamine pathway receives inputs from numerous regions of the brain as part of a neural system that detects rewarding stimuli and coordinates a behavioral response. The capacity to simultaneously map and molecularly define the components of this complex multisynaptic circuit would thus advance our understanding of the determinants of motivated behavior. To accomplish this, we have constructed pseudorabies virus (PRV) strains in which viral propagation and fluorophore expression are activated only after exposure to Cre recombinase. Once activated in Cre-expressing neurons, the virus serially labels chains of presynaptic neurons. Dual injection of GFP and mCherry tracing viruses simultaneously illuminates nigrostriatal and mesolimbic circuitry and shows no overlap, demonstrating that PRV transmission is confined to synaptically connected neurons. To molecularly profile mesolimbic dopamine neurons and their presynaptic inputs, we injected Cre-conditional GFP virus into the NAc of (anti-GFP) nanobody-L10 transgenic mice and immunoprecipitated translating ribosomes from neurons infected after retrograde tracing. Analysis of purified RNA revealed an enrichment of transcripts expressed in neurons of the dorsal raphe nuclei and lateral hypothalamus that project to the mesolimbic dopamine circuit. These studies identify important inputs to the mesolimbic dopamine pathway and further show that PRV circuit-directed translating ribosome affinity purification can be broadly applied to identify molecularly defined neurons comprising complex, multisynaptic circuits.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The mesolimbic dopamine circuit integrates signals from key brain regions to detect and respond to rewarding stimuli. To further define this complex multisynaptic circuit, we constructed a panel of Cre recombinase-activated pseudorabies viruses (PRVs) that enabled retrograde tracing of neural inputs that terminate on Cre-expressing neurons. Using these viruses and Retro

  20. Cell surface area regulation in neurons in hippocampal slice cultures is resistant to oxygen-glucose deprivation

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    Natalya Shulyakova

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Natalya Shulyakova1,2, Jamie Fong2, Diana Diec2, Adrian Nahirny1,2, Linda R Mills1,21Department of Physiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, M5T 2S8; 2Toronto Western Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, 11-430, 399 Bathurst St, Toronto, ON, Canada, M5T 2S8Background: Neurons swell in response to a variety of insults. The capacity to recover, ie, to shrink, is critical for neuronal function and survival. Studies on dissociated neurons have shown that during swelling and shrinking, neurons reorganize their plasma membrane; as neurons swell, in response to hypo-osmotic media, the bilayer area increases. Upon restoration of normo-osmotic media, neurons shrink, forming transient invaginations of the plasma membrane known as vacuole-like dilations (VLDs, to accommodate the decrease in the bilayer.Methods: Here we used confocal microscopy to monitor neuronal swelling and shrinking in the three-dimensional (3D environment of post-natal rat hippocampal slice cultures. To label neurons, we used biolistic transfection, to introduce enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP targeted to the cytoplasm; and a membrane targeted GFP (lckGFP, targeted to the plasma membrane.Results: Neurons in slice cultures swelled and shrank in response to hypo-osmotic to normo-osmotic media changes. Oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD caused sustained neuronal swelling; after reperfusion, some neurons recovered but in others, VLD recovery was stalled. OGD did not impair neuronal capacity to recover from a subsequent osmotic challenge.Conclusion: These results suggest cell surface area regulation (SAR is an intrinsic property of neurons, and that neuronal capacity for SAR may play an important role in the brain’s response to ischemic insults.Keywords: neurons, swelling, ischemia, cell surface area, hippocampal slice culture

  1. Association between tetrodotoxin resistant channels and lipid rafts regulates sensory neuron excitability.

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    Alessandro Pristerà

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs play a key role in the initiation and propagation of action potentials in neurons. Na(V1.8 is a tetrodotoxin (TTX resistant VGSC expressed in nociceptors, peripheral small-diameter neurons able to detect noxious stimuli. Na(V1.8 underlies the vast majority of sodium currents during action potentials. Many studies have highlighted a key role for Na(V1.8 in inflammatory and chronic pain models. Lipid rafts are microdomains of the plasma membrane highly enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids. Lipid rafts tune the spatial and temporal organisation of proteins and lipids on the plasma membrane. They are thought to act as platforms on the membrane where proteins and lipids can be trafficked, compartmentalised and functionally clustered. In the present study we investigated Na(V1.8 sub-cellular localisation and explored the idea that it is associated with lipid rafts in nociceptors. We found that Na(V1.8 is distributed in clusters along the axons of DRG neurons in vitro and ex vivo. We also demonstrated, by biochemical and imaging studies, that Na(V1.8 is associated with lipid rafts along the sciatic nerve ex vivo and in DRG neurons in vitro. Moreover, treatments with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD and 7-ketocholesterol (7KC led to the dissociation between rafts and Na(V1.8. By calcium imaging we demonstrated that the lack of association between rafts and Na(V1.8 correlated with impaired neuronal excitability, highlighted by a reduction in the number of neurons able to conduct mechanically- and chemically-evoked depolarisations. These findings reveal the sub-cellular localisation of Na(V1.8 in nociceptors and highlight the importance of the association between Na(V1.8 and lipid rafts in the control of nociceptor excitability.

  2. Multiple oxygen tension environments reveal diverse patterns of transcriptional regulation in primary astrocytes.

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    Wayne Chadwick

    Full Text Available The central nervous system normally functions at O(2 levels which would be regarded as hypoxic by most other tissues. However, most in vitro studies of neurons and astrocytes are conducted under hyperoxic conditions without consideration of O(2-dependent cellular adaptation. We analyzed the reactivity of astrocytes to 1, 4 and 9% O(2 tensions compared to the cell culture standard of 20% O(2, to investigate their ability to sense and translate this O(2 information to transcriptional activity. Variance of ambient O(2 tension for rat astrocytes resulted in profound changes in ribosomal activity, cytoskeletal and energy-regulatory mechanisms and cytokine-related signaling. Clustering of transcriptional regulation patterns revealed four distinct response pattern groups that directionally pivoted around the 4% O(2 tension, or demonstrated coherent ascending/decreasing gene expression patterns in response to diverse oxygen tensions. Immune response and cell cycle/cancer-related signaling pathway transcriptomic subsets were significantly activated with increasing hypoxia, whilst hemostatic and cardiovascular signaling mechanisms were attenuated with increasing hypoxia. Our data indicate that variant O(2 tensions induce specific and physiologically-focused transcript regulation patterns that may underpin important physiological mechanisms that connect higher neurological activity to astrocytic function and ambient oxygen environments. These strongly defined patterns demonstrate a strong bias for physiological transcript programs to pivot around the 4% O(2 tension, while uni-modal programs that do not, appear more related to pathological actions. The functional interaction of these transcriptional 'programs' may serve to regulate the dynamic vascular responsivity of the central nervous system during periods of stress or heightened activity.

  3. Neuron-specific protein interactions of Drosophila CASK-b are revealed by mass spectrometry

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    Konark eMukherjee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Modular scaffolding proteins are designed to have multiple interactors. CASK, a member of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK superfamily, has been shown to have roles in many tissues, including neurons and epithelia. It is likely that the set of proteins it interacts with is different in each of these diverse tissues. In this study we asked if within the Drosophila central nervous system, there were neuron-specific sets of CASK-interacting proteins. A YFP-tagged CASK transgene was expressed in genetically defined subsets of neurons in the Drosophila brain known to be important for CASK function, and proteins present in an anti-GFP immunoprecipitation were identified by mass spectrometry. Each subset of neurons had a distinct set of interacting proteins, suggesting that CASK participates in multiple protein networks and that these networks may be different in different neuronal circuits. One common set of proteins was associated with mitochondria, and we show here that endogenous CASK co-purifies with mitochondria. We also determined CASK posttranslational modifications for one cell type, supporting the idea that this technique can be used to assess cell- and circuit-specific protein modifications as well as protein interaction networks.

  4. Nurr1 regulates Top IIβ and functions in axon genesis of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons

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    Heng Xin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NURR1 (also named as NR4A2 is a member of the steroid/thyroid hormone receptor family, which can bind to DNA and modulate expression of target genes. Previous studies have shown that NURR1 is essential for the nigral dopaminergic neuron phenotype and function maintenance, and the defects of the gene are possibly associated with Parkinson's disease (PD. Results In this study, we used new born Nurr1 knock-out mice combined with Affymetrix genechip technology and real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR to identify Nurr1 regulated genes, which led to the discovery of several transcripts differentially expressed in the nigro-striatal pathway of Nurr1 knock-out mice. We found that an axon genesis gene called Topoisomerase IIβ (Top IIβ was down-regulated in Nurr1 knock-out mice and we identified two functional NURR1 binding sites in the proximal Top IIβ promoter. While in Top IIβ null mice, we saw a significant loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantial nigra and lack of neurites along the nigro-striatal pathway. Using specific TOP II antagonist ICRF-193 or Top IIβ siRNA in the primary cultures of ventral mesencephalic (VM neurons, we documented that suppression of TOP IIβ expression resulted in VM neurites shortening and growth cones collapsing. Furthermore, microinjection of ICRF-193 into the mouse medial forebrain bundle (MFB led to the loss of nigro-striatal projection. Conclusion Taken together, our findings suggest that Top IIβ might be a down-stream target of Nurr1, which might influence the processes of axon genesis in dopaminergic neurons via the regulation of TOP IIβ expression. The Nurr1-Top IIβ interaction may shed light on the pathologic role of Nurr1 defect in the nigro-striatal pathway deficiency associated with PD.

  5. BDNF up-regulates TrkB protein and prevents the death of CA1 neurons following transient forebrain ischemia.

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    Ferrer, I; Ballabriga, J; Martí, E; Pérez, E; Alberch, J; Arenas, E

    1998-04-01

    The neurotrophin family of growth factors, which includes Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF), Neurotrophin-3 (NT3) and Neurotrophin-4/5 (NT4/5) bind and activate specific tyrosine kinase (Trk) receptors to promote cell survival and growth of different cell populations. For these reasons, growing attention has been paid to the use of neurotrophins as therapeutic agents in neurodegeneration, and to the regulation of the expression of their specific receptors by the ligands. BDNF expression, as revealed by immunohistochemistry, is found in the pre-subiculum, CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Strong TrkB immunoreactivity is present in most CA3 neurons but only in scattered neurons of the CA1 area. Weak TrkB immunoreactivity is found in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus. Unilateral grafting of BDNF-transfected fibroblasts into the hippocampus resulted in a marked increase in the intensity of the immunoreaction and in the number of TrkB-immunoreactive neurons in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus, pre-subiculum and CA1 area in the vicinity of the graft. No similar effects were produced after the injection of control mock-transfected fibroblasts. Delayed cell death in the CA1 area was produced following 5 min of forebrain ischemia in the gerbil. The majority of living cells in the CA1 area at the fourth day were BDNF/TrkB immunoreactive. Unilateral grafting of control mock-transfected or BDNF fibroblasts two days before ischemia resulted in a moderate non-specific protection of TrkB-negative, but not TrkB-positive cells, in the CA1 area of the grafted side. This finding is in line with a vascular and glial reaction, as revealed, by immunohistochemistry using astroglial and microglial cell markers. This astroglial response was higher in the grafted side than in the contralateral side in ischemic gerbils, but no differences were seen between BDNF-producing and non-BDNF-producing grafts. However, grafting of

  6. Topoisomerase 1 Regulates Gene Expression in Neurons through Cleavage Complex-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms.

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    Angela M Mabb

    Full Text Available Topoisomerase 1 (TOP1 inhibitors, including camptothecin and topotecan, covalently trap TOP1 on DNA, creating cleavage complexes (cc's that must be resolved before gene transcription and DNA replication can proceed. We previously found that topotecan reduces the expression of long (>100 kb genes and unsilences the paternal allele of Ube3a in neurons. Here, we sought to evaluate overlap between TOP1cc-dependent and -independent gene regulation in neurons. To do this, we utilized Top1 conditional knockout mice, Top1 knockdown, the CRISPR-Cas9 system to delete Top1, TOP1 catalytic inhibitors that do not generate TOP1cc's, and a TOP1 mutation (T718A that stabilizes TOP1cc's. We found that topotecan treatment significantly alters the expression of many more genes, including long neuronal genes, immediate early genes, and paternal Ube3a, when compared to Top1 deletion. Our data show that topotecan has a stronger effect on neuronal transcription than Top1 deletion, and identifies TOP1cc-dependent and -independent contributions to gene expression.

  7. Cortical regulation of striatal projection neurons and interneurons in a Parkinson's disease rat model

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    Jia-jia Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Striatal neurons can be either projection neurons or interneurons, with each type exhibiting distinct susceptibility to various types of brain damage. In this study, 6-hydroxydopamine was injected into the right medial forebrain bundle to induce dopamine depletion, and/or ibotenic acid was injected into the M1 cortex to induce motor cortex lesions. Immunohistochemistry and western blot assay showed that dopaminergic depletion results in significant loss of striatal projection neurons marked by dopamine- and cyclic adenosine monophosphate-regulated phosphoprotein, molecular weight 32 kDa, calbindin, and μ-opioid receptor, while cortical lesions reversed these pathological changes. After dopaminergic deletion, the number of neuropeptide Y-positive striatal interneurons markedly increased, which was also inhibited by cortical lesioning. No noticeable change in the number of parvalbumin-positive interneurons was found in 6-hydroxydopamine-treated rats. Striatal projection neurons and interneurons show different susceptibility to dopaminergic depletion. Further, cortical lesions inhibit striatal dysfunction and damage induced by 6-hydroxydopamine, which provides a new possibility for clinical treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  8. Intracellular pH regulation by acid/base transporters in mammalian neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon A. Ruffin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular pH (pHi regulation in the brain is important in both physiological and physiopathological conditions because changes in pHi generally result in altered neuronal excitability. In this review, we will cover 4 major areas: [1] The effect of pHi on cellular processes in the brain, including channel activity and neuronal excitability. [2] pHi homeostasis and how it is determined by the balance between rates of acid loading (JL and extrusion (JE. The balance between JE and JL determine steady-state pHi, as well as the ability of the cell to defend pHi in the face of extracellular acid-base disturbances (e.g. metabolic acidosis. [3] The properties and importance of members of the SLC4 and SLC9 families of acid-base transporters expressed in the brain that contribute to JL (namely the Cl-HCO3 exchanger AE3 and JE (the Na-H exchangers NHE1, NHE3 and NHE5 as well as the Na+- coupled HCO3- transporters NBCe1, NBCn1, NDCBE, and NBCn2. [4] The effect of acid-base disturbances on neuronal function and the roles of acid-base transporters in defending neuronal pHi under physiopathologic conditions.

  9. Differential Maturation of the Two Regulated Secretory Pathways in Human iPSC-Derived Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emperador Melero, Javier; Nadadhur, Aishwarya G; Schut, Desiree; Weering, Jan V; Heine, Vivi M; Toonen, Ruud F; Verhage, Matthijs

    2017-03-14

    Neurons communicate by regulated secretion of chemical signals from synaptic vesicles (SVs) and dense-core vesicles (DCVs). Here, we investigated the maturation of these two secretory pathways in micro-networks of human iPSC-derived neurons. These micro-networks abundantly expressed endogenous SV and DCV markers, including neuropeptides. DCV transport was microtubule dependent, preferentially anterograde in axons, and 2-fold faster in axons than in dendrites. SV and DCV secretion were strictly Ca(2+) and SNARE dependent. DCV secretion capacity matured until day in vitro (DIV) 36, with intense stimulation releasing 6% of the total DCV pool, and then plateaued. This efficiency is comparable with mature mouse neurons. In contrast, SV secretion capacity continued to increase until DIV50, with substantial further increase in secretion efficiency and decrease in silent synapses. These data show that the two secretory pathways can be studied in human neurons and that they mature differentially, with DCV secretion reaching maximum efficiency when that of SVs is still low.

  10. Differential Maturation of the Two Regulated Secretory Pathways in Human iPSC-Derived Neurons

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    Javier Emperador Melero

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurons communicate by regulated secretion of chemical signals from synaptic vesicles (SVs and dense-core vesicles (DCVs. Here, we investigated the maturation of these two secretory pathways in micro-networks of human iPSC-derived neurons. These micro-networks abundantly expressed endogenous SV and DCV markers, including neuropeptides. DCV transport was microtubule dependent, preferentially anterograde in axons, and 2-fold faster in axons than in dendrites. SV and DCV secretion were strictly Ca2+ and SNARE dependent. DCV secretion capacity matured until day in vitro (DIV 36, with intense stimulation releasing 6% of the total DCV pool, and then plateaued. This efficiency is comparable with mature mouse neurons. In contrast, SV secretion capacity continued to increase until DIV50, with substantial further increase in secretion efficiency and decrease in silent synapses. These data show that the two secretory pathways can be studied in human neurons and that they mature differentially, with DCV secretion reaching maximum efficiency when that of SVs is still low.

  11. NMDAR-regulated dynamics of layer 4 neuronal dendrites during thalamocortical reorganization in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Hidenobu; Luo, Wenshu; Tarusawa, Etsuko; Saito, Yoshikazu M; Sato, Takuya; Yoshimura, Yumiko; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Iwasato, Takuji

    2014-04-16

    Thalamocortical (TC) connectivity is reorganized by thalamic inputs during postnatal development; however, the dynamic characteristics of TC reorganization and the underlying mechanisms remain unexplored. We addressed this question using dendritic refinement of layer 4 (L4) stellate neurons in mouse barrel cortex (barrel cells) as a model; dendritic refinement of L4 neurons is a critical component of TC reorganization through which postsynaptic L4 neurons acquire their dendritic orientation toward presynaptic TC axon termini. Simultaneous labeling of TC axons and individual barrel cell dendrites allowed in vivo time-lapse imaging of dendritic refinement in the neonatal cortex. The barrel cells reinforced the dendritic orientation toward TC axons by dynamically moving their branches. In N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-deficient barrel cells, this dendritic motility was enhanced, and the orientation bias was not reinforced. Our data suggest that L4 neurons have "fluctuating" dendrites during TC reorganization and that NMDARs cell autonomously regulate these dynamics to establish fine-tuned circuits.

  12. Neuronal influence behind the central nervous system regulation of the immune cells

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    ANAHI eCHAVARRIA

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system has a highly specialized microenvironment, and despite being initially considered an immune privileged site, this immune status is far from absolute because it varies with age and brain topography. The brain monitors immune responses by several means that act in parallel; one pathway involves afferent nerves (vagal nerve and the other resident cells (neurons and glia. These cell populations exert a strong role in the regulation of the immune system, favoring an immune-modulatory environment in the CNS. Neurons control glial cell and infiltrated T-cells by contact-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Contact-dependent mechanisms are provided by several membrane immune modulating molecules such as Sema-7A, CD95L, CD22, CD200, CD47, NCAM, ICAM-5 and cadherins; which can inhibit the expression of microglial inflammatory cytokines, induce apoptosis or inactivate infiltrated T-cells. On the other hand, soluble neuronal factors like Sema-3A, cytokines, neurotrophins, neuropeptides, and neurotransmitters attenuate microglial and/or T-cell activation. In this review, we focused on all known mechanism driven only by neurons in order to control the local immune cells.

  13. Circadian Rhythms in Rho1 Activity Regulate Neuronal Plasticity and Network Hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petsakou, Afroditi; Sapsis, Themistoklis P; Blau, Justin

    2015-08-13

    Neuronal plasticity helps animals learn from their environment. However, it is challenging to link specific changes in defined neurons to altered behavior. Here, we focus on circadian rhythms in the structure of the principal s-LNv clock neurons in Drosophila. By quantifying neuronal architecture, we observed that s-LNv structural plasticity changes the amount of axonal material in addition to cycles of fasciculation and defasciculation. We found that this is controlled by rhythmic Rho1 activity that retracts s-LNv axonal termini by increasing myosin phosphorylation and simultaneously changes the balance of pre-synaptic and dendritic markers. This plasticity is required to change clock network hierarchy and allow seasonal adaptation. Rhythms in Rho1 activity are controlled by clock-regulated transcription of Puratrophin-1-like (Pura), a Rho1 GEF. Since spinocerebellar ataxia is associated with mutations in human Puratrophin-1, our data support the idea that defective actin-related plasticity underlies this ataxia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Mutations in genes regulating neuronal migration predict reduced prefrontal cognition in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: a preliminary study

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez-Aran Anabel; Geijo-Barrientos Emilio; Vieta Eduard; Rubio Cristina; Selva Gabriel; Salazar Jose; Balanza Vicent; Martinez-Gimenez Juan; Escamez Teresa; Tabares-Seisdedos Rafael; Reiner Orly; Martinez Salvador

    2006-01-01

    Both neurodevelopmental processes and prefrontal cortex function are known to be abnormal in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The hypothesis to be tested was that these features are related with genes that regulate neuronal migration.

  15. Decoupling kinematics and mechanics reveals coding properties of trigeminal ganglion neurons in the rat vibrissal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Nicholas E; Schroeder, Christopher L; Hobbs, Jennifer A; Yang, Anne Et; Huet, Lucie A; Solla, Sara A; Hartmann, Mitra Jz

    2016-06-27

    Tactile information available to the rat vibrissal system begins as external forces that cause whisker deformations, which in turn excite mechanoreceptors in the follicle. Despite the fundamental mechanical origin of tactile information, primary sensory neurons in the trigeminal ganglion (Vg) have often been described as encoding the kinematics (geometry) of object contact. Here we aimed to determine the extent to which Vg neurons encode the kinematics vs. mechanics of contact. We used models of whisker bending to quantify mechanical signals (forces and moments) at the whisker base while simultaneously monitoring whisker kinematics and recording single Vg units in both anesthetized rats and awake, body restrained rats. We employed a novel manual stimulation technique to deflect whiskers in a way that decouples kinematics from mechanics, and used Generalized Linear Models (GLMs) to show that Vg neurons more directly encode mechanical signals when the whisker is deflected in this decoupled stimulus space.

  16. Div-Seq: Single-nucleus RNA-Seq reveals dynamics of rare adult newborn neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Naomi; Li, Yinqing; Heidenreich, Matthias; Swiech, Lukasz; Avraham-Davidi, Inbal; Trombetta, John J; Hession, Cynthia; Zhang, Feng; Regev, Aviv

    2016-08-26

    Single-cell RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) provides rich information about cell types and states. However, it is difficult to capture rare dynamic processes, such as adult neurogenesis, because isolation of rare neurons from adult tissue is challenging and markers for each phase are limited. Here, we develop Div-Seq, which combines scalable single-nucleus RNA-Seq (sNuc-Seq) with pulse labeling of proliferating cells by 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) to profile individual dividing cells. sNuc-Seq and Div-Seq can sensitively identify closely related hippocampal cell types and track transcriptional dynamics of newborn neurons within the adult hippocampal neurogenic niche, respectively. We also apply Div-Seq to identify and profile rare newborn neurons in the adult spinal cord, a noncanonical neurogenic region. sNuc-Seq and Div-Seq open the way for unbiased analysis of diverse complex tissues.

  17. Gap Junction-Mediated Signaling from Motor Neurons Regulates Motor Generation in the Central Circuits of Larval Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Teruyuki; Kohsaka, Hiroshi; Nose, Akinao

    2017-02-22

    In this study, we used the peristaltic crawling of Drosophila larvae as a model to study how motor patterns are regulated by central circuits. We built an experimental system that allows simultaneous application of optogenetics and calcium imaging to the isolated ventral nerve cord (VNC). We then investigated the effects of manipulating local activity of motor neurons (MNs) on fictive locomotion observed as waves of MN activity propagating along neuromeres. Optical inhibition of MNs with halorhodopsin3 in a middle segment (A4, A5, or A6), but not other segments, dramatically decreased the frequency of the motor waves. Conversely, local activation of MNs with channelrhodopsin2 in a posterior segment (A6 or A7) increased the frequency of the motor waves. Since peripheral nerves mediating sensory feedback were severed in the VNC preparation, these results indicate that MNs send signals to the central circuits to regulate motor pattern generation. Our results also indicate segmental specificity in the roles of MNs in motor control. The effects of the local MN activity manipulation were lost in shaking-B(2) (shakB(2) ) or ogre(2) , gap-junction mutations in Drosophila, or upon acute application of the gap junction blocker carbenoxolone, implicating electrical synapses in the signaling from MNs. Cell-type-specific RNAi suggested shakB and ogre function in MNs and interneurons, respectively, during the signaling. Our results not only reveal an unexpected role for MNs in motor pattern regulation, but also introduce a powerful experimental system that enables examination of the input-output relationship among the component neurons in this system.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Motor neurons are generally considered passive players in motor pattern generation, simply relaying information from upstream interneuronal circuits to the target muscles. This study shows instead that MNs play active roles in the control of motor generation by conveying information via gap junctions to the

  18. Proteomic profiling reveals dopaminergic regulation of progenitor cell functions of goldfish radial glial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Lei; Martyniuk, Christopher J; Esau, Crystal; Da Fonte, Dillon F; Trudeau, Vance L

    2016-07-20

    Radial glial cells (RGCs) are stem-like cells found in the developing and adult central nervous system. They function as both a scaffold to guide neuron migration and as progenitor cells that support neurogenesis. Our previous study revealed a close anatomical relationship between dopamine neurons and RGCs in the telencephalon of female goldfish. In this study, label-free proteomics was used to identify the proteins in a primary RGC culture and to determine the proteome response to the selective dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF 38393 (10μM), in order to better understand dopaminergic regulation of RGCs. A total of 689 unique proteins were identified in the RGCs and these were classified into biological and pathological pathways. Proteins such as nucleolin (6.9-fold) and ependymin related protein 1 (4.9-fold) were increased in abundance while proteins triosephosphate isomerase (10-fold) and phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (5-fold) were decreased in abundance. Pathway analysis revealed that proteins that consistently changed in abundance across biological replicates were related to small molecules such as ATP, lipids and steroids, hormones, glucose, cyclic AMP and Ca(2+). Sub-network enrichment analysis suggested that estrogen receptor signaling, among other transcription factors, is regulated by D1 receptor activation. This suggests that these signaling pathways are correlated to dopaminergic regulation of radial glial cell functions. Most proteins down-regulated by SKF 38393 were involved in cell cycle/proliferation, growth, death, and survival, which suggests that dopamine inhibits the progenitor-related processes of radial glial cells. Examples of differently expressed proteins including triosephosphate isomerase, nucleolin, phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase and capping protein (actin filament) muscle Z-line beta were validated by qPCR and western blot, which were consistent with MS/MS data in the direction of change. This is the first study to characterize the RGC

  19. A molecular platform in neurons regulates inflammation after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Pablo; Lotocki, George; Marcillo, Alex E; Dietrich, W Dalton; Keane, Robert W

    2008-03-26

    Vigorous immune responses are induced in the immune privileged CNS by injury and disease, but the molecular mechanisms regulating innate immunity in the CNS are poorly defined. The inflammatory response initiated by spinal cord injury (SCI) involves activation of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) that contributes to secondary cell death. In the peripheral immune response, the inflammasome activates caspase-1 to process proinflammatory cytokines, but the regulation of trauma-induced inflammation in the CNS is not clearly understood. Here we show that a molecular platform [NALP1 (NAcht leucine-rich-repeat protein 1) inflammasome] consisting of caspase-1, caspase-11, ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase-activating recruitment domain), and NALP1 is expressed in neurons of the normal rat spinal cord and forms a protein assembly with the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP). Moderate cervical contusive SCI induced processing of IL-1beta, IL-18, activation of caspase-1, cleavage of XIAP, and promoted assembly of the multiprotein complex. Anti-ASC neutralizing antibodies administered to injured rats entered spinal cord neurons via a mechanism that was sensitive to carbenoxolone. Therapeutic neutralization of ASC reduced caspase-1 activation, XIAP cleavage, and interleukin processing, resulting in significant tissue sparing and functional improvement. Thus, rat spinal cord neurons contain a caspase-1, pro-ILbeta, and pro-IL-18 activating complex different from the human NALP1 inflammasome that constitutes an important arm of the innate CNS inflammatory response after SCI.

  20. Sumoylation regulates nuclear localization of lipin-1alpha in neuronal cells.

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    Guang-Hui Liu

    Full Text Available Lipin-1 is a protein that has dual functions as a phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase (PAP and a nuclear transcriptional coactivator. It remains unknown how the nuclear localization and coactivator functions of lipin-1 are regulated. Here, we show that lipin-1 (including both the alpha and beta isoforms is modified by sumoylation at two consensus sumoylation sites. We are unable to detect sumoylation of the related proteins lipin-2 and lipin-3. Lipin-1 is sumoylated at relatively high levels in brain, where lipin-1alpha is the predominant form. In cultured embryonic cortical neurons and SH-SY5Y neuronal cells, ectopically expressed lipin-1alpha is localized in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm, and the nuclear localization is abrogated by mutating the consensus sumyolation motifs. The sumoylation site mutant of lipin-1alpha loses the capacity to coactivate the transcriptional (co- activators PGC-1alpha and MEF2, consistent with its nuclear exclusion. Thus, these results show that sumoylation facilitates the nuclear localization and transcriptional coactivator behavior of lipin-1alpha that we observe in cultured neuronal cells, and suggest that lipin-1alpha may act as a sumoylation-regulated transcriptional coactivator in brain.

  1. Electroacupuncture regulates glucose-inhibited neurons in treatment of simple obesity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi Yu; Youbing Xia; Chuanhui Ju; Qinghua Shao; Zhen Mao; Yun Gu; Bin Xu

    2013-01-01

    The glucose-inhibited neurons present in the lateral hypothalamic area are regarded as glucose detectors. This structure is involved in the regulation of food intake through extracellular blood glucose concentrations, and plays a crucial role in obesity onset. In the present study, obesity models established with high fat feeding were treated with electroacupuncture at Zusanli (ST36)/ Inner Court (ST44) on the left side and Tianshu (ST25) bilaterally. We found that electroacupuncture could effectively reduce body weight and the fat-weight ratio, and decrease serum leptin, resistin, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and neuropeptide Y levels, while increase serum adiponectin and cholecystokinin-8 levels. This treatment altered the electrical activity of glucose-inhibited neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area, with electroacupuncture at Zusanli/ Inner Court exerting an inhibitory effect, while electroacupuncture at bilateral Tianshu exerting an excitatory effect. These data suggest that electroacupuncture at the lower limbs and abdominal cavity is an effective means for regulating the activity of glucose-inhibited neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area and for improving the secretory function of adipose tissue.

  2. Regulation of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase by neuron-specific transcription factor Sp4: implication in the tight coupling of energy production, neuronal activity and energy consumption in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johar, Kaid; Priya, Anusha; Wong-Riley, Margaret T T

    2014-02-01

    A major source of energy demand in neurons is the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase pump that restores the ionic gradient across the plasma membrane subsequent to depolarizing neuronal activity. The energy comes primarily from mitochondrial oxidative metabolism, of which cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is a key enzyme. Recently, we found that all 13 subunits of COX are regulated by specificity (Sp) factors, and that the neuron-specific Sp4, but not Sp1 or Sp3, regulates the expression of key glutamatergic receptor subunits as well. The present study sought to test our hypothesis that Sp4 also regulates Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase subunit genes in neurons. By means of multiple approaches, including in silico analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift and supershift assays, chromatin immunoprecipitation, promoter mutational analysis, over-expression, and RNA interference studies, we found that Sp4, with minor contributions from Sp1 and Sp3, functionally regulate the Atp1a1, Atp1a3, and Atp1b1 subunit genes of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in neurons. Transcripts of all three genes were up-regulated by depolarizing KCl stimulation and down-regulated by the impulse blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX), indicating that their expression was activity-dependent. Silencing of Sp4 blocked the up-regulation of these genes induced by KCl, whereas over-expression of Sp4 rescued them from TTX-induced suppression. The effect of silencing or over-expressing Sp4 on primary neurons was much greater than those of Sp1 or Sp3. The binding sites of Sp factors on these genes are conserved among mice, rats and humans. Thus, Sp4 plays an important role in the transcriptional coupling of energy generation and energy consumption in neurons.

  3. Projection patterns of lateral hypothalamic, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) neurons to the dorsal raphe and/or the locus coeruleus in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Ye S; Lee, Hyun S

    2013-02-04

    The present study was designed to reveal the projection patterns of lateral hypothalamic (LH), cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) neurons to the dorsal raphe (DR) and/or the locus coeruleus (LC) in the rat. After the injection of Red or Green Retrobeads into the DR or LC, LH sections were immunostained for CART and/or melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH). First, CART-immunoreactive axon terminals formed close appositions to the DR (or LC) neuronal profiles. Second, a subpopulation of CART neurons containing MCH projected to the monoaminergic nuclei; the majority of labeled neurons were observed in the dorsal hypothalamic area, the dorsal part of the posterior hypothalamic area, and the zona incerta. Cells were also observed in the perifornical part of the LH, the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus, the peduncular and the magnocellular parts of the LH. Of the total population of DR (or LC)-projecting cells, CART/MCH co-containing neurons were 9.5% ± 1.6% (or 10.8% ± 1.3% for LC). Finally, a subset of CART (or MCH) neurons provided divergent axon collaterals to the DR and the LC. Of the entire CART (or MCH) cell population, 3.9% ± 0.8% (or 5.6% ± 1.0% for MCH) sent axon collaterals to the DR/LC. CART/MCH co-containing neurons projecting to the DR or LC might be involved in the feeding-related regulation of arousal, stress-related responses, and emotional behaviors. Thus, CART (or MCH) cells that send divergent axon collaterals to the DR/LC might have a simultaneous (and possibly more efficient) way to exert their specific influences on the aminergic nuclei.

  4. Volume regulated anion channel currents of rat hippocampal neurons and their contribution to oxygen-and-glucose deprivation induced neuronal death.

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    Huaqiu Zhang

    Full Text Available Volume-regulated anion channels (VRAC are widely expressed chloride channels that are critical for the cell volume regulation. In the mammalian central nervous system, the physiological expression of neuronal VRAC and its role in cerebral ischemia are issues largely unknown. We show that hypoosmotic medium induce an outwardly rectifying chloride conductance in CA1 pyramidal neurons in rat hippocampal slices. The induced chloride conductance was sensitive to some of the VRAC inhibitors, namely, IAA-94 (300 µM and NPPB (100 µM, but not to tamoxifen (10 µM. Using oxygen-and-glucose deprivation (OGD to simulate ischemic conditions in slices, VRAC activation appeared after OGD induced anoxic depolarization (AD that showed a progressive increase in current amplitude over the period of post-OGD reperfusion. The OGD induced VRAC currents were significantly inhibited by inhibitors for glutamate AMPA (30 µM NBQX and NMDA (40 µM AP-5 receptors in the OGD solution, supporting the view that induction of AD requires an excessive Na(+-loading via these receptors that in turn to activate neuronal VRAC. In the presence of NPPB and DCPIB in the post-OGD reperfusion solution, the OGD induced CA1 pyramidal neuron death, as measured by TO-PRO-3-I staining, was significantly reduced, although DCPIB did not appear to be an effective neuronal VRAC blocker. Altogether, we show that rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons express functional VRAC, and ischemic conditions can initial neuronal VRAC activation that may contribute to ischemic neuronal damage.

  5. TGF-β Signaling in Dopaminergic Neurons Regulates Dendritic Growth, Excitatory-Inhibitory Synaptic Balance, and Reversal Learning

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    Sarah X. Luo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Neural circuits involving midbrain dopaminergic (DA neurons regulate reward and goal-directed behaviors. Although local GABAergic input is known to modulate DA circuits, the mechanism that controls excitatory/inhibitory synaptic balance in DA neurons remains unclear. Here, we show that DA neurons use autocrine transforming growth factor β (TGF-β signaling to promote the growth of axons and dendrites. Surprisingly, removing TGF-β type II receptor in DA neurons also disrupts the balance in TGF-β1 expression in DA neurons and neighboring GABAergic neurons, which increases inhibitory input, reduces excitatory synaptic input, and alters phasic firing patterns in DA neurons. Mice lacking TGF-β signaling in DA neurons are hyperactive and exhibit inflexibility in relinquishing learned behaviors and re-establishing new stimulus-reward associations. These results support a role for TGF-β in regulating the delicate balance of excitatory/inhibitory synaptic input in local microcircuits involving DA and GABAergic neurons and its potential contributions to neuropsychiatric disorders.

  6. JIP3 regulates neuronal radial migration by mediating TrkB axonal anterograde transport in the developing cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Huixian; Yu, Hui; Li, Ting; Zhao, Yan; Hou, Ming; Chen, Zheyu; Wang, Yue; Sun, Tao

    2017-04-15

    Radial migration is essential for the precise lamination and the coordinated function of the cerebral cortex. However, the molecular mechanisms for neuronal radial migration are not clear. Here, we report that c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK)-interacting protein-3 (JIP3) is highly expressed in the brain of embryonic mice and essential for radial migration. Knocking down JIP3 by in utero electroporation specifically perturbs the radial migration of cortical neurons but has no effect on neurogenesis and neuronal differentiation. Furthermore, we illustrate that JIP3 knockdown delays but does not block the migration of cortical neurons by investigating the distribution of neurons with JIP3 knocked down in the embryo and postnatal mouse. Finally, we find that JIP3 regulates cortical neuronal migration by mediating TrkB axonal anterograde transport during brain development. These findings deepen our understanding of the regulation of neuronal development by JIP3 and provide us a novel view on the regulating mechanisms of neuronal radial migration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Asymmetric fMRI adaptation reveals no evidence for mirror neurons in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingnau, Angelika; Gesierich, Benno; Caramazza, Alfonso

    2009-06-16

    Neurons in macaque ventral premotor cortex and inferior parietal lobe discharge during both the observation and the execution of motor acts. It has been claimed that these so-called mirror neurons form the basis of action understanding by matching the visual input with the corresponding motor program (direct matching). Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) adaptation can be used to test the direct matching account of action recognition by determining whether putative mirror neurons show adaptation for repeated motor acts independently of whether they are observed or executed. An unambiguous test of the hypothesis requires that the motor acts be meaningless to ensure that any adaptation effect is directly because of movement recognition/motor execution and not contextually determined inferences. We found adaptation for motor acts that were repeatedly observed or repeatedly executed. We also found adaptation for motor acts that were first observed and then executed, as would be expected if a previously seen act primed the subsequent execution of that act. Crucially, we found no signs of adaptation for motor acts that were first executed and then observed. Failure to find cross-modal adaptation for executed and observed motor acts is not compatible with the core assumption of mirror neuron theory, which holds that action recognition and understanding are based on motor simulation.

  8. Nonlinear properties of medial entorhinal cortex neurons reveal frequency selectivity during multi-sinusoidal stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe eMagnani

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The neurons in layer II of the medial entorhinal cortex are part of the grid cell network involved in the representation of space. Many of these neurons are likely to be stellate cells with specific oscillatory and firing properties important for their function. A fundamental understanding of the nonlinear basis of these oscillatory properties is critical for the development of theories of grid cell firing. In order to evaluate the behavior of stellate neurons, measurements of their quadratic responses were used to estimate a second order Volterra kernel. This paper uses an operator theory, termed quadratic sinusoidal analysis (QSA, which quantitatively determines that the quadratic response accounts for a major part of the nonlinearity observed at membrane potential levels characteristic of normal synaptic events. Practically, neurons were probed with multi-sinusoidal stimulations to determine a Hermitian operator that captures the quadratic function in the frequency domain. We have shown that the frequency content of the stimulation plays an important role in the characteristics of the nonlinear response, which can distort the linear response as well. Stimulations with enhanced low frequency amplitudes evoked a different nonlinear response than broadband profiles. The nonlinear analysis was also applied to spike frequencies and it was shown that the nonlinear response of subthreshold membrane potential at resonance frequencies near the threshold is similar to the nonlinear response of spike trains.

  9. IFN gamma regulates proliferation and neuronal differentiation by STAT1 in adult SVZ niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Leticia; Medina, Rebeca; Baena, Miguel; Planas, Anna M; Pozas, Esther

    2015-01-01

    The adult subventricular zone (SVZ) is the main neurogenic niche in normal adult brains of mice and rats. Interferon gamma (IFNγ) has somewhat controversially been associated with SVZ progenitor proliferation and neurogenesis. The in vivo involvement of IFNγ in the physiology of the adult SVZ niche is not fully understood and its intracellular mediators are unknown. Here we show that IFNγ, through activation of its canonical signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) pathway, acts specifically on Nestin+ progenitors by decreasing both progenitor proliferation and the number of cycling cells. In addition, IFNγ increases the number of neuroblasts generated without shifting glial fate determination. The final result is deficient recruitment of newborn neurons to the olfactory bulb (OB), indicating that IFNγ-induced stimulation of neuronal differentiation does not compensate for its antiproliferative effect. We conclude that IFNγ signaling via STAT1 in the SVZ acts dually as an antiproliferative and proneurogenic factor, and thereby regulates neurogenesis in normal adult brains.

  10. Regulation of progenitor cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation in enteric nervous system neurospheres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokratis Theocharatos

    Full Text Available Enteric nervous system (ENS progenitor cells isolated from mouse and human bowel can be cultured in vitro as neurospheres which are aggregates of the proliferating progenitor cells, together with neurons and glial cells derived from them. To investigate the factors regulating progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation, we first characterised cell proliferation in mouse ENS neurospheres by pulse chase experiments using thymidine analogs. We demonstrate rapid and continuous cell proliferation near the neurosphere periphery, after which postmitotic cells move away from the periphery to become distributed throughout the neurosphere. While many proliferating cells expressed glial markers, expression of the neuronal markers β-tubulin III (Tuj1 and nitric oxide synthase was detected in increasing numbers of post-mitotic cells after a delay of several days. Treatment of both mouse and human neurospheres with the γ-secretase inhibitor N-[N-(3,5-Difluorophenacetyl-L-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester (DAPT reduced expression of the transcription factors Hes1 and Hes5, demonstrating inhibition of Notch signaling. DAPT treatment also inhibited progenitor cell proliferation and increased the numbers of differentiating neurons expressing Tuj1 and nitric oxide synthase. To confirm that the cellular effects of DAPT treatment were due to inhibition of Notch signaling, siRNA knockdown of RBPjκ, a key component of the canonical Notch signaling pathway, was demonstrated both to reduce proliferation and to increase neuronal differentiation in neurosphere cells. These observations indicate that Notch signaling promotes progenitor cell proliferation and inhibits neuronal differentiation in ENS neurospheres.

  11. Propofol up-regulates Mas receptor expression in dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lijun; Xun, Junmei; Jiang, Xinghua; Tan, Rong

    2013-08-01

    Mas is a functional binding site for angiotensin (Ang)-(1-7), a critical component of the renin-angiotensin system that is involved in processing nociceptive information. A recent study reported the localization of Mas in rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and demonstrated that Ang-(1-7) produced a dose-dependent peripheral antinociceptive effect in rats through the Mas receptor by an opioid-independent mechanism. In the present study, we for the first time examined the effect of propofol on Mas expression in cultured DRG neurons. We treated rat DRG neurons with propofol at different concentrations (0.1, 0.5, 1, 5 or 10 microM) for different length of time (0.5, 1, 2, 4 or 6 h) with or without transcription inhibitor actinomycin D or different kinase inhibitors. Propofol increased the Mas receptormRNA level in a statistically significant dose- and time-dependent manner within 4 h, which led to dose-dependent up-regulation of the Mas receptor protein level as well as Ang-(1-7) binding on the cell membrane. Actinomycin D (1 mg/ml) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor PD169316 (25 microM) completely abolished the effect of propofol on Mas receptor expression in DRG neurons. In conclusion, we demonstrate that propofol markedly up-regulates Mas receptor expression at the transcription level in DRG neurons by a p38 MAPK-dependent mechanism. This study provides new insights into the mechanisms of action of propofol in peripheral antinociception, and suggests a new regulatory mechanism on the Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis in the peripheral nervous system.

  12. Mechanisms regulating neuronal excitability and seizure development following mTOR pathway hyperactivation

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    Candi L LaSarge

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The PI3K/PTEN-mTOR pathway regulates a variety of neuronal functions, including cell proliferation, survival, growth and plasticity. Dysregulation of the pathway is implicated in the development of both genetic and acquired epilepsies. Indeed, several causal mutations have been identified in patients with epilepsy, the most prominent of these being mutations in phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN and tuberal sclerosis complexes 1 and 2 (TSC1, TSC2. These genes act as negative regulators of mTOR signaling, and mutations lead to hyperactivation of the pathway. Animal models deleting PTEN, TSC1 and TSC2 consistently produce epilepsy phenotypes, demonstrating that increased mTOR signaling can provoke neuronal hyperexcitability. Given the broad range of changes induced by altered mTOR signaling, however, the mechanisms underlying seizure development in these animals remain uncertain. In transgenic mice, cell populations with hyperactive mTOR have many structural abnormalities that support recurrent circuit formation, including somatic and dendritic hypertrophy, aberrant basal dendrites, and enlargement of axon tracts. At the functional level, mTOR hyperactivation is commonly, but not always, associated with enhanced synaptic transmission and plasticity. Moreover, these populations of abnormal neurons can affect the larger network, inducing secondary changes that may explain paradoxical findings reported between cell and network functioning in different models or at different developmental time points. Here, we review the animal literature examining the link between mTOR hyperactivation and epileptogenesis, emphasizing the impact of enhanced mTOR signaling on neuronal form and function.

  13. Neuronal process structure and growth proteins are targets of heavy PTM regulation during brain development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Alistair V G; Schwämmle, Veit; Larsen, Martin Røssel

    2014-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Brain development is a process requiring precise control of many different cell types. One method to achieve this is through specific and temporally regulated modification of proteins in order to alter structure and function. Post-translational modification (PTM) of proteins is known...... to have wide-ranging and substantial effects on cellular function, both as part of signalling network modulation and more directly by modifying the function of key proteins. In this study, we show that PTM regulation is differentially targeted at different areas of the proteome, and that cytoskeletal...... proteins involved in neuronal process extension and maintenance are both more heavily modified and more frequently regulated at a PTM level. This suggests a clear role not only for PTMs in these processes, but possibly also for heavy protein modification in general. BIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE: This study...

  14. miR-134 regulates ischemia/reperfusion injury-induced neuronal cell death by regulating CREB signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weidong; Liu, Xiaobin; Cao, Jie; Meng, Facai; Li, Min; Chen, Bo; Zhang, Jie

    2015-04-01

    microRNA-134 (miR-134) has been reported to be a brain-specific miRNA and is differently expressed in brain tissues subjected to ischemic injury. However, the underlying mechanism of miR-134 in regulating cerebral ischemic injury remains poorly understood. The current study was designed to delineate the molecular basis of miR-134 in regulating cerebral ischemic injury. Using the oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) model of hippocampal neuron ischemia in vitro, we found that the overexpression of miR-134 mediated by recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector infection significantly promoted neuron death induced by OGD/reoxygenation, whereas the inhibition of miR-134 provided protective effects against OGD/reoxygenation-induced cell death. Moreover, cyclic AMP (cAMP) response element-binding protein (CREB) as a putative target of miR-134 was downregulated and upregulated by miR-134 overexpression or inhibition, respectively. The direct interaction between miR-134 and the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of CREB mRNA was further confirmed by dual-luciferase reporter assay. Overexpression of miR-134 also inhibited the expression of the downstream gene of CREB, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-2, whereas the inhibition of miR-134 upregulated the expression of BDNF and Bcl-2 in neurons after OGD/reoxygenation. Notably, the knockdown of CREB by CREB siRNA apparently abrogated the protective effect of anti-miR-134 on OGD/reoxygenation-induced cell death. Taken together, our study suggests that downregulation of miR-134 alleviates ischemic injury through enhancing CREB expression and downstream genes, providing a promising and potential therapeutic target for cerebral ischemic injury.

  15. Regulation of intracellular heme trafficking revealed by subcellular reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaojing; Rietzschel, Nicole; Kwon, Hanna; Walter Nuno, Ana Beatriz; Hanna, David A; Phillips, John D; Raven, Emma L; Reddi, Amit R; Hamza, Iqbal

    2016-08-30

    Heme is an essential prosthetic group in proteins that reside in virtually every subcellular compartment performing diverse biological functions. Irrespective of whether heme is synthesized in the mitochondria or imported from the environment, this hydrophobic and potentially toxic metalloporphyrin has to be trafficked across membrane barriers, a concept heretofore poorly understood. Here we show, using subcellular-targeted, genetically encoded hemoprotein peroxidase reporters, that both extracellular and endogenous heme contribute to cellular labile heme and that extracellular heme can be transported and used in toto by hemoproteins in all six subcellular compartments examined. The reporters are robust, show large signal-to-background ratio, and provide sufficient range to detect changes in intracellular labile heme. Restoration of reporter activity by heme is organelle-specific, with the Golgi and endoplasmic reticulum being important sites for both exogenous and endogenous heme trafficking. Expression of peroxidase reporters in Caenorhabditis elegans shows that environmental heme influences labile heme in a tissue-dependent manner; reporter activity in the intestine shows a linear increase compared with muscle or hypodermis, with the lowest heme threshold in neurons. Our results demonstrate that the trafficking pathways for exogenous and endogenous heme are distinct, with intrinsic preference for specific subcellular compartments. We anticipate our results will serve as a heuristic paradigm for more sophisticated studies on heme trafficking in cellular and whole-animal models.

  16. microRNA as a new agent for regulating neuronal glutathione synthesis and metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chisato Kinoshita

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available microRNA (miRNA is a small non-coding RNA molecule that plays a role in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Recent evidence shows that miRNAs are involved in various diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases (NDs such as: Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s disease, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosisand multiple system atrophy (MSA. The initiation and progression of NDs is generally considered to be induced by oxidative stress arising from an imbalance of oxidants and antioxidants. One of the most important antioxidants against oxidative stress is glutathione (GSH, which is a tripeptide composed of cysteine, glutamate and glycine. Among these precursor amino acids, cysteine is the determinant of neuronal GSH synthesis. Cysteine uptake in the neurons is mostly mediated by excitatory amino acid carrier 1 (EAAC1, a member of the sodium-dependent excitatory amino acid transporters. Interestingly, it has been reported that one miRNA, miR-96-5p, regulates the neuroprotective effect of GSH by directly regulating EAAC1 expression. Furthermore, the expressions of miR-96-5p and its target EAAC1 are specifically deregulated in the brains of patients with MSA, suggesting that deregulated miR-96-5p induces MSA via EAAC1 down-regulation. Since miR-96-5p regulation of EAAC1 expression and GSH level is indicated to be under circadian control, a greater understanding of rhythmic miRNA regulation could lead to the use of miRNA in chronotherapy for ND. In this review, we focus on the role of miRNA in the mechanism of GSH synthesis and metabolism; particularly with respect to a critical transport system of its rate-limiting substrate via EAAC1, as well as on the implications and chronotherapeutic potential of miRNA for NDs.

  17. Exposure to cell phone radiation up-regulates apoptosis genes in primary cultures of neurons and astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tian-Yong; Zou, Shi-Ping; Knapp, Pamela E

    2007-01-22

    The health effects of cell phone radiation exposure are a growing public concern. This study investigated whether expression of genes related to cell death pathways are dysregulated in primary cultured neurons and astrocytes by exposure to a working Global System for Mobile Communication (GSM) cell phone rated at a frequency of 1900MHz. Primary cultures were exposed to cell phone emissions for 2h. We used array analysis and real-time RT-PCR to show up-regulation of caspase-2, caspase-6 and Asc (apoptosis associated speck-like protein containing a card) gene expression in neurons and astrocytes. Up-regulation occurred in both "on" and "stand-by" modes in neurons, but only in "on" mode in astrocytes. Additionally, astrocytes showed up-regulation of the Bax gene. The effects are specific since up-regulation was not seen for other genes associated with apoptosis, such as caspase-9 in either neurons or astrocytes, or Bax in neurons. The results show that even relatively short-term exposure to cell phone radiofrequency emissions can up-regulate elements of apoptotic pathways in cells derived from the brain, and that neurons appear to be more sensitive to this effect than astrocytes.

  18. Subcellular targeting and dynamic regulation of PTEN: Implications for neuronal cells and neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia eKreis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available PTEN is a lipid and protein phosphatase that regulates a diverse range of cellular mechanisms. PTEN is mainly present in the cytosol and transiently associates with the plasma membrane to dephosphorylate PI(3,4,5P3, thereby antagonizing the PI3-Kinase signaling pathway. Recently, PTEN has been shown to associate also with organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum, the mitochondria or the nucleus, and to be secreted outside of the cell. In addition, PTEN dynamically localizes to specialized sub-cellular compartments such as the neuronal growth cone or dendritic spines. The diverse localizations of PTEN imply a tight temporal and spatial regulation, orchestrated by mechanisms such as posttranslational modifications, formation of distinct protein-protein interactions or the activation/recruitment of PTEN downstream of external cues. The regulation of PTEN function is thus not only important at the enzymatic activity level, but is also associated to its spatial distribution. In this review we will summarize (i recent findings that highlight mechanisms controlling PTEN movement and sub-cellular localization, and (ii current understanding of how PTEN localization is achieved by mechanisms controlling posttranslational modification, by association with binding partners and by PTEN structural or activity requirements. Finally, we will discuss the possible roles of compartmentalized PTEN in developing and mature neurons in health and disease.

  19. GTPase activity and neuronal toxicity of Parkinson's disease-associated LRRK2 is regulated by ArfGAP1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klodjan Stafa

    Full Text Available Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 gene are the most common cause of autosomal dominant familial Parkinson's disease (PD and also contribute to idiopathic PD. LRRK2 encodes a large multi-domain protein with GTPase and kinase activity. Initial data indicates that an intact functional GTPase domain is critically required for LRRK2 kinase activity. PD-associated mutations in LRRK2, including the most common G2019S variant, have variable effects on enzymatic activity but commonly alter neuronal process morphology. The mechanisms underlying the intrinsic and extrinsic regulation of LRRK2 GTPase and kinase activity, and the pathogenic effects of familial mutations, are incompletely understood. Here, we identify a novel functional interaction between LRRK2 and ADP-ribosylation factor GTPase-activating protein 1 (ArfGAP1. LRRK2 and ArfGAP1 interact in vitro in mammalian cells and in vivo in brain, and co-localize in the cytoplasm and at Golgi membranes. PD-associated and functional mutations that alter the GTPase activity of LRRK2 modulate the interaction with ArfGAP1. The GTP hydrolysis activity of LRRK2 is markedly enhanced by ArfGAP1 supporting a role for ArfGAP1 as a GTPase-activating protein for LRRK2. Unexpectedly, ArfGAP1 promotes the kinase activity of LRRK2 suggesting a potential role for GTP hydrolysis in kinase activation. Furthermore, LRRK2 robustly and directly phosphorylates ArfGAP1 in vitro. Silencing of ArfGAP1 expression in primary cortical neurons rescues the neurite shortening phenotype induced by G2019S LRRK2 overexpression, whereas the co-expression of ArfGAP1 and LRRK2 synergistically promotes neurite shortening in a manner dependent upon LRRK2 GTPase activity. Neurite shortening induced by ArfGAP1 overexpression is also attenuated by silencing of LRRK2. Our data reveal a novel role for ArfGAP1 in regulating the GTPase activity and neuronal toxicity of LRRK2; reciprocally, LRRK2 phosphorylates ArfGAP1 and is

  20. A molecular toolbox for rapid generation of viral vectors to up- or down-regulate in vivo neuronal gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie D. White

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a molecular toolbox for manipulation of neuronal gene expression in vivo. The toolbox includes promoters, ion channels, optogenetic tools, fluorescent proteins and intronic artificial microRNAs. The components are easily assembled into adeno-associated virus (AAV or lentivirus vectors using recombination cloning. We demonstrate assembly of toolbox components into lentivirus and AAV vectors and use these vectors for in vivo expression of inwardly rectifying potassium channels (Kir2.1, Kir3.1 and Kir3.2 and an artificial microRNA targeted against the ion channel HCN1 (HCN1 miR. We show that AAV assembled to express HCN1 miR produces efficacious and specific in vivo knockdown of HCN1 channels. Comparison of in vivo viral transduction using HCN1 miR with mice containing a germ line deletion of HCN1 reveals similar physiological phenotypes in cerebellar Purkinje cells. The easy assembly and re-usability of the toolbox components, together with the ability to up- or down-regulate neuronal gene expression in vivo, may be useful for applications in many areas of neuroscience.

  1. The F-BAR Protein Rapostlin Regulates Dendritic Spine Formation in Hippocampal Neurons*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakita, Yohei; Kakimoto, Tetsuhiro; Katoh, Hironori; Negishi, Manabu

    2011-01-01

    Pombe Cdc15 homology proteins, characterized by Fer/CIP4 homology Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs/extended Fer/CIP4 homology (F-BAR/EFC) domains with membrane invaginating property, play critical roles in a variety of membrane reorganization processes. Among them, Rapostlin/formin-binding protein 17 (FBP17) has attracted increasing attention as a critical coordinator of endocytosis. Here we found that Rapostlin was expressed in the developing rat brain, including the hippocampus, in late developmental stages when accelerated dendritic spine formation and maturation occur. In primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons, knockdown of Rapostlin by shRNA or overexpression of Rapostlin-QQ, an F-BAR domain mutant of Rapostlin that has no ability to induce membrane invagination, led to a significant decrease in spine density. Expression of shRNA-resistant wild-type Rapostlin effectively restored spine density in Rapostlin knockdown neurons, whereas expression of Rapostlin deletion mutants lacking the protein kinase C-related kinase homology region 1 (HR1) or Src homology 3 (SH3) domain did not. In addition, knockdown of Rapostlin or overexpression of Rapostlin-QQ reduced the uptake of transferrin in hippocampal neurons. Knockdown of Rnd2, which binds to the HR1 domain of Rapostlin, also reduced spine density and the transferrin uptake. These results suggest that Rapostlin and Rnd2 cooperatively regulate spine density. Indeed, Rnd2 enhanced the Rapostlin-induced tubular membrane invagination. We conclude that the F-BAR protein Rapostlin, whose activity is regulated by Rnd2, plays a key role in spine formation through the regulation of membrane dynamics. PMID:21768103

  2. Neuron-specific stimulus masking reveals interference in spike timing at the cortical level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Eric; Maddox, Ross K; Perrone, Ben P; Sen, Kamal; Billimoria, Cyrus P

    2012-02-01

    The auditory system is capable of robust recognition of sounds in the presence of competing maskers (e.g., other voices or background music). This capability arises despite the fact that masking stimuli can disrupt neural responses at the cortical level. Since the origins of such interference effects remain unknown, in this study, we work to identify and quantify neural interference effects that originate due to masking occurring within and outside receptive fields of neurons. We record from single and multi-unit auditory sites from field L, the auditory cortex homologue in zebra finches. We use a novel method called spike timing-based stimulus filtering that uses the measured response of each neuron to create an individualized stimulus set. In contrast to previous adaptive experimental approaches, which have typically focused on the average firing rate, this method uses the complete pattern of neural responses, including spike timing information, in the calculation of the receptive field. When we generate and present novel stimuli for each neuron that mask the regions within the receptive field, we find that the time-varying information in the neural responses is disrupted, degrading neural discrimination performance and decreasing spike timing reliability and sparseness. We also find that, while removing stimulus energy from frequency regions outside the receptive field does not significantly affect neural responses for many sites, adding a masker in these frequency regions can nonetheless have a significant impact on neural responses and discriminability without a significant change in the average firing rate. These findings suggest that maskers can interfere with neural responses by disrupting stimulus timing information with power either within or outside the receptive fields of neurons.

  3. Optogenetically induced olfactory stimulation in Drosophila larvae reveales the neuronal basis of odor-aversion behavior

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    Dennis Bellmann

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory stimulation induces an odor-guided crawling behavior of Drosophila melanogaster larvae characterized by either an attractive or a repellent reaction. In order to understand the underlying processes leading to these orientations we stimulated single olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs through photo-activation within an intact neuronal network. Using the Gal4-UAS system two light inducible proteins, the light-sensitive cation channel channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR-2 or the light-sensitive adenylyl cyclase (Pac α were expressed in all or in individual ORNs of the larval olfactory system. Blue light stimulation caused an activation of these neurons, ultimately producing the illusion of an odor stimulus. Larvae were tested in a phototaxis assay for their orientation towards or away from the light source. Here we show that activation of Pacα expressing ORNs bearing the receptors Or33b or Or45a in blind norpA mutant larvae induces a repellent behavior away from the light. Conversely, photo-activation of the majority of ORNs induces attraction towards the light. Interestingly, in wild type larvae two ligands of Or33b and Or45a, octyl acetate and propionic ethylester, respectively, have been found to cause an escape reaction. Therefore, we combined light and odor stimulation to analyze the function of Or33b and Or45a expressing ORNs. We show that the larval olfactory system contains a designated neuronal pathway for repellent odorants and that activation of a specific class of ORNs already determines olfactory avoidance behavior.

  4. fMRI adaptation reveals mirror neurons in human inferior parietal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Trevor T-J; Cunnington, Ross; Williams, Mark A; Kanwisher, Nancy; Mattingley, Jason B

    2008-10-28

    Mirror neurons, as originally described in the macaque, have two defining properties [1, 2]: They respond specifically to a particular action (e.g., bringing an object to the mouth), and they produce their action-specific responses independent of whether the monkey executes the action or passively observes a conspecific performing the same action. In humans, action observation and action execution engage a network of frontal, parietal, and temporal areas. However, it is unclear whether these responses reflect the activity of a single population that represents both observed and executed actions in a common neural code or the activity of distinct but overlapping populations of exclusively perceptual and motor neurons [3]. Here, we used fMRI adaptation to show that the right inferior parietal lobe (IPL) responds independently to specific actions regardless of whether they are observed or executed. Specifically, responses in the right IPL were attenuated when participants observed a recently executed action relative to one that had not previously been performed. This adaptation across action and perception demonstrates that the right IPL responds selectively to the motoric and perceptual representations of actions and is the first evidence for a neural response in humans that shows both defining properties of mirror neurons.

  5. c-Jun N-terminal kinase regulates mitochondrial bioenergetics by modulating pyruvate dehydrogenase activity in primary cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiongqiong; Lam, Philip Y; Han, Derick; Cadenas, Enrique

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the role of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in mitochondrial signaling and bioenergetics in primary cortical neurons and isolated rat brain mitochondria. Exposure of neurons to either anisomycin (an activator of JNK/p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases) or H2O2 resulted in activation (phosphorylation) of JNK (mostly p46(JNK1)) and its translocation to mitochondria. Experiments with mitochondria isolated from either rat brain or primary cortical neurons and incubated with proteinase K revealed that phosphorylated JNK was associated with the outer mitochondrial membrane; this association resulted in the phosphorylation of the E(1alpha) subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase, a key enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate and that links two major metabolic pathways: glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. JNK-mediated phosphorylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase was not observed in experiments carried out with mitoplasts, thus suggesting the requirement of intact, functional mitochondria for this effect. JNK-mediated phosphorylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase was associated with a decline in its activity and, consequently, a shift to anaerobic pyruvate metabolism: the latter was confirmed by increased accumulation of lactic acid and decreased overall energy production (ATP levels). Pyruvate dehydrogenase appears to be a specific phosphorylation target for JNK, for other kinases, such as protein kinase A and protein kinase C did not elicit pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphorylation and did not decrease the activity of the complex. These results suggest that JNK mediates a signaling pathway that regulates metabolic functions in mitochondria as part of a network that coordinates cytosolic and mitochondrial processes relevant for cell function.

  6. The regulation and function of fibroblast growth factor 8 and its function during gonadotropin-releasing hormone neuron development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson CJ Chung

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few years, numerous studies solidified the hypothesis that fibroblast growth factor (FGF signaling regulates neuroendocrine progenitor cell proliferation, fate-specification, and cell survival, and therefore is critical for the regulation and maintenance of homeostasis of the body. One important example that underscores the involvement of FGF signaling during neuroendocrine cell development is gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neuron ontogenesis. Indeed, transgenic mice with reduced olfactory placode (OP Fgf8 expression do not have GnRH neurons. This observation indicates the requirement of FGF8 signaling for the emergence of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neuronal system in the embryonic OP, the putative birth place of GnRH neurons. Mammalian reproductive success depends on the presence of GnRH neurons to stimulate gonadotropin secretion from the anterior pituitary, which activates gonadal steroidogenesis and gametogenesis. Together, these observations are critical for understanding the function of GnRH neurons and their control of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis to maintain fertility. Taken together, these studies illustrate that GnRH neuron emergence, and hence HPG-function is vulnerable to genomic and molecular signals that abnormally modify Fgf8 expression in the developing mouse OP. In this short review, we focus on research that is aimed at unraveling how androgen, all-trans retinoic acid and epigenetic modifies control mouse OP Fgf8 transcription in the context of GnRH neuronal development, and mammalian reproductive success.

  7. Neuronal differentiation of human iPS cells induced by baicalin via regulation of bHLH gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Akihiro; Soga, Kohei; Nakayama, Hironobu; Ishida, Torao; Kawanishi, Shosuke; Sato, Eisuke F

    2015-09-25

    Efficient differentiation is important for regenerative medicine based on pluripotent stem cells, including treatment of neurodegenerative disorders and trauma. Baicalin promotes neuronal differentiation of neural stem/progenitor cells of rats and mice. To evaluate the suitability of baicalin for neuronal differentiation of human iPS cells, we investigated whether it promotes neuronal differentiation in human iPS cells and monitored basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) gene expression during neuronal differentiation. Baicalin promoted neuronal differentiation and inhibited glial differentiation, suggesting that baicalin can influence the neuronal fate decision in human iPS cells. Notch signaling, which is upstream of bHLH proteins, was not involved in baicalin-induced neuronal differentiation. Baicalin treatment did not down-regulate Hes1 gene expression, but it reduced Hes1 protein levels and up-regulated Ascl1 gene expression. Thus, baicalin promoted neuronal differentiation via modulation of bHLH transcriptional factors. Therefore, baicalin has potential to be used as a small-molecule drug for regenerative treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.

  8. Regulation of differentiation flux by Notch signalling influences the number of dopaminergic neurons in the adult brain

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    Niurka Trujillo-Paredes

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Notch signalling is a well-established pathway that regulates neurogenesis. However, little is known about the role of Notch signalling in specific neuronal differentiation. Using Dll1 null mice, we found that Notch signalling has no function in the specification of mesencephalic dopaminergic neural precursor cells (NPCs, but plays an important role in regulating their expansion and differentiation into neurons. Premature neuronal differentiation was observed in mesencephalons of Dll1-deficient mice or after treatment with a Notch signalling inhibitor. Coupling between neurogenesis and dopaminergic differentiation was indicated from the coincident emergence of neuronal and dopaminergic markers. Early in differentiation, decreasing Notch signalling caused a reduction in NPCs and an increase in dopaminergic neurons in association with dynamic changes in the proportion of sequentially-linked dopaminergic NPCs (Msx1/2+, Ngn2+, Nurr1+. These effects in differentiation caused a significant reduction in the number of dopaminergic neurons produced. Accordingly, Dll1 haploinsufficient adult mice, in comparison with their wild-type littermates, have a consistent reduction in neuronal density that was particularly evident in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Our results are in agreement with a mathematical model based on a Dll1-mediated regulatory feedback loop between early progenitors and their dividing precursors that controls the emergence and number of dopaminergic neurons.

  9. Activity of D1/2 Receptor Expressing Neurons in the Nucleus Accumbens Regulates Running, Locomotion, and Food Intake

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    Xianglong eZhu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available While weight gain is clearly promoted by excessive energy intake and reduced expenditure, the underlying neural mechanisms of energy balance remain unclear. The NAc is one brain region that has received attention for its role in the regulation of energy balance; its D1 and D2 receptor containing neurons have distinct functions in regulating reward behavior and require further examination. The goal of the present study is to investigate how activation and inhibition of D1 and D2 neurons in the NAc influences behaviors related to energy intake and expenditure. Specific manipulation of D1 vs D2 neurons was done in both low expenditure and high expenditure (wheel running conditions to assess behavioral effects in these different states. Direct control of neural activity was achieved using a DREADD (Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs strategy. Activation of NAc D1 neurons increased food intake, wheel running and locomotor activity. In contrast, activation of D2 neurons in the NAc reduced running and locomotion while D2 neuron inhibition had opposite effects. These results highlight the importance of considering both intake and expenditure in the analysis of D1 and D2 neuronal manipulations. Moreover, the behavioral outcomes from D1 NAc neuronal manipulations depend upon the activity state of the animals (wheel running vs non-running. The data support and complement the hypothesis of specific NAc dopamine pathways facilitating energy expenditure and suggest a potential strategy for human weight control.

  10. Revealed: The spy who regulates neuroblastoma stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, Parvez; Venugopal, Chitra; Singh, Sheila K

    2014-11-30

    Neuroblastoma (NB), an embryonal tumour of the sympathetic nervous system, is thought to originate from undifferentiated neural crest cells and is known to exhibit extremely heterogeneous biological and clinical behaviors. Occurring in very young children, the median age at diagnosis is 17 months and it accounts for 10% of all pediatric cancer mortalities. The standard treatment regimen for patients with high-risk NB includes induction and surgery followed by isotretinoin or Accutane (13-cis retinoic acid) treatment, which is shown to induce terminal differentiation of NB cells. However, molecular regulators that maintain an undifferentiated phenotype in NB cells are still poorly understood.

  11. Bidirectional Regulation of Innate and Learned Behaviors That Rely on Frequency Discrimination by Cortical Inhibitory Neurons.

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    Mark Aizenberg

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The ability to discriminate tones of different frequencies is fundamentally important for everyday hearing. While neurons in the primary auditory cortex (AC respond differentially to tones of different frequencies, whether and how AC regulates auditory behaviors that rely on frequency discrimination remains poorly understood. Here, we find that the level of activity of inhibitory neurons in AC controls frequency specificity in innate and learned auditory behaviors that rely on frequency discrimination. Photoactivation of parvalbumin-positive interneurons (PVs improved the ability of the mouse to detect a shift in tone frequency, whereas photosuppression of PVs impaired the performance. Furthermore, photosuppression of PVs during discriminative auditory fear conditioning increased generalization of conditioned response across tone frequencies, whereas PV photoactivation preserved normal specificity of learning. The observed changes in behavioral performance were correlated with bidirectional changes in the magnitude of tone-evoked responses, consistent with predictions of a model of a coupled excitatory-inhibitory cortical network. Direct photoactivation of excitatory neurons, which did not change tone-evoked response magnitude, did not affect behavioral performance in either task. Our results identify a new function for inhibition in the auditory cortex, demonstrating that it can improve or impair acuity of innate and learned auditory behaviors that rely on frequency discrimination.

  12. Regeneration of Drosophila sensory neuron axons and dendrites is regulated by the Akt pathway involving Pten and microRNA bantam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yuanquan; Ori-McKenney, Kassandra M.; Zheng, Yi; Han, Chun; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh Nung

    2012-01-01

    Both cell-intrinsic and extrinsic pathways govern axon regeneration, but only a limited number of factors have been identified and it is not clear to what extent axon regeneration is evolutionarily conserved. Whether dendrites also regenerate is unknown. Here we report that, like the axons of mammalian sensory neurons, the axons of certain Drosophila dendritic arborization (da) neurons are capable of substantial regeneration in the periphery but not in the CNS, and activating the Akt pathway enhances axon regeneration in the CNS. Moreover, those da neurons capable of axon regeneration also display dendrite regeneration, which is cell type-specific, developmentally regulated, and associated with microtubule polarity reversal. Dendrite regeneration is restrained via inhibition of the Akt pathway in da neurons by the epithelial cell-derived microRNA bantam but is facilitated by cell-autonomous activation of the Akt pathway. Our study begins to reveal mechanisms for dendrite regeneration, which depends on both extrinsic and intrinsic factors, including the PTEN–Akt pathway that is also important for axon regeneration. We thus established an important new model system—the fly da neuron regeneration model that resembles the mammalian injury model—with which to study and gain novel insights into the regeneration machinery. PMID:22759636

  13. BDNF regulates the expression and distribution of vesicular glutamate transporters in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos V Melo

    Full Text Available BDNF is a pro-survival protein involved in neuronal development and synaptic plasticity. BDNF strengthens excitatory synapses and contributes to LTP, presynaptically, through enhancement of glutamate release, and postsynaptically, via phosphorylation of neurotransmitter receptors, modulation of receptor traffic and activation of the translation machinery. We examined whether BDNF upregulated vesicular glutamate receptor (VGLUT 1 and 2 expression, which would partly account for the increased glutamate release in LTP. Cultured rat hippocampal neurons were incubated with 100 ng/ml BDNF, for different periods of time, and VGLUT gene and protein expression were assessed by real-time PCR and immunoblotting, respectively. At DIV7, exogenous application of BDNF rapidly increased VGLUT2 mRNA and protein levels, in a dose-dependent manner. VGLUT1 expression also increased but only transiently. However, at DIV14, BDNF stably increased VGLUT1 expression, whilst VGLUT2 levels remained low. Transcription inhibition with actinomycin-D or α-amanitine, and translation inhibition with emetine or anisomycin, fully blocked BDNF-induced VGLUT upregulation. Fluorescence microscopy imaging showed that BDNF stimulation upregulates the number, integrated density and intensity of VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 puncta in neurites of cultured hippocampal neurons (DIV7, indicating that the neurotrophin also affects the subcellular distribution of the transporter in developing neurons. Increased VGLUT1 somatic signals were also found 3 h after stimulation with BDNF, further suggesting an increased de novo transcription and translation. BDNF regulation of VGLUT expression was specifically mediated by BDNF, as no effect was found upon application of IGF-1 or bFGF, which activate other receptor tyrosine kinases. Moreover, inhibition of TrkB receptors with K252a and PLCγ signaling with U-73122 precluded BDNF-induced VGLUT upregulation. Hippocampal neurons express both isoforms during

  14. Regulation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 inlfuences hippocampal neuronal survival in a rat model of diabetic cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaning Zhao; Jianmin Li; Qiqun Tang; Pan Zhang; Liwei Jing; Changxiang Chen; Shuxing Li

    2014-01-01

    Activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 has been demonstrated in acute brain ischemia. We hypothesized that activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 can protect hippocampal neurons from injury in a diabetic model after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion. In this study, transient whole-brain ischemia was induced by four-vessel occlusion in normal and diabetic rats, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 inhibitor (U0126) was administered into diabetic rats 30 minutes before ischemia as a pretreatment. Results showed that the number of surviving neurons in the hippocampal CA1 region was reduced, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation and Ku70 activity were decreased, and pro-apoptotic Bax expression was upregulated after intervention using U0126. These ifndings demonstrate that inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activity aggravated neuronal loss in the hippocampus in a diabetic rat after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion, further decreased DNA repairing ability and ac-celerated apoptosis in hippocampal neurons. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation plays a neuroprotective role in hippocampal neurons in a diabetic rat after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion.

  15. Zebrafish cyclin Dx is required for development of motor neuron progenitors, and its expression is regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor 2α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Huang-Wei; Yuan, Rey-Yue; Chou, Chih-Ming; Chen, Yi-Chung; Hung, Chin-Chun; Hu, Chin-Hwa; Hwang, Sheng-Ping L; Hwang, Pung-Pung; Shen, Chia-Ning; Chen, Chih-Lung; Cheng, Chia-Hsiung; Huang, Chang-Jen

    2016-06-21

    Cyclins play a central role in cell-cycle regulation; in mammals, the D family of cyclins consists of cyclin D1, D2, and D3. In Xenopus, only homologs of cyclins D1 and D2 have been reported, while a novel cyclin, cyclin Dx (ccndx), was found to be required for the maintenance of motor neuron progenitors during embryogenesis. It remains unknown whether zebrafish possess cyclin D3 or cyclin Dx. In this study, we identified a zebrafish ccndx gene encoding a protein which can form a complex with Cdk4. Through whole-mount in situ hybridization, we observed that zccndx mRNA is expressed in the motor neurons of hindbrain and spinal cord during development. Analysis of a 4-kb promoter sequence of the zccndx gene revealed the presence of HRE sites, which can be regulated by HIF2α. Morpholino knockdown of zebrafish Hif2α and cyclin Dx resulted in the abolishment of isl1 and oligo2 expression in the precursors of motor neurons, and also disrupted axon growth. Overexpression of cyclin Dx mRNA in Hif2α morphants partially rescued zccndx expression. Taken together, our data indicate that zebrafish cyclin Dx plays a role in maintaining the precursors of motor neurons.

  16. Dopamine D2 Receptors Regulate Collateral Inhibition between Striatal Medium Spiny Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Goes, Marie-Sophie; Partridge, John G.; Vicini, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    The principle neurons of the striatum are GABAergic medium spiny neurons (MSNs), whose collateral synapses onto neighboring neurons play critical roles in striatal function. MSNs can be divided by dopamine receptor expression into D1-class and D2-class MSNs, and alterations in D2 MSNs are associated with various pathological states. Despite overwhelming evidence for D2 receptors (D2Rs) in maintaining proper striatal function, it remains unclear how MSN collaterals are specifically altered by D2R activation. Here, we report that chronic D2R stimulation regulates MSN collaterals in vitro by presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms. We used corticostriatal cultures from mice in which MSN subtypes were distinguished by fluorophore expression. Quinpirole, an agonist for D2/3 receptors, was used to chronically activate D2Rs. Quinpirole increased the rate and strength of collateral formation onto D2R-containing MSNs as measured by dual whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. Additionally, these neurons were more sensitive to low concentrations of GABA and exhibited an increase in gephyrin puncta density, suggesting increased postsynaptic GABAA receptors. Last, quinpirole treatment increased presynaptic GABA release sites, as shown by increased frequency of sIPSCs and mIPSCs, correlating with increased VGAT (vesicular GABA transporter) puncta. Combined with the observation that there were no detectable differences in sensitivity to specific GABAA receptor modulators, we provide evidence that D2R activation powerfully transforms MSN collaterals via coordinated presynaptic and postsynaptic alterations. As the D2 class of MSNs is highly implicated in Parkinson's disease and other neurological disorders, our findings may contribute to understanding and treating the changes that occur in these pathological states. PMID:23986243

  17. In vivo analysis of MEF2 transcription factors in synapse regulation and neuronal survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Waseem Akhtar

    Full Text Available MEF2 (A-D transcription factors govern development, differentiation and maintenance of various cell types including neurons. The role of MEF2 isoforms in the brain has been studied using in vitro manipulations with only MEF2C examined in vivo. In order to understand specific as well as redundant roles of the MEF2 isoforms, we generated brain-specific deletion of MEF2A and found that Mef2aKO mice show normal behavior in a range of paradigms including learning and memory. We next generated Mef2a and Mef2d brain-specific double KO (Mef2a/dDKO mice and observed deficits in motor coordination and enhanced hippocampal short-term synaptic plasticity, however there were no alterations in learning and memory, Schaffer collateral pathway long-term potentiation, or the number of dendritic spines. Since previous work has established a critical role for MEF2C in hippocampal plasticity, we generated a Mef2a, Mef2c and Mef2d brain-specific triple KO (Mef2a/c/dTKO. Mef2a/c/d TKO mice have early postnatal lethality with increased neuronal apoptosis, indicative of a redundant role for the MEF2 factors in neuronal survival. We examined synaptic plasticity in the intact neurons in the Mef2a/c/d TKO mice and found significant impairments in short-term synaptic plasticity suggesting that MEF2C is the major isoform involved in hippocampal synaptic function. Collectively, these data highlight the key in vivo role of MEF2C isoform in the brain and suggest that MEF2A and MEF2D have only subtle roles in regulating hippocampal synaptic function.

  18. In Vivo Analysis of MEF2 Transcription Factors in Synapse Regulation and Neuronal Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Megumi; Morris, Michael J.; Qi, Xiaoxia; Richardson, James A.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.; Kavalali, Ege T.; Monteggia, Lisa M.

    2012-01-01

    MEF2 (A–D) transcription factors govern development, differentiation and maintenance of various cell types including neurons. The role of MEF2 isoforms in the brain has been studied using in vitro manipulations with only MEF2C examined in vivo. In order to understand specific as well as redundant roles of the MEF2 isoforms, we generated brain-specific deletion of MEF2A and found that Mef2aKO mice show normal behavior in a range of paradigms including learning and memory. We next generated Mef2a and Mef2d brain-specific double KO (Mef2a/dDKO) mice and observed deficits in motor coordination and enhanced hippocampal short-term synaptic plasticity, however there were no alterations in learning and memory, Schaffer collateral pathway long-term potentiation, or the number of dendritic spines. Since previous work has established a critical role for MEF2C in hippocampal plasticity, we generated a Mef2a, Mef2c and Mef2d brain-specific triple KO (Mef2a/c/dTKO). Mef2a/c/d TKO mice have early postnatal lethality with increased neuronal apoptosis, indicative of a redundant role for the MEF2 factors in neuronal survival. We examined synaptic plasticity in the intact neurons in the Mef2a/c/d TKO mice and found significant impairments in short-term synaptic plasticity suggesting that MEF2C is the major isoform involved in hippocampal synaptic function. Collectively, these data highlight the key in vivo role of MEF2C isoform in the brain and suggest that MEF2A and MEF2D have only subtle roles in regulating hippocampal synaptic function. PMID:22496871

  19. Translational regulation of human neuronal nitric-oxide synthase by an alternatively spliced 5'-untranslated region leader exon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Derek C; Bevan, Sian C; Choi, Stephen; Robb, G Brett; Millar, Adam; Wang, Yang; Marsden, Philip A

    2003-01-03

    Expression of the neuronal nitric-oxide synthase (nNOS) mRNA is subject to complex cell-specific transcriptional regulation, which is mediated by alternative promoters. Unexpectedly, we identified a 89-nucleotide alternatively spliced exon located in the 5'-untranslated region between exon 1 variants and a common exon 2 that contains the translational initiation codon. Alternative splicing events that do not affect the open reading frame are distinctly uncommon in mammals; therefore, we assessed its functional relevance. Transient transfection of reporter RNAs performed in a variety of cell types revealed that this alternatively spliced exon acts as a potent translational repressor. Stably transfected cell lines confirmed that the alternatively spliced exon inhibited translation of the native nNOS open reading frame. Reverse transcription-PCR and RNase protection assays indicated that nNOS mRNAs containing this exon are common and expressed in both a promoter-specific and tissue-restricted fashion. Mutational analysis identified the functional cis-element within this novel exon, and a secondary structure prediction revealed that it forms a putative stem-loop. RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assay techniques revealed that a specific cytoplasmic RNA-binding complex interacts with this motif. Hence, a unique splicing event within a 5'-untranslated region is demonstrated to introduce a translational control element. This represents a newer model for the translational control of a mammalian mRNA.

  20. Unexpected role of interferon-γ in regulating neuronal connectivity and social behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filiano, Anthony J; Xu, Yang; Tustison, Nicholas J; Marsh, Rachel L; Baker, Wendy; Smirnov, Igor; Overall, Christopher C; Gadani, Sachin P; Turner, Stephen D; Weng, Zhiping; Peerzade, Sayeda Najamussahar; Chen, Hao; Lee, Kevin S; Scott, Michael M; Beenhakker, Mark P; Litvak, Vladimir; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2016-07-21

    Immune dysfunction is commonly associated with several neurological and mental disorders. Although the mechanisms by which peripheral immunity may influence neuronal function are largely unknown, recent findings implicate meningeal immunity influencing behaviour, such as spatial learning and memory. Here we show that meningeal immunity is also critical for social behaviour; mice deficient in adaptive immunity exhibit social deficits and hyper-connectivity of fronto-cortical brain regions. Associations between rodent transcriptomes from brain and cellular transcriptomes in response to T-cell-derived cytokines suggest a strong interaction between social behaviour and interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-driven responses. Concordantly, we demonstrate that inhibitory neurons respond to IFN-γ and increase GABAergic (γ-aminobutyric-acid) currents in projection neurons, suggesting that IFN-γ is a molecular link between meningeal immunity and neural circuits recruited for social behaviour. Meta-analysis of the transcriptomes of a range of organisms reveals that rodents, fish, and flies elevate IFN-γ/JAK-STAT-dependent gene signatures in a social context, suggesting that the IFN-γ signalling pathway could mediate a co-evolutionary link between social/aggregation behaviour and an efficient anti-pathogen response. This study implicates adaptive immune dysfunction, in particular IFN-γ, in disorders characterized by social dysfunction and suggests a co-evolutionary link between social behaviour and an anti-pathogen immune response driven by IFN-γ signalling.

  1. Cortical regulation of dopamine depletion-induced dendritic spine loss in striatal medium spiny neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, M D; Schmidt, D E; Deutch, A Y

    2007-10-26

    The proximate cause of Parkinson's disease is striatal dopamine depletion. Although no overt toxicity to striatal neurons has been reported in Parkinson's disease, one of the consequences of striatal dopamine loss is a decrease in the number of dendritic spines on striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs). Dendrites of these neurons receive cortical glutamatergic inputs onto the dendritic spine head and dopaminergic inputs from the substantia nigra onto the spine neck. This synaptic arrangement suggests that dopamine gates corticostriatal glutamatergic drive onto spines. Using triple organotypic slice cultures composed of ventral mesencephalon, striatum, and cortex of the neonatal rat, we examined the role of the cortex in dopamine depletion-induced dendritic spine loss in MSNs. The striatal dopamine innervation was lesioned by treatment of the cultures with the dopaminergic neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) or by removing the mesencephalon. Both MPP+ and mesencephalic ablation decreased MSN dendritic spine density. Analysis of spine morphology revealed that thin spines were preferentially lost after dopamine depletion. Removal of the cortex completely prevented dopamine depletion-induced spine loss. These data indicate that the dendritic remodeling of MSNs seen in parkinsonism occurs secondary to increases in corticostriatal glutamatergic drive, and suggest that modulation of cortical activity may be a useful therapeutic strategy in Parkinson's disease.

  2. NMDA-mediated and Self-induced Bdnf Exon IV Transcriptions are Differentially Regulated in Cultured Cortical Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Fei; Wang, Hongbing

    2009-01-01

    Activity-dependent transcriptional up-regulation of bdnf (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) is involved in regulating many aspects of neuronal functions. The NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartic acid)-mediated and BDNF-mediated exon IV transcription may represent mechanistically different responses, and relevant to activity-dependent changes in neurons. We found that the activities of ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase), CaM KII/IV (calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and IV), PI3K (phosphoi...

  3. The protocadherins, PCDHB1 and PCDH7, are regulated by MeCP2 in neuronal cells and brain tissues: implication for pathogenesis of Rett syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakagawa Takayuki

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental and autistic disease caused by mutations of Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2 gene. MeCP2 protein is mainly expressed in neurons and binds to methylated gene promoters to suppress their expression, indicating that Rett syndrome is caused by the deregulation of target genes in neurons. However, it is likely that there are more unidentified neuronal MeCP2-targets associated with the neurological features of RTT. Results Using a genome-microarray approach, we found 22 genomic regions that contain sites potentially regulated by MeCP2 based on the features of MeCP2 binding, DNA methylation, and repressive histone modification in human cell lines. Within these regions, Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP analysis revealed that MeCP2 binds to the upstream regions of the protocadherin genes PCDHB1 and PCDH7 in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. PCDHB1 and PCDH7 promoter activities were down-regulated by MeCP2, but not by MBD-deleted MeCP2. These gene expression were up-regulated following MeCP2 reduction with siRNA in SH-SY5Y cells and in the brains of Mecp2-null mice. Furthermore, PCDHB1 was up-regulated in postmortem brains from Rett syndrome patients. Conclusions We identified MeCP2 target genes that encode neuronal adhesion molecules using ChIP-on-BAC array approach. Since these protocadherin genes are generally essential for brain development, aberrant regulation of these molecules may contribute to the pathogenesis of the neurological features observed in Rett syndrome.

  4. Regulation of gene expression in neuronal tissue by RNA interference and editing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venø, Morten Trillingsgaard

    No tissue in the mammalian organism is more complex than the brain. This complexity is in part the result of precise timing and interplay of a large number mechanisms modulating gene expression post-transcriptionally. Fine-tuning mechanisms such as A-to-I editing of RNA transcripts and regulation...... mediated by microRNAs are crucial for the correct function of the mammalian brain. We are addressing A-to-I editing and regulation by microRNAs with spatio-temporal resolution in the embryonic porcine brain by Solexa sequencing of microRNAs and 454 sequencing of edited neuronal messenger RNAs, resulting...... in detailed data of both of these fine-tuning mechanisms in the embryonic development of the pig. Editing levels of transcripts examined are generally seen to increase through development, in agreement with editing of specific microRNA also examined in the Solexa sequencing study. Three studies examining...

  5. KV7 Channels Regulate Firing during Synaptic Integration in GABAergic Striatal Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Belén Pérez-Ramírez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Striatal projection neurons (SPNs process motor and cognitive information. Their activity is affected by Parkinson’s disease, in which dopamine concentration is decreased and acetylcholine concentration is increased. Acetylcholine activates muscarinic receptors in SPNs. Its main source is the cholinergic interneuron that responds with a briefer latency than SPNs during a cortical command. Therefore, an important question is whether muscarinic G-protein coupled receptors and their signaling cascades are fast enough to intervene during synaptic responses to regulate synaptic integration and firing. One of the most known voltage dependent channels regulated by muscarinic receptors is the KV7/KCNQ channel. It is not known whether these channels regulate the integration of suprathreshold corticostriatal responses. Here, we study the impact of cholinergic muscarinic modulation on the synaptic response of SPNs by regulating KV7 channels. We found that KV7 channels regulate corticostriatal synaptic integration and that this modulation occurs in the dendritic/spines compartment. In contrast, it is negligible in the somatic compartment. This modulation occurs on sub- and suprathreshold responses and lasts during the whole duration of the responses, hundreds of milliseconds, greatly altering SPNs firing properties. This modulation affected the behavior of the striatal microcircuit.

  6. KV7 Channels Regulate Firing during Synaptic Integration in GABAergic Striatal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ramírez, M. Belén; Laville, Antonio; Tapia, Dagoberto; Lara-González, Esther; Bargas, José; Galarraga, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    Striatal projection neurons (SPNs) process motor and cognitive information. Their activity is affected by Parkinson's disease, in which dopamine concentration is decreased and acetylcholine concentration is increased. Acetylcholine activates muscarinic receptors in SPNs. Its main source is the cholinergic interneuron that responds with a briefer latency than SPNs during a cortical command. Therefore, an important question is whether muscarinic G-protein coupled receptors and their signaling cascades are fast enough to intervene during synaptic responses to regulate synaptic integration and firing. One of the most known voltage dependent channels regulated by muscarinic receptors is the KV7/KCNQ channel. It is not known whether these channels regulate the integration of suprathreshold corticostriatal responses. Here, we study the impact of cholinergic muscarinic modulation on the synaptic response of SPNs by regulating KV7 channels. We found that KV7 channels regulate corticostriatal synaptic integration and that this modulation occurs in the dendritic/spines compartment. In contrast, it is negligible in the somatic compartment. This modulation occurs on sub- and suprathreshold responses and lasts during the whole duration of the responses, hundreds of milliseconds, greatly altering SPNs firing properties. This modulation affected the behavior of the striatal microcircuit. PMID:26113994

  7. Neuronal exosomal miRNA-dependent translational regulation of astroglial glutamate transporter GLT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Lydie; Regan, Melissa; Higashimori, Haruki; Ng, Seng Kah; Esau, Christine; Vidensky, Svetlana; Rothstein, Jeffrey; Yang, Yongjie

    2013-03-08

    Perisynaptic astrocytes express important glutamate transporters, especially excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2, rodent analog GLT1) to regulate extracellular glutamate levels and modulate synaptic activation. In this study, we investigated an exciting new pathway, the exosome-mediated transfer of microRNA (in particular, miR-124a), in neuron-to-astrocyte signaling. Exosomes isolated from neuron-conditioned medium contain abundant microRNAs and small RNAs. These exosomes can be directly internalized into astrocytes and increase astrocyte miR-124a and GLT1 protein levels. Direct miR-124a transfection also significantly and selectively increases protein (but not mRNA) expression levels of GLT1 in cultured astrocytes. Consistent with our in vitro findings, intrastriatal injection of specific antisense against miR-124a into adult mice dramatically reduces GLT1 protein expression and glutamate uptake levels in striatum without reducing GLT1 mRNA levels. MiR-124a-mediated regulation of GLT1 expression appears to be indirect and is not mediated by its suppression of the putative GLT1 inhibitory ligand ephrinA3. Moreover, miR-124a is selectively reduced in the spinal cord tissue of end-stage SOD1 G93A mice, the mouse model of ALS. Subsequent exogenous delivery of miR-124a in vivo through stereotaxic injection significantly prevents further pathological loss of GLT1 proteins, as determined by GLT1 immunoreactivity in SOD1 G93A mice. Together, our study characterized a new neuron-to-astrocyte communication pathway and identified miRNAs that modulate GLT1 protein expression in astrocytes in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Neuronal Exosomal miRNA-dependent Translational Regulation of Astroglial Glutamate Transporter GLT1*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Lydie; Regan, Melissa; Higashimori, Haruki; Ng, Seng Kah; Esau, Christine; Vidensky, Svetlana; Rothstein, Jeffrey; Yang, Yongjie

    2013-01-01

    Perisynaptic astrocytes express important glutamate transporters, especially excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2, rodent analog GLT1) to regulate extracellular glutamate levels and modulate synaptic activation. In this study, we investigated an exciting new pathway, the exosome-mediated transfer of microRNA (in particular, miR-124a), in neuron-to-astrocyte signaling. Exosomes isolated from neuron-conditioned medium contain abundant microRNAs and small RNAs. These exosomes can be directly internalized into astrocytes and increase astrocyte miR-124a and GLT1 protein levels. Direct miR-124a transfection also significantly and selectively increases protein (but not mRNA) expression levels of GLT1 in cultured astrocytes. Consistent with our in vitro findings, intrastriatal injection of specific antisense against miR-124a into adult mice dramatically reduces GLT1 protein expression and glutamate uptake levels in striatum without reducing GLT1 mRNA levels. MiR-124a-mediated regulation of GLT1 expression appears to be indirect and is not mediated by its suppression of the putative GLT1 inhibitory ligand ephrinA3. Moreover, miR-124a is selectively reduced in the spinal cord tissue of end-stage SOD1 G93A mice, the mouse model of ALS. Subsequent exogenous delivery of miR-124a in vivo through stereotaxic injection significantly prevents further pathological loss of GLT1 proteins, as determined by GLT1 immunoreactivity in SOD1 G93A mice. Together, our study characterized a new neuron-to-astrocyte communication pathway and identified miRNAs that modulate GLT1 protein expression in astrocytes in vitro and in vivo. PMID:23364798

  9. Clustering and Functional Coupling of Diverse Ion Channels and Signaling Proteins Revealed by Super-resolution STORM Microscopy in Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Carver, Chase M; Choveau, Frank S; Shapiro, Mark S

    2016-10-19

    The fidelity of neuronal signaling requires organization of signaling molecules into macromolecular complexes, whose components are in intimate proximity. The intrinsic diffraction limit of light makes visualization of individual signaling complexes using visible light extremely difficult. However, using super-resolution stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), we observed intimate association of individual molecules within signaling complexes containing ion channels (M-type K(+), L-type Ca(2+), or TRPV1 channels) and G protein-coupled receptors coupled by the scaffolding protein A-kinase-anchoring protein (AKAP)79/150. Some channels assembled as multi-channel supercomplexes. Surprisingly, we identified novel layers of interplay within macromolecular complexes containing diverse channel types at the single-complex level in sensory neurons, dependent on AKAP79/150. Electrophysiological studies revealed that such ion channels are functionally coupled as well. Our findings illustrate the novel role of AKAP79/150 as a molecular coupler of different channels that conveys crosstalk between channel activities within single microdomains in tuning the physiological response of neurons.

  10. Layered hydrogels accelerate iPSC-derived neuronal maturation and reveal migration defects caused by MeCP2 dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen-Ning; Freitas, Beatriz C.; Qian, Hao; Lux, Jacques; Acab, Allan; Trujillo, Cleber A.; Herai, Roberto H.; Nguyen Huu, Viet Anh; Wen, Jessica H.; Joshi-Barr, Shivanjali; Karpiak, Jerome V.; Engler, Adam J.; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Muotri, Alysson R.; Almutairi, Adah

    2016-03-01

    Probing a wide range of cellular phenotypes in neurodevelopmental disorders using patient-derived neural progenitor cells (NPCs) can be facilitated by 3D assays, as 2D systems cannot entirely recapitulate the arrangement of cells in the brain. Here, we developed a previously unidentified 3D migration and differentiation assay in layered hydrogels to examine how these processes are affected in neurodevelopmental disorders, such as Rett syndrome. Our soft 3D system mimics the brain environment and accelerates maturation of neurons from human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived NPCs, yielding electrophysiologically active neurons within just 3 wk. Using this platform, we revealed a genotype-specific effect of methyl-CpG-binding protein-2 (MeCP2) dysfunction on iPSC-derived neuronal migration and maturation (reduced neurite outgrowth and fewer synapses) in 3D layered hydrogels. Thus, this 3D system expands the range of neural phenotypes that can be studied in vitro to include those influenced by physical and mechanical stimuli or requiring specific arrangements of multiple cell types.

  11. PPAR{gamma} transcriptionally regulates the expression of insulin-degrading enzyme in primary neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Jing; Zhang, Lang; Liu, Shubo; Zhang, Chi [Protein Science Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education, Department of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Huang, Xiuqing; Li, Jian [The Key Laboratory of Geriatrics, Beijing Hospital and Beijing Institute of Geriatrics, Ministry of Health, Beijing 100730 (China); Zhao, Nanming [Protein Science Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education, Department of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Zhao, E-mail: zwang@tsinghua.edu.cn [Protein Science Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education, Department of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2009-06-12

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a protease that has been demonstrated to play a key role in degrading both A{beta} and insulin and deficient in IDE function is associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) pathology. However, little is known about the cellular and molecular regulation of IDE expression. Here we show IDE levels are markedly decreased in DM2 patients and positively correlated with the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) levels. Further studies show that PPAR{gamma} plays an important role in regulating IDE expression in rat primary neurons through binding to a functional peroxisome proliferator-response element (PPRE) in IDE promoter and promoting IDE gene transcription. Finally, we demonstrate that PPAR{gamma} participates in the insulin-induced IDE expression in neurons. These results suggest that PPAR{gamma} transcriptionally induces IDE expression which provides a novel mechanism for the use of PPAR{gamma} agonists in both DM2 and AD therapies.

  12. Regulation of Neuron-Astrocyte Metabolic Coupling across the Sleep-Wake Cycle

    KAUST Repository

    Petit, Jean-Marie

    2015-12-17

    Over the last thirty years, a growing number of studies showed that astrocytes play a pivotal role in the energy support to synapses. More precisely, astrocytes adjust the energy production to the neuronal energy needs through different mechanisms grouped under the term “neurometabolic coupling” (NMC). In this review we describe these mechanisms of coupling and how they involve astrocytes. From a physiological point of view, these mechanisms of coupling are particularly important to ensure normal synaptic functioning when neurons undergo rapid and repetitive changes in firing rate such as during the sleep/wake transitions. Investigations on brain energy metabolism during the sleep/wake cycle have been mainly focused on glucose consumption and on glycogen metabolism. However, the recent development of substrate-specific biosensors allowed measurements of the variation in extracellular levels of glutamate, glucose and lactate with a time resolution compatible with sleep stage duration. Together with gene expression data these experiments allowed to better define the variations of energy metabolites regulation across the sleep/wake cycle. The aim of this review is to bring into perspective the role of astrocytes and neurometabolic coupling in the regulation of the sleep/wake cycle. The data reviewed also suggest an important role of the astrocytic network. In addition, the role of astrocytes in NMC mechanisms is consistent with the “local and use dependent” sleep hypothesis.

  13. ZBTB20 regulates nociception and pain sensation by modulating TRP channel expression in nociceptive sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, An-Jing; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Huan; Liu, Anjun; Ma, Xianhua; Liang, Qing; Cao, Dongmei; Wood, John N; He, David Z; Ding, Yu-Qiang; Yuan, Wen-Jun; Xie, Zhifang; Zhang, Weiping J

    2014-11-05

    In mammals, pain sensation is initiated by the detection of noxious stimuli through specialized transduction ion channels and receptors in nociceptive sensory neurons. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are the key sensory transducers that confer nociceptors distinct sensory modalities. However, the regulatory mechanisms about their expression are poorly defined. Here we show that the zinc-finger protein ZBTB20 regulates TRP channels expression in nociceptors. ZBTB20 is highly expressed in nociceptive sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia. Disruption of ZBTB20 in nociceptors led to a marked decrease in the expression levels of TRPV1, TRPA1 and TRPM8 and the response of calcium flux and whole-cell currents evoked by their respective specific agonists. Phenotypically, the mice lacking ZBTB20 specifically in nociceptors showed a defect in nociception and pain sensation in response to thermal, mechanical and inflammatory stimulation. Our findings point to ZBTB20 as a critical regulator of nociception and pain sensation by modulating TRP channels expression in nociceptors.

  14. Fibroblast growth factor-regulated palmitoylation of the neural cell adhesion molecule determines neuronal morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponimaskin, Evgeni; Dityateva, Galina; Ruonala, Mika O; Fukata, Masaki; Fukata, Yuko; Kobe, Fritz; Wouters, Fred S; Delling, Markus; Bredt, David S; Schachner, Melitta; Dityatev, Alexander

    2008-09-03

    During development of the nervous system, short- and long-range signals cooperate to promote axonal growth, guidance, and target innervation. Particularly, a short-range signal transducer, the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), stimulates neurite outgrowth via mechanisms that require posttranslational modification of NCAM and signaling via receptors to a long-range messenger, the fibroblast growth factor (FGF). In the present study we further characterized a mechanism which regulates the functional interplay between NCAM and FGF receptor(s). We show that activation of FGF receptor(s) by FGF2 leads to palmitoylation of the two major transmembrane NCAM isoforms, NCAM140 and NCAM180, translocation of NCAM to GM1 ganglioside-containing lipid rafts, and stimulation of neurite outgrowth of hippocampal neurons. Ablation of NCAM, mutation of NCAM140 or NCAM180 palmitoylation sites, or pharmacological suppression of NCAM signaling inhibited FGF2-stimulated neurite outgrowth. Of the 23 members of the aspartate-histidine-histidine-cysteine (DHHC) domain containing proteins, DHHC-7 most strongly stimulated palmitoylation of NCAM, and enzyme activity was enhanced by FGF2. Thus, our study uncovers a molecular mechanism by which a growth factor regulates neuronal morphogenesis via activation of palmitoylation, which in turn modifies subcellular location and thus signaling via an adhesion molecule.

  15. proBDNF negatively regulates neuronal remodeling, synaptic transmission, and synaptic plasticity in hippocampus.

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    Yang, Jianmin; Harte-Hargrove, Lauren C; Siao, Chia-Jen; Marinic, Tina; Clarke, Roshelle; Ma, Qian; Jing, Deqiang; Lafrancois, John J; Bath, Kevin G; Mark, Willie; Ballon, Douglas; Lee, Francis S; Scharfman, Helen E; Hempstead, Barbara L

    2014-05-08

    Experience-dependent plasticity shapes postnatal development of neural circuits, but the mechanisms that refine dendritic arbors, remodel spines, and impair synaptic activity are poorly understood. Mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) modulates neuronal morphology and synaptic plasticity, including long-term potentiation (LTP) via TrkB activation. BDNF is initially translated as proBDNF, which binds p75(NTR). In vitro, recombinant proBDNF modulates neuronal structure and alters hippocampal long-term plasticity, but the actions of endogenously expressed proBDNF are unclear. Therefore, we generated a cleavage-resistant probdnf knockin mouse. Our results demonstrate that proBDNF negatively regulates hippocampal dendritic complexity and spine density through p75(NTR). Hippocampal slices from probdnf mice exhibit depressed synaptic transmission, impaired LTP, and enhanced long-term depression (LTD) in area CA1. These results suggest that proBDNF acts in vivo as a biologically active factor that regulates hippocampal structure, synaptic transmission, and plasticity, effects that are distinct from those of mature BDNF. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. CREB activity in dopamine D1 receptor expressing neurons regulates cocaine-induced behavioral effects

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    Ainhoa eBilbao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available IIt is suggested that striatal cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB regulates sensitivity to psychostimulants. To test the cell-specificity of this hypothesis we examined the effects of a dominant-negative CREB protein variant expressed in dopamine receptor D1 (D1R neurons on cocaine-induced behaviors. A transgenic mouse strain was generated by pronuclear injection of a BAC-derived transgene harboring the A-CREB sequence under the control of the D1R gene promoter. Compared to wild-type, drug-naïve mutants showed moderate alterations in gene expression, especially a reduction in basal levels of activity-regulated transcripts such as Arc and Egr2. Drug-naïve mutants showed moderate alterations in gene expression, most prominently a reduction in basal levels of activity-regulated transcripts such as Arc and Egr2, when compared to wild-type controls. The behavioral responses to cocaine were elevated in mutant mice. Locomotor activity after acute treatment, psychomotor sensitization after intermittent drug injections and the conditioned locomotion after saline treatment were increased compared to wild-type littermates. Transgenic mice had significantly higher cocaine conditioned place preference, displayed normal extinction of the conditioned preference, but showed an augmented cocaine-seeking response following priming-induced reinstatement. This enhanced cocaine-seeking response was associated with increased levels of activity-regulated transcripts and prodynorphin. The primary reinforcing effects of cocaine were not altered in the mutant mice as they did not differ from wild-type in cocaine self-administration under a fixed ratio schedule at the training dose. Collectively, our data indicate that expression of a dominant-negative CREB variant exclusively in neurons expressing D1R is sufficient to recapitulate the previously reported behavioral phenotypes associated with virally expressed dominant-negative CREB.

  17. Estradiol regulates alternative splicing of estrogen receptor-alpha mRNA in differentiated NG108-15 neuronal cells.

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    Aizawa, Shu; Yamamuro, Yutaka

    2008-03-26

    The biological actions of estrogen are mostly conveyed through interaction with two different types of estrogen receptor (ER), ER-alpha and ER-beta. With regard to ER-alpha, an alternatively spliced form and its translated product, truncated estrogen receptor product-1 (TERP-1), have been identified in the rat pituitary. TERP-1 has the ability to inhibit the ER binding to DNA response element by forming hetero-dimers with the wild-type ER. Furthermore, TERP-1 expression increased concurrently with serum estrogen levels. Although estrogen also plays important roles in the central nervous system, the existence and regulatory mechanism of alternatively spliced ER-alpha mRNA expression has remained unclear. The present study evaluated the expression of the alternatively spliced form of the ER-alpha gene, and examined the influence of a representative ER ligand, 17beta-estradiol (E2), on the expression in differentiated NG108-15 neuronal cells. A real-time RT-PCR analysis using primer sets designed to amplify from exons 3 to 4, exons 4 to 5, exons 5 to 6, exons 6 to 7, and exons 7 to 8 of the mouse ER-alpha gene revealed the existence of alternatively spliced ER-alpha mRNA and its putative transcription initiation site, located between exon 4 and exon 5. Although E2 had no apparent effect on the overall expression of ER-alpha mRNA, it reduced the incidence of the alternatively spliced form of ER-alpha. The down-regulation by E2 predominantly arose via binding to nuclear ERs. The present study demonstrated that alternatively spliced ER-alpha mRNA is expressed in differentiated NG108-15 neuronal cells, and provides evidence for the functional up-regulation of ER-alpha via the ligand-binding activation of ERs.

  18. Bmp indicator mice reveal dynamic regulation of transcriptional response.

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    Anna L Javier

    Full Text Available Cellular responses to Bmp ligands are regulated at multiple levels, both extracellularly and intracellularly. Therefore, the presence of these growth factors is not an accurate indicator of Bmp signaling activity. While a common approach to detect Bmp signaling activity is to determine the presence of phosphorylated forms of Smad1, 5 and 8 by immunostaining, this approach is time consuming and not quantitative. In order to provide a simpler readout system to examine the presence of Bmp signaling in developing animals, we developed BRE-gal mouse embryonic stem cells and a transgenic mouse line that specifically respond to Bmp ligand stimulation. Our reporter identifies specific transcriptional responses that are mediated by Smad1 and Smad4 with the Schnurri transcription factor complex binding to a conserved Bmp-Responsive Element (BRE, originally identified among Drosophila, Xenopus and human Bmp targets. Our BRE-gal mES cells specifically respond to Bmp ligands at concentrations as low as 5 ng/ml; and BRE-gal reporter mice, derived from the BRE-gal mES cells, show dynamic activity in many cellular sites, including extraembryonic structures and mammary glands, thereby making this a useful scientific tool.

  19. Pro-survival role for Parkinson's associated gene DJ-1 revealed in trophically impaired dopaminergic neurons.

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    Liviu Aron

    Full Text Available The mechanisms underlying the selective death of substantia nigra (SN neurons in Parkinson disease (PD remain elusive. While inactivation of DJ-1, an oxidative stress suppressor, causes PD, animal models lacking DJ-1 show no overt dopaminergic (DA neuron degeneration in the SN. Here, we show that aging mice lacking DJ-1 and the GDNF-receptor Ret in the DA system display an accelerated loss of SN cell bodies, but not axons, compared to mice that only lack Ret signaling. The survival requirement for DJ-1 is specific for the GIRK2-positive subpopulation in the SN which projects exclusively to the striatum and is more vulnerable in PD. Using Drosophila genetics, we show that constitutively active Ret and associated Ras/ERK, but not PI3K/Akt, signaling components interact genetically with DJ-1. Double loss-of-function experiments indicate that DJ-1 interacts with ERK signaling to control eye and wing development. Our study uncovers a conserved interaction between DJ-1 and Ret-mediated signaling and a novel cell survival role for DJ-1 in the mouse. A better understanding of the molecular connections between trophic signaling, cellular stress and aging could uncover new targets for drug development in PD.

  20. Status epilepticus induces increasing neuronal excitability and hypersynchrony as revealed by optical imaging.

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    Holtkamp, M; Buchheim, K; Elsner, M; Matzen, J; Weissinger, F; Meierkord, H

    2011-07-01

    In the wake of acquired brain insults such as status epilepticus (SE), time-dependent neuronal network alterations may occur resulting in cortical hyperexcitability and enhanced synchrony merging into chronic epilepsy. To better understand the underlying processes, we performed electrophysiological and optical imaging studies on combined hippocampal-entorhinal cortex slices. These were prepared from rats 1, 4 and 8 weeks after electrically-induced SE. Non-invasive imaging using intrinsic optical signal changes allowed detailed analysis of onset and spread patterns of seizure-like events (SLE) since coverage of the entire preparation is possible. The latency to occurrence of first SLEs after omission of Mg(2+) from the artificial cerebrospinal fluid was significantly reduced at 4 and 8 weeks after SE compared with all other groups indicating increased brain excitability. Optical imaging displayed multiregional onset and discontiguous propagation of SLEs 8 weeks after SE. Such patterns indicate neuronal hypersynchrony and are not encountered in naïve rodents in which SLEs commonly begin in the entorhinal cortex and display contiguous spread to invade adjacent regions. The electrophysiological and optical findings of the current study indicate evolving fundamental brain plasticity changes after the detrimental event predisposing to chronic epilepsy. The current results should be incorporated in any strategies aiming at prevention of chronic epilepsy.

  1. Heterogeneity in the developmental potential of motor neuron progenitors revealed by clonal analysis of single cells in vitro

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    Schieren Ira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The differentiation of neural progenitors into distinct classes within the central nervous system occurs over an extended period during which cells become progressively restricted in their fates. In the developing spinal cord, Sonic Hedgehog (Shh controls neural fates in a concentration-dependent manner by establishing discrete ventral progenitor domains characterized by specific combinations of transcription factors. It is unclear whether motor neuron progenitors can maintain their identities when expanded in vitro and whether their developmental potentials are restricted when exposed to defined extracellular signals. Results We have generated mice expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein under the control of the Nkx6.1 promoter, enabling fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS, purification and culture of individual spinal progenitors at clonal density, and analysis of their progeny. We demonstrate that cells isolated after progenitor domains are established are heterogeneous with respect to maintaining their identity after in vitro expansion. Most Nkx6.1+ progenitors lose their ventral identity following several divisions in culture, whereas a small subset is able to maintain its identity. Thus, subtype-restricted progenitors from the Nkx6.1+ region are present in the ventral spinal cord, although at a lower frequency than expected. Clones that maintain a motor neuron identity assume a transcriptional profile characteristic of thoracic motor neurons, despite some having been isolated from non-thoracic regions initially. Exposure of progenitors to Bone Morphogenetic Protein-4 induces some dorsal cell type characteristics in their progeny, revealing that lineage-restricted progenitor subtypes are not fully committed to their fates. Conclusion These findings support a model whereby continuous Shh signaling is required to maintain the identity of ventral progenitors isolated from the spinal cord, including motor

  2. The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis Cln8 gene expression is developmentally regulated in mouse brain and up-regulated in the hippocampal kindling model of epilepsy

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    Kuronen Mervi

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs are a group of inherited neurodegenerative disorders characterized by accumulation of autofluorescent material in many tissues, especially in neurons. Mutations in the CLN8 gene, encoding an endoplasmic reticulum (ER transmembrane protein of unknown function, underlie NCL phenotypes in humans and mice. The human phenotype is characterized by epilepsy, progressive psychomotor deterioration and visual loss, while motor neuron degeneration (mnd mice with a Cln8 mutation show progressive motor neuron dysfunction and retinal degeneration. Results We investigated spatial and temporal expression of Cln8 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA using in situ hybridization, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and northern blotting. Cln8 is ubiquitously expressed at low levels in embryonic and adult tissues. In prenatal embryos Cln8 is most prominently expressed in the developing gastrointestinal tract, dorsal root ganglia (DRG and brain. In postnatal brain the highest expression is in the cortex and hippocampus. Expression of Cln8 mRNA in the central nervous system (CNS was also analyzed in the hippocampal electrical kindling model of epilepsy, in which Cln8 expression was rapidly up-regulated in hippocampal pyramidal and granular neurons. Conclusion Expression of Cln8 in the developing and mature brain suggests roles for Cln8 in maturation, differentiation and supporting the survival of different neuronal populations. The relevance of Cln8 up-regulation in hippocampal neurons of kindled mice should be further explored.

  3. The NAV2 homolog Sickie regulates F-actin-mediated axonal growth in Drosophila mushroom body neurons via the non-canonical Rac-Cofilin pathway.

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    Abe, Takashi; Yamazaki, Daisuke; Murakami, Satoshi; Hiroi, Makoto; Nitta, Yohei; Maeyama, Yuko; Tabata, Tetsuya

    2014-12-01

    The Rac-Cofilin pathway is essential for cytoskeletal remodeling to control axonal development. Rac signals through the canonical Rac-Pak-LIMK pathway to suppress Cofilin-dependent axonal growth and through a Pak-independent non-canonical pathway to promote outgrowth. Whether this non-canonical pathway converges to promote Cofilin-dependent F-actin reorganization in axonal growth remains elusive. We demonstrate that Sickie, a homolog of the human microtubule-associated protein neuron navigator 2, cell-autonomously regulates axonal growth of Drosophila mushroom body (MB) neurons via the non-canonical pathway. Sickie was prominently expressed in the newborn F-actin-rich axons of MB neurons. A sickie mutant exhibited axonal growth defects, and its phenotypes were rescued by exogenous expression of Sickie. We observed phenotypic similarities and genetic interactions among sickie and Rac-Cofilin signaling components. Using the MARCM technique, distinct F-actin and phospho-Cofilin patterns were detected in developing axons mutant for sickie and Rac-Cofilin signaling regulators. The upregulation of Cofilin function alleviated the axonal defect of the sickie mutant. Epistasis analyses revealed that Sickie suppresses the LIMK overexpression phenotype and is required for Pak-independent Rac1 and Slingshot phosphatase to counteract LIMK. We propose that Sickie regulates F-actin-mediated axonal growth via the non-canonical Rac-Cofilin pathway in a Slingshot-dependent manner.

  4. Ionic modulation of QPX stability as a nano-switch regulating gene expression in neurons

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    Baghaee Ravari, Soodeh

    G-quadruplexes (G-QPX) have been the subject of intense research due to their unique structural configuration and potential applications, particularly their functionality in biological process as a novel type of nano--switch. They have been found in critical regions of the human genome such as telomeres, promoter regions, and untranslated regions of RNA. About 50% of human DNA in promoters has G-rich regions with the potential to form G-QPX structures. A G-QPX might act mechanistically as an ON/OFF switch, regulating gene expression, meaning that the formation of G-QPX in a single strand of DNA disrupts double stranded DNA, prevents the binding of transcription factors (TF) to their recognition sites, resulting in gene down-regulation. Although there are numerous studies on biological roles of G-QPXs in oncogenes, their potential formation in neuronal cells, in particular upstream of transcription start sites, is poorly investigated. The main focus of this research is to identify stable G-QPXs in the 97bp active promoter region of the choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) gene, the terminal enzyme involved in synthesis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, and to clarify ionic modulation of G-QPX nanostructures through the mechanism of neural action potentials. Different bioinformatics analyses (in silico), including the QGRS, quadparser and G4-Calculator programs, have been used to predict stable G-QPX in the active promoter region of the human ChAT gene, located 1000bp upstream from the TATA box. The results of computational studies (using those three different algorithms) led to the identification of three consecutive intramolecular G-QPX structures in the negative strand (ChAT G17-2, ChAT G17, and ChAT G29) and one intramolecular G-QPX structure in the positive strand (ChAT G30). Also, the results suggest the possibility that nearby G-runs in opposed DNA strands with a short distance of each other may be able to form a stable intermolecular G-QPX involving two DNA

  5. A Co-operative Regulation of Neuronal Excitability by UNC-7 Innexin and NCA/NALCN Leak Channel

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    Bouhours Magali

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gap junctions mediate the electrical coupling and intercellular communication between neighboring cells. Some gap junction proteins, namely connexins and pannexins in vertebrates, and innexins in invertebrates, may also function as hemichannels. A conserved NCA/Dmα1U/NALCN family cation leak channel regulates the excitability and activity of vertebrate and invertebrate neurons. In the present study, we describe a genetic and functional interaction between the innexin UNC-7 and the cation leak channel NCA in Caenorhabditis elegans neurons. While the loss of the neuronal NCA channel function leads to a reduced evoked postsynaptic current at neuromuscular junctions, a simultaneous loss of the UNC-7 function restores the evoked response. The expression of UNC-7 in neurons reverts the effect of the unc-7 mutation; moreover, the expression of UNC-7 mutant proteins that are predicted to be unable to form gap junctions also reverts this effect, suggesting that UNC-7 innexin regulates neuronal activity, in part, through gap junction-independent functions. We propose that, in addition to gap junction-mediated functions, UNC-7 innexin may also form hemichannels to regulate C. elegans' neuronal activity cooperatively with the NCA family leak channels.

  6. Osmotic regulation of neuronal activity: a new role for taurine and glial cells in a hypothalamic neuroendocrine structure.

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    Hussy, N; Deleuze, C; Desarménien, M G; Moos, F C

    2000-10-01

    Maintenance of osmotic pressure is a primary regulatory process essential for normal cell function. The osmolarity of extracellular fluids is regulated by modifying the intake and excretion of salts and water. A major component of this regulatory process is the neuroendocrine hypothalamo-neurohypophysial system, which consists of neurons located in the paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei. These neurons synthesize the neurohormones vasopressin and oxytocin and release them in the blood circulation. We here review the mechanisms responsible for the osmoregulation of the activity of these neurons. Notably, the osmosensitivity of the supraoptic nucleus is described including the recent data that suggests an important participation of taurine in the transmission of the osmotic information. Taurine is an amino acid mainly known for its involvement in cell volume regulation, as it is one of the major inorganic osmolytes used by cells to compensate for changes in extracellular osmolarity. In the supraoptic nucleus, taurine is highly concentrated in astrocytes, and released in an osmodependent manner through volume-sensitive anion channels. Via its agonist action on neuronal glycine receptors, taurine is likely to contribute to the inhibition of neuronal activity induced by hypotonic stimuli. This inhibitory influence would complement the intrinsic osmosensitivity of supraoptic neurons, mediated by excitatory mechanoreceptors activated under hypertonic conditions. These observations extend the role of taurine from the regulation of cell volume to that of the whole body fluid balance. They also point to a new role of supraoptic glial cells as active components in a neuroendocrine regulatory loop.

  7. Distinct forms of synaptic inhibition and neuromodulation regulate calretinin-positive neuron excitability in the spinal cord dorsal horn.

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    Smith, K M; Boyle, K A; Mustapa, M; Jobling, P; Callister, R J; Hughes, D I; Graham, B A

    2016-06-21

    The dorsal horn (DH) of the spinal cord contains a heterogenous population of neurons that process incoming sensory signals before information ascends to the brain. We have recently characterized calretinin-expressing (CR+) neurons in the DH and shown that they can be divided into excitatory and inhibitory subpopulations. The excitatory population receives high-frequency excitatory synaptic input and expresses delayed firing action potential discharge, whereas the inhibitory population receives weak excitatory drive and exhibits tonic or initial bursting discharge. Here, we characterize inhibitory synaptic input and neuromodulation in the two CR+ populations, in order to determine how each is regulated. We show that excitatory CR+ neurons receive mixed inhibition from GABAergic and glycinergic sources, whereas inhibitory CR+ neurons receive inhibition, which is dominated by glycine. Noradrenaline and serotonin produced robust outward currents in excitatory CR+ neurons, predicting an inhibitory action on these neurons, but neither neuromodulator produced a response in CR+ inhibitory neurons. In contrast, enkephalin (along with selective mu and delta opioid receptor agonists) produced outward currents in inhibitory CR+ neurons, consistent with an inhibitory action but did not affect the excitatory CR+ population. Our findings show that the pharmacology of inhibitory inputs and neuromodulator actions on CR+ cells, along with their excitatory inputs can define these two subpopulations further, and this could be exploited to modulate discrete aspects of sensory processing selectively in the DH.

  8. Medial prefrontal cortex inversely regulates toluene-induced changes in markers of synaptic plasticity of mesolimbic dopamine neurons

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    Beckley, Jacob T.; Evins, Caitlin E.; Fedarovich, Hleb; Gilstrap, Meghin J.; Woodward, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Toluene is a volatile solvent that is intentionally inhaled by children, adolescents and adults for its intoxicating effects. While voluntary use of toluene suggests that it possesses rewarding properties and abuse potential, it is unknown whether toluene alters excitatory synaptic transmission in reward sensitive dopamine neurons like other drugs of abuse. Here, using a combination of retrograde labeling and slice electrophysiology, we show that a brief in vivo exposure of rats to a behaviorally relevant concentration of toluene vapor enhances glutamatergic synaptic strength of dopamine (DA) neurons projecting to nucleus accumbens core and medial shell neurons. This effect persisted for up to 3 days in mesoaccumbens core DA neurons and for at least 21 days in those projecting to the medial shell. In contrast, toluene vapor exposure had no effect on synaptic strength of DA neurons that project to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Furthermore, infusion of GABAergic modulators into the mPFC prior to vapor exposure to pharmacologically manipulate output, inhibited or potentiated toluene's action on mesoaccumbens DA neurons. Taken together, the results of these studies indicate that toluene induces a target-selective increase in mesolimbic DA neuron synaptic transmission and strongly implicates the mPFC as an important regulator of drug-induced plasticity of mesolimbic dopamine neurons. PMID:23303956

  9. Pulvinar neurons reveal neurobiological evidence of past selection for rapid detection of snakes

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    Van Le, Quan; Isbell, Lynne A.; Matsumoto, Jumpei; Nguyen, Minh; Hori, Etsuro; Maior, Rafael S.; Tomaz, Carlos; Tran, Anh Hai; Ono, Taketoshi; Nishijo, Hisao

    2013-01-01

    Snakes and their relationships with humans and other primates have attracted broad attention from multiple fields of study, but not, surprisingly, from neuroscience, despite the involvement of the visual system and strong behavioral and physiological evidence that humans and other primates can detect snakes faster than innocuous objects. Here, we report the existence of neurons in the primate medial and dorsolateral pulvinar that respond selectively to visual images of snakes. Compared with three other categories of stimuli (monkey faces, monkey hands, and geometrical shapes), snakes elicited the strongest, fastest responses, and the responses were not reduced by low spatial filtering. These findings integrate neuroscience with evolutionary biology, anthropology, psychology, herpetology, and primatology by identifying a neurobiological basis for primates’ heightened visual sensitivity to snakes, and adding a crucial component to the growing evolutionary perspective that snakes have long shaped our primate lineage. PMID:24167268

  10. Pulvinar neurons reveal neurobiological evidence of past selection for rapid detection of snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Le, Quan; Isbell, Lynne A; Matsumoto, Jumpei; Nguyen, Minh; Hori, Etsuro; Maior, Rafael S; Tomaz, Carlos; Tran, Anh Hai; Ono, Taketoshi; Nishijo, Hisao

    2013-11-19

    Snakes and their relationships with humans and other primates have attracted broad attention from multiple fields of study, but not, surprisingly, from neuroscience, despite the involvement of the visual system and strong behavioral and physiological evidence that humans and other primates can detect snakes faster than innocuous objects. Here, we report the existence of neurons in the primate medial and dorsolateral pulvinar that respond selectively to visual images of snakes. Compared with three other categories of stimuli (monkey faces, monkey hands, and geometrical shapes), snakes elicited the strongest, fastest responses, and the responses were not reduced by low spatial filtering. These findings integrate neuroscience with evolutionary biology, anthropology, psychology, herpetology, and primatology by identifying a neurobiological basis for primates' heightened visual sensitivity to snakes, and adding a crucial component to the growing evolutionary perspective that snakes have long shaped our primate lineage.

  11. Rhythmic Components in Extracranial Brain Signals Reveal Multifaceted Task Modulation of Overlapping Neuronal Activity.

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    Roemer van der Meij

    Full Text Available Oscillatory neuronal activity is implicated in many cognitive functions, and its phase coupling between sensors may reflect networks of communicating neuronal populations. Oscillatory activity is often studied using extracranial recordings and compared between experimental conditions. This is challenging, because there is overlap between sensor-level activity generated by different sources, and this can obscure differential experimental modulations of these sources. Additionally, in extracranial data, sensor-level phase coupling not only reflects communicating populations, but can also be generated by a current dipole, whose sensor-level phase coupling does not reflect source-level interactions. We present a novel method, which is capable of separating and characterizing sources on the basis of their phase coupling patterns as a function of space, frequency and time (trials. Importantly, this method depends on a plausible model of a neurobiological rhythm. We present this model and an accompanying analysis pipeline. Next, we demonstrate our approach, using magnetoencephalographic (MEG recordings during a cued tactile detection task as a case study. We show that the extracted components have overlapping spatial maps and frequency content, which are difficult to resolve using conventional pairwise measures. Because our decomposition also provides trial loadings, components can be readily contrasted between experimental conditions. Strikingly, we observed heterogeneity in alpha and beta sources with respect to whether their activity was suppressed or enhanced as a function of attention and performance, and this happened both in task relevant and irrelevant regions. This heterogeneity contrasts with the common view that alpha and beta amplitude over sensory areas are always negatively related to attention and performance.

  12. Computational modeling reveals dendritic origins of GABA(A-mediated excitation in CA1 pyramidal neurons.

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    Naomi Lewin

    Full Text Available GABA is the key inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult central nervous system, but in some circumstances can lead to a paradoxical excitation that has been causally implicated in diverse pathologies from endocrine stress responses to diseases of excitability including neuropathic pain and temporal lobe epilepsy. We undertook a computational modeling approach to determine plausible ionic mechanisms of GABA(A-dependent excitation in isolated post-synaptic CA1 hippocampal neurons because it may constitute a trigger for pathological synchronous epileptiform discharge. In particular, the interplay intracellular chloride accumulation via the GABA(A receptor and extracellular potassium accumulation via the K/Cl co-transporter KCC2 in promoting GABA(A-mediated excitation is complex. Experimentally it is difficult to determine the ionic mechanisms of depolarizing current since potassium transients are challenging to isolate pharmacologically and much GABA signaling occurs in small, difficult to measure, dendritic compartments. To address this problem and determine plausible ionic mechanisms of GABA(A-mediated excitation, we built a detailed biophysically realistic model of the CA1 pyramidal neuron that includes processes critical for ion homeostasis. Our results suggest that in dendritic compartments, but not in the somatic compartments, chloride buildup is sufficient to cause dramatic depolarization of the GABA(A reversal potential and dominating bicarbonate currents that provide a substantial current source to drive whole-cell depolarization. The model simulations predict that extracellular K(+ transients can augment GABA(A-mediated excitation, but not cause it. Our model also suggests the potential for GABA(A-mediated excitation to promote network synchrony depending on interneuron synapse location - excitatory positive-feedback can occur when interneurons synapse onto distal dendritic compartments, while interneurons projecting to the perisomatic

  13. Transcriptional regulation of rod photoreceptor homeostasis revealed by in vivo NRL targetome analysis.

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    Hong Hao

    Full Text Available A stringent control of homeostasis is critical for functional maintenance and survival of neurons. In the mammalian retina, the basic motif leucine zipper transcription factor NRL determines rod versus cone photoreceptor cell fate and activates the expression of many rod-specific genes. Here, we report an integrated analysis of NRL-centered gene regulatory network by coupling chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-Seq data from Illumina and ABI platforms with global expression profiling and in vivo knockdown studies. We identified approximately 300 direct NRL target genes. Of these, 22 NRL targets are associated with human retinal dystrophies, whereas 95 mapped to regions of as yet uncloned retinal disease loci. In silico analysis of NRL ChIP-Seq peak sequences revealed an enrichment of distinct sets of transcription factor binding sites. Specifically, we discovered that genes involved in photoreceptor function include binding sites for both NRL and homeodomain protein CRX. Evaluation of 26 ChIP-Seq regions validated their enhancer functions in reporter assays. In vivo knockdown of 16 NRL target genes resulted in death or abnormal morphology of rod photoreceptors, suggesting their importance in maintaining retinal function. We also identified histone demethylase Kdm5b as a novel secondary node in NRL transcriptional hierarchy. Exon array analysis of flow-sorted photoreceptors in which Kdm5b was knocked down by shRNA indicated its role in regulating rod-expressed genes. Our studies identify candidate genes for retinal dystrophies, define cis-regulatory module(s for photoreceptor-expressed genes and provide a framework for decoding transcriptional regulatory networks that dictate rod homeostasis.

  14. Transcriptional regulation of rod photoreceptor homeostasis revealed by in vivo NRL targetome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Hong; Kim, Douglas S; Klocke, Bernward; Johnson, Kory R; Cui, Kairong; Gotoh, Norimoto; Zang, Chongzhi; Gregorski, Janina; Gieser, Linn; Peng, Weiqun; Fann, Yang; Seifert, Martin; Zhao, Keji; Swaroop, Anand

    2012-01-01

    A stringent control of homeostasis is critical for functional maintenance and survival of neurons. In the mammalian retina, the basic motif leucine zipper transcription factor NRL determines rod versus cone photoreceptor cell fate and activates the expression of many rod-specific genes. Here, we report an integrated analysis of NRL-centered gene regulatory network by coupling chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-Seq) data from Illumina and ABI platforms with global expression profiling and in vivo knockdown studies. We identified approximately 300 direct NRL target genes. Of these, 22 NRL targets are associated with human retinal dystrophies, whereas 95 mapped to regions of as yet uncloned retinal disease loci. In silico analysis of NRL ChIP-Seq peak sequences revealed an enrichment of distinct sets of transcription factor binding sites. Specifically, we discovered that genes involved in photoreceptor function include binding sites for both NRL and homeodomain protein CRX. Evaluation of 26 ChIP-Seq regions validated their enhancer functions in reporter assays. In vivo knockdown of 16 NRL target genes resulted in death or abnormal morphology of rod photoreceptors, suggesting their importance in maintaining retinal function. We also identified histone demethylase Kdm5b as a novel secondary node in NRL transcriptional hierarchy. Exon array analysis of flow-sorted photoreceptors in which Kdm5b was knocked down by shRNA indicated its role in regulating rod-expressed genes. Our studies identify candidate genes for retinal dystrophies, define cis-regulatory module(s) for photoreceptor-expressed genes and provide a framework for decoding transcriptional regulatory networks that dictate rod homeostasis.

  15. Transcriptional regulation of rod photoreceptor homeostasis revealed by in vivo NRL targetome analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Hao

    Full Text Available A stringent control of homeostasis is critical for functional maintenance and survival of neurons. In the mammalian retina, the basic motif leucine zipper transcription factor NRL determines rod versus cone photoreceptor cell fate and activates the expression of many rod-specific genes. Here, we report an integrated analysis of NRL-centered gene regulatory network by coupling chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-Seq data from Illumina and ABI platforms with global expression profiling and in vivo knockdown studies. We identified approximately 300 direct NRL target genes. Of these, 22 NRL targets are associated with human retinal dystrophies, whereas 95 mapped to regions of as yet uncloned retinal disease loci. In silico analysis of NRL ChIP-Seq peak sequences revealed an enrichment of distinct sets of transcription factor binding sites. Specifically, we discovered that genes involved in photoreceptor function include binding sites for both NRL and homeodomain protein CRX. Evaluation of 26 ChIP-Seq regions validated their enhancer functions in reporter assays. In vivo knockdown of 16 NRL target genes resulted in death or abnormal morphology of rod photoreceptors, suggesting their importance in maintaining retinal function. We also identified histone demethylase Kdm5b as a novel secondary node in NRL transcriptional hierarchy. Exon array analysis of flow-sorted photoreceptors in which Kdm5b was knocked down by shRNA indicated its role in regulating rod-expressed genes. Our studies identify candidate genes for retinal dystrophies, define cis-regulatory module(s for photoreceptor-expressed genes and provide a framework for decoding transcriptional regulatory networks that dictate rod homeostasis.

  16. Regulation of Neuronal Stem Cell Proliferation in the Hippocampus by Endothelial Ceramide

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    Anne Gulbins

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Major depressive disorder is one of the most common diseases in western countries. The disease is mainly defined by its psychiatric symptoms. However, the disease has also many symptoms outside the central nervous system, in particular cardiovascular symptoms. Recent studies demonstrated that the acid sphingomyelinase/ceramide system plays an important role in the development of major depressive disorder and functions as a target of antidepressants. Methods: Here, we investigated (i whether ceramide accumulates in endothelial cells in the neurogenetic zone of the hippocampus after glucocorticosterone-mediated stress, (ii whether ceramide is released into the extracellular space of the hippocampus and (iii whether extracellular ceramide inhibits neuronal proliferation. Ceramide was determined in endothelial cell culture supernatants or extracellular hippocampus extracts by a kinase assay. Endothelial ceramide in the hippocampus was analyzed by confocal microscopy of brain sections stained with Cy3-labelled anti-ceramide antibodies and FITC-Isolectin B4. Neuronal proliferation was measured by incubation of pheochromocytoma neuronal cells with culture supernatants and extracellular hippocampus extracts. Results: Treatment of cultured endothelial cells with glucocorticosterone induces a release of ceramide into the supernatant. Likewise, treatment of mice with glucocorticosterone triggers a release of ceramide into the extracellular space of the hippocampus. The release of ceramide is inhibited by concomitant treatment with the antidepressant amitriptyline, which also inhibits the activity of the acid sphingomyelinase. Studies employing confocal microscopy revealed that ceramide is formed and accumulates exclusively in endothelial cells in the hippocampus of stressed mice, a process that was again prevented by co-application of amitriptyline. Ceramide released in the culture supernatant or into the extracellular space of the

  17. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase regulates hippocampal neuronal pH by recruiting Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE5 to the cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinadasa, Tushare; Szabó, Elöd Z; Numat, Masayuki; Orlowski, John

    2014-07-25

    Strict regulation of intra- and extracellular pH is an important determinant of nervous system function as many voltage-, ligand-, and H(+)-gated cationic channels are exquisitely sensitive to transient fluctuations in pH elicited by neural activity and pathophysiologic events such as hypoxia-ischemia and seizures. Multiple Na(+)/H(+) exchangers (NHEs) are implicated in maintenance of neural pH homeostasis. However, aside from the ubiquitous NHE1 isoform, their relative contributions are poorly understood. NHE5 is of particular interest as it is preferentially expressed in brain relative to other tissues. In hippocampal neurons, NHE5 regulates steady-state cytoplasmic pH, but intriguingly the bulk of the transporter is stored in intracellular vesicles. Here, we show that NHE5 is a direct target for phosphorylation by the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key sensor and regulator of cellular energy homeostasis in response to metabolic stresses. In NHE5-transfected non-neuronal cells, activation of AMPK by the AMP mimetic AICAR or by antimycin A, which blocks aerobic respiration and causes acidification, increased cell surface accumulation and activity of NHE5, and elevated intracellular pH. These effects were effectively blocked by the AMPK antagonist compound C, the NHE inhibitor HOE694, and mutation of a predicted AMPK recognition motif in the NHE5 C terminus. This regulatory pathway was also functional in primary hippocampal neurons, where AMPK activation of NHE5 protected the cells from sustained antimycin A-induced acidification. These data reveal a unique role for AMPK and NHE5 in regulating the pH homeostasis of hippocampal neurons during metabolic stress.

  18. Tet1 oxidase regulates neuronal gene transcription, active DNA hydroxymethylation, object location memory, and threat recognition memory

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    Dinesh Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic equilibrium between DNA methylation and demethylation of neuronal activity-regulated genes is crucial for memory processes. However, the mechanisms underlying this equilibrium remain elusive. Tet1 oxidase has been shown to play a key role in the active DNA demethylation in the central nervous system. In this study, we used Tet1 gene knockout (Tet1KO mice to examine the involvement of Tet1 in memory consolidation and storage in the adult brain. We found that Tet1 ablation leads to altered expression of numerous neuronal activity-regulated genes, compensatory upregulation of active demethylation pathway genes, and upregulation of various epigenetic modifiers. Moreover, Tet1KO mice showed an enhancement in the consolidation and storage of threat recognition (cued and contextual fear conditioning and object location memories. We conclude that Tet1 plays a critical role in regulating neuronal transcription and in maintaining the epigenetic state of the brain associated with memory consolidation and storage.

  19. Neuronal Splicing Regulator RBFOX3 (NeuN) Regulates Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Synaptogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Meng-Ying; Chou, Chih-Hsuan; Wu, I-Ju; Huang, Guo-Jen; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunction of RBFOX3 has been identified in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder, cognitive impairments and epilepsy and a causal relationship with these diseases has been previously demonstrated with Rbfox3 homozygous knockout mice. Despite the importance of RBFOX3 during neurodevelopment, the function of RBFOX3 regarding neurogenesis and synaptogenesis remains unclear. To address this critical question, we profiled the developmental expression pattern of Rbfox3 in the brain of wild-type mice and analyzed brain volume, disease-relevant behaviors, neurogenesis, synaptic plasticity, and synaptogenesis in Rbfox3 homozygous knockout mice and their corresponding wild-type counterparts. Here we report that expression of Rbfox3 differs developmentally for distinct brain regions. Moreover, Rbfox3 homozygous knockout mice exhibited cold hyperalgesia and impaired cognitive abilities. Focusing on hippocampal phenotypes, we found Rbfox3 homozygous knockout mice displayed deficits in neurogenesis, which was correlated with cognitive impairments. Furthermore, RBFOX3 regulates the exons of genes with synapse-related function. Synaptic plasticity and density, which are related to cognitive behaviors, were altered in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of Rbfox3 homozygous knockout mice; synaptic plasticity decreased and the density of synapses increased. Taken together, our results demonstrate the important role of RBFOX3 during neural development and maturation. In addition, abnormalities in synaptic structure and function occur in Rbfox3 homozygous knockout mice. Our findings may offer mechanistic explanations for human brain diseases associated with dysfunctional RBFOX3. PMID:27701470

  20. Spatial segregation within the sacral parasympathetic nucleus of neurons innervating the bladder or the penis of the rat as revealed by three-dimensional reconstruction.

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    Banrezes, B; Andrey, P; Maschino, E; Schirar, A; Peytevin, J; Rampin, O; Maurin, Y

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigations was (1) to examine the spatial organization of preganglionic neurons of the sacral parasympathetic nucleus in the lumbosacral spinal cord of male adult rats and (2) to search, in this nucleus, for a possible segregation of sub-populations of neurons innervating the penis or the bladder, respectively. To estimate their spatial organization, neurons of the sacral parasympathetic nucleus were retrogradely labeled by wheat germ agglutinin coupled to horseradish peroxidase applied to the central end of the sectioned pelvic nerve. The sub-populations of lumbosacral neurons innervating the corpus cavernosum of the penis or the dome of the bladder were identified using transsynaptic retrograde labeling by pseudorabies virus injected into these organs in different rats. In both wheat germ agglutinin-labeled and pseudorabies virus-labeled rats, serial coronal sections were cut through the spinal L5-S1 segments. Labeled neurons were revealed by histochemistry (peroxidase experiments) or immunohistochemistry (pseudorabies virus experiments). By means of a three-dimensional reconstruction software developed in our laboratory, three-dimensional models were calculated from each spinal section image series. They revealed the spatial organization of (i) preganglionic neurons and (ii) neurons innervating the bladder or the penis. The different three-dimensional models were subsequently merged into a single one which revealed the segregation, within the sacral parasympathetic nucleus, of the sub-populations of neurons. Neurons labeled by virus injected into the penis extended predominantly from the rostral part of the L6 segment to the rostral part of the S1 segment while those labeled by bladder injections were distributed predominantly from the caudal part of the L6 segment to the caudal part of the S1 segment. These results support the hypothesis of a viscerotopic organization of sacral neurons providing the spinal control of pelvic organs.

  1. Endogenous polyamines regulate cortical neuronal excitability by blocking voltage-gated Na+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleidervish, Ilya A; Libman, Lior; Katz, Efrat; Gutnick, Michael J

    2008-12-02

    Because the excitable properties of neurons in the neocortex depend on the characteristics of voltage-gated Na(+) channels, factors which regulate those characteristics can fundamentally modify the dynamics of cortical circuits. Here, we report on a novel neuromodulatory mechanism that links the availability of Na(+) channels to metabolism of polyamines (PAs) in the cerebral cortex. Using single channel and whole-cell recordings, we found that products of PA metabolism, the ubiquitous aliphatic polycations spermine and spermidine, are endogenous blockers of Na(+) channels in layer 5 pyramidal cells. Because the blockade is activity-dependent, it is particularly effective against Na(+) channels which fail to inactivate rapidly and thus underlie the persistent Na(+) current. At the level of the local cortical circuit, pharmacological depletion of PAs led to increased spontaneous spiking and periods of hypersynchronous discharge. Our data suggest that changes in PA levels, whether associated with normal brain states or pathological conditions, profoundly modify Na(+) channel availability and thereby shape the integrative behavior of single neurons and neocortical circuits.

  2. Mmp1 processing of the PDF neuropeptide regulates circadian structural plasticity of pacemaker neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depetris-Chauvin, Ana; Fernández-Gamba, Agata; Gorostiza, E Axel; Herrero, Anastasia; Castaño, Eduardo M; Ceriani, M Fernanda

    2014-10-01

    In the Drosophila brain, the neuropeptide PIGMENT DISPERSING FACTOR (PDF) is expressed in the small and large Lateral ventral neurons (LNvs) and regulates circadian locomotor behavior. Interestingly, PDF immunoreactivity at the dorsal terminals changes across the day as synaptic contacts do as a result of a remarkable remodeling of sLNv projections. Despite the relevance of this phenomenon to circuit plasticity and behavior, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this work we provide evidence that PDF along with matrix metalloproteinases (Mmp1 and 2) are key in the control of circadian structural remodeling. Adult-specific downregulation of PDF levels per se hampers circadian axonal remodeling, as it does altering Mmp1 or Mmp2 levels within PDF neurons post-developmentally. However, only Mmp1 affects PDF immunoreactivity at the dorsal terminals and exerts a clear effect on overt behavior. In vitro analysis demonstrated that PDF is hydrolyzed by Mmp1, thereby suggesting that Mmp1 could directly terminate its biological activity. These data demonstrate that Mmp1 modulates PDF processing, which leads to daily structural remodeling and circadian behavior.

  3. Selective regulation of axonal growth from developing hippocampal neurons by tumor necrosis factor superfamily member APRIL☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osório, Catarina; Chacón, Pedro J.; White, Matthew; Kisiswa, Lilian; Wyatt, Sean; Rodríguez-Tébar, Alfredo; Davies, Alun M.

    2014-01-01

    APRIL (A Proliferation-Inducing Ligand, TNFSF13) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily that regulates lymphocyte survival and activation and has been implicated in tumorigenesis and autoimmune diseases. Here we report the expression and first known activity of APRIL in the nervous system. APRIL and one of its receptors, BCMA (B-Cell Maturation Antigen, TNFRSF17), are expressed by hippocampal pyramidal cells of fetal and postnatal mice. In culture, these neurons secreted APRIL, and function-blocking antibodies to either APRIL or BCMA reduced axonal elongation. Recombinant APRIL enhanced axonal elongation, but did not influence dendrite elongation. The effect of APRIL on axon elongation was inhibited by anti-BCMA and the expression of a signaling-defective BCMA mutant in these neurons, suggesting that the axon growth-promoting effect of APRIL is mediated by BCMA. APRIL promoted phosphorylation and activation of ERK1, ERK2 and Akt and serine phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3β in cultured hippocampal pyramidal cells. Inhibition of MEK1/MEK2 (activators of ERK1/ERK2), PI3-kinase (activator of Akt) or Akt inhibited the axon growth-promoting action of APRIL, as did pharmacological activation of GSK-3β and the expression of a constitutively active form of GSK-3β. These findings suggest that APRIL promotes axon elongation by a mechanism that depends both on ERK signaling and PI3-kinase/Akt/GSK-3β signaling. PMID:24444792

  4. Mmp1 processing of the PDF neuropeptide regulates circadian structural plasticity of pacemaker neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Depetris-Chauvin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the Drosophila brain, the neuropeptide PIGMENT DISPERSING FACTOR (PDF is expressed in the small and large Lateral ventral neurons (LNvs and regulates circadian locomotor behavior. Interestingly, PDF immunoreactivity at the dorsal terminals changes across the day as synaptic contacts do as a result of a remarkable remodeling of sLNv projections. Despite the relevance of this phenomenon to circuit plasticity and behavior, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this work we provide evidence that PDF along with matrix metalloproteinases (Mmp1 and 2 are key in the control of circadian structural remodeling. Adult-specific downregulation of PDF levels per se hampers circadian axonal remodeling, as it does altering Mmp1 or Mmp2 levels within PDF neurons post-developmentally. However, only Mmp1 affects PDF immunoreactivity at the dorsal terminals and exerts a clear effect on overt behavior. In vitro analysis demonstrated that PDF is hydrolyzed by Mmp1, thereby suggesting that Mmp1 could directly terminate its biological activity. These data demonstrate that Mmp1 modulates PDF processing, which leads to daily structural remodeling and circadian behavior.

  5. L-arginine regulates neuronal nitric oxide synthase production of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Pei; Weaver, John; Cao, Guan Liang; Pou, Sovitj; Roman, Linda J; Starkov, Anatoly A; Rosen, Gerald M

    2005-03-15

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (H(4)B) in the absence of L-arginine has been shown to be an important factor in promoting the direct formation of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) at the expense of superoxide (O(2)(*-)) by neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS1) [Rosen GM, Tsai P, Weaver J, Porasuphatana S, Roman LJ, Starkov AA, et al. Role of tetrahydrobiopterin in the regulation of neuronal nitric-oxide synthase-generated superoxide. J Biol Chem 2002;277:40275-80]. Based on these findings, it is hypothesized that L-arginine also shifts the equilibrium between O(2)(*-) and H(2)O(2). Experiments were designed to test this theory. As the concentration of L-arginine and N(omega)-hydroxyl-L-arginine increases, the rate of NADPH consumption for H(4)B-bound NOS1 decreased resulting in lower rates of both O(2)(*-) and H(2)O(2) generation, while increasing the rate of nitric oxide (*NO) production. At saturating concentrations of L-arginine or N(omega)-hydroxyl-L-arginine (50microM), NOS1 still produced O(2)(*-) and H(2)O(2). Both L-arginine and N(omega)-hydroxyl-L-arginine have greater impact on the rate of generation of O(2)(*-) than on H(2)O(2).

  6. Mutant huntingtin regulates EGF receptor fate in non-neuronal cells lacking wild-type protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melone, Mariarosa A B; Calarco, Anna; Petillo, Orsolina; Margarucci, Sabrina; Colucci-D'Amato, Luca; Galderisi, Umberto; Koverech, Guido; Peluso, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Huntingtin (htt) is a scaffold protein localized at the subcellular level and is involved in coordinating the activity of several protein for signaling and intracellular transport. The emerging properties of htt in intracellular trafficking prompted us to study the role of mutant htt (polyQ-htt) in the intracellular fate of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), whose activity seems to be strictly regulated by htt. In particular, to evaluate whether protein trafficking dysfunction occurs in non-neuronal cells in the absence of functional htt, we monitored the EGFR protein in fibroblasts from homozygotic HD patients and their healthy counterpart. We found that polyQ-htt controls EGFR degradation and recycling. Lack of wild-type htt caused alteration of the ubiquitination cycle, formation of EGFR-incorporating high-molecular weight protein aggregates and abnormal EGFR distribution in endosomes of the degradation and recycling pathways after EGF stimulation. PolyQ-htt-induced alteration of EGFR trafficking affected cell migration and proliferation, at least in part, through inhibition of ERK signaling. To our knowledge the data here reported represent the first signaling and phenotypic characterization of polyQ-htt involvement in the modulation of growth factor stimulation in non-neuronal cells.

  7. Subcellular localization of regulator of G protein signaling RGS7 complex in neurons and transfected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liapis, Evangelos; Sandiford, Simone; Wang, Qiang; Gaidosh, Gabriel; Motti, Dario; Levay, Konstantin; Slepak, Vladlen Z

    2012-08-01

    The R7 family of regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) is involved in many functions of the nervous system. This family includes RGS6, RGS7, RGS9, and RGS11 gene products and is defined by the presence of the characteristic first found in Disheveled, Egl-10, Pleckstrin (DEP), DEP helical extension (DHEX), Gγ-like, and RGS domains. Herein, we examined the subcellular localization of RGS7, the most broadly expressed R7 member. Our immunofluorescence studies of retinal and dorsal root ganglion neurons showed that RGS7 concentrated at the plasma membrane of cell bodies, in structures resembling lamellipodia or filopodia along the processes, and at the dendritic tips. At the plasma membrane of dorsal root ganglia neurons, RGS7 co-localized with its known binding partners R7 RGS binding protein (R7BP), Gαo, and Gαq. More than 50% of total RGS7-specific immunofluorescence was present in the cytoplasm, primarily within numerous small puncta that did not co-localize with R7BP. No specific RGS7 or R7BP immunoreactivity was detected in the nuclei. In transfected cell lines, ectopic RGS7 had both diffuse cytosolic and punctate localization patterns. RGS7 also localized in centrosomes. Structure-function analysis showed that the punctate localization was mediated by the DEP/DHEX domains, and centrosomal localization was dependent on the DHEX domain.

  8. RNA-seq analysis of Drosophila clock and non-clock neurons reveals neuron-specific cycling and novel candidate neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abruzzi, Katharine C; Zadina, Abigail; Luo, Weifei; Wiyanto, Evelyn; Rahman, Reazur; Guo, Fang; Shafer, Orie; Rosbash, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Locomotor activity rhythms are controlled by a network of ~150 circadian neurons within the adult Drosophila brain. They are subdivided based on their anatomical locations and properties. We profiled transcripts "around the clock" from three key groups of circadian neurons with different functions. We also profiled a non-circadian outgroup, dopaminergic (TH) neurons. They have cycling transcripts but fewer than clock neurons as well as low expression and poor cycling of clock gene transcripts. This suggests that TH neurons do not have a canonical circadian clock and that their gene expression cycling is driven by brain systemic cues. The three circadian groups are surprisingly diverse in their cycling transcripts and overall gene expression patterns, which include known and putative novel neuropeptides. Even the overall phase distributions of cycling transcripts are distinct, indicating that different regulatory principles govern transcript oscillations. This surprising cell-type diversity parallels the functional heterogeneity of the different neurons.

  9. RNA-seq analysis of Drosophila clock and non-clock neurons reveals neuron-specific cycling and novel candidate neuropeptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine C Abruzzi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Locomotor activity rhythms are controlled by a network of ~150 circadian neurons within the adult Drosophila brain. They are subdivided based on their anatomical locations and properties. We profiled transcripts "around the clock" from three key groups of circadian neurons with different functions. We also profiled a non-circadian outgroup, dopaminergic (TH neurons. They have cycling transcripts but fewer than clock neurons as well as low expression and poor cycling of clock gene transcripts. This suggests that TH neurons do not have a canonical circadian clock and that their gene expression cycling is driven by brain systemic cues. The three circadian groups are surprisingly diverse in their cycling transcripts and overall gene expression patterns, which include known and putative novel neuropeptides. Even the overall phase distributions of cycling transcripts are distinct, indicating that different regulatory principles govern transcript oscillations. This surprising cell-type diversity parallels the functional heterogeneity of the different neurons.

  10. Retinoblastoma (Rb) regulates laminar dendritic arbor reorganization in retinal horizontal neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Rodrigo [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital; Davis, Denise [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital; Dyer, Michael [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital; Kerekes, Ryan A [ORNL; Zhang, Jiakun [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital; Bayazitov, Ildar [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital; Hiler, Daniel [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital; Karakaya, Mahmut [ORNL; Frase, Sharon [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital; Gleason, Shaun Scott [ORNL; Zakharenko, Stanislav S [ORNL; Johnson, Dianna [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal differentiation with respect to the acquisition of synaptic competence needs to be regulated precisely during neurogenesis to ensure proper formation of circuits at the right place and time in development.This regulation is particularly important for synaptic triads among photoreceptors, horizontal cells (HCs), and bipolar cells in the retina, because HCs are among the rst cell types produced during development, and bipolar cells are among thel ast.HCs undergo a dramatic transition from vertically oriented neurites that form columnar arbors to overlapping laminar dendritic arbors with differentiation.However, how this process is regulated and coordinated with differentiation of photoreceptors and bipolar cells remains unknown. Previous studies have suggested that there tino-blastoma(Rb) tumor suppressor gene may play a role in horizontal cell differentiation and synaptogenesis. By combining genetic mosaic analysis of individual synaptictriads with neuroanatomic analyses and multiphoton live imaging of developing HCs, we found that Rb plays a cell-autonomous role in there organization of horizontal cell neurites as they differentiate. Aberrant vertical processes in Rb-de cient HCs form ectopic synapses with rods in the outer nuclear layer but lack bipolar dendrites. Although previous reports indicate that photoreceptor abnormalities can trigger formation of ectopic synapses, our studies now demonstrate that defects in a post synaptic partner contribute to the formation of ectopic photoreceptor synapses in the mammalian retina.

  11. E2 regulates epigenetic signature on Neuroglobin enhancer-promoter in neuronal cells

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    Michela eGuglielmotto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Estrogens are neuroprotective factors in several neurological diseases. Neuroglobin (NGB is one of the estrogen target gene involved in neuroprotection, but little is known about its transcriptional regulation. Estrogen genomic pathway in gene expression regulation is mediated by estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ that bind to specific regulatory genomic regions. We focused our attention on E2-induced NGB expression in human differentiated neuronal cell lines (SK-N-BE and NT-2. Previously, using bioinformatics analysis we identified a putative enhancer in the first intron of NGB locus. Therefore, we observed that E2 increased the enrichment of the H3K4me3 epigenetic marks at the promoter and of the H3K4me1 and H3K27Ac at the intron enhancer. In these NGB regulatory regions, we found estrogen receptor alpha (ER binding suggesting that ER may mediate chromatin remodeling to induce NGB expression upon E2 treatment. Altogether our data show that NGB expression is regulated by ERa binding on genomic regulatory regions supporting hormone therapy applications for the neuroprotection against neurodegenerative disease.

  12. Delivery of circulating lipoproteins to specific neurons in the Drosophila brain regulates systemic insulin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brankatschk, Marko; Dunst, Sebastian; Nemetschke, Linda; Eaton, Suzanne

    2014-10-02

    The Insulin signaling pathway couples growth, development and lifespan to nutritional conditions. Here, we demonstrate a function for the Drosophila lipoprotein LTP in conveying information about dietary lipid composition to the brain to regulate Insulin signaling. When yeast lipids are present in the diet, free calcium levels rise in Blood Brain Barrier glial cells. This induces transport of LTP across the Blood Brain Barrier by two LDL receptor-related proteins: LRP1 and Megalin. LTP accumulates on specific neurons that connect to cells that produce Insulin-like peptides, and induces their release into the circulation. This increases systemic Insulin signaling and the rate of larval development on yeast-containing food compared with a plant-based food of similar nutritional content.

  13. Wnt signaling regulates multipolar-to-bipolar transition of migrating neurons in the cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boitard, Michael; Bocchi, Riccardo; Egervari, Kristof; Petrenko, Volodymyr; Viale, Beatrice; Gremaud, Stéphane; Zgraggen, Eloisa; Salmon, Patrick; Kiss, Jozsef Z

    2015-03-03

    The precise timing of pyramidal cell migration from the ventricular germinal zone to the cortical plate is essential for establishing cortical layers, and migration errors can lead to neurodevelopmental disorders underlying psychiatric and neurological diseases. Here, we report that Wnt canonical as well as non-canonical signaling is active in pyramidal precursors during radial migration. We demonstrate using constitutive and conditional genetic strategies that transient downregulation of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling during the multipolar stage plays a critical role in polarizing and orienting cells for radial migration. In addition, we show that reduced canonical Wnt signaling is triggered cell autonomously by time-dependent expression of Wnt5A and activation of non-canonical signaling. We identify ephrin-B1 as a canonical Wnt-signaling-regulated target in control of the multipolar-to-bipolar switch. These findings highlight the critical role of Wnt signaling activity in neuronal positioning during cortical development.

  14. Assembly and interrogation of Alzheimer's disease genetic networks reveal novel regulators of progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soline Aubry

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a complex multifactorial disorder with poorly characterized pathogenesis. Our understanding of this disease would thus benefit from an approach that addresses this complexity by elucidating the regulatory networks that are dysregulated in the neural compartment of AD patients, across distinct brain regions. Here, we use a Systems Biology (SB approach, which has been highly successful in the dissection of cancer related phenotypes, to reverse engineer the transcriptional regulation layer of human neuronal cells and interrogate it to infer candidate Master Regulators (MRs responsible for disease progression. Analysis of gene expression profiles from laser-captured neurons from AD and controls subjects, using the Algorithm for the Reconstruction of Accurate Cellular Networks (ARACNe, yielded an interactome consisting of 488,353 transcription-factor/target interactions. Interrogation of this interactome, using the Master Regulator INference algorithm (MARINa, identified an unbiased set of candidate MRs causally responsible for regulating the transcriptional signature of AD progression. Experimental assays in autopsy-derived human brain tissue showed that three of the top candidate MRs (YY1, p300 and ZMYM3 are indeed biochemically and histopathologically dysregulated in AD brains compared to controls. Our results additionally implicate p53 and loss of acetylation homeostasis in the neurodegenerative process. This study suggests that an integrative, SB approach can be applied to AD and other neurodegenerative diseases, and provide significant novel insight on the disease progression.

  15. Interactions of histaminergic and serotonergic neurons in the hypothalamic regulation of prolactin and ACTH secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, H; Knigge, U; Kjaer, A; Warberg, J

    1996-11-01

    Serotonergic and histaminergic neuronal systems are both involved in mediation of the stress-induced release of the pituitary hormones prolactin (PRL) and ACTH. We investigated the possibility of an interaction between serotonin (5-HT) and histamine (HA) in regulation of PRL and ACTH secretion in conscious male rats. Animals were pretreated systemically with antagonists to 5-HT1, 5-HT2 or 5-HT3 receptors prior to intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of HA. The 5-HT1 + 2 receptor antagonist methysergide prevented and the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist LY 53857 attenuated the HA-induced PRL release while the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist ondansetron had no effect on this response. None of the three 5-HT receptor antagonists affected the ACTH response to HA. Specific blockade of HA synthesis by alpha-fluoromethylhistidine or blockade of postsynaptic HA receptors by icv infusion of the H1 receptor antagonist mepyramine or the H2 receptor antagonist cimetidine inhibited the PRL response to 5-HT or to the 5-HT precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan (5- HTP) given in combination with the 5-HT reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine (Flx). Blockade of the histaminergic system had no effect on the ACTH response to serotonergic stimulation. The H3 receptors are inhibitory HA receptors. Systemic pretreatment with the H3 receptor agonist R(alpha)methylhistamine, or the H3 receptor antagonist thioperamide had no effect on the hormone response to activation of the serotonergic system by 5-HTP plus Flx. We conclude that the serotonergic and histaminergic neuronal systems interact in their stimulation of PRL secretion, but not in their stimulation of ACTH secretion. This interaction involves serotonergic 5-HT1 and 5-HT2 receptors and histaminergic H1 and H2 receptors. Furthermore, the previously observed inhibitory effect of the H3 receptor agonist R(alpha)methylhistamine on stress-induced PRL and ACTH release seems not to be exerted by activation of presynaptic H3 receptors located on serotonergic

  16. Bidirectional regulation of eEF2 phosphorylation controls synaptic plasticity by decoding neuronal activity patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCamphill, Patrick K; Farah, Carole A; Anadolu, Mina N; Hoque, Sanjida; Sossin, Wayne S

    2015-03-11

    At the sensory-motor neuron synapse of Aplysia, either spaced or continuous (massed) exposure to serotonin (5-HT) induces a form of intermediate-term facilitation (ITF) that requires new protein synthesis but not gene transcription. However, spaced and massed ITF use distinct molecular mechanisms to maintain increased synaptic strength. Synapses activated by spaced applications of 5-HT generate an ITF that depends on persistent protein kinase A (PKA) activity, whereas an ITF produced by massed 5-HT depends on persistent protein kinase C (PKC) activity. In this study, we demonstrate that eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2), which catalyzes the GTP-dependent translocation of the ribosome during protein synthesis, acts as a biochemical sensor that is tuned to the pattern of neuronal stimulation. Specifically, we find that massed training leads to a PKC-dependent increase in phosphorylation of eEF2, whereas spaced training results in a PKA-dependent decrease in phosphorylation of eEF2. Importantly, by using either pharmacological or dominant-negative strategies to inhibit eEF2 kinase (eEF2K), we were able to block massed 5-HT-dependent increases in eEF2 phosphorylation and subsequent PKC-dependent ITF. In contrast, pharmacological inhibition of eEF2K during the longer period of time required for spaced training was sufficient to reduce eEF2 phosphorylation and induce ITF. Finally, we find that the massed 5-HT-dependent increase in synaptic strength requires translation elongation, but not translation initiation, whereas the spaced 5-HT-dependent increase in synaptic strength is partially dependent on translation initiation. Thus, bidirectional regulation of eEF2 is critical for decoding distinct activity patterns at synapses by activating distinct modes of translation regulation. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/354403-15$15.00/0.

  17. AMP kinase regulates ligand-gated K-ATP channels in substantia nigra dopamine neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ke-Zhong; Wu, Yan-Na; Munhall, Adam C; Johnson, Steven W

    2016-08-25

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master enzyme that regulates ATP-sensitive K(+) (K-ATP) channels in pancreatic beta-cells and cardiac myocytes. We used patch pipettes to record currents and potentials to investigate effects of AMPK on K-ATP currents in substantia nigra compacta (SNC) dopamine neurons in slices of rat midbrain. When slices were superfused repeatedly with the K-ATP channel opener diazoxide, we were surprised to find that diazoxide currents gradually increased in magnitude, reaching 300% of the control value 60min after starting whole-cell recording. However, diazoxide current increased significantly more, to 472% of control, when recorded in the presence of the AMPK activator A769662. Moreover, superfusing the slice with the AMPK blocking agent dorsomorphin significantly reduced diazoxide current to 38% of control. Control experiments showed that outward currents evoked by the K-ATP channel opener NN-414 also increased over time, but not currents evoked by the GABAB agonist baclofen. Delaying the application of diazoxide after starting whole-cell recording correlated with augmentation of current. Loose-patch recording showed that diazoxide produced a 34% slowing of spontaneous firing rate that did not intensify with repeated applications of diazoxide. However, superfusion with A769662 significantly augmented the inhibitory effect of diazoxide on firing rate. We conclude that K-ATP channel function is augmented by AMPK, which is activated during the process of making whole-cell recordings. Our results suggest that AMPK and K-ATP interactions may play an important role in regulating dopamine neuronal excitability.

  18. The release of glutamate from cortical neurons regulated by BDNF via the TrkB/Src/PLC-γ1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zitao; Fan, Jin; Ren, Yongxin; Zhou, Wei; Yin, Guoyong

    2013-01-01

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) participates in the regulation of cortical neurons by influencing the release of glutamate. However, the specific mechanisms are unclear. Hence, we isolated and cultured the cortical neurons of Sprague Dawley rats. Specific inhibitors of TrkB, Src, PLC-γ1, Akt, and MEK1/2 (i.e., K252a, PP2, U73122, LY294002, and PD98059, respectively) were used to treat cortical neurons and to detect the glutamate release from cortical neurons stimulated with BDNF. BDNF significantly increased glutamate release, and simultaneously enhanced phosphorylation levels of TrkB, Src, PLC-γ, Akt, and Erk1/2. For BDNF-stimulated cortical neurons, K252a inhibited glutamate release and inhibited the phosphorylation levels of TrkB, Src, PLC-γ, Erk1/2, and Akt (P PLC-γ1 (P 0.05). U73122 inhibited the glutamate release from BDNF-stimulated cortical neurons, but had no influence on the phosphorylation levels of TrkB, Src, Erk1/2, or Akt (P > 0.05). LY294002 and PD98059 did not affect the BDNF-stimulated glutamate release and did not inhibit the phosphorylation levels of TrkB, Src, or PLC-γ1. In summary, BDNF stimulated the glutamate release from cortical neurons via the TrkB/Src/PLC-γ1 signaling pathway.

  19. Orientational Recognition and Low-Resistance Passing (LRP) Regulation of Segmental Re-innervation by Central Neurons in Leeches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张帆; 张人骥

    1994-01-01

    Re-innervation of sensory and motor neurons on a defined area of the body wall was studied in two species of leeches, Whitmania pigra and Hirudo medicinalis, as a model of segmental animals. Following isolation and rotation of a tube of body wall, the mechanical sensory and annular erection (AE) motor neurons re-innervated the body wall, at a rate of approximately 3. 8 -8. 4 μm/h. The patterns of re-innerva-tion by pairs of neurons on each side of a ganglion were bilaterally symmetric. The repairs are synchronous for the sensory and motor neurons which are of different functions but in a same ganglion. The gap junctions are widely spread in leech between neurons and glia cells, as well as among the neurons and glia cells themselves. Therefore, it is proposed that the nervous system repair is regulated by a low-resistance pathway. In the xenotransplantation experiments, neurons recognized target tissues before the immuno-recognition and rejection.

  20. The volume-regulated anion channel (LRRC8) in nodose neurons is sensitive to acidic pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Runping; Lu, Yongjun; Gunasekar, Susheel; Zhang, Yanhui; Benson, Christopher J.; Chapleau, Mark W.; Sah, Rajan; Abboud, François M.

    2017-01-01

    The leucine rich repeat containing protein 8A (LRRC8A), or SWELL1, is an essential component of the volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) that is activated by cell swelling and ionic strength. We report here for the first time to our knowledge its expression in a primary cell culture of nodose ganglia neurons and its localization in the soma, neurites, and neuronal membrane. We show that this neuronal VRAC/SWELL1 senses low external pH (pHo) in addition to hypoosmolarity. A robust sustained chloride current is seen in 77% of isolated nodose neurons following brief exposures to extracellular acid pH. Its activation involves proton efflux, intracellular alkalinity, and an increase in NOX-derived H2O2. The molecular identity of both the hypoosmolarity-induced and acid pHo–conditioned VRAC as LRRC8A (SWELL1) was confirmed by Cre-flox–mediated KO, shRNA-mediated knockdown, and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated LRRC8A deletion in HEK cells and in primary nodose neuronal cultures. Activation of VRAC by low pHo reduces neuronal injury during simulated ischemia and N-methyl-D-aspartate–induced (NMDA-induced) apoptosis. These results identify the VRAC (LRRC8A) as a dual sensor of hypoosmolarity and low pHo in vagal afferent neurons and define the mechanisms of its activation and its neuroprotective potential. PMID:28289711

  1. The volume-regulated anion channel (LRRC8) in nodose neurons is sensitive to acidic pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Runping; Lu, Yongjun; Gunasekar, Susheel; Zhang, Yanhui; Benson, Christopher J; Chapleau, Mark W; Sah, Rajan; Abboud, François M

    2017-03-09

    The leucine rich repeat containing protein 8A (LRRC8A), or SWELL1, is an essential component of the volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) that is activated by cell swelling and ionic strength. We report here for the first time to our knowledge its expression in a primary cell culture of nodose ganglia neurons and its localization in the soma, neurites, and neuronal membrane. We show that this neuronal VRAC/SWELL1 senses low external pH (pHo) in addition to hypoosmolarity. A robust sustained chloride current is seen in 77% of isolated nodose neurons following brief exposures to extracellular acid pH. Its activation involves proton efflux, intracellular alkalinity, and an increase in NOX-derived H2O2. The molecular identity of both the hypoosmolarity-induced and acid pHo-conditioned VRAC as LRRC8A (SWELL1) was confirmed by Cre-flox-mediated KO, shRNA-mediated knockdown, and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated LRRC8A deletion in HEK cells and in primary nodose neuronal cultures. Activation of VRAC by low pHo reduces neuronal injury during simulated ischemia and N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced (NMDA-induced) apoptosis. These results identify the VRAC (LRRC8A) as a dual sensor of hypoosmolarity and low pHo in vagal afferent neurons and define the mechanisms of its activation and its neuroprotective potential.

  2. Intrinsic up-regulation of 2-AG favors an area specific neuronal survival in different in vitro models of neuronal damage.

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    Sonja Kallendrusch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG acts as a retrograde messenger and modulates synaptic signaling e. g. in the hippocampus. 2-AG also exerts neuroprotective effects under pathological situations. To better understand the mechanism beyond physiological signaling we used Organotypic Entorhino-Hippocampal Slice Cultures (OHSC and investigated the temporal regulation of 2-AG in different cell subsets during excitotoxic lesion and dendritic lesion of long range projections in the enthorhinal cortex (EC, dentate gyrus (DG and the cornu ammonis region 1 (CA1. RESULTS: 2-AG levels were elevated 24 h after excitotoxic lesion in CA1 and DG (but not EC and 24 h after perforant pathway transection (PPT in the DG only. After PPT diacylglycerol lipase alpha (DAGL protein, the synthesizing enzyme of 2-AG was decreased when Dagl mRNA expression and 2-AG levels were enhanced. In contrast to DAGL, the 2-AG hydrolyzing enzyme monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL showed no alterations in total protein and mRNA expression after PPT in OHSC. MAGL immunoreaction underwent a redistribution after PPT and excitotoxic lesion since MAGL IR disappeared in astrocytes of lesioned OHSC. DAGL and MAGL immunoreactions were not detectable in microglia at all investigated time points. Thus, induction of the neuroprotective endocannabinoid 2-AG might be generally accomplished by down-regulation of MAGL in astrocytes after neuronal lesions. CONCLUSION: Increase in 2-AG levels during secondary neuronal damage reflects a general neuroprotective mechanism since it occurred independently in both different lesion models. This intrinsic up-regulation of 2-AG is synergistically controlled by DAGL and MAGL in neurons and astrocytes and thus represents a protective system for neurons that is involved in dendritic reorganisation.

  3. Neuroserpin, a brain-associated inhibitor of tissue plasminogen activator is localized primarily in neurons. Implications for the regulation of motor learning and neuronal survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, G A; Coleman, T A; Haudenschild, C C; Stefansson, S; Smith, E P; Barthlow, R; Cherry, S; Sandkvist, M; Lawrence, D A

    1997-12-26

    A cDNA clone for the serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin), neuroserpin, was isolated from a human whole brain cDNA library, and recombinant protein was expressed in insect cells. The purified protein is an efficient inhibitor of tissue type plasminogen activator (tPA), having an apparent second-order rate constant of 6. 2 x 10(5) M-1 s-1 for the two-chain form. However, unlike other known plasminogen activator inhibitors, neuroserpin is a more effective inactivator of tPA than of urokinase-type plasminogen activator. Neuroserpin also effectively inhibited trypsin and nerve growth factor-gamma but reacted only slowly with plasmin and thrombin. Northern blot analysis showed a 1.8 kilobase messenger RNA expressed predominantly in adult human brain and spinal cord, and immunohistochemical studies of normal mouse tissue detected strong staining primarily in neuronal cells with occasionally positive microglial cells. Staining was most prominent in the ependymal cells of the choroid plexus, Purkinje cells of the cerebellum, select neurons of the hypothalamus and hippocampus, and in the myelinated axons of the commissura. Expression of tPA within these regions is reported to be high and has previously been correlated with both motor learning and neuronal survival. Taken together, these data suggest that neuroserpin is likely to be a critical regulator of tPA activity in the central nervous system, and as such may play an important role in neuronal plasticity and/or maintenance.

  4. Learning-Induced Gene Expression in the Hippocampus Reveals a Role of Neuron -Astrocyte Metabolic Coupling in Long Term Memory.

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    Monika Tadi

    Full Text Available We examined the expression of genes related to brain energy metabolism and particularly those encoding glia (astrocyte-specific functions in the dorsal hippocampus subsequent to learning. Context-dependent avoidance behavior was tested in mice using the step-through Inhibitory Avoidance (IA paradigm. Animals were sacrificed 3, 9, 24, or 72 hours after training or 3 hours after retention testing. The quantitative determination of mRNA levels revealed learning-induced changes in the expression of genes thought to be involved in astrocyte-neuron metabolic coupling in a time dependent manner. Twenty four hours following IA training, an enhanced gene expression was seen, particularly for genes encoding monocarboxylate transporters 1 and 4 (MCT1, MCT4, alpha2 subunit of the Na/K-ATPase and glucose transporter type 1. To assess the functional role for one of these genes in learning, we studied MCT1 deficient mice and found that they exhibit impaired memory in the inhibitory avoidance task. Together, these observations indicate that neuron-glia metabolic coupling undergoes metabolic adaptations following learning as indicated by the change in expression of key metabolic genes.

  5. Learning-Induced Gene Expression in the Hippocampus Reveals a Role of Neuron -Astrocyte Metabolic Coupling in Long Term Memory

    KAUST Repository

    Tadi, Monika

    2015-10-29

    We examined the expression of genes related to brain energy metabolism and particularly those encoding glia (astrocyte)-specific functions in the dorsal hippocampus subsequent to learning. Context-dependent avoidance behavior was tested in mice using the step-through Inhibitory Avoidance (IA) paradigm. Animals were sacrificed 3, 9, 24, or 72 hours after training or 3 hours after retention testing. The quantitative determination of mRNA levels revealed learning-induced changes in the expression of genes thought to be involved in astrocyte-neuron metabolic coupling in a time dependent manner. Twenty four hours following IA training, an enhanced gene expression was seen, particularly for genes encoding monocarboxylate transporters 1 and 4 (MCT1, MCT4), alpha2 subunit of the Na/K-ATPase and glucose transporter type 1. To assess the functional role for one of these genes in learning, we studied MCT1 deficient mice and found that they exhibit impaired memory in the inhibitory avoidance task. Together, these observations indicate that neuron-glia metabolic coupling undergoes metabolic adaptations following learning as indicated by the change in expression of key metabolic genes.

  6. Genomic Analysis Reveals Disruption of Striatal Neuronal Development and Therapeutic Targets in Human Huntington’s Disease Neural Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen L. Ring

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We utilized induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs derived from Huntington’s disease (HD patients as a human model of HD and determined that the disease phenotypes only manifest in the differentiated neural stem cell (NSC stage, not in iPSCs. To understand the molecular basis for the CAG repeat expansion-dependent disease phenotypes in NSCs, we performed transcriptomic analysis of HD iPSCs and HD NSCs compared to isogenic controls. Differential gene expression and pathway analysis pointed to transforming growth factor β (TGF-β and netrin-1 as the top dysregulated pathways. Using data-driven gene coexpression network analysis, we identified seven distinct coexpression modules and focused on two that were correlated with changes in gene expression due to the CAG expansion. Our HD NSC model revealed the dysregulation of genes involved in neuronal development and the formation of the dorsal striatum. The striatal and neuronal networks disrupted could be modulated to correct HD phenotypes and provide therapeutic targets.

  7. Long-Term Spatiotemporal Reconfiguration of Neuronal Activity Revealed by Voltage-Sensitive Dye Imaging in the Cerebellar Granular Layer

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    Daniela Gandolfi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the spatiotemporal organization of long-term synaptic plasticity in neuronal networks demands techniques capable of monitoring changes in synaptic responsiveness over extended multineuronal structures. Among these techniques, voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSD imaging is of particular interest due to its good spatial resolution. However, improvements of the technique are needed in order to overcome limits imposed by its low signal-to-noise ratio. Here, we show that VSD imaging can detect long-term potentiation (LTP and long-term depression (LTD in acute cerebellar slices. Combined VSD imaging and patch-clamp recordings revealed that the most excited regions were predominantly associated with granule cells (GrCs generating EPSP-spike complexes, while poorly responding regions were associated with GrCs generating EPSPs only. The correspondence with cellular changes occurring during LTP and LTD was highlighted by a vector representation obtained by combining amplitude with time-to-peak of VSD signals. This showed that LTP occurred in the most excited regions lying in the core of activated areas and increased the number of EPSP-spike complexes, while LTD occurred in the less excited regions lying in the surround. VSD imaging appears to be an efficient tool for investigating how synaptic plasticity contributes to the reorganization of multineuronal activity in neuronal circuits.

  8. Genomic Analysis Reveals Disruption of Striatal Neuronal Development and Therapeutic Targets in Human Huntington's Disease Neural Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Karen L; An, Mahru C; Zhang, Ningzhe; O'Brien, Robert N; Ramos, Eliana Marisa; Gao, Fuying; Atwood, Robert; Bailus, Barbara J; Melov, Simon; Mooney, Sean D; Coppola, Giovanni; Ellerby, Lisa M

    2015-12-08

    We utilized induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from Huntington's disease (HD) patients as a human model of HD and determined that the disease phenotypes only manifest in the differentiated neural stem cell (NSC) stage, not in iPSCs. To understand the molecular basis for the CAG repeat expansion-dependent disease phenotypes in NSCs, we performed transcriptomic analysis of HD iPSCs and HD NSCs compared to isogenic controls. Differential gene expression and pathway analysis pointed to transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and netrin-1 as the top dysregulated pathways. Using data-driven gene coexpression network analysis, we identified seven distinct coexpression modules and focused on two that were correlated with changes in gene expression due to the CAG expansion. Our HD NSC model revealed the dysregulation of genes involved in neuronal development and the formation of the dorsal striatum. The striatal and neuronal networks disrupted could be modulated to correct HD phenotypes and provide therapeutic targets.

  9. siRNA screen of ES cell-derived motor neurons identifies novel regulators of tetanus toxin and neurotrophin receptor trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eTerenzio

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Neurons rely on the long-range transport of several signalling molecules such as neurotrophins and their receptors, which are required for neuronal development, function and survival. However, the nature of the machinery controlling the trafficking of signalling endosomes containing activated neurotrophin receptors has not yet been completely elucidated. We aimed to identify new players involved in the dynamics of neurotrophin signalling endosomes using a high-throughput unbiased siRNA screening approach to quantify the intracellular accumulation of two fluorescently tagged reporters: the binding fragment of tetanus neurotoxin (HCT, and an antibody directed against the neurotrophin receptor p75NTR. This screen performed in motor neurons differentiated from mouse embryonic stem (ES cells identified a number of candidate genes encoding molecular motors and motor adaptor proteins involved in regulating the intracellular trafficking of these probes. Bicaudal D homolog 1 (BICD1, a molecular motor adaptor with pleiotropic roles in intracellular trafficking, was selected for further analyses, which revealed that BICD1 regulates the intracellular trafficking of HCT and neurotrophin receptors and likely plays an important role in nervous system development and function.

  10. ASCL1 and NEUROD1 Reveal Heterogeneity in Pulmonary Neuroendocrine Tumors and Regulate Distinct Genetic Programs

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    Mark D. Borromeo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC is a high-grade pulmonary neuroendocrine tumor. The transcription factors ASCL1 and NEUROD1 play crucial roles in promoting malignant behavior and survival of human SCLC cell lines. Here, we find that ASCL1 and NEUROD1 identify heterogeneity in SCLC, bind distinct genomic loci, and regulate mostly distinct genes. ASCL1, but not NEUROD1, is present in mouse pulmonary neuroendocrine cells, and only ASCL1 is required in vivo for tumor formation in mouse models of SCLC. ASCL1 targets oncogenic genes including MYCL1, RET, SOX2, and NFIB while NEUROD1 targets MYC. ASCL1 and NEUROD1 regulate different genes that commonly contribute to neuronal function. ASCL1 also regulates multiple genes in the NOTCH pathway including DLL3. Together, ASCL1 and NEUROD1 distinguish heterogeneity in SCLC with distinct genomic landscapes and distinct gene expression programs.

  11. Familial Dysautonomia (FD Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived PNS Neurons Reveal that Synaptic Vesicular and Neuronal Transport Genes Are Directly or Indirectly Affected by IKBKAP Downregulation.

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    Sharon Lefler

    Full Text Available A splicing mutation in the IKBKAP gene causes Familial Dysautonomia (FD, affecting the IKAP protein expression levels and proper development and function of the peripheral nervous system (PNS. Here we found new molecular insights for the IKAP role and the impact of the FD mutation in the human PNS lineage by using a novel and unique human embryonic stem cell (hESC line homozygous to the FD mutation originated by pre implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD analysis. We found that IKBKAP downregulation during PNS differentiation affects normal migration in FD-hESC derived neural crest cells (NCC while at later stages the PNS neurons show reduced intracellular colocalization between vesicular proteins and IKAP. Comparative wide transcriptome analysis of FD and WT hESC-derived neurons together with the analysis of human brains from FD and WT 12 weeks old embryos and experimental validation of the results confirmed that synaptic vesicular and neuronal transport genes are directly or indirectly affected by IKBKAP downregulation in FD neurons. Moreover we show that kinetin (a drug that corrects IKBKAP alternative splicing promotes the recovery of IKAP expression and these IKAP functional associated genes identified in the study. Altogether, these results support the view that IKAP might be a vesicular like protein that might be involved in neuronal transport in hESC derived PNS neurons. This function seems to be mostly affected in FD-hESC derived PNS neurons probably reflecting some PNS neuronal dysfunction observed in FD.

  12. Familial Dysautonomia (FD) Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived PNS Neurons Reveal that Synaptic Vesicular and Neuronal Transport Genes Are Directly or Indirectly Affected by IKBKAP Downregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefler, Sharon; Cohen, Malkiel A; Kantor, Gal; Cheishvili, David; Even, Aviel; Birger, Anastasya; Turetsky, Tikva; Gil, Yaniv; Even-Ram, Sharona; Aizenman, Einat; Bashir, Nibal; Maayan, Channa; Razin, Aharon; Reubinoff, Benjamim E; Weil, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    A splicing mutation in the IKBKAP gene causes Familial Dysautonomia (FD), affecting the IKAP protein expression levels and proper development and function of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Here we found new molecular insights for the IKAP role and the impact of the FD mutation in the human PNS lineage by using a novel and unique human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line homozygous to the FD mutation originated by pre implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) analysis. We found that IKBKAP downregulation during PNS differentiation affects normal migration in FD-hESC derived neural crest cells (NCC) while at later stages the PNS neurons show reduced intracellular colocalization between vesicular proteins and IKAP. Comparative wide transcriptome analysis of FD and WT hESC-derived neurons together with the analysis of human brains from FD and WT 12 weeks old embryos and experimental validation of the results confirmed that synaptic vesicular and neuronal transport genes are directly or indirectly affected by IKBKAP downregulation in FD neurons. Moreover we show that kinetin (a drug that corrects IKBKAP alternative splicing) promotes the recovery of IKAP expression and these IKAP functional associated genes identified in the study. Altogether, these results support the view that IKAP might be a vesicular like protein that might be involved in neuronal transport in hESC derived PNS neurons. This function seems to be mostly affected in FD-hESC derived PNS neurons probably reflecting some PNS neuronal dysfunction observed in FD.

  13. Genetic feedback regulation of frontal cortical neuronal ensembles through activity-dependent Arc expression and dopaminergic input

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    Surjeet Mastwal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mental functions involve coordinated activities of specific neuronal ensembles that are embedded in complex brain circuits. Aberrant neuronal ensemble dynamics is thought to form the neurobiological basis of mental disorders. A major challenge in mental health research is to identify these cellular ensembles and determine what molecular mechanisms constrain their emergence and consolidation during development and learning. Here, we provide a perspective based on recent studies that use activity-dependent gene Arc/Arg3.1 as a cellular marker to identify neuronal ensembles and a molecular probe to modulate circuit functions. These studies have demonstrated that the transcription of Arc is activated in selective groups of frontal cortical neurons in response to specific behavioral tasks. Arc expression regulates the persistent firing of individual neurons and predicts the consolidation of neuronal ensembles during repeated learning. Therefore, the Arc pathway represents a prototypical example of activity-dependent genetic feedback regulation of neuronal ensembles. The activation of this pathway in the frontal cortex starts during early postnatal development and requires dopaminergic input. Conversely, genetic disruption of Arc leads to a hypoactive mesofrontal dopamine circuit and its related cognitive deficit. This mutual interaction suggests an auto-regulatory mechanism to amplify the impact of neuromodulators and activity-regulated genes during postnatal development. Such a mechanism may contribute to the association of mutations in dopamine and Arc pathways with neurodevelopmental psychiatric disorders. As the mesofrontal dopamine circuit shows extensive activity-dependent developmental plasticity, activity-guided modulation of dopaminergic projections or Arc ensembles during development may help to repair circuit deficits related to neuropsychiatric disorders.

  14. Changes in neuronal excitability by activated microglia: Differential Na+ current up-regulation in pyramid-shaped and bipolar neurons by TNF-α and IL-18

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    Lars eKlapal

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Microglia are activated during pathological events in the brain and are capable of releasing various types of inflammatory cytokines. Here we demonstrate that the addition of 5% microglia activated by 1 µg/ml lipopolysaccharides (LPS to hippocampal cultures up-regulates Na+ current densities (INavD of bipolar as well as pyramid-shaped neurons, thereby increasing their excitability. Deactivation of microglia by the addition of 10 ng/ml transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β decreases INavD below control levels suggesting that the residual activated microglial cells influence neuronal excitability in control cultures. Preincubation of hippocampal cultures with 10 ng/ml tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, a major cytokine released by activated microglia, up-regulated INavD significantly by ~30% in bipolar cells, whereas in pyramid-shaped cells the up-regulation only reached an increase of ~14%. Incubation of the cultures with antibodies against either TNF-receptor 1 or 2 blocked the up-regulation of INavD in bipolar cells, whereas in pyramid-shaped cells increases in INavD were exclusively blocked by antibodies against TNF-receptor 2, suggesting that both cell types respond differently to TNF-α exposure. Since additional cytokines, such as interleukin-18 (IL-18, are released from activated microglia we tested potential effects of IL-18 on INavD in both cell types. Exposure to 5-10 ng/ml IL-18 for 4 days increased INavD in both pyramid-shaped as well as bipolar neurons, albeit the dose-response curves were shifted to lower concentrations in bipolar cells. Our results suggest that by secretion of cytokines microglial cells up-regulate Na+ current densities in bipolar and pyramid-shaped neurons to some extent differentially. Depending on the exact cytokine composition and concentration released this could change the balance between the activity of inhibitory bipolar and excitatory pyramid-shaped cells. Since bipolar cells show a larger up-regulation of

  15. Reciprocal regulation between taurine and glutamate response via Ca2+- dependent pathways in retinal third-order neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Although taurine and glutamate are the most abundant amino acids conducting neural signals in the central nervous system, the communication between these two neurotransmitters is largely unknown. This study explores the interaction of taurine and glutamate in the retinal third-order neurons. Using specific antibodies, both taurine and taurine transporters were localized in photoreceptors and Off-bipolar cells, glutamatergic neurons in retinas. It is possible that Off-bipolar cells release juxtaposed glutamate and taurine to activate the third-order neurons in retina. The interaction of taurine and glutamate was studied in acutely dissociated third-order neurons in whole-cell patch-clamp recording and Ca2+ imaging. We find that taurine effectively reduces glutamate-induced Ca2+ influx via ionotropic glutamate receptors and voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels in the neurons, and the effect of taurine was selectively inhibited by strychnine and picrotoxin, but not GABA receptor antagonists, although GABA receptors are present in the neurons. A CaMKII inhibitor partially reversed the effect of taurine, suggesting that a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent pathway is involved in taurine regulation. On the other hand, a rapid influx of Ca2+ through ionotropic glutamate receptors could inhibit the amplitude and kinetics of taurine-elicited currents in the third-order neurons, which could be controlled with intracellular application of BAPTA a fast Ca2+ chelator. This study indicates that taurine is a potential neuromodulator in glutamate transmission. The reciprocal inhibition between taurine and glutamate in the postsynaptic neurons contributes to computation of visual signals in the retinal neurons. PMID:20804625

  16. The regulation of p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis by JNK/c-Jun pathway in β-amyloid-induced neuron death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Rumana; Sanphui, Priyankar; Das, Hrishita; Saha, Pampa; Biswas, Subhas Chandra

    2015-09-01

    Neuronal loss in selective areas of brain underlies the pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent evidences place oligomeric β-amyloid (Aβ) central to the disease. However, mechanism of neuron death in response to Aβ remains elusive. Activation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway and induction of the AP-1 transcription factor c-Jun are reported in AD. However, targets of JNK/c-Jun in Aβ-induced neuron death are mostly unknown. Our study shows that pro-apoptotic proteins, Bim (Bcl-2 interacting mediator of cell death) and Puma (p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis) are targets of c-Jun in Aβ-treated neurons. We demonstrate that the JNK/c-Jun pathway is activated, in cultures of cortical neurons following treatment with oligomeric Aβ and in AD transgenic mice, and that inhibition of this pathway by selective inhibitor blocks induction of Puma by Aβ. We also find that both JNK and p53 pathways co-operatively regulate Puma expression in Aβ-treated neurons. Moreover, we identified a novel AP1-binding site on rat puma gene which is necessary for direct binding of c-Jun with Puma promoter. Finally, we find that knocking down of c-Jun by siRNA provides significant protection from Aβ toxicity and that induction of Bim and Puma by Aβ in neurons requires c-Jun. Taken together, our results suggest that both Bim and Puma are target of c-Jun and elucidate the intricate regulation of Puma expression by JNK/c-Jun and p53 pathways in neurons upon Aβ toxicity. JNK/c-Jun pathway is shown to be activated in neurons of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain and plays a vital role in neuron death in AD models. However, downstream targets of c-Jun in this disease have not been thoroughly elucidated. Our study shows that two important pro-apoptotic proteins, Bim (Bcl-2 interacting mediator of cell death) and Puma (p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis) are targets of c-Jun in Aβ-treated neurons. We demonstrate that the JNK/c-jun pathway is activated, in cultures

  17. CELF family RNA-binding protein UNC-75 regulates two sets of mutually exclusive exons of the unc-32 gene in neuron-specific manners in Caenorhabditis elegans.

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    Hidehito Kuroyanagi

    Full Text Available An enormous number of alternative pre-mRNA splicing patterns in multicellular organisms are coordinately defined by a limited number of regulatory proteins and cis elements. Mutually exclusive alternative splicing should be strictly regulated and is a challenging model for elucidating regulation mechanisms. Here we provide models of the regulation of two sets of mutually exclusive exons, 4a-4c and 7a-7b, of the Caenorhabditis elegans uncoordinated (unc-32 gene, encoding the a subunit of V0 complex of vacuolar-type H(+-ATPases. We visualize selection patterns of exon 4 and exon 7 in vivo by utilizing a trio and a pair of symmetric fluorescence splicing reporter minigenes, respectively, to demonstrate that they are regulated in tissue-specific manners. Genetic analyses reveal that RBFOX family RNA-binding proteins ASD-1 and FOX-1 and a UGCAUG stretch in intron 7b are involved in the neuron-specific selection of exon 7a. Through further forward genetic screening, we identify UNC-75, a neuron-specific CELF family RNA-binding protein of unknown function, as an essential regulator for the exon 7a selection. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays specify a short fragment in intron 7a as the recognition site for UNC-75 and demonstrate that UNC-75 specifically binds via its three RNA recognition motifs to the element including a UUGUUGUGUUGU stretch. The UUGUUGUGUUGU stretch in the reporter minigenes is actually required for the selection of exon 7a in the nervous system. We compare the amounts of partially spliced RNAs in the wild-type and unc-75 mutant backgrounds and raise a model for the mutually exclusive selection of unc-32 exon 7 by the RBFOX family and UNC-75. The neuron-specific selection of unc-32 exon 4b is also regulated by UNC-75 and the unc-75 mutation suppresses the Unc phenotype of the exon-4b-specific allele of unc-32 mutants. Taken together, UNC-75 is the neuron-specific splicing factor and regulates both sets of the mutually exclusive

  18. Cholinergic neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamus regulate mouse brown adipose tissue metabolism

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    Jae Hoon Jeong

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: DMH cholinergic neurons directly send efferent signals to sympathetic premotor neurons in the Rpa. Elevated cholinergic input to this area reduces BAT activity through activation of M2 mAChRs on serotonergic neurons. Therefore, the direct DMHACh–Rpa5-HT pathway may mediate physiological heat-defense responses to elevated environmental temperature.

  19. Non-coding RNA interact to regulate neuronal development and function

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    Bharat Ravi Iyengar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The human brain is one of the most complex biological systems, and the cognitive abilities have greatly expanded compared to invertebrates without much expansion in the number of protein coding genes. This suggests that gene regulation plays a very important role in the development and function of nervous system, by acting at multiple levels such as transcription and translation. In this article we discuss the regulatory roles of three classes of ncRNAs – miRNAs, piRNAs and lncRNA, in the process of neurogenesis and nervous function including control of synaptic plasticity and potential roles in neurodegenerative diseases. miRNAs are involved in diverse processes including neurogenesis where they channelize the cellular physiology towards neuronal differentiation. miRNAs can also indirectly influence neurogenesis by regulating the proliferation and self renewal of neural stem cells and are dysregulated in several neurodegenerative diseases. miRNAs are also known to regulate synaptic plasticity and are usually found to be co-expressed with their targets. The dynamics of gene regulation is thus dependent on the local architecture of the gene regulatory network around the miRNA and its targets. piRNAs had been classically known to regulate transposons in the germ cells. However, piRNAs have been, recently, found to be expressed in the brain and possibly function by imparting epigenetic changes by DNA methylation. piRNAs are known to be maternally inherited and we assume that they may play a role in early development. We also explore the possible function of piRNAs in regulating the expasnsion of transposons in the brain. Brain is known to express several lncRNA but functional roles in brain development are attributed to a few lncRNA while functions of most of the them remain unknown. We review the roles of some known lncRNA and explore the other possible functions of lncRNAs including their interaction with miRNAs.

  20. Hydrogen sulfide regulates cardiovascular function by influencing the excitability of subfornical organ neurons.

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    Markus Kuksis

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S, a gasotransmitter endogenously found in the central nervous system, has recently been suggested to act as a signalling molecule in the brain having beneficial effects on cardiovascular function. This study was thus undertaken to investigate the effect of NaHS (an H2S donor in the subfornical organ (SFO, a central nervous system site important to blood pressure regulation. We used male Sprague-Dawley rats for both in vivo and in vitro experiments. We first used RT-PCR to confirm our previous microarray analyses showing that mRNAs for the enzymes required to produce H2S are expressed in the SFO. We then used microinjection techniques to investigate the physiological effects of NaHS in SFO, and found that NaHS microinjection (5 nmol significantly increased blood pressure (mean AUC = 853.5±105.7 mmHg*s, n = 5. Further, we used patch-clamp electrophysiology and found that 97.8% (88 of 90 of neurons depolarized in response to NaHS. This response was found to be concentration dependent with an EC50 of 35.6 µM. Coupled with the depolarized membrane potential, we observed an overall increase in neuronal excitability using an analysis of rheobase and action potential firing patterns. This study has provided the first evidence of NaHS and thus H2S actions and their cellular correlates in SFO, implicating this brain area as a site where H2S may act to control blood pressure.

  1. In vivo neuronal function of the fragile X mental retardation protein is regulated by phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffee, R Lane; Williamson, Ashley J; Adkins, Christopher M; Gray, Marisa C; Page, Terry L; Broadie, Kendal

    2012-02-15

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), caused by loss of the Fragile X Mental Retardation 1 (FMR1) gene product (FMRP), is the most common heritable cause of intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders. It has been long hypothesized that the phosphorylation of serine 500 (S500) in human FMRP controls its function as an RNA-binding translational repressor. To test this hypothesis in vivo, we employed neuronally targeted expression of three human FMR1 transgenes, including wild-type (hFMR1), dephosphomimetic (S500A-hFMR1) and phosphomimetic (S500D-hFMR1), in the Drosophila FXS disease model to investigate phosphorylation requirements. At the molecular level, dfmr1 null mutants exhibit elevated brain protein levels due to loss of translational repressor activity. This defect is rescued for an individual target protein and across the population of brain proteins by the phosphomimetic, whereas the dephosphomimetic phenocopies the null condition. At the cellular level, dfmr1 null synapse architecture exhibits increased area, branching and bouton number. The phosphomimetic fully rescues these synaptogenesis defects, whereas the dephosphomimetic provides no rescue. The presence of Futsch-positive (microtubule-associated protein 1B) supernumerary microtubule loops is elevated in dfmr1 null synapses. The human phosphomimetic restores normal Futsch loops, whereas the dephosphomimetic provides no activity. At the behavioral level, dfmr1 null mutants exhibit strongly impaired olfactory associative learning. The human phosphomimetic targeted only to the brain-learning center restores normal learning ability, whereas the dephosphomimetic provides absolutely no rescue. We conclude that human FMRP S500 phosphorylation is necessary for its in vivo function as a neuronal translational repressor and regulator of synaptic architecture, and for the manifestation of FMRP-dependent learning behavior.

  2. Neuronal and microglial regulators of cortical wiring: usual and novel guideposts

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    Paola eSquarzoni

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Neocortex functioning relies on the formation of complex networks that begins to be assembled during embryogenesis by highly stereotyped processes of cell migration and axonal navigation. The guidance of cells and axons is driven by extracellular cues, released along by final targets or intermediate targets located along specific pathways. In particular, guidepost cells, originally described in the grasshopper, are considered discrete, specialized cell populations located at crucial decision points along axonal trajectories that regulate tract formation. These cells are usually early-born, transient and act at short-range or via cell-cell contact. The vast majority of guidepost cells initially identified were glial cells, which play a role in the formation of important axonal tracts in the forebrain, such as the corpus callosum, anterior and post-optic commissures as well as optic chiasm. In the last decades, tangential migrating neurons have also been found to participate in the guidance of principal axonal tracts in the forebrain. This is the case for several examples such as guideposts for the lateral olfactory tract (LOT, corridor cells, which open an internal path for thalamo-cortical axons and Cajal-Retzius cells that have been involved in the formation of the entorhino-hippocampal connections. More recently, microglia, the resident macrophages of the brain, were specifically observed at the crossroads of important neuronal migratory routes and axonal tract pathways during forebrain development. We furthermore found that microglia participate to the shaping of prenatal forebrain circuits, thereby opening novel perspectives on forebrain development and wiring. Here we will review the last findings on already known guidepost cells populations and will discuss the role of microglia as a potentially new class of atypical guidepost cells.

  3. Hydrogen sulfide regulates cardiovascular function by influencing the excitability of subfornical organ neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuksis, Markus; Smith, Pauline M; Ferguson, Alastair V

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a gasotransmitter endogenously found in the central nervous system, has recently been suggested to act as a signalling molecule in the brain having beneficial effects on cardiovascular function. This study was thus undertaken to investigate the effect of NaHS (an H2S donor) in the subfornical organ (SFO), a central nervous system site important to blood pressure regulation. We used male Sprague-Dawley rats for both in vivo and in vitro experiments. We first used RT-PCR to confirm our previous microarray analyses showing that mRNAs for the enzymes required to produce H2S are expressed in the SFO. We then used microinjection techniques to investigate the physiological effects of NaHS in SFO, and found that NaHS microinjection (5 nmol) significantly increased blood pressure (mean AUC = 853.5±105.7 mmHg*s, n = 5). Further, we used patch-clamp electrophysiology and found that 97.8% (88 of 90) of neurons depolarized in response to NaHS. This response was found to be concentration dependent with an EC50 of 35.6 µM. Coupled with the depolarized membrane potential, we observed an overall increase in neuronal excitability using an analysis of rheobase and action potential firing patterns. This study has provided the first evidence of NaHS and thus H2S actions and their cellular correlates in SFO, implicating this brain area as a site where H2S may act to control blood pressure.

  4. Brain imaging reveals neuronal circuitry underlying the crow's perception of human faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzluff, John M; Miyaoka, Robert; Minoshima, Satoshi; Cross, Donna J

    2012-09-25

    Crows pay close attention to people and can remember specific faces for several years after a single encounter. In mammals, including humans, faces are evaluated by an integrated neural system involving the sensory cortex, limbic system, and striatum. Here we test the hypothesis that birds use a similar system by providing an imaging analysis of an awake, wild animal's brain as it performs an adaptive, complex cognitive task. We show that in vivo imaging of crow brain activity during exposure to familiar human faces previously associated with either capture (threatening) or caretaking (caring) activated several brain regions that allow birds to discriminate, associate, and remember visual stimuli, including the rostral hyperpallium, nidopallium, mesopallium, and lateral striatum. Perception of threatening faces activated circuitry including amygdalar, thalamic, and brainstem regions, known in humans and other vertebrates to be related to emotion, motivation, and conditioned fear learning. In contrast, perception of caring faces activated motivation and striatal regions. In our experiments and in nature, when perceiving a threatening face, crows froze and fixed their gaze (decreased blink rate), which was associated with activation of brain regions known in birds to regulate perception, attention, fear, and escape behavior. These findings indicate that, similar to humans, crows use sophisticated visual sensory systems to recognize faces and modulate behavioral responses by integrating visual information with expectation and emotion. Our approach has wide applicability and potential to improve our understanding of the neural basis for animal behavior.

  5. Brain imaging reveals neuronal circuitry underlying the crow’s perception of human faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzluff, John M.; Miyaoka, Robert; Minoshima, Satoshi; Cross, Donna J.

    2012-01-01

    Crows pay close attention to people and can remember specific faces for several years after a single encounter. In mammals, including humans, faces are evaluated by an integrated neural system involving the sensory cortex, limbic system, and striatum. Here we test the hypothesis that birds use a similar system by providing an imaging analysis of an awake, wild animal’s brain as it performs an adaptive, complex cognitive task. We show that in vivo imaging of crow brain activity during exposure to familiar human faces previously associated with either capture (threatening) or caretaking (caring) activated several brain regions that allow birds to discriminate, associate, and remember visual stimuli, including the rostral hyperpallium, nidopallium, mesopallium, and lateral striatum. Perception of threatening faces activated circuitry including amygdalar, thalamic, and brainstem regions, known in humans and other vertebrates to be related to emotion, motivation, and conditioned fear learning. In contrast, perception of caring faces activated motivation and striatal regions. In our experiments and in nature, when perceiving a threatening face, crows froze and fixed their gaze (decreased blink rate), which was associated with activation of brain regions known in birds to regulate perception, attention, fear, and escape behavior. These findings indicate that, similar to humans, crows use sophisticated visual sensory systems to recognize faces and modulate behavioral responses by integrating visual information with expectation and emotion. Our approach has wide applicability and potential to improve our understanding of the neural basis for animal behavior. PMID:22984177

  6. Spontaneous kisspeptin neuron firing in the adult mouse reveals marked sex and brain region differences but no support for a direct role in negative feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Croft, Simon; Piet, Richard; Mayer, Christian; Mai, Oliver; Boehm, Ulrich; Herbison, Allan E

    2012-11-01

    Kisspeptin-Gpr54 signaling is critical for the GnRH neuronal network controlling fertility. The present study reports on a kisspeptin (Kiss)-green fluorescent protein (GFP) mouse model enabling brain slice electrophysiological recordings to be made from Kiss neurons in the arcuate nucleus (ARN) and rostral periventricular region of the third ventricle (RP3V). Using dual immunofluorescence, approximately 90% of GFP cells in the RP3V of females, and ARN in both sexes, are shown to be authentic Kiss-synthesizing neurons in adult mice. Cell-attached recordings of ARN Kiss-GFP cells revealed a marked sex difference in their mean firing rates; 90% of Kiss-GFP cells in males exhibited slow irregular firing (0.17 ± 0.04 Hz) whereas neurons from diestrous (0.01 ± 0.01 Hz) and ovariectomized (0 Hz) mice were mostly or completely silent. In contrast, RP3V Kiss-GFP cells were all spontaneously active, exhibiting tonic, irregular, and bursting firing patterns. Mean firing rates were significantly (P neurons at the time of the proestrous GnRH surge revealed a significant decline in firing rate after the surge. Together, these observations demonstrate unexpected sex differences in the electrical activity of ARN Kiss neurons and markedly different patterns of firing by Kiss neurons in the ARN and RP3V. Although data supported a positive influence of gonadal steroids on RP3V Kiss neuron firing, no direct evidence was found to support the previously postulated role of ARN Kiss neurons in the estrogen-negative feedback mechanism.

  7. Involvement of AMPK in regulating the degradation of MAD2B under high glucose in neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xianfang; Chu, Guangpin; Ye, Chen; Tang, Hui; Qiu, Ping; Hu, Yue; Li, Man; Zhang, Chun

    2016-12-13

    Although our recent study has demonstrated that mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint protein (MAD2B) mediates high glucose-induced neuronal apoptosis, the mechanisms for MAD2B degradation under hyperglycaemia have not yet been elucidated. In this study, we first found that the activation of adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) was decreased in neurons, accompanied with the increased expression of MAD2B. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that activation of AMPK with its activators such as AICAR and metformin decreased the expression of MAD2B, indicating a role of AMPK in regulating the expression of MAD2B. Moreover, activation of AMPK prevented neuronal cells from high glucose-induced injury as demonstrated by the reduced expression of cyclin B1 and percentage of apoptosis as detected by TUNEL. We further found that when total protein synthesis was suppressed by chlorhexidine, the degradation of MAD2B was slower in high glucose-treated neurons and was mainly dependent on the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Finally, it was indicated that high glucose inhibited the ubiquitination of MAD2B, which could be reversed by activation of AMPK. Collectively, this study demonstrates that AMPK acts as a key regulator of MAD2B expression, suggesting that activation of AMPK signalling might be crucial for the treatment of high glucose-induced neuronal injury.

  8. Up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 by isoflurane preconditioning during tolerance against neuronal injury induced by oxygen glucose deprivation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qifang Li; Yesen Zhu; Hong Jiang; Hui Xu; Heping Liu

    2008-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the degradation of heme to produce bile pigments and carbon monoxide. The HO-1 isozyme is induced by a variety of factors such as heat, heme, ischemia, and hydrogen peroxide. In recent years, mounting findings have suggested that HO-1 has a neuroprotective activity against ischemic injury. The neuroprotective role of isoflurane, a commonly used anesthetic, has been well documented, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms involved. Recently, isoflurane has been shown to up-regulate HO-1 in the liver. In this study,we show that isoflurane preconditioning promotes the survival of cultured ischemic hippocampal neurons by increasing the number of surviving neurons and their viability. Further study by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis showed that isoflurane preconditioning significantly increases HO-1 expression in oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced neuronal injury. Furthermore,inhibition of HO activity by tin protoporphyrin partially abolishes isoflurane preconditioning's protective effect as measured by lactate dehydrogenase release in OGD neurons.These findings indicated that the neuroprotective role of isoflurane preconditioning against OGD-induced injury might be associated with its role in up-regulating HO-1 in ischemic neurons.

  9. Up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 by isoflurane preconditioning during tolerance against neuronal injury induced by oxygen glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qifang; Zhu, Yesen; Jiang, Hong; Xu, Hui; Liu, Heping

    2008-09-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the degradation of heme to produce bile pigments and carbon monoxide. The HO-1 isozyme is induced by a variety of factors such as heat, heme, ischemia, and hydrogen peroxide. In recent years, mounting findings have suggested that HO-1 has a neuroprotective activity against ischemic injury. The neuroprotective role of isoflurane, a commonly used anesthetic, has been well documented, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms involved. Recently, isoflurane has been shown to up-regulate HO-1 in the liver. In this study, we show that isoflurane preconditioning promotes the survival of cultured ischemic hippocampal neurons by increasing the number of surviving neurons and their viability. Further study by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis showed that isoflurane preconditioning significantly increases HO-1 expression in oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced neuronal injury. Furthermore, inhibition of HO activity by tin protoporphyrin partially abolishes isoflurane preconditioning's protective effect as measured by lactate dehydrogenase release in OGD neurons. These findings indicated that the neuroprotective role of isoflurane preconditioning against OGD-induced injury might be associated with its role in up-regulating HO-1 in ischemic neurons.

  10. Meis/UNC-62 isoform dependent regulation of CoupTF-II/UNC-55 and GABAergic motor neuron subtype differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Richard F; Walthall, Walter W

    2016-11-15

    Gene regulatory networks orchestrate the assembly of functionally related cells within a cellular network. Subtle differences often exist among functionally related cells within such networks. How differences are created among cells with similar functions has been difficult to determine due to the complexity of both the gene and the cellular networks. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the DD and VD motor neurons compose a cross-inhibitory, GABAergic network that coordinates dorsal and ventral muscle contractions during locomotion. The Pitx2 homologue, UNC-30, acts as a terminal selector gene to create similarities and the Coup-TFII homologue, UNC-55, is necessary for creating differences between the two motor neuron classes. What is the organizing gene regulatory network responsible for initiating the expression of UNC-55 and thus creating differences between the DD and VD motor neurons? We show that the unc-55 promoter has modules that contain Meis/UNC-62 binding sites. These sites can be subdivided into regions that are capable of activating or repressing UNC-55 expression in different motor neurons. Interestingly, different isoforms of UNC-62 are responsible for the activation and the stabilization of unc-55 transcription. Furthermore, specific isoforms of UNC-62 are required for proper synaptic patterning of the VD motor neurons. Isoform specific regulation of differentiating neurons is a relatively unexplored area of research and presents a mechanism for creating differences among functionally related cells within a network. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Metformin Protects Neurons against Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation/Reoxygenation -Induced Injury by Down-Regulating MAD2B

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    Xianfang Meng

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Metformin, the common medication for type II diabetes, has protective effects on cerebral ischemia. However, the molecular mechanisms are far from clear. Mitotic arrest deficient 2-like protein 2 (MAD2B, an inhibitor of the anaphase-promoting complex (APC, is widely expressed in hippocampal and cortical neurons and plays an important role in mediating high glucose-induced neurotoxicity. The present study investigated whether metformin modifies the expression of MAD2B and to exert its neuroprotective effects in primary cultured cortical neurons during oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R, a widely used in vitro model of ischemia/reperfusion. Methods: Primary cortical neurons were cultured, deprived of oxygen-glucose for 1 h, and then recovered with oxygen-glucose for 12 h and 24 h. Cell viability was measured by detecting the levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH in culture medium. The levels of MAD2B, cyclin B and p-histone 3 were measured by Western blot. Results: Cell viability of neurons was reduced under oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R. The expression of MAD2B was increased under OGD/R. The levels of cyclin B1, which is a substrate of APC, were also increased. Moreover, OGD/R up-regulated the phosphorylation levels of histone 3, which is the induction of aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons. However, pretreatment of neurons with metformin alleviated OGD/R-induced injury. Metformin further decreased the expression of MAD2B, cyclin B1 and phosphorylation levels of histone 3. Conclusion: Metformin exerts its neuroprotective effect through regulating the expression of MAD2B in neurons under OGD/R.

  12. Projections of nucleus accumbens adenosine A2A receptor neurons in the mouse brain and their implications in mediating sleep-wake regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping eZhang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs in the nucleus accumbens (Acb have been demonstrated to play an important role in the arousal effect of adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine, and may be involved in physiological sleep. To better understand the functions of these receptors in sleep, projections of A2AR neurons were mapped utilizing adeno-associated virus (AAV encoding humanized Renilla green fluorescent protein (hrGFP as a tracer for long axonal pathways. The Cre-dependent AAV was injected into the core (AcbC and shell (AcbSh of the Acb in A2AR-Cre mice. Immunohistochemistry was then used to visualize hrGFP, highlighting the perikarya of the A2AR neurons in the injection sites, and their axons in projection regions. The data revealed that A2AR neurons exhibit medium-sized and either round or elliptic perikarya with their processes within the Acb. Moreover, the projections from the Acb distributed to nuclei in the forebrain, diencephalon, and brainstem. In the forebrain, A2AR neurons from all Acb sub-regions jointly projected to the ventral pallidum, the nucleus of the diagonal band, and the substantia innominata. Heavy projections from the AcbC and the ventral AcbSh, and weaker projections from the medial AcbSh, were observed in the lateral hypothalamus and lateral preoptic area. In the brainstem, the Acb projections were found in the ventral tegmental area, while AcbC and ventral AcbSh also projected to the median raphe nucleus, the dorsal raphe nucleus, and the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray. The results supply a solid base for understanding the roles of the A2AR and A2AR neurons in the Acb, especially in the regulation of sleep.

  13. Regulation of voltage-gated Ca(2+) currents by Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in resting sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostic, Sandra; Pan, Bin; Guo, Yuan; Yu, Hongwei; Sapunar, Damir; Kwok, Wai-Meng; Hudmon, Andy; Wu, Hsiang-En; Hogan, Quinn H

    2014-09-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is recognized as a key element in encoding depolarization activity of excitable cells into facilitated voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel (VGCC) function. Less is known about the participation of CaMKII in regulating VGCCs in resting cells. We examined constitutive CaMKII control of Ca(2+) currents in peripheral sensory neurons acutely isolated from dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) of adult rats. The small molecule CaMKII inhibitor KN-93 (1.0μM) reduced depolarization-induced ICa by 16-30% in excess of the effects produced by the inactive homolog KN-92. The specificity of CaMKII inhibition on VGCC function was shown by the efficacy of the selective CaMKII blocking peptide autocamtide-2-related inhibitory peptide in a membrane-permeable myristoylated form, which also reduced VGCC current in resting neurons. Loss of VGCC currents is primarily due to reduced N-type current, as application of mAIP selectively reduced N-type current by approximately 30%, and prior N-type current inhibition eliminated the effect of mAIP on VGCCs, while prior block of L-type channels did not reduce the effect of mAIP on total ICa. T-type currents were not affected by mAIP in resting DRG neurons. Transduction of sensory neurons in vivo by DRG injection of an adeno-associated virus expressing AIP also resulted in a loss of N-type currents. Together, these findings reveal a novel molecular adaptation whereby sensory neurons retain CaMKII support of VGCCs despite remaining quiescent.

  14. Cholinergic neurons regulate secretion of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor by skeletal muscle cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianney, John-Mary; Spitsbergen, John M

    2011-05-16

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has been identified as a potent survival factor for both central and peripheral neurons. GDNF has been shown to be a potent survival factor for motor neurons during programmed cell death and continuous treatment with GDNF maintains hyperinnervation of skeletal muscle in adulthood. However, little is known about factors regulating normal production of endogenous GDNF in skeletal muscle. This study aimed to examine the role that motor neurons play in regulating GDNF secretion by skeletal muscle. A co-culture of skeletal muscle cells (C2C12) and cholinergic neurons, glioma×neuroblastoma hybrid cells (NG108-15) were used to create nerve-muscle interactions in vitro. Acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) on nerve-myotube co-cultures were blocked with alpha-bungarotoxin (α-BTX). GDNF protein content in cells and in culture medium was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) and western blotting. GDNF localization was examined by immunocytochemistry. The nerve-muscle co-culture study indicated that the addition of motor neurons to skeletal muscle cells reduced the secretion of GDNF by skeletal muscle. The results also showed that blocking AChRs with α-BTX reversed the action of neural cells on GDNF secretion by skeletal muscle. Although ELISA results showed no GDNF in differentiated NG108-15 cells grown alone, immunocytochemical analysis showed that GDNF was localized in NG108-15 cells co-cultured with C2C12 myotubes. These results suggest that motor neurons may be regulating their own supply of GDNF secreted by skeletal muscle and that activation of AChRs may be involved in this process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A novel mouse model of Warburg Micro syndrome reveals roles for RAB18 in eye development and organisation of the neuronal cytoskeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M. Carpanini

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in RAB18 have been shown to cause the heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder Warburg Micro syndrome (WARBM. Individuals with WARBM present with a range of clinical symptoms, including ocular and neurological abnormalities. However, the underlying cellular and molecular pathogenesis of the disorder remains unclear, largely owing to the lack of any robust animal models that phenocopy both the ocular and neurological features of the disease. We report here the generation and characterisation of a novel Rab18-mutant mouse model of WARBM. Rab18-mutant mice are viable and fertile. They present with congenital nuclear cataracts and atonic pupils, recapitulating the characteristic ocular features that are associated with WARBM. Additionally, Rab18-mutant cells exhibit an increase in lipid droplet size following treatment with oleic acid. Lipid droplet abnormalities are a characteristic feature of cells taken from WARBM individuals, as well as cells taken from individuals with other neurodegenerative conditions. Neurological dysfunction is also apparent in Rab18-mutant mice, including progressive weakness of the hind limbs. We show that the neurological defects are, most likely, not caused by gross perturbations in synaptic vesicle recycling in the central or peripheral nervous system. Rather, loss of Rab18 is associated with widespread disruption of the neuronal cytoskeleton, including abnormal accumulations of neurofilament and microtubule proteins in synaptic terminals, and gross disorganisation of the cytoskeleton in peripheral nerves. Global proteomic profiling of peripheral nerves in Rab18-mutant mice reveals significant alterations in several core molecular pathways that regulate cytoskeletal dynamics in neurons. The apparent similarities between the WARBM phenotype and the phenotype that we describe here indicate that the Rab18-mutant mouse provides an important platform for investigation of the disease pathogenesis and therapeutic

  16. Electrophysiological characteristics of paraventricular thalamic (PVT) neurons in response to cocaine and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeoh, Jiann Wei; James, Morgan H; Graham, Brett A; Dayas, Christopher V

    2014-01-01

    Recent work has established that the paraventricular thalamus (PVT) is a central node in the brain reward-seeking pathway. This role is mediated in part through projections from hypothalamic peptide transmitter systems such as cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART). Consistent with this proposition, we previously found that inactivation of the PVT or infusions of CART into the PVT suppressed drug-seeking behavior in an animal model of contingent cocaine self-administration. Despite this work, few studies have assessed how the basic physiological properties of PVT neurons are influenced by exposure to drugs such as cocaine. Further, our previous work did not assess how infusions of CART, which we found to decrease cocaine-seeking, altered the activity of PVT neurons. In the current study we address these issues by recording from anterior PVT (aPVT) neurons in acutely prepared brain slices from cocaine-treated (15 mg/ml, n = 8) and saline-treated (control) animals (n = 8). The excitability of aPVT neurons was assessed by injecting a series of depolarizing and hyperpolarizing current steps and characterizing the resulting action potential (AP) discharge properties. This analysis indicated that the majority of aPVT neurons exhibit tonic firing (TF), and initial bursting (IB) consistent with previous studies. However, we also identified PVT neurons that exhibited delayed firing (DF), single spiking (SS) and reluctant firing (RF) patterns. Interestingly, cocaine exposure significantly increased the proportion of aPVT neurons that exhibited TF. We then investigated the effects of CART on excitatory synaptic inputs to aPVT neurons. Application of CART significantly suppressed excitatory synaptic drive to PVT neurons in both cocaine-treated and control recordings. This finding is consistent with our previous behavioral data, which showed that CART signaling in the PVT negatively regulates drug-seeking behavior. Together, these studies suggest that cocaine

  17. Electrophysiological characteristics of paraventricular thalamic (PVT) neurons in response to cocaine and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeoh, Jiann Wei; James, Morgan H.; Graham, Brett A.; Dayas, Christopher V.

    2014-01-01

    Recent work has established that the paraventricular thalamus (PVT) is a central node in the brain reward-seeking pathway. This role is mediated in part through projections from hypothalamic peptide transmitter systems such as cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART). Consistent with this proposition, we previously found that inactivation of the PVT or infusions of CART into the PVT suppressed drug-seeking behavior in an animal model of contingent cocaine self-administration. Despite this work, few studies have assessed how the basic physiological properties of PVT neurons are influenced by exposure to drugs such as cocaine. Further, our previous work did not assess how infusions of CART, which we found to decrease cocaine-seeking, altered the activity of PVT neurons. In the current study we address these issues by recording from anterior PVT (aPVT) neurons in acutely prepared brain slices from cocaine-treated (15 mg/ml, n = 8) and saline-treated (control) animals (n = 8). The excitability of aPVT neurons was assessed by injecting a series of depolarizing and hyperpolarizing current steps and characterizing the resulting action potential (AP) discharge properties. This analysis indicated that the majority of aPVT neurons exhibit tonic firing (TF), and initial bursting (IB) consistent with previous studies. However, we also identified PVT neurons that exhibited delayed firing (DF), single spiking (SS) and reluctant firing (RF) patterns. Interestingly, cocaine exposure significantly increased the proportion of aPVT neurons that exhibited TF. We then investigated the effects of CART on excitatory synaptic inputs to aPVT neurons. Application of CART significantly suppressed excitatory synaptic drive to PVT neurons in both cocaine-treated and control recordings. This finding is consistent with our previous behavioral data, which showed that CART signaling in the PVT negatively regulates drug-seeking behavior. Together, these studies suggest that cocaine

  18. Term-seq reveals abundant ribo-regulation of antibiotics resistance in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Daniel; Shamir, Maya; Mellin, J R; Koutero, Mikael; Stern-Ginossar, Noam; Cossart, Pascale; Sorek, Rotem

    2016-04-01

    Riboswitches and attenuators are cis-regulatory RNA elements, most of which control bacterial gene expression via metabolite-mediated, premature transcription termination. We developed an unbiased experimental approach for genome-wide discovery of such ribo-regulators in bacteria. We also devised an experimental platform that quantitatively measures the in vivo activity of all such regulators in parallel and enables rapid screening for ribo-regulators that respond to metabolites of choice. Using this approach, we detected numerous antibiotic-responsive ribo-regulators that control antibiotic resistance genes in pathogens and in the human microbiome. Studying one such regulator in Listeria monocytogenes revealed an attenuation mechanism mediated by antibiotic-stalled ribosomes. Our results expose broad roles for conditional termination in regulating antibiotic resistance and provide a tool for discovering riboswitches and attenuators that respond to previously unknown ligands.

  19. Joint cross-correlation analysis reveals complex, time-dependent functional relationship between cortical neurons and arm electromyograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Katie Z.; Lebedev, Mikhail A.

    2014-01-01

    Correlation between cor