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Sample records for neurons noisy cation

  1. Noisy Neurons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 1. Noisy Neurons: Hodgkin-Huxley Model and Stochastic Variants. Shurti Paranjape. General Article Volume 20 Issue 1 January 2015 pp 34-43. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  2. Noisy Neurons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Nerves are fibres that conduct electrical signals and hence pass on information from and to the brain. Nerves are made of nerve cells called neurons (Figure 1). Instructions in our body are sent via electrical signals that present themselves as variations in the potential across neuronal membranes. These potential differences ...

  3. Population Coding in Sparsely Connected Networks of Noisy Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Patrick Tripp

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the relationship between population coding and spatial connection statistics in networks of noisy neurons. Encoding of sensory information in the neocortex is thought to require coordinated neural populations, because individual cortical neurons respond to a wide range of stimuli, and exhibit highly variable spiking in response to repeated stimuli. Population coding is rooted in network structure, because cortical neurons receive information only from other neurons, and because the information they encode must be decoded by other neurons, if it is to affect behaviour. However, population coding theory has often ignored network structure, or assumed discrete, fully-connected populations (in contrast with the sparsely connected, continuous sheet of the cortex. In this study, we model a sheet of cortical neurons with sparse, primarily local connections, and find that a network with this structure can encode multiple internal state variables with high signal-to-noise ratio. However, in our model, although connection probability varies with the distance between neurons, we find that the connections cannot be instantiated at random according to these probabilities, but must have additional structure if information is to be encoded with high fidelity.

  4. Stochastic resonance in noisy spiking retinal and sensory neuron models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ashok; Kosko, Bart

    2005-01-01

    Two new theorems show that small amounts of additive white noise can improve the bit count or mutual information of several popular models of spiking retinal neurons and spiking sensory neurons. The first theorem gives necessary and sufficient conditions for this noise benefit or stochastic resonance (SR) effect for subthreshold signals in a standard family of Poisson spiking models of retinal neurons. The result holds for all types of finite-variance noise and for all types of infinite-variance stable noise: SR occurs if and only if a sum of noise means or location parameters falls outside a 'forbidden interval' of values. The second theorem gives a similar forbidden-interval sufficient condition for the SR effect for several types of spiking sensory neurons that include the Fitzhugh-Nagumo neuron, the leaky integrate-and-fire neuron, and the reduced Type I neuron model if the additive noise is Gaussian white noise. Simulations show that neither the forbidden-interval condition nor Gaussianity is necessary for the SR effect.

  5. Noisy Neurons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Recent experiments show fluctuations which call for introducing randomness into the model's equations. Some simulations which re- produce the observed behavior are presented. 1. The Hodgkin–Huxley Model. A few billion years ago, life began. In its infant stages, life only manifested itself as unicellular organisms which.

  6. Capturing Spike Variability in Noisy Izhikevich Neurons Using Point Process Generalized Linear Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østergaard, Jacob; Kramer, Mark A; Eden, Uri T

    2018-01-01

    To understand neural activity, two broad categories of models exist: statistical and dynamical. While statistical models possess rigorous methods for parameter estimation and goodness-of-fit assessment, dynamical models provide mechanistic insight. In general, these two categories of models are separately applied; understanding the relationships between these modeling approaches remains an area of active research. In this letter, we examine this relationship using simulation. To do so, we first generate spike train data from a well-known dynamical model, the Izhikevich neuron, with a noisy input current. We then fit these spike train data with a statistical model (a generalized linear model, GLM, with multiplicative influences of past spiking). For different levels of noise, we show how the GLM captures both the deterministic features of the Izhikevich neuron and the variability driven by the noise. We conclude that the GLM captures essential features of the simulated spike trains, but for near-deterministic spike trains, goodness-of-fit analyses reveal that the model does not fit very well in a statistical sense; the essential random part of the GLM is not captured.

  7. Modeling pharmacological clock and memory patterns of interval timing in a striatal beat-frequency model with realistic, noisy neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorinel A. Oprisan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In most species, the capability of perceiving and using the passage of time in the seconds-to-minutes range (interval timing is not only accurate but also scalar: errors in time estimation are linearly related to the estimated duration. The ubiquity of scalar timing extends over behavioral, lesion, and pharmacological manipulations. For example, in mammals, dopaminergic drugs induce an immediate, scalar change in the perceived time (clock pattern, whereas cholinergic drugs induce a gradual, scalar change in perceived time (memory pattern. How do these properties emerge from unreliable, noisy neurons firing in the milliseconds range? Neurobiological information relative to the brain circuits involved in interval timing provide support for an Striatal Beat Frequency (SBF model, in which time is coded by the coincidental activation of striatal spiny neurons by cortical neural oscillators. While biologically plausible, the impracticality of perfect oscillators, or their lack thereof, questions this mechanism in a brain with noisy neurons. We explored the computational mechanisms required for the clock and memory patterns in an SBF model with biophysically realistic and noisy Morris-Lecar neurons (SBF-ML. Under the assumption that dopaminergic drugs modulate the firing frequency of cortical oscillators, and that cholinergic drugs modulate the memory representation of the criterion time, we show that our SBF-ML model can reproduce the pharmacological clock and memory patterns observed in the literature. Numerical results also indicate that parameter variability (noise – which is ubiquitous in the form of small fluctuations in the intrinsic frequencies of neural oscillators within and between trails, and in the errors in recording/retrieving stored information related to criterion time – seems to be critical for the time-scale invariance of the clock and memory patterns.

  8. Time-scale invariance as an emergent property in a perceptron with realistic, noisy neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhusi, Catalin V; Oprisan, Sorinel A

    2013-05-01

    In most species, interval timing is time-scale invariant: errors in time estimation scale up linearly with the estimated duration. In mammals, time-scale invariance is ubiquitous over behavioral, lesion, and pharmacological manipulations. For example, dopaminergic drugs induce an immediate, whereas cholinergic drugs induce a gradual, scalar change in timing. Behavioral theories posit that time-scale invariance derives from particular computations, rules, or coding schemes. In contrast, we discuss a simple neural circuit, the perceptron, whose output neurons fire in a clockwise fashion based on the pattern of coincidental activation of its input neurons. We show numerically that time-scale invariance emerges spontaneously in a perceptron with realistic neurons, in the presence of noise. Under the assumption that dopaminergic drugs modulate the firing of input neurons, and that cholinergic drugs modulate the memory representation of the criterion time, we show that a perceptron with realistic neurons reproduces the pharmacological clock and memory patterns, and their time-scale invariance, in the presence of noise. These results suggest that rather than being a signature of higher order cognitive processes or specific computations related to timing, time-scale invariance may spontaneously emerge in a massively connected brain from the intrinsic noise of neurons and circuits, thus providing the simplest explanation for the ubiquity of scale invariance of interval timing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Detecting and estimating signals in noisy cable structure, I: neuronal noise sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manwani, A; Koch, C

    1999-11-15

    In recent theoretical approaches addressing the problem of neural coding, tools from statistical estimation and information theory have been applied to quantify the ability of neurons to transmit information through their spike outputs. These techniques, though fairly general, ignore the specific nature of neuronal processing in terms of its known biophysical properties. However, a systematic study of processing at various stages in a biophysically faithful model of a single neuron can identify the role of each stage in information transfer. Toward this end, we carry out a theoretical analysis of the information loss of a synaptic signal propagating along a linear, one-dimensional, weakly active cable due to neuronal noise sources along the way, using both a signal reconstruction and a signal detection paradigm. Here we begin such an analysis by quantitatively characterizing three sources of membrane noise: (1) thermal noise due to the passive membrane resistance, (2) noise due to stochastic openings and closings of voltage-gated membrane channels (NA+ and K+), and (3) noise due to random, background synaptic activity. Using analytical expressions for the power spectral densities of these noise sources, we compare their magnitudes in the case of a patch of membrane from a cortical pyramidal cell and explore their dependence on different biophysical parameters.

  10. Comparative sensitivity of rat cerebellar neurons to dysregulation of divalent cation homeostasis and cytotoxicity caused by methylmercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, Joshua R.; Marty, M. Sue; Atchison, William D.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the relative effectiveness of methylmercury (MeHg) to alter divalent cation homeostasis and cause cell death in MeHg-resistant cerebellar Purkinje and MeHg-sensitive granule neurons. Application of 0.5-5 μM MeHg to Purkinje and granule cells grown in culture caused a concentration- and time-dependent biphasic increase in fura-2 fluorescence. At 0.5 and 1 μM MeHg, the elevations of fura-2 fluorescence induced by MeHg were biphasic in both cell types, but significantly delayed in Purkinje as compared to granule cells. Application of the heavy-metal chelator, TPEN, to Purkinje cells caused a precipitous decline in a proportion of the fura-2 fluorescence signal, indicating that MeHg causes release of Ca 2+ and non-Ca 2+ divalent cations. Purkinje cells were also more resistant than granule cells to the neurotoxic effects of MeHg. At 24.5 h after-application of 5 μM MeHg, 97.7% of Purkinje cells were viable. At 3 μM MeHg there was no detectable loss of Purkinje cell viability. In contrast, only 40.6% of cerebellar granule cells were alive 24.5 h after application of 3 μM MeHg. In conclusion, Purkinje neurons in primary cultures appear to be more resistant to MeHg-induced dysregulation of divalent cation homeostasis and subsequent cell death when compared to cerebellar granule cells. There is a significant component of non-Ca 2+ divalent cation released by MeHg in Purkinje neurons

  11. Calcium influx through hyperpolarization-activated cation channels (I(h) channels) contributes to activity-evoked neuronal secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao; Duan, Kai-Lai; Shang, Chun-Feng; Yu, Han-Gang; Zhou, Zhuan

    2004-01-27

    The hyperpolarization-activated cation channels (I(h)) play a distinct role in rhythmic activities in a variety of tissues, including neurons and cardiac cells. In the present study, we investigated whether Ca(2+) can permeate through the hyperpolarization-activated pacemaker channels (HCN) expressed in HEK293 cells and I(h) channels in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Using combined measurements of whole-cell currents and fura-2 Ca(2+) imaging, we found that there is a Ca(2+) influx in proportion to I(h) induced by hyperpolarization in HEK293 cells. The I(h) channel blockers Cs(+) and ZD7288 inhibit both HCN current and Ca(2+) influx. Measurements of the fractional Ca(2+) current showed that it constitutes 0.60 +/- 0.02% of the net inward current through HCN4 at -120 mV. This fractional current is similar to that of the low Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA-R (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor) channels in Purkinje neurons. In DRG neurons, activation of I(h) for 30 s also resulted in a Ca(2+) influx and an elevated action potential-induced secretion, as assayed by the increase in membrane capacitance. These results suggest a functional significance for I(h) channels in modulating neuronal secretion by permitting Ca(2+) influx at negative membrane potentials.

  12. Differential contribution of TRPM4 and TRPM5 nonselective cation channels to the slow afterdepolarization in mouse prefrontal cortex neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Ting eLei

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In certain neurons from different brain regions, a brief burst of action potentials can activate a slow afterdepolarization (sADP in the presence of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonists. The sADP, if suprathreshold, can contribute to persistent non-accommodating firing in some of these neurons. Previous studies have characterized a Ca2+-activated non-selective cation (CAN current (ICAN that is thought to underlie the sADP. ICAN depends on muscarinic receptor stimulation and exhibits a dependence on neuronal activity, membrane depolarization and Ca2+-influx similar to that observed for the sADP. Despite the widespread occurrence of sADPs in neurons throughout the brain, the molecular identity of the ion channels underlying these events, as well as ICAN, remains uncertain. Here we used a combination of genetic, pharmacological and electrophysiological approaches to characterize the molecular mechanisms underlying the muscarinic receptor-dependent sADP in layer 5 pyramidal neurons of mouse prefrontal cortex. First, we confirmed that in the presence of the cholinergic agonist carbachol a brief burst of action potentials triggers a prominent sADP in these neurons. Second, we confirmed that this sADP requires activation of a PLC signaling cascade and intracellular calcium signaling. Third, we obtained direct evidence that the transient receptor potential melastatin 5 channel (TRPM5, which is thought to function as a CAN channel in non-neural cells, contributes importantly to the sADP in the layer 5 neurons. In contrast, the closely related TRPM4 channel may play only a minor role in the sADP.

  13. Differential contribution of TRPM4 and TRPM5 nonselective cation channels to the slow afterdepolarization in mouse prefrontal cortex neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Ya-Ting; Thuault, Sebastien J; Launay, Pierre; Margolskee, Robert F; Kandel, Eric R; Siegelbaum, Steven A

    2014-01-01

    In certain neurons from different brain regions, a brief burst of action potentials can activate a slow afterdepolarization (sADP) in the presence of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonists. The sADP, if suprathreshold, can contribute to persistent non-accommodating firing in some of these neurons. Previous studies have characterized a Ca(2+)-activated non-selective cation (CAN) current (ICAN ) that is thought to underlie the sADP. ICAN depends on muscarinic receptor stimulation and exhibits a dependence on neuronal activity, membrane depolarization and Ca(2+)-influx similar to that observed for the sADP. Despite the widespread occurrence of sADPs in neurons throughout the brain, the molecular identity of the ion channels underlying these events, as well as ICAN , remains uncertain. Here we used a combination of genetic, pharmacological and electrophysiological approaches to characterize the molecular mechanisms underlying the muscarinic receptor-dependent sADP in layer 5 pyramidal neurons of mouse prefrontal cortex. First, we confirmed that in the presence of the cholinergic agonist carbachol a brief burst of action potentials triggers a prominent sADP in these neurons. Second, we confirmed that this sADP requires activation of a PLC signaling cascade and intracellular calcium signaling. Third, we obtained direct evidence that the transient receptor potential (TRP) melastatin 5 channel (TRPM5), which is thought to function as a CAN channel in non-neural cells, contributes importantly to the sADP in the layer 5 neurons. In contrast, the closely related TRPM4 channel may play only a minor role in the sADP.

  14. A simple, highly efficient method for heterologous expression in mammalian primary neurons using cationic lipid-mediated mRNA transfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian J Williams

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Expression of heterologous proteins in adult mammalian neurons is a valuable technique for the study of neuronal function. The postmitotic nature of mature neurons prevents effective DNA transfection using simple, cationic lipid-based methods. Adequate heterologous protein expression is often only achievable using complex techniques that, in many cases, are associated with substantial toxicity. Here, a simple method for high efficiency transfection of mammalian primary neurons using in vitro-transcribed mRNA and the cationic lipid transfection reagent Lipofectamine 2000 is described. Optimal transfection conditions were established in adult mouse dissociated dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons using a 96-well based luciferase activity assay. Using these conditions, a transfection efficiency of 25% was achieved in DRG neurons transfected with EGFP mRNA. High transfection efficiencies were also obtained in dissociated rat superior cervical ganglion (SCG neurons and mouse cortical and hippocampal cultures. Endogenous Ca2+ currents in EGFP mRNA-transfected SCG neurons were not significantly different from untransfected neurons, which suggested that this technique is well suited for heterologous expression in patch clamp recording experiments. Functional expression of a cannabinoid receptor (CB1R, a G protein inwardly-rectifying K+ channel (GIRK4 and a dominant-negative G protein α-subunit mutant (GoA G203T indicate that the levels of heterologous protein expression attainable using mRNA transfection are suitable for most functional protein studies. This study demonstrates that mRNA transfection is a straightforward and effective method for heterologous expression in neurons and is likely to have many applications in neuroscience research.

  15. Organic cation transporter-mediated ergothioneine uptake in mouse neural progenitor cells suppresses proliferation and promotes differentiation into neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Ishimoto

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to clarify the functional expression and physiological role in neural progenitor cells (NPCs of carnitine/organic cation transporter OCTN1/SLC22A4, which accepts the naturally occurring food-derived antioxidant ergothioneine (ERGO as a substrate in vivo. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that mRNA expression of OCTN1 was much higher than that of other organic cation transporters in mouse cultured cortical NPCs. Immunocytochemical analysis showed colocalization of OCTN1 with the NPC marker nestin in cultured NPCs and mouse embryonic carcinoma P19 cells differentiated into neural progenitor-like cells (P19-NPCs. These cells exhibited time-dependent [(3H]ERGO uptake. These results demonstrate that OCTN1 is functionally expressed in murine NPCs. Cultured NPCs and P19-NPCs formed neurospheres from clusters of proliferating cells in a culture time-dependent manner. Exposure of cultured NPCs to ERGO or other antioxidants (edaravone and ascorbic acid led to a significant decrease in the area of neurospheres with concomitant elimination of intracellular reactive oxygen species. Transfection of P19-NPCs with small interfering RNA for OCTN1 markedly promoted formation of neurospheres with a concomitant decrease of [(3H]ERGO uptake. On the other hand, exposure of cultured NPCs to ERGO markedly increased the number of cells immunoreactive for the neuronal marker βIII-tubulin, but decreased the number immunoreactive for the astroglial marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, with concomitant up-regulation of neuronal differentiation activator gene Math1. Interestingly, edaravone and ascorbic acid did not affect such differentiation of NPCs, in contrast to the case of proliferation. Knockdown of OCTN1 increased the number of cells immunoreactive for GFAP, but decreased the number immunoreactive for βIII-tubulin, with concomitant down-regulation of Math1 in P19-NPCs. Thus, OCTN1-mediated uptake of ERGO in NPCs inhibits

  16. The Outwardly Rectifying Current of Layer 5 Neocortical Neurons that was Originally Identified as "Non-Specific Cationic" Is Essentially a Potassium Current.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Revah

    Full Text Available In whole-cell patch clamp recordings from layer 5 neocortical neurons, blockade of voltage gated sodium and calcium channels leaves a cesium current that is outward rectifying. This current was originally identified as a "non-specific cationic current", and subsequently it was hypothesized that it is mediated by TRP channels. In order to test this hypothesis, we used fluorescence imaging of intracellular sodium and calcium indicators, and found no evidence to suggest that it is associated with influx of either of these ions to the cell body or dendrites. Moreover, the current is still prominent in neurons from TRPC1-/- and TRPC5-/- mice. The effects on the current of various blocking agents, and especially its sensitivity to intracellular tetraethylammonium, suggest that it is not a non-specific cationic current, but rather that it is generated by cesium-permeable delayed rectifier potassium channels.

  17. Noisy-or classifier

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vomlel, Jiří

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 3 (2006), s. 381-389 ISSN 0884-8173 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA201/04/0393 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : automatic classification * probabilistic models * EM algorithm * noisy-or model Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics Impact factor: 0.429, year: 2006

  18. Cryptography from noisy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehner, Stephanie; Schaffner, Christian; Terhal, Barbara M

    2008-06-06

    We show how to implement cryptographic primitives based on the realistic assumption that quantum storage of qubits is noisy. We thereby consider individual-storage attacks; i.e., the dishonest party attempts to store each incoming qubit separately. Our model is similar to the model of bounded-quantum storage; however, we consider an explicit noise model inspired by present-day technology. To illustrate the power of this new model, we show that a protocol for oblivious transfer is secure for any amount of quantum-storage noise, as long as honest players can perform perfect quantum operations. Our model also allows us to show the security of protocols that cope with noise in the operations of the honest players and achieve more advanced tasks such as secure identification.

  19. Xanthurenic acid binds to neuronal G-protein-coupled receptors that secondarily activate cationic channels in the cell line NCB-20.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Taleb

    Full Text Available Xanthurenic acid (XA is a metabolite of the tryptophan oxidation pathway through kynurenine and 3-hydroxykynurenine. XA was until now considered as a detoxification compound and dead-end product reducing accumulation of reactive radical species. Apart from a specific role for XA in the signaling cascade resulting in gamete maturation in mosquitoes, nothing was known about its functions in other species including mammals. Based upon XA distribution, transport, accumulation and release in the rat brain, we have recently suggested that XA may potentially be involved in neurotransmission/neuromodulation, assuming that neurons presumably express specific XA receptors. Recently, it has been shown that XA could act as a positive allosteric ligand for class II metabotropic glutamate receptors. This finding reinforces the proposed signaling role of XA in brain. Our present results provide several lines of evidence in favor of the existence of specific receptors for XA in the brain. First, binding experiments combined with autoradiography and time-course analysis led to the characterization of XA binding sites in the rat brain. Second, specific kinetic and pharmacological properties exhibited by these binding sites are in favor of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR. Finally, in patch-clamp and calcium imaging experiments using NCB-20 cells that do not express glutamate-induced calcium signals, XA elicited specific responses involving activation of cationic channels and increases in intracellular Ca(2+ concentration. Altogether, these results suggest that XA, acting through a GPCR-induced cationic channel modulatory mechanism, may exert excitatory functions in various brain neuronal pathways.

  20. Identification of the endogenous key substrates of the human organic cation transporter OCT2 and their implication in function of dopaminergic neurons.

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    Dirk Taubert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The etiology of neurodegenerative disorders, such as the accelerated loss of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease, is unclear. Current hypotheses suggest an abnormal function of the neuronal sodium-dependent dopamine transporter DAT to contribute to cell death in the dopaminergic system, but it has not been investigated whether sodium-independent amine transporters are implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By the use of a novel tandem-mass spectrometry-based substrate search technique, we have shown that the dopaminergic neuromodulators histidyl-proline diketopiperazine (cyclo(his-pro and salsolinol were the endogenous key substrates of the sodium-independent organic cation transporter OCT2. Quantitative real-time mRNA expression analysis revealed that OCT2 in contrast to its related transporters was preferentially expressed in the dopaminergic regions of the substantia nigra where it colocalized with DAT and tyrosine hydroxylase. By assessing cell viability with the MTT reduction assay, we found that salsolinol exhibited a selective toxicity toward OCT2-expressing cells that was prevented by cyclo(his-pro. A frequent genetic variant of OCT2 with the amino acid substitution R400C reduced the transport efficiency for the cytoprotective cyclo(his-pro and thereby increased the susceptibility to salsolinol-induced cell death. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings indicate that the OCT2-regulated interplay between cyclo(his-pro and salsolinol is crucial for nigral cell integrity and that a shift in transport efficiency may impact the risk of Parkinson's disease.

  1. Noisy signaling: theory and experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, T.; Offerman, T.; Sloof, R.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate a noisy signaling game, in which nature adds random noise to the message chosen. Theoretically, with an unfavorable prior the separating equilibrium vanishes for low noise. It reappears for intermediate and high noise, where messages increase with noise. A pooling equilibrium always

  2. Actinide cation-cation complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoyer, N.J.; Seaborg, G.T.

    1994-12-01

    The +5 oxidation state of U, Np, Pu, and Am is a linear dioxo cation (AnO 2 + ) with a formal charge of +1. These cations form complexes with a variety of other cations, including actinide cations. Other oxidation states of actinides do not form these cation-cation complexes with any cation other than AnO 2 + ; therefore, cation-cation complexes indicate something unique about AnO 2 + cations compared to actinide cations in general. The first cation-cation complex, NpO 2 + ·UO 2 2+ , was reported by Sullivan, Hindman, and Zielen in 1961. Of the four actinides that form AnO 2 + species, the cation-cation complexes of NpO 2 + have been studied most extensively while the other actinides have not. The only PuO 2 + cation-cation complexes that have been studied are with Fe 3+ and Cr 3+ and neither one has had its equilibrium constant measured. Actinides have small molar absorptivities and cation-cation complexes have small equilibrium constants; therefore, to overcome these obstacles a sensitive technique is required. Spectroscopic techniques are used most often to study cation-cation complexes. Laser-Induced Photacoustic Spectroscopy equilibrium constants for the complexes NpO 2 + ·UO 2 2+ , NpO 2 + ·Th 4+ , PuO 2 + ·UO 2 2+ , and PuO 2 + ·Th 4+ at an ionic strength of 6 M using LIPAS are 2.4 ± 0.2, 1.8 ± 0.9, 2.2 ± 1.5, and ∼0.8 M -1

  3. Penguins and their noisy world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Aubin

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Penguins identify their mate or chick by an acoustic signal, the display call. This identification is realized in a particularly constraining environment: the noisy world of a colony of thousands of birds. To fully understand how birds solve this problem of communication, we have done observations, acoustic analysis, propagation and playback experiments with 6 species of penguins studied in the field. According to our results, it appears that penguins use a particularly efficient ''anti-confusion'' and ''anti-noise'' coding system, allowing a quick identification and localization of individuals on the move in a noisy crowd.Os pingüins identificam seu parceiro ou seu filhote através de um sinal acústico, o grito de exibição. Esta identificação está realizada num ambiente particularmente exigente: o mundo barulhento de uma colônia de milhares de aves. Para entender totalmente como essas aves resolvem este problema de comunicação, realizamos observações, análises acústicas e experiências de propagação e de ''play-back'' com 6 espécies de pingüins estudados no campo. Segundo nossos resultados, parece que os pingüins usam um sistema de codificação ''anti-confusão'' e ''anti-barulho'' particularmente eficiente, permitindo uma rápida identificação e localização dos indivíduos em movimento numa multidão barulhenta.

  4. Stabilization using both noisy and noiseless feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Sahai, Anant

    2006-01-01

    When designing a distributed control system, the system designer has a choice in how to connect the different units through communication channels. In practice, noiseless and noisy channels may coexist. Using the standard toy example of scalar stabilization, this paper shows how a small amount of noiseless feedback can perform a ``supervisory'' role and thereby boost the effectiveness of noisy feedback.

  5. Data Acquisition in Noisy Environments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ability to capture and record the low-level signals in the noisy environments typical of manned and unmanned space exploration missions will prove an invaluable...

  6. An edge extraction technique for noisy images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cios, K.J.; Sarieh, A.

    1990-01-01

    We present an algorithm for extracting edges from noisy images. Our method uses an unsupervised learning approach for local threshold computation by means of Pearson's method for mixture density identification. We tested the technique by applying it to computer-generated images corrupted with artificial noise and to an actual Thallium-201 heart image and it is shown that the technique has potential use for noisy images

  7. Identification of noisy response latency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamborrino, Massimiliano; Ditlevsen, Susanne; Lansky, Petr

    2012-08-01

    In many physical systems there is a time delay before an applied input (stimulation) has an impact on the output (response), and the quantification of this delay is of paramount interest. If the response can only be observed on top of an indistinguishable background signal, the estimation can be highly unreliable, unless the background signal is accounted for in the analysis. In fact, if the background signal is ignored, however small it is compared to the response and however large the delay is, the estimate of the time delay will go to zero for any reasonable estimator when increasing the number of observations. Here we propose a unified concept of response latency identification in event data corrupted by a background signal. It is done in the context of information transfer within a neural system, more specifically on spike trains from single neurons. The estimators are compared on simulated data and the most suitable for specific situations are recommended.

  8. Identification of noisy response latency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamborrino, Massimiliano; Ditlevsen, Susanne; Lansky, Petr

    2012-01-01

    the number of observations. Here we propose a unified concept of response latency identification in event data corrupted by a background signal. It is done in the context of information transfer within a neural system, more specifically on spike trains from single neurons. The estimators are compared......In many physical systems there is a time delay before an applied input (stimulation) has an impact on the output (response), and the quantification of this delay is of paramount interest. If the response can only be observed on top of an indistinguishable background signal, the estimation can...... be highly unreliable, unless the background signal is accounted for in the analysis. In fact, if the background signal is ignored, however small it is compared to the response and however large the delay is, the estimate of the time delay will go to zero for any reasonable estimator when increasing...

  9. Analyzing Evolutionary Optimization in Noisy Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Chao; Yu, Yang; Zhou, Zhi-Hua

    2018-01-01

    Many optimization tasks must be handled in noisy environments, where the exact evaluation of a solution cannot be obtained, only a noisy one. For optimization of noisy tasks, evolutionary algorithms (EAs), a type of stochastic metaheuristic search algorithm, have been widely and successfully applied. Previous work mainly focuses on the empirical study and design of EAs for optimization under noisy conditions, while the theoretical understandings are largely insufficient. In this study, we first investigate how noisy fitness can affect the running time of EAs. Two kinds of noise-helpful problems are identified, on which the EAs will run faster with the presence of noise, and thus the noise should not be handled. Second, on a representative noise-harmful problem in which the noise has a strong negative effect, we examine two commonly employed mechanisms dealing with noise in EAs: reevaluation and threshold selection. The analysis discloses that using these two strategies simultaneously is effective for the one-bit noise but ineffective for the asymmetric one-bit noise. Smooth threshold selection is then proposed, which can be proved to be an effective strategy to further improve the noise tolerance ability in the problem. We then complement the theoretical analysis by experiments on both synthetic problems as well as two combinatorial problems, the minimum spanning tree and the maximum matching. The experimental results agree with the theoretical findings and also show that the proposed smooth threshold selection can deal with the noise better.

  10. Global games with noisy sharing of information

    KAUST Repository

    Touri, Behrouz

    2014-12-15

    We provide a framework for the study of global games with noisy sharing of information. In contrast to the previous works where it is shown that an intuitive threshold policy is an equilibrium for such games, we show that noisy sharing of information leads to non-existence of such an equilibrium. We also investigate the group best-response dynamics of two groups of agents sharing the same information to threshold policies based on each group\\'s observation and show the convergence of such dynamics.

  11. Reentrant transition in coupled noisy oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yasuaki; Kori, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    We report on a synchronization-breaking instability observed in a noisy oscillator unidirectionally coupled to a pacemaker. Using a phase oscillator model, we find that, as the coupling strength is increased, the noisy oscillator lags behind the pacemaker more frequently and the phase slip rate increases, which may not be observed in averaged phase models such as the Kuramoto model. Investigation of the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation enables us to obtain the reentrant transition line between the synchronized state and the phase slip state. We verify our theory using the Brusselator model, suggesting that this reentrant transition can be found in a wide range of limit cycle oscillators.

  12. Multiple Equilibria in Noisy Rational Expectations Economies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pálvölgyi, Dömötör; Venter, Gyuri

    This paper studies equilibrium uniqueness in standard noisy rational expectations economies with asymmetric or differential information a la Grossman and Stiglitz (1980) and Hellwig (1980). We show that the standard linear equilibrium of Grossman and Stiglitz (1980) is the unique equilibrium with...

  13. Radical cations in condensed phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Symons, M.C.R. (Leicester Univ. (UK). Dept. of Chemistry)

    The subject is covered in sections, entitled: introduction (scope of present Review); preparative procedures; alkane and cycloalkane cations; alkene and cyclic alkene cations; alkyl-halide cations; alcohol and ether cations; carbonyl cations (aldehyde, ketone and ester cations); sulphur-centred cations; selenium-centred cations; nitrogen-centred cations; phosphorus-centred cations; tin- and lead-centred cations; aromatic cations; five membered hetero-aromatic cations; vinyl cations; inorganic cations.

  14. Characterization of emergent synaptic topologies in noisy neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Aaron James

    of a LIF neuron subjected to Gaussian white noise (GWN). The system reduces to the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck first passage time problem, the solution of which we build into the mapping method of Chapter 2. We demonstrate that simulations using the stochastic mapping have reduced computation time compared to traditional Runge-Kutta methods by more than a factor of 150. In Chapter 4, we use the stochastic mapping to study the dynamics of emerging synaptic topologies in noisy networks. With the addition of membrane noise, networks with dynamical synapses can admit states in which the distribution of the synaptic weights is static under spontaneous activity, but the random connectivity between neurons is dynamical. The widely cited problem of instabilities in networks with STDP is avoided with the implementation of a synaptic decay and an activation threshold on each synapse. When such networks are presented with stimulus modeled by a focused excitatory current, chain-like networks can emerge with the addition of an axon-remodeling plasticity rule, a topological constraint on the connectivity modeling the finite resources available to each neuron. The emergent topologies are the result of an iterative stochastic process. The dynamics of the growth process suggest a strong interplay between the network topology and the spike sequences they produce during development. Namely, the existence of an embedded spike sequence alters the distribution of synaptic weights through the entire network. The roles of model parameters that affect the interplay between network structure and activity are elucidated. Finally, we propose two mathematical growth models, which are complementary, that capture the essence of the growth dynamics observed in simulations. In Chapter 5, we present an extension of the stochastic mapping that allows the possibility of neuronal cooperation. We demonstrate that synaptic topologies admitting stereotypical sequences can emerge in yet higher, biologically

  15. On covariance structure in noisy, big data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paffenroth, Randy C.; Nong, Ryan; Du Toit, Philip C.

    2013-09-01

    Herein we describe theory and algorithms for detecting covariance structures in large, noisy data sets. Our work uses ideas from matrix completion and robust principal component analysis to detect the presence of low-rank covariance matrices, even when the data is noisy, distorted by large corruptions, and only partially observed. In fact, the ability to handle partial observations combined with ideas from randomized algorithms for matrix decomposition enables us to produce asymptotically fast algorithms. Herein we will provide numerical demonstrations of the methods and their convergence properties. While such methods have applicability to many problems, including mathematical finance, crime analysis, and other large-scale sensor fusion problems, our inspiration arises from applying these methods in the context of cyber network intrusion detection.

  16. Generalizations of the noisy-or model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vomlel, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 3 (2015), s. 508-524 ISSN 0023-5954 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-20012S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Bayesian networks * noisy-or model * classification * generalized linear models Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics Impact factor: 0.628, year: 2015 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2015/MTR/vomlel-0447357.pdf

  17. Neural network approaches for noisy language modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Ouazzane, Karim; Kazemian, Hassan B; Afzal, Muhammad Sajid

    2013-11-01

    Text entry from people is not only grammatical and distinct, but also noisy. For example, a user's typing stream contains all the information about the user's interaction with computer using a QWERTY keyboard, which may include the user's typing mistakes as well as specific vocabulary, typing habit, and typing performance. In particular, these features are obvious in disabled users' typing streams. This paper proposes a new concept called noisy language modeling by further developing information theory and applies neural networks to one of its specific application-typing stream. This paper experimentally uses a neural network approach to analyze the disabled users' typing streams both in general and specific ways to identify their typing behaviors and subsequently, to make typing predictions and typing corrections. In this paper, a focused time-delay neural network (FTDNN) language model, a time gap model, a prediction model based on time gap, and a probabilistic neural network model (PNN) are developed. A 38% first hitting rate (HR) and a 53% first three HR in symbol prediction are obtained based on the analysis of a user's typing history through the FTDNN language modeling, while the modeling results using the time gap prediction model and the PNN model demonstrate that the correction rates lie predominantly in between 65% and 90% with the current testing samples, and 70% of all test scores above basic correction rates, respectively. The modeling process demonstrates that a neural network is a suitable and robust language modeling tool to analyze the noisy language stream. The research also paves the way for practical application development in areas such as informational analysis, text prediction, and error correction by providing a theoretical basis of neural network approaches for noisy language modeling.

  18. Hawking effects as a noisy quantum channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Doyeol

    2018-01-01

    In this work, we have shown that the evolution of the bipartite entangled state near the black hole with the Hawking radiation can be described by a noisy quantum channel, having a complete positive map with an "operator sum representation." The entanglement fidelity is obtained in analytic form from the "operator sum representation." The bipartite entangled state becomes bipartite mixed Gaussian state as the black hole evaporates. By comparing negativity and entanglement monotone with the analytical form of the entanglement fidelity, we found that the negativity and the entanglement monotone for s = 1/2 provide the upper and the lower bounds of the entanglement fidelity, respectively.

  19. A Noisy 10GB Provenance Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheah, You-Wei; Plale, Beth; Kendall-Morwick, Joey; Leake, David; Ramakrishnan, Lavanya

    2011-06-06

    Provenance of scientific data is a key piece of the metadata record for the data's ongoing discovery and reuse. Provenance collection systems capture provenance on the fly, however, the protocol between application and provenance tool may not be reliable. Consequently, the provenance record can be partial, partitioned, and simply inaccurate. We use a workflow emulator that models faults to construct a large 10GB database of provenance that we know is noisy (that is, has errors). We discuss the process of generating the provenance database, and show early results on the kinds of provenance analysis enabled by the large provenance.

  20. Efficient Filtering of Noisy Fingerprint Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Liliana Costin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fingerprint identification is an important field in the wide domain of biometrics with many applications, in different areas such: judicial, mobile phones, access systems, airports. There are many elaborated algorithms for fingerprint identification, but none of them can guarantee that the results of identification are always 100 % accurate. A first step in a fingerprint image analysing process consists in the pre-processing or filtering. If the result after this step is not by a good quality the upcoming identification process can fail. A major difficulty can appear in case of fingerprint identification if the images that should be identified from a fingerprint image database are noisy with different type of noise. The objectives of the paper are: the successful completion of the noisy digital image filtering, a novel more robust algorithm of identifying the best filtering algorithm and the classification and ranking of the images. The choice about the best filtered images of a set of 9 algorithms is made with a dual method of fuzzy and aggregation model. We are proposing through this paper a set of 9 filters with different novelty designed for processing the digital images using the following methods: quartiles, medians, average, thresholds and histogram equalization, applied all over the image or locally on small areas. Finally the statistics reveal the classification and ranking of the best algorithms.

  1. Continuous Variables Quantum Information in Noisy Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berni, Adriano

    The technological progress of the last few decades has brought us the ability of exploiting quantum effects to accomplish a variety of relevant tasks. Yet, quantum phenomena are fragile, and with the ability to engineer quantum information protocols comes the problem of keeping such information...... safe from the detrimental effects of noise and losses. In the present work we investigate continuous variables Gaussian quantum information in noisy environments, studying the effects of various noise sources in the cases of a quantum metrological task, an error correction scheme and discord......-type correlations. We engage each of the topics from a theoretical point of view, successively delving into the details of the experimental realizations and concluding with a survey of the results. In particular, we present experimental implementation of an ab initio, deterministic, real-time adaptive phase...

  2. A segmentation algorithm for noisy images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Y.; Olman, V.; Uberbacher, E.C.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a 2-D image segmentation algorithm and addresses issues related to its performance on noisy images. The algorithm segments an image by first constructing a minimum spanning tree representation of the image and then partitioning the spanning tree into sub-trees representing different homogeneous regions. The spanning tree is partitioned in such a way that the sum of gray-level variations over all partitioned subtrees is minimized under the constraints that each subtree has at least a specified number of pixels and two adjacent subtrees have significantly different ``average`` gray-levels. Two types of noise, transmission errors and Gaussian additive noise. are considered and their effects on the segmentation algorithm are studied. Evaluation results have shown that the segmentation algorithm is robust in the presence of these two types of noise.

  3. Noisy signal filtration using complex wavelet basis sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaseen, A. S.; Pavlova, O. N.; Pavlov, A. N.

    2017-07-01

    Methods of noisy signal filtration using a discrete wavelet transform (DWT) with real basis sets of the Daubechies family are compared to methods employing a double-density dual-tree complex wavelet transform (DDCWT) with excess (nonorthonormalized) basis sets. Recommendations concerning the choice of filter parameters for minimization of the error of noisy signal filtration are formulated.

  4. Learning from Weak and Noisy Labels for Semantic Segmentation

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Zhiwu

    2016-04-08

    A weakly supervised semantic segmentation (WSSS) method aims to learn a segmentation model from weak (image-level) as opposed to strong (pixel-level) labels. By avoiding the tedious pixel-level annotation process, it can exploit the unlimited supply of user-tagged images from media-sharing sites such as Flickr for large scale applications. However, these ‘free’ tags/labels are often noisy and few existing works address the problem of learning with both weak and noisy labels. In this work, we cast the WSSS problem into a label noise reduction problem. Specifically, after segmenting each image into a set of superpixels, the weak and potentially noisy image-level labels are propagated to the superpixel level resulting in highly noisy labels; the key to semantic segmentation is thus to identify and correct the superpixel noisy labels. To this end, a novel L1-optimisation based sparse learning model is formulated to directly and explicitly detect noisy labels. To solve the L1-optimisation problem, we further develop an efficient learning algorithm by introducing an intermediate labelling variable. Extensive experiments on three benchmark datasets show that our method yields state-of-the-art results given noise-free labels, whilst significantly outperforming the existing methods when the weak labels are also noisy.

  5. Noisy non-transitive quantum games

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramzan, M; Khan, Salman; Khan, M Khalid

    2010-01-01

    We study the effect of quantum noise in 3 x 3 entangled quantum games. By taking into account different noisy quantum channels, we analyze how a two-player, three-strategy Rock-Scissor-Paper game is influenced by the quantum noise. We consider the winning non-transitive strategies R, S and P such that R beats S, S beats P and P beats R. The game behaves as a noiseless game for the maximum value of the quantum noise. It is seen that Alice's payoff is heavily influenced by the depolarizing noise as compared to the amplitude damping noise. A depolarizing channel causes a monotonic decrease in players' payoffs as we increase the amount of quantum noise. In the case of the amplitude damping channel, Alice's payoff function reaches its minimum for α = 0.5 and is symmetrical. This means that larger values of quantum noise influence the game weakly. On the other hand, the phase damping channel does not influence the game. Furthermore, the Nash equilibrium and non-transitive character of the game are not affected under the influence of quantum noise.

  6. Noisy signaling through promoter logic gates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstung, Moritz; Timmer, Jens; Fleck, Christian

    2009-01-01

    We study the influence of noisy transcription factor signals on cis-regulatory promoter elements. These elements process the probability of binary binding events analogous to computer logic gates. At equilibrium, this probability is given by the so-called input function. We show that transcription factor noise causes deviations from the equilibrium value due to the nonlinearity of the input function. For a single binding site, the correction is always negative resulting in an occupancy below the mean-field level. Yet for more complex promoters it depends on the correlation of the transcription factor signals and the geometry of the input function. We present explicit solutions for the basic types of AND and OR gates. The correction size varies among these different types of gates and signal types, mainly being larger in AND gates and for correlated fluctuations. In all cases we find excellent agreement between the analytical results and numerical simulations. We also study the E. coli Lac operon as an example of an AND NOR gate. We present a consistent mathematical method that allows one to separate different sources of noise and quantifies their effect on promoter occupation. A surprising result of our analysis is that Poissonian molecular fluctuations, in contrast to external fluctuations, do no contribute to the correction.

  7. Isomerization of propargyl cation to cyclopropenyl cation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    step) for isomerization of the linear propargyl cation to the aromatic cyclopropenyl cation, also probing the phenomenon of solvation of this reaction by simple lone pair donors (NH3, H2O, H2S and HF) which bind to the substrate at two sites.

  8. Effect of lateral connections on the accuracy of the population code for a network of spiking neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Spiridon, M.; Gerstner, W.

    2001-01-01

    We study how neuronal connections in a population of spiking neurons affect the accuracy of stimulus estimation. Neurons in our model code for a one-dimensional orientation variable $\\phi$. Connectivity between two neurons depends on the absolute difference $|\\phi-\\phi'|$ between the preferred orientation of the two neurons. We derive an analytical expression of the activity profile for a population of neurons described by the spike response model with noisy threshold. We estimate the stimulu...

  9. Threshold policy for global games with noisy information sharing

    KAUST Repository

    Mahdavifar, Hessam

    2015-12-15

    It is known that global games with noisy sharing of information do not admit a certain type of threshold policies [1]. Motivated by this result, we investigate the existence of threshold-type policies on global games with noisy sharing of information and show that such equilibrium strategies exist and are unique if the sharing of information happens over a sufficiently noisy environment. To show this result, we establish that if a threshold function is an equilibrium strategy, then it will be a solution to a fixed point equation. Then, we show that for a sufficiently noisy environment, the functional fixed point equation leads to a contraction mapping, and hence, its iterations converge to a unique continuous threshold policy.

  10. Badapple: promiscuity patterns from noisy evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jeremy J; Ursu, Oleg; Lipinski, Christopher A; Sklar, Larry A; Oprea, Tudor I; Bologa, Cristian G

    2016-01-01

    Bioassay data analysis continues to be an essential, routine, yet challenging task in modern drug discovery and chemical biology research. The challenge is to infer reliable knowledge from big and noisy data. Some aspects of this problem are general with solutions informed by existing and emerging data science best practices. Some aspects are domain specific, and rely on expertise in bioassay methodology and chemical biology. Testing compounds for biological activity requires complex and innovative methodology, producing results varying widely in accuracy, precision, and information content. Hit selection criteria involve optimizing such that the overall probability of success in a project is maximized, and resource-wasteful "false trails" are avoided. This "fail-early" approach is embraced both in pharmaceutical and academic drug discovery, since follow-up capacity is resource-limited. Thus, early identification of likely promiscuous compounds has practical value. Here we describe an algorithm for identifying likely promiscuous compounds via associated scaffolds which combines general and domain-specific features to assist and accelerate drug discovery informatics, called Badapple: bioassay-data associative promiscuity pattern learning engine. Results are described from an analysis using data from MLP assays via the BioAssay Research Database (BARD) http://bard.nih.gov. Specific examples are analyzed in the context of medicinal chemistry, to illustrate associations with mechanisms of promiscuity. Badapple has been developed at UNM, released and deployed for public use two ways: (1) BARD plugin, integrated into the public BARD REST API and BARD web client; and (2) public web app hosted at UNM. Badapple is a method for rapidly identifying likely promiscuous compounds via associated scaffolds. Badapple generates a score associated with a pragmatic, empirical definition of promiscuity, with the overall goal to identify "false trails" and streamline workflows. Unlike

  11. Mean-field behavior as a result of noisy local dynamics in self-organized criticality: Neuroscience implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi, S. Amin; Montakhab, Afshin

    2014-05-01

    Motivated by recent experiments in neuroscience which indicate that neuronal avalanches exhibit scale invariant behavior similar to self-organized critical systems, we study the role of noisy (nonconservative) local dynamics on the critical behavior of a sandpile model which can be taken to mimic the dynamics of neuronal avalanches. We find that despite the fact that noise breaks the strict local conservation required to attain criticality, our system exhibits true criticality for a wide range of noise in various dimensions, given that conservation is respected on the average. Although the system remains critical, exhibiting finite-size scaling, the value of critical exponents change depending on the intensity of local noise. Interestingly, for a sufficiently strong noise level, the critical exponents approach and saturate at their mean-field values, consistent with empirical measurements of neuronal avalanches. This is confirmed for both two and three dimensional models. However, the addition of noise does not affect the exponents at the upper critical dimension (D =4). In addition to an extensive finite-size scaling analysis of our systems, we also employ a useful time-series analysis method to establish true criticality of noisy systems. Finally, we discuss the implications of our work in neuroscience as well as some implications for the general phenomena of criticality in nonequilibrium systems.

  12. Simulation of noisy dynamical system by Deep Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Kyongmin

    2017-11-01

    Deep learning has attracted huge attention due to its powerful representation capability. However, most of the studies on deep learning have been focused on visual analytics or language modeling and the capability of the deep learning in modeling dynamical systems is not well understood. In this study, we use a recurrent neural network to model noisy nonlinear dynamical systems. In particular, we use a long short-term memory (LSTM) network, which constructs internal nonlinear dynamics systems. We propose a cross-entropy loss with spatial ridge regularization to learn a non-stationary conditional probability distribution from a noisy nonlinear dynamical system. A Monte Carlo procedure to perform time-marching simulations by using the LSTM is presented. The behavior of the LSTM is studied by using noisy, forced Van der Pol oscillator and Ikeda equation.

  13. Active learning for noisy oracle via density power divergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogawa, Yasuhiro; Ueno, Tsuyoshi; Kawahara, Yoshinobu; Washio, Takashi

    2013-10-01

    The accuracy of active learning is critically influenced by the existence of noisy labels given by a noisy oracle. In this paper, we propose a novel pool-based active learning framework through robust measures based on density power divergence. By minimizing density power divergence, such as β-divergence and γ-divergence, one can estimate the model accurately even under the existence of noisy labels within data. Accordingly, we develop query selecting measures for pool-based active learning using these divergences. In addition, we propose an evaluation scheme for these measures based on asymptotic statistical analyses, which enables us to perform active learning by evaluating an estimation error directly. Experiments with benchmark datasets and real-world image datasets show that our active learning scheme performs better than several baseline methods. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Isomerization of propargyl cation to cyclopropenyl cation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    step) for isomeri- zation of the linear propargyl cation to ..... C3, C4 and C5. The ZPE corrections in each case are derived from the. B3LYP calculations. ..... the converse of which gives the relative capacity of the. LPD's to stabilize TS6 with respect ...

  15. Power laws from linear neuronal cable theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pettersen, Klas H; Lindén, Henrik Anders; Tetzlaff, Tom

    2014-01-01

    suggested to be at the root of this phenomenon, we here demonstrate a possible origin of such power laws in the biophysical properties of single neurons described by the standard cable equation. Taking advantage of the analytical tractability of the so called ball and stick neuron model, we derive general...... expressions for the PSD transfer functions for a set of measures of neuronal activity: the soma membrane current, the current-dipole moment (corresponding to the single-neuron EEG contribution), and the soma membrane potential. These PSD transfer functions relate the PSDs of the respective measurements...... to the PSDs of the noisy input currents. With homogeneously distributed input currents across the neuronal membrane we find that all PSD transfer functions express asymptotic high-frequency [Formula: see text] power laws with power-law exponents analytically identified as [Formula: see text] for the soma...

  16. Information transmission with spiking Bayesian neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochmann, Timm; Deneve, Sophie

    2008-01-01

    Spike trains of cortical neurons resulting from repeatedpresentations of a stimulus are variable and exhibit Poisson-like statistics. Many models of neural coding therefore assumed that sensory information is contained in instantaneous firing rates, not spike times. Here, we ask how much information about time-varying stimuli can be transmitted by spiking neurons with such input and output variability. In particular, does this variability imply spike generation to be intrinsically stochastic? We consider a model neuron that estimates optimally the current state of a time-varying binary variable (e.g. presence of a stimulus) by integrating incoming spikes. The unit signals its current estimate to other units with spikes whenever the estimate increased by a fixed amount. As shown previously, this computation results in integrate and fire dynamics with Poisson-like output spike trains. This output variability is entirely due to the stochastic input rather than noisy spike generation. As a result such a deterministic neuron can transmit most of the information about the time varying stimulus. This contrasts with a standard model of sensory neurons, the linear-nonlinear Poisson (LNP) model which assumes that most variability in output spike trains is due to stochastic spike generation. Although it yields the same firing statistics, we found that such noisy firing results in the loss of most information. Finally, we use this framework to compare potential effects of top-down attention versus bottom-up saliency on information transfer with spiking neurons

  17. Iterative estimation of the background in noisy spectroscopic data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, M.H. [Space Exploration Laboratory, Macao University of Science and Technology, Taipa (Macao)], E-mail: peter_zu@163.com; Liu, L.G.; Cheng, Y.S.; Dong, T.K.; You, Z.; Xu, A.A. [Space Exploration Laboratory, Macao University of Science and Technology, Taipa (Macao)

    2009-04-21

    In this paper, we present an iterative filtering method to estimate the background of noisy spectroscopic data. The proposed method avoids the calculation of the average full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the whole spectrum and the peak regions, and it can estimate the background efficiently, especially for spectroscopic data with the Compton continuum.

  18. On Distributed Computation in Noisy Random Planar Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Kanoria, Y.; Manjunath, D.

    2007-01-01

    We consider distributed computation of functions of distributed data in random planar networks with noisy wireless links. We present a new algorithm for computation of the maximum value which is order optimal in the number of transmissions and computation time.We also adapt the histogram computation algorithm of Ying et al to make the histogram computation time optimal.

  19. Consensus of Multiagent Systems with Sampled Information and Noisy Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao-Jun Tang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider consensus problems of first-order multiagent systems with sampled information and noisy measurements. A distributed stochastic approximation type algorithm is employed to attenuate the measurement noises. We provide conditions under which almost sure strong consensus is guaranteed for fixed and switching directed network topologies. Simulation results are provided to illustrate the theoretical results.

  20. Data and Network Science for Noisy Heterogeneous Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Andrew Kent

    2013-01-01

    Data in many growing fields has an underlying network structure that can be taken advantage of. In this dissertation we apply data and network science to problems in the domains of systems biology and healthcare. Data challenges in these fields include noisy, heterogeneous data, and a lack of ground truth. The primary thesis of this work is that…

  1. The Quantum Steganography Protocol via Quantum Noisy Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhan-Hong; Chen, Xiu-Bo; Niu, Xin-Xin; Yang, Yi-Xian

    2015-08-01

    As a promising branch of quantum information hiding, Quantum steganography aims to transmit secret messages covertly in public quantum channels. But due to environment noise and decoherence, quantum states easily decay and change. Therefore, it is very meaningful to make a quantum information hiding protocol apply to quantum noisy channels. In this paper, we make the further research on a quantum steganography protocol for quantum noisy channels. The paper proved that the protocol can apply to transmit secret message covertly in quantum noisy channels, and explicity showed quantum steganography protocol. In the protocol, without publishing the cover data, legal receivers can extract the secret message with a certain probability, which make the protocol have a good secrecy. Moreover, our protocol owns the independent security, and can be used in general quantum communications. The communication, which happen in our protocol, do not need entangled states, so our protocol can be used without the limitation of entanglement resource. More importantly, the protocol apply to quantum noisy channels, and can be used widely in the future quantum communication.

  2. Cation Exchange Water Softeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    WaterSense released a notice of intent to develop a specification for cation exchange water softeners. The program has made the decision not to move forward with a spec at this time, but is making this information available.

  3. Cation-cation interaction in neptunyl(V) compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krot, N.N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physical Chemistry (Russian Federation); Saeki, Masakatsu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The original manuscript was prepared by Professor N.N. Krot of Institute of Physical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, in 1997. Saeki tried to translate that into Japanese and to add some new data since 1997. The contents include the whole picture of cation-cation interactions mainly in 5-valence neptunium compounds. Firstly, characteristic structures of neptunium are summarized of the cation-cation bonding in compounds. Secondly, it is mentioned how the cation-cation bonding affects physical and chemical properties of the compounds. Then, characterization-methods for the cation-cation bonding in the compounds are discussed. Finally, the cation-cation interactions in compounds of other actinide-ions are shortly reviewed. (author)

  4. An integrated approach to improving noisy speech perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koval, Serguei; Stolbov, Mikhail; Smirnova, Natalia; Khitrov, Mikhail

    2002-05-01

    For a number of practical purposes and tasks, experts have to decode speech recordings of very poor quality. A combination of techniques is proposed to improve intelligibility and quality of distorted speech messages and thus facilitate their comprehension. Along with the application of noise cancellation and speech signal enhancement techniques removing and/or reducing various kinds of distortions and interference (primarily unmasking and normalization in time and frequency fields), the approach incorporates optimal listener expert tactics based on selective listening, nonstandard binaural listening, accounting for short-term and long-term human ear adaptation to noisy speech, as well as some methods of speech signal enhancement to support speech decoding during listening. The approach integrating the suggested techniques ensures high-quality ultimate results and has successfully been applied by Speech Technology Center experts and by numerous other users, mainly forensic institutions, to perform noisy speech records decoding for courts, law enforcement and emergency services, accident investigation bodies, etc.

  5. Zealots in the mean-field noisy voter model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Nagi; San Miguel, Maxi; Toral, Raul

    2018-01-01

    The influence of zealots on the noisy voter model is studied theoretically and numerically at the mean-field level. The noisy voter model is a modification of the voter model that includes a second mechanism for transitions between states: Apart from the original herding processes, voters may change their states because of an intrinsic noisy-in-origin source. By increasing the importance of the noise with respect to the herding, the system exhibits a finite-size phase transition from a quasiconsensus state, where most of the voters share the same opinion, to one with coexistence. Upon introducing some zealots, or voters with fixed opinion, the latter scenario may change significantly. We unveil new situations by carrying out a systematic numerical and analytical study of a fully connected network for voters, but allowing different voters to be directly influenced by different zealots. We show that this general system is equivalent to a system of voters without zealots, but with heterogeneous values of their parameters characterizing herding and noisy dynamics. We find excellent agreement between our analytical and numerical results. Noise and herding or zealotry acting together in the voter model yields a nontrivial mixture of the scenarios with the two mechanisms acting alone: It represents a situation where the global-local (noise-herding) competition is coupled to a symmetry breaking (zealots). In general, the zealotry enhances the effective noise of the system, which may destroy the original quasiconsensus state, and can introduce a bias towards the opinion of the majority of zealots, hence breaking the symmetry of the system and giving rise to new phases. In the most general case we find two different transitions: a discontinuous transition from an asymmetric bimodal phase to an extreme asymmetric phase and a second continuous transition from the extreme asymmetric phase to an asymmetric unimodal phase.

  6. Effective stimuli for constructing reliable neuron models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaul Druckmann

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The rich dynamical nature of neurons poses major conceptual and technical challenges for unraveling their nonlinear membrane properties. Traditionally, various current waveforms have been injected at the soma to probe neuron dynamics, but the rationale for selecting specific stimuli has never been rigorously justified. The present experimental and theoretical study proposes a novel framework, inspired by learning theory, for objectively selecting the stimuli that best unravel the neuron's dynamics. The efficacy of stimuli is assessed in terms of their ability to constrain the parameter space of biophysically detailed conductance-based models that faithfully replicate the neuron's dynamics as attested by their ability to generalize well to the neuron's response to novel experimental stimuli. We used this framework to evaluate a variety of stimuli in different types of cortical neurons, ages and animals. Despite their simplicity, a set of stimuli consisting of step and ramp current pulses outperforms synaptic-like noisy stimuli in revealing the dynamics of these neurons. The general framework that we propose paves a new way for defining, evaluating and standardizing effective electrical probing of neurons and will thus lay the foundation for a much deeper understanding of the electrical nature of these highly sophisticated and non-linear devices and of the neuronal networks that they compose.

  7. Magnitude estimation with noisy integrators linked by an adaptive reference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay eThurley

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Judgments of physical stimuli show characteristic biases; relatively small stimuli are overestimated whereas relatively large stimuli are underestimated (regression effect. Such biases likely result from a strategy that seeks to minimize errors given noisy estimates about stimuli that itself are drawn from a distribution, i.e., the statistics of the environment. While being conceptually well described, it is unclear how such a strategy could be implemented neurally. The present paper aims towards answering this question. A theoretical approach is introduced that describes magnitude estimation as two successive stages of noisy (neural integration. Both stages are linked by a reference memory that is updated with every new stimulus. The model reproduces the behavioral characteristics of magnitude estimation and makes several experimentally testable predictions. Moreover, the model identifies the regression effect as a means of minimizing estimation errors and explains how this optimality strategy depends on the subject's discrimination abilities and on the stimulus statistics. The latter influence predicts another property of magnitude estimation, the so-called range effect. Beyond being successful in describing decision-making, the present work suggests that noisy integration may also be important in processing magnitudes.

  8. Shape adaptive, robust iris feature extraction from noisy iris images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodrati, Hamed; Dehghani, Mohammad Javad; Danyali, Habibolah

    2013-10-01

    In the current iris recognition systems, noise removing step is only used to detect noisy parts of the iris region and features extracted from there will be excluded in matching step. Whereas depending on the filter structure used in feature extraction, the noisy parts may influence relevant features. To the best of our knowledge, the effect of noise factors on feature extraction has not been considered in the previous works. This paper investigates the effect of shape adaptive wavelet transform and shape adaptive Gabor-wavelet for feature extraction on the iris recognition performance. In addition, an effective noise-removing approach is proposed in this paper. The contribution is to detect eyelashes and reflections by calculating appropriate thresholds by a procedure called statistical decision making. The eyelids are segmented by parabolic Hough transform in normalized iris image to decrease computational burden through omitting rotation term. The iris is localized by an accurate and fast algorithm based on coarse-to-fine strategy. The principle of mask code generation is to assign the noisy bits in an iris code in order to exclude them in matching step is presented in details. An experimental result shows that by using the shape adaptive Gabor-wavelet technique there is an improvement on the accuracy of recognition rate.

  9. Noisy Ocular Recognition Based on Three Convolutional Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Beom Lee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the iris recognition system has been gaining increasing acceptance for applications such as access control and smartphone security. When the images of the iris are obtained under unconstrained conditions, an issue of undermined quality is caused by optical and motion blur, off-angle view (the user’s eyes looking somewhere else, not into the front of the camera, specular reflection (SR and other factors. Such noisy iris images increase intra-individual variations and, as a result, reduce the accuracy of iris recognition. A typical iris recognition system requires a near-infrared (NIR illuminator along with an NIR camera, which are larger and more expensive than fingerprint recognition equipment. Hence, many studies have proposed methods of using iris images captured by a visible light camera without the need for an additional illuminator. In this research, we propose a new recognition method for noisy iris and ocular images by using one iris and two periocular regions, based on three convolutional neural networks (CNNs. Experiments were conducted by using the noisy iris challenge evaluation-part II (NICE.II training dataset (selected from the university of Beira iris (UBIRIS.v2 database, mobile iris challenge evaluation (MICHE database, and institute of automation of Chinese academy of sciences (CASIA-Iris-Distance database. As a result, the method proposed by this study outperformed previous methods.

  10. Neuroscience-inspired computational systems for speech recognition under noisy conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Phillip B.

    Humans routinely recognize speech in challenging acoustic environments with background music, engine sounds, competing talkers, and other acoustic noise. However, today's automatic speech recognition (ASR) systems perform poorly in such environments. In this dissertation, I present novel methods for ASR designed to approach human-level performance by emulating the brain's processing of sounds. I exploit recent advances in auditory neuroscience to compute neuron-based representations of speech, and design novel methods for decoding these representations to produce word transcriptions. I begin by considering speech representations modeled on the spectrotemporal receptive fields of auditory neurons. These representations can be tuned to optimize a variety of objective functions, which characterize the response properties of a neural population. I propose an objective function that explicitly optimizes the noise invariance of the neural responses, and find that it gives improved performance on an ASR task in noise compared to other objectives. The method as a whole, however, fails to significantly close the performance gap with humans. I next consider speech representations that make use of spiking model neurons. The neurons in this method are feature detectors that selectively respond to spectrotemporal patterns within short time windows in speech. I consider a number of methods for training the response properties of the neurons. In particular, I present a method using linear support vector machines (SVMs) and show that this method produces spikes that are robust to additive noise. I compute the spectrotemporal receptive fields of the neurons for comparison with previous physiological results. To decode the spike-based speech representations, I propose two methods designed to work on isolated word recordings. The first method uses a classical ASR technique based on the hidden Markov model. The second method is a novel template-based recognition scheme that takes

  11. Identifi cation of Sectarianism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinovich Vladimir

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available «New religious movements and society» is traditionally one of the most sophisticated topics in the area of new religions studies. Its problem field is so huge that up to now by far not all important research themes where even touched by scientists from all over the world. The problem of the process of the identification of sectarianism by diff erent societal institutions is one of such untouched themes that is taken as the main subject of this article. This process by itself is an inseparable part of the every societal deliberate reaction to the very existence of unconventional religiosity, its unstructured and mainly structured types. The focal point of the article is step-by-step analysis of the general structure elements of the process of the identification of sectarianism without any reference to the specific time and place of its flow. Special attention is paid to the analysis of the subjects of the identification of sectarianism, to the criteria for religious groups to be qualified as new religious movements, and to the specific features of the process of documents filtration. The causes of selective perception of sectarianism are disclosed. Some main consequences and unpredictable outcomes of the process of the identification of sectarianism are described.

  12. Optimized dynamical control of state transfer through noisy spin chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Analia; Álvarez, Gonzalo A.; Bensky, Guy; Kurizki, Gershon

    2014-06-01

    We propose a method of optimally controlling the tradeoff of speed and fidelity of state transfer through a noisy quantum channel (spin-chain). This process is treated as qubit state-transfer through a fermionic bath. We show that dynamical modulation of the boundary-qubits levels can ensure state transfer with the best tradeoff of speed and fidelity. This is achievable by dynamically optimizing the transmission spectrum of the channel. The resulting optimal control is robust against both static and fluctuating noise in the channel's spin-spin couplings. It may also facilitate transfer in the presence of diagonal disorder (on site energy noise) in the channel.

  13. Noisy Spins and the Richardson-Gaudin Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, Daniel A.; Lamacraft, Austen

    2018-03-01

    We study a system of spins (qubits) coupled to a common noisy environment, each precessing at its own frequency. The correlated noise experienced by the spins implies long-lived correlations that relax only due to the differing frequencies. We use a mapping to a non-Hermitian integrable Richardson-Gaudin model to find the exact spectrum of the quantum master equation in the high-temperature limit and, hence, determine the decay rate. Our solution can be used to evaluate the effect of inhomogeneous splittings on a system of qubits coupled to a common bath.

  14. Modeling evolution of crosstalk in noisy signal transduction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tareen, Ammar; Wingreen, Ned S.; Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan

    2018-02-01

    Signal transduction networks can form highly interconnected systems within cells due to crosstalk between constituent pathways. To better understand the evolutionary design principles underlying such networks, we study the evolution of crosstalk for two parallel signaling pathways that arise via gene duplication. We use a sequence-based evolutionary algorithm and evolve the network based on two physically motivated fitness functions related to information transmission. We find that one fitness function leads to a high degree of crosstalk while the other leads to pathway specificity. Our results offer insights on the relationship between network architecture and information transmission for noisy biomolecular networks.

  15. New Horizons in Cationic Photopolymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Sangermano

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we report some recent advances and new horizons in UV-induced cationic photopolymerization. In particular, after a brief introduction on the discovery and affirmation of the cationic photopolymerization process, new efforts in the synthesis of cationic photoinitiators are reported. Subsequently, an interesting and absolutely new application is reported, related to the combination of Radical-Induced Cationic Photopolymerization with Frontal Polymerization, achieving the cross-linking of epoxy composites.

  16. Nonlinear spectral correlation for fatigue crack detection under noisy environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peipei; Sohn, Hoon; Jeon, Ikgeun

    2017-07-01

    When ultrasonic waves at two distinct frequencies are applied to a structure with a fatigue crack, crack-induced nonlinearity creates nonlinear ultrasonic modulations at the sum and difference of the two input frequencies. The amplitude of the nonlinear modulation components is typically one or two orders of magnitude smaller than that of the primary linear components. Therefore, the modulation components can be easily buried under noise levels and it becomes difficult to extract the nonlinear modulation components under noisy environments using a conventional spectral density function. In this study, nonlinear spectral correlation, which calculates the spectral correlation between nonlinear modulation components, is proposed to isolate the nonlinear modulation components from noisy environments and used for fatigue crack detection. The proposed nonlinear spectral correlation offers the following benefits: (1) Stationary noises have little effect on nonlinear spectral correlation; (2) By using a wideband high-frequency input and a single low-frequency input, the contrast of nonlinear spectral correlation between damage and intact conditions can be enhanced; and (3) The test efficiency can be also improved via reducing the data collection time. Validation tests are performed on aluminum plates and scaled steel shafts with real fatigue cracks. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed nonlinear spectral correlation owns a higher sensitivity to fatigue crack than the classical nonlinear coefficient estimated from the spectral density function, and the usage of nonlinear spectral correlation allows the detection of fatigue crack even using noncontact air-coupled transducers with a low signal-to-noise ratio.

  17. Effect of weak measurement on entanglement distribution over noisy channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-Wen; Yu, Sixia; Zhang, Deng-Yu; Oh, C H

    2016-03-03

    Being able to implement effective entanglement distribution in noisy environments is a key step towards practical quantum communication, and long-term efforts have been made on the development of it. Recently, it has been found that the null-result weak measurement (NRWM) can be used to enhance probabilistically the entanglement of a single copy of amplitude-damped entangled state. This paper investigates remote distributions of bipartite and multipartite entangled states in the amplitudedamping environment by combining NRWMs and entanglement distillation protocols (EDPs). We show that the NRWM has no positive effect on the distribution of bipartite maximally entangled states and multipartite Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states, although it is able to increase the amount of entanglement of each source state (noisy entangled state) of EDPs with a certain probability. However, we find that the NRWM would contribute to remote distributions of multipartite W states. We demonstrate that the NRWM can not only reduce the fidelity thresholds for distillability of decohered W states, but also raise the distillation efficiencies of W states. Our results suggest a new idea for quantifying the ability of a local filtering operation in protecting entanglement from decoherence.

  18. Estimation of object motion parameters from noisy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broida, T J; Chellappa, R

    1986-01-01

    An approach is presented for the estimation of object motion parameters based on a sequence of noisy images. The problem considered is that of a rigid body undergoing unknown rotational and translational motion. The measurement data consists of a sequence of noisy image coordinates of two or more object correspondence points. By modeling the object dynamics as a function of time, estimates of the model parameters (including motion parameters) can be extracted from the data using recursive and/or batch techniques. This permits a desired degree of smoothing to be achieved through the use of an arbitrarily large number of images. Some assumptions regarding object structure are presently made. Results are presented for a recursive estimation procedure: the case considered here is that of a sequence of one dimensional images of a two dimensional object. Thus, the object moves in one transverse dimension, and in depth, preserving the fundamental ambiguity of the central projection image model (loss of depth information). An iterated extended Kalman filter is used for the recursive solution. Noise levels of 5-10 percent of the object image size are used. Approximate Cramer-Rao lower bounds are derived for the model parameter estimates as a function of object trajectory and noise level. This approach may be of use in situations where it is difficult to resolve large numbers of object match points, but relatively long sequences of images (10 to 20 or more) are available.

  19. Noisy: Identification of problematic columns in multiple sequence alignments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grünewald Stefan

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Motivation Sequence-based methods for phylogenetic reconstruction from (nucleic acid sequence data are notoriously plagued by two effects: homoplasies and alignment errors. Large evolutionary distances imply a large number of homoplastic sites. As most protein-coding genes show dramatic variations in substitution rates that are not uncorrelated across the sequence, this often leads to a patchwork pattern of (i phylogenetically informative and (ii effectively randomized regions. In highly variable regions, furthermore, alignment errors accumulate resulting in sometimes misleading signals in phylogenetic reconstruction. Results We present here a method that, based on assessing the distribution of character states along a cyclic ordering of the taxa, allows the identification of phylogenetically uninformative homoplastic sites in a multiple sequence alignment. Removal of these sites appears to improve the performance of phylogenetic reconstruction algorithms as measured by various indices of "tree quality". In particular, we obtain more stable trees due to the exclusion of phylogenetically incompatible sites that most likely represent strongly randomized characters. Software The computer program noisy implements this approach. It can be employed to improving phylogenetic reconstruction capability with quite a considerable success rate whenever (1 the average bootstrap support obtained from the original alignment is low, and (2 there are sufficiently many taxa in the data set – at least, say, 12 to 15 taxa. The software can be obtained under the GNU Public License from http://www.bioinf.uni-leipzig.de/Software/noisy/.

  20. Weighting of field heights for sharpness and noisiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keelan, Brian W.; Jin, Elaine W.

    2009-01-01

    Weighting of field heights is important in cases when a single numerical value needs to be calculated that characterizes an attribute's overall impact on perceived image quality. In this paper we report an observer study to derive the weighting of field heights for sharpness and noisiness. One-hundred-forty images were selected to represent a typical consumer photo space distribution. Fifty-three sample points were sampled per image, representing field heights of 0, 14, 32, 42, 51, 58, 71, 76, 86% and 100%. Six observers participated in this study. The field weights derived in this report include both: the effect of area versus field height (which is a purely objective, geometric factor); and the effect of the spatial distribution of image content that draws attention to or masks each of these image structure attributes. The results show that relative to the geometrical area weights, sharpness weights were skewed to lower field heights, because sharpness-critical subject matter was often positioned relatively near the center of an image. Conversely, because noise can be masked by signal, noisiness-critical content (such as blue skies, skin tones, walls, etc.) tended to occur farther from the center of an image, causing the weights to be skewed to higher field heights.

  1. NOISY IMAGE SEGMENTATION USING A SELF-ORGANIZING MAP NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh Gorjizadeh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Image segmentation is an essential step in image processing. Many image segmentation methods are available but most of these methods are not suitable for noisy images or they require priori knowledge, such as knowledge on the type of noise. In order to overcome these obstacles, a new image segmentation algorithm is proposed by using a self-organizing map (SOM with some changes in its structure and training data. In this paper, we choose a pixel with its spatial neighbors and two statistical features, mean and median, computed based on a block of pixels as training data for each pixel. This approach helps SOM network recognize a model of noise, and consequently, segment noisy image as well by using spatial information and two statistical features. Moreover, a two cycle thresholding process is used at the end of learning phase to combine or remove extra segments. This way helps the proposed network to recognize the correct number of clusters/segments automatically. A performance evaluation of the proposed algorithm is carried out on different kinds of image, including medical data imagery and natural scene. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has advantages in accuracy and robustness against noise in comparison with the well-known unsupervised algorithms.

  2. Noise Measurement and Frequency Analysis of Commercially Available Noisy Toys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohreh Jalaie

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Noise measurement and frequency analysis of commercially available noisy toys were the main purposes of the study. Materials and Methods: 181 noisy toys commonly found in toy stores in different zones of Tehran were selected and categorized into 10 groups. Noise measurement were done at 2, 25, and 50 cm from toys in dBA. The noisiest toy of each group was frequency analyzed in octave bands. Results: The highest and the lowest intensity levels belonged to the gun (mean=112 dBA and range of 100-127 dBA and to the rattle-box (mean=84 dBA and range of 74-95 dBA, respectively. Noise intensity levels significantly decreased with increasing distance except for two toys. Noise frequency analysis indicated energy in effective hearing frequencies. Most of the toys energies were in the middle and high frequency region. Conclusion: As intensity level of the toys is considerable, mostly more than 90 dBA, and also their energy exist in the middle and high frequency region, toys should be considered as a cause of the hearing impairment.

  3. AveBoost2: Boosting for Noisy Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oza, Nikunj C.

    2004-01-01

    AdaBoost is a well-known ensemble learning algorithm that constructs its constituent or base models in sequence. A key step in AdaBoost is constructing a distribution over the training examples to create each base model. This distribution, represented as a vector, is constructed to be orthogonal to the vector of mistakes made by the pre- vious base model in the sequence. The idea is to make the next base model's errors uncorrelated with those of the previous model. In previous work, we developed an algorithm, AveBoost, that constructed distributions orthogonal to the mistake vectors of all the previous models, and then averaged them to create the next base model s distribution. Our experiments demonstrated the superior accuracy of our approach. In this paper, we slightly revise our algorithm to allow us to obtain non-trivial theoretical results: bounds on the training error and generalization error (difference between training and test error). Our averaging process has a regularizing effect which, as expected, leads us to a worse training error bound for our algorithm than for AdaBoost but a superior generalization error bound. For this paper, we experimented with the data that we used in both as originally supplied and with added label noise-a small fraction of the data has its original label changed. Noisy data are notoriously difficult for AdaBoost to learn. Our algorithm's performance improvement over AdaBoost is even greater on the noisy data than the original data.

  4. Effects of reconstructed magnetic field from sparse noisy boundary measurements on localization of active neural source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hui-min; Lee, Kok-Meng; Hu, Liang; Foong, Shaohui; Fu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Localization of active neural source (ANS) from measurements on head surface is vital in magnetoencephalography. As neuron-generated magnetic fields are extremely weak, significant uncertainties caused by stochastic measurement interference complicate its localization. This paper presents a novel computational method based on reconstructed magnetic field from sparse noisy measurements for enhanced ANS localization by suppressing effects of unrelated noise. In this approach, the magnetic flux density (MFD) in the nearby current-free space outside the head is reconstructed from measurements through formulating the infinite series solution of the Laplace's equation, where boundary condition (BC) integrals over the entire measurements provide "smooth" reconstructed MFD with the decrease in unrelated noise. Using a gradient-based method, reconstructed MFDs with good fidelity are selected for enhanced ANS localization. The reconstruction model, spatial interpolation of BC, parametric equivalent current dipole-based inverse estimation algorithm using reconstruction, and gradient-based selection are detailed and validated. The influences of various source depths and measurement signal-to-noise ratio levels on the estimated ANS location are analyzed numerically and compared with a traditional method (where measurements are directly used), and it was demonstrated that gradient-selected high-fidelity reconstructed data can effectively improve the accuracy of ANS localization.

  5. Noisy random Boolean formulae: a statistical physics perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozeika, Alexander; Saad, David; Raymond, Jack

    2010-10-01

    Properties of computing Boolean circuits composed of noisy logical gates are studied using the statistical physics methodology. A formula-growth model that gives rise to random Boolean functions is mapped onto a spin system, which facilitates the study of their typical behavior in the presence of noise. Bounds on their performance, derived in the information theory literature for specific gates, are straightforwardly retrieved, generalized and identified as the corresponding macroscopic phase transitions. The framework is employed for deriving results on error-rates at various function-depths and function sensitivity, and their dependence on the gate-type and noise model used. These are difficult to obtain via the traditional methods used in this field.

  6. LUM Smoother with Smooth Control for Noisy Image Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukàč Rastislav

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on adaptive structure of LUM (lower-upper-middle smoothers for noisy image sequences. For the balance between noise suppression and signal-detail preservation, the LUM smoothers are widely used in smoothing applications. The amount of smoothing done by LUM smoothers is controlled by tuning parameter. However, the smoothing level is fixed for whole image. Thus, the excessive or insufficient smoothing can be performed. This problem is solved by a new method based on the adaptive controlled level of smoothing. A new method has excellent performance of the noise reduction in the environments corrupted by the impulse noise. In addition, minimal signal-detail and motion blurring can be observed. The performance of proposed method is evaluated through objective criteria and compared with traditional temporal, spatial, and spatiotemporal LUM smoothers.

  7. Reconstruction of noisy and blurred images using blur kernel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellappan, Vijayan; Chopra, Vishal

    2017-11-01

    Blur is a common in so many digital images. Blur can be caused by motion of the camera and scene object. In this work we proposed a new method for deblurring images. This work uses sparse representation to identify the blur kernel. By analyzing the image coordinates Using coarse and fine, we fetch the kernel based image coordinates and according to that observation we get the motion angle of the shaken or blurred image. Then we calculate the length of the motion kernel using radon transformation and Fourier for the length calculation of the image and we use Lucy Richardson algorithm which is also called NON-Blind(NBID) Algorithm for more clean and less noisy image output. All these operation will be performed in MATLAB IDE.

  8. Stabilized quasi-Newton optimization of noisy potential energy surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, Bastian; Goedecker, Stefan; Alireza Ghasemi, S.; Roy, Shantanu

    2015-01-01

    Optimizations of atomic positions belong to the most commonly performed tasks in electronic structure calculations. Many simulations like global minimum searches or characterizations of chemical reactions require performing hundreds or thousands of minimizations or saddle computations. To automatize these tasks, optimization algorithms must not only be efficient but also very reliable. Unfortunately, computational noise in forces and energies is inherent to electronic structure codes. This computational noise poses a severe problem to the stability of efficient optimization methods like the limited-memory Broyden–Fletcher–Goldfarb–Shanno algorithm. We here present a technique that allows obtaining significant curvature information of noisy potential energy surfaces. We use this technique to construct both, a stabilized quasi-Newton minimization method and a stabilized quasi-Newton saddle finding approach. We demonstrate with the help of benchmarks that both the minimizer and the saddle finding approach are superior to comparable existing methods

  9. Sketch of a Noisy Channel Model for the Translation Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carl, Michael

    default rendering" procedure, later conscious processes are triggered by a monitor who interferes when something goes wrong. An attempt is made to explain monitor activities with relevance theoretic concepts according to which a translator needs to ensure the similarity of explicatures and implicatures......The paper develops a Noisy Channel Model for the translation process that is based on actual user activity data. It builds on the monitor model and makes a distinction between early, automatic and late, conscious translation processes: while early priming processes are at the basis of a "literal...... of the source and the target texts. It is suggested that events and parameters in the model need be measurable and quantifiable in the user activity data so as to trace back monitoring activities in the translation process data. Michael Carl is a Professor with special responsibilities at the Department...

  10. Double pulsed holography used to investigate noisy brakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieldhouse, J. D.; Newcomb, T. P.

    1996-12-01

    The vibrational characteristics of a noisy passenger car disc brake have been studied using the double pulsed holographic technique which has been developed to allow three orthogonal visual images of a vibrating brake system to be recorded simultaneously. These images show the disc to be vibrating in a bending mode whereas the pad is seen to be excited in a variety of modes such as bending, torsion, and often a combination of both. The development of the technique includes alternative ways of triggering the laser and typical results from the application of these differing methods are also included along with mechanical signals which confirm the visual interpretations. Final results, using a laser trigger delay technique, show that the disc mode waveform rotates about the disc at a rate equivalent to the frequency of vibration divided by the diametral mode order. Early work on a passenger car drum brake is also introduced, this complementing commercial 'noise fix' solutions and a proposed theoretical model.

  11. Trading in markets with noisy information: an evolutionary analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloembergen, Daan; Hennes, Daniel; McBurney, Peter; Tuyls, Karl

    2015-07-01

    We analyse the value of information in a stock market where information can be noisy and costly, using techniques from empirical game theory. Previous work has shown that the value of information follows a J-curve, where averagely informed traders perform below market average, and only insiders prevail. Here we show that both noise and cost can change this picture, in several cases leading to opposite results where insiders perform below market average, and averagely informed traders prevail. Moreover, we investigate the effect of random explorative actions on the market dynamics, showing how these lead to a mix of traders being sustained in equilibrium. These results provide insight into the complexity of real marketplaces, and show under which conditions a broad mix of different trading strategies might be sustainable.

  12. Local impermeant anions establish the neuronal chloride concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glykys, J; Dzhala, V; Egawa, K

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal intracellular chloride concentration [Cl(-)](i) is an important determinant of γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptor (GABA(A)R)-mediated inhibition and cytoplasmic volume regulation. Equilibrative cation-chloride cotransporters (CCCs) move Cl(-) across the membrane, but accumulat......Neuronal intracellular chloride concentration [Cl(-)](i) is an important determinant of γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptor (GABA(A)R)-mediated inhibition and cytoplasmic volume regulation. Equilibrative cation-chloride cotransporters (CCCs) move Cl(-) across the membrane...... anions determine the homeostatic set point for [Cl(-)], and hence, neuronal volume and the polarity of local GABA(A)R signaling....

  13. Sorption by cation exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, M.H.; Baeyens, B.

    1994-04-01

    A procedure for introducing exchange into geochemical/surface complexation codes is described. Beginning with selectivity coefficients, K c , defined in terms of equivalent fractional ion occupancies, a general expression for the molar based exchange code input parameters, K ex , is derived. In natural systems the uptake of nuclides onto complex sorbents often occurs by more than one mechanism. The incorporation of cation exchange and surface complexation into a geochemical code therefore enables sorption by both mechanisms to be calculated simultaneously. The code and model concepts are tested against sets of experimental data from widely different sorption studies. A proposal is made to set up a data base of selectivity coefficients. Such a data base would form part of a more general one consisting of sorption mechanism specific parameters to be used in conjunction with geochemical/sorption codes to model and predict sorption. (author) 6 figs., 6 tabs., 26 refs

  14. Sentence comprehension in aphasia: A noisy channel approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Walsh Dickey

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Probabilistic accounts of language understanding assume that comprehension involves determining the probability of an intended message (m given an input utterance (u (P(m|u; e.g. Gibson et al, 2013a; Levy et al, 2009. One challenge is that communication occurs within a noisy channel; i.e. the comprehender’s representation of u may have been distorted, e.g., by a typo or by impairment associated with aphasia. Bayes’ rule provides a model of how comprehenders can combine the prior probability of m (P(m with the probability that m would have been distorted to u (P(mu to calculate the probability of m given u (P(m|u  P(mP(mu. This formalism can capture the observation that people with aphasia (PWA rely more on semantics than syntax during comprehension (e.g., Caramazza & Zurif, 1976: given the high probability that their representation of the input is unreliable, they weigh message likelihood more heavily. Gibson et al. (2013a showed that unimpaired adults are sensitive to P(m and P(mu: they more often chose interpretations that increased message plausibility or involved distortions requiring fewer changes, and/or deletions instead of insertions (see Figure 1a for examples. Gibson et al. (2013b found PWA were also sensitive to both P(m and P(mu in an act-out task, but relied more heavily than unimpaired controls on P(m. This shows group-level optimization towards the less noisy (semantic channel in PWA. The current experiment (8 PWA; 7 age-matched controls investigated noisy channel optimization at the level of individual PWA. It also included active/passive items with a weaker plausibility manipulation to test whether P(m is higher for implausible than impossible strings. The task was forced-choice sentence-picture matching (Figure 1b. Experimental sentences crossed active versus passive (A-P structures with plausibility (Set 1 or impossibility (Set 2, and prepositional-object versus double-object structures (PO-DO: Set 3 with

  15. On robust signal reconstruction in noisy filter banks

    CERN Document Server

    Vikalo, H; Hassibi, B; Kailath, T; 10.1016/j.sigpro.2004.08.011

    2005-01-01

    We study the design of synthesis filters in noisy filter bank systems using an H/sup infinity / estimation point of view. The H/sup infinity / approach is most promising in situations where the statistical properties of the disturbances (arising from quantization, compression, etc.) in each subband of the filter bank is unknown, or is too difficult to model and analyze. For the important special case of unitary analysis polyphase matrices we obtain an explicit expression for the minimum achievable disturbance attenuation. For arbitrary analysis polyphase matrices, standard state-space H/sup infinity / techniques can be employed to obtain numerical solutions. When the synthesis filters are restricted to being FIR, as is often the case in practice, the design can be cast as a finite-dimensional semi-definite program. In this case, we can effectively exploit the inherent non-uniqueness of the H/sup infinity / solution to optimize for an additional criteria. By optimizing for average performance in addition to th...

  16. Stochastic perturbations in open chaotic systems: random versus noisy maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bódai, Tamás; Altmann, Eduardo G; Endler, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the effects of random perturbations on fully chaotic open systems. Perturbations can be applied to each trajectory independently (white noise) or simultaneously to all trajectories (random map). We compare these two scenarios by generalizing the theory of open chaotic systems and introducing a time-dependent conditionally-map-invariant measure. For the same perturbation strength we show that the escape rate of the random map is always larger than that of the noisy map. In random maps we show that the escape rate κ and dimensions D of the relevant fractal sets often depend nonmonotonically on the intensity of the random perturbation. We discuss the accuracy (bias) and precision (variance) of finite-size estimators of κ and D, and show that the improvement of the precision of the estimations with the number of trajectories N is extremely slow ([proportionality]1/lnN). We also argue that the finite-size D estimators are typically biased. General theoretical results are combined with analytical calculations and numerical simulations in area-preserving baker maps.

  17. The noisy Hegselmann-Krause model for opinion dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Miguel; Toral, Raúl; Hernández-García, Emilio

    2013-12-01

    In the model for continuous opinion dynamics introduced by Hegselmann and Krause, each individual moves to the average opinion of all individuals within an area of confidence. In this work we study the effects of noise in this system. With certain probability, individuals are given the opportunity to change spontaneously their opinion to another one selected randomly inside the opinion space with different rules. If the random jump does not occur, individuals interact through the Hegselmann-Krause's rule. We analyze two cases, one where individuals can carry out opinion random jumps inside the whole opinion space, and other where they are allowed to perform jumps just inside a small interval centered around the current opinion. We found that these opinion random jumps change the model behavior inducing interesting phenomena. Using pattern formation techniques, we obtain approximate analytical results for critical conditions of opinion cluster formation. Finally, we compare the results of this work with the noisy version of the Deffuant et al. model [G. Deffuant, D. Neu, F. Amblard, G. Weisbuch, Adv. Compl. Syst. 3, 87 (2000)] for continuous-opinion dynamics.

  18. Bayesian Inference for Linear Parabolic PDEs with Noisy Boundary Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Ruggeri, Fabrizio

    2016-01-06

    In this work we develop a hierarchical Bayesian setting to infer unknown parameters in initial-boundary value problems (IBVPs) for one-dimensional linear parabolic partial differential equations. Noisy boundary data and known initial condition are assumed. We derive the likelihood function associated with the forward problem, given some measurements of the solution field subject to Gaussian noise. Such function is then analytically marginalized using the linearity of the equation. Gaussian priors have been assumed for the time-dependent Dirichlet boundary values. Our approach is applied to synthetic data for the one-dimensional heat equation model, where the thermal diffusivity is the unknown parameter. We show how to infer the thermal diffusivity parameter when its prior distribution is lognormal or modeled by means of a space-dependent stationary lognormal random field. We use the Laplace method to provide approximated Gaussian posterior distributions for the thermal diffusivity. Expected information gains and predictive posterior densities for observable quantities are numerically estimated for different experimental setups.

  19. Bayesian Inference for Linear Parabolic PDEs with Noisy Boundary Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Ruggeri, Fabrizio

    2015-01-07

    In this work we develop a hierarchical Bayesian setting to infer unknown parameters in initial-boundary value problems (IBVPs) for one-dimensional linear parabolic partial differential equations. Noisy boundary data and known initial condition are assumed. We derive the likelihood function associated with the forward problem, given some measurements of the solution field subject to Gaussian noise. Such function is then analytically marginalized using the linearity of the equation. Gaussian priors have been assumed for the time-dependent Dirichlet boundary values. Our approach is applied to synthetic data for the one-dimensional heat equation model, where the thermal diffusivity is the unknown parameter. We show how to infer the thermal diffusivity parameter when its prior distribution is lognormal or modeled by means of a space-dependent stationary lognormal random field. We use the Laplace method to provide approximated Gaussian posterior distributions for the thermal diffusivity. Expected information gains and predictive posterior densities for observable quantities are numerically estimated for different experimental setups.

  20. Retrieval of noisy fingerprint patterns using metric attractor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Mario; Dominguez, David; Rodríguez, Francisco B; Sánchez, Ángel

    2014-11-01

    This work experimentally analyzes the learning and retrieval capabilities of the diluted metric attractor neural network when applied to collections of fingerprint images. The computational cost of the network decreases with the dilution, so we can increase the region of interest to cover almost the complete fingerprint. The network retrieval was successfully tested for different noisy configurations of the fingerprints, and proved to be robust with a large basin of attraction. We showed that network topologies with a 2D-Grid arrangement adapt better to the fingerprints spatial structure, outperforming the typical 1D-Ring configuration. An optimal ratio of local connections to random shortcuts that better represent the intrinsic spatial structure of the fingerprints was found, and its influence on the retrieval quality was characterized in a phase diagram. Since the present model is a set of nonlinear equations, it is possible to go beyond the naïve static solution (consisting in matching two fingerprints using a fixed distance threshold value), and a crossing evolution of similarities was shown, leading to the retrieval of the right fingerprint from an apparently more distant candidate. This feature could be very useful for fingerprint verification to discriminate between fingerprints pairs.

  1. Synchronous Generator Model Parameter Estimation Based on Noisy Dynamic Waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhausen, Sebastian; Paszek, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there have occurred system failures in many power systems all over the world. They have resulted in a lack of power supply to a large number of recipients. To minimize the risk of occurrence of power failures, it is necessary to perform multivariate investigations, including simulations, of power system operating conditions. To conduct reliable simulations, the current base of parameters of the models of generating units, containing the models of synchronous generators, is necessary. In the paper, there is presented a method for parameter estimation of a synchronous generator nonlinear model based on the analysis of selected transient waveforms caused by introducing a disturbance (in the form of a pseudorandom signal) in the generator voltage regulation channel. The parameter estimation was performed by minimizing the objective function defined as a mean square error for deviations between the measurement waveforms and the waveforms calculated based on the generator mathematical model. A hybrid algorithm was used for the minimization of the objective function. In the paper, there is described a filter system used for filtering the noisy measurement waveforms. The calculation results of the model of a 44 kW synchronous generator installed on a laboratory stand of the Institute of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science of the Silesian University of Technology are also given. The presented estimation method can be successfully applied to parameter estimation of different models of high-power synchronous generators operating in a power system.

  2. Multiengine Speech Processing Using SNR Estimator in Variable Noisy Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad R. Abu-El-Quran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a multiengine speech processing system that can detect the location and the type of audio signal in variable noisy environments. This system detects the location of the audio source using a microphone array; the system examines the audio first, determines if it is speech/nonspeech, then estimates the value of the signal to noise (SNR using a Discrete-Valued SNR Estimator. Using this SNR value, instead of trying to adapt the speech signal to the speech processing system, we adapt the speech processing system to the surrounding environment of the captured speech signal. In this paper, we introduced the Discrete-Valued SNR Estimator and a multiengine classifier, using Multiengine Selection or Multiengine Weighted Fusion. Also we use the SI as example of the speech processing. The Discrete-Valued SNR Estimator achieves an accuracy of 98.4% in characterizing the environment's SNR. Compared to a conventional single engine SI system, the improvement in accuracy was as high as 9.0% and 10.0% for the Multiengine Selection and Multiengine Weighted Fusion, respectively.

  3. An array extension method in a noisy environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Sun, Chao

    2011-06-01

    An array extension method in a noisy environment was proposed to improve angular resolution and array gain. The proposed method combines the FOC (fourth-order cumulants) technique with the ETAM (extended towed array measurements) method to extend array aperture and suppress Gaussian noise. First, successive measurements of a virtual uniform linear array were constructed by applying fourth-order cumulants to measurements of uniform linear array; Gaussian noise in these measurements was also eliminated. Then, the array was extended by compensating phase differences using the ETAM method. Finally, the synthetic aperture was extended further by the fourth-order cumulants technique. The proposed FOC-ETAM-FOC method not only improves angular resolution and array gain, but also effectively suppresses Gaussian noise. Furthermore, it inherits the advantages of the ETAM method. Simulation results showed that the FOC-ETAM-FOC method achieved better angular resolution and array gain than the ETAM method. Furthermore this method outperforms the ETAM method in Gaussian noise environment.

  4. Use of global context for handling noisy names in discussion texts of a homeopathy discussion forum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukta Majumder

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The task of identifying named entities from the discussion texts in Web forums faces the challenge of noisy names. As the names are often misspelled or abbreviated, the conventional techniques have failed to detect the noisy names properly. In this paper we propose a global context based framework for handling the noisy names. The framework is tested on a named entity recognition system designed to identify the names from the discussion texts in a homeopathy diagnosis discussion forum. The proposed global context-based framework is found to be effective in improving the accuracy of the named entity recognition system.

  5. Resolution of Nested Neuronal Representations Can Be Exponential in the Number of Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, Alexander; Herz, Andreas V. M.; Stemmler, Martin B.

    2012-07-01

    Collective computation is typically polynomial in the number of computational elements, such as transistors or neurons, whether one considers the storage capacity of a memory device or the number of floating-point operations per second of a CPU. However, we show here that the capacity of a computational network to resolve real-valued signals of arbitrary dimensions can be exponential in N, even if the individual elements are noisy and unreliable. Nested, modular codes that achieve such high resolutions mirror the properties of grid cells in vertebrates, which underlie spatial navigation.

  6. [Mirror neurons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubia Vila, Francisco José

    2011-01-01

    Mirror neurons were recently discovered in frontal brain areas of the monkey. They are activated when the animal makes a specific movement, but also when the animal observes the same movement in another animal. Some of them also respond to the emotional expression of other animals of the same species. These mirror neurons have also been found in humans. They respond to or "reflect" actions of other individuals in the brain and are thought to represent the basis for imitation and empathy and hence the neurobiological substrate for "theory of mind", the potential origin of language and the so-called moral instinct.

  7. Inhibitory coherence in a heterogeneous population of subthreshold and suprathreshold type-I neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang-Yoon; Hong, Duk-Geun; Kim, Jean; Lim, Woochang

    2012-01-01

    We study inhibitory coherence (i.e. collective coherence by synaptic inhibition) in a population of globally coupled type-I neurons, which can fire at arbitrarily low frequency. No inhibitory coherence is observed in a homogeneous population composed of only subthreshold neurons, which exhibit noise-induced firings. In addition to subthreshold neurons, there exist spontaneously firing suprathreshold neurons in a noisy environment of a real brain. To take into consideration the effect of suprathreshold neurons on inhibitory coherence, we consider a heterogeneous population of subthreshold and suprathreshold neurons and investigate the inhibitory coherence by increasing the fraction of suprathreshold neurons P supra . As P supra passes a threshold P* supra , suprathreshold neurons begin to synchronize and play the role of coherent inhibitors for the emergence of inhibitory coherence. Thus, regularly oscillating population-averaged global potential appears for P supra > P* supra . For this coherent case, suprathreshold neurons exhibit sparse spike synchronization (i.e. individual potentials of suprathreshold neurons consist of coherent sparse spikings and coherent subthreshold small-amplitude hoppings). By virtue of their coherent inhibition, sparsely synchronized suprathreshold neurons suppress the noisy activity of subthreshold neurons. Thus, subthreshold neurons exhibit hopping synchronization (i.e. only coherent subthreshold hopping oscillations without spikings appear in the individual potentials of subthreshold neurons). We also characterize the inhibitory coherence in terms of the ‘statistical-mechanical’ spike-based and correlation-based measures, which quantify the average contributions of the microscopic individual spikes and individual potentials to the macroscopic global potential. Finally, the effect of sparse randomness of synaptic connectivity on the inhibitory coherence is briefly discussed. (paper)

  8. Cationic polymers and porous materials

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Yu

    2017-04-27

    According to one or more embodiments, cationic polymers may be produced which include one or more monomers containing cations. Such cationic polymers may be utilized as structure directing agents to form mesoporous zeolites. The mesoporous zeolites may include micropores as well as mesopores, and may have a surface area of greater than 350 m2/g and a pore volume of greater than 0.3 cm3/g. Also described are core/shell zeolites, where at least the shell portion includes a mesoporous zeolite material.

  9. A High Performance Approach to Local Active Noise Reduction in Noisy Cabins Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spacecraft cabin is noisy and uncomfortable. Sometimes, the noise level can exceed 80 dBA. There are 2 challenges to meet the above needs. One is to generate an...

  10. A Survey of Image Compression Techniques and their Performance in Noisy Environments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marvel, Lisa

    1997-01-01

    ... techniques - namely, fractal, wavelet, DPCM, and the most recent compression standard for still imagery, JPEG version 6. Methods for minimizing the effects of the noisy channel on algorithm performance are also considered.

  11. Extortion under uncertainty: Zero-determinant strategies in noisy games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Dong; Rong, Zhihai; Zhou, Tao

    2015-05-01

    Repeated game theory has been one of the most prevailing tools for understanding long-running relationships, which are the foundation in building human society. Recent works have revealed a new set of "zero-determinant" (ZD) strategies, which is an important advance in repeated games. A ZD strategy player can exert unilateral control on two players' payoffs. In particular, he can deterministically set the opponent's payoff or enforce an unfair linear relationship between the players' payoffs, thereby always seizing an advantageous share of payoffs. One of the limitations of the original ZD strategy, however, is that it does not capture the notion of robustness when the game is subjected to stochastic errors. In this paper, we propose a general model of ZD strategies for noisy repeated games and find that ZD strategies have high robustness against errors. We further derive the pinning strategy under noise, by which the ZD strategy player coercively sets the opponent's expected payoff to his desired level, although his payoff control ability declines with the increase of noise strength. Due to the uncertainty caused by noise, the ZD strategy player cannot ensure his payoff to be permanently higher than the opponent's, which implies dominant extortions do not exist even under low noise. While we show that the ZD strategy player can still establish a novel kind of extortions, named contingent extortions, where any increase of his own payoff always exceeds that of the opponent's by a fixed percentage, and the conditions under which the contingent extortions can be realized are more stringent as the noise becomes stronger.

  12. Pandemics and immune memory in the noisy Penna model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebrat, Stanisław; Bonkowska, Katarzyna; Biecek, Przemysław

    2007-06-01

    In the noisy Penna model of ageing, instead of counting the number of defective loci which eventually kill an individual, the noise describing the health status of individuals is introduced. This white noise is composed of two components: the environmental one and the personal one. If the sum of both trespasses the limit set for the individuals homeodynamics the individual dies. The energy of personal fluctuations depends on the number of defective loci expressed in the individuals genome. Environmental fluctuations, the same for all individuals can include some signals, corresponding to the exposition to pathogens which could be dangerous for a fraction of the organisms. Personal noise and the component of random environmental fluctuations, when superimposed on the signal can be life threatening if they are stronger than the limit set for individuals homeodynamics. Nevertheless, some organisms survive the period of dangerous signal and they may remember the signal in the future, like antigens are remembered by our immune systems. Unfortunately, this memory weakens with time and, even worse, some additional defective genes are switched on during the ageing. If the same pathogens (signals) emerge during the lifespan of the population, a fraction of the population could remember it and could respond by increasing the resistance to it. Again, unfortunately for some individuals, their memory could be too weak and their own health status has worsened due to the accumulated mutations, they have to die. Though, a fraction of individuals can survive the pandemics due to the immune memory, but a fraction of population has no such a memory because they were born after the last pandemic or they didnt notice this pandemic. Our simple model, by implementing the noise instead of deterministic threshold of genetic defects, describes how the impact of pandemics on populations depends on the time which elapsed between the two incidents and how the different age groups of

  13. Bias-Compensated Normalized Maximum Correntropy Criterion Algorithm for System Identification with Noisy Input

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Wentao; Zheng, Dongqiao; Li, Yuanhao; Zhang, Zhiyu; Chen, Badong

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposed a bias-compensated normalized maximum correntropy criterion (BCNMCC) algorithm charactered by its low steady-state misalignment for system identification with noisy input in an impulsive output noise environment. The normalized maximum correntropy criterion (NMCC) is derived from a correntropy based cost function, which is rather robust with respect to impulsive noises. To deal with the noisy input, we introduce a bias-compensated vector (BCV) to the NMCC algorithm, and th...

  14. Orexin receptor activation generates gamma band input to cholinergic and serotonergic arousal system neurons and drives an intrinsic Ca2+-dependent resonance in LDT and PPT cholinergic neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru eIshibashi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark of the waking state is a shift in EEG power to higher frequencies with epochs of synchronized intracortical gamma activity (30-60 Hz - a process associated with high-level cognitive functions. The ascending arousal system, including cholinergic laterodorsal (LDT and pedunculopontine (PPT tegmental neurons and serotonergic dorsal raphe (DR neurons, promotes this state. Recently, this system has been proposed as a gamma wave generator, in part, because some neurons produce high-threshold, Ca2+-dependent oscillations at gamma frequencies. However, it is not known whether arousal-related inputs to these neurons generate such oscillations, or whether such oscillations are ever transmitted to neuronal targets. Since key arousal input arises from hypothalamic orexin (hypocretin neurons, we investigated whether the unusually noisy, depolarizing orexin current could provide significant gamma input to cholinergic and serotonergic neurons, and whether such input could drive Ca2+-dependent oscillations. Whole-cell recordings in brain slices were obtained from mice expressing Cre-induced fluorescence in cholinergic LDT and PPT, and serotonergic DR neurons. After first quantifying reporter expression accuracy in cholinergic and serotonergic neurons, we found that the orexin current produced significant high frequency, including gamma, input to both cholinergic and serotonergic neurons. Then, by using a dynamic clamp, we found that adding a noisy orexin conductance to cholinergic neurons induced a Ca2+-dependent resonance that peaked in the theta and alpha frequency range (4 - 14 Hz and extended up to 100 Hz. We propose that this orexin current noise and the Ca2+ dependent resonance work synergistically to boost the encoding of high-frequency synaptic inputs into action potentials and to help ensure cholinergic neurons fire during EEG activation. This activity could reinforce thalamocortical states supporting arousal, REM sleep and intracortical

  15. Asymmetric cation-binding catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira, Maria Teresa; Lee, Jiwoong

    2017-01-01

    solvents, thus increasing their applicability in synthesis. The expansion of this concept to chiral polyethers led to the emergence of asymmetric cation-binding catalysis, where chiral counter anions are generated from metal salts, particularly using BINOL-based polyethers. Alkali metal salts, namely KF...... and KCN, are selectively bound to the catalyst, providing exceptionally high enantioselectivities for kinetic resolutions, elimination reactions (fluoride base), and Strecker synthesis (cyanide nucleophile). Asymmetric cation-binding catalysis was recently expanded to silicon-based reagents, enabling...

  16. Liquid-solid extraction of cationic metals by cationic amphiphiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, W.

    2010-01-01

    In the field of selective separation for recycling of spent nuclear fuel, liquid-liquid extraction processes are widely used (PUREX, DIAMEX..) in industrial scale. In order to guarantee a sustainable nuclear energy for the forthcoming generations, alternative reprocessing techniques are under development. One of them bases on the studies from Heckmann et al in the 80's and consists in selectively precipitating actinides from aqueous waste solutions by cationic surfactants (liquid-solid extraction). This technique has some interesting advantages over liquid-liquid extraction techniques, because several steps are omitted like stripping or solvent washing. Moreover, the amount of waste is decreased considerably, since no contaminated organic solvent is produced. In this thesis, we have carried out a physico-chemical study to understand the specific interactions between the metallic cations with the cationic surfactant. First, we have analysed the specific effect of the different counter-ions (Cl - , NO 3 - , C 2 O 4 2- ) and then the effect of alkaline cations on the structural properties of the surfactant aggregation in varying thermodynamical conditions. Finally, different multivalent cations (Cu 2+ , Zn 2+ , UO 2 2+ , Fe 3+ , Nd 3+ , Eu 3+ , Th 4+ ) were considered; we have concluded that depending on the anionic complex of these metals formed in acidic media, we can observe either an adsorption at the micellar interface or not. This adsorption has a large influence of the surfactant aggregation properties and determines the limits of the application in term of ionic strength, temperature and surfactant concentration. (author) [fr

  17. Motor Neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hounsgaard, Jorn

    2017-01-01

    Motor neurons translate synaptic input from widely distributed premotor networks into patterns of action potentials that orchestrate motor unit force and motor behavior. Intercalated between the CNS and muscles, motor neurons add to and adjust the final motor command. The identity and functional...... properties of this facility in the path from synaptic sites to the motor axon is reviewed with emphasis on voltage sensitive ion channels and regulatory metabotropic transmitter pathways. The catalog of the intrinsic response properties, their underlying mechanisms, and regulation obtained from motoneurons...... in in vitro preparations is far from complete. Nevertheless, a foundation has been provided for pursuing functional significance of intrinsic response properties in motoneurons in vivo during motor behavior at levels from molecules to systems....

  18. Neurons other than motor neurons in motor neuron disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffoli, Riccardo; Biagioni, Francesca; Busceti, Carla L; Gaglione, Anderson; Ryskalin, Larisa; Gambardella, Stefano; Frati, Alessandro; Fornai, Francesco

    2017-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is typically defined by a loss of motor neurons in the central nervous system. Accordingly, morphological analysis for decades considered motor neurons (in the cortex, brainstem and spinal cord) as the neuronal population selectively involved in ALS. Similarly, this was considered the pathological marker to score disease severity ex vivo both in patients and experimental models. However, the concept of non-autonomous motor neuron death was used recently to indicate the need for additional cell types to produce motor neuron death in ALS. This means that motor neuron loss occurs only when they are connected with other cell types. This concept originally emphasized the need for resident glia as well as non-resident inflammatory cells. Nowadays, the additional role of neurons other than motor neurons emerged in the scenario to induce non-autonomous motor neuron death. In fact, in ALS neurons diverse from motor neurons are involved. These cells play multiple roles in ALS: (i) they participate in the chain of events to produce motor neuron loss; (ii) they may even degenerate more than and before motor neurons. In the present manuscript evidence about multi-neuronal involvement in ALS patients and experimental models is discussed. Specific sub-classes of neurons in the whole spinal cord are reported either to degenerate or to trigger neuronal degeneration, thus portraying ALS as a whole spinal cord disorder rather than a disease affecting motor neurons solely. This is associated with a novel concept in motor neuron disease which recruits abnormal mechanisms of cell to cell communication.

  19. Tuning positive feedback for signal detection in noisy dynamic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Anders; Ramsch, Kai; Middendorf, Martin; Sumpter, David J T

    2012-09-21

    Learning from previous actions is a key feature of decision-making. Diverse biological systems, from neuronal assemblies to insect societies, use a combination of positive feedback and forgetting of stored memories to process and respond to input signals. Here we look how these systems deal with a dynamic two-armed bandit problem of detecting a very weak signal in the presence of a high degree of noise. We show that by tuning the form of positive feedback and the decay rate to appropriate values, a single tracking variable can effectively detect dynamic inputs even in the presence of a large degree of noise. In particular, we show that when tuned appropriately a simple positive feedback algorithm is Fisher efficient, in that it can track changes in a signal on a time of order L(h)=(|h|/σ)(-2), where |h| is the magnitude of the signal and σ the magnitude of the noise. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Do Quiet Areas Afford Greater Health-Related Quality of Life than Noisy Areas?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim N. Dirks

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available People typically choose to live in quiet areas in order to safeguard their health and wellbeing. However, the benefits of living in quiet areas are relatively understudied compared to the burdens associated with living in noisy areas. Additionally, research is increasingly focusing on the relationship between the human response to noise and measures of health and wellbeing, complementing traditional dose-response approaches, and further elucidating the impact of noise and health by incorporating human factors as mediators and moderators. To further explore the benefits of living in quiet areas, we compared the results of health-related quality of life (HRQOL questionnaire datasets collected from households in localities differentiated by their soundscapes and population density: noisy city, quiet city, quiet rural, and noisy rural. The dose-response relationships between noise annoyance and HRQOL measures indicated an inverse relationship between the two. Additionally, quiet areas were found to have higher mean HRQOL domain scores than noisy areas. This research further supports the protection of quiet locales and ongoing noise abatement in noisy areas.

  1. Fuzzy Logic Based Edge Detection in Smooth and Noisy Clinical Images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izhar Haq

    Full Text Available Edge detection has beneficial applications in the fields such as machine vision, pattern recognition and biomedical imaging etc. Edge detection highlights high frequency components in the image. Edge detection is a challenging task. It becomes more arduous when it comes to noisy images. This study focuses on fuzzy logic based edge detection in smooth and noisy clinical images. The proposed method (in noisy images employs a 3 × 3 mask guided by fuzzy rule set. Moreover, in case of smooth clinical images, an extra mask of contrast adjustment is integrated with edge detection mask to intensify the smooth images. The developed method was tested on noise-free, smooth and noisy images. The results were compared with other established edge detection techniques like Sobel, Prewitt, Laplacian of Gaussian (LOG, Roberts and Canny. When the developed edge detection technique was applied to a smooth clinical image of size 270 × 290 pixels having 24 dB 'salt and pepper' noise, it detected very few (22 false edge pixels, compared to Sobel (1931, Prewitt (2741, LOG (3102, Roberts (1451 and Canny (1045 false edge pixels. Therefore it is evident that the developed method offers improved solution to the edge detection problem in smooth and noisy clinical images.

  2. Fuzzy Logic Based Edge Detection in Smooth and Noisy Clinical Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Izhar; Anwar, Shahzad; Shah, Kamran; Khan, Muhammad Tahir; Shah, Shaukat Ali

    2015-01-01

    Edge detection has beneficial applications in the fields such as machine vision, pattern recognition and biomedical imaging etc. Edge detection highlights high frequency components in the image. Edge detection is a challenging task. It becomes more arduous when it comes to noisy images. This study focuses on fuzzy logic based edge detection in smooth and noisy clinical images. The proposed method (in noisy images) employs a 3 × 3 mask guided by fuzzy rule set. Moreover, in case of smooth clinical images, an extra mask of contrast adjustment is integrated with edge detection mask to intensify the smooth images. The developed method was tested on noise-free, smooth and noisy images. The results were compared with other established edge detection techniques like Sobel, Prewitt, Laplacian of Gaussian (LOG), Roberts and Canny. When the developed edge detection technique was applied to a smooth clinical image of size 270 × 290 pixels having 24 dB 'salt and pepper' noise, it detected very few (22) false edge pixels, compared to Sobel (1931), Prewitt (2741), LOG (3102), Roberts (1451) and Canny (1045) false edge pixels. Therefore it is evident that the developed method offers improved solution to the edge detection problem in smooth and noisy clinical images.

  3. Channel properties of Nax expressed in neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahito Matsumoto

    Full Text Available Nax is a sodium-concentration ([Na+]-sensitive Na channel with a gating threshold of ~150 mM for extracellular [Na+] ([Na+]o in vitro. We previously reported that Nax was preferentially expressed in the glial cells of sensory circumventricular organs including the subfornical organ, and was involved in [Na+] sensing for the control of salt-intake behavior. Although Nax was also suggested to be expressed in the neurons of some brain regions including the amygdala and cerebral cortex, the channel properties of Nax have not yet been adequately characterized in neurons. We herein verified that Nax was expressed in neurons in the lateral amygdala of mice using an antibody that was newly generated against mouse Nax. To investigate the channel properties of Nax expressed in neurons, we established an inducible cell line of Nax using the mouse neuroblastoma cell line, Neuro-2a, which is endogenously devoid of the expression of Nax. Functional analyses of this cell line revealed that the [Na+]-sensitivity of Nax in neuronal cells was similar to that expressed in glial cells. The cation selectivity sequence of the Nax channel in cations was revealed to be Na+ ≈ Li+ > Rb+ > Cs+ for the first time. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Nax bound to postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95 through its PSD95/Disc-large/ZO-1 (PDZ-binding motif at the C-terminus in neurons. The interaction between Nax and PSD95 may be involved in promoting the surface expression of Nax channels because the depletion of endogenous PSD95 resulted in a decrease in Nax at the plasma membrane. These results indicated, for the first time, that Nax functions as a [Na+]-sensitive Na channel in neurons as well as in glial cells.

  4. Global optimization based on noisy evaluations: An empirical study of two statistical approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, Emmanuel; Villemonteix, Julien; Sidorkiewicz, Maryan; Walter, Eric

    2008-01-01

    The optimization of the output of complex computer codes has often to be achieved with a small budget of evaluations. Algorithms dedicated to such problems have been developed and compared, such as the Expected Improvement algorithm (El) or the Informational Approach to Global Optimization (IAGO). However, the influence of noisy evaluation results on the outcome of these comparisons has often been neglected, despite its frequent appearance in industrial problems. In this paper, empirical convergence rates for El and IAGO are compared when an additive noise corrupts the result of an evaluation. IAGO appears more efficient than El and various modifications of El designed to deal with noisy evaluations. Keywords. Global optimization; computer simulations; kriging; Gaussian process; noisy evaluations.

  5. Risk-based in situ bioremediation design using a noisy genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, J. Bryan; Minsker, Barbara S.; Goldberg, David E.

    2000-10-01

    Risk-based corrective action (RBCA) is rapidly becoming the method of choice for remediating contaminated groundwater. In this paper, a management model is presented that simultaneously predicts risk and proposes cost-effective options for reducing risk to acceptable levels under conditions of uncertainty. The model combines a noisy genetic algorithm with a numerical fate and transport model and an exposure and risk assessment model. The noisy genetic algorithm uses sampling from parameter distributions to assess the performance of candidate designs. Results from an application to a site from the literature show that the noisy genetic algorithm is capable of identifying highly reliable designs from a small number of samples, a significant advantage for computationally intensive groundwater management models. For the site considered, time-dependent costs associated with monitoring and the remedial system were significant, illustrating the potential importance of allowing variable cleanup lengths and a realistic cost function.

  6. Voice Activity Detection in Noisy Environments Based on Double-Combined Fourier Transform and Line Fitting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinsoo Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new voice activity detector for noisy environments is proposed. In conventional algorithms, the endpoint of speech is found by applying an edge detection filter that finds the abrupt changing point in a feature domain. However, since the frame energy feature is unstable in noisy environments, it is difficult to accurately find the endpoint of speech. Therefore, a novel feature extraction algorithm based on the double-combined Fourier transform and envelope line fitting is proposed. It is combined with an edge detection filter for effective detection of endpoints. Effectiveness of the proposed algorithm is evaluated and compared to other VAD algorithms using two different databases, which are AURORA 2.0 database and SITEC database. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm performs well under a variety of noisy conditions.

  7. Voice activity detection in noisy environments based on double-combined fourier transform and line fitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jinsoo; Kim, Wooil; Han, David K; Ko, Hanseok

    2014-01-01

    A new voice activity detector for noisy environments is proposed. In conventional algorithms, the endpoint of speech is found by applying an edge detection filter that finds the abrupt changing point in a feature domain. However, since the frame energy feature is unstable in noisy environments, it is difficult to accurately find the endpoint of speech. Therefore, a novel feature extraction algorithm based on the double-combined Fourier transform and envelope line fitting is proposed. It is combined with an edge detection filter for effective detection of endpoints. Effectiveness of the proposed algorithm is evaluated and compared to other VAD algorithms using two different databases, which are AURORA 2.0 database and SITEC database. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm performs well under a variety of noisy conditions.

  8. ASR Systems in Noisy Environment: Analysis and Solutions for Increasing Noise Robustness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rajnoha

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the analysis of Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR suitable for usage within noisy environment and suggests optimum configuration under various noisy conditions. The behavior of standard parameterization techniques was analyzed from the viewpoint of robustness against background noise. It was done for Melfrequency cepstral coefficients (MFCC, Perceptual linear predictive (PLP coefficients, and their modified forms combining main blocks of PLP and MFCC. The second part is devoted to the analysis and contribution of modified techniques containing frequency-domain noise suppression and voice activity detection. The above-mentioned techniques were tested with signals in real noisy environment within Czech digit recognition task and AURORA databases. Finally, the contribution of special VAD selective training and MLLR adaptation of acoustic models were studied for various signal features.

  9. Global optimization based on noisy evaluations: An empirical study of two statistical approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Emmanuel; Villemonteix, Julien; Sidorkiewicz, Maryan; Walter, Éric

    2008-11-01

    The optimization of the output of complex computer codes has often to be achieved with a small budget of evaluations. Algorithms dedicated to such problems have been developed and compared, such as the Expected Improvement algorithm (El) or the Informational Approach to Global Optimization (IAGO). However, the influence of noisy evaluation results on the outcome of these comparisons has often been neglected, despite its frequent appearance in industrial problems. In this paper, empirical convergence rates for El and IAGO are compared when an additive noise corrupts the result of an evaluation. IAGO appears more efficient than El and various modifications of El designed to deal with noisy evaluations. Keywords. Global optimization; computer simulations; kriging; Gaussian process; noisy evaluations.

  10. Noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation modulates the amplitude of EEG synchrony patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana J Kim

    Full Text Available Noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation has been associated with numerous cognitive and behavioural effects, such as enhancement of visual memory in healthy individuals, improvement of visual deficits in stroke patients, as well as possibly improvement of motor function in Parkinson's disease; yet, the mechanism of action is unclear. Since Parkinson's and other neuropsychiatric diseases are characterized by maladaptive dynamics of brain rhythms, we investigated whether noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation was associated with measurable changes in EEG oscillatory rhythms within theta (4-7.5 Hz, low alpha (8-10 Hz, high alpha (10.5-12 Hz, beta (13-30 Hz and gamma (31-50 Hz bands. We recorded the EEG while simultaneously delivering noisy bilateral, bipolar stimulation at varying intensities of imperceptible currents - at 10, 26, 42, 58, 74 and 90% of sensory threshold - to ten neurologically healthy subjects. Using standard spectral analysis, we investigated the transient aftereffects of noisy stimulation on rhythms. Subsequently, using robust artifact rejection techniques and the Least Absolute Shrinkage Selection Operator regression and cross-validation, we assessed the combinations of channels and power spectral features within each EEG frequency band that were linearly related with stimulus intensity. We show that noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation predominantly leads to a mild suppression of gamma power in lateral regions immediately after stimulation, followed by delayed increase in beta and gamma power in frontal regions approximately 20-25 s after stimulation ceased. Ongoing changes in the power of each oscillatory band throughout frontal, central/parietal, occipital and bilateral electrodes predicted the intensity of galvanic vestibular stimulation in a stimulus-dependent manner, demonstrating linear effects of stimulation on brain rhythms. We propose that modulation of neural oscillations is a potential mechanism for the previously

  11. Security bound of continuous-variable quantum key distribution with noisy coherent states and channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Yong; Yang Jian; Guo Hong

    2009-01-01

    Security of a continuous-variable quantum key distribution protocol based on noisy coherent states and channel is analysed. Assuming that the noise of coherent states is induced by Fred, a neutral party relative to others, we prove that the prepare-and-measurement scheme (P and M) and entanglement-based scheme (E-B) are equivalent. Then, we show that this protocol is secure against Gaussian collective attacks even if the channel is lossy and noisy, and, further, a lower bound to the secure key rate is derived.

  12. Frequency characteristics of human muscle and cortical responses evoked by noisy Achilles tendon vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mildren, Robyn L; Peters, Ryan M; Hill, Aimee J; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Carpenter, Mark G; Inglis, J Timothy

    2017-05-01

    Noisy stimuli, along with linear systems analysis, have proven to be effective for mapping functional neural connections. We explored the use of noisy (10-115 Hz) Achilles tendon vibration to examine somatosensory reflexes in the triceps surae muscles in standing healthy young adults ( n = 8). We also examined the association between noisy vibration and electrical activity recorded over the sensorimotor cortex using electroencephalography. We applied 2 min of vibration and recorded ongoing muscle activity of the soleus and gastrocnemii using surface electromyography (EMG). Vibration amplitude was varied to characterize reflex scaling and to examine how different stimulus levels affected postural sway. Muscle activity from the soleus and gastrocnemii was significantly correlated with the tendon vibration across a broad frequency range (~10-80 Hz), with a peak located at ~40 Hz. Vibration-EMG coherence positively scaled with stimulus amplitude in all three muscles, with soleus displaying the strongest coupling and steepest scaling. EMG responses lagged the vibration by ~38 ms, a delay that paralleled observed response latencies to tendon taps. Vibration-evoked cortical oscillations were observed at frequencies ~40-70 Hz (peak ~54 Hz) in most subjects, a finding in line with previous reports of sensory-evoked γ-band oscillations. Further examination of the method revealed 1 ) accurate reflex estimates could be obtained with vibration; 2 ) responses did not habituate over 2 min of exposure; and importantly, 3 ) noisy vibration had a minimal influence on standing balance. Our findings suggest noisy tendon vibration is an effective novel approach to characterize somatosensory reflexes during standing. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We applied noisy (10-115 Hz) vibration to the Achilles tendon to examine the frequency characteristics of lower limb somatosensory reflexes during standing. Ongoing muscle activity was coherent with the noisy vibration (peak coherence ~40 Hz), and

  13. A model for sequential decoding overflow due to a noisy carrier reference. [communication performance prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layland, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    An approximate analysis of the effect of a noisy carrier reference on the performance of sequential decoding is presented. The analysis uses previously developed techniques for evaluating noisy reference performance for medium-rate uncoded communications adapted to sequential decoding for data rates of 8 to 2048 bits/s. In estimating the ten to the minus fourth power deletion probability thresholds for Helios, the model agrees with experimental data to within the experimental tolerances. The computational problem involved in sequential decoding, carrier loop effects, the main characteristics of the medium-rate model, modeled decoding performance, and perspectives on future work are discussed.

  14. Robustness of Input features from Noisy Silhouettes in Human Pose Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Wenjuan; Fihl, Preben; Gonzàlez, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Silhouettes are frequently extracted and described to compose inputs for learning methods in solving human pose estimation problem. Although silhouettes extracted from background subtraction methods are usually noisy, the effect of noisy inputs to pose estimation accuracies is seldom studied....... In this paper, we explore this problem. First, We compare performances of several image features widely used for human pose estimation and explore their performances against each other and select one with best performance. Second, iterative closest point algorithm is introduced for a new quantitative...... of silhouette samples of different noise levels and compare with the selected feature on a public dataset: Human Eva dataset....

  15. The Neuronal Network Orchestration behind Motor Behaviors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Peter Christian

    behaviors from a premotor network with recurrent connections, which is operating in the irregular regime. Our experimental findings are in agreement with studies from the cortex and the balanced model. It is therefore relevant to study the population activity in the spinal cord for traits from cortex...... (Buzsáki and Mizuseki, 2014). Roxin et al. (2011) detailed the firing rate distribution in networks in the balanced regime, and found it to be similar to a lognormal distribution and describing the data from the population studies very well. Our experimental observations and analysis are in agreement......In biological networks, millions of neurons organize themselves from microscopic noisy individuals to robust macroscopic entities. These entities are capable of producing higher functions like sensory processing, decision-making, and elaborate behavioral responses. Every aspect of these behaviors...

  16. A Diffusion Approximation and Numerical Methods for Adaptive Neuron Models with Stochastic Inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing the spiking statistics of neurons receiving noisy synaptic input is a central problem in computational neuroscience. Monte Carlo approaches to this problem are computationally expensive and often fail to provide mechanistic insight. Thus, the field has seen the development of mathematical and numerical approaches, often relying on a Fokker-Planck formalism. These approaches force a compromise between biological realism, accuracy and computational efficiency. In this article we develop an extension of existing diffusion approximations to more accurately approximate the response of neurons with adaptation currents and noisy synaptic currents. The implementation refines existing numerical schemes for solving the associated Fokker-Planck equations to improve computationally efficiency and accuracy. Computer code implementing the developed algorithms is made available to the public.

  17. Neuron dynamics in the presence of 1/f noise

    OpenAIRE

    Sobie, Cameron; Babul, Arif; de Sousa, Rogerio

    2010-01-01

    Interest in understanding the interplay between noise and the response of a non-linear device cuts across disciplinary boundaries. It is as relevant for unmasking the dynamics of neurons in noisy environments as it is for designing reliable nanoscale logic circuit elements and sensors. Most studies of noise in non-linear devices are limited to either time-correlated noise with a Lorentzian spectrum (of which the white noise is a limiting case) or just white noise. We use analytical theory and...

  18. Micronutrient Fortification of Foods

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Micronutrient Fortification of Foods: Developing A Program. Mahshid Lotti, M.G. Venkatesh Manar, Richard J. H. M. .... Develop the fortification technology. 11. Perform studies on interactions, potency, stability, ... Fortification with vitamin A is a long-term strategy capable of maintaining adequate vitamin A status over time.

  19. Cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising lignin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenn, David; Bowman, Mark P; Zawacky, Steven R; Van Buskirk, Ellor J; Kamarchik, Peter

    2013-07-30

    A cationic electrodepositable coating composition is disclosed. The present invention in directed to a cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising a lignin-containing cationic salt resin, that comprises (A) the reaction product of: lignin, an amine, and a carbonyl compound; (B) the reaction product of lignin, epichlorohydrin, and an amine; or (C) combinations thereof.

  20. Sensing in a noisy world: lessons from auditory specialists, echolocating bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Aaron J; Moss, Cynthia F

    2017-12-15

    All animals face the essential task of extracting biologically meaningful sensory information from the 'noisy' backdrop of their environments. Here, we examine mechanisms used by echolocating bats to localize objects, track small prey and communicate in complex and noisy acoustic environments. Bats actively control and coordinate both the emission and reception of sound stimuli through integrated sensory and motor mechanisms that have evolved together over tens of millions of years. We discuss how bats behave in different ecological scenarios, including detecting and discriminating target echoes from background objects, minimizing acoustic interference from competing conspecifics and overcoming insect noise. Bats tackle these problems by deploying a remarkable array of auditory behaviors, sometimes in combination with the use of other senses. Behavioral strategies such as ceasing sonar call production and active jamming of the signals of competitors provide further insight into the capabilities and limitations of echolocation. We relate these findings to the broader topic of how animals extract relevant sensory information in noisy environments. While bats have highly refined abilities for operating under noisy conditions, they face the same challenges encountered by many other species. We propose that the specialized sensory mechanisms identified in bats are likely to occur in analogous systems across the animal kingdom. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Generation of Werner states and preservation of entanglement in a noisy environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakobczyk, Lech; Jamroz, Anna

    2005-01-01

    We study the influence of noisy environment on the evolution of two-atomic system in the presence of collective damping. Generation of Werner states as asymptotic stationary states of evolution is described. We also show that for some initial states the amount of entanglement is preserved during the evolution

  2. Convolutional Neural Network-based SAR Image Classification with Noisy Labels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Juanping

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available SAR image classification is an important task in SAR image interpretation. Supervised learning methods, such as the Convolutional Neural Network (CNN, demand samples that are accurately labeled. However, this presents a major challenge in SAR image labeling. Due to their unique imaging mechanism, SAR images are seriously affected by speckle, geometric distortion, and incomplete structural information. Thus, SAR images have a strong non-intuitive property, which causes difficulties in SAR image labeling, and which results in the weakened learning and generalization performance of many classifiers (including CNN. In this paper, we propose a Probability Transition CNN (PTCNN for patch-level SAR image classification with noisy labels. Based on the classical CNN, PTCNN builds a bridge between noise-free labels and their noisy versions via a noisy-label transition layer. As such, we derive a new CNN model trained with a noisily labeled training dataset that can potentially revise noisy labels and improve learning capacity with noisily labeled data. We use a 16-class land cover dataset and the MSTAR dataset to demonstrate the effectiveness of our model. Our experimental results show the PTCNN model to be robust with respect to label noise and demonstrate its promising classification performance compared with the classical CNN model. Therefore, the proposed PTCNN model could lower the standards required regarding the quality of image labels and have a variety of practical applications.

  3. Generation of Werner states and preservation of entanglement in a noisy environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakobczyk, Lech [Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Wroclaw, Pl. M. Borna 9, 50-204 Wroclaw (Poland)]. E-mail: ljak@ift.uni.wroc.pl; Jamroz, Anna [Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Wroclaw, Pl. M. Borna 9, 50-204 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2005-12-05

    We study the influence of noisy environment on the evolution of two-atomic system in the presence of collective damping. Generation of Werner states as asymptotic stationary states of evolution is described. We also show that for some initial states the amount of entanglement is preserved during the evolution.

  4. Neuronal assembly dynamics in supervised and unsupervised learning scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moioli, Renan C; Husbands, Phil

    2013-11-01

    The dynamic formation of groups of neurons--neuronal assemblies--is believed to mediate cognitive phenomena at many levels, but their detailed operation and mechanisms of interaction are still to be uncovered. One hypothesis suggests that synchronized oscillations underpin their formation and functioning, with a focus on the temporal structure of neuronal signals. In this context, we investigate neuronal assembly dynamics in two complementary scenarios: the first, a supervised spike pattern classification task, in which noisy variations of a collection of spikes have to be correctly labeled; the second, an unsupervised, minimally cognitive evolutionary robotics tasks, in which an evolved agent has to cope with multiple, possibly conflicting, objectives. In both cases, the more traditional dynamical analysis of the system's variables is paired with information-theoretic techniques in order to get a broader picture of the ongoing interactions with and within the network. The neural network model is inspired by the Kuramoto model of coupled phase oscillators and allows one to fine-tune the network synchronization dynamics and assembly configuration. The experiments explore the computational power, redundancy, and generalization capability of neuronal circuits, demonstrating that performance depends nonlinearly on the number of assemblies and neurons in the network and showing that the framework can be exploited to generate minimally cognitive behaviors, with dynamic assembly formation accounting for varying degrees of stimuli modulation of the sensorimotor interactions.

  5. Caffeine inhibits nonselective cationic currents in interstitial cells of Cajal from the murine jejunum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Nan Ge; Koh, Sang Don; Sanders, Kenton M

    2009-10-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) discharge unitary potentials in gastrointestinal muscles that constitute the basis for pacemaker activity. Caffeine has been used to block unitary potentials, but the ionic conductance responsible for unitary potentials is controversial. We investigated currents in cultured ICC from murine jejunum that may underlie unitary potentials and studied the effects of caffeine. Networks of ICC generated slow wave events under current clamp, and these events were blocked by caffeine in a concentration-dependent manner. Single ICC generated spontaneous transient inward currents (STICs) under voltage clamp at -60 mV and noisy voltage fluctuations in current clamp. STICs were unaffected when the equilibrium potential for Cl- (ECl) was set to -60 mV (excluding Cl- currents) and reversed at 0 mV, demonstrating that a nonselective cationic conductance, and not a Cl- conductance, is responsible for STICs in ICC. Caffeine inhibited STICs in a concentration-dependent manner. Reduced intracellular Ca2+ and calmidazolium (CMZ; 1 microM) activated persistent inward, nonselective cation currents in ICC. Currents activated by CMZ and by dialysis of cells with 10 mM BAPTA were also inhibited by caffeine. Excised inside-out patches contained channels that exhibited spontaneous openings, and resulting currents reversed at 0 mV. Channel openings were increased by reducing Ca2+ concentration from 10(-6) M to 10(-8) M. CMZ (1 microM) also increased openings of nonselective cation channels. Spontaneous currents and channels activated by CMZ were inhibited by caffeine (5 mM). The findings demonstrate that the Ca2+-inhibited nonselective cation channels that generate STICs in ICC are blocked directly by caffeine. STICs are responsible for unitary potentials in intact muscles, and the block of these events by caffeine is consistent with the idea that a nonselective cation conductance underlies unitary potentials in ICC.

  6. Automatic detection of noisy channels in fNIRS signal based on correlation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Mosquera, Carlos; Borragán, Guillermo; Peigneux, Philippe

    2016-09-15

    fNIRS signals can be contaminated by distinct sources of noise. While most of the noise can be corrected using digital filters, optimized experimental paradigms or pre-processing methods, few approaches focus on the automatic detection of noisy channels. In the present study, we propose a new method that detect automatically noisy fNIRS channels by combining the global correlations of the signal obtained from sliding windows (Cui et al., 2010) with correlation coefficients extracted experimental conditions defined by triggers. The validity of the method was evaluated on test data from 17 participants, for a total of 16 NIRS channels per subject, positioned over frontal, dorsolateral prefrontal, parietal and occipital areas. Additionally, the detection of noisy channels was tested in the context of different levels of cognitive requirement in a working memory N-back paradigm. Bad channels detection accuracy, defined as the proportion of bad NIRS channels correctly detected among the total number of channels examined, was close to 91%. Under different cognitive conditions the area under the Receiver Operating Curve (AUC) increased from 60.5% (global correlations) to 91.2% (local correlations). Our results show that global correlations are insufficient for detecting potentially noisy channels when the whole data signal is included in the analysis. In contrast, adding specific local information inherent to the experimental paradigm (e.g., cognitive conditions in a block or event-related design), improved detection performance for noisy channels. Also, we show that automated fNIRS channel detection can be achieved with high accuracy at low computational cost. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Competition model for aperiodic stochastic resonance in a Fitzhugh-Nagumo model of cardiac sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kember, G C; Fenton, G A; Armour, J A; Kalyaniwalla, N

    2001-04-01

    Regional cardiac control depends upon feedback of the status of the heart from afferent neurons responding to chemical and mechanical stimuli as transduced by an array of sensory neurites. Emerging experimental evidence shows that neural control in the heart may be partially exerted using subthreshold inputs that are amplified by noisy mechanical fluctuations. This amplification is known as aperiodic stochastic resonance (ASR). Neural control in the noisy, subthreshold regime is difficult to see since there is a near absence of any correlation between input and the output, the latter being the average firing (spiking) rate of the neuron. This lack of correlation is unresolved by traditional energy models of ASR since these models are unsuitable for identifying "cause and effect" between such inputs and outputs. In this paper, the "competition between averages" model is used to determine what portion of a noisy, subthreshold input is responsible, on average, for the output of sensory neurons as represented by the Fitzhugh-Nagumo equations. A physiologically relevant conclusion of this analysis is that a nearly constant amount of input is responsible for a spike, on average, and this amount is approximately independent of the firing rate. Hence, correlation measures are generally reduced as the firing rate is lowered even though neural control under this model is actually unaffected.

  8. Mirror Neurons Modeled Through Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity are Affected by Channelopathies Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Gabriela; da Silva, Samuel F Faria; de Souza, Fabio M Simoes

    2017-11-28

    Mirror neurons fire action potentials both when the agent performs a certain behavior and watches someone performing a similar action. Here, we present an original mirror neuron model based on the spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) between two morpho-electrical models of neocortical pyramidal neurons. Both neurons fired spontaneously with basal firing rate that follows a Poisson distribution, and the STDP between them was modeled by the triplet algorithm. Our simulation results demonstrated that STDP is sufficient for the rise of mirror neuron function between the pairs of neocortical neurons. This is a proof of concept that pairs of neocortical neurons associating sensory inputs to motor outputs could operate like mirror neurons. In addition, we used the mirror neuron model to investigate whether channelopathies associated with autism spectrum disorder could impair the modeled mirror function. Our simulation results showed that impaired hyperpolarization-activated cationic currents (Ih) affected the mirror function between the pairs of neocortical neurons coupled by STDP.

  9. Persistent Histamine Excitation of Glutamatergic Preoptic Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabarean, Iustin V.

    2012-01-01

    Thermoregulatory neurons of the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) represent a target at which histamine modulates body temperature. The mechanism by which histamine excites a population of MnPO neurons is not known. In this study it was found that histamine activated a cationic inward current and increased the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, actions that had a transient component as well as a sustained one that lasted for tens of minutes after removal of the agonist. The sustained component was blocked by TRPC channel blockers. Single-cell reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed expression of TRPC1, TRPC5 and TRPC7 subunits in neurons excited by histamine. These studies also established the presence of transcripts for the glutamatergic marker Vglut2 and for the H1 histamine receptor in neurons excited by histamine. Intracellular application of antibodies directed against cytoplasmic sites of the TRPC1 or TRPC5 channel subunits decreased the histamine-induced inward current. The persistent inward current and elevation in intracellular Ca2+ concentration could be reversed by activating the PKA pathway. This data reveal a novel mechanism by which histamine induces persistent excitation and sustained intracellular Ca2+ elevation in glutamatergic MnPO neurons. PMID:23082195

  10. Cation-Coupled Bicarbonate Transporters

    OpenAIRE

    Aalkjaer, Christian; Boedtkjer, Ebbe; Choi, Inyeong; Lee, Soojung

    2014-01-01

    Cation-coupled HCO3− transport was initially identified in the mid-1970s when pioneering studies showed that acid extrusion from cells is stimulated by CO2/HCO3− and associated with Na+ and Cl− movement. The first Na+-coupled bicarbonate transporter (NCBT) was expression-cloned in the late 1990s. There are currently five mammalian NCBTs in the SLC4-family: the electrogenic Na,HCO3-cotransporters NBCe1 and NBCe2 (SLC4A4 and SLC4A5 gene products); the electroneutral Na,HCO3-cotransporter NBCn1 ...

  11. The Free Tricoordinated Silyl Cation Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čičak, H.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available As the importance and abundance of silicon in our environment is large, it has been thought that silicon might take the place of carbon in forming a host of similar compounds and silicon-based life. However, until today there is no experimental evidence for such a hypothesis and carbon is still unique among the elements in the vast number and variety of compounds it can form. Also, the corresponding derivatives of the two elements show considerable differences in their chemical properties.The essential debate concerning organosilicon chemistry relates to the existence of the free planar tricoordinated silyl cations in condensed phase (R3Si+, in analogy to carbocations (R3C+ which have been known and characterized as free species. Although silyl cations are thermodynamically more stable than their carbon analogs, they are very reactive due to their high inherent electrophilicity and the ability of hypervalent coordination. On the other hand, stabilization by inductive and hyperconjugative effects and larger steric effects of carbocations make them less sensitive to solvation or other environmental effects than silyl cations. Hence, observation of free silyl cations in the condensed phase proved extremely difficult and the actual problem is the question of the degree of the (remaining silyl cation character.The first free silyl cation, trimesitylsilyl cation, and in analogy with it tridurylsilyl cation, were synthesized by Lambert et al. Free silyl cations based on analogy to aromatic ions (homocyclopropenylium and tropylium have also been prepared. However, in these silyl cations the cationic character is reduced by internal π -conjugation. Čičak et al. prepared some silyl-cationic intermediates (Me3Si--CH≡CR+in solid state. With the help of quantum-mechanical calculations it was concluded that these adducts have much more silyl cation than carbocation character.

  12. Arginine-based cationic liposomes for efficient in vitro plasmid DNA delivery with low cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarker SR

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Satya Ranjan Sarker, Yumiko Aoshima, Ryosuke Hokama, Takafumi Inoue, Keitaro Sou, Shinji Takeoka Department of Life Science and Medical Bioscience, Graduate School of Advanced Science and Engineering, Waseda University (TWIns, Tokyo, Japan Background: Currently available gene delivery vehicles have many limitations such as low gene delivery efficiency and high cytotoxicity. To overcome these drawbacks, we designed and synthesized two cationic lipids comprised of n-tetradecyl alcohol as the hydrophobic moiety, 3-hydrocarbon chain as the spacer, and different counterions (eg, hydrogen chloride [HCl] salt or trifluoroacetic acid [TFA] salt in the arginine head group. Methods: Cationic lipids were hydrated in 4-(2-hydroxyethyl-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid (HEPES buffer to prepare cationic liposomes and characterized in terms of their size, zeta potential, phase transition temperature, and morphology. Lipoplexes were then prepared and characterized in terms of their size and zeta potential in the absence or presence of serum. The morphology of the lipoplexes was determined using transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The gene delivery efficiency was evaluated in neuronal cells and HeLa cells and compared with that of lysine-based cationic assemblies and Lipofectamine™ 2000. The cytotoxicity level of the cationic lipids was investigated and compared with that of Lipofectamine™ 2000. Results: We synthesized arginine-based cationic lipids having different counterions (ie, HCl-salt or TFA-salt that formed cationic liposomes of around 100 nm in size. In the absence of serum, lipoplexes prepared from the arginine-based cationic liposomes and plasmid (p DNA formed large aggregates and attained a positive zeta potential. However, in the presence of serum, the lipoplexes were smaller in size and negative in zeta potential. The morphology of the lipoplexes was vesicular. Arginine-based cationic liposomes with HCl-salt showed the

  13. Joint source/channel coding of scalable video over noisy channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, G.; Zakhor, A. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences University of California Berkeley, California94720 (United States)

    1997-01-01

    We propose an optimal bit allocation strategy for a joint source/channel video codec over noisy channel when the channel state is assumed to be known. Our approach is to partition source and channel coding bits in such a way that the expected distortion is minimized. The particular source coding algorithm we use is rate scalable and is based on 3D subband coding with multi-rate quantization. We show that using this strategy, transmission of video over very noisy channels still renders acceptable visual quality, and outperforms schemes that use equal error protection only. The flexibility of the algorithm also permits the bit allocation to be selected optimally when the channel state is in the form of a probability distribution instead of a deterministic state. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Simple protocols for oblivious transfer and secure identification in the noisy-quantum-storage model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffner, Christian

    2010-09-01

    We present simple protocols for oblivious transfer and password-based identification which are secure against general attacks in the noisy-quantum-storage model as defined in R. König, S. Wehner, and J. Wullschleger [e-print arXiv:0906.1030]. We argue that a technical tool from König suffices to prove security of the known protocols. Whereas the more involved protocol for oblivious transfer from König requires less noise in storage to achieve security, our “canonical” protocols have the advantage of being simpler to implement and the security error is easier control. Therefore, our protocols yield higher OT rates for many realistic noise parameters. Furthermore, a proof of security of a direct protocol for password-based identification against general noisy-quantum-storage attacks is given.

  15. Simple protocols for oblivious transfer and secure identification in the noisy-quantum-storage model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaffner, Christian

    2010-01-01

    We present simple protocols for oblivious transfer and password-based identification which are secure against general attacks in the noisy-quantum-storage model as defined in R. Koenig, S. Wehner, and J. Wullschleger [e-print arXiv:0906.1030]. We argue that a technical tool from Koenig et al. suffices to prove security of the known protocols. Whereas the more involved protocol for oblivious transfer from Koenig et al. requires less noise in storage to achieve security, our ''canonical'' protocols have the advantage of being simpler to implement and the security error is easier control. Therefore, our protocols yield higher OT rates for many realistic noise parameters. Furthermore, a proof of security of a direct protocol for password-based identification against general noisy-quantum-storage attacks is given.

  16. Practical signal-dependent noise parameter estimation from a single noisy image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinhao; Tanaka, Masayuki; Okutomi, Masatoshi

    2014-10-01

    The additive white Gaussian noise is widely assumed in many image processing algorithms. However, in the real world, the noise from actual cameras is better modeled as signal-dependent noise (SDN). In this paper, we focus on the SDN model and propose an algorithm to automatically estimate its parameters from a single noisy image. The proposed algorithm identifies the noise level function of signal-dependent noise assuming the generalized signal-dependent noise model and is also applicable to the Poisson-Gaussian noise model. The accuracy is achieved by improved estimation of local mean and local noise variance from the selected low-rank patches. We evaluate the proposed algorithm with both synthetic and real noisy images. Experiments demonstrate that the proposed estimation algorithm outperforms the state-of-the-art methods.

  17. Avoiding disentanglement of multipartite entangled optical beams with a correlated noisy channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaowei; Tian, Caixing; Su, Xiaolong; Xie, Changde

    2017-03-01

    A quantum communication network can be constructed by distributing a multipartite entangled state to space-separated nodes. Entangled optical beams with highest flying speed and measurable brightness can be used as carriers to convey information in quantum communication networks. Losses and noises existing in real communication channels will reduce or even totally destroy entanglement. The phenomenon of disentanglement will result in the complete failure of quantum communication. Here, we present the experimental demonstrations on the disentanglement and the entanglement revival of tripartite entangled optical beams used in a quantum network. We experimentally demonstrate that symmetric tripartite entangled optical beams are robust in pure lossy but noiseless channels. In a noisy channel, the excess noise will lead to the disentanglement and the destroyed entanglement can be revived by the use of a correlated noisy channel (non-Markovian environment). The presented results provide useful technical references for establishing quantum networks.

  18. Complex Lyapunov exponents from short and noisy sets of data. Application to stability analysis of BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdu, G.; Ginestar, D.; Bovea, M.D.; Jimenez, P.; Pena, J.; Munoz-Cobo, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    The dynamics reconstruction techniques have been applied to systems as BWRs with a big amount of noise. The success of this methodology was limited due to the noise in the signals. Recently, new techniques have been introduced for short and noisy data sets based on a global fit of the signal by means of orthonormal polynomials. In this paper, we revisit these ideas in order to adapt them for the analysis of the neutronic power signals to characterize the stability regime of BWR reactors. To check the performance of the methodology, we have analyzed simulated noisy signals, observing that the method works well, even with a big amount of noise. Also, we have analyzed experimental signals from Ringhals 1 BWR. In this case, the reconstructed phase space for the system is not very good. A modal decomposition treatment for the signals is proposed producing signals with better behaviour. (author)

  19. Advanced topics in control and estimation of state-multiplicative noisy systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gershon, Eli

    2013-01-01

    Advanced Topics in Control and Estimation of State-Multiplicative Noisy Systems begins with an introduction and extensive literature survey. The text proceeds to cover solutions of measurement-feedback control and state problems and the formulation of the Bounded Real Lemma for both continuous- and discrete-time systems. The continuous-time reduced-order and stochastic-tracking control problems for delayed systems are then treated. Ideas of nonlinear stability are introduced for infinite-horizon systems, again, in both the continuous- and discrete-time cases. The reader is introduced to six practical examples of noisy state-multiplicative control and filtering associated with various fields of control engineering. The book is rounded out by a three-part appendix containing stochastic tools necessary for a proper appreciation of the text: a basic introduction to nonlinear stochastic differential equations and aspects of switched systems and peak to peak  optimal control and filtering. Advanced Topics in Contr...

  20. Fast reversible learning based on neurons functioning as anisotropic multiplex hubs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardi, Roni; Goldental, Amir; Sheinin, Anton; Sardi, Shira; Kanter, Ido

    2017-05-01

    Neural networks are composed of neurons and synapses, which are responsible for learning in a slow adaptive dynamical process. Here we experimentally show that neurons act like independent anisotropic multiplex hubs, which relay and mute incoming signals following their input directions. Theoretically, the observed information routing enriches the computational capabilities of neurons by allowing, for instance, equalization among different information routes in the network, as well as high-frequency transmission of complex time-dependent signals constructed via several parallel routes. In addition, this kind of hubs adaptively eliminate very noisy neurons from the dynamics of the network, preventing masking of information transmission. The timescales for these features are several seconds at most, as opposed to the imprint of information by the synaptic plasticity, a process which exceeds minutes. Results open the horizon to the understanding of fast and adaptive learning realities in higher cognitive brain's functionalities.

  1. The Effect of Aging and the High-Frequency Auditory Threshold on Speech-Evoked Mismatch Negativity in a Noisy Background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junming; Chen, Suijun; Zheng, Yiqing; Ou, Yongkang

    2016-01-01

    neurons that is weakened in the MMN time window, which may be a cause of central auditory processing disorders in elderly subjects in noisy background conditions. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Chaotic noisy transport of electron pairs in a superconducting junction device: thermal-inertia ratchets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing-hui

    2006-07-01

    Chaotic noisy transport of electron pairs in a superconducting junction device (thermal-inertia ratchets) is investigated. The study shows that when the temperature is low enough, the transport of the electron pairs can be mainly chaotic; when the temperature is high enough, it can be mainly stochastic. By controlling the temperature and the amplitude of the input ac signal, the current of electron pairs can be reversed.

  3. Multifaceted effects of noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation on manual tracking behavior in Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soojin; Kim, Diana J.; Svenkeson, Daniel; Parras, Gabriel; Oishi, Meeko Mitsuko K.; McKeown, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative movement disorder that is characterized clinically by slowness of movement, rigidity, tremor, postural instability, and often cognitive impairments. Recent studies have demonstrated altered cortico-basal ganglia rhythms in PD, which raises the possibility of a role for non-invasive stimulation therapies such as noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS). We applied noisy GVS to 12 mild-moderately affected PD subjects (Hoehn and Yahr 1.5–2.5) off medication while they performed a sinusoidal visuomotor joystick tracking task, which alternated between 2 task conditions depending on whether the displayed cursor position underestimated the actual error by 30% (‘Better’) or overestimated by 200% (‘Worse’). Either sham or subthreshold, noisy GVS (0.1–10 Hz, 1/f-type power spectrum) was applied in pseudorandom order. We used exploratory (linear discriminant analysis with bootstrapping) and confirmatory (robust multivariate linear regression) methods to determine if the presence of GVS significantly affected our ability to predict cursor position based on target variables. Variables related to displayed error were robustly seen to discriminate GVS in all subjects particularly in the Worse condition. If we considered higher frequency components of the cursor trajectory as “noise,” the signal-to-noise ratio of cursor trajectory was significantly increased during the GVS stimulation. The results suggest that noisy GVS influenced motor performance of the PD subjects, and we speculate that they were elicited through a combination of mechanisms: enhanced cingulate activity resulting in modulation of frontal midline theta rhythms, improved signal processing in neuromotor system via stochastic facilitation and/or enhanced “vigor” known to be deficient in PD subjects. Further work is required to determine if GVS has a selective effect on corrective submovements that could not be detected by the current analyses

  4. Effects of flashlight guidance on chest compression performance in cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a noisy environment

    OpenAIRE

    You, Je Sung; Chung, Sung Phil; Chang, Chul Ho; Park, Incheol; Lee, Hye Sun; Kim, SeungHo; Lee, Hahn Shick

    2012-01-01

    Background In real cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), noise can arise from instructional voices and environmental sounds in places such as a battlefield and industrial and high-traffic areas. A feedback device using a flashing light was designed to overcome noise-induced stimulus saturation during CPR. This study was conducted to determine whether ?flashlight? guidance influences CPR performance in a simulated noisy setting. Materials and methods We recruited 30 senior medical students with...

  5. Well-posedness of the limiting equation of a noisy consensus model in opinion dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazelle, Bernard; Jiu, Quansen; Li, Qianxiao; Wang, Chu

    2017-07-01

    This paper establishes the global well-posedness of the nonlinear Fokker-Planck equation for a noisy version of the Hegselmann-Krause model. The equation captures the mean-field behavior of a classic multiagent system for opinion dynamics. We prove the global existence, uniqueness, nonnegativity and regularity of the weak solution. We also exhibit a global stability condition, which delineates a forbidden region for consensus formation. This is the first nonlinear stability result derived for the Hegselmann-Krause model.

  6. Tomographic diffractive microscopy with agile illuminations for imaging targets in a noisy background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T; Godavarthi, C; Chaumet, P C; Maire, G; Giovannini, H; Talneau, A; Prada, C; Sentenac, A; Belkebir, K

    2015-02-15

    Tomographic diffractive microscopy is a marker-free optical digital imaging technique in which three-dimensional samples are reconstructed from a set of holograms recorded under different angles of incidence. We show experimentally that, by processing the holograms with singular value decomposition, it is possible to image objects in a noisy background that are invisible with classical wide-field microscopy and conventional tomographic reconstruction procedure. The targets can be further characterized with a selective quantitative inversion.

  7. Application of morphological associative memories and Fourier descriptors for classification of noisy subsurface signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Jorge L.; Parsiani, Hamed; Tolstoy, Leonid

    2004-02-01

    This paper presents a method for recognition of Noisy Subsurface Images using Morphological Associative Memories (MAM). MAM are type of associative memories that use a new kind of neural networks based in the algebra system known as semi-ring. The operations performed in this algebraic system are highly nonlinear providing additional strength when compared to other transformations. Morphological associative memories are a new kind of neural networks that provide a robust performance with noisy inputs. Two representations of morphological associative memories are used called M and W matrices. M associative memory provides a robust association with input patterns corrupted by dilative random noise, while the W associative matrix performs a robust recognition in patterns corrupted with erosive random noise. The robust performance of MAM is used in combination of the Fourier descriptors for the recognition of underground objects in Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) images. Multiple 2-D GPR images of a site are made available by NASA-SSC center. The buried objects in these images appear in the form of hyperbolas which are the results of radar backscatter from the artifacts or objects. The Fourier descriptors of the prototype hyperbola-like and shapes from non-hyperbola shapes in the sub-surface images are used to make these shapes scale-, shift-, and rotation-invariant. Typical hyperbola-like and non-hyperbola shapes are used to calculate the morphological associative memories. The trained MAMs are used to process other noisy images to detect the presence of these underground objects. The outputs from the MAM using the noisy patterns may be equal to the training prototypes, providing a positive identification of the artifacts. The results are images with recognized hyperbolas which indicate the presence of buried artifacts. A model using MATLAB has been developed and results are presented.

  8. Indicators to assess the environmental performances of an innovative subway station : example of Noisy-Champs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schertzer, D. J. M.; Charbonnier, L.; Versini, P. A.; Tchiguirinskaia, I.

    2017-12-01

    Noisy-Champs is a train station located in Noisy-le-Grand and Champs-sur-Marne, in the Paris urban area (France). Integrated into the Grand Paris Express project (huge development project to modernise the transport network around Paris), this station is going to be radically transformed and become a major hub. Designed by the architectural office Duthilleul, the new Noisy-Champs station aspires to be an example of an innovative and sustainable infrastructure. Its architectural precepts are indeed meant to improve its environmental performances, especially those related to storm water management, water consumption and users' thermal and hygrometric comfort. In order to assess and monitor these performances, objectives and associated indicators have been developed. They aim to be adapted for a specific infrastructure such as a public transport station. Analyses of pre-existing comfort simulations, blueprints and regulatory documents have led to identify the main issues for the Noisy-Champs station, focusing on its resilience to extreme events like droughts, heatwaves and heaxvy rainfalls. Both objectives and indicators have been proposed by studying the space-time variabilities of physical fluxes (heat, pollutants, radiation, wind and water) and passenger flows, and their interactions. Each indicator is linked to an environmental performance and has been determined after consultation of the different stakeholders involved in the rebuilding of the station. It results a monitoring program to assess the environmental performances of the station composed by both the indicators grid and their related objectives, and a measurement program detailing the nature and location of sensors, and the frequency of measurements.

  9. Clustering of noisy image data using an adaptive neuro-fuzzy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemmaraju, Surya; Mitra, Sunanda

    1992-01-01

    Identification of outliers or noise in a real data set is often quite difficult. A recently developed adaptive fuzzy leader clustering (AFLC) algorithm has been modified to separate the outliers from real data sets while finding the clusters within the data sets. The capability of this modified AFLC algorithm to identify the outliers in a number of real data sets indicates the potential strength of this algorithm in correct classification of noisy real data.

  10. Information Extraction with Character-level Neural Networks and Free Noisy Supervision

    OpenAIRE

    Meerkamp, Philipp; Zhou, Zhengyi

    2016-01-01

    We present an architecture for information extraction from text that augments an existing parser with a character-level neural network. The network is trained using a measure of consistency of extracted data with existing databases as a form of noisy supervision. Our architecture combines the ability of constraint-based information extraction systems to easily incorporate domain knowledge and constraints with the ability of deep neural networks to leverage large amounts of data to learn compl...

  11. Multifaceted Effects of Noisy Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation on Manual Tracking Behavior in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soojin eLee

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a neurodegenerative movement disorder that is characterized clinically by slowness of movement, rigidity, tremor, postural instability, and often cognitive impairments. Recent studies have demonstrated altered cortico-basal ganglia rhythms in PD, which raises the possibility of a role for non-invasive stimulation therapies such as noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS. We applied noisy GVS to 12 mild-moderately affected PD subjects (Hoehn & Yahr 1.5-2.5 off medication while they performed a sinusoidal visuomotor joystick tracking task, which alternated between 2 task conditions depending on whether the displayed cursor position underestimated the actual error by 30% (‘Better’ or overestimated by 200% (‘Worse’. Either sham or subthreshold, noisy GVS (0.1-10 Hz, 1/f-type power spectrum was applied in pseudorandom order. We used exploratory (Linear Discriminant Analysis with bootstrapping and confirmatory (robust multivariate linear regression methods to determine if the presence of GVS significantly affected our ability to predict cursor position based on target variables. Variables related to displayed error were robustly seen to discriminate GVS in all subjects particularly in the Worse condition. If we considered higher frequency components of the cursor trajectory as noise, the signal-to-noise ratio of cursor trajectory was significantly increased during the GVS stimulation. The results suggest that noisy GVS influenced motor performance of the PD subjects, and we speculate that they were elicited through a combination of mechanisms: enhanced cingulate activity resulting in modulation of frontal midline theta rhythms, improved signal processing in neuromotor system via stochastic facilitation and/or enhanced vigor known to be deficient in PD subjects. Further work is required to determine if GVS has a selective effect on corrective submovements that could not be detected by the current analyses.

  12. Mathematical properties of a semi-classical signal analysis method: Noisy signal case

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Dayan

    2012-08-01

    Recently, a new signal analysis method based on a semi-classical approach has been proposed [1]. The main idea in this method is to interpret a signal as a potential of a Schrodinger operator and then to use the discrete spectrum of this operator to analyze the signal. In this paper, we are interested in a mathematical analysis of this method in discrete case considering noisy signals. © 2012 IEEE.

  13. Application of incremental algorithms to CT image reconstruction for sparse-view, noisy data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Sean; Andersen, Martin Skovgaard; Sidky, Emil Y.

    2014-01-01

    This conference contribution adapts an incremental framework for solving optimization problems of interest for sparse-view CT. From the incremental framework two algorithms are derived: one that combines a damped form of the algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) with a total-variation (TV......) projection, and one that employs a modified damped ART, accounting for a weighted-quadratic data fidelity term, combined with TV projection. The algorithms are demonstrated on simulated, noisy, sparseview CT data....

  14. Jump Variation Estimation with Noisy High Frequency Financial Data via Wavelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a method to improve the estimation of jump variation using high frequency data with the existence of market microstructure noises. Accurate estimation of jump variation is in high demand, as it is an important component of volatility in finance for portfolio allocation, derivative pricing and risk management. The method has a two-step procedure with detection and estimation. In Step 1, we detect the jump locations by performing wavelet transformation on the observed noisy price processes. Since wavelet coefficients are significantly larger at the jump locations than the others, we calibrate the wavelet coefficients through a threshold and declare jump points if the absolute wavelet coefficients exceed the threshold. In Step 2 we estimate the jump variation by averaging noisy price processes at each side of a declared jump point and then taking the difference between the two averages of the jump point. Specifically, for each jump location detected in Step 1, we get two averages from the observed noisy price processes, one before the detected jump location and one after it, and then take their difference to estimate the jump variation. Theoretically, we show that the two-step procedure based on average realized volatility processes can achieve a convergence rate close to O P ( n − 4 / 9 , which is better than the convergence rate O P ( n − 1 / 4 for the procedure based on the original noisy process, where n is the sample size. Numerically, the method based on average realized volatility processes indeed performs better than that based on the price processes. Empirically, we study the distribution of jump variation using Dow Jones Industrial Average stocks and compare the results using the original price process and the average realized volatility processes.

  15. Lithium NLP: A System for Rich Information Extraction from Noisy User Generated Text on Social Media

    OpenAIRE

    Bhargava, Preeti; Spasojevic, Nemanja; Hu, Guoning

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the Lithium Natural Language Processing (NLP) system - a resource-constrained, high- throughput and language-agnostic system for information extraction from noisy user generated text on social media. Lithium NLP extracts a rich set of information including entities, topics, hashtags and sentiment from text. We discuss several real world applications of the system currently incorporated in Lithium products. We also compare our system with existing commercial and acad...

  16. Bayesian Aggregation of Evidence for Detection and Characterization of Patterns in Multiple Noisy Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    presence of benign nuisance sources or noise fluctu- ations in the sensor data. In the radiation domain, false positives may emerge from common nuisances ...patterns in noisy sensor data. Our Bayesian Aggregation (BA) algorithmic framework can leverage data fusion from multiple low Signal-To- Noise Ratio (SNR...more flexibly model background and nuisance source fluctuations in a dynamic environment. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17

  17. Joint Segmentation and Recognition of Categorized Objects from Noisy Web Image Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Le; Hua, Gang; Xue, Jianru; Gao, Zhanning; Zheng, Nanning

    2014-07-14

    The segmentation of categorized objects addresses the problem of joint segmentation of a single category of object across a collection of images, where categorized objects are referred to objects in the same category. Most existing methods of segmentation of categorized objects made the assumption that all images in the given image collection contain the target object. In other words, the given image collection is noise free. Therefore, they may not work well when there are some noisy images which are not in the same category, such as those image collections gathered by a text query from modern image search engines. To overcome this limitation, we propose a method for automatic segmentation and recognition of categorized objects from noisy Web image collections. This is achieved by cotraining an automatic object segmentation algorithm that operates directly on a collection of images, and an object category recognition algorithm that identifies which images contain the target object. The object segmentation algorithm is trained on a subset of images from the given image collection which are recognized to contain the target object with high confidence, while training the object category recognition model is guided by the intermediate segmentation results obtained from the object segmentation algorithm. This way, our co-training algorithm automatically identifies the set of true positives in the noisy Web image collection, and simultaneously extracts the target objects from all the identified images. Extensive experiments validated the efficacy of our proposed approach on four datasets: 1) the Weizmann horse dataset, 2) the MSRC object category dataset, 3) the iCoseg dataset, and 4) a new 30-categories dataset including 15,634 Web images with both hand-annotated category labels and ground truth segmentation labels. It is shown that our method compares favorably with the state-of-the-art, and has the ability to deal with noisy image collections.

  18. Thallium Flux Assay for Measuring the Activity of Monovalent Cation Channels and Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, C David

    2018-01-01

    Monovalent cation channels are critically important for physiological processes ranging from the control of neuronal excitability to the maintenance of solute balance. Mutations in these channels are associated with a multiplicity of diseases and monovalent cation channel-modulating drugs are used as therapeutics. Techniques that allow the measurement of the activity of these ion channels are useful for exploring their many biological roles as well as enabling the discovery and characterization of ion channel modulators for the purposes of drug discovery. Although there are numerous techniques for measuring the activity of monovalent cation channels, the thallium flux assay technique is a widely used fluorescence-based approach. Described herein is a method for using the thallium-flux technique for detecting and quantifying the activity of small-molecule potassium channel modulators in 384-well plates.

  19. ADSORPTION METHOD FOR SEPARATING METAL CATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khym, J.X.

    1959-03-10

    The chromatographic separation of fission product cations is discussed. By use of this method a mixture of metal cations containing Zr, Cb, Ce, Y, Ba, and Sr may be separated from one another. Mentioned as preferred exchange adsorbents are resins containing free sulfonic acid groups. Various eluants, such as tartaric acid, HCl, and citric acid, used at various acidities, are employed to effect the selective elution and separation of the various fission product cations.

  20. A rating scale experiment on loudness, noisiness and annoyance of environmental sounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, K.; Takagi, K.; Yamamoto, T.

    1988-12-01

    How people judge loudness, noisiness and annoyance of sounds was investigated by using a variety of environmental sounds. Fifty male and female subjects, aged from 18 to 60 years, heard 59 environmental sounds as well as seven kinds of white noise and judged their loudness, noisiness and annoyance on rating scales. Average scores on the three concepts given to the steady white noises are approximately in linear proportion to the level of the noise, with high correlation coefficients. The relationships were used to convert the scores given to the sounds to the levels of white noise which would have the same scores and can be regarded as points of subjective equality ( PSE's) of the sounds. It is found that the PSE thus obtained concerning loudness is best correlated among the three with Perceived Level and that concerning annoyance is least correlated with the level. Scattergrams of PSE's between the three concepts plotted against each other showed considerably high correlations. They are more correlated when sounds such as music, church bell, birds, etc., being on average judged pleasant or neutral, are excluded. This suggests that the human responses concerning those three concepts of auditory sensation and/or perception are mutually correlated. Lower correlation between loudness and annoyance, however, suggests sounds heard as equally loud could be differently annoying. More detailed analysis of the results showed that the judgement of loudness was not independent of noisiness and/or annoyance of the sound.

  1. Dictionary learning based noisy image super-resolution via distance penalty weight model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yulan; Zhao, Yongping; Wang, Qisong

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we address the problem of noisy image super-resolution. Noisy low resolution (LR) image is always obtained in applications, while most of the existing algorithms assume that the LR image is noise-free. As to this situation, we present an algorithm for noisy image super-resolution which can achieve simultaneously image super-resolution and denoising. And in the training stage of our method, LR example images are noise-free. For different input LR images, even if the noise variance varies, the dictionary pair does not need to be retrained. For the input LR image patch, the corresponding high resolution (HR) image patch is reconstructed through weighted average of similar HR example patches. To reduce computational cost, we use the atoms of learned sparse dictionary as the examples instead of original example patches. We proposed a distance penalty model for calculating the weight, which can complete a second selection on similar atoms at the same time. Moreover, LR example patches removed mean pixel value are also used to learn dictionary rather than just their gradient features. Based on this, we can reconstruct initial estimated HR image and denoised LR image. Combined with iterative back projection, the two reconstructed images are applied to obtain final estimated HR image. We validate our algorithm on natural images and compared with the previously reported algorithms. Experimental results show that our proposed method performs better noise robustness.

  2. Non-stationary component extraction in noisy multicomponent signal using polynomial chirping Fourier transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wenlong; Xie, Junwei; Wang, Heming; Sheng, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by track-before-detection technology in radar, a novel time-frequency transform, namely polynomial chirping Fourier transform (PCFT), is exploited to extract components from noisy multicomponent signal. The PCFT combines advantages of Fourier transform and polynomial chirplet transform to accumulate component energy along a polynomial chirping curve in the time-frequency plane. The particle swarm optimization algorithm is employed to search optimal polynomial parameters with which the PCFT will achieve a most concentrated energy ridge in the time-frequency plane for the target component. The component can be well separated in the polynomial chirping Fourier domain with a narrow-band filter and then reconstructed by inverse PCFT. Furthermore, an iterative procedure, involving parameter estimation, PCFT, filtering and recovery, is introduced to extract components from a noisy multicomponent signal successively. The Simulations and experiments show that the proposed method has better performance in component extraction from noisy multicomponent signal as well as provides more time-frequency details about the analyzed signal than conventional methods.

  3. Hierarchical singleton-type recurrent neural fuzzy networks for noisy speech recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juang, Chia-Feng; Chiou, Chyi-Tian; Lai, Chun-Lung

    2007-05-01

    This paper proposes noisy speech recognition using hierarchical singleton-type recurrent neural fuzzy networks (HSRNFNs). The proposed HSRNFN is a hierarchical connection of two singleton-type recurrent neural fuzzy networks (SRNFNs), where one is used for noise filtering and the other for recognition. The SRNFN is constructed by recurrent fuzzy if-then rules with fuzzy singletons in the consequences, and their recurrent properties make them suitable for processing speech patterns with temporal characteristics. In n words recognition, n SRNFNs are created for modeling n words, where each SRNFN receives the current frame feature and predicts the next one of its modeling word. The prediction error of each SRNFN is used as recognition criterion. In filtering, one SRNFN is created, and each SRNFN recognizer is connected to the same SRNFN filter, which filters noisy speech patterns in the feature domain before feeding them to the SRNFN recognizer. Experiments with Mandarin word recognition under different types of noise are performed. Other recognizers, including multilayer perceptron (MLP), time-delay neural networks (TDNNs), and hidden Markov models (HMMs), are also tested and compared. These experiments and comparisons demonstrate good results with HSRNFN for noisy speech recognition tasks.

  4. New approach for T-wave end detection on electrocardiogram: Performance in noisy conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marañón Reyes Enrique J

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The detection of T-wave end points on electrocardiogram (ECG is a basic procedure for ECG processing and analysis. Several methods have been proposed and tested, featuring high accuracy and percentages of correct detection. Nevertheless, their performance in noisy conditions remains an open problem. Methods A new approach and algorithm for T-wave end location based on the computation of Trapezium's areas is proposed and validated (in terms of accuracy and repeatability, using signals from the Physionet QT Database. The performance of the proposed algorithm in noisy conditions has been tested and compared with one of the most used approaches for estimating the T-wave end point: the method based on the threshold on the first derivative. Results The results indicated that the proposed approach based on Trapezium's areas outperformed the baseline method with respect to accuracy and repeatability. Also, the proposed method is more robust to wideband noise. Conclusions The trapezium-based approach has a good performance in noisy conditions and does not rely on any empirical threshold. It is very adequate for use in scenarios where the levels of broadband noise are significant.

  5. Neuronal Networks on Nanocellulose Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Malin; Brackmann, Christian; Puchades, Maja; Brattås, Karoline; Ewing, Andrew; Gatenholm, Paul; Enejder, Annika

    2015-11-01

    Proliferation, integration, and neurite extension of PC12 cells, a widely used culture model for cholinergic neurons, were studied in nanocellulose scaffolds biosynthesized by Gluconacetobacter xylinus to allow a three-dimensional (3D) extension of neurites better mimicking neuronal networks in tissue. The interaction with control scaffolds was compared with cationized nanocellulose (trimethyl ammonium betahydroxy propyl [TMAHP] cellulose) to investigate the impact of surface charges on the cell interaction mechanisms. Furthermore, coatings with extracellular matrix proteins (collagen, fibronectin, and laminin) were investigated to determine the importance of integrin-mediated cell attachment. Cell proliferation was evaluated by a cellular proliferation assay, while cell integration and neurite propagation were studied by simultaneous label-free Coherent anti-Stokes Raman Scattering and second harmonic generation microscopy, providing 3D images of PC12 cells and arrangement of nanocellulose fibrils, respectively. Cell attachment and proliferation were enhanced by TMAHP modification, but not by protein coating. Protein coating instead promoted active interaction between the cells and the scaffold, hence lateral cell migration and integration. Irrespective of surface modification, deepest cell integration measured was one to two cell layers, whereas neurites have a capacity to integrate deeper than the cell bodies in the scaffold due to their fine dimensions and amoeba-like migration pattern. Neurites with lengths of >50 μm were observed, successfully connecting individual cells and cell clusters. In conclusion, TMAHP-modified nanocellulose scaffolds promote initial cellular scaffold adhesion, which combined with additional cell-scaffold treatments enables further formation of 3D neuronal networks.

  6. Afrikaans Syllabification Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilla Fick

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to English, automatic hyphenation by computer of Afrikaans words is a problem that still needs to be addressed, since errors are still often encountered in printed text. An initial step in this task is the ability to automatically syllabify words. Since new words are created continuously by joining words, it is necessary to develop an “intelligent” technique for syllabification. As a first phase of the research, we consider only the orthographic information of words, and disregard both syntactic and morphological information. This approach allows us to use machine-learning techniques such as artificial neural networks and decision trees that are known for their pattern recognition abilities. Both these techniques are trained with isolated patterns consisting of input patterns and corresponding outputs (or targets that indicate whether the input pattern should be split at a certain position, or not. In the process of compiling a list of syllabified words from which to generate training data for the  syllabification problem, irregular patterns were identified. The same letter patterns are split differently in different words and complete words that are spelled identically are split differently due to meaning. We also identified irregularities in and between  the different dictionaries that we used. We examined the influence range of letters that are involved in irregularities. For example, for their in agter-ente and vaste-rente we have to consider three letters to the left of r to be certain where the hyphen should be inserted. The influence range of the k in verstek-waarde and kleinste-kwadrate is four to the left and three to the right. In an analysis of letter patterns in Afrikaans words we found that the letter e has the highest frequency overall (16,2% of all letters in the word list. The frequency of words starting with s is the highest, while the frequency of words ending with e is the highest. It is important to

  7. NEURON and Python

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Hines; Andrew P Davison; Eilif Muller

    2009-01-01

    The NEURON simulation program now allows Python to be used, alone or in combination with NEURON's traditional Hoc interpreter. Adding Python to NEURON has the immediate benefit of making available a very extensive suite of analysis tools written for engineering and science. It also catalyzes NEURON software development by offering users a modern programming tool that is recognized for its flexibility and power to create and maintain complex programs. At the same time, nothing is lost because ...

  8. Optimization of divalent cation in Saccharomyces pastorianus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cassava starch fermentations were conducted in batch cultures to optimize the effect of divalent cations on ethanol production with Saccharomyces pastorianus using the central composite rotatable response surface design. Divalent cations used were magnesium (Mg2+), zinc (Zn2+) and calcium (Ca2+). Maximum ethanol ...

  9. Crystal structure of the channelrhodopsin light-gated cation channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hideaki E.; Zhang, Feng; Yizhar, Ofer; Ramakrishnan, Charu; Nishizawa, Tomohiro; Hirata, Kunio; Ito, Jumpei; Aita, Yusuke; Tsukazaki, Tomoya; Hayashi, Shigehiko; Hegemann, Peter; Maturana, Andrés D.; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Deisseroth, Karl; Nureki, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Channelrhodopsins (ChRs) are light-gated cation channels derived from algae that have shown experimental utility in optogenetics; for example, neurons expressing ChRs can be optically controlled with high temporal precision within systems as complex as freely moving mammals. Although ChRs have been broadly applied to neuroscience research, little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which these unusual and powerful proteins operate. Here we present the crystal structure of a ChR (a C1C2 chimaera between ChR1 and ChR2 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii) at 2.3 Å resolution. The structure reveals the essential molecular architecture of ChRs, including the retinal-binding pocket and cation conduction pathway. This integration of structural and electrophysiological analyses provides insight into the molecular basis for the remarkable function of ChRs, and paves the way for the precise and principled design of ChR variants with novel properties. PMID:22266941

  10. Exploring backbone-cation alkyl spacers for multi-cation side chain anion exchange membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liang; Yu, Xuedi; Hickner, Michael A.

    2018-01-01

    In order to systematically study how the arrangement of cations on the side chain and length of alkyl spacers between cations impact the performance of multi-cation AEMs for alkaline fuel cells, a series of polyphenylene oxide (PPO)-based AEMs with different cationic side chains were synthesized. This work resulted in samples with two or three cations in a side chain pendant to the PPO backbone. More importantly, the length of the spacer between cations varied from 3 methylene (-CH2-) (C3) groups to 8 methylene (C8) groups. The highest conductivity, up to 99 mS/cm in liquid water at room temperature, was observed for the triple-cation side chain AEM with pentyl (C5) or hexyl (C6) spacers. The multi-cation AEMs were found to have decreased water uptake and ionic conductivity when the spacer chains between cations were lengthened from pentyl (C5) or hexyl (C6) to octyl (C8) linking groups. The triple-cation membranes with pentyl (C5) or hexyl (C6) groups between cations showed greatest stability after immersion in 1 M NaOH at 80 °C for 500 h.

  11. Myelin basic protein induces neuron-specific toxicity by directly damaging the neuronal plasma membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhang

    Full Text Available The central nervous system (CNS insults may cause massive demyelination and lead to the release of myelin-associated proteins including its major component myelin basic protein (MBP. MBP is reported to induce glial activation but its effect on neurons is still little known. Here we found that MBP specifically bound to the extracellular surface of the neuronal plasma membrane and induced neurotoxicity in vitro. This effect of MBP on neurons was basicity-dependent because the binding was blocked by acidic lipids and competed by other basic proteins. Further studies revealed that MBP induced damage to neuronal membrane integrity and function by depolarizing the resting membrane potential, increasing the permeability to cations and other molecules, and decreasing the membrane fluidity. At last, artificial liposome vesicle assay showed that MBP directly disturbed acidic lipid bilayer and resulted in increased membrane permeability. These results revealed that MBP induces neurotoxicity through its direct interaction with acidic components on the extracellular surface of neuronal membrane, which may suggest a possible contribution of MBP to the pathogenesis in the CNS disorders with myelin damage.

  12. Intracellular trafficking mechanism of cationic phospholipids including cationic liposomes in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Un, K; Sakai-Kato, K; Goda, Y

    2014-07-01

    The development of gene delivery methods is essential for the achievement of effective gene therapy. Elucidation of the intracellular transfer mechanism for cationic carriers is in progress, but there are few reports regarding the intracellular trafficking processes of the cationic phospholipids taken up into cells. In the present work, the trafficking processes of a cationic phospholipid (1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane, DOTAP) were investigated from intracellular uptake to extracellular efflux using cationic liposomes in vitro. Following intracellular transport of liposomes via endocytosis, DOTAP was localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, and mitochondria. Moreover, the proteins involved in DOTAP intracellular trafficking and extracellular efflux were identified. In addition, helper lipids of cationic liposomes were found to partially affect this intracellulartrafficking. These findings might provide valuable information for designing cationic carriers and avoiding unexpected toxic side effects derived from cationic liposomal components.

  13. Network architecture underlying maximal separation of neuronal representations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron A Jortner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most basic and general tasks faced by all nervous systems is extracting relevant information from the organism’s surrounding world. While physical signals available to sensory systems are often continuous, variable, overlapping and noisy, high-level neuronal representations used for decision-making tend to be discrete, specific, invariant, and highly separable. This study addresses the question of how neuronal specificity is generated. Inspired by experimental findings on network architecture in the olfactory system of the locust, I construct a highly simplified theoretical framework which allows for analytic solution of its key properties. For generalized feed-forward systems, I show that an intermediate range of connectivity values between source- and target-populations leads to a combinatorial explosion of wiring possibilities, resulting in input spaces which are, by their very nature, exquisitely sparsely populated. In particular, connection probability ½, as found in the locust antennal-lobe–mushroom-body circuit, serves to maximize separation of neuronal representations across the target Kenyon-cells, and explains their specific and reliable responses. This analysis yields a function expressing response specificity in terms of lower network-parameters; together with appropriate gain control this leads to a simple neuronal algorithm for generating arbitrarily sparse and selective codes and linking network architecture and neural coding. I suggest a way to easily construct ecologically meaningful representations from this code.

  14. Dealing with noisy absences to optimize species distribution models: an iterative ensemble modelling approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Lauzeral

    Full Text Available Species distribution models (SDMs are widespread in ecology and conservation biology, but their accuracy can be lowered by non-environmental (noisy absences that are common in species occurrence data. Here we propose an iterative ensemble modelling (IEM method to deal with noisy absences and hence improve the predictive reliability of ensemble modelling of species distributions. In the IEM approach, outputs of a classical ensemble model (EM were used to update the raw occurrence data. The revised data was then used as input for a new EM run. This process was iterated until the predictions stabilized. The outputs of the iterative method were compared to those of the classical EM using virtual species. The IEM process tended to converge rapidly. It increased the consensus between predictions provided by the different methods as well as between those provided by different learning data sets. Comparing IEM and EM showed that for high levels of non-environmental absences, iterations significantly increased prediction reliability measured by the Kappa and TSS indices, as well as the percentage of well-predicted sites. Compared to EM, IEM also reduced biases in estimates of species prevalence. Compared to the classical EM method, IEM improves the reliability of species predictions. It particularly deals with noisy absences that are replaced in the data matrices by simulated presences during the iterative modelling process. IEM thus constitutes a promising way to increase the accuracy of EM predictions of difficult-to-detect species, as well as of species that are not in equilibrium with their environment.

  15. Effects of flashlight guidance on chest compression performance in cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a noisy environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Je Sung; Chung, Sung Phil; Chang, Chul Ho; Park, Incheol; Lee, Hye Sun; Kim, SeungHo; Lee, Hahn Shick

    2013-08-01

    In real cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), noise can arise from instructional voices and environmental sounds in places such as a battlefield and industrial and high-traffic areas. A feedback device using a flashing light was designed to overcome noise-induced stimulus saturation during CPR. This study was conducted to determine whether 'flashlight' guidance influences CPR performance in a simulated noisy setting. We recruited 30 senior medical students with no previous experience of using flashlight-guided CPR to participate in this prospective, simulation-based, crossover study. The experiment was conducted in a simulated noisy situation using a cardiac arrest model without ventilation. Noise such as patrol car and fire engine sirens was artificially generated. The flashlight guidance device emitted light pulses at the rate of 100 flashes/min. Participants also received instructions to achieve the desired rate of 100 compressions/min. CPR performances were recorded with a Resusci Anne mannequin with a computer skill-reporting system. There were significant differences between the control and flashlight groups in mean compression rate (MCR), MCR/min and visual analogue scale. However, there were no significant differences in correct compression depth, mean compression depth, correct hand position, and correctly released compression. The flashlight group constantly maintained the pace at the desired 100 compressions/min. Furthermore, the flashlight group had a tendency to keep the MCR constant, whereas the control group had a tendency to decrease it after 60 s. Flashlight-guided CPR is particularly advantageous for maintaining a desired MCR during hands-only CPR in noisy environments, where metronome pacing might not be clearly heard.

  16. Oversampling smoothness: an effective algorithm for phase retrieval of noisy diffraction intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Jose A; Xu, Rui; Chen, Chien-Chun; Zou, Yunfei; Miao, Jianwei

    2013-04-01

    Coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) is high-resolution lensless microscopy that has been applied to image a wide range of specimens using synchrotron radiation, X-ray free-electron lasers, high harmonic generation, soft X-ray lasers and electrons. Despite recent rapid advances, it remains a challenge to reconstruct fine features in weakly scattering objects such as biological specimens from noisy data. Here an effective iterative algorithm, termed oversampling smoothness (OSS), for phase retrieval of noisy diffraction intensities is presented. OSS exploits the correlation information among the pixels or voxels in the region outside of a support in real space. By properly applying spatial frequency filters to the pixels or voxels outside the support at different stages of the iterative process ( i.e. a smoothness constraint), OSS finds a balance between the hybrid input-output (HIO) and error reduction (ER) algorithms to search for a global minimum in solution space, while reducing the oscillations in the reconstruction. Both numerical simulations with Poisson noise and experimental data from a biological cell indicate that OSS consistently outperforms the HIO, ER-HIO and noise robust (NR)-HIO algorithms at all noise levels in terms of accuracy and consistency of the reconstructions. It is expected that OSS will find application in the rapidly growing CDI field, as well as other disciplines where phase retrieval from noisy Fourier magnitudes is needed. The MATLAB (The MathWorks Inc., Natick, MA, USA) source code of the OSS algorithm is freely available from http://www.physics.ucla.edu/research/imaging.

  17. Least-squares methods for identifying biochemical regulatory networks from noisy measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heslop-Harrison Pat

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We consider the problem of identifying the dynamic interactions in biochemical networks from noisy experimental data. Typically, approaches for solving this problem make use of an estimation algorithm such as the well-known linear Least-Squares (LS estimation technique. We demonstrate that when time-series measurements are corrupted by white noise and/or drift noise, more accurate and reliable identification of network interactions can be achieved by employing an estimation algorithm known as Constrained Total Least Squares (CTLS. The Total Least Squares (TLS technique is a generalised least squares method to solve an overdetermined set of equations whose coefficients are noisy. The CTLS is a natural extension of TLS to the case where the noise components of the coefficients are correlated, as is usually the case with time-series measurements of concentrations and expression profiles in gene networks. Results The superior performance of the CTLS method in identifying network interactions is demonstrated on three examples: a genetic network containing four genes, a network describing p53 activity and mdm2 messenger RNA interactions, and a recently proposed kinetic model for interleukin (IL-6 and (IL-12b messenger RNA expression as a function of ATF3 and NF-κB promoter binding. For the first example, the CTLS significantly reduces the errors in the estimation of the Jacobian for the gene network. For the second, the CTLS reduces the errors from the measurements that are corrupted by white noise and the effect of neglected kinetics. For the third, it allows the correct identification, from noisy data, of the negative regulation of (IL-6 and (IL-12b by ATF3. Conclusion The significant improvements in performance demonstrated by the CTLS method under the wide range of conditions tested here, including different levels and types of measurement noise and different numbers of data points, suggests that its application will enable

  18. Cation transport in isomeric pentanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyoergy, Istvan; Gee, Norman; Freeman, G.R.

    1985-01-01

    The cation mobility μsub(+) is measured in n-pentane, isopentane, neo-pentane, and mixtures of n- and neo-pentane over conditions from the normal liquid, through the critical fluid, to the low density gas. Most of the liquid data correlate with the reduced temperature T/Tsub(c). The T/Tsub(c) reflects free volume and viscosity changes. Comparison is made to neutral molecule diffusion. The transition from viscosity control of mobility in the liquid to density control in the dilute gas occurs over the reduced viscosity region 3 > eta/etasub(c) > 0.6, which corresponds to the reduced density region 1.9 > eta/etasub(c) > 0.5. In the saturated gas etaμsub(+) is similar in all pentanes, but iso- approximately> n- > neo-pentane. At constant density dμsub(+)/dT >= 0 for gases. The average gas nμsub(+) is similar in all pentanes, but iso- approximately> n- > neo-pentane. At constant density dμsub(+)/dT >= 0 for gases. The average momentum transfer cross sections in the n-/neo-pentane mixtures are similar to those in neo-pentane at low T but similar to those in n-pentane at high T. The present findings are combined with previous electron mobility data in addressing the effect of hydrocarbon molecular (external) shape on the electric breakdown strength of gases

  19. Cationic Bolaamphiphiles for Gene Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Amelia Li Min; Lim, Alisa Xue Ling; Zhu, Yiting; Yang, Yi Yan; Khan, Majad

    2014-05-01

    Advances in medical research have shed light on the genetic cause of many human diseases. Gene therapy is a promising approach which can be used to deliver therapeutic genes to treat genetic diseases at its most fundamental level. In general, nonviral vectors are preferred due to reduced risk of immune response, but they are also commonly associated with low transfection efficiency and high cytotoxicity. In contrast to viral vectors, nonviral vectors do not have a natural mechanism to overcome extra- and intracellular barriers when delivering the therapeutic gene into cell. Hence, its design has been increasingly complex to meet challenges faced in targeting of, penetration of and expression in a specific host cell in achieving more satisfactory transfection efficiency. Flexibility in design of the vector is desirable, to enable a careful and controlled manipulation of its properties and functions. This can be met by the use of bolaamphiphile, a special class of lipid. Unlike conventional lipids, bolaamphiphiles can form asymmetric complexes with the therapeutic gene. The advantage of having an asymmetric complex lies in the different purposes served by the interior and exterior of the complex. More effective gene encapsulation within the interior of the complex can be achieved without triggering greater aggregation of serum proteins with the exterior, potentially overcoming one of the great hurdles faced by conventional single-head cationic lipids. In this review, we will look into the physiochemical considerations as well as the biological aspects of a bolaamphiphile-based gene delivery system.

  20. Gaussian Error Correction of Quantum States in a Correlated Noisy Channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Mikael Østergaard; Berni, Adriano; Madsen, Lars Skovgaard

    2013-01-01

    Noise is the main obstacle for the realization of fault-tolerant quantum information processing and secure communication over long distances. In this work, we propose a communication protocol relying on simple linear optics that optimally protects quantum states from non-Markovian or correlated...... noise. We implement the protocol experimentally and demonstrate the near-ideal protection of coherent and entangled states in an extremely noisy channel. Since all real-life channels are exhibiting pronounced non-Markovian behavior, the proposed protocol will have immediate implications in improving...... the performance of various quantum information protocols....

  1. Stochastic bounded consensus of second-order multi-agent systems in noisy environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Hong-Wei; Deng Fei-Qi

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the stochastic bounded consensus of leader-following second-order multi-agent systems in a noisy environment. It is assumed that each agent received the information of its neighbors corrupted by noises and time delays. Based on the graph theory, stochastic tools, and the Lyapunov function method, we derive the sufficient conditions under which the systems would reach stochastic bounded consensus in mean square with the protocol we designed. Finally, a numerical simulation is illustrated to check the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms. (paper)

  2. The MISO Wiretap Channel with Noisy Main Channel Estimation in the High Power Regime

    KAUST Repository

    Rezki, Zouheir

    2017-02-07

    We improve upon our previous upper bound on the secrecy capacity of the wiretap channel with multiple transmit antennas and single-antenna receivers, with noisy main channel state information (CSI) at the transmitter (CSI-T). Specifically, we show that if the main CSI error does not scale with the power budget at the transmitter P̅, then the secrecy capacity is )bounded above essentially by log log (P̅ yielding a secure degree of freedom (sdof) equal to zero. However, if the main CSI error scales as O(P̅-β), for β ∈ [0,1], then the sdof is equal to β.

  3. Can we use PCA to detect small signals in noisy data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegelberg, Jakob; Rusz, Ján

    2017-01-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) is among the most commonly applied dimension reduction techniques suitable to denoise data. Focusing on its limitations to detect low variance signals in noisy data, we discuss how statistical and systematical errors occur in PCA reconstructed data as a function of the size of the data set, which extends the work of Lichtert and Verbeeck, (2013) [16]. Particular attention is directed towards the estimation of bias introduced by PCA and its influence on experiment design. Aiming at the denoising of large matrices, nullspace based denoising (NBD) is introduced. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Using the generalized Radon transform for detection of curves in noisy images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Peter Aundal

    1996-01-01

    In this paper the discrete generalized Radon transform will be investigated as a tool for detection of curves in noisy digital images. The discrete generalized Radon transform maps an image into a parameter domain, where curves following a specific parameterized curve form will correspond to a peak...... in the parameter domain. A major advantage of the generalized Radon transform is that the curves are allowed to intersect. This enables a thresholding algorithm in the parameter domain for simultaneous detection of curve parameters. A threshold level based on the noise level in the image is derived. A numerical...

  5. Network Synchronization in a Noisy Environment with Time Delays: Fundamental Limits and Trade-Offs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, D.; Korniss, G.; Szymanski, B. K.

    2010-08-01

    We study the effects of nonzero time delays in stochastic synchronization problems with linear couplings in an arbitrary network. Using the known exact threshold value from the theory of differential equations with delays, we provide the synchronizability threshold for an arbitrary network. Further, by constructing the scaling theory of the underlying fluctuations, we establish the absolute limit of synchronization efficiency in a noisy environment with uniform time delays, i.e., the minimum attainable value of the width of the synchronization landscape. Our results also have strong implications for optimization and trade-offs in network synchronization with delays.

  6. A Statistical and Spectral Model for Representing Noisy Sounds with Short-Time Sinusoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Desainte-Catherine

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available We propose an original model for noise analysis, transformation, and synthesis: the CNSS model. Noisy sounds are represented with short-time sinusoids whose frequencies and phases are random variables. This spectral and statistical model represents information about the spectral density of frequencies. This perceptually relevant property is modeled by three mathematical parameters that define the distribution of the frequencies. This model also represents the spectral envelope. The mathematical parameters are defined and the analysis algorithms to extract these parameters from sounds are introduced. Then algorithms for generating sounds from the parameters of the model are presented. Applications of this model include tools for composers, psychoacoustic experiments, and pedagogy.

  7. Victims’ language: (noisy silences and (grave parodies to talk (unknowingly about individuals’ forced disappearance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Gatti

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on the results of research carried out between 2005 and 2008 about social universes constructed in Argentina and Uruguay around the figure of the disappeared detainee, this piece aims to systematize several answer to one the more complex problems this repression figure bears: that of representation of facts and their consequences. This work focuses no on all possible answers, but on several of the more innovative and creative: those betting on talking about the impossibility to talk (the noisy silences, and those betting on forcing language up to its limit (grave parodies.

  8. Correspondence between noisy sample space reducing process and records in correlated random events

    OpenAIRE

    Yadav, Avinash Chand

    2016-01-01

    We study survival time statistics in a noisy sample space reducing (SSR) process. Our simulations suggest that both the mean and standard deviation scale as $\\sim N/N^{\\lambda}$, where $N$ is the system size and $\\lambda$ is a tunable parameter that characterizes the process. The survival time distribution has the form $\\mathcal{P}_{N}(\\tau)\\sim N^{-\\theta}J(\\tau/N^{\\theta})$, where $J$ is a universal scaling function and $\\theta = 1-\\lambda$. Analytical insight is provided by a conjecture fo...

  9. Improving the fidelity of teleportation through noisy channels using weak measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pramanik, T., E-mail: tanu.pram99@bose.res.in; Majumdar, A.S., E-mail: archan@bose.res.in

    2013-12-13

    We employ the technique of weak measurement in order to enable preservation of teleportation fidelity for two-qubit noisy channels. We consider one or both qubits of a maximally entangled state to undergo amplitude damping, and show that the application of weak measurement and a subsequent reverse operation could lead to a fidelity greater than 2/3 for any value of the decoherence parameter. The success probability of the protocol decreases with the strength of weak measurement, and is lower when both the qubits are affected by decoherence. Finally, our protocol is shown to work for the Werner state too.

  10. The modulation of TRPM7 currents by nafamostat mesilate depends directly upon extracellular concentrations of divalent cations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xuanmao

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Concentrations of extracellular divalent cations (Ca2+ and Mg2+ fall substantially during intensive synaptic transmission as well as during some pathophysiological conditions such as epilepsy and brain ischemia. Here we report that a synthetic serine protease inhibitor, nafamostat mesylate (NM, and several of its analogues, block recombinant TRPM7 currents expressed in HEK293T cells in inverse relationship to the concentration of extracellular divalent cations. Lowering extracellular Ca2+ and Mg2+ also evokes a divalent-sensitive non-selective cation current that is mediated by TRPM7 expression in hippocampal neurons. In cultured hippocampal neurons, NM blocked these TRPM7-mediated currents with an apparent affinity of 27 μM, as well as the paradoxical Ca2+ influx associated with lowering extracellular Ca2+. Unexpectedly, pre-exposure to NM strongly potentiated TRPM7 currents. In the presence of physiological concentrations of extracellular divalent cations, NM activates TRPM7. The stimulating effects of NM on TRPM7 currents are also inversely related to extracellular Ca2+ and Mg2+. DAPI and HSB but not netropsin, blocked and stimulated TRPM7. In contrast, mono-cationic, the metabolites of NM, p-GBA and AN, as well as protease inhibitor leupeptin and gabexate failed to substantially modulate TRPM7. NM thus provides a molecular template for the design of putative modulators of TRPM7.

  11. Velocity neurons improve performance more than goal or position neurons do in a simulated closed-loop BCI arm-reaching task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Yu-Chang Liao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs that convert brain-recorded neural signals into intended movement commands could eventually be combined with Functional Electrical Stimulation to allow individuals with Spinal Cord Injury to regain effective and intuitive control of their paralyzed limbs. To accelerate the development of such an approach, we developed a model of closed-loop BCI control of arm movements that (1 generates realistic arm movements (based on experimentally measured, visually-guided movements with real-time error correction, (2 simulates cortical neurons with firing properties consistent with literature reports, and (3 decodes intended movements from the noisy neural ensemble. With this model we explored (1 the relative utility of neurons tuned for different movement parameters (position, velocity, and goal and (2 the utility of recording from larger numbers of neurons – critical issues for technology development and for determining appropriate brain areas for recording. We simulated arm movements that could be practically restored to individuals with severe paralysis, i.e., movements from an armrest to a volume in front of the person. Performance was evaluated by calculating the smallest movement endpoint target radius within which the decoded cursor position could dwell for one second. Our results show that goal, position, and velocity neurons all contribute to improve performance. However, velocity neurons enabled smaller targets to be reached in shorter amounts of time than goal or position neurons. Increasing the number of neurons also improved performance, although performance saturated at 30-50 neurons for most neuron types. Overall, our work presents a closed-loop BCI simulator that models error corrections and the firing properties of various movement-related neurons that can be easily modified to incorporate different neural properties. We anticipate that this kind of tool will be important for development of future BCIs.

  12. Spectrophotometric studies on cation-cation interactions between Np(V) and Th(IV) cations in nitric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, P.K.; Pathak, P.N.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Prabhu, D.R.; Mohapatra, P.K.

    2014-01-01

    The higher-valent actinide cations exhibit fascinating coordination chemistry essentially due to the flexibility in their electronic structures. This is particularly applicable for the dioxo penta- and hexavalent lighter actinides such as U, Np, Pu, and Am. Even though the oxo moiety is assumed to be chemically inert in these cations, there are several studies which show that pentavalent Np cation (NpO 2 + ) displays a tendency of bonding with charged metal ions. This class of weak bond formation has been classified as cation-cation interactions (CCI). Initial studies suggested that these types of interactions of Np(V) with polyvalent metal ions are more probable in non complexing perchloric acid solutions. Majority of these studies have been performed in perchlorate media and the stability constant values have been calculated. On the other hand, these studies in nitric acid medium are rather few. Our recent spectrophotometric study has shown that Np(V) cation undergoes disproportionation reaction and the tendency for CCI becomes less favorable at elevated temperature in nitric acid media. This study has been extended for understanding possible CCI between Np(V)O 2 + and Th 4 + ions under varying conditions such as nitric acid (1-6 M HNO 3 ). Th concentration (up to 0.86 M), and temperature (293-343K). An attempt has been made to calculate the stability constant values and compare with those reported in other media

  13. Simple Neurite Tracer: open source software for reconstruction, visualization and analysis of neuronal processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longair, Mark H; Baker, Dean A; Armstrong, J Douglas

    2011-09-01

    Advances in techniques to sparsely label neurons unlock the potential to reconstruct connectivity from 3D image stacks acquired by light microscopy. We present an application for semi-automated tracing of neurons to quickly annotate noisy datasets and construct complex neuronal topologies, which we call the Simple Neurite Tracer. Simple Neurite Tracer is open source software, licensed under the GNU General Public Licence (GPL) and based on the public domain image processing software ImageJ. The software and further documentation are available via http://fiji.sc/Simple_Neurite_Tracer as part of the package Fiji, and can be used on Windows, Mac OS and Linux. Documentation and introductory screencasts are available at the same URL. longair@ini.phys.ethz.ch; longair@ini.phys.ethz.ch.

  14. Heterogeneous delay-induced asynchrony and resonance in a small-world neuronal network system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wen-Ting; Tang, Jun; Ma, Jun; Yang, Xianqing

    2016-06-01

    A neuronal network often involves time delay caused by the finite signal propagation time in a given biological network. This time delay is not a homogenous fluctuation in a biological system. The heterogeneous delay-induced asynchrony and resonance in a noisy small-world neuronal network system are numerically studied in this work by calculating synchronization measure and spike interval distribution. We focus on three different delay conditions: double-values delay, triple-values delay, and Gaussian-distributed delay. Our results show the following: 1) the heterogeneity in delay results in asynchronous firing in the neuronal network, and 2) maximum synchronization could be achieved through resonance given that the delay values are integer or half-integer times of each other.

  15. Multi-objective optimization with estimation of distribution algorithm in a noisy environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Vui Ann; Tan, Kay Chen; Chia, Jun Yong; Al Mamun, Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    Many real-world optimization problems are subjected to uncertainties that may be characterized by the presence of noise in the objective functions. The estimation of distribution algorithm (EDA), which models the global distribution of the population for searching tasks, is one of the evolutionary computation techniques that deals with noisy information. This paper studies the potential of EDAs; particularly an EDA based on restricted Boltzmann machines that handles multi-objective optimization problems in a noisy environment. Noise is introduced to the objective functions in the form of a Gaussian distribution. In order to reduce the detrimental effect of noise, a likelihood correction feature is proposed to tune the marginal probability distribution of each decision variable. The EDA is subsequently hybridized with a particle swarm optimization algorithm in a discrete domain to improve its search ability. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm is examined via eight benchmark instances with different characteristics and shapes of the Pareto optimal front. The scalability, hybridization, and computational time are rigorously studied. Comparative studies show that the proposed approach outperforms other state of the art algorithms.

  16. DPCM picture transmission over noisy channels with the aid of a Markov model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emami, S; Miller, S L

    1995-01-01

    The problem of DPCM picture transmission over noisy channels is considered. It is well known that DPCM systems are very sensitive to channel errors. The goal in this work is to build robustness against channel errors. Three methods are proposed in this paper and are obtained by modeling the encoded signal as a Markov sequence. First, an optimum method for decoding correlated sequences is derived, and it is shown to require Viterbi decoding. Then, a modified MAP method (MMAP) for Markov sequences is described. A maximal signal-to-noise (MSNR) receiver for DPCM systems is also developed that minimizes the distortion power due to channel errors. The appropriate cost matrix for this receiver is computed. These methods are applied to DPCM picture transmission over noisy channels and are compared with a another method. The SNR graphs, as well as subjective examination of the received pictures, demonstrate that the proposed procedures are quite effective and superior to that method. Among the proposed methods, the MSNR receiver was found to be more effective than the others for a given order of the Markov model. It is observed that the proposed methods are most beneficial for low detail pictures.

  17. Learning from noisy information in FasArt and FasBack neuro-fuzzy systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano Izquierdo, J M; Dimitriadis, Y A; Gómez Sánchez, E; López Coronado, J

    2001-05-01

    Neuro-fuzzy systems have been in the focus of recent research as a solution to jointly exploit the main features of fuzzy logic systems and neural networks. Within the application literature, neuro-fuzzy systems can be found as methods for function identification. This approach is supported by theorems that guarantee the possibility of representing arbitrary functions by fuzzy systems. However, due to the fact that real data are often noisy, generation of accurate identifiers is presented as an important problem. Within the Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART), PROBART architecture has been proposed as a solution to this problem. After a detailed comparison of these architectures based on their design principles, the FasArt and FasBack models are proposed. They are neuro-fuzzy identifiers that offer a dual interpretation, as fuzzy logic systems or neural networks. FasArt and FasBack can be trained on noisy data without need of change in their structure or data preprocessing. In the simulation work, a comparative study is carried out on the performances of Fuzzy ARTMAP, PROBART, FasArt and FasBack, focusing on prediction error and network complexity. Results show that FasArt and FasBack clearly enhance the performance of other models in this important problem.

  18. An effective cluster-based model for robust speech detection and speech recognition in noisy environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górriz, J M; Ramírez, J; Segura, J C; Puntonet, C G

    2006-07-01

    This paper shows an accurate speech detection algorithm for improving the performance of speech recognition systems working in noisy environments. The proposed method is based on a hard decision clustering approach where a set of prototypes is used to characterize the noisy channel. Detecting the presence of speech is enabled by a decision rule formulated in terms of an averaged distance between the observation vector and a cluster-based noise model. The algorithm benefits from using contextual information, a strategy that considers not only a single speech frame but also a neighborhood of data in order to smooth the decision function and improve speech detection robustness. The proposed scheme exhibits reduced computational cost making it adequate for real time applications, i.e., automated speech recognition systems. An exhaustive analysis is conducted on the AURORA 2 and AURORA 3 databases in order to assess the performance of the algorithm and to compare it to existing standard voice activity detection (VAD) methods. The results show significant improvements in detection accuracy and speech recognition rate over standard VADs such as ITU-T G.729, ETSI GSM AMR, and ETSI AFE for distributed speech recognition and a representative set of recently reported VAD algorithms.

  19. The Effect of Information Analysis Automation Display Content on Human Judgment Performance in Noisy Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Ellen J.; Baumgart, Leigh A.; Shepley, Kathryn Klein

    2014-01-01

    Displaying both the strategy that information analysis automation employs to makes its judgments and variability in the task environment may improve human judgment performance, especially in cases where this variability impacts the judgment performance of the information analysis automation. This work investigated the contribution of providing either information analysis automation strategy information, task environment information, or both, on human judgment performance in a domain where noisy sensor data are used by both the human and the information analysis automation to make judgments. In a simplified air traffic conflict prediction experiment, 32 participants made probability of horizontal conflict judgments under different display content conditions. After being exposed to the information analysis automation, judgment achievement significantly improved for all participants as compared to judgments without any of the automation's information. Participants provided with additional display content pertaining to cue variability in the task environment had significantly higher aided judgment achievement compared to those provided with only the automation's judgment of a probability of conflict. When designing information analysis automation for environments where the automation's judgment achievement is impacted by noisy environmental data, it may be beneficial to show additional task environment information to the human judge in order to improve judgment performance. PMID:24847184

  20. Accurate estimation of motion blur parameters in noisy remote sensing image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xueyan; Wang, Lin; Shao, Xiaopeng; Wang, Huilin; Tao, Zhong

    2015-05-01

    The relative motion between remote sensing satellite sensor and objects is one of the most common reasons for remote sensing image degradation. It seriously weakens image data interpretation and information extraction. In practice, point spread function (PSF) should be estimated firstly for image restoration. Identifying motion blur direction and length accurately is very crucial for PSF and restoring image with precision. In general, the regular light-and-dark stripes in the spectrum can be employed to obtain the parameters by using Radon transform. However, serious noise existing in actual remote sensing images often causes the stripes unobvious. The parameters would be difficult to calculate and the error of the result relatively big. In this paper, an improved motion blur parameter identification method to noisy remote sensing image is proposed to solve this problem. The spectrum characteristic of noisy remote sensing image is analyzed firstly. An interactive image segmentation method based on graph theory called GrabCut is adopted to effectively extract the edge of the light center in the spectrum. Motion blur direction is estimated by applying Radon transform on the segmentation result. In order to reduce random error, a method based on whole column statistics is used during calculating blur length. Finally, Lucy-Richardson algorithm is applied to restore the remote sensing images of the moon after estimating blur parameters. The experimental results verify the effectiveness and robustness of our algorithm.

  1. Fractional Order Differentiation by Integration and Error Analysis in Noisy Environment

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Dayan

    2015-03-31

    The integer order differentiation by integration method based on the Jacobi orthogonal polynomials for noisy signals was originally introduced by Mboup, Join and Fliess. We propose to extend this method from the integer order to the fractional order to estimate the fractional order derivatives of noisy signals. Firstly, two fractional order differentiators are deduced from the Jacobi orthogonal polynomial filter, using the Riemann-Liouville and the Caputo fractional order derivative definitions respectively. Exact and simple formulae for these differentiators are given by integral expressions. Hence, they can be used for both continuous-time and discrete-time models in on-line or off-line applications. Secondly, some error bounds are provided for the corresponding estimation errors. These bounds allow to study the design parameters\\' influence. The noise error contribution due to a large class of stochastic processes is studied in discrete case. The latter shows that the differentiator based on the Caputo fractional order derivative can cope with a class of noises, whose mean value and variance functions are polynomial time-varying. Thanks to the design parameters analysis, the proposed fractional order differentiators are significantly improved by admitting a time-delay. Thirdly, in order to reduce the calculation time for on-line applications, a recursive algorithm is proposed. Finally, the proposed differentiator based on the Riemann-Liouville fractional order derivative is used to estimate the state of a fractional order system and numerical simulations illustrate the accuracy and the robustness with respect to corrupting noises.

  2. Structural Damage Detection with Different Objective Functions in Noisy Conditions Using an Evolutionary Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal Shabbir

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic properties such as natural frequencies and mode shapes are directly affected by damage in structures. In this paper, changes in natural frequencies and mode shapes were used as the input to various objective functions for damage detection. Objective functions related to natural frequencies, mode shapes, modal flexibility and modal strain energy have been used, and their performances have been analyzed in varying noise conditions. Three beams were analyzed: two of which were simulated beams with single and multiple damage scenarios and one was an experimental beam. In order to do this, SAP 2000 (v14, Computers and Structures Inc., Berkeley, CA, United States, 2009 is linked with MATLAB (r2015, The MathWorks, Inc., Natick, MA, United States, 2015. The genetic algorithm (GA, an evolutionary algorithm (EA, was used to update the damaged structure for damage detection. Due to the degradation of the performance of objective functions in varying noisy conditions, a modified objective function based on the concept of regularization has been proposed, which can be effectively used in combination with EA. All three beams were used to validate the proposed procedure. It has been found that the modified objective function gives better results even in noisy and actual experimental conditions.

  3. An Investigation of Wavelet Average Framing LPC for Noisy Speaker Identification Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Daqrouq

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the presented research paper, an average framing linear prediction coding (AFLPC method for a text-independent speaker identification system is studied. AFLPC was proposed in our previous work. Generally, linear prediction coding (LPC has been used in numerous speech recognition tasks. Here, an investigative procedure was based on studying the AFLPC speaker recognition system in a noisy environment. In the stage of feature extraction, the speaker-specific resonances of the vocal tract were extracted using the AFLPC technique. In the phase of classification, a probabilistic neural network (PNN and Bayesian classifier (BC were applied for comparison. In the performed investigation, the quality of different wavelet transforms with AFLPC techniques was compared with each other. In addition, the capability analysis of the proposed system was examined for comparison with other systems suggested in the literature. In response to an achieved experimental result in a noisy environment, the PNN classifier could have a better performance with the fusion of wavelets and AFLPC as a feature extraction technique termed WFALPCF.

  4. Entanglement-assisted quantum parameter estimation from a noisy qubit pair: A Fisher information analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapeau-Blondeau, François, E-mail: chapeau@univ-angers.fr

    2017-04-25

    Benefit from entanglement in quantum parameter estimation in the presence of noise or decoherence is investigated, with the quantum Fisher information to asses the performance. When an input probe experiences any (noisy) transformation introducing the parameter dependence, the performance is always maximized by a pure probe. As a generic estimation task, for estimating the phase of a unitary transformation on a qubit affected by depolarizing noise, the optimal separable probe and its performance are characterized as a function of the level of noise. By entangling qubits in pairs, enhancements of performance over that of the optimal separable probe are quantified, in various settings of the entangled pair. In particular, in the presence of the noise, enhancement over the performance of the one-qubit optimal probe can always be obtained with a second entangled qubit although never interacting with the process to be estimated. Also, enhancement over the performance of the two-qubit optimal separable probe can always be achieved by a two-qubit entangled probe, either partially or maximally entangled depending on the level of the depolarizing noise. - Highlights: • Quantum parameter estimation from a noisy qubit pair is investigated. • The quantum Fisher information is used to assess the ultimate best performance. • Theoretical expressions are established and analyzed for the Fisher information. • Enhanced performances are quantified with various entanglements of the pair. • Enhancement is shown even with one entangled qubit noninteracting with the process.

  5. Technical Note: Correcting for signal attenuation from noisy proxy data in climate reconstructions

    KAUST Repository

    Ammann, C. M.

    2010-04-20

    Regression-based climate reconstructions scale one or more noisy proxy records against a (generally) short instrumental data series. Based on that relationship, the indirect information is then used to estimate that particular measure of climate back in time. A well-calibrated proxy record(s), if stationary in its relationship to the target, should faithfully preserve the mean amplitude of the climatic variable. However, it is well established in the statistical literature that traditional regression parameter estimation can lead to substantial amplitude attenuation if the predictors carry significant amounts of noise. This issue is known as "Measurement Error" (Fuller, 1987; Carroll et al., 2006). Climate proxies derived from tree-rings, ice cores, lake sediments, etc., are inherently noisy and thus all regression-based reconstructions could suffer from this problem. Some recent applications attempt to ward off amplitude attenuation, but implementations are often complex (Lee et al., 2008) or require additional information, e.g. from climate models (Hegerl et al., 2006, 2007). Here we explain the cause of the problem and propose an easy, generally applicable, data-driven strategy to effectively correct for attenuation (Fuller, 1987; Carroll et al., 2006), even at annual resolution. The impact is illustrated in the context of a Northern Hemisphere mean temperature reconstruction. An inescapable trade-off for achieving an unbiased reconstruction is an increase in variance, but for many climate applications the change in mean is a core interest.

  6. Corticospinal mirror neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Kraskov, A.; Philipp, R.; Waldert, S.; Vigneswaran, G.; Quallo, M. M.; Lemon, R. N.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the properties of neurons with mirror-like characteristics that were identified as pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs) and recorded in the ventral premotor cortex (area F5) and primary motor cortex (M1) of three macaque monkeys. We analysed the neurons' discharge while the monkeys performed active grasp of either food or an object, and also while they observed an experimenter carrying out a similar range of grasps. A considerable proportion of tested PTNs showed clear mirror-like p...

  7. Effects of distance-dependent delay on small-world neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinjie; Chen, Zhen; Liu, Xianbin

    2016-04-01

    We study firing behaviors and the transitions among them in small-world noisy neuronal networks with electrical synapses and information transmission delay. Each neuron is modeled by a two-dimensional Rulkov map neuron. The distance between neurons, which is a main source of the time delay, is taken into consideration. Through spatiotemporal patterns and interspike intervals as well as the interburst intervals, the collective behaviors are revealed. It is found that the networks switch from resting state into intermittent firing state under Gaussian noise excitation. Initially, noise-induced firing behaviors are disturbed by small time delays. Periodic firing behaviors with irregular zigzag patterns emerge with an increase of the delay and become progressively regular after a critical value is exceeded. More interestingly, in accordance with regular patterns, the spiking frequency doubles compared with the former stage for the spiking neuronal network. A growth of frequency persists for a larger delay and a transition to antiphase synchronization is observed. Furthermore, it is proved that these transitions are generic also for the bursting neuronal network and the FitzHugh-Nagumo neuronal network. We show these transitions due to the increase of time delay are robust to the noise strength, coupling strength, network size, and rewiring probability.

  8. Cationization of heparin for film applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimkovic, I.; Mendichi, R.; Kelnar, Ivan; Filip, J.; Hricovíni, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 115, 22 January (2015), s. 551-558 ISSN 0144-8617 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : heparin * cationization * NMR Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 4.219, year: 2015

  9. Test procedure for cation exchange chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, T.D.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this test plan is to demonstrate the synthesis of inorganic antimonate ion exchangers and compare their performance against the standard organic cation exchangers. Of particular interest is the degradation rate of both inorganic and organic cation exchangers. This degradation rate will be tracked by determining the ion exchange capacity and thermal stability as a function of time, radiation dose, and chemical reaction

  10. Cationic surfactants as the hydrolytic micellar catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Janošcová, Petra

    2013-01-01

    Cationic surfactants as the hydrolytic micellar catalysts Petra Janošcová The effectiveness of hydrolytic cleavage of the pesticide fenitrothionin cationic surfactants micellar media has been tested. All used surfactants increased the rate of fenitrothionhydrolysis, which was the evidence of micellar catalysis. For some surfactants decreases has been evident at the highest rate of hydrolysis concentrations. It has been the result of a phenomenon called the effect of empty micelles. High hydro...

  11. Asymmetric Aminalization via Cation-Binding Catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Sang Yeon; Liu, Yidong; Oh, Joong Suk

    2018-01-01

    Asymmetric cation-binding catalysis, in principle, can generate "chiral" anionic nucleophiles, where the counter cations are coordinated within chiral environments. Nitrogen-nucleophiles are intrinsically basic, therefore, its use as nucleophiles is often challenging and limiting the scope...... of the reaction. Particularly, a formation of configurationally labile aminal centers with alkyl substituents has been a formidable challenge due to the enamine/imine equilibrium of electrophilic substrates. Herein, we report enantioselective nucleophilic addition reactions of potassium phthalimides to Boc-protected...

  12. Cycloaliphatic epoxide resins for cationic UV - cure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verschueren, K.; Balwant Kaur

    1999-01-01

    This paper introduces the cyclo - aliphatic epoxide resins used for the various applications of radiation curing and their comparison with acrylate chemistry. Radiation curable coatings and inks are pre - dominantly based on acrylate chemistry but over the last few years, cationic chemistry has emerged successfully with the unique properties inherent with cyclo - aliphatic epoxide ring structures. Wide variety of cationic resins and diluents, the formulation techniques to achieve the desired properties greatly contributes to the advancement of UV - curing technology

  13. Cationized Carbohydrate Gas-Phase Fragmentation Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bythell, Benjamin J.; Abutokaikah, Maha T.; Wagoner, Ashley R.; Guan, Shanshan; Rabus, Jordan M.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the fragmentation chemistry of cationized carbohydrates using a combination of tandem mass spectrometry, regioselective labeling, and computational methods. Our model system is D-lactose. Barriers to the fundamental glyosidic bond cleavage reactions, neutral loss pathways, and structurally informative cross-ring cleavages are investigated. The most energetically favorable conformations of cationized D-lactose were found to be similar. In agreement with the literature, larger group I cations result in structures with increased cation coordination number which require greater collision energy to dissociate. In contrast with earlier proposals, the B n -Y m fragmentation pathways of both protonated and sodium-cationized analytes proceed via protonation of the glycosidic oxygen with concerted glycosidic bond cleavage. Additionally, for the sodiated congeners our calculations support sodiated 1,6-anhydrogalactose B n ion structures, unlike the preceding literature. This affects the subsequent propensity of formation and prediction of B n /Y m branching ratio. The nature of the anomeric center (α/β) affects the relative energies of these processes, but not the overall ranking. Low-energy cross-ring cleavages are observed for the metal-cationized analytes with a retro-aldol mechanism producing the 0,2 A 2 ion from the sodiated forms . Theory and experiment support the importance of consecutive fragmentation processes, particularly for the protonated congeners at higher collision energies.

  14. Luminescent sulfides of monovalent and trivalent cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The invention discloses a family of luminescent materials or phosphors having a rhombohedral crystal structure and consisting essentially of a mixed host sulfide of at least one monovalent host cation and at least one trivalent host cation, and containing, for each mole of phosphor, 0.0005 to 0.05 mole of at least one activating cation. The monovalent host cations may be Na, K or Rb and Cs. The trivalent host cations may be Gd, La, Lu, Sc and Y. The activating cations may be one or more of trivalent As, Bi, Ce, Dy, Er, Pr, Sb, Sm, Tb and Tm; divalent Lu, Mn, Pb and Sn; and monovalent Ag, Cu and Tl. The novel phosphors may be used in devices to convert electron-beam, ultraviolet or x-ray energy to light in the visible spectrum. Such energy conversion can be employed for example in fluoroscopic screens, and in viewing screens of cathode-ray tubes and other electron tubes

  15. Kappe neurons, a novel population of olfactory sensory neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Ahuja, Gaurav; Nia, Shahrzad Bozorg; Zapilko, Veronika; Shiriagin, Vladimir; Kowatschew, Daniel; Oka, Yuichiro; Korsching, Sigrun I.

    2014-01-01

    Perception of olfactory stimuli is mediated by distinct populations of olfactory sensory neurons, each with a characteristic set of morphological as well as functional parameters. Beyond two large populations of ciliated and microvillous neurons, a third population, crypt neurons, has been identified in teleost and cartilaginous fishes. We report here a novel, fourth olfactory sensory neuron population in zebrafish, which we named kappe neurons for their characteristic shape. Kappe neurons ar...

  16. Improving the maximum transmission distance of continuous-variable quantum key distribution with noisy coherent states using a noiseless amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Tianyi; Yu, Song; Zhang, Yi-Chen; Gu, Wanyi; Guo, Hong

    2014-01-01

    By employing a nondeterministic noiseless linear amplifier, we propose to increase the maximum transmission distance of continuous-variable quantum key distribution with noisy coherent states. With the covariance matrix transformation, the expression of secret key rate under reverse reconciliation is derived against collective entangling cloner attacks. We show that the noiseless linear amplifier can compensate the detrimental effect of the preparation noise with an enhancement of the maximum transmission distance and the noise resistance. - Highlights: • Noiseless amplifier is applied in noisy coherent state quantum key distribution. • Negative effect of preparation noise is compensated by noiseless amplification. • Maximum transmission distance and noise resistance are both enhanced

  17. Collective stochastic coherence in recurrent neuronal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancristóbal, Belén; Rebollo, Beatriz; Boada, Pol; Sanchez-Vives, Maria V.; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2016-09-01

    Recurrent networks of dynamic elements frequently exhibit emergent collective oscillations, which can show substantial regularity even when the individual elements are considerably noisy. How noise-induced dynamics at the local level coexists with regular oscillations at the global level is still unclear. Here we show that a combination of stochastic recurrence-based initiation with deterministic refractoriness in an excitable network can reconcile these two features, leading to maximum collective coherence for an intermediate noise level. We report this behaviour in the slow oscillation regime exhibited by a cerebral cortex network under dynamical conditions resembling slow-wave sleep and anaesthesia. Computational analysis of a biologically realistic network model reveals that an intermediate level of background noise leads to quasi-regular dynamics. We verify this prediction experimentally in cortical slices subject to varying amounts of extracellular potassium, which modulates neuronal excitability and thus synaptic noise. The model also predicts that this effectively regular state should exhibit noise-induced memory of the spatial propagation profile of the collective oscillations, which is also verified experimentally. Taken together, these results allow us to construe the high regularity observed experimentally in the brain as an instance of collective stochastic coherence.

  18. Corticospinal mirror neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraskov, A; Philipp, R; Waldert, S; Vigneswaran, G; Quallo, M M; Lemon, R N

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the properties of neurons with mirror-like characteristics that were identified as pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs) and recorded in the ventral premotor cortex (area F5) and primary motor cortex (M1) of three macaque monkeys. We analysed the neurons' discharge while the monkeys performed active grasp of either food or an object, and also while they observed an experimenter carrying out a similar range of grasps. A considerable proportion of tested PTNs showed clear mirror-like properties (52% F5 and 58% M1). Some PTNs exhibited 'classical' mirror neuron properties, increasing activity for both execution and observation, while others decreased their discharge during observation ('suppression mirror-neurons'). These experiments not only demonstrate the existence of PTNs as mirror neurons in M1, but also reveal some interesting differences between M1 and F5 mirror PTNs. Although observation-related changes in the discharge of PTNs must reach the spinal cord and will include some direct projections to motoneurons supplying grasping muscles, there was no EMG activity in these muscles during action observation. We suggest that the mirror neuron system is involved in the withholding of unwanted movement during action observation. Mirror neurons are differentially recruited in the behaviour that switches rapidly between making your own movements and observing those of others.

  19. Cation Exchange in the Presence of Oil in Porous Media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farajzadeh, R.; Guo, H.; van Winden, J.L.; Bruining, J.

    2017-01-01

    Cation exchange is an interfacial process during which cations on a clay surface are replaced by other cations. This study investigates the effect of oil type and composition on cation exchange on rock surfaces, relevant for a variety of oil-recovery processes. We perform experiments in which brine

  20. How structure determines correlations in neuronal networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Pernice

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Networks are becoming a ubiquitous metaphor for the understanding of complex biological systems, spanning the range between molecular signalling pathways, neural networks in the brain, and interacting species in a food web. In many models, we face an intricate interplay between the topology of the network and the dynamics of the system, which is generally very hard to disentangle. A dynamical feature that has been subject of intense research in various fields are correlations between the noisy activity of nodes in a network. We consider a class of systems, where discrete signals are sent along the links of the network. Such systems are of particular relevance in neuroscience, because they provide models for networks of neurons that use action potentials for communication. We study correlations in dynamic networks with arbitrary topology, assuming linear pulse coupling. With our novel approach, we are able to understand in detail how specific structural motifs affect pairwise correlations. Based on a power series decomposition of the covariance matrix, we describe the conditions under which very indirect interactions will have a pronounced effect on correlations and population dynamics. In random networks, we find that indirect interactions may lead to a broad distribution of activation levels with low average but highly variable correlations. This phenomenon is even more pronounced in networks with distance dependent connectivity. In contrast, networks with highly connected hubs or patchy connections often exhibit strong average correlations. Our results are particularly relevant in view of new experimental techniques that enable the parallel recording of spiking activity from a large number of neurons, an appropriate interpretation of which is hampered by the currently limited understanding of structure-dynamics relations in complex networks.

  1. Neuron dynamics in the presence of 1/f noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobie, Cameron; Babul, Arif; de Sousa, Rogério

    2011-05-01

    Interest in understanding the interplay between noise and the response of a nonlinear device cuts across disciplinary boundaries. It is as relevant for unmasking the dynamics of neurons in noisy environments as it is for designing reliable nanoscale logic circuit elements and sensors. Most studies of noise in nonlinear devices are limited to either time-correlated noise with a Lorentzian spectrum (of which the white noise is a limiting case) or just white noise. We use analytical theory and numerical simulations to study the impact of the more ubiquitous "natural" noise with a 1/f frequency spectrum. Specifically, we study the impact of the 1/f noise on a leaky integrate and fire model of a neuron. The impact of noise is considered on two quantities of interest to neuron function: The spike count Fano factor and the speed of neuron response to a small steplike stimulus. For the perfect (nonleaky) integrate and fire model, we show that the Fano factor can be expressed as an integral over noise spectrum weighted by a (low-pass) filter function given by F(t,f)=sinc(2)(πft). This result elucidates the connection between low-frequency noise and disorder in neuron dynamics. Under 1/f noise, spike dynamics lacks a characteristic correlation time, inducing the leaky and nonleaky models, to exhibit nonergodic behavior and the Fano factor, increasing logarithmically as a function of time. We compare our results to experimental data of single neurons in vivo [Teich, Heneghan, Lowen, Ozaki, and Kaplan, J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 14, 529 (1997)] and show how the 1/f noise model provides much better agreement than the usual approximations based on Lorentzian noise. The low-frequency noise, however, complicates the case for an information-coding scheme based on interspike intervals by introducing variability in the neuron response time. On a positive note, the neuron response time to a step stimulus is, remarkably, nearly optimal in the presence of 1/f noise. An explanation of this

  2. NEURON and Python.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Michael L; Davison, Andrew P; Muller, Eilif

    2009-01-01

    The NEURON simulation program now allows Python to be used, alone or in combination with NEURON's traditional Hoc interpreter. Adding Python to NEURON has the immediate benefit of making available a very extensive suite of analysis tools written for engineering and science. It also catalyzes NEURON software development by offering users a modern programming tool that is recognized for its flexibility and power to create and maintain complex programs. At the same time, nothing is lost because all existing models written in Hoc, including graphical user interface tools, continue to work without change and are also available within the Python context. An example of the benefits of Python availability is the use of the xml module in implementing NEURON's Import3D and CellBuild tools to read MorphML and NeuroML model specifications.

  3. Single Ih channels in pyramidal neuron dendrites: properties, distribution, and impact on action potential output

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kole, Maarten H. P.; Hallermann, Stefan; Stuart, Greg J.

    2006-01-01

    The hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih) plays an important role in regulating neuronal excitability, yet its native single-channel properties in the brain are essentially unknown. Here we use variance-mean analysis to study the properties of single Ih channels in the apical dendrites of

  4. Homeostatic scaling of neuronal excitability by synaptic modulation of somatic hyperpolarization-activated Ih channels.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Welie, I.; van Hooft, J.A.; Wadman, W.J.

    2004-01-01

    The hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih) plays an important role in determining membrane potential and firing characteristics of neurons and therefore is a potential target for regulation of intrinsic excitability. Here we show that an increase in AMPA-receptor-dependent synaptic activity

  5. Differential sensitivity of [3H]nitrendipine binding to cations of toxicological interest in various rat brain areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rius, R.A.; Govoni, S.; Battaini, F.

    1985-01-01

    [ 3 H]Nitrendipine ([ 3 H]NTP) is a radiolabelled calcium antagonist which can be used to study neuronal calcium (Ca 2+ ) channels. The interaction of Mn 2+ , Zn 2+ , Pb 2+ and La 3+ on [ 3 H]NTP binding was studied in 3 brain areas particularly rich in [ 3 H]NTP binding sites. Differences were observed in the brain regional distribution of [ 3 H]NTP binding as well as in their sensitivity to the metal ions Pb, Mn and Zn. The binding data suggest that neuronal Ca 2+ channels in different brain areas display distinct sensitivity to selected divalent cations. (Auth.)

  6. Noise-induced divisive gain control in neuron models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longtin, André; Doiron, Brent; Bulsara, Adi R

    2002-01-01

    A recent computational study of gain control via shunting inhibition has shown that the slope of the frequency-versus-input (f-I) characteristic of a neuron can be decreased by increasing the noise associated with the inhibitory input (Neural Comput. 13, 227-248). This novel noise-induced divisive gain control relies on the concommittant increase of the noise variance with the mean of the total inhibitory conductance. Here we investigate this effect using different neuronal models. The effect is shown to occur in the standard leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) model with additive Gaussian white noise, and in the LIF with multiplicative noise acting on the inhibitory conductance. The noisy scaling of input currents is also shown to occur in the one-dimensional theta-neuron model, which has firing dynamics, as well as a large scale compartmental model of a pyramidal cell in the electrosensory lateral line lobe of a weakly electric fish. In this latter case, both the inhibition and the excitatory input have Poisson statistics; noise-induced divisive inhibition is thus seen in f-I curves for which the noise increases along with the input I. We discuss how the variation of the noise intensity along with inputs is constrained by the physiological context and the class of model used, and further provide a comparison of the divisive effect across models.

  7. Topological quantum computing with a very noisy network and local error rates approaching one percent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Naomi H; Li, Ying; Benjamin, Simon C

    2013-01-01

    A scalable quantum computer could be built by networking together many simple processor cells, thus avoiding the need to create a single complex structure. The difficulty is that realistic quantum links are very error prone. A solution is for cells to repeatedly communicate with each other and so purify any imperfections; however prior studies suggest that the cells themselves must then have prohibitively low internal error rates. Here we describe a method by which even error-prone cells can perform purification: groups of cells generate shared resource states, which then enable stabilization of topologically encoded data. Given a realistically noisy network (≥10% error rate) we find that our protocol can succeed provided that intra-cell error rates for initialisation, state manipulation and measurement are below 0.82%. This level of fidelity is already achievable in several laboratory systems.

  8. Frequency-Zooming ARMA Modeling for Analysis of Noisy String Instrument Tones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo A. A. Esquef

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses model-based analysis of string instrument sounds. In particular, it reviews the application of autoregressive (AR modeling to sound analysis/synthesis purposes. Moreover, a frequency-zooming autoregressive moving average (FZ-ARMA modeling scheme is described. The performance of the FZ-ARMA method on modeling the modal behavior of isolated groups of resonance frequencies is evaluated for both synthetic and real string instrument tones immersed in background noise. We demonstrate that the FZ-ARMA modeling is a robust tool to estimate the decay time and frequency of partials of noisy tones. Finally, we discuss the use of the method in synthesis of string instrument sounds.

  9. Security Analysis of Measurement-Device-Independent Quantum Key Distribution in Collective-Rotation Noisy Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na; Zhang, Yu; Wen, Shuang; Li, Lei-lei; Li, Jian

    2018-01-01

    Noise is a problem that communication channels cannot avoid. It is, thus, beneficial to analyze the security of MDI-QKD in noisy environment. An analysis model for collective-rotation noise is introduced, and the information theory methods are used to analyze the security of the protocol. The maximum amount of information that Eve can eavesdrop is 50%, and the eavesdropping can always be detected if the noise level ɛ ≤ 0.68. Therefore, MDI-QKD protocol is secure as quantum key distribution protocol. The maximum probability that the relay outputs successful results is 16% when existing eavesdropping. Moreover, the probability that the relay outputs successful results when existing eavesdropping is higher than the situation without eavesdropping. The paper validates that MDI-QKD protocol has better robustness.

  10. Noisy transcription factor NF-¿B oscillations stabilize and sensitize cytokine signaling in space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gangstad, S.W.; Feldager, C.W.; Juul, Jeppe Søgaard

    2013-01-01

    communication, as it is both activated by and upregulates production of cytokines, signals used by white blood cells to find the source of inflammation. While the oscillatory dynamics of NF-¿B has been extensively investigated both experimentally and theoretically, the role of the noise and the lower secondary...... amplitude has not been addressed. We use a cellular automaton model to address these issues in the context of spatially distributed communicating cells. We find that noisy secondary oscillations stabilize concentric wave patterns, thus improving signal quality. Furthermore, both lower secondary amplitude...... as well as noise in the oscillation period might be working against chronic inflammation, the state of self-sustained and stimulus-independent excitations. Our findings suggest that the characteristic irregular secondary oscillations of lower amplitude are not accidental. On the contrary, they might have...

  11. Interframe DPCM with robust median-based predictors for transmission of image sequences over noisy channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, X; Viero, T; Neuvo, Y

    1996-01-01

    A new image sequence coding technique based on robust median-based predictors is presented for the transmission of image sequences over noisy channels. We analyze the robustness of median-based predictors against channel errors. A heuristic algorithm for the design of a robust predictor from a given median-based predictor is presented. It is shown that with small modifications in terms of a necessary requirement for a median-based predictor to be robust against channel errors, the robustness of a given median-based predictor can be considerably improved. Simulations on a real image sequence show significant improvement over the conventional differential pulse code modulation (DPCM) at high bit error rate (BER) using this new technique. The technique does not increase the transmission rate. It is shown that the quality of reconstructed images obtained by robust median-based predictors can be further improved by postprocessing the image using a nonlinear detail-preserving noise-smoothing filter.

  12. Using Body-Conducted Acoustic Sensors for Human-Robot Communication in Noisy Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panikos Heracleous

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the use of alternative acoustic sensors in human-robot communication is investigated. In particular, a Non-Audible Murmur (NAM microphone was applied in tele-operating the Geminoid HI-1 robot in noisy environments. The current study introduces the methodology and the results of speech intelligibility subjective tests when a NAM microphone was used in comparison with using a standard microphone. The results show the advantage of using a NAM microphone when the operation takes place in adverse environmental conditions. In addition, the effect of Geminoid's lip movements on speech intelligibility is also investigated. Subjective speech intelligibility tests show that the operator's speech can be perceived with higher intelligibility scores when the operator's audio speech is perceived along with the lip movements of robots.

  13. Accurate Fitting of Noisy Irregular Beam Data for the Planck Space Telescope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borries, Oscar; Nielsen, Per Heighwood; Tauber, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Accurate fitting of the noisy irregular amplitude only main beam data is essential for the retrieval of the Planck space telescope geometry [1]. Therefore, a novel two-step fitting algorithm which focuses on the spatial dependency of the in-flight measurements has been implemented. To reduce both...... the noise and the size of the dataset a spatial filter is applied, without reducing the amount of pattern information. Thereafter, a Kriging [2], [3] fitting is performed, providing a smooth model with a significant noise level reduction. As a result, this algorithm provides a much more accurate...... and smoother result, reasonable error estimates and runtimes several orders of magnitudes faster than the previous algorithms....

  14. Implementation of two-party protocols in the noisy-storage model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehner, Stephanie; Curty, Marcos; Schaffner, Christian; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2010-01-01

    The noisy-storage model allows the implementation of secure two-party protocols under the sole assumption that no large-scale reliable quantum storage is available to the cheating party. No quantum storage is thereby required for the honest parties. Examples of such protocols include bit commitment, oblivious transfer, and secure identification. Here, we provide a guideline for the practical implementation of such protocols. In particular, we analyze security in a practical setting where the honest parties themselves are unable to perform perfect operations and need to deal with practical problems such as errors during transmission and detector inefficiencies. We provide explicit security parameters for two different experimental setups using weak coherent, and parametric down-conversion sources. In addition, we analyze a modification of the protocols based on decoy states.

  15. Quantum Privacy Amplification and the Security of Quantum Cryptography over Noisy Channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, D.; Ekert, A.; Jozsa, R.; Macchiavello, C.; Popescu, S.; Sanpera, A.

    1996-01-01

    Existing quantum cryptographic schemes are not, as they stand, operable in the presence of noise on the quantum communication channel. Although they become operable if they are supplemented by classical privacy-amplification techniques, the resulting schemes are difficult to analyze and have not been proved secure. We introduce the concept of quantum privacy amplification and a cryptographic scheme incorporating it which is provably secure over a noisy channel. The scheme uses an open-quote open-quote entanglement purification close-quote close-quote procedure which, because it requires only a few quantum controlled-not and single-qubit operations, could be implemented using technology that is currently being developed. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  16. Using Hierarchical Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy Systems And Design Two New Edge Detectors In Noisy Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Olyaee

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important topics in image processing is edge detection. Many methods have been proposed for this end but most of them have weak performance in noisy images because noise pixels are determined as edge. In this paper, two new methods are represented based on Hierarchical Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy Systems (HANFIS. Each method consists of desired number of HANFIS operators that receive the value of some neighbouring pixels and decide central pixel is edge or not. Simple train images are used in order to set internal parameters of each HANFIS operator. The presented methods are evaluated by some test images and compared with several popular edge detectors. The experimental results show that these methods are robust against impulse noise and extract edge pixels exactly.

  17. Comparative study of speed estimators with highly noisy measurement signals for Wind Energy Generation Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carranza, O. [Escuela Superior de Computo, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Av. Juan de Dios Batiz S/N, Col. Lindavista, Del. Gustavo A. Madero 7738, D.F. (Mexico); Figueres, E.; Garcera, G. [Grupo de Sistemas Electronicos Industriales, Departamento de Ingenieria Electronica, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera S/N, 7F, 46020 Valencia (Spain); Gonzalez, L.G. [Departamento de Ingenieria Electronica, Universidad de los Andes, Merida (Venezuela)

    2011-03-15

    This paper presents a comparative study of several speed estimators to implement a sensorless speed control loop in Wind Energy Generation Systems driven by power factor correction three-phase boost rectifiers. This rectifier topology reduces the low frequency harmonics contents of the generator currents and, consequently, the generator power factor approaches unity whereas undesired vibrations of the mechanical system decrease. For implementation of the speed estimators, the compared techniques start from the measurement of electrical variables like currents and voltages, which contain low frequency harmonics of the fundamental frequency of the wind generator, as well as switching frequency components due to the boost rectifier. In this noisy environment it has been analyzed the performance of the following estimation techniques: Synchronous Reference Frame Phase Locked Loop, speed reconstruction by measuring the dc current and voltage of the rectifier and speed estimation by means of both an Extended Kalman Filter and a Linear Kalman Filter. (author)

  18. Enhancement of noisy EDX HRSTEM spectrum-images by combination of filtering and PCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapov, Pavel; Longo, Paolo; Okunishi, Eiji

    2017-05-01

    STEM spectrum-imaging with collecting EDX signal is considered in view of the extraction of maximum information from very noisy data. It is emphasized that spectrum-images with weak EDX signal often suffer from information loss in the course of PCA treatment. The loss occurs when the level of random noise exceeds a certain threshold. Weighted PCA, though potentially helpful in isolation of meaningful variations from noise, might provoke the complete loss of information in the situation of weak EDX signal. Filtering datasets prior PCA can improve the situation and recover the lost information. In particular, Gaussian kernel filters are found to be efficient. A new filter useful in the case of sparse atomic-resolution EDX spectrum-images is suggested. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Optimal Estimation of Diffusion Coefficients from Noisy Time-Lapse-Recorded Single-Particle Trajectories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Christian Lyngby

    2012-01-01

    Optimal Estimation of Diusion Coecients from Noisy Time-Lapse- Measurements of Single-Particle Trajectories Single-particle tracking techniques allow quantitative measurements of diusion at the single-molecule level. Recorded time-series are mostly short and contain considerable measurement noise....... The standard method for estimating diusion coecients from single-particle trajectories is based on leastsquares tting to the experimentally measured mean square displacements. This method is highly inecient, since it ignores the high correlations inherent in these. We derive the exact maximum likelihood...... parameter values. We extend the methods to particles diusing on a uctuating substrate, e.g., exible or semi exible polymers such as DNA, and show that uctuations induce an important bias in the estimates of diusion coecients if they are not accounted for. We apply the methods to obtain precise estimates...

  20. Continuous-variable protocol for oblivious transfer in the noisy-storage model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furrer, Fabian; Gehring, Tobias; Schaffner, Christian

    2018-01-01

    for oblivious transfer for optical continuous-variable systems, and prove its security in the noisy-storage model. This model allows us to establish security by sending more quantum signals than an attacker can reliably store during the protocol. The security proof is based on uncertainty relations which we......Cryptographic protocols are the backbone of our information society. This includes two-party protocols which offer protection against distrustful players. Such protocols can be built from a basic primitive called oblivious transfer. We present and experimentally demonstrate here a quantum protocol...... derive for continuous-variable systems, that differ from the ones used in quantum key distribution. We experimentally demonstrate in a proof-of-principle experiment the proposed oblivious transfer protocol for various channel losses by using entangled two-mode squeezed states measured with balanced...

  1. An experimental implementation of oblivious transfer in the noisy storage model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erven, C.; Ng, N.; Gigov, N.; Laflamme, R.; Wehner, S.; Weihs, G.

    2014-03-01

    Cryptography’s importance in our everyday lives continues to grow in our increasingly digital world. Oblivious transfer has long been a fundamental and important cryptographic primitive, as it is known that general two-party cryptographic tasks can be built from this basic building block. Here we show the experimental implementation of a 1-2 random oblivious transfer protocol by performing measurements on polarization-entangled photon pairs in a modified entangled quantum key distribution system, followed by all of the necessary classical postprocessing including one-way error correction. We successfully exchange a 1,366 bit random oblivious transfer string in ~3 min and include a full security analysis under the noisy storage model, accounting for all experimental error rates and finite size effects. This demonstrates the feasibility of using today’s quantum technologies to implement secure two-party protocols.

  2. Continuous leakage location in noisy environment using modal and wavelet analysis with one AE sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafapour, Amir; Davoodi, Saman

    2015-09-01

    A noble method for continuous leakage source location with one sensor in gas-filled pipe and noisy environment is proposed based on wavelet analysis and modal location theory. The leakage signals were analyzed into high and low frequencies by wavelet decomposition and noises and reflected waves were omitted. Then the processed signals were reconstructed. A frequency range of 0-250kHz was selected using wavelet packet decomposition to analyze the flexural and extensional modes of leakage signals. In this frequency range, the peak magnitudes of wavelet transform could determine the arrival times of different modes. The frequencies which the peak magnitudes of wavelet transform occurred per them were chosen to calculate the group velocities. Experiments were carried out and the locating results show the high precision of this algorithm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Mobile robot trajectory tracking using noisy RSS measurements: an RFID approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, M Suruz; Gueaieb, Wail

    2014-03-01

    Most RF beacons-based mobile robot navigation techniques rely on approximating line-of-sight (LOS) distances between the beacons and the robot. This is mostly performed using the robot's received signal strength (RSS) measurements from the beacons. However, accurate mapping between the RSS measurements and the LOS distance is almost impossible to achieve in reverberant environments. This paper presents a partially-observed feedback controller for a wheeled mobile robot where the feedback signal is in the form of noisy RSS measurements emitted from radio frequency identification (RFID) tags. The proposed controller requires neither an accurate mapping between the LOS distance and the RSS measurements, nor the linearization of the robot model. The controller performance is demonstrated through numerical simulations and real-time experiments. ©2013 Published by ISA. All rights reserved.

  4. A Novel Approach in Text-Independent Speaker Recognition in Noisy Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nona Heydari Esfahani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, robust text-independent speaker recognition is taken into consideration. The proposed method performs on manual silence-removed utterances that are segmented into smaller speech units containing few phones and at least one vowel. The segments are basic units for long-term feature extraction. Sub-band entropy is directly extracted in each segment. A robust vowel detection method is then applied on each segment to separate a high energy vowel that is used as unit for pitch frequency and formant extraction. By applying a clustering technique, extracted short-term features namely MFCC coefficients are combined with long term features. Experiments using MLP classifier show that the average speaker accuracy recognition rate is 97.33% for clean speech and 61.33% in noisy environment for -2db SNR, that shows improvement compared to other conventional methods.

  5. Multi-Robot, Multi-Target Particle Swarm Optimization Search in Noisy Wireless Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurt Derr; Milos Manic

    2009-05-01

    Multiple small robots (swarms) can work together using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) to perform tasks that are difficult or impossible for a single robot to accomplish. The problem considered in this paper is exploration of an unknown environment with the goal of finding a target(s) at an unknown location(s) using multiple small mobile robots. This work demonstrates the use of a distributed PSO algorithm with a novel adaptive RSS weighting factor to guide robots for locating target(s) in high risk environments. The approach was developed and analyzed on multiple robot single and multiple target search. The approach was further enhanced by the multi-robot-multi-target search in noisy environments. The experimental results demonstrated how the availability of radio frequency signal can significantly affect robot search time to reach a target.

  6. Communication in a noisy environment: Perception of one's own voice and speech enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Cocq, Cecile

    Workers in noisy industrial environments are often confronted to communication problems. Lost of workers complain about not being able to communicate easily with their coworkers when they wear hearing protectors. In consequence, they tend to remove their protectors, which expose them to the risk of hearing loss. In fact this communication problem is a double one: first the hearing protectors modify one's own voice perception; second they interfere with understanding speech from others. This double problem is examined in this thesis. When wearing hearing protectors, the modification of one's own voice perception is partly due to the occlusion effect which is produced when an earplug is inserted in the car canal. This occlusion effect has two main consequences: first the physiological noises in low frequencies are better perceived, second the perception of one's own voice is modified. In order to have a better understanding of this phenomenon, the literature results are analyzed systematically, and a new method to quantify the occlusion effect is developed. Instead of stimulating the skull with a bone vibrator or asking the subject to speak as is usually done in the literature, it has been decided to excite the buccal cavity with an acoustic wave. The experiment has been designed in such a way that the acoustic wave which excites the buccal cavity does not excite the external car or the rest of the body directly. The measurement of the hearing threshold in open and occluded car has been used to quantify the subjective occlusion effect for an acoustic wave in the buccal cavity. These experimental results as well as those reported in the literature have lead to a better understanding of the occlusion effect and an evaluation of the role of each internal path from the acoustic source to the internal car. The speech intelligibility from others is altered by both the high sound levels of noisy industrial environments and the speech signal attenuation due to hearing

  7. An efficient method for simulation of noisy coupled multi-dimensional oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Adam R.; Forger, Daniel B.

    2016-09-01

    We present an efficient computational method for the study of populations of noisy coupled oscillators. By taking a population density approach in which the probability density of observing an oscillator at a point of state space is the primary variable instead of the states of all of the oscillators, we are able to seamlessly account for intrinsic noise within the oscillators and global coupling within the population. The population is assumed to consist of a large number of oscillators so that the noise process is well sampled over the population. Our numerical method is able to solve the governing equation even in the challenging case of limit cycle oscillators with a large number of state variables. Instead of simulating a prohibitive number of oscillators, our particle method simulates relatively few particles allowing for the efficient solution of the governing equation.

  8. Neuronal-glial trafficking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachelard, H.S.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The name 'glia' originates from the Greek word for glue, because astro glia (or astrocytes) were thought only to provide an anatomical framework for the electrically-excitable neurones. However, awareness that astrocytes perform vital roles in protecting the neurones, which they surround, emerged from evidence that they act as neuroprotective K + -sinks, and that they remove potentially toxic extracellular glutamate from the vicinity of the neurones. The astrocytes convert the glutamate to non-toxic glutamine which is returned to the neurones and used to replenish transmitter glutamate. This 'glutamate-glutamine cycle' (established in the 1960s by Berl and his colleagues) also contributes to protecting the neurones against a build-up of toxic ammonia. Glial cells also supply the neurones with components for free-radical scavenging glutathione. Recent studies have revealed that glial cells play a more positive interactive role in furnishing the neurones with fuels. Studies using radioactive 14 C, 13 C-MRS and 15 N-GCMS have revealed that glia produce alanine, lactate and proline for consumption by neurones, with increased formation of neurotransmitter glutamate. On neuronal activation the release of NH 4 + and glutamate from the neurones stimulates glucose uptake and glycolysis in the glia to produce more alanine, which can be regarded as an 'alanine-glutamate cycle' Use of 14 C-labelled precursors provided early evidence that neurotransmitter GABA may be partly derived from glial glutamine, and this has been confirmed recently in vivo by MRS isotopomer analysis of the GABA and glutamine labelled from 13 C-acetate. Relative rates of intermediary metabolism in glia and neurones can be calculated using a combination of [1- 13 C] glucose and [1,2- 13 C] acetate. When glutamate is released by neurones there is a net neuronal loss of TCA intermediates which have to be replenished. Part of this is derived from carboxylation of pyruvate, (pyruvate carboxylase

  9. The non-selective monovalent cationic channels TRPM4 and TRPM5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinamard, Romain; Sallé, Laurent; Simard, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) proteins are non-selective cationic channels with a consistent Ca(2+)-permeability, except for TRPM4 and TRPM5 that are not permeable to this ion. However, Ca(2+) is a major regulator of their activity since both channels are activated by a rise in internal Ca(2+). Thus TRPM4 and TRPM5 are responsible for most of the Ca(2+)-activated non-selective cationic currents (NSC(Ca)) recorded in a large variety of tissues. Their activation induces cell-membrane depolarization that modifies the driving force for ions as well as activity of voltage gated channels and thereby strongly impacts cell physiology. In the last few years, the ubiquitously expressed TRPM4 channel has been implicated in insulin secretion, the immune response, constriction of cerebral arteries, the activity of inspiratory neurons and cardiac dysfunction. Conversely, TRPM5 whose expression is more restricted, has until now been mainly implicated in taste transduction.

  10. Brainstem neurons survive the identical ischemic stress that kills higher neurons: insight to the persistent vegetative state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Devin Brisson

    Full Text Available Global ischemia caused by heart attack, pulmonary failure, near-drowning or traumatic brain injury often damages the higher brain but not the brainstem, leading to a 'persistent vegetative state' where the patient is awake but not aware. Approximately 30,000 U.S. patients are held captive in this condition but not a single research study has addressed how the lower brain is preferentially protected in these people. In the higher brain, ischemia elicits a profound anoxic depolarization (AD causing neuronal dysfunction and vasoconstriction within minutes. Might brainstem nuclei generate less damaging AD and so be more resilient? Here we compared resistance to acute injury induced from simulated ischemia by 'higher' hippocampal and striatal neurons versus brainstem neurons in live slices from rat and mouse. Light transmittance (LT imaging in response to 10 minutes of oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD revealed immediate and acutely damaging AD propagating through gray matter of neocortex, hippocampus, striatum, thalamus and cerebellar cortex. In adjacent brainstem nuclei, OGD-evoked AD caused little tissue injury. Whole-cell patch recordings from hippocampal and striatal neurons under OGD revealed sudden membrane potential loss that did not recover. In contrast brainstem neurons from locus ceruleus and mesencephalic nucleus as well as from sensory and motor nuclei only slowly depolarized and then repolarized post-OGD. Two-photon microscopy confirmed non-recoverable swelling and dendritic beading of hippocampal neurons during OGD, while mesencephalic neurons in midbrain appeared uninjured. All of the above responses were mimicked by bath exposure to 100 µM ouabain which inhibits the Na+/K+ pump or to 1-10 nM palytoxin which converts the pump into an open cationic channel. Therefore during ischemia the Na+/K+ pump of higher neurons fails quickly and extensively compared to naturally resilient hypothalamic and brainstem neurons. The selective survival

  11. Forecasting turbulent modes with nonparametric diffusion models: Learning from noisy data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Tyrus; Harlim, John

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we apply a recently developed nonparametric modeling approach, the "diffusion forecast", to predict the time-evolution of Fourier modes of turbulent dynamical systems. While the diffusion forecasting method assumes the availability of a noise-free training data set observing the full state space of the dynamics, in real applications we often have only partial observations which are corrupted by noise. To alleviate these practical issues, following the theory of embedology, the diffusion model is built using the delay-embedding coordinates of the data. We show that this delay embedding biases the geometry of the data in a way which extracts the most stable component of the dynamics and reduces the influence of independent additive observation noise. The resulting diffusion forecast model approximates the semigroup solutions of the generator of the underlying dynamics in the limit of large data and when the observation noise vanishes. As in any standard forecasting problem, the forecasting skill depends crucially on the accuracy of the initial conditions. We introduce a novel Bayesian method for filtering the discrete-time noisy observations which works with the diffusion forecast to determine the forecast initial densities. Numerically, we compare this nonparametric approach with standard stochastic parametric models on a wide-range of well-studied turbulent modes, including the Lorenz-96 model in weakly chaotic to fully turbulent regimes and the barotropic modes of a quasi-geostrophic model with baroclinic instabilities. We show that when the only available data is the low-dimensional set of noisy modes that are being modeled, the diffusion forecast is indeed competitive to the perfect model.

  12. Computerized Lung Sound Screening for Pediatric Auscultation in Noisy Field Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanouilidou, Dimitra; McCollum, Eric D; Park, Daniel E; Elhilali, Mounya

    2017-06-19

    Chest auscultations offer a non-invasive and low-cost tool for monitoring lung disease. However, they present many shortcomings including inter-listener variability, subjectivity, and vulnerability to noise and distortions. The current work proposes a computer-aided approach to process lung signals acquired in the field under adverse noisy conditions, by improving the signal quality and offering automated iden- tification of abnormal auscultations indicative of respiratory pathologies. The developed noise-suppression scheme eliminates ambient sounds, heart sounds, sensor artifacts and crying contamination. The improved high-quality signal is then mapped onto a rich spectro-temporal feature space before being classified using a trained support-vector machine clas- sifier. Individual signal frame decisions are then combined using an evaluation scheme, providing an overall patient-level decision for unseen patient records. All methods are evaluated on a large data set with > 1,000 children enrolled, 1-59 months old. The noise suppression scheme is shown to significantly improve signal quality; and the classification system achieves an accuracy of 86.7% in distinguishing normal from pathological sounds, far surpassing other state-of-the art methods. Computerized lung sound processing can benefit from the enforcement of advanced noise-suppression. A fairly short processing window size (< 1 s) combined with detailed spectro-temporal features is recommended, in order to capture transient adventitious events without highlighting sharp noise occurrences. Unlike existing methodologies in the literature, the proposed work is not limited in scope or confined to laboratory-settings: this work validates a practical method for fully automated chest sound processing applicable to realistic and noisy auscultation settings.

  13. Parameter estimation of an artificial respiratory system under mechanical ventilation following a noisy regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Henrique Victor Júnior

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: This work concerns the assessment of a novel system for mechanical ventilation and a parameter estimation method in a bench test. The tested system was based on a commercial mechanical ventilator and a personal computer. A computational routine was developed do drive the mechanical ventilator and a parameter estimation method was utilized to estimate positive end-expiratory pressure, resistance and compliance of the artificial respiratory system. Methods The computational routine was responsible for establishing connections between devices and controlling them. Parameters such as tidal volume, respiratory rate and others can be set for standard and noisy ventilation regimes. Ventilation tests were performed directly varying parameters in the system. Readings from a calibrated measuring device were the basis for analysis. Adopting a first-order linear model, the parameters could be estimated and the outcomes statistically analysed. Results Data acquisition was effective in terms of sample frequency and low noise content. After filtering, cycle detection and estimation took place. Statistics of median, mean and standard deviation were calculated, showing consistent matching with adjusted values. Changes in positive end-expiratory pressure statistically imply changes in compliance, but not the opposite. Conclusion The developed system was satisfactory in terms of clinical parameters. Statistics exhibited consistent relations between adjusted and estimated values, besides precision of the measurements. The system is expected to be used in animals, with a view to better understand the benefits of noisy ventilation, by evaluating the estimated parameters and performing cross relations among blood gas, ultrasonography and electrical impedance tomography.

  14. TRPA1 expression levels and excitability brake by KV channels influence cold sensitivity of TRPA1-expressing neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, Tosifa; Chase, Kevin; Leavitt, Lee S; Olivera, Baldomero M; Teichert, Russell W

    2017-06-14

    The molecular sensor of innocuous (painless) cold sensation is well-established to be transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 8 (TRPM8). However, the role of transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1) in noxious (painful) cold sensation has been controversial. We find that TRPA1 channels contribute to the noxious cold sensitivity of mouse somatosensory neurons, independent of TRPM8 channels, and that TRPA1-expressing neurons are largely non-overlapping with TRPM8-expressing neurons in mouse dorsal-root ganglia (DRG). However, relatively few TRPA1-expressing neurons (e.g., responsive to allyl isothiocyanate or AITC, a selective TRPA1 agonist) respond overtly to cold temperature in vitro, unlike TRPM8-expressing neurons, which almost all respond to cold. Using somatosensory neurons from TRPM8-/- mice and subtype-selective blockers of TRPM8 and TRPA1 channels, we demonstrate that responses to cold temperatures from TRPA1-expressing neurons are mediated by TRPA1 channels. We also identify two factors that affect the cold-sensitivity of TRPA1-expressing neurons: (1) cold-sensitive AITC-sensitive neurons express relatively more TRPA1 transcripts than cold-insensitive AITC-sensitive neurons and (2) voltage-gated potassium (K V ) channels attenuate the cold-sensitivity of some TRPA1-expressing neurons. The combination of these two factors, combined with the relatively weak agonist-like activity of cold temperature on TRPA1 channels, partially explains why few TRPA1-expressing neurons respond to cold. Blocking K V channels also reveals another subclass of noxious cold-sensitive DRG neurons that do not express TRPM8 or TRPA1 channels. Altogether, the results of this study provide novel insights into the cold-sensitivity of different subclasses of somatosensory neurons. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A Novel Image Encryption Scheme Based on Clifford Attractor and Noisy Logistic Map for Secure Transferring Images in Navy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohadeseh Kanafchian

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we first give a brief introduction into chaotic image encryption and then we investigate some important properties and behaviour of the logistic map. The logistic map, aperiodic trajectory, or random-like fluctuation, could not be obtained with some choice of initial condition. Therefore, a noisy logistic map with an additive system noise is introduced. The proposed scheme is based on the extended map of the Clifford strange attractor, where each dimension has a specific role in the encryption process. Two dimensions are used for pixel permutation and the third dimension is used for pixel diffusion. In order to optimize the Clifford encryption system we increase the space key by using the noisy logistic map and a novel encryption scheme based on the Clifford attractor and the noisy logistic map for secure transfer images is proposed. This algorithm consists of two parts: the noisy logistic map shuffle of the pixel position and the pixel value. We use times for shuffling the pixel position and value then we generate the new pixel position and value by the Clifford system. To illustrate the efficiency of the proposed scheme, various types of security analysis are tested. It can be concluded that the proposed image encryption system is a suitable choice for practical applications.

  16. Loss of entanglement after propagation in a quantum noisy channel modeled by a canonical unitary operation in two qubits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves de Brito, Wellington; Viana Ramos, Rubens

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we analyze the loss of entanglement of bipartite states after propagation in a noisy channel modeled by the interaction between the bipartite state and the environment through a canonical unitary form of a two-qubit gate. An analytic expression for the entanglement loss is found

  17. Controlling transfer of quantum correlations among bi-partitions of a composite quantum system by combining different noisy environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiu-Xing; Li Fu-Li

    2011-01-01

    The correlation dynamics are investigated for various bi-partitions of a composite quantum system consisting of two qubits and two independent and non-identical noisy environments. The two qubits have no direct interaction with each other and locally interact with their environments. Classical and quantum correlations including the entanglement are initially prepared only between the two qubits. We find that contrary to the identical noisy environment case, the quantum correlation transfer direction can be controlled by combining different noisy environments. The amplitude-damping environment determines whether there exists the entanglement transfer among bi-partitions of the system. When one qubit is coupled to an amplitude-damping environment and the other one to a bit-flip one, we find a very interesting result that all the quantum and the classical correlations, and even the entanglement, originally existing between the qubits, can be completely transferred without any loss to the qubit coupled to the bit-flit environment and the amplitude-damping environment. We also notice that it is possible to distinguish the quantum correlation from the classical correlation and the entanglement by combining different noisy environments. (general)

  18. Single neuron computation

    CERN Document Server

    McKenna, Thomas M; Zornetzer, Steven F

    1992-01-01

    This book contains twenty-two original contributions that provide a comprehensive overview of computational approaches to understanding a single neuron structure. The focus on cellular-level processes is twofold. From a computational neuroscience perspective, a thorough understanding of the information processing performed by single neurons leads to an understanding of circuit- and systems-level activity. From the standpoint of artificial neural networks (ANNs), a single real neuron is as complex an operational unit as an entire ANN, and formalizing the complex computations performed by real n

  19. Mesmerising mirror neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyes, Cecilia

    2010-06-01

    Mirror neurons have been hailed as the key to understanding social cognition. I argue that three currents of thought-relating to evolution, atomism and telepathy-have magnified the perceived importance of mirror neurons. When they are understood to be a product of associative learning, rather than an adaptation for social cognition, mirror neurons are no longer mesmerising, but they continue to raise important questions about both the psychology of science and the neural bases of social cognition. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Top-down modulation on perceptual decision with balanced inhibition through feedforward and feedback inhibitory neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Te Wang

    Full Text Available Recent physiological studies have shown that neurons in various regions of the central nervous systems continuously receive noisy excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs in a balanced and covaried fashion. While this balanced synaptic input (BSI is typically described in terms of maintaining the stability of neural circuits, a number of experimental and theoretical studies have suggested that BSI plays a proactive role in brain functions such as top-down modulation for executive control. Two issues have remained unclear in this picture. First, given the noisy nature of neuronal activities in neural circuits, how do the modulatory effects change if the top-down control implements BSI with different ratios between inhibition and excitation? Second, how is a top-down BSI realized via only excitatory long-range projections in the neocortex? To address the first issue, we systematically tested how the inhibition/excitation ratio affects the accuracy and reaction times of a spiking neural circuit model of perceptual decision. We defined an energy function to characterize the network dynamics, and found that different ratios modulate the energy function of the circuit differently and form two distinct functional modes. To address the second issue, we tested BSI with long-distance projection to inhibitory neurons that are either feedforward or feedback, depending on whether these inhibitory neurons do or do not receive inputs from local excitatory cells, respectively. We found that BSI occurs in both cases. Furthermore, when relying on feedback inhibitory neurons, through the recurrent interactions inside the circuit, BSI dynamically and automatically speeds up the decision by gradually reducing its inhibitory component in the course of a trial when a decision process takes too long.

  1. Mechanism of bacterial inactivation by cationic surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlova, I.B.; Samoylenko, I.I.

    1985-03-01

    The mechanism of bacteriocidal action of the cationic surfactant dimethylbenzylammonium chloride was studied on exposure of Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus faecium, Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli to different concentrations of the agent and determinations of survival plots. The data showed that the surfactant was bacteriocidal for all the bacteria tested at a concentration of 0.0001%, but more efficient in the case of the gram positives. Electron microscopy showed considerable damage and dissarrangement of the cytoplasmic membrane, indicating that the killing mechanism involved this organelle. It appears that cationic surfactants may constitute effective disinfectant preparations. 9 references, 2 figures.

  2. The Chronotron: A Neuron That Learns to Fire Temporally Precise Spike Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florian, Răzvan V.

    2012-01-01

    In many cases, neurons process information carried by the precise timings of spikes. Here we show how neurons can learn to generate specific temporally precise output spikes in response to input patterns of spikes having precise timings, thus processing and memorizing information that is entirely temporally coded, both as input and as output. We introduce two new supervised learning rules for spiking neurons with temporal coding of information (chronotrons), one that provides high memory capacity (E-learning), and one that has a higher biological plausibility (I-learning). With I-learning, the neuron learns to fire the target spike trains through synaptic changes that are proportional to the synaptic currents at the timings of real and target output spikes. We study these learning rules in computer simulations where we train integrate-and-fire neurons. Both learning rules allow neurons to fire at the desired timings, with sub-millisecond precision. We show how chronotrons can learn to classify their inputs, by firing identical, temporally precise spike trains for different inputs belonging to the same class. When the input is noisy, the classification also leads to noise reduction. We compute lower bounds for the memory capacity of chronotrons and explore the influence of various parameters on chronotrons' performance. The chronotrons can model neurons that encode information in the time of the first spike relative to the onset of salient stimuli or neurons in oscillatory networks that encode information in the phases of spikes relative to the background oscillation. Our results show that firing one spike per cycle optimizes memory capacity in neurons encoding information in the phase of firing relative to a background rhythm. PMID:22879876

  3. The chronotron: a neuron that learns to fire temporally precise spike patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Răzvan V Florian

    Full Text Available In many cases, neurons process information carried by the precise timings of spikes. Here we show how neurons can learn to generate specific temporally precise output spikes in response to input patterns of spikes having precise timings, thus processing and memorizing information that is entirely temporally coded, both as input and as output. We introduce two new supervised learning rules for spiking neurons with temporal coding of information (chronotrons, one that provides high memory capacity (E-learning, and one that has a higher biological plausibility (I-learning. With I-learning, the neuron learns to fire the target spike trains through synaptic changes that are proportional to the synaptic currents at the timings of real and target output spikes. We study these learning rules in computer simulations where we train integrate-and-fire neurons. Both learning rules allow neurons to fire at the desired timings, with sub-millisecond precision. We show how chronotrons can learn to classify their inputs, by firing identical, temporally precise spike trains for different inputs belonging to the same class. When the input is noisy, the classification also leads to noise reduction. We compute lower bounds for the memory capacity of chronotrons and explore the influence of various parameters on chronotrons' performance. The chronotrons can model neurons that encode information in the time of the first spike relative to the onset of salient stimuli or neurons in oscillatory networks that encode information in the phases of spikes relative to the background oscillation. Our results show that firing one spike per cycle optimizes memory capacity in neurons encoding information in the phase of firing relative to a background rhythm.

  4. Corticospinal mirror neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraskov, A.; Philipp, R.; Waldert, S.; Vigneswaran, G.; Quallo, M. M.; Lemon, R. N.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the properties of neurons with mirror-like characteristics that were identified as pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs) and recorded in the ventral premotor cortex (area F5) and primary motor cortex (M1) of three macaque monkeys. We analysed the neurons’ discharge while the monkeys performed active grasp of either food or an object, and also while they observed an experimenter carrying out a similar range of grasps. A considerable proportion of tested PTNs showed clear mirror-like properties (52% F5 and 58% M1). Some PTNs exhibited ‘classical’ mirror neuron properties, increasing activity for both execution and observation, while others decreased their discharge during observation (‘suppression mirror-neurons’). These experiments not only demonstrate the existence of PTNs as mirror neurons in M1, but also reveal some interesting differences between M1 and F5 mirror PTNs. Although observation-related changes in the discharge of PTNs must reach the spinal cord and will include some direct projections to motoneurons supplying grasping muscles, there was no EMG activity in these muscles during action observation. We suggest that the mirror neuron system is involved in the withholding of unwanted movement during action observation. Mirror neurons are differentially recruited in the behaviour that switches rapidly between making your own movements and observing those of others. PMID:24778371

  5. Effect of cations on the hydrated proton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottosson, Niklas; Hunger, Johannes; Bakker, Huib J

    2014-09-17

    We report on a strong nonadditive effect of protons and other cations on the structural dynamics of liquid water, which is revealed using dielectric relaxation spectroscopy in the frequency range of 1-50 GHz. For pure acid solutions, protons are known to have a strong structuring effect on water, leading to a pronounced decrease of the dielectric response. We observe that this structuring is reduced when protons are cosolvated with salts. This reduction is exclusively observed for combinations of protons with other ions; for all studied solutions of cosolvated salts, the effect on the structural dynamics of water is observed to be purely additive, even up to high concentrations. We derive an empirical model that quantitatively describes the nonadditive effect of cosolvated protons and cations. We argue that the effect can be explained from the special character of the proton in water and that Coulomb fields exerted by other cations, in particular doubly charged cations like Mg(2+)aq and Ca(2+)aq, induce a localization of the H(+)aq hydration structures.

  6. NMR studies of cation transport across membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shochet, N.R.

    1985-01-01

    /sup 23/Na NMR Studies of cation transport across membranes were conducted both on model and biological membranes. Two ionophores, the carrier monensin and the channel-former gramicidin, were chosen to induce cation transport in large unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles. The distinction between the NMR signals arising from the two sides of the membrane was achieved by the addition of an anionic paramagnetic shift reagent to the outer solution. The kinetics of the cation transport across the membrane was observed simultaneously monitoring the changes in the /sup 23/Na NMR signals of both compartments. Two mathematical models were developed for the estimation of the transport parameters of the monensin- and gramicidin-induced cation transport. The models were able to fit the experimental data very well. A new method for the estimation of the volume trapped inside the vesicles was developed. The method uses the relative areas of the intra- and extravesicular NMR signals arising from a suspension of vesicles bathed in the same medium they contain, as a measure for the relative volumes of these compartments. Sodium transport across biological membranes was studied by /sup 23/ NMR, using suspensions of cultured nerve cells. The sodium influx through voltage-gated channels was studied using the channel modifier batrachotoxin in combination with scorpion toxin.

  7. Mixed cation effect in sodium aluminosilicate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Jonas; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Mauro, John C.

    , network structure, and the resistances associated with the deformation processes in mixed cation glasses by partially substituting magnesium for calcium and calcium for lithium in sodium aluminosilicate glasses. We use Raman and 27Al NMR spectroscopies to obtain insights into the structural...

  8. Resonance raman studies of phenylcyclopropane radical cations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godbout, J.T.; Zuilhof, H.; Heim, G.; Gould, I.R.; Goodman, J.L.; Dinnocenzo, J.P.; Myers Kelley, A.

    2000-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of the radical cations of phenylcyclopropane and trans-1-phenyl-2-methylcyclopropane are reported. A near-UV pump pulse excites a photosensitizer which oxidizes the species of interest, and a visible probe pulse delayed by 35 ns obtains the spectrum of the radical ion. The

  9. Water Adsorption on Free Cobalt Cluster Cations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiawi, Denis M.; Bakker, Joost M.; Oomens, Jos; Buma, Wybren Jan; Jamshidi, Zahra; Visscher, Lucas; Waters, L. B. F. M.

    2015-01-01

    Cationic cobalt clusters complexed with water Con+–H2O (n = 6–20) are produced through laser ablation and investigated via infrared multiple photon dissociation (IR-MPD) spectroscopy in the 200–1700 cm–1 spectral range. All spectra exhibit a resonance close to the 1595 cm–1 frequency of the free

  10. Water adsorption on free cobalt cluster cations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiawi, D.M.; Bakker, J.M.; Oomens, J.; Buma, W.J.; Jamshidi, Z.; Visscher, L.; Waters, L.B.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Cationic cobalt clusters complexed with water Con+-​H2O (n = 6-​20) are produced through laser ablation and investigated via IR multiple photon dissocn. (IR-​MPD) spectroscopy in the 200-​1700 cm-​1 spectral range. All spectra exhibit a resonance close to the 1595 cm-​1 frequency of the free water

  11. Simultaneous anion and cation mobility in polypyrrole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaarup, Steen; Bay, Lasse; Vidanapathirana, K.

    2003-01-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) polymer films permanently doped with large, immobile anion dodecyl benzene sulfonate (DBS) have been characterized by cyclic voltammetry in order to clarify the roles of cations and anions in the aqueous electrolyte as mobile ions in the film. Aqueous solutions of 0.05-0.1 M...

  12. Cationic flotation of some lithium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valadao, G.E.S.; Peres, A.E.C.; Silva, H.C. da

    1984-01-01

    The cationic flotation of some lithium ores (spodumene, amblygonite, petalite, lepidolite) is studied by the measure of zeta potential and micro-flotation tests in Hallimond tube. The effect of some modifier agents (corn starch, meta sodium silicate) on the lithium flotation is studied. (M.A.C.) [pt

  13. Selective crystallization of cations with crown ethers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heffels, Dennis Egidius

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the selectivity and preferences of the incorporation of differently sized cations in the cavities of various crown ethers and the characterization of the resulting compounds. The coordination preferences of crown ethers with different cavities have long been known, and the impact of other effects on the structure formation have increasingly become the focus of attention. In this work a comparative overview of the coordination preferences depending on various factors was undertaken. The focus was mainly on the variation of the cavity of the crown ether in the presence of differently sized cations. In addition, the effects of the solvent and differently coordinating anions have been investigated. Within the framework of this work, basic coordination preferences could be detected with rare earth nitrates, which are affected particularly by the choice of the solvent. The formation of different types of structures could be controlled by varying the conditions such that the incorporation of the cation in the cavity of the crown ether was influenced and the formation of a particular type of structure can be influenced partly by the choice of solvent. In this case no direct preferences for the incorporation into the cavity of the crown ether in relation to the cation size were observed for rare earth cations. However, the coordination of the crown ether leads in each case - for lanthanides - to rather high coordination numbers. A total of five new rare earth complexes and two structural variants could be observed with crown ethers. In the study of the selectivity of the incorporation into the cavity, known structures were also reproduced and further structures were characterized but the crystal structures not entirely solved. With the use of monovalent cations such as potassium, lithium or silver a total of nine new compounds could be synthesized, while no clear preferences for the incorporation of certain cations were detected. The

  14. Chaotic synchronization of nearest-neighbor diffusive coupling Hindmarsh-Rose neural networks in noisy environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Xiaoling; Yu Hongjie; Jiang Zonglai

    2009-01-01

    The chaotic synchronization of Hindmarsh-Rose neural networks linked by a nonlinear coupling function is discussed. The HR neural networks with nearest-neighbor diffusive coupling form are treated as numerical examples. By the construction of a special nonlinear-coupled term, the chaotic system is coupled symmetrically. For three and four neurons network, a certain region of coupling strength corresponding to full synchronization is given, and the effect of network structure and noise position are analyzed. For five and more neurons network, the full synchronization is very difficult to realize. All the results have been proved by the calculation of the maximum conditional Lyapunov exponent.

  15. Transient receptor potential (TRP gene superfamily encoding cation channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Zan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transient receptor potential (TRP non-selective cation channels constitute a superfamily, which contains 28 different genes. In mammals, this superfamily is divided into six subfamilies based on differences in amino acid sequence homology between the different gene products. Proteins within a subfamily aggregate to form heteromeric or homomeric tetrameric configurations. These different groupings have very variable permeability ratios for calcium versus sodium ions. TRP expression is widely distributed in neuronal tissues, as well as a host of other tissues, including epithelial and endothelial cells. They are activated by environmental stresses that include tissue injury, changes in temperature, pH and osmolarity, as well as volatile chemicals, cytokines and plant compounds. Their activation induces, via intracellular calcium signalling, a host of responses, including stimulation of cell proliferation, migration, regulatory volume behaviour and the release of a host of cytokines. Their activation is greatly potentiated by phospholipase C (PLC activation mediated by coupled GTP-binding proteins and tyrosine receptors. In addition to their importance in maintaining tissue homeostasis, some of these responses may involve various underlying diseases. Given the wealth of literature describing the multiple roles of TRP in physiology in a very wide range of different mammalian tissues, this review limits itself to the literature describing the multiple roles of TRP channels in different ocular tissues. Accordingly, their importance to the corneal, trabecular meshwork, lens, ciliary muscle, retinal, microglial and retinal pigment epithelial physiology and pathology is reviewed.

  16. Scaling law of diffusivity generated by a noisy telegraph signal with fractal intermittency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paradisi, Paolo; Allegrini, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    In many complex systems the non-linear cooperative dynamics determine the emergence of self-organized, metastable, structures that are associated with a birth–death process of cooperation. This is found to be described by a renewal point process, i.e., a sequence of crucial birth–death events corresponding to transitions among states that are faster than the typical long-life time of the metastable states. Metastable states are highly correlated, but the occurrence of crucial events is typically associated with a fast memory drop, which is the reason for the renewal condition. Consequently, these complex systems display a power-law decay and, thus, a long-range or scale-free behavior, in both time correlations and distribution of inter-event times, i.e., fractal intermittency. The emergence of fractal intermittency is then a signature of complexity. However, the scaling features of complex systems are, in general, affected by the presence of added white or short-term noise. This has been found also for fractal intermittency. In this work, after a brief review on metastability and noise in complex systems, we discuss the emerging paradigm of Temporal Complexity. Then, we propose a model of noisy fractal intermittency, where noise is interpreted as a renewal Poisson process with event rate r p . We show that the presence of Poisson noise causes the emergence of a normal diffusion scaling in the long-time range of diffusion generated by a telegraph signal driven by noisy fractal intermittency. We analytically derive the scaling law of the long-time normal diffusivity coefficient. We find the surprising result that this long-time normal diffusivity depends not only on the Poisson event rate, but also on the parameters of the complex component of the signal: the power exponent μ of the inter-event time distribution, denoted as complexity index, and the time scale T needed to reach the asymptotic power-law behavior marking the emergence of complexity. In particular

  17. Neuronal avalanches and learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcangelis, Lucilla de, E-mail: dearcangelis@na.infn.it [Department of Information Engineering and CNISM, Second University of Naples, 81031 Aversa (Italy)

    2011-05-01

    Networks of living neurons represent one of the most fascinating systems of biology. If the physical and chemical mechanisms at the basis of the functioning of a single neuron are quite well understood, the collective behaviour of a system of many neurons is an extremely intriguing subject. Crucial ingredient of this complex behaviour is the plasticity property of the network, namely the capacity to adapt and evolve depending on the level of activity. This plastic ability is believed, nowadays, to be at the basis of learning and memory in real brains. Spontaneous neuronal activity has recently shown features in common to other complex systems. Experimental data have, in fact, shown that electrical information propagates in a cortex slice via an avalanche mode. These avalanches are characterized by a power law distribution for the size and duration, features found in other problems in the context of the physics of complex systems and successful models have been developed to describe their behaviour. In this contribution we discuss a statistical mechanical model for the complex activity in a neuronal network. The model implements the main physiological properties of living neurons and is able to reproduce recent experimental results. Then, we discuss the learning abilities of this neuronal network. Learning occurs via plastic adaptation of synaptic strengths by a non-uniform negative feedback mechanism. The system is able to learn all the tested rules, in particular the exclusive OR (XOR) and a random rule with three inputs. The learning dynamics exhibits universal features as function of the strength of plastic adaptation. Any rule could be learned provided that the plastic adaptation is sufficiently slow.

  18. Optogenetically enhanced axon regeneration: motor versus sensory neuron-specific stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Patricia J; Clanton, Scott L; English, Arthur W

    2018-02-01

    Brief neuronal activation in injured peripheral nerves is both necessary and sufficient to enhance motor axon regeneration, and this effect is specific to the activated motoneurons. It is less clear whether sensory neurons respond in a similar manner to neuronal activation following peripheral axotomy. Further, it is unknown to what extent enhancement of axon regeneration with increased neuronal activity relies on a reflexive interaction within the spinal circuitry. We used mouse genetics and optical tools to evaluate the precision and selectivity of system-specific neuronal activation to enhance axon regeneration in a mixed nerve. We evaluated sensory and motor axon regeneration in two different mouse models expressing the light-sensitive cation channel, channelrhodopsin (ChR2). We selectively activated either sensory or motor axons using light stimulation combined with transection and repair of the sciatic nerve. Regardless of genotype, the number of ChR2-positive neurons whose axons had regenerated successfully was greater following system-specific optical treatment, with no effect on the number of ChR2-negative neurons (whether motor or sensory neurons). We conclude that acute system-specific neuronal activation is sufficient to enhance both motor and sensory axon regeneration. This regeneration-enhancing effect is likely cell autonomous. © 2018 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Sialic acid accelerates the electrophoretic velocity of injured dorsal root ganglion neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-xu Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve injury has been shown to result in ectopic spontaneous discharges on soma and injured sites of sensory neurons, thereby inducing neuropathic pain. With the increase of membrane proteins on soma and injured site neurons, the negatively charged sialic acids bind to the external domains of membrane proteins, resulting in an increase of this charge. We therefore speculate that the electrophoretic velocity of injured neurons may be faster than non-injured neurons. The present study established rat models of neuropathic pain via chronic constriction injury. Results of the cell electrophoresis test revealed that the electrophoretic velocity of injured neuronal cells was faster than that of non-injured (control cells. We then treated cells with divalent cations of Ca 2+ and organic compounds with positive charges, polylysine to counteract the negatively charged sialic acids, or neuraminidase to specifically remove sialic acids from the membrane surface of injured neurons. All three treatments significantly reduced the electrophoretic velocity of injured neuronal cells. These findings suggest that enhanced sialic acids on injured neurons may accelerate the electrophoretic velocity of injured neurons.

  20. Spike detection from noisy neural data in linear-probe recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takekawa, Takashi; Ota, Keisuke; Murayama, Masanori; Fukai, Tomoki

    2014-06-01

    Simultaneous recordings of multiple neuron activities with multi-channel extracellular electrodes are widely used for studying information processing by the brain's neural circuits. In this method, the recorded signals containing the spike events of a number of adjacent or distant neurons must be correctly sorted into spike trains of individual neurons, and a variety of methods have been proposed for this spike sorting. However, spike sorting is computationally difficult because the recorded signals are often contaminated by biological noise. Here, we propose a novel method for spike detection, which is the first stage of spike sorting and hence crucially determines overall sorting performance. Our method utilizes a model of extracellular recording data that takes into account variations in spike waveforms, such as the widths and amplitudes of spikes, by detecting the peaks of band-pass-filtered data. We show that the new method significantly improves the cost-performance of multi-channel electrode recordings by increasing the number of cleanly sorted neurons. © 2014 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Review of smoothing methods for enhancement of noisy data from heavy-duty LHD mining machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodecki, Jacek; Michalak, Anna; Stefaniak, Paweł

    2018-01-01

    Appropriate analysis of data measured on heavy-duty mining machines is essential for processes monitoring, management and optimization. Some particular classes of machines, for example LHD (load-haul-dump) machines, hauling trucks, drilling/bolting machines etc. are characterized with cyclicity of operations. In those cases, identification of cycles and their segments or in other words - simply data segmentation is a key to evaluate their performance, which may be very useful from the management point of view, for example leading to introducing optimization to the process. However, in many cases such raw signals are contaminated with various artifacts, and in general are expected to be very noisy, which makes the segmentation task very difficult or even impossible. To deal with that problem, there is a need for efficient smoothing methods that will allow to retain informative trends in the signals while disregarding noises and other undesired non-deterministic components. In this paper authors present a review of various approaches to diagnostic data smoothing. Described methods can be used in a fast and efficient way, effectively cleaning the signals while preserving informative deterministic behaviour, that is a crucial to precise segmentation and other approaches to industrial data analysis.

  2. The J-Matrix formalism applied to noisy data series: universal properties of noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotti, Luca; Bessis, Daniel; Vrinceanu, Daniel

    2009-10-01

    We developed a new method in the spectral analysis of noisy time-series. From the Jacobi recursive relation for the denominators of the Pad'e Approximants of the Z-transform of an infinite time-series, we build a J-Operator where each bound state (inside the unit circle) is associated to one damped oscillator while the essential spectrum, which lies on the unit circle, represents noise. Damped signal and noise are thus clearly separated in the complex plane. For a finite time series, the J-operator is replaced by a finite order J-Matrix JN. Eigenvalues (poles of the Pad'e Approximant) corresponding to noise are each correlated to one of the zeros of the Pad'e Approximant and can be cleaned, thus exposing constant amplitude signals. Different classes of noise are analyzed, our formalism allowing efficient calculation of hundreds of poles of the Z-transform. Evidence of universal behaviour in the statistical distribution of poles and zeros of the Z-transform was found: poles and zeros tend, when the the time series goes to infinity, to a uniform angular distribution on the unit circle. The roots of unity thus appear to be noise attractors. We show that the Z-transform allows lossless undersampling and that this property can be used to increase signal detection. We give examples to suggest the power of our method, and discuss the relative importance of (uncorrelated) noise and background signals in practical applications.

  3. Performance analysis of seismocardiography for heart sound signal recording in noisy scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Puneet Kumar; Tiwari, Anil Kumar; Chourasia, Vijay S

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a system based on Seismocardiography (SCG) to monitor the heart sound signal for the long-term. It uses an accelerometer, which is of small size and low weight and, thus, convenient to wear. Such a system should also be robust to various noises which occur in real life scenarios. Therefore, a detailed analysis is provided of the proposed system and its performance is compared to the performance of the Phoncardiography (PCG) system. For this purpose, both signals of five subjects were simultaneously recorded in clinical and different real life noisy scenarios. For the quantitative analysis, the detection rate of fundamental heart sound components, S1 and S2, is obtained. Furthermore, a quality index based on the energy of fundamental components is also proposed and obtained for the same. Results show that both the techniques are able to acquire the S1 and S2, in clinical set-up. However, in real life scenarios, we observed many favourable features in the proposed system as compared to PCG, for its use for long-term monitoring.

  4. A Hierarchical Bayesian Setting for an Inverse Problem in Linear Parabolic PDEs with Noisy Boundary Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Ruggeri, Fabrizio

    2016-05-12

    In this work we develop a Bayesian setting to infer unknown parameters in initial-boundary value problems related to linear parabolic partial differential equations. We realistically assume that the boundary data are noisy, for a given prescribed initial condition. We show how to derive the joint likelihood function for the forward problem, given some measurements of the solution field subject to Gaussian noise. Given Gaussian priors for the time-dependent Dirichlet boundary values, we analytically marginalize the joint likelihood using the linearity of the equation. Our hierarchical Bayesian approach is fully implemented in an example that involves the heat equation. In this example, the thermal diffusivity is the unknown parameter. We assume that the thermal diffusivity parameter can be modeled a priori through a lognormal random variable or by means of a space-dependent stationary lognormal random field. Synthetic data are used to test the inference. We exploit the behavior of the non-normalized log posterior distribution of the thermal diffusivity. Then, we use the Laplace method to obtain an approximated Gaussian posterior and therefore avoid costly Markov Chain Monte Carlo computations. Expected information gains and predictive posterior densities for observable quantities are numerically estimated using Laplace approximation for different experimental setups.

  5. Remaining useful life prediction based on noisy condition monitoring signals using constrained Kalman filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Junbo; Zhou, Shiyu; Sankavaram, Chaitanya; Du, Xinyu; Zhang, Yilu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a statistical prognostic method to predict the remaining useful life (RUL) of individual units based on noisy condition monitoring signals is proposed. The prediction accuracy of existing data-driven prognostic methods depends on the capability of accurately modeling the evolution of condition monitoring (CM) signals. Therefore, it is inevitable that the RUL prediction accuracy depends on the amount of random noise in CM signals. When signals are contaminated by a large amount of random noise, RUL prediction even becomes infeasible in some cases. To mitigate this issue, a robust RUL prediction method based on constrained Kalman filter is proposed. The proposed method models the CM signals subject to a set of inequality constraints so that satisfactory prediction accuracy can be achieved regardless of the noise level of signal evolution. The advantageous features of the proposed RUL prediction method is demonstrated by both numerical study and case study with real world data from automotive lead-acid batteries. - Highlights: • A computationally efficient constrained Kalman filter is proposed. • Proposed filter is integrated into an online failure prognosis framework. • A set of proper constraints significantly improves the failure prediction accuracy. • Promising results are reported in the application of battery failure prognosis.

  6. The evolution of alternative adaptive strategies for effective communication in noisy environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ord, Terry J; Charles, Grace K; Hofer, Rebecca K

    2011-01-01

    Animals communicating socially are expected to produce signals that are conspicuous within the habitats in which they live. The particular way in which a species adapts to its environment will depend on its ancestral condition and evolutionary history. At this point, it is unclear how properties of the environment and historical factors interact to shape communication. Tropical Anolis lizards advertise territorial ownership using visual displays in habitats where visual motion or "noise" from windblown vegetation poses an acute problem for the detection of display movements. We studied eight Anolis species that live in similar noise environments but belong to separate island radiations with divergent evolutionary histories. We found that species on Puerto Rico displayed at times when their signals were more likely to be detected by neighboring males and females (during periods of low noise). In contrast, species on Jamaica displayed irrespective of the level of environmental motion, apparently because these species have a display that is effective in a range of viewing conditions. Our findings appear to reflect a case of species originating from different evolutionary starting points evolving different signal strategies for effective communication in noisy environments.

  7. Analysis of Overlapped and Noisy Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttman, Miklos; Weis, David D.; Engen, John R.; Lee, Kelly K.

    2013-12-01

    Noisy and overlapped mass spectrometry data hinder the sequence coverage that can be obtained from hydrogen deuterium exchange analysis, and places a limit on the complexity of the samples that can be studied by this technique. Advances in instrumentation have addressed these limits, but as the complexity of the biological samples under investigation increases, these problems are re-encountered. Here we describe the use of binomial distribution fitting with asymmetric linear squares regression for calculating the accurate deuterium content for mass envelopes of low signal or that contain significant overlap. The approach is demonstrated with a test data set of HIV Env gp140 wherein inclusion of the new analysis regime resulted in obtaining exchange data for 42 additional peptides, improving the sequence coverage by 11 %. At the same time, the precision of deuterium uptake measurements was improved for nearly every peptide examined. The improved processing algorithms also provide an efficient method for deconvolution of bimodal mass envelopes and EX1 kinetic signatures. All these functions and visualization tools have been implemented in the new version of the freely available software, HX-Express v2.

  8. An analysis dictionary learning algorithm under a noisy data model with orthogonality constraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Yu, Tenglong; Wang, Wenwu

    2014-01-01

    Two common problems are often encountered in analysis dictionary learning (ADL) algorithms. The first one is that the original clean signals for learning the dictionary are assumed to be known, which otherwise need to be estimated from noisy measurements. This, however, renders a computationally slow optimization process and potentially unreliable estimation (if the noise level is high), as represented by the Analysis K-SVD (AK-SVD) algorithm. The other problem is the trivial solution to the dictionary, for example, the null dictionary matrix that may be given by a dictionary learning algorithm, as discussed in the learning overcomplete sparsifying transform (LOST) algorithm. Here we propose a novel optimization model and an iterative algorithm to learn the analysis dictionary, where we directly employ the observed data to compute the approximate analysis sparse representation of the original signals (leading to a fast optimization procedure) and enforce an orthogonality constraint on the optimization criterion to avoid the trivial solutions. Experiments demonstrate the competitive performance of the proposed algorithm as compared with three baselines, namely, the AK-SVD, LOST, and NAAOLA algorithms.

  9. Putting Social Media in Its Place: A Curatorial Theory for Media’s Noisy Social Worlds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary L. Gray

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The quest to make sense of media’s impact—what it does to us—dominates communication theories and popular discourse about media. But the impulse to collar, cultivate, domesticate, or measure the impact of media on individuals and society can have pernicious effects, too. This essay calls for a set of new analytical models to account for media as messy instantiations of social interaction transforming before our very eyes. We need to shift from a media effects paradigm that narrowly focuses on the brightest signals of social media use and turn to what I will call here a curatorial theory of social media. This approach, inspired by research from several founding editors of Social Media + Society , focuses on media’s cultural work and myriad manifestations—from its technologies to the discourses that flow through and from them. Let us attend to the more elusive, noisy cultural and social forces that bring some aspects of media sharply into focus while obscuring others. And, above all, let us pay attention to the curatorial reworking of media that happens in particular places—nations, towns, bodies.

  10. Noisy Hegselmann-Krause Systems: Phase Transition and the 2 R-Conjecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chu; Li, Qianxiao; E, Weinan; Chazelle, Bernard

    2017-03-01

    The classic Hegselmann-Krause ( HK) model for opinion dynamics consists of a set of agents on the real line, each one instructed to move, at every time step, to the mass center of the agents within a fixed distance R. In this work, we investigate the effects of noise in the continuous-time version of the model as described by its mean-field Fokker-Planck equation. In the presence of a finite number of agents, the system exhibits a phase transition from order to disorder as the noise increases. We introduce an order parameter to track the phase transition and resolve the corresponding phase diagram. The system undergoes a phase transition for small R but none for larger R. Based on the stability analysis of the mean-field equation, we derive the existence of a forbidden zone for the disordered phase to emerge. We also provide a theoretical explanation for the well-known 2 R conjecture, which states that, for a random initial distribution in a fixed interval, the final configuration consists of clusters separated by a distance of roughly 2 R. Our theoretical analysis confirms previous simulations and predicts properties of the noisy HK model in higher dimension.

  11. Environmental magneto-gradiometric marine survey in a highly anthropic noisy area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Cocchi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available

    We describe a magneto-gradiometric survey performed in the «Mar Piccolo» of Taranto, Italy in May 2005 for

    environmental purposes. This region, which is a noisy harbour environment, provides a challenging test for magnetic methods. To reduce spurious noise signals, with both temporal and spatial origins, we used two Geometrics G880 model caesium magnetometers towed in a transverse gradient configuration. We show how, in shallow waters, this gradiometric configuration allows us to distinguish anomalies due to small metallic bodies near the seabed from the induced noise due to the anthropic contribution and geomagnetic field variations. A direct visual inspection confirmed that the peculiarities highlighted in the gradient anomaly map were due to abandoned metallic objects found on the seabed.


  12. High frequency modal identification on noisy high-speed camera data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javh, Jaka; Slavič, Janko; Boltežar, Miha

    2018-01-01

    Vibration measurements using optical full-field systems based on high-speed footage are typically heavily burdened by noise, as the displacement amplitudes of the vibrating structures are often very small (in the range of micrometers, depending on the structure). The modal information is troublesome to measure as the structure's response is close to, or below, the noise level of the camera-based measurement system. This paper demonstrates modal parameter identification for such noisy measurements. It is shown that by using the Least-Squares Complex-Frequency method combined with the Least-Squares Frequency-Domain method, identification at high-frequencies is still possible. By additionally incorporating a more precise sensor to identify the eigenvalues, a hybrid accelerometer/high-speed camera mode shape identification is possible even below the noise floor. An accelerometer measurement is used to identify the eigenvalues, while the camera measurement is used to produce the full-field mode shapes close to 10 kHz. The identified modal parameters improve the quality of the measured modal data and serve as a reduced model of the structure's dynamics.

  13. Construction and Iterative Decoding of LDPC Codes Over Rings for Phase-Noisy Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karuppasami Sridhar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper presents the construction and iterative decoding of low-density parity-check (LDPC codes for channels affected by phase noise. The LDPC code is based on integer rings and designed to converge under phase-noisy channels. We assume that phase variations are small over short blocks of adjacent symbols. A part of the constructed code is inherently built with this knowledge and hence able to withstand a phase rotation of radians, where " " is the number of phase symmetries in the signal set, that occur at different observation intervals. Another part of the code estimates the phase ambiguity present in every observation interval. The code makes use of simple blind or turbo phase estimators to provide phase estimates over every observation interval. We propose an iterative decoding schedule to apply the sum-product algorithm (SPA on the factor graph of the code for its convergence. To illustrate the new method, we present the performance results of an LDPC code constructed over with quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK modulated signals transmitted over a static channel, but affected by phase noise, which is modeled by the Wiener (random-walk process. The results show that the code can withstand phase noise of standard deviation per symbol with small loss.

  14. Construction and Iterative Decoding of LDPC Codes Over Rings for Phase-Noisy Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William G. Cowley

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the construction and iterative decoding of low-density parity-check (LDPC codes for channels affected by phase noise. The LDPC code is based on integer rings and designed to converge under phase-noisy channels. We assume that phase variations are small over short blocks of adjacent symbols. A part of the constructed code is inherently built with this knowledge and hence able to withstand a phase rotation of 2π/M radians, where “M” is the number of phase symmetries in the signal set, that occur at different observation intervals. Another part of the code estimates the phase ambiguity present in every observation interval. The code makes use of simple blind or turbo phase estimators to provide phase estimates over every observation interval. We propose an iterative decoding schedule to apply the sum-product algorithm (SPA on the factor graph of the code for its convergence. To illustrate the new method, we present the performance results of an LDPC code constructed over ℤ4 with quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK modulated signals transmitted over a static channel, but affected by phase noise, which is modeled by the Wiener (random-walk process. The results show that the code can withstand phase noise of 2∘ standard deviation per symbol with small loss.

  15. Extreme deconvolution: Inferring complete distribution functions from noisy, heterogeneous and incomplete observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovy Jo; Hogg, David W.; Roweis, Sam T.

    2011-06-01

    We generalize the well-known mixtures of Gaussians approach to density estimation and the accompanying Expectation-Maximization technique for finding the maximum likelihood parameters of the mixture to the case where each data point carries an individual d-dimensional uncertainty covariance and has unique missing data properties. This algorithm reconstructs the error-deconvolved or "underlying" distribution function common to all samples, even when the individual data points are samples from different distributions, obtained by convolving the underlying distribution with the heteroskedastic uncertainty distribution of the data point and projecting out the missing data directions. We show how this basic algorithm can be extended with conjugate priors on all of the model parameters and a "split-and-"erge- procedure designed to avoid local maxima of the likelihood. We demonstrate the full method by applying it to the problem of inferring the three-dimensional veloc! ity distribution of stars near the Sun from noisy two-dimensional, transverse velocity measurements from the Hipparcos satellite.

  16. An iterated cubature unscented Kalman filter for large-DoF systems identification with noisy data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Esmaeil; Cha, Young-Jin

    2018-04-01

    Structural and mechanical system identification under dynamic loading has been an important research topic over the last three or four decades. Many Kalman-filtering-based approaches have been developed for linear and nonlinear systems. For example, to predict nonlinear systems, an unscented Kalman filter was applied. However, from extensive literature reviews, the unscented Kalman filter still showed weak performance on systems with large degrees of freedom. In this research, a modified unscented Kalman filter is proposed by integration of a cubature Kalman filter to improve the system identification performance of systems with large degrees of freedom. The novelty of this work lies on conjugating the unscented transform with the cubature integration concept to find a more accurate output from the transformation of the state vector and its related covariance matrix. To evaluate the proposed method, three different numerical models (i.e., the single degree-of-freedom Bouc-Wen model, the linear 3-degrees-of-freedom system, and the 10-degrees-of-freedom system) are investigated. To evaluate the robustness of the proposed method, high levels of noise in the measured response data are considered. The results show that the proposed method is significantly superior to the traditional UKF for noisy measured data in systems with large degrees of freedom.

  17. Analysis of overlapped and noisy hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttman, Miklos; Weis, David D; Engen, John R; Lee, Kelly K

    2013-12-01

    Noisy and overlapped mass spectrometry data hinder the sequence coverage that can be obtained from hydrogen deuterium exchange analysis, and places a limit on the complexity of the samples that can be studied by this technique. Advances in instrumentation have addressed these limits, but as the complexity of the biological samples under investigation increases, these problems are re-encountered. Here we describe the use of binomial distribution fitting with asymmetric linear squares regression for calculating the accurate deuterium content for mass envelopes of low signal or that contain significant overlap. The approach is demonstrated with a test data set of HIV Env gp140 wherein inclusion of the new analysis regime resulted in obtaining exchange data for 42 additional peptides, improving the sequence coverage by 11%. At the same time, the precision of deuterium uptake measurements was improved for nearly every peptide examined. The improved processing algorithms also provide an efficient method for deconvolution of bimodal mass envelopes and EX1 kinetic signatures. All these functions and visualization tools have been implemented in the new version of the freely available software, HX-Express v2.

  18. Dynamic Programming for Re-Mapping Noisy Fixations in Translation Tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carl, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Eyetrackers which allow for free head movement are in many cases imprecise to the extent that reading pattern become heavily distorted. As a result, a "naïve" gazeto-symbol mapping approach wrongly maps also the drifted center of the xation on the symbol directly below it. In this talk, I extend...... this "naïve" gaze-to-word mapping by introducing background knowledge about the gazing task. In a first step, the sequence of "naïve" gaze-to-symbol mappings is projected into a lattice of several possible gaze locations above and below the current fixation on the text. In a second step a dynamic programming...... problems and noise that we observe when using eyetrackers to record and analyse gazing behavior of translators. I describe the mapping algorithm and show how it rectifies and re-aligns the noisy gaze data to provide a more intelligible gaze path. I show examples of re-mapped fixations which better explain...

  19. Restoration of a single superresolution image from several blurred, noisy, and undersampled measured images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elad, M; Feuer, A

    1997-01-01

    The three main tools in the single image restoration theory are the maximum likelihood (ML) estimator, the maximum a posteriori probability (MAP) estimator, and the set theoretic approach using projection onto convex sets (POCS). This paper utilizes the above known tools to propose a unified methodology toward the more complicated problem of superresolution restoration. In the superresolution restoration problem, an improved resolution image is restored from several geometrically warped, blurred, noisy and downsampled measured images. The superresolution restoration problem is modeled and analyzed from the ML, the MAP, and POCS points of view, yielding a generalization of the known superresolution restoration methods. The proposed restoration approach is general but assumes explicit knowledge of the linear space- and time-variant blur, the (additive Gaussian) noise, the different measured resolutions, and the (smooth) motion characteristics. A hybrid method combining the simplicity of the ML and the incorporation of nonellipsoid constraints is presented, giving improved restoration performance, compared with the ML and the POCS approaches. The hybrid method is shown to converge to the unique optimal solution of a new definition of the optimization problem. Superresolution restoration from motionless measurements is also discussed. Simulations demonstrate the power of the proposed methodology.

  20. Methodology to estimate the relative pressure field from noisy experimental velocity data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolin, C D; Raguin, L G

    2008-01-01

    The determination of intravascular pressure fields is important to the characterization of cardiovascular pathology. We present a two-stage method that solves the inverse problem of estimating the relative pressure field from noisy velocity fields measured by phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) on an irregular domain with limited spatial resolution, and includes a filter for the experimental noise. For the pressure calculation, the Poisson pressure equation is solved by embedding the irregular flow domain into a regular domain. To lessen the propagation of the noise inherent to the velocity measurements, three filters - a median filter and two physics-based filters - are evaluated using a 2-D Couette flow. The two physics-based filters outperform the median filter for the estimation of the relative pressure field for realistic signal-to-noise ratios (SNR = 5 to 30). The most accurate pressure field results from a filter that applies in a least-squares sense three constraints simultaneously: consistency between measured and filtered velocity fields, divergence-free and additional smoothness conditions. This filter leads to a 5-fold gain in accuracy for the estimated relative pressure field compared to without noise filtering, in conditions consistent with PC-MRI of the carotid artery: SNR = 5, 20 x 20 discretized flow domain (25 X 25 computational domain).

  1. The Impact of Time Delays in Network Synchronization in a Noisy Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korniss, G.

    2012-02-01

    Coordinating, distributing, and balancing resources in networks is a complex task and it is very sensitive to time delays. To understand and manage the collective response in these coupled interacting systems, one must understand the interplay of stochastic effects, network connections, and time delays. In synchronization and coordination problems in coupled interacting systems individual units attempt to adjust their local state variables (e.g., pace, orientation, load) in a decentralized fashion. They interact or communicate only with their local neighbors in the network, often with explicit or implicit intention to improve global performance. Applications of the corresponding models range from physics, biology, computer science to control theory. I will discuss the effects of nonzero time delays in stochastic synchronization problems with linear couplings in an arbitrary network. Further, by constructing the scaling theory of the underlying fluctuations, we establish the absolute limit of synchronization efficiency in a noisy environment with uniform time delays, i.e., the minimum attainable value of the width of the synchronization landscape.ootnotetextD. Hunt, G. Korniss, and B.K. Szymanski, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 068701 (2010). These results have also strong implications for optimization and trade-offs in network synchronization with delays.

  2. A stable computation of log-derivatives from noisy drawdown data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Gustavo; Carrera, Jesus; Gómez, Susana; Minutti, Carlos; Camacho, Rodolfo

    2017-09-01

    Pumping tests interpretation is an art that involves dealing with noise coming from multiple sources and conceptual model uncertainty. Interpretation is greatly helped by diagnostic plots, which include drawdown data and their derivative with respect to log-time, called log-derivative. Log-derivatives are especially useful to complement geological understanding in helping to identify the underlying model of fluid flow because they are sensitive to subtle variations in the response to pumping of aquifers and oil reservoirs. The main problem with their use lies in the calculation of the log-derivatives themselves, which may display fluctuations when data are noisy. To overcome this difficulty, we propose a variational regularization approach based on the minimization of a functional consisting of two terms: one ensuring that the computed log-derivatives honor measurements and one that penalizes fluctuations. The minimization leads to a diffusion-like differential equation in the log-derivatives, and boundary conditions that are appropriate for well hydraulics (i.e., radial flow, wellbore storage, fractal behavior, etc.). We have solved this equation by finite differences. We tested the methodology on two synthetic examples showing that a robust solution is obtained. We also report the resulting log-derivative for a real case.

  3. Out-of-Sample Extension for Dimensionality Reduction of Noisy Time Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadkhahi, Hamid; Duarte, Marco F.; Marlin, Benjamin M.

    2017-11-01

    This paper proposes an out-of-sample extension framework for a global manifold learning algorithm (Isomap) that uses temporal information in out-of-sample points in order to make the embedding more robust to noise and artifacts. Given a set of noise-free training data and its embedding, the proposed framework extends the embedding for a noisy time series. This is achieved by adding a spatio-temporal compactness term to the optimization objective of the embedding. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first method for out-of-sample extension of manifold embeddings that leverages timing information available for the extension set. Experimental results demonstrate that our out-of-sample extension algorithm renders a more robust and accurate embedding of sequentially ordered image data in the presence of various noise and artifacts when compared to other timing-aware embeddings. Additionally, we show that an out-of-sample extension framework based on the proposed algorithm outperforms the state of the art in eye-gaze estimation.

  4. Power-Constrained Sparse Gaussian Linear Dimensionality Reduction Over Noisy Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazinia, Amirpasha; Dey, Subhrakanti

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate power-constrained sensing matrix design in a sparse Gaussian linear dimensionality reduction framework. Our study is carried out in a single--terminal setup as well as in a multi--terminal setup consisting of orthogonal or coherent multiple access channels (MAC). We adopt the mean square error (MSE) performance criterion for sparse source reconstruction in a system where source-to-sensor channel(s) and sensor-to-decoder communication channel(s) are noisy. Our proposed sensing matrix design procedure relies upon minimizing a lower-bound on the MSE in single-- and multiple--terminal setups. We propose a three-stage sensing matrix optimization scheme that combines semi-definite relaxation (SDR) programming, a low-rank approximation problem and power-rescaling. Under certain conditions, we derive closed-form solutions to the proposed optimization procedure. Through numerical experiments, by applying practical sparse reconstruction algorithms, we show the superiority of the proposed scheme by comparing it with other relevant methods. This performance improvement is achieved at the price of higher computational complexity. Hence, in order to address the complexity burden, we present an equivalent stochastic optimization method to the problem of interest that can be solved approximately, while still providing a superior performance over the popular methods.

  5. Nearly optimal measurement schemes in a noisy Mach-Zehnder interferometer with coherent and squeezed vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gard, Bryan T.; You, Chenglong; Singh, Robinjeet; Lee, Hwang; Corbitt, Thomas R.; Dowling, Jonathan P. [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Mishra, Devendra K. [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); V.S. Mehta College of Science, Physics Department, Bharwari, UP (India)

    2017-12-15

    The use of an interferometer to perform an ultra-precise parameter estimation under noisy conditions is a challenging task. Here we discuss nearly optimal measurement schemes for a well known, sensitive input state, squeezed vacuum and coherent light. We find that a single mode intensity measurement, while the simplest and able to beat the shot-noise limit, is outperformed by other measurement schemes in the low-power regime. However, at high powers, intensity measurement is only outperformed by a small factor. Specifically, we confirm, that an optimal measurement choice under lossless conditions is the parity measurement. In addition, we also discuss the performance of several other common measurement schemes when considering photon loss, detector efficiency, phase drift, and thermal photon noise. We conclude that, with noise considerations, homodyne remains near optimal in both the low and high power regimes. Surprisingly, some of the remaining investigated measurement schemes, including the previous optimal parity measurement, do not remain even near optimal when noise is introduced. (orig.)

  6. Noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation induces a sustained improvement in body balance in elderly adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Chisato; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu; Kamogashira, Teru; Kinoshita, Makoto; Egami, Naoya; Uemura, Yukari; Togo, Fumiharu; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Iwasaki, Shinichi

    2016-11-21

    Vestibular dysfunction causes postural instability, which is prevalent in the elderly. We previously showed that an imperceptible level of noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation (nGVS) can improve postural stability in patients with bilateral vestibulopathy during the stimulus, presumably by enhancing vestibular information processing. In this study, we investigated the after-effects of an imperceptible long-duration nGVS on body balance in elderly adults. Thirty elderly participants underwent two nGVS sessions in a randomised order. In Session 1, participants received nGVS for 30 min twice with a 4-h interval. In Session 2, participants received nGVS for 3 h. Two-legged stance tasks were performed with eyes closed while participants stood on a foam rubber surface, with and without nGVS, and parameters related to postural stability were measured using posturography. In both sessions, the postural stability was markedly improved for more than 2 h after the cessation of the stimulus and tended to decrease thereafter. The second stimulation in Session 1 caused a moderate additional improvement in body balance and promoted the sustainability of the improvement. These results suggest that nGVS can lead to a postural stability improvement in elderly adults that lasts for several hours after the cessation of the stimulus, probably via vestibular neuroplasticity.

  7. Noisy Response to Antibiotic Stress Predicts Subsequent Single-Cell Survival in an Acidic Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitosch, Karin; Rieckh, Georg; Bollenbach, Tobias

    2017-04-26

    Antibiotics elicit drastic changes in microbial gene expression, including the induction of stress response genes. While certain stress responses are known to "cross-protect" bacteria from other stressors, it is unclear whether cellular responses to antibiotics have a similar protective role. By measuring the genome-wide transcriptional response dynamics of Escherichia coli to four antibiotics, we found that trimethoprim induces a rapid acid stress response that protects bacteria from subsequent exposure to acid. Combining microfluidics with time-lapse imaging to monitor survival and acid stress response in single cells revealed that the noisy expression of the acid resistance operon gadBC correlates with single-cell survival. Cells with higher gadBC expression following trimethoprim maintain higher intracellular pH and survive the acid stress longer. The seemingly random single-cell survival under acid stress can therefore be predicted from gadBC expression and rationalized in terms of GadB/C molecular function. Overall, we provide a roadmap for identifying the molecular mechanisms of single-cell cross-protection between antibiotics and other stressors. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Toward a synthesis of cognitive biases: how noisy information processing can bias human decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Martin

    2012-03-01

    A single coherent framework is proposed to synthesize long-standing research on 8 seemingly unrelated cognitive decision-making biases. During the past 6 decades, hundreds of empirical studies have resulted in a variety of rules of thumb that specify how humans systematically deviate from what is normatively expected from their decisions. Several complementary generative mechanisms have been proposed to explain those cognitive biases. Here it is suggested that (at least) 8 of these empirically detected decision-making biases can be produced by simply assuming noisy deviations in the memory-based information processes that convert objective evidence (observations) into subjective estimates (decisions). An integrative framework is presented to show how similar noise-based mechanisms can lead to conservatism, the Bayesian likelihood bias, illusory correlations, biased self-other placement, subadditivity, exaggerated expectation, the confidence bias, and the hard-easy effect. Analytical tools from information theory are used to explore the nature and limitations that characterize such information processes for binary and multiary decision-making exercises. The ensuing synthesis offers formal mathematical definitions of the biases and their underlying generative mechanism, which permits a consolidated analysis of how they are related. This synthesis contributes to the larger goal of creating a coherent picture that explains the relations among the myriad of seemingly unrelated biases and their potential psychological generative mechanisms. Limitations and research questions are discussed.

  9. The outbreak of cooperation among success-driven individuals under noisy conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbing, Dirk; Yu, Wenjian

    2009-03-10

    According to Thomas Hobbes' Leviathan [1651; 2008 (Touchstone, New York), English Ed], "the life of man [is] solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short," and it would need powerful social institutions to establish social order. In reality, however, social cooperation can also arise spontaneously, based on local interactions rather than centralized control. The self-organization of cooperative behavior is particularly puzzling for social dilemmas related to sharing natural resources or creating common goods. Such situations are often described by the prisoner's dilemma. Here, we report the sudden outbreak of predominant cooperation in a noisy world dominated by selfishness and defection, when individuals imitate superior strategies and show success-driven migration. In our model, individuals are unrelated, and do not inherit behavioral traits. They defect or cooperate selfishly when the opportunity arises, and they do not know how often they will interact or have interacted with someone else. Moreover, our individuals have no reputation mechanism to form friendship networks, nor do they have the option of voluntary interaction or costly punishment. Therefore, the outbreak of prevailing cooperation, when directed motion is integrated in a game-theoretical model, is remarkable, particularly when random strategy mutations and random relocations challenge the formation and survival of cooperative clusters. Our results suggest that mobility is significant for the evolution of social order, and essential for its stabilization and maintenance.

  10. An Analysis Dictionary Learning Algorithm under a Noisy Data Model with Orthogonality Constraint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Two common problems are often encountered in analysis dictionary learning (ADL algorithms. The first one is that the original clean signals for learning the dictionary are assumed to be known, which otherwise need to be estimated from noisy measurements. This, however, renders a computationally slow optimization process and potentially unreliable estimation (if the noise level is high, as represented by the Analysis K-SVD (AK-SVD algorithm. The other problem is the trivial solution to the dictionary, for example, the null dictionary matrix that may be given by a dictionary learning algorithm, as discussed in the learning overcomplete sparsifying transform (LOST algorithm. Here we propose a novel optimization model and an iterative algorithm to learn the analysis dictionary, where we directly employ the observed data to compute the approximate analysis sparse representation of the original signals (leading to a fast optimization procedure and enforce an orthogonality constraint on the optimization criterion to avoid the trivial solutions. Experiments demonstrate the competitive performance of the proposed algorithm as compared with three baselines, namely, the AK-SVD, LOST, and NAAOLA algorithms.

  11. New Lagrange Multipliers for the Blind Adaptive Deconvolution Problem Applicable for the Noisy Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Pinchas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a new blind adaptive deconvolution algorithm was proposed based on a new closed-form approximated expression for the conditional expectation (the expectation of the source input given the equalized or deconvolutional output where the output and input probability density function (pdf of the deconvolutional process were approximated with the maximum entropy density approximation technique. The Lagrange multipliers for the output pdf were set to those used for the input pdf. Although this new blind adaptive deconvolution method has been shown to have improved equalization performance compared to the maximum entropy blind adaptive deconvolution algorithm recently proposed by the same author, it is not applicable for the very noisy case. In this paper, we derive new Lagrange multipliers for the output and input pdfs, where the Lagrange multipliers related to the output pdf are a function of the channel noise power. Simulation results indicate that the newly obtained blind adaptive deconvolution algorithm using these new Lagrange multipliers is robust to signal-to-noise ratios (SNR, unlike the previously proposed method, and is applicable for the whole range of SNR down to 7 dB. In addition, we also obtain new closed-form approximated expressions for the conditional expectation and mean square error (MSE.

  12. Observer performance in dynamic displays: effect of frame rate on visual signal detection in noisy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, James S.; Honig, David A.; Carterette, Edward; Eigler, Neal L.

    1991-06-01

    An observer's ability to detect low contrast features (signals) within an image is an important measure of image quality. A theory exists for describing the relationship between measurable image parameters and the detectability of simple visual signals such as squares or disks in single images. This signal detection theory has been successfully applied to many practical visual tasks yielding fundamental re'ationships between noise, contrast, and the effect on detectability of intensifying screen/x-ray film combinations in conventional radiology2, and quantization noise,3 image processing,4 and window/level settings5'6 in digital displays. We are aware of no studies examining signal detectability in dynamically displayed medical images, despite the importance of these displays for many imaging modalities. Examples of dynamic displays in medical imaging include x-ray fluoroscopy, cardiac cineangiography, real-time two-dimensional ultrasound (2D-Echo), rapid-sequence nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (cine MRI), radioisotope ventriculography, and ultrafast computed tomography (UFCT) . The goal of the present study was to quantify the psychophysical parameters which affect observer performance in dynamically displayed sequences of noisy images.

  13. Chaos synchronization in noisy environment using nonlinear filtering and sliding mode control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behzad, Mehdi; Salarieh, Hassan; Alasty, Aria

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for synchronizing two different chaotic systems, using a combination of the extended Kalman filter and the sliding mode controller. It is assumed that the drive chaotic system has a random excitation with a stochastically chaotic behavior. Two different cases are considered in this study. At first it is assumed that all state variables of the drive system are available, i.e. complete state measurement, and a sliding mode controller is designed for synchronization. For the second case, it is assumed that the output of the drive system does not contain the whole state variables of the drive system, and it is also affected by some random noise. By combination of extended Kalman filter and the sliding mode control, a synchronizing control law is proposed. As a case study, the presented algorithm is applied to the Lur'e-Genesio chaotic systems as the drive-response dynamic systems. Simulation results show the good performance of the algorithm in synchronizing the chaotic systems in presence of noisy environment

  14. NOISY DISPERSION CURVE PICKING (NDCP): a Matlab friendly suite package for fully control dispersion curve picking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados, I.; Calo, M.; Ramos, V.

    2017-12-01

    We developed a Matlab suite package (NDCP, Noisy Dispersion Curve Picking) that allows a full control over parameters to identify correctly group velocity dispersion curves in two types of datasets: correlograms between two stations or surface wave records from earthquakes. Using the frequency-time analysis (FTAN), the procedure to obtain the dispersion curves from records with a high noise level becomes difficult, and sometimes, the picked curve result in a misinterpreted character. For correlogram functions, obtained with cross-correlation of noise records or earthquake's coda, a non-homogeneous noise sources distribution yield to a non-symmetric Green's function (GF); to retrieve the complete information contained in there, NDCP allows to pick the dispersion curve in the time domain both in the causal and non-causal part of the GF. Then the picked dispersion curve is displayed on the FTAN diagram to in order to check if it matches with the maximum of the signal energy avoiding confusion with overtones or spike of noise. To illustrate how NDCP performs, we show exemple using: i) local correlograms functions obtained from sensors deployed into a volcanic caldera (Los Humeros, in Puebla, Mexico), ii) regional correlograms functions between two stations of the National Seismological Service (SSN, Servicio Sismológico Nacional in Spanish), and iii) surface wave seismic record for an earthquake located in the Pacific Ocean coast of Mexico and recorded by the SSN. This work is supported by the GEMEX project (Geothermal Europe-Mexico consortium).

  15. Effect of noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation on center of pressure sway of static standing posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inukai, Yasuto; Otsuru, Naofumi; Masaki, Mitsuhiro; Saito, Kei; Miyaguchi, Shota; Kojima, Sho; Onishi, Hideaki

    The vestibular system is involved in the control of standing balance. Galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) is a noninvasive technique that can stimulate the vestibular system. In recent years, noisy GVS (nGVS) using noise current stimulation has been attempted, but it has not been clarified whether it affects postural sway in open-eye standing. The purpose of this study was to clarify the influence of nGVS on the center of pressure (COP) sway measurement in open-eye standing postural control and identify the responders of nGVS. nGVS (0.1-640 Hz) was delivered at 0.4 and 1.0 mA over the bipolar mastoid. COP sway root mean square area, sway path length, medio-lateral (ML) mean velocity, and antero-posterior (AP) mean velocity before and during nGVS in an open-eye standing posture was measured. nGVS at 0.4 and 1.0 mA significantly reduced sway path length, mean velocity. The stimulation effect of nGVS was also large in subjects with a long sway path. For subjects with high COP sway of Baseline, nGVS was effective even with stimulation for a short duration (5 s). These findings suggest that nGVS improves postural sway in an open-eye standing posture among young subjects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A Robust Classification of Galaxy Spectra: Dealing with Noisy and Incomplete Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, A. J.; Szalay, A. S.

    1999-05-01

    Over the next few years new spectroscopic surveys (from the optical surveys of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the 2dF Galaxy Survey through to space-based ultraviolet satellites such as GALEX) will provide the opportunity and challenge of understanding how galaxies of different spectral type evolve with redshift. Techniques have been developed to classify galaxies based on their continuum and line spectra. Some of the most promising of these have used the Karhunen & Loève transform (or principal component analysis) to separate galaxies into distinct classes. Their limitation has been that they assume that the spectral coverage and quality of the spectra are constant for all galaxies within a given sample. In this paper we develop a general formalism that accounts for the missing data within the observed spectra (such as the removal of sky lines or the effect of sampling different intrinsic rest-wavelength ranges due to the redshift of a galaxy). We demonstrate that by correcting for these gaps we can recover an almost redshift-independent classification scheme. From this classification we can derive an optimal interpolation that reconstructs the underlying galaxy spectral energy distributions in the regions of missing data. This provides a simple and effective mechanism for building galaxy spectral energy distributions directly from data that may be noisy, incomplete, or drawn from a number of different sources.

  17. Kappe neurons, a novel population of olfactory sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Gaurav; Bozorg Nia, Shahrzad; Zapilko, Veronika; Shiriagin, Vladimir; Kowatschew, Daniel; Oka, Yuichiro; Korsching, Sigrun I

    2014-02-10

    Perception of olfactory stimuli is mediated by distinct populations of olfactory sensory neurons, each with a characteristic set of morphological as well as functional parameters. Beyond two large populations of ciliated and microvillous neurons, a third population, crypt neurons, has been identified in teleost and cartilaginous fishes. We report here a novel, fourth olfactory sensory neuron population in zebrafish, which we named kappe neurons for their characteristic shape. Kappe neurons are identified by their Go-like immunoreactivity, and show a distinct spatial distribution within the olfactory epithelium, similar to, but significantly different from that of crypt neurons. Furthermore, kappe neurons project to a single identified target glomerulus within the olfactory bulb, mdg5 of the mediodorsal cluster, whereas crypt neurons are known to project exclusively to the mdg2 glomerulus. Kappe neurons are negative for established markers of ciliated, microvillous and crypt neurons, but appear to have microvilli. Kappe neurons constitute the fourth type of olfactory sensory neurons reported in teleost fishes and their existence suggests that encoding of olfactory stimuli may require a higher complexity than hitherto assumed already in the peripheral olfactory system.

  18. Stochastic neuron models

    CERN Document Server

    Greenwood, Priscilla E

    2016-01-01

    This book describes a large number of open problems in the theory of stochastic neural systems, with the aim of enticing probabilists to work on them. This includes problems arising from stochastic models of individual neurons as well as those arising from stochastic models of the activities of small and large networks of interconnected neurons. The necessary neuroscience background to these problems is outlined within the text, so readers can grasp the context in which they arise. This book will be useful for graduate students and instructors providing material and references for applying probability to stochastic neuron modeling. Methods and results are presented, but the emphasis is on questions where additional stochastic analysis may contribute neuroscience insight. An extensive bibliography is included. Dr. Priscilla E. Greenwood is a Professor Emerita in the Department of Mathematics at the University of British Columbia. Dr. Lawrence M. Ward is a Professor in the Department of Psychology and the Brain...

  19. Minimal Effects of Age and Exposure to a Noisy Environment on Hearing in Alpha9 Nicotinic Receptor Knockout Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda M. Lauer

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies have suggested a role of weakened medial olivocochlear (OC efferent feedback in accelerated hearing loss and increased susceptibility to noise. The present study investigated the progression of hearing loss with age and exposure to a noisy environment in medial OC-deficient mice. Alpha9 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor knockout (α9KO and wild types were screened for hearing loss using auditory brainstem responses. α9KO mice housed in a quiet environment did not show increased hearing loss compared to wild types in young adulthood and middle age. Challenging the medial OC system by housing in a noisy environment did not increase hearing loss in α9KO mice compared to wild types. ABR wave 1 amplitudes also did not show differences between α9KO mice and wild types. These data suggest that deficient medial OC feedback does not result in early onset of hearing loss.

  20. The adjuvant mechanism of cationic dimethyldioctadecylammonium liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Karen Smith; Agger, Else Marie; Foged, Camilla

    2007-01-01

    Cationic liposomes are being used increasingly as efficient adjuvants for subunit vaccines but their precise mechanism of action is still unknown. Here, we investigated the adjuvant mechanism of cationic liposomes based on the synthetic amphiphile dimethyldioctadecylammonium (DDA). The liposomes...... concentrations. This efficient adsorption onto the liposomes led to an enhanced uptake of OVA by BM-DCs as assessed by flow cytometry and confocal fluorescence laser-scanning microscopy. This was an active process, which was arrested at 4 degrees and by an inhibitor of actin-dependent endocytosis, cytochalasin D....... In vivo studies confirmed the observed effect because adsorption of OVA onto DDA liposomes enhanced the uptake of the antigen by peritoneal exudate cells after intraperitoneal injection. The liposomes targeted antigen preferentially to antigen-presenting cells because we only observed a minimal uptake...

  1. Dynamic Team Theory of Stochastic Differential Decision Systems with Decentralized Noisy Information Structures via Girsanov's Measure Transformation

    OpenAIRE

    Charalambous, Charalambos D.; Ahmed, Nasir U.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present two methods which generalize static team theory to dynamic team theory, in the context of continuous-time stochastic nonlinear differential decentralized decision systems, with relaxed strategies, which are measurable to different noisy information structures. For both methods we apply Girsanov's measure transformation to obtain an equivalent dynamic team problem under a reference probability measure, so that the observations and information structures available for ...

  2. Regulation of Cation Balance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyert, Martha S.; Philpott, Caroline C.

    2013-01-01

    All living organisms require nutrient minerals for growth and have developed mechanisms to acquire, utilize, and store nutrient minerals effectively. In the aqueous cellular environment, these elements exist as charged ions that, together with protons and hydroxide ions, facilitate biochemical reactions and establish the electrochemical gradients across membranes that drive cellular processes such as transport and ATP synthesis. Metal ions serve as essential enzyme cofactors and perform both structural and signaling roles within cells. However, because these ions can also be toxic, cells have developed sophisticated homeostatic mechanisms to regulate their levels and avoid toxicity. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have characterized many of the gene products and processes responsible for acquiring, utilizing, storing, and regulating levels of these ions. Findings in this model organism have often allowed the corresponding machinery in humans to be identified and have provided insights into diseases that result from defects in ion homeostasis. This review summarizes our current understanding of how cation balance is achieved and modulated in baker’s yeast. Control of intracellular pH is discussed, as well as uptake, storage, and efflux mechanisms for the alkali metal cations, Na+ and K+, the divalent cations, Ca2+ and Mg2+, and the trace metal ions, Fe2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, and Mn2+. Signal transduction pathways that are regulated by pH and Ca2+ are reviewed, as well as the mechanisms that allow cells to maintain appropriate intracellular cation concentrations when challenged by extreme conditions, i.e., either limited availability or toxic levels in the environment. PMID:23463800

  3. Mechanism of metal cationization in organic SIMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojciechowski, I.; Delcorte, A.; Gonze, X.; Bertrand, P.

    2003-01-01

    A scenario of metal cationization in which the organic molecule combines with a neutral excited metal atom is proposed. Ionization of the nascent complex occurs via ejection of an electron during the association process. Electron structure calculations for the model systems C 6 H 6 +Me (Me=Ag, Cu, Au) using the density functional theory give a strong argument in favor of the proposed mechanism

  4. Proton dynamics investigation for dimethyl ammonium cation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pislewski, N.; Tritt-Goc, J.; Jakubas, R.

    1995-01-01

    Proton dynamics in dimethyl ammonium cation has been investigated by means of NMR and spin echo methods in polycrystalline salts [NH 2 (CH 3 ) 2 ] + Bi 2 J 9 - and [NH 2 (CH 3 ) 2 ] + SbJ 9 - . Spin-lattice relaxation time as well as second moment of NMR line have been measured for influence study of crystal structure changes on proton dynamics

  5. A novel segmentation approach for noisy medical images using intuitionistic fuzzy divergence with neighbourhood-based membership function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jati, A; Singh, G; Koley, S; Konar, A; Ray, A K; Chakraborty, C

    2015-03-01

    Medical image segmentation demands higher segmentation accuracy especially when the images are affected by noise. This paper proposes a novel technique to segment medical images efficiently using an intuitionistic fuzzy divergence-based thresholding. A neighbourhood-based membership function is defined here. The intuitionistic fuzzy divergence-based image thresholding technique using the neighbourhood-based membership functions yield lesser degradation of segmentation performance in noisy environment. Its ability in handling noisy images has been validated. The algorithm is independent of any parameter selection. Moreover, it provides robustness to both additive and multiplicative noise. The proposed scheme has been applied on three types of medical image datasets in order to establish its novelty and generality. The performance of the proposed algorithm has been compared with other standard algorithms viz. Otsu's method, fuzzy C-means clustering, and fuzzy divergence-based thresholding with respect to (1) noise-free images and (2) ground truth images labelled by experts/clinicians. Experiments show that the proposed methodology is effective, more accurate and efficient for segmenting noisy images. © 2014 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2014 Royal Microscopical Society.

  6. Reducible cationic lipids for gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzer, B; Byk, G; Frederic, M; Airiau, M; Blanche, F; Pitard, B; Scherman, D

    2001-01-01

    One of the main challenges of gene therapy remains the increase of gene delivery into eukaryotic cells. We tested whether intracellular DNA release, an essential step for gene transfer, could be facilitated by using reducible cationic DNA-delivery vectors. For this purpose, plasmid DNA was complexed with cationic lipids bearing a disulphide bond. This reduction-sensitive linker is expected to be reduced and cleaved in the reducing milieu of the cytoplasm, thus potentially improving DNA release and consequently transfection. The DNA--disulphide-lipid complexation was monitored by ethidium bromide exclusion, and the size of complexes was determined by dynamic light scattering. It was found that the reduction kinetics of disulphide groups in DNA--lipid complexes depended on the position of the disulphide linker within the lipid molecule. Furthermore, the internal structure of DNA--lipid particles was examined by small-angle X-ray scattering before and after lipid reduction. DNA release from lipid complexes was observed after the reduction of disulphide bonds of several lipids. Cell-transfection experiments suggested that complexes formed with selected reducible lipids resulted in up to 1000-fold higher reporter-gene activity, when compared with their analogues without disulphide bonds. In conclusion, reduction-sensitive groups introduced into cationic lipid backbones potentially allow enhanced DNA release from DNA--lipid complexes after intracellular reduction and represent a tool for improved vectorization. PMID:11389682

  7. [Antioxidant activity of cationic whey protein isolate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    titova, M E; Komolov, S A; Tikhomirova, N A

    2012-01-01

    The process of lipid peroxidation (LPO) in biological membranes of cells is carried out by free radical mechanism, a feature of which is the interaction of radicals with other molecules. In this work we investigated the antioxidant activity of cationic whey protein isolate, obtained by the cation-exchange chromatography on KM-cellulose from raw cow's milk, in vitro and in vivo. In biological liquids, which are milk, blood serum, fetal fluids, contains a complex of biologically active substances with a unique multifunctional properties, and which are carrying out a protective, antimicrobial, regenerating, antioxidant, immunomodulatory, regulatory and others functions. Contents of the isolate were determined electrophoretically and by its biological activity. Cationic whey protein isolate included lactoperoxidase, lactoferrin, pancreatic RNase, lysozyme and angeogenin. The given isolate significantly has an antioxidant effect in model experimental systems in vitro and therefore may be considered as a factor that can adjust the intensity of lipid oxidation. In model solutions products of lipid oxidation were obtained by oxidation of phosphatidylcholine by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of a source of iron. The composition of the reaction mixture: 0,4 mM H2O2; 50 mcM of hemin; 2 mg/ml L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine from soybean (Sigma, German). Lipid peroxidation products were formed during the incubation of the reaction mixture for two hours at 37 degrees C. In our studies rats in the adaptation period immediately after isolation from the nest obtained from food given orally native cationic whey protein isolate at the concentration three times higher than in fresh cow's milk. On the manifestation of the antioxidant activity of cationic whey protein isolate in vivo evidence decrease of lipid peroxidation products concentration in the blood of rats from the experimental group receipt whey protein isolate in dos 0,6 mg/g for more than 20% (pisolate has an antioxidant

  8. ULTRASTRUCTURAL CHANGES OF THE NEURONAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ULTRASTRUCTURAL CHANGES OF THE NEURONAL COMPONENT IN THE DETRUSOR MUSCLE FOLLOWING SACRAL ROOT STIMULATION OF DECENTRALIZED ... Early sacral root electric stimulation decreased the incidence of neuronal degeneration in decentralized detrusor muscle, together with improving the ...

  9. Osmosensation in vasopressin neurons: changing actin density to optimize function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prager-Khoutorsky, Masha; Bourque, Charles W

    2010-02-01

    The proportional relation between circulating vasopressin concentration and plasma osmolality is fundamental for body fluid homeostasis. Although changes in the sensitivity of this relation are associated with pathophysiological conditions, central mechanisms modulating osmoregulatory gain are unknown. Here, we review recent data that sheds important light on this process. The cell autonomous osmosensitivity of vasopressin neurons depends on cation channels comprising a variant of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel. Hyperosmotic activation is mediated by a mechanical process where sensitivity increases in proportion with actin filament density. Moreover, angiotensin II amplifies osmotic activation by a rapid stimulation of actin polymerization, suggesting that neurotransmitter-induced changes in cytoskeletal organization in osmosensory neurons can mediate central changes in osmoregulatory gain. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. TRPM7 is required within zebrafish sensory neurons for the activation of touch-evoked escape behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Sean E.; Amburgey, Kimberly; Horstick, Eric; Linsley, Jeremy; Sprague, Shawn M.; Cui, Wilson W.; Zhou, Weibin; Hirata, Hiromi; Saint-Amant, Louis; Hume, Richard I.; Kuwada, John Y.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding TRPM7 (trpm7), a member of the TRP superfamily of cation channels that possesses an enzymatically active kinase at its carboxyl terminus, cause the touch-unresponsive zebrafish mutant touchdown. We identified and characterized a new allele of touchdown, as well as two previously reported alleles, and found that all three alleles harbor mutations which abolish channel activity. Through the selective restoration of TRPM7 expression in sensory neurons we found that TRPM7’s kinase activity, and selectivity for divalent cations over monovalent cations, were dispensable for touch-evoked activation of escape behaviors in zebrafish. Additional characterization revealed that sensory neurons were present and capable of responding to tactile stimuli in touchdown mutants, indicating that TRPM7 is not required for sensory neuron survival or mechanosensation. Finally, exposure to elevated concentrations of divalent cations was found to restore touch-evoked behaviors in touchdown mutants. Collectively these findings are consistent with a role for zebrafish TRPM7 within sensory neurons in the modulation of neurotransmitter release at central synapses, similar to that proposed for mammalian TRPM7 at peripheral synapses. PMID:21832193

  11. Comparative analysis of cation/proton antiporter superfamily in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Chuyu [ORNL; Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Xia, Xinli [Beijing Forestry University, China; Yin, Weilun [Beijing Forestry University, China

    2013-01-01

    The cation/proton antiporter superfamily is associated with the transport of monovalent cations across membranes. This superfamily was annotated in the Arabidopsis genome and some members were functionally characterized. In the present study, a systematic analysis of the cation/proton antiporter genes in diverse plant specieswas reported.We identified 240 cation/proton antiporters in alga, moss, and angiosperm. A phylogenetic tree was constructed showing these 240members are separated into three families, i.e., Na+/H+ exchangers, K+ efflux antiporters, and cation/H+ exchangers. Our analysis revealed that tandem and/or segmental duplications contribute to the expansion of cation/H+ exchangers in the examined angiospermspecies. Sliding windowanalysis of the nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution ratios showed some differences in the evolutionary fate of cation/proton antiporter paralogs. Furthermore, we identified over-represented motifs among these 240 proteins and foundmostmotifs are family specific, demonstrating diverse evolution of the cation/proton antiporters among three families. In addition, we investigated the co-expressed genes of the cation/proton antiporters in Arabidopsis thaliana. The results showed some biological processes are enriched in the co-expressed genes, suggesting the cation/proton antiporters may be involved in these biological processes. Taken together, this study furthers our knowledge on cation/proton antiporters in plants.

  12. Noisy mean field game model for malware propagation in opportunistic networks

    KAUST Repository

    Tembine, Hamidou

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present analytical mean field techniques that can be used to better understand the behavior of malware propagation in opportunistic large networks. We develop a modeling methodology based on stochastic mean field optimal control that is able to capture many aspects of the problem, especially the impact of the control and heterogeneity of the system on the spreading characteristics of malware. The stochastic large process characterizing the evolution of the total number of infected nodes is examined with a noisy mean field limit and compared to a deterministic one. The stochastic nature of the wireless environment make stochastic approaches more realistic for such types of networks. By introducing control strategies, we show that the fraction of infected nodes can be maintained below some threshold. In contrast to most of the existing results on mean field propagation models which focus on deterministic equations, we show that the mean field limit is stochastic if the second moment of the number of object transitions per time slot is unbounded with the size of the system. This allows us to compare one path of the fraction of infected nodes with the stochastic trajectory of its mean field limit. In order to take into account the heterogeneity of opportunistic networks, the analysis is extended to multiple types of nodes. Our numerical results show that the heterogeneity can help to stabilize the system. We verify the results through simulation showing how to obtain useful approximations in the case of very large systems. © 2012 ICST Institute for Computer Science, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering.

  13. Noisy Galvanic Stimulation Improves Roll-Tilt Vestibular Perception in Healthy Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aram Keywan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available It has recently been demonstrated that noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation (nGVS delivered as imperceptible white noise can improve balance control via the induction of stochastic resonance. However, it is unclear whether these balance improvements are accompanied by simultaneous enhancement to vestibular motion perception. In this study, 15 healthy subjects performed 8 quiet-stance tasks on foam with eyes closed at 8 different nGVS amplitudes ranging from 0 mA (baseline to 0.5 mA. The nGVS amplitude that improved balance performance most compared to baseline was assigned as the optimal nGVS amplitude. Optimal nGVS amplitudes could be determined for 13 out of 15 subjects, who were included in the subsequent experimental procedures. The effect of nGVS delivered at the determined optimal intensity on vestibular perceptual thresholds was examined using direction-recognition tasks on a motion platform, testing roll rotations at 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 Hz, both with active and sham nGVS stimulations. nGVS significantly reduced direction-recognition thresholds compared to the sham condition at 0.5 and 1.0 Hz, while no significant effect of nGVS was found at 0.2 Hz. Interestingly, no correlation was found between nGVS-induced improvements in balance control and vestibular motion perception at 0.5 and 1 Hz, which may suggest different mechanisms by which nGVS affects both modalities. For the first time, we show that nGVS can enhance roll vestibular motion perception. The outcomes of this study are likely to be relevant for the potential therapeutic use of nGVS in patients with balance problems.

  14. Noisy Galvanic Stimulation Improves Roll-Tilt Vestibular Perception in Healthy Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keywan, Aram; Wuehr, Max; Pradhan, Cauchy; Jahn, Klaus

    2018-01-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation (nGVS) delivered as imperceptible white noise can improve balance control via the induction of stochastic resonance. However, it is unclear whether these balance improvements are accompanied by simultaneous enhancement to vestibular motion perception. In this study, 15 healthy subjects performed 8 quiet-stance tasks on foam with eyes closed at 8 different nGVS amplitudes ranging from 0 mA (baseline) to 0.5 mA. The nGVS amplitude that improved balance performance most compared to baseline was assigned as the optimal nGVS amplitude. Optimal nGVS amplitudes could be determined for 13 out of 15 subjects, who were included in the subsequent experimental procedures. The effect of nGVS delivered at the determined optimal intensity on vestibular perceptual thresholds was examined using direction-recognition tasks on a motion platform, testing roll rotations at 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 Hz, both with active and sham nGVS stimulations. nGVS significantly reduced direction-recognition thresholds compared to the sham condition at 0.5 and 1.0 Hz, while no significant effect of nGVS was found at 0.2 Hz. Interestingly, no correlation was found between nGVS-induced improvements in balance control and vestibular motion perception at 0.5 and 1 Hz, which may suggest different mechanisms by which nGVS affects both modalities. For the first time, we show that nGVS can enhance roll vestibular motion perception. The outcomes of this study are likely to be relevant for the potential therapeutic use of nGVS in patients with balance problems.

  15. Computational Phenotype Discovery Using Unsupervised Feature Learning over Noisy, Sparse, and Irregular Clinical Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasko, Thomas A.; Denny, Joshua C.; Levy, Mia A.

    2013-01-01

    Inferring precise phenotypic patterns from population-scale clinical data is a core computational task in the development of precision, personalized medicine. The traditional approach uses supervised learning, in which an expert designates which patterns to look for (by specifying the learning task and the class labels), and where to look for them (by specifying the input variables). While appropriate for individual tasks, this approach scales poorly and misses the patterns that we don’t think to look for. Unsupervised feature learning overcomes these limitations by identifying patterns (or features) that collectively form a compact and expressive representation of the source data, with no need for expert input or labeled examples. Its rising popularity is driven by new deep learning methods, which have produced high-profile successes on difficult standardized problems of object recognition in images. Here we introduce its use for phenotype discovery in clinical data. This use is challenging because the largest source of clinical data – Electronic Medical Records – typically contains noisy, sparse, and irregularly timed observations, rendering them poor substrates for deep learning methods. Our approach couples dirty clinical data to deep learning architecture via longitudinal probability densities inferred using Gaussian process regression. From episodic, longitudinal sequences of serum uric acid measurements in 4368 individuals we produced continuous phenotypic features that suggest multiple population subtypes, and that accurately distinguished (0.97 AUC) the uric-acid signatures of gout vs. acute leukemia despite not being optimized for the task. The unsupervised features were as accurate as gold-standard features engineered by an expert with complete knowledge of the domain, the classification task, and the class labels. Our findings demonstrate the potential for achieving computational phenotype discovery at population scale. We expect such data

  16. Equilibrium and stochastic resonance in finite chains of noisy bistable elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morillo, Manuel; Gomez-Ordonez, Jose; Casado, Jose Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Graphical abstract: We analyze the dependence of the equilibrium distribution of a collective variable of a chain on relevant parameters including the chain size and its connectivity. We also analyze the stochastic resonance effect of the same variable. - Abstract: Using numerical simulations, we analyze equilibrium properties of finite chains of coupled noisy bistable units and their response to weak time periodic forces. Finite chains with global as well as local (nearest neighbors) coupling are considered. We focus on the study of a collective variable defined as the arithmetic mean of the variables characterizing each element of the chain. By contrast with the case of infinite size chains, where the coexistence of several equilibrium distributions for the same values of parameters is possible, for finite chains just a single equilibrium distribution exists for given values of the parameters. We demonstrate that, regardless of the chain connectivity, there exist transition lines separating regions in parameter space where the equilibrium distribution function is either monomodal or multimodal. The location of the transition line depends on the chain connectivity and the size of the system. For driven chains, the response of the system shows stochastic resonant effects. For the two types of chains considered, both the power spectral amplification and the signal-to-noise ratio of the collective variable are analyzed as the noise strength, the coupling parameter and the number of bistable units in the system are varied. Compared with the effects observed in single unit systems, the collective variable shows a strong enhancement of the stochastic resonance effects.

  17. Computational phenotype discovery using unsupervised feature learning over noisy, sparse, and irregular clinical data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Lasko

    Full Text Available Inferring precise phenotypic patterns from population-scale clinical data is a core computational task in the development of precision, personalized medicine. The traditional approach uses supervised learning, in which an expert designates which patterns to look for (by specifying the learning task and the class labels, and where to look for them (by specifying the input variables. While appropriate for individual tasks, this approach scales poorly and misses the patterns that we don't think to look for. Unsupervised feature learning overcomes these limitations by identifying patterns (or features that collectively form a compact and expressive representation of the source data, with no need for expert input or labeled examples. Its rising popularity is driven by new deep learning methods, which have produced high-profile successes on difficult standardized problems of object recognition in images. Here we introduce its use for phenotype discovery in clinical data. This use is challenging because the largest source of clinical data - Electronic Medical Records - typically contains noisy, sparse, and irregularly timed observations, rendering them poor substrates for deep learning methods. Our approach couples dirty clinical data to deep learning architecture via longitudinal probability densities inferred using Gaussian process regression. From episodic, longitudinal sequences of serum uric acid measurements in 4368 individuals we produced continuous phenotypic features that suggest multiple population subtypes, and that accurately distinguished (0.97 AUC the uric-acid signatures of gout vs. acute leukemia despite not being optimized for the task. The unsupervised features were as accurate as gold-standard features engineered by an expert with complete knowledge of the domain, the classification task, and the class labels. Our findings demonstrate the potential for achieving computational phenotype discovery at population scale. We expect such

  18. Computational phenotype discovery using unsupervised feature learning over noisy, sparse, and irregular clinical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasko, Thomas A; Denny, Joshua C; Levy, Mia A

    2013-01-01

    Inferring precise phenotypic patterns from population-scale clinical data is a core computational task in the development of precision, personalized medicine. The traditional approach uses supervised learning, in which an expert designates which patterns to look for (by specifying the learning task and the class labels), and where to look for them (by specifying the input variables). While appropriate for individual tasks, this approach scales poorly and misses the patterns that we don't think to look for. Unsupervised feature learning overcomes these limitations by identifying patterns (or features) that collectively form a compact and expressive representation of the source data, with no need for expert input or labeled examples. Its rising popularity is driven by new deep learning methods, which have produced high-profile successes on difficult standardized problems of object recognition in images. Here we introduce its use for phenotype discovery in clinical data. This use is challenging because the largest source of clinical data - Electronic Medical Records - typically contains noisy, sparse, and irregularly timed observations, rendering them poor substrates for deep learning methods. Our approach couples dirty clinical data to deep learning architecture via longitudinal probability densities inferred using Gaussian process regression. From episodic, longitudinal sequences of serum uric acid measurements in 4368 individuals we produced continuous phenotypic features that suggest multiple population subtypes, and that accurately distinguished (0.97 AUC) the uric-acid signatures of gout vs. acute leukemia despite not being optimized for the task. The unsupervised features were as accurate as gold-standard features engineered by an expert with complete knowledge of the domain, the classification task, and the class labels. Our findings demonstrate the potential for achieving computational phenotype discovery at population scale. We expect such data

  19. Quality optimization of H.264/AVC video transmission over noisy environments using a sparse regression framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandremmenou, K.; Tziortziotis, N.; Paluri, S.; Zhang, W.; Blekas, K.; Kondi, L. P.; Kumar, S.

    2015-03-01

    We propose the use of the Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO) regression method in order to predict the Cumulative Mean Squared Error (CMSE), incurred by the loss of individual slices in video transmission. We extract a number of quality-relevant features from the H.264/AVC video sequences, which are given as input to the LASSO. This method has the benefit of not only keeping a subset of the features that have the strongest effects towards video quality, but also produces accurate CMSE predictions. Particularly, we study the LASSO regression through two different architectures; the Global LASSO (G.LASSO) and Local LASSO (L.LASSO). In G.LASSO, a single regression model is trained for all slice types together, while in L.LASSO, motivated by the fact that the values for some features are closely dependent on the considered slice type, each slice type has its own regression model, in an e ort to improve LASSO's prediction capability. Based on the predicted CMSE values, we group the video slices into four priority classes. Additionally, we consider a video transmission scenario over a noisy channel, where Unequal Error Protection (UEP) is applied to all prioritized slices. The provided results demonstrate the efficiency of LASSO in estimating CMSE with high accuracy, using only a few features. les that typically contain high-entropy data, producing a footprint that is far less conspicuous than existing methods. The system uses a local web server to provide a le system, user interface and applications through an web architecture.

  20. Contributions of intrinsic motor neuron properties to the production of rhythmic motor output in the mammalian spinal cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiehn, O; Kjaerulff, O; Tresch, M C

    2000-01-01

    showing that the neonatal rat spinal cord can produce a stable motor rhythm in the absence of spike activity in premotor interneuronal networks. These coordinated motor neuron oscillations are dependent on NMDA-evoked pacemaker properties, which are synchronized across gap junctions. We discuss...... the functional relevance for such coordinated oscillations in immature and mature spinal motor systems.......Motor neurons are endowed with intrinsic and conditional membrane properties that may shape the final motor output. In the first half of this paper we present data on the contribution of I(h), a hyperpolarization-activated inward cation current, to phase-transition in motor neurons during rhythmic...

  1. Neuronal survival in the brain: neuron type-specific mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfisterer, Ulrich Gottfried; Khodosevich, Konstantin

    2017-01-01

    Neurogenic regions of mammalian brain produce many more neurons that will eventually survive and reach a mature stage. Developmental cell death affects both embryonically produced immature neurons and those immature neurons that are generated in regions of adult neurogenesis. Removal of substantial...... for survival in a certain brain region. This review focuses on how immature neurons survive during normal and impaired brain development, both in the embryonic/neonatal brain and in brain regions associated with adult neurogenesis, and emphasizes neuron type-specific mechanisms that help to survive for various...

  2. Neuronal substrate of eating disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Timofeeva, Elena; Calvez, Juliane

    2014-01-01

    Eating disorders are devastating and life-threatening psychiatric diseases. Although clinical and experimental investigations have significantly progressed in discovering the neuronal causes of eating disorders, the exact neuronal and molecular mechanisms of the development and maintenance of these pathologies are not fully understood. The complexity of the neuronal substrate of eating disorders hampers progress in revealing the precise mechanisms. The present re...

  3. Cultures of Cerebellar Granule Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Parizad M. Bilimoria and Azad Bonni1 Corresponding author ([]()) ### INTRODUCTION Primary cultures of granule neurons from the post-natal rat cerebellum provide an excellent model system for molecular and cell biological studies of neuronal development and function. The cerebellar cortex, with its highly organized structure and few neuronal subtypes, offers a well-characterized neural circuitry. Many fundamental insight...

  4. Motor neuron disease in blacks

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1989-08-19

    Aug 19, 1989 ... We reported earlier that motor neuron disease occurs more commonly among blacks than Parkinson's disease, which is relatively rare in this race group.! The hypothesis that these conditions, and other neuronal abiotrophies, are the result of previous subclinical neuronal insult and subsequent age-related.

  5. Cationic niosomes an effective gene carrier composed of novel spermine-derivative cationic lipids: effect of central core structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opanasopit, Praneet; Leksantikul, Lalita; Niyomtham, Nattisa; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Yingyongnarongkul, Boon-Ek

    2017-05-01

    Cationic niosomes formulated from Span 20, cholesterol (Chol) and novel spermine-based cationic lipids of multiple central core structures (di(oxyethyl)amino, di(oxyethyl)amino carboxy, 3-amino-1,2-dioxypropyl and 2-amino-1,3-dioxypropyl) were successfully prepared for improving transfection efficiency in vitro. The niosomes composed of spermine cationic lipid with central core structure of di(oxyethyl)amino revealed the highest gene transfection efficiency. To investigate the factors affecting gene transfection and cell viability including differences in the central core structures of cationic lipids, the composition of vesicles, molar ratio of cationic lipids in formulations and the weight ratio of niosomes to DNA. Cationic niosomes composed of nonionic surfactants (Span20), cholesterol and spermine-based cationic lipids of multiple central core structures were formulated. Gene transfection and cell viability were evaluated on a human cervical carcinoma cell line (HeLa cells) using pDNA encoding green fluorescent protein (pEGFP-C2). The morphology, size and charge were also characterized. High transfection efficiency was obtained from cationic niosomes composed of Span20:Chol:cationic lipid at the molar ratio of 2.5:2.5:0.5 mM. Cationic lipids with di(oxyethyl)amino as a central core structure exhibited highest transfection efficiency. In addition, there was also no serum effect on transfection efficiency. These novel cationic niosomes may constitute a good alternative carrier for gene transfection.

  6. The neuronal control of cardiac functions in Molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodirov, Sodikdjon A

    2011-10-01

    In this manuscript, I review the current and relevant classical studies on properties of the Mollusca heart and their central nervous system including ganglia, neurons, and nerves involved in cardiomodulation. Similar to mammalian brain hemispheres, these invertebrates possess symmetrical pairs of ganglia albeit visceral (only one) ganglion and the parietal ganglia (the right ganglion is bigger than the left one). Furthermore, there are two major regulatory drives into the compartments (pericard, auricle, and ventricle) and cardiomyocytes of the heart. These are the excitatory and inhibitory signals that originate from a few designated neurons and their putative neurotransmitters. Many of these neurons are well-identified, their specific locations within the corresponding ganglion are mapped, and some are termed as either heart excitatory (HE) or inhibitory (HI) cells. The remaining neurons are classified as cardio-regulatory, and their direct and indirect actions on the heart's function have been documented. The cardiovascular anatomy of frequently used experimental animals, Achatina, Aplysia, Helix, and Lymnaea is relatively simple. However, as in humans, it possesses all major components including even trabeculae and atrio-ventricular valves. Since the myocardial cells are enzymatically dispersible, multiple voltage dependent cationic currents in isolated cardiomyocytes are described. The latter include at least the A-type K(+), delayed rectifier K(+), TTX-sensitive Na(+), and L-type Ca(2+) channels. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. The neuronal control of cardiac functions in Molluscs☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodirov, Sodikdjon A.

    2017-01-01

    In this manuscript, I review the current and relevant classical studies on properties of the Mollusca heart and their central nervous system including ganglia, neurons, and nerves involved in cardiomodulation. Similar to mammalian brain hemispheres, these invertebrates possess symmetrical pairs of ganglia albeit visceral (only one) ganglion and the parietal ganglia (the right ganglion is bigger than the left one). Furthermore, there are two major regulatory drives into the compartments (pericard, auricle, and ventricle) and cardiomyocytes of the heart. These are the excitatory and inhibitory signals that originate from a few designated neurons and their putative neurotransmitters. Many of these neurons are well-identified, their specific locations within the corresponding ganglion are mapped, and some are termed as either heart excitatory (HE) or inhibitory (HI) cells. The remaining neurons are classified as cardio-regulatory, and their direct and indirect actions on the heart’s function have been documented. The cardiovascular anatomy of frequently used experimental animals, Achatina, Aplysia, Helix, and Lymnaea is relatively simple. However, as in humans, it possesses all major components including even trabeculae and atrio-ventricular valves. Since the myocardial cells are enzymatically dispersible, multiple voltage dependent cationic currents in isolated cardiomyocytes are described. The latter include at least the A-type K+, delayed rectifier K+, TTX-sensitive Na+, and L-type Ca2+ channels. PMID:21736949

  8. Complex Macromolecular Architectures by Living Cationic Polymerization

    KAUST Repository

    Alghamdi, Reem D.

    2015-05-01

    Poly (vinyl ether)-based graft polymers have been synthesized by the combination of living cationic polymerization of vinyl ethers with other living or controlled/ living polymerization techniques (anionic and ATRP). The process involves the synthesis of well-defined homopolymers (PnBVE) and co/terpolymers [PnBVE-b-PCEVE-b-PSiDEGVE (ABC type) and PSiDEGVE-b-PnBVE-b-PSiDEGVE (CAC type)] by sequential living cationic polymerization of n-butyl vinyl ether (nBVE), 2-chloroethyl vinyl ether (CEVE) and tert-butyldimethylsilyl ethylene glycol vinyl ether (SiDEGVE), using mono-functional {[n-butoxyethyl acetate (nBEA)], [1-(2-chloroethoxy) ethyl acetate (CEEA)], [1-(2-(2-(t-butyldimethylsilyloxy)ethoxy) ethoxy) ethyl acetate (SiDEGEA)]} or di-functional [1,4-cyclohexanedimethanol di(1-ethyl acetate) (cHMDEA), (VEMOA)] initiators. The living cationic polymerizations of those monomers were conducted in hexane at -20 0C using Et3Al2Cl3 (catalyst) in the presence of 1 M AcOEt base.[1] The PCEVE segments of the synthesized block terpolymers were then used to react with living macroanions (PS-DPE-Li; poly styrene diphenyl ethylene lithium) to afford graft polymers. The quantitative desilylation of PSiDEGVE segments by n-Bu4N+F- in THF at 0 °C led to graft co- and terpolymers in which the polyalcohol is the outer block. These co-/terpolymers were subsequently subjected to “grafting-from” reactions by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of styrene to afford more complex macromolecular architectures. The base assisted living cationic polymerization of vinyl ethers were also used to synthesize well-defined α-hydroxyl polyvinylether (PnBVE-OH). The resulting polymers were then modified into an ATRP macro-initiator for the synthesis of well-defined block copolymers (PnBVE-b-PS). Bifunctional PnBVE with terminal malonate groups was also synthesized and used as a precursor for more complex architectures such as H-shaped block copolymer by “grafting-from” or

  9. Complexes of natural carbohydrates with metal cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, Yurii E; Garnovskii, Alexander D; Zhdanov, Yu A

    1998-01-01

    Data on the interaction of natural carbohydrates (mono-, oligo-, and poly-saccharides, amino sugars, and natural organic acids of carbohydrate origin) with metal cations are surveyed and described systematically. The structural diversity of carbohydrate metal complexes, caused by some specific features of carbohydrates as ligands, is demonstrated. The influence of complex formation on the chemical properties of carbohydrates is discussed. It is shown that the formation of metal complexes plays an important role in the configurational and conformational analysis of carbohydrates. The practical significance of the coordination interaction in the series of carbohydrate ligands is demonstrated. The bibliography includes 571 references.

  10. Homogeneous cation exchange membrane by radiation grafting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolhe, Shailesh M.; G, Agathian; Ashok Kumar

    2001-01-01

    Preparation of a strong cation exchange membrane by radiation grafting of styrene on to polyethylene (LDPE) film by mutual irradiation technique in the presence of air followed by sulfonation is described. The grafting has been carried out in the presence of air and without any additive. Low dose rate has been seen to facilitate the grafting. Further higher the grafting percentage more is the exchange capacity. The addition of a swelling agent during the sulfonation helped in achieving the high exchange capacity. The TGA-MASS analysis confirmed the grafting and the sulfonation. (author)

  11. Abnormal expression of cerebrospinal fluid cation chloride cotransporters in patients with Rett syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Temudo Duarte

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Rett Syndrome is a progressive neurodevelopmental disorder caused mainly by mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2. The relevance of MeCP2 for GABAergic function was previously documented in animal models. In these models, animals show deficits in brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of this disease. Neuronal Cation Chloride Cotransporters (CCCs play a key role in GABAergic neuronal maturation, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor is implicated in the regulation of CCCs expression during development. Our aim was to analyse the expression of two relevant CCCs, NKCC1 and KCC2, in the cerebrospinal fluid of Rett syndrome patients and compare it with a normal control group. METHODS: The presence of bumetanide sensitive NKCC1 and KCC2 was analysed in cerebrospinal fluid samples from a control pediatric population (1 day to 14 years of life and from Rett syndrome patients (2 to 19 years of life, by immunoblot analysis. RESULTS: Both proteins were detected in the cerebrospinal fluid and their levels are higher in the early postnatal period. However, Rett syndrome patients showed significantly reduced levels of KCC2 and KCC2/NKCC1 ratio when compared to the control group. CONCLUSIONS: Reduced KCC2/NKCC1 ratio in the cerebrospinal fluid of Rett Syndrome patients suggests a disturbed process of GABAergic neuronal maturation and open up a new therapeutic perspective.

  12. Modeling glial contributions to seizures and epileptogenesis: cation-chloride cotransporters in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeid M Rusan

    Full Text Available Flies carrying a kcc loss-of-function mutation are more seizure-susceptible than wild-type flies. The kcc gene is the highly conserved Drosophila melanogaster ortholog of K+/Cl- cotransporter genes thought to be expressed in all animal cell types. Here, we examined the spatial and temporal requirements for kcc loss-of-function to modify seizure-susceptibility in flies. Targeted RNA interference (RNAi of kcc in various sets of neurons was sufficient to induce severe seizure-sensitivity. Interestingly, kcc RNAi in glia was particularly effective in causing seizure-sensitivity. Knockdown of kcc in glia or neurons during development caused a reduction in seizure induction threshold, cell swelling, and brain volume increase in 24-48 hour old adult flies. Third instar larval peripheral nerves were enlarged when kcc RNAi was expressed in neurons or glia. Results suggest that a threshold of K+/Cl- cotransport dysfunction in the nervous system during development is an important determinant of seizure-susceptibility in Drosophila. The findings presented are the first attributing a causative role for glial cation-chloride cotransporters in seizures and epileptogenesis. The importance of elucidating glial cell contributions to seizure disorders and the utility of Drosophila models is discussed.

  13. Tinbergen on mirror neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Heyes, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Fifty years ago, Niko Tinbergen defined the scope of behavioural biology with his four problems: causation, ontogeny, survival value and evolution. About 20 years ago, there was another highly significant development in behavioural biology—the discovery of mirror neurons (MNs). Here, I use Tinbergen's original four problems (rather than the list that appears in textbooks) to highlight the differences between two prominent accounts of MNs, the genetic and associative accounts; to suggest that ...

  14. Blueberries and neuronal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukitt-Hale, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    As the population of people in the United States over the age of 65 years continues to increase, so too will the incidence of age-related pathologies, including decreases in cognitive and motor function. In cases of severe deficits in memory or motor function, hospitalization and/or custodial care would be a likely outcome. This means that unless some way is found to reduce these age-related decrements in neuronal function, health care costs will continue to rise exponentially. Evidence is accumulating that consumption of blueberries may be one strategy to forestall or even reverse age-related neuronal deficits, as well as their subsequent behavioral manifestations, in order to increase healthy aging. Research suggests that the polyphenolic compounds found in blueberries exert their beneficial effects either through their ability to lower oxidative stress and inflammation or directly by altering the signaling involved in neuronal communication. These interventions, in turn, may protect against age-related deficits in cognitive and motor function. Appropriately, the US Department of Agriculture has figured prominently in these discoveries, through the efforts of two USDA researchers who worked for the department 100 years apart. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Efficient transmission of subthreshold signals in complex networks of spiking neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquin J Torres

    Full Text Available We investigate the efficient transmission and processing of weak, subthreshold signals in a realistic neural medium in the presence of different levels of the underlying noise. Assuming Hebbian weights for maximal synaptic conductances--that naturally balances the network with excitatory and inhibitory synapses--and considering short-term synaptic plasticity affecting such conductances, we found different dynamic phases in the system. This includes a memory phase where population of neurons remain synchronized, an oscillatory phase where transitions between different synchronized populations of neurons appears and an asynchronous or noisy phase. When a weak stimulus input is applied to each neuron, increasing the level of noise in the medium we found an efficient transmission of such stimuli around the transition and critical points separating different phases for well-defined different levels of stochasticity in the system. We proved that this intriguing phenomenon is quite robust, as it occurs in different situations including several types of synaptic plasticity, different type and number of stored patterns and diverse network topologies, namely, diluted networks and complex topologies such as scale-free and small-world networks. We conclude that the robustness of the phenomenon in different realistic scenarios, including spiking neurons, short-term synaptic plasticity and complex networks topologies, make very likely that it could also occur in actual neural systems as recent psycho-physical experiments suggest.

  16. Noise and Synchronization Analysis of the Cold-Receptor Neuronal Network Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Du

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the dynamics of the cold receptor neural network model. First, it examines noise effects on neuronal stimulus in the model. From ISI plots, it is shown that there are considerable differences between purely deterministic simulations and noisy ones. The ISI-distance is used to measure the noise effects on spike trains quantitatively. It is found that spike trains observed in neural models can be more strongly affected by noise for different temperatures in some aspects; meanwhile, spike train has greater variability with the noise intensity increasing. The synchronization of neuronal network with different connectivity patterns is also studied. It is shown that chaotic and high period patterns are more difficult to get complete synchronization than the situation in single spike and low period patterns. The neuronal network will exhibit various patterns of firing synchronization by varying some key parameters such as the coupling strength. Different types of firing synchronization are diagnosed by a correlation coefficient and the ISI-distance method. The simulations show that the synchronization status of neurons is related to the network connectivity patterns.

  17. Learning grammar rules of building parts from precise models and noisy observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehbi, Y.; Plümer, L.

    The automatic interpretation of dense three-dimensional (3D) point clouds is still an open research problem. The quality and usability of the derived models depend to a large degree on the availability of highly structured models which represent semantics explicitly and provide a priori knowledge to the interpretation process. The usage of formal grammars for modelling man-made objects has gained increasing interest in the last few years. In order to cope with the variety and complexity of buildings, a large number of fairly sophisticated grammar rules are needed. As yet, such rules mostly have to be designed by human experts. This article describes a novel approach to machine learning of attribute grammar rules based on the Inductive Logic Programming paradigm. Apart from syntactic differences, logic programs and attribute grammars are basically the same language. Attribute grammars extend context-free grammars by attributes and semantic rules and provide a much larger expressive power. Our approach to derive attribute grammars is able to deal with two kinds of input data. On the one hand, we show how attribute grammars can be derived from precise descriptions in the form of examples provided by a human user as the teacher. On the other hand, we present the acquisition of models from noisy observations such as 3D point clouds. This includes the learning of geometric and topological constraints by taking measurement errors into account. The feasibility of our approach is proven exemplarily by stairs, and a generic framework for learning other building parts is discussed. Stairs aggregate an arbitrary number of steps in a manner which is specified by topological and geometric constraints and can be modelled in a recursive way. Due to this recursion, they pose a special challenge to machine learning. In order to learn the concept of stairs, only a small number of examples were required. Our approach represents and addresses the quality of the given observations and

  18. A Bayesian approach to solve proton stopping powers from noisy multi-energy CT data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalonde, Arthur; Bär, Esther; Bouchard, Hugo

    2017-10-01

    SPR using up to five energy bins. In terms of range prediction, Bayesian ETD with four energy bins in realistic conditions reduces proton beam range uncertainties by a factor of up to 1.5 compared to ρ e  - Z. The Bayesian ETD is shown to be more robust against noise than similar methods and a promising approach to extract SPR from noisy DECT data. In the advent of commercially available multi-energy CT or photon-counting CT scanners, the Bayesian ETD is expected to allow extracting more information and improve the precision of proton therapy beyond DECT. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  19. Contributions of intrinsic motor neuron properties to the production of rhythmic motor output in the mammalian spinal cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiehn, O; Kjaerulff, O; Tresch, M C

    2000-01-01

    Motor neurons are endowed with intrinsic and conditional membrane properties that may shape the final motor output. In the first half of this paper we present data on the contribution of I(h), a hyperpolarization-activated inward cation current, to phase-transition in motor neurons during rhythmic...... firing. Motor neurons were recorded intracellularly during locomotion induced with a mixture of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and serotonin, after pharmacological blockade of I(h). I(h) was then replaced by using dynamic clamp, a computer program that allows artificial conductances to be inserted into real...... neurons. I(h) was simulated with biophysical parameters determined in voltage clamp experiments. The data showed that electronic replacement of the native I(h) caused a depolarization of the average membrane potential, a phase-advance of the locomotor drive potential, and increased motor neuron spiking...

  20. Alkali Metal Cation versus Proton and Methyl Cation Affinities: Structure and Bonding Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughlala, Zakaria; Fonseca Guerra, Célia; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2016-06-01

    We have analyzed the structure and bonding of gas-phase Cl-X and [HCl-X](+) complexes for X(+)= H(+), CH3 (+), Li(+), and Na(+), using relativistic density functional theory (DFT). We wish to establish a quantitative trend in affinities of the anionic and neutral Lewis bases Cl(-) and HCl for the various cations. The Cl-X bond becomes longer and weaker along X(+) = H(+), CH3 (+), Li(+), and Na(+). Our main purpose is to understand the heterolytic bonding mechanism behind the intrinsic (i.e., in the absence of solvent) alkali metal cation affinities (AMCA) and how this compares with and differs from those of the proton affinity (PA) and methyl cation affinity (MCA). Our analyses are based on Kohn-Sham molecular orbital (KS-MO) theory in combination with a quantitative energy decomposition analysis (EDA) that pinpoints the importance of the different features in the bonding mechanism. Orbital overlap appears to play an important role in determining the trend in cation affinities.

  1. Transglial transmission at the dorsal root ganglion sandwich synapse: glial cell to postsynaptic neuron communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanski, Gabriela M; Li, Qi; Stanley, Elise F

    2013-04-01

    The dorsal root ganglion (DRG) contains a subset of closely-apposed neuronal somata (NS) separated solely by a thin satellite glial cell (SGC) membrane septum to form an NS-glial cell-NS trimer. We recently reported that stimulation of one NS with an impulse train triggers a delayed, noisy and long-lasting response in its NS pair via a transglial signaling pathway that we term a 'sandwich synapse' (SS). Transmission could be unidirectional or bidirectional and facilitated in response to a second stimulus train. We have shown that in chick or rat SS the NS-to-SGC leg of the two-synapse pathway is purinergic via P2Y2 receptors but the second SGC-to-NS synapse mechanism remained unknown. A noisy evoked current in the target neuron, a reversal potential close to 0 mV, and insensitivity to calcium scavengers or G protein block favored an ionotropic postsynaptic receptor. Selective block by D-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate (AP5) implicated glutamatergic transmission via N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors. This agent also blocked NS responses evoked by puff of UTP, a P2Y2 agonist, directly onto the SGC cell, confirming its action at the second synapse of the SS transmission pathway. The N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor NR2B subunit was implicated by block of transmission with ifenprodil and by its immunocytochemical localization to the NS membrane, abutting the glial septum P2Y2 receptor. Isolated DRG cell clusters exhibited daisy-chain and branching NS-glial cell-NS contacts, suggestive of a network organization within the ganglion. The identification of the glial-to-neuron transmitter and receptor combination provides further support for transglial transmission and completes the DRG SS molecular transmission pathway. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Cationic Antimicrobial Polymers and Their Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana Maria; de Melo Carrasco, Letícia Dias

    2013-01-01

    Cationic compounds are promising candidates for development of antimicrobial agents. Positive charges attached to surfaces, particles, polymers, peptides or bilayers have been used as antimicrobial agents by themselves or in sophisticated formulations. The main positively charged moieties in these natural or synthetic structures are quaternary ammonium groups, resulting in quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs). The advantage of amphiphilic cationic polymers when compared to small amphiphilic molecules is their enhanced microbicidal activity. Besides, many of these polymeric structures also show low toxicity to human cells; a major requirement for biomedical applications. Determination of the specific elements in polymers, which affect their antimicrobial activity, has been previously difficult due to broad molecular weight distributions and random sequences characteristic of radical polymerization. With the advances in polymerization control, selection of well defined polymers and structures are allowing greater insight into their structure-antimicrobial activity relationship. On the other hand, antimicrobial polymers grafted or self-assembled to inert or non inert vehicles can yield hybrid antimicrobial nanostructures or films, which can act as antimicrobials by themselves or deliver bioactive molecules for a variety of applications, such as wound dressing, photodynamic antimicrobial therapy, food packing and preservation and antifouling applications. PMID:23665898

  3. Cobalt 60 cation exchange with mexican clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nava Galve, R.G.

    1993-01-01

    Mexican clays can be used to remove radioactive elements from contaminated aqueous solutions. Cation exchange experiments were performed with 60 Co radioactive solution. In the present work the effect of contact time on the sorption of Co 2+ was studied. The contact time in hydrated montmorillonite was from 5 to 120 minutes and in dehydrated montmorillonite 5 to 1400 minutes. The Co 2+ uptake value was, in hydrated montmorillonite, between 0.3 to 0.85 m eq/g and in dehydrated montmorillonite, between 0.6 to 1.40 m eq/g. The experiments were done in a pH 5.1 to 5.7 and normal conditions. XRD patterns were used to characterize the samples. The crystallinity was determined by X-ray Diffraction and it was maintained before and after the cation exchange. DTA thermo grams showed the temperatures of the lost humidity and crystallization water. Finally, was observed that dehydrated montmorillonite adsorb more cobalt than hydrated montmorillonite. (Author)

  4. Cationic Antimicrobial Polymers and Their Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Carmona-Ribeiro

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cationic compounds are promising candidates for development of antimicrobial agents. Positive charges attached to surfaces, particles, polymers, peptides or bilayers have been used as antimicrobial agents by themselves or in sophisticated formulations. The main positively charged moieties in these natural or synthetic structures are quaternary ammonium groups, resulting in quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs. The advantage of amphiphilic cationic polymers when compared to small amphiphilic molecules is their enhanced microbicidal activity. Besides, many of these polymeric structures also show low toxicity to human cells; a major requirement for biomedical applications. Determination of the specific elements in polymers, which affect their antimicrobial activity, has been previously difficult due to broad molecular weight distributions and random sequences characteristic of radical polymerization. With the advances in polymerization control, selection of well defined polymers and structures are allowing greater insight into their structure-antimicrobial activity relationship. On the other hand, antimicrobial polymers grafted or self-assembled to inert or non inert vehicles can yield hybrid antimicrobial nanostructures or films, which can act as antimicrobials by themselves or deliver bioactive molecules for a variety of applications, such as wound dressing, photodynamic antimicrobial therapy, food packing and preservation and antifouling applications.

  5. Accuracy of Mobile-Based Audiometry in the Evaluation of Hearing Loss in Quiet and Noisy Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliba, Joe; Al-Reefi, Mahmoud; Carriere, Junie S; Verma, Neil; Provencal, Christiane; Rappaport, Jamie M

    2017-04-01

    Objectives (1) To compare the accuracy of 2 previously validated mobile-based hearing tests in determining pure tone thresholds and screening for hearing loss. (2) To determine the accuracy of mobile audiometry in noisy environments through noise reduction strategies. Study Design Prospective clinical study. Setting Tertiary hospital. Subjects and Methods Thirty-three adults with or without hearing loss were tested (mean age, 49.7 years; women, 42.4%). Air conduction thresholds measured as pure tone average and at individual frequencies were assessed by conventional audiogram and by 2 audiometric applications (consumer and professional) on a tablet device. Mobile audiometry was performed in a quiet sound booth and in a noisy sound booth (50 dB of background noise) through active and passive noise reduction strategies. Results On average, 91.1% (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 89.1%-93.2%) and 95.8% (95% CI, 93.5%-97.1%) of the threshold values obtained in a quiet sound booth with the consumer and professional applications, respectively, were within 10 dB of the corresponding audiogram thresholds, as compared with 86.5% (95% CI, 82.6%-88.5%) and 91.3% (95% CI, 88.5%-92.8%) in a noisy sound booth through noise cancellation. When screening for at least moderate hearing loss (pure tone average >40 dB HL), the consumer application showed a sensitivity and specificity of 87.5% and 95.9%, respectively, and the professional application, 100% and 95.9%. Overall, patients preferred mobile audiometry over conventional audiograms. Conclusion Mobile audiometry can correctly estimate pure tone thresholds and screen for moderate hearing loss. Noise reduction strategies in mobile audiometry provide a portable effective solution for hearing assessments outside clinical settings.

  6. Noncovalent cation-π interactions – their role in nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Fink

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Non-covalent interactions play an extremely important role in organisms. The main non-covalent interactions in nature are: ion-ion interactions, dipole-dipole interactions, hydrogen bonds, and van der Waals interactions. A new kind of intermolecular interactions – cation-π interactions – is gaining increasing attention. These interactions occur between a cation and a π system. The main contributors to cation-π interactions are electrostatic, polarization and, to a lesser extent, dispersion interactions. At first, cation-π interactions were studied in a gas phase, with metal cation–aromatic system complexes. The characteristics of these complexes are as follows: an increase of cation atomic number leads to a decrease of interaction energy, and an increase of cation charge leads to an increase of interaction energy. Aromatic amino acids bind with metal cations mainly through interactions with their main chain. Nevertheless, cation-π interaction with a hydrophobic side chain significantly enhances binding energy. In water solutions most cations preferentially interact with water molecules rather than aromatic systems. Cation-π interactions occur in environments with lower accessibility to a polar solvent. Cation-π interactions can have a stabilizing role on the secondary, tertiary and quaternary structure of proteins. These interactions play an important role in substrate or ligand binding sites in many proteins, which should be taken into consideration when the screening of effective inhibitors for these proteins is carried out. Cation-π interactions are abundant and play an important role in many biological processes.

  7. Stability and recovery of DNA origami structure with cation concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Wang, Ping; Liu, Yang; Liu, Ting; Xu, Yan; Zhu, Shanshan; Zhu, Jun; Ye, Kai; Huang, Guang; Dannong, He

    2018-01-01

    We synthesized triangular and rectangular DNA origami nanostructures and investigated the stability and recovery of them under low cation concentration. Our results demonstrated that the origami nanostructures would melt when incubated in low cation concentration, and recover whilst kept in the concentration for less than 10 min. However, extending the incubation time would lead to irreversible melting. Our results show the possibility of application of DNA origami nanostructures for things such as a sensor for cation concentration response, etc.

  8. Parvalbumin+ Neurons and Npas1+ Neurons Are Distinct Neuron Classes in the Mouse External Globus Pallidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Vivian M; Hegeman, Daniel J; Cui, Qiaoling; Kelver, Daniel A; Fiske, Michael P; Glajch, Kelly E; Pitt, Jason E; Huang, Tina Y; Justice, Nicholas J; Chan, C Savio

    2015-08-26

    Compelling evidence suggests that pathological activity of the external globus pallidus (GPe), a nucleus in the basal ganglia, contributes to the motor symptoms of a variety of movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Recent studies have challenged the idea that the GPe comprises a single, homogenous population of neurons that serves as a simple relay in the indirect pathway. However, we still lack a full understanding of the diversity of the neurons that make up the GPe. Specifically, a more precise classification scheme is needed to better describe the fundamental biology and function of different GPe neuron classes. To this end, we generated a novel multicistronic BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) transgenic mouse line under the regulatory elements of the Npas1 gene. Using a combinatorial transgenic and immunohistochemical approach, we discovered that parvalbumin-expressing neurons and Npas1-expressing neurons in the GPe represent two nonoverlapping cell classes, amounting to 55% and 27% of the total GPe neuron population, respectively. These two genetically identified cell classes projected primarily to the subthalamic nucleus and to the striatum, respectively. Additionally, parvalbumin-expressing neurons and Npas1-expressing neurons were distinct in their autonomous and driven firing characteristics, their expression of intrinsic ion conductances, and their responsiveness to chronic 6-hydroxydopamine lesion. In summary, our data argue that parvalbumin-expressing neurons and Npas1-expressing neurons are two distinct functional classes of GPe neurons. This work revises our understanding of the GPe, and provides the foundation for future studies of its function and dysfunction. Until recently, the heterogeneity of the constituent neurons within the external globus pallidus (GPe) was not fully appreciated. We addressed this knowledge gap by discovering two principal GPe neuron classes, which were identified by their nonoverlapping expression of the

  9. Astroglial networks promote neuronal coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chever, Oana; Dossi, Elena; Pannasch, Ulrike; Derangeon, Mickael; Rouach, Nathalie

    2016-01-12

    Astrocytes interact with neurons to regulate network activity. Although the gap junction subunits connexin 30 and connexin 43 mediate the formation of extensive astroglial networks that cover large functional neuronal territories, their role in neuronal synchronization remains unknown. Using connexin 30- and connexin 43-deficient mice, we showed that astroglial networks promoted sustained population bursts in hippocampal slices by setting the basal active state of neurons. Astroglial networks limited excessive neuronal depolarization induced by spontaneous synaptic activity, increased neuronal release probability, and favored the recruitment of neurons during bursting, thus promoting the coordinated activation of neuronal networks. In vivo, this sustained neuronal coordination translated into increased severity of acutely evoked epileptiform events and convulsive behavior. These results revealed that connexin-mediated astroglial networks synchronize bursting of neuronal assemblies, which can exacerbate pathological network activity and associated behavior. Our data thus provide molecular and biophysical evidence predicting selective astroglial gap junction inhibitors as anticonvulsive drugs. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  10. The formation of singly and doubly cationized oligomers in SIMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delcorte, A.; Wojciechowski, I.; Gonze, X.; Garrison, B.J.; Bertrand, P.

    2003-01-01

    The cationization of sputtered organic species via metal particle adduction is investigated using poly-4-methylstyrene molecules in combination with Cu, Pd, Ag and Au substrates. Metal-cationization occurs for these four substrates. The cationized molecule yields vary with the considered substrate and they are not correlated with the metal ion yields. In addition, double cationization with two metal particles is observed with a very significant intensity for Cu, Ag and Au supports. We interpret the results with an emission scheme in which excited molecules and metal atoms recombine above the surface and decay via electron emission, thereby locking the complex in the ionic state

  11. Release of acetylcholine from murine embryonic stem cells: effect of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors and blockade of organic cation transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessler, Ignaz; Michel-Schmidt, Rosmarie; Dohle, Eva; Kirkpatrick, Charles James

    2012-11-27

    The non-neuronal cholinergic system is widely expressed in nature. The present experiments were performed to characterize the non-neuronal cholinergic system in murine embryonic stem cells (CGR8 cell line). CGR8 cells were cultured in gelatinized flasks with Glasgow's buffered minimal essential medium (Gibco, Germany). Acetylcholine was measured by HPLC combined with bioreactor and electrochemical detection. CGR8 cells contained 1.08±0.12 pmol acetylcholine/10(6) cells (n=7) which was reduced to 0.50±0.06 pmol/10(6) cells (n=6; pacetylcholine into the incubation medium was demonstrated, when cholinesterase activity was blocked by 10 μM physostigmine, with 97±13, 180±15 and 216±14 pmol being released from 65×10(6) cells after incubation periods of 2, 4 and 6h, respectively. The cumulative release corresponds to a fractional release rate of 2%/min. Blockade of nicotine or muscarine receptors did not significantly modulate the release of acetylcholine which was substantially reduced by 300 μM quinine (inhibitor of organic cation transporters). This inhibition showed considerable fading over the incubation period, indicating additional release mechanisms activated upon inhibition of organic cation transporters. Murine embryonic stem cells contain and release significant amounts of acetylcholine. The high fractional release rate and the compensation for blocked organic cation transporters indicate that non-neuronal acetylcholine may play a functional role in the homeostasis of murine embryonic stem cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Polyethyleneimine-mediated transfection of cultured postmitotic neurons from rat sympathetic ganglia and adult human retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higgins Dennis

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemical methods of transfection that have proven successful with cell lines often do not work with primary cultures of neurons. Recent data, however, suggest that linear polymers of the cation polyethyleneimine (PEI can facilitate the uptake of nucleic acids by neurons. Consequently, we examined the ability of a commercial PEI preparation to allow the introduction of foreign genes into postmitotic mammalian neurons. Sympathetic neurons were obtained from perinatal rat pups and maintained for 5 days in vitro in the absence of nonneuronal cells. Cultures were then transfected with varying amounts of a plasmid encoding either E. coli β-galactosidase or enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP using PEI. Results Optimal transfection efficiency was observed with 1 μg/ml of plasmid DNA and 5 μg/ml PEI. Expression of β-galactosidase was both rapid and stable, beginning within 6 hours and lasting for at least 21 days. A maximum yield was obtained within 72 hours with ∼ 9% of the neurons expressing β-galactosidase, as assessed by both histochemistry and antibody staining. Cotransfection of two plasmids encoding reporter genes was achieved. Postmitotic neurons from adult human retinal cultures also demonstrated an ability to take up and express foreign DNA using PEI as a vector. Conclusions These data suggest that PEI is a useful agent for the stable expression of plasmid-encoded genes in neuronal cultures.

  13. From Neurons to Newtons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bjørn Gilbert

    2001-01-01

    proteins generate forces, to the macroscopic levels where overt arm movements are vol- untarily controlled within an unpredictable environment by legions of neurons¯ring in orderly fashion. An extensive computer simulation system has been developed for this thesis, which at present contains a neural...... of phenomena, ranging from the force-velocity and force-length relationships, to tetanic fusion, "catch-like" e®ects and the distinctions between fast and slow muscle ¯ber types. Furthermore the model incorporates su±cient neuromus-cular information as to permit orderly recruitment of motor units, exponential...

  14. Imitation, mirror neurons and autism

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Justin H.G.; Whiten, Andrew; Suddendorf, Thomas; Perrett, David I.

    2001-01-01

    Various deficits in the cognitive functioning of people with autism have been documented in recent years but these provide only partial explanations for the condition. We focus instead on an imitative disturbance involving difficulties both in copying actions and in inhibiting more stereotyped mimicking, such as echolalia. A candidate for the neural basis of this disturbance may be found in a recently discovered class of neurons in frontal cortex, 'mirror neurons' (MNs). These neurons show ac...

  15. Hydration Structure of the Quaternary Ammonium Cations

    KAUST Repository

    Babiaczyk, Wojtek Iwo

    2010-11-25

    Two indicators of the hydropathicity of small solutes are introduced and tested by molecular dynamics simulations. These indicators are defined as probabilities of the orientation of water molecules\\' dipoles and hydrogen bond vectors, conditional on a generalized distance from the solute suitable for arbitrarily shaped molecules. Using conditional probabilities, it is possible to distinguish features of the distributions in close proximity of the solute. These regions contain the most significant information on the hydration structure but cannot be adequately represented by using, as is usually done, joint distance-angle probability densities. Our calculations show that using our indicators a relative hydropathicity scale for the interesting test set of the quaternary ammonium cations can be roughly determined. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  16. Use of a material conducting hydrogen cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, A.T.; Shilton, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    The invention concerns a separator conducting hydrogenous for electrical devices, which contains at least one compound with the formula H(UO 2 )PO 4 x nH 2 O, H(UO 2 )AsO 4 x nH 2 O or H(UO 2 )IO 4 (OH) 2 x nH 2 O, where not more than 50% by weight of the H + is replaced by one or more cations, such as Li + , Na + , K + , NH 4 + , Cu 2+ , Mg 2+ , Ca 2+ , Ba 2+ , Sr 2+ , Pb 2+ , Fe 2+ , Co 2+ , Ni 2+ , Mn 2+ or Al 3+ . The electrical device having the separator can be an electrolysis cell, for example, an electro chromium cell. (H x WO 3 ), a hydrogen isotope enrichment device, a proton-sensitive electrode (eg for a pH meter), a battery or a fuel cell. (orig./MM) [de

  17. An investigation of mixed cation oxide glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brook, H.C.

    1999-02-01

    This study has been undertaken with several purposes in mind. Firstly, the author wished to ascertain whether EXAFS would show the mixed alkali (MAE) in a mixed alkali glass in shell parameters other than those for the first shell, as well as being a structural probe. Secondly, it was desired to see whether borate glasses show the MAE in EXAFS. Thirdly, the author attempted to ascertain whether cations of different charges would show an effect similar to the MAE. Fourthly, to use NMR as a second structure probe in an attempt to gain a better understanding of the structure. Fifthly, to perform electrical conductivity experiments to try to link the conductivity behaviour with structural changes. Finally, to attempt to develop a generalised explanation of the origins of the MAE and the variations in physical properties in glasses. (author)

  18. Retention of Cationic Starch onto Cellulose Fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missaoui, Mohamed; Mauret, Evelyne; Belgacem, Mohamed Naceur

    2008-08-01

    Three methods of cationic starch titration were used to quantify its retention on cellulose fibres, namely: (i) the complexation of CS with iodine and measurement of the absorbency of the ensuing blue solution by UV-vis spectroscopy; (ii) hydrolysis of the starch macromolecules followed by the conversion of the resulting sugars to furan-based molecules and quantifying the ensuing mixture by measuring their absorbance at a Ι of 490 nm, using the same technique as previous one and; finally (iii) hydrolysis of starch macromolecules by trifluoro-acetic acid and quantification of the sugars in the resulting hydrolysates by high performance liquid chromatography. The three methods were found to give similar results within the range of CS addition from 0 to 50 mg per g of cellulose fibres.

  19. Altered erythrocyte cation permeability in familial pseudohyperkalaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagher, G; Vantyghem, M C; Doise, B; Lallau, G; Racadot, A; Lefebvre, J

    1989-08-01

    1. Erythrocyte cation transport pathways have been investigated in a family with pseudohyperkalaemia. 2. Ouabain- and bumetanide-resistant Na+ and K+ effluxes in three pseudohyperkalaemic patients were not different from those of control subjects when assessed at 37 degrees C. 3. When the temperature was decreased to 20 degrees C and 9 degrees C, K+ passive permeability markedly increased and Na+ permeability remained unchanged in these patients. In contrast, in control subjects a reduction in temperature caused a marked reduction in Na+ and K+ passive permeability. 4. These findings could account for the marked increase in plasma K+ concentration observed at subphysiological temperatures. 5. The Na+-K+ co-transport pathway was reduced in all members of the family, but the Na+-K+ pump was reduced in only two of them. These alterations were independent from the pseudohyperkalaemic state.

  20. A Cationic Smart Copolymer for DNA Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Ribeiro

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A new block copolymer with a temperature-responsive block and a cationic block was prepared by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT polymerization, with good control of its size and composition. The first block is composed by di(ethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate (DEGMA and oligo(ethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate (OEGMA, with the ratio DEGMA/OEGMA being used to choose the volume phase transition temperature of the polymer in water, tunable from ca. 25 to above 90 °C. The second block, of trimethyl-2-methacroyloxyethylammonium chloride (TMEC, is positively charged at physiological pH values and is used for DNA binding. The coacervate complexes between the block copolymer and a model single strand DNA are characterized by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy. The new materials offer good prospects for biomedical application, for example in controlled gene delivery.

  1. Cell Penetrating Peptides and Cationic Antibacterial Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Plaza, Jonathan G.; Morales-Nava, Rosmarbel; Diener, Christian; Schreiber, Gabriele; Gonzalez, Zyanya D.; Lara Ortiz, Maria Teresa; Ortega Blake, Ivan; Pantoja, Omar; Volkmer, Rudolf; Klipp, Edda; Herrmann, Andreas; Del Rio, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPP) and cationic antibacterial peptides (CAP) have similar physicochemical properties and yet it is not understood how such similar peptides display different activities. To address this question, we used Iztli peptide 1 (IP-1) because it has both CPP and CAP activities. Combining experimental and computational modeling of the internalization of IP-1, we show it is not internalized by receptor-mediated endocytosis, yet it permeates into many different cell types, including fungi and human cells. We also show that IP-1 makes pores in the presence of high electrical potential at the membrane, such as those found in bacteria and mitochondria. These results provide the basis to understand the functional redundancy of CPPs and CAPs. PMID:24706763

  2. The biophysics of neuronal growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franze, Kristian; Guck, Jochen

    2010-01-01

    For a long time, neuroscience has focused on biochemical, molecular biological and electrophysiological aspects of neuronal physiology and pathology. However, there is a growing body of evidence indicating the importance of physical stimuli for neuronal growth and development. In this review we briefly summarize the historical background of neurobiophysics and give an overview over the current understanding of neuronal growth from a physics perspective. We show how biophysics has so far contributed to a better understanding of neuronal growth and discuss current inconsistencies. Finally, we speculate how biophysics may contribute to the successful treatment of lesions to the central nervous system, which have been considered incurable until very recently.

  3. How mobile are sorbed cations in clays and clay rocks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimmi, T; Kosakowski, G

    2011-02-15

    Diffusion of cations and other contaminants through clays is of central interest, because clays and clay rocks are widely considered as barrier materials for waste disposal sites. An intriguing experimental observation has been made in this context: Often, the diffusive flux of cations at trace concentrations is much larger and the retardation smaller than expected based on their sorption coefficients. So-called surface diffusion of sorbed cations has been invoked to explain the observations but remains a controversial issue. Moreover, the corresponding surface diffusion coefficients are largely unknown. Here we show that, by an appropriate scaling, published diffusion data covering a broad range of cations, clays, and chemical conditions can all be modeled satisfactorily by a surface diffusion model. The average mobility of sorbed cations seems to be primarily an intrinsic property of each cation that follows inversely its sorption affinity. With these surface mobilities, cation diffusion coefficients can now be estimated from those of water tracers. In pure clays at low salinities, surface diffusion can reduce the cation retardation by a factor of more than 1000.

  4. In vivo toxicity of cationic micelles and liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Kristina Bram; Northeved, Helle; Ek, Pramod Kumar

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated toxicity of nanocarriers comprised of cationic polymer and lipid components often used in gene and drug delivery, formulated as cationic micelles and liposomes. Rats were injected intravenously with 10, 25 or 100 mg/kg and sacrificed after 24 or 48 h, or 24 h after the las...

  5. Synthesis of Cationic Core-Shell Latex Particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dziomkina, N.; Hempenius, Mark A.; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2006-01-01

    Surfactant-free seeded (core-shell) polymerization of cationic polymer colloids is presented. Polystyrene core particles with sizes between 200 nm and 500 nm were synthesized. The number average diameter of the colloidal core particles increased with increasing monomer concentration. Cationic shells

  6. Effects of metallic cations in the beryl flotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima Leonel, C.M. de; Peres, A.E.C.

    1984-01-01

    The beryl zeta potential in microelectrophoretic cell is studied in the presence of neutral electrolyte, cations of calcium, magnesium and iron. The petroleum sulfonate is used how collector in Hallimond tube. Hydroxy complex of metallic cations seems activate the ore and precipitates of colloidal metallic hidroxies seems lower him when added to the mixture. (M.A.C.) [pt

  7. Does alkali cation binding to aromatic ring retard the fluxional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Kalpana

    2017-11-10

    Nov 10, 2017 ... the role of cation on haptotropic migration. Cation binding not only enhances the complex interaction energy but also delicately affects the fluxionality in the molecule by increasing the barrier to haptotropic shift of Cr(CO)3. The competing nature of the bifacial acids with sandwiched aromatic ring is ...

  8. Membrane potential change effects on cationic and neutral drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Membrane potential change effects on cationic and neutral drug - induced erythrocyte shape change and cellular uptake of drugs. A Nwafor, WT Coakley. Abstract. The effect of membrane potential change of the human erythrocytes on cationic drugs tetracaine and chlorpromazine and neutral drug benzyl alcohol induced ...

  9. Cation substitution induced blue-shift of optical band gap

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cation substitution induced blue-shift of optical band gap in nanocrystalline Zn ( 1 − x ) Ca x O thin films deposited by sol–gel dip coating technique ... thin films giving 13.03% enhancement in theenergy gap value due to the electronic perturbation caused by cation substitution as well as deterioration in crystallinity.

  10. Base Cation Leaching From the Canopy of a Rubber ( Hevea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Base cations are essential to the sustainability of forest ecosystems. They are important for neutralizing the acidifying effects of atmospheric deposition. There is the need for in-depth understanding of base cation depletion and leaching from forest canopy. This is important particularly due to the increasing acidification and ...

  11. Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides Inactivate Shiga Toxin-Encoding Bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel E. Del Cogliano

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin (Stx is the principal virulence factor during Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC infections. We have previously reported the inactivation of bacteriophage encoding Stx after treatment with chitosan, a linear polysaccharide polymer with cationic properties. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (cAMPs are short linear aminoacidic sequences, with a positive net charge, which display bactericidal or bacteriostatic activity against a wide range of bacterial species. They are promising novel antibiotics since they have shown bactericidal effects against multiresistant bacteria. To evaluate whether cationic properties are responsible for bacteriophage inactivation, we tested seven cationic peptides with proven antimicrobial activity as anti-bacteriophage agents, and one random sequence cationic peptide with no antimicrobial activity as a control. We observed bacteriophage inactivation after incubation with five cAMPs, but no inactivating activity was observed with the random sequence cationic peptide or with the non-alpha helical cAMP Omiganan. Finally, to confirm peptide-bacteriophage interaction, zeta potential was analyzed by following changes on bacteriophage surface charges after peptide incubation. According to our results we could propose that: (1 direct interaction of peptides with phage is a necessary step for bacteriophage inactivation, (2 cationic properties are necessary but not sufficient for bacteriophage inactivation, and (3 inactivation by cationic peptides could be sequence (or structure specific. Overall our data suggest that these peptides could be considered a new family of molecules potentially useful to decrease bacteriophage replication and Stx expression.

  12. Cation-cation "attraction": when London dispersion attraction wins over Coulomb repulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimme, Stefan; Djukic, Jean-Pierre

    2011-03-21

    London forces are omnipresent in nature and relevant to molecular engineering. Proper tuning of their energetic contribution may stabilize molecular aggregates, which would be otherwise highly unstable by virtue of other overwhelming repulsive terms. The literature contains a number of such noncovalently bonded molecular aggregates, of which the "binding mode" has never been thoroughly settled. Among those are the emblematic cationic complexes of tetrakis(isonitrile)rhodium(I) studied by a number of researchers. The propensity of these complexes to spontaneously produce oligomers has been an "open case" for years. For the dimer [(PhNC)(4)Rh](2)(2+), one of the archetypes of such oligomers, density functional theory methods (DFT-D3) and wave function based spin-component-scaled second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (SCS-MP2) quantum chemical calculations indicate that when the eight isonitrile ligands arrange spatially in an optimal π-stacked fashion, the energy due to dispersion not only overcomes coulombic repulsion but also the entropy penalty of complex formation. This central role of long-range electron correlation explains such cation-cation attractive interactions. Furthermore, the present findings relativize the role of the metal-metal "d(8)-d(8)" interactions, which are present on a relatively small scale compared to the effects of the ligands; d(8)-d(8) interactions represent about 10-15% of the total dispersion contribution to the binding energy.

  13. Cooling of PAH cations studied with an electrostatic storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Jérôme; Chen, Li; Brédy, Richard; Ji, Mingchao; Ortéga, Céline; Matsumoto, Jun; Martin, Serge

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we discuss the production of molecular PAH cations using an ECR ion source and their subsequent cooling studied with an electrostatic storage ring, the Mini-Ring on a time range up to 10 ms. We show that the ECR ion source can produce high currents of small PAH cation, here naphthalene and anthracene cations. Then, we report experimental result for the cooling of three PAH cations (anthracene, naphthalene and pyrene) stored in our compact electrostatic storage ring (the Mini-Ring). We show that the Poincaré recurrent fluorescence plays a major role in the cooling process of those PAH cations. We show that for a given internal energy, the cooling rate is much smaller for pyrene than for anthracene and naphthalene. We conclude that the Poincaré recurrent fluorescence is less efficient due to smaller oscillator strength of the D2-D0 electronic transition for pyrene.

  14. Thermochemical stability of Soviet macroporous sulfonated cation-exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rukhlyada, N.N.; Plotnikova, V.P.; Roginskaya, B.S.; Znamenskii, Yu.P.; Zavodovskaya, A.S.; Dobrova, E.I.

    1988-10-20

    The purpose of this work was to study the influence of macroporosity on the thermochemical stability of sulfonated cation-exchangers. The investigations were carried out on commercial macroporous sulfonated cation-exchangers based on styrene-divinylbenzene copolymers. Study of the thermochemical stability of macroporous sulfonated cation-exchangers in dilute hydrogen peroxide solutions showed that the type of macroporosity has virtually no influence on their stability. The determining factor in thermal stability of macroporous cation-exchangers, as of the gel type, is the degree of cross-linking of the polymer matrix. The capacity loss of macroporous cation-exchangers during oxidative thermolysis is caused by destruction of the macromolecular skeleton and elution of fragments of polar chains containing sulfo groups into the solution.

  15. Hypomorphic variants of cationic amino acid transporter 3 in males with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, Caroline; Rupp, Johanna; Boissel, Jean-Paul; Mignot, Cyril; Rastetter, Agnès; Amiet, Claire; Jacquette, Aurélia; Dupuits, Céline; Bouteiller, Delphine; Keren, Boris; Ruberg, Merle; Faudet, Anne; Doummar, Diane; Philippe, Anne; Périsse, Didier; Laurent, Claudine; Lebrun, Nicolas; Guillemot, Vincent; Chelly, Jamel; Cohen, David; Héron, Delphine; Brice, Alexis; Closs, Ellen I; Depienne, Christel

    2015-12-01

    Cationic amino acid transporters (CATs) mediate the entry of L-type cationic amino acids (arginine, ornithine and lysine) into the cells including neurons. CAT-3, encoded by the SLC7A3 gene on chromosome X, is one of the three CATs present in the human genome, with selective expression in brain. SLC7A3 is highly intolerant to variation in humans, as attested by the low frequency of deleterious variants in available databases, but the impact on variants in this gene in humans remains undefined. In this study, we identified a missense variant in SLC7A3, encoding the CAT-3 cationic amino acid transporter, on chromosome X by exome sequencing in two brothers with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We then sequenced the SLC7A3 coding sequence in 148 male patients with ASD and identified three additional rare missense variants in unrelated patients. Functional analyses of the mutant transporters showed that two of the four identified variants cause severe or moderate loss of CAT-3 function due to altered protein stability or abnormal trafficking to the plasma membrane. The patient with the most deleterious SLC7A3 variant had high-functioning autism and epilepsy, and also carries a de novo 16p11.2 duplication possibly contributing to his phenotype. This study shows that rare hypomorphic variants of SLC7A3 exist in male individuals and suggest that SLC7A3 variants possibly contribute to the etiology of ASD in male subjects in association with other genetic factors.

  16. How Native and Alien Metal Cations Bind ATP: Implications for Lithium as a Therapeutic Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudev, Todor; Grauffel, Cédric; Lim, Carmay

    2017-02-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the major energy currency of the cell, exists in solution mostly as ATP-Mg. Recent experiments suggest that Mg2+ interacts with the highly charged ATP triphosphate group and Li+ can co-bind with the native Mg2+ to form ATP-Mg-Li and modulate the neuronal purine receptor response. However, it is unclear how the negatively charged ATP triphosphate group binds Mg2+ and Li+ (i.e. which phosphate group(s) bind Mg2+/Li+) and how the ATP solution conformation depends on the type of metal cation and the metal-binding mode. Here, we reveal the preferred ATP-binding mode of Mg2+/Li+ alone and combined: Mg2+ prefers to bind ATP tridentately to each of the three phosphate groups, but Li+ prefers to bind bidentately to the terminal two phosphates. We show that the solution ATP conformation depends on the cation and its binding site/mode, but it does not change significantly when Li+ binds to Mg2+-loaded ATP. Hence, ATP-Mg-Li, like Mg2+-ATP, can fit in the ATP-binding site of the host enzyme/receptor, activating specific signaling pathways.

  17. Increasing Base Cations in Streams: Another Legacy of Deicing Salts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helton, A. M.; Barclay, J. R.; Bellucci, C.; Rittenhouse, C.

    2017-12-01

    Elevated use of deicing salts directly increases sodium chloride inputs to watersheds. Sodium can accumulate in soils over time and has the potential to leach other cations (e.g., calcium, magnesium, and potassium) from the soil through cation exchange. We hypothesize that increased use of deicing salts results in a legacy of soils depleted in non-sodium base cations with loss of cations to receiving waters. The goal of this project is to quantify temporal trends in base cations and chloride in streams and rivers across the United States. We used Weighted Regressions on Time, Discharge, and Season (WRTDS) to analyze trends in base cations. Our preliminary analysis of 10 rivers in Connecticut with chemical periods of record ranging from 24 - 64 years (median = 55 years), shows that the flux of base cations is increasing in all sites (25 - 366 103 meq ha-1 yr-1 yr-1), driven largely by increases in sodium (23 - 222 103 meq ha-1 yr-1 yr-1), the dominant cation in 7 of the sites. Chloride is also increasing at all sites (26 - 261 103 meq ha-1 yr-1 yr-1), which, in combination with salt use trends, suggests a road salt source for the increased sodium. Non-sodium cations are also increasing in 9 of the sites (8 - 54 103 meq ha-1 yr-1 yr-1), though they are not directly added with most deicing salts. We will compare these trends to other long-term sites across the United States, and quantify relationships between cation trends and land cover, road density, and snowfall.

  18. Motor neuron disease in blacks

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1989-08-19

    Aug 19, 1989 ... A series of 86 black, Indian and white patients with motor neuron disease were analysed retrospectively. Although the material does not allow statistically valid conclusions, there are sufficient cases among blacks to allow two prima facie observations in this population group: (~ motor neuron disease.

  19. The Neuronal Ceroid-Lipofuscinoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Michael J.; Rakheja, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    The neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinoses (NCL's, Batten disease) represent a group of severe neurodegenerative diseases, which mostly present in childhood. The phenotypes are similar and include visual loss, seizures, loss of motor and cognitive function, and early death. At autopsy, there is massive neuronal loss with characteristic storage in…

  20. Understanding Neuronal Mechanisms of Epilepsy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Admin

    20 μM glutamate,. Recording epileptogenesis. Long term connectivity c. 10 min neuronal loss. (De Lorenzo et al., 2000) injury epileptogenesis. Neuronal loss .... decay. Control Condition. Relative Increase in τ decay. Values in. Epileptic Condition. The relative contribution of the Na+/Ca2+ exchangers in Ca2+ extrusion.

  1. IRMPD Action Spectroscopy of Alkali Metal Cation-Cytosine Complexes: Effects of Alkali Metal Cation Size on Gas Phase Conformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, B.; Wu, R.R.; Polfer, N.C.; Berden, G.; Oomens, J.; Rodgers, M.T.

    2013-01-01

    The gas-phase structures of alkali metal cation-cytosine complexes generated by electrospray ionization are probed via infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. IRMPD action spectra of five alkali metal cation-cytosine complexes exhibit both

  2. Geophysical Prospection of Archaeological Structures in a Noisy Area in Shayzar, Syria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seren, S.; Hinterleitner, A.; Löcker, K.; Bayirli, E.

    2009-04-01

    Site The roman town "Caesarea", which was named "Sezer" and used as a citadel in middle ages, is located within the modern town "Shayzar" in the north-west of Syria. The modern buildings, power lines and the streets with a lot of cars cause a very noisy environment for geophysical prospection. A football ground of about 50x90 m was chosen for testing both methods, magnetic and ground penetrating radar (GPR), to detect archaeological structures. Instruments and survey area The magnetic survey was carried out using a fluxgate magnetic acquisition system with 4 sensors in gradient array from the manufacturer FÖRSTER® mounted on a one wheel cart. The cart was developed in our institute and allows to record high quality data in areas with difficult field conditions. An optical distance measurement system on the wheel ensures an exact positioning of the magnetic data. The measurement grid was 50x10 cm. GPR survey was carried out using a NOGGIN system with 250 MHz antenna from the manufacturer Sensors & Software. A new base plate was mounted on the antenna for the easy moving at rough surface conditions. The measurement grid was 50x5 cm. Data processing The magnetic data are processed using the self developed software ApMag. The main steps of the processing are filtering, removing of the line pattern, interpolation to a grid of 10x10 cm, geo-referencing and producing of a grey scale magnetogramm for visualizing in a geographical information system (GIS). The GPR data are automatically processed using the self developed software package ApRadar. Several pre-processing steps were carried out including removing of constant shifts, automatic detection of the starting point (time zero), frequency dependent high-pass filtering and a background removal filter to get the best results for each measurement. There is no gain control algorithm applied to the traces of a section but a statistical correction of each depth-slice for each section. This is equal to an automatic gain

  3. Anaerobic toxicity of cationic silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gitipour, Alireza; Thiel, Stephen W. [Biomedical, Chemical, and Environmental Engineering, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Scheckel, Kirk G. [USEPA, Office of Research and Development, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Tolaymat, Thabet, E-mail: tolaymat.thabet@epa.gov [USEPA, Office of Research and Development, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2016-07-01

    The microbial toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) stabilized with different capping agents was compared to that of Ag{sup +} under anaerobic conditions. Three AgNPs were investigated: (1) negatively charged citrate-coated AgNPs (citrate-AgNPs), (2) minimally charged polyvinylpyrrolidone coated AgNPs (PVP-AgNPs) and (3) positively charged branched polyethyleneimine coated AgNPs (BPEI-AgNPs). The AgNPs investigated in this experiment were similar in size (10–15 nm), spherical in shape, but varied in surface charge which ranged from highly negative to highly positive. While, at AgNPs concentrations lower than 5 mg L{sup −1}, the anaerobic decomposition process was not influenced by the presence of the nanoparticles, there was an observed impact on the diversity of the microbial community. At elevated concentrations (100 mg L{sup −1} as silver), only the cationic BPEI-AgNPs demonstrated toxicity similar in magnitude to that of Ag{sup +}. Both citrate and PVP-AgNPs did not exhibit toxicity at the 100 mg L{sup −1} as measured by biogas evolution. These findings further indicate the varying modes of action for nanoparticle toxicity and represent one of the few studies that evaluate end-of-life management concerns with regards to the increasing use of nanomaterials in our everyday life. These findings also highlight some of the concerns with a one size fits all approach to the evaluation of environmental health and safety concerns associated with the use of nanoparticles. - Highlights: • At concentrations -1 the anaerobic decomposition process was not impacted. • An impact on the microbial community at concentrations -1 were observed. • At high concentrations (100 mg L{sup −1}), the cationic BPEI-AgNPs demonstrated toxicity. • Toxicity was demonstrated without the presence of oxidative dissolution of silver. • A one size fits all approach for the evaluation of NPs may not be accurate.

  4. Discovery of kimberlite in a magnetically noisy environment: a case study of the Syferfontein and Goedgevonden kimberlites (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, S. J.; Van Buren, R.

    2013-12-01

    Airborne geophysical methods play an important role in the exploration for kimberlites. As regions become more intensively explored, smaller kimberlites, which can be extremely difficult to find, are being targeted. These smaller kimberlites, as evidenced by the M-1 Maarsfontein pipe in the Klipspringer cluster in South Africa, can be highly profitable. The Goedgevonden and Syferfontein pipes are small kimberlites (~0.2 ha) ~25 km NNE of Klerksdorp in South Africa. The Goedgevonden pipe has been known since the 1930s and is diamondiferous, but not commercially viable due to small stone size and low quality of stones. In the early 1990s, Gold Fields used this pipe as a typical kimberlite to collect example geophysical data. The nearby (~1 km to the east) Syferfontein pipe is not diamondiferous but was discovered in 1994 as part of a speculative airborne EM survey conducted by Gold Fields and Geodass (now CGG) as part of their case study investigations. Both kimberlites have had extensive ground geophysical survey data collected and have prominent magnetic, gravity and EM responses that aided in the delineation of the pipes. These pipes represent a realistic and challenging case study target due to their small size and the magnetically noisy environment into which they have been emplaced. The discovery of the Syferfontein pipe in 1994 stimulated further testing of airborne methods, especially as the surface was undisturbed. These pipes are located in a region that hosts highly variably magnetized Hospital Hill shales, dolerite dykes and Ventersdorp lavas, a 2-3 m thick resistive ferricrete cap and significant cultural features such as an electric railroad and high tension power line. Although the kimberlites both show prominent magnetic anomalies on ground surveys, the airborne data are significantly noisy and the pipes do not show up as well determined targets. However, the clay-rich weathered zone of the pipes provides an ideal target for the EM method, and both

  5. Orexin neurons receive glycinergic innervations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Hondo

    Full Text Available Glycine, a nonessential amino-acid that acts as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, is currently used as a dietary supplement to improve the quality of sleep, but its mechanism of action is poorly understood. We confirmed the effects of glycine on sleep/wakefulness behavior in mice when administered peripherally. Glycine administration increased non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep time and decreased the amount and mean episode duration of wakefulness when administered in the dark period. Since peripheral administration of glycine induced fragmentation of sleep/wakefulness states, which is a characteristic of orexin deficiency, we examined the effects of glycine on orexin neurons. The number of Fos-positive orexin neurons markedly decreased after intraperitoneal administration of glycine to mice. To examine whether glycine acts directly on orexin neurons, we examined the effects of glycine on orexin neurons by patch-clamp electrophysiology. Glycine directly induced hyperpolarization and cessation of firing of orexin neurons. These responses were inhibited by a specific glycine receptor antagonist, strychnine. Triple-labeling immunofluorescent analysis showed close apposition of glycine transporter 2 (GlyT2-immunoreactive glycinergic fibers onto orexin-immunoreactive neurons. Immunoelectron microscopic analysis revealed that GlyT2-immunoreactive terminals made symmetrical synaptic contacts with somata and dendrites of orexin neurons. Double-labeling immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that glycine receptor alpha subunits were localized in the postsynaptic membrane of symmetrical inhibitory synapses on orexin neurons. Considering the importance of glycinergic regulation during REM sleep, our observations suggest that glycine injection might affect the activity of orexin neurons, and that glycinergic inhibition of orexin neurons might play a role in physiological sleep regulation.

  6. Mean-field dynamics of a population of stochastic map neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franović, Igor; Maslennikov, Oleg V.; Bačić, Iva; Nekorkin, Vladimir I.

    2017-07-01

    We analyze the emergent regimes and the stimulus-response relationship of a population of noisy map neurons by means of a mean-field model, derived within the framework of cumulant approach complemented by the Gaussian closure hypothesis. It is demonstrated that the mean-field model can qualitatively account for stability and bifurcations of the exact system, capturing all the generic forms of collective behavior, including macroscopic excitability, subthreshold oscillations, periodic or chaotic spiking, and chaotic bursting dynamics. Apart from qualitative analogies, we find a substantial quantitative agreement between the exact and the approximate system, as reflected in matching of the parameter domains admitting the different dynamical regimes, as well as the characteristic properties of the associated time series. The effective model is further shown to reproduce with sufficient accuracy the phase response curves of the exact system and the assembly's response to external stimulation of finite amplitude and duration.

  7. Beyond blow-up in excitatory integrate and fire neuronal networks: Refractory period and spontaneous activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres, María J; Perthame, Benoît

    2014-06-07

    The Network Noisy Leaky Integrate and Fire equation is among the simplest model allowing for a self-consistent description of neural networks and gives a rule to determine the probability to find a neuron at the potential v. However, its mathematical structure is still poorly understood and, concerning its solutions, very few results are available. In the midst of them, a recent result shows blow-up in finite time for fully excitatory networks. The intuitive explanation is that each firing neuron induces a discharge of the others; thus increases the activity and consequently the discharge rate of the full network. In order to better understand the details of the phenomena and show that the equation is more complex and fruitful than expected, we analyze further the model. We extend the finite time blow-up result to the case when neurons, after firing, enter a refractory state for a given period of time. We also show that spontaneous activity may occur when, additionally, randomness is included on the firing potential VF in regimes where blow-up occurs for a fixed value of VF. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Direct Thy-1/alphaVbeta3 integrin interaction mediates neuron to astrocyte communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermosilla, Tamara; Muñoz, Daniel; Herrera-Molina, Rodrigo; Valdivia, Alejandra; Muñoz, Nicolás; Nham, Sang-Uk; Schneider, Pascal; Burridge, Keith; Quest, Andrew F G; Leyton, Lisette

    2008-06-01

    Thy-1 is an abundant neuronal glycoprotein of poorly defined function. We recently provided evidence indicating that Thy-1 clusters a beta3-containing integrin in astrocytes to induce tyrosine phosphorylation, RhoA activation and the formation of focal adhesions and stress fibers. To date, the alpha subunit partner of beta3 integrin in DI TNC1 astrocytes is unknown. Similarly, the ability of neuronal, membrane-bound Thy-1 to trigger astrocyte signaling via integrin engagement remains speculation. Here, evidence that alphav forms an alphavbeta3 heterodimer in DI TNC1 astrocytes was obtained. In neuron-astrocyte association assays, the presence of either anti-alphav or anti-beta3 integrin antibodies reduced cell-cell interaction demonstrating the requirement of both integrin subunits for this association. Moreover, anti-Thy-1 antibodies blocked stimulation of astrocytes by neurons but not the binding of these two cell types. Thus, neuron-astrocyte association involved binding between molecular components in addition to the Thy-1-integrin; however, the signaling events leading to focal adhesion formation in astrocytes depended exclusively on the latter interaction. Additionally, wild-type (RLD) but not mutated (RLE) Thy-1 was shown to directly interact with alphavbeta3 integrin by Surface Plasmon Resonance analysis. This interaction was promoted by divalent cations and was species-independent. Together, these results demonstrate that the alphavbeta3 integrin heterodimer interacts directly with Thy-1 present on neuronal cells to stimulate astrocytes.

  9. Radical Cations and Acid Protection during Radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mincher, Bruce J.; Zarzana, Christopher A.; Mezyk, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Ligand molecules for used nuclear fuel separation schemes are exposed to high radiation fields and high concentrations of acid. Thus, an understanding of the complex interactions between extraction ligands, diluent, and acid is critical to understanding the performance of a separation process. The diglycolamides are ligands with important structural similarities to CMPO; however, previous work has shown that their radiolytic degradation has important mechanistic differences from CMPO. The DGAs do not enjoy radioprotection by HNO3 and the kinetics of DGA radiolytic degradation are different. CMPO degrades with pseudo-zero-order kinetics in linear fashion with absorbed dose while the DGAs degrade in pseudo-first-order, exponential fashion. This suggests that the DGAs degrade by simple reaction with some product of direct diluent radiolysis, while CMPO degradation is probably multi-step, with a slow step that is not dependent on the CMPO concentration, and mitigated by HNO 3 . It is thus believed that radio-protection and the zero-order radiolytic degradation kinetics are related, and that these phenomena are a function of either the formation of strong acid complexes with CMPO and/or to the presence of the CMPO phenyl ring. Experiments to test both these hypotheses have been designed and partially conducted. This report summarizes findings related to these phenomena for FY16, in satisfaction of milestone M3FT-16IN030104053. It also reports continued kinetic measurements for the reactions of the dodecane radical cation with solvent extraction ligands.

  10. Antiviral activity of cationic amphiphilic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salata, Cristiano; Calistri, Arianna; Parolin, Cristina; Baritussio, Aldo; Palù, Giorgio

    2017-05-01

    Emerging and reemerging viral infections represent a major concern for human and veterinary public health and there is an urgent need for the development of broad-spectrum antivirals. Areas covered: A recent strategy in antiviral research is based on the identification of molecules targeting host functions required for infection of multiple viruses. A number of FDA-approved drugs used to treat several human diseases are cationic amphiphilic drugs (CADs) that have the ability to accumulate inside cells affecting several structures/functions hijacked by viruses during infection. In this review we summarized the CADs' chemical properties and effects on the cells and reported the main FDA-approved CADs that have been identified so far as potential antivirals in drug repurposing studies. Expert commentary: Although there have been concerns regarding the efficacy and the possible side effects of the off-label use of CADs as antivirals, they seem to represent a promising starting point for the development of broad-spectrum antiviral strategies. Further knowledge about their mechanism of action is required to improve their antiviral activity and to reduce the risk of side effects.

  11. Radical Cations and Acid Protection during Radiolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mincher, Bruce J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zarzana, Christopher A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mezyk, Stephen P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-09

    Ligand molecules for used nuclear fuel separation schemes are exposed to high radiation fields and high concentrations of acid. Thus, an understanding of the complex interactions between extraction ligands, diluent, and acid is critical to understanding the performance of a separation process. The diglycolamides are ligands with important structural similarities to CMPO; however, previous work has shown that their radiolytic degradation has important mechanistic differences from CMPO. The DGAs do not enjoy radioprotection by HNO3 and the kinetics of DGA radiolytic degradation are different. CMPO degrades with pseudo-zero-order kinetics in linear fashion with absorbed dose while the DGAs degrade in pseudo-first-order, exponential fashion. This suggests that the DGAs degrade by simple reaction with some product of direct diluent radiolysis, while CMPO degradation is probably multi-step, with a slow step that is not dependent on the CMPO concentration, and mitigated by HNO3. It is thus believed that radio-protection and the zero-order radiolytic degradation kinetics are related, and that these phenomena are a function of either the formation of strong acid complexes with CMPO and/or to the presence of the CMPO phenyl ring. Experiments to test both these hypotheses have been designed and partially conducted. This report summarizes findings related to these phenomena for FY16, in satisfaction of milestone M3FT-16IN030104053. It also reports continued kinetic measurements for the reactions of the dodecane radical cation with solvent extraction ligands.

  12. Interaction of cationic drugs with liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Brett A; Chauhan, Anuj

    2009-10-20

    Interactions between cationic drugs and anionic liposomes were studied by measuring binding of drugs and the effect of binding on liposome permeability. The measurements were analyzed in the context of a continuum model based on electrostatic interactions and a Langmuir isotherm. Experiments and modeling indicate that, although electrostatic interactions are important, the fraction of drug sequestered in the double-layer is negligible. The majority of drug enters the bilayer with the charged regions interacting with the charged lipid head groups and the lipophilic regions associated with the bilayer. The partitioning of the drug can be described by a Langmuir isotherm with the electrostatic interactions increasing the sublayer concentration of the drug. The binding isotherms are similar for all tricyclic antidepressants (TCA). Bupivacaine (BUP) binds significantly less compared to TCA because its structure is such that the charged region has minimal interactions with the lipid heads once the BUP molecule partitions inside the bilayer. Conversely, the TCAs are linear with distinct hydrophilic and lipophilic regions, allowing the lipophilic regions to lie inside the bilayer and the hydrophilic regions to protrude out. This conformation maximizes the permeability of the bilayer, leading to an increased release of a hydrophilic fluorescent dye from liposomes.

  13. Water Adsorption on Free Cobalt Cluster Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiawi, Denis M; Bakker, Joost M; Oomens, Jos; Buma, Wybren Jan; Jamshidi, Zahra; Visscher, Lucas; Waters, L B F M

    2015-11-05

    Cationic cobalt clusters complexed with water Con(+)-H2O (n = 6-20) are produced through laser ablation and investigated via infrared multiple photon dissociation (IR-MPD) spectroscopy in the 200-1700 cm(-1) spectral range. All spectra exhibit a resonance close to the 1595 cm(-1) frequency of the free water bending vibration, indicating that the water molecule remains intact upon adsorption. For n = 6, the frequency of this band is blue-shifted, but it gradually converges to the free water value with increasing cluster size. In the lower-frequency range (200-650 cm(-1)) the spectra contain several bands which show a very regular frequency evolution, suggesting that the exact cluster geometry has little effect on the water-surface interaction. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are carried out at the OPBE/TZP level for three representative sizes (n = 6, 9, 13) and indicate that the vibrations responsible for the resonances correspond to bending and torsional modes between the cluster and water moieties. The potential energy surfaces describing these interactions are very shallow, making the calculated harmonic frequencies and IR intensities very sensitive to small geometrical perturbations. We conclude that harmonic frequency calculations on (local) minima structures provide insufficient information for these types of cluster complexes and need to be complemented with calculations that provide a more extensive sampling of the potential energy surface.

  14. Repurposing Cationic Amphiphilic Antihistamines for Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Marie Ellegaard

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is one of the deadliest cancers worldwide. In search for new NSCLC treatment options, we screened a cationic amphiphilic drug (CAD library for cytotoxicity against NSCLC cells and identified several CAD antihistamines as inducers of lysosomal cell death. We then performed a cohort study on the effect of CAD antihistamine use on mortality of patients diagnosed with non-localized cancer in Denmark between 1995 and 2011. The use of the most commonly prescribed CAD antihistamine, loratadine, was associated with significantly reduced all-cause mortality among patients with non-localized NSCLC or any non-localized cancer when compared with use of non-CAD antihistamines and adjusted for potential confounders. Of the less frequently described CAD antihistamines, astemizole showed a similar significant association with reduced mortality as loratadine among patients with any non-localized cancer, and ebastine use showed a similar tendency. The association between CAD antihistamine use and reduced mortality was stronger among patients with records of concurrent chemotherapy than among those without such records. In line with this, sub-micromolar concentrations of loratadine, astemizole and ebastine sensitized NSCLC cells to chemotherapy and reverted multidrug resistance in NSCLC, breast and prostate cancer cells. Thus, CAD antihistamines may improve the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy.

  15. Repurposing Cationic Amphiphilic Antihistamines for Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellegaard, Anne-Marie; Dehlendorff, Christian; Vind, Anna C; Anand, Atul; Cederkvist, Luise; Petersen, Nikolaj H T; Nylandsted, Jesper; Stenvang, Jan; Mellemgaard, Anders; Østerlind, Kell; Friis, Søren; Jäättelä, Marja

    2016-07-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the deadliest cancers worldwide. In search for new NSCLC treatment options, we screened a cationic amphiphilic drug (CAD) library for cytotoxicity against NSCLC cells and identified several CAD antihistamines as inducers of lysosomal cell death. We then performed a cohort study on the effect of CAD antihistamine use on mortality of patients diagnosed with non-localized cancer in Denmark between 1995 and 2011. The use of the most commonly prescribed CAD antihistamine, loratadine, was associated with significantly reduced all-cause mortality among patients with non-localized NSCLC or any non-localized cancer when compared with use of non-CAD antihistamines and adjusted for potential confounders. Of the less frequently described CAD antihistamines, astemizole showed a similar significant association with reduced mortality as loratadine among patients with any non-localized cancer, and ebastine use showed a similar tendency. The association between CAD antihistamine use and reduced mortality was stronger among patients with records of concurrent chemotherapy than among those without such records. In line with this, sub-micromolar concentrations of loratadine, astemizole and ebastine sensitized NSCLC cells to chemotherapy and reverted multidrug resistance in NSCLC, breast and prostate cancer cells. Thus, CAD antihistamines may improve the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The Drosophila Gr28bD product is a non-specific cation channel that can be used as a novel thermogenetic tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Aditi; Salari, Autoosa; Berigan, Benton R; Miguel, Kayla C; Amirshenava, Marzie; Robinson, Abbey; Zars, Benjamin C; Lin, Jenna L; Milescu, Lorin S; Milescu, Mirela; Zars, Troy

    2018-01-17

    Extrinsic control of single neurons and neuronal populations is a powerful approach for understanding how neural circuits function. Adding new thermogenetic tools to existing optogenetic and other forms of intervention will increase the complexity of questions that can be addressed. A good candidate for developing new thermogenetic tools is the Drosophila gustatory receptor family, which has been implicated in high-temperature avoidance behavior. We examined the five members of the Gr28b gene cluster for temperature-dependent properties via three approaches: biophysical characterization in Xenopus oocytes, functional calcium imaging in Drosophila motor neurons, and behavioral assays in adult Drosophila. Our results show that Gr28bD expression in Xenopus oocytes produces a non-specific cationic current that is activated by elevated temperatures. This current is non-inactivating and non-voltage dependent. When expressed in Drosophila motor neurons, Gr28bD can be used to change the firing pattern of individual cells in a temperature-dependent fashion. Finally, we show that pan-neuronal or motor neuron expression of Gr28bD can be used to alter fruit fly behavior with elevated temperatures. Together, these results validate the potential of the Gr28bD gene as a founding member of a new class of thermogenetic tools.

  17. Mining Data of Noisy Signal Patterns in Recognition of Gasoline Bio-Based Additives using Electronic Nose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osowski Stanisław

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the distorted data of an electronic nose in recognizing the gasoline bio-based additives. Different tools of data mining, such as the methods of data clustering, principal component analysis, wavelet transformation, support vector machine and random forest of decision trees are applied. A special stress is put on the robustness of signal processing systems to the noise distorting the registered sensor signals. A special denoising procedure based on application of discrete wavelet transformation has been proposed. This procedure enables to reduce the error rate of recognition in a significant way. The numerical results of experiments devoted to the recognition of different blends of gasoline have shown the superiority of support vector machine in a noisy environment of measurement.

  18. Statistical Model-Based Voice Activity Detection Using Spatial Cues and Log Energy for Dual-Channel Noisy Speech Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Hun; Shin, Min Hwa; Kim, Hong Kook

    In this paper, a voice activity detection (VAD) method for dual-channel noisy speech recognition is proposed on the basis of statistical models constructed by spatial cues and log energy. In particular, spatial cues are composed of the interaural time differences and interaural level differences of dual-channel speech signals, and the statistical models for speech presence and absence are based on a Gaussian kernel density. In order to evaluate the performance of the proposed VAD method, speech recognition is performed using only speech signals segmented by the proposed VAD method. The performance of the proposed VAD method is then compared with those of conventional methods such as a signal-to-noise ratio variance based method and a phase vector based method. It is shown from the experiments that the proposed VAD method outperforms conventional methods, providing the relative word error rate reductions of 19.5% and 12.2%, respectively.

  19. A deep convolutional neural network with new training methods for bearing fault diagnosis under noisy environment and different working load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Li, Chuanhao; Peng, Gaoliang; Chen, Yuanhang; Zhang, Zhujun

    2018-02-01

    In recent years, intelligent fault diagnosis algorithms using machine learning technique have achieved much success. However, due to the fact that in real world industrial applications, the working load is changing all the time and noise from the working environment is inevitable, degradation of the performance of intelligent fault diagnosis methods is very serious. In this paper, a new model based on deep learning is proposed to address the problem. Our contributions of include: First, we proposed an end-to-end method that takes raw temporal signals as inputs and thus doesn't need any time consuming denoising preprocessing. The model can achieve pretty high accuracy under noisy environment. Second, the model does not rely on any domain adaptation algorithm or require information of the target domain. It can achieve high accuracy when working load is changed. To understand the proposed model, we will visualize the learned features, and try to analyze the reasons behind the high performance of the model.

  20. [The occupational risk of hearing impairment associated with cardiovascular pathologies in the subjects engaged in 'noisy' industries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankova, V B; Preobrazhenskaya, E A; Fedina, I N

    The objective of the present study was to analyze the structure of concomitant somatic pathology in the subjects experiencing the occupational hearing problems. The study demonstrated the increase in the frequency of concomitant chronic diseases and the prevalence of polynosological conditions with the increasing severity of hearing impairment. It was shown that cardiovascular pathologies tend to enhance the risk of hearing loss in the employees engaged in «noisy» occupations. The cause-and-effect relationships were elucidated as the contribution of the "vascular" factor to the formation of occupational pathology of the organs of hearing. The clinical audilogical features of co-morbid occupational hearing impairment associated with vascular pathology were characterized by the accelerated development and progression of the hearing disorders with the gradual disappearance of the audiological signs characteristic of noise-induced lesions.

  1. Structural models used in real-time biosurveillance outbreak detection and outbreak curve isolation from noisy background morbidity levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Karen Elizabeth; Crary, David J; Ray, Jaideep; Safta, Cosmin

    2013-05-01

    We discuss the use of structural models for the analysis of biosurveillance related data. Using a combination of real and simulated data, we have constructed a data set that represents a plausible time series resulting from surveillance of a large scale bioterrorist anthrax attack in Miami. We discuss the performance of anomaly detection with structural models for these data using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and activity monitoring operating characteristic (AMOC) analysis. In addition, we show that these techniques provide a method for predicting the level of the outbreak valid for approximately 2 weeks, post-alarm. Structural models provide an effective tool for the analysis of biosurveillance data, in particular for time series with noisy, non-stationary background and missing data.

  2. A methodology for least-squares local quasi-geoid modelling using a noisy satellite-only gravity field model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klees, R.; Slobbe, D. C.; Farahani, H. H.

    2018-04-01

    The paper is about a methodology to combine a noisy satellite-only global gravity field model (GGM) with other noisy datasets to estimate a local quasi-geoid model using weighted least-squares techniques. In this way, we attempt to improve the quality of the estimated quasi-geoid model and to complement it with a full noise covariance matrix for quality control and further data processing. The methodology goes beyond the classical remove-compute-restore approach, which does not account for the noise in the satellite-only GGM. We suggest and analyse three different approaches of data combination. Two of them are based on a local single-scale spherical radial basis function (SRBF) model of the disturbing potential, and one is based on a two-scale SRBF model. Using numerical experiments, we show that a single-scale SRBF model does not fully exploit the information in the satellite-only GGM. We explain this by a lack of flexibility of a single-scale SRBF model to deal with datasets of significantly different bandwidths. The two-scale SRBF model performs well in this respect, provided that the model coefficients representing the two scales are estimated separately. The corresponding methodology is developed in this paper. Using the statistics of the least-squares residuals and the statistics of the errors in the estimated two-scale quasi-geoid model, we demonstrate that the developed methodology provides a two-scale quasi-geoid model, which exploits the information in all datasets.

  3. Noisy interlimb coordination can be a main cause of freezing of gait in patients with little to no parkinsonism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Tanahashi

    Full Text Available Freezing of gait in patients with Parkinson's disease is associated with several factors, including interlimb incoordination and impaired gait cycle regulation. Gait analysis in patients with Parkinson's disease is confounded by parkinsonian symptoms such as rigidity. To understand the mechanisms underlying freezing of gait, we compared gait patterns during straight walking between 9 patients with freezing of gait but little to no parkinsonism (freezing patients and 11 patients with Parkinson's disease (non-freezing patients. Wireless sensors were used to detect foot contact and toe-off events, and the step phase of each foot contact was calculated by defining one stride cycle of the other leg as 360°. Phase-resetting analysis was performed, whereby the relation between the step phase of one leg and the subsequent phase change in the following step of the other leg was quantified using regression analysis. A small slope of the regression line indicates a forceful correction (phase reset at every step of the deviation of step phase from the equilibrium phase, usually at around 180°. The slope of this relation was smaller in freezing patients than in non-freezing patients, but the slope exhibited larger step-to-step variability. This indicates that freezing patients executed a forceful but noisy correction of the deviation of step phase, whereas non-freezing patients made a gradual correction of the deviation. Moreover, freezing patients tended to show more variable step phase and stride time than non-freezing patients. Dynamics of a model of two coupled oscillators interacting through a phase resetting mechanism were examined, and indicated that the deterioration of phase reset by noise provoked variability in step phase and stride time. That is, interlimb coordination can affect regulation of the gait cycle. These results suggest that noisy interlimb coordination, which probably caused forceful corrections of step phase deviation, can be a

  4. Preparation, characterization, and efficient transfection of cationic liposomes and nanomagnetic cationic liposomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samadikhah HR

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Hamid Reza Samadikhah1,*, Asia Majidi2,*, Maryam Nikkhah2, Saman Hosseinkhani11Department of Biochemistry, 2Department of Nanobiotechnology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Iran *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: Cationic liposomes (CLs are composed of phospholipid bilayers. One of the most important applications of these particles is in drug and gene delivery. However, using CLs to deliver therapeutic nucleic acids and drugs to target organs has some problems, including low transfection efficiency in vivo. The aim of this study was to develop novel CLs containing magnetite to overcome the deficiencies. Patients and methods: CLs and magnetic cationic liposomes (MCLs were prepared using the freeze-dried empty liposome method. Luciferase-harboring vectors (pGL3 were transferred into liposomes and the transfection efficiencies were determined by luciferase assay. Firefly luciferase is one of most popular reporter genes often used to measure the efficiency of gene transfer in vivo and in vitro. Different formulations of liposomes have been used for delivery of different kinds of gene reporters. Lipoplex (liposome–plasmid DNA complexes formation was monitored by gel retardation assay. Size and charge of lipoplexes were determined using particle size analysis. Chinese hamster ovary cells were transfected by lipoplexes (liposome-pGL3; transfection efficiency and gene expression level was evaluated by luciferase assay. Results: High transfection efficiency of plasmid by CLs and novel nanomagnetic CLs was achieved. Moreover, lipoplexes showed less cytotoxicity than polyethyleneimine and Lipofectamine™. Conclusion: Novel liposome compositions (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine [DPPC]/dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide [DOAB] and DPPC/cholesterol/DOAB with high transfection efficiency can be useful in gene delivery in vitro. MCLs can also be used for targeted gene delivery, due to

  5. Evaluation of phenomena affecting diffusion of cations in compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muurinen, A.; Lehikoinen, J.

    1995-04-01

    In a number of diffusion studies, contradictions between the apparent diffusivities of cations and their distribution coefficients in bentonite have been found. Two principal reasons have been offered as explanations for this discrepancy; diffusion of the sorbed cations, often called surface diffusion, and the decrease of sorption in compacted clay compared to a sorption value obtained from a batch experiment. In the study the information available from the literature on sorption-diffusion mechanisms of cations in bentonite has been compiled and re-interpreted in order to improve the understanding of the diffusion process. (103 refs., 23 figs., 8 tabs.)

  6. Alkali Metal Cation versus Proton and Methyl Cation Affinities: Structure and Bonding Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Boughlala, Z.; Guerra, C.F.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We have analyzed the structure and bonding of gas?phase Cl?X and [HCl?X]+ complexes for X+=?H+, CH3 +, Li+, and Na+, using relativistic density functional theory (DFT). We wish to establish a quantitative trend in affinities of the anionic and neutral Lewis bases Cl? and HCl for the various cations. The Cl?X bond becomes longer and weaker along X+?=?H+, CH3 +, Li+, and Na+. Our main purpose is to understand the heterolytic bonding mechanism behind the intrinsic (i.e., in the absence ...

  7. Converting Hg-1212 to Tl-2212 via Tl-Hg cation exchange in combination with Tl cation intercalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hua; Wu, Judy Z

    2007-01-01

    In a cation exchange process developed recently for epitaxy of HgBa 2 CaCu 2 O 6 (Hg-1212) thin films, TlBa 2 CaCu 2 O 7 (Tl-1212) or Tl 2 Ba 2 CaCu 2 O 9 (Tl-2212) precursor films were employed as the precursor matrices and Hg-1212 was obtained by replacing Tl cations on the precursor lattice with Hg cations. The reversibility of the cation exchange dictates directly the underlying mechanism. Following our recent success in demonstrating a complete reversibility within '1212' structure, we show the conversion from Hg-1212 to Tl-2212 can be achieved via two steps: conversion from Hg-1212 to Tl-1212 followed by Tl intercalation to form double Tl-O plans in each unit cell. The demonstrated reversibility of the cation exchange process has confirmed the process is a thermal perturbation of weakly bonded cations on the lattice and the direction of the process is determined by the population ratio between the replacing cations and that to be replaced

  8. Endomembrane Cation Transporters and Membrane Trafficking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sze, Heven [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Cell Biology & Molecular Genetics

    2017-04-01

    Multicellular, as well as unicellular, organisms have evolved mechanisms to regulate ion and pH homeostasis in response to developmental cues and to a changing environment. The working hypothesis is that the balance of fluxes mediated by diverse transporters at the plasma membrane and in subcellular organelles determines ionic cellular distribution, which is critical for maintenance of membrane potential, pH control, osmolality, transport of nutrients, and protein activity. An emerging theme in plant cell biology is that cells respond and adapt to diverse cues through changes of the dynamic endomembrane system. Yet we know very little about the transporters that might influence the operation of the secretory system in plants. Here we focus on transporters that influence alkali cation and pH homeostasis, mainly in the endomembrane/ secretory system. The endomembrane system of eukaryote cells serves several major functions: i) sort cargo (e.g. enzymes, transporters or receptors) to specific destinations, ii) modulate the protein and lipid composition of membrane domains through remodeling, and iii) determine and alter the properties of the cell wall through synthesis and remodeling. We had uncovered a novel family of predicted cation/H+ exchangers (CHX) and K+ efflux antiporters (KEA) that are prevalent in higher plants, but rare in metazoans. We combined phylogenetic and transcriptomic analyses with molecular genetic, cell biological and biochemical studies, and have published the first reports on functions of plant CHXs and KEAs. CHX studied to date act at the endomembrane system where their actions are distinct from the better-studied NHX (Na/K-H+ exchangers). Arabidopsis thaliana CHX20 in guard cells modulate stomatal opening, and thus is significant for vegetative survival. Other CHXs ensure reproductive success on dry land, as they participate in organizing pollen walls, targeting of pollen tubes to the ovule or promoting

  9. Tinbergen on mirror neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyes, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Fifty years ago, Niko Tinbergen defined the scope of behavioural biology with his four problems: causation, ontogeny, survival value and evolution. About 20 years ago, there was another highly significant development in behavioural biology-the discovery of mirror neurons (MNs). Here, I use Tinbergen's original four problems (rather than the list that appears in textbooks) to highlight the differences between two prominent accounts of MNs, the genetic and associative accounts; to suggest that the latter provides the defeasible 'best explanation' for current data on the causation and ontogeny of MNs; and to argue that functional analysis, of the kind that Tinbergen identified somewhat misleadingly with studies of 'survival value', should be a high priority for future research. In this kind of functional analysis, system-level theories would assign MNs a small, but potentially important, role in the achievement of action understanding-or another social cognitive function-by a production line of interacting component processes. These theories would be tested by experimental intervention in human and non-human animal samples with carefully documented and controlled developmental histories.

  10. Insulin-like growth factor-1 inhibits adult supraoptic neurons via complementary modulation of mechanoreceptors and glycine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ster, Jeanne; Colomer, Claude; Monzo, Cécile; Duvoid-Guillou, Anne; Moos, Françoise; Alonso, Gérard; Hussy, Nicolas

    2005-03-02

    In the CNS, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is mainly known for its trophic effect both during development and in adulthood. Here, we show than in adult rat supraoptic nucleus (SON), IGF-1 receptor immunoreactivity is present in neurons, whereas IGF-1 immunoreactivity is found principally in astrocytes and more moderately in neurons. In vivo application of IGF-1 within the SON acutely inhibits the activity of both vasopressin and oxytocin neurons, the two populations of SON neuroendocrine cells. Recordings of acutely isolated SON neurons showed that this inhibition occurs through two rapid and reversible mechanisms, both involving the neuronal IGF-1 receptor but different intracellular messengers. IGF-1 inhibits Gd3+-sensitive and osmosensitive mechanoreceptor cation current via phosphatidylinositol-3 (PI3) kinase activation. IGF-1 also potentiates taurine-activated glycine receptor (GlyR) Cl- currents by increasing the agonist sensitivity through a extremely rapid (within a second) PI3 kinase-independent mechanism. Both mechanoreceptor channels and GlyR, which form the excitatory and inhibitory components of SON neuron osmosensitivity, are active at rest, and their respective inhibition and potentiation will both be inhibitory, leading to strong decrease in neuronal activity. It will be of interest to determine whether IGF-1 is released by neurons, thus participating in an inhibitory autocontrol, or astrocytes, then joining the growing family of glia-to-neuron transmitters that modulate neuronal and synaptic activity. Through the opposite and complementary acute regulation of mechanoreceptors and GlyR, IGF-1 appears as a new important neuromodulator in the adult CNS, participating in the complex integration of neural messages that regulates the level of neuronal excitability.

  11. Opposing effects of cationic antimicrobial peptides and divalent cations on bacterial lipopolysaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Matthew; Rajagopal, Aruna; Liu, Wing-Ki; Ha, Bae-Yeun

    2017-10-01

    The permeability of the bacterial outer membrane, enclosing Gram-negative bacteria, depends on the interactions of the outer, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) layer, with surrounding ions and molecules. We present a coarse-grained model for describing how cationic amphiphilic molecules (e.g., antimicrobial peptides) interact with and perturb the LPS layer in a biologically relevant medium, containing monovalent and divalent salt ions (e.g., Mg2+). In our approach, peptide binding is driven by electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions and is assumed to expand the LPS layer, eventually priming it for disruption. Our results suggest that in parameter ranges of biological relevance (e.g., at micromolar concentrations) the antimicrobial peptide magainin 2 effectively disrupts the LPS layer, even though it has to compete with Mg2+ for the layer. They also show how the integrity of LPS is restored with an increasing concentration of Mg2+. Using the approach, we make a number of predictions relevant for optimizing peptide parameters against Gram-negative bacteria and for understanding bacterial strategies to develop resistance against cationic peptides.

  12. Removal of cesium ions from clays by cationic surfactant intercalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan Woo; Kim, Bo Hyun; Yang, Hee-Man; Seo, Bum-Kyoung; Moon, Jei-Kwon; Lee, Kune-Woo

    2017-02-01

    We propose a new approach to remediate cesium-contaminated clays based on intercalation of the cationic surfactant dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) into clay interlayers. Intercalation of DTAB was found to occur very rapidly and involved exchanging interlayer cations. The reaction yielded efficient cesium desorption (∼97%), including of a large amount of otherwise non-desorbable cesium ions by cation exchange with ammonium ions. In addition, the intercalation of DTAB afforded an expansion of the interlayers, and an enhanced desorption of Cs by cation exchange with ammonium ions even at low concentrations of DTAB. Finally, the residual intercalated surfactants were easily removed by a decomposition reaction with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of Cu 2+ /Fe 2+ catalysts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Chemical bonding and structural ordering of cations in silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calas, G.; Cormier, L.; Galoisy, L.; Ramos, A.; Rossano, St.

    1997-01-01

    The specific surrounding of cations in multicomponent silicate glasses is briefly presented. Information about interatomic distances and site geometry may be gained by using spectroscopic methods among which x-ray absorption spectroscopy may be used for the largest number of glass components. Scattering of x-rays and neutrons may also be used to determine the importance of medium range order around specific cations. All the existing data show that cations occur in sites with a well-defined geometry, which are in most cases connected to the silicate polymeric network. Medium range order has been detected around cations such as Ti, Ca and Ni, indicating that these elements have an heterogeneous distribution within the glassy matrix. (authors)

  14. Significant role of cationic polymers in drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshbaf, Masoud; Davaran, Soodabeh; Zarebkohan, Amir; Annabi, Nasim; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl; Salehi, Roya

    2017-11-06

    Cationic polymers are characterized as the macromolecules that possess positive charges, which can be either inherently in the polymer side chains and/or its backbone. Based on their origins, cationic polymers are divided in two category including natural and synthetic, in which the possessed positive charges are as result of primary, secondary or tertiary amine functional groups that could be protonated in particular situations. Cationic polymers have been employed commonly as drug delivery agents due to their superior encapsulation efficacy, enhanced bioavailability, low toxicity and improved release profile. In this paper, we focus on the most prominent examples of cationic polymers which have been revealed to be applicable in drug delivery systems and we also discuss their general synthesis and surface modification methods as well as their controlled release profile in drug delivery.

  15. DNA Damage Induced Neuronal Death

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kisby, Glen

    1999-01-01

    ... (nitrogen mustard or HN2) and the neurotoxic DNA-damaging agent methylazoxymethanol (MAM) using neuronal and astrocyte cell cultures from different brain regions of mice with perturbed DNA repair...

  16. Information processing by neuronal populations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hölscher, Christian; Munk, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    ... simultaneously recorded spike trains 120 Mark Laubach, Nandakumar S. Narayanan, and Eyal Y. Kimchi Part III Neuronal population information coding and plasticity in specific brain areas 149 7 F...

  17. Protective effect of divalent cations against aluminum toxicity in soybean

    OpenAIRE

    Silva,Ivo Ribeiro da; Corrêa,Tarcísio Fernando Côrtes; Novais,Roberto Ferreira; Gebrim,Fabrício de Oliveira; Nunes,Flancer Novais; Silva,Eulene Francisco da; Smyth,Thomas Jot

    2008-01-01

    A large proportion of soybean fields in Brazil are currently cultivated in the Cerrado region, where the area planted with this crop is growing considerably every year. Soybean cultivation in acid soils is also increasing worldwide. Since the levels of toxic aluminum (Al) in these acid soils is usually high it is important to understand how cations can reduce Al rhizotoxicity in soybean. In the present study we evaluated the ameliorative effect of nine divalent cations (Ca, Mg, Mn, Sr, Sn, Cu...

  18. Isomerizations of the Nitromethane Radical Cation in the Gas Phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, Helge; Carlsen, Lars; Elbel, Susanne

    1986-01-01

    The concurrent isomerizations of the nitromethane radical cation to its aci-nitromethane and methylnitrite isomers, respectively, has been established based on metastable ion studies and collision activation mass spectrometry. The energy diagram for the ionized nitromethane/aci-nitromethane tauto......The concurrent isomerizations of the nitromethane radical cation to its aci-nitromethane and methylnitrite isomers, respectively, has been established based on metastable ion studies and collision activation mass spectrometry. The energy diagram for the ionized nitromethane...

  19. Bithiophene radical cation: Resonance Raman spectroscopy and molecular orbital calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grage, M.M.-L.; Keszthelyi, T.; Offersgaard, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    The resonance Raman spectrum of the photogenerated radical cation of bithiophene is reported. The bithiophene radical cation was produced via a photoinduced electron transfer reaction between excited bithiophene and the electron acceptor fumaronitrile in a room temperature acetonitrile solution...... and the Raman spectrum excited in resonance with the absorption band at 425 nm. The spectrum was interpreted with the help of density functional theory calculations. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V....

  20. Mercury release from deforested soils triggered by base cation enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farella, N.; Lucotte, M.; Davidson, R.; Daigle, S.

    2006-01-01

    The Brazilian Amazon has experienced considerable colonization in the last few decades. Family agriculture based on slash-and-burn enables millions of people to live in that region. However, the poor nutrient content of most Amazonian soils requires cation-rich ashes from the burning of the vegetation biomass for cultivation to be successful, which leads to forest ecosystem degradation, soil erosion and mercury contamination. While recent studies have suggested that mercury present in soils was transferred towards rivers upon deforestation, little is known about the dynamics between agricultural land-use and mercury leaching. In this context, the present study proposes an explanation that illustrates how agricultural land-use triggers mercury loss from soils. This explanation lies in the competition between base cations and mercury in soils which are characterized by a low adsorption capacity. Since these soils are naturally very poor in base cations, the burning of the forest biomass suddenly brings high quantities of base cations to soils, destabilizing the previous equilibrium amongst cations. Base cation enrichment triggers mobility in soil cations, rapidly dislocating mercury atoms. This conclusion comes from principal component analyses illustrating that agricultural land-use was associated with base cation enrichment and mercury depletion. The overall conclusions highlight a pernicious cycle: while soil nutrient enrichment actually occurs through biomass burning, although on a temporary basis, there is a loss in Hg content, which is leached to rivers, entering the aquatic chain, and posing a potential health threat to local populations. Data presented here reflects three decades of deforestation activities, but little is known about the long-term impact of such a disequilibrium. These findings may have repercussions on our understanding of the complex dynamics of deforestation and agriculture worldwide

  1. Trafficking of neuronal calcium channels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Weiss, Norbert; Zamponi, G. W.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2017), č. článku NS20160003. ISSN 2059-6553 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-13556S; GA MŠk 7AMB15FR015 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : calcium channel * neuron * trafficing Subject RIV: ED - Physiology OBOR OECD: Physiology (including cytology) http://www. neuron alsignaling.org/content/1/1/NS20160003

  2. Sorption phenomena of modification of clinoptilolite tuffs by surfactant cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozić, M; Ivanec Sipusić, D; Sekovanić, L; Miljanić, S; Curković, L; Hrenović, J

    2009-03-15

    The sorption of cationic surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) onto the solid/liquid interfaces of different clinoptilolite rich tuffs (CT) is examined. Examined were CT from Serbia with 75% clinoptilolite, CT from Turkey with 70% clinoptilolite, and CT from Croatia with 60% clinoptilolite. The sorption of HDTMA cations increased in the following order: CT from Serbia>CT from Turkey>CT from Croatia. The maximum amounts of sorbed HDTMA cations, normalized with regard to external cation exchange capacities of tuffs, were 1.79, 1.70, and 1.14 for Serbian, Turkish, and Croatian CT. FTIR analysis of samples with the maximum amount of sorbed HDTMA cations showed that HDTMA chains on Serbian CT adopt mainly a stretched all-trans conformation, while at the surfaces of CT from Turkey and Croatia the amount of gauche conformations increased. The zeta potentials of CT samples with the maximum amount of sorbed HDTMA cations and the sorption of benzoate anions on these samples increased in the following order: CT from Turkey>CT from Serbia>CT from Croatia. It can be assumed that on the surface of CT from Turkey iron (hydr)oxide clusters or nanoparticles with positive surface sites are present, due to which the isoelectric point is sifted toward lower and the zeta potential toward higher values. Therefore, the sorption of benzoate anions on modified CT from Turkey is also higher.

  3. On the mobility of exchangeable cations on clay surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimmi, T.; Kosakowski, G.; Glaus, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The diffusive mobility of radionuclides in buffer materials and potential host rocks is an important topic in the safety analysis for underground waste repositories. Many of the radionuclides are cations. Accordingly, the diffusion and retention of cations in compacted clay minerals and clay rocks is of central interest. The retention properties of the clay minerals originate from their negative surface charges. These are compensated by un-specifically sorbed cations that are located on planar surfaces or in interlayers (exchangeable cations) and by cations that are more specifically sorbed for instance to edge sites. In general, sorbed cations are considered as immobile with respect to diffusive transport. Whereas this may be correct for specifically sorbed cations, this is probably not the case for un-specifically sorbed exchangeable cations. They can easily exchange with cations in the pore solution, even if they are located- at low hydration states-in very narrow interlayers. For such exchange a certain mobility in the sorbed state is required. This is in line with the observations that many experimentally derived cation diffusion coefficients are larger than expected when compared with those of water tracers. This and the dependence of effective diffusion coefficients on the external salt concentration can be explained with so-called surface diffusion, that is, a movement of sorbed cations. Unfortunately, no direct proof of this phenomenon is available, and parameters like surface diffusion coefficients or surface mobilities are largely unknown. We compiled a large number of published cation diffusion coefficients for various clay minerals and clay rocks. We showed that by an appropriate scaling of the cation diffusion coefficients, it is possible to estimate the average surface mobility of the cation in each experiment. We define the surface mobility as the surface diffusion coefficient of a cation on a flat

  4. Tunable states of interlayer cations in two-dimensional materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, K.; Numata, K. [Department of Environmental Sciences, Tokyo Gakugei University, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Dai, W. [Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (Ministry of Education), College of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Hunger, M. [Institute of Chemical Technology, University of Stuttgart, 70550 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2014-03-31

    The local state of cations inside the Ångstrom-scale interlayer spaces is one of the controlling factors for designing sophisticated two-dimensional (2D) materials consisting of 2D nanosheets. In the present work, the molecular mechanism on how the interlayer cation states are induced by the local structures of the 2D nanosheets is highlighted. For this purpose, the local states of Na cations in inorganic 2D materials, in which the compositional fluctuations of a few percent are introduced in the tetrahedral and octahedral units of the 2D nanosheets, were systematically studied by means of {sup 23}Na magic-angle-spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and {sup 23}Na multiple-quantum MAS (MQMAS) NMR spectroscopy. In contrast with an uniform distribution of Na cations expected so far, various well-defined cation states sensitive to the local structures of the 2D nanosheets were identified. The tunability of the interlayer cation states along with the local structure of the 2D nanosheets, as the smallest structural unit of the 2D material, is discussed.

  5. Novel Reactivity Of The Cationic Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.; Dash, A.K.; Eisen, AM.; Berthet, J.C.; Ephritikhine, M.

    2002-01-01

    The catalytic chemistry of electrophilic d 0 /f organometallic complexes is nowadays under intense investigation, reaching a high level of sophistication. General aspects concerning these complexes are concentrated for most studies to the functionalization of unsaturated organic molecules. To cite an instance, the actinide-promoted oligomerization of terminal alkynes is of essential present concern since it may introduce to a diversity of organic enynes and oligoacetylene products that are valuable synthons for the synthesis of natural products. Enynes are the simplest oligomerization products of alkynes. We have demonstrated that organoactinides complexes of the type [Cp* 2 AnMe 2 AnMe 2 ] (Cp* = C 5 Me 5 ; An = U, Th) are active catalysts for the linear oligomerization of terminal alkynes and the extent of oligomerization was found to be strongly dependent on the electronic and steric properties of the alkyne substituents. Bulky alkynes were reacted with high regioselectivity toward dimer and/or trimers whereas for non-bulky alkynes, these compounds were transformed into oligomers with a total deficiency of regioselectivity. The addition of primary amines to the catalytic cycle, for An = Th, granted the chemoselective formation of dimers, chemoselectively, whereas for An = U, this control was not succeeded. In distinction to the neutral organoactinide complexes, homogeneous cationic d 0 /f n actinide complexes have been used as in the homogeneous polymerization of olefins as extremely active catalysts. Hence, the catalytic alkyne oligomerization is a opportune route to explore insertions and σ-bond metathesis reactivity of complexes. We have recently shown that the reaction of terminal alkynes (RC≡CH), promoted by [(Et 2 N) 3 U][BPh 4 ], in toluene, produces efficiently mostly the gem dimers (for R = Me, i Pr and n Bu) as the major products, whereas for bulky alkynes (R = t MS or t Bu) small amounts of the cis dimer was concomitantly obtained. A plausible

  6. TrpC5 Mediates Acute Leptin and Serotonin Effects via Pomc Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Gao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms underlying acute leptin and serotonin 2C receptor-induced hypophagia remain unclear. Here, we show that neuronal and pro-opiomelanocortin (Pomc-specific loss of transient receptor potential cation 5 (TrpC5 subunits is sufficient to decrease energy expenditure and increase food intake resulting in elevated body weight. Deficiency of Trpc5 subunits in Pomc neurons is also sufficient to block the anorexigenic effects of leptin and serotonin 2C receptor (Ht2Cr agonists. The loss of acute anorexigenic effects of these receptors is concomitant with a blunted electrophysiological response to both leptin and Ht2Cr agonists in arcuate Pomc neurons. We also demonstrate that the Ht2Cr agonist lorcaserin-induced improvements in glucose and insulin tolerance are blocked by TrpC5 deficiency in Pomc neurons. Together, our results link TrpC5 subunits in the brain with leptin- and serotonin 2C receptor-dependent changes in neuronal activity, as well as energy balance, feeding behavior, and glucose metabolism.

  7. Cation Exchange in the Presence of Oil in Porous Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajzadeh, R; Guo, H; van Winden, J; Bruining, J

    2017-04-20

    Cation exchange is an interfacial process during which cations on a clay surface are replaced by other cations. This study investigates the effect of oil type and composition on cation exchange on rock surfaces, relevant for a variety of oil-recovery processes. We perform experiments in which brine with a different composition than that of the in situ brine is injected into cores with and without remaining oil saturation. The cation-exchange capacity (CEC) of the rocks was calculated using PHREEQC software (coupled to a multipurpose transport simulator) with the ionic composition of the effluent histories as input parameters. We observe that in the presence of crude oil, ion exchange is a kinetically controlled process and its rate depends on residence time of the oil in the pore, the temperature, and kinetic rate of adsorption of the polar groups on the rock surface. The cation-exchange process occurs in two stages during two phase flow in porous media. Initially, the charged sites of the internal surface of the clays establish a new equilibrium by exchanging cations with the aqueous phase. At later stages, the components of the aqueous and oleic phases compete for the charged sites on the external surface or edges of the clays. When there is sufficient time for crude oil to interact with the rock (i.e., when the core is aged with crude oil), a fraction of the charged sites are neutralized by the charged components stemming from crude oil. Moreover, the positively charged calcite and dolomite surfaces (at the prevailing pH environment of our experiments) are covered with the negatively charged components of the crude oil and therefore less mineral dissolution takes place when oil is present in porous media.

  8. Neurotensin Co-Expressed in Orexin-Producing Neurons in the Lateral Hypothalamus Plays an Important Role in Regulation of Sleep/Wakefulness States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, Haruaki; Tsujino, Natsuko; Mieda, Michihiro; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Shioda, Seiji; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Both orexin and neurotensin are expressed in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) and have been implicated in the regulation of feeding, motor activity and the reward system. A double label immunofluorescence and in situ hybridization studies showed that neurotensin colocalizes with orexin in neurons of the LHA. Pharmacological studies suggested that neurotensin excites orexin-producing neurons (orexin neurons) through activation of neurotensin receptor-2 (NTSR-2) and non-selective cation channels. In situ hybridization study showed that most orexin neurons express neurotensin receptor-2 mRNA but not neurotensin receptor-1 (Ntsr-1) mRNA. Immunohistochemical studies showed that neurotensin-immunoreactive fibers make appositions to orexin neurons. A neurotensin receptor antagonist decreased Fos expression in orexin neurons and wakefulness time in wild type mice when administered intraperitoneally. However, the antagonist did not evoke any effect on these parameters in orexin neuron-ablated mice. These observations suggest the importance of neurotensin in maintaining activity of orexin neurons. The evidence presented here expands our understanding of the regulatory mechanism of orexin neurons. PMID:23620827

  9. Mechanisms Underlying Serotonergic Excitation of Callosal Projection Neurons in the Mouse Medial Prefrontal Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily K. Stephens

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin (5-HT selectively excites subpopulations of pyramidal neurons in the neocortex via activation of 5-HT2A (2A receptors coupled to Gq subtype G-protein alpha subunits. Gq-mediated excitatory responses have been attributed primarily to suppression of potassium conductances, including those mediated by KV7 potassium channels (i.e., the M-current, or activation of non-specific cation conductances that underlie calcium-dependent afterdepolarizations (ADPs. However, 2A-dependent excitation of cortical neurons has not been extensively studied, and no consensus exists regarding the underlying ionic effector(s involved. In layer 5 of the mouse medial prefrontal cortex, we tested potential mechanisms of serotonergic excitation in commissural/callosal (COM projection neurons, a subpopulation of pyramidal neurons that exhibits 2A-dependent excitation in response to 5-HT. In baseline conditions, 5-HT enhanced the rate of action potential generation in COM neurons experiencing suprathreshold somatic current injection. This serotonergic excitation was occluded by activation of muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh receptors, confirming that 5-HT acts via the same Gq-signaling cascades engaged by ACh. Like ACh, 5-HT promoted the generation of calcium-dependent ADPs following spike trains. However, calcium was not necessary for serotonergic excitation, as responses to 5-HT were enhanced (by >100%, rather than reduced, by chelation of intracellular calcium with 10 mM BAPTA. This suggests intracellular calcium negatively regulates additional ionic conductances gated by 2A receptors. Removal of extracellular calcium had no effect when intracellular calcium signaling was intact, but suppressed 5-HT response amplitudes, by about 50%, when BAPTA was included in patch pipettes. This suggests that 2A excitation involves activation of a non-specific cation conductance that is both calcium-sensitive and calcium-permeable. M-current suppression was found to be a third

  10. Neuronal factors determining high intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicke, Ursula; Roth, Gerhard

    2016-01-05

    Many attempts have been made to correlate degrees of both animal and human intelligence with brain properties. With respect to mammals, a much-discussed trait concerns absolute and relative brain size, either uncorrected or corrected for body size. However, the correlation of both with degrees of intelligence yields large inconsistencies, because although they are regarded as the most intelligent mammals, monkeys and apes, including humans, have neither the absolutely nor the relatively largest brains. The best fit between brain traits and degrees of intelligence among mammals is reached by a combination of the number of cortical neurons, neuron packing density, interneuronal distance and axonal conduction velocity--factors that determine general information processing capacity (IPC), as reflected by general intelligence. The highest IPC is found in humans, followed by the great apes, Old World and New World monkeys. The IPC of cetaceans and elephants is much lower because of a thin cortex, low neuron packing density and low axonal conduction velocity. By contrast, corvid and psittacid birds have very small and densely packed pallial neurons and relatively many neurons, which, despite very small brain volumes, might explain their high intelligence. The evolution of a syntactical and grammatical language in humans most probably has served as an additional intelligence amplifier, which may have happened in songbirds and psittacids in a convergent manner. © 2015 The Author(s).

  11. More questions for mirror neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Emma

    2013-09-01

    The mirror neuron system is widely held to provide direct access to the motor goals of others. This paper critically investigates this idea, focusing on the so-called 'intentional worry'. I explore two answers to the intentional worry: first that the worry is premised on too limited an understanding of mirror neuron behaviour (Sections 2 and 3), second that the appeal made to mirror neurons can be refined in such a way as to avoid the worry (Section 4). I argue that the first response requires an account of the mechanism by which small-scale gestures are supposedly mapped to larger chains of actions but that none of the extant accounts of this mechanism are plausible. Section 4 then briefly examines refinements of the mirror neuron-mindreading hypothesis which avoid the intentional worry. I conclude that these refinements may well be plausible but that they undermine many of the claims standardly made for mirror neurons. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Global analysis of neuronal phosphoproteome regulation by chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panpan Yu

    Full Text Available Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs are major components of the extracellular matrix which mediate inhibition of axonal regeneration after injury to the central nervous system (CNS. Several neuronal receptors for CSPGs have recently been identified; however, the signaling pathways by which CSPGs restrict axonal growth are still largely unknown. In this study, we applied quantitative phosphoproteomics to investigate the global changes in protein phosphorylation induced by CSPGs in primary neurons. In combination with isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ labeling, strong cation exchange chromatography (SCX fractionation, immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC and LC-MS/MS, we identified and quantified 2214 unique phosphopeptides corresponding to 1118 phosphoproteins, with 118 changing significantly in abundance with CSPG treatment. The proteins that were regulated by CSPGs included key components of synaptic vesicle trafficking, axon guidance mediated by semaphorins, integrin signaling, cadherin signaling and EGF receptor signaling pathways. A significant number of the regulated proteins are cytoskeletal and related proteins that have been implicated in regulating neurite growth. Another highly represented protein category regulated by CSPGs is nucleic acid binding proteins involved in RNA post-transcriptional regulation. Together, by screening the overall phosphoproteome changes induced by CSPGs, this data expand our understanding of CSPG signaling, which provides new insights into development of strategies for overcoming CSPG inhibition and promoting axonal regeneration after CNS injury.

  13. THERMODYNAMICS OF ETHANOLAMMONIUM CATIONES DISSOCIATION IN AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Khoma

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The literature data on the thermodynamics of ethanolamines onium cations dissociation have been systematized and generalized. The correlation between these cations dissociation thermodynamic functions (DH and DS and physicochemical properties (Tmp., Tbp, Pp, lgPow et al. has been revealed. There was a correlation between lipophilicity determined experimentally and calculated by QSAR. For monoethanolammonium, diethanolammonium, and their N-methyl and N-ethyl derivatives it was found dissociation thermodynamic functions to depend on bases lgPow. Acid-base dissociation of TRIS and triethanolamine onium cations does not correspond to said relationship because TRIS (primary amine, TEA (tertiary amine act differently on aqueous solutions of SO2. TEA, unlike MEA, DEA and MMEA, has a salting out effect towards sulfur dioxide because of competing hydration that promotes sulfite «onium» salts hydrolysis. TRIS promotes S(IV → S(VI sulphooxidation, in contrast to another ethanolamines. Enthalpy–enthropy compensation with isothermodynamic temperature 303 K has been recorded. The revealed correlations may be useful in developing of procedures for air sanitary cleaning from acidic gases; chemisorbents immobilized for gas and ion exchange chromatography; potentiometric methods for fluorocomplex acids determinations. The use of monoethanolamine is most promising to obtain chemisorbents because the thermodynamic functions of its onium cation acid-base dissociation are least dependent on temperature compared to other etanolammonium cations.

  14. Experimental demonstration of robust entanglement distribution over reciprocal noisy channels assisted by a counter-propagating classical reference light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikuta, Rikizo; Nozaki, Shota; Yamamoto, Takashi; Koashi, Masato; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2017-07-06

    Embedding a quantum state in a decoherence-free subspace (DFS) formed by multiple photons is one of the promising methods for robust entanglement distribution of photonic states over collective noisy channels. In practice, however, such a scheme suffers from a low efficiency proportional to transmittance of the channel to the power of the number of photons forming the DFS. The use of a counter-propagating coherent pulse can improve the efficiency to scale linearly in the channel transmission, but it achieves only protection against phase noises. Recently, it was theoretically proposed [Phys. Rev. A 87, 052325(2013)] that the protection against bit-flip noises can also be achieved if the channel has a reciprocal property. Here we experimentally demonstrate the proposed scheme to distribute polarization-entangled photon pairs against a general collective noise including the bit flip noise and the phase noise. We observed an efficient sharing rate scaling while keeping a high quality of the distributed entangled state. Furthermore, we show that the method is applicable not only to the entanglement distribution but also to the transmission of arbitrary polarization states of a single photon.

  15. Consensual punishment does not promote cooperation in the six-person prisoner's dilemma game with noisy public monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Miltenburg, Nynke; Przepiorka, Wojtek; Buskens, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    We study the effects of different punishment institutions on cooperation in a six-person prisoner's dilemma game in which actors observe others' cooperation with some noise (i.e. imperfect public monitoring). Previous research has shown that peer punishment can sustain cooperation, if a certain proportion of group members punish defectors at a cost to themselves. However, in the presence of noise, co-operators will sometimes be mistaken for defectors and punished, and defectors will sometimes be mistaken for co-operators and escape punishment. Both types of mistakes are detrimental for cooperation because cooperation is discouraged and defection is encouraged. By means of a laboratory experiment, we study whether this adverse effect of noise can be mitigated by consensual punishment. The more other group members have to agree on punishing a defector, the less likely will a co-operator be punished by mistake. We compare a punishment institution in which each subject decides individually whether to punish another, with institutions in which punishments are only implemented if subjects reach sufficient consensus that a particular group member should be punished. In conditions without noise, we find that cooperation and subjects' payoffs are higher if more consensus is required before a punishment is implemented. In conditions with noise, cooperation is lower if more consensus is required. Moreover, with noise, subjects' payoffs are lower under all punishment institutions than in the control condition without punishment opportunities. Our results narrow down the conditions under which punishment institutions can promote cooperation if such cooperation is noisy.

  16. Rapid evolution of sexual signals in sympatric Calopteryx damselflies: reinforcement or 'noisy-neighbour' ecological character displacement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, S P; Andrés, J A

    2007-07-01

    Enhanced prezygotic isolation in sympatry is one of the most intriguing patterns in evolutionary biology and has frequently been interpreted as evidence for reinforcement. However, the frequency with which reinforcement actually completes speciation remains unclear. The Jewelwing damselflies (Calopteryx aequabilis and C. maculata) have served as one of the few classic examples of speciation via reinforcement outside of Drosophila. Although evidence for wing pattern displacement and increased mate discrimination in this system have been demonstrated, the degree of hybridization and gene flow in nature are unknown. Here, we show that sympatric populations of these two species are the result of recent secondary contact, as predicted under a model of speciation via reinforcement. However, we found no phenotypic evidence of hybridization in natural populations and a complete association between species-specific haplotypes at two different loci (mitochondrial CO I and nuclear EF1-alpha), suggesting little or no contemporary gene flow. Moreover, genealogical and coalescent-based estimates of divergence times and migration rates indicate that, speciation occurred in the distant past. The rapid evolution of wing colour in sympatry is recent, therefore, relative to speciation and seems to be better explained by selection against wasting mating effort and/or interspecific aggression resulting from a 'noisy neighbour' signalling environment.

  17. Crack Identification in CFRP Laminated Beams Using Multi-Resolution Modal Teager-Kaiser Energy under Noisy Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Cao, Maosen; Ding, Keqin; Radzieński, Maciej; Ostachowicz, Wiesław

    2017-06-15

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminates are increasingly used in the aerospace and civil engineering fields. Identifying cracks in carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminated beam components is of considerable significance for ensuring the integrity and safety of the whole structures. With the development of high-resolution measurement technologies, mode-shape-based crack identification in such laminated beam components has become an active research focus. Despite its sensitivity to cracks, however, this method is susceptible to noise. To address this deficiency, this study proposes a new concept of multi-resolution modal Teager-Kaiser energy, which is the Teager-Kaiser energy of a mode shape represented in multi-resolution, for identifying cracks in carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminated beams. The efficacy of this concept is analytically demonstrated by identifying cracks in Timoshenko beams with general boundary conditions; and its applicability is validated by diagnosing cracks in a carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminated beam, whose mode shapes are precisely acquired via non-contact measurement using a scanning laser vibrometer. The analytical and experimental results show that multi-resolution modal Teager-Kaiser energy is capable of designating the presence and location of cracks in these beams under noisy environments. This proposed method holds promise for developing crack identification systems for carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminates.

  18. Crack Identification in CFRP Laminated Beams Using Multi-Resolution Modal Teager–Kaiser Energy under Noisy Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminates are increasingly used in the aerospace and civil engineering fields. Identifying cracks in carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminated beam components is of considerable significance for ensuring the integrity and safety of the whole structures. With the development of high-resolution measurement technologies, mode-shape-based crack identification in such laminated beam components has become an active research focus. Despite its sensitivity to cracks, however, this method is susceptible to noise. To address this deficiency, this study proposes a new concept of multi-resolution modal Teager–Kaiser energy, which is the Teager–Kaiser energy of a mode shape represented in multi-resolution, for identifying cracks in carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminated beams. The efficacy of this concept is analytically demonstrated by identifying cracks in Timoshenko beams with general boundary conditions; and its applicability is validated by diagnosing cracks in a carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminated beam, whose mode shapes are precisely acquired via non-contact measurement using a scanning laser vibrometer. The analytical and experimental results show that multi-resolution modal Teager–Kaiser energy is capable of designating the presence and location of cracks in these beams under noisy environments. This proposed method holds promise for developing crack identification systems for carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminates.

  19. Pre-adaptation to noisy Galvanic vestibular stimulation is associated with enhanced sensorimotor performance in novel vestibular environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven T Moore

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Performance on a visuomotor task in the presence of novel vestibular stimulation was assessed in nine healthy subjects. Four subjects had previously been adapted to 120 minutes exposure to noisy Galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS over 12 weekly sessions of 10 minutes; the remaining five subjects had never experienced GVS. Subjects were seated in a flight simulator and asked to null the roll motion of a visual bar presented on a screen using a joystick. Both the visual bar and the simulator cabin were moving in roll with a pseudorandom (sum of sines waveform that were uncorrelated. The cross correlation coefficient, which ranges from 1 (identical waveforms to 0 (unrelated waveforms, was calculated for the ideal (perfect nulling of bar motion and actual joystick input waveform for each subject. The cross correlation coefficient for the GVS-adapted group (0.90 [SD 0.04] was significantly higher (t[8]=3.162; p=0.013 than the control group (0.82 [SD 0.04], suggesting that prior adaptation to GVS was associated with an enhanced ability to perform the visuomotor task in the presence of novel vestibular noise.

  20. Crack Identification in CFRP Laminated Beams Using Multi-Resolution Modal Teager–Kaiser Energy under Noisy Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Cao, Maosen; Ding, Keqin; Radzieński, Maciej; Ostachowicz, Wiesław

    2017-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminates are increasingly used in the aerospace and civil engineering fields. Identifying cracks in carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminated beam components is of considerable significance for ensuring the integrity and safety of the whole structures. With the development of high-resolution measurement technologies, mode-shape-based crack identification in such laminated beam components has become an active research focus. Despite its sensitivity to cracks, however, this method is susceptible to noise. To address this deficiency, this study proposes a new concept of multi-resolution modal Teager–Kaiser energy, which is the Teager–Kaiser energy of a mode shape represented in multi-resolution, for identifying cracks in carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminated beams. The efficacy of this concept is analytically demonstrated by identifying cracks in Timoshenko beams with general boundary conditions; and its applicability is validated by diagnosing cracks in a carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminated beam, whose mode shapes are precisely acquired via non-contact measurement using a scanning laser vibrometer. The analytical and experimental results show that multi-resolution modal Teager–Kaiser energy is capable of designating the presence and location of cracks in these beams under noisy environments. This proposed method holds promise for developing crack identification systems for carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminates. PMID:28773016

  1. Nutrients and toxin producing phytoplankton control algal blooms - a spatio-temporal study in a noisy environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Ram Rup; Malchow, Horst

    2005-12-01

    A phytoplankton-zooplankton prey-predator model has been investigated for temporal, spatial and spatio-temporal dissipative pattern formation in a deterministic and noisy environment, respectively. The overall carrying capacity for the phytoplankton population depends on the nutrient level. The role of nutrient concentrations and toxin producing phytoplankton for controlling the algal blooms has been discussed. The local analysis yields a number of stationary and/or oscillatory regimes and their combinations. Correspondingly interesting is the spatio-temporal behaviour, modelled by stochastic reaction-diffusion equations. The present study also reveals the fact that the rate of toxin production by toxin producing phytoplankton (TPP) plays an important role for controlling oscillations in the plankton system. We also observe that different mortality functions of zooplankton due to TPP have significant influence in controlling oscillations, coexistence, survival or extinction of the zoo-plankton population. External noise can enhance the survival and spread of zooplankton that would go extinct in the deterministic system due to a high rate of toxin production.

  2. Reliable real-time calculation of heart-rate complexity in critically ill patients using multiple noisy waveform sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nehemiah T; Cancio, Leopoldo C; Salinas, Jose; Batchinsky, Andriy I

    2014-04-01

    Heart-rate complexity (HRC) has been proposed as a new vital sign for critical care medicine. The purpose of this research was to develop a reliable method for determining HRC continuously in real time in critically ill patients using multiple waveform channels that also compensates for noisy and unreliable data. Using simultaneously acquired electrocardiogram (Leads I, II, V) and arterial blood pressure waveforms sampled at 360 Hz from 250 patients (over 375 h of patient data), we evaluated a new data fusion framework for computing HRC in real time. The framework employs two algorithms as well as signal quality indices. HRC was calculated (via the method of sample entropy), and equivalence tests were then performed. Bland-Altman plots and box plots of differences between mean HRC values were also obtained. Finally, HRC differences were analyzed by paired t tests. The gold standard for obtaining true means was manual verification of R waves and subsequent entropy calculations. Equivalence tests between mean HRC values derived from manually verified sequences and those derived from automatically detected peaks showed that the "Fusion" values were the least statistically different from the gold standard. Furthermore, the fusion of waveform sources produced better error density distributions than those derived from individual waveforms. The data fusion framework was shown to provide in real-time a reliable continuously streamed HRC value, derived from multiple waveforms in the presence of noise and artifacts. This approach will be validated and tested for assessment of HRC in critically ill patients.

  3. A Novel Method for Detection of Epilepsy in Short and Noisy EEG Signals Using Ordinal Pattern Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Veisi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In this paper, a novel complexity measure is proposed to detect dynamical changes in nonlinear systems using ordinal pattern analysis of time series data taken from the system. Epilepsy is considered as a dynamical change in nonlinear and complex brain system. The ability of the proposed measure for characterizing the normal and epileptic EEG signals when the signal is short or is contaminated with noise is investigated and compared with some traditional chaos-based measures. Materials and Methods: In the proposed method, the phase space of the time series is reconstructed and then partitioned using ordinal patterns. The partitions can be labeled using a set of symbols. Therefore, the state trajectory is converted to a symbol sequence. A finite state machine is then constructed to model the sequence. A new complexity measure is proposed to detect dynamical changes using the state transition matrix of the state machine. The proposed complexity measure was applied to detect epilepsy in short and noisy EEG signals and the results were compared with some chaotic measures. Results: The results indicate that this complexity measure can distinguish normal and epileptic EEG signals with an accuracy of more than 97% for clean EEG and more than 75% for highly noised EEG signals. Discussion and Conclusion: The complexity measure can be computed in a very fast and easy way and, unlike traditional chaotic measures, is robust with respect to noise corrupting the data. This measure is also capable of dynamical change detection in short time series data.

  4. Convergence estimates in probability and in expectation for discrete least squares with noisy evaluations at random points

    KAUST Repository

    Migliorati, Giovanni

    2015-08-28

    We study the accuracy of the discrete least-squares approximation on a finite dimensional space of a real-valued target function from noisy pointwise evaluations at independent random points distributed according to a given sampling probability measure. The convergence estimates are given in mean-square sense with respect to the sampling measure. The noise may be correlated with the location of the evaluation and may have nonzero mean (offset). We consider both cases of bounded or square-integrable noise / offset. We prove conditions between the number of sampling points and the dimension of the underlying approximation space that ensure a stable and accurate approximation. Particular focus is on deriving estimates in probability within a given confidence level. We analyze how the best approximation error and the noise terms affect the convergence rate and the overall confidence level achieved by the convergence estimate. The proofs of our convergence estimates in probability use arguments from the theory of large deviations to bound the noise term. Finally we address the particular case of multivariate polynomial approximation spaces with any density in the beta family, including uniform and Chebyshev.

  5. Modulation of Specific Sensory Cortical Areas by Segregated Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neurons Demonstrated by Neuronal Tracing and Optogenetic Stimulation in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves-Coira, Irene; Barros-Zulaica, Natali; Rodrigo-Angulo, Margarita; Núñez, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    Neocortical cholinergic activity plays a fundamental role in sensory processing and cognitive functions. Previous results have suggested a refined anatomical and functional topographical organization of basal forebrain (BF) projections that may control cortical sensory processing in a specific manner. We have used retrograde anatomical procedures to demonstrate the existence of specific neuronal groups in the BF involved in the control of specific sensory cortices. Fluoro-Gold (FlGo) and Fast Blue (FB) fluorescent retrograde tracers were deposited into the primary somatosensory (S1) and primary auditory (A1) cortices in mice. Our results revealed that the BF is a heterogeneous area in which neurons projecting to different cortical areas are segregated into different neuronal groups. Most of the neurons located in the horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB) projected to the S1 cortex, indicating that this area is specialized in the sensory processing of tactile stimuli. However, the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (B) nucleus shows a similar number of cells projecting to the S1 as to the A1 cortices. In addition, we analyzed the cholinergic effects on the S1 and A1 cortical sensory responses by optogenetic stimulation of the BF neurons in urethane-anesthetized transgenic mice. We used transgenic mice expressing the light-activated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2, tagged with a fluorescent protein (ChR2-YFP) under the control of the choline-acetyl transferase promoter (ChAT). Cortical evoked potentials were induced by whisker deflections or by auditory clicks. According to the anatomical results, optogenetic HDB stimulation induced more extensive facilitation of tactile evoked potentials in S1 than auditory evoked potentials in A1, while optogenetic stimulation of the B nucleus facilitated either tactile or auditory evoked potentials equally. Consequently, our results suggest that cholinergic projections to the cortex are organized into segregated

  6. Modulation of specific sensory cortical areas by segregated basal forebrain cholinergic neurons demonstrated by neuronal tracing and optogenetic stimulation in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene eChaves-Coira

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Neocortical cholinergic activity plays a fundamental role in sensory processing and cognitive functions. Previous results have suggested a refined anatomical and functional topographical organization of basal forebrain (BF projections that may control cortical sensory processing in a specific manner. We have used retrograde anatomical procedures to demonstrate the existence of specific neuronal groups in the BF involved in the control of specific sensory cortices. Fluoro-gold and Fast Blue fluorescent retrograde tracers were deposited into the primary somatosensory (S1 and primary auditory (A1 cortices in mice. Our results revealed that the BF is a heterogeneous area in which neurons projecting to different cortical areas are segregated into different neuronal groups. Most of the neurons located in the horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB projected to the S1 cortex, indicating that this area is specialized in the sensory processing of tactile stimuli. However, the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (B nucleus shows a similar number of cells projecting to the S1 as to the A1 cortices. In addition, we analyzed the cholinergic effects on the S1 and A1 cortical sensory responses by optogenetic stimulation of the BF neurons in urethane-anesthetized transgenic mice. We used transgenic mice expressing the light-activated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2, tagged with a fluorescent protein (ChR2-YFP under the control of the choline-acetyl transferase promoter (ChAT. Cortical evoked potentials were induced by whisker deflections or by auditory clicks. According to the anatomical results, optogenetic HDB stimulation induced more extensive facilitation of tactile evoked potentials in S1 than auditory evoked potentials in A1, while optogenetic stimulation of the B nucleus facilitated either tactile or auditory evoked potentials equally. Consequently, our results suggest that cholinergic projections to the cortex are organized into segregated

  7. The neuroleptic chlorpromazine inhibits the cationic and stimulates the anionic phospholipid precursor synthesis in human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staub, M; Stenger, A; Sumeg, R; Spasokoukotskaja, T; Fairbanks, L D; Simmonds, H A; Keszler, G

    2006-01-01

    The widely used neuroleptic drug chlorpromazine (CPZ) influences membrane functions at the levels of ionic channels and receptors as shown. Here we show the effect of short term treatments by CPZ (30 microM), on the nucleotide-containing phospholipid precursors in human lymphocyte primary cultures. During 60 minutes incubation of the cells, the CDP-ethanolamine (CDP-EA) content was only slightly reduced (87 to 76 pmol/10(6) cells), the amount of CDP-choline (CDP-Ch) was inhibited totally (from 25 to 0 pmol) upon the treatment with 30 microM CPZ under the same conditions. It has been shown earlier, that dCTP can be used as well as CTP for biosynthesis of phospholipids. Thus, the separation of the corresponding ribo- and deoxyribo-liponucleotides was developed. CPZ almost completely inhibited the synthesis of both dCDP-EA and dCDP-Ch under the same conditions The synthesis of the activated liponucleotide precursors, can be measured by incorporation of extracellular 14C-dCyt into both dCDP-EA and dCDP-Ch, as shown earlier. While the cationic deoxyribo-liponucleotide content (dCDP-Ch, dCDP-EA) was decreased, the labelling of the anionic phospholipid precursor dCDP-diacylglycerol (dCDP-DAG) was enhanced several times, it could be labelled only in the presence of CPZ from 14C-dCyd. Thus, a principal disturbance of the membrane phospholipid synthesis is presented (i.e., inhibition of the cationic and enhancement of the anionic dCDP-DAG synthesis). This profound influence on the membrane phospholipids by chlorpromazine, might be the primary effect that contributes to the wide spectrum of CPZ effects on neuronal cells.

  8. Towards a Neuronal Gauge Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Biswa; Tozzi, Arturo; Cooray, Gerald K.; Douglas, Pamela K.; Friston, Karl J.

    2016-01-01

    Given the amount of knowledge and data accruing in the neurosciences, is it time to formulate a general principle for neuronal dynamics that holds at evolutionary, developmental, and perceptual timescales? In this paper, we propose that the brain (and other self-organised biological systems) can be characterised via the mathematical apparatus of a gauge theory. The picture that emerges from this approach suggests that any biological system (from a neuron to an organism) can be cast as resolving uncertainty about its external milieu, either by changing its internal states or its relationship to the environment. Using formal arguments, we show that a gauge theory for neuronal dynamics—based on approximate Bayesian inference—has the potential to shed new light on phenomena that have thus far eluded a formal description, such as attention and the link between action and perception. PMID:26953636

  9. Neuronal oscillations in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witcher, Mark; Moran, Rosalyn; Tatter, Stephen B; Laxton, Adrian W

    2014-06-01

    Parkinson's Disease (PD), characterized by tremor, rigidity, and bradykinesia, is one of the most prevalent neurodegenerative disorders in the world. The pathological hallmark of PD is the loss of dopaminergic cells in the substantia nigra and other brain regions. The pathophysiological mechanisms by which dopaminergic cell loss leads to the motor manifestations of PD are yet to be fully elucidated. A growing body of evidence has revealed abnormal neuronal oscillations within and between multiple brain regions in PD. Unique oscillatory patterns are associated with specific motor abnormalities in PD. Therapies, such as dopaminergic medication and deep brain stimulation that disrupt these abnormal neuronal oscillatory patterns produce symptomatic improvement in PD patients. These findings emphasize the importance of abnormal neuronal oscillations in the pathophysiology of PD, making the disruption of these oscillatory patterns a promising target in the development of effective PD treatments.

  10. Prospective Coding by Spiking Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanni Brea

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Animals learn to make predictions, such as associating the sound of a bell with upcoming feeding or predicting a movement that a motor command is eliciting. How predictions are realized on the neuronal level and what plasticity rule underlies their learning is not well understood. Here we propose a biologically plausible synaptic plasticity rule to learn predictions on a single neuron level on a timescale of seconds. The learning rule allows a spiking two-compartment neuron to match its current firing rate to its own expected future discounted firing rate. For instance, if an originally neutral event is repeatedly followed by an event that elevates the firing rate of a neuron, the originally neutral event will eventually also elevate the neuron's firing rate. The plasticity rule is a form of spike timing dependent plasticity in which a presynaptic spike followed by a postsynaptic spike leads to potentiation. Even if the plasticity window has a width of 20 milliseconds, associations on the time scale of seconds can be learned. We illustrate prospective coding with three examples: learning to predict a time varying input, learning to predict the next stimulus in a delayed paired-associate task and learning with a recurrent network to reproduce a temporally compressed version of a sequence. We discuss the potential role of the learning mechanism in classical trace conditioning. In the special case that the signal to be predicted encodes reward, the neuron learns to predict the discounted future reward and learning is closely related to the temporal difference learning algorithm TD(λ.

  11. Calcium signals in olfactory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tareilus, E; Noé, J; Breer, H

    1995-11-09

    Laser scanning confocal microscopy in combination with the fluorescent calcium indicators Fluo-3 and Fura-Red was employed to estimate the intracellular concentration of free calcium ions in individual olfactory receptor neurons and to monitor temporal and spatial changes in the Ca(2+)-level upon stimulation. The chemosensory cells responded to odorants with a significant increase in the calcium concentration, preferentially in the dendritic knob. Applying various stimulation paradigma, it was found that in a population of isolated cells, subsets of receptor neurons display distinct patterns of responsiveness.

  12. Noise Enhances Action Potential Generation in Mouse Sensory Neurons via Stochastic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onorato, Irene; D'Alessandro, Giuseppina; Di Castro, Maria Amalia; Renzi, Massimiliano; Dobrowolny, Gabriella; Musarò, Antonio; Salvetti, Marco; Limatola, Cristina; Crisanti, Andrea; Grassi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Noise can enhance perception of tactile and proprioceptive stimuli by stochastic resonance processes. However, the mechanisms underlying this general phenomenon remain to be characterized. Here we studied how externally applied noise influences action potential firing in mouse primary sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia, modelling a basic process in sensory perception. Since noisy mechanical stimuli may cause stochastic fluctuations in receptor potential, we examined the effects of sub-threshold depolarizing current steps with superimposed random fluctuations. We performed whole cell patch clamp recordings in cultured neurons of mouse dorsal root ganglia. Noise was added either before and during the step, or during the depolarizing step only, to focus onto the specific effects of external noise on action potential generation. In both cases, step + noise stimuli triggered significantly more action potentials than steps alone. The normalized power norm had a clear peak at intermediate noise levels, demonstrating that the phenomenon is driven by stochastic resonance. Spikes evoked in step + noise trials occur earlier and show faster rise time as compared to the occasional ones elicited by steps alone. These data suggest that external noise enhances, via stochastic resonance, the recruitment of transient voltage-gated Na channels, responsible for action potential firing in response to rapid step-wise depolarizing currents.

  13. Span: spike pattern association neuron for learning spatio-temporal spike patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohemmed, Ammar; Schliebs, Stefan; Matsuda, Satoshi; Kasabov, Nikola

    2012-08-01

    Spiking Neural Networks (SNN) were shown to be suitable tools for the processing of spatio-temporal information. However, due to their inherent complexity, the formulation of efficient supervised learning algorithms for SNN is difficult and remains an important problem in the research area. This article presents SPAN - a spiking neuron that is able to learn associations of arbitrary spike trains in a supervised fashion allowing the processing of spatio-temporal information encoded in the precise timing of spikes. The idea of the proposed algorithm is to transform spike trains during the learning phase into analog signals so that common mathematical operations can be performed on them. Using this conversion, it is possible to apply the well-known Widrow-Hoff rule directly to the transformed spike trains in order to adjust the synaptic weights and to achieve a desired input/output spike behavior of the neuron. In the presented experimental analysis, the proposed learning algorithm is evaluated regarding its learning capabilities, its memory capacity, its robustness to noisy stimuli and its classification performance. Differences and similarities of SPAN regarding two related algorithms, ReSuMe and Chronotron, are discussed.

  14. Multiscale analysis of slow-fast neuronal learning models with noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galtier, Mathieu; Wainrib, Gilles

    2012-11-22

    This paper deals with the application of temporal averaging methods to recurrent networks of noisy neurons undergoing a slow and unsupervised modification of their connectivity matrix called learning. Three time-scales arise for these models: (i) the fast neuronal dynamics, (ii) the intermediate external input to the system, and (iii) the slow learning mechanisms. Based on this time-scale separation, we apply an extension of the mathematical theory of stochastic averaging with periodic forcing in order to derive a reduced deterministic model for the connectivity dynamics. We focus on a class of models where the activity is linear to understand the specificity of several learning rules (Hebbian, trace or anti-symmetric learning). In a weakly connected regime, we study the equilibrium connectivity which gathers the entire 'knowledge' of the network about the inputs. We develop an asymptotic method to approximate this equilibrium. We show that the symmetric part of the connectivity post-learning encodes the correlation structure of the inputs, whereas the anti-symmetric part corresponds to the cross correlation between the inputs and their time derivative. Moreover, the time-scales ratio appears as an important parameter revealing temporal correlations.

  15. Comparison contemporary methods of regeneration sodium-cationic filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burakov, I. A.; Burakov, A. Y.; Nikitina, I. S.; Verkhovsky, A. E.; Ilyushin, A. S.; Aladushkin, S. V.

    2017-11-01

    Regeneration plays a crucial role in the field of efficient application sodium-cationic filters for softening the water. Traditionally used as regenerant saline NaCl. However, due to the modern development of the energy industry and its close relationship with other industrial and academic sectors the opportunity to use in the regeneration of other solutions. The report estimated data and application possibilities as regenerant solution sodium-cationic filters brine wells a high mineral content, as both primary application and after balneotherapeutic use reverse osmosis and concentrates especially recycled regenerant water repeated. Comparison of the effectiveness of these solutions with the traditional use of NaCl. Developed and tested system for the processing of highly mineralized brines wells after balneological use. Recommendations for use as regeneration solutions for the sodium-cationic unit considered solutions and defined rules of brine for regeneration costs.

  16. Cationization of Alpha-Cellulose to Develop New Sustainable Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Moral

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Papermaking has been using high quantities of retention agents, mainly cationic substances and organic compounds such as polyamines. The addition of these agents is related to economic and environmental issues, increasing contamination of the effluents. The aim of this work is to develop a cationic polymer for papermaking purposes based on the utilization of alpha-cellulose. The cationization of mercerized alpha-cellulose with 3-chloro-2-hydroxypropyltrimethylammonium chloride (CHPTAC is governed by a pseudo-second-order reaction. The initial amorphous fraction of cellulose is reacted with CHPTAC until the equilibrium value of nitrogen substitution is reached. Nitrogen is incorporated as a quaternary ammonium group in the polymer. Also, the kinetic constant increased with decreasing crystallinity index, showing the importance of the previous alkalization stage. The use of modified natural polysaccharides is a sustainable alternative to synthetic, nonbiodegradable polyelectrolytes and thus is desirable with a view to developing new products and new processes.

  17. Structure and Intramolecular Proton Transfer of Alanine Radical Cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gab Yong

    2012-01-01

    The structures of the four lowest alanine conformers, along with their radical cations and the effect of ionization on the intramolecular proton transfer process, are studied using the density functional theory and MP2 method. The energy order of the radical cations of alanine differs from that of the corresponding neutral conformers due to changes in the basicity of the NH 2 group upon ionization. Ionization favors the intramolecular proton transfer process, leading to a proton-transferred radical-cation structure, [NH 3 + -CHCH 3 -COO·], which contrasts with the fact that a proton-transferred zwitterionic conformer is not stable for a neutral alanine in the gas phase. The energy barrier during the proton transfer process is calculated to be about 6 kcal/mol

  18. Nanoscale encapsulation: the structure of cations in hydrophobic microporous aluminosilicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasserman, S.R.; Yuchs, S.E.; Giaquinta, D.; Soderholm, L.; Song, Kang.

    1996-01-01

    Hydrophobic microporous aluminosilicates, created by organic surface modification of inherently hydrophilic materials such as zeolites and clays, are currently being investigated as storage media for hazardous cations. Use of organic monolayers to modify the surface of an aluminosilicate after introducing an ion into the zeolite/clay reduces the interaction of water with the material. Resulting systems are about 20 times more resistant to leaching of stored ion. XAS spectra from the encapsulated ion demonstrate that byproducts from the organic modifier can complex with the stored cation. This complexation can result in a decreased affinity of the cation for the aluminosilicate matrix. Changing the organic modifier eliminates this problem. XAS spectra also indicate that the reactivity and speciation of the encapsulated ion may change upon application of the hydrophobic layer

  19. Vibronic and cation spectroscopy of 2,4-difluoroaniline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei Chih; Huang, Po Sheng; Hu, Ching Han; Tzeng, Wen Bih

    We applied the two-color resonant two-photon ionization and mass-analyzed threshold ionization techniques to record the vibronic and cation spectra of 2,4-difluoroaniline. The cation spectra were recorded by ionizing via the 00, X1, 6b1, and 11 levels of the electronically excited S1 state. Most of the observed active modes of this molecule in the S1 and cationic ground D0 states are related to the in-plane ring deformation vibrations. The band origin of the S1 ← S0 electronic excitation was found to appear at 33 294 ± 2 cm-1, whereas the adiabatic ionization energy was determined to be 63 935 ± 5 cm-1. Comparing the data of 2,4-difluoroaniline with those of aniline, 2-fluoroaniline, and 4-fluoroaniline, one can learn the effects of fluorine substitution on the electronic transition and molecular vibration.

  20. Changing of Cations Concentrations in Waters of Polluted Urban River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrianova Maria

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Water from urban river Okhta polluted with domestic and industrial wastewaters was investigated. Specific electric conductivity (k, molar concentrations of ions Na+, K+, Mg++ and Ca++, concentration of total nitrogen (TN were measured in water samples. Increasing of k happened together with increasing of molar fraction of sodium-ion (RNa among all studied cations (and correspondingly decreasing of molar fractions of other cations. Good correlations were found between RNa and TN (r = 0.67, k and TN (r = 0.84. The results support the idea of the leading role of wastewaters in changing of k and cations concentrations. Electric conductivity and RNa could be used to distinguish between polluted and not polluted waters in the Okhta.