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  1. MRI Findings of Coexistence of Ectopic Neurohypophysis, Corpus Callosum Dysgenesis, and Periventricular Neuronal Heterotopia

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    Harun Arslan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic neurohypophysis is a pituitary gland abnormality, which can accompany growth hormone deficiency associated with dwarfism. Here we present magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings of a rare case of ectopic neurohypophysis, corpus callosum dysgenesis, and periventricular neuronal heterotopia coexisting, with a review of the literature.

  2. Novel DLK-independent neuronal regeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans shares links with activity-dependent ectopic outgrowth

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    Awal, Mehraj R.; Shay, James; McLoed, Melissa M.; Mazur, Eric; Gabel, Christopher V.

    2016-01-01

    During development, a neuron transitions from a state of rapid growth to a stable morphology, and neurons within the adult mammalian CNS lose their ability to effectively regenerate in response to injury. Here, we identify a novel form of neuronal regeneration, which is remarkably independent of DLK-1/DLK, KGB-1/JNK, and other MAPK signaling factors known to mediate regeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila, and mammals. This DLK-independent regeneration in C. elegans has direct genetic and molecular links to a well-studied form of endogenous activity-dependent ectopic axon outgrowth in the same neuron type. Both neuron outgrowth types are triggered by physical lesion of the sensory dendrite or mutations disrupting sensory activity, calcium signaling, or genes that restrict outgrowth during neuronal maturation, such as SAX-1/NDR kinase or UNC-43/CaMKII. These connections suggest that ectopic outgrowth represents a powerful platform for gene discovery in neuronal regeneration. Moreover, we note numerous similarities between C. elegans DLK-independent regeneration and lesion conditioning, a phenomenon producing robust regeneration in the mammalian CNS. Both regeneration types are triggered by lesion of a sensory neurite via reduction of neuronal activity and enhanced by disrupting L-type calcium channels or elevating cAMP. Taken as a whole, our study unites disparate forms of neuronal outgrowth to uncover fresh molecular insights into activity-dependent control of the adult nervous system’s intrinsic regenerative capacity. PMID:27078101

  3. The Site of Spontaneous Ectopic Spike Initiation Facilitates Signal Integration in a Sensory Neuron.

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    Städele, Carola; Stein, Wolfgang

    2016-06-22

    Essential to understanding the process of neuronal signal integration is the knowledge of where within a neuron action potentials (APs) are generated. Recent studies support the idea that the precise location where APs are initiated and the properties of spike initiation zones define the cell's information processing capabilities. Notably, the location of spike initiation can be modified homeostatically within neurons to adjust neuronal activity. Here we show that this potential mechanism for neuronal plasticity can also be exploited in a rapid and dynamic fashion. We tested whether dislocation of the spike initiation zone affects signal integration by studying ectopic spike initiation in the anterior gastric receptor neuron (AGR) of the stomatogastric nervous system of Cancer borealis Like many other vertebrate and invertebrate neurons, AGR can generate ectopic APs in regions distinct from the axon initial segment. Using voltage-sensitive dyes and electrophysiology, we determined that AGR's ectopic spike activity was consistently initiated in the neuropil region of the stomatogastric ganglion motor circuits. At least one neurite branched off the AGR axon in this area; and indeed, we found that AGR's ectopic spike activity was influenced by local motor neurons. This sensorimotor interaction was state-dependent in that focal axon modulation with the biogenic amine octopamine, abolished signal integration at the primary spike initiation zone by dislocating spike initiation to a distant region of the axon. We demonstrate that the site of ectopic spike initiation is important for signal integration and that axonal neuromodulation allows for a dynamic adjustment of signal integration. Although it is known that action potentials are initiated at specific sites in the axon, it remains to be determined how the precise location of action potential initiation affects neuronal activity and signal integration. We addressed this issue by studying ectopic spiking in the axon of

  4. E2F1-mediated human POMC expression in ectopic Cushing's syndrome.

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    Araki, Takako; Liu, Ning-Ai; Tone, Yukiko; Cuevas-Ramos, Daniel; Heltsley, Roy; Tone, Masahide; Melmed, Shlomo

    2016-11-01

    Cushing's syndrome is caused by excessive adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) secretion derived from pituitary corticotroph tumors (Cushing disease) or from non-pituitary tumors (ectopic Cushing's syndrome). Hypercortisolemic features of ectopic Cushing's syndrome are severe, and no definitive treatment for paraneoplastic ACTH excess is available. We aimed to identify subcellular therapeutic targets by elucidating transcriptional regulation of the human ACTH precursor POMC (proopiomelanocortin) and ACTH production in non-pituitary tumor cells and in cell lines derived from patients with ectopic Cushing's syndrome. We show that ectopic hPOMC transcription proceeds independently of pituitary-specific Tpit/Pitx1 and demonstrate a novel E2F1-mediated transcriptional mechanism regulating hPOMC We identify an E2F1 cluster binding to the proximal hPOMC promoter region (-42 to +68), with DNA-binding activity determined by the phosphorylation at Ser-337. hPOMC mRNA expression in cancer cells was upregulated (up to 40-fold) by the co-expression of E2F1 and its heterodimer partner DP1. Direct and indirect inhibitors of E2F1 activity suppressed hPOMC gene expression and ACTH by modifying E2F1 DNA-binding activity in ectopic Cushing's cell lines and primary tumor cells, and also suppressed paraneoplastic ACTH and cortisol levels in xenografted mice. E2F1-mediated hPOMC transcription is a potential target for suppressing ACTH production in ectopic Cushing's syndrome. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  5. Ectopic eyes outside the head in Xenopus tadpoles provide sensory data for light-mediated learning.

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    Blackiston, Douglas J; Levin, Michael

    2013-03-15

    A major roadblock in the biomedical treatment of human sensory disorders, including blindness, has been an incomplete understanding of the nervous system and its ability to adapt to changes in sensory modality. Likewise, fundamental insight into the evolvability of complex functional anatomies requires understanding brain plasticity and the interaction between the nervous system and body architecture. While advances have been made in the generation of artificial and biological replacement components, the brain's ability to interpret sensory information arising from ectopic locations is not well understood. We report the use of eye primordia grafts to create ectopic eyes along the body axis of Xenopus tadpoles. These eyes are morphologically identical to native eyes and can be induced at caudal locations. Cell labeling studies reveal that eyes created in the tail send projections to the stomach and trunk. To assess function we performed light-mediated learning assays using an automated machine vision and environmental control system. The results demonstrate that ectopic eyes in the tail of Xenopus tadpoles could confer vision to the host. Thus ectopic visual organs were functional even when present at posterior locations. These data and protocols demonstrate the ability of vertebrate brains to interpret sensory input from ectopic structures and incorporate them into adaptive behavioral programs. This tractable new model for understanding the robust plasticity of the central nervous system has significant implications for regenerative medicine and sensory augmentation technology.

  6. Insertion sequence inversions mediated by ectopic recombination between terminal inverted repeats.

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    Ling, Alison; Cordaux, Richard

    2010-12-20

    Transposable elements are widely distributed and diverse in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, as exemplified by DNA transposons. As a result, they represent a considerable source of genomic variation, for example through ectopic (i.e. non-allelic homologous) recombination events between transposable element copies, resulting in genomic rearrangements. Ectopic recombination may also take place between homologous sequences located within transposable element sequences. DNA transposons are typically bounded by terminal inverted repeats (TIRs). Ectopic recombination between TIRs is expected to result in DNA transposon inversions. However, such inversions have barely been documented. In this study, we report natural inversions of the most common prokaryotic DNA transposons: insertion sequences (IS). We identified natural TIR-TIR recombination-mediated inversions in 9% of IS insertion loci investigated in Wolbachia bacteria, which suggests that recombination between IS TIRs may be a quite common, albeit largely overlooked, source of genomic diversity in bacteria. We suggest that inversions may impede IS survival and proliferation in the host genome by altering transpositional activity. They may also alter genomic instability by modulating the outcome of ectopic recombination events between IS copies in various orientations. This study represents the first report of TIR-TIR recombination within bacterial IS elements and it thereby uncovers a novel mechanism of structural variation for this class of prokaryotic transposable elements.

  7. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and ectopic neuronal discharge after chronic compression of dorsal root ganglia.

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    Song, X J; Hu, S J; Greenquist, K W; Zhang, J M; LaMotte, R H

    1999-12-01

    Chronic compression of the dorsal root ganglion (CCD) was produced in adult rats by implanting a stainless steel rod unilaterally into the intervertebral foramen, one rod at L(4) and another at L(5). Two additional groups of rats received either a sham surgery or an acute injury consisting of a transient compression of the ganglion. Withdrawal of the hindpaw was used as evidence of a nocifensive response to mechanical and thermal stimulation of the plantar surface. In addition, extracellular electrophysiological recordings of spontaneous discharges were obtained from dorsal root fibers of formerly compressed ganglia using an in vitro nerve-DRG-dorsal root preparation. The mean threshold force of punctate indentation and the mean threshold temperature of heating required to elicit a 50% incidence of foot withdrawal ipsilateral to the CCD were significantly lower than preoperative values throughout the 35 days of postoperative testing. The number of foot withdrawals ipsilateral to the CCD during a 20-min contact with a temperature-controlled floor was significantly increased over preoperative values throughout postoperative testing when the floor was 4 degrees C (hyperalgesia) and, to a lesser extent, when it was 30 degrees C (spontaneous pain). Stroking the foot with a cotton wisp never elicited a reflex withdrawal before surgery but did so in most rats tested ipsilateral to the CCD during the first 2 postoperative weeks. In contrast, the CCD produced no changes in responses to mechanical or thermal stimuli on the contralateral foot. The sham operation and acute injury produced no change in behavior other than slight, mechanical hyperalgesia for approximately 1 day, ipsilateral to the acute injury. Ectopic spontaneous discharges generated within the chronically compressed ganglion and, occurring in the absence of blood-borne chemicals and without an intact sympathetic nervous system, were recorded from neurons with intact, conducting, myelinated or unmyelinated

  8. Ectopic Kidney

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    ... Ectopic Kidney Medullary Sponge Kidney Kidney Dysplasia Ectopic Kidney What is an ectopic kidney? An ectopic kidney is a birth defect in ... has an ectopic kidney. 1 What are the kidneys and what do they do? The kidneys are ...

  9. Ectopic Motor Unit Activity in Motor Neuron Disease : Clinical application of surface EMG methods

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    B.T.H.M. Sleutjes (Boudewijn)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Motor neuron disease (MND) is characterized by the progressive loss of motor neurons that control voluntary muscles. Due to its progressive nature, the muscles gradually lose their function leading to paralysis and, ultimately, death. The most common variant of MND is a

  10. Ectopic Expression of α6 and δ GABAA Receptor Subunits in Hilar Somatostatin Neurons Increases Tonic Inhibition and Alters Network Activity in the Dentate Gyrus.

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    Tong, Xiaoping; Peng, Zechun; Zhang, Nianhui; Cetina, Yliana; Huang, Christine S; Wallner, Martin; Otis, Thomas S; Houser, Carolyn R

    2015-12-09

    The role of GABAA receptor (GABAAR)-mediated tonic inhibition in interneurons remains unclear and may vary among subgroups. Somatostatin (SOM) interneurons in the hilus of the dentate gyrus show negligible expression of nonsynaptic GABAAR subunits and very low tonic inhibition. To determine the effects of ectopic expression of tonic GABAAR subtypes in these neurons, Cre-dependent viral vectors were used to express GFP-tagged GABAAR subunits (α6 and δ) selectively in hilar SOM neurons in SOM-Cre mice. In single-transfected animals, immunohistochemistry demonstrated strong expression of either the α6 or δ subunit; in cotransfected animals, both subunits were consistently expressed in the same neurons. Electrophysiology revealed a robust increase of tonic current, with progressively larger increases following transfection of δ, α6, and α6/δ subunits, respectively, indicating formation of functional receptors in all conditions and likely coassembly of the subunits in the same receptor following cotransfection. An in vitro model of repetitive bursting was used to determine the effects of increased tonic inhibition in hilar SOM interneurons on circuit activity in the dentate gyrus. Upon cotransfection, the frequency of GABAAR-mediated bursting in granule cells was reduced, consistent with a reduction in synchronous firing among hilar SOM interneurons. Moreover, in vivo studies of Fos expression demonstrated reduced activation of α6/δ-cotransfected neurons following acute seizure induction by pentylenetetrazole. The findings demonstrate that increasing tonic inhibition in hilar SOM interneurons can alter dentate gyrus circuit activity during strong stimulation and suggest that tonic inhibition of interneurons could play a role in regulating excessive synchrony within the network. In contrast to many hippocampal interneurons, somatostatin (SOM) neurons in the hilus of the dentate gyrus have very low levels of nonsynaptic GABAARs and exhibit very little tonic

  11. 3' Untranslated regions mediate transcriptional interference between convergent genes both locally and ectopically in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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    Wang, Luwen; Jiang, Ning; Wang, Lin; Fang, Ou; Leach, Lindsey J; Hu, Xiaohua; Luo, Zewei

    2014-01-01

    Paired sense and antisense (S/AS) genes located in cis represent a structural feature common to the genomes of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and produce partially complementary transcripts. We used published genome and transcriptome sequence data and found that over 20% of genes (645 pairs) in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome are arranged in convergent pairs with overlapping 3'-UTRs. Using published microarray transcriptome data from the standard laboratory strain of S. cerevisiae, our analysis revealed that expression levels of convergent pairs are significantly negatively correlated across a broad range of environments. This implies an important role for convergent genes in the regulation of gene expression, which may compensate for the absence of RNA-dependent mechanisms such as micro RNAs in budding yeast. We selected four representative convergent gene pairs and used expression assays in wild type yeast and its genetically modified strains to explore the underlying patterns of gene expression. Results showed that convergent genes are reciprocally regulated in yeast populations and in single cells, whereby an increase in expression of one gene produces a decrease in the expression of the other, and vice-versa. Time course analysis of the cell cycle illustrated the functional significance of this relationship for the three pairs with relevant functional roles. Furthermore, a series of genetic modifications revealed that the 3'-UTR sequence plays an essential causal role in mediating transcriptional interference, which requires neither the sequence of the open reading frame nor the translation of fully functional proteins. More importantly, transcriptional interference persisted even when one of the convergent genes was expressed ectopically (in trans) and therefore does not depend on the cis arrangement of convergent genes; we conclude that the mechanism of transcriptional interference cannot be explained by the transcriptional collision

  12. 3' Untranslated regions mediate transcriptional interference between convergent genes both locally and ectopically in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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    Luwen Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Paired sense and antisense (S/AS genes located in cis represent a structural feature common to the genomes of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and produce partially complementary transcripts. We used published genome and transcriptome sequence data and found that over 20% of genes (645 pairs in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome are arranged in convergent pairs with overlapping 3'-UTRs. Using published microarray transcriptome data from the standard laboratory strain of S. cerevisiae, our analysis revealed that expression levels of convergent pairs are significantly negatively correlated across a broad range of environments. This implies an important role for convergent genes in the regulation of gene expression, which may compensate for the absence of RNA-dependent mechanisms such as micro RNAs in budding yeast. We selected four representative convergent gene pairs and used expression assays in wild type yeast and its genetically modified strains to explore the underlying patterns of gene expression. Results showed that convergent genes are reciprocally regulated in yeast populations and in single cells, whereby an increase in expression of one gene produces a decrease in the expression of the other, and vice-versa. Time course analysis of the cell cycle illustrated the functional significance of this relationship for the three pairs with relevant functional roles. Furthermore, a series of genetic modifications revealed that the 3'-UTR sequence plays an essential causal role in mediating transcriptional interference, which requires neither the sequence of the open reading frame nor the translation of fully functional proteins. More importantly, transcriptional interference persisted even when one of the convergent genes was expressed ectopically (in trans and therefore does not depend on the cis arrangement of convergent genes; we conclude that the mechanism of transcriptional interference cannot be explained by the

  13. Ectopic neurons in the hippocampus may be a cause of learning disability after prenatal exposure to X-rays in rats.

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    Takai, Nobuhiko; Sun, Xue-Zhi; Ando, Koichi; Mishima, Kenichi; Takahashi, Sentaro

    2004-12-01

    The relationship between an impairment of spatial navigation and an incidence of ectopic neurons in the dorsal hippocampus was investigated in adult rats that were prenatally exposed to X-ray irradiation. Adult rats which had received 1.5 Gy X-rays at embryonic day 15 (E15) showed significant learning disability in the water-maze task. According to the mean value of the swimming time, we categorized the irradiated adult rats into the following three groups: slightly damaged group, mildly damaged group and severely damaged group. No significant difference in the brain weight was found between the three categorized groups. Ectopic neurons appearing at abnormal places were prominently observed in the dorsal hippocampus of the severely damaged group with a remarkable learning disturbance, while no ectopia in the hippocampus was observed in the slightly damaged group. This may suggest that the cognitive dysfunction induced by prenatal exposure to X-ray irradiation may be, at least in part, attributable to ectopic neurons of the hippocampus.

  14. Ectopic Pregnancy

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    ... woman is pregnant. If you have an ectopic pregnancy, the fertilized egg grows in the wrong place, ... tubes. The result is usually a miscarriage. Ectopic pregnancy can be a medical emergency if it ruptures. ...

  15. Ectopic Pregnancy

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    ... Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & ... low blood pressure (also caused by blood loss) lower back pain continue What Causes an Ectopic Pregnancy? An ectopic ...

  16. Ectopic Myf5 or MyoD prevents the neuronal differentiation program in addition to inducing skeletal muscle differentiation, in the chick neural tube.

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    Delfini, Marie-Claire; Duprez, Delphine

    2004-02-01

    Forced expression of the bHLH myogenic factors, Myf5 and MyoD, in various mammalian cell lines induces the full program of myogenic differentiation. However, this property has not been extensively explored in vivo. We have taken advantage of the chick model to investigate the effect of electroporation of the mouse Myf5 and MyoD genes in the embryonic neural tube. We found that misexpression of either mouse Myf5 or MyoD in the chick neural tube leads to ectopic skeletal muscle differentiation, assayed by the expression of the myosin heavy chains in the neural tube and neural crest derivatives. We also showed that the endogenous neuronal differentiation program is inhibited under the influence of either ectopic mouse Myf5 or MyoD. We used this new system to analyse, in vivo, the transcriptional regulation between the myogenic factors. We found that MyoD and Myogenin expression can be activated by ectopic mouse Myf5 or MyoD, while Myf5 expression cannot be activated either by mouse MyoD or by itself. We also analysed the transcriptional regulation between the myogenic factors and the different genes involved in myogenesis, such as Mef2c, Pax3, Paraxis, Six1, Mox1, Mox2 and FgfR4. We established the existence of an unexpected regulatory loop between MyoD and FgfR4. The consequences for myogenesis are discussed.

  17. Antibody-Mediated Clearance of Alphavirus Infection from Neurons

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    Levine, Beth; Hardwick, J. Marie; Trapp, Bruce D.; Crawford, Thomas O.; Bollinger, Robert C.; Griffin, Diane E.

    1991-11-01

    Humoral immunity is important for protection against viral infection and neutralization of extracellular virus, but clearance of virus from infected tissues is thought to be mediated solely by cellular immunity. However, in a SCID mouse model of persistent alphavirus encephalomyelitis, adoptive transfer of hyperimmune serum resulted in clearance of infectious virus and viral RNA from the nervous system, whereas adoptive transfer of sensitized T lymphocytes had no effect on viral replication. Three monoclonal antibodies to two different epitopes on the E2 envelope glycoprotein mediated viral clearance. Treatment of alphavirus-infected primary cultured rat neurons with these monoclonal antibodies to E2 resulted in decreased viral protein synthesis, followed by gradual termination of mature infectious virion production. Thus, antibody can mediate clearance of alphavirus infection from neurons by restricting viral gene expression.

  18. Necroptosis Mediates TNF-Induced Toxicity of Hippocampal Neurons

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    Shan Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α is a critical proinflammatory cytokine regulating neuroinflammation. Elevated levels of TNF-α have been associated with various neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. However, the signaling events that lead to TNF-α-initiated neurotoxicity are still unclear. Here, we report that RIP3-mediated necroptosis, a form of regulated necrosis, is activated in the mouse hippocampus after intracerebroventricular injection of TNF-α. RIP3 deficiency attenuates TNF-α-initiated loss of hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we characterized the molecular mechanism of TNF-α-induced neurotoxicity in HT-22 hippocampal neuronal cells. HT-22 cells are sensitive to TNF-α only upon caspase blockage and subsequently undergo necrosis. The cell death is suppressed by knockdown of CYLD or RIP1 or RIP3 or MLKL, suggesting that this necrosis is necroptosis and mediated by CYLD-RIP1-RIP3-MLKL signaling pathway. TNF-α-induced necroptosis of HT-22 cells is largely independent of both ROS accumulation and calcium influx although these events have been shown to be critical for necroptosis in certain cell lines. Taken together, these data not only provide the first in vivo evidence for a role of RIP3 in TNF-α-induced toxicity of hippocampal neurons, but also demonstrate that TNF-α promotes CYLD-RIP1-RIP3-MLKL-mediated necroptosis of hippocampal neurons largely bypassing ROS accumulation and calcium influx.

  19. Necroptosis mediates TNF-induced toxicity of hippocampal neurons.

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    Liu, Shan; Wang, Xing; Li, Yun; Xu, Lei; Yu, Xiaoliang; Ge, Lin; Li, Jun; Zhu, Yongjin; He, Sudan

    2014-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a critical proinflammatory cytokine regulating neuroinflammation. Elevated levels of TNF-α have been associated with various neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. However, the signaling events that lead to TNF-α-initiated neurotoxicity are still unclear. Here, we report that RIP3-mediated necroptosis, a form of regulated necrosis, is activated in the mouse hippocampus after intracerebroventricular injection of TNF-α. RIP3 deficiency attenuates TNF-α-initiated loss of hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we characterized the molecular mechanism of TNF-α-induced neurotoxicity in HT-22 hippocampal neuronal cells. HT-22 cells are sensitive to TNF-α only upon caspase blockage and subsequently undergo necrosis. The cell death is suppressed by knockdown of CYLD or RIP1 or RIP3 or MLKL, suggesting that this necrosis is necroptosis and mediated by CYLD-RIP1-RIP3-MLKL signaling pathway. TNF-α-induced necroptosis of HT-22 cells is largely independent of both ROS accumulation and calcium influx although these events have been shown to be critical for necroptosis in certain cell lines. Taken together, these data not only provide the first in vivo evidence for a role of RIP3 in TNF-α-induced toxicity of hippocampal neurons, but also demonstrate that TNF-α promotes CYLD-RIP1-RIP3-MLKL-mediated necroptosis of hippocampal neurons largely bypassing ROS accumulation and calcium influx.

  20. Genetic analysis of ectopic growth suppression during planar growth of integuments mediated by the Arabidopsis AGC protein kinase UNICORN

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    Enugutti Balaji

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The coordination of growth within a tissue layer is of critical importance for tissue morphogenesis. For example, cells within the epidermis undergo stereotypic cell divisions that are oriented along the plane of the layer (planar growth, thereby propagating the layered epidermal structure. Little is known about the developmental control that regulates such planar growth in plants. Recent evidence suggested that the Arabidopsis AGC VIII protein kinase UNICORN (UCN maintains planar growth by suppressing the formation of ectopic multicellular protrusions in several floral tissues including integuments. In the current model UCN controls this process during integument development by directly interacting with the ABERRANT TESTA SHAPE (ATS protein, a member of the KANADI (KAN family of transcription factors, thereby repressing its activity. Here we report on the further characterization of the UCN mechanism. Results Phenotypic analysis of flowers of ucn-1 plants impaired in floral homeotic gene activity revealed that any of the four floral whorls could produce organs carrying ucn-1 protrusions. The ectopic outgrowths of ucn integuments did not accumulate detectable signals of the auxin and cytokinin reporters DR5rev::GFP and ARR5::GUS, respectively. Furthermore, wild-type and ucn-1 seedlings showed similarly strong callus formation upon in vitro culture on callus-inducing medium. We also show that ovules of ucn-1 plants carrying the dominant ats allele sk21-D exhibited more pronounced protrusion formation. Finally ovules of ucn-1 ett-1 double mutants and ucn-1 ett-1 arf4-1 triple mutants displayed an additive phenotype. Conclusions These data deepen the molecular insight into the UCN-mediated control of planar growth during integument development. The presented evidence indicates that UCN downstream signaling does not involve the control of auxin or cytokinin homeostasis. The results also reveal that UCN interacts with ATS

  1. Multiple redundant medulla projection neurons mediate color vision in Drosophila.

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    Melnattur, Krishna V; Pursley, Randall; Lin, Tzu-Yang; Ting, Chun-Yuan; Smith, Paul D; Pohida, Thomas; Lee, Chi-Hon

    2014-01-01

    The receptor mechanism for color vision has been extensively studied. In contrast, the circuit(s) that transform(s) photoreceptor signals into color percepts to guide behavior remain(s) poorly characterized. Using intersectional genetics to inactivate identified subsets of neurons, we have uncovered the first-order interneurons that are functionally required for hue discrimination in Drosophila. We developed a novel aversive operant conditioning assay for intensity-independent color discrimination (true color vision) in Drosophila. Single flying flies are magnetically tethered in an arena surrounded by blue and green LEDs (light-emitting diodes). The flies' optomotor response is used to determine the blue-green isoluminant intensity. Flies are then conditioned to discriminate between equiluminant blue or green stimuli. Wild-type flies are successfully trained in this paradigm when conditioned to avoid either blue or green. Functional color entrainment requires the function of the narrow-spectrum photoreceptors R8 and/or R7, and is within a limited range, intensity independent, suggesting that it is mediated by a color vision system. The medulla projection neurons, Tm5a/b/c and Tm20, receive direct inputs from R7 or R8 photoreceptors and indirect input from the broad-spectrum photoreceptors R1-R6 via the lamina neuron L3. Genetically inactivating these four classes of medulla projection neurons abolished color learning. However, inactivation of subsets of these neurons is insufficient to block color learning, suggesting that true color vision is mediated by multiple redundant pathways. We hypothesize that flies represent color along multiple axes at the first synapse in the fly visual system. The apparent redundancy in learned color discrimination sharply contrasts with innate ultraviolet (UV) spectral preference, which is dominated by a single pathway from the amacrine neuron Dm8 to the Tm5c projection neurons.

  2. TMC-1 Mediates Alkaline Sensation in C. elegans through Nociceptive Neurons.

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    Wang, Xiang; Li, Guang; Liu, Jie; Liu, Jianfeng; Xu, X Z Shawn

    2016-07-06

    Noxious pH triggers pungent taste and nocifensive behavior. While the mechanisms underlying acidic pH sensation have been extensively characterized, little is known about how animals sense alkaline pH in the environment. TMC genes encode a family of evolutionarily conserved membrane proteins whose functions are largely unknown. Here, we characterize C. elegans TMC-1, which was suggested to form a Na(+)-sensitive channel mediating salt chemosensation. Interestingly, we find that TMC-1 is required for worms to avoid noxious alkaline environment. Alkaline pH evokes an inward current in nociceptive neurons, which is primarily mediated by TMC-1 and to a lesser extent by the TRP channel OSM-9. However, unlike OSM-9, which is sensitive to both acidic and alkaline pH, TMC-1 is only required for alkali-activated current, revealing a specificity for alkaline sensation. Ectopic expression of TMC-1 confers alkaline sensitivity to alkali-insensitive cells. Our results identify an unexpected role for TMCs in alkaline sensation and nociception.

  3. Ectopic heartbeat

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    ... forceful beats Note: There may be no symptoms. Exams and Tests A physical exam may show an ... help reduce ectopic heartbeats for some people: Limiting caffeine, alcohol, and tobacco Regular exercise for people who ...

  4. Extracellular vesicles as mediators of neuron-glia communication

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    Carsten eFrühbeis

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In the nervous system, glia cells maintain homeostasis, synthesize myelin, provide metabolic support, and participate in immune defense. The communication between glia and neurons is essential to synchronize these diverse functions with brain activity. Evidence is accumulating that secreted extracellular vesicles (EVs, such as exosomes and shedding microvesicles, are key players in intercellular signaling. Among others, the cells of the nervous system secrete EVs, which carry protein and RNA cargo from one cell to another. After delivery, the cargo has the ability to modify the target cell phenotype. Here, we review the recent advances in understanding the role of EV secretion by astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system. Current work has demonstrated that oligodendrocytes transfer exosomes to neurons as a result of neurotransmitter signaling suggesting that these vesicles may mediate glial support of neurons.

  5. DJ-1 mediates paraquat-induced dopaminergic neuronal cell death.

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    Kwon, Hyun Joo; Heo, Jun Young; Shim, Jung Hee; Park, Ji Hoon; Seo, Kang Sik; Ryu, Min Jeong; Han, Jeong Su; Shong, Minho; Son, Jin H; Kweon, Gi Ryang

    2011-04-25

    There are two causes of Parkinson's disease (PD): environmental insults and genetic mutations of PD-associated genes. Environmental insults and genetic mutations lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, and a combination of mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress in dopaminergic neurons is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of PD. Among the PD-associated genes, DJ-1 acts as a redox sensor for oxidative stress and has been also proposed to maintain mitochondrial complex I activity. To understand molecular functions of DJ-1 in the cell, we have generated DJ-1 null cells from the DJ-1(-/-) mouse embryos. Using these null cells, we investigated the susceptibility to an environmental toxin, paraquat, which is known to inhibit mitochondrial complex I. Interestingly, we found that DJ-1 null cells showed a resistance to paraquat-induced apoptosis, including reduced poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and procaspase-3. Also DJ-1 null cells generated less superoxide than SN4741 cells by paraquat treatment. Consistent with the reduced paraquat sensitivity, DJ-1 null cells showed reduced complex I activity, which was partially rescued by ectopic DJ-I expression. In summary, our results suggest that DJ-1 is critical to maintain mitochondrial complex I and complex I could be a key target in interaction of paraquat toxicity and DJ-1 for giving rise to PD.

  6. Cerebral ischemia—induced neuronal apoptosis mediated by nitric oxide

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    NomuY

    2002-01-01

    To elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanism of cerebral ischemia-induced neuronal apoptosis mediated by nitric oxide (NO) in the brain,we investigated:(1)cell death in hippocampal CA1 neurons of rats after a rransient four vessel occlusion (4VO)/reperfusion and (2) apoptosis induced by NOC18(NO releaser) using SHSY5Y cells,a human neuroblastoma cell line.We found that 4VO caused expression of inducible type of NO synthase (iNOS) in glial cells and neuronal apoptosis in CA1 region of rats.Next we examined in vitro apoptotic effects of NOC18 on SHSY5Y cells and suggest that NO decrease mitochondrial membrane potential,release cytochrome C from mitochondria,activates caspase-3,degrade inhibitor of caspase-activated DNase(Icad),and activated DNase translocate into nucleus and induce DNA fragmentation.Thus we conclude that the excess amount of NO produced by glial iNOS at cerebral ischemia could be involved in neuronal apoptosis in CA1 region.Regarding NO action on neurons,we further obtained that NO propects neuronal apoptosis in PC12 cells perhaps by nitrosylation of caspase,subsequent reduction of proteolytic activity.Taken together,we suggest that NO seem to exert dual effects(toxic and beneficial) on neuronal apoptosis,the one (toxic);apoptosis-induction throuth the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potentials and cytochrome C release and the othe (beneficial);protection against apoptosis through the inhibition of caspase activity.

  7. Localization of Presynaptic Plasticity Mechanisms Enables Functional Independence of Synaptic and Ectopic Transmission in the Cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine L. Dobson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the cerebellar molecular layer parallel fibre terminals release glutamate from both the active zone and from extrasynaptic “ectopic” sites. Ectopic release mediates transmission to the Bergmann glia that ensheathe the synapse, activating Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors and glutamate transporters. Parallel fibre terminals exhibit several forms of presynaptic plasticity, including cAMP-dependent long-term potentiation and endocannabinoid-dependent long-term depression, but it is not known whether these presynaptic forms of long-term plasticity also influence ectopic transmission to Bergmann glia. Stimulation of parallel fibre inputs at 16 Hz evoked LTP of synaptic transmission, but LTD of ectopic transmission. Pharmacological activation of adenylyl cyclase by forskolin caused LTP at Purkinje neurons, but only transient potentiation at Bergmann glia, reinforcing the concept that ectopic sites lack the capacity to express sustained cAMP-dependent potentiation. Activation of mGluR1 caused depression of synaptic transmission via retrograde endocannabinoid signalling but had no significant effect at ectopic sites. In contrast, activation of NMDA receptors suppressed both synaptic and ectopic transmission. The results suggest that the signalling mechanisms for presynaptic LTP and retrograde depression by endocannabinoids are restricted to the active zone at parallel fibre synapses, allowing independent modulation of synaptic transmission to Purkinje neurons and ectopic transmission to Bergmann glia.

  8. Localization of Presynaptic Plasticity Mechanisms Enables Functional Independence of Synaptic and Ectopic Transmission in the Cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Katharine L.; Bellamy, Tomas C.

    2015-01-01

    In the cerebellar molecular layer parallel fibre terminals release glutamate from both the active zone and from extrasynaptic “ectopic” sites. Ectopic release mediates transmission to the Bergmann glia that ensheathe the synapse, activating Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors and glutamate transporters. Parallel fibre terminals exhibit several forms of presynaptic plasticity, including cAMP-dependent long-term potentiation and endocannabinoid-dependent long-term depression, but it is not known whether these presynaptic forms of long-term plasticity also influence ectopic transmission to Bergmann glia. Stimulation of parallel fibre inputs at 16 Hz evoked LTP of synaptic transmission, but LTD of ectopic transmission. Pharmacological activation of adenylyl cyclase by forskolin caused LTP at Purkinje neurons, but only transient potentiation at Bergmann glia, reinforcing the concept that ectopic sites lack the capacity to express sustained cAMP-dependent potentiation. Activation of mGluR1 caused depression of synaptic transmission via retrograde endocannabinoid signalling but had no significant effect at ectopic sites. In contrast, activation of NMDA receptors suppressed both synaptic and ectopic transmission. The results suggest that the signalling mechanisms for presynaptic LTP and retrograde depression by endocannabinoids are restricted to the active zone at parallel fibre synapses, allowing independent modulation of synaptic transmission to Purkinje neurons and ectopic transmission to Bergmann glia. PMID:26171253

  9. Ectopic study of calcium phosphate cement seeded with pBMP-2 modified canine bMSCs mediated by a non-viral PEI derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Kaige; Zeng, Deliang; Zhang, Wenjie; Xia, Lunguo; Xu, Ling; Jiang, Xinquan; Zhang, Fuqiang

    2012-02-01

    We have evaluated the ectopic new bone formation effects of CPC (calcium phosphate cement) seeded with pBMP-2 (plasmids containing bone morphogenetic protein-2 gene) transfected canine bMSCs (bone marrow stromal cells) mediated by a non-viral PEI (polyethylenimine) derivative (GenEscort™ II) in nude mice. Canine bMSCs were transfected with pBMP-2 or pEGFP (plasmids containing enhanced green fluorescent protein gene) mediated by GenEscort™ II in vitro, and the osteoblastic differentiation was explored by ALP (alkaline phosphatase) staining, ARS (alizarin red S) staining and RT-qPCR (real-time quantitative PCR) analysis. Ectopic bone formation effects of CPC/pBMP-2 transfected bMSCs were evaluated and compared with CPC/pEGFP transfected bMSCs or CPC/untransfected bMSCs through histological, histomorphological and immunohistochemical analysis 8 and 12 weeks post-operation in nude mice. Transfection efficiency was up ∼35% as demonstrated by EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) expression. ALP and ARS staining were stronger with pBMP-2 gene transfection, and mRNA expression of BMP-2 (bone morphogenetic protein-2), Col 1 (collagen 1) and OCN (osteocalcin) in pBMP-2 group was significantly up-regulated at 6 and 9 days. Significantly higher NBV (new bone volume) was achieved in pBMP-2 group than in the control groups at 8 and 12 weeks (P<0.05). In addition, immunohistochemical analysis indicated higher OCN expression in pBMP-2 group (P<0.01). We conclude that CPC seeded with pBMP-2 transfected bMSCs mediated by GenEscort™ II could enhance ectopic new bone formation in nude mice, suggesting that GenEscort™ II mediated pBMP-2 gene transfer is an effective non-viral method and CPC is a suitable scaffold for gene enhanced bone tissue engineering.

  10. GABA mediated excitation in immature rat CA3 hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherubini, E; Rovira, C; Gaiarsa, J L; Corradetti, R; Ben Ari, Y

    1990-01-01

    Intracellular recordings from rat hippocampal neurons in vitro during the first postnatal week revealed the presence of spontaneous giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs). These were generated by the synchronous discharge of a population of neurons. GDPs reversed polarity at -27 and -51 mV when recorded with KCl or K-methylsulphate filled electrodes, respectively. GDPs were blocked by the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (10 microM). Iontophoretic or bath applications of GABA (10-300 microM) in the presence of tetrodotoxin (1 microM), induced a membrane depolarization or in voltage clamp experiments an inward current which reversed polarity at the same potential as GDPs. The response to GABA was blocked in a non-competitive manner by bicuculline (10 microM) and did not desensitize. GABA mediated GDPs were presynaptically modulated by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA receptors. Their frequency was reduced or blocked by NMDA receptor antagonists and by the rather specific non-NMDA receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX). The frequency of GDPs was enhanced by glycine and D-serine (10-30 microM) in a strychnine insensitive manner. This effect was blocked by AP-5, suggesting that it was mediated by the allosteric modulatory site of the NMDA receptor. These observations suggest that most of the 'excitatory' drive in immature neurons is mediated by GABA acting on GABAA receptors; furthermore excitatory amino acids modulate the release of GABA by a presynaptic action on GABAergic interneurons.

  11. [Ectopic calcification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumoto, Seiji

    2014-02-01

    Calcium deposition can be observed in many tissues in addition to bones and teeth which physiologically calcify. This unphysiological calcification can damage several organs. It has been shown that vascular calcification which is a risk factor for cardiovascular events develops through similar mechanisms to physiological calcification. Further studies to clarify detailed mechanisms of calcification are necessary to develop measures that inhibit unphysiological ectopic calcification without affecting physiological calcification in bones and teeth.

  12. Ectopic expression of homeobox gene NKX2-1 in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is mediated by aberrant chromatin modifications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Nagel

    Full Text Available Homeobox genes encode transcription factors ubiquitously involved in basic developmental processes, deregulation of which promotes cell transformation in multiple cancers including hematopoietic malignancies. In particular, NKL-family homeobox genes TLX1, TLX3 and NKX2-5 are ectopically activated by chromosomal rearrangements in T-cell neoplasias. Here, using transcriptional microarray profiling and RQ-PCR we identified ectopic expression of NKL-family member NKX2-1, in a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL cell line SU-DHL-5. Moreover, in silico analysis demonstrated NKX2-1 overexpression in 5% of examined DLBCL patient samples. NKX2-1 is physiologically expressed in lung and thyroid tissues where it regulates differentiation. Chromosomal and genomic analyses excluded rearrangements at the NKX2-1 locus in SU-DHL-5, implying alternative activation. Comparative expression profiling implicated several candidate genes in NKX2-1 regulation, variously encoding transcription factors, chromatin modifiers and signaling components. Accordingly, siRNA-mediated knockdown and overexpression studies confirmed involvement of transcription factor HEY1, histone methyltransferase MLL and ubiquitinated histone H2B in NKX2-1 deregulation. Chromosomal aberrations targeting MLL at 11q23 and the histone gene cluster HIST1 at 6p22 which we observed in SU-DHL-5 may, therefore, represent fundamental mutations mediating an aberrant chromatin structure at NKX2-1. Taken together, we identified ectopic expression of NKX2-1 in DLBCL cells, representing the central player in an oncogenic regulative network compromising B-cell differentiation. Thus, our data extend the paradigm of NKL homeobox gene deregulation in lymphoid malignancies.

  13. Secretory phospholipase A2-mediated neuronal cell death involves glutamate ionotropic receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Turco, Elena B; Diemer, Nils Henrik; Bazan, Nicolas G

    2002-01-01

    To define the significance of glutamate ionotropic receptors in sPLA -mediated neuronal cell death we used the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 and the AMPA receptor antagonist PNQX. In primary neuronal cell cultures both MK-801 and PNQX inhibited sPLA - and glutamate-induced neuronal death. [ H]A...

  14. MFG-E8 mediates primary phagocytosis of viable neurons during neuroinflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Fricker, Michael; Neher, Jonas J.; Zhao, Jing-Wei; Théry, Clotilde; Tolkovsky, Aviva M; Brown, Guy C.

    2012-01-01

    Milk-fat globule EGF factor-8 (MFG-E8, SED1, lactadherin) is known to mediate the phagocytic removal of apoptotic cells by bridging phosphatidylserine (PS)-exposing cells and the vitronectin receptor (VR) on phagocytes. However, we show here that MFG-E8 can mediate phagocytosis of viable neurons during neuroinflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), thereby causing neuronal death. In vitro, inflammatory neuronal loss is independent of apoptotic pathways, and is inhibited by blocking th...

  15. Interneuron-mediated inhibition synchronizes neuronal activity during slow oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jen-Yung; Chauvette, Sylvain; Skorheim, Steven; Timofeev, Igor; Bazhenov, Maxim

    2012-01-01

    The signature of slow-wave sleep in the electroencephalogram (EEG) is large-amplitude fluctuation of the field potential, which reflects synchronous alternation of activity and silence across cortical neurons. While initiation of the active cortical states during sleep slow oscillation has been intensively studied, the biological mechanisms which drive the network transition from an active state to silence remain poorly understood. In the current study, using a combination of in vivo electrophysiology and thalamocortical network simulation, we explored the impact of intrinsic and synaptic inhibition on state transition during sleep slow oscillation. We found that in normal physiological conditions, synaptic inhibition controls the duration and the synchrony of active state termination. The decline of interneuron-mediated inhibition led to asynchronous downward transition across the cortical network and broke the regular slow oscillation pattern. Furthermore, in both in vivo experiment and computational modelling, we revealed that when the level of synaptic inhibition was reduced significantly, it led to a recovery of synchronized oscillations in the form of seizure-like bursting activity. In this condition, the fast active state termination was mediated by intrinsic hyperpolarizing conductances. Our study highlights the significance of both intrinsic and synaptic inhibition in manipulating sleep slow rhythms. PMID:22641778

  16. The microRNA miR-181c controls microglia-mediated neuronal apoptosis by suppressing tumor necrosis factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Li

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post-ischemic microglial activation may contribute to neuronal damage through the release of large amounts of pro-inflammatory cytokines and neurotoxic factors. The involvement of microRNAs (miRNAs in the pathogenesis of disorders related to the brain and central nervous system has been previously studied, but it remains unknown whether the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines is regulated by miRNAs. Methods BV-2 and primary rat microglial cells were activated by exposure to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD. Global cerebral ischemia was induced using the four-vessel occlusion (4-VO model in rats. Induction of pro-inflammatory and neurotoxic factors, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-1β, and nitric oxide (NO, were assessed by ELISA, immunofluorescence, and the Griess assay, respectively. The miRNA expression profiles of OGD-activated BV-2 cells were subsequently compared with the profiles of resting cells in a miRNA microarray. BV-2 and primary rat microglial cells were transfected with miR-181c to evaluate its effects on TNF-α production after OGD. In addition, a luciferase reporter assay was conducted to confirm whether TNF-α is a direct target of miR-181c. Results OGD induced BV-2 microglial activation in vitro, as indicated by the overproduction of TNF-α, IL-1β, and NO. Global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury induced microglial activation and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the hippocampus. OGD also downregulated miR-181c expression and upregulated TNF-α expression. Overproduction of TNF-α after OGD-induced microglial activation provoked neuronal apoptosis, whereas the ectopic expression of miR-181c partially protected neurons from cell death caused by OGD-activated microglia. RNAinterference-mediated knockdown of TNF-α phenocopied the effect of miR-181c-mediated neuronal protection, whereas overexpression of TNF-α blocked the miR-181c-dependent suppression of apoptosis

  17. Ectopic corticotroph syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penezić Zorana

    2004-01-01

    located nuclei. Stromal tissue was scanty, and mitotic figures were infrequent. Tumor cells were immunoreactive for synaptophysin, neuron-specific enolase, and ACTH. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on glucocorticoid supplementation. Signs of Cushing's syndrome were in regression, and patient remained normotensive and normoglycaemic without therapy. DISCUSSION A multitude of normal nonpituitary cells from different organs and tissues have been shown to express the POMC gene from which ACTH is derived. The tumors most commonly associated the ectopic ACTH syndrome arise from neuroendocrine tissues, APUD cells. POMC gene expression in non-pituitary cells differs from that in pituitary cells both qualitatively and quantitatively [8], Aggressive tumors, like small cell cancer of the lung (SCCL preferentially release intact POMC, whereas carcinoids rather overprocess the precursor, releasing ACTH and smaller peptides like CLIP. Some tumors associated with ectopic ACTH syndrome express other markers of neuroendocrine differentiation like two specific prohormone convertases (PCs. Assessment of vasopressin (V3 receptor gene expression in ACTH-producing nonpituitary tumors revealed bronchial carcinoid as a particular subset of tumors where both V3 receptor and POMC gene may be expressed in pattern indistinguishable from that in corticotroph adenoma [9]. In most, but not all, patients with ectopic ACTH syndrome, cortisol is unresponsive to high-dose dexamethason suppression test, what is used as diagnostic tool. It is not clear if the primary resistance resulted from structural abnormality of the native glucocorticoid receptor (GR, a low level of expression, or some intrinsic property of the cell line [9]. It appears that ectopic ACTH syndrome is made of two different entities. When it is because of highly differentiated tumors, with highest level of pituitary-like POMC mRNA, expressing PCs, high level of V3 receptors and GR, like bronchial

  18. Recombinant AAV-mediated Expression of Human BDNF Protects Neurons against Cell Apoptosis in Aβ-induced Neuronal Damage Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhaohui; MA Dongliang; FENG Gaifeng; MA Yanbing; HU Haitao

    2007-01-01

    The human brain-derived neurotrophic factor (hBDNF) gene was cloned by polymerase chain reaction and the recombinant adeno-associated viral vector inserted with hBDNF gene (AAV-hBDNF) was constructed. Cultured rat hippocampal neurons were treated with Aβ25-35 and serued as the experimental Aβ-induced neuronal damage model (AD model), and the AD model was infected with AAV-hBDNF to explore neuroprotective effects of expression of BDNF. Cell viability was assayed by MTT. The expression of bcl-2 anti-apoptosis protein was detected by immunocytochemical staining. The change of intracellular free Ca ion ([Ca2+]i) was measured by laser scanning confocal microscopy. The results showed that BDNF had protective effects against Aβ-induced neuronal damage. The expression of the bcl-2 anti-apoptosis protein was raised significantly and the balance of [Ca2+]i was maintained in the AAV-hBDNF treatment group as compared with AD model group. These data suggested that recombinant AAV mediated a stable expression of hBDNF in cultured hippocampal neurons and resulted in significant neuron protective effects in AD model. The BDNF may reduce neuron apoptosis through increasing the expression of the bcl-2 anti-apoptosis protein and inhibiting intracellular calcium overload. The viral vector-mediated gene expression of BDNF may pave the way of a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Huntingtin-Mediated Multipolar-Bipolar Transition of Newborn Cortical Neurons Is Critical for Their Postnatal Neuronal Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnat, Monia; Le Friec, Julien; Benstaali, Caroline; Humbert, Sandrine

    2017-01-04

    In the developing cortex, projection neurons undergo multipolar-bipolar transition, radial-directed migration, and maturation. The contribution of these developmental steps to the structure of the adult cortex is not completely understood. Here, we report that huntingtin (HTT), the protein mutated in Huntington's disease, is enriched in polarizing projection neurons. The depletion of HTT in postmitotic projection neurons leads to the mislocalization of layer-specific neuronal populations in the mouse neocortex. HTT is required for the multipolar-bipolar transition of projection neurons and for the maintenance of their bipolar shape during their radial migration. HTT mediates these effects in vivo through the regulation of RAB11-dependent N-Cadherin trafficking. Importantly, HD pathological HTT alters RAB11-dependent neuronal migration. Finally, we show that the cortical defects resulting from the postmitotic loss of HTT specifically during embryonic development affect neuronal morphology at adulthood. Our data reveal a new HTT-RAB11-N-Cadherin pathway regulating multipolar-bipolar transition with direct implications for mature brain. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  20. Ectopically expressed sweet pepper ferredoxin PFLP enhances disease resistance to Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum affected by harpin and protease-mediated hypersensitive response in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ger, Mang-Jye; Louh, Guan-Yu; Lin, Yi-Hsien; Feng, Teng-Yung; Huang, Hsiang-En

    2014-12-01

    Plant ferredoxin-like protein (PFLP) is a photosynthesis-type ferredoxin (Fd) found in sweet pepper. It contains an iron-sulphur cluster that receives and delivers electrons between enzymes involved in many fundamental metabolic processes. It has been demonstrated that transgenic plants overexpressing PFLP show a high resistance to many bacterial pathogens, although the mechanism remains unclear. In this investigation, the PFLP gene was transferred into Arabidopsis and its defective derivatives, such as npr1 (nonexpresser of pathogenesis-related gene 1) and eds1 (enhanced disease susceptibility 1) mutants and NAHG-transgenic plants. These transgenic plants were then infected with the soft-rot bacterial pathogen Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum (Erwinia carotovora ssp. carotovora, ECC) to investigate the mechanism behind PFLP-mediated resistance. The results revealed that, instead of showing soft-rot symptoms, ECC activated hypersensitive response (HR)-associated events, such as the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ), electrical conductivity leakage and expression of the HR marker genes (ATHSR2 and ATHSR3) in PFLP-transgenic Arabidopsis. This PFLP-mediated resistance could be abolished by inhibitors, such as diphenylene iodonium (DPI), 1-l-trans-epoxysuccinyl-leucylamido-(4-guanidino)-butane (E64) and benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone (z-VAD-fmk), but not by myriocin and fumonisin. The PFLP-transgenic plants were resistant to ECC, but not to its harpin mutant strain ECCAC5082. In the npr1 mutant and NAHG-transgenic Arabidopsis, but not in the eds1 mutant, overexpression of the PFLP gene increased resistance to ECC. Based on these results, we suggest that transgenic Arabidopsis contains high levels of ectopic PFLP; this may lead to the recognition of the harpin and to the activation of the HR and other resistance mechanisms, and is dependent on the protease-mediated pathway.

  1. Evaluating the Role of Viral Proteins in HIV-Mediated Neurotoxicity Using Primary Human Neuronal Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Vasudev R; Eugenin, Eliseo A; Prasad, Vinayaka R

    2016-01-01

    Despite the inability of HIV-1 to infect neurons, over half of the HIV-1-infected population in the USA suffers from neurocognitive dysfunction. HIV-infected immune cells in the periphery enter the central nervous system by causing a breach in the blood-brain barrier. The damage to the neurons is mediated by viral and host toxic products released by activated and infected immune and glial cells. To evaluate the toxicity of any viral isolate, viral protein, or host inflammatory protein, we describe a protocol to assess the neuronal apoptosis and synaptic compromise in primary cultures of human neurons and astrocytes.

  2. Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors serve as sensitive targets that mediate β-amyloid neurotoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang LIU; Jie WU

    2006-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of brain dementia characterized by the accumulation of β-amyloid peptides (Aβ) and loss of forebrain cholinergic neurons. Aβ accumulation and aggregation are thought to contribute to cholinergic neuronal degeneration, in turn causing learning and memory deficits, but the specific targets that mediate Aβ neurotoxicity remain elusive. Recently, accumlating lines of evidence have demonstrated that Aβ directly modulates the function of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), which leads to the new hypothesis that neuronal nAChRs may serve as important targets that mediate Aβ neurotoxicity. In this review, we summarize current studies performed in our laboratory and in others to address the question of how Aβ modulates neuronal nAChRs, especially nAChR subunit function.

  3. Magnetosensitive neurons mediate geomagnetic orientation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Gadea, Andrés; Ward, Kristi; Beron, Celia; Ghorashian, Navid; Gokce, Sertan; Russell, Joshua; Truong, Nicholas; Parikh, Adhishri; Gadea, Otilia; Ben-Yakar, Adela; Pierce-Shimomura, Jonathan

    2015-06-17

    Many organisms spanning from bacteria to mammals orient to the earth's magnetic field. For a few animals, central neurons responsive to earth-strength magnetic fields have been identified; however, magnetosensory neurons have yet to be identified in any animal. We show that the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans orients to the earth's magnetic field during vertical burrowing migrations. Well-fed worms migrated up, while starved worms migrated down. Populations isolated from around the world, migrated at angles to the magnetic vector that would optimize vertical translation in their native soil, with northern- and southern-hemisphere worms displaying opposite migratory preferences. Magnetic orientation and vertical migrations required the TAX-4 cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel in the AFD sensory neuron pair. Calcium imaging showed that these neurons respond to magnetic fields even without synaptic input. C. elegans may have adapted magnetic orientation to simplify their vertical burrowing migration by reducing the orientation task from three dimensions to one.

  4. Glutamate mediates the function of melanocortin receptor 4 on sim1 neurons in body weight regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R) is a well-established mediator of body weight homeostasis. However, the neurotransmitter(s) that mediate MC4R function remain largely unknown; as a result, little is known about the second-order neurons of the MC4R neural pathway. Single-minded 1 (Sim1)-expressing ...

  5. Ectopic pregnancy (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    An ectopic pregnancy is one in which the fertilized egg implants in tissue outside of the uterus and the placenta ... common site is within a Fallopian tube, however, ectopic pregnancies can occur in the ovary, the abdomen, and ...

  6. Magnetosensitive neurons mediate geomagnetic orientation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Gadea, Andrés; Ward, Kristi; Beron, Celia; Ghorashian, Navid; Gokce, Sertan; Russell, Joshua; Truong, Nicholas; Parikh, Adhishri; Gadea, Otilia; Ben-Yakar, Adela; Pierce-Shimomura, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Many organisms spanning from bacteria to mammals orient to the earth's magnetic field. For a few animals, central neurons responsive to earth-strength magnetic fields have been identified; however, magnetosensory neurons have yet to be identified in any animal. We show that the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans orients to the earth's magnetic field during vertical burrowing migrations. Well-fed worms migrated up, while starved worms migrated down. Populations isolated from around the world, migrated at angles to the magnetic vector that would optimize vertical translation in their native soil, with northern- and southern-hemisphere worms displaying opposite migratory preferences. Magnetic orientation and vertical migrations required the TAX-4 cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel in the AFD sensory neuron pair. Calcium imaging showed that these neurons respond to magnetic fields even without synaptic input. C. elegans may have adapted magnetic orientation to simplify their vertical burrowing migration by reducing the orientation task from three dimensions to one. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07493.001 PMID:26083711

  7. Moonwalker Descending Neurons Mediate Visually Evoked Retreat in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Rajyashree; Wu, Ming; Branson, Kristin; Robie, Alice; Rubin, Gerald M; Dickson, Barry J

    2017-03-06

    Insects, like most animals, tend to steer away from imminent threats [1-7]. Drosophila melanogaster, for example, generally initiate an escape take-off in response to a looming visual stimulus, mimicking a potential predator [8]. The escape response to a visual threat is, however, flexible [9-12] and can alternatively consist of walking backward away from the perceived threat [11], which may be a more effective response to ambush predators such as nymphal praying mantids [7]. Flexibility in escape behavior may also add an element of unpredictability that makes it difficult for predators to anticipate or learn the prey's likely response [3-6]. Whereas the fly's escape jump has been well studied [8, 9, 13-18], the neuronal underpinnings of evasive walking remain largely unexplored. We previously reported the identification of a cluster of descending neurons-the moonwalker descending neurons (MDNs)-the activity of which is necessary and sufficient to trigger backward walking [19], as well as a population of visual projection neurons-the lobula columnar 16 (LC16) cells-that respond to looming visual stimuli and elicit backward walking and turning [11]. Given the similarity of their activation phenotypes, we hypothesized that LC16 neurons induce backward walking via MDNs and that turning while walking backward might reflect asymmetric activation of the left and right MDNs. Here, we present data from functional imaging, behavioral epistasis, and unilateral activation experiments that support these hypotheses. We conclude that LC16 and MDNs are critical components of the neural circuit that transduces threatening visual stimuli into directional locomotor output.

  8. Pgrmc1/BDNF Signaling Plays a Critical Role in Mediating Glia-Neuron Cross Talk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fen; Nguyen, Trinh; Jin, Xin; Huang, Renqi; Chen, Zhenglan; Cunningham, Rebecca L; Singh, Meharvan; Su, Chang

    2016-05-01

    Progesterone (P4) exerts robust cytoprotection in brain slice cultures (containing both neurons and glia), yet such protection is not as evident in neuron-enriched cultures, suggesting that glia may play an indispensable role in P4's neuroprotection. We previously reported that a membrane-associated P4 receptor, P4 receptor membrane component 1, mediates P4-induced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) release from glia. Here, we sought to determine whether glia are required for P4's neuroprotection and whether glia's roles are mediated, at least partially, via releasing soluble factors to act on neighboring neurons. Our data demonstrate that P4 increased the level of mature BDNF (neuroprotective) while decreasing pro-BDNF (potentially neurotoxic) in the conditioned media (CMs) of cultured C6 astrocytes. We examined the effects of CMs derived from P4-treated astrocytes (P4-CMs) on 2 neuronal models: 1) all-trans retinoid acid-differentiated SH-SY5Y cells and 2) mouse primary hippocampal neurons. P4-CM increased synaptic marker expression and promoted neuronal survival against H2O2. These effects were attenuated by Y1036 (an inhibitor of neurotrophin receptor [tropomysin-related kinase] signaling), as well as tropomysin-related kinase B-IgG (a more specific inhibitor to block BDNF signaling), which pointed to BDNF as the key protective component within P4-CM. These findings suggest that P4 may exert its maximal protection by triggering a glia-neuron cross talk, in which P4 promotes mature BDNF release from glia to enhance synaptogenesis as well as survival of neurons. This recognition of the importance of glia in mediating P4's neuroprotection may also inform the design of effective therapeutic methods for treating diseases wherein neuronal death and/or synaptic deficits are noted.

  9. Endocannabinoids may mediate the ability of (n-3) fatty acids to reduce ectopic fat and inflammatory mediators in obese Zucker rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batetta, Barbara; Griinari, Mikko; Carta, Gianfranca; Murru, Elisabetta; Ligresti, Alessia; Cordeddu, Lina; Giordano, Elena; Sanna, Francesca; Bisogno, Tiziana; Uda, Sabrina; Collu, Maria; Bruheim, Inge; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Banni, Sebastiano

    2009-08-01

    Dietary (n-3) long-chain PUFA [(n-3) LCPUFA] ameliorate several metabolic risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, although the mechanisms of these beneficial effects are not fully understood. In this study, we compared the effects of dietary (n-3) LCPUFA, in the form of either fish oil (FO) or krill oil (KO) balanced for eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) content, with a control (C) diet containing no EPA and DHA and similar contents of oleic, linoleic, and alpha-linolenic acids, on ectopic fat and inflammation in Zucker rats, a model of obesity and related metabolic dysfunction. Diets were fed for 4 wk. Given the emerging evidence for an association between elevated endocannabinoid concentrations and metabolic syndrome, we also measured tissue endocannabinoid concentrations. In (n-3) LCPUFA-supplemented rats, liver triglycerides and the peritoneal macrophage response to an inflammatory stimulus were significantly lower than in rats fed the control diet, and heart triglycerides were lower, but only in KO-fed rats. These effects were associated with a lower concentration of the endocannabinoids, anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol, in the visceral adipose tissue and of anandamide in the liver and heart, which, in turn, was associated with lower levels of arachidonic acid in membrane phospholipids, but not with higher activity of endocannabinoid-degrading enzymes. Our data suggest that the beneficial effects of a diet enriched with (n-3) LCPUFA are the result of changes in membrane fatty acid composition. The reduction of substrates for inflammatory molecules and endocannabinoids may account for the dampened inflammatory response and the physiological reequilibration of body fat deposition in obese rats.

  10. NR2D-containing NMDA receptors mediate tissue plasminogen activator-promoted neuronal excitotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, A; Montagne, A; Cassé, F; Launay, S; Maubert, E; Ali, C; Vivien, D

    2010-05-01

    Although the molecular bases of its actions remain debated, tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a paradoxical brain protease, as it favours some learning/memory processes, but increases excitotoxic neuronal death. Here, we show that, in cultured cortical neurons, tPA selectively promotes NR2D-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent activation. We show that tPA-mediated signalling and neurotoxicity through the NMDAR are blocked by co-application of an NR2D antagonist (phenanthrene derivative (2S(*), 3R(*))-1-(phenanthrene-2-carbonyl)piperazine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid, PPDA) or knockdown of neuronal NR2D expression. In sharp contrast with cortical neurons, hippocampal neurons do not exhibit NR2D both in vitro and in vivo and are consequently resistant to tPA-promoted NMDAR-mediated neurotoxicity. Moreover, we have shown that activation of synaptic NMDAR prevents further tPA-dependent NMDAR-mediated neurotoxicity and sensitivity to PPDA. This study shows that the earlier described pro-neurotoxic effect of tPA is mediated by NR2D-containing NMDAR-dependent extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation, a deleterious effect prevented by synaptic pre-activation.

  11. MFG-E8 mediates primary phagocytosis of viable neurons during neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricker, Michael; Neher, Jonas J; Zhao, Jing-Wei; Théry, Clotilde; Tolkovsky, Aviva M; Brown, Guy C

    2012-02-22

    Milk-fat globule EGF factor-8 (MFG-E8, SED1, lactadherin) is known to mediate the phagocytic removal of apoptotic cells by bridging phosphatidylserine (PS)-exposing cells and the vitronectin receptor (VR) on phagocytes. However, we show here that MFG-E8 can mediate phagocytosis of viable neurons during neuroinflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), thereby causing neuronal death. In vitro, inflammatory neuronal loss is independent of apoptotic pathways, and is inhibited by blocking the PS/MFG-E8/VR pathway (by adding PS blocking antibodies, annexin V, mutant MFG-E8 unable to bind VR, or VR antagonist). Neuronal loss is absent in Mfge8 knock-out cultures, but restored by adding recombinant MFG-E8, without affecting inflammation. In vivo, LPS-induced neuronal loss is reduced in the striatum of Mfge8 knock-out mice or by coinjection of an MFG-E8 receptor (VR) inhibitor into the rat striatum. Our data show that blocking MFG-E8-dependent phagocytosis preserves live neurons, implying that phagocytosis actively contributes to neuronal death during brain inflammation.

  12. Parthanatos Mediates AIMP2 Activated Age Dependent Dopaminergic Neuronal Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yunjong; Karuppagounder, Senthilkumar S.; Shin, Joo-Ho; Lee, Yun-Il; Ko, Han Seok; Swing, Debbie; Jiang, Haisong; Kang, Sung-Ung; Lee, Byoung Dae; Kang, Ho Chul; Kim, Donghoon; Tessarollo, Lino; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2013-01-01

    The defining pathogenic feature of Parkinson’s disease is the age dependent loss of dopaminergic neurons. Mutations and inactivation of parkin, an ubiquitin E3 ligase, cause Parkinson’s disease through accumulation of pathogenic substrates. Here we show that transgenic overexpression of the parkin substrate, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complex interacting multifunctional protein-2 (AIMP2) leads to a selective, age-dependent progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons via activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP1). AIMP2 accumulation in vitro and in vivo results in PARP1 overactivation and dopaminergic cell toxicity via direct association of these proteins in the nucleus providing a new path to PARP1 activation other than DNA damage. Inhibition of PARP1 through gene deletion or drug inhibition reverses behavioral deficits and protects in vivo against dopamine neuron death in AIMP2 transgenic mice. These data indicate that brain permeable PARP inhibitors could be effective in delaying or preventing disease progression in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:23974709

  13. Critical role of neuronal pentraxin 1 in mitochondria-mediated hypoxic-ischemic neuronal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Rahim, Md; Thatipamula, Shabarish; Hossain, Mir Ahamed

    2013-02-01

    Developing brain is highly susceptible to hypoxic-ischemic (HI) injury leading to severe neurological disabilities in surviving infants and children. Previously, we have reported induction of neuronal pentraxin 1 (NP1), a novel neuronal protein of long-pentraxin family, following HI neuronal injury. Here, we investigated how this specific signal is propagated to cause the HI neuronal death. We used wild-type (WT) and NP1 knockout (NP1-KO) mouse hippocampal cultures, modeled in vitro following exposure to oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD), and in vivo neonatal (P9-10) mouse model of HI brain injury. Our results show induction of NP1 in primary hippocampal neurons following OGD exposure (4-8 h) and in the ipsilateral hippocampal CA1 and CA3 regions at 24-48 h post-HI compared to the contralateral side. We also found increased PTEN activity concurrent with OGD time-dependent (4-8 h) dephosphorylation of Akt (Ser473) and GSK-3β (Ser9). OGD also caused a time-dependent decrease in the phosphorylation of Bad (Ser136), and Bax protein levels. Immunofluorescence staining and subcellular fractionation analyses revealed increased mitochondrial translocation of Bad and Bax proteins from cytoplasm following OGD (4 h) and simultaneously increased release of Cyt C from mitochondria followed by activation of caspase-3. NP1 protein was immunoprecipitated with Bad and Bax proteins; OGD caused increased interactions of NP1 with Bad and Bax, thereby, facilitating their mitochondrial translocation and dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ(m)). This NP1 induction preceded the increased mitochondrial release of cytochrome C (Cyt C) into the cytosol, activation of caspase-3 and OGD time-dependent cell death in WT primary hippocampal neurons. In contrast, in NP1-KO neurons there was no translocation of Bad and Bax from cytosol to the mitochondria, and no evidence of ΔΨ(m) loss, increased Cyt C release and caspase-3 activation following OGD; which resulted in

  14. Prokineticin-2 upregulation during neuronal injury mediates a compensatory protective response against dopaminergic neuronal degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Richard; Neal, Matthew L.; Luo, Jie; Langley, Monica R.; Harischandra, Dilshan S.; Panicker, Nikhil; Charli, Adhithiya; Jin, Huajun; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Woodruff, Trent M.; Zhou, Qun-Yong; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.; Kanthasamy, Arthi

    2016-01-01

    Prokineticin-2 (PK2), a recently discovered secreted protein, regulates important physiological functions including olfactory biogenesis and circadian rhythms in the CNS. Interestingly, although PK2 expression is low in the nigral system, its receptors are constitutively expressed on nigrostriatal neurons. Herein, we demonstrate that PK2 expression is highly induced in nigral dopaminergic neurons during early stages of degeneration in multiple models of Parkinson's disease (PD), including PK2 reporter mice and MitoPark mice. Functional studies demonstrate that PK2 promotes mitochondrial biogenesis and activates ERK and Akt survival signalling pathways, thereby driving neuroprotection. Importantly, PK2 overexpression is protective whereas PK2 receptor antagonism exacerbates dopaminergic degeneration in experimental PD. Furthermore, PK2 expression increased in surviving nigral dopaminergic neurons from PD brains, indicating that PK2 upregulation is clinically relevant to human PD. Collectively, our results identify a paradigm for compensatory neuroprotective PK2 signalling in nigral dopaminergic neurons that could have important therapeutic implications for PD. PMID:27703142

  15. Prolactin mediates neuroprotection against excitotoxicity in primary cell cultures of hippocampal neurons via its receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara-Castañeda, E; Grattan, D R; Pasantes-Morales, H; Pérez-Domínguez, M; Cabrera-Reyes, E A; Morales, T; Cerbón, M

    2016-04-01

    Recently it has been reported that prolactin (PRL) exerts a neuroprotective effect against excitotoxicity in hippocampus in the rat in vivo models. However, the exact mechanism by which PRL mediates this effect is not completely understood. The aim of our study was to assess whether prolactin exerts neuroprotection against excitotoxicity in an in vitro model using primary cell cultures of hippocampal neurons, and to determine whether this effect is mediated via the prolactin receptor (PRLR). Primary cell cultures of rat hippocampal neurons were used in all experiments, gene expression was evaluated by RT-qPCR, and protein expression was assessed by Western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry. Cell viability was assessed by using the MTT method. The results demonstrated that PRL treatment of neurons from primary cultures did not modify cell viability, but that it exerted a neuroprotective effect, with cells treated with PRL showing a significant increase of viability after glutamate (Glu)--induced excitotoxicity as compared with neurons treated with Glu alone. Cultured neurons expressed mRNA for both PRL and its receptor (PRLR), and both PRL and PRLR expression levels changed after the excitotoxic insult. Interestingly, the PRLR protein was detected as two main isoforms of 100 and 40 kDa as compared with that expressed in hypothalamic cells, which was present only as a 30 kDa variant. On the other hand, PRL was not detected in neuron cultures, either by western blot or by immunohistochemistry. Neuroprotection induced by PRL was significantly blocked by specific oligonucleotides against PRLR, thus suggesting that the PRL role is mediated by its receptor expressed in these neurons. The overall results indicated that PRL induces neuroprotection in neurons from primary cell cultures.

  16. Cancer-induced anorexia and malaise are mediated by CGRP neurons in the parabrachial nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Carlos A; Bowen, Anna J; Han, Sung; Wisse, Brent E; Palmiter, Richard D; Schwartz, Michael W

    2017-07-01

    Anorexia is a common manifestation of chronic diseases, including cancer. Here we investigate the contribution to cancer anorexia made by calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) neurons in the parabrachial nucleus (PBN) that transmit anorexic signals. We show that CGRP(PBN) neurons are activated in mice implanted with Lewis lung carcinoma cells. Inactivation of CGRP(PBN) neurons before tumor implantation prevents anorexia and loss of lean mass, and their inhibition after symptom onset reverses anorexia. CGRP(PBN) neurons are also activated in Apc(min/+) mice, which develop intestinal cancer and lose weight despite the absence of reduced food intake. Inactivation of CGRP(PBN) neurons in Apc(min/+) mice permits hyperphagia that counteracts weight loss, revealing a role for these neurons in a 'nonanorexic' cancer model. We also demonstrate that inactivation of CGRP(PBN) neurons prevents lethargy, anxiety and malaise associated with cancer. These findings establish CGRP(PBN) neurons as key mediators of cancer-induced appetite suppression and associated behavioral changes.

  17. Classification of HIV-1-mediated neuronal dendritic and synaptic damage using multiple criteria linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jialin; Zhuang, Wei; Yan, Nian; Kou, Gang; Peng, Hui; McNally, Clancy; Erichsen, David; Cheloha, Abby; Herek, Shelley; Shi, Chris

    2004-01-01

    The ability to identify neuronal damage in the dendritic arbor during HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD) is crucial for designing specific therapies for the treatment of HAD. To study this process, we utilized a computer-based image analysis method to quantitatively assess HIV-1 viral protein gp120 and glutamate-mediated individual neuronal damage in cultured cortical neurons. Changes in the number of neurites, arbors, branch nodes, cell body area, and average arbor lengths were determined and a database was formed (http://dm.ist.unomaha. edu/database.htm). We further proposed a two-class model of multiple criteria linear programming (MCLP) to classify such HIV-1-mediated neuronal dendritic and synaptic damages. Given certain classes, including treatments with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glutamate, gp120 or non-treatment controls from our in vitro experimental systems, we used the two-class MCLP model to determine the data patterns between classes in order to gain insight about neuronal dendritic damages. This knowledge can be applied in principle to the design and study of specific therapies for the prevention or reversal of neuronal damage associated with HAD. Finally, the MCLP method was compared with a well-known artificial neural network algorithm to test for the relative potential of different data mining applications in HAD research.

  18. Neuronal processing of noxious thermal stimuli mediated by dendritic Ca(2+) influx in Drosophila somatosensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Shin-Ichiro; Matsubara, Daisuke; Onodera, Koun; Matsuzaki, Masanori; Uemura, Tadashi; Usui, Tadao

    2016-02-15

    Adequate responses to noxious stimuli causing tissue damages are essential for organismal survival. Class IV neurons in Drosophila larvae are polymodal nociceptors responsible for thermal, mechanical, and light sensation. Importantly, activation of Class IV provoked distinct avoidance behaviors, depending on the inputs. We found that noxious thermal stimuli, but not blue light stimulation, caused a unique pattern of Class IV, which were composed of pauses after high-frequency spike trains and a large Ca(2+) rise in the dendrite (the Ca(2+) transient). Both these responses depended on two TRPA channels and the L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (L-VGCC), showing that the thermosensation provokes Ca(2+) influx. The precipitous fluctuation of firing rate in Class IV neurons enhanced the robust heat avoidance. We hypothesize that the Ca(2+) influx can be a key signal encoding a specific modality.

  19. Tunneling nanotube (TNT)-mediated neuron-to neuron transfer of pathological Tau protein assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardivel, Meryem; Bégard, Séverine; Bousset, Luc; Dujardin, Simon; Coens, Audrey; Melki, Ronald; Buée, Luc; Colin, Morvane

    2016-11-04

    A given cell makes exchanges with its neighbors through a variety of means ranging from diffusible factors to vesicles. Cells use also tunneling nanotubes (TNTs), filamentous-actin-containing membranous structures that bridge and connect cells. First described in immune cells, TNTs facilitate HIV-1 transfer and are found in various cell types, including neurons. We show that the microtubule-associated protein Tau, a key player in Alzheimer's disease, is a bona fide constituent of TNTs. This is important because Tau appears beside filamentous actin and myosin 10 as a specific marker of these fine protrusions of membranes and cytosol that are difficult to visualize. Furthermore, we observed that exogenous Tau species increase the number of TNTs established between primary neurons, thereby facilitating the intercellular transfer of Tau fibrils. In conclusion, Tau may contribute to the formation and function of the highly dynamic TNTs that may be involved in the prion-like propagation of Tau assemblies.

  20. CCL2 Mediates Neuron-Macrophage Interactions to Drive Proregenerative Macrophage Activation Following Preconditioning Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Min Jung; Shin, Hae Young; Cui, Yuexian; Kim, Hyosil; Thi, Anh Hong Le; Choi, Jun Young; Kim, Eun Young; Hwang, Dong Hoon; Kim, Byung Gon

    2015-12-01

    CNS neurons in adult mammals do not spontaneously regenerate axons after spinal cord injury. Preconditioning peripheral nerve injury allows the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory axons to regenerate beyond the injury site by promoting expression of regeneration-associated genes. We have previously shown that peripheral nerve injury increases the number of macrophages in the DRGs and that the activated macrophages are critical to the enhancement of intrinsic regeneration capacity. The present study identifies a novel chemokine signal mediated by CCL2 that links regenerating neurons with proregenerative macrophage activation. Neutralization of CCL2 abolished the neurite outgrowth activity of conditioned medium obtained from neuron-macrophage cocultures treated with cAMP. The neuron-macrophage interactions that produced outgrowth-promoting conditioned medium required CCL2 in neurons and CCR2/CCR4 in macrophages. The conditioning effects were abolished in CCL2-deficient mice at 3 and 7 d after sciatic nerve injury, but CCL2 was dispensable for the initial growth response and upregulation of GAP-43 at the 1 d time point. Intraganglionic injection of CCL2 mimicked conditioning injury by mobilizing M2-like macrophages. Finally, overexpression of CCL2 in DRGs promoted sensory axon regeneration in a rat spinal cord injury model without harmful side effects. Our data suggest that CCL2-mediated neuron-macrophage interaction plays a critical role for amplification and maintenance of enhanced regenerative capacity by preconditioning peripheral nerve injury. Manipulation of chemokine signaling mediating neuron-macrophage interactions may represent a novel therapeutic approach to promote axon regeneration after CNS injury.

  1. Necroptosis Mediates TNF-Induced Toxicity of Hippocampal Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a critical proinflammatory cytokine regulating neuroinflammation. Elevated levels of TNF-α have been associated with various neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. However, the signaling events that lead to TNF-α-initiated neurotoxicity are still unclear. Here, we report that RIP3-mediated necroptosis, a form of regulated necrosis, is activated in the mouse hippocampus after intracerebroventricular injection of TNF-α....

  2. Nutritional Omega-3 deficiency abolishes endocannabinoid mediated neuronal functions

    OpenAIRE

    Lafourcade, Mathieu; Larrieu, Thomas; Mato, Susana; Duffaud, Anais; Sepers, Marja; Matias, Isabelle; de Smedt, Veronique; Labrousse, Virginie; Bretillon, Lionel; Matute, Carlos; Rodriguez-Puertas, Raphael; Layé, Sophie; Manzoni, Olivier Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The corollaries of the obesity epidemic that plagues developed societies are malnutrition and resulting biochemical imbalances. Low levels of essential n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) have been linked to neuropsychiatric diseases, but the underlying synaptic alterations are mostly unknown. We found that lifelong n-3 PUFAs dietary insufficiency specifically ablates long-term synaptic depression mediated by endocannabinoids in the prelimbic prefrontal cortex and ...

  3. Computational simulation: astrocyte-induced depolarization of neighboring neurons mediates synchronous UP states in a neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriu, Takayuki; Kakimoto, Yuta; Araki, Osamu

    2015-09-01

    Although recent reports have suggested that synchronous neuronal UP states are mediated by astrocytic activity, the mechanism responsible for this remains unknown. Astrocytic glutamate release synchronously depolarizes adjacent neurons, while synaptic transmissions are blocked. The purpose of this study was to confirm that astrocytic depolarization, propagated through synaptic connections, can lead to synchronous neuronal UP states. We applied astrocytic currents to local neurons in a neural network consisting of model cortical neurons. Our results show that astrocytic depolarization may generate synchronous UP states for hundreds of milliseconds in neurons even if they do not directly receive glutamate release from the activated astrocyte.

  4. Evidence for glutamate-mediated activation of hippocampal neurons by glial calcium waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassinger, T D; Atkinson, P B; Strecker, G J; Whalen, L R; Dudek, F E; Kossel, A H; Kater, S B

    1995-10-01

    Communication from astrocytes to neurons has recently been reported by two laboratories, but different mechanisms were though to underlie glial calcium wave activation of associated neurons. Neuronal calcium elevation by glia observed in the present report is similar to that reported previously, where an increase in neuronal calcium was demonstrated in response to glial stimulation. In the present study hippocampal neurons plated on a confluent glial monolayer displayed a transient increase in intracellular calcium following a short delay after the passage of a wave of increased calcium in underlying glia. Activated cells displayed action potentials in response to glial waves and showed antineurofilament immunoreactivity. Finally, the N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor antagonist DL-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid and the non-NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione significantly reduced the responsiveness of neurons to glial calcium waves. Our results indicate that hippocampal neurons growing on hippocampal or cortical astrocytes respond to glial calcium waves with elevations in calcium and increased electrical activity. Furthermore, we show that in most cases this communication appears to be mediated by ionotropic glutamate receptor channels.

  5. Intracellular mannose binding lectin mediates subcellular trafficking of HIV-1 gp120 in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodorof, C; Divakar, S; Soontornniyomkij, B; Achim, C L; Kaul, M; Singh, K K

    2014-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) enters the brain early during infection and leads to severe neuronal damage and central nervous system impairment. HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein 120 (gp120), a neurotoxin, undergoes intracellular trafficking and transport across neurons; however mechanisms of gp120 trafficking in neurons are unclear. Our results show that mannose binding lectin (MBL) that binds to the N-linked mannose residues on gp120, participates in intravesicular packaging of gp120 in neuronal subcellular organelles and also in subcellular trafficking of these vesicles in neuronal cells. Perinuclear MBL:gp120 vesicular complexes were observed and MBL facilitated the subcellular trafficking of gp120 via the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi vesicles. The functional carbohydrate recognition domain of MBL was required for perinuclear organization, distribution and subcellular trafficking of MBL:gp120 vesicular complexes. Nocodazole, an agent that depolymerizes the microtubule network, abolished the trafficking of MBL:gp120 vesicles, suggesting that these vesicular complexes were transported along the microtubule network. Live cell imaging confirmed the association of the MBL:gp120 complexes with dynamic subcellular vesicles that underwent trafficking in neuronal soma and along the neurites. Thus, our findings suggest that intracellular MBL mediates subcellular trafficking and transport of viral glycoproteins in a microtubule-dependent mechanism in the neurons.

  6. Regnase-1 in microglia negatively regulates high mobility group box 1-mediated inflammation and neuronal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Xi; Wang, Chen; Huang, Shao-Fei; Chen, Qiong; Hu, Ya-Fang; Zhou, Liang; Gu, Yong

    2016-04-05

    Extracellular high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) has been demonstrated to function as a proinflammatory cytokine and induces neuronal injury in response to various pathological stimuli in central nervous system (CNS). However, the regulatory factor involved in HMGB1-mediated inflammatory signaling is largely unclear. Regulatory RNase 1 (Regnase-1) is a potent anti-inflammation enzyme that can degrade a set of mRNAs encoding proinflammatory cytokines. The present study aims to determine the role of Regnase-1 in the regulation of HMGB1-mediated inflammatory injury in CNS. Cultured microglia and rat brain were treated with recombinant HMGB1 to examine the induction of Regnase-1 expression. Moreover, the role of Regnase-1 in modulating the expression of inflammatory cytokines and neuronal injury was then investigated in microglia by specific siRNA knockdown upon HMGB1 treatment. Results showed that HMGB1 could significantly induce the de novo synthesis of Regnase-1 in cultured microglia. Consistently, Regnase-1 was elevated and found to be co-localized with microglia marker in the brain of rat treated with HMGB1. Silencing Regnase-1 in microglia enhanced HMGB1-induced expression of proinflammatory cytokines and exacerbated neuronal toxicity. Collectively, these results suggest that Regnase-1 can be induced by HMGB1 in microglia and negatively regulates HMGB1-mediated neuroinflammation and neuronal toxicity.

  7. Nociceptive sensory neurons drive interleukin-23-mediated psoriasiform skin inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riol-Blanco, Lorena; Ordovas-Montanes, Jose; Perro, Mario; Naval, Elena; Thiriot, Aude; Alvarez, David; Paust, Silke; Wood, John N; von Andrian, Ulrich H

    2014-06-05

    The skin has a dual function as a barrier and a sensory interface between the body and the environment. To protect against invading pathogens, the skin harbours specialized immune cells, including dermal dendritic cells (DDCs) and interleukin (IL)-17-producing γδ T (γδT17) cells, the aberrant activation of which by IL-23 can provoke psoriasis-like inflammation. The skin is also innervated by a meshwork of peripheral nerves consisting of relatively sparse autonomic and abundant sensory fibres. Interactions between the autonomic nervous system and immune cells in lymphoid organs are known to contribute to systemic immunity, but how peripheral nerves regulate cutaneous immune responses remains unclear. We exposed the skin of mice to imiquimod, which induces IL-23-dependent psoriasis-like inflammation. Here we show that a subset of sensory neurons expressing the ion channels TRPV1 and Nav1.8 is essential to drive this inflammatory response. Imaging of intact skin revealed that a large fraction of DDCs, the principal source of IL-23, is in close contact with these nociceptors. Upon selective pharmacological or genetic ablation of nociceptors, DDCs failed to produce IL-23 in imiquimod-exposed skin. Consequently, the local production of IL-23-dependent inflammatory cytokines by dermal γδT17 cells and the subsequent recruitment of inflammatory cells to the skin were markedly reduced. Intradermal injection of IL-23 bypassed the requirement for nociceptor communication with DDCs and restored the inflammatory response. These findings indicate that TRPV1(+)Nav1.8(+) nociceptors, by interacting with DDCs, regulate the IL-23/IL-17 pathway and control cutaneous immune responses.

  8. Nociceptive Sensory Neurons Drive Interleukin-23 Mediated Psoriasiform Skin Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riol-Blanco, Lorena; Ordovas-Montanes, Jose; Perro, Mario; Naval, Elena; Thiriot, Aude; Alvarez, David; Wood, John N.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.

    2014-01-01

    The skin has a dual function as a barrier and a sensory interface between the body and the environment. To protect against invading pathogens, the skin harbors specialized immune cells, including dermal dendritic cells (DDCs) and interleukin (IL)-17 producing γδ T cells (γδT17), whose aberrant activation by IL-23 can provoke psoriasis-like inflammation1–4. The skin is also innervated by a meshwork of peripheral nerves consisting of relatively sparse autonomic and abundant sensory fibers. Interactions between the autonomic nervous system and immune cells in lymphoid organs are known to contribute to systemic immunity, but how peripheral nerves regulate cutaneous immune responses remains unclear5,6. Here, we have exposed the skin of mice to imiquimod (IMQ), which induces IL-23 dependent psoriasis-like inflammation7,8. We show that a subset of sensory neurons expressing the ion channels TRPV1 and NaV1.8 is essential to drive this inflammatory response. Imaging of intact skin revealed that a large fraction of DDCs, the principal source of IL-23, is in close contact with these nociceptors. Upon selective pharmacological or genetic ablation of nociceptors9–11, DDCs failed to produce IL-23 in IMQ exposed skin. Consequently, the local production of IL-23 dependent inflammatory cytokines by dermal γδT17 cells and the subsequent recruitment of inflammatory cells to the skin were dramatically reduced. Intradermal injection of IL-23 bypassed the requirement for nociceptor communication with DDCs and restored the inflammatory response12. These findings indicate that TRPV1+NaV1.8+ nociceptors, by interacting with DDCs, regulate the IL-23/IL-17 pathway and control cutaneous immune responses. PMID:24759321

  9. Cytosolic phospholipase A(2) alpha mediates electrophysiologic responses of hippocampal pyramidal neurons to neurotoxic NMDA treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ying; Kishimoto, Koji; Linden, David J; Sapirstein, Adam

    2007-04-03

    The arachidonic acid-generating enzyme cytosolic phospholipase A(2) alpha (cPLA(2)alpha) has been implicated in the progression of excitotoxic neuronal injury. However, the mechanisms of cPLA(2)alpha toxicity have yet to be determined. Here, we used a model system exposing mouse hippocampal slices to NMDA as an excitotoxic injury, in combination with simultaneous patch-clamp recording and confocal Ca(2+) imaging of CA1 pyramidal neurons. NMDA treatment caused significantly greater injury in wild-type (WT) than in cPLA(2)alpha null CA1 neurons. Bath application of NMDA evoked a slow inward current in voltage-clamped neurons (composed of both NMDA receptor-mediated and other conductances) that was smaller in cPLA(2)alpha null than in WT slices. This was not due to down-regulation of NMDA receptor function because NMDA receptor-mediated currents were equivalent in each genotype following brief photolysis of caged glutamate. Current-clamp recordings were made during and following NMDA exposure by eliciting a single action potential with a brief current injection. After NMDA exposure, WT CA1 neurons developed a spike-evoked plateau potential and an increased spike-evoked dendritic Ca(2+) transient. These effects were absent in CA1 neurons from cPLA(2)alpha null mice and WT neurons treated with a cPLA(2)alpha inhibitor. The Ca-sensitive K-channel toxins, apamin and paxilline, caused spike broadening and Ca(2+) enhancement in WT and cPLA(2)alpha null slices. NMDA application in WT and arachidonate applied to cPLA(2)alpha null cells occluded the effects of apamin/paxilline. These results indicate that cPLA(2)alpha activity is required for development of aberrant electrophysiologic events triggered by NMDA receptor activation, in part through attenuation of K-channel function.

  10. Nestin-positive/SOX2-negative cells mediate adult neurogenesis of nigral dopaminergic neurons in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, Joshua E; Stojkovska, Iva; Rahman, Abir A; Brown, Connor J; Morrison, Brad E

    2016-02-26

    The primary clinical motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) result from loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). Consequently, neurogenesis of this group of neurons in the adult brain has drawn considerable interest for the purpose of harnessing endogenous neurogenerative potential as well as devising better strategies for stem cell therapy for PD. However, the existence of adult neurogenesis for DA neurons within the SN remains controversial. To overcome technical and design limitations associated with previous studies, our group has developed a novel genetic mouse model for assessing adult nigral DA neurogenesis. This system utilizes transgenic mice that express a tamoxifen-activatable Cre recombinase (Cre(ERT2)) under the control of the neuronal progenitor cell promoters nestin or Sox2 leading to suppression of the DA neuron marker tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) via excision of exon 1 by flanking loxP sites in adult animals. This study reports that six months following initiation of a six week treatment with tamoxifen mice with nestin-mediated Th excision displayed a significant reduction in TH+ neurons in the SN. This finding indicates that nestin-expressing cells regenerate DA neurons within the SN of adult animals. Interestingly, no reduction was observed in TH+ cells following Sox2-mediated Th excision suggesting that a nestin+/SOX2- precursor cell population drives DA neurogenesis in the adult SN. This information represents a substantial leap in current knowledge of adult DA neurogenesis, will enable improved in vitro and in vivo modeling, as well as facilitate the harnessing of this process for therapeutic intervention for PD. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  11. Capsaicin-mediated denervation of sensory neurons promotes mammary tumor metastasis to lung and heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erin, Nuray; Boyer, Philip J; Bonneau, Robert H; Clawson, Gary A; Welch, Danny R

    2004-01-01

    Capsaicin specifically activates or destroys small diameter nociceptive sensory neurons that contain the capsaicin receptor, also called vanilloid receptor 1. Neurons sensitive to capsaicin mediate inflammatory pain and are important targets for management of chronic pain. These neurons also regulate local tissue homeostasis, inflammation, healing and development, especially under conditions of psychological stress. Stress contributes to increased cancer recurrence and metastasis through as yet undefined mechanisms. Likewise, activity of capsaicin-sensitive neurons is altered by pathological conditions that may lead to metastatic growth (e.g. stress). Therefore, we examined effects of a treatment that induces sensory nerve denervation on breast cancer metastases. Systemic denervation of sensory neurons caused by treatment with 125 mg/kg capsaicin resulted in significantly more lung and cardiac metastases in adult mice injected orthotopically with syngeneic 4T1 mammary carcinoma cells than was observed in vehicle-treated controls. Heart metastases, normally very rare, occurred as pericardial nodules, intra-myocardial nodules, or combined pericardial-myocardial lesions. Since the rate of primary tumor growth was unaffected, effects on metastases appear to be host tissue-specific. Although preliminary, these observations provide one possible explanation for resistance of cardiac tissue to tumor involvement and highlight contributions of host tissue, including sensory neurons, in the efficiency of cancer metastasis.

  12. Antibody to collapsin response mediator protein 1 promotes neurite outgrowth from rat hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongsheng Lin; Jing Chen; Wenbin Zhang; Xiaobing Gong; Biao Chen; Guoqing Guo

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the role of collapsin response mediator protein 1 (CRMP-1) on neurite outgrowth from rat hippocampal neurons by blocking its function using an antibody. Hippocampal neurons, cultured in vitro, were treated (blocked) using a polyclonal antibody to CRMP-1, and neurite outgrowth and cytoskeletal changes w ere captured using atomic force microscopy and laser confocal microscopy. Control cells, treated with normal rabbit IgG, established their characteristic morphology and had a large number of processes emerging from the soma, including numerous branches. Microtubules were clearly visible in the soma, formed an elaborate network, and were aligned in parallel arrays to form bundles which projected into neurites. After blocking with CRMP-1 antibody, the number of branches emerging from axons and dendrites significantly increased and were substantially longer, compared with control cells. However, the microtubule network nearly disappeared and only a few remnants were visible. When CRMP-1 antibody-blocked neurons were treated with the Rho inhibitor, Y27632, numerous neurites emerged from the soma, and branches were more abundant than in control neurons. Although the microtubules were not as clearly visible compared with neurons cultured in control medium, the microtubule network recovered in cells treated with Y27632, when compared with cells that were blocked by CRMP-1 antibody (but not treated with Y27632). These results demonstrate that neurite outgrowth from hippocampal neurons can be promoted by blocking CRMP-1 with a polyclonal antibody.

  13. Lactate modulates the activity of primary cortical neurons through a receptor-mediated pathway.

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    Luigi Bozzo

    Full Text Available Lactate is increasingly described as an energy substrate of the brain. Beside this still debated metabolic role, lactate may have other effects on brain cells. Here, we describe lactate as a neuromodulator, able to influence the activity of cortical neurons. Neuronal excitability of mouse primary neurons was monitored by calcium imaging. When applied in conjunction with glucose, lactate induced a decrease in the spontaneous calcium spiking frequency of neurons. The effect was reversible and concentration dependent (IC50 ∼4.2 mM. To test whether lactate effects are dependent on energy metabolism, we applied the closely related substrate pyruvate (5 mM or switched to different glucose concentrations (0.5 or 10 mM. None of these conditions reproduced the effect of lactate. Recently, a Gi protein-coupled receptor for lactate called HCA1 has been introduced. To test if this receptor is implicated in the observed lactate sensitivity, we incubated cells with pertussis toxin (PTX an inhibitor of Gi-protein. PTX prevented the decrease of neuronal activity by L-lactate. Moreover 3,5-dyhydroxybenzoic acid, a specific agonist of the HCA1 receptor, mimicked the action of lactate. This study indicates that lactate operates a negative feedback on neuronal activity by a receptor-mediated mechanism, independent from its intracellular metabolism.

  14. Lactate modulates the activity of primary cortical neurons through a receptor-mediated pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzo, Luigi; Puyal, Julien; Chatton, Jean-Yves

    2013-01-01

    Lactate is increasingly described as an energy substrate of the brain. Beside this still debated metabolic role, lactate may have other effects on brain cells. Here, we describe lactate as a neuromodulator, able to influence the activity of cortical neurons. Neuronal excitability of mouse primary neurons was monitored by calcium imaging. When applied in conjunction with glucose, lactate induced a decrease in the spontaneous calcium spiking frequency of neurons. The effect was reversible and concentration dependent (IC50 ∼4.2 mM). To test whether lactate effects are dependent on energy metabolism, we applied the closely related substrate pyruvate (5 mM) or switched to different glucose concentrations (0.5 or 10 mM). None of these conditions reproduced the effect of lactate. Recently, a Gi protein-coupled receptor for lactate called HCA1 has been introduced. To test if this receptor is implicated in the observed lactate sensitivity, we incubated cells with pertussis toxin (PTX) an inhibitor of Gi-protein. PTX prevented the decrease of neuronal activity by L-lactate. Moreover 3,5-dyhydroxybenzoic acid, a specific agonist of the HCA1 receptor, mimicked the action of lactate. This study indicates that lactate operates a negative feedback on neuronal activity by a receptor-mediated mechanism, independent from its intracellular metabolism.

  15. An epigenetic mechanism mediates developmental nicotine effects on neuronal structure and behavior

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    Jung, Yonwoo; Hsieh, Lawrence S.; Lee, Angela M.; Zhou, Zhifeng; Coman, Daniel; Heath, Christopher J.; Hyder, Fahmeed; Mineur, Yann S.; Yuan, Qiaoping; Goldman, David; Bordey, Angelique; Picciotto, Marina R.

    2016-01-01

    Developmental nicotine exposure causes persistent changes in cortical neuron morphology and in behavior. We used microarray screening to identify master transcriptional or epigenetic regulators mediating these effects of nicotine and discovered increases in Ash2l, a component of a histone methyltransferase complex. We therefore examined genome-wide changes in H3K4 tri-methylation, a mark induced by the Ash2l complex associated with increased gene transcription. A significant number of regulated promoter sites were involved in synapse maintenance. We found that Mef2c interacts with Ash2l and mediates changes in H3K4 tri-methylation. Knockdown of Ash2l or Mef2c abolishes nicotine-mediated alterations of dendritic complexity in vitro and in vivo, and attenuates nicotine-dependent changes in passive avoidance behavior. In contrast, overexpression mimics nicotine-mediated alterations of neuronal structure and passive avoidance behavior. These studies identify Ash2l as a novel target induced by nicotinic stimulation that couples developmental nicotine exposure to changes in brain epigenetic marks, neuronal structure and behavior. PMID:27239938

  16. Colonic mucosal mediators from patients with irritable bowel syndrome excite enteric cholinergic motor neurons.

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    Balestra, B; Vicini, R; Cremon, C; Zecchi, L; Dothel, G; Vasina, V; De Giorgio, R; Paccapelo, A; Pastoris, O; Stanghellini, V; Corinaldesi, R; De Ponti, F; Tonini, M; Barbara, G

    2012-12-01

    Mediators released in the mucosal milieu have been suggested to be involved in visceral hypersensitivity and abdominal pain in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). However, their impact on myenteric neurons remains unsettled. Mucosal biopsies were obtained from the descending colon of patients with IBS and controls. Mucosal mast cells were identified immunohistochemically. The impact of spontaneously released mucosal mediators on guinea pig electrically stimulated longitudinal muscle myenteric plexus (LMMP) preparations was assessed in vitro by means of selective receptor antagonists and inhibitors. Patients with IBS showed an increased mast cell count compared with controls. Application of mucosal mediators of IBS to LMMPs potentiated cholinergic twitch contractions, an effect directly correlated with mast cell counts. Enhanced contractions were inhibited by 50.3% with the prostaglandin D2 antagonist BW A868C, by 31.3% and 39% with the TRPV1 antagonists capsazepine and HC-030031, respectively, and by 60.5% with purinergic P2X antagonist pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid. Conversely, the serotonin1-4, histamine1-3, tachykinin1-3 receptor blockade, and serine protease inhibition had no significant effect. Colonic mucosal mediators from patients with IBS excite myenteric cholinergic motor neurons. These effects were correlated with mast cell counts and mediated by activation of prostanoid receptors, TRPV1, and P2X receptors. These results support the role of mucosal inflammatory mediators and mast cell activation in altered motor function of IBS. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Transmitters and pathways mediating inhibition of spinal itch-signaling neurons by scratching and other counterstimuli.

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    Tasuku Akiyama

    Full Text Available Scratching relieves itch, but the underlying neural mechanisms are poorly understood. We presently investigated a role for the inhibitory neurotransmitters GABA and glycine in scratch-evoked inhibition of spinal itch-signaling neurons in a mouse model of chronic dry skin itch. Superficial dorsal horn neurons ipsilateral to hindpaw dry skin treatment exhibited a high level of spontaneous firing that was significantly attenuated by cutaneous scratching, pinch and noxious heat. Scratch-evoked inhibition was nearly abolished by spinal delivery of the glycine antagonist, strychnine, and was markedly attenuated by respective GABA(A and GABA(B antagonists bicuculline and saclofen. Scratch-evoked inhibition was also significantly attenuated (but not abolished by interruption of the upper cervical spinal cord, indicating the involvement of both segmental and suprasegmental circuits that engage glycine- and GABA-mediated inhibition of spinal itch-signaling neurons by noxious counterstimuli.

  18. TFEB-mediated autophagy rescues midbrain dopamine neurons from α-synuclein toxicity

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    Decressac, Mickael; Mattsson, Bengt; Weikop, Pia

    2013-01-01

    The aggregation of α-synuclein plays a major role in Parkinson disease (PD) pathogenesis. Recent evidence suggests that defects in the autophagy-mediated clearance of α-synuclein contribute to the progressive loss of nigral dopamine neurons. Using an in vivo model of α-synuclein toxicity, we show...... that the PD-like neurodegenerative changes induced by excess cellular levels of α-synuclein in nigral dopamine neurons are closely linked to a progressive decline in markers of lysosome function, accompanied by cytoplasmic retention of transcription factor EB (TFEB), a major transcriptional regulator...... in both A9 and A10 dopamine neurons. Delayed activation of TFEB function through inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin blocked α-synuclein induced neurodegeneration and further disease progression. The results provide a mechanistic link between α-synuclein toxicity and impaired TFEB function...

  19. Cholinergic impact on neuroplasticity drives muscarinic M1 receptor mediated differentiation into neurons.

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    Benninghoff, Jens; Rauh, Werner; Brantl, Victor; Schloesser, Robert J; Moessner, Rainald; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Rujescu, Dan

    2013-04-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that canonical neurotransmitters act as regulatory signals during neuroplasticity. Here, we report that muscarinic cholinergic neurotransmission stimulates differentiation of adult neural stem cells in vitro. Adult neural stem cells (ANSC) dissociated from the adult mouse hippocampus were expanded in culture with basic fibroblast growth factor (BFGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). Carbachol (CCh), an analog of acetylcholine (ACh) significantly enhanced de novo differentiation into neurons on bFGF- and EGF-deprived stem cells as shown by the percentage of TUJ1 positive cells. By contrast, pirenzepine (PIR), a muscarinic M1 receptor antagonist, reduced the generation of neurons. Activation of cholinergic signaling drives the de novo differentiation of uncommitted stem cells into neurons. These effects appear to be predominantly mediated via the muscarinic M1 receptor subtype.

  20. Descending propriospinal neurons mediate restoration of locomotor function following spinal cord injury.

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    Benthall, Katelyn N; Hough, Ryan A; McClellan, Andrew D

    2017-01-01

    Following spinal cord injury (SCI) in the lamprey, there is virtually complete recovery of locomotion within a few weeks, but interestingly, axonal regeneration of reticulospinal (RS) neurons is mostly limited to short distances caudal to the injury site. To explain this situation, we hypothesize that descending propriospinal (PS) neurons relay descending drive from RS neurons to indirectly activate spinal central pattern generators (CPGs). In the present study, the contributions of PS neurons to locomotor recovery were tested in the lamprey following SCI. First, long RS neuron projections were interrupted by staggered spinal hemitransections on the right side at 10% body length (BL; normalized from the tip of the oral hood) and on the left side at 30% BL. For acute recovery conditions (≤1 wk) and before axonal regeneration, swimming muscle burst activity was relatively normal, but with some deficits in coordination. Second, lampreys received two spaced complete spinal transections, one at 10% BL and one at 30% BL, to interrupt long-axon RS neuron projections. At short recovery times (3-5 wk), RS and PS neurons will have regenerated their axons for short distances and potentially established a polysynaptic descending command pathway. At these short recovery times, swimming muscle burst activity had only minor coordination deficits. A computer model that incorporated either of the two spinal lesions could mimic many aspects of the experimental data. In conclusion, descending PS neurons are a viable mechanism for indirect activation of spinal locomotor CPGs, although there can be coordination deficits of locomotor activity. In the lamprey following spinal lesion-mediated interruption of long axonal projections of reticulospinal (RS) neurons, sensory stimulation still elicited relatively normal locomotor muscle burst activity, but with some coordination deficits. Computer models incorporating the spinal lesions could mimic many aspects of the experimental results

  1. RIG-I mediates innate immune response in mouse neurons following Japanese encephalitis virus infection.

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    Arshed Nazmi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neuroinflammation associated with Japanese encephalitis (JE is mainly due to the activation of glial cells with subsequent release of proinflammatory mediators from them. The recognition of viral RNA, in part, by the pattern recognition receptor retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I has been indicated to have a role in such processes. Even though neurons are also known to express this receptor, its role after JE virus (JEV infections is yet to be elucidated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Upon infecting murine neuroblastoma cells and primary cortical neurons with JEV the expression profile of key proinflammatory cyto/chemokines were analyzed by qRT-PCR and bead array, both before and after ablation of RIG-I. Immunoblotting was performed to evaluate the levels of key molecules downstream to RIG-I leading to production of proinflammatory mediators. Changes in the intracellular viral antigen expression were confirmed by intracellular staining and immunoblotting. JEV infection induced neuronal expression of IL-6, IL-12p70, MCP-1, IP-10 and TNF-α in a time-dependent manner, which showed significant reduction upon RIG-I ablation. Molecules downstream to RIG-I showed significant changes upon JEV-infection, that were modulated following RIG-I ablation. Ablation of RIG-I in neurons also increased their susceptibility to JEV. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this study we propose that neurons are one of the potential sources of proinflammatory cyto/chemokines in JEV-infected brain that are produced via RIG-I dependent pathways. Ablation of RIG-I in neurons leads to increased viral load and reduced release of the cyto/chemokines.

  2. NGF-mediated transcriptional targets of p53 in PC12 neuronal differentiation

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    Labhart Paul

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background p53 is recognized as a critical regulator of the cell cycle and apoptosis. Mounting evidence also suggests a role for p53 in differentiation of cells including neuronal precursors. We studied the transcriptional role of p53 during nerve growth factor-induced differentiation of the PC12 line into neuron-like cells. We hypothesized that p53 contributed to PC12 differentiation through the regulation of gene targets distinct from its known transcriptional targets for apoptosis or DNA repair. Results Using a genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation cloning technique, we identified and validated 14 novel p53-regulated genes following NGF treatment. The data show p53 protein was transcriptionally activated and contributed to NGF-mediated neurite outgrowth during differentiation of PC12 cells. Furthermore, we describe stimulus-specific regulation of a subset of these target genes by p53. The most salient differentiation-relevant target genes included wnt7b involved in dendritic extension and the tfcp2l4/grhl3 grainyhead homolog implicated in ectodermal development. Additional targets included brk, sdk2, sesn3, txnl2, dusp5, pon3, lect1, pkcbpb15 and other genes. Conclusion Within the PC12 neuronal context, putative p53-occupied genomic loci spanned the entire Rattus norvegicus genome upon NGF treatment. We conclude that receptor-mediated p53 transcriptional activity is involved in PC12 differentiation and may suggest a contributory role for p53 in neuronal development.

  3. Neuron-microglia crosstalk up-regulates neuronal FGF-2 expression which mediates neuroprotection against excitotoxicity via JNK1/2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Catarina; Pais, Teresa F; Gomes, João R; Chatterjee, Sukalyan

    2008-10-01

    Glial cells and neurons are in constant reciprocal signalling both under physiological and neuropathological conditions. Microglial activation is often associated with neuronal death during inflammation of the CNS, although microglial cells are also known to exert a neuroprotective role. In this work, we investigated the interplay between cerebellar granule neurons (CGN) and microglia in the perspective of CGN survival to an excitotoxic stimulus, quinolinic acid (QA), a catabolite of the tryptophan degradation pathway. We observed that CGN succumb to QA challenge via extracellular signal regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK) activation. Our data with transgenic mice expressing the natural inhibitor of calpains, calpastatin, indicate that together with cathepsins they mediate QA-induced toxicity acting downstream of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-ERK pathway. Microglial cells are not only resistant to QA but can rescue neurons from QA-mediated toxicity when they are mixed in culture with neurons or by using mixed culture-conditioned medium (MCCM). This effect is mediated via fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) present in MCCM. FGF-2 is transcriptionally up-regulated in neurons and secreted in the MCCM as a result of neuron-microglia crosstalk. The neuroprotection is associated with the retention of cathepsins in the lysosomes and with transactivation of inducible heat-shock protein 70 downstream of FGF-2. Furthermore, FGF-2 upon release by neurons activates c-jun N-terminal kinase 1 and 2 pathway which also contributes to neuronal survival. We suggest that FGF-2 plays a pivotal role in neuroprotection against QA as an outcome of neuron-microglia interaction.

  4. PI3K-mTOR-S6K Signaling Mediates Neuronal Viability via Collapsin Response Mediator Protein-2 Expression

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    Eun J. Na

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Collapsin response mediator protein (CRMP-2 and the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 signaling pathway are associated with common physiological functions such as neuronal polarity, axonal outgrowth and synaptic strength, as well as various brain disorders including epilepsy. But, their regulatory and functional links are unclear. Alterations in CRMP-2 expression that lead to its functional changes are implicated in brain disorders such as epilepsy. Here, we investigate whether changes in CRMP-2 expression, possibly regulated by mTOR-related signaling, correlates with neuronal growth and viability. Inhibition of mTOR and/or phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K led to deceased p-S6K, and p-S6 signals also reduced CRMP-2 expression. These changes corresponded to inhibition of neuronal viability and proliferation in cultured hippocampal HT-22 cells under both basal serum-free and serum- or insulin-induced mTOR pathway-activated conditions. CRMP-2 expression tended to be increased by mTOR activation, indicated by an increase in p-S6/S6 level, in pentylentetrazole (PTZ-induced epileptic rat hippocampal tissues was also significantly reduced by mTOR inhibition. Knockdown of CRMP-2 by si-RNA reduced the neuronal viability without changes in mTOR signaling, and overexpression of CRMP-2 recovered the glutamate-induced neurotoxicity and decrease of mTOR signaling in HT-22 cells. In conclusion, CRMP-2 protein expression controlled by the PI3K-mTOR-S6K signaling axis exerts its important functional roles in neuronal growth and survival.

  5. Imbalanced Dopaminergic Transmission Mediated by Serotonergic Neurons in L-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesia

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    Sylvia Navailles

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias (LIDs are one of the main motor side effects of L-DOPA therapy in Parkinson's disease. The review will consider the biochemical evidence indicating that the serotonergic neurons are involved in the dopaminergic effects of L-DOPA in the brain. The consequences are an ectopic and aberrant release of dopamine that follows the serotonergic innervation of the brain. After mid- to long-term treatment with L-DOPA, the pattern of L-DOPA-induced dopamine release is modified. In several brain regions, its effect is dramatically reduced while, in the striatum, its effect is quite preserved. LIDs could appear when the dopaminergic effects of L-DOPA fall in brain areas such as the cortex, enhancing the subcortical impact of dopamine and promoting aberrant motor responses. The consideration of the serotonergic system in the core mechanism of action of L-DOPA opens an important reserve of possible strategies to limit LIDs.

  6. Aβ induces PUMA activation: a new mechanism for Aβ-mediated neuronal apoptosis.

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    Feng, Jie; Meng, Chengbo; Xing, Da

    2015-02-01

    p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) is a promising tumor therapy target because it elicits apoptosis and profound sensitivity to radiation and chemotherapy. However, inhibition of PUMA may be beneficial for curbing excessive apoptosis associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a representative neurodegenerative disease in which amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition causes neurotoxicity. The regulation of PUMA during Aβ-induced neuronal apoptosis remains poorly understood. Here, we reported that PUMA expression was significantly increased in the hippocampus of transgenic mice models of AD and hippocampal neurons in response to Aβ. PUMA knockdown protected the neurons against Aβ-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, besides p53, PUMA transactivation was also regulated by forkhead box O3a through p53-independent manner following Aβ treatment. Notably, PUMA contributed to neuronal apoptosis through competitive binding of apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain to activate caspase-8 that cleaved Bid into tBid to accelerate Bax mitochondrial translocation, revealing a novel pathway of Bax activation by PUMA to mediate Aβ-induced neuronal apoptosis. Together, we demonstrated that PUMA activation involved in Aβ-induced apoptosis, representing a drug target to antagonize AD progression.

  7. Transcriptional and Epigenetic Regulation in Injury-Mediated Neuronal Dendritic Plasticity.

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    Wang, Ying; Li, Wen-Yuan; Li, Zhi-Gang; Guan, Li-Xin; Deng, Ling-Xiao

    2017-02-01

    Injury to the nervous system induces localized damage in neural structures and neuronal death through the primary insult, as well as delayed atrophy and impaired plasticity of the delicate dendritic fields necessary for interneuronal communication. Excitotoxicity and other secondary biochemical events contribute to morphological changes in neurons following injury. Evidence suggests that various transcription factors are involved in the dendritic response to injury and potential therapies. Transcription factors play critical roles in the intracellular regulation of neuronal morphological plasticity and dendritic growth and patterning. Mounting evidence supports a crucial role for epigenetic modifications via histone deacetylases, histone acetyltransferases, and DNA methyltransferases that modify gene expression in neuronal injury and repair processes. Gene regulation through epigenetic modification is of great interest in neurotrauma research, and an early picture is beginning to emerge concerning how injury triggers intracellular events that modulate such responses. This review provides an overview of injury-mediated influences on transcriptional regulation through epigenetic modification, the intracellular processes involved in the morphological consequences of such changes, and potential approaches to the therapeutic manipulation of neuronal epigenetics for regulating gene expression to facilitate growth and signaling through dendritic arborization following injury.

  8. Co-activation of VTA DA and GABA neurons mediates nicotine reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolu, S; Eddine, R; Marti, F; David, V; Graupner, M; Pons, S; Baudonnat, M; Husson, M; Besson, M; Reperant, C; Zemdegs, J; Pagès, C; Hay, Y A H; Lambolez, B; Caboche, J; Gutkin, B; Gardier, A M; Changeux, J-P; Faure, P; Maskos, U

    2013-03-01

    Smoking is the most important preventable cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. This nicotine addiction is mediated through the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), expressed on most neurons, and also many other organs in the body. Even within the ventral tegmental area (VTA), the key brain area responsible for the reinforcing properties of all drugs of abuse, nicotine acts on several different cell types and afferents. Identifying the precise action of nicotine on this microcircuit, in vivo, is important to understand reinforcement, and finally to develop efficient smoking cessation treatments. We used a novel lentiviral system to re-express exclusively high-affinity nAChRs on either dopaminergic (DAergic) or γ-aminobutyric acid-releasing (GABAergic) neurons, or both, in the VTA. Using in vivo electrophysiology, we show that, contrary to widely accepted models, the activation of GABA neurons in the VTA plays a crucial role in the control of nicotine-elicited DAergic activity. Our results demonstrate that both positive and negative motivational values are transmitted through the dopamine (DA) neuron, but that the concerted activity of DA and GABA systems is necessary for the reinforcing actions of nicotine through burst firing of DA neurons. This work identifies the GABAergic interneuron as a potential target for smoking cessation drug development.

  9. Neurovascular coupling in hippocampus is mediated via diffusion by neuronal-derived nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, Cátia F; Santos, Ricardo M; Barbosa, Rui M; Cadenas, Enrique; Radi, Rafael; Laranjinha, João

    2014-08-01

    The coupling between neuronal activity and cerebral blood flow (CBF) is essential for normal brain function. The mechanisms behind this neurovascular coupling process remain elusive, mainly because of difficulties in probing dynamically the functional and coordinated interaction between neurons and the vasculature in vivo. Direct and simultaneous measurements of nitric oxide (NO) dynamics and CBF changes in hippocampus in vivo support the notion that during glutamatergic activation nNOS-derived NO induces a time-, space-, and amplitude-coupled increase in the local CBF, later followed by a transient increase in local O2 tension. These events are dependent on the activation of the NMDA-glutamate receptor and nNOS, without a significant contribution of endothelial-derived NO or astrocyte-neuron signaling pathways. Upon diffusion of NO from active neurons, the vascular response encompasses the activation of soluble guanylate cyclase. Hence, in the hippocampus, neurovascular coupling is mediated by nNOS-derived NO via a diffusional connection between active glutamatergic neurons and blood vessels.

  10. Prostaglandin receptor EP2 protects dopaminergic neurons against 6-OHDA-mediated low oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Emilce; Werner, Peter; Casper, Diana

    2008-08-15

    Dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) selectively die in Parkinson's disease (PD), but it is unclear how and why this occurs. Recent findings implicate prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and two of its four receptors, namely EP1 and EP2, as mediators of degenerative and protective events in situations of acute and chronic neuronal death. EP1 activation can exacerbate excitotoxic damage in stroke models and our recent study showed that EP1 activation may explain the selective sensitivity of dopaminergic neurons to oxidative stress. Conversely, EP2 activation may be neuroprotective, although toxic effects have also been demonstrated. Here we investigated if and how EP2 activation might alter the survival of dopaminergic neurons following selective low-level oxidative injury evoked by the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in primary neuronal cultures prepared from embryonic rat midbrain. We found that cultured dopaminergic neurons displayed EP2 receptors. Butaprost, a selective EP2 agonist, significantly reduced 6-OHDA neurotoxicity. EP2 receptors are coupled to stimulatory G-proteins (Gs), which activate adenylate cyclase, increasing cAMP synthesis, which then activates protein kinase A (PKA). Both dibutyryl cAMP and forskolin reduced dopaminergic cell loss after 6-OHDA exposure. Conversely, KT5720 and H-89, two structurally distinct high-affinity PKA inhibitors, abolished the protective effect of butaprost, implicating cAMP-dependent PKA activity in the neuroprotection by EP2 activation. Finally, we show that melanized dopaminergic neurons in the human SN express EP2. This pathway warrants consideration as a neuroprotective strategy for PD.

  11. The MLK family mediates c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation in neuronal apoptosis.

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    Xu, Z; Maroney, A C; Dobrzanski, P; Kukekov, N V; Greene, L A

    2001-07-01

    Neuronal apoptotic death induced by nerve growth factor (NGF) deprivation is reported to be in part mediated through a pathway that includes Rac1 and Cdc42, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases 4 and 7 (MKK4 and -7), c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs), and c-Jun. However, additional components of the pathway remain to be defined. We show here that members of the mixed-lineage kinase (MLK) family (including MLK1, MLK2, MLK3, and dual leucine zipper kinase [DLK]) are expressed in neuronal cells and are likely to act between Rac1/Cdc42 and MKK4 and -7 in death signaling. Overexpression of MLKs effectively induces apoptotic death of cultured neuronal PC12 cells and sympathetic neurons, while expression of dominant-negative forms of MLKs suppresses death evoked by NGF deprivation or expression of activated forms of Rac1 and Cdc42. CEP-1347 (KT7515), which blocks neuronal death caused by NGF deprivation and a variety of additional apoptotic stimuli and which selectively inhibits the activities of MLKs, effectively protects neuronal PC12 cells from death induced by overexpression of MLK family members. In addition, NGF deprivation or UV irradiation leads to an increase in both level and phosphorylation of endogenous DLK. These observations support a role for MLKs in the neuronal death mechanism. With respect to ordering the death pathway, dominant-negative forms of MKK4 and -7 and c-Jun are protective against death induced by MLK overexpression, placing MLKs upstream of these kinases. Additional findings place the MLKs upstream of mitochondrial cytochrome c release and caspase activation.

  12. Insulin receptors mediate growth effects in cultured fetal neurons. I. Rapid stimulation of protein synthesis

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    Heidenreich, K.A.; Toledo, S.P. (Univ. of California-San Diego, La Jolla (USA))

    1989-09-01

    In this study we have examined the effects of insulin on protein synthesis in cultured fetal chick neurons. Protein synthesis was monitored by measuring the incorporation of (3H)leucine (3H-leu) into trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-precipitable protein. Upon addition of 3H-leu, there was a 5-min lag before radioactivity occurred in protein. During this period cell-associated radioactivity reached equilibrium and was totally recovered in the TCA-soluble fraction. After 5 min, the incorporation of 3H-leu into protein was linear for 2 h and was inhibited (98%) by the inclusion of 10 micrograms/ml cycloheximide. After 24 h of serum deprivation, insulin increased 3H-leu incorporation into protein by approximately 2-fold. The stimulation of protein synthesis by insulin was dose dependent (ED50 = 70 pM) and seen within 30 min. Proinsulin was approximately 10-fold less potent than insulin on a molar basis in stimulating neuronal protein synthesis. Insulin had no effect on the TCA-soluble fraction of 3H-leu at any time and did not influence the uptake of (3H)aminoisobutyric acid into neurons. The isotope ratio of 3H-leu/14C-leu in the leucyl tRNA pool was the same in control and insulin-treated neurons. Analysis of newly synthesized proteins by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that insulin uniformly increased the incorporation of 14C-leu into all of the resolved neuronal proteins. We conclude from these data that (1) insulin rapidly stimulates overall protein synthesis in fetal neurons independent of amino acid uptake and aminoacyl tRNA precursor pools; (2) stimulation of protein synthesis is mediated by the brain subtype of insulin receptor; and (3) insulin is potentially an important in vivo growth factor for fetal central nervous system neurons.

  13. Expressing exogenous functional odorant receptors in cultured olfactory sensory neurons

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    Fomina Alla F

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Olfactory discrimination depends on the large numbers of odorant receptor genes and differential ligand-receptor signaling among neurons expressing different receptors. In this study, we describe an in vitro system that enables the expression of exogenous odorant receptors in cultured olfactory sensory neurons. Olfactory sensory neurons in the culture express characteristic signaling molecules and, therefore, provide a system to study receptor function within its intrinsic cellular environment. Results We demonstrate that cultured olfactory sensory neurons express endogenous odorant receptors. Lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer enables successful ectopic expression of odorant receptors. We show that the ectopically expressed mouse I7 is functional in the cultured olfactory sensory neurons. When two different odorant receptors are ectopically expressed simultaneously, both receptor proteins co-localized in the same olfactory sensory neurons up to 10 days in vitro. Conclusion This culture technique provided an efficient method to culture olfactory sensory neurons whose morphology, molecular characteristics and maturation progression resembled those observed in vivo. Using this system, regulation of odorant receptor expression and its ligand specificity can be studied in its intrinsic cellular environment.

  14. Phosphorylation of CHIP at Ser20 by Cdk5 promotes tAIF-mediated neuronal death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, C; Yun, N; Lee, J; Youdim, M B H; Ju, C; Kim, W-K; Han, P-L; Oh, Y J

    2016-02-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a proline-directed serine/threonine kinase and its dysregulation is implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. Likewise, C-terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP) is linked to neurological disorders, serving as an E3 ubiquitin ligase for targeting damaged or toxic proteins for proteasomal degradation. Here, we demonstrate that CHIP is a novel substrate for Cdk5. Cdk5 phosphorylates CHIP at Ser20 via direct binding to a highly charged domain of CHIP. Co-immunoprecipitation and ubiquitination assays reveal that Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation disrupts the interaction between CHIP and truncated apoptosis-inducing factor (tAIF) without affecting CHIP's E3 ligase activity, resulting in the inhibition of CHIP-mediated degradation of tAIF. Lentiviral transduction assay shows that knockdown of Cdk5 or overexpression of CHIP(S20A), but not CHIP(WT), attenuates tAIF-mediated neuronal cell death induced by hydrogen peroxide. Thus, we conclude that Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation of CHIP negatively regulates its neuroprotective function, thereby contributing to neuronal cell death progression following neurotoxic stimuli.

  15. Nanofibrous scaffold-mediated REST knockdown to enhance neuronal differentiation of stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Wei Ching; Rujitanaroj, Pim-On; Lee, Dong-Keun; Messersmith, Phillip B; Stanton, Lawrence W; Goh, Eyleen; Chew, Sing Yian

    2013-05-01

    At present, the recovery prospect for patients with chronic neurodegenerative diseases or acute trauma in the central nervous system is sub-optimal. The controlled differentiation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) to functional neurons is a possible treatment strategy. In contrast to the classical approach of biochemicals supplementation for guided stem cell commitment, this study explores the feasibility of directing neuronal differentiation through synergistic integration of three-dimensional nanofibrous topographical cues and scaffold-mediated knockdown of RE-1 silencing transcription factor (REST) in mouse NPCs. Taking advantage of the strong adhesive property and latent reactivity of mussel-inspired polydopamine (PD) coating, electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofibers were successfully functionalized with REST siRNAs (denoted as siREST PD-fiber). Sustained REST knockdown in NPCs was achieved for up to five days in vitro and the silencing efficiency was significantly higher than that mediated through siRNA adsorption onto non-PD coated sample controls. The silencing of REST, together with nanofiber topographical effect, significantly enhanced NPC neuronal commitment (57.5% Map2(+) cells in siREST PD-fiber vs. 43.5% in siREST PD-film vs. 50% in PD-fiber controls, p < 0.05) while reducing astrocytic and oligodendrocytic differentiation (10.7% O4(+) cells vs. ∼30% in siREST PD-film, p < 0.01). Taken together, the synergistic effects of scaffold-mediated REST knockdown and topographical cues from PD-modified nanofibers may be a useful strategy for generating functional neurons for therapeutic purposes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Selective ablation of dopamine β-hydroxylase neurons in the brain by immunotoxin-mediated neuronal targeting: new insights into brain catecholaminergic circuitry and catecholamine-related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoi, Keiichi; Ohara, Shinji; Kobayashi, Kazuto

    2013-01-01

    The locus coeruleus (LC) has been implicated in a variety of physiological functions including sleep/wakefulness, cognition/memory, stress/emotion, and pain. Marked loss of LC-noradrenergic (NAergic) neurons is observed in autopsy specimens of patients with Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease (PD), and part of the clinical symptoms of these diseases may be related to dysfunction of the LC. Neurotoxins have been utilized to ablate LC-NAergic neurons in experimental animals for elucidating the pathophysiological implication of the loss of LC, but there are methodological drawbacks in previously utilized methods. We employed immunotoxin-mediated neuronal targeting to overcome these problems. Following complete disruption of the LC-NAergic neurons by immunotoxin, mice showed behavioral changes, which resembled the nonmotor symptoms of PD. The LC-NAergic neurons did not regenerate following ablation, so the immunotoxin-mediated neuronal targeting may be useful especially for studying the long-term effects of the loss of LC-NAergic neurons on brain functions. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Chloride Accumulators NKCC1 and AE2 in Mouse GnRH Neurons: Implications for GABAA Mediated Excitation.

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    Carol Taylor-Burds

    Full Text Available A developmental "switch" in chloride transporters occurs in most neurons resulting in GABAA mediated hyperpolarization in the adult. However, several neuronal cell subtypes maintain primarily depolarizing responses to GABAA receptor activation. Among this group are gonadotropin-releasing hormone-1 (GnRH neurons, which control puberty and reproduction. NKCC1 is the primary chloride accumulator in neurons, expressed at high levels early in development and contributes to depolarization after GABAA receptor activation. In contrast, KCC2 is the primary chloride extruder in neurons, expressed at high levels in the adult and contributes to hyperpolarization after GABAA receptor activation. Anion exchangers (AEs are also potential modulators of responses to GABAA activation since they accumulate chloride and extrude bicarbonate. To evaluate the mechanism(s underlying GABAA mediated depolarization, GnRH neurons were analyzed for 1 expression of chloride transporters and AEs in embryonic, pre-pubertal, and adult mice 2 responses to GABAA receptor activation in NKCC1-/- mice and 3 function of AEs in these responses. At all ages, GnRH neurons were immunopositive for NKCC1 and AE2 but not KCC2 or AE3. Using explants, calcium imaging and gramicidin perforated patch clamp techniques we found that GnRH neurons from NKCC1-/- mice retained relatively normal responses to the GABAA agonist muscimol. However, acute pharmacological inhibition of NKCC1 with bumetanide eliminated the depolarization/calcium response to muscimol in 40% of GnRH neurons from WT mice. In the remaining GnRH neurons, HCO3- mediated mechanisms accounted for the remaining calcium responses to muscimol. Collectively these data reveal mechanisms responsible for maintaining depolarizing GABAA mediated transmission in GnRH neurons.

  18. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene knock-down in post-mitotic neurons.

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    Christoph Straub

    Full Text Available The prokaryotic adaptive immune system CRISPR/Cas9 has recently been adapted for genome editing in eukaryotic cells. This technique allows for sequence-specific induction of double-strand breaks in genomic DNA of individual cells, effectively resulting in knock-out of targeted genes. It thus promises to be an ideal candidate for application in neuroscience where constitutive genetic modifications are frequently either lethal or ineffective due to adaptive changes of the brain. Here we use CRISPR/Cas9 to knock-out Grin1, the gene encoding the obligatory NMDA receptor subunit protein GluN1, in a sparse population of mouse pyramidal neurons. Within this genetically mosaic tissue, manipulated cells lack synaptic current mediated by NMDA-type glutamate receptors consistent with complete knock-out of the targeted gene. Our results show the first proof-of-principle demonstration of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knock-down in neurons in vivo, where it can be a useful tool to study the function of specific proteins in neuronal circuits.

  19. PLCγ-activated signalling is essential for TrkB mediated sensory neuron structural plasticity

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    Rocha-Sanchez Sonia M

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vestibular system provides the primary input of our sense of balance and spatial orientation. Dysfunction of the vestibular system can severely affect a person's quality of life. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis of vestibular neuron survival, maintenance, and innervation of the target sensory epithelia is fundamental. Results Here we report that a point mutation at the phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ docking site in the mouse neurotrophin tyrosine kinase receptor TrkB (Ntrk2 specifically impairs fiber guidance inside the vestibular sensory epithelia, but has limited effects on the survival of vestibular sensory neurons and growth of afferent processes toward the sensory epithelia. We also show that expression of the TRPC3 cation calcium channel, whose activity is known to be required for nerve-growth cone guidance induced by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, is altered in these animals. In addition, we find that absence of the PLCγ mediated TrkB signalling interferes with the transformation of bouton type afferent terminals of vestibular dendrites into calyces (the largest synaptic contact of dendrites known in the mammalian nervous system on type I vestibular hair cells; the latter are normally distributed in these mutants as revealed by an unaltered expression pattern of the potassium channel KCNQ4 in these cells. Conclusions These results demonstrate a crucial involvement of the TrkB/PLCγ-mediated intracellular signalling in structural aspects of sensory neuron plasticity.

  20. Pharmacological induction of CCL5 in vivo prevents gp120-mediated neuronal injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Lee A.; Avdoshina, Valeriya; Day, Chris; Lim, Seung T.; Mocchetti, Italo

    2015-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope protein gp120 promotes neuronal injury which is believed to contribute to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Therefore, blocking the neurotoxic effect of gp120 may lead to alternative strategies to reduce the neurotoxic effect of HIV. In vitro, the neurotoxic effect of M-tropic gp120BaL is reduced by the chemokine CCL5, the natural ligand of CCR5 receptors. To determine whether CCL5 reduces the toxic effect of gp120BaL in vivo, animals were intrastriatally injected with lentiviral vectors overexpressing CCL5 prior to an intrastriatal injection of gp120BaL (400 ng). Neuronal injury was determined by silver staining, cleaved caspase-3 and TUNEL. Overexpression of CCL5 decreased gp120-mediated neuronal injury. CCL5 expression can be up-regulated by chronic morphine. Therefore, we examined whether morphine reduces the neurotoxic effect of gp120BaL. Rats stereotaxically injected with gp120BaL into the striatum received saline or chronic morphine for five days (10 mg/kg escalating to 30 mg/kg twice a day). Morphine-treated rats showed a decrease in all markers used to determine neuronal degeneration compared to saline-treated rats. The neuroprotective effect of morphine was significantly attenuated by expressing CCL5 shRNA. Our results suggest that compounds that increase the endogenous production of CCL5 may be used to reduce the pathogenesis of HIV–associated neurocognitive disorders. PMID:25623966

  1. Class 3 semaphorin mediates dendrite growth in adult newborn neurons through Cdk5/FAK pathway.

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    Teclise Ng

    Full Text Available Class 3 semaphorins are well-known axonal guidance cues during the embryonic development of mammalian nervous system. However, their activity on postnatally differentiated neurons in neurogenic regions of adult brains has not been characterized. We found that silencing of semaphorin receptors neuropilins (NRP 1 or 2 in neural progenitors at the adult mouse dentate gyrus resulted in newly differentiated neurons with shorter dendrites and simpler branching in vivo. Tyrosine phosphorylation (Tyr 397 and serine phosphorylation (Ser 732 of FAK were essential for these effects. Semaphorin 3A and 3F mediate serine phosphorylation of FAK through the activation of Cdk5. Silencing of either Cdk5 or FAK in newborn neurons phenocopied the defects in dendritic development seen upon silencing of NRP1 or NRP2. Furthermore, in vivo overexpression of Cdk5 or FAK rescued the dendritic phenotypes seen in NRP1 and NRP2 deficient neurons. These results point to a novel role for class 3 semaphorins in promoting dendritic growth and branching during adult hippocampal neurogenesis through the activation of Cdk5-FAK signaling pathway.

  2. S-Nitrosylation-Mediated Redox Transcriptional Switch Modulates Neurogenesis and Neuronal Cell Death

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    Shu-ichi Okamoto

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Redox-mediated posttranslational modifications represent a molecular switch that controls major mechanisms of cell function. Nitric oxide (NO can mediate redox reactions via S-nitrosylation, representing transfer of an NO group to a critical protein thiol. NO is known to modulate neurogenesis and neuronal survival in various brain regions in disparate neurodegenerative conditions. However, a unifying molecular mechanism linking these phenomena remains unknown. Here, we report that S-nitrosylation of myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2 transcription factors acts as a redox switch to inhibit both neurogenesis and neuronal survival. Structure-based analysis reveals that MEF2 dimerization creates a pocket, facilitating S-nitrosylation at an evolutionally conserved cysteine residue in the DNA binding domain. S-Nitrosylation disrupts MEF2-DNA binding and transcriptional activity, leading to impaired neurogenesis and survival in vitro and in vivo. Our data define a molecular switch whereby redox-mediated posttranslational modification controls both neurogenesis and neurodegeneration via a single transcriptional signaling cascade.

  3. Multiple receptor subtypes mediate the effects of serotonin on rat subfornical organ neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrogin, K. E.; Johnson, A. K.; Schmid, H. A.

    1998-01-01

    The subfornical organ (SFO) receives significant serotonergic innervation. However, few reports have examined the functional effects of serotonin on SFO neurons. This study characterized the effects of serotonin on spontaneously firing SFO neurons in the rat brain slice. Of 31 neurons tested, 80% responded to serotonin (1-100 microM) with either an increase (n = 15) or decrease (n = 10) in spontaneous activity. Responses to serotonin were dose dependent and persisted after synaptic blockade. Excitatory responses could also be mimicked by the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)2A/2C receptor agonist 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI; 1-10 microM) and could be blocked by the 5-HT2A/2C-receptor antagonist LY-53,857 (10 microM). LY-53,857 unmasked inhibitory responses to serotonin in 56% of serotonin-excited cells tested. Serotonin-inhibited cells were also inhibited by the 5-HT1A-receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT; 1-10 microM; n = 7). The data indicate that SFO neurons are responsive to serotonin via postsynaptic activation of multiple receptor subtypes. The results suggest that excitatory responses to serotonin are mediated by 5-HT2A or 5-HT2C receptors and that inhibitory responses may be mediated by 5-HT1A receptors. In addition, similar percentages of serotonin-excited and -inhibited cells were also sensitive to ANG II. As such the functional relationship between serotonin and ANG II in the SFO remains unclear.

  4. Scar Ectopic Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Madhuri Arvind

    2015-12-01

    Scar ectopic pregnancy is the rarest form of ectopic pregnancy and has been increasingly diagnosed all over the world. This is a life-threatening form of abnormal implantation of embryo within the myometrium and fibrous tissues in a previous scar on the uterus, especially following caesarean section. With the increasing rate of caesarean section, there is a substantial increase in this condition with better understanding of this disease. The early and accurate diagnosis with timely management can prevent pregnancy complications such as haemorrhage, uterine rupture and can preserve fertility.

  5. Ectopic Hidradenoma Papilliferum

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    Aristóteles David Neiva Rosmaninho

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hidradenoma papilliferum is a rare tumor that occurs almost exclusively in females on the anogenital area. Rare cases of ectopic (nongenital hidradenoma papilliferum have been described. The lesions usually present as an asymptomatic slow-growing, red, firm, mobile, well-delimitated nodule that grows for a long time before resection. We describe a case of an 26-year-old man that presented with an enlarging nodule on his right eyelid. The histological findings revealed a hidradenoma papilliferum. So far, among the very few reports of ectopic hidradenoma papilliferum, only a very small number were localized to the eyelid.

  6. Molecular Mechanisms Responsible for Neuron-Derived Conditioned Medium (NCM)-Mediated Protection of Ischemic Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chi-Hsin; Wang, Chen-Hsuan; Hsu, Shih-Lan; Liao, Li-Ya; Lin, Ting-An; Hsueh, Chi-Mei

    2016-01-01

    The protective value of neuron-derived conditioned medium (NCM) in cerebral ischemia and the underlying mechanism(s) responsible for NCM-mediated brain protection against cerebral ischemia were investigated in the study. NCM was first collected from the neuronal culture growing under the in vitro ischemic condition (glucose-, oxygen- and serum-deprivation or GOSD) for 2, 4 or 6 h. Through the focal cerebral ischemia (bilateral CCAO/unilateral MCAO) animal model, we discovered that ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced brain infarction was significantly reduced by NCM, given directly into the cistern magna at the end of 90 min of CCAO/MCAO. Immunoblocking and chemical blocking strategies were applied in the in vitro ischemic studies to show that NCM supplement could protect microglia, astrocytes and neurons from GOSD-induced cell death, in a growth factor (TGFβ1, NT-3 and GDNF) and p-ERK dependent manner. Brain injection with TGFβ1, NT3, GDNF and ERK agonist (DADS) alone or in combination, therefore also significantly decreased the infarct volume of ischemic brain. Moreover, NCM could inhibit ROS but stimulate IL-1β release from GOSD-treated microglia and limit the infiltration of IL-β-positive microglia into the core area of ischemic brain, revealing the anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of NCM. In overall, NCM-mediated brain protection against cerebral ischemia has been demonstrated for the first time in S.D. rats, due to its anti-apoptotic, anti-oxidant and potentially anti-glutamate activities (NCM-induced IL-1β can inhibit the glutamate-mediated neurotoxicity) and restriction upon the infiltration of inflammatory microglia into the core area of ischemic brain. The therapeutic potentials of NCM, TGFβ1, GDNF, NT-3 and DADS in the control of cerebral ischemia in human therefore have been suggested and require further investigation.

  7. Visualization of oxytocin release that mediates paired pulse facilitation in hypothalamic pathways to brainstem autonomic neurons.

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    Ramón A Piñol

    Full Text Available Recent work has shown that oxytocin is involved in more than lactation and uterine contraction. The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN contains neuroendocrine neurons that control the release of hormones, including vasopressin and oxytocin. Other populations of PVN neurons do not release hormones, but rather project to and release neurotransmitters onto other neurons in the CNS involved in fluid retention, thermoregulation, sexual behavior and responses to stress. Activation of oxytocin receptors can be cardioprotective and reduces the adverse cardiovascular consequences of anxiety and stress, yet how oxytocin can affect heart rate and cardiac function is unknown. While anatomical work has shown the presence of peptides, including oxytocin, in the projections from the PVN to parasympathetic nuclei, electrophysiological studies to date have only demonstrated release of glutamate and activation of fast ligand gated receptors in these pathways. In this study, using rats, we directly show, using sniffer CHO cells that express oxytocin receptors and the Ca2+ indicator R-GECO, that optogenetic activation of channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2 expressing PVN fibers in the brainstem activates oxytocin receptors in the dorsomotor nucleus of the vagus (DMNV. We also demonstrate that while a single photoactivation of PVN terminals only activates glutamatergic receptors in brainstem cardiac vagal neurons (CVNs, neurons that dominate the neural control of heart rate, both the paired pulse facilitation, and sustained enhancement of glutamate release in this pathway is mediated by activation of oxytocin receptors. Our results provide direct evidence that a pathway from the PVN likely releases oxytocin and enhances short-term plasticity of this critical autonomic connection.

  8. Visualization of Oxytocin Release that Mediates Paired Pulse Facilitation in Hypothalamic Pathways to Brainstem Autonomic Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñol, Ramón A.; Jameson, Heather; Popratiloff, Anastas; Lee, Norman H.; Mendelowitz, David

    2014-01-01

    Recent work has shown that oxytocin is involved in more than lactation and uterine contraction. The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) contains neuroendocrine neurons that control the release of hormones, including vasopressin and oxytocin. Other populations of PVN neurons do not release hormones, but rather project to and release neurotransmitters onto other neurons in the CNS involved in fluid retention, thermoregulation, sexual behavior and responses to stress. Activation of oxytocin receptors can be cardioprotective and reduces the adverse cardiovascular consequences of anxiety and stress, yet how oxytocin can affect heart rate and cardiac function is unknown. While anatomical work has shown the presence of peptides, including oxytocin, in the projections from the PVN to parasympathetic nuclei, electrophysiological studies to date have only demonstrated release of glutamate and activation of fast ligand gated receptors in these pathways. In this study, using rats, we directly show, using sniffer CHO cells that express oxytocin receptors and the Ca2+ indicator R-GECO, that optogenetic activation of channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) expressing PVN fibers in the brainstem activates oxytocin receptors in the dorsomotor nucleus of the vagus (DMNV). We also demonstrate that while a single photoactivation of PVN terminals only activates glutamatergic receptors in brainstem cardiac vagal neurons (CVNs), neurons that dominate the neural control of heart rate, both the paired pulse facilitation, and sustained enhancement of glutamate release in this pathway is mediated by activation of oxytocin receptors. Our results provide direct evidence that a pathway from the PVN likely releases oxytocin and enhances short-term plasticity of this critical autonomic connection. PMID:25379676

  9. Dopamine receptor-mediated mechanisms involved in the expression of learned activity of primate striatal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K; Kimura, M

    1998-05-01

    To understand the mechanisms by which basal ganglia neurons express acquired activities during and after behavioral learning, selective dopamine (DA) receptor antagonists were applied while recording the activity of striatal neurons in monkeys performing behavioral tasks. In experiment 1, a monkey was trained to associate a click sound with a drop of reward water. DA receptor antagonists were administered by micropressure using a stainless steel injection cannula (300 microm ID) through which a Teflon-coated tungsten wire for recording neuronal activity had been threaded. Responses to sound by tonically active neurons (TANs), a class of neurons in the primate striatum, were recorded through a tungsten wire electrode during the application of either D1- or D2-class DA receptor antagonists (total volume one of the surrounding barrels. SCH23390 (10 mM, pH 4.5) and (-)-sulpiride (10 mM, pH 4.5) were used. The effects of iontophoresis of both D1- and D2-class antagonists were examined in 40 TANs. Of 40 TANs from which recordings were made, responses were suppressed exclusively by the D2-class antagonist in 19 TANs, exclusively by the D1-class antagonist in 3 TANs, and by both D1- and D2-class antagonists in 7 TANs. When 0.9% NaCl, saline, was applied by pressure (<1 microl) or by iontophoresis (<30 nA) as a control, neither the background discharge rates nor the responses of TANs were significantly influenced. Background discharge rate of TANs was also not affected by D1- or D2-class antagonists applied by either micropressure injection or iontophoresis. It was concluded that the nigrostriatal DA system enables TANs to express learned activity primarily through D2-class and partly through D1-class receptor-mediated mechanisms in the striatum.

  10. Glutamate transporter activity promotes enhanced Na+/K+-ATPase-mediated extracellular K+ management during neuronal activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Brian Roland; Holm, Rikke; Vilsen, Bente;

    2016-01-01

    , in addition, Na+/K+-ATPase-mediated K+ clearance could be governed by astrocytic [Na+]i. During most neuronal activity, glutamate is released in the synaptic cleft and is re-absorbed by astrocytic Na+-coupled glutamate transporters, thereby elevating [Na+]i. It thus remains unresolved whether the different Na...... constellations in Xenopus oocytes and determined their apparent Na+ affinity in intact oocytes and isolated membranes. The Na+/K+-ATPase was not fully saturated at basal astrocytic [Na+]i, irrespective of isoform constellation, although the β1 subunit conferred lower apparent Na+ affinity to the α1 and α2...

  11. Atrial Ectopics Precipitating Atrial Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson Francis

    2015-01-01

    Holter monitor tracing showing blocked atrial ectopics and atrial ectopic precipitating atrial fibrillation is being demonstrated. Initially it was coarse atrial fibrillation, which rapidly degenerated into fine atrial fibrillation.

  12. Soaking RNAi-mediated modification of Sf9 cells for baculovirus expression system by ectopic expression of Caenorhabditis elegans SID-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Nagata, Yudai; Mon, Hiroaki; Li, Zhiqing; Zhu, Li; Iiyama, Kazuhiro; Kusakabe, Takahiro; Lee, Jae Man

    2013-07-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a biological phenomenon that silences the expression of genes of interest. Passive double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) uptake has been uniquely observed in Caenorhabditis elegans due to the expression of systemic RNAi defective-1 (SID-1). We report that ectopic expression of CeSID-1 endows the Sf9 cells with a capacity for soaking RNAi. Soaking the Sf9-SID1 with dsRNA corresponding to either exogenous or endogenous target genes induced a significant decrease in the amount of mRNA or protein. These results enabled us to modify the target proteins of baculovirus expression vector system in both quantities and posttranslational modifications. The current low-cost and high-efficiency RNAi system is useful for high-throughput gene function analysis and mass production of recombinant protein.

  13. Primary ectopic frontotemporal craniopharyngioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Porcayo, Luis Alberto; Ponce-Gómez, Juan Antonio; Martínez-Moreno, Mauricio; Portocarrero-Ortíz, Lesly; Tena-Suck, Martha Lilia; Gómez-Amador, Juan Luis

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Primary ectopic craniopharyngiomas have only rarely been reported. Craniopharyngiomas involve usually the sellar and suprasellar region, but can be originated from cell remnants of the obliterated craniopharyngeal duct or metaplastic change of andenohypophyseal cells. We present the first case of a primary ectopic frontotemporal craniopharyngioma. Presentation of case A 35-year old woman presented with a one-year history of headache and diplopia. MRI showed a large frontotemporal cystic lesion. Tumor resection was performed with a keyhole endoscopic frontal lateral approach. The pathological features showed an adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma with a cholesterol granuloma reaction. Discussion There have been reported different localizations for primary ectopic craniopharyngioma. Our case presented a lobulated frontotemporal cystic mass formed by a dense eosinophilic proteinaceous material dystrophic calcifications and cholesterol crystals, with epithelial remnants. No tumor regrowth was observed in the magnetic resonance image 27 months postoperatively. Conclusion Primary ectopic craniopharyngioma is a rare entity with a pathogenesis that remains uncertain. This is an unusual anatomic location associated with unique clinical findings. PMID:25725331

  14. Computational modeling reveals dendritic origins of GABA(A-mediated excitation in CA1 pyramidal neurons.

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    Naomi Lewin

    Full Text Available GABA is the key inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult central nervous system, but in some circumstances can lead to a paradoxical excitation that has been causally implicated in diverse pathologies from endocrine stress responses to diseases of excitability including neuropathic pain and temporal lobe epilepsy. We undertook a computational modeling approach to determine plausible ionic mechanisms of GABA(A-dependent excitation in isolated post-synaptic CA1 hippocampal neurons because it may constitute a trigger for pathological synchronous epileptiform discharge. In particular, the interplay intracellular chloride accumulation via the GABA(A receptor and extracellular potassium accumulation via the K/Cl co-transporter KCC2 in promoting GABA(A-mediated excitation is complex. Experimentally it is difficult to determine the ionic mechanisms of depolarizing current since potassium transients are challenging to isolate pharmacologically and much GABA signaling occurs in small, difficult to measure, dendritic compartments. To address this problem and determine plausible ionic mechanisms of GABA(A-mediated excitation, we built a detailed biophysically realistic model of the CA1 pyramidal neuron that includes processes critical for ion homeostasis. Our results suggest that in dendritic compartments, but not in the somatic compartments, chloride buildup is sufficient to cause dramatic depolarization of the GABA(A reversal potential and dominating bicarbonate currents that provide a substantial current source to drive whole-cell depolarization. The model simulations predict that extracellular K(+ transients can augment GABA(A-mediated excitation, but not cause it. Our model also suggests the potential for GABA(A-mediated excitation to promote network synchrony depending on interneuron synapse location - excitatory positive-feedback can occur when interneurons synapse onto distal dendritic compartments, while interneurons projecting to the perisomatic

  15. Tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channels in sensory neurons generate slow resurgent currents that are enhanced by inflammatory mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhi-Yong; Piekarz, Andrew D; Priest, Birgit T; Knopp, Kelly L; Krajewski, Jeffrey L; McDermott, Jeff S; Nisenbaum, Eric S; Cummins, Theodore R

    2014-05-21

    Resurgent sodium currents contribute to the regeneration of action potentials and enhanced neuronal excitability. Tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) resurgent currents have been described in many different neuron populations, including cerebellar and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. In most cases, sodium channel Nav1.6 is the major contributor to these TTX-S resurgent currents. Here we report a novel TTX-resistant (TTX-R) resurgent current recorded from rat DRG neurons. The TTX-R resurgent currents are similar to classic TTX-S resurgent currents in many respects, but not all. As with TTX-S resurgent currents, they are activated by membrane repolarization, inhibited by lidocaine, and enhanced by a peptide-mimetic of the β4 sodium channel subunit intracellular domain. However, the TTX-R resurgent currents exhibit much slower kinetics, occur at more depolarized voltages, and are sensitive to the Nav1.8 blocker A803467. Moreover, coimmunoprecipitation experiments from rat DRG lysates indicate the endogenous sodium channel β4 subunits associate with Nav1.8 in DRG neurons. These results suggest that slow TTX-R resurgent currents in DRG neurons are mediated by Nav1.8 and are generated by the same mechanism underlying TTX-S resurgent currents. We also show that both TTX-S and TTX-R resurgent currents in DRG neurons are enhanced by inflammatory mediators. Furthermore, the β4 peptide increased excitability of small DRG neurons in the presence of TTX. We propose that these slow TTX-R resurgent currents contribute to the membrane excitability of nociceptive DRG neurons under normal conditions and that enhancement of both types of resurgent currents by inflammatory mediators could contribute to sensory neuronal hyperexcitability associated with inflammatory pain.

  16. Ethanol Activation of PKA Mediates Single-Minded 2 Expression in Neuronal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolan; Yang, Zhihua; Sun, Yinan; Zhou, Hanjing; Chu, Guangpin; Zhang, Jing; Meng, Xianfang

    2015-12-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure can cause extensive apoptotic neurodegeneration throughout the developing central nervous system (CNS), which results in cognitive deficits and memory decline. However, the underlying mechanisms need further study. Single-minded 2 (Sim2), a transcriptional repressor, is reportedly involved in diseases that impair learning and memory, such as Down syndrome (DS) and Alzheimer's disease. It is still unknown whether Sim2 is involved in regulating ethanol-mediated neuronal injury that might ultimately lead to neuronal dysfunction and subsequent learning and memory deficits. To study the effects of ethanol on Sim2 expression and neuronal injury, we used animal models and cell culture experiments. Our results indicated that in SH-SY5Y cells, ethanol exposure increased Sim2 expression and levels of cleaved caspase 3, which is a marker for cells undergoing apoptosis. Silencing Sim2 expression attenuated caspase 3 activation and cellular apoptosis. We also found that protein kinase A (PKA) activation induced Sim2 expression, as did ethanol. Inhibiting the PKA signaling pathway with H-89 decreased Sim2 expression and cleavage of caspase 3 that was induced by ethanol in vivo and in vitro. We further found that PKA regulated Sim2 expression at the transcriptional level. These results demonstrate that ethanol leads to increased Sim2 expression via the PKA pathway, ultimately resulting in apoptotic cell death.

  17. Neuronal mechanisms mediating the variability of somatosensory evoked potentials during sleep oscillations in cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosanova, Mario; Timofeev, Igor

    2005-01-01

    The slow oscillation (SO) generated within the corticothalamic system is composed of active and silent states. The studies of response variability during active versus silent network states within thalamocortical system of human and animals provided inconsistent results. To investigate this inconsistency, we used electrophysiological recordings from the main structures of the somatosensory system in anaesthetized cats. Stimulation of the median nerve (MN) elicited cortical responses during all phases of SO. Cortical responses to stimulation of the medial lemniscus (ML) were virtually absent during silent periods. At the ventral-posterior lateral (VPL) level, ML stimuli elicited either EPSPs in isolation or EPSPs crowned by spikes, as a function of membrane potential. Response to MN stimuli elicited compound synaptic responses and spiked at any physiological level of membrane potential. The responses of dorsal column nuclei neurones to MN stimuli were of similar latency, but the latencies of antidromic responses to ML stimuli were variable. Thus, the variable conductance velocity of ascending prethalamic axons was the most likely cause of the barrages of synaptic events in VPL neurones mediating their firing at different level of the membrane potential. We conclude that the preserved ability of the somatosensory system to transmit the peripheral stimuli to the cerebral cortex during all the phases of sleep slow oscillation is based on the functional properties of the medial lemniscus and on the intrinsic properties of the thalamocortical cells. However the reduced firing ability of the cortical neurones during the silent state may contribute to impair sensory processing during sleep. PMID:15528249

  18. Tissue plasminogen activator inhibits NMDA-receptor-mediated increases in calcium levels in cultured hippocampal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel D Robinson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available NMDA receptors (NMDARs play a critical role in neurotransmission, acting as essential mediators of many forms of synaptic plasticity, and also modulating aspects of development, synaptic transmission and cell death. NMDAR-induced responses are dependent on a range of factors including subunit composition and receptor location. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA is a serine protease that has been reported to interact with NMDARs and modulate NMDAR activity. In this study we report that tPA inhibits NMDAR-mediated changes in intracellular calcium levels in cultures of primary hippocampal neurons stimulated by low (5 μM but not high (50 μM concentrations of NMDA. tPA also inhibited changes in calcium levels stimulated by presynaptic release of glutamate following treatment with bicucculine/4-AP. Inhibition was dependent on the proteolytic activity of tPA but was unaffected by α2-antiplasmin, an inhibitor of the tPA substrate plasmin, and RAP, a pan-ligand blocker of the low-density lipoprotein receptor, two proteins previously reported to modulate NMDAR activity. These findings suggest that tPA can modulate changes in intracellular calcium levels in a subset of NMDARs expressed in cultured embryonic hippocampal neurons through a mechanism that involves the proteolytic activity of tPA and synaptic NMDARs.

  19. Salidroside Protects Caenorhabditis elegans Neurons from Polyglutamine-Mediated Toxicity by Reducing Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyun Xiao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Polyglutamine (polyQ aggregation plays a pivotal role in the pathological process of Huntington’s disease and other polyQ disorders. Therefore, strategies aiming at restoring dysfunction and reducing stresses mediated by polyQ toxicity are of therapeutic interest for proteotoxicity diseases. Salidroside, a glycoside from Rhodiola rosea, has been shown to have a variety of bioactivities, including antioxidant activity. Using transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans models, we show here that salidroside is able to reduce neuronal death and behavioral dysfunction mediated by polyQ expressed in ASH neurons, but the neuroprotective effect is not associated with prevention of polyQ aggregation per se. Further experiments reveal that the neuroprotective effect of salidroside in C. elegans models involves its antioxidant capabilities, including decrease of ROS levels and paraquat-induced mortality, increase of antioxidant enzyme activities and reduction of lipid peroxidation. These results demonstrate that salidroside exerts its neuroprotective function against polyQ toxicity via oxidative stress pathways.

  20. Human iPSC-Derived Neuronal Model of Tau-A152T Frontotemporal Dementia Reveals Tau-Mediated Mechanisms of Neuronal Vulnerability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Catarina Silva

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Frontotemporal dementia (FTD and other tauopathies characterized by focal brain neurodegeneration and pathological accumulation of proteins are commonly associated with tau mutations. However, the mechanism of neuronal loss is not fully understood. To identify molecular events associated with tauopathy, we studied induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC-derived neurons from individuals carrying the tau-A152T variant. We highlight the potential of in-depth phenotyping of human neuronal cell models for pre-clinical studies and identification of modulators of endogenous tau toxicity. Through a panel of biochemical and cellular assays, A152T neurons showed accumulation, redistribution, and decreased solubility of tau. Upregulation of tau was coupled to enhanced stress-inducible markers and cell vulnerability to proteotoxic, excitotoxic, and mitochondrial stressors, which was rescued upon CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeting of tau or by pharmacological activation of autophagy. Our findings unmask tau-mediated perturbations of specific pathways associated with neuronal vulnerability, revealing potential early disease biomarkers and therapeutic targets for FTD and other tauopathies.

  1. Short-term plasticity in turtle dorsal horn neurons mediated by L-type Ca2+ channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russo, R E; Hounsgaard, J

    1994-01-01

    Windup--the gradual increase of the response--of dorsal horn neurons to repeated activation of primary afferents is an elementary form of short-term plasticity that may mediate central sensitization to pain. In deep dorsal horn neurons of the turtle spinal cord in vitro we report windup...... for intrinsic postsynaptic properties in nociceptive plasticity and for L-type Ca2+ channels as a promising target for therapeutic intervention....

  2. NMDA-mediated and Self-induced Bdnf Exon IV Transcriptions are Differentially Regulated in Cultured Cortical Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Fei; Wang, Hongbing

    2009-01-01

    Activity-dependent transcriptional up-regulation of bdnf (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) is involved in regulating many aspects of neuronal functions. The NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartic acid)-mediated and BDNF-mediated exon IV transcription may represent mechanistically different responses, and relevant to activity-dependent changes in neurons. We found that the activities of ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase), CaM KII/IV (calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and IV), PI3K (phosphoi...

  3. Human mast cell mediator cocktail excites neurons in human and guinea-pig enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schemann, M; Michel, K; Ceregrzyn, M; Zeller, F; Seidl, S; Bischoff, S C

    2005-04-01

    Neuroimmune interactions are an integral part of gut physiology and involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory and functional bowel disorders. Mast cells and their mediators are important conveyors in the communication from the innate enteric immune system to the enteric nervous system (ENS). However, it is not known whether a mediator cocktail released from activated human mast cells affects neural activity in the ENS. We used the Multi-Site Optical Recording Technique to image single cell activity in guinea-pig and human ENS after application of a mast cell mediator cocktail (MCMC) that was released from isolated human intestinal mucosa mast cells stimulated by IgE-receptor cross-linking. Local application of MCMC onto individual ganglia evoked an excitatory response consisting of action potential discharge. This excitatory response occurred in 31%, 38% or 11% neurons of guinea-pig submucous plexus, human submucous plexus, or guinea-pig myenteric plexus, respectively. Compound action potentials from nerve fibres or fast excitatory synaptic inputs were not affected by MCMC. This study demonstrates immunoneural signalling in the human gut and revealed for the first time that an MCMC released from stimulated human intestinal mast cells induces excitatory actions in the human and guinea-pig ENS.

  4. Ghrelin action on GnRH neurons and pituitary gonadotropes might be mediated by GnIH-GPR147 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Onder; Celik, Nilufer; Aydin, Suleyman; Aygun, Banu Kumbak; Haberal, Esra Tustas; Kuloglu, Tuncay; Ulas, Mustafa; Aktun, Lebriz Hale; Acet, Mustafa; Celik, Sudenaz

    2016-02-01

    Acylated ghrelin (AG) effect on GnRH secretion is mediated, at least in part, by GH secreta-gogue receptor (GHS-R) which is present in the GnRH neurons. As the acylation is mandatory for binding to GHS-R, unacylated isoform of ghrelin (UAG) action on gonadotropin secretion is likely to be mediated by other receptors or mediators that have not been identified yet. UAG, therefore, may act partially via a GHS-R-independent mechanism and inhibitory impact of UAG on GnRH neurons may be executed via modulation of other neuronal networks. Ghrelin and gonadotropin inhibitory hormone (GnIH), two agonistic peptides, have been known as important regulators of reproductive events. Potential impact of ghrelin on the activity of GnIH neurons is not exactly known. Both GnIH and ghrelin are potent stimulators of food intake and inhibitors of gonadotropin release. By binding G-protein coupled GnIH receptor (GnIH-R), GPR147, which is located in the human gonadotropes and GnRh neurons, GnIH exerts an inhibitory effect on both GnRH neurons and the gonadotropes. The GnIH-GPR147 system receives information regarding the status of energy reservoir of body from circulating peptides and then transfers them to the kisspeptin-GnIH-GnRH network. Due to wide distribution of this network in brain GnIH neurons may project on ghrelin neurons in the arcuate nucleus and contribute to the regulation of UAG's central effects or vice versa. Together, the unidentified ghrelin receptor in the hypothalamus and hypophysis may be GnIH-R. Therefore, it is reasonable that ghrelin may act on both hypothalamus and hypophysis via GnIH-GPR147 system to block gonadotropin synthesis and secretion.

  5. JIP3 regulates neuronal radial migration by mediating TrkB axonal anterograde transport in the developing cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Huixian; Yu, Hui; Li, Ting; Zhao, Yan; Hou, Ming; Chen, Zheyu; Wang, Yue; Sun, Tao

    2017-04-15

    Radial migration is essential for the precise lamination and the coordinated function of the cerebral cortex. However, the molecular mechanisms for neuronal radial migration are not clear. Here, we report that c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK)-interacting protein-3 (JIP3) is highly expressed in the brain of embryonic mice and essential for radial migration. Knocking down JIP3 by in utero electroporation specifically perturbs the radial migration of cortical neurons but has no effect on neurogenesis and neuronal differentiation. Furthermore, we illustrate that JIP3 knockdown delays but does not block the migration of cortical neurons by investigating the distribution of neurons with JIP3 knocked down in the embryo and postnatal mouse. Finally, we find that JIP3 regulates cortical neuronal migration by mediating TrkB axonal anterograde transport during brain development. These findings deepen our understanding of the regulation of neuronal development by JIP3 and provide us a novel view on the regulating mechanisms of neuronal radial migration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Serotonin receptor antagonists discriminate between PKA- and PKC-mediated plasticity in aplysia sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitriu, Bogdan; Cohen, Jonathan E; Wan, Qin; Negroiu, Andreea M; Abrams, Thomas W

    2006-04-01

    Highly selective serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) receptor antagonists developed for mammals are ineffective in Aplysia due to the evolutionary divergence of neurotransmitter receptors and because the higher ionic strength of physiological saline for marine invertebrates reduces antagonist affinity. It has therefore been difficult to identify antagonists that specifically block individual signaling cascades initiated by 5-HT. We studied two broad-spectrum 5-HT receptor antagonists that have been characterized biochemically in Aplysia CNS: methiothepin and spiperone. Methiothepin is highly effective in inhibiting adenylyl cyclase (AC)-coupled 5-HT receptors in Aplysia. Spiperone, which blocks phospholipase C (PLC)-coupled 5-HT receptors in mammals, does not block AC-coupled 5-HT receptors in Aplysia. In electrophysiological studies, we explored whether methiothepin and spiperone can be used in parallel to distinguish between the AC-cAMP and PLC-protein kinase C (PKC) modulatory cascades that are initiated by 5-HT. 5-HT-induced broadening of the sensory neuron action potential in the presence of tetraethylammonium/nifedipine, which is mediated by modulation of the S-K+ currents, was used an assay for the AC-cAMP cascade. Spike broadening initiated by 5 microM 5-HT was unaffected by 100 microM spiperone, whereas it was effectively blocked by 100 microM methiothepin. Facilitation of highly depressed sensory neuron-to-motor neuron synapses by 5-HT was used as an assay for the PLC-PKC cascade. Spiperone completely blocked facilitation of highly depressed synapses by 5 microM 5-HT. In contrast, methiothepin produced a modest, nonsignificant, reduction in the facilitation of depressed synapses. Interestingly, these experiments revealed that the PLC-PKC cascade undergoes desensitization during exposure to 5-HT.

  7. Mitochondrial function in neuronal cells depends on p97/VCP/Cdc48-mediated quality control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei eFang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining mitochondrial function is essential for neuronal survival and offers protection against neurodegeneration. Ubiquitin-mediated, proteasome-dependent protein degradation in the form of outer mitochondrial membrane associated degradation (OMMAD was shown to play roles in maintenance of mitochondria on the level of proteostasis, but also mitophagy and cell death. Recently, the AAA-ATPase p97/VCP/Cdc48 was recognized as part of OMMAD acting as retrotranslocase of ubiquitinated mitochondrial proteins for proteasomal degradation. Thus, p97 likely plays a major role in mitochondrial maintenance. Support for this notion comes from mitochondrial dysfunction associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and hereditary inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD caused by p97 mutation. Using SH-SY5Y cells stably expressing p97 or dominant-negative p97QQ treated with mitochondrial toxins rotenone, 6-OHDA, or Aβ-peptide as model for neuronal cells suffering from mitochondrial dysfunction, we found mitochondrial fragmentation under normal and stress conditions was significantly increased upon inactivation of p97. Furthermore, inactivation of p97 resulted in loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Under additional stress conditions, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and increased ROS production was even more pronounced. Loss of mitochondrial fidelity upon inactivation of p97 was likely due to disturbed maintenance of mitochondrial proteostasis as the employed treatments neither induced mitophagy nor cell death. This was supported by the accumulation of oxidatively-damaged proteins on mitochondria in response to p97 inactivation. Dysfunction of p97 under normal and stress conditions in neuron-like cells severely impacts mitochondrial function, thus supporting for the first time a role for p97 as a major component of mitochondrial

  8. Novel Ganglioside-mediated Entry of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype D into Neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroken, Abby R.; Karalewitz, Andrew P.-A.; Fu, Zhuji; Kim, Jung-Ja P.; Barbieri, Joseph T. (MCW)

    2012-02-07

    Botulinum Neurotoxins (BoNTs) are organized into seven serotypes, A-G. Although several BoNT serotypes enter neurons through synaptic vesicle cycling utilizing dual receptors (a ganglioside and a synaptic vesicle-associated protein), the entry pathway of BoNT/D is less well understood. Although BoNT/D entry is ganglioside-dependent, alignment and structural studies show that BoNT/D lacks key residues within a conserved ganglioside binding pocket that are present in BoNT serotypes A, B, E, F, and G, which indicate that BoNT/D-ganglioside interactions may be unique. In this study BoNT/D is shown to have a unique association with ganglioside relative to the other BoNT serotypes, utilizing a ganglioside binding loop (GBL, residues Tyr-1235-Ala-1245) within the receptor binding domain of BoNT/D (HCR/D) via b-series gangliosides, including GT1b, GD1b, and GD2. HCR/D bound gangliosides and entered neurons dependent upon the aromatic ring of Phe-1240 within the GBL. This is the first BoNT-ganglioside interaction that is mediated by a phenylalanine. In contrast, Trp-1238, located near the N terminus of the ganglioside binding loop, was mostly solvent-inaccessible and appeared to contribute to maintaining the loop structure. BoNT/D entry and intoxication were enhanced by membrane depolarization via synaptic vesicle cycling, where HCR/D colocalized with synaptophysin, a synaptic vesicle marker, but immunoprecipitation experiments did not detect direct association with synaptic vesicle protein 2. Thus, BoNT/D utilizes unique associations with gangliosides and synaptic vesicles to enter neurons, which may facilitate new neurotoxin therapies.

  9. Insulin induces long-term depression of VTA dopamine neurons via an endocannabinoid-mediated mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labouèbe, Gwenaël; Liu, Shuai; Dias, Carine; Zou, Haiyan; Wong, Jovi C.Y.; Karunakaran, Subashini; Clee, Susanne M.; Phillips, Anthony; Boutrel, Benjamin; Borgland, Stephanie L.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity has drastically increased over the last few decades. Exploration into how hunger and satiety signals influence the reward system can help us to understand non-homeostatic mechanisms of feeding. Evidence suggests that insulin may act in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), a critical site for reward-seeking behavior, to suppress feeding. However, the neural mechanisms underlying insulin effects in the VTA remain unknown. We demonstrate that insulin, a circulating catabolic peptide that inhibits feeding, can induce a long-term depression (LTD) of excitatory synapses onto VTA dopamine neurons. This effect requires endocannabinoid-mediated presynaptic inhibition of glutamate release. Furthermore, after a sweetened high fat meal, which elevates endogenous insulin levels, insulin-induced LTD is occluded. Finally, insulin in the VTA reduces food anticipatory behavior and conditioned place preference for food. Taken together, these results suggest that insulin in the VTA suppresses excitatory synaptic transmission and reduces salience of food-related cues. PMID:23354329

  10. Pαx6 expression in postmitotic neurons mediates the growth of axons in response to SFRP1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Sebastián-Serrano

    Full Text Available During development, the mechanisms that specify neuronal subclasses are coupled to those that determine their axonal response to guidance cues. Pax6 is a homedomain transcription factor required for the specification of a variety of neural precursors. After cell cycle exit, Pax6 expression is often shut down in the precursor progeny and most postmitotic neurons no longer express detectable levels of the protein. There are however exceptions and high Pax6 protein levels are found, for example, in postmitotic retinal ganglion cells (RGCs, dopaminergic neurons of the olfactory bulb and the limbic system in the telencephalon. The function of Pax6 in these differentiating neurons remains mostly elusive. Here, we demonstrate that Pax6 mediates the response of growing axons to SFRP1, a secreted molecule expressed in several Pax6-positive forebrain territories. Forced expression of Pax6 in cultured postmitotic cortical neurons, which do not normally express Pax6, was sufficient to increment axonal length. Growth was blocked by the addition of anti-SFRP1 antibodies, whereas exogenously added SFRP1 increased axonal growth of Pax6-transfected neurons but not that of control or untransfected cortical neurons. In the reverse scenario, shRNA-mediated knock-down of Pax6 in mouse retinal explants specifically abolished RGCs axonal growth induced by SFRP1, but had no effect on RGCs differentiation and it did not modify the effect of Shh or Netrin on axon growth. Taken together these results demonstrate that expression of Pax6 is necessary and sufficient to render postmitotic neurons competent to respond to SFRP1. These results reveal a novel and unexpected function of Pax6 in postmitotic neurons and situate Pax6 and SFRP1 as pair regulators of axonal connectivity.

  11. Pαx6 Expression in Postmitotic Neurons Mediates the Growth of Axons in Response to SFRP1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastián-Serrano, Alvaro; Sandonis, Africa; Cardozo, Marcos; Rodríguez-Tornos, Fernanda M.; Bovolenta, Paola; Nieto, Marta

    2012-01-01

    During development, the mechanisms that specify neuronal subclasses are coupled to those that determine their axonal response to guidance cues. Pax6 is a homedomain transcription factor required for the specification of a variety of neural precursors. After cell cycle exit, Pax6 expression is often shut down in the precursor progeny and most postmitotic neurons no longer express detectable levels of the protein. There are however exceptions and high Pax6 protein levels are found, for example, in postmitotic retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), dopaminergic neurons of the olfactory bulb and the limbic system in the telencephalon. The function of Pax6 in these differentiating neurons remains mostly elusive. Here, we demonstrate that Pax6 mediates the response of growing axons to SFRP1, a secreted molecule expressed in several Pax6-positive forebrain territories. Forced expression of Pax6 in cultured postmitotic cortical neurons, which do not normally express Pax6, was sufficient to increment axonal length. Growth was blocked by the addition of anti-SFRP1 antibodies, whereas exogenously added SFRP1 increased axonal growth of Pax6-transfected neurons but not that of control or untransfected cortical neurons. In the reverse scenario, shRNA-mediated knock-down of Pax6 in mouse retinal explants specifically abolished RGCs axonal growth induced by SFRP1, but had no effect on RGCs differentiation and it did not modify the effect of Shh or Netrin on axon growth. Taken together these results demonstrate that expression of Pax6 is necessary and sufficient to render postmitotic neurons competent to respond to SFRP1. These results reveal a novel and unexpected function of Pax6 in postmitotic neurons and situate Pax6 and SFRP1 as pair regulators of axonal connectivity. PMID:22359602

  12. Oxidative DNA Damage Mediated by Intranuclear MMP Activity Is Associated with Neuronal Apoptosis in Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shihoko Kimura-Ohba

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence of the pathological roles of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs in various neurological disorders has made them attractive therapeutic targets. MMPs disrupt the blood-brain barrier and cause neuronal death and neuroinflammation in acute cerebral ischemia and are critical for angiogenesis during recovery. However, some challenges have to be overcome before MMPs can be further validated as drug targets in stroke injury. Identifying in vivo substrates of MMPs should greatly improve our understanding of the mechanisms of ischemic injury and is critical for providing more precise drug targets. Recent works have uncovered nontraditional roles for MMPs in the cytosol and nucleus. These have shed light on intracellular targets and biological actions of MMPs, adding additional layers of complexity for therapeutic MMP inhibition. In this review, we discussed the recent advances made in understanding nuclear location of MMPs, their regulation of intranuclear sorting, and their intranuclear proteolytic activity and substrates. In particular, we highlighted the roles of intranuclear MMPs in oxidative DNA damage, neuronal apoptosis, and neuroinflammation at an early stage of stroke insult. These novel data point to new putative MMP-mediated intranuclear actions in stroke-induced pathological processes and may lead to novel approaches to treatment of stroke and other neurological diseases.

  13. Oxidative DNA Damage Mediated by Intranuclear MMP Activity Is Associated with Neuronal Apoptosis in Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura-Ohba, Shihoko; Yang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Evidence of the pathological roles of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in various neurological disorders has made them attractive therapeutic targets. MMPs disrupt the blood-brain barrier and cause neuronal death and neuroinflammation in acute cerebral ischemia and are critical for angiogenesis during recovery. However, some challenges have to be overcome before MMPs can be further validated as drug targets in stroke injury. Identifying in vivo substrates of MMPs should greatly improve our understanding of the mechanisms of ischemic injury and is critical for providing more precise drug targets. Recent works have uncovered nontraditional roles for MMPs in the cytosol and nucleus. These have shed light on intracellular targets and biological actions of MMPs, adding additional layers of complexity for therapeutic MMP inhibition. In this review, we discussed the recent advances made in understanding nuclear location of MMPs, their regulation of intranuclear sorting, and their intranuclear proteolytic activity and substrates. In particular, we highlighted the roles of intranuclear MMPs in oxidative DNA damage, neuronal apoptosis, and neuroinflammation at an early stage of stroke insult. These novel data point to new putative MMP-mediated intranuclear actions in stroke-induced pathological processes and may lead to novel approaches to treatment of stroke and other neurological diseases.

  14. L-Lactate protects neurons against excitotoxicity: implication of an ATP-mediated signaling cascade

    KAUST Repository

    Jourdain, P.

    2016-02-19

    Converging experimental data indicate a neuroprotective action of L-Lactate. Using Digital Holographic Microscopy, we observe that transient application of glutamate (100 μM; 2 min) elicits a NMDA-dependent death in 65% of mouse cortical neurons in culture. In the presence of L-Lactate (or Pyruvate), the percentage of neuronal death decreases to 32%. UK5099, a blocker of the Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier, fully prevents L-Lactate-mediated neuroprotection. In addition, L-Lactate-induced neuroprotection is not only inhibited by probenicid and carbenoxolone, two blockers of ATP channel pannexins, but also abolished by apyrase, an enzyme degrading ATP, suggesting that ATP produced by the Lactate/Pyruvate pathway is released to act on purinergic receptors in an autocrine/paracrine manner. Finally, pharmacological approaches support the involvement of the P2Y receptors associated to the PI3-kinase pathway, leading to activation of KATP channels. This set of results indicates that L-Lactate acts as a signalling molecule for neuroprotection against excitotoxicity through coordinated cellular pathways involving ATP production, release and activation of a P2Y/KATP cascade.

  15. HIF-1 antagonizes p53-mediated apoptosis through a secreted neuronal tyrosinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendoel, Ataman; Kohler, Ines; Fellmann, Christof; Lowe, Scott W; Hengartner, Michael O

    2010-06-03

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is a transcription factor that regulates fundamental cellular processes in response to changes in oxygen concentration. HIFalpha protein levels are increased in most solid tumours and correlate with patient prognosis. The link between HIF and apoptosis, a major determinant of cancer progression and treatment outcome, is poorly understood. Here we show that Caenorhabditis elegans HIF-1 protects against DNA-damage-induced germ cell apoptosis by antagonizing the function of CEP-1, the homologue of the tumour suppressor p53. The antiapoptotic property of HIF-1 is mediated by means of transcriptional upregulation of the tyrosinase family member TYR-2 in the ASJ sensory neurons. TYR-2 is secreted by ASJ sensory neurons to antagonize CEP-1-dependent germline apoptosis. Knock down of the TYR-2 homologue TRP2 (also called DCT) in human melanoma cells similarly increases apoptosis, indicating an evolutionarily conserved function. Our findings identify a novel link between hypoxia and programmed cell death, and provide a paradigm for HIF-1 dictating apoptotic cell fate at a distance.

  16. Acute neuregulin-1 signaling influences AMPA receptor mediated responses in cultured cerebellar granule neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenster, Catherine; Vullhorst, Detlef; Buonanno, Andres

    2012-01-04

    Neuregulin-1 (NRG1) is a trophic and differentiation factor that signals through ErbB receptor tyrosine kinases to regulate nervous system development. Previous studies have demonstrated that NRG1 affects plasticity at glutamatergic synapses in principal glutamatergic neurons of the hippocampus and frontal cortex; however, immunohistochemical and genetic analyses strongly suggest these effects are indirect and mediated via ErbB4 receptors on GABAergic interneurons. Here, we used cultured cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) that express ErbB4 to analyze the cell-autonomous effects of NRG1 stimulation on glutamatergic function. These cultures have the advantage that they are relatively homogenous and consist primarily of granule neurons that express ErbB4. We show that acute NRG1 treatment does not affect whole-cell AMPA or NMDA receptor (NMDAR) mediated currents in CGCs at 10-12 days in vitro. NRG1 also does not affect the frequency or amplitude of spontaneous AMPAR or NMDAR mediated miniature excitatory post-synaptic currents (mEPSCs). To further investigate the effects of NRG1 on activity-dependent plasticity of glutamatergic synapses in CGCs, we characterized the effects of high-glyine/0 Mg(2+) (which activates synaptic NMDARs) on AMPAR-mEPSC frequency and amplitude. We show that high-glycine induces a form of chemical long-term potentiation (chemLTP) in CGCs characterized by an increase in AMPAR-mEPSC frequency but not amplitude. Moreover, NRG1 induces a decrease in AMPAR-mEPSC frequency following chemLTP, but does not affect AMPAR-mEPSC amplitude. CGCs in our cultures conditions express low levels of GluR1, in contrast to dissociated hippocampal cultures, but do express the long isoform of GluR4. This study provides first evidence that (1) high-glycine can induce plasticity at glutamatergic synapses in CGCs, and (2) that acute NRG1/ErbB-signaling can regulate glutamatergic plasticity in CGCs. Taken together with previous reports, our results suggest that, similar

  17. Positive reinforcement mediated by midbrain dopamine neurons requires D1 and D2 receptor activation in the nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Elizabeth E; Boivin, Josiah R; Saunders, Benjamin T; Witten, Ilana B; Deisseroth, Karl; Janak, Patricia H

    2014-01-01

    The neural basis of positive reinforcement is often studied in the laboratory using intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS), a simple behavioral model in which subjects perform an action in order to obtain exogenous stimulation of a specific brain area. Recently we showed that activation of ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine neurons supports ICSS behavior, consistent with proposed roles of this neural population in reinforcement learning. However, VTA dopamine neurons make connections with diverse brain regions, and the specific efferent target(s) that mediate the ability of dopamine neuron activation to support ICSS have not been definitively demonstrated. Here, we examine in transgenic rats whether dopamine neuron-specific ICSS relies on the connection between the VTA and the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a brain region also implicated in positive reinforcement. We find that optogenetic activation of dopaminergic terminals innervating the NAc is sufficient to drive ICSS, and that ICSS driven by optical activation of dopamine neuron somata in the VTA is significantly attenuated by intra-NAc injections of D1 or D2 receptor antagonists. These data demonstrate that the NAc is a critical efferent target sustaining dopamine neuron-specific ICSS, identify receptor subtypes through which dopamine acts to promote this behavior, and ultimately help to refine our understanding of the neural circuitry mediating positive reinforcement.

  18. Coordinated regulation of endocannabinoid-mediated retrograde synaptic suppression in the cerebellum by neuronal and astrocytic monoacylglycerol lipase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaojie; Chen, Yao; Vickstrom, Casey R.; Li, Yan; Viader, Andreu; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Liu, Qing-song

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) mediates retrograde synaptic depression including depolarization-induced suppression of excitation (DSE) and inhibition (DSI). 2-AG is degraded primarily by monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), which is expressed in neurons and astrocytes. Using knockout mice in which MAGL is deleted globally or selectively in neurons or astrocytes, we investigated the relative contribution of neuronal and astrocytic MAGL to the termination of DSE and DSI in Purkinje cells (PCs) in cerebellar slices. We report that neuronal MAGL plays a predominant role in terminating DSE at climbing fiber (CF) to PC synapses, while both neuronal and astrocytic MAGL significantly contributes to the termination of DSE at parallel fiber (PF) to PC synapses and DSI at putative Stellate cell to PC synapses. Thus, DSE and DSI at different synapses is not uniformly affected by global and cell type-specific knockout of MAGL. Additionally, MAGL global knockout, but not cell type-specific knockout, caused tonic activation and partial desensitization of the CB1 receptor at PF-PC synapses. This tonic CB1 activation is mediated by 2-AG since it was blocked by the diacylglycerol lipase inhibitor DO34. Together, these results suggest that both neuronal and astrocytic MAGL contribute to 2-AG clearance and prevent CB1 receptor over-stimulation in the cerebellum. PMID:27775008

  19. In vivo targeted gene delivery to peripheral neurons mediated by neurotropic poly(ethylene imine)-based nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Cátia Df; Oliveira, Hugo; Estevão, Inês; Pires, Liliana Raquel; Pêgo, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    A major challenge in neuronal gene therapy is to achieve safe, efficient, and minimally invasive transgene delivery to neurons. In this study, we report the use of a nonviral neurotropic poly(ethylene imine)-based nanoparticle that is capable of mediating neuron-specific transfection upon a subcutaneous injection. Nanoparticles were targeted to peripheral neurons by using the nontoxic carboxylic fragment of tetanus toxin (HC), which, besides being neurotropic, is capable of being retrogradely transported from neuron terminals to the cell bodies. Nontargeted particles and naked plasmid DNA were used as control. Five days after treatment by subcutaneous injection in the footpad of Wistar rats, it was observed that 56% and 64% of L4 and L5 dorsal root ganglia neurons, respectively, were expressing the reporter protein. The delivery mediated by HC-functionalized nanoparticles spatially limited the transgene expression, in comparison with the controls. Histological examination revealed no significant adverse effects in the use of the proposed delivery system. These findings demonstrate the feasibility and safety of the developed neurotropic nanoparticles for the minimally invasive delivery of genes to the peripheral nervous system, opening new avenues for the application of gene therapy strategies in the treatment of peripheral neuropathies.

  20. Positive reinforcement mediated by midbrain dopamine neurons requires D1 and D2 receptor activation in the nucleus accumbens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth E Steinberg

    Full Text Available The neural basis of positive reinforcement is often studied in the laboratory using intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS, a simple behavioral model in which subjects perform an action in order to obtain exogenous stimulation of a specific brain area. Recently we showed that activation of ventral tegmental area (VTA dopamine neurons supports ICSS behavior, consistent with proposed roles of this neural population in reinforcement learning. However, VTA dopamine neurons make connections with diverse brain regions, and the specific efferent target(s that mediate the ability of dopamine neuron activation to support ICSS have not been definitively demonstrated. Here, we examine in transgenic rats whether dopamine neuron-specific ICSS relies on the connection between the VTA and the nucleus accumbens (NAc, a brain region also implicated in positive reinforcement. We find that optogenetic activation of dopaminergic terminals innervating the NAc is sufficient to drive ICSS, and that ICSS driven by optical activation of dopamine neuron somata in the VTA is significantly attenuated by intra-NAc injections of D1 or D2 receptor antagonists. These data demonstrate that the NAc is a critical efferent target sustaining dopamine neuron-specific ICSS, identify receptor subtypes through which dopamine acts to promote this behavior, and ultimately help to refine our understanding of the neural circuitry mediating positive reinforcement.

  1. Electrical stimulation therapies for CNS disorders and pain are mediated by competition between different neuronal networks in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faingold, Carl L

    2008-11-01

    CNS neuronal networks are known to control normal physiological functions, including locomotion and respiration. Neuronal networks also mediate the pathophysiology of many CNS disorders. Stimulation therapies, including localized brain and vagus nerve stimulation, electroshock, and acupuncture, are proposed to activate "therapeutic" neuronal networks. These therapeutic networks are dormant prior to stimulatory treatments, but when the dormant networks are activated they compete with pathophysiological neuronal networks, disrupting their function. This competition diminishes the disease symptoms, providing effective therapy for otherwise intractable CNS disorders, including epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, chronic pain, and depression. Competition between stimulation-activated therapeutic networks and pathophysiological networks is a major mechanism mediating the therapeutic effects of stimulation. This network interaction is hypothesized to involve competition for "control" of brain regions that contain high proportions of conditional multireceptive (CMR) neurons. CMR regions, including brainstem reticular formation, amygdala, and cerebral cortex, have extensive connections to numerous brain areas, allowing these regions to participate potentially in many networks. The participation of CMR regions in any network is often variable, depending on the conditions affecting the organism, including vigilance states, drug treatment, and learning. This response variability of CMR neurons is due to the high incidence of excitatory postsynaptic potentials that are below threshold for triggering action potentials. These subthreshold responses can be brought to threshold by blocking inhibition or enhancing excitation via the paradigms used in stimulation therapies. Participation of CMR regions in a network is also strongly affected by pharmacological treatments (convulsant or anesthetic drugs) and stimulus parameters (strength and repetition rate). Many studies indicate that

  2. Beneficial effect of cilostazol-mediated neuronal repair following trimethyltin-induced neuronal loss in the dentate gyrus.

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    Yoneyama, Masanori; Tanaka, Masayuki; Hasebe, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Taro; Shiba, Tatsuo; Ogita, Kiyokazu

    2015-01-01

    Cilostazol acts as an antiplatelet agent and has other pleiotropic effects based on phosphodiesterase-3-dependent mechanisms. We evaluated whether cilostazol would have a beneficial effect on neuronal repair following hippocampal neuronal damage by using a mouse model of trimethyltin (TMT)-induced neuronal loss/self-repair in the hippocampal dentate gyrus [Ogita et al. (2005) J Neurosci Res 82:609-621]; these mice will hereafter be referred to as impaired animals. A single treatment with cilostazol (10 mg/kg, i.p.) produced no significant change in the number of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-incorporating cells in the dentate granule cell layer (GCL) or subgranular zone on day 3 after TMT treatment. However, chronic treatment with cilostazol on days 3-15 posttreatment resulted in an increase in the number of BrdU-incorporating cells in the dentate GCL of the impaired animals, and these cells were positive for neuronal nuclear antigen or doublecortin. Cilostazol was effective in elevating the level of phosphorylated cyclic adrenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (pCREB) in the dentate gyrus of impaired animals. The results of a forced swimming test revealed that the chronic treatment with cilostazol improved the depression-like behavior seen in the impaired animals. In the cultures of hippocampal neural stem/progenitor cells, exposure to cilostazol produced not only enhancement of proliferation activity but also elevation of pCREB levels. Taken together, our data suggest that cilostazol has a beneficial effect on neuronal repair following neuronal loss in the dentate gyrus through promotion of proliferation and/or neuronal differentiation of neural progenitor cells in the subgranular zone. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. NK3 receptors mediate an increase in firing rate of midbrain dopamine neurons of the rat and the guinea pig.

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    Werkman, Taco R; McCreary, Andrew C; Kruse, Chris G; Wadman, Wytse J

    2011-08-01

    This in vitro study investigates and compares the effects of NK3 receptor ligands on the firing rate of rat and guinea pig midbrain dopamine neurons. The findings are discussed in the light of choosing suitable animal models for investigating pharmacological properties of NK3 receptor antagonists, which have been proposed to possess therapeutic activity in neuropsychiatric diseases like e.g. schizophrenia. In vitro midbrain slice preparations of both species were used to record (extracellularly) the firing rates of dopamine neurons located in the substantia nigra (SN) and ventral tegmental area (VTA). Furthermore, the effect of the D2 receptor agonist quinpirole on guinea pig SN and VTA dopamine neurons was investigated. The efficacy of quinpirole in inhibiting guinea pig dopamine neuron firing activity was much less as compared to that of rat dopamine neurons, suggesting a lower dopamine D2 autoreceptor density on the guinea pig neurons. The NK3 receptor agonist senktide induced in subpopulations of rat SN (55%) and VTA (79%) and guinea pig SN (50%) and VTA (21%) dopamine neurons an increase in firing rate. In responsive neurons this effect was concentration-dependent with EC₅₀ values of 3-5 nM (for both species). The selective NK3 receptor antagonist osanetant (100 nM) was able to partly block the senktide-induced increase in firing rates of dopamine neurons and shifted the concentration-response relation curves for senktide to the right (pA₂ values were ~7.5). The fractional block of the senktide responses by osanetant appeared to be larger in guinea pig dopamine neurons, indicating that osanetant is a more potent blocker of NK3 receptor-mediated responses with noncompetitive properties in the guinea pig.

  4. Herpesvirus-mediated gene delivery into the rat brain: specificity and efficiency of the neuron-specific enolase promoter.

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    Andersen, J K; Frim, D M; Isacson, O; Breakefield, X O

    1993-10-01

    1. Herpesvirus infection with genetically engineered vectors is a way to deliver foreign gene products to various cell populations in culture and in vivo. Selective neuronal gene expression can be achieved using the neuron-specific enolase (NSE) promoter regulating expression of a transgene placed in and delivered by a herpesvirus vector. 2. We sought to determine the anatomical specificity and efficiency of herpesvirus-mediated gene transfer into the rat brain following placement of virus particles carrying a transgene (lacZ) under control of the NSE promoter. The virus utilized was thymidine kinase (TK) deficient and therefore replication deficient in the brain. 3. Infusion of 10(6) plaque-forming units of virus into the striatum caused a limited number of striatal neurons to express the lacZ transgene mRNA and protein product 7 days postinfection. In addition, small numbers of neurons expressing the transgene mRNA and protein were found ipsilateral to the viral injection in the frontal cortex, substantia nigra pars compacta, and thalamus. Neurons at these anatomic loci project directly to the striatal injection site. No other cells within the brains of injected animals expressed the lacZ gene. 4. While this herpesvirus NSE vector was capable of introducing novel functional genetic information into postmitotic neurons within defined neuroanatomic constraints, the numbers of neurons expressing detectable levels of beta-galactosidase was minimal. The calculated efficiency of delivery and transgene expression at 7 days postinfection was 1 transgenic neuron per 10(4) virus particles infused. 5. We conclude that NSE probably is not an optimal promoter for use in gene delivery to CNS neurons in herpesvirus vectors and that the efficacy of gene delivery using other neuron-specific promoters placed at various sites in the herpes viral genome needs to be explored.

  5. Curcumin protects microglia and primary rat cortical neurons against HIV-1 gp120-mediated inflammation and apoptosis.

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    Luyan Guo

    Full Text Available Curcumin is a molecule found in turmeric root that has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-tumor properties and has been widely used as both an herbal drug and a food additive to treat or prevent neurodegenerative diseases. To explore whether curcumin is able to ameliorate HIV-1-associated neurotoxicity, we treated a murine microglial cell line (N9 and primary rat cortical neurons with curcumin in the presence or absence of neurotoxic HIV-1 gp120 (V3 loop protein. We found that HIV-1 gp120 profoundly induced N9 cells to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1. HIV-1 gp120 also induced apoptosis of primary rat cortical neurons. Curcumin exerted a powerful inhibitory effect against HIV-1 gp120-induced neuronal damage, reducing the production of ROS, TNF-α and MCP-1 by N9 cells and inhibiting apoptosis of primary rat cortical neurons. Curcumin may exert its biological activities through inhibition of the delayed rectification and transient outward potassium (K(+ current, as curcumin effectively reduced HIV-1 gp120-mediated elevation of the delayed rectification and transient outward K(+ channel current in neurons. We conclude that HIV-1 gp120 increases ROS, TNF-α and MCP-1 production in microglia, and induces cortical neuron apoptosis by affecting the delayed rectification and transient outward K(+ channel current. Curcumin reduces production of ROS and inflammatory mediators in HIV-1-gp120-stimulated microglia, and protects cortical neurons against HIV-1-mediated apoptosis, most likely through inhibition of HIV-1 gp120-induced elevation of the delayed rectification and transient outward K(+ current.

  6. Spindle-F Is the Central Mediator of Ik2 Kinase-Dependent Dendrite Pruning in Drosophila Sensory Neurons.

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    Tzu Lin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available During development, certain Drosophila sensory neurons undergo dendrite pruning that selectively eliminates their dendrites but leaves the axons intact. How these neurons regulate pruning activity in the dendrites remains unknown. Here, we identify a coiled-coil protein Spindle-F (Spn-F that is required for dendrite pruning in Drosophila sensory neurons. Spn-F acts downstream of IKK-related kinase Ik2 in the same pathway for dendrite pruning. Spn-F exhibits a punctate pattern in larval neurons, whereas these Spn-F puncta become redistributed in pupal neurons, a step that is essential for dendrite pruning. The redistribution of Spn-F from puncta in pupal neurons requires the phosphorylation of Spn-F by Ik2 kinase to decrease Spn-F self-association, and depends on the function of microtubule motor dynein complex. Spn-F is a key component to link Ik2 kinase to dynein motor complex, and the formation of Ik2/Spn-F/dynein complex is critical for Spn-F redistribution and for dendrite pruning. Our findings reveal a novel regulatory mechanism for dendrite pruning achieved by temporal activation of Ik2 kinase and dynein-mediated redistribution of Ik2/Spn-F complex in neurons.

  7. Neuronal IL-17 receptor upregulates TRPV4 but not TRPV1 receptors in DRG neurons and mediates mechanical but not thermal hyperalgesia.

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    Segond von Banchet, Gisela; Boettger, Michael K; König, Christian; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Bräuer, Rolf; Schaible, Hans-Georg

    2013-01-01

    In addition to the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6 and interleukin-1ß, the cytokine interleukin-17 (IL-17) is considered an important mediator of autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Because tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1ß have the potential to influence the expression of transduction molecules such as transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and thus to contribute to pain we explored in the present study whether IL-17A activates DRG neurons and influences the expression of TRPV1. The IL-17A receptor was visualized in most neurons in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sections as well as in cultured DRG neurons. Upon long-term exposure to IL-17A, isolated and cultured rat DRG neurons showed a significant upregulation of extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) and nuclear factor κB (NFκB). Long-term exposure of neurons to IL-17A did not upregulate the expression of TRPV1. However, we found a pronounced upregulation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) which is considered a candidate transduction molecule for mechanical hyperalgesia. Upon the injection of zymosan into the paw, IL-17A-deficient mice showed less mechanical hyperalgesia than wild type mice but thermal hyperalgesia was not attenuated in IL-17A-deficient mice. These data show, therefore, a particular role of IL-17 in mechanical hyperalgesia, and they suggest that this effect is linked to an activation and upregulation of TRPV4.

  8. Treatment of trigeminal ganglion neurons in vitro with NGF, GDNF or BDNF: effects on neuronal survival, neurochemical properties and TRPV1-mediated neuropeptide secretion

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    Patwardhan Amol M

    2005-01-01

    results illustrate that NGF, GDNF and BDNF differentially alter TG sensory neuron survival, neurochemical properties and TRPV1-mediated neuropeptide release in culture. In particular, our findings suggest that GDNF and NGF differentially modulate TRPV1-mediated neuropeptide secretion sensitivity, with NGF having a much greater effect on a per neuron basis than GDNF. These findings are discussed in relation to possible therapeutic roles for growth factors or their modulators in pathological pain states, especially as these relate to the trigeminal system.

  9. Leptin receptor neurons in the mouse hypothalamus are colocalized with the neuropeptide galanin and mediate anorexigenic leptin action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laque, Amanda; Zhang, Yan; Gettys, Sarah; Nguyen, Tu-Anh; Bui, Kelly; Morrison, Christopher D.

    2013-01-01

    Leptin acts centrally via leptin receptor (LepRb)-expressing neurons to regulate food intake, energy expenditure, and other physiological functions. LepRb neurons are found throughout the brain, and several distinct populations contribute to energy homeostasis control. However, the function of most LepRb populations remains unknown, and their contribution to regulate energy homeostasis has not been studied. Galanin has been hypothesized to interact with the leptin signaling system, but literature investigating colocalization of LepRb and galanin has been inconsistent, which is likely due to technical difficulties to visualize both. We used reporter mice with green fluorescent protein expression from the galanin locus to recapitulate the colocalization of galanin and leptin-induced p-STAT3 as a marker for LepRb expression. Here, we report the existence of two populations of galanin-expressing LepRb neurons (Gal-LepRb neurons): in the hypothalamus overspanning the perifornical area and adjacent dorsomedial and lateral hypothalamus [collectively named extended perifornical area (exPFA)] and in the brainstem (nucleus of the solitary tract). Surprisingly, despite the known orexigenic galanin action, leptin induces galanin mRNA expression and stimulates LepRb neurons in the exPFA, thus conflicting with the expected anorexigenic leptin action. However, we confirmed that intra-exPFA leptin injections were indeed sufficient to mediate anorexic responses. Interestingly, LepRb and galanin-expressing neurons are distinct from orexin or melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH)-expressing neurons, but exPFA galanin neurons colocalized with the anorexigenic neuropeptides neurotensin and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART). Based on galanin's known inhibitory function, we speculate that in exPFA Gal-LepRb neurons galanin acts inhibitory rather than orexigenic. PMID:23482448

  10. Opposing effects of sirtuins on neuronal survival: SIRT1-mediated neuroprotection is independent of its deacetylase activity.

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    Jason A Pfister

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Growing evidence suggests that sirtuins, a family of seven distinct NAD-dependent enzymes, are involved in the regulation of neuronal survival. Indeed, SIRT1 has been reported to protect against neuronal death, while SIRT2 promotes neurodegeneration. The effect of SIRTs 3-7 on the regulation of neuronal survival, if any, has yet to be reported. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined the effect of expressing each of the seven SIRT proteins in healthy cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs or in neurons induced to die by low potassium (LK treatment. We report that SIRT1 protects neurons from LK-induced apoptosis, while SIRT2, SIRT3 and SIRT6 induce apoptosis in otherwise healthy neurons. SIRT5 is generally localized to both the nucleus and cytoplasm of CGNs and exerts a protective effect. In a subset of neurons, however, SIRT5 localizes to the mitochondria and in this case it promotes neuronal death. Interestingly, the protective effect of SIRT1 in neurons is not reduced by treatments with nicotinamide or sirtinol, two pharmacological inhibitors of SIRT1. Neuroprotection was also observed with two separate mutant forms of SIRT1, H363Y and H355A, both of which lack deacetylase activity. Furthermore, LK-induced neuronal death was not prevented by resveratrol, a pharmacological activator of SIRT1, at concentrations at which it activates SIRT1. We extended our analysis to HT-22 neuroblastoma cells which can be induced to die by homocysteic acid treatment. While the effects of most of the SIRT proteins were similar to that observed in CGNs, SIRT6 was modestly protective against homocysteic acid toxicity in HT-22 cells. SIRT5 was generally localized in the mitochondria of HT-22 cells and was apoptotic. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Overall, our study makes three contributions - (a it represents the first analysis of SIRT3-7 in the regulation of neuronal survival, (b it shows that neuroprotection by SIRT1 can be mediated by a novel, non

  11. Non-tubal ectopic pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Victoria Louise; Srinivas, M

    2016-07-01

    11 per 1000 pregnancies are ectopic (NICE Guidelines, 2012) with 95 % of ectopic pregnancies being tubal in origin, and 80 % of these occurring within the ampulla (The Ectopic Pregnancy Trust). 5% therefore are non-tubal. In this review we aim to collate literature relevant to non-tubal ectopic pregnancy. Literature regarding cornual, ovarian, abdominal, interstitial, cervical and Caesarean scar ectopic pregnancy was reviewed using EMBASE and Medline databases. Non-tubal ectopic pregnancies are often overlooked, diagnosed late and are associated with higher maternal morbidity and mortality. Ultrasound remains the mainstay of diagnosis in corroboration with clinical features. Management may include medical treatment with methotrexate, surgery or expectancy. There is also an increasing interest in the use of minimally invasive radiological approaches. Non-tubal ectopic pregnancy is a rare but potentially life-threatening and often misdiagnosed condition. This is particularly pertinent for Caesarean scar ectopic pregnancies, the prevalence of which is increasing due to the rising proportion of women having Caesarean sections (Litwicka and Greco, 2011). Practitioners should be aware of non-tubal pregnancies to aid more efficient diagnosis, optimise management and increase patient safety.

  12. Non-Neuronal Cells Are Required to Mediate the Effects of Neuroinflammation: Results from a Neuron-Enriched Culture System.

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    Chin Wai Hui

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation is associated with activated microglia and reactive astrocytes and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's. Both in vivo and in vitro studies have demonstrated that inflammatory cytokine responses to immune challenges contribute to neuronal death during neurodegeneration. In order to investigate the role of glial cells in this phenomenon, we developed a modified method to remove the non-neuronal cells in primary cultures of E16.5 mouse cortex. We modified previously reported methods as we found that a brief treatment with the thymidine analog, 5-fluorodeoxyuridine (FdU, is sufficient to substantially deplete dividing non-neuronal cells in primary cultures. Cell cycle and glial markers confirm the loss of ~99% of all microglia, astrocytes and oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs. More importantly, under this milder treatment, the neurons suffered neither cell loss nor any morphological defects up to 2.5 weeks later; both pre- and post-synaptic markers were retained. Further, neurons in FdU-treated cultures remained responsive to excitotoxicity induced by glutamate application. The immunobiology of the FdU culture, however, was significantly changed. Compared with mixed culture, the protein levels of NFκB p65 and the gene expression of several cytokine receptors were altered. Individual cytokines or conditioned medium from β-amyloid-stimulated THP-1 cells that were, potent neurotoxins in normal, mixed cultures, were virtually inactive in the absence of glial cells. The results highlight the importance of our glial-depleted culture system and identifies and offer unexpected insights into the complexity of -brain neuroinflammation.

  13. Adenosine A1 receptor-mediated transactivation of the EGF receptor produces a neuroprotective effect on cortical neurons in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke-qiang XIE; Li-min ZHANG; Yan CAO; Jun ZHU; Lin-yin FENG

    2009-01-01

    Aim:To understand the mechanism of the transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mediated by the adenosine A1 receptor (A1R).Methods:Primary cultured rat cortical neurons subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and HEK293/A1R cells were treated with the A1R-specific agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA).Phospho-EGFR,Akt,and ERK1/2 were observed by Western blot.An interaction between EGFR and AIR was detected using immunoprecipitation and immunocytochemistry.Results:The A1R agonist CPA causes protein kinase B (Akt) activation and protects primary cortical neurons from oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) insult.A1R and EGFR co-localize in the membranes of neurons and form an immunocomplex.A1R stimulation induces significant EGFR phosphorylation via a P13K and Src kinase signaling pathway;this stimulation provides a neuroprotective effect in cortical neurons.CPA leads to sustained phosphorylation of extracellularly regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) in cortical neurons,but only to transient phosphorylation in HEK 293/A1R cells.The response to the AtR agonist is mediated primarily through EGFR trans-activation that is dependent on pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive G1 protein and metalloproteases in HEK 293/A1R.Conclusion:A1R-mediated EGFR transactivation confers a neuroprotective effect in primary cortical neurons.P13 kinase and Src kinase play pivotal roles in this response.

  14. Potentiation by histamine of synaptically mediated excitotoxicity in cultured hippocampal neurones: a possible role for mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaper, S D; Facci, L; Kee, W J; Strijbos, P J

    2001-01-01

    Excessive glutamatergic neurotransmission, particularly when mediated by the N:-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of glutamate receptor, is thought to underlie neuronal death in a number of neurological disorders. Histamine has been reported to potentiate NMDA receptor-mediated events under a variety of conditions. In the present study we have utilized primary hippocampal neurone cultures to investigate the effect of mast cell-derived, as well as exogenously applied, histamine on neurotoxicity evoked by excessive synaptic activity. Exposure of mature cultures for 15 min to an Mg(2+)-free/glycine-containing buffer to trigger synaptic transmission through NMDA receptors, caused a 30-35% neuronal loss over 24 h. When co-cultured with hippocampal neurones, activated mast cells increased excitotoxic injury to 60%, an effect that was abolished in the presence of histaminase. Similarly, addition of histamine during magnesium deprivation produced a concentration-dependent potentiation (+ 60%; EC(50) : 5 microM) of neuronal death which was inhibited by sodium channel blockers and NMDA receptor antagonists, although this effect did not involve known histamine receptors. The histamine effect was further potentiated by acidification of the culture medium. Cultures 'preconditioned' by sublethal (5 min) Mg(2+) deprivation exhibited less neuronal death than controls when exposed to a more severe insult. NMDA receptor activation and the extracellular regulated kinase cascade were required for preconditioning neuroprotection. The finding that histamine potentiates NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity may have important implications for our understanding of conditions where enhanced glutamatergic neurotransmission is observed in conjunction with tissue acidification, such as cerebral ischaemia and epilepsy.

  15. System x(c)- activity and astrocytes are necessary for interleukin-1 beta-mediated hypoxic neuronal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogal, Birgit; Li, Jun; Lobner, Doug; McCullough, Louise D; Hewett, Sandra J

    2007-09-19

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the cellular/biochemical pathway(s) by which interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) contributes to the pathogenesis of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. In vivo, IL-1 receptor type I (IL-1RI)-deficient mice showed smaller infarcts and less neurological deficits than wild-type animals after a 90 min reversible middle cerebral artery occlusion. In vitro, IL-1beta mediated an enhancement of hypoxic neuronal injury in murine cortical cultures that was lacking in cultures derived from IL-1RI null mutant animals and was blocked by the IL-1 receptor antagonist or an IL-1RI blocking antibody. This IL-1beta-mediated potentiation of hypoxic neuronal injury was associated with an increase in both cellular cystine uptake ([cystine]i) and extracellular glutamate levels ([glutamate]e) and was prevented by either ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonism or removal of L-cystine, suggesting a role for the cystine/glutamate antiporter (System x(c)-). Indeed, dual System x(c)-/metabotropic glutamate receptor subunit 1 (mGluR1) antagonism but not selective mGluR1 antagonism prevented neuronal injury. Additionally, cultures derived from mGluR1-deficient mice exhibited the same potentiation in injury after treatment with IL-1beta as wild-type cultures, an effect prevented by System x(c)-/mGluR1 antagonism. Finally, assessment of System x(c)- function and kinetics in IL-1beta-treated cultures revealed an increase in velocity of cystine transport (Vmax), in the absence of a change in affinity (Km). Neither the enhancement in [cystine]i, [glutamate]e, or neuronal injury were observed in chimeric cultures consisting of IL-1RI(+/+) neurons plated on top of IL-1RI(-/-) astrocytes, highlighting the importance of astrocyte-mediated alterations in System x(c)- as a novel contributor to the development and progression of hypoxic neuronal injury.

  16. Ghrelin receptors mediate ghrelin-induced excitation of agouti-related protein/neuropeptide Y but not pro-opiomelanocortin neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Rui; Chen, Hong; Zhou, Jing-Jing; Pradhan, Geetali; Sun, Yuxiang; Pan, Hui-Lin; Li, De-Pei

    2017-08-01

    Ghrelin increases food intake and body weight by stimulating orexigenic agouti-related protein (AgRP)/neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons and inhibiting anorexic pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in the hypothalamus. Growth hormone secretagogue receptor (Ghsr) mediates the effect of ghrelin on feeding behavior and energy homeostasis. However, the role of Ghsr in the ghrelin effect on these two populations of neurons is unclear. We hypothesized that Ghsr mediates the effect of ghrelin on AgRP and POMC neurons. In this study, we determined whether Ghsr similarly mediates the effects of ghrelin on AgRP/NPY and POMC neurons using cell type-specific Ghsr-knockout mice. Perforated whole-cell recordings were performed on green fluorescent protein-tagged AgRP/NPY and POMC neurons in the arcuate nucleus in hypothalamic slices. In Ghsr(+/+) mice, ghrelin (100 nM) significantly increased the firing activity of AgRP/NPY neurons but inhibited the firing activity of POMC neurons. In Ghsr(-/-) mice, the excitatory effect of ghrelin on AgRP/NPY neurons was abolished. Ablation of Ghsr also eliminated ghrelin-induced increases in the frequency of GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents of POMC neurons. Strikingly, ablation of Ghsr converted the ghrelin effect on POMC neurons from inhibition to excitation. Des-acylated ghrelin had no such effect on POMC neurons in Ghsr(-/-) mice. In both Ghsr(+/+) and Ghsr(-/-) mice, blocking GABAA receptors with gabazine increased the basal firing activity of POMC neurons, and ghrelin further increased the firing activity of POMC neurons in the presence of gabazine. Our findings provide unequivocal evidence that Ghsr is essential for ghrelin-induced excitation of AgRP/NPY neurons. However, ghrelin excites POMC neurons through an unidentified mechanism that is distinct from conventional Ghsr. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  17. Low-affinity neurotrophin receptor with targeted mutation of exon 3 is capable of mediating the death of axotomized neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Simon S; Bartlett, Perry F; Lopes, Elizabeth C; Coulson, Elizabeth J; Greferath, Una; Cheema, Surindar S

    2003-04-01

    1. In vivo studies have shown that the low-affinity 75 kDa neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) is involved in axotomy-induced cell death of sensory and motor neurons. To further examine the importance of p75NTR in mediating neuronal death in vivo, we examined the effect of axotomy in the p75NTR-knockout mouse, which has a disrupted ligand-binding domain. 2. The extent of sensory and motor neuron loss in the p75NTR-knockout mouse following axotomy was not significantly different to that in wild-type mice. This suggests that disruption of the ligand-binding domain is insufficient to block the cell death process in axotomized neurons. 3. Immunohistochemical studies showed that axotomized neurons continue to express this mutant receptor with its intracellular death-signalling moiety intact. 4. Treatment with antisense oligonucleotides targeted against p75NTR resulted in significant reduction in the loss of axotomized neurons in the knockout mouse. 5. These data suggest that the intracellular domain of p75NTR is essential for death-signalling and that p75NTR can signal apoptosis, despite a disrupted ligand-binding domain.

  18. Comparative impact of voltage-gated calcium channels and NMDA receptors on mitochondria-mediated neuronal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanika, Ruslan I; Villanueva, Idalis; Kazanina, Galina; Andrews, S Brian; Pivovarova, Natalia B

    2012-05-09

    Glutamate excitotoxicity, a major component of many neurodegenerative disorders, is characterized by excessive calcium influx selectively through NMDARs. However, there is a substantial uncertainty concerning why other known routes of significant calcium entry, in particular, VGCCs, are not similarly toxic. Here, we report that in the majority of neurons in rat hippocampal and cortical cultures, maximal L-type VGCC activation induces much lower calcium loading than toxic NMDAR activation. Consequently, few depolarization-activated neurons exhibit calcium deregulation and cell death. Activation of alternative routes of calcium entry induced neuronal death in proportion to the degree of calcium loading. In a small subset of neurons, depolarization evoked stronger calcium elevations, approaching those induced by toxic NMDA. These neurons were characterized by elevated expression of VGCCs and enhanced voltage-gated calcium currents, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death. Preventing VGCC-dependent mitochondrial calcium loading resulted in stronger cytoplasmic calcium elevations, whereas inhibiting mitochondrial calcium clearance accelerated mitochondrial depolarization. Both observations further implicate mitochondrial dysfunction in VGCC-mediated cell death. Results indicate that neuronal vulnerability tracks the extent of calcium loading but does not appear to depend explicitly on the route of calcium entry.

  19. Neuronal Fc gamma receptor I as a novel mediator for IgG immune complex-induced peripheral sensitization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lintao Qu

    2012-01-01

    Chronic pain often accompanies immune-related diseases with an elevated level of IgG immune complex (IgG-IC) in the serum and/or the affected tissues though the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Fc gamma receptors (FcγRs), known as the receptors for the Fc domain of immunoglobulin G (IgG), are typically expressed on immune cells. A general consensus is that the activation of FcγRs by IgG-IC in such immune cells induces the release of proinflammatory cytokines from the immune cells, which may contribute to the IgG-IC-mediated peripheral sensitization. In addition to the immune cells, recent studies have revealed that FcγRI, but not FcγRII and FcγRIII, is also expressed in a subpopulation of primary sensory neurons. Moreover, IgG-IC directly excites the primary sensory neurons through neuronal FcγRI. These findings indicate that neuronal FcγRI provides a novel direct linkage between immunoglobulin and primary sensory neurons, which may be a novel target for the treatment of pain in the immune-related disorders. In this review, we summarize the expression pattern, functions, and the associated cellular signaling of FcγRs in the primary sensory neurons.

  20. Neuronal networks and mediators of cortical neurovascular coupling responses in normal and altered brain states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecrux, C; Hamel, E

    2016-10-05

    Brain imaging techniques that use vascular signals to map changes in neuronal activity, such as blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging, rely on the spatial and temporal coupling between changes in neurophysiology and haemodynamics, known as 'neurovascular coupling (NVC)'. Accordingly, NVC responses, mapped by changes in brain haemodynamics, have been validated for different stimuli under physiological conditions. In the cerebral cortex, the networks of excitatory pyramidal cells and inhibitory interneurons generating the changes in neural activity and the key mediators that signal to the vascular unit have been identified for some incoming afferent pathways. The neural circuits recruited by whisker glutamatergic-, basal forebrain cholinergic- or locus coeruleus noradrenergic pathway stimulation were found to be highly specific and discriminative, particularly when comparing the two modulatory systems to the sensory response. However, it is largely unknown whether or not NVC is still reliable when brain states are altered or in disease conditions. This lack of knowledge is surprising since brain imaging is broadly used in humans and, ultimately, in conditions that deviate from baseline brain function. Using the whisker-to-barrel pathway as a model of NVC, we can interrogate the reliability of NVC under enhanced cholinergic or noradrenergic modulation of cortical circuits that alters brain states.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'.

  1. Inhibiton of neurons in the amygdala by dorsal raphe stimulation: mediation through a direct serotonergic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R Y; Aghajanian, G K

    1977-01-14

    This study presents data showing that the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) has a marked inhibitory influence upon neurons in the amygdala and that this inhibitory effect is mediated by a direct DRN-amygdala serotonergic pathway. The evidence may be briefly summarized as follows:(1) on the same amygdaloid cells, both iontophoresis of serotonin (5-HT) and electrical stimulation of the DRN markedly inhibited spontaneous single unit activities; (2) the latency of DRN-induced inhibition was relatively short and is compatible with the conduction velocities (which were determined by antidromic activation of the 5-HT pathway) of unmyelinated 5-HT fibers; (3) destruction of 5-HT projections by 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) or pharmacological depletion of 5-HT by parachlorophenylalanine (PCPA) prevented the inhibitory responsed to DRN stimulation in the great majority of cells studied; (4) in PCPA-pretreated animals, injection of 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) reversed the PCPA effect, restoring the responses of amygdaloid cells to DRN stimulation. In the amygdala, the presumptive 5-HT antagonists which we tested did not block the inhibitory effects of 5-HT except that intravenously administered LSD blocked the inhibitory responses produced by submaximal DRN stimulation. The implications of these results for the possible functions of 5-HT in the amygdala is discussed.

  2. TDP-43-Mediated Neuron Loss In Vivo Requires RNA-Binding Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Kavita; Müller, Daniel; Karsten, Peter; Weber, Stephanie S.; Kahle, Philipp J.; Marquardt, Till; Schulz, Jörg B.

    2010-01-01

    Alteration and/or mutations of the ribonucleoprotein TDP-43 have been firmly linked to human neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). The relative impacts of TDP-43 alteration, mutation, or inherent protein function on neural integrity, however, remain less clear—a situation confounded by conflicting reports based on transient and/or random-insertion transgenic expression. We therefore performed a stringent comparative investigation of impacts of these TDP-43 modifications on neural integrity in vivo. To achieve this, we systematically screened ALS/FTLD-associated and synthetic TDP-43 isoforms via same-site gene insertion and neural expression in Drosophila; followed by transposon-based motor neuron-specific transgenesis in a chick vertebrate system. Using this bi-systemic approach we uncovered a requirement of inherent TDP-43 RNA-binding function—but not ALS/FTLD-linked mutation, mislocalization, or truncation—for TDP-43-mediated neurotoxicity in vivo. PMID:20806063

  3. Nanoparticle-mediated transcriptional modification enhances neuronal differentiation of human neural stem cells following transplantation in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaowei; Tzeng, Stephany Y; Liu, Xiaoyan; Tammia, Markus; Cheng, Yu-Hao; Rolfe, Andrew; Sun, Dong; Zhang, Ning; Green, Jordan J; Wen, Xuejun; Mao, Hai-Quan

    2016-04-01

    Strategies to enhance survival and direct the differentiation of stem cells in vivo following transplantation in tissue repair site are critical to realizing the potential of stem cell-based therapies. Here we demonstrated an effective approach to promote neuronal differentiation and maturation of human fetal tissue-derived neural stem cells (hNSCs) in a brain lesion site of a rat traumatic brain injury model using biodegradable nanoparticle-mediated transfection method to deliver key transcriptional factor neurogenin-2 to hNSCs when transplanted with a tailored hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel, generating larger number of more mature neurons engrafted to the host brain tissue than non-transfected cells. The nanoparticle-mediated transcription activation method together with an HA hydrogel delivery matrix provides a translatable approach for stem cell-based regenerative therapy.

  4. Melatonin Mediates Protective Effects against Kainic Acid-Induced Neuronal Death through Safeguarding ER Stress and Mitochondrial Disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Feixiao; Shi, Cai; Chen, Qingjie; Hang, Weijian; Xia, Liangtao; Wu, Yue; Tao, Sophia Z.; Zhou, Jie; Shi, Anbing; Chen, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Kainic acid (KA)-induced neuronal death is linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress. Melatonin is known to protect hippocampal neurons from KA-induced apoptosis, but the exact mechanisms underlying melatonin protective effects against neuronal mitochondria disorder and ER stress remain uncertain. In this study, we investigated the sheltering roles of melatonin during KA-induced apoptosis by focusing on mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress mediated signal pathways. KA causes mitochondrial dynamic disorder and dysfunction through calpain activation, leading to neuronal apoptosis. Ca2+ chelator BAPTA-AM and calpain inhibitor calpeptin can significantly restore mitochondrial morphology and function. ER stress can also be induced by KA treatment. ER stress inhibitor 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) attenuates ER stress-mediated apoptosis and mitochondrial disorder. It is worth noting that calpain activation was also inhibited under PBA administration. Thus, we concluded that melatonin effectively inhibits KA-induced calpain upregulation/activation and mitochondrial deterioration by alleviating Ca2+ overload and ER stress. PMID:28293167

  5. Prostaglandin E2 potentiation of P2X3 receptor mediated currents in dorsal root ganglion neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Li-Yen

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 is a well-known inflammatory mediator that enhances the excitability of DRG neurons. Homomeric P2X3 and heteromeric P2X2/3 receptors are abundantly expressed in dorsal root ganglia (DRG neurons and participate in the transmission of nociceptive signals. The interaction between PGE2 and P2X3 receptors has not been well delineated. We studied the actions of PGE2 on ATP-activated currents in dissociated DRG neurons under voltage-clamp conditions. PGE2 had no effects on P2X2/3 receptor-mediated responses, but significantly potentiated fast-inactivating ATP currents mediated by homomeric P2X3 receptors. PGE2 exerted its action by activating EP3 receptors. To study the mechanism underlying the action of PGE2, we found that the adenylyl cyclase activator, forskolin and the membrane-permeable cAMP analogue, 8-Br-cAMP increased ATP currents, mimicking the effect of PGE2. In addition, forskolin occluded the enhancement produced by PGE2. The protein kinase A (PKA inhibitors, H89 and PKA-I blocked the PGE2 effect. In contrast, the PKC inhibitor, bisindolymaleimide (Bis did not change the potentiating action of PGE2. We further showed that PGE2 enhanced α,β-meATP-induced allodynia and hyperalgesia and the enhancement was blocked by H89. These observations suggest that PGE2 binds to EP3 receptors, resulting in the activation of cAMP/PKA signaling pathway and leading to an enhancement of P2X3 homomeric receptor-mediated ATP responses in DRG neurons.

  6. The diversified function and potential therapy of ectopic olfactory receptors in non-olfactory tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Zhao, Hong; Fu, Nian; Chen, Linxi

    2017-03-24

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) are mainly distributed in olfactory neurons and play a key role in detecting volatile odorants, eventually resulting in the production of smell perception. Recently, it is also reported that ORs are expressed in non-olfactory tissues including heart, lung, sperm, skin, and cancerous tissues. Interestingly, ectopic ORs are associated with the development of diseases in non-olfactory tissues. For instance, ectopic ORs initiate the hypoxic ventilatory responses and maintain the oxygen homeostasis of breathing in the carotid body when oxygen levels decline. Ectopic ORs induce glucose homeostasis in diabetes. Ectopic ORs regulate systemic blood pressure by increasing renin secretion and vasodilation. Ectopic ORs participate in the process of tumor cell proliferation, apoptosis, metastasis, and invasiveness. Ectopic ORs accelerate the occurrence of obesity, angiogenesis and wound-healing processes. Ectopic ORs affect fetal hemoglobin levels in sickle cell anemia and thalassemia. Finally, we also elaborate some ligands targeting for ORs. Obviously, the diversified function and related signal pathway of ectopic ORs may play a potential therapeutic target in non-olfactory tissues. Thus, this review focuses on the latest research results about the diversified function and therapeutic potential of ectopic ORs in non-olfactory tissues. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Translocation of PKC-betaII is mediated via RACK-1 in the neuronal cells following dioxin exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Gyo; Kim, Sun-Young; Choi, Eun-Jung; Park, Ki-Yeon; Yang, Jae-Ho

    2007-03-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is known to induce neurotoxic effects. However, the mechanism of TCDD-mediated signaling pathways and its possible molecular targets in neurons remains unknown. In this study, we analyzed effects of TCDD on neurofilament subunits, receptor for activated C kinase-1 (RACK-1), and PKC-betaII activity in developing neuronal cells. TCDD induced a significant increase of RACK-1, an adaptor protein for protein kinase C (PKC), in cerebellar granule cells in both dose- and time-dependent manner, indicating that RACK-1 is a sensitive molecular target in neuronal cells for TCDD exposure. TCDD induced a dose-dependent translocation of PKC-betaII from cytosol to membrane fractions. However, when RACK-1 induction was blocked by antisense oligonucleotide or alpha-naphthoflavone, Ah receptor (AhR) inhibitor, the translocation of PKC-betaII was inhibited. Our data suggests that TCDD activates PKC-betaII via RACK-1 in an AhR-dependent manner. This is the first report identifying RACK-1 as a target molecule involved in TCDD-mediated signaling pathways. TCDD exposure also increased the level of neurofilament-H mRNA. These results suggest that identification of target molecules may contribute to improve our understanding of TCDD-mediated signaling pathway and the risk assessment of TCDD-induced neurotoxicities.

  8. A Cytotoxic, Co-operative Interaction Between Energy Deprivation and Glutamate Release From System xc- Mediates Aglycemic Neuronal Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Trista L; He, Yan; Jackman, Nicole A; Lobner, Doug; Hewett, James A; Hewett, Sandra J

    2015-01-01

    The astrocyte cystine/glutamate antiporter (system xc(-)) contributes substantially to the excitotoxic neuronal cell death facilitated by glucose deprivation. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanism by which this occurred. Using pure astrocyte cultures, as well as, mixed cortical cell cultures containing both neurons and astrocytes, we found that neither an enhancement in system xc(-) expression nor activity underlies the excitotoxic effects of aglycemia. In addition, using three separate bioassays, we demonstrate no change in the ability of glucose-deprived astrocytes--either cultured alone or with neurons--to remove glutamate from the extracellular space. Instead, we demonstrate that glucose-deprived cultures are 2 to 3 times more sensitive to the killing effects of glutamate or N-methyl-D-aspartate when compared with their glucose-containing controls. Hence, our results are consistent with the weak excitotoxic hypothesis such that a bioenergetic deficiency, which is measureable in our mixed but not astrocyte cultures, allows normally innocuous concentrations of glutamate to become excitotoxic. Adding to the burgeoning literature detailing the contribution of astrocytes to neuronal injury, we conclude that under our experimental paradigm, a cytotoxic, co-operative interaction between energy deprivation and glutamate release from astrocyte system xc(-) mediates aglycemic neuronal cell death.

  9. Excitotoxin-induced neuronal degeneration and seizure are mediated by tissue plasminogen activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirka, S E; Gualandris, A; Amaral, D G; Strickland, S

    1995-09-28

    Neuronal degeneration in the hippocampus, a region of the brain important for acquisition of memory in humans, occurs in various pathological conditions, including Alzheimer's disease, brain ischaemia and epilepsy. When neuronal activity is stimulated in the adult rat and mouse hippocampus, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a serine protease that converts inactive plasminogen to the active protease plasmin, is transcriptionally induced. The activity of tPA in neural tissue is correlated with neurite outgrowth, regeneration and migration, suggesting that it might be involved in neuronal plasticity. Here we show that tPA is produced primarily by microglia in the hippocampus. Using excitotoxins to induce neuronal cell loss, we demonstrate that tPA-deficient mice are resistant to neuronal degeneration. These mice are also less susceptible to pharmacologically induced seizures than wild-type mice. These findings identify a role for tPA in neuronal degeneration and seizure.

  10. Possible role of brain stem respiratory neurons in mediating vomiting during space motion sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A. D.; Tan, L. K.

    1987-01-01

    The object of this study was to determine if brain stem expiratory neurons control abdominal muscle activity during vomiting. The activity of 27 ventral respiratory group expiratory neurons, which are known to be of primary importance for control of abdominal muscle activity during respiration, was recorded. It is concluded that abdominal muscle activity during vomiting must be controlled not only by some brain stem expiratory neurons but also by other input(s).

  11. Using expression profiles of Caenorhabditis elegans neurons to identify genes that mediate synaptic connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruch, Leehod; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Golan-Mashiach, Michal; Shapiro, Ehud; Segal, Eran

    2008-07-11

    Synaptic wiring of neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans is largely invariable between animals. It has been suggested that this feature stems from genetically encoded molecular markers that guide the neurons in the final stage of synaptic formation. Identifying these markers and unraveling the logic by which they direct synapse formation is a key challenge. Here, we address this task by constructing a probabilistic model that attempts to explain the neuronal connectivity diagram of C. elegans as a function of the expression patterns of its neurons. By only considering neuron pairs that are known to be connected by chemical or electrical synapses, we focus on the final stage of synapse formation, in which neurons identify their designated partners. Our results show that for many neurons the neuronal expression map of C. elegans can be used to accurately predict the subset of adjacent neurons that will be chosen as its postsynaptic partners. Notably, these predictions can be achieved using the expression patterns of only a small number of specific genes that interact in a combinatorial fashion.

  12. Using expression profiles of Caenorhabditis elegans neurons to identify genes that mediate synaptic connectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leehod Baruch

    Full Text Available Synaptic wiring of neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans is largely invariable between animals. It has been suggested that this feature stems from genetically encoded molecular markers that guide the neurons in the final stage of synaptic formation. Identifying these markers and unraveling the logic by which they direct synapse formation is a key challenge. Here, we address this task by constructing a probabilistic model that attempts to explain the neuronal connectivity diagram of C. elegans as a function of the expression patterns of its neurons. By only considering neuron pairs that are known to be connected by chemical or electrical synapses, we focus on the final stage of synapse formation, in which neurons identify their designated partners. Our results show that for many neurons the neuronal expression map of C. elegans can be used to accurately predict the subset of adjacent neurons that will be chosen as its postsynaptic partners. Notably, these predictions can be achieved using the expression patterns of only a small number of specific genes that interact in a combinatorial fashion.

  13. Nociceptive-induced myocardial remote conditioning is mediated by neuronal gamma protein kinase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Eric R; Hsu, Anna K; Urban, Travis J; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Gross, Garrett J

    2013-09-01

    Deciphering the remote conditioning molecular mechanism may provide targets to develop therapeutics that can broaden the clinical application. To further investigate this, we tested whether two protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes, the ubiquitously expressed epsilon PKC (εPKC) and the neuronal-specific gamma PKC (γPKC), mediate nociceptive-induced remote myocardial conditioning. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used for both in vivo and ex vivo myocardial ischemia-reperfusion protocols. For the in vivo studies, using a surgical abdominal incision for comparison, applying only to the abdomen either bradykinin or the εPKC activator (ψεRACK) reduced myocardial infarct size (45 ± 1, 44 ± 2 %, respectively, vs. incision: 43 ± 2 %, and control: 63 ± 2 %, P classical PKC isozyme activator (activating α, β, βII, and γ), reduced myocardial injury. Importantly, the classical PKC isozyme activator given to the abdomen in vivo (with an intact nervous system including γPKC) during myocardial ischemia reduced infarct size as effectively as an abdominal incision or ψεRACK (45 ± 1 vs. 45 ± 2 and 47 ± 1 %, respectively). The classical PKC activator-induced protection was also blocked by spinal cord surgical transection. These findings identified potential remote conditioning mimetics, with these strategies effective even during myocardial ischemia. A novel mechanism of nociceptive-induced remote conditioning, involving γPKC, was also identified.

  14. CHOLINERGIC NEURONS OF THE BASAL FOREBRAIN MEDIATE BIOCHEMICAL AND ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL MECHANISMS UNDERLYING SLEEP HOMEOSTASIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinchuk, Anna V.; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; McCarley, Robert W.; Basheer, Radhika

    2015-01-01

    The tight coordination of biochemical and electrophysiological mechanisms underlies the homeostatic sleep pressure (HSP) produced by sleep deprivation (SD). We have reported that during SD the levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), extracellular nitric oxide (NO), adenosine [AD]ex, lactate [Lac]ex and pyruvate [Pyr]ex increase in the basal forebrain (BF). However, it is not clear whether all of them contribute to HSP leading to increased electroencephalogram (EEG) delta activity during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) recovery sleep (RS) following SD. Previously, we showed that NREM delta increase evident during RS depends on the presence of BF cholinergic (ChBF) neurons. Here, we investigated the role of ChBF cells in coordination of biochemical and EEG changes seen during SD and RS in the rat. Increases in low theta power (5–7Hz), but not high theta (7–9Hz), during SD correlated with the increase in NREM delta power during RS, and with the changes in nitrate/nitrite [NOx]ex and [AD]ex. Lesions of ChBF cells using IgG 192-saporin prevented increases in [NOx]ex, [AD]ex and low theta activity, during SD, but did not prevent increases in [Lac]ex and [Pyr]ex. Infusion of NO donor DETA NONOate into the saporin-treated BF failed to increase NREM RS and delta power, suggesting ChBF cells are important for mediating NO homeostatic effects. Finally, SD-induced iNOS was mostly expressed in ChBF cells, and the intensity of iNOS induction correlated with the increase in low theta activity. Together, our data indicate ChBF cells are important in regulating the biochemical and EEG mechanisms that contribute to HSP. PMID:25369989

  15. Impaired neuronal nitric oxide synthase-mediated vasodilator responses to mental stress in essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sitara G; Geer, Amber; Fok, Henry W; Shabeeh, Husain; Brett, Sally E; Shah, Ajay M; Chowienczyk, Philip J

    2015-04-01

    Neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) regulates blood flow in resistance vasculature at rest and during mental stress. To investigate whether nNOS signaling is dysfunctional in essential hypertension, forearm blood flow responses to mental stress were examined in 88 subjects: 48 with essential hypertension (42±14 years; blood pressure, 141±17/85±15 mm Hg; mean±SD) and 40 normotensive controls (38±14 years; 117±13/74±9 mm Hg). A subsample of 34 subjects (17 hypertensive) participated in a single blind 2-phase crossover study, in which placebo or sildenafil 50 mg PO was administered before an intrabrachial artery infusion of the selective nNOS inhibitor S-methyl-l-thiocitrulline (SMTC, 0.05, 0.1, and 0.2 μmol/min) at rest and during mental stress. In a further subsample (n=21) with an impaired blood flow response to mental stress, responses were measured in the presence and absence of the α-adrenergic antagonist phentolamine. The blood flow response to mental stress was impaired in hypertensive compared with normotensive subjects (37±7% versus 70±8% increase over baseline; Phypertensive subjects (reduction of 40±11% versus 3.0±14%, respectively, P=0.01, between groups). Sildenafil reduced the blood flow response to stress in normotensive subjects from 89±14% to 43±14% (Phypertensive subjects. Phentolamine augmented impaired blood flow responses to mental stress from 39±8% to 67±13% (Phypertension is associated with impaired mental stress-induced nNOS-mediated vasodilator responses; this may relate to increased sympathetic outflow in hypertension. nNOS dysfunction may impair vascular homeostasis in essential hypertension and contribute to stress-induced cardiovascular events.

  16. [Early diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belics, Zoran; Gérecz, Balázs; Csákány, M György

    2014-07-20

    Ectopic pregnancy is a high-risk condition that occurs in 2% of reported pregnancies. This percentage is fivefold higher than that registered in the 1970s. Since 1970 there has been a two-fold increase in the ratio of ectopic pregnancies to all reported pregnancies in Hungary and in 2012 7.4 ectopic pregnancies per thousand registered pregnancies were reported. Recently, the majority (80%) of cases can be diagnosed in early stage, and the related mortality objectively decreased in the past few decades to 3.8/10,000 ectopic pregnancies. If a woman with positive pregnancy test has abdominal pain and/or vaginal bleeding the physician should perform a work-up to safely exclude the possibility of ectopic pregnancy. The basis of diagnosis is ultrasonography, especially vaginal ultrasound examination and measurement of the β-subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin. The ultrasound diagnosis is based on the visualization of an ectopic mass rather than the inability to visualize an intrauterine pregnancy. In some questionable cases the diagnostic uterine curettage or laparoscopy may be useful. The actuality of this topic is justified by practical difficulties in obtaining correct diagnosis, especially in the early gestational time.

  17. Clinical study of ectopic pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, S; Aher, K; Jaiswal, M

    1992-01-01

    Ectopic pregnancy remains a leading cause of maternal mortality and accounts for a sizeable proportion of infertility and ectopic recurrence. The possibility that a woman is experiencing an ectopic pregnancy must be considered when evaluating a woman, especially a sterilized woman, who has a possible pregnancy, amenorrhea, abdominal pain, or abnormal bleeding; studies have found that one in six pregnancies occurring after tubal sterilization are ectopic. The authors present a clinical study of 82 cases of ectopic pregnancy admitted to the department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Sevagram. Cases of ectopic pregnancy represent 0.99% of total obstetric admissions, of whom 69.51% were diagnosed as such on admission. 40.24% of the women were older than 30 years, while 34.14% were elderly beyond third parity. 70.73% of the women presented before missing their second period. Patients presented with multiple complaints, but the most common was abdominal pain reported by 61.70%. 78.04% were admitted with an acute abdomen, but shock was present in only 7.14% of cases. The main surgical treatment modality was salpingectomy among 59.75%. There was no maternal mortality through postoperative morbidity in the form of paralytic ileus, although fever did occur in some women.

  18. Neuron-Specific Effects of Interleukin-1ß are Mediated by a Novel Isoform of the IL-1 Receptor Accessory Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Yangyang; Smith, Dirk E.; Ibáñez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Sims, John E.; Friedman, Wilma J.

    2011-01-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is synthesized and released during injury, infection, and disease, mediating inflammatory responses. However, IL-1ß is also present in the brain under physiological conditions, and can influence hippocampal neuronal function. Several cell-specific IL-1-mediated signaling pathways and functions have been identified in neurons and astrocytes, but their mechanisms have not been fully defined. In astrocytes, IL-1β induced both the p38 MA...

  19. Enhancement of dendritic branching in cultured hippocampal neurons by 17beta-estradiol is mediated by nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audesirk, T; Cabell, L; Kern, M; Audesirk, G

    2003-06-01

    Both 17beta-estradiol (E2) and nitric oxide (NO) are important in neuronal development, learning and memory, and age-related memory changes. There is growing evidence that a number of estrogen receptor-mediated effects of estradiol utilize nitric oxide as an intermediary. The role of estradiol in hippocampal neuronal differentiation and function has particular implications for learning and memory. Low levels of estradiol (10nM) significantly increase dendritic branching in cultured embryonic rat hippocampal neurons (158% of control). This study investigates the hypothesis that the estrogen-stimulated increase in dendritic branching is mediated by nitric oxide. We found that nitric oxide donors also produce significantly increased dendritic branching S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP: 119%; 2,2'-(hydroxynitrosohydrazino)bis-ethanamine (NOC-18): 128% of control). We then determined that the increases in dendritic branching stimulated by estradiol or by a nitric oxide donor were both blocked by an inhibitor of guanylyl cyclase. Dendritic branching was also stimulated by a cell permeable analog of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (dibutyryl-cGMP: 173% of control). Estradiol-stimulated dendritic branching was reversed by the nitric oxide scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl imidazoline-1-oxyl 3-oxide (carboxy-PTIO). This study provides evidence that estradiol influences the development of embryonic hippocampal neurons in culture by increasing the production of nitric oxide or by increasing the sensitivity of the neurons to nitric oxide. Nitric oxide in turn stimulates dendritic branching via activation of guanylyl cyclase.

  20. DLP1-Dependent Mitochondrial Fragmentation Mediates 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium Toxicity in Neurons: Implications for Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinglong; Su, Bo; Liu, Wanhong; He, Xiaohua; Gao, Yuan; Castellani, Rudy J.; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A.; Zhu, Xiongwei

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Selective degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson disease (PD) can be modeled by the administration of the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+). Since abnormal mitochondrial dynamics are increasingly implicated in the pathogenesis of PD, in this study, we investigated the effect of MPP+ on mitochondrial dynamics and assessed temporal and causal relationship with other toxic effects induced by MPP+ in neuronal cells. In SH-SY5Y cells, MPP+ causes a rapid increase in mitochondrial fragmentation followed by a second wave of increase in mitochondrial fragmentation, along with increased DLP1 expression and mitochondrial translocation. Genetic inactivation of DLP1 completely blocks MPP+-induced mitochondrial fragmentation. Notably, this approach partially rescues MPP+-induced decline in ATP levels and ATP/ADP ratio and increased [Ca2+]i and almost completely prevents increased reactive oxygen species production, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, enhanced autophagy and cell death, suggesting that mitochondria fragmentation is an upstream event that mediates MPP+-induced toxicity. On the other hand, thiol antioxidant NAC or glutamate receptor antagonist D-AP5 also partially alleviate MPP+-induced mitochondrial fragmentation, suggesting a vicious spiral of events contributes to MPP+-induced toxicity. We further validated our findings in primary rat midbrain dopaminergic neurons that 0.5 μM MPP+ induced mitochondrial fragmentation only in TH-positive dopaminergic neurons in a similar pattern to that in SH-SY5Y cells but had no effects on these mitochondrial parameters in TH-negative neurons. Overall, these findings suggest that DLP1-dependent mitochondrial fragmentation plays a crucial role in mediating MPP+-induced mitochondria abnormalities and cellular dysfunction and may represent a novel therapeutic target for PD. PMID:21615675

  1. Molecular and celllar mechanisms underlying anti-neuronal antibody mediated disorders of the central nervous system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Coevorden - Hameete, Marleen; de Graaff, Esther; Titulaer, M.J; Hoogenraad, Casper; Sillevis Smitt, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade multiple autoantigens located on the plasma membrane of neurons have been identified. Neuronal surface antigens include molecules directly involved in neurotransmission and excitability. Binding of the antibody to the antigen may directly alter the target protein's function, res

  2. Neuronal AKAP150 coordinates PKA and Epac-mediated PKB/Akt phosphorylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Ingrid M.; Dolga, Amalia M.; Ostroveanu, Anghelus; Luiten, Paul G. M.; Schmidt, Martina; Eisel, Ulrich L. M.

    2008-01-01

    In diverse neuronal processes ranging from neuronal survival to synaptic plasticity cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent signaling is tightly connected with the protein kinase B (PKB)/Akt pathway but the precise nature of this connection remains unknown. In the current study we investigat

  3. Activity deprivation induces neuronal cell death: mediation by tissue-type plasminogen activator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eldi Schonfeld-Dado

    Full Text Available Spontaneous activity is an essential attribute of neuronal networks and plays a critical role in their development and maintenance. Upon blockade of activity with tetrodotoxin (TTX, neurons degenerate slowly and die in a manner resembling neurodegenerative diseases-induced neuronal cell death. The molecular cascade leading to this type of slow cell death is not entirely clear. Primary post-natal cortical neurons were exposed to TTX for up to two weeks, followed by molecular, biochemical and immunefluorescence analysis. The expression of the neuronal marker, neuron specific enolase (NSE, was down-regulated, as expected, but surprisingly, there was a concomitant and striking elevation in expression of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA. Immunofluorescence analysis indicated that tPA was highly elevated inside affected neurons. Transfection of an endogenous tPA inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1, protected the TTX-exposed neurons from dying. These results indicate that tPA is a pivotal player in slowly progressing activity deprivation-induced neurodegeneration.

  4. Ischemic Preconditioning Mediates Neuroprotection against Ischemia in Mouse Hippocampal CA1 Neurons by Inducing Autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunlin Gao

    Full Text Available The hippocampal CA1 region is sensitive to hypoxic and ischemic injury but can be protected by ischemic preconditioning (IPC. However, the mechanism through which IPC protects hippocampal CA1 neurons is still under investigation. Additionally, the role of autophagy in determining the fate of hippocampal neurons is unclear. Here, we examined whether IPC induced autophagy to alleviate hippocampal CA1 neuronal death in vitro and in vivo with oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD and bilateral carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO models. Survival of hippocampal neurons increased from 51.5% ± 6.3% in the non-IPC group (55 min of OGD to 77.3% ± 7.9% in the IPC group (15 min of OGD, followed by 55 min of OGD 24 h later. The number of hippocampal CA1 layer neurons increased from 182 ± 26 cells/mm2 in the non-IPC group (20 min of BCCAO to 278 ± 55 cells/mm2 in the IPC group (1 min × 3 BCCAO, followed by 20 min of BCCAO 24 h later. Akt phosphorylation and microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3-II/LC3-I expression were increased in the preconditioning group. Moreover, the protective effects of IPC were abolished only by inhibiting the activity of autophagy, but not by blocking the activation of Akt in vitro. Using in vivo experiments, we found that LC3 expression was upregulated, accompanied by an increase in neuronal survival in hippocampal CA1 neurons in the preconditioning group. The neuroprotective effects of IPC on hippocampal CA1 neurons were completely inhibited by treatment with 3-MA. In contrast, hippocampal CA3 neurons did not show changes in autophagic activity or beneficial effects of IPC. These data suggested that IPC may attenuate ischemic injury in hippocampal CA1 neurons through induction of Akt-independent autophagy.

  5. Ischemic Preconditioning Mediates Neuroprotection against Ischemia in Mouse Hippocampal CA1 Neurons by Inducing Autophagy.

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    Gao, Chunlin; Cai, Ying; Zhang, Xuebin; Huang, Huiling; Wang, Jin; Wang, Yajing; Tong, Xiaoguang; Wang, Jinhuan; Wu, Jialing

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampal CA1 region is sensitive to hypoxic and ischemic injury but can be protected by ischemic preconditioning (IPC). However, the mechanism through which IPC protects hippocampal CA1 neurons is still under investigation. Additionally, the role of autophagy in determining the fate of hippocampal neurons is unclear. Here, we examined whether IPC induced autophagy to alleviate hippocampal CA1 neuronal death in vitro and in vivo with oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) and bilateral carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) models. Survival of hippocampal neurons increased from 51.5% ± 6.3% in the non-IPC group (55 min of OGD) to 77.3% ± 7.9% in the IPC group (15 min of OGD, followed by 55 min of OGD 24 h later). The number of hippocampal CA1 layer neurons increased from 182 ± 26 cells/mm2 in the non-IPC group (20 min of BCCAO) to 278 ± 55 cells/mm2 in the IPC group (1 min × 3 BCCAO, followed by 20 min of BCCAO 24 h later). Akt phosphorylation and microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3)-II/LC3-I expression were increased in the preconditioning group. Moreover, the protective effects of IPC were abolished only by inhibiting the activity of autophagy, but not by blocking the activation of Akt in vitro. Using in vivo experiments, we found that LC3 expression was upregulated, accompanied by an increase in neuronal survival in hippocampal CA1 neurons in the preconditioning group. The neuroprotective effects of IPC on hippocampal CA1 neurons were completely inhibited by treatment with 3-MA. In contrast, hippocampal CA3 neurons did not show changes in autophagic activity or beneficial effects of IPC. These data suggested that IPC may attenuate ischemic injury in hippocampal CA1 neurons through induction of Akt-independent autophagy.

  6. Alkaloids from piper longum protect dopaminergic neurons against inflammation-mediated damage induced by intranigral injection of lipopolysaccharide.

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    He, Huan; Guo, Wei-Wei; Xu, Rong-Rong; Chen, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Nan; Wu, Xia; Wang, Xiao-Min

    2016-10-24

    Alkaloids from Piper longum (PLA), extracted from P. longum, have potent anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate whether PLA could protect dopaminergic neurons against inflammation-mediated damage by inhibiting microglial activation using a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced dopaminergic neuronal damage rat model. The animal behaviors of rotational behavior, rotarod test and open-field test were investigated. The survival ratio of dopaminergic neurons and microglial activation were examined. The dopamine (DA) and its metabolite were detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The effects of PLA on the expression of interleukin (IL)-6, interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) were also estimated. We showed that the survival ratio of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-ir) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and DA content in the striatum were reduced after a single intranigral dose of LPS (10 μg) treatment. The survival rate of TH-ir neurons in the SNpc and DA levels in the striatum were significantly improved after treatment with PLA for 6 weeks. The over-activated microglial cells were suppressed by PLA treatment. We also observed that the levels of inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β were decreased and the excessive production of ROS and NO were abolished after PLA treatment. Therefore, the behavioral dysfunctions induced by LPS were improved after PLA treatment. This study suggests that PLA plays a significant role in protecting dopaminergic neurons against inflammatory reaction induced damage.

  7. Over-expressed copper/zinc superoxide dismutase localizes to mitochondria in neurons inhibiting the angiotensin II-mediated increase in mitochondrial superoxide.

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    Li, Shumin; Case, Adam J; Yang, Rui-Fang; Schultz, Harold D; Zimmerman, Matthew C

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) is the main effector peptide of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), and contributes to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease by exerting its effects on an array of different cell types, including central neurons. AngII intra-neuronal signaling is mediated, at least in part, by reactive oxygen species, particularly superoxide (O2 (•-)). Recently, it has been discovered that mitochondria are a major subcellular source of AngII-induced O2 (•-). We have previously reported that over-expression of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), a mitochondrial matrix-localized O2 (•-) scavenging enzyme, inhibits AngII intra-neuronal signaling. Interestingly, over-expression of copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), which is believed to be primarily localized to the cytoplasm, similarly inhibits AngII intra-neuronal signaling and provides protection against AngII-mediated neurogenic hypertension. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that CuZnSOD over-expression in central neurons localizes to mitochondria and inhibits AngII intra-neuronal signaling by scavenging mitochondrial O2 (•-). Using a neuronal cell culture model (CATH.a neurons), we demonstrate that both endogenous and adenovirus-mediated over-expressed CuZnSOD (AdCuZnSOD) are present in mitochondria. Furthermore, we show that over-expression of CuZnSOD attenuates the AngII-mediated increase in mitochondrial O2 (•-) levels and the AngII-induced inhibition of neuronal potassium current. Taken together, these data clearly show that over-expressed CuZnSOD in neurons localizes in mitochondria, scavenges AngII-induced mitochondrial O2 (•-), and inhibits AngII intra-neuronal signaling.

  8. Over-expressed copper/zinc superoxide dismutase localizes to mitochondria in neurons inhibiting the angiotensin II-mediated increase in mitochondrial superoxide

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    Shumin Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II (AngII is the main effector peptide of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS, and contributes to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease by exerting its effects on an array of different cell types, including central neurons. AngII intra-neuronal signaling is mediated, at least in part, by reactive oxygen species, particularly superoxide (O2·−. Recently, it has been discovered that mitochondria are a major subcellular source of AngII-induced O2·−. We have previously reported that over-expression of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD, a mitochondrial matrix-localized O2·− scavenging enzyme, inhibits AngII intra-neuronal signaling. Interestingly, over-expression of copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD, which is believed to be primarily localized to the cytoplasm, similarly inhibits AngII intra-neuronal signaling and provides protection against AngII-mediated neurogenic hypertension. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that CuZnSOD over-expression in central neurons localizes to mitochondria and inhibits AngII intra-neuronal signaling by scavenging mitochondrial O2·−. Using a neuronal cell culture model (CATH.a neurons, we demonstrate that both endogenous and adenovirus-mediated over-expressed CuZnSOD (AdCuZnSOD are present in mitochondria. Furthermore, we show that over-expression of CuZnSOD attenuates the AngII-mediated increase in mitochondrial O2·− levels and the AngII-induced inhibition of neuronal potassium current. Taken together, these data clearly show that over-expressed CuZnSOD in neurons localizes in mitochondria, scavenges AngII-induced mitochondrial O2·−, and inhibits AngII intra-neuronal signaling.

  9. Erythropoietin-mediated protection of insect brain neurons involves JAK and STAT but not PI3K transduction pathways.

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    Miljus, N; Heibeck, S; Jarrar, M; Micke, M; Ostrowski, D; Ehrenreich, H; Heinrich, R

    2014-01-31

    The cytokine erythropoietin (Epo) initiates adaptive cellular responses to both moderate environmental challenges and tissue damaging insults in various non-hematopoietic mammalian tissues including the nervous system. Neuroprotective and neuroregenerative functions of Epo in mammals are mediated through receptor-associated Janus kinase 2 and intracellular signaling cascades that modify the transcription of Epo-regulated genes. Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) and phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) represent key components of two important Epo-induced transduction pathways. Our previous study on insects revealed neuroprotective and regenerative functions of recombinant human Epo (rhEpo) similar to those in mammalian nervous tissues. Here we demonstrate that rhEpo effectively rescues primary cultured locust brain neurons from apoptotic cell death induced by hypoxia or the chemical compound H-7. The Janus kinase inhibitor AG-490 and the STAT inhibitor sc-355797 abolished protective effects of rhEpo on locust brain neurons. In contrast, inhibition of PI3K with LY294002 had no effect on rhEpo-mediated neuroprotection. The results indicate that rhEpo mediates the protection of locust brain neurons through interference with apoptotic pathways by the activation of a Janus kinase-associated receptor and STAT transcription factor(s). The involvement of similar transduction pathways in mammals and insects for the mediation of neuroprotection and support of neural regeneration by Epo indicates that an Epo/Epo receptor-like signaling system with high structural and functional similarity exists in both groups of animals. Epo-like signaling involved in tissue protection appears to be an ancient beneficial function shared by vertebrates and invertebrates.

  10. Existence of glia mitigated ketamine-induced neurotoxicity in neuron-glia mixed cultures of neonatal rat cortex and the glia-mediated protective effect of 2-PMPA.

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    Zuo, Daiying; Wang, Chengna; Li, Zengqiang; Lin, Li; Duan, Zhenfang; Qi, Huan; Li, Lin; Sun, Feng; Wu, Yingliang

    2014-09-01

    The present study compared ketamine-induced neurotoxicity in the neuron-glia mixed cultures and neuronal cultures and further explored the neuroprotective effect of the NAAG peptidase inhibitor 2-(phosphonomethyl) pentanedioic acid (2-PMPA). Firstly, Rosenfeld's staining and immunofluorescence staining of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were used to address the difference of morphology in the mixed cultures and neuronal cultures. Our results showed that neurons and astrocytes grew in good conditions. The ratio of neurons and astrocytes in the mixed cultures was around 1:1, and the purity of neurons in the neuronal cultures is 91.3%. Furthermore, ketamine was used to test the hypothesis that the presence of a higher proportion of glia in the mixed cultures would be protective against ketamine-induced neurotoxicity in the mixed cultures compared with neuronal cultures. The results showed that ketamine-induced morphological changes, cell viability decrease and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels increase were significantly mitigated in neuron-glia mixed cultures compared with neuronal cultures. Furthermore, 2-PMPA was included to further explore efficient protective drug for ketamine-induced neurotoxicity. Our results showed that 2-PMPA reduced ketamine-induced decrease of cell viability and increase of LDH levels in the mixed cultures but not in the neuronal cultures. Further morphological changes of neurons and astrocytes also indicated that 2-PMPA could improve ketamine damaged neurons in the mixed cultures instead of neuronal cultures. These results indicate that glia protect neurons from ketamine-induced neurotoxicity. These data further suggest that glia mediate the neuroprotective effect of 2-PMPA and 2-PMPA has the potential to treat ketamine-induced neurotoxicity in vivo. Delineating the mechanisms underlying the communication between neurons and glia and the neuroprotective effects of 2-PMPA in the mixed

  11. TGFβ1 inhibits IFNγ-mediated microglia activation and protects mDA neurons from IFNγ-driven neurotoxicity.

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    Zhou, Xiaolai; Zöller, Tanja; Krieglstein, Kerstin; Spittau, Björn

    2015-07-01

    Microglia-mediated neuroinflammation has been reported as a common feature of familial and sporadic forms of Parkinson's disease (PD), and a growing body of evidence indicates that onset and progression of PD correlates with the extent of neuroinflammatory responses involving Interferon γ (IFNγ). Transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) has been shown to be a major player in the regulation of microglia activation states and functions and, thus, might be a potential therapeutic agent by shaping microglial activation phenotypes during the course of neurodegenerative diseases such as PD. In this study, we demonstrate that TGFβ1 is able to block IFNγ-induced microglia activation by attenuating STAT1 phosphorylation and IFNγRα expression. Moreover, we identified a set of genes involved in microglial IFNγ signaling transduction that were significantly down-regulated upon TGFβ1 treatment, resulting in decreased sensitivity of microglia toward IFNγ stimuli. Interestingly, genes mediating negative regulation of IFNγ signaling, such as SOCS2 and SOCS6, were up-regulated after TGFβ1 treatment. Finally, we demonstrate that TGFβ1 is capable of protecting midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neurons from IFNγ-driven neurotoxicity in mixed neuron-glia cultures derived from embryonic day 14 (E14) midbrain tissue. Together, these data underline the importance of TGFβ1 as a key immunoregulatory factor for microglia by silencing IFNγ-mediated microglia activation and, thereby, rescuing mDA neurons from IFNγ-induced neurotoxicity. Interferon γ (IFNγ) is a potent pro-inflammatory factor that triggers the activation of microglia and the subsequent release of neurotoxic factors. Transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) is able to inhibit the IFNγ-mediated activation of microglia, which is characterized by the release of nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα). By decreasing the expression of IFNγ-induced genes as well as the signaling receptor IFNγR1, TGFβ1

  12. CLINICAL STUDY OF ECTOPIC PREGNANCY

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    Swami

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available An ectopic pregnancy is one in which fertilized ovum is implanted at the site other than normal uterine cavity.[1] Incidence of ectopic pregnancy is 1:160 deliveries.[2] Clinical presentation is variable from acute to chronic type. Due to its varied clinical presentation ectopic pregnancy poses great diagnostic difficulty both to obstetrician, physician and surgeons.[3] OBJECTIVE: To find out incidence in our study population and to evaluate symptomatically and clinical presentation in these patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective study of 34 ectopic pregnancies admitted and treated in Medical College hospital, Ujjain from 2010 to 2015 are included in the study. RESULTS: The incidence of ectopic pregnancy is more between the age group of 21-30years (73.52% and in Multigravida 64.71%. Infertility and previous tubal surgery are the high risk factors for tubal pregnancy. Pain in abdomen was present in all 34 cases, amenorrhea in 97.05% and bleeding per vagina in 76.47% cases. Syncopal attacks, vomiting were detected in 14.70% cases. Acute ectopic pregnancy was detected in 14.71% and chronic in 85.29% cases. 82.35% cases presented with adnexal mass, 79.41% with cervical motion tenderness, 50% with pallor, 32.35% with abdominal lump and tenderness and 11.76% with fullness in POD. CONCLUSION: Ectopic pregnancy is leading cause of maternal mortality in first trimester. In spite of advanced diagnostic techniques. It poses great diagnostic difficulties due to varied signs and symptoms. Previous tubal surgery pelvic inflammatory disease and infertility are the risk factors of tubal pregnancy.

  13. αν and β1 Integrins mediate Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in hippocampal neurons via the FAK signaling pathway.

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    Hai-Yan Han

    Full Text Available αν and β1 integrins mediate Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in primary hippocampal neurons. We treated hippocampal neurons with 2.5 µg/mL 17E6 and 5 µg/mL ab58524, which are specific αν and β1 integrin antagonists, respectively, for 42 h prior to 10 µM Aβ treatment. Next, we employed small interfering RNA (siRNA to silence focal adhesion kinase (FAK, a downstream target gene of integrins. The siRNAs were designed with a target sequence, an MOI of 10 and the addition of 5 µg/mL polybrene. Under these conditions, the neurons were transfected and the apoptosis of different cell types was detected. Moreover, we used real-time PCR and Western blotting analyses to detect the expression of FAK and ρFAK genes in different cell types and investigated the underlying mechanism and signal pathway by which αν and β1 integrins mediate Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in hippocampal neurons. An MTT assay showed that both 17E6 and ab58524 significantly increased cell viability compared with the Aβ-treated neurons (P<0.01 and P<0.05, respectively. However, this protective effect was markedly attenuated after transfection with silencing FAK (siFAK. Moreover, TUNEL immunostaining and flow cytometry indicated that both 17E6 and ab58524 significantly protected hippocampal neurons against apoptosis induced by Aβ (P<0.05 compared with the Aβ-treated cells. However, this protective effect was reversed with siFAK treatment. Both the gene and protein expression of FAK increased after Aβ treatment. Interestingly, as the gene and protein levels of FAK decreased, the ρFAK protein expression markedly increased. Furthermore, both the gene and protein expression of FAK and ρFAK were significantly diminished. Thus, we concluded that both αν and β1 integrins interfered with Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in hippocampal neurons and that this mechanism partially contributes to the activation of the Integrin-FAK signaling pathway.

  14. Prenatal Ethanol Exposure Persistently Alters Endocannabinoid Signaling and Endocannabinoid-Mediated Excitatory Synaptic Plasticity in Ventral Tegmental Area Dopamine Neurons.

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    Hausknecht, Kathryn; Shen, Ying-Ling; Wang, Rui-Xiang; Haj-Dahmane, Samir; Shen, Roh-Yu

    2017-06-14

    Prenatal ethanol exposure (PE) leads to increased addiction risk which could be mediated by enhanced excitatory synaptic strength in ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons. Previous studies have shown that PE enhances excitatory synaptic strength by facilitating an anti-Hebbian form of long-term potentiation (LTP). In this study, we investigated the effect of PE on endocannabinoid-mediated long-term depression (eCB-LTD) in VTA DA neurons. Rats were exposed to moderate (3 g/kg/d) or high (6 g/kg/d) levels of ethanol during gestation. Whole-cell recordings were conducted in male offspring between 4 and 10 weeks old.We found that PE led to increased amphetamine self-administration. Both moderate and high levels of PE persistently reduced low-frequency stimulation-induced eCB-LTD. Furthermore, action potential-independent glutamate release was regulated by tonic eCB signaling in PE animals. Mechanistic studies for impaired eCB-LTD revealed that PE downregulated CB1 receptor function. Interestingly, eCB-LTD in PE animals was rescued by metabotropic glutamate receptor I activation, suggesting that PE did not impair the synthesis/release of eCBs. In contrast, eCB-LTD in PE animals was not rescued by increasing presynaptic activity, which actually led to LTP in PE animals, whereas LTD was still observed in controls. This result shows that the regulation of excitatory synaptic plasticity is fundamentally altered in PE animals. Together, PE leads to impaired eCB-LTD at the excitatory synapses of VTA DA neurons primarily due to CB1 receptor downregulation. This effect could contribute to enhanced LTP and the maintenance of augmented excitatory synaptic strength in VTA DA neurons and increased addiction risk after PE.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Prenatal ethanol exposure (PE) is among many adverse developmental factors known to increase drug addiction risk. Increased excitatory synaptic strength in VTA DA neurons is a critical cellular mechanism for addiction risk. Our

  15. HDAC2 selectively regulates FOXO3a-mediated gene transcription during oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death.

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    Peng, Shengyi; Zhao, Siqi; Yan, Feng; Cheng, Jinbo; Huang, Li; Chen, Hong; Liu, Qingsong; Ji, Xunming; Yuan, Zengqiang

    2015-01-21

    All neurodegenerative diseases are associated with oxidative stress-induced neuronal death. Forkhead box O3a (FOXO3a) is a key transcription factor involved in neuronal apoptosis. However, how FOXO3a forms complexes and functions in oxidative stress processing remains largely unknown. In the present study, we show that histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) forms a physical complex with FOXO3a, which plays an important role in FOXO3a-dependent gene transcription and oxidative stress-induced mouse cerebellar granule neuron (CGN) apoptosis. Interestingly, we also found that HDAC2 became selectively enriched in the promoter region of the p21 gene, but not those of other target genes, and inhibited FOXO3a-mediated p21 transcription. Furthermore, we found that oxidative stress reduced the interaction between FOXO3a and HDAC2, leading to an increased histone H4K16 acetylation level in the p21 promoter region and upregulated p21 expression in a manner independent of p53 or E2F1. Phosphorylation of HDAC2 at Ser 394 is important for the HDAC2-FOXO3a interaction, and we found that cerebral ischemia/reperfusion reduced phosphorylation of HDAC2 at Ser 394 and mitigated the HDAC2-FOXO3a interaction in mouse brain tissue. Our study reveals the novel regulation of FOXO3a-mediated selective gene transcription via epigenetic modification in the process of oxidative stress-induced cell death, which could be exploited therapeutically.

  16. Establishment of a novel fluorescence-based method to evaluate chaperone-mediated autophagy in a single neuron.

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    Takahiro Seki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA is a selective autophagy-lysosome protein degradation pathway. The role of CMA in normal neuronal functions and in neural disease pathogenesis remains unclear, in part because there is no available method to monitor CMA activity at the single-cell level. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We sought to establish a single-cell monitoring method by visualizing translocation of CMA substrates from the cytosol to lysosomes using the HaloTag (HT system. GAPDH, a CMA substrate, was fused to HT (GAPDH-HT; this protein accumulated in the lysosomes of HeLa cells and cultured cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs after labeling with fluorescent dye-conjugated HT ligand. Lysosomal accumulation was enhanced by treatments that activate CMA and prevented by siRNA-mediated knockdown of LAMP2A, a lysosomal receptor for CMA, and by treatments that inactivate CMA. These results suggest that lysosomal accumulation of GAPDH-HT reflects CMA activity. Using this method, we revealed that mutant γPKC, which causes spinocerebellar ataxia type 14, decreased CMA activity in cultured PCs. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: In the present study, we established a novel fluorescent-based method to evaluate CMA activity in a single neuron. This novel method should be useful and valuable for evaluating the role of CMA in various neuronal functions and neural disease pathogenesis.

  17. Molecular reconstruction of mGluR5a-mediated endocannabinoid signaling cascade in single rat sympathetic neurons.

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    Won, Yu-Jin; Puhl, Henry L; Ikeda, Stephen R

    2009-10-28

    Endocannabinoids (eCB) such as 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) are lipid metabolites that are synthesized in a postsynaptic neurons and act upon CB(1) cannabinoid receptors (CB(1)R) in presynaptic nerve terminals. This retrograde transmission underlies several forms of short and long term synaptic plasticity within the CNS. Here, we constructed a model system based on isolated rat sympathetic neurons, in which an eCB signaling cascade could be studied in a reduced, spatially compact, and genetically malleable system. We constructed a complete eCB production/mobilization pathway by sequential addition of molecular components. Heterologous expression of four components was required for eCB production and detection: metabotropic glutamate receptor 5a (mGluR5a), Homer 2b, diacylglycerol lipase alpha, and CB(1)R. In these neurons, application of l-glutamate produced voltage-dependent modulation of N-type Ca(2+) channels mediated by activation of CB(1)R. Using both molecular dissection and pharmacological agents, we provide evidence that activation of mGluR5a results in rapid enzymatic production of 2-AG followed by activation of CB(1)R. These experiments define the critical elements required to recapitulate retrograde eCB production and signaling in a single peripheral neuron. Moreover, production/mobilization of eCB can be detected on a physiologically relevant time scale using electrophysiological techniques. The system provides a platform for testing candidate molecules underlying facilitation of eCB transport across the plasma membrane.

  18. 980-nm infrared laser modulation of sodium channel kinetics in a neuron cell linearly mediated by photothermal effect

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    Li, Xinyu; Liu, Jia; Liang, Shanshan; Sun, Changsen

    2014-10-01

    Photothermal effect (PE) plays a major role in the near-infrared laser interaction with biological tissue. But, quite few interactions can be quantitatively depicted. Here, a two-step model is proposed to describe a 980-nm infrared laser interaction with neuron cell in vitro. First, the laser-induced temperature rises in the cell surrounding area were measured by using an open pipette method and also calculated by solving the heat conduction equation. Second, we recorded the modifications on sodium (Na) channel current in neuron cells directly by using a patch clamp to synchronize the 980-nm laser irradiation and obtained how the electrophysiological function of neuron cells respond to the temperature rise. Then, the activation time constants, τm, were extracted by fitting the sodium currents with the Hodgkin-Huxley model. The infrared laser modulation effect on sodium currents kinetics was examined by taking a ratio between the time constants with and without the laser irradiations. The analysis revealed that the averaged ratio at a specific laser exposure could be well related to the temperature properties of the Na channel protein. These results proved that the modulation of sodium current kinetics of a neuron cell in vitro by 980-nm laser with different-irradiation levels was linearly mediated corresponding to the laser-induced PE.

  19. A Cytotoxic, Co-operative Interaction Between Energy Deprivation and Glutamate Release From System xc− Mediates Aglycemic Neuronal Cell Death

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    Trista L. Thorn

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The astrocyte cystine/glutamate antiporter (system xc− contributes substantially to the excitotoxic neuronal cell death facilitated by glucose deprivation. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanism by which this occurred. Using pure astrocyte cultures, as well as, mixed cortical cell cultures containing both neurons and astrocytes, we found that neither an enhancement in system xc− expression nor activity underlies the excitotoxic effects of aglycemia. In addition, using three separate bioassays, we demonstrate no change in the ability of glucose-deprived astrocytes—either cultured alone or with neurons—to remove glutamate from the extracellular space. Instead, we demonstrate that glucose-deprived cultures are 2 to 3 times more sensitive to the killing effects of glutamate or N-methyl-D-aspartate when compared with their glucose-containing controls. Hence, our results are consistent with the weak excitotoxic hypothesis such that a bioenergetic deficiency, which is measureable in our mixed but not astrocyte cultures, allows normally innocuous concentrations of glutamate to become excitotoxic. Adding to the burgeoning literature detailing the contribution of astrocytes to neuronal injury, we conclude that under our experimental paradigm, a cytotoxic, co-operative interaction between energy deprivation and glutamate release from astrocyte system xc− mediates aglycemic neuronal cell death.

  20. GABAergic ventrolateral pre‑optic nucleus neurons are involved in the mediation of the anesthetic hypnosis induced by propofol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jie; Luo, Zhuxin; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Yuan; Cao, Song; Fu, Bao; Yang, Hao; Zhang, Lin; Zhou, Wenjing; Yu, Tian

    2017-09-01

    Intravenous anesthetics have been used clinically to induce unconsciousness for seventeen decades, however the mechanism of anesthetic‑induced unconsciousness remains to be fully elucidated. It has previously been demonstrated that anesthetics exert sedative effects by acting on endoge-nous sleep‑arousal circuits. However, few studies focus on the ventrolateral pre‑optic (VLPO) to locus coeruleus (LC) sleep‑arousal pathway. The present study aimed to investigate if VLPO is involved in unconsciousness induced by propofol. The present study additionally investigated if the inhibitory effect of propofol on LC neurons was mediated by activating VLPO neurons. Microinjection, target lesion and extracellular single‑unit recordings were used to study the role of the VLPO‑LC pathway in propofol anesthesia. The results demonstrated that GABAA agonist (THIP) or GABAA antagonist (gabazine) microinjections into VLPO altered the time of loss of righting reflex and the time of recovery of righting reflex. Furthermore, propofol suppressed the spontaneous firing activity of LC noradrenergic neurons. There was no significant difference observed in firing activity between VLPO sham lesion and VLPO lesion rats. The findings indicate that VLPO neurons are important in propofol‑induced unconsciousness, however are unlikely to contribute to the inhibitory effect of propofol on LC spontaneous firing activity.

  1. Inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate as a mediator of neuronal death in ischemic hippocampus.

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    Tsubokawa, H; Oguro, K; Robinson, H P; Masuzawa, T; Rhee, T S; Takenawa, T; Kawai, N

    1994-03-01

    Selective death of CA1 pyramidal neurons after transient forebrain ischemia has attracted interest for its possible relation to the pathogenesis of memory deficits and dementia. Using whole cell patch-clamp recording from CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampal slices of gerbils after ischemia we studied the intracellular signaling mechanisms related to the phosphoinositide cycle. Intracellular application of an antibody against phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate rescued ischemic neurons from stimulus-induced irreversible depolarization. Furthermore, application of inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate in normal cells caused an irreversible depolarization in response to synaptic input, which mimicked the deterioration of ischemic neurons. Depolarization of both ischemic and normal neurons in the presence of inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate was prevented by the addition of the Ca2+ chelator, 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetate. Application of antibody against inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate 3-kinase, which blocks formation of inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate, also protected against cell deterioration. Our results suggest that the vulnerability of hippocampal pyramidal neurons following ischemia is caused by a disturbed phosphoinositide cascade, with one metabolite, inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate, playing a key role in the induction of Ca2+ accumulation, which leads to neuronal death.

  2. Caspase-Mediated Apoptosis in Sensory Neurons of Cultured Dorsal Root Ganglia in Adult Mouse

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    Hamid Reza Momeni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Sensory neurons in dorsal root ganglia (DRG undergo apoptosis after peripheral nerve injury. The aim of this study was to investigate sensory neuron death and the mechanism involved in the death of these neurons in cultured DRG.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, L5 DRG from adult mouse were dissected and incubated in culture medium for 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours. Freshly dissected and cultured DRG were then fixed and sectioned using a cryostat. Morphological and biochemical features of apoptosis were investigated using fluorescent staining (Propidium iodide and Hoechst 33342 and the terminal Deoxynucleotide transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL method respectively. To study the role of caspases, general caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD.fmk, 100 μM and immunohistochemistry for activated caspase-3 were used.Results: After 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours in culture, sensory neurons not only displayed morphological features of apoptosis but also they appeared TUNEL positive. The application of Z-VAD.fmk inhibited apoptosis in these neurons over the same time period. In addition, intense activated caspase-3 immunoreactivity was found both in the cytoplasm and the nuclei of these neurons after 24 and 48 hours.Conclusion: Results of the present study show caspase-dependent apoptosis in the sensory neurons of cultured DRG from adult mouse.

  3. Role of nitric oxide-mediated glutathionylation in neuronal function: potential regulation of energy utilization.

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    Yap, Li-Peng; Garcia, Jerome V; Han, Derick S; Cadenas, Enrique

    2010-04-28

    Excessive generation of nitric oxide radical (NO*) in neuroinflammation, excitotoxicity and during age-related neurodegenerative disorders entails the localized and concerted increase in nitric oxide synthase(s) expression in glial cells and neurons. The aim of the present study was to assess the biological significance of the impact of NO* on the cell's thiol status with emphasis on S-glutathionylation of targeted proteins. Exposure of primary cortical neurons or astrocytes to increasing flow rates of NO* (0.061-0.25 microM/s) resulted in the following. (i) A decrease in GSH (glutathione) in neurons accompanied by formation of GSNO (S-nitrosoglutathione) and GSSG (glutathione disulfide); neurons were far more sensitive to NO* exposure than astrocytes. (ii) A dose-dependent oxidation of the cellular redox status: the neuron's redox potential increased approximately 42 mV and that of astrocytes approximately 23 mV. A good correlation was observed between cell viability and the cellular redox potential. The higher susceptibility of neurons to NO* can be partly explained by a reduced capacity to recover GSH through lower activities of GSNO and GSSG reductases. (iii) S-glutathionylation of a small subset of proteins, among them GAPDH (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), the S-glutathionylation of which resulted in inhibition of enzyme activity. The quantitative analyses of changes in the cell's thiol potential upon NO* exposure and their consequences for S-glutathionylation are discussed in terms of the distinct redox environment of astrocytes and neurons.

  4. GABAA receptor-mediated input change on orexin neurons following sleep deprivation in mice.

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    Matsuki, T; Takasu, M; Hirose, Y; Murakoshi, N; Sinton, C M; Motoike, T; Yanagisawa, M

    2015-01-22

    Orexins are bioactive peptides, which have been shown to play a pivotal role in vigilance state transitions: the loss of orexin-producing neurons (orexin neurons) leads to narcolepsy with cataplexy in the human. However, the effect of the need for sleep (i.e., sleep pressure) on orexin neurons remains largely unknown. Here, we found that immunostaining intensities of the α1 subunit of the GABAA receptor and neuroligin 2, which is involved in inhibitory synapse specialization, on orexin neurons of mouse brain were significantly increased by 6-h sleep deprivation. In contrast, we noted that immunostaining intensities of the α2, γ2, and β2/3 subunits of the GABAA receptor and Huntingtin-associated protein 1, which is involved in GABAAR trafficking, were not changed by 6-h sleep deprivation. Using a slice patch recording, orexin neurons demonstrated increased sensitivity to a GABAA receptor agonist together with synaptic plasticity changes after sleep deprivation when compared with an ad lib sleep condition. In summary, the GABAergic input property of orexin neurons responds rapidly to sleep deprivation. This molecular response of orexin neurons may thus play a role in the changes that accompany the need for sleep following prolonged wakefulness, in particular the decreased probability of a transition to wakefulness once recovery sleep has begun.

  5. Beclin-1-mediated autophagy protects spinal cord neurons against mechanical injury-induced apoptosis.

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    Wang, Zhen-Yu; Lin, Jian-Hua; Muharram, Akram; Liu, Wen-Ge

    2014-06-01

    Apoptosis has been widely reported to be involved in the pathogenesis associated with spinal cord injury (SCI). Recently, autophagy has also been implicated in various neuronal damage models. However, the role of autophagy in SCI is still controversial and its interrelationship with apoptosis remains unclear. Here, we used an in vitro SCI model to observe a time-dependent induction of autophagy and apoptosis. Mechanical injury induced autophagy markers such as LC3 lipidation, LC3II/LC3I conversion, and Beclin-1 expression. Injured neurons showed decreased cell viability and increased apoptosis. To elucidate the effect of autophagy on apoptosis, the mechanically-injured neurons were treated with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin and 3-methyl adenine (3-MA), which are known to regulate autophagy positively and negatively, respectively. Rapamycin-treated neurons showed the highest level of cell viability and lowest level of apoptosis among the injured neurons and those treated with 3-MA showed the reciprocal effect. Notably, rapamycin-treated neurons exhibited slightly reduced Bax expression and significantly increased Bcl-2 expression. Furthermore, by plasmid transfection, we showed that Beclin-1-overexpressing neuronal cells responded to mechanical injury with greater LC3II/LC3I conversion and cell viability, lower levels of apoptosis, higher Bcl-2 expression, and unaltered Bax expression as compared to vector control cells. Beclin-1-knockdown neurons showed almost the opposite effects. Taken together, our results suggest that autophagy may serve as a protection against apoptosis in mechanically-injured spinal cord neurons. Targeting mTOR and/or enhancing Beclin-1 expression might be alternative therapeutic strategies for SCI.

  6. Paraventricular nucleus Sim1 neuron ablation mediated obesity is resistant to high fat diet.

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    Dong Xi

    Full Text Available Single minded 1 (SIM1 is a transcription factor involved in brain patterning and control of energy balance. In humans, haploinsufficiency of SIM1 causes early-onset obesity. Mice deficient in the homologous gene, SIM1, also exhibit early onset obesity and increased sensitivity to a high fat diet. SIM1 is expressed in several areas of the brain implicated in control of energy balance including the paraventricular nucleus (PVN, the supraoptic nucleus (SON, the medial amygdala and nucleus of the lateral olfactory tract. We have previously shown that mice with global Sim1 neuron ablation exhibit obesity with hyperphagia as the primary defect. The PVN has a critical role in feeding and in high-fat appetite, thus, we sought to determine the effect of Sim1 neuron ablation limited to the PVN. We achieved PVN-SIM1 limited ablation through stereotactic injection of diphtheria toxin into the PVN of Sim1Cre-iDTR mice. The specificity of this ablation was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and quantitative real time PCR of the PVN, supraoptic nucleus and the amygdala. Mice with PVN Sim1 neuron ablation, similar to mice with global Sim1 neuron ablation, exhibit early onset obesity with hyperphagia as the primary defect. However, PVN-Sim1 neuron ablated mice have a decreased response to fasting-induced hyperphagia. Consistent with this decrement, PVN-Sim1 neuron ablated mice have a decreased hyperphagic response to PVN injection of agouti-related peptide (AgRP. When PVN-Sim1 neuron ablated mice are placed on a high fat diet, surprisingly, their intake decreases and they actually lose weight. When allowed ad lib access to high fat diet and normal chow simultaneously, PVN-Sim1 neuron ablated mice exhibit overall decreased intake. That is, in PVN-Sim1 neuron ablated mice, access to fat suppresses overall appetite.

  7. Posttraumatic GABA(A)-mediated [Ca2+]i increase is essential for the induction of brain-derived neurotrophic factor-dependent survival of mature central neurons.

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    Shulga, Anastasia; Thomas-Crusells, Judith; Sigl, Thomas; Blaesse, Anne; Mestres, Pedro; Meyer, Michael; Yan, Qiao; Kaila, Kai; Saarma, Mart; Rivera, Claudio; Giehl, Klaus M

    2008-07-02

    A shift of GABA(A)-mediated responses from hyperpolarizing to depolarizing after neuronal injury leads to GABA(A)-mediated increase in [Ca2+](i). In addition, central neurons become dependent on BDNF for survival. Whether these two mechanisms are causally interrelated is an open question. Here, we show in lesioned CA3 hippocampal neurons in vitro and in axotomized corticospinal neurons in vivo that posttraumatic downregulation of the neuron-specific K-Cl cotransporter KCC2 leads to intracellular chloride accumulation by the Na-K-2Cl cotransporter NKCC1, resulting in GABA-induced [Ca2+](i) transients. This mechanism is required by a population of neurons to survive in a BDNF-dependent manner after injury, because blocking GABA(A)-depolarization with the NKCC1 inhibitor bumetanide prevents the loss of neurons on BDNF withdrawal. The resurgence of KCC2 expression during recovery coincides with loss of BDNF dependency for survival. This is likely mediated through BDNF itself, because injured neurons reverse their response to this neurotrophin by switching the BDNF-induced downregulation of KCC2 to upregulation.

  8. Glial glutamate transporters mediate a functional metabolic crosstalk between neurons and astrocytes in the mouse developing cortex.

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    Voutsinos-Porche, Brigitte; Bonvento, Gilles; Tanaka, Kohichi; Steiner, Pascal; Welker, Egbert; Chatton, Jean-Yves; Magistretti, Pierre J; Pellerin, Luc

    2003-01-23

    Neuron-glia interactions are essential for synaptic function, and glial glutamate (re)uptake plays a key role at glutamatergic synapses. In knockout mice, for either glial glutamate transporters, GLAST or GLT-1, a classical metabolic response to synaptic activation (i.e., enhancement of glucose utilization) is decreased at an early functional stage in the somatosensory barrel cortex following activation of whiskers. Investigation in vitro demonstrates that glial glutamate transport represents a critical step for triggering enhanced glucose utilization, but also lactate release from astrocytes through a mechanism involving changes in intracellular Na(+) concentration. These data suggest that a metabolic crosstalk takes place between neurons and astrocytes in the developing cortex, which would be regulated by synaptic activity and mediated by glial glutamate transporters.

  9. Distinct dopamine neurons mediate reward signals for short- and long-term memories.

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    Yamagata, Nobuhiro; Ichinose, Toshiharu; Aso, Yoshinori; Plaçais, Pierre-Yves; Friedrich, Anja B; Sima, Richard J; Preat, Thomas; Rubin, Gerald M; Tanimoto, Hiromu

    2015-01-13

    Drosophila melanogaster can acquire a stable appetitive olfactory memory when the presentation of a sugar reward and an odor are paired. However, the neuronal mechanisms by which a single training induces long-term memory are poorly understood. Here we show that two distinct subsets of dopamine neurons in the fly brain signal reward for short-term (STM) and long-term memories (LTM). One subset induces memory that decays within several hours, whereas the other induces memory that gradually develops after training. They convey reward signals to spatially segregated synaptic domains of the mushroom body (MB), a potential site for convergence. Furthermore, we identified a single type of dopamine neuron that conveys the reward signal to restricted subdomains of the mushroom body lobes and induces long-term memory. Constant appetitive memory retention after a single training session thus comprises two memory components triggered by distinct dopamine neurons.

  10. Neuron-glia interactions through the Heartless FGF receptor signaling pathway mediate morphogenesis of Drosophila astrocytes.

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    Stork, Tobias; Sheehan, Amy; Tasdemir-Yilmaz, Ozge E; Freeman, Marc R

    2014-07-16

    Astrocytes are critically important for neuronal circuit assembly and function. Mammalian protoplasmic astrocytes develop a dense ramified meshwork of cellular processes to form intimate contacts with neuronal cell bodies, neurites, and synapses. This close neuron-glia morphological relationship is essential for astrocyte function, but it remains unclear how astrocytes establish their intricate morphology, organize spatial domains, and associate with neurons and synapses in vivo. Here we characterize a Drosophila glial subtype that shows striking morphological and functional similarities to mammalian astrocytes. We demonstrate that the Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor Heartless autonomously controls astrocyte membrane growth, and the FGFs Pyramus and Thisbe direct astrocyte processes to ramify specifically in CNS synaptic regions. We further show that the shape and size of individual astrocytes are dynamically sculpted through inhibitory or competitive astrocyte-astrocyte interactions and Heartless FGF signaling. Our data identify FGF signaling through Heartless as a key regulator of astrocyte morphological elaboration in vivo.

  11. Modulation of COUP-TF expression in a cnidarian by ectopic Wnt signalling and allorecognition.

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    David J Duffy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: COUP transcription factors are required for the regulation of gene expression underlying development, differentiation, and homeostasis. They have an evolutionarily conserved function, being a known marker for neurogenesis from cnidarians to vertebrates. A homologue of this gene was shown previously to be a neuronal and nematocyte differentiation marker in Hydra. However, COUP-TFs had not previously been studied in a colonial cnidarian. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We cloned a COUP-TF homologue from the colonial marine cnidarian Hydractinia echinata. Expression of the gene was analysed during normal development, allorecognition events and ectopic Wnt activation, using in situ hybridisation and quantitative PCR. During normal Hydractinia development, the gene was first expressed in post-gastrula stages. It was undetectable in larvae, and its mRNA was present again in putative differentiating neurons and nematocytes in post-metamorphic stages. Global activation of canonical Wnt signalling in adult animals resulted in the upregulation of COUP-TF. We also monitored a strong COUP-TF upregulation in stolons undergoing allogeneic interactions. COUP-TF mRNA was most concentrated in the tissues that contacted allogeneic, non-self tissues, and decreased in a gradient away from the contact area. Interestingly, the gene was transiently upregulated during initial contact of self stolons, but dissipated rapidly following self recognition, while in non-self contacts high expression levels were maintained. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that COUP-TF is likely involved in neuronal/nematocyte differentiation in a variety of contexts. This has now been shown to include allorecognition, where COUP-TF is thought to have been co-opted to mediate allorejection by recruiting stinging cells that are the effectors of cytotoxic rejection of allogeneic tissue. Our findings that Wnt activation upregulates COUP-TF expression suggests that Wnts' role in

  12. Different forms of glycine- and GABAA-receptor mediated inhibitory synaptic transmission in mouse superficial and deep dorsal horn neurons

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    Brichta Alan M

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurons in superficial (SDH and deep (DDH laminae of the spinal cord dorsal horn receive sensory information from skin, muscle, joints and viscera. In both regions, glycine- (GlyR and GABAA-receptors (GABAARs contribute to fast synaptic inhibition. For rat, several types of GABAAR coexist in the two regions and each receptor type provides different contributions to inhibitory tone. Recent work in mouse has discovered an additional type of GlyR, (containing alpha 3 subunits in the SDH. The contribution of differing forms of the GlyR to sensory processing in SDH and DDH is not understood. Methods and Results Here we compare fast inhibitory synaptic transmission in mouse (P17-37 SDH and DDH using patch-clamp electrophysiology in transverse spinal cord slices (L3-L5 segments, 23°C. GlyR-mediated mIPSCs were detected in 74% (25/34 and 94% (25/27 of SDH and DDH neurons, respectively. In contrast, GABAAR-mediated mIPSCs were detected in virtually all neurons in both regions (93%, 14/15 and 100%, 18/18. Several Gly- and GABAAR properties also differed in SDH vs. DDH. GlyR-mediated mIPSC amplitude was smaller (37.1 ± 3.9 vs. 64.7 ± 5.0 pA; n = 25 each, decay time was slower (8.5 ± 0.8 vs. 5.5 ± 0.3 ms, and frequency was lower (0.15 ± 0.03 vs. 0.72 ± 0.13 Hz in SDH vs. DDH neurons. In contrast, GABAAR-mediated mIPSCs had similar amplitudes (25.6 ± 2.4, n = 14 vs. 25. ± 2.0 pA, n = 18 and frequencies (0.21 ± 0.08 vs. 0.18 ± 0.04 Hz in both regions; however, decay times were slower (23.0 ± 3.2 vs. 18.9 ± 1.8 ms in SDH neurons. Mean single channel conductance underlying mIPSCs was identical for GlyRs (54.3 ± 1.6 pS, n = 11 vs. 55.7 ± 1.8, n = 8 and GABAARs (22.7 ± 1.7 pS, n = 10 vs. 22.4 ± 2.0 pS, n = 11 in both regions. We also tested whether the synthetic endocanabinoid, methandamide (methAEA, had direct effects on Gly- and GABAARs in each spinal cord region. MethAEA (5 μM reduced GlyR-mediated mIPSC frequency in SDH

  13. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor mediates estradiol-induced dendritic spine formation in hippocampal neurons.

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    Murphy, D D; Cole, N B; Segal, M

    1998-09-15

    Dendritic spines are of major importance in information processing and memory formation in central neurons. Estradiol has been shown to induce an increase of dendritic spine density on hippocampal neurons in vivo and in vitro. The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) recently has been implicated in neuronal maturation, plasticity, and regulation of GABAergic interneurons. We now demonstrate that estradiol down-regulates BDNF in cultured hippocampal neurons to 40% of control values within 24 hr of exposure. This, in turn, decreases inhibition and increases excitatory tone in pyramidal neurons, leading to a 2-fold increase in dendritic spine density. Exogenous BDNF blocks the effects of estradiol on spine formation, and BDNF depletion with a selective antisense oligonucleotide mimics the effects of estradiol. Addition of BDNF antibodies also increases spine density, and diazepam, which facilitates GABAergic neurotransmission, blocks estradiol-induced spine formation. These observations demonstrate a functional link between estradiol, BDNF as a potent regulator of GABAergic interneurons, and activity-dependent formation of dendritic spines in hippocampal neurons.

  14. Oxidative stress-mediated down-regulation of bcl-2 promoter in hippocampal neurons.

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    Pugazhenthi, Subbiah; Nesterova, Albina; Jambal, Purevsuren; Audesirk, Gerald; Kern, Marcey; Cabell, Leigh; Eves, Eva; Rosner, Marsha R; Boxer, Linda M; Reusch, Jane E-B

    2003-03-01

    Generation of oxidative stress/reactive oxygen species (ROS) is one of the causes of neuronal apoptosis. We have examined the effects of ROS at the transcriptional level in an immortalized hippocampal neuronal cell line (H19-7) and in rat primary hippocampal neurons. Treatment of H19-7 cells with hydrogen peroxide (150 micro m) resulted in a 40% decrease in Bcl-2 protein and a parallel decrease in bcl-2 mRNA levels. H19-7 cells overexpressing bcl-2 were found to be resistant to ROS-induced apoptosis. We had previously shown that bcl-2 promoter activity is positively regulated by the transcription factor cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) in neurons. In the present study, we demonstrate that ROS decreases the activity of luciferase reporter gene driven by a cyclic AMP response element site containing bcl-2 promoter. Exposure of neurons to ROS for 6 h resulted in basal and fibroblast growth factor-2-stimulated phosphorylation/activation of CREB. Chronic 24 h treatment with ROS led to a significant (p < 0.01) decrease in CREB protein and CREB mRNA levels. Adenoviral overexpression of wild type CREB in H19-7 cells resulted in significant (p < 0.01) protection against ROS-induced apoptosis through up-regulation of Bcl-2 expression whereas dominant negative CREB exaggerated the injury. These findings demonstrate that loss of CREB function contributes to oxidative stress-induced neuronal dysfunction.

  15. Menin: a tumor suppressor that mediates postsynaptic receptor expression and synaptogenesis between central neurons of Lymnaea stagnalis.

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    Nichole Flynn

    Full Text Available Neurotrophic factors (NTFs support neuronal survival, differentiation, and even synaptic plasticity both during development and throughout the life of an organism. However, their precise roles in central synapse formation remain unknown. Previously, we demonstrated that excitatory synapse formation in Lymnaea stagnalis requires a source of extrinsic NTFs and receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK activation. Here we show that NTFs such as Lymnaea epidermal growth factor (L-EGF act through RTKs to trigger a specific subset of intracellular signalling events in the postsynaptic neuron, which lead to the activation of the tumor suppressor menin, encoded by Lymnaea MEN1 (L-MEN1 and the expression of excitatory nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs. We provide direct evidence that the activation of the MAPK/ERK cascade is required for the expression of nAChRs, and subsequent synapse formation between pairs of neurons in vitro. Furthermore, we show that L-menin activation is sufficient for the expression of postsynaptic excitatory nAChRs and subsequent synapse formation in media devoid of NTFs. By extending our findings in situ, we reveal the necessity of EGFRs in mediating synapse formation between a single transplanted neuron and its intact presynaptic partner. Moreover, deficits in excitatory synapse formation following EGFR knock-down can be rescued by injecting synthetic L-MEN1 mRNA in the intact central nervous system. Taken together, this study provides the first direct evidence that NTFs functioning via RTKs activate the MEN1 gene, which appears sufficient to regulate synapse formation between central neurons. Our study also offers a novel developmental role for menin beyond tumour suppression in adult humans.

  16. Menin: A Tumor Suppressor That Mediates Postsynaptic Receptor Expression and Synaptogenesis between Central Neurons of Lymnaea stagnalis

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    Flynn, Nichole; Getz, Angela; Visser, Frank; Janes, Tara A.; Syed, Naweed I.

    2014-01-01

    Neurotrophic factors (NTFs) support neuronal survival, differentiation, and even synaptic plasticity both during development and throughout the life of an organism. However, their precise roles in central synapse formation remain unknown. Previously, we demonstrated that excitatory synapse formation in Lymnaea stagnalis requires a source of extrinsic NTFs and receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) activation. Here we show that NTFs such as Lymnaea epidermal growth factor (L-EGF) act through RTKs to trigger a specific subset of intracellular signalling events in the postsynaptic neuron, which lead to the activation of the tumor suppressor menin, encoded by Lymnaea MEN1 (L-MEN1) and the expression of excitatory nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). We provide direct evidence that the activation of the MAPK/ERK cascade is required for the expression of nAChRs, and subsequent synapse formation between pairs of neurons in vitro. Furthermore, we show that L-menin activation is sufficient for the expression of postsynaptic excitatory nAChRs and subsequent synapse formation in media devoid of NTFs. By extending our findings in situ, we reveal the necessity of EGFRs in mediating synapse formation between a single transplanted neuron and its intact presynaptic partner. Moreover, deficits in excitatory synapse formation following EGFR knock-down can be rescued by injecting synthetic L-MEN1 mRNA in the intact central nervous system. Taken together, this study provides the first direct evidence that NTFs functioning via RTKs activate the MEN1 gene, which appears sufficient to regulate synapse formation between central neurons. Our study also offers a novel developmental role for menin beyond tumour suppression in adult humans. PMID:25347295

  17. Heterochronic bilateral ectopic pregnancy after ovulation induction.

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    Zhu, Bo; Xu, Gu-feng; Liu, Yi-feng; Qu, Fan; Yao, Wei-miao; Zhu, Yi-min; Gao, Hui-juan; Zhang, Dan

    2014-08-01

    Ectopic pregnancy is identified with the widely-applied assisted reproductive technology (ART). Bilateral ectopic pregnancy is a rare form of ectopic pregnancy which is difficult to be diagnosed at the pre-operation stage. In this paper, we presented an unusual case of heterochronic bilateral ectopic pregnancy after stimulated intrauterine insemination (IUI), where there has been a delay of 22 d between the diagnoses of the two ectopic pregnancies. Literature was reviewed on the occurrence of bilateral ectopic pregnancy during the past four years in the MEDLINE database. We found 16 cases of bilateral ectopic pregnancy reported since 2008, and analyzed the characteristics of those cases of bilateral ectopic pregnancy. We emphasize that ovulation induction and other ARTs may increase the risk of bilateral ectopic pregnancy. Because of the difficulty in identification of bilateral ectopic pregnancy by ultrasonography, the clinician should be aware that the treatment of one ectopic pregnancy does not preclude the occurrence of a second ectopic pregnancy in the same patient and should pay attention to the intra-operation inspection of both side fallopian tubes in any ectopic pregnancy case.

  18. Formalin-induced behavioural hypersensitivity and neuronal hyperexcitability are mediated by rapid protein synthesis at the spinal level

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    Wallace Victoria C

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR is a key regulator of mRNA translation whose action can be inhibited by the drug rapamycin. Forms of long-term plasticity require protein synthesis and evidence indicates that mRNA in dendrites, axon terminals and cell bodies is essential for long-term synaptic plasticity. Specific to pain, shifts in pain thresholds and responsiveness are an expression of neuronal plasticity and this likely contributes to persistent pain. We investigated this by inhibiting the activity of mTOR with rapamycin at the spinal level, of rats that were subjected to the formalin test, using both behavioural and electrophysiological techniques. Results For in vivo electrophysiology, Sprague Dawley rats were fully anaesthetised and single-unit extracellular recordings were obtained from lamina V wide dynamic range (WDR dorsal horn spinal neurones at the region where input is received from the hind paw. Neuronal responses from naive rats showed that rapamycin-sensitive pathways were important in nociceptive-specific C-fibre mediated transmission onto WDR neurones as well mechanically-evoked responses since rapamycin was effective in attenuating these measures. Formalin solution was injected into the hind paw prior to which, rapamycin or vehicle was applied directly onto the exposed spinal cord. When rapamycin was applied to the spinal cord prior to hind paw formalin injection, there was a significant attenuation of the prolonged second phase of the formalin test, which comprises continuing afferent input to the spinal cord, neuronal hyperexcitability and an activated descending facilitatory drive from the brainstem acting on spinal neurones. In accordance with electrophysiological data, behavioural studies showed that rapamycin attenuated behavioural hypersensitivity elicited by formalin injection into the hind paw. Conclusion We conclude that mTOR has a role in maintaining persistent pain states via m

  19. Adenosine A2B receptor-mediated leukemia inhibitory factor release from astrocytes protects cortical neurons against excitotoxicity

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    Moidunny Shamsudheen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF have been widely reported. In the central nervous system (CNS, astrocytes are the major source for LIF, expression of which is enhanced following disturbances leading to neuronal damage. How astrocytic LIF expression is regulated, however, has remained an unanswered question. Since neuronal stress is associated with production of extracellular adenosine, we investigated whether LIF expression in astrocytes was mediated through adenosine receptor signaling. Methods Mouse cortical neuronal and astrocyte cultures from wild-type and adenosine A2B receptor knock-out animals, as well as adenosine receptor agonists/antagonists and various enzymatic inhibitors, were used to study LIF expression and release in astrocytes. When needed, a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA followed by Bonferroni post-hoc test was used for statistical analysis. Results We show here that glutamate-stressed cortical neurons induce LIF expression through activation of adenosine A2B receptor subtype in cultured astrocytes and require signaling of protein kinase C (PKC, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs: p38 and ERK1/2, and the nuclear transcription factor (NF-κB. Moreover, LIF concentration in the supernatant in response to 5′-N-ethylcarboxamide (NECA stimulation was directly correlated to de novo protein synthesis, suggesting that LIF release did not occur through a regulated release pathway. Immunocytochemistry experiments show that LIF-containing vesicles co-localize with clathrin and Rab11, but not with pHogrin, Chromogranin (CgA and CgB, suggesting that LIF might be secreted through recycling endosomes. We further show that pre-treatment with supernatants from NECA-treated astrocytes increased survival of cultured cortical neurons against glutamate, which was absent when the supernatants were pre-treated with an anti-LIF neutralizing antibody. Conclusions

  20. ER-mediated stress induces mitochondrial-dependent caspases activation in NT2 neuron-like cells.

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    Arduino, Daniela M; Esteves, A Raquel; Domingues, A Filipa; Pereira, Claudia M F; Cardoso, Sandra M; Oliveira, Catarina R

    2009-11-30

    Recent studies have revealed that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) disturbance is involved in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative disorders, contributing to the activation of the ER stress-mediated apoptotic pathway. Therefore, we investigated here the molecular mechanisms underlying the ER-mitochondria axis, focusing on calcium as a potential mediator of cell death signals. Using NT2 cells treated with brefeldin A or tunicamycin, we observed that ER stress induces changes in the mitochondrial function, impairing mitochondrial membrane potential and distressing mitochondrial respiratory chain complex Moreover, stress stimuli at ER level evoked calcium fluxes between ER and mitochondria. Under these conditions, ER stress activated the unfolded protein response by an overexpression of GRP78, and also caspase-4 and-2, both involved upstream of caspase-9. Our findings show that ER and mitochondria interconnection plays a prominent role in the induction of neuronal cell death under particular stress circumstances.

  1. Akt1 mediates neuronal differentiation in zebrafish via a reciprocal interaction with notch signaling.

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    Yi-Chuan Cheng

    Full Text Available Akt1 is well known for its role in regulating cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis and is implicated in tumors and several neurological disorders. However, the role of Akt1 in neural development has not been well defined. We have isolated zebrafish akt1 and shown that this gene is primarily transcribed in the developing nervous system, and its spatiotemporal expression pattern suggests a role in neural differentiation. Injection of akt1 morpholinos resulted in loss of neuronal precursors with a concomitant increase in post-mitotic neurons, indicating that knockdown of Akt1 is sufficient to cause premature differentiation of neurons. A similar phenotype was observed in embryos deficient for Notch signaling. Both the ligand (deltaA and the downstream target of Notch (her8a were downregulated in akt1 morphants, indicating that Akt1 is required for Delta-Notch signaling. Furthermore, akt1 expression was downregulated in Delta-Notch signaling-deficient embryos and could be induced by constitutive activation of Notch signaling. In addition, knockdown of Akt1 was able to nullify the inhibition of neuronal differentiation caused by constitutive activation of Notch signaling. Taken together, these results provide in vivo evidence that Akt1 interacts with Notch signaling reciprocally and provide an explanation of why Akt1 is essential for the inhibition of neuronal differentiation.

  2. TrpC5 Mediates Acute Leptin and Serotonin Effects via Pomc Neurons

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    Yong Gao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms underlying acute leptin and serotonin 2C receptor-induced hypophagia remain unclear. Here, we show that neuronal and pro-opiomelanocortin (Pomc-specific loss of transient receptor potential cation 5 (TrpC5 subunits is sufficient to decrease energy expenditure and increase food intake resulting in elevated body weight. Deficiency of Trpc5 subunits in Pomc neurons is also sufficient to block the anorexigenic effects of leptin and serotonin 2C receptor (Ht2Cr agonists. The loss of acute anorexigenic effects of these receptors is concomitant with a blunted electrophysiological response to both leptin and Ht2Cr agonists in arcuate Pomc neurons. We also demonstrate that the Ht2Cr agonist lorcaserin-induced improvements in glucose and insulin tolerance are blocked by TrpC5 deficiency in Pomc neurons. Together, our results link TrpC5 subunits in the brain with leptin- and serotonin 2C receptor-dependent changes in neuronal activity, as well as energy balance, feeding behavior, and glucose metabolism.

  3. Activation of mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons following central administration of histamine is mediated by H1 receptors.

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    Fleckenstein, A E; Lookingland, K J; Moore, K E

    1993-01-01

    The effect of intracerebroventricular administration of histamine on the activity of mesolimbic and nigrostriatal dopaminergic (DA) neurons was determined in male rats. The activity of these neurons was estimated by measuring: (1) the accumulation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) after administration of a decarboxylase inhibitor, and (2) the concentration of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) in the nucleus accumbens and striatum, which contain the terminals of these neurons. Central administration of histamine increased both DOPA accumulation and DOPAC concentrations in the nucleus accumbens, but was without effect in the striatum. The increase in DOPAC concentrations in the nucleus accumbens occurred within 10 min and was sustained for at least 120 min. The H1 antagonist mepyramine blocked whereas the H2 antagonist zolantidine did not affect histamine-induced increases in DOPAC concentrations in the nucleus accumbens. Neither mepyramine nor zolantidine affected basal DOPAC concentrations in the nucleus accumbens. These results indicate that central administration of histamine stimulates mesolimbic DA neurons through an action at the H1 receptor, but has no effect upon the activity of nigrostriatal DA neurons.

  4. Innervation of ectopic endometrium in a rat model of endometriosis.

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    Berkley, Karen J; Dmitrieva, Natalia; Curtis, Kathleen S; Papka, Raymond E

    2004-07-27

    Endometriosis (ENDO) is a disorder in which vascularized growths of endometrial tissue occur outside the uterus. Its symptoms include reduced fertility and severe pelvic pain. Mechanisms that maintain the ectopic growths and evoke symptoms are poorly understood. One factor not yet considered is that the ectopic growths develop their own innervation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the growths develop both an autonomic and a sensory innervation. We used a rat model of surgically induced ENDO whose growths mimic those in women. Furthermore, similar to women with ENDO, such rats exhibit reduced fertility and increased pelvic nociception. The ENDO was induced by autotransplanting, on mesenteric cascade arteries, small pieces of uterus that formed vascularized cysts. The cysts and healthy uterus were harvested from proestrous rats and immunostained using the pan-neuronal marker PGP9.5 and specific markers for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) (sensory C and A delta fibers), substance P (SP) (sensory C and A delta fibers) and vesicular monoamine transporter (sympathetic fibers). Cysts (like the uterus) were robustly innervated, with many PGP9.5-stained neurites accompanying blood vessels and extending into nearby luminal epithelial layers. CGRP-, SP-, and vesicular monoamine transporter-immunostained neurites also were observed, with CGRP and SP neurites extending the furthest into the cyst lining. These results demonstrate that ectopic endometrial growths develop an autonomic and sensory innervation. This innervation could contribute not only to symptoms associated with ENDO but also to maintenance of the ectopic growths.

  5. Layer-specific endocannabinoid-mediated long-term depression of GABAergic neurotransmission onto principal neurons in mouse visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenjuan; Wang, Laijian; Li, Shuo; Tie, Xiaoxiu; Jiang, Bin

    2015-08-01

    Visually induced endocannabinoid-mediated long-term depression of GABAergic neurotransmission (iLTD) mediates the maturation of GABAergic release in layer 2/3 of visual cortex. Here we examined whether the maturation of GABAergic transmission in other layers of visual cortex also requires endocannabinoids. The developmental plasticity of GABAergic neurotransmission onto the principal neurons in different layers of mouse visual cortex was examined in cortical slices by whole-cell recordings of inhibitory postsynaptic currents evoked by presynaptic inhibitory inputs. Theta burst stimulation of GABAergic inputs induced an endocannabinoid-mediated long-term depression of GABAergic neurotransmission onto pyramidal cells in layer 2/3 from postnatal day (P)10 to 30 and in layer 5 from P10 to 40, whereas that of GABAergic inputs did not induce iLTD onto star pyramidal neurons in layer 4 at any time postnatally, indicating that this plasticity is laminar-specific. The developmental loss of iLTD paralleled the maturation of GABAergic inhibition in both layer 2/3 and layer 5. Visual deprivation delayed the developmental loss of iLTD in layers 3 and 5 during a critical period, while 2 days of light exposure eliminated iLTD in both layers. Furthermore, the GABAergic synapses in layers 2/3 and 5 did not normally mature in the type 1 cannabinoid receptor knock-out mice, whereas those in layer 4 did not require endocannabinoid receptor for maturation. These results suggest that visually induced endocannabinoid-dependent iLTD mediates the maturation of GABAergic release in extragranular layer rather than in granular layer of mouse visual cortex.

  6. Early Cellular Responses of Purine Nucleoside-mediated Protection of Hypoxia-induced Injuries of Neuronal PC12 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Tomaselli

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia in brain may lead to cell death by apoptosis and necrosis. In parallel adenosine, a powerful endogenous neuroprotectant is formed. We wanted to investigate the effect of adenosine and its purine nucleoside relatives, inosine and guanosine on early cellular responses to hypoxia. O2-sensitive neuronal PC12-cells were subjected to chemical hypoxia induced with rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I. Loss of viability after hypoxic insult was impressively rescued by adenosine, guanosine and inosine. PC12-cells mainly express the A2A adenosine receptor. Its inhibition with a specific antagonist (CSC induced cell death of PC12-cells, which could be salvaged by adenosine but not with guanosine or inosine. We have previously demonstrated the important role of mitogen activated protein kinases 1/2 (p42/44 MAPK in purine-mediated rescue. In this study we were interested in the involvement of protein kinases whose activities mediate these processes, including protein kinase A (PKA, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-K and protein kinase C-related kinases (PRK 1/2. Pharmacological inhibition of PKA and PI3-K increased hypoxia-induced toxicity and likewise also affected the rescue by purine nucleosides. Nerve growth factor (NGF and purine nucleosides induced an activation of PRK 1/2, which to our knowledge indicates for the first time that these kinases are potentially involved in purine nucleoside-mediated rescue of hypoxic neuronal cells. Results suggest that A2A receptor expressing cells are mainly dependent on the purine nucleoside adenosine for their rescue after hypoxic insult. In addition to PKA, PI3-K is an important effector molecule in A2A-mediated signaling and for the rescue of PC12-cells after hypoxic insult.

  7. Sympathetic preganglionic efferent and afferent neurons mediated by the greater splanchnic nerve in rabbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torigoe, Yasuhiro; Cernucan, Roxana D.; Nishimoto, Jo Ann S.; Blanks, Robert H. I.

    1985-01-01

    As a part of the study of the vestibular-autonomic pathways involved in motion sickness, the location and the morphology of preganglionic sympathetic neurons (PSNs) projecting via the greater splanchnic nerve were examined. Retrograde labeling of neurons was obtained by application of horseradish peroxidase to the cut end of the greater splanchnic nerve. Labeled PSNs were found, ipsilaterally, within the T1 to T11 spinal cord segments, with the highest density of neurons in T6. Most PSNs were located within the intermediolateral column, but a significant portion also occurred within the lateral funiculus, the intercalated region, and the central autonomic area; the proportion of labeling between the four regions depended on the spinal cord segment.

  8. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonist 15d-prostaglandin J2 mediates neuronal autophagy after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xu

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ has recently emerged as potential therapeutic agents for cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I/R injury because of anti-neuronal apoptotic actions. However, whether PPAR-γ activation mediates neuronal autophagy in such conditions remains unclear. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the role of PPAR-γ agonist 15-PGJ(2 on neuronal autophagy induced by I/R. The expression of autophagic-related protein in ischemic cortex such as LC3-II, Beclin 1, cathepsin-B and LAMP1 increased significantly after cerebral I/R injury. Furthermore, increased punctate LC3 labeling and cathepsin-B staining occurred in neurons. Treatment with PPAR-γ agonist 15d-PGJ(2 decreased not only autophagic-related protein expression in ischemic cortex, but also immunoreactivity of LC3 and cathepsin-B in neurons. Autophagic inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA decreased LC3-II levels, reduced the infarct volume, and mimicked some protective effect of 15d-PGJ(2 against cerebral I/R injury. These results indicate that PPAR-γ agonist 15d-PGJ(2 exerts neuroprotection by inhibiting neuronal autophagy after cerebral I/R injury. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying PPAR-γ agonist in mediating neuronal autophagy remain to be determined, neuronal autophagy may be a new target for PPAR-γ agonist treatment in cerebral I/R injury.

  9. Staurosporine and extracellular matrix proteins mediate the conversion of small cell lung carcinoma cells into a neuron-like phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murmann, Tamara; Carrillo-García, Carmen; Veit, Nadine; Courts, Cornelius; Glassmann, Alexander; Janzen, Viktor; Madea, Burkhard; Reinartz, Markus; Harzen, Anne; Nowak, Michael; Perner, Sven; Winter, Jochen; Probstmeier, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Small cell lung carcinomas (SCLCs) represent highly aggressive tumors with an overall five-year survival rate in the range of 5 to 10%. Here, we show that four out of five SCLC cell lines reversibly develop a neuron-like phenotype on extracellular matrix constituents such as fibronectin, laminin or thrombospondin upon staurosporine treatment in an RGD/integrin-mediated manner. Neurite-like processes extend rapidly with an average speed of 10 µm per hour. Depending on the cell line, staurosporine treatment affects either cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase or induction of polyploidy. Neuron-like conversion, although not accompanied by alterations in the expression pattern of a panel of neuroendocrine genes, leads to changes in protein expression as determined by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. It is likely that SCLC cells already harbour the complete molecular repertoire to convert into a neuron-like phenotype. More extensive studies are needed to evaluate whether the conversion potential of SCLC cells is suitable for therapeutic interventions.

  10. Staurosporine and extracellular matrix proteins mediate the conversion of small cell lung carcinoma cells into a neuron-like phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Murmann

    Full Text Available Small cell lung carcinomas (SCLCs represent highly aggressive tumors with an overall five-year survival rate in the range of 5 to 10%. Here, we show that four out of five SCLC cell lines reversibly develop a neuron-like phenotype on extracellular matrix constituents such as fibronectin, laminin or thrombospondin upon staurosporine treatment in an RGD/integrin-mediated manner. Neurite-like processes extend rapidly with an average speed of 10 µm per hour. Depending on the cell line, staurosporine treatment affects either cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase or induction of polyploidy. Neuron-like conversion, although not accompanied by alterations in the expression pattern of a panel of neuroendocrine genes, leads to changes in protein expression as determined by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. It is likely that SCLC cells already harbour the complete molecular repertoire to convert into a neuron-like phenotype. More extensive studies are needed to evaluate whether the conversion potential of SCLC cells is suitable for therapeutic interventions.

  11. DREADD Modulation of Transplanted DA Neurons Reveals a Novel Parkinsonian Dyskinesia Mechanism Mediated by the Serotonin 5-HT6 Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrin-Kirk, Patrick; Heuer, Andreas; Wang, Gang; Mattsson, Bengt; Lundblad, Martin; Parmar, Malin; Björklund, Tomas

    2016-06-01

    Transplantation of DA neurons is actively pursued as a restorative therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD). Pioneering clinical trials using transplants of fetal DA neuroblasts have given promising results, although a number of patients have developed graft-induced dyskinesias (GIDs), and the mechanism underlying this troublesome side effect is still unknown. Here we have used a new model where the activity of the transplanted DA neurons can be selectively modulated using a bimodal chemogenetic (DREADD) approach, allowing either enhancement or reduction of the therapeutic effect. We show that exclusive activation of a cAMP-linked (Gs-coupled) DREADD or serotonin 5-HT6 receptor, located on the grafted DA neurons, is sufficient to induce GIDs. These findings establish a mechanistic link between the 5-HT6 receptor, intracellular cAMP, and GIDs in transplanted PD patients. This effect is thought to be mediated through counteraction of the D2 autoreceptor feedback inhibition, resulting in a dysplastic DA release from the transplant.

  12. Proneural Transcription Factor Atoh1 Drives Highly Efficient Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Into Dopaminergic Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagal, Jonathan; Zhan, Xiping; Xu, Jinchong; Tilghman, Jessica; Karuppagounder, Senthilkumar S.; Chen, Li; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.; Laterra, John

    2014-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) are a promising cell resource for various applications in regenerative medicine. Highly efficient approaches that differentiate human PSCs into functional lineage-specific neurons are critical for modeling neurological disorders and testing potential therapies. Proneural transcription factors are crucial drivers of neuron development and hold promise for driving highly efficient neuronal conversion in PSCs. Here, we study the functions of proneural transcription factor Atoh1 in the neuronal differentiation of PSCs. We show that Atoh1 is induced during the neuronal conversion of PSCs and that ectopic Atoh1 expression is sufficient to drive PSCs into neurons with high efficiency. Atoh1 induction, in combination with cell extrinsic factors, differentiates PSCs into functional dopaminergic (DA) neurons with >80% purity. Atoh1-induced DA neurons recapitulate key biochemical and electrophysiological features of midbrain DA neurons, the degeneration of which is responsible for clinical symptoms in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Atoh1-induced DA neurons provide a reliable disease model for studying PD pathogenesis, such as neurotoxin-induced neurodegeneration in PD. Overall, our results determine the role of Atoh1 in regulating neuronal differentiation and neuron subtype specification of human PSCs. Our Atoh1-mediated differentiation approach will enable large-scale applications of PD patient-derived midbrain DA neurons in mechanistic studies and drug screening for both familial and sporadic PD. PMID:24904172

  13. [Ectopic breast fibroadenoma. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senatore, G; Zanotti, S; Cambrini, P; Montroni, I; Pellegrini, A; Montanari, E; Santini, D; Taffurelli, M

    2010-03-01

    Among the rare anomalies of the breast development, polythelia is the most common, between 1% and 5% of women and men present supernumerary nipples. Polymastia, usually presenting as ectopic breast tissue without areola-nipple complex, is seen mostly along the milk line, extending from the axilla to the pubic region. Ectopic breast tissue is functionally analogous to mammary gland and it is subjected to the same alterations and diseases, whether benign or malignant, that affect normal breast tissue. We report the case of a 21 years-old female evaluated by the medical staff after founding a solid nodular mass by suspect axillary lymphadenopathy. Differential diagnosis with lymphoma is the major problem in these cases. The mass was removed and the intraoperative histological examination showed fibroadenoma in axillary supernumerary breast. Presence of ectopic breast tissue is a rare condition; development of benign mass or malignant degeneration is possible, but it is very unusual. In case of polymastia diagnosis is simple; in case of isolated nodule, without local inflammation or infection, there are greater difficulties. Ultrasonography is diagnostic in case of breast fibroadenoma, but it might be inadequate in ectopic localizations owing to the shortage of mammary tissue around the mass. Preoperative diagnosis is important to plan an adequate surgical treatment; lumpectomy is indicated in case of benign tissue; in case of malignancy, therapy is based on the standard treatment used for breast cancer (surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy).

  14. The Flexibility of Ectopic Lipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Loher

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the subcutaneous and the visceral fat tissue, lipids can also be stored in non-adipose tissue such as in hepatocytes (intrahepatocellular lipids; IHCL, skeletal (intramyocellular lipids; IMCL or cardiac muscle cells (intracardiomyocellular lipids; ICCL. Ectopic lipids are flexible fuel stores that can be depleted by physical exercise and repleted by diet. They are related to obesity and insulin resistance. Quantification of IMCL was initially performed invasively, using muscle biopsies with biochemical and/or histological analysis. 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS is now a validated method that allows for not only quantifying IMCL non-invasively and repeatedly, but also assessing IHCL and ICCL. This review summarizes the current available knowledge on the flexibility of ectopic lipids. The available evidence suggests a complex interplay between quantitative and qualitative diet, fat availability (fat mass, insulin action, and physical exercise, all important factors that influence the flexibility of ectopic lipids. Furthermore, the time frame of the intervention on these parameters (short-term vs. long-term appears to be critical. Consequently, standardization of physical activity and diet are critical when assessing ectopic lipids in predefined clinical situations.

  15. MRI atlas of ectopic endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallaudière, B; Salut, C; Hummel, V; Pouquet, M; Piver, P; Rouanet, J-P; Maubon, A

    2013-03-01

    Ectopic endometriosis is a common condition which is often underdiagnosed, where MRI can help make a diagnosis simply, non-invasively and without irradiation. However, imagery signs of it are enormously polymorphic with a wide range of possible locations. In this paper, we have tried to illustrate comprehensively all its MRI appearances depending on the different locations where it occurs.

  16. Clinical audit of ectopic pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Alaa Aldin Abdel; Yousry, Almraghy; El Radi, Safwat Abd; Shabaan, Omar Mamdouh; Mazen, Elzahry; Nabil, Halal

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors of ectopic pregnancy in cases presented to the Woman's Health Hospital (WHH) in Assuit University, and to perform clinical audit on strategies for management of ectopic pregnancy in the WHH. This descriptive hospital based study was conducted at the Woman's Health Hospital (WHH) of Assuit University (Egypt). There were 210 patients who were admitted to the WHH with the diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy in the period between February 1, 2015 through the end of October 2015. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 21, using descriptive statistics, Mann-Whitney U test, and Chi square. Ectopic pregnancy affects woman in the reproductive age. There are many risk factors that increase the chance of its occurrence; however, it may also occur in the absence of any risk factors (14.0%). Internal VD (72.5%) is the most frequent risk factor; other risk factors include history of abortion, previous CS, ovulation induction, history of infertility, or previous history of EP. Clinical audit is an important item of any adequate health care. As regards to the clinical audit of EP management, we are not adhering to the guidelines.

  17. The Flexibility of Ectopic Lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loher, Hannah; Kreis, Roland; Boesch, Chris; Christ, Emanuel

    2016-09-14

    In addition to the subcutaneous and the visceral fat tissue, lipids can also be stored in non-adipose tissue such as in hepatocytes (intrahepatocellular lipids; IHCL), skeletal (intramyocellular lipids; IMCL) or cardiac muscle cells (intracardiomyocellular lipids; ICCL). Ectopic lipids are flexible fuel stores that can be depleted by physical exercise and repleted by diet. They are related to obesity and insulin resistance. Quantification of IMCL was initially performed invasively, using muscle biopsies with biochemical and/or histological analysis. ¹H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (¹H-MRS) is now a validated method that allows for not only quantifying IMCL non-invasively and repeatedly, but also assessing IHCL and ICCL. This review summarizes the current available knowledge on the flexibility of ectopic lipids. The available evidence suggests a complex interplay between quantitative and qualitative diet, fat availability (fat mass), insulin action, and physical exercise, all important factors that influence the flexibility of ectopic lipids. Furthermore, the time frame of the intervention on these parameters (short-term vs. long-term) appears to be critical. Consequently, standardization of physical activity and diet are critical when assessing ectopic lipids in predefined clinical situations.

  18. Immunoglobulin Fc gamma receptor promotes immunoglobulin uptake, immunoglobulin-mediated calcium increase, and neurotransmitter release in motor neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Habib A.; Mosier, Dennis R.; Zou, Ling L.; Siklos, Laszlo; Alexianu, Maria E.; Engelhardt, Jozsef I.; Beers, David R.; Le, Wei-dong; Appel, Stanley H.

    2002-01-01

    Receptors for the Fc portion of immunoglobulin G (IgG; FcgammaRs) facilitate IgG uptake by effector cells as well as cellular responses initiated by IgG binding. In earlier studies, we demonstrated that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patient IgG can be taken up by motor neuron terminals and transported retrogradely to the cell body and can alter the function of neuromuscular synapses, such as increasing intracellular calcium and spontaneous transmitter release from motor axon terminals after passive transfer. In the present study, we examined whether FcgammaR-mediated processes can contribute to these effects of ALS patient immunoglobulins. F(ab')(2) fragments (which lack the Fc portion) of ALS patient IgG were not taken up by motor axon terminals and were not retrogradely transported. Furthermore, in a genetically modified mouse lacking the gamma subunit of the FcR, the uptake of whole ALS IgG and its ability to enhance intracellular calcium and acetylcholine release were markedly attenuated. These data suggest that FcgammaRs appear to participate in IgG uptake into motor neurons as well as IgG-mediated increases in intracellular calcium and acetylcholine release from motor axon terminals. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Treatment of ectopic varices with portal hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic varices are unusual with portal hypertension andcan involve any site along the digestive tract outsidethe gastroesophageal region. Hemorrhage from ectopicvarices generally are massive and life threatening.Diagnosis of ectopic varices is difficult and subsequenttreatment is also difficult; the optimal treatment hasnot been established. Recently, interventional radiologyand endoscopic treatments have been carried outsuccessfully for hemorrhage from ectopic varices.

  20. α6 subunit-containing nicotinic receptors mediate low-dose ethanol effects on ventral tegmental area neurons and ethanol reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffensen, Scott C; Shin, Samuel I; Nelson, Ashley C; Pistorius, Stephanie S; Williams, Stephanie B; Woodward, Taylor J; Park, Hyun Jung; Friend, Lindsey; Gao, Ming; Gao, Fenfei; Taylor, Devin H; Foster Olive, M; Edwards, Jeffrey G; Sudweeks, Sterling N; Buhlman, Lori M; Michael McIntosh, J; Wu, Jie

    2017-09-13

    Dopamine (DA) neuron excitability is regulated by inhibitory GABAergic synaptic transmission and modulated by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of α6 subunit-containing nAChRs (α6*-nAChRs) in acute ethanol effects on ventral tegmental area (VTA) GABA and DA neurons. α6*-nAChRs were visualized on GABA terminals on VTA GABA neurons, and α6*-nAChR transcripts were expressed in most DA neurons, but only a minority of VTA GABA neurons from GAD67 GFP mice. Low concentrations of ethanol (1-10 mM) enhanced GABAA receptor (GABAA R)-mediated spontaneous and evoked inhibition with blockade by selective α6*-nAChR antagonist α-conotoxins (α-Ctxs) and lowered sensitivity in α6 knock-out (KO) mice. Ethanol suppression of VTA GABA neuron firing rate in wild-type mice in vivo was significantly reduced in α6 KO mice. Ethanol (5-100 mM) had no effect on optically evoked GABAA R-mediated inhibition of DA neurons, and ethanol enhancement of VTA DA neuron firing rate at high concentrations was not affected by α-Ctxs. Ethanol conditioned place preference was reduced in α6 KO mice compared with wild-type controls. Taken together, these studies indicate that relatively low concentrations of ethanol act through α6*-nAChRs on GABA terminals to enhance GABA release onto VTA GABA neurons, in turn to reduce GABA neuron firing, which may lead to VTA DA neuron disinhibition, suggesting a possible mechanism of action of alcohol and nicotine co-abuse. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  1. Computer simulations of neuron-glia interactions mediated by ion flux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Somjen, G.G.; Kager, H.; Wadman, W.J.

    2008-01-01

    Extracellular potassium concentration, [K(+)](o), and intracellular calcium, [Ca(2+)](i), rise during neuron excitation, seizures and spreading depression. Astrocytes probably restrain the rise of K(+) in a way that is only partly understood. To examine the effect of glial K(+) uptake, we used a mod

  2. A Chemical Screen Identifies Novel Compounds That Overcome Glial-Mediated Inhibition Of Neuronal Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, Lynn C.; Johnstone, Andrea; Ertürk, Ali; Hu, Ying; Strikis, Dinara; Wanner, Ina B.; Moorman, Sanne; Lee, Jae-Wook; Min, Jaeki; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Duan, Yuanli; Hoffman, Stanley; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.; Bradke, Frank; Chang, Young-Tae; Lemmon, Vance P.; Bixby, John L.

    2010-01-01

    A major barrier to regeneration of central nervous system (CNS) axons is the presence of growth-inhibitory proteins associated with myelin and the glial scar. To identify chemical compounds with the ability to overcome the inhibition of regeneration, we screened a novel triazine library, based on the ability of compounds to increase neurite outgrowth from cerebellar neurons on inhibitory myelin substrates. The screen produced 4 “hit compounds”, which act with nM potency on several different neuronal types, and on several distinct substrates relevant to glial inhibition. Moreover, the compounds selectively overcome inhibition rather than promote growth in general. The compounds do not affect neuronal cAMP levels, PKC activity, or EGFR activation. Interestingly, one of the compounds alters microtubule dynamics and increases microtubule density in both fibroblasts and neurons. This same compound promotes regeneration of dorsal column axons after acute lesions, and potentiates regeneration of optic nerve axons after nerve crush in vivo. These compounds should provide insight into the mechanisms through which glial-derived inhibitors of regeneration act, and could lead to the development of novel therapies for CNS injury. PMID:20357120

  3. Neuron-mediated generation of regulatory T cells from encephalitogenic T cells suppresses EAE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yawei; Teige, Ingrid; Birnir, Bryndis

    2006-01-01

    ) inflammation. Neurons induce the proliferation of activated CD4+ T cells through B7-CD28 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1-TGF-beta receptor signaling pathways, resulting in amplification of T-cell receptor signaling through phosphorylated ZAP-70, interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-9. The interaction between...

  4. Kv4.2 mediates histamine modulation of preoptic neuron activity and body temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine Sethi

    Full Text Available Histamine regulates arousal, circadian rhythms, and thermoregulation. Activation of H3 histamine receptors expressed by preoptic GABAergic neurons results in a decrease of their firing rate and hyperthermia. Here we report that an increase in the A-type K⁺ current in preoptic GABAergic neurons in response to activation of H3 histamine receptors results in decreased firing rate and hyperthermia in mice. The Kv4.2 subunit is required for these actions in spite of the fact that Kv4.2⁻/⁻ preoptic GABAergic neurons display A-type currents and firing characteristics similar to those of wild-type neurons. This electrical remodeling is achieved by robust upregulation of the expression of the Kv4.1 subunit and of a delayed rectifier current. Dynamic clamp experiments indicate that enhancement of the A-type current by a similar amount to that induced by histamine is sufficient to mimic its robust effect on firing rates. These data indicate a central role played by the Kv4.2 subunit in histamine regulation of body temperature and its interaction with pERK1/2 downstream of the H3 receptor. We also reveal that this pathway provides a mechanism for selective modulation of body temperature at the beginning of the active phase of the circadian cycle.

  5. Injury of cortical neurons is caused by the advanced glycation end products-mediated pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Xing; Xu Zhang; Xiangfu Song; Zhongwen Lv; Lingling Hou; Fei Li

    2013-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products lead to cell apoptosis, and cause cell death by increasing endoplasmic reticulum stress. Advanced glycation end products alone may also directly cause damage to tissues and cells, but the precise mechanism remains unknown. This study used primary cultures of rat cerebral cortex neurons, and treated cells with different concentrations of glycation end products (50, 100, 200, 400 mg/L), and with an antibody for the receptor of advanced glycation end products before and after treatment with advanced glycation end products. The results showed that with increasing concentrations of glycation end products, free radical content increased in neurons, and the number of apoptotic cells increased in a dose-dependent manner. Before and after treatment of advanced glycation end products, the addition of the antibody against advanced glycation end-products markedly reduced hydroxyl free radicals, malondialdehyde levels, and inhibited cell apoptosis. This result indicated that the antibody for receptor of advanced glycation end-products in neurons from the rat cerebral cortex can reduce glycation end product-induced oxidative stress damage by suppressing glycation end product receptors. Overall, our study confirms that the advanced glycation end products-advanced glycation end products receptor pathway may be the main signaling pathway leading to neuronal damage.

  6. MIRNAS in Astrocyte-Derived Exosomes as Possible Mediators of Neuronal Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Lafourcade

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes use gliotransmitters to modulate neuronal function and plasticity. However, the role of small extracellular vesicles, called exosomes, in astrocyte-to-neuron signaling is mostly unknown. Exosomes originate in multivesicular bodies of parent cells and are secreted by fusion of the multivesicular body limiting membrane with the plasma membrane. Their molecular cargo, consisting of RNA species, proteins, and lipids, is in part cell type and cell state specific. Among the RNA species transported by exosomes, microRNAs (miRNAs are able to modify gene expression in recipient cells. Several miRNAs present in astrocytes are regulated under pathological conditions, and this may have far-reaching consequences if they are loaded in exosomes. We propose that astrocyte-derived miRNA-loaded exosomes, such as miR-26a, are dysregulated in several central nervous system diseases; thus potentially controlling neuronal morphology and synaptic transmission through validated and predicted targets. Unraveling the contribution of this new signaling mechanism to the maintenance and plasticity of neuronal networks will impact our understanding on the physiology and pathophysiology of the central nervous system.

  7. Parvalbumin interneurons mediate neuronal circuitry-neurogenesis coupling in the adult hippocampus.

    OpenAIRE

    Song, J; Sun, J.; Moss, J.; Z. Wen; G. J. Sun; D Hsu; Zhong, C.; Davoudi, H.; Christian, K.M.; Toni, N.; Ming, G.L.; Song, H.

    2013-01-01

    Using immunohistology, electron microscopy, electrophysiology and optogenetics, we found that proliferating adult mouse hippocampal neural precursors received immature GABAergic synaptic inputs from parvalbumin-expressing interneurons. Recently shown to suppress adult quiescent neural stem cell activation, parvalbumin interneuron activation promoted newborn neuronal progeny survival and development. Our results suggest a niche mechanism involving parvalbumin interneurons that couples local ci...

  8. P2X receptors mediate ATP-induced primary nociceptive neurone activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland-Ward, P A; Humphrey, P P

    2000-07-01

    ATP-gated P2X ion-channel receptors are localised throughout the mammalian nervous system and have been identified on neurones which participate in conduction of nociceptive information from the periphery to, and within, the CNS. This article briefly reviews recently published research describing the role that ATP and P2X receptors may play in pain perception, highlighting the importance of the P2X(3) receptor in this process. The P2X(3) receptor subunit is almost exclusively expressed on a subset of small and medium diameter sensory neurones innervating cutaneous and visceral tissue. Activation of P2X receptors present on the peripheral terminals of primary afferents results in neuronal depolarisation and, in conscious animals, leads to the manifestation of acute nociceptive behaviour. Recent animal studies have also shown that P2X(3) receptor expression is increased in sensory ganglia following acute neuronal injury, hinting that similar plasticity in the expression of this receptor subtype could underlie the mechanisms involved in a range of conditions characterised by sensory hypersensitivity in man. It is apparent from the evidence available that functional antagonists at specific P2X receptor subtypes could represent an important class of novel analgesic agents.

  9. Ectopic uterine tissue as a chronic pain generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, P; Chen, X; Hendrich, J; Irwin, J C; Green, P G; Giudice, L C; Levine, J D

    2012-12-06

    While chronic pain is a main symptom in endometriosis, the underlying mechanisms and effective therapy remain elusive. We developed an animal model enabling the exploration of ectopic endometrium as a source of endometriosis pain. Rats were surgically implanted with autologous uterus in the gastrocnemius muscle. Within two weeks, visual inspection revealed the presence of a reddish-brown fluid-filled cystic structure at the implant site. Histology demonstrated cystic glandular structures with stromal invasion of the muscle. Immunohistochemical studies of these lesions revealed the presence of markers for nociceptor nerve fibers and neuronal sprouting. Fourteen days after surgery rats exhibited persistent mechanical hyperalgesia at the site of the ectopic endometrial lesion. Intralesional, but not contralateral, injection of progesterone was dose-dependently antihyperalgesic. Systemic administration of leuprolide also produced antihyperalgesia. In vivo electrophysiological recordings from sensory neurons innervating the lesion revealed a significant increase in their response to sustained mechanical stimulation. These results are consistent with clinical and pathological findings observed in patients with endometriosis, compatible with the ectopic endometrium as a source of pain. This model of endometriosis allows mechanistic exploration at the lesion site facilitating our understanding of endometriosis pain.

  10. Cannabinoid receptor CB1 mediates baseline and activity-induced survival of new neurons in adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Anke

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adult neurogenesis is a particular example of brain plasticity that is partially modulated by the endocannabinoid system. Whereas the impact of synthetic cannabinoids on the neuronal progenitor cells has been described, there has been lack of information about the action of plant-derived extracts on neurogenesis. Therefore we here focused on the effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC and Cannabidiol (CBD fed to female C57Bl/6 and Nestin-GFP-reporter mice on proliferation and maturation of neuronal progenitor cells and spatial learning performance. In addition we used cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1 deficient mice and treatment with CB1 antagonist AM251 in Nestin-GFP-reporter mice to investigate the role of the CB1 receptor in adult neurogenesis in detail. Results THC and CBD differed in their effects on spatial learning and adult neurogenesis. CBD did not impair learning but increased adult neurogenesis, whereas THC reduced learning without affecting adult neurogenesis. We found the neurogenic effect of CBD to be dependent on the CB1 receptor, which is expressed over the whole dentate gyrus. Similarly, the neurogenic effect of environmental enrichment and voluntary wheel running depends on the presence of the CB1 receptor. We found that in the absence of CB1 receptors, cell proliferation was increased and neuronal differentiation reduced, which could be related to CB1 receptor mediated signaling in Doublecortin (DCX-expressing intermediate progenitor cells. Conclusion CB1 affected the stages of adult neurogenesis that involve intermediate highly proliferative progenitor cells and the survival and maturation of new neurons. The pro-neurogenic effects of CBD might explain some of the positive therapeutic features of CBD-based compounds.

  11. Neuronal androgen receptor regulates insulin sensitivity via suppression of hypothalamic NF-κB-mediated PTP1B expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, I-Chen; Lin, Hung-Yun; Liu, Ning-Chun; Sparks, Janet D; Yeh, Shuyuan; Fang, Lei-Ya; Chen, Lumin; Chang, Chawnshang

    2013-02-01

    Clinical investigations highlight the increased incidence of metabolic syndrome in prostate cancer (PCa) patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Studies using global androgen receptor (AR) knockout mice demonstrate that AR deficiency results in the development of insulin resistance in males. However, mechanisms by which AR in individual organs coordinately regulates insulin sensitivity remain unexplored. Here we tested the hypothesis that functional AR in the brain contributes to whole-body insulin sensitivity regulation and to the metabolic abnormalities developed in AR-deficient male mice. The mouse model selectively lacking AR in the central nervous system and AR-expressing GT1-7 neuronal cells were established and used to delineate molecular mechanisms in insulin signaling modulated by AR. Neuronal AR deficiency leads to reduced insulin sensitivity in middle-aged mice. Neuronal AR regulates hypothalamic insulin signaling by repressing nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)-mediated induction of protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B). Hypothalamic insulin resistance leads to hepatic insulin resistance, lipid accumulation, and visceral obesity. The functional deficiency of AR in the hypothalamus leads to male mice being more susceptible to the effects of high-fat diet consumption on PTP1B expression and NF-κB activation. These findings suggest that in men with PCa undergoing ADT, reduction of AR function in the brain may contribute to insulin resistance and visceral obesity. Pharmacotherapies targeting neuronal AR and NF-κB may be developed to combat the metabolic syndrome in men receiving ADT and in elderly men with age-associated hypogonadism.

  12. Endosome-mediated retrograde axonal transport of P2X3 receptor signals in primary sensory neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu-Qiao Chen; BinWang; Chengbiao Wu; Jin Pan; Bo Yuan; Yuan-Yuan Su; Xing-Yu Jiang; Xu Zhang; Lan Bao

    2012-01-01

    Neurotrophins and their receptors adopt signaling endosomes to transmit retrograde signals.However,the mechanisms of retrograde signaling for other ligand/receptor systems are poorly understood.Here,we report that the signals of the purinergic (P)2X3 receptor,an ATP-gated ion channel are retrogradely transported in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron axons.We found that Rab5,a small GTPase,controls the early sorting of P2X3 receptors into endosomes,while Rab7 mediates the fast retrograde transport of P2X3 receptors.Intraplantar injection and axonal application into the microfluidic chamber of α,β-methylene-ATP (α,β-MeATP),a P2X selective agonist,enhanced the endocytosis and retrograde transport of P2X3 receptors.The α,β-MeATP-induced Ca2+ influx activated a pathway comprised of protein kinase C,rat sarcoma viral oncogene and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK),which associated with endocytic P2X3 receptors to form signaling endosomes.Disruption of the lipid rafts abolished the α,β-MeATP-induced ERK phosphorylation,endocytosis and retrograde transport of P2X3 receptors.Furthermore,treatment of peripheral axons with α,β-MeATP increased the activation level of ERK and cAMP response element-binding protein in the cell bodies of DRG neurons and enhanced neuronal excitability.Impairment of either microtubule-based axonal transport in vivo or dynein function in vitro blocked α,β-MeATP-induced retrograde signals.These results indicate that P2X3 receptor-activated signals are transmitted via retrogradely transported endosomes in primary sensory neurons and provide a novel signaling mechanism for ligand-gated channels.

  13. Presynaptically mediated effects of cholecystokinin-8 on the excitability of area postrema neurons in rat brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugeta, Shingo; Hirai, Yoshiyuki; Maezawa, Hitoshi; Inoue, Nobuo; Yamazaki, Yutaka; Funahashi, Makoto

    2015-08-27

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a well-known gut hormone that shows anorexigenic effects via action at peripheral and central receptors. CCK is also widely distributed throughout the mammalian brain and appears to function as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator. The area postrema is one of the circumventricular organs, located on the dorsal surface of the medulla oblongata at the caudal end of the fourth ventricle. Blood vessels in the area postrema lack a blood brain barrier, offering specific central neural elements unique access to circulating substances. Immunohistochemical studies show CCK-A receptors in the area postrema, and we reported CCK-sensitive area postrema neurons. However, the receptive mechanism of CCK in area postrema neurons still remains unexplained. We investigated the responses of area postrema neurons to agonists and antagonists of CCK receptors using whole cell and perforated patch-clamp recordings in rat brain slices. The application of CCK-8 elicited excitatory responses, such as increases in the frequency of mEPSCs (miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents), a shift toward larger amplitude mEPSCs, and increases in the frequency of action potentials. These changes were found mostly in cells not displaying the hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih), except for small excitatory changes in a minority of Ih-positive neurons. Tonic inward currents or an inhibitory response to CCK-8 were never seen. Analysis of the amplitude of mEPSCs before and after the administration of CCK-8 indicated the responses mediated via the presynaptic receptors. The effect of CCK-8 was abolished in the presence of CNQX (AMPA type glutamate receptor antagonist). In the presence of lorglumide (a selective CCK-A receptor antagonist), CCK-8-induced excitatory responses were inhibited. No cells responded to the administration of non-sulfated CCK-8 (CCK-8NS, a selective CCK-B receptor agonist). We conclude that CCK-8 exerts its action via presynaptic CCK-A receptors

  14. Diversity of neural signals mediated by multiple, burst-firing mechanisms in rat olfactory tubercle neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Elizabeth; Strowbridge, Ben W

    2007-11-01

    Olfactory information is processed by a diverse group of interconnected forebrain regions. Most efforts to define the cellular mechanisms involved in processing olfactory information have been focused on understanding the function of the olfactory bulb, the primary second-order olfactory region, and its principal target, the piriform cortex. However, the olfactory bulb also projects to other targets, including the rarely studied olfactory tubercle, a ventral brain region recently implicated in regulating cocaine-related reward behavior. We used whole cell patch-clamp recordings from rat tubercle slices to define the intrinsic properties of neurons in the dense and multiform cell layers. We find three common firing modes of tubercle neurons: regular-spiking, intermittent-discharging, and bursting. Regular-spiking neurons are typically spiny-dense-cell-layer cells with pyramidal-shaped, dendritic arborizations. Intermittently discharging and bursting neurons comprise the majority of the deeper multiform layer and share a common morphology: multipolar, sparsely spiny cells. Rather than generating all-or-none stereotyped discharges, as observed in many brain areas, bursting cells in the tubercle generate depolarizing plateau potentials that trigger graded but time-limited discharges. We find two distinct subclasses of bursting cells that respond similarly to step stimuli but differ in the role transmembrane Ca currents play in their intrinsic behavior. Calcium currents amplify depolarizing inputs and enhance excitability in regenerative bursting cells, whereas the primary action of Ca in nonregenerative bursting tubercle neurons appears to be to decrease excitability by triggering Ca-activated K currents. Nonregenerative bursting cells exhibit a prolonged refractory period after even short discharges suggesting that they may function to detect transient events.

  15. Mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways promote low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1-mediated internalization of beta-amyloid protein in primary cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei-Na; Ma, Kai-Ge; Qian, Yi-Hua; Zhang, Jian-Shui; Feng, Gai-Feng; Shi, Li-Li; Zhang, Zhi-Chao; Liu, Zhao-Hui

    2015-07-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are caused by the intraneuronal accumulation of beta-amyloid protein (Aβ). Reuptake of extracellular Aβ is believed to contribute significantly to the intraneuronal Aβ pool in the early stages of AD. Published reports have claimed that the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) mediates Aβ1-42 uptake and lysosomal trafficking in GT1-7 neuronal cells and mouse embryonic fibroblast non-neuronal cells. However, there is no direct evidence supporting the role of LRP1 in Aβ internalization in primary neurons. Our recent study indicated that p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling pathways are involved in regulating α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR)-mediated Aβ1-42 uptake in SH-SY5Y cells. This study was designed to explore the regulation of MAPK signaling pathways on LRP1-mediated Aβ internalization in neurons. We found that extracellular Aβ1-42 oligomers could be internalized into endosomes/lysosomes and mitochondria in cortical neurons. Aβ1-42 and LRP1 were also found co-localized in neurons during Aβ1-42 internalization, and they could form Aβ1-42-LRP1 complex. Knockdown of LRP1 expression significantly decreased neuronal Aβ1-42 internalization. Finally, we identified that p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling pathways regulated the internalization of Aβ1-42 via LRP1. Therefore, these results demonstrated that LRP1, p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 mediated the internalization of Aβ1-42 in neurons and provided evidence that blockade of LRP1 or inhibitions of MAPK signaling pathways might be a potential approach to lowering brain Aβ levels and served a potential therapeutic target for AD.

  16. Tamoxifen mediated estrogen receptor activation protects against early impairment of hippocampal neuron excitability in an oxygen/glucose deprivation brain slice ischemia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huaqiu; Xie, Minjie; Schools, Gary P; Feustel, Paul F; Wang, Wei; Lei, Ting; Kimelberg, Harold K; Zhou, Min

    2009-01-09

    Pretreatment of ovarectomized rats with estrogen shows long-term protection via activation of the estrogen receptor (ER). However, it remains unknown whether activation of the ER can provide protection against early neuronal damage when given acutely. We simulated ischemic conditions by applying oxygen and glucose deprived (OGD) solution to acute male rat hippocampal slices and examined the neuronal electrophysiological changes. Pyramidal neurons and interneurons showed a time-dependent membrane potential depolarization and reduction in evoked action potential frequency and amplitude over a 10 to 15 min OGD exposure. These changes were largely suppressed by 10 microM TAM. The TAM effect was neuron-specific as the OGD-induced astrocytic membrane potential depolarization was not altered. The TAM effect was mediated through ER activation because it could be simulated by 17beta-estradiol and was completely inhibited by the ER inhibitor ICI 182, 780, and is therefore an example of TAM's selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) action. We further show that TAM's effects on OGD-induced impairment of neuronal excitability was largely due to activation of neuroprotective BK channels, as the TAM effect was markedly attenuated by the BK channel inhibitor paxilline at 10 microM. TAM also significantly reduced the frequency and amplitude of AMPA receptor mediated spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) in pyramidal neurons which is an early consequence of OGD. Altogether, this study demonstrates that both 17beta-estradiol and TAM attenuate neuronal excitability impairment early on in a simulated ischemia model via ER activation mediated potentiation of BK K(+) channels and reduction in enhanced neuronal AMPA/NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity.

  17. Microglia are mediators of Borrelia burgdorferi-induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y neuronal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereance A Myers

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation has long been implicated as a contributor to pathogenesis in many CNS illnesses, including Lyme neuroborreliosis. Borrelia burgdorferi is the spirochete that causes Lyme disease and it is known to potently induce the production of inflammatory mediators in a variety of cells. In experiments where B. burgdorferi was co-cultured in vitro with primary microglia, we observed robust expression and release of IL-6 and IL-8, CCL2 (MCP-1, CCL3 (MIP-1alpha, CCL4 (MIP-1beta and CCL5 (RANTES, but we detected no induction of microglial apoptosis. In contrast, SH-SY5Y (SY neuroblastoma cells co-cultured with B. burgdorferi expressed negligible amounts of inflammatory mediators and also remained resistant to apoptosis. When SY cells were co-cultured with microglia and B. burgdorferi, significant neuronal apoptosis consistently occurred. Confocal microscopy imaging of these cell cultures stained for apoptosis and with cell type-specific markers confirmed that it was predominantly the SY cells that were dying. Microarray analysis demonstrated an intense microglia-mediated inflammatory response to B. burgdorferi including up-regulation in gene transcripts for TLR-2 and NFkappabeta. Surprisingly, a pathway that exhibited profound changes in regard to inflammatory signaling was triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM1. Significant transcript alterations in essential p53 pathway genes also occurred in SY cells cultured in the presence of microglia and B. burgdorferi, which indicated a shift from cell survival to preparation for apoptosis when compared to SY cells cultured in the presence of B. burgdorferi alone. Taken together, these findings indicate that B. burgdorferi is not directly toxic to SY cells; rather, these cells become distressed and die in the inflammatory surroundings generated by microglia through a bystander effect. If, as we hypothesized, neuronal apoptosis is the key pathogenic event in Lyme neuroborreliosis, then

  18. Quantitative analysis of serotonin secreted by human embryonic stem cells-derived serotonergic neurons via pH-mediated online stacking-CE-ESI-MRM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xuefei; Hao, Ling; Lu, Jianfeng; Ye, Hui; Zhang, Su-Chun; Li, Lingjun

    2016-04-01

    A CE-ESI-MRM-based assay was developed for targeted analysis of serotonin released by human embryonic stem cells-derived serotonergic neurons in a chemically defined environment. A discontinuous electrolyte system was optimized for pH-mediated online stacking of serotonin. Combining with a liquid-liquid extraction procedure, LOD of serotonin in the Krebs'-Ringer's solution by CE-ESI-MS/MS on a 3D ion trap MS was0.15 ng/mL. The quantitative results confirmed the serotonergic identity of the in vitro developed neurons and the capacity of these neurons to release serotonin in response to stimulus.

  19. Morphine activation of mu opioid receptors causes disinhibition of neurons in the ventral tegmental area mediated by β-arrestin2 and c-Src.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Fiona A; Baptista-Hon, Daniel T; Lambert, Jeremy J; Walwyn, Wendy; Hales, Tim G

    2017-08-30

    The tyrosine kinase, c-Src, participates in mu opioid receptor (MOP) mediated inhibition in sensory neurons in which β-arrestin2 (β-arr2) is implicated in its recruitment. Mice lacking β-arr2 exhibit increased sensitivity to morphine reinforcement; however, whether β-arr2 and/or c-Src participate in the actions of opioids in neurons within the reward pathway is unknown. It is also unclear whether morphine acts exclusively through MOPs, or involves delta opioid receptors (DOPs). We examined the involvement of MOPs, DOPs, β-arr2 and c-Src in the inhibition by morphine of GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) recorded from neurons in the mouse ventral tegmental area. Morphine inhibited spontaneous IPSC frequency, mainly through MOPs, with only a negligible effect remaining in MOP-/- neurons. However, a reduction in the inhibition by morphine for DOP-/- c.f. WT neurons and a DPDPE-induced decrease of IPSC frequency revealed a role for DOPs. The application of the c-Src inhibitor, PP2, to WT neurons also reduced inhibition by morphine, while the inactive PP3, and the MEK inhibitor, SL327, had no effect. Inhibition of IPSC frequency by morphine was also reduced in β-arr2-/- neurons in which PP2 caused no further reduction. These data suggest that inhibition of IPSCs by morphine involves a β-arr2/c-Src mediated mechanism.

  20. Herpes simplex virus-mediated human hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene transfer into neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palella, T D; Silverman, L J; Schroll, C T; Homa, F L; Levine, M; Kelley, W N

    1988-01-01

    The virtually complete deficiency of the purine salvage enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) results in a devastating neurological disease, Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. Transfer of the HPRT gene into fibroblasts and lymphoblasts in vitro and into hematopoietic cells in vivo has been accomplished by other groups with retroviral-derived vectors. It appears to be necessary, however, to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal cells to correct the neurological dysfunction of this disorder. The neurotropic virus herpes simplex virus type 1 has features that make it suitable for use as a vector to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal tissue. This report describes the isolation of an HPRT-deficient rat neuroma cell line, designated B103-4C, and the construction of a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 that contained human HPRT cDNA. These recombinant viruses were used to infect B103-4C cells. Infected cells expressed HPRT activity which was human in origin.

  1. Herpes simplex virus-mediated human hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene transfer into neuronal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palella, T.D.; Silverman, L.J.; Schroll, C.T.; Homa, F.L.; Levine, M.; Kelley, W.N.

    1988-01-01

    The virtually complete deficiency of the purine salvage enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) results in a devastating neurological disease, Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. Transfer of the HPRT gene into fibroblasts and lymphoblasts in vitro and into hematopoietic cells in vivo has been accomplished by other groups with retroviral-derived vectors. It appears to be necessary, however, to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal cells to correct the neurological dysfunction of this disorder. The neurotropic virus herpes simplex virus type 1 has features that make it suitable for use as a vector to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal tissue. This report describes the isolation of an HPRT-deficient rat neuroma cell line, designated B103-4C, and the construction of a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 that contained human HPRT cDNA. These recombinant viruses were used to infect B103-4C cells. Infected cells expressed HPRT activity which was human in origin.

  2. Neuronal and intestinal protein kinase d isoforms mediate Na+ (salt taste)-induced learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ya; Ren, Min; Feng, Hui; Chen, Lu; Altun, Zeynep F; Rubin, Charles S

    2009-08-11

    Ubiquitously expressed protein kinase D (PKD) isoforms are poised to disseminate signals carried by diacylglycerol (DAG). However, the in vivo regulation and functions of PKDs are poorly understood. We show that the Caenorhabditis elegans gene, dkf-2, encodes not just DKF-2A, but also a second previously unknown isoform, DKF-2B. Whereas DKF-2A is present mainly in intestine, we show that DKF-2B is found in neurons. Characterization of dkf-2 null mutants and transgenic animals expressing DKF-2B, DKF-2A, or both isoforms revealed that PKDs couple DAG signals to regulation of sodium ion (Na+)-induced learning. EGL-8 (a phospholipase Cbeta4 homolog) and TPA-1 (a protein kinase Cdelta homolog) are upstream regulators of DKF-2 isoforms in vivo. Thus, pathways containing EGL-8-TPA-1-DKF-2 enable learning and behavioral plasticity by receiving, transmitting, and cooperatively integrating environmental signals targeted to both neurons and intestine.

  3. Signaling Pathways that Mediate Neurotoxin-Induced Death of Dopamine Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    1985; Borghesani et al., 2000), autism (Ritvo et al., 1986; Bailey et al., 1998), and certain prion enceph- alopathies (Ferrer et al., 1991; Watanabe...Montgomery M, Rutter M, Lantos P (1998) A clinicopathological study of autism . Brain 121:889–905. Baptista CA, Hatten ME, Blazeski R, Mason CA (1994...neurons in Alzheimer’s disease pathogenesis : a review. Neuro- chem Res 25:1161–1172. Petersen A, Larsen KE, Behr GG, Romero N, Przedborski S, Brundin P

  4. Reactive oxygen species mediate TNFR1 increase after TRPV1 activation in mouse DRG neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westlund Karin N

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1 is activated by low pH/protons and is well known to be involved in hyperalgesia during inflammation. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α, a proinflammatory cytokine, is involved in nociceptive responses causing hyperalgesia through TNF receptor type 1 (TNFR1 activation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS production is also prominently increased in inflamed tissue. The present study investigated TNFR1 receptors in primary cultured mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons after TRPV1 activation and the involvement of ROS. C57BL/6 mice, both TRPV1 knockout and wild type, were used for immunofluorescent and live cell imaging. The L4 and L5 DRGs were dissected bilaterally and cultured overnight. TRPV1 was stimulated with capsaicin or its potent analog, resiniferatoxin. ROS production was measured with live cell imaging and TNFR1 was detected with immunofluorescence in DRG primary cultures. The TRPV1 knockout mice, TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine, and ROS scavenger, N-tert-Butyl-α-phenylnitrone (PBN, were employed to explore the functional relationship among TRPV1, ROS and TNFR1 in these studies. Results The results demonstrate that TRPV1 activation increases TNFR1 receptors and ROS generation in primary cultures of mouse DRG neurons. Activated increases in TNFR1 receptors and ROS production are absent in TRPV1 deficient mice. The PBN blocks increases in TNFR1 and ROS production induced by capsaicin/resiniferatoxin. Conclusion TRPV1 activation increases TNFR1 in cultured mouse DRG neurons through a ROS signaling pathway, a novel sensitization mechanism in DRG neurons.

  5. Autaptic pacemaker mediated propagation of weak rhythmic activity across small-world neuronal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ergin; Baysal, Veli; Ozer, Mahmut; Perc, Matjaž

    2016-02-01

    We study the effects of an autapse, which is mathematically described as a self-feedback loop, on the propagation of weak, localized pacemaker activity across a Newman-Watts small-world network consisting of stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley neurons. We consider that only the pacemaker neuron, which is stimulated by a subthreshold periodic signal, has an electrical autapse that is characterized by a coupling strength and a delay time. We focus on the impact of the coupling strength, the network structure, the properties of the weak periodic stimulus, and the properties of the autapse on the transmission of localized pacemaker activity. Obtained results indicate the existence of optimal channel noise intensity for the propagation of the localized rhythm. Under optimal conditions, the autapse can significantly improve the propagation of pacemaker activity, but only for a specific range of the autaptic coupling strength. Moreover, the autaptic delay time has to be equal to the intrinsic oscillation period of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron or its integer multiples. We analyze the inter-spike interval histogram and show that the autapse enhances or suppresses the propagation of the localized rhythm by increasing or decreasing the phase locking between the spiking of the pacemaker neuron and the weak periodic signal. In particular, when the autaptic delay time is equal to the intrinsic period of oscillations an optimal phase locking takes place, resulting in a dominant time scale of the spiking activity. We also investigate the effects of the network structure and the coupling strength on the propagation of pacemaker activity. We find that there exist an optimal coupling strength and an optimal network structure that together warrant an optimal propagation of the localized rhythm.

  6. Neuronal populations mediating the effects of endocannabinoids on stress and emotionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häring, M; Guggenhuber, S; Lutz, B

    2012-03-01

    An adequate emotional response to stress is essential for survival and requires the fine-tuned regulation of several distinct neuronal circuits. Therefore, a precise control of these circuits is necessary to prevent behavioral imbalances. During the last decade, numerous investigations have evidenced that the endocannabinoid (eCB) system is able to crucially control stress coping. Its central component, the cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1 receptor), is located at the presynapse, where it is able to attenuate neurotransmitter release after its activation by postsynaptically produced and released eCBs. To date, the eCB system has been found to control the neurotransmitter release from several neuron populations (e.g. GABA, glutamate, catecholamines and monoamines), suggesting a general mechanism for tuning neuronal activity, and thereby regulating emotion and stress responses. In this review, we aim at summarizing the anatomical and functional relation of the eCB system to an adequate response to stressful situations. Of special interest will be neuronal connections to the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, but also circuits between cortical structures, such as prefrontal cortex, amygdala and hippocampus, and subcortical regions, such as raphe nuclei and locus coeruleus. We further like to step toward allocating eCB system functions to distinct cellular subpopulations in the brain. It has emerged that the eCB system is spatially well defined, and its detailed knowledge is a prerequisite for understanding the eCB system in the context of controlling behavior. Thus, advanced approaches combining different genetic and pharmacological tools to dissect specific eCB system functions are of particular interest. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Parvalbumin interneurons mediate neuronal circuitry-neurogenesis coupling in the adult hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Juan; Sun, Jiaqi; Moss, Jonathan; Wen, Zhexing; Sun, Gerald J; Hsu, Derek; Zhong, Chun; Davoudi, Heydar; Christian, Kimberly M; Toni, Nicolas; Ming, Guo-Li; Song, Hongjun

    2013-12-01

    Using immunohistology, electron microscopy, electrophysiology and optogenetics, we found that proliferating adult mouse hippocampal neural precursors received immature GABAergic synaptic inputs from parvalbumin-expressing interneurons. Recently shown to suppress adult quiescent neural stem cell activation, parvalbumin interneuron activation promoted newborn neuronal progeny survival and development. Our results suggest a niche mechanism involving parvalbumin interneurons that couples local circuit activity to the diametric regulation of two critical early phases of adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

  8. The metal transporter SMF-3/DMT-1 mediates aluminum-induced dopamine neuron degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDuyn, Natalia; Settivari, Raja; LeVora, Jennifer; Zhou, Shaoyu; Unrine, Jason; Nass, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Aluminum (Al(3+)) is the most prevalent metal in the earth's crust and is a known human neurotoxicant. Al(3+) has been shown to accumulate in the substantia nigra of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), and epidemiological studies suggest correlations between Al(3+) exposure and the propensity to develop both PD and the amyloid plaque-associated disorder Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although Al(3+) exposures have been associated with the development of the most common neurodegenerative disorders, the molecular mechanism involved in Al(3+) transport in neurons and subsequent cellular death has remained elusive. In this study, we show that a brief exposure to Al(3+) decreases mitochondrial membrane potential and cellular ATP levels, and confers dopamine (DA) neuron degeneration in the genetically tractable nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). Al(3+) exposure also exacerbates DA neuronal death conferred by the human PD-associated protein α-synuclein. DA neurodegeneration is dependent on SMF-3, a homologue to the human divalent metal transporter (DMT-1), as a functional null mutation partially inhibits the cell death. We also show that SMF-3 is expressed in DA neurons, Al(3+) exposure results in a significant decrease in protein levels, and the neurodegeneration is partially dependent on the PD-associated transcription factor Nrf2/SKN-1 and caspase Apaf1/CED-4. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the deletion of SMF-3 confers Al(3+) resistance due to sequestration of Al(3+) into an intracellular compartment. This study describes a novel model for Al(3+)-induced DA neurodegeneration and provides the first molecular evidence of an animal Al(3+) transporter.

  9. Determination of nitric oxide mediating intracellular Ca2+ release on neurons based on confocal microscopy imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Liqin; Wang, Yuhua; He, Yipeng; Zeng, Yixiu; Zhang, Yanding; Xie, Shusen

    2014-09-01

    The gas NO is a ubiquitous intercellular messenger that modulates a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological functions. But few studies were made to study the role of NO in the Ca2+ release in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons by confocal microscopy. Thus the objective of this study was to assess if NO has a role in Ca2+ signaling in DRG neurons using confocal microscopy combined with special fluorescence probe Fluo-3/AM. A 100 μM concentration of the NO donors (Sodium Nitroprusside, Dihydrate, SNP) and NO synthase inhibitor (NG-Monomethyl-L-arginine, Monoacetate salt, L-NMMA) was used in the study. Results showed that the fluorescence intensity increased rapidly after injecting SNP, which indicated that SNP could enhance intracellular Ca2+ release. And the fluorescence intensity shrank gradually with time and kept at a low level for quite a long period after loading with L-NMMA which indicated that L-NMMA could block intracellular Ca2+ release. All these results demonstrated that NO was involved in the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ release in the DRG neurons.

  10. A model for modulation of neuronal synchronization by D4 dopamine receptor-mediated phospholipid methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Anna Y; Deth, Richard C

    2008-06-01

    We describe a new molecular mechanism of dopamine-induced membrane protein modulation that can tune neuronal oscillation frequency to attention-related gamma rhythm. This mechanism is based on the unique ability of D4 dopamine receptors (D4R) to carry out phospholipid methylation (PLM) that may affect the kinetics of ion channels. We show that by deceasing the inertia of the delayed rectifier potassium channel, a transition to 40 Hz oscillations can be achieved. Decreased potassium channel inertia shortens spike duration and decreases the interspike interval via its influence on the calcium-dependent potassium current. This mechanism leads to a transition to attention-related gamma oscillations in a pyramidal cell-interneuron network. The higher frequency and better synchronization is observed with PLM affecting pyramidal neurons only, and recurrent excitation between pyramidal neurons is important for synchronization. Thus dopamine-stimulated methylation of membrane phospholipids may be an important mechanism for modulating firing activity, while impaired methylation can contribute to disorders of attention.

  11. PINK1 Primes Parkin-Mediated Ubiquitination of PARIS in Dopaminergic Neuronal Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunjong Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1 and parkin cause autosomal-recessive Parkinson’s disease through a common pathway involving mitochondrial quality control. Parkin inactivation leads to accumulation of the parkin interacting substrate (PARIS, ZNF746 that plays an important role in dopamine cell loss through repression of proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1-alpha (PGC-1α promoter activity. Here, we show that PARIS links PINK1 and parkin in a common pathway that regulates dopaminergic neuron survival. PINK1 interacts with and phosphorylates serines 322 and 613 of PARIS to control its ubiquitination and clearance by parkin. PINK1 phosphorylation of PARIS alleviates PARIS toxicity, as well as repression of PGC-1α promoter activity. Conditional knockdown of PINK1 in adult mouse brains leads to a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra that is dependent on PARIS. Altogether, these results uncover a function of PINK1 to direct parkin-PARIS-regulated PGC-1α expression and dopaminergic neuronal survival.

  12. Fetal calf serum-mediated inhibition of neurite growth from ciliary ganglion neurons in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, G E; Skaper, S D; Manthorpe, M; Moonen, G; Varon, S

    1984-01-01

    Embryonic chick ciliary ganglion (CG) neurons cultured in fetal calf serum-containing medium have been previously reported to extend neurites on polyornithine (PORN) substrata precoated with a neurite-promoting factor (PNPF) from rat schwannoma-conditioned medium. On PORN substrata alone, however, no neuritic growth occurred. This was interpreted as evidence that PORN was an incompetent substratum for ciliary neuritic growth. In this study, we now find that an untreated PORN substratum allows neuritic growth in serum-free defined medium. When PNPF was added to PORN, a more rapid and extensive neuritic response occurred. After 5 hr of culture, a 60% neuritic response occurred on PNPF/PORN, whereas no neurons initiated neurites until 10-12 hr on PORN. The inhibitory effect of fetal calf serum noted above on PORN could be obtained in part by pretreating the substratum with serum for 1 hr. Maximal inhibitory effects in the PORN pretreatment were achieved after 30 min and were not further improved by treatments up to 4 hr. Bovine serum albumin was also found to inhibit neurite growth on PORN to about 60% of the inhibition obtained by an equivalent amount of serum protein. Fetal calf serum was shown to cause a 15% reduction in the percentage of neurons bearing neurites after its addition to 18-hr serum-free PORN cultures and to cause statistically significant reductions in neurite lengths measured 2 hr later.

  13. Calpain activation induced by glucose deprivation is mediated by oxidative stress and contributes to neuronal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páramo, Blanca; Montiel, Teresa; Hernández-Espinosa, Diego R; Rivera-Martínez, Marlene; Morán, Julio; Massieu, Lourdes

    2013-11-01

    The mechanisms leading to neuronal death during glucose deprivation have not been fully elucidated, but a role of oxidative stress has been suggested. In the present study we have investigated whether the production of reactive oxygen species during glucose deprivation, contributes to the activation of calpain, a calcium-dependent protease involved in neuronal injury associated with brain ischemia and cerebral trauma. We have observed a rapid activation of calpain, as monitored by the cleavage of the cytoskeletal protein α-spectrin, after glucose withdrawal, which is reduced by inhibitors of xanthine oxidase, phospholipase A2 and NADPH oxidase. Results suggest that phospholipase A2 and NADPH oxidase contribute to the early activation of calpain after glucose deprivation. In particular NOX2, a member of the NADPH oxidase family is involved, since reduced stimulation of calpain activity is observed after glucose deprivation in hippocampal slices from transgenic mice lacking a functional NOX2. We observed an additive effect of the inhibitors of xanthine oxidase and phospholipase A2 on both ROS production and calpain activity, suggesting a synergistic action of these two enzymes. The present results provide new evidence showing that reactive oxygen species stimulate calpain activation during glucose deprivation and that this mechanism is involved in neuronal death.

  14. Neurons efficiently repair glutamate-induced oxidative DNA damage by a process involving CREB-mediated up-regulation of apurinic endonuclease 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Jenq-Lin; Tadokoro, Takashi; Keijzers, Guido

    2010-01-01

    damage after glutamate treatment, suggesting that APE1 is a key repair protein for glutamate-induced DNA damage. A cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) binding sequence is present in the Ape1 gene (encodes APE1 protein) promoter and treatment of neurons with a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase......-mediated DNA damage that is then rapidly repaired by a mechanism involving Ca(2+)-induced, CREB-mediated APE1 expression. Our findings reveal a previously unknown ability of neurons to efficiently repair oxidative DNA lesions after transient activation of glutamate receptors....

  15. Morphine enhances HIV-1SF162-mediated neuron death and delays recovery of injured neurites.

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    Ruturaj R Masvekar

    Full Text Available HIV-1 enters the CNS soon after initial systemic infection; within the CNS parenchyma infected and/or activated perivascular macrophages, microglia and astrocytes release viral and cellular toxins that drive secondary toxicity in neurons and other cell types. Our previous work has largely modeled HIV-neuropathology using the individual viral proteins Tat or gp120, with murine striatal neurons as targets. To model disease processes more closely, the current study uses supernatant from HIV-1-infected cells. Supernatant from HIV-1SF162-infected differentiated-U937 cells (HIV+sup was collected and p24 level was measured by ELISA to assess the infection. Injection drug abuse is a significant risk factor for HIV-infection, and opiate drug abusers show increased HIV-neuropathology, even with anti-retroviral treatments. We therefore assessed HIV+sup effects on neuronal survival and neurite growth/pruning with or without concurrent exposure to morphine, an opiate that preferentially acts through µ-opioid receptors. Effects of HIV+sup ± morphine were assessed on neuronal populations, and also by time-lapse imaging of individual cells. HIV+sup caused dose-dependent toxicity over a range of p24 levels (10-500 pg/ml. Significant interactions occurred with morphine at lower p24 levels (10 and 25 pg/ml, and GSK3β was implicated as a point of convergence. In the presence of glia, selective neurotoxic measures were significantly enhanced and interactions with morphine were also augmented, perhaps related to a decreased level of BDNF. Importantly, the arrest of neurite growth that occurred with exposure to HIV+sup was reversible unless neurons were continuously exposed to morphine. Thus, while reducing HIV-infection levels may be protective, ongoing exposure to opiates may limit recovery. Opiate interactions observed in this HIV-infective environment were similar, though not entirely concordant, with Tat/gp120 interactions reported previously, suggesting

  16. Calcium-stores mediate adaptation in axon terminals of Olfactory Receptor Neurons in Drosophila

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    Murmu Meena S

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vertebrates and invertebrates, sensory neurons adapt to variable ambient conditions, such as the duration or repetition of a stimulus, a physiological mechanism considered as a simple form of non-associative learning and neuronal plasticity. Although various signaling pathways, as cAMP, cGMP, and the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (InsP3R play a role in adaptation, their precise mechanisms of action at the cellular level remain incompletely understood. Recently, in Drosophila, we reported that odor-induced Ca2+-response in axon terminals of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs is related to odor duration. In particular, a relatively long odor stimulus (such as 5 s triggers the induction of a second component involving intracellular Ca2+-stores. Results We used a recently developed in-vivo bioluminescence imaging approach to quantify the odor-induced Ca2+-activity in the axon terminals of ORNs. Using either a genetic approach to target specific RNAs, or a pharmacological approach, we show that the second component, relying on the intracellular Ca2+-stores, is responsible for the adaptation to repetitive stimuli. In the antennal lobes (a region analogous to the vertebrate olfactory bulb ORNs make synaptic contacts with second-order neurons, the projection neurons (PNs. These synapses are modulated by GABA, through either GABAergic local interneurons (LNs and/or some GABAergic PNs. Application of GABAergic receptor antagonists, both GABAA or GABAB, abolishes the adaptation, while RNAi targeting the GABABR (a metabotropic receptor within the ORNs, blocks the Ca2+-store dependent component, and consequently disrupts the adaptation. These results indicate that GABA exerts a feedback control. Finally, at the behavioral level, using an olfactory test, genetically impairing the GABABR or its signaling pathway specifically in the ORNs disrupts olfactory adapted behavior. Conclusion Taken together, our results indicate that a

  17. Duplication of a Single Neuron in C. elegans Reveals a Pathway for Dendrite Tiling by Mutual Repulsion

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    Zhiqi Candice Yip

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Simple cell-cell interactions can give rise to complex cellular patterns. For example, neurons of the same type can interact to create a complex patchwork of non-overlapping dendrite arbors, a pattern known as dendrite tiling. Dendrite tiling often involves mutual repulsion between neighboring neurons. While dendrite tiling is found across nervous systems, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has a relatively simple nervous system with few opportunities for tiling. Here, we show that genetic duplication of a single neuron, PVD, is sufficient to create dendrite tiling among the resulting ectopic neurons. We use laser ablation to show that this tiling is mediated by mutual repulsion between neighbors. Furthermore, we find that tiling requires a repulsion signal (UNC-6/Netrin and its receptors UNC-40/DCC and UNC-5 that normally patterns the PVD dendrite arbor. These results demonstrate that an apparently complex cellular pattern can emerge in a simple nervous system merely by increasing neuron number.

  18. Mechanisms of Ectopic Gene Conversion

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    P.J. Hastings

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Gene conversion (conversion, the unidirectional transfer of DNA sequence information, occurs as a byproduct of recombinational repair of broken or damaged DNA molecules. Whereas excision repair processes replace damaged DNA by copying the complementary sequence from the undamaged strand of duplex DNA, recombinational mechanisms copy similar sequence, usually in another molecule, to replace the damaged sequence. In mitotic cells the other molecule is usually a sister chromatid, and the repair does not lead to genetic change. Less often a homologous chromosome or homologous sequence in an ectopic position is used. Conversion results from repair in two ways. First, if there was a double-strand gap at the site of a break, homologous sequence will be used as the template for synthesis to fill the gap, thus transferring sequence information in both strands. Second, recombinational repair uses complementary base pairing, and the heteroduplex molecule so formed is a source of conversion, both as heteroduplex and when donor (undamaged template information is retained after correction of mismatched bases in heteroduplex. There are mechanisms that favour the use of sister molecules that must fail before ectopic homology can be used. Meiotic recombination events lead to the formation of crossovers required in meiosis for orderly segregation of pairs of homologous chromosomes. These events result from recombinational repair of programmed double-strand breaks, but in contrast with mitotic recombination, meiotic recombinational events occur predominantly between homologous chromosomes, so that transfer of sequence differences by conversion is very frequent. Transient recombination events that do not form crossovers form both between homologous chromosomes and between regions of ectopic homology, and leave their mark in the occurrence of frequent non-crossover conversion, including ectopic conversion.

  19. EGFR mediates astragaloside IV-induced Nrf2 activation to protect cortical neurons against in vitro ischemia/reperfusion damages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Da-min [Department of Anesthesiology, Affiliated Yixing People' s Hospital, Jiangsu University, Yixing (China); Lu, Pei-Hua, E-mail: lphty1_1@163.com [Department of Medical Oncology, Wuxi People' s Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, Wuxi (China); Zhang, Ke; Wang, Xiang [Department of Anesthesiology, Affiliated Yixing People' s Hospital, Jiangsu University, Yixing (China); Sun, Min [Department of General Surgery, Affiliated Yixing People' s Hospital, Jiangsu University, Yixing (China); Chen, Guo-Qian [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Wuxi People' s Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, Wuxi (China); Wang, Qiong, E-mail: WangQiongprof1@126.com [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Wuxi People' s Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, Wuxi (China)

    2015-02-13

    In this study, we tested the potential role of astragaloside IV (AS-IV) against oxygen and glucose deprivation/re-oxygenation (OGD/R)-induced damages in murine cortical neurons, and studied the associated signaling mechanisms. AS-IV exerted significant neuroprotective effects against OGD/R by reducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, thereby attenuating oxidative stress and neuronal cell death. We found that AS-IV treatment in cortical neurons resulted in NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling activation, evidenced by Nrf2 Ser-40 phosphorylation, and its nuclear localization, as well as transcription of antioxidant-responsive element (ARE)-regulated genes: heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO-1) and sulphiredoxin 1 (SRXN-1). Knockdown of Nrf2 through lentiviral shRNAs prevented AS-IV-induced ARE genes transcription, and abolished its anti-oxidant and neuroprotective activities. Further, we discovered that AS-IV stimulated heparin-binding-epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF) release to trans-activate epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in cortical neurons. Blockage or silencing EGFR prevented Nrf2 activation by AS-IV, thus inhibiting AS-IV-mediated anti-oxidant and neuroprotective activities against OGD/R. In summary, AS-IV protects cortical neurons against OGD/R damages through activating of EGFR-Nrf2 signaling. - Highlights: • Pre-treatment of astragaloside IV (AS-IV) protects murine cortical neurons from OGD/R. • AS-IV activates Nrf2-ARE signaling in murine cortical neurons. • Nrf2 is required for AS-IV-mediated anti-oxidant and neuroprotective activities. • AS-IV stimulates HB-EGF release to trans-activate EGFR in murine cortical neurons. • EGFR mediates AS-IV-induced Nrf2 activation and neuroprotection against OGD/R.

  20. Control of Neuronal Migration and Aggregation by Reelin Signaling in the Developing Cerebral Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Yuki; Nakajima, Kazunori

    2017-01-01

    The mammalian cerebral neocortex has a well-organized laminar structure, achieved by the highly coordinated control of neuronal migration. During cortical development, excitatory neurons born near the lateral ventricle migrate radially to reach their final positions to form the cortical plate. During this process, dynamic changes are observed in the morphologies and migration modes, including multipolar migration, locomotion, and terminal translocation, of the newborn neurons. Disruption of these migration processes can result in neuronal disorders such as lissencephaly and periventricular heterotopia. The extracellular protein, Reelin, mainly secreted by the Cajal-Retzius neurons in the marginal zone during development, plays a crucial role in the neuronal migration and neocortical lamination. Reelin signaling, which exerts essential roles in the formation of the layered neocortex, is triggered by the binding of Reelin to its receptors, ApoER2 and VLDLR, followed by phosphorylation of the Dab1 adaptor protein. Accumulating evidence suggests that Reelin signaling controls multiple steps of neuronal migration, including the transition from multipolar to bipolar neurons, terminal translocation, and termination of migration beneath the marginal zone. In addition, it has been shown that ectopically expressed Reelin can cause neuronal aggregation via an N-cadherin-mediated manner. This review attempts to summarize our knowledge of the roles played by Reelin in neuronal migration and the underlying mechanisms.

  1. Fear extinction induces mGluR5-mediated synaptic and intrinsic plasticity in infralimbic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda-Orengo, Marian T; Lopez, Ana V; Soler-Cedeño, Omar; Porter, James T

    2013-04-24

    Studies suggest that plasticity in the infralimbic prefrontal cortex (IL) in rodents and its homolog in humans is necessary for inhibition of fear during the recall of fear extinction. The recall of extinction is impaired by locally blocking metabotropic glutamate receptor type 5 (mGluR5) activation in IL during extinction training. This finding suggests that mGluR5 stimulation may lead to IL plasticity needed for fear extinction. To test this hypothesis, we recorded AMPA and NMDA currents, AMPA receptor (AMPAR) rectification, and intrinsic excitability in IL pyramidal neurons in slices from trained rats using whole-cell patch-clamp recording. We observed that fear extinction increases the AMPA/NMDA ratio, consistent with insertion of AMPARs into IL synapses. In addition, extinction training increased inward rectification, suggesting that extinction induces the insertion of calcium-permeable (GluA2-lacking) AMPARs into IL synapses. Consistent with this, selectively blocking calcium-permeable AMPARs with Naspm reduced the AMPA EPSCs in IL neurons to a larger degree after extinction. Extinction-induced changes in AMPA/NMDA ratio, rectification, and intrinsic excitability were blocked with an mGluR5 antagonist. These findings suggest that mGluR5 activation leads to consolidation of fear extinction by regulating the intrinsic excitability of IL neurons and modifying the composition of AMPARs in IL synapses. Therefore, impaired mGluR5 activity in IL synapses could be one factor that causes inappropriate modulation of fear expression leading to anxiety disorders.

  2. Phorbol Ester Modulation of Ca2+ Channels Mediates Nociceptive Transmission in Dorsal Horn Neurones

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    Gary J. Stephens

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Phorbol esters are analogues of diacylglycerol which activate C1 domain proteins, such as protein kinase C (PKC. Phorbol ester/PKC pathways have been proposed as potential therapeutic targets for chronic pain states, potentially by phosphorylating proteins involved in nociception, such as voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs. In this brief report, we investigate the potential involvement of CaV2 VDCC subtypes in functional effects of the phorbol ester, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA on nociceptive transmission in the spinal cord. Effects of PMA and of selective pharmacological blockers of CaV2 VDCC subtypes on nociceptive transmission at laminae II dorsal horn neurones were examined in mouse spinal cord slices. Experiments were extended to CaV2.3(−/− mice to complement pharmacological studies. PMA increased the mean frequency of spontaneous postsynaptic currents (sPSCs in dorsal horn neurones, without an effect on event amplitude or half-width. sPSC frequency was reduced by selective VDCC blockers, w-agatoxin-IVA (AgTX; CaV2.1, w-conotoxin-GVIA (CTX; CaV2.2 or SNX-482 (CaV2.3. PMA effects were attenuated in the presence of each VDCC blocker and, also, in CaV2.3(−/− mice. These initial data demonstrate that PMA increases nociceptive transmission at dorsal horn neurones via actions on different CaV2 subtypes suggesting potential anti-nociceptive targets in this system.

  3. Possible Signaling Pathways Mediating Neuronal Calcium Sensor-1-Dependent Spatial Learning and Memory in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tomoe Y.; Nakao, Shu; Nakajo, Yukako; Takahashi, Jun C.; Wakabayashi, Shigeo; Yanamoto, Hiroji

    2017-01-01

    Intracellular Ca2+ signaling regulates diverse functions of the nervous system. Many of these neuronal functions, including learning and memory, are regulated by neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS-1). However, the pathways by which NCS-1 regulates these functions remain poorly understood. Consistent with the findings of previous reports, we revealed that NCS-1 deficient (Ncs1-/-) mice exhibit impaired spatial learning and memory function in the Morris water maze test, although there was little change in their exercise activity, as determined via treadmill-analysis. Expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF; a key regulator of memory function) and dopamine was significantly reduced in the Ncs1-/- mouse brain, without changes in the levels of glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor or nerve growth factor. Although there were no gross structural abnormalities in the hippocampi of Ncs1-/- mice, electron microscopy analysis revealed that the density of large dense core vesicles in CA1 presynaptic neurons, which release BDNF and dopamine, was decreased. Phosphorylation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-α (CaMKII-α, which is known to trigger long-term potentiation and increase BDNF levels, was significantly reduced in the Ncs1-/- mouse brain. Furthermore, high voltage electric potential stimulation, which increases the levels of BDNF and promotes spatial learning, significantly increased the levels of NCS-1 concomitant with phosphorylated CaMKII-α in the hippocampus; suggesting a close relationship between NCS-1 and CaMKII-α. Our findings indicate that NCS-1 may regulate spatial learning and memory function at least in part through activation of CaMKII-α signaling, which may directly or indirectly increase BDNF production. PMID:28122057

  4. Neuronal growth and survival mediated by eIF5A, a polyamine-modified translation initiation factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yunfei; Higginson, Daniel S.; Hester, Lynda; Park, Myung Hee; Snyder, Solomon H.

    2007-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A), the only known protein containing the polyamine-derived amino acid hypusine, modulates protein synthesis. We show that neurotrophic and neuroprotective actions of nerve growth factor (NGF) are mediated by hypusinated eIF5A, which can account for the known roles of polyamines in cell growth and survival. NGF treatment of PC12 cells stimulates eIF5A formation. Moreover, prevention of hypusine formation by a selective inhibitor of deoxyhypusine synthase and by its depletion with RNA interference blocks the NGF-elicited augmentation of neurite outgrowth and cell survival of PC12 cells. In brain cultures, inhibition of hypusine formation also inhibits neuronal process extension. PMID:17360499

  5. Cholecystokinin-2 receptor mediated gene expression in neuronal PC12 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas v O; Borup, Rehannah; Marstrand, Troels;

    2007-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is abundantly expressed in the CNS, in which it regulates feeding behavior and long-term memory. Moreover, CCK has been implicated in mental disorders, such as anxiety and schizophrenia. Despite its manifest physiological and pathophysiological role, the molecular targets...... could be identified. Comparison with forskolin- and nerve growth factor (NGF)-treated PC12 cells showed that CCK induced a separate set of target genes. Taken together, we propose that neuronal CCK may have a role in the regulation of the circadian rhythm, the metabolism of cerebral cholesterol...

  6. Plasticity of TRPV1-expressing sensory neurons mediating autonomic dysreflexia following spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leanne M Ramer

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI triggers profound changes in visceral and somatic targets of sensory neurons below the level of injury. Despite this, little is known about the influence of injury to the spinal cord on sensory ganglia. One of the defining characteristics of sensory neurons is the size of their cell body: for example, nociceptors are smaller in size than mechanoreceptors or proprioceptors. In these experiments, we first used a comprehensive immunohistochemical approach to characterize the size distribution of sensory neurons after high- and low-thoracic SCI. Male Wistar rats (300g received a spinal cord transection (T3 or T10 or sham injury. At 30 days post-injury, dorsal root ganglia (DRGs and spinal cords were harvested and analyzed immunohistochemically. In a wide survey of primary afferents, only those expressing the capsaicin receptor (TRPV1 exhibited somal hypertrophy after T3 SCI. Hypertrophy only occurred caudal to SCI and was pronounced in ganglia far distal to SCI (i.e., in L4-S1 DRGs. Injury-induced hypertrophy was accompanied by a small expansion of central territory in the lumbar spinal dorsal horn and by evidence of TRPV1 upregulation. Importantly, hypertrophy of TRPV1-positive neurons was modest after T10 SCI. Given the specific effects of T3 SCI on TRPV1-positive afferents, we hypothesized that these afferents contribute to autonomic dysreflexia (AD. Rats with T3 SCI received vehicle or capsaicin via intrathecal injection at 2 or 28 days post-SCI; at 30 days, AD was assessed by recording intra-arterial blood pressure during colo-rectal distension. In both groups of capsaicin-treated animals, the severity of AD was dramatically reduced. While AD is multi-factorial in origin, TRPV1-positive afferents are clearly involved in AD elicited by colo-rectal distension. These findings implicate TRPV1-positive afferents in the initiation of AD and suggest that TRPV1 may be a therapeutic target for amelioration or prevention of AD

  7. Aberrant Axonal Arborization of PDF Neurons Induced by Aβ42-Mediated JNK Activation Underlies Sleep Disturbance in an Alzheimer's Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qian; Feng, Ge; Huang, Zehua; Chen, Xiaoman; Chen, Zhaohuan; Ping, Yong

    2016-10-07

    Impaired sleep patterns are common symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Cellular mechanisms underlying sleep disturbance in AD remain largely unknown. Here, using a Drosophila Aβ42 AD model, we show that Aβ42 markedly decreases sleep in a large population, which is accompanied with postdevelopmental axonal arborization of wake-promoting pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) neurons. The arborization is mediated in part via JNK activation and can be reversed by decreasing JNK signaling activity. Axonal arborization and impaired sleep are correlated in Aβ42 and JNK kinase hemipterous mutant flies. Image reconstruction revealed that these aberrant fibers preferentially project to pars intercerebralis (PI), a fly brain region analogous to the mammalian hypothalamus. Moreover, PDF signaling in PI neurons was found to modulate sleep/wake activities, suggesting that excessive release of PDF by these aberrant fibers may lead to the impaired sleep in Aβ42 flies. Finally, inhibition of JNK activation in Aβ42 flies restores nighttime sleep loss, decreases Aβ42 accumulation, and attenuates neurodegeneration. These data provide a new mechanism by which sleep disturbance could be induced by Aβ42 burden, a key initiator of a complex pathogenic cascade in AD.

  8. Biphasic somatic A-type K channel downregulation mediates intrinsic plasticity in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

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    Sung-Cherl Jung

    Full Text Available Since its original description, the induction of synaptic long-term potentiation (LTP has been known to be accompanied by a lasting increase in the intrinsic excitability (intrinsic plasticity of hippocampal neurons. Recent evidence shows that dendritic excitability can be enhanced by an activity-dependent decrease in the activity of A-type K(+ channels. In the present manuscript, we examined the role of A-type K(+ channels in regulating intrinsic excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus after synapse-specific LTP induction. In electrophysiological recordings we found that LTP induced a potentiation of excitability which was accompanied by a two-phased change in A-type K(+ channel activity recorded in nucleated patches from organotypic slices of rat hippocampus. Induction of LTP resulted in an immediate but short lasting hyperpolarization of the voltage-dependence of steady-state A-type K(+ channel inactivation along with a progressive, long-lasting decrease in peak A-current density. Blocking clathrin-mediated endocytosis prevented the A-current decrease and most measures of intrinsic plasticity. These results suggest that two temporally distinct but overlapping mechanisms of A-channel downregulation together contribute to the plasticity of intrinsic excitability. Finally we show that intrinsic plasticity resulted in a global enhancement of EPSP-spike coupling.

  9. Optogenetic inhibition of D1R containing nucleus accumbens neurons alters cocaine- mediated regulation of Tiam1

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    Ramesh eChandra

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to psychostimulants results in structural and synaptic plasticity in striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs. These cellular adaptations arise from alterations in genes that are highly implicated in the rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton, such as Tiam1. Previous studies have demonstrated a crucial role for dopamine receptor 1 (D1-containing striatal MSNs in mediating psychostimulant induced plasticity changes. These D1-MSNs in the nucleus accumbens (NAc positively regulate drug seeking, reward, and locomotor behavioral effects as well as the morphological adaptations of psychostimulant drugs. Here, we demonstrate that rats that actively self-administer cocaine display reduced levels of Tiam1 in the NAc. To further examine the cell type specific contribution to these changes in Tiam1 we used optogenetics to selectively manipulate NAc D1-MSNs or dopamine receptor 2 (D2 expressing MSNs. We find that repeated ChR2 activation of D1-MSNs but not D2-MSNs caused a down-regulation of Tiam1 levels similar to the effects of cocaine. Further, activation of D2-MSNs, which caused a late blunted cocaine-mediated locomotor behavioral response, did not alter Tiam1 levels. We then examined the contribution of D1-MSNs to the cocaine-mediated decrease of Tiam1. Using the light activated chloride pump, eNpHR3.0, we selectively inhibited D1-MSNs during cocaine exposure, which resulted in a behavioral blockade of cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization. Moreover, inhibiting these NAc D1-MSNs during cocaine exposure reversed the down-regulation of Tiam1 gene expression and protein levels. These data demonstrate that altering activity in specific neural circuits with optogenetics can impact the underlying molecular substrates of psychostimulant mediated behavior and function.

  10. Rotenone-induced toxicity is mediated by Rho-GTPases in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Monica; Gastaldi, Laura; Remedi, Monica; Cáceres, Alfredo; Landa, Carlos

    2008-08-01

    In this study, we have examined the effects of rotenone in primary cultures of hippocampal and dopaminergic neurons in order to obtain insights into the possible mechanisms underlying the neurotoxic effects of this pesticide. The results obtained indicate that a 48-h exposure to rotenone (0.1 microM) produces a complete and selective suppression of axon formation. This effect was dose dependent, not accompanied by changes in microtubule organization, and reversible after washout of the agrochemical from the tissue culture medium. Interestingly, pull-down assays revealed that rotenone decreases Cdc42 and Rac activities, whereas increasing that of Rho. In accordance with this, treatment of neuronal cultures with cytochalasin D, an actin-depolymerizing drug, or with the Rho-kinase inhibitor Y27632, or overexpression of Tiam1, a guanosine nucleotide exchange factor for Rac, reverts the inhibitory effect of rotenone on axon formation. Taken together, our data suggest that at least some of the neurotoxic effects of rotenone are associated with an inhibition of actin dynamics through modifications of Rho-GTPase activity.

  11. Do sensory neurons mediate adaptive cytoprotection of gastric mucosa against bile acid injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, D W; Ritchie, W P; Dempsey, D T

    1992-01-01

    Pretreatment with the mild irritant 1 mmol acidified taurocholate protects the gastric mucosa from the injury induced by the subsequent application of 5 mmol acidified taurocholate, a phenomenon referred to as "adaptive cytoprotection." How this occurs remains an enigma. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of sensory neurons and mucus secretion in this phenomenon. Prior to injury with 5 mmol acidified taurocholate (pH 1.2), the stomachs of six groups of rats were subjected to the following protocol. Two groups were topically pretreated with either saline or the mild irritant 1 mmol acidified taurocholate. Two other groups received the topical anesthetic 1% lidocaine prior to pretreatment with either saline or 1 mmol acidified taurocholate. The last two groups got the mucolytic agent 10% N-acetylcysteine (NAC) after pretreatment with either saline or 1 mmol acidified taurocholate. Injury was assessed by measuring net transmucosal ion fluxes, luminal appearance of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), and gross and histologic injury. Pretreatment with the mild irritant 1 mmol acidified taurocholate significantly decreased bile acid-induced luminal ion fluxes and DNA accumulation, suggesting mucosal protection (corroborated by gross and histologic injury analysis). This effect was negated by lidocaine but not by NAC. Thus, it appears that sensory neurons, and not increased mucus secretion, play a critical role in adaptive cytoprotection.

  12. Factors mediating powerful voltage attenuation along CA1 pyramidal neuron dendrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golding, Nace L; Mickus, Timothy J; Katz, Yael; Kath, William L; Spruston, Nelson

    2005-01-01

    We performed simultaneous patch-electrode recordings from the soma and apical dendrite of CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampal slices, in order to determine the degree of voltage attenuation along CA1 dendrites. Fifty per cent attenuation of steady-state somatic voltage changes occurred at a distance of 238 μm from the soma in control and 409 μm after blocking the hyperpolarization-activated (H) conductance. The morphology of three neurons was reconstructed and used to generate computer models, which were adjusted to fit the somatic and dendritic voltage responses. These models identify several factors contributing to the voltage attenuation along CA1 dendrites, including high axial cytoplasmic resistivity, low membrane resistivity, and large H conductance. In most cells the resting membrane conductances, including the H conductances, were larger in the dendrites than the soma. Simulations suggest that synaptic potentials attenuate enormously as they propagate from the dendrite to the soma, with greater than 100-fold attenuation for synapses on many small, distal dendrites. A prediction of this powerful EPSP attenuation is that distal synaptic inputs are likely only to be effective in the presence of conductance scaling, dendritic excitability, or both. PMID:16002454

  13. Hypoxia-activated microglial mediators of neuronal survival are differentially regulated by tetracyclines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Aaron Y; Todd, Kathryn G

    2006-06-01

    The tetracycline derivatives minocycline (MINO) and doxycycline (DOXY) have been shown to be neuroprotective in in vivo and in vitro models of stroke. This neuroprotection is thought to be due to the suppression of microglial activation. However, the specific molecular parameters in microglia of the tetracyclines' effect are not understood. We subjected cultured rat microglial and neuronal cells to in vitro hypoxia and examined the effects of MINO and DOXY pre-treatments. Our data showed that MINO and DOXY protect against hypoxia-induced neuronal death by a mechanism dependent on regulation of microglial factors, but likely unrelated to regulation of microglial proliferation/viability. Both MINO and DOXY suppressed the hypoxic activation of ED-1, a marker for microglial activation. Morphological analyses of hypoxic microglia using the microglial marker Iba1 revealed that treatment with MINO and DOXY caused a higher percentage of microglia to remain in a non-activated state. MINO suppressed the hypoxic upregulation of pro-inflammatory agents nitric oxide (NO), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1beta), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), while DOXY down-regulated only NO and IL-1beta. In contrast, the hypoxic activation of pro-survival/neuroprotective microglial proteins, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), were unaffected by tetracycline treatments. Taken together, these results suggest that MINO and DOXY may provide neuroprotection against stroke by selectively down-regulating microglial toxic factors while maintaining functional pro-survival factors.

  14. Distinct hypothalamic neurons mediate estrogenic effects on energy homeostasis and reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrogens regulate body weight and reproduction primarily through actions on estrogen receptor-a(ERa). However, ERalpha-expressing cells mediating these effects are not identified. We demonstrate that brain-specific deletion of ERalapha in female mice causes abdominal obesity stemming from both hype...

  15. mRNA for N-Bak, a neuron-specific BH3-only splice isoform of Bak, escapes nonsense-mediated decay and is translationally repressed in the neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobson, M; Lintulahti, A; Arumäe, U

    2012-02-02

    mRNA for neuronal Bak (N-Bak), a splice variant of pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member Bak is expressed in the neurons. Surprisingly the endogeneous N-Bak protein cannot be demonstrated in the neurons, although the antibodies recognize N-Bak protein from in vitro translation or transiently transfected cells. As N-Bak mRNA contains premature termination codon (PTC) at 89 nucleotides upstream from the last exon-exon junction, it could be degraded by nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) during the pioneer round of translation thus explaining the absence of the protein. We show here that the endogeneous neuronal N-Bak mRNA is not the NMD substrate, as it is not accumulating by cycloheximide treatment, it has a long lifetime, and even prevention of PTC by interfering with the alternative splicing did not lead to translation of the Bak mRNA. N-Bak protein is also not revealed by proteasome inhibitors. Our data suggest strong translational arrest of N-Bak mRNA in the neurons. We show that this arrest is partially mediated by 5'-untranslated region of Bak mRNA and it is not released during mitochondrial apoptosis.

  16. Oxytocin-induced antinociception in the spinal cord is mediated by a subpopulation of glutamatergic neurons in lamina I-II which amplify GABAergic inhibition

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    Schlichter Rémy

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent evidence suggests that oxytocin (OT, secreted in the superficial spinal cord dorsal horn by descending axons of paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVN neurons, produces antinociception and analgesia. The spinal mechanism of OT is, however, still unclear and requires further investigation. We have used patch clamp recording of lamina II neurons in spinal cord slices and immunocytochemistry in order to identify PVN-activated neurons in the superficial layers of the spinal cord and attempted to determine how this neuronal population may lead to OT-mediated antinociception. Results We show that OT released during PVN stimulation specifically activates a subpopulation of lamina II glutamatergic interneurons which are localized in the most superficial layers of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord (lamina I-II. This OT-specific stimulation of glutamatergic neurons allows the recruitment of all GABAergic interneurons in lamina II which produces a generalized elevation of local inhibition, a phenomenon which might explain the reduction of incoming Aδ and C primary afferent-mediated sensory messages. Conclusion Our results obtained in lamina II of the spinal cord provide the first clear evidence of a specific local neuronal network that is activated by OT release to induce antinociception. This OT-specific pathway might represent a novel and interesting therapeutic target for the management of neuropathic and inflammatory pain.

  17. IL-6 mediated degeneration of forebrain GABAergic interneurons and cognitive impairment in aged mice through activation of neuronal NADPH oxidase.

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    Laura L Dugan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multiple studies have shown that plasma levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6 are elevated in patients with important and prevalent adverse health conditions, including atherosclerosis, diabetes, obesity, obstructive sleep apnea, hypertension, and frailty. Higher plasma levels of IL-6, in turn, increase the risk of many conditions associated with aging including age-related cognitive decline. However, the mechanisms underlying this association between IL-6 and cognitive vulnerability remain unclear. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We investigated the role of IL-6 in brain aging in young (4 mo and aged (24 mo wild-type C57BL6 and genetically-matched IL-6(-/- mice, and determined that IL-6 was necessary and sufficient for increased neuronal expression of the superoxide-producing immune enzyme, NADPH-oxidase, and this was mediated by non-canonical NFkappaB signaling. Furthermore, superoxide production by NADPH-oxidase was directly responsible for age-related loss of parvalbumin (PV-expressing GABAergic interneurons, neurons essential for normal information processing, encoding, and retrieval in hippocampus and cortex. Targeted deletion of IL-6 or elimination of superoxide by chronic treatment with a superoxide-dismutase mimetic prevented age-related loss of PV-interneurons and reversed age-related cognitive deficits on three standard tests of spatial learning and recall. CONCLUSIONS: Present results indicate that IL-6 mediates age-related loss of critical PV-expressing GABAergic interneurons through increased neuronal NADPH-oxidase-derived superoxide production, and that rescue of these interneurons preserves cognitive performance in aging mice, suggesting that elevated peripheral IL-6 levels may be directly and mechanistically linked to long-lasting cognitive deficits in even normal older individuals. Further, because PV-interneurons are also selectively affected by commonly used anesthetic agents and drugs, our findings

  18. Gap Junction-Mediated Signaling from Motor Neurons Regulates Motor Generation in the Central Circuits of Larval Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Teruyuki; Kohsaka, Hiroshi; Nose, Akinao

    2017-02-22

    In this study, we used the peristaltic crawling of Drosophila larvae as a model to study how motor patterns are regulated by central circuits. We built an experimental system that allows simultaneous application of optogenetics and calcium imaging to the isolated ventral nerve cord (VNC). We then investigated the effects of manipulating local activity of motor neurons (MNs) on fictive locomotion observed as waves of MN activity propagating along neuromeres. Optical inhibition of MNs with halorhodopsin3 in a middle segment (A4, A5, or A6), but not other segments, dramatically decreased the frequency of the motor waves. Conversely, local activation of MNs with channelrhodopsin2 in a posterior segment (A6 or A7) increased the frequency of the motor waves. Since peripheral nerves mediating sensory feedback were severed in the VNC preparation, these results indicate that MNs send signals to the central circuits to regulate motor pattern generation. Our results also indicate segmental specificity in the roles of MNs in motor control. The effects of the local MN activity manipulation were lost in shaking-B(2) (shakB(2) ) or ogre(2) , gap-junction mutations in Drosophila, or upon acute application of the gap junction blocker carbenoxolone, implicating electrical synapses in the signaling from MNs. Cell-type-specific RNAi suggested shakB and ogre function in MNs and interneurons, respectively, during the signaling. Our results not only reveal an unexpected role for MNs in motor pattern regulation, but also introduce a powerful experimental system that enables examination of the input-output relationship among the component neurons in this system.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Motor neurons are generally considered passive players in motor pattern generation, simply relaying information from upstream interneuronal circuits to the target muscles. This study shows instead that MNs play active roles in the control of motor generation by conveying information via gap junctions to the

  19. Different Sonographic Faces of Ectopic Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanana, Charu; Gupta, Nishant; Bansal, Itisha; Hooda, Kusum; Sharma, Pranav; Gupta, Mohit; Gandhi, Darshan; Kumar, Yogesh

    2017-01-01

    Vaginal bleeding in the first trimester has wide differential diagnoses, the most common being a normal early intrauterine pregnancy, with other potential causes including spontaneous abortion and ectopic pregnancy. The incidence of ectopic pregnancy is approximately 2% of all reported pregnancies and is one of the leading causes of maternal mortality worldwide. Clinical signs and symptoms of ectopic pregnancy are often nonspecific. History of pelvic pain with bleeding and positive β-human chorionic gonadotropin should raise the possibility of ectopic pregnancy. Knowledge of the different locations of ectopic pregnancy is of utmost importance, in which ultrasound imaging plays a crucial role. This pictorial essay depicts sonographic findings and essential pitfalls in diagnosing ectopic pregnancy.

  20. Different Sonographic Faces of Ectopic Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charu Chanana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaginal bleeding in the first trimester has wide differential diagnoses, the most common being a normal early intrauterine pregnancy, with other potential causes including spontaneous abortion and ectopic pregnancy. The incidence of ectopic pregnancy is approximately 2% of all reported pregnancies and is one of the leading causes of maternal mortality worldwide. Clinical signs and symptoms of ectopic pregnancy are often nonspecific. History of pelvic pain with bleeding and positive β-human chorionic gonadotropin should raise the possibility of ectopic pregnancy. Knowledge of the different locations of ectopic pregnancy is of utmost importance, in which ultrasound imaging plays a crucial role. This pictorial essay depicts sonographic findings and essential pitfalls in diagnosing ectopic pregnancy.

  1. Different Sonographic Faces of Ectopic Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanana, Charu; Gupta, Nishant; Bansal, Itisha; Hooda, Kusum; Sharma, Pranav; Gupta, Mohit; Gandhi, Darshan; Kumar, Yogesh

    2017-01-01

    Vaginal bleeding in the first trimester has wide differential diagnoses, the most common being a normal early intrauterine pregnancy, with other potential causes including spontaneous abortion and ectopic pregnancy. The incidence of ectopic pregnancy is approximately 2% of all reported pregnancies and is one of the leading causes of maternal mortality worldwide. Clinical signs and symptoms of ectopic pregnancy are often nonspecific. History of pelvic pain with bleeding and positive β-human chorionic gonadotropin should raise the possibility of ectopic pregnancy. Knowledge of the different locations of ectopic pregnancy is of utmost importance, in which ultrasound imaging plays a crucial role. This pictorial essay depicts sonographic findings and essential pitfalls in diagnosing ectopic pregnancy.

  2. Ca2+ channels as integrators of G protein-mediated signaling in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strock, Jesse; Diversé-Pierluissi, María A

    2004-11-01

    The observations from Dunlap and Fischbach that transmitter-mediated shortening of the duration of action potentials could be caused by a decrease in calcium conductance led to numerous studies of the mechanisms of modulation of voltage-dependent calcium channels. Calcium channels are well known targets for inhibition by receptor-G protein pathways, and multiple forms of inhibition have been described. Inhibition of Ca(2+) channels can be mediated by G protein betagamma-subunits or by kinases, such as protein kinase C and tyrosine kinases. In the last few years, it has been shown that integration of G protein signaling can take place at the level of the calcium channel by regulation of the interaction of the channel pore-forming subunit with different cellular proteins.

  3. Bradykinin as a pain mediator: receptors are localized to sensory neurons, and antagonists have analgesic actions

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    Steranka, L.R.; Manning, D.C.; DeHaas, C.J.; Ferkany, J.W.; Borosky, S.A.; Connor, J.R.; Vavrek, R.J.; Stewart, J.M.; Snyder, S.H.

    1988-05-01

    Autoradiographic studies localize (/sup 3/H)bradykinin receptor binding sites to the substantia gelatinosa, dorsal root, and a subset of small cells in both the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia of the guinea pig. (/sup 3/H)Bradykinin labeling is also observed over myocardinal/coronary visceral afferent fibers. The localization of (/sup 3/H)bradykinin receptors to nociceptive pathways supports a role for bradykinin in pain mediation. Several bradkykinin antagonists block bradykinin-induced acute vascular pain in the rat. The bradykinin antagonists also relieve bradykinin- and urate-induced hyperalgesia in the rat paw. These results indicate that bradykinin is a physiologic mediator of pain and that bradykinin antagonists have analgesic activity in both acute and chronic pain models.

  4. Hippocampal neuronal nitric oxide synthase mediates the stress-related depressive behaviors of glucocorticoids by downregulating glucocorticoid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qi-Gang; Zhu, Li-Juan; Chen, Chen; Wu, Hai-Yin; Luo, Chun-Xia; Chang, Lei; Zhu, Dong-Ya

    2011-05-25

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the behavioral effects of glucocorticoids are poorly understood. We report here that hippocampal neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is a crucial mediator. Chronic mild stress and glucocorticoids exposures caused hippocampal nNOS overexpression via activating mineralocorticoid receptor. In turn, hippocampal nNOS-derived nitric oxide (NO) significantly downregulated local glucocorticoid receptor expression through both soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)/cGMP and peroxynitrite (ONOO(-))/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signal pathways, and therefore elevated hypothalamic corticotrophin-releasing factor, a peptide that governs the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. More importantly, nNOS deletion or intrahippocampal nNOS inhibition and NO-cGMP signaling blockade (using NO scavenger or sGC inhibitor) prevented the corticosterone-induced behavioral modifications, suggesting that hippocampal nNOS is necessary for the role of glucocorticoids in mediating depressive behaviors. In addition, directly delivering ONOO(-) donor into hippocampus caused depressive-like behaviors. Our findings reveal a role of hippocampal nNOS in regulating the behavioral effects of glucocorticoids.

  5. Synaptic activity protects neurons against calcium-mediated oxidation and contraction of mitochondria during excitotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depp, Constanze; Bas-Orth, Carlos; Schroeder, Lisa; Hellwig, Andrea; Bading, Hilmar

    2017-10-07

    Excitotoxicity triggered by extrasynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs) has been implicated in many neurodegenerative conditions, including Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and stroke. Mitochondrial calcium overload leading to mitochondrial dysfunction represents an early event in excitotoxicity. Neurons are rendered resistant to excitotoxicity by previous periods of synaptic activity that activates a nuclear calcium-driven neuroprotective gene program. This process, termed acquired neuroprotection, involves transcriptional repression of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter leading to a reduction in excitotoxcity-associated mitochondrial calcium load. As mitochondrial calcium and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) may be linked, we monitored excitotoxicity-associated changes in the mitochondrial redox status using the ratiometric glutathione redox potential indicator, Grx1-roGFP2, targeted to the mitochondrial matrix. Aim of this study was to investigate if suppression of oxidative stress underlies mitoprotection afforded by synaptic activity. We found that synaptic activity protects primary rat hippocampal neurons against acute excitotoxicity-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress and mitochondrial contraction associated with it. Downregulation of the mitochondrial uniporter by genetic means mimics the protective effect of synaptic activity on mitochondrial redox status. These findings indicate that oxidative stress acts downstream of mitochondrial calcium overload in excitotoxicity. Innovation and conclusion: We established mito-Grx1-roGFP2 as a reliable and sensitive tool to monitor rapid redox changes in mitochondria during excitotoxicity. Our results highlight the importance of developing means of blocking mitochondrial calcium overload for therapeutic targeting of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases.

  6. Neuronal plasticity in chronic pancreatitis is mediated via the neurturin/GFRα2 axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Ihsan Ekin; Wang, Kun; Tieftrunk, Elke; Giese, Nathalia A; Xing, Baocai; Friess, Helmut; Kehl, Timo; Ceyhan, Güralp O

    2012-11-01

    The glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family member neurturin (NRTN) and its receptor GFRα2 play a deciding role in the normal development of pancreatic parasympathetic innervation. In this study, we aimed at investigating the role of NRTN/GFRα2 axis in pancreatic neuropathy in human chronic pancreatitis (CP). Expression of NRTN/GFRα2 was compared between normal human pancreas (NP) and CP tissues via immunohistochemistry, immunoblotting, and quantitative RT-PCR and correlated to abdominal pain sensation. To elucidate the impact of NRTN in pancreatic neuroplasticity, neuronal phenotype and glial density were quantified via an in vitro neuroplasticity assay in dissociated newborn rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cultured 1) in CP tissue extracts depleted from NRTN, 2) in NP, 3) in untreated CP tissue extracts, and 4) CP extracts in which nerve growth factor, glial cell derived-neurotrophic factor, or TGF-β(1) was depleted. NRTN and GFRα2 were highly upregulated in CP, especially in intrapancreatic nerves and the extracellular matrix. CP tissue demonstrated increased amounts of mature multimeric NRTN and elevated levels of GFRα2. The noticeable neurotrophic effect of CP tissue extracts on DRG neurons was diminished upon blockade of NRTN from these extracts. However, blockade of NRTN from CP extracts did not influence the density of DRG glia cells. In conclusion, the NRTN/GFRα2 axis is activated during the course of CP and represents a major key player in the reactive neural alterations in CP. This is the first study to provide functional evidence for the contribution of neurotrophic factors to neuroplasticity in CP.

  7. Membrane coordination of receptors and channels mediating the inhibition of neuronal ion currents by ADP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafar, Hend; Dominguez Rodriguez, Manuel; Chandaka, Giri K; Salzer, Isabella; Boehm, Stefan; Schicker, Klaus

    2016-09-01

    ADP and other nucleotides control ion currents in the nervous system via various P2Y receptors. In this respect, Cav2 and Kv7 channels have been investigated most frequently. The fine tuning of neuronal ion channel gating via G protein coupled receptors frequently relies on the formation of higher order protein complexes that are organized by scaffolding proteins and harbor receptors and channels together with interposed signaling components. However, ion channel complexes containing P2Y receptors have not been described. Therefore, the regulation of Cav2.2 and Kv7.2/7.3 channels via P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors and the coordination of these ion channels and receptors in the plasma membranes of tsA 201 cells have been investigated here. ADP inhibited currents through Cav2.2 channels via both P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors with phospholipase C and pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins being involved, respectively. The nucleotide controlled the gating of Kv7 channels only via P2Y1 and phospholipase C. In fluorescence energy transfer assays using conventional as well as total internal reflection (TIRF) microscopy, both P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors were found juxtaposed to Cav2.2 channels, but only P2Y1, and not P2Y12, was in close proximity to Kv7 channels. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching in TIRF microscopy, evidence for a physical interaction was obtained for the pair P2Y12/Cav2.2, but not for any other receptor/channel combination. These results reveal a membrane juxtaposition of P2Y receptors and ion channels in parallel with the control of neuronal ion currents by ADP. This juxtaposition may even result in apparent physical interactions between receptors and channels.

  8. HIPP neurons in the dentate gyrus mediate the cholinergic modulation of background context memory salience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Syed Ahsan; Albrecht, Anne; Çalışkan, Gürsel; Müller, Bettina; Demiray, Yunus Emre; Ludewig, Susann; Meis, Susanne; Faber, Nicolai; Hartig, Roland; Schraven, Burkhart; Lessmann, Volkmar; Schwegler, Herbert; Stork, Oliver

    2017-08-04

    Cholinergic neuromodulation in the hippocampus controls the salience of background context memory acquired in the presence of elemental stimuli predicting an aversive reinforcement. With pharmacogenetic inhibition we here demonstrate that hilar perforant path-associated (HIPP) cells of the dentate gyrus mediate the devaluation of background context memory during Pavlovian fear conditioning. The salience adjustment is sensitive to reduction of hilar neuropeptide Y (NPY) expression via dominant negative CREB expression in HIPP cells and to acute blockage of NPY-Y1 receptors in the dentate gyrus during conditioning. We show that NPY transmission and HIPP cell activity contribute to inhibitory effects of acetylcholine in the dentate gyrus and that M1 muscarinic receptors mediate the cholinergic activation of HIPP cells as well as their control of background context salience. Our data provide evidence for a peptidergic local circuit in the dentate gyrus that mediates the cholinergic encoding of background context salience during fear memory acquisition.Intra-hippocampal circuits are essential for associating a background context with behaviorally salient stimuli and involve cholinergic modulation at SST(+) interneurons. Here the authors show that the salience of the background context memory is modulated through muscarinic activation of NPY(+) hilar perforant path associated interneurons and NPY signaling in the dentate gyrus.

  9. Ectopic pregnancy-derived human trophoblastic stem cells regenerate dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathway to treat parkinsonian rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tony Tung-Yin; Tsai, Cheng-Fang; Hsieh, Tsung-Hsun; Chen, Jia-Jin Jason; Wang, Yu-Chih; Kao, Mi-Chun; Wu, Ruey-Meei; Singh, Sher; Tsai, Eing-Mei; Lee, Jau-Nan

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is a potential strategy to treat patients with Parkinson's disease (PD); however, several practical limitations remain. As such, finding the appropriate stem cell remains the primary issue in regenerative medicine today. We isolated a pre-placental pluripotent stem cell from the chorionic villi of women with early tubal ectopic pregnancies. Our objectives in this study were (i) to identify the characteristics of hTS cells as a potential cell source for therapy; and (ii) to test if hTS cells can be used as a potential therapeutic strategy for PD. hTS cells expressed gene markers of both the trophectoderm (TE) and the inner cell mass (ICM). hTS cells exhibited genetic and biological characteristics similar to that of hES cells, yet genetically distinct from placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells. All-trans retinoic acid (RA) efficiently induced hTS cells into trophoblast neural stem cells (tNSCs) in 1-day. Overexpression of transcription factor Nanog was possibly achieved through a RA-induced non-genomic c-Src/Stat3/Nanog signaling pathway mediated by the subcellular c-Src mRNA localization for the maintenance of pluripotency in tNSCs. tNSC transplantation into the lesioned striatum of acute and chronic PD rats not only improved behavioral deficits but also regenerated dopaminergic neurons in the nigrostriatal pathway, evidenced by immunofluorescent and immunohistological analyses at 18-weeks. Furthermore, tNSCs showed immunological advantages for the application in regenerative medicine. We successfully isolated and characterized the unique ectopic pregnancy-derived hTS cells. hTS cells are pluripotent stem cells that can be efficiently induced to tNSCs with positive results in PD rat models. Our data suggest that the hTS cell is a dynamic stem cell platform that is potentially suitable for use in disease models, drug discovery, and cell therapy such as PD.

  10. Fluorescent protein tagging of endogenous protein in brain neurons using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knock-in and in utero electroporation techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Takeshi; Mori, Takuma; Kurihara, Taiga; Kawase, Shiori; Koike, Rie; Satoga, Michiru; Cao, Xueshan; Li, Xue; Yanagawa, Toru; Sakurai, Takayuki; Shindo, Takayuki; Tabuchi, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing is a powerful technique for studying gene functions. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene knock-in has recently been applied to various cells and organisms. Here, we successfully knocked in an EGFP coding sequence at the site immediately after the first ATG codon of the β-actin gene in neurons in the brain by the combined use of the CRISPR/Cas9 system and in utero electroporation technique, resulting in the expression of the EGFP-tagged β-actin protein in cortical layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons. We detected EGFP fluorescence signals in the soma and neurites of EGFP knock-in neurons. These signals were particularly abundant in the head of dendritic spines, corresponding to the localization of the endogenous β-actin protein. EGFP knock-in neurons showed no detectable changes in spine density and basic electrophysiological properties. In contrast, exogenously overexpressed EGFP-β-actin showed increased spine density and EPSC frequency, and changed resting membrane potential. Thus, our technique provides a potential tool to elucidate the localization of various endogenous proteins in neurons by epitope tagging without altering neuronal and synaptic functions. This technique can be also useful for introducing a specific mutation into genes to study the function of proteins and genomic elements in brain neurons. PMID:27782168

  11. Analysis of BH3-only proteins upregulated in response to oxygen/glucose deprivation in cortical neurons identifies Bmf but not Noxa as potential mediator of neuronal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, S; Anilkumar, U; Chen, G; Ramírez-Peinado, S; Galindo-Moreno, J; Muñoz-Pinedo, C; Prehn, J H M

    2014-10-09

    Stress signaling in response to oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) and ischemic injury activates a group of pro-apoptotic genes, the Bcl-2 homology domain 3 (BH3)-only proteins, which are capable of activating the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Targeted studies previously identified the BH3-only proteins Puma, Bim and Bid to have a role in ischemic/hypoxic neuronal injury. We here investigated the transcriptional activation of pro-apoptotic BH3-only proteins after OGD-induced injury in murine neocortical neurons. We observed a potent and early upregulation of noxa at mRNA and protein level, and a significant increase in Bmf protein levels during OGD in neocortical neurons and in the ipsilateral cortex of mice subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). Surprisingly, gene deficiency in noxa reduced neither OGD- nor glutamate-induced neuronal injury in cortical neurons and failed to influence infarct size or neurological deficits after tMCAO. In contrast, bmf deficiency induced significant protection against OGD- or glutamate-induced injury in cultured neurons, and bmf-deficient mice showed reduced neurological deficits after tMCAO in vivo. Collectively, our data not only point to a role of Bmf as a BH3-only protein contributing to excitotoxic and ischemic neuronal injury but also demonstrate that the early and potent induction of noxa does not influence ischemic neuronal injury.

  12. Epidemiology of Ectopic Pregnancy in Hamadan Province

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    Fatemeh Shobeiri

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The blastocyst implantation in any place other than uterus cavity endometrium is called ectopic pregnancy. The prevalence of ectopic pregnancy is different in various countries. This study has been conducted to investigate the epidemiology of ectopic pregnancy in Hamadan province during 2000-2010.Materials and Methods: The present study is a retrospective descriptive study. The data on 872 ectopic pregnancies were extracted by questionnaires from the files in the records department of hospitals and delivery centers in Hamadan province during 2000-2010. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and the obtained data were analyzed using SPSS-16 software.Results: The frequency of ectopic pregnancy in Hamadan province during 2000-2010 was averagely 2.6 per 1000 pregnancies. Tubal pregnancy with 95.2% is the most prevalent type of ectopic pregnancy most of which had occurred in the right tube (52.4%. Most ectopic pregnancies (52.2% were in the age group of 25-34.Conclusion: The prevalence of ectopic pregnancy in Hamadan province during the mentioned years has been 2.6 in 1000 pregnancies, which is lower compared to many existing data. However, the prevalence of ectopic pregnancy in this province has increased over time, so that it has become 3.3 times as much from 2000-2010.

  13. Ectopic tooth in maxillary sinus: Case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanojam, Shandilya; Halli, Rajshekhar; Hebbale, Manjula; Bhardwaj, Smita

    2013-01-01

    Ectopic eruption of a tooth within the dentate region of the jaws is often noticed in clinical practice and is well documented in the literature. But the ectopic eruption into the non dentate region is rare and scantly documented. The maxillary sinus is one such a non dentate region, apart from nasal septum, mandibular condyle, coronoid process and the palate, to accommodate such ectopic eruptions of teeth. Due to its rarity and lack of consensus over its management, the incidence deserves to be added to the literature and discussed. Early surgical intervention for removal of ectopic tooth along with enucleation of the associated cyst, if any, is the treatment of choice.

  14. (Pro)renin receptor mediates both angiotensin II-dependent and -independent oxidative stress in neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hua; Li, Wencheng; Seth, Dale M; Nair, Anand R; Francis, Joseph; Feng, Yumei

    2013-01-01

    The binding of renin or prorenin to the (pro)renin receptor (PRR) promotes angiotensin (Ang) II formation and mediates Ang II-independent signaling pathways. In the central nervous system (CNS), Ang II regulates blood pressure via inducing oxidative stress; however, the role of PRR-mediated Ang II-independent signaling pathways in oxidative stress in the CNS remains undefined. To address this question, Neuro-2A cells were infected with control virus or an adeno-associated virus encoding the human PRR. Human PRR over-expression alone increased ROS levels, NADPH oxidase activity, as well as NADPH oxidase (NOX) isoforms 2 and 4 mRNA expression levels and these effects were not blocked by losartan. Moreover, the increase in NOX 2 and NOX 4 mRNA levels, NADPH oxidase activity, and ROS levels induced by PRR over-expression was prevented by mitogen activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (MAPK/ERK1/2) inhibition, and phosphoinositide 3 kinase/Akt (IP3/Akt) inhibition, indicating that PRR regulates NOX activity and ROS formation in neuro-2A cells through Ang II-independent ERK1/2 and IP3/Akt activation. Interestingly, at a concentration of 2 nM or higher, prorenin promoted Ang II formation, and thus further increased the ROS levels in cultured Neuro-2A cells via PRR. In conclusion, human PRR over-expression induced ROS production through both angiotensin II-dependent and -independent mechanisms. We showed that PRR-mediated angiotensin II-independent ROS formation is associated with activation of the MAPK/ERK1/2 and PI3/Akt signaling pathways and up-regulation of mRNA level of NOX 2 and NOX4 isoforms in neuronal cells.

  15. Silica nanoparticles mediated neuronal cell death in corpus striatum of rat brain: implication of mitochondrial, endoplasmic reticulum and oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parveen, Arshiya; Rizvi, Syed Husain Mustafa; Mahdi, Farzana; Tripathi, Sandeep; Ahmad, Iqbal; Shukla, Rajendra K.; Khanna, Vinay K.; Singh, Ranjana; Patel, Devendra K.; Mahdi, Abbas Ali

    2014-11-01

    Extensive uses of silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) in biomedical and industrial fields have increased the risk of exposure, resulting concerns about their safety. We focussed on some of the safety aspects by studying neurobehavioural impairment, oxidative stress (OS), neurochemical and ultrastructural changes in corpus striatum (CS) of male Wistar rats exposed to 80-nm SiNPs. Moreover, its role in inducing mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated neuronal apoptosis was also investigated. The results demonstrated impairment in neurobehavioural indices, and a significant increase in lipid peroxide levels (LPO), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide (O2 -) and protein carbonyl content, whereas there was a significant decrease in the activities of the enzymes, manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT) and reduced glutathione (GSH) content, suggesting impaired antioxidant defence system. Protein (cytochrome c, Bcl-2, Bax, p53, caspase-3, caspase 12 and CHOP/Gadd153) and mRNA (Bcl-2, Bax, p53 and CHOP/Gadd153, cytochrome c) expression studies of mitochondrial and ER stress-related apoptotic factors suggested that both the cell organelles were involved in OS-mediated apoptosis in treated rat brain CS. Moreover, electron microscopic studies clearly showed mitochondrial and ER dysfunction. In conclusion, the result of the study suggested that subchronic SiNPs' exposure has the potential to alter the behavioural activity and also to bring about changes in biochemical, neurochemical and ultrastructural profiles in CS region of rat brain. Furthermore, we also report SiNPs-induced apoptosis in CS, through mitochondrial and ER stress-mediated signalling.

  16. Neuronal GLP1R mediates liraglutide’s anorectic but not glucose-lowering effect

    OpenAIRE

    Sisley, Stephanie; Gutierrez-Aguilar, Ruth; Scott, Michael; D’Alessio, David A.; Sandoval, Darleen A.; Seeley, Randy J

    2014-01-01

    Glucose control and weight loss are cornerstones of type 2 diabetes treatment. Currently, only glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) analogs are able to achieve both weight loss and glucose tolerance. Both glucose and body weight are regulated by the brain, which contains GLP1 receptors (GLP1R). Even though the brain is poised to mediate the effects of GLP1 analogs, it remains unclear whether the glucose- and body weight–lowering effects of long-acting GLP1R agonists are via direct action on CNS GLP...

  17. Serotonergic neurons mediate dyskinesia side effects in Parkinson's patients with neural transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politis, Marios; Wu, Kit; Loane, Clare; Quinn, Niall P; Brooks, David J; Rehncrona, Stig; Bjorklund, Anders; Lindvall, Olle; Piccini, Paola

    2010-06-30

    Troublesome involuntary movements in the absence of dopaminergic medication, so-called off-medication dyskinesias, are a serious adverse effect of fetal neural grafts that hinders the development of cell-based therapies for Parkinson's disease. The mechanisms underlying these dyskinesias are not well understood, and it is not known whether they are the same as in the dyskinesias induced by l-dopa treatment. Using in vivo brain imaging, we show excessive serotonergic innervation in the grafted striatum of two patients with Parkinson's disease, who had exhibited major motor recovery after transplantation with dopamine-rich fetal mesencephalic tissue but had later developed off-medication dyskinesias. The dyskinesias were markedly attenuated by systemic administration of a serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] receptor (5-HT(1A)) agonist, which dampens transmitter release from serotonergic neurons, indicating that the dyskinesias were caused by the serotonergic hyperinnervation. Our observations suggest strategies for avoiding and treating graft-induced dyskinesias that result from cell therapies for Parkinson's disease with fetal tissue or stem cells.

  18. IP3-mediated octopamine-induced synaptic enhancement of crayfish LG neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Makoto; Nagayama, Toshiki

    2012-08-01

    The biogenic amines, octopamine and serotonin, modulate the synaptic activity of the lateral giant interneuron (LG) circuitry of the crayfish escape behavior. Bath application of both octopamine and serotonin enhances the synaptic responses of LG to sensory stimulation. We have shown previously (Araki et al. J Neurophysiol 94:2644-2652, 2005) that a serotonin-induced enhancement of the LG response was mediated by an increase in cAMP levels following activation of adenylate cyclase; however, octopamine acts independently. Here, we clarify how octopamine enhances the LG response during sensory stimulation using physiological and pharmacological analyses. When phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122 was directly injected into the LG before biogenic amine application, it abolished the enhancing effect of octopamine on direct sensory input to the LG, but did not block indirect input via sensory interneurons or the effect of serotonin. Direct injection of IP(3), and its analogue adenophostin A, into the LG increased the synaptic response of the LG to sensory stimulation. Thus, IP(3) mediates octopamine-induced synaptic enhancement of the LG, but serotonin acts independently. These results indicate that both octopamine and serotonin enhance the synaptic responses of the LG to sensory stimulation, but that they activate two different signaling cascades in the LG.

  19. Roles of octopaminergic and dopaminergic neurons in mediating reward and punishment signals in insect visual learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unoki, Sae; Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Mizunami, Makoto

    2006-10-01

    Insects, like vertebrates, have considerable ability to associate visual, olfactory or other sensory signals with reward or punishment. Previous studies in crickets, honey bees and fruit-flies have suggested that octopamine (OA, invertebrate counterpart of noradrenaline) and dopamine (DA) mediate various kinds of reward and punishment signals in olfactory learning. However, whether the roles of OA and DA in mediating positive and negative reinforcing signals can be generalized to learning of sensory signals other than odors remained unknown. Here we first established a visual learning paradigm in which to associate a visual pattern with water reward or saline punishment for crickets and found that memory after aversive conditioning decayed much faster than that after appetitive conditioning. Then, we pharmacologically studied the roles of OA and DA in appetitive and aversive forms of visual learning. Crickets injected with epinastine or mianserin, OA receptor antagonists, into the hemolymph exhibited a complete impairment of appetitive learning to associate a visual pattern with water reward, but aversive learning with saline punishment was unaffected. By contrast, fluphenazine, chlorpromazine or spiperone, DA receptor antagonists, completely impaired aversive learning without affecting appetitive learning. The results demonstrate that OA and DA participate in reward and punishment conditioning in visual learning. This finding, together with results of previous studies on the roles of OA and DA in olfactory learning, suggests ubiquitous roles of the octopaminergic reward system and dopaminergic punishment system in insect learning.

  20. γ-Aminobutyric Acid B Receptor Mediated Inhibition of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Neurons Is Suppressed by Kisspeptin-G Protein-Coupled Receptor 54 Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunguang; Bosch, Martha A.; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.; Kelly, Martin J.

    2009-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is one of the most important neurotransmitters that regulate the excitability of GnRH neurons. Numerous studies have shown that GABA activates Cl− currents in GnRH neurons, and these effects are antagonized by GABAA receptor antagonists. The GABAB receptor is a heterodimer composed of GABAB R1 and R2, and although both subunits have been localized in GnRH neurons, nothing is known about the cellular signaling of this Gαi,o-coupled receptor in GnRH neurons. Using whole-cell recordings from mouse enhanced green fluorescent protein-GnRH neurons, we found that the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen hyperpolarized GnRH neurons through activation of an inwardly rectifying K+ current in a concentration-dependent manner. The effects of baclofen were antagonized by the selective GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 52432 with a Ki (inhibitory constant) of 85 nm. Furthermore, in the presence of the GABAA receptor antagonist picrotoxin, GABA hyperpolarized GnRH neurons in a similar manner. Treatment with 17β-estradiol as compared with oil vehicle did not significantly alter either the EC50 for the baclofen-induced response (0.8 ± 0.1 vs. 1.0 ± 0.1 μm, respectively) or the maximal outward current (10.8 ± 1.7 pA vs. 11.4 ± 0.6 pA, respectively) in GnRH neurons. However, the outward current (and membrane hyperpolarization) was abrogated by submaximal concentrations of the G protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) agonist kisspeptin-10 in both groups, indicating that Gαq-coupled (GPR54) can desensitize the GABAB receptor-mediated response. Therefore, the activation of GABAB receptors in GnRH neurons may provide increased inhibitory tone during estrogen-negative feedback states that is attenuated by kisspeptin during positive feedback. PMID:19164470

  1. LKB1-mediated spatial control of GSK3beta and adenomatous polyposis coli contributes to centrosomal forward movement and neuronal migration in the developing neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Naoyuki; Sanada, Kamon

    2010-06-30

    Neuronal migration is an essential process for the development of the cerebral cortex. We have previously shown that LKB1, an evolutionally conserved polarity kinase, plays a critical role in neuronal migration in the developing neocortex. Here we show that LKB1 mediates Ser9 phosphorylation of GSK3beta to inactivate the kinase at the leading process tip of migrating neurons in the developing neocortex. This enables the microtubule plus-end binding protein adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) to localize at the distal ends of microtubules in the tip, thereby stabilizing microtubules near the leading edge. We also show that LKB1 activity, Ser9 phosphorylation of GSK3beta, and APC binding to the distal ends of microtubules are required for the microtubule stabilization in the leading process tip, centrosomal forward movement, and neuronal migration. These findings suggest that LKB1-induced spatial control of GSK3beta and APC at the leading process tip mediates the stabilization of microtubules within the tip and is critical for centrosomal forward movement and neuronal migration in the developing neocortex.

  2. α-Actinin-2 mediates spine morphology and assembly of the post-synaptic density in hippocampal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Hodges

    Full Text Available Dendritic spines are micron-sized protrusions that constitute the primary post-synaptic sites of excitatory neurotransmission in the brain. Spines mature from a filopodia-like protrusion into a mushroom-shaped morphology with a post-synaptic density (PSD at its tip. Modulation of the actin cytoskeleton drives these morphological changes as well as the spine dynamics that underlie learning and memory. Several PSD molecules respond to glutamate receptor activation and relay signals to the underlying actin cytoskeleton to regulate the structural changes in spine and PSD morphology. α-Actinin-2 is an actin filament cross-linker, which localizes to dendritic spines, enriched within the post-synaptic density, and implicated in actin organization. We show that loss of α-actinin-2 in rat hippocampal neurons creates an increased density of immature, filopodia-like protrusions that fail to mature into a mushroom-shaped spine during development. α-Actinin-2 knockdown also prevents the recruitment and stabilization of the PSD in the spine, resulting in failure of synapse formation, and an inability to structurally respond to chemical stimulation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA-type glutamate receptor. The Ca2+-insensitive EF-hand motif in α-actinin-2 is necessary for the molecule's function in regulating spine morphology and PSD assembly, since exchanging it for the similar but Ca2+-sensitive domain from α-actinin-4, another α-actinin isoform, inhibits its function. Furthermore, when the Ca2+-insensitive domain from α-actinin-2 is inserted into α-actinin-4 and expressed in neurons, it creates mature spines. These observations support a model whereby α-actinin-2, partially through its Ca2+-insensitive EF-hand motif, nucleates PSD formation via F-actin organization and modulates spine maturation to mediate synaptogenesis.

  3. Neurons in the amygdala play an important role in the neuronal network mediating a clonic form of audiogenic seizures both before and after audiogenic kindling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raisinghani, Manish; Faingold, Carl L

    2005-01-25

    Previous studies showed that neuronal network nuclei for behaviorally different forms of audiogenic seizure (AGS) exhibit similarities and important differences. The amygdala is involved differentially in tonic AGS as compared to clonic AGS networks. The role of the lateral amygdala (LAMG) undergoes major changes after AGS repetition (AGS kindling) in tonic forms of AGS. The present study examined the role of LAMG in a clonic form of AGS [genetically epilepsy-prone rats (GEPR-3s)] before and after AGS kindling using bilateral microinjection and chronic neuronal recordings. AGS kindling in GEPR-3s results in facial and forelimb (F&F) clonus, and this behavior could be blocked following bilateral microinjection of a NMDA antagonist (2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoate) without affecting generalized clonus. Higher AP7 doses blocked both generalized clonus and F&F clonus. LAMG neurons in GEPR-3s exhibited only onset type neuronal responses both before and after AGS kindling, unlike LAMG neurons in normal rats and a tonic form of AGS. A significantly greater LAMG neuronal firing rate occurred after AGS kindling at high acoustic intensities. The latency of LAMG neuronal firing increased significantly after AGS kindling. Burst firing occurred during wild running and generalized clonic behaviors before and after AGS kindling. Burst firing also occurred during F&F clonus after AGS kindling. These findings indicate that LAMG neurons play a critical role in the neuronal network for generalized clonus as well as F&F clonus in GEPR-3s, both before and after AGS kindling, which contrasts markedly with the role of LAMG in tonic AGS.

  4. AAV-mediated expression of BAG1 and ROCK2-shRNA promote neuronal survival and axonal sprouting in a rat model of rubrospinal tract injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challagundla, Malleswari; Koch, Jan Christoph; Ribas, Vinicius Toledo; Michel, Uwe; Kügler, Sebastian; Ostendorf, Thomas; Bradke, Frank; Müller, Hans Werner; Bähr, Mathias; Lingor, Paul

    2015-07-01

    A lesion to the rat rubrospinal tract is a model for traumatic spinal cord lesions and results in atrophy of the red nucleus neurons, axonal dieback, and locomotor deficits. In this study, we used adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated over-expression of BAG1 and ROCK2-shRNA in the red nucleus to trace [by co-expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)] and treat the rubrospinal tract after unilateral dorsal hemisection. We investigated the effects of targeted gene therapy on neuronal survival, axonal sprouting of the rubrospinal tract, and motor recovery 12 weeks after unilateral dorsal hemisection at Th8 in rats. In addition to the evaluation of BAG1 and ROCK2 as therapeutic targets in spinal cord injury, we aimed to demonstrate the feasibility and the limits of an AAV-mediated protein over-expression versus AAV.shRNA-mediated down-regulation in this traumatic CNS lesion model. Our results demonstrate that BAG1 and ROCK2-shRNA both promote neuronal survival of red nucleus neurons and enhance axonal sprouting proximal to the lesion.

  5. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 mediates the electrophysiological and toxic actions of the cycad derivative beta-N-Methylamino-L-alanine on substantia nigra pars compacta DAergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucchiaroni, Maria Letizia; Viscomi, Maria Teresa; Bernardi, Giorgio; Molinari, Marco; Guatteo, Ezia; Mercuri, Nicola B

    2010-04-14

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-Parkinson dementia complex (ALS-PDC) is a neurodegenerative disease with ALS, parkinsonism, and Alzheimer's symptoms that is prevalent in the Guam population. beta-N-Methylamino alanine (BMAA) has been proposed as the toxic agent damaging several neuronal types in ALS-PDC, including substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic (SNpc DAergic) neurons. BMAA is a mixed glutamate receptor agonist, but the specific pathways activated in DAergic neurons are not yet known. We combined electrophysiology, microfluorometry, and confocal microscopy analysis to monitor membrane potential/current, cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) changes, cytochrome-c (cyt-c) immunoreactivity, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production induced by BMAA. Rapid toxin applications caused reversible membrane depolarization/inward current and increase of firing rate and [Ca(2+)](i) in DAergic neurons. The inward current (I(BMAA)) was mainly mediated by activation of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1), coupled to transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, and to a lesser extent, AMPA receptors. Indeed, mGluR1 (CPCCOEt) and TRP channels (SKF 96365; Ruthenium Red) antagonists reduced I(BMAA), and a small component of I(BMAA) was reduced by the AMPA receptor antagonist CNQX. Calcium accumulation was mediated by mGluR1 but not by AMPA receptors. Application of a low concentration of NMDA potentiated the BMAA-mediated calcium increase. Prolonged exposure to BMAA caused significant modifications of membrane properties, calcium overload, cell shrinkage, massive cyt-c release into the cytosol and ROS production. In SNpc GABAergic neurons, BMAA activated only AMPA receptors. Our study identifies the mGluR1-activated mechanism induced by BMAA that may cause the neuronal degeneration and parkinsonian symptoms seen in ALS-PDC. Moreover, environmental exposure to BMAA might possibly also contribute to idiopathic PD.

  6. G-protein-coupled receptor 30-mediated antiapoptotic effect of estrogen on spinal motor neurons following injury and its underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingyu; Hu, Rong; Ge, Hongfei; Duanmu, Wangsheng; Li, Yuhong; Xue, Xingseng; Hu, Shengli; Feng, Hua

    2015-08-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) may result in severe dysfunction of motor neurons. G-protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30) expression in the motor neurons of the ventral horn of the spinal cord mediates neuroprotection through estrogen signaling. The present study explored the antiapoptotic effect of estrogen, mediated by GPR30 following SCI, and the mechanisms underlying this effect. Spinal motor neurons from rats were cultured in vitro in order to establish cell models of oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). The effects of estrogen, the estrogen agonist, G1, and the estrogen inhibitor, G15, on motor neurons were observed using MTT assays. The effects of E2, G1 and G15 on spinal motor neuron apoptosis following OGD, were detected using flow cytometry. The role of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) inhibitor, LY294002, was also determined using flow cytometry. Rat SCI models were established. E2, G1 and E2+LY294002 were administered in vivo. Motor function was scored at 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 d following injury, using Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) standards. Cell activity in the estrogen and G1 groups was higher than that in the solvent group, whereas cell activity in the E2+G15 group was lower than that in the E2 group (Pestrogen group was significantly lower than that in the solvent group, whereas the proportion of apoptotic cells in the E2+G15 and E2+LY294002 groups was higher than that in the E2 group (PEstrogen thus appears to exert a protective effect on spinal motor neurons following OGD, via GPR30. The PI3K/Akt pathway may be one of those involved in the estrogen‑related antiapoptotic effects mediated by GPR30.

  7. Essential Roles of Natural Products and Gaseous Mediators on Neuronal Cell Death or Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Yoshinori; Kakizawa, Sho; Yamazawa, Toshiko

    2016-01-01

    Although precise cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration still remain enigmatic, key factors associated with degenerative disorders, such as glutamate toxicity and oxidative stress, have been recently identified. Accordingly, there has been growing interest in examining the effects of exogenous and endogenous molecules on neuroprotection and neurodegeneration. In this paper, we review recent studies on neuroprotective and/or neurodegenerative effects of natural products, such as caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid, and gaseous mediators, including hydrogen sulfide and nitric oxide. Furthermore, possible molecular mechanisms of these molecules in relation to glutamate signals are discussed. Insight into the pathophysiological role of these molecules will make progress in our understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative diseases, and is expected to lead to potential therapeutic approaches. PMID:27690018

  8. Neuron-restrictive silencer factor-mediated cyclic nucleotide gated channelopathy in experimental temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Shawn; Flynn, Corey; Dubé, Celine; Richichi, Cristina; Zha, Qinqin; Ghestem, Antoine; Esclapez, Monique; Bernard, Christophe; Baram, Tallie Z.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Enduring, abnormal expression and function of the ion channel hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-AMP gated channel type 1 (HCN1) occurs in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). We examined the underlying mechanisms, and queried if interfering with these mechanisms could modify disease course. Methods Experimental TLE was provoked by kainic acid-induced status epilepticus (SE), HCN1 channel repression was examined at mRNA, protein and functional levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was employed to identify the transcriptional mechanism of repressed hcn1 expression, and the basis for their endurance. Physical interaction of the repressor, NRSF, was abolished using decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs). Video-EEG recordings were performed to assess the onset and initial pattern of spontaneous seizures. Results Levels of NRSF and its physical binding to the hcn1 gene were augmented after SE, resulting in repression of hcn1 expression and HCN1-mediated currents (Ih), and reduced Ih-dependent resonance in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cell dendrites. Chromatin changes typical of enduring, epigenetic gene repression were apparent at the hcn1 gene within a week after SE. Administration of decoy ODNs comprising the NRSF DNA-binding sequence (NRSE) in vitro and in vivo, reduced NRSF binding to hcn1, prevented its repression and restored Ih function. In vivo, decoy NRSE-ODN treatment restored theta rhythm and altered the initial pattern of spontaneous seizures. Interpretation Acquired HCN1 channelopathy derives from NRSF-mediated transcriptional repression that endures via chromatin modification and may provide insight into the mechanisms of a number of channelopathies that co-exist with, and may contribute to, the conversion of a normal brain into an epileptic one. PMID:21905079

  9. Mesodiencephalic dopaminergic neuronal differentiation does not involve GLI2A-mediated SHH-signaling and is under the direct influence of canonical WNT signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesman, Simone; von Oerthel, Lars; Smidt, Marten P

    2014-01-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) and WNT proteins are key regulators in many developmental processes, like embryonic patterning and brain development. In the brain, SHH is expressed in a gradient starting in the floor plate (FP) progressing ventrally in the midbrain, where it is thought to be involved in the development and specification of mesodiencephalic dopaminergic (mdDA) neurons. GLI2A-mediated SHH-signaling induces the expression of Gli1, which is inhibited when cells start expressing SHH themselves. To determine whether mdDA neurons receive GLI2A-mediated SHH-signaling during differentiation, we used a BAC-transgenic mouse model expressing eGFP under the control of the Gli1 promoter. This mouse-model allowed for mapping of GLI2A-mediated SHH-signaling temporal and spatial in the mouse midbrain. Since mdDA neurons are born from E10.5, peaking at E11.0-E12.0, we examined Gli1-eGFP embryos at E11.5, E12.5, and E13.5, indicating whether Gli1 was induced before or during mdDA development and differentiation. Our data indicate that GLI2A-mediated SHH-signaling is not involved in mdDA neuronal differentiation. However, it appears to be involved in the differentiation of neurons which make up a subset of the red nucleus (RN). In order to detect whether mdDA neuronal differentiation may be under the control of canonical WNT-signaling, we used a transgenic mouse-line expressing LacZ under the influence of stable β-catenin. Here, we show that TH+ neurons of the midbrain receive canonical WNT-signaling during differentiation. Therefore, we suggest that early SHH-signaling is indirectly involved in mdDA development through early patterning of the midbrain area, whereas canonical WNT-signaling is directly involved in the differentiation of the mdDA neuronal population.

  10. Pro-inflammatory cytokines derived from West Nile virus (WNV-infected SK-N-SH cells mediate neuroinflammatory markers and neuronal death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerurkar Vivek R

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background WNV-associated encephalitis (WNVE is characterized by increased production of pro-inflammatory mediators, glial cells activation and eventual loss of neurons. WNV infection of neurons is rapidly progressive and destructive whereas infection of non-neuronal brain cells is limited. However, the role of neurons and pathological consequences of pro-inflammatory cytokines released as a result of WNV infection is unclear. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine the role of key cytokines secreted by WNV-infected neurons in mediating neuroinflammatory markers and neuronal death. Methods A transformed human neuroblastoma cell line, SK-N-SH, was infected with WNV at multiplicity of infection (MOI-1 and -5, and WNV replication kinetics and expression profile of key pro-inflammatory cytokines were analyzed by plaque assay, qRT-PCR, and ELISA. Cell death was measured in SK-N-SH cell line in the presence and absence of neutralizing antibodies against key pro-inflammatory cytokines using cell viability assay, TUNEL and flow cytometry. Further, naïve primary astrocytes were treated with UV-inactivated supernatant from mock- and WNV-infected SK-N-SH cell line and the activation of astrocytes was measured using flow cytometry and ELISA. Results WNV-infected SK-N-SH cells induced the expression of IL-1β, -6, -8, and TNF-α in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which coincided with increase in virus-induced cell death. Treatment of cells with anti-IL-1β or -TNF-α resulted in significant reduction of the neurotoxic effects of WNV. Furthermore treatment of naïve astrocytes with UV-inactivated supernatant from WNV-infected SK-N-SH cell line increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and key inflammatory cytokines. Conclusion Our results for the first time suggest that neurons are one of the potential sources of pro-inflammatory cytokines in WNV-infected brain and these neuron-derived cytokines contribute to WNV

  11. Ectopic fat depositions in obesity and diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, Jacqueline Thérèse

    2012-01-01

    The studies described in this thesis explored the effects of nutritional, exercise and pharmacological interventions on ectopic triglyceride accumulation in obese patients and/or patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Ectopic fat is defined as triglyceride (TG) storage in tissues,

  12. Minimally Invasive Management of Ectopic Pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitiello, Gerardo A; Cavnar, Michael J; Hajdu, Cristina; Khaykis, Inessa; Newman, Elliot; Melis, Marcovalerio; Pachter, H Leon; Cohen, Steven M

    2017-03-01

    The management of ectopic pancreas is not well defined. This study aims to determine the prevalence of symptomatic ectopic pancreas and identify those who may benefit from treatment, with a particular focus on robotically assisted surgical management. Our institutional pathology database was queried to identify a cohort of ectopic pancreas specimens. Additional clinical data regarding clinical symptomatology, diagnostic studies, and treatment were obtained through chart review. Nineteen cases of ectopic pancreas were found incidentally during surgery for another condition or found incidentally in a pathologic specimen (65.5%). Eleven patients (37.9%) reported prior symptoms, notably abdominal pain and/or gastrointestinal bleeding. The most common locations for ectopic pancreas were the duodenum and small bowel (31% and 27.6%, respectively). Three out of 29 cases (10.3%) had no symptoms, but had evidence of preneoplastic changes on pathology, while one harbored pancreatic cancer. Over the years, treatment of ectopic pancreas has shifted from open to laparoscopic and more recently to robotic surgery. Our experience is in line with existing evidence supporting surgical treatment of symptomatic or complicated ectopic pancreas. In the current era, minimally invasive and robotic surgery can be used safely and successfully for treatment of ectopic pancreas.

  13. Concurrent bilateral ectopic pregnancy: a rarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhleen Kaur

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral ectopic pregnancy is a rare twin gestation with only a few cases reported in the literature. We report a 30 year old woman without any high risk factor for ectopic pregnancy, who had concurrent bilateral ectopic pregnancy. A 30 year old female presented to the Gynecology emergency department complaining of vaginal bleeding and abdominal pain. The presumptive diagnosis of ruptured left sided ectopic pregnancy was made on basis of clinical findings and ultrasound finings. An emergency laparotomy was done revealed a hemoperitoneum of 1.5 liters, a ruptured left tubal pregnancy with active bleeding and right tubal un-ruptured ectopic was found. A bilateral salpingectomy was performed. Histopathology confirmed presence of chorionic villi in both tubes. In theory, laparoscopic salpingostomy is the best surgical approach in bilateral tubal pregnancy. However, bilateral salpingectomy may be necessary when both tubes are extensively damaged or are actively bleeding. Successful pregnancies have been reported after conservative surgical treatment of bilateral ectopic, but the risk of recurrence is high. Our decision for an emergency laparotomy followed by bilateral salpingectomy was based on the fact that the patient presented with acute abdomen and was haemodynamically unstable and there was extensive bilateral tubal damage. As the incidence of ectopic pregnancies is increasing concurrently with the incidences of pelvic inflammatory disease and use of assisted fertility techniques; it may be that these and ldquo;rare ectopics and rdquo; will become less uncommon. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(4.000: 1197-1199

  14. Autotransplantation of Ectopic Permanent Maxillary Incisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd Jalil, Laila; Muhd Noor, Nurhidayah

    2017-01-01

    The report presents examples of successful cases of autotransplantation of ectopic teeth as donor in the treatment of clinically missing maxillary anterior teeth in young patients. The transplanted teeth were either severely ectopic, inverted, rotated or in an unfavourable position that they are commonly sacrificed as a result. Details of surgical technique as well as clinical and radiographic assessments were discussed.

  15. GT1b-induced neurotoxicity is mediated by the Akt/GSK-3/tau signaling pathway but not caspase-3 in mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohn Sunghyang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gangliosides, sialic acid-containing glycosphingolipids exist in mammalian cell membranes particularly neuronal membranes. The trisialoganglioside (GT1b is one of the major brain gangliosides and acts as an endogenous regulator in the brain. We previously showed GT1b induces mesencephalic dopaminergic (DA neuronal death, both in vivo and in vitro. We further investigate the underlying mechanisms of GT1b neurotoxicity. Results Consistent with earlier findings, GT1b attenuated the DA neuron number and dopamine uptake level in mesencephalic cultures. Morphological evidence revealed GT1b-induced chromatin condensation and nuclear fragmentation as well as an increased number of TUNEL-positive cells, compared to control cultures. Interestingly, while GT1b enhanced caspase-3 activity, DEVD, a caspase-3 inhibitor, failed to rescue DA neuronal death. Immunoblot analysis revealed that GT1b inactivates Akt through dephosphorylation at both Ser473 and Thr308, subsequent dephosphorylation of GSK-3β, a substrate of Akt, and hyperphosphorylation of tau, downstream of GSK-3β. Moreover, a GSK-3β specific inhibitor, L803-mt, attenuated tau phosphorylation and rescued DA neurons from cell death in mesencephalic cultures. Conclusion Our data provide novel evidence that a Akt/GSK-3β/tau-dependent, but not caspase-3 signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in GT1b-mediated neurotoxic actions on mesencephalic DA neurons.

  16. Histaminergic H1 and H2 Receptors Mediate the Effects of Propofol on the Noradrenalin-Inhibited Neurons in Rat Ventrolateral Preoptic Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Yu; Qian, Kun; Zhang, Lin; Yu, Tian

    2017-02-09

    The ventrolateral preoptic nucleus is a sleep-promoting nucleus located in the basal forebrain. A commonly used intravenous anesthetic, propofol, had been reported to induce sleep spindles and augment the firing rate of neurons in ventrolateral preoptic nucleus, but the underlining mechanism is yet to be known. By using patch clamp recording on neuron in acute brain slice, present study tested if histaminergic H1 and H2 receptors play a role in the effect of propofol on the noradrenalin-inhibited neurons in ventrolateral preoptic nucleus. We found that the firing rate of noradrenalin-inhibited neurons were significantly augmented by propofol; the frequency of inhibitory postsynaptic currents of noradrenalin-inhibited neuron were evidently attenuated by propofol; such inhibition effect was suppressed by histamine; and both triprolidine (antagonist for H1 histamine receptor) and ranitidine (antagonist for H2 histamine receptor) were able to increase the inhibition rate of propofol in presence of histamine. Present study demonstrated that propofol-induced inhibition of inhibitory postsynaptic currents on noradrenalin-inhibited neurons were mediated by histaminergic H1 and H2 receptors.

  17. Revisiting Ectopic Pregnancy: A Pictorial Essay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artemis Petrides

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic pregnancies occur in approximately 1.4% of all pregnancies and account for 15% of pregnancy-related deaths. Considering the high degree of mortality, recognizing an ectopic pregnancy is important. Signs and symptoms of an ectopic pregnancy are nonspecific and include pain, vaginal bleeding, and an adnexal mass. Therefore, imaging can play a critical role in diagnosis. There are different types of ectopic pregnancies, which are tubal, cornual, cesarean scar, cervical, heterotopic, abdominal, and ovarian. Initial imaging evaluation of pregnant patients with pelvic symptoms is by ultrasonography, transabdominal, transvaginal or both. We review the sonographic appearance of different types of ectopic pregnancies that will aid in accurate and prompt diagnosis.

  18. Optimising the diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Janet; Davey, Mark; Hon, Mei-See; Behrens, Renée

    2016-05-01

    This retrospective cohort study reviewed the diagnosis of all ectopic pregnancies within a district general hospital over a 5-year period after the establishment of a dedicated Early Pregnancy Assessment Unit (EPAU). Of 215 ectopic pregnancies identified, notes were available for 208 (97%). Two-hundred and two cases were determined to have been diagnosed and managed as ectopic pregnancies. Six cases were excluded as they were pregnancies of unknown location managed as such. Overall, 91% were diagnosed by ultrasound scan, 5% were diagnosed clinically and 3% were diagnosed on serial human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) levels. This study found that the introduction of a dedicated, multi-professional, EPAU with a stable workforce improved ultrasound visualisation of ectopic pregnancies at first ultrasound scan from 22% prior to its commencement, to 61% over this period. The improvement in positive scan diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy was associated with a reduction in negative laparoscopy rate from 13% to 6%.

  19. Ectopic incisors in the maxillary sinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Satvinder Singh Bakshi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Ectopic tooth within the tooth bearing region is often noticed in clinical practice but ectopic eruption in non-dentate regions like maxillary sinus is rare. Rarer is the presence of multiple ectopic teeth involving both the maxillary incisors and canine and has not been reported yet. Method: A seventeen year old male presented with a complaints of dull pain on the right side of the face for past two years. Water’s view X-ray of PNS revealed dense non-specific opacification of the right maxillary sinus. Result: Antrostomy through Caldwell–Luc approach revealed three ectopic teeth in the right maxillary sinus. Later the teeth were identified to be central incisor, lateral incisor and canine. Conclusion: Rare finding of ectopic incisors in the maxillary sinus is reported and the need for interdisciplinary approach to patients is stressed upon.

  20. Ovarian Ectopic Pregnancy: a Rare Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Lotfian

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Ovarian pregnancy is an uncommon form of ectopic pregnancy which usually diagnosed so late. The aim of this study is to report a case of ovarian ectopic pregnancy Case presentation: A 19 years old woman, with a history of polycystic ovary, first pregnancy, gestation age 9 weeks and 4 days, visited the doctor. She was complaining of severe abdomen pain and vaginal spotting and she was bedridden because of threatened miscarriage. She had discharged from hospital with progesterone suppository prescription. Requesting a transvaginal ultrasound and heterogeneous echogenic mass (size18×8/5 was shown near the left ovary. It was shown as ectopic pregnancy. The patient was hospitalized by ectopic pregnancy in ovary diagnosis and she was treated by methotrexate. Conclusion: In pregnant women that complain of bleeding and spotting in early pregnancy, in addition to threatened abortion, ectopic pregnancy should exist even in the absence of clinical symptoms, should be considered.

  1. Real Time Multiplicative Memory Amplification Mediated by Whole-Cell Scaling of Synaptic Response in Key Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuveni, Iris; Ghosh, Sourav; Barkai, Edi

    2017-01-01

    Intense spiking response of a memory-pattern is believed to play a crucial role both in normal learning and pathology, where it can create biased behavior. We recently proposed a novel model for memory amplification where the simultaneous two-fold increase of all excitatory (AMPAR-mediated) and inhibitory (GABAAR-mediated) synapses in a sub-group of cells that constitutes a memory-pattern selectively amplifies this memory. Here we confirm the cellular basis of this model by validating its major predictions in four sets of experiments, and demonstrate its induction via a whole-cell transduction mechanism. Subsequently, using theory and simulations, we show that this whole-cell two-fold increase of all inhibitory and excitatory synapses functions as an instantaneous and multiplicative amplifier of the neurons’ spiking. The amplification mechanism acts through multiplication of the net synaptic current, where it scales both the average and the standard deviation of the current. In the excitation-inhibition balance regime, this scaling creates a linear multiplicative amplifier of the cell’s spiking response. Moreover, the direct scaling of the synaptic input enables the amplification of the spiking response to be synchronized with rapid changes in synaptic input, and to be independent of previous spiking activity. These traits enable instantaneous real-time amplification during brief elevations of excitatory synaptic input. Furthermore, the multiplicative nature of the amplifier ensures that the net effect of the amplification is large mainly when the synaptic input is mostly excitatory. When induced on all cells that comprise a memory-pattern, these whole-cell modifications enable a substantial instantaneous amplification of the memory-pattern when the memory is activated. The amplification mechanism is induced by CaMKII dependent phosphorylation that doubles the conductance of all GABAA and AMPA receptors in a subset of neurons. This whole-cell transduction

  2. Neuron-restrictive silencer factor-mediated hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide gated channelopathy in experimental temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Shawn; Flynn, Corey; Dubé, Celine; Richichi, Cristina; Zha, Qinqin; Ghestem, Antoine; Esclapez, Monique; Bernard, Christophe; Baram, Tallie Z

    2011-09-01

    Enduring, abnormal expression and function of the ion channel hyperpolarization-activated cyclic adenosine monophosphate gated channel type 1 (HCN1) occurs in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). We examined the underlying mechanisms, and investigated whether interfering with these mechanisms could modify disease course. Experimental TLE was provoked by kainic acid-induced status epilepticus (SE). HCN1 channel repression was examined at mRNA, protein, and functional levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was employed to identify the transcriptional mechanism of repressed HCN1 expression, and the basis for their endurance. Physical interaction of the repressor, NRSF, was abolished using decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs). Video/electroencephalographic recordings were performed to assess the onset and initial pattern of spontaneous seizures. Levels of NRSF and its physical binding to the Hcn1 gene were augmented after SE, resulting in repression of HCN1 expression and HCN1-mediated currents (I(h) ), and reduced I(h) -dependent resonance in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cell dendrites. Chromatin changes typical of enduring, epigenetic gene repression were apparent at the Hcn1 gene within a week after SE. Administration of decoy ODNs comprising the NRSF DNA-binding sequence (neuron restrictive silencer element [NRSE]), in vitro and in vivo, reduced NRSF binding to Hcn1, prevented its repression, and restored I(h) function. In vivo, decoy NRSE ODN treatment restored theta rhythm and altered the initial pattern of spontaneous seizures. Acquired HCN1 channelopathy derives from NRSF-mediated transcriptional repression that endures via chromatin modification and may provide insight into the mechanisms of a number of channelopathies that coexist with, and may contribute to, the conversion of a normal brain into an epileptic one. Copyright © 2011 American Neurological Association.

  3. Rapid signaling actions of environmental estrogens in developing granule cell neurons are mediated by estrogen receptor ß.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Hoa H; Belcher, Scott M

    2010-12-01

    Estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) constitute a diverse group of man-made chemicals and natural compounds derived from plants and microbial metabolism. Estrogen-like actions are mediated via the nuclear hormone receptor activity of estrogen receptor (ER)α and ERβ and rapid regulation of intracellular signaling cascades. Previous study defined cerebellar granule cell neurons as estrogen responsive and that granule cell precursor viability was developmentally sensitive to estrogens. In this study experiments using Western blot analysis and pharmacological approaches have characterized the receptor and signaling modes of action of selective and nonselective estrogen ligands in developing cerebellar granule cells. Estrogen treatments were found to briefly increase ERK1/2-phosphorylation and then cause prolonged depression of ERK1/2 activity. The sensitivity of granule cell precursors to estrogen-induced cell death was found to require the integrated activation of membrane and intracellular ER signaling pathways. The sensitivity of granule cells to selective and nonselective ER agonists and a variety of estrogenic and nonestrogenic EDCs was also examined. The ERβ selective agonist DPN, but not the ERα selective agonist 4,4',4'-(4-propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl) trisphenol or other ERα-specific ligands, stimulated cell death. Only EDCs with selective or nonselective ERβ activities like daidzein, equol, diethylstilbestrol, and bisphenol A were observed to induce E2-like neurotoxicity supporting the conclusion that estrogen sensitivity in granule cells is mediated via ERβ. The presented results also demonstrate the utility of estrogen sensitive developing granule cells as an in vitro assay for elucidating rapid estrogen-signaling mechanisms and to detect EDCs that act at ERβ to rapidly regulate intracellular signaling.

  4. Low levels of LTR retrotransposon deletion by ectopic recombination in the gigantic genomes of salamanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frahry, Matthew Blake; Sun, Cheng; Chong, Rebecca A; Mueller, Rachel Lockridge

    2015-02-01

    Across the tree of life, species vary dramatically in nuclear genome size. Mutations that add or remove sequences from genomes-insertions or deletions, or indels-are the ultimate source of this variation. Differences in the tempo and mode of insertion and deletion across taxa have been proposed to contribute to evolutionary diversity in genome size. Among vertebrates, most of the largest genomes are found within the salamanders, an amphibian clade with genome sizes ranging from ~14 to ~120 Gb. Salamander genomes have been shown to experience slower rates of DNA loss through small (i.e., salamander genomes resulting from larger deletions. Here, we focus on one type of large deletion-ectopic-recombination-mediated removal of LTR retrotransposon sequences. In ectopic recombination, double-strand breaks are repaired using a "wrong" (i.e., ectopic, or non-allelic) template sequence-typically another locus of similar sequence. When breaks occur within the LTR portions of LTR retrotransposons, ectopic-recombination-mediated repair can produce deletions that remove the internal transposon sequence and the equivalent of one of the two LTR sequences. These deletions leave a signature in the genome-a solo LTR sequence. We compared levels of solo LTRs in the genomes of four salamander species with levels present in five vertebrates with smaller genomes. Our results demonstrate that salamanders have low levels of solo LTRs, suggesting that ectopic-recombination-mediated deletion of LTR retrotransposons occurs more slowly than in other vertebrates with smaller genomes.

  5. GDNF-Enhanced Axonal Regeneration and Myelination Following Spinal Cord Injury is Mediated by Primary Effects on Neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIQUN ZHANG; ZHENGWEN MA; GEORGE M.SMITH; XUEJUN WEN; YELENA PRESSMAN; PATRICK M.WOOD; XIAO-MING XU

    2009-01-01

    我们先前研究表明胶质细胞源性神经营养因子(GDNF)联合施万细胞移植能促进脊髓损伤后轴突再生和髓鞘形成.然而,GDNF介导这一过程的细胞靶点尚不清楚.在此,我们报道了GDNF可增加在体再生轴突的数目和直径,并促进体外背根神经节神经元的轴突向外生长,提示GDNF对神经元有直接作用.在施万细胞-背根神经节神经元共培养下,GDNF显著增加施万细胞生成的髓鞘数目;GDNF处理对孤立培养的施万细胞增殖无作用,但可促进已与神经轴突有突触联系的施万细胞增殖;GDNF可增加孤立施万细胞中分子量为140 kDa的神经细胞黏附分子(NCAM)的表达,但对黏附分子L1表达或神经营养因子NGF、NT3及BDNF分泌没有影响.总之,这些结果支持假设:GDNF提高轴突再生和施万细胞髓鞘形成主要是通过GDNF对神经元的直接作用介导的,并且提示GDNF联合施万细胞移植可能是促进脊髓损伤后轴突再生和髓鞘形成的有效策略之一.%We previously demonstrated that coadministration of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor(GDNF) with grafts of Schwann cells(SCs) enhanced axonal regeneration and remyelination following spinal cord injury(SCI).However,the cellular target through which GDNF mediates such actions was unclear.Here,we report that GDNF enhanced both the number and caliber of regenerated axons in vivo and increased neurite outgrowth of dorsal root ganglion neurons(DRGN) in vitro,suggesting that GDNF has a direct effect on neurons.In SC-DRGN coculture,GDNF significantly increased the number of myelin sheaths produced by SCs.GDNF treatment had no effect on the proliferation of isolated SCs but enhanced the proliferation of SCs already in contact with axons.GDNF increased the expression of the 140 kDa neural cell adhesion molecule(NCAM) in isolated SCs but not their expression of the adhesion molecule L1 or the secretion of the neurotrophins NGF,NT3,or BDNF

  6. YiQiFuMai Powder Injection Ameliorates Cerebral Ischemia by Inhibiting Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Mediated Neuronal Apoptosis

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    Guosheng Cao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available YiQiFuMai (YQFM powder injection as a modern preparation derived from Sheng Mai San, a traditional Chinese medicine, has been widely used in the treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. However, its neuroprotective effect and underlying mechanism in cerebral ischemia remain to be explored. The present study was designed to investigate the neuroprotective effect of YQFM on endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress-mediated neuronal apoptosis in the permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion- (MCAO- injured mice and the oxygen-glucose deprivation- (OGD- induced pheochromocytoma (PC12 cells. The results showed that single administration of YQFM (1.342 g/kg, i.p. could reduce the brain infarction and improve the neurological deficits and the cerebral blood flow (CBF after MCAO for 24 h in mice. Moreover, incubation with YQFM (100, 200, and 400 μg/mL could increase the cell viability, decrease the caspase-3 activity, and inhibit the cell apoptosis in OGD-induced PC12 cells for 12 h. In addition, YQFM treatment could significantly modulate cleaved caspase-3 and Bcl-2 expressions and inhibit the expressions of ER stress-related marker proteins and signaling pathways in vivo and in vitro. In conclusion, our findings provide the first evidence that YQFM ameliorates cerebral ischemic injury linked with modulating ER stress-related signaling pathways, which provided some new insights for its prevention and treatment of cerebral ischemia diseases.

  7. [Conservative treatment of ectopic pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odland, J O; Maltau, J M; Tollan, A

    1991-01-30

    During the last decades the incidence of ectopic pregnancy has been steadily rising. The chosen therapy has usually been unilateral salpingectomy. Recently, different conservative (tube-preserving) treatment-modalities have been introduced in clinical practice. We have tried conservative treatment by local injection of prostaglandin F2a (total dose 2-4 mg) directly into the tubal pregnancy and, if feasible, also into the corpus luteum graviditate. The treatment was successful in 13 out of 16 patients. In one patient laparotomia was performed because of pain, and revealed a haematoma in fossa Douglasi. Reinjection of prostaglandin was necessary in one patient because of rising HCG titres. One patient was hospitalized for four days because of nausea and pain. The treatment was otherwise successful. The method may be useful as a non-surgical alternative in haemodynamically stable patients without tubal rupture. Further studies are needed to evaluate the outcome in terms of future fertility.

  8. Evaluation of PFOS-mediated neurotoxicity in rat primary neurons and astrocytes cultured separately or in co-culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenwei; Liu, Qi; Liu, Chang; Li, Chunna; Li, Yachen; Li, Shuangyue; Liu, Xiaohui; Shao, Jing

    2017-02-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a potential neurotoxicant reported by epidemiological investigations and experimental studies, while the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Astrocytes not only support for the construction of neurons, but also conduct neuronal functions through glutamate-glutamine cycle in astrocyte-neuron crosstalk. In the present study, the effect of PFOS exposure on rat primary hippocampal neurons or cortex astrocytes was evaluated. Then the role of the astrocytes in PFOS-induced toxic effect on neurons was explored with astrocyte-neuron co-culture system. Exposure of rat primary hippocampal neurons to PFOS has led to oxidation-antioxidation imbalance, increased apoptosis and abnormal autophagy. The adverse effect of PFOS on rat primary cortex astrocytes manifested in the form of altered extracellular glutamate and glutamine concentrations, decreased glutamine synthase activity, as well as decreased gene expression of glutamine synthase, glutamate transporters and glutamine transporters in the glutamate-glutamine cycle. Especially, the alleviation of PFOS-inhibited neurite outgrowth in neurons could be observed in astrocyte-neuron co-culture system, though the ability of astrocytes in fostering neurite outgrowth was affected by PFOS. These results indicated that both astrocytes and neurons might be the targets of PFOS-induced neurotoxicity, and astrocytes could protect against PFOS-inhibited neurite outgrowth in primary cultured neurons. Our research might render some information in explaining the mechanisms of PFOS-induced neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Acute effects of alcohol on sleep are mediated by components of homeostatic sleep regulatory system: An Editorial Highlight for 'Lesions of the basal forebrain cholinergic neurons attenuates sleepiness and adenosine after alcohol consumption' on page 710.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md Noor; McGinty, Dennis

    2017-09-01

    Alcohol causes adenosine buildup, which inhibits wake-active neurons via adenosine A1 receptors thus disinhibiting sleep active neurons and also stimulates sleep-active neurons via A2A receptors, causing sleep. This editorial highlights the study entitled, "Lesions of the basal forebrain cholinergic neurons attenuates sleepiness and adenosine after alcohol consumption" by Sharma and colleagues. They report that the wake-promoting basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic neurons play a crucial role in mediating acute alcohol-induced sleep via adenosinergic signaling. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  10. Effect of Ca2EDTA on zinc mediated inflammation and neuronal apoptosis in hippocampus of an in vivo mouse model of hypobaric hypoxia.

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    Udayabanu Malairaman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Calcium overload has been implicated as a critical event in glutamate excitotoxicity associated neurodegeneration. Recently, zinc accumulation and its neurotoxic role similar to calcium has been proposed. Earlier, we reported that free chelatable zinc released during hypobaric hypoxia mediates neuronal damage and memory impairment. The molecular mechanism behind hypobaric hypoxia mediated neuronal damage is obscure. The role of free zinc in such neuropathological condition has not been elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the underlying role of free chelatable zinc in hypobaric hypoxia-induced neuronal inflammation and apoptosis resulting in hippocampal damage. METHODS: Adult male Balb/c mice were exposed to hypobaric hypoxia and treated with saline or Ca2EDTA (1.25 mM/kg i.p daily for four days. The effects of Ca2EDTA on apoptosis (caspases activity and DNA fragmentation, pro-inflammatory markers (iNOS, TNF-α and COX-2, NADPH oxidase activity, poly(ADP ribose polymerase (PARP activity and expressions of Bax, Bcl-2, HIF-1α, metallothionein-3, ZnT-1 and ZIP-6 were examined in the hippocampal region of brain. RESULTS: Hypobaric hypoxia resulted in increased expression of metallothionein-3 and zinc transporters (ZnT-1 and ZIP-6. Hypobaric hypoxia elicited an oxidative stress and inflammatory response characterized by elevated NADPH oxidase activity and up-regulation of iNOS, COX-2 and TNF-α. Furthermore, hypobaric hypoxia induced HIF-1α protein expression, PARP activation and apoptosis in the hippocampus. Administration of Ca2EDTA significantly attenuated the hypobaric hypoxia induced oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis in the hippocampus. CONCLUSION: We propose that hypobaric hypoxia/reperfusion instigates free chelatable zinc imbalance in brain associated with neuroinflammation and neuronal apoptosis. Therefore, zinc chelating strategies which block zinc mediated neuronal damage linked with cerebral hypoxia

  11. Functional switching of ATM: sensor of DNA damage in proliferating cells and mediator of Akt survival signal in post-mitotic human neuron-like cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Li; Hua Xiong; Da-Qing Yang

    2012-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cerebellar ataxia and oculocutaneous telangiectasias.The gene mutated in this disease,ATM (A-T,mutated),encodes a 370-kDa Ser/Thr protein kinase.ATM not only mediates cellular response to DNA damage but also acts as an activator of Akt in response to insulin.However,despite intensive studies,the mechanism underlying the neuronal degeneration symptoms of human A-T is still poorly understood.We found that the topoisomerase inhibitors etoposide and camptothecin readily induced apoptosis in undifferentiated proliferating SH-SY5Y cells but could not induce apoptosis in neuronally differentiated SH-SY5Y cells.In addition,etoposide induced p53 phosphorylation and H2AX foci formation in proliferating SH-SY5Y cells but failed to do so in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells.Moreover,while inhibition of ATM in undifferentiated SH-SY5Y cells partially protected them from etoposide-induced apoptosis,the same treatment had no effect on cell viability in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells.These results suggest that DNA damage or defective response to DNA damage is not the cause of neuronal cell death in human A-T.In contrast,we discovered that Akt phosphorylation was inhibited when ATM activity was suppressed in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells.Furthermore,inhibition of ATM induced apoptosis following serum starvation in neuronally differentiated SH-SY5Y cells but could not trigger apoptosis under the same conditions in undifferentiated proliferating SH-SY5Y cells.These results demonstrate that ATM mediates the Akt signaling and promotes cell survival in neuron-like human SH-SY5Y cells,suggesting that impaired activation of Akt is the reason for neuronal degeneration in human A-T.

  12. Ectopic Pregnancy%异位妊娠

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    项翠莲

    2014-01-01

    Where fecundity implantation in the uterus outside the body cavity development, known as ectopic pregnancy, commonly known as "ectopic pregnancy." There was no medicine in ancient ectopic pregnancy nonaggressive records, but in the "pregnancy pain", "by the leak," "Zheng Jia" and other syndromes have similar symptoms described. Ectopic pregnancy, including ectopic pregnancy, ovarian pregnancy, abdominal pregnancy, broad ligament pregnancy, cervical pregnancy and uterine rudimentary horn pregnancy. Ectopic pregnancy is confined outside the uterus, excluding cervical pregnancy and uterine rudimentary horn pregnancy. Therefore, ectopic pregnancy broader meaning.%凡孕卵在子宫体腔以外着床发育,称为异位妊娠,俗称"宫外孕"。中医学古籍中未见有异位妊娠的病名记载,但在"妊娠腹痛"、"经漏"、"癥瘕"等病证中有类似症状的描述。异位妊娠包括输卵管妊娠、卵巢妊娠、腹腔妊娠、阔韧带妊娠、宫颈妊娠以及子宫残角妊娠。宫外孕则仅指子宫以外的妊娠,不包括宫颈妊娠和子宫残角妊娠。因此异位妊娠含义更广。

  13. Sigmoid Microinvasion by an Ectopic Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Joalee; Leboeuf, Mathieu; Gorak-Savard, Émilie

    2016-11-01

    Approximately 2.1% to 8.6% of all pregnancies after IVF with embryo transfer have been reported to be ectopic. In this report, we present a case of presumed intestinal microperforation caused by an ectopic pregnancy following IVF. A 29-year-old woman presented with rectal bleeding. She had previously been treated for an ectopic pregnancy for which she had received two doses of methotrexate. Colonoscopy and abdominal CT angiography were performed and showed that the ectopic pregnancy was attached to the sigmoid colon. Surgery was performed to remove the ectopic pregnancy. Because intestinal microperforations were suspected, the patient received intravenous antibiotic therapy during her hospitalization. In cases of intestinal bleeding, clinicians should consider the possibility of intestinal involvement of an ectopic pregnancy, even if the response to treatment for the ectopic pregnancy has been appropriate. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada/La Société des obstétriciens et gynécologues du Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A neuronal model of Alzheimer's disease: an insight into the mechanisms of oxidative stress-mediated mitochondrial injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sompol, P; Ittarat, W; Tangpong, J; Chen, Y; Doubinskaia, I; Batinic-Haberle, I; Abdul, H M; Butterfield, D A; St Clair, D K

    2008-04-22

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with beta-amyloid accumulation, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. However, the effects of genetic mutation of AD on oxidative status and mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) production during neuronal development are unclear. To investigate the consequences of genetic mutation of AD on oxidative damages and production of MnSOD during neuronal development, we used primary neurons from new born wild-type (WT/WT) and amyloid precursor protein (APP) (NLh/NLh) and presenilin 1 (PS1) (P264L) knock-in mice (APP/PS1) which incorporated humanized mutations in the genome. Increasing levels of oxidative damages, including protein carbonyl, 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT), were accompanied by a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential in both developing and mature APP/PS1 neurons compared with WT/WT neurons suggesting mitochondrial dysfunction under oxidative stress. Interestingly, developing APP/PS1 neurons were significantly more resistant to beta-amyloid 1-42 treatment, whereas mature APP/PS1 neurons were more vulnerable than WT/WT neurons of the same age. Consistent with the protective function of MnSOD, developing APP/PS1 neurons have increased MnSOD protein and activity, indicating an adaptive response to oxidative stress in developing neurons. In contrast, mature APP/PS1 neurons exhibited lower MnSOD levels compared with mature WT/WT neurons indicating that mature APP/PS1 neurons lost the adaptive response. Moreover, mature APP/PS1 neurons had more co-localization of MnSOD with nitrotyrosine indicating a greater inhibition of MnSOD by nitrotyrosine. Overexpression of MnSOD or addition of MnTE-2-PyP(5+) (SOD mimetic) protected against beta-amyloid-induced neuronal death and improved mitochondrial respiratory function. Together, the results demonstrate that compensatory induction of MnSOD in response to an early increase in oxidative stress protects developing neurons against

  15. Organic cation transporter-mediated ergothioneine uptake in mouse neural progenitor cells suppresses proliferation and promotes differentiation into neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Ishimoto

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to clarify the functional expression and physiological role in neural progenitor cells (NPCs of carnitine/organic cation transporter OCTN1/SLC22A4, which accepts the naturally occurring food-derived antioxidant ergothioneine (ERGO as a substrate in vivo. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that mRNA expression of OCTN1 was much higher than that of other organic cation transporters in mouse cultured cortical NPCs. Immunocytochemical analysis showed colocalization of OCTN1 with the NPC marker nestin in cultured NPCs and mouse embryonic carcinoma P19 cells differentiated into neural progenitor-like cells (P19-NPCs. These cells exhibited time-dependent [(3H]ERGO uptake. These results demonstrate that OCTN1 is functionally expressed in murine NPCs. Cultured NPCs and P19-NPCs formed neurospheres from clusters of proliferating cells in a culture time-dependent manner. Exposure of cultured NPCs to ERGO or other antioxidants (edaravone and ascorbic acid led to a significant decrease in the area of neurospheres with concomitant elimination of intracellular reactive oxygen species. Transfection of P19-NPCs with small interfering RNA for OCTN1 markedly promoted formation of neurospheres with a concomitant decrease of [(3H]ERGO uptake. On the other hand, exposure of cultured NPCs to ERGO markedly increased the number of cells immunoreactive for the neuronal marker βIII-tubulin, but decreased the number immunoreactive for the astroglial marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, with concomitant up-regulation of neuronal differentiation activator gene Math1. Interestingly, edaravone and ascorbic acid did not affect such differentiation of NPCs, in contrast to the case of proliferation. Knockdown of OCTN1 increased the number of cells immunoreactive for GFAP, but decreased the number immunoreactive for βIII-tubulin, with concomitant down-regulation of Math1 in P19-NPCs. Thus, OCTN1-mediated uptake of ERGO in NPCs inhibits

  16. Frequency of nonallelic homologous recombination is correlated with length of homology: evidence that ectopic synapsis precedes ectopic crossing-over.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pengfei; Lacaria, Melanie; Zhang, Feng; Withers, Marjorie; Hastings, P J; Lupski, James R

    2011-10-07

    Genomic disorders constitute a class of diseases that are associated with DNA rearrangements resulting from region-specific genome instability, that is, genome architecture incites genome instability. Nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR) or crossing-over in meiosis between sequences that are not in allelic positions (i.e., paralogous sequences) can result in recurrent deletions or duplications causing genomic disorders. Previous studies of NAHR have focused on description of the phenomenon, but it remains unclear how NAHR occurs during meiosis and what factors determine its frequency. Here we assembled two patient cohorts with reciprocal genomic disorders; deletion associated Smith-Magenis syndrome and duplication associated Potocki-Lupski syndrome. By assessing the full spectrum of rearrangement types from the two cohorts, we find that complex rearrangements (those with more than one breakpoint) are more prevalent in copy-number gains (17.7%) than in copy-number losses (2.3%); an observation that supports a role for replicative mechanisms in complex rearrangement formation. Interestingly, for NAHR-mediated recurrent rearrangements, we show that crossover frequency is positively associated with the flanking low-copy repeat (LCR) length and inversely influenced by the inter-LCR distance. To explain this, we propose that the probability of ectopic chromosome synapsis increases with increased LCR length, and that ectopic synapsis is a necessary precursor to ectopic crossing-over. Copyright © 2011 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Regulation of Notch-mediated transcription by a bovine herpesvirus 1 encoded protein (ORF2) that is expressed in latently infected sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yilin; Jones, Clinton

    2016-08-01

    Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) is an Alphaherpesvirinae subfamily member that establishes life-long latency in sensory neurons. The latency-related RNA (LR-RNA) is abundantly expressed during latency. An LR mutant virus containing stop codons at the amino-terminus of open reading frame (ORF)2 does not reactivate from latency and replicates less efficiently in tonsils and trigeminal ganglia. ORF2 inhibits apoptosis, interacts with Notch family members, and interferes with Notch-dependent transcription suggesting ORF2 expression enhances survival of infected neurons. The Notch signaling pathway is crucial for neuronal differentiation and survival suggesting that interactions between ORF2 and Notch family members regulate certain aspects of latency. Consequently, for this study, we compared whether ORF2 interfered with the four mammalian Notch family members. ORF2 consistently interfered with Notch1-3-mediated transactivation of three cellular promoters. Conversely, Notch4-mediated transcription was not consistently inhibited by ORF2. Electrophoretic shift mobility assays using four copies of a consensus-DNA binding site for Notch/CSL (core binding factor (CBF)-1, Suppressor of Hairless, Lag-2) as a probe revealed ORF2 interfered with Notch1 and 3 interactions with a CSL family member bound to DNA. Additional studies demonstrated ORF2 enhances neurite sprouting in mouse neuroblastoma cells that express Notch1-3, but not Notch4. Collectively, these studies indicate that ORF2 inhibits Notch-mediated transcription and signaling by interfering with Notch interacting with CSL bound to DNA.

  18. Vanillin Protects Dopaminergic Neurons against Inflammation-Mediated Cell Death by Inhibiting ERK1/2, P38 and the NF-κB Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Yan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuroinflammation plays a very important role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD. After activation, microglia produce pro-inflammatory mediators that damage surrounding neurons. Consequently, the inhibition of microglial activation might represent a new therapeutic approach of PD. Vanillin has been shown to protect dopaminergic neurons, but the mechanism is still unclear. Herein, we further study the underlying mechanisms in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced PD models. In vivo, we firstly established rat models of PD by unilateral injection of LPS into substantia nigra (SN, and then examined the role of vanillin in motor dysfunction, microglial activation and degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. In vitro, murine microglial BV-2 cells were treated with vanillin prior to the incubation of LPS, and then the inflammatory responses and the related signaling pathways were analyzed. The in vivo results showed that vanillin markedly improved the motor dysfunction, suppressed degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and inhibited microglial over-activation induced by LPS intranigral injection. The in vitro studies demonstrated that vanillin reduces LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide (iNOS, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, IL-1β, and IL-6 through regulating ERK1/2, p38 and NF-κB signaling. Collectively, these data indicated that vanillin has a role in protecting dopaminergic neurons via inhibiting inflammatory activation.

  19. Vanillin Protects Dopaminergic Neurons against Inflammation-Mediated Cell Death by Inhibiting ERK1/2, P38 and the NF-κB Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xuan; Liu, Dian-Feng; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Liu, Dong; Xu, Shi-Yao; Chen, Guang-Xin; Huang, Bing-Xu; Ren, Wen-Zhi; Wang, Wei; Fu, Shou-Peng; Liu, Ju-Xiong

    2017-02-12

    Neuroinflammation plays a very important role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). After activation, microglia produce pro-inflammatory mediators that damage surrounding neurons. Consequently, the inhibition of microglial activation might represent a new therapeutic approach of PD. Vanillin has been shown to protect dopaminergic neurons, but the mechanism is still unclear. Herein, we further study the underlying mechanisms in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced PD models. In vivo, we firstly established rat models of PD by unilateral injection of LPS into substantia nigra (SN), and then examined the role of vanillin in motor dysfunction, microglial activation and degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. In vitro, murine microglial BV-2 cells were treated with vanillin prior to the incubation of LPS, and then the inflammatory responses and the related signaling pathways were analyzed. The in vivo results showed that vanillin markedly improved the motor dysfunction, suppressed degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and inhibited microglial over-activation induced by LPS intranigral injection. The in vitro studies demonstrated that vanillin reduces LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), IL-1β, and IL-6 through regulating ERK1/2, p38 and NF-κB signaling. Collectively, these data indicated that vanillin has a role in protecting dopaminergic neurons via inhibiting inflammatory activation.

  20. Vanillin Protects Dopaminergic Neurons against Inflammation-Mediated Cell Death by Inhibiting ERK1/2, P38 and the NF-κB Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xuan; Liu, Dian-Feng; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Liu, Dong; Xu, Shi-Yao; Chen, Guang-Xin; Huang, Bing-Xu; Ren, Wen-Zhi; Wang, Wei; Fu, Shou-Peng; Liu, Ju-Xiong

    2017-01-01

    Neuroinflammation plays a very important role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD). After activation, microglia produce pro-inflammatory mediators that damage surrounding neurons. Consequently, the inhibition of microglial activation might represent a new therapeutic approach of PD. Vanillin has been shown to protect dopaminergic neurons, but the mechanism is still unclear. Herein, we further study the underlying mechanisms in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced PD models. In vivo, we firstly established rat models of PD by unilateral injection of LPS into substantia nigra (SN), and then examined the role of vanillin in motor dysfunction, microglial activation and degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. In vitro, murine microglial BV-2 cells were treated with vanillin prior to the incubation of LPS, and then the inflammatory responses and the related signaling pathways were analyzed. The in vivo results showed that vanillin markedly improved the motor dysfunction, suppressed degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and inhibited microglial over-activation induced by LPS intranigral injection. The in vitro studies demonstrated that vanillin reduces LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), IL-1β, and IL-6 through regulating ERK1/2, p38 and NF-κB signaling. Collectively, these data indicated that vanillin has a role in protecting dopaminergic neurons via inhibiting inflammatory activation. PMID:28208679

  1. Aortopulmonary ectopic parathyroid gland and concurrent thymolipoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Abeeleh, Mahmoud; Bani Hani, Amjad; Ghaith, Ata; Alodwan, Tareq; Bani Ismail, Zuhair; Alshehabat, Musa

    2016-10-01

    Ectopic parathyroid adenomas are considered the main cause of primary hyperparathyroidism. However, concurrent parathyroid and thymic pathologies are rarely diagnosed in the same patient. A 47-year-old man with history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and myasthenia gravis presented with persistent hypercalcemia. Laboratory investigations, computed tomography, and technetium-99 m sestamibi scintigraphy revealed ectopic parathyroid glands, a mediastinal mass, and an enlarged thymus. The patient underwent thymectomy and mass excision via a median sternotomy. Histopathology was consistent with ectopic parathyroid adenoma and thymolipoma. The serum calcium and parathormone concentrations normalized within 48 hours after surgery. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Mitochondrial UCP4 mediates an adaptive shift in energy metabolism and increases the resistance of neurons to metabolic and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Chan, Sic L; de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C; Slevin, John R; Wersto, Robert P; Zhan, Ming; Mustafa, Khadija; de Cabo, Rafael; Mattson, Mark P

    2006-01-01

    The high-metabolic demand of neurons and their reliance on glucose as an energy source places them at risk for dysfunction and death under conditions of metabolic and oxidative stress. Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) are mitochondrial inner membrane proteins implicated in the regulation of mitochondrial membrane potential (Deltapsim) and cellular energy metabolism. The authors cloned UCP4 cDNA from mouse and rat brain, and demonstrate that UCP4 mRNA is expressed abundantly in brain and at particularly high levels in populations of neurons believed to have high-energy requirements. Neural cells with increased levels of UCP4 exhibit decreased Deltapsim, reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and decreased mitochondrial calcium accumulation. UCP4 expressing cells also exhibited changes of oxygen-consumption rate, GDP sensitivity, and response of Deltapsim to oligomycin that were consistent with mitochondrial uncoupling. UCP4 modulates neuronal energy metabolism by increasing glucose uptake and shifting the mode of ATP production from mitochondrial respiration to glycolysis, thereby maintaining cellular ATP levels. The UCP4-mediated shift in energy metabolism reduces ROS production and increases the resistance of neurons to oxidative and mitochondrial stress. Knockdown of UCP4 expression by RNA interference in primary hippocampal neurons results in mitochondrial calcium overload and cell death. UCP4-mRNA expression is increased in neurons exposed to cold temperatures and in brain cells of rats maintained on caloric restriction, suggesting a role for UCP4 in the previously reported antiageing and neuroprotective effects of caloric restriction. By shifting energy metabolism to reduce ROS production and cellular reliance on mitochondrial respiration, UCP4 can protect neurons against oxidative stress and calcium overload.

  3. Serotonin 5-HT2C receptor-mediated inhibition of the M-current in hypothalamic POMC neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Roepke, T. A.; Smith, A W; Rønnekleiv, O. K.; Kelly, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    Hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons are controlled by many central signals, including serotonin. Serotonin increases POMC activity and reduces feeding behavior via serotonion [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] receptors by modulating K+ currents. A potential K+ current is the M-current, a noninactivating, subthreshold outward K+ current. Previously, we found that M-current activity was highly reduced in fasted vs. fed states in neuropeptide Y neurons. Because POMC neurons also respond t...

  4. A single GABAergic neuron mediates feedback of odor-evoked signals in the mushroom body of larval Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liria Monica Masuda-Nakagawa

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition has a central role in defining the selectivity of the responses of higher order neurons to sensory stimuli. However, the circuit mechanisms of regulation of these responses by inhibitory neurons are still unclear. In Drosophila, the mushroom bodies (MBs are necessary for olfactory memory, and by implication for the selectivity of learned responses to specific odors. To understand the circuitry of inhibition in the calyx (the input dendritic region of the MBs, and its relationship with MB excitatory activity, we used the simple anatomy of the Drosophila larval olfactory system to identify any inhibitory inputs that could contribute to the selectivity of MB odor responses. We found that a single neuron accounts for all detectable GABA innervation in the calyx of the MBs, and that this neuron has presynaptic terminals in the calyx and postsynaptic branches in the MB lobes (output axonal area. We call this neuron the larval anterior paired lateral (APL neuron, because of its similarity to the previously described adult APL neuron. Reconstitution of GFP partners (GRASP suggests that the larval APL makes extensive contacts with the MB intrinsic neurons, Kenyon Cells (KCs, but few contacts with incoming projection neurons. Using calcium imaging of neuronal activity in live larvae, we show that the larval APL responds to odors, in a mannner that requires output from KCs. Our data suggest that the larval APL is the sole GABAergic neuron that innervates the MB input region and carries inhibitory feedback from the MB output region, consistent with a role in modulating the olfactory selectivity of MB neurons.

  5. Bidirectional coupling between astrocytes and neurons mediates learning and dynamic coordination in the brain: a multiple modeling approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J Wade

    Full Text Available In recent years research suggests that astrocyte networks, in addition to nutrient and waste processing functions, regulate both structural and synaptic plasticity. To understand the biological mechanisms that underpin such plasticity requires the development of cell level models that capture the mutual interaction between astrocytes and neurons. This paper presents a detailed model of bidirectional signaling between astrocytes and neurons (the astrocyte-neuron model or AN model which yields new insights into the computational role of astrocyte-neuronal coupling. From a set of modeling studies we demonstrate two significant findings. Firstly, that spatial signaling via astrocytes can relay a "learning signal" to remote synaptic sites. Results show that slow inward currents cause synchronized postsynaptic activity in remote neurons and subsequently allow Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity based learning to occur at the associated synapses. Secondly, that bidirectional communication between neurons and astrocytes underpins dynamic coordination between neuron clusters. Although our composite AN model is presently applied to simplified neural structures and limited to coordination between localized neurons, the principle (which embodies structural, functional and dynamic complexity, and the modeling strategy may be extended to coordination among remote neuron clusters.

  6. Drosophila motor neuron retraction during metamorphosis is mediated by inputs from TGF-β/BMP signaling and orphan nuclear receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Boulanger

    Full Text Available Larval motor neurons remodel during Drosophila neuro-muscular junction dismantling at metamorphosis. In this study, we describe the motor neuron retraction as opposed to degeneration based on the early disappearance of β-Spectrin and the continuing presence of Tubulin. By blocking cell dynamics with a dominant-negative form of Dynamin, we show that phagocytes have a key role in this process. Importantly, we show the presence of peripheral glial cells close to the neuro-muscular junction that retracts before the motor neuron. We show also that in muscle, expression of EcR-B1 encoding the steroid hormone receptor required for postsynaptic dismantling, is under the control of the ftz-f1/Hr39 orphan nuclear receptor pathway but not the TGF-β signaling pathway. In the motor neuron, activation of EcR-B1 expression by the two parallel pathways (TGF-β signaling and nuclear receptor triggers axon retraction. We propose that a signal from a TGF-β family ligand is produced by the dismantling muscle (postsynapse compartment and received by the motor neuron (presynaptic compartment resulting in motor neuron retraction. The requirement of the two pathways in the motor neuron provides a molecular explanation for the instructive role of the postsynapse degradation on motor neuron retraction. This mechanism insures the temporality of the two processes and prevents motor neuron pruning before postsynaptic degradation.

  7. Zbtb20 defines a hippocampal neuronal identity through direct repression of genes that control projection neuron development in the isocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jakob V; Thomassen, Mads; Møllgård, Kjeld; Noraberg, Jens; Jensen, Niels A

    2014-05-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal neurons are important for encoding and retrieval of spatial maps and episodic memories. While previous work has shown that Zbtb20 is a cell fate determinant for CA1 pyramidal neurons, the regulatory mechanisms governing this process are not known. In this study, we demonstrate that Zbtb20 binds to genes that control neuronal subtype specification in the developing isocortex, including Cux1, Cux2, Fezf2, Foxp2, Mef2c, Rorb, Satb2, Sox5, Tbr1, Tle4, and Zfpm2. We show that Zbtb20 represses these genes during ectopic CA1 pyramidal neuron development in transgenic mice. These data reveal a novel regulatory mechanism by which Zbtb20 suppresses the acquisition of an isocortical fate during archicortical neurogenesis to ensure commitment to a CA1 pyramidal neuron fate. We further show that the expression pattern of Zbtb20 is evolutionary conserved in the fetal human hippocampus, where it is complementary to the expression pattern of the Zbtb20 target gene Tbr1. Therefore, the disclosed Zbtb20-mediated transcriptional repressor mechanism may be involved in development of the human archicortex.

  8. Histamine H2-receptors on guinea-pig ileum myenteric plexus neurons mediate the release of contractile agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, L.A.; Ebersole, B.J.

    1982-04-01

    Dimaprit, a highly selective H2-agonist, caused a multiphasic contraction of guinea-pig ileal segments and ileal myenteric plexus-longitudinal muscle preparations. The initial phase was characterized by a twitch which reached a maximum in 15 to 30 sec and was followed by a partial relaxation. The later phase was variable and consisted of a series of twitch responses or of a slowly developing contracture which sometimes was accompanied by oscillatory changes in tension. dose-response curves were generated for the initial response; for isolated ileal segments the EC50 was 5.1 +/- 1.8 micrometers (mean +/- S.D., N . 7) and the Hill coefficient was 1.1 +/- 0.2 and for longitudinal muscle strips the EC50 was 5.8 +/- 1.2 micrometer and the Hill coefficient was 1.2 +/- 0.1 (N . 7). Both the initial and secondary components of the contractile responses to dimaprit were prevented by 0.2 micron tetrodotoxin or 10 microns mefenamic acid and by the production of tachphylaxis to either substance P or serotonin. Scopolamine, 0.001 to 0.1 micron, insurmountably antagonized only the initial component of the response. Mepyramine (1.0 micrometer), hexamethonium (100 microns), bromolysergic acid (0.25 microns) and p-(imidazol-1-yl)phenyl (10 microns) were without effect on the response to dimaprit. The histamine H2-receptor antagonist, tiotidine, produced parallel dextral shifts in the dose-response curve for dimaprit. The apparent pA2 value for tiotidine was 7.65. The results suggest that dimaprit acts on H2-receptors located on myenteric plexus neurons to cause the release of contractile substances. The mediators of the contractile response are tentatively identified as acetylcholine, substance P, serotonin and a product(s) of the arachadonic acid cascade.

  9. Amyloid β-protein differentially affects NMDA receptor- and GABAA receptor-mediated currents in rat hippocampal CA1 neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junfang Zhang; Lei Hou; Xiuping Gao; Fen Guo; Wei Jing; Jinshun Qi; Jiantian Qiao

    2009-01-01

    Although the aggregated amyloid β-protein (Aβ) in senile plaques is one of the key neuropathological features of Alzheimer's disease (AD), soluble forms of Aβ also interfere with synaptic plasticity at the early stage of AD. The suppressive action of acute application of Aβ on hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) has been reported widely, whereas the mechanism underlying the effects of Aβ is still mostly unknown. The present study, using the whole-cell patch clamp technique, investigated the effects of Aβ fragments (Aβ25-35 and Aβ31-35) on the LTP induction-related postsynaptic ligand-gated channel currents in isolated hippocampal CA1 neurons. The results showed a rapid but opposite action of both peptides on excitatory and inhibitory receptor currents. Glutamate application-induced currents were suppressed by A β25-35 in a dose-dependent manner, and further N-methyl-I>aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated currents were selec-tively inhibited. In contrast, pretreatment with Aβ fragments potentiated γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced whole-cell currents. As a control, Aβ35-31 the reversed sequence of Aβ35-31 showed no effect on the currents induced by glutamate, NMDA or GABA. These results may partly explain the impaired effects of Aβ on hippocampal LTP, and suggest that the functional down-regulation of N M DA receptors and up-regulation of GABAA receptors may play an important role in remodeling the hippocampal synaptic plasticity in early AD.

  10. Defective synthesis and release of astrocytic thrombospondin-1 mediates the neuronal TDP-43 proteinopathy, resulting in defects in neuronal integrity associated with chronic traumatic encephalopathy: in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Arumugam Radhakrishnan; Tong, Xiao Y; Shamaladevi, Nagarajarao; Barcelona, Stephanie; Gaidosh, Gabriel; Agarwal, Apeksha; Norenberg, Michael D

    2017-02-01

    Transactivating DNA-binding protein-43 (TDP-43) inclusions and the accumulation of phosphorylated and ubiquitinated tau proteins (p-tau) have been identified in postmortem brain specimens from patients with chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). To examine whether these proteins contribute to the development of CTE, we utilized an in vitro trauma system known to reproduce many of the findings observed in humans and experimental animals with traumatic brain injury. Accordingly, we examined the role of TDP-43 and Tau in an in vitro model of trauma, and determined whether these proteins contribute to the defective neuronal integrity associated with CNS trauma. Single or multiple episodes of trauma to cultured neurons resulted in a time-dependent increase in cytosolic levels of phosphorylated TDP-43 (p-TDP-43). Trauma to cultured neurons also caused an increase in levels of casein kinase 1 epsilon (CK1ε), and ubiquitinated p-TDP-43, along with a decrease in importin-β (all factors known to mediate the "TDP-43 proteinopathy"). Defective neuronal integrity, as evidenced by a reduction in levels of the NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor, and in PSD95, along with increased levels of phosphorylated tau were also observed. Additionally, increased levels of intra- and extracellular thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) (a factor known to regulate neuronal integrity) were observed in cultured astrocytes at early stages of trauma, while at later stages decreased levels were identified. The addition of recombinant TSP-1, conditioned media from cultured astrocytes at early stages of trauma, or the CK1ε inhibitor PF4800567 hydrochloride to traumatized cultured neurons reduced levels of p-TDP-43, and reversed the trauma-induced decline in NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor and PSD95 levels. These findings suggest that a trauma-induced increase in TDP-43 phosphorylation contributes to defective neuronal integrity, and that increasing TSP-1 levels may represent a useful therapeutic approach for

  11. Ectopic cervical thymoma in a patient with Myasthenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Hung

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ectopic cervical thymoma is rare and is often misdiagnosed as a thyroid tumor or other malignancy. Ectopic thymic tissue can be found along the entire thymic descent path during embryogenesis. However, a thymoma arising from such ectopic thymic tissue is extremely rare. Herein we report a patient with ectopic cervical thymoma and myasthenia gravis (MG and discuss the management.

  12. Ovarian ectopic pregnancy- a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiremath PB, Nidhi Bansal, SPArunkumar, Lavanya M, Sandhya Panjeta Gulia, Premaleela KGM, Reshma Hiremath

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic pregnancy (implantation anywhere outside the normal uterine cavity is the most common pregnancy complication leading to mortality. In the era of artificial reproductive techniques and liberated life style, ectopic pregnancy is not rare. However, ovarian pregnancy is an uncommonly encountered variety of ectopic pregnancy, and a definitive preoperative diagnosis is very challenging. Intraoperative findings and histopathology usually provide the final diagnosis. High serum beta human chorionic gonadotrophin levels, lack of an intrauterine gestational sac, tubo ovarian mass on ultrasonography (USG, patient’s risk factors, in addition to the Spiegelberg’s criteria gives a high probability of ovarian pregnancy. Management with surgical approach is required in all cases. We have made an attempt to present a case of ovarian pregnancy, consistent with Spiegelberg’s criteria. Our case demonstrates the difficulty in preoperative and intra operative diagnosis of ovarian ectopic, the final confirmation has been made by histopathology.

  13. Ectopic Axillary Breast during Systemic Lupus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besma Ben Dhaou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many breast changes may occur in systemic lupus erythematosus. We report a 41-year-old woman with lupus who presented three years after the onset of lupus an ectopic mammary gland confirmed by histological study.

  14. Endometrium implantation and ectopic pregnancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yixun

    2004-01-01

    Embryo in uterine implantation is a complex and multifactor-related process and is a downstream and ideal point for woman fertility control.Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanism of implantation is a prerequisite for development of anti-implantation contraceptives.In spite of considerable accumulation of information from the laboratory animals that has been achieved,it is difficult to generate such information in human due to ethical restriction and experimental limitation,and the present knowledge for understanding the definitive mechanisms which control these events remains elusive.Embryo implantation can also occur outside uterus.Some women with abdominal pregnancies could successfully complete the processes of gestation and bear normal babies,implying that implantation itself may be not an endometrium-specific process.Reproductive biologists should cooperate with gynecologists to further comparatively study the molecular and cellular mechanisms of implantation normally occurring in endometrium and abnormally appearing outside uterine cavity.Such collaborative studies may generate new important information for developing anti-implantation contraceptive and for techniques of accurate diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy.A specially designed GnRH-2 analog and a combination use of Iow dose RU486 and gossypol as anti-implantation contraceptives have been suggested.

  15. MR features of ectopic pregnancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamai, Ken; Togashi, Kaori [Kyoto University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Koyama, Takashi [Kyoto University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kyoto (Japan)

    2007-12-15

    Ectopic pregnancy (EP), in which a fertilized ovum implants outside the uterine cavity, is the leading cause of pregnancy-related death in the first trimester. EP is usually suspected by a positive pregnancy test and an empty uterus on transvaginal sonography (TVS). Although TVS is the initial modality of choice, it may occasionally fail to demonstrate the implantation site. When TVS findings are indeterminate, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may provide better delineation of the focus of EP owing to its excellent tissue contrast. The key MRI features of EP include gestational sac (GS)-like structures that typically appear as a cystic sac-like structure, frequently associated with surrounding acute hematoma of distinct low intensity on T2-weighted images. In tubal pregnancy, an enhanced tubal wall on postcontrast images may be another diagnostic finding. Ruptured EP is inevitably associated with acute hematoma outside these structures. In intrauterine EP, recognition of the relationship between GS-like structure and the myometrium can aid in differentiating from normal pregnancy. Diagnostic pitfalls include heterotopic pregnancy, decidual changes in endometrial cyst and theca lutein cysts mimicking GS-like structures. Knowledge of a spectrum of clinical and MRI features of EP is essential for establishing an accurate diagnosis and determining appropriate management. (orig.)

  16. Damage to dopaminergic neurons is mediated by proliferating cell nuclear antigen through the p53 pathway under conditions of oxidative stress in a cell model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Da-Wei; Li, Guang-Ren; Zhang, Bei-Lin; Feng, Jing-Jing; Zhao, Hua

    2016-02-01

    Oxidative stress is widely considered as a central event in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). The mechanisms underlying the oxidative damage-mediated loss of dopaminergic neurons in PD are not yet fully understood. Accumulating evidence has indicated that oxidative DNA damage plays a crucial role in programmed neuronal cell death, and is considered to be at least partly responsible for the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in PD. This process involves a number of signaling cascades and molecular proteins. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a pleiotropic protein affecting a wide range of vital cellular processes, including chromatin remodelling, DNA repair and cell cycle control, by interacting with a number of enzymes and regulatory proteins. In the present study, the exposure of PC12 cells to 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) led to the loss of cell viability and decreased the expression levels of PCNA in a dose- and time-dependent manner, indicating that this protein may be involved in the neurotoxic actions of MPP+ in dopaminergic neuronal cells. In addition, a significant upregulation in p53 expression was also observed in this cellular model of PD. p53 is an upstream inducer of PCNA and it has been recognized as a key contributor responsible for dopaminergic neuronal cell death in mouse models of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced PD. This indicates that MPP+-induced oxidative damage is mediated by the downregulation of PCNA through the p53 pathway in a cellular model of PD. Thus, our results may provide some novel insight into the molecular mechanisms responsible for the development of PD and provide new possible therapeutic targets for the treatment of PD.

  17. Salvianolic acid B attenuates toxin-induced neuronal damage via Nrf2-dependent glial cells-mediated protective activity in Parkinson's disease models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhou

    Full Text Available Salvianolic acid B (SalB, a bioactive compound isolated from the plant-derived medicinal herb Danshen, has been shown to exert various anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities in several neurological disorders. In this study, we sought to investigate the potential protective effects and associated molecular mechanisms of SalB in Parkinson's disease (PD models. To determine the neuroprotective effects of SalB in vitro, MPP+- or lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced neuronal injury was achieved using primary cultures with different compositions of neurons, microglia and astrocytes. Our results showed that SalB reduced both LPS- and MPP+-induced toxicity of dopamine neurons in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, SalB treatment inhibited the release of microglial pro-inflammatory cytokines and resulted in an increase in the expression and release of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF from astrocytes. Western blot analysis illustrated that SalB increased the expression and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2. The knockdown of Nrf2 using specific small interfering RNA (siRNA partially reversed the SalB-induced GDNF expression and anti-inflammatory activity. Moreover, SalB treatment significantly attenuated dopaminergic (DA neuronal loss, inhibited neuroinflammation, increased GDNF expression and improved the neurological function in MPTP-treated mice. Collectively, these findings demonstrated that SalB protects DA neurons by an Nrf-2 -mediated dual action: reducing microglia activation-mediated neuroinflammation and inducing astrocyte activation-dependent GDNF expression. Importantly the present study also highlights critical roles of glial cells as targets for developing new strategies to alter the progression of neurodegenerative disorders.

  18. Salvianolic Acid B Attenuates Toxin-Induced Neuronal Damage via Nrf2-Dependent Glial Cells-Mediated Protective Activity in Parkinson’s Disease Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Yun; Wei-Ji; Liu, Qi; Ma, Yi-Hui; He, Jiao-Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Salvianolic acid B (SalB), a bioactive compound isolated from the plant-derived medicinal herb Danshen, has been shown to exert various anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities in several neurological disorders. In this study, we sought to investigate the potential protective effects and associated molecular mechanisms of SalB in Parkinson’s disease (PD) models. To determine the neuroprotective effects of SalB in vitro, MPP+- or lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neuronal injury was achieved using primary cultures with different compositions of neurons, microglia and astrocytes. Our results showed that SalB reduced both LPS- and MPP+-induced toxicity of dopamine neurons in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, SalB treatment inhibited the release of microglial pro-inflammatory cytokines and resulted in an increase in the expression and release of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) from astrocytes. Western blot analysis illustrated that SalB increased the expression and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2). The knockdown of Nrf2 using specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) partially reversed the SalB-induced GDNF expression and anti-inflammatory activity. Moreover, SalB treatment significantly attenuated dopaminergic (DA) neuronal loss, inhibited neuroinflammation, increased GDNF expression and improved the neurological function in MPTP-treated mice. Collectively, these findings demonstrated that SalB protects DA neurons by an Nrf-2 -mediated dual action: reducing microglia activation-mediated neuroinflammation and inducing astrocyte activation-dependent GDNF expression. Importantly the present study also highlights critical roles of glial cells as targets for developing new strategies to alter the progression of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24991814

  19. Conservation of 5-HT1A receptor-mediated autoinhibition of serotonin (5-HT neurons in mice with altered 5-HT homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naozumi eAraragi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Firing activity of serotonin (5-HT neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN is controlled by inhibitory somatodendritic 5-HT1A autoreceptors. This autoinhibitory mechanism is implicated in the etiology of disorders of emotion regulation, such as anxiety disorders and depression, as well as in the mechanism of antidepressant action. Here, we investigated how persistent alterations in brain 5-HT availability affect autoinhibition in two genetically modified mouse models lacking critical mediators of serotonergic transmission: 5-HT transporter knockout (Sert -/- and tryptophan hydroxylase-2 knockout (Tph2 -/- mice. The degree of autoinhibition was assessed by loose-seal cell-attached recording in DRN slices. First, application of the 5-HT1A-selective agonist R(+-8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylaminotetralin showed mild sensitization and marked desensitization of 5-HT1A receptors in Tph2 -/- mice and Sert -/- mice, respectively. While 5-HT neurons from Tph2 -/- mice did not display autoinhibition in response to L-tryptophan, autoinhibition of these neurons was unaltered in Sert -/- mice despite marked desensitization of their 5-HT1A autoreceptors. When the Tph2-dependent 5-HT synthesis step was bypassed by application of 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan (5-HTP, neurons from both Tph2 -/- and Sert -/- mice decreased their firing rates at significantly lower concentrations of 5-HTP compared to wildtype controls. Our findings demonstrate that, as opposed to the prevalent view, sensitivity of somatodendritic 5-HT1A receptors does not predict the magnitude of 5-HT neuron autoinhibition. Changes in 5-HT1A receptor sensitivity may rather be seen as an adaptive mechanism to keep autoinhibition functioning in response to extremely altered levels of extracellular 5-HT resulting from targeted inactivation of mediators of serotonergic signaling.

  20. Caspase-3 dependent nitrergic neuronal apoptosis following cavernous nerve injury is mediated via RhoA and ROCK activation in major pelvic ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Johanna L; Matsui, Hotaka; Sopko, Nikolai A; Liu, Xiaopu; Weyne, Emmanuel; Albersen, Maarten; Watson, Joseph W; Hoke, Ahmet; Burnett, Arthur L; Bivalacqua, Trinity J

    2016-07-08

    Axonal injury due to prostatectomy leads to Wallerian degeneration of the cavernous nerve (CN) and erectile dysfunction (ED). Return of potency is dependent on axonal regeneration and reinnervation of the penis. Following CN injury (CNI), RhoA and Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) increase in penile endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Previous studies indicate that nerve regeneration is hampered by activation of RhoA/ROCK pathway. We evaluated the role of RhoA/ROCK pathway in CN regulation following CNI using a validated rat model. CNI upregulated gene and protein expression of RhoA/ROCK and caspase-3 mediated apoptosis in the major pelvic ganglion (MPG). ROCK inhibitor (ROCK-I) prevented upregulation of RhoA/ROCK pathway as well as activation of caspase-3 in the MPG. Following CNI, there was decrease in the dimer to monomer ratio of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) protein and lowered NOS activity in the MPG, which were prevented by ROCK-I. CNI lowered intracavernous pressure and impaired non-adrenergic non-cholinergic-mediated relaxation in the penis, consistent with ED. ROCK-I maintained the intracavernous pressure and non-adrenergic non-cholinergic-mediated relaxation in the penis following CNI. These results suggest that activation of RhoA/ROCK pathway mediates caspase-3 dependent apoptosis of nitrergic neurons in the MPG following CNI and that ROCK-I can prevent post-prostatectomy ED.

  1. Multiple ectopic hepatocellular carcinomas in the pancreas: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhigui; Wu, Xiaoting; Wen, Tianfu; Li, Chuan; Peng, Wen

    2017-07-01

    Ectopic liver tissue can develop at various sites near the liver. Ectopic hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) arising from ectopic liver tissue have a rare clinical incidence. A very rare case has been observed to have metastasis after operation. We report an extremely rare case with multiple masses which were identified in the head and body of the pancreas. Ectopic hepatocellular carcinomas. The masses were removed by surgical resection. Histopathological analysis showed that both masses were ectopic HCC. The patient was still alive and did not have metastasis and relapse. The literature review for this rare case is also presented to highlight the risk of ectopic HCC and good prognosis of operation for ectopic HCC.

  2. Molecular diagnostics and therapeutics for ectopic pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Stephen; Skubisz, Monika M; Horne, Andrew W

    2015-02-01

    Ectopic pregnancies are a serious gynaecological emergency that can be fatal. As such, prompt diagnosis and safe timely treatment is essential. Here, we review the literature on the development of molecularly targeted diagnostics and therapeutics for ectopic pregnancy. A blood-based biomarker that accurately identifies an ectopic pregnancy could be used to offer early diagnostic certainty in cases where ultrasound cannot determine the location of the embryo ('a pregnancy of unknown location'). Molecules examined so far can be broadly grouped into biological themes of relevance to reproduction: (i) Fallopian tube (dys)function, (ii) embryo/trophoblast growth, (iii) corpus luteum function, (iv) inflammation, (v) uterine function and (vi) angiogenesis. While a sensitive and specific biomarker for ectopic pregnancy has yet to be identified, it is possible that improvements in platform technologies or a multi-modal biomarker approach may yield an accurate diagnostic biomarker test. Furthermore, with the advent of better imaging technology, the need for a blood-based biomarker test may be superseded by improvements in ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging technology. There have been some recent preclinical studies describing molecularly targeted therapeutic approaches for ectopic pregnancy. Notably, bench-to-bedside studies have examined the use of combination gefitinib (orally available epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor) and methotrexate. Preclinical studies suggest that combination gefitinib and methotrexate is highly effective in inducing placental cell death, and is significantly more effective than methotrexate alone. In early human trials, encouraging preliminary efficacy data have shown that combination gefitinib and methotrexate can rapidly resolve tubal ectopic pregnancies, and large extra-tubal ectopic pregnancies. If a large clinical randomized controlled trial confirms these findings, combination gefitinib and methotrexate could become a new

  3. Ectopic third molar in the maxillary sinus

    OpenAIRE

    Mohan, Shishir; Kankariya, Hasti; Harjani, Bhupendra; Sharma, Harendra

    2011-01-01

    Ectopic eruption of teeth into a region other than the oral cavity is rare although there have been reports of teeth in the nasal septum, mandibular condyle, coronoid process, palate, chin and maxillary sinus. Occasionally, a tooth may erupt in the maxillary sinus and present with local sinonasal symptoms attributed to chronic sinusitis. We present a case of an ectopic maxillary third molar tooth that caused chronic purulent sinusitis in relation to the right maxillary sinus.

  4. Locating Ectopic Foci on a Cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuklik, Pawel; Zebrowski, Jan J.

    2003-07-01

    Arrhythmia is a condition in which an additional ectopic pacemaker is present in the tissue of the heart. Localization of ectopic foci is essential for successful radio-frequency ablation, an important surgical way of treating arrhythmia. In one of the possible mechanisms, arrhythmia induced by an ectopic foci located in one of the main blood vessels leading out or onto the heart. The therapeutic procedure in this case is usually ablation of the whole junction of the blood vessel with heart wall. In this way, whatever excitation occurs inside the vessel, it cannot penetrate the ventricles perturbing their contraction cycle. Such an ablation procedure is long and burdened with the risk of the perforation. A more safe method would involve the localization of the source of the excitation (i.e. the ectopic foci) and its ablation. The methods used in cardiology at present involve complicated localization systems and are time-consuming with the patient spending a long time on the operating table. Recently, Hall and Glass have developed numerical methods which allow to quickly to model the localization of the ectopic foci in a flat, square sample of an inhomogeneous medium. Here, we demonstrate an extension of this model for the case of a cylinder containing an ectopic foci, that can be a model of a blood vessel with the source of the ectopic beat inside it. Three methods of localization are implemented. Standard electrodes containing several active tips are used to stimulate the medium locally and locate the foci judging from the reaction of the system. The first one uses electrode activation times to compute the location of the ectopic site. The second one localizes it by measuring the resetting response of the foci, and the third one, uses wavefront curvature. Specifically for the cylindrical geometry of the blood vessel, we developed a localization procedure that allows to quickly localize the pacemaker.

  5. A clinical study of ectopic pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanti Sri Asuri

    2016-11-01

    Conclusions: The early diagnosis of an ectopic pregnancy is one of the greatest challenges for a physician. It requires a high index of suspicion to diagnose an ectopic pregnancy. The importance of an early diagnosis lies in the fact that the lady can be offered a conservative line of management which can definitely have a beneficial effect on her reproductive career. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(11.000: 3750-3753

  6. Deletion of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b in proopiomelanocortin neurons reduces neurogenic control of blood pressure and protects mice from leptin- and sympatho-mediated hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruder-Nascimento, Thiago; Butler, Benjamin R; Herren, David J; Brands, Michael W; Bence, Kendra K; Belin de Chantemèle, Eric J

    2015-12-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b (Ptp1b), which represses leptin signaling, is a promising therapeutic target for obesity. Genome wide deletion of Ptp1b, increases leptin sensitivity, protects mice from obesity and diabetes, but alters cardiovascular function by increasing blood pressure (BP). Leptin-control of metabolism is centrally mediated and involves proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons. Whether these neurons contribute to leptin-mediated increases in BP remain unclear. We hypothesized that increasing leptin signaling in POMC neurons with Ptp1b deletion will sensitize the cardiovascular system to leptin and enhance neurogenic control of BP. We analyzed the cardiovascular phenotype of Ptp1b+/+ and POMC-Ptp1b-/- mice, at baseline and after 7 days of leptin infusion or sympatho-activation with phenylephrine. POMCPtp1b deletion did not alter baseline cardiovascular hemodynamics (BP, heart rate) but reduced BP response to ganglionic blockade and plasma catecholamine levels that suggests a decreased neurogenic control of BP. In contrast, POMC-Ptp1b deletion increased vascular adrenergic reactivity and aortic α-adrenergic receptors expression. Chronic leptin treatment reduced vascular adrenergic reactivity and blunted diastolic and mean BP increases in POMC-Ptp1b-/- mice only. Similarly POMC-Ptp1b-/- mice exhibited a blunted increased in diastolic and mean BP accompanied by a gradual reduction in adrenergic reactivity in response to chronic vascular sympatho-activation with phenylephrine. Together these data rule out our hypothesis but suggest that deletion of Ptp1b in POMC neurons protects from leptin- and sympatho-mediated increases in BP. Vascular adrenergic desensitization appears as a protective mechanism against hypertension, and POMC-Ptp1b as a key therapeutic target for the treatment of metabolic and cardiovascular dysfunctions associated with obesity.

  7. Diagnosis and management of ectopic pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barash, Joshua H; Buchanan, Edward M; Hillson, Christina

    2014-07-01

    Ectopic pregnancy affects 1% to 2% of all pregnancies and is responsible for 9% of pregnancy-related deaths in the United States. When a pregnant patient presents with first-trimester bleeding or abdominal pain, physicians should consider ectopic pregnancy as a possible cause. The patient history, physical examination, and imaging with transvaginal ultrasonography can usually confirm the diagnosis. When ultrasonography does not clearly identify the pregnancy location, the physician must determine whether the pregnancy is intrauterine (either viable or failing) or ectopic. Use of the beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (ß-hCG) discriminatory level, the ß-hCG value above which an intrauterine pregnancy should be visualized by transvaginal ultrasonography, may be helpful. Failure to visualize an intrauterine pregnancy when ß-hCG is above the discriminatory level suggests ectopic pregnancy. In addition to single measurements of ß-hCG levels, serial levels can be monitored to detect changes. ß-hCG values in approximately 99% of viable intrauterine pregnancies increase by about 50% in 48 hours. The remaining 1% of patients have a slower rate of increase; these patients may have pregnancies that are misdiagnosed as nonviable intrauterine or ectopic. After an ectopic pregnancy has been confirmed, treatment options include medical, surgical, or expectant management. For patients who are medically unstable or experiencing life-threatening hemorrhage, a surgical approach is indicated. For others, management should be based on patient preference after discussion of the risks, benefits, and monitoring requirements of all approaches.

  8. Disparities in the management of ectopic pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jennifer Y; Chen, Ling; Gumer, Arielle R; Tergas, Ana I; Hou, June Y; Burke, William M; Ananth, Cande V; Hershman, Dawn L; Wright, Jason D

    2017-07-01

    Ectopic pregnancy is common among young women. Treatment can consist of either surgery with salpingectomy or salpingostomy or medical management with methotrexate. In addition to acute complications, treatment of ectopic pregnancy can result in long-term sequelae that include decreased fertility. Little is known about the patterns of care and predictors of treatment in women with ectopic pregnancy. Similarly, data on outcomes for various treatments are limited. We examined the patterns of care and outcomes for women with ectopic pregnancy. Specifically, we examined predictors of medical (vs surgical) management of ectopic pregnancy and tubal conservation (salpingostomy vs salpingectomy) among women who underwent surgery. The Perspective database was used to identify women with a diagnosis of tubal ectopic pregnancy treated from 2006-2015. Perspective is an all-payer database that collects data on patients at hospitals from throughout the United States. Women were classified as having undergone medical treatment, if they received methotrexate, and surgical treatment, if treatment consisted of salpingostomy or salpingectomy. Multivariable models were developed to examine predictors of medical treatment and of tubal conserving salpingostomy among women who were treated surgically. Among the 62,588 women, 49,090 women (78.4%) were treated surgically, and 13,498 women (21.6%) received methotrexate. Use of methotrexate increased from 14.5% in 2006 to 27.3% by 2015 (Pectopic pregnancy. There are significant race- and insurance-related disparities associated with treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Oxygen/glucose deprivation induces a reduction in synaptic AMPA receptors on hippocampal CA3 neurons mediated by mGluR1 and adenosine A3 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Siobhan H; Jaafari, Nadia; Cimarosti, Helena; Hanley, Jonathan G; Henley, Jeremy M; Mellor, Jack R

    2011-08-17

    Hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons are highly sensitive to ischemic damage, whereas neighboring CA3 pyramidal neurons are less susceptible. It is proposed that switching of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) subunits on CA1 neurons during an in vitro model of ischemia, oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD), leads to an enhanced permeability of AMPARs to Ca(2+), resulting in delayed cell death. However, it is unclear whether the same mechanisms exist in CA3 neurons and whether this underlies the differential sensitivity to ischemia. Here, we investigated the consequences of OGD for AMPAR function in CA3 neurons using electrophysiological recordings in rat hippocampal slices. Following a 15 min OGD protocol, a substantial depression of AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission was observed at CA3 associational/commissural and mossy fiber synapses but not CA1 Schaffer collateral synapses. The depression of synaptic transmission following OGD was prevented by metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1) or A(3) receptor antagonists, indicating a role for both glutamate and adenosine release. Inhibition of PLC, PKC, or chelation of intracellular Ca(2+) also prevented the depression of synaptic transmission. Inclusion of peptides to interrupt the interaction between GluA2 and PICK1 or dynamin and amphiphysin prevented the depression of transmission, suggesting a dynamin and PICK1-dependent internalization of AMPARs after OGD. We also show that a reduction in surface and total AMPAR protein levels after OGD was prevented by mGluR1 or A(3) receptor antagonists, indicating that AMPARs are degraded following internalization. Thus, we describe a novel mechanism for the removal of AMPARs in CA3 pyramidal neurons following OGD that has the potential to reduce excitotoxicity and promote neuroprotection.

  10. Oxygen/glucose Deprivation Induces a Reduction in Synaptic AMPA Receptors on Hippocampal CA3 Neurons Mediated by mGluR1 and A3 Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Siobhan H.; Jaafari, Nadia; Cimarosti, Helena; Hanley, Jonathan G.; Henley, Jeremy M.; Mellor, Jack R.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons are highly sensitive to ischemic damage, whereas neighbouring CA3 pyramidal neurons are less susceptible. It is proposed that switching of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) subunits on CA1 neurons during an in vitro model of ischemia, oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD), leads to an enhanced permeability of AMPARs to Ca2+ resulting in delayed cell death. However, it is unclear if the same mechanisms exist in CA3 neurons and whether this underlies the differential sensitivity to ischemia. Here, we investigated the consequences of OGD for AMPAR function in CA3 neurons using electrophysiological recordings in rat hippocampal slices. Following a 15 minute OGD protocol a substantial depression of AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission was observed at CA3 associational/commissural and mossy fiber synapses but not CA1 Schaffer collateral synapses. The depression of synaptic transmission following OGD was prevented by mGluR1 or A3 receptor antagonists, indicating a role for both glutamate and adenosine release. Inhibition of PLC, PKC or chelation of intracellular Ca2+ also prevented the depression of synaptic transmission. Inclusion of peptides to interrupt the interaction between GluA2 and PICK1 or dynamin and amphiphysin prevented the depression of transmission, suggesting a dynamin and PICK1-dependent internalisation of AMPARs after OGD. We also show a reduction in surface and total AMPAR protein levels after OGD was prevented by mGluR1 or A3 receptor antagonists indicating that AMPARs are degraded following internalisation. Thus, we describe a novel mechanism for the removal of AMPARs in CA3 pyramidal neurons following OGD that has the potential to reduce excitotoxicity and promote neuroprotection. PMID:21849555

  11. Sphk1 mediates neuroinflammation and neuronal injury via TRAF2/NF-κB pathways in activated microglia in cerebral ischemia reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Danying; Cheng, Yuefeng; Li, Shi; Dai, Dawei; Zhang, Wei; Lv, Manhua

    2017-04-15

    Sphingosine kinase 1 (Sphk1), a key enzyme responsible for phosphorylating sphingosine into sphingosine1-phosphate (S1P), plays an important role in mediating post-stroke neuroinflammation. However, the pathway and mechanism of the Sphk1-mediated inflammatory response remains unknown. In this study, we found that suppression of Sphk1 decreased IL17 production and relieved neuronal damage induced by microglia in cerebral ischemia reperfusion (IR) or in an in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation reperfusion (OGDR) system. Inhibition of Sphk1 with an inhibitor or siRNA decreased tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) sequentially in microglia in response to IR or OGDR. Moreover, we also found that after suppression of TRAF2 or NF-κB by siRNA in microglia, reductions in the downstream molecules NF-κB and IL-17 and in neuronal apoptosis were observed in response to OGDR. Taken together, we hypothesize that Sphk1, TRAF2 and NF-κB form an axis that leads to increased IL-17 and neuronal apoptosis. This axis may be a potential therapeutic target to control neuroinflammation in brain IR.

  12. ANALYSIS OF RISK FACTORS ECTOPIC PREGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budi Santoso

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ectopic pregnancy is a pregnancy with extrauterine implantation. This situation is gynecologic emergency that contributes to maternal mortality. Therefore, early recognition, based on identification of the causes of ectopic pregnancy risk factors, is needed. Methods: The design descriptive observational. The samples were pregnant women who had ectopic pregnancy at Maternity Room, Emergency Unit, Dr. Soetomo Hospital, Surabaya, from 1 July 2008 to 1 July 2010. Sampling technique was total sampling using medical records. Result: Patients with ectopic pregnancy were 99 individuals out of 2090 pregnant women who searched for treatment in Dr. Soetomo Hospital. However, only 29 patients were accompanied with traceable risk factors. Discussion:. Most ectopic pregnancies were in the age group of 26-30 years, comprising 32 patients (32.32%, then in age groups of 31–35 years as many as 25 patients (25.25%, 18 patients in age group 21–25 years (18.18%, 17 patients in age group 36–40 years (17.17%, 4 patients in age group 41 years and more (4.04%, and the least was in age group of 16–20 years with 3 patients (3.03%. A total of 12 patients with ectopic pregnancy (41.38% had experience of abortion and 6 patients (20.69% each in groups of patients with ectopic pregnancy who used family planning, in those who used family planning as well as ectopic pregnancy patients with history of surgery. There were 2 patients (6.90% of the group of patients ectopic pregnancy who had history of surgery and history of abortion. The incidence rate of ectopic pregnancy was 4.73%, mostly in the second gravidity (34.34%, whereas the nulliparous have the highest prevalence of 39.39%. Acquired risk factors, i.e. history of operations was 10.34%, patients with family planning 20.69%, patients with history of abortion 41.38%, patients with history of abortion and operation 6.90% patients with family and history of abortion was 20.69%.

  13. Cadmium-induced ectopic apoptosis in zebrafish embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Po Kwok; Cheng, Shuk Han [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2003-02-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that cadmium-induced developmental toxicity was mediated via ectopic occurrence of apoptosis during embryonic development. We employed confocal microscopy to acquire images of whole-mount staining of apoptotic cells in zebrafish embryo exposed to 100 {mu}M cadmium from 5 hours post fertilisation (hpf) to 28 hpf. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the images was performed and the spatial and temporal distributions of apoptotic cells in the embryos were compared. In cadmium-treated embryos with varying degrees of gross developmental malformations, significantly higher numbers of apoptotic cells were detected with this method. In order to detect the precise locations of apoptotic cells, we performed terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) assay in sectioned embryos. In the degenerating neural tube of cadmium-treated embryos apoptotic cells were detected, while in the healthy neural tube of the untreated controls no apoptotic cells were found. We then employed flow cytometry to investigate whether cadmium exposure would affect the dynamics of apoptosis or induce any abnormalities in cell-cycle progression. It appeared that cadmium did not induce cell-cycle arrest. The percentages of apoptotic cells did not differ in the two groups at 13, 16 or 19 hpf. At 28 hpf, however, a significantly higher percentage of apoptotic cells were found in the cadmium-treated group. Exposure to cadmium, therefore, induced ectopic apoptosis at 28 hpf without affecting the dynamics of apoptosis at earlier developmental stages. (orig.)

  14. Phospho-Rb mediating cell cycle reentry induces early apoptosis following oxygen-glucose deprivation in rat cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ying; Ren, Qing-Guo; Zhang, Zhao-Hui; Zhou, Ke; Yu, Zhi-Yuan; Luo, Xiang; Wang, Wei

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between cell cycle reentry and apoptosis in cultured cortical neurons following oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). We found that the percentage of neurons with BrdU uptake, TUNEL staining, and colocalized BrdU uptake and TUNEL staining was increased relative to control 6, 12 and 24 h after 1 h of OGD. The number of neurons with colocalized BrdU and TUNEL staining was decreased relative to the number of TUNEL-positive neurons at 24 h. The expression of phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein (phospho-Rb) was significantly increased 6, 12 and 24 h after OGD, parallel with the changes in BrdU uptake. Phospho-Rb and TUNEL staining were colocalized in neurons 6 and 12 h after OGD. This colocalization was strikingly decreased 24 h after OGD. Treatment with the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor roscovitine (100 μM) decreased the expression of phospho-Rb and reduced neuronal apoptosis in vitro. These results demonstrated that attempted cell cycle reentry with phosphorylation of Rb induce early apoptosis in neurons after OGD and there must be other mechanisms involved in the later stages of neuronal apoptosis besides cell cycle reentry. Phosphoralated Rb may be an important factor which closely associates aberrant cell cycle reentry with the early stages of neuronal apoptosis following ischemia/hypoxia in vitro, and pharmacological interventions for neuroprotection may be useful directed at this keypoint.

  15. Magel2 is required for leptin-mediated depolarization of POMC neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca E Mercer

    Full Text Available Prader-Willi Syndrome is the most common syndromic form of human obesity and is caused by the loss of function of several genes, including MAGEL2. Mice lacking Magel2 display increased weight gain with excess adiposity and other defects suggestive of hypothalamic deficiency. We demonstrate Magel2-null mice are insensitive to the anorexic effect of peripherally administered leptin. Although their excessive adiposity and hyperleptinemia likely contribute to this physiological leptin resistance, we hypothesized that Magel2 may also have an essential role in intracellular leptin responses in hypothalamic neurons. We therefore measured neuronal activation by immunohistochemistry on brain sections from leptin-injected mice and found a reduced number of arcuate nucleus neurons activated after leptin injection in the Magel2-null animals, suggesting that most but not all leptin receptor-expressing neurons retain leptin sensitivity despite hyperleptinemia. Electrophysiological measurements of arcuate nucleus neurons expressing the leptin receptor demonstrated that although neurons exhibiting hyperpolarizing responses to leptin are present in normal numbers, there were no neurons exhibiting depolarizing responses to leptin in the mutant mice. Additional studies demonstrate that arcuate nucleus pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC expressing neurons are unresponsive to leptin. Interestingly, Magel2-null mice are hypersensitive to the anorexigenic effects of the melanocortin receptor agonist MT-II. In Prader-Willi Syndrome, loss of MAGEL2 may likewise abolish leptin responses in POMC hypothalamic neurons. This neural defect, together with increased fat mass, blunted circadian rhythm, and growth hormone response pathway defects that are also linked to loss of MAGEL2, could contribute to the hyperphagia and obesity that are hallmarks of this disorder.

  16. CD8 T cell-mediated killing of orexinergic neurons induces a narcolepsy-like phenotype in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard-Valnet, Raphaël; Yshii, Lidia; Quériault, Clémence; Nguyen, Xuan-Hung; Arthaud, Sébastien; Rodrigues, Magda; Canivet, Astrid; Morel, Anne-Laure; Matthys, Arthur; Bauer, Jan; Pignolet, Béatrice; Dauvilliers, Yves; Peyron, Christelle; Liblau, Roland S

    2016-09-27

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy is a rare and severe sleep disorder caused by the destruction of orexinergic neurons in the lateral hypothalamus. The genetic and environmental factors associated with narcolepsy, together with serologic data, collectively point to an autoimmune origin. The current animal models of narcolepsy, based on either disruption of the orexinergic neurotransmission or neurons, do not allow study of the potential autoimmune etiology. Here, we sought to generate a mouse model that allows deciphering of the immune mechanisms leading to orexin(+) neuron loss and narcolepsy development. We generated mice expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) as a "neo-self-antigen" specifically in hypothalamic orexin(+) neurons (called Orex-HA), which were transferred with effector neo-self-antigen-specific T cells to assess whether an autoimmune process could be at play in narcolepsy. Given the tight association of narcolepsy with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) HLA-DQB1*06:02 allele, we first tested the pathogenic contribution of CD4 Th1 cells. Although these T cells readily infiltrated the hypothalamus and triggered local inflammation, they did not elicit the loss of orexin(+) neurons or clinical manifestations of narcolepsy. In contrast, the transfer of cytotoxic CD8 T cells (CTLs) led to both T-cell infiltration and specific destruction of orexin(+) neurons. This phenotype was further aggravated upon repeated injections of CTLs. In situ, CTLs interacted directly with MHC class I-expressing orexin(+) neurons, resulting in cytolytic granule polarization toward neurons. Finally, drastic neuronal loss caused manifestations mimicking human narcolepsy, such as cataplexy and sleep attacks. This work demonstrates the potential role of CTLs as final effectors of the immunopathological process in narcolepsy.

  17. Fragmentation of Care in Ectopic Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stulberg, Debra B; Dahlquist, Irma; Jarosch, Christina; Lindau, Stacy T

    2016-05-01

    Ectopic pregnancy is an important cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. Women who experience fragmented care may undergo unnecessary delays to diagnosis and treatment. Based on ectopic pregnancy cases observed in clinical practice that raised our concern about fragmentation of care, we designed an exploratory study to describe the number, characteristics, and outcomes of fragmented care among patients with ectopic pregnancy at one urban academic hospital. Chart review with descriptive statistics. Fragmented care was defined as a patient being evaluated at an outside facility for possible ectopic pregnancy and transferred, referred, or discharged before receiving care at the study institution. Of 191 women seen for possible or definite ectopic pregnancy during the study period, 42 (22 %) met the study definition of fragmented care. The study was under-powered to observe statistically significant differences across groups, but we found concerning, non-significant trends: patients with fragmented care were more likely to be Medicaid recipients (65.9 vs. 58.8 %) and to experience a complication (23.8 vs. 18.1 %) compared to those with non-fragmented care. Most patients (n = 37) received no identifiable treatment prior to transfer and arrived to the study hospital with no communication to the receiving hospital from the outside provider (n = 34). Nine patients (21 %) presented with ruptured ectopic pregnancies. The fragmentation we observed in our study may contribute to previously identified socio-economic disparities in ectopic pregnancy outcomes. If future research confirms these findings, health information exchanges and regional coordination of care may be important strategies for reducing maternal mortality.

  18. [Surgery treatment of ectopic adrenocorticotrophic hormone syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, H; Li, H Z; Xu, W F; Ji, Z G; Zhang, Y S

    2017-08-18

    To investigation the diagnosis and treatment of ectopic adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) syndrome. The clinical characters of 57 cases of ecotopic ACTH syndrome from Jan. 1996 to Dec. 2016 were collected and analyzed. The 57 cases included 32 males and 25 females. The age ranged from 11 to 68 years (average 32 years). ACTH levels significantly increased from 16.5 to 365.6 pmol/L, with average 77.6 pmol/L (normal range ectopic ACTH syndrome cases (44%) were group A, without identified source of ectopic hormone, were treated with bilateral or unilateral adrenalectomy due to the severity of the disease and difficulty of operation. Group B was composed of 16 cases (28%) diagnosed as ectopic ACTH syndrome by finding ectopic ACTH tumors and surgical resection. Group C included 16 cases (28%) with nonsurgical therapy. Different treatment results and prognosis were analyzed. In the study, 40 cases of the 57 had been followed up for 6 months to 10 years. In group A, of the 25 cases with bilateral or unilateral adrenalectomy, 4 died of diabetes and severe pulmonary infection, 18 survived, and 3 were lost to the follow-up, and the survival rate was 81% (18/22). In group B, of the 16 cases with radical tumor resection, 5 died of tumor recurrence 0.5-6.0 years after operation, 3 survived, and 8 were lost to the follow-up, and the survival rate was 37.5% (3/8). In group C, of the 16 non-operation patients, 4 with radiotherapy and chemotherapy died of metastases, diabetes or pulmonary infection, 6 with chemotherapy died of pulmonary infection within 1 year and the others were lost to the follow-up, and the survival rate was 0. Ectopic ACTH syndrome is difficult to treat. Adrenalectomy is effective for the management of ectopic ACTH syndrome, especially for those patients with severe Cushing's syndrome, but the primary tumor can not be located.

  19. Folate deprivation modulates the expression of autophagy- and circadian-related genes in HT-22 hippocampal neuron cells through GR-mediated pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qinwei; Yang, Yang; Li, Xi; He, Bin; Jia, Yimin; Zhang, Nana; Zhao, Ruqian

    2016-08-01

    Folic acid (FA) is an extremely important nutrient for brain formation and development. FA deficiency is highly linked to brain degeneration and age-related diseases, which are also associated with autophagic activities and circadian rhythm in hippocampal neurons. However, little is known how autophagy- and circadian-related genes in hippocampal neurons are regulated under FA deficiency. Here, hippocampal neuroncells (HT-22) were employed to determine the effect of FA deprivation (FD) on the expression of relevant genes and to reveal the potential role of glucocorticoid receptor (GR). FD increased autophagic activities in HT-22 cells, associated with significantly (PGR activation indicated by higher ratio of GR phosphorylation. Out of 17 autophagy-related genes determined, 8 was significantly (PGR binding to the promoter sequence of ATG3 and Per2. Moreover, MeDIP analysis demonstrated significant (PGR-mediated pathway. Our results provide a basis for future investigations into the intracellular regulatory network in response to folate deficiency.

  20. Effect of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase-mediated p53 expression on neuron autophagy following traumatic brain injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HONG Ming-yan; GAO Jun-ling; CUI Jian-zhong; WANG Kai-jie; TIAN Yan-xia; LI Ran; WANG Hai-tao; WANG Huan

    2012-01-01

    Background Activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) has been implicated in neuron apoptosis as well as autophagy in response to various stressors after traumatic brain injury (TBI).However,the underlying molecular pathway remains unclear.Our study assessed whether JNK-mediated p53 phosphorylation might be an important mechanism for enhancing neuron autophagy in response to TBI.Methods A total of 186 male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats (300-350 g) were used in this study.By randomized block method rats were randomly divided into four groups:sham-operated (n=46),TBI (n=60),TBI + dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) (n=40),and TBI + SP600125 (n=40).JNK was treated with SP600125,a specific JNK inhibitor.JNK,p-P53,Beclin-1,damage-regulated autophagy modulator (DRAM) and p-bcl-2 were evaluated by Western blotting analysis.The cellular localization and expression of Beclin-1 and DRAM was observed by immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry,and the expression of Beclin-1-Bcl-2/Bcl-xL complexes was evaluated by immunoprecipitation.Multiple-group comparisons were conducted using analysis of variance (ANOVA).P values of less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant.Results It was observed that the expression of JNK,p-P53,Beclin-1,DRAM and p-bcl-2 was increasing after TBI,and the expression of Beclin-1 and DRAM was mainly located in the cytoplasm of neurons.But these were significantly inhibited in SP600125 group compared with sham group and TBI+SP600125 group (P <0.05).The expression of Beclin-1-Bcl-2/Bcl-xL complexes was reduced after TBI.Conclusion JNK-mediated p53 phosphorylation might be an important mechanism for enhancing neuron autophagy in response to TBI.

  1. PI3 kinase/Akt activation mediates estrogen and IGF-1 nigral DA neuronal neuroprotection against a unilateral rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada, Arnulfo; Lee, Becky Y; Micevych, Paul E

    2008-04-01

    Recently, using the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) 6-hydroxydopmaine (6-OHDA) lesion rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD), we have demonstrated that blockade of central IGF-1 receptors (IGF-1R) attenuated estrogen neuroprotection of substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) DA neurons, but exacerbated 6-OHDA lesions in IGF-1 only treated rats (Quesada and Micevych [2004]: J Neurosci Res 75:107-116). This suggested that the IGF-1 system is a central mechanism through which estrogen acts to protect the nigrostriatal DA system. Moreover, these results also suggest that IGF-1R-induced intracellular signaling pathways are involved in the estrogen mechanism that promotes neuronal survival. In vitro, two convergent intracellular signaling pathways used by estrogen and IGF-1, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK/ERK), and phosphatidyl-inositol-3-kinase/Akt (PI3K/Akt), have been demonstrated to be neuroprotective. Continuous central infusions of MAPK/ERK and PI3K/Akt inhibitors were used to test the hypothesis that one or both of these signal transduction pathways mediates estrogen and/or IGF-1 neuroprotection of SNpc DA neurons after a unilateral administration of 6-OHDA into the MFB of rats. Motor behavior tests and tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity revealed that the inhibitor of the PI3K/Akt pathway (LY294002) blocked the survival effects of both estrogen and IGF-1, while an inhibitor of the MAPK/ERK signaling (PD98059) was ineffective. Western blot analyses showed that estrogen and IGF-1 treatments increased PI3K/Akt activation in the SN; however, MAPK/ERK activation was decreased in the SN. Indeed, continuous infusions of inhibitors blocked phosphorylation of PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK. These findings indicate that estrogen and IGF-1-mediated SNpc DA neuronal protection is dependent on PI3K/Akt signaling, but not on the MAPK/ERK pathway.

  2. Activation of the cannabinoid type-1 receptor mediates the anticonvulsant properties of cannabinoids in the hippocampal neuronal culture models of acquired epilepsy and status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Robert E; Deshpande, Laxmikant S; Sombati, Sompong; Falenski, Katherine W; Martin, Billy R; DeLorenzo, Robert J

    2006-06-01

    Cannabinoids have been shown to have anticonvulsant properties, but no studies have evaluated the effects of cannabinoids in the hippocampal neuronal culture models of acquired epilepsy (AE) and status epilepticus (SE). This study investigated the anticonvulsant properties of the cannabinoid receptor agonist R(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-[(morpholinyl)methyl]pyrrolol[1,2,3 de]-1,4-benzoxazinyl]-(1-naphthalenyl)methanone (WIN 55,212-2) in primary hippocampal neuronal culture models of both AE and SE. WIN 55,212-2 produced dose-dependent anticonvulsant effects against both spontaneous recurrent epileptiform discharges (SRED) (EC50 = 0.85 microM) and SE (EC50 = 1.51 microM), with total suppression of seizure activity at 3 microM and of SE activity at 5 microM. The anticonvulsant properties of WIN 55,212-2 in these preparations were both stereospecific and blocked by the cannabinoid type-1 (CB1) receptor antagonist N-(piperidin-1-yl-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamidehydrochloride (SR141716A; 1 microM), showing a CB1 receptor-dependent pathway. The inhibitory effect of WIN 55,212-2 against low Mg2+-induced SE is the first observation in this model of total suppression of SE by a selective pharmacological agent. The clinically used anticonvulsants phenytoin and phenobarbital were not able to abolish low Mg2+-induced SE at concentrations up to 150 microM. The results from this study show CB1 receptor-mediated anticonvulsant effects of the cannabimimetic WIN 55,212-2 against both SRED and low Mg2+-induced SE in primary hippocampal neuronal cultures and show that these in vitro models of AE and SE may represent powerful tools to investigate the molecular mechanisms mediating the effects of cannabinoids on neuronal excitability.

  3. DREADD Modulation of Transplanted DA Neurons Reveals a Novel Parkinsonian Dyskinesia Mechanism Mediated by the Serotonin 5-HT6 Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Summary Transplantation of DA neurons is actively pursued as a restorative therapy in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Pioneering clinical trials using transplants of fetal DA neuroblasts have given promising results, although a number of patients have developed graft-induced dyskinesias (GIDs), and the mechanism underlying this troublesome side effect is still unknown. Here we have used a new model where the activity of the transplanted DA neurons can be selectively modulated using a bimodal chemog...

  4. Identification of sodium channel isoforms that mediate action potential firing in lamina I/II spinal cord neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Paula L

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Voltage-gated sodium channels play key roles in acute and chronic pain processing. The molecular, biophysical, and pharmacological properties of sodium channel currents have been extensively studied for peripheral nociceptors while the properties of sodium channel currents in dorsal horn spinal cord neurons remain incompletely understood. Thus far, investigations into the roles of sodium channel function in nociceptive signaling have primarily focused on recombinant channels or peripheral nociceptors. Here, we utilize recordings from lamina I/II neurons withdrawn from the surface of spinal cord slices to systematically determine the functional properties of sodium channels expressed within the superficial dorsal horn. Results Sodium channel currents within lamina I/II neurons exhibited relatively hyperpolarized voltage-dependent properties and fast kinetics of both inactivation and recovery from inactivation, enabling small changes in neuronal membrane potentials to have large effects on intrinsic excitability. By combining biophysical and pharmacological channel properties with quantitative real-time PCR results, we demonstrate that functional sodium channel currents within lamina I/II neurons are predominantly composed of the NaV1.2 and NaV1.3 isoforms. Conclusions Overall, lamina I/II neurons express a unique combination of functional sodium channels that are highly divergent from the sodium channel isoforms found within peripheral nociceptors, creating potentially complementary or distinct ion channel targets for future pain therapeutics.

  5. The prion protein regulates glutamate-mediated Ca(2+) entry and mitochondrial Ca(2+) accumulation in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mario, Agnese; Peggion, Caterina; Massimino, Maria Lina; Viviani, Francesca; Castellani, Angela; Giacomello, Marta; Lim, Dmitry; Bertoli, Alessandro; Sorgato, Maria Catia

    2017-08-15

    The cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) whose conformational misfolding leads to the production of deadly prions, has a still-unclarified cellular function despite decades of intensive research. Following our recent finding that PrP(C) limits Ca(2+) entry via store-operated Ca(2+) channels in neurons, we investigated whether the protein could also control the activity of ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs). To this end, we compared local Ca(2+) movements in primary cerebellar granule neurons and cortical neurons transduced with genetically encoded Ca(2+) probes and expressing, or not expressing, PrP(C) Our investigation demonstrated that PrP(C) downregulates Ca(2+) entry through each specific agonist-stimulated iGluR and after stimulation by glutamate. We found that, although PrP-knockout (KO) mitochondria were displaced from the plasma membrane, glutamate addition resulted in a higher mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in PrP-KO neurons than in their PrP(C)-expressing counterpart. This was because the increased Ca(2+) entry through iGluRs in PrP-KO neurons led to a parallel increase in Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release via ryanodine receptor channels. These data thus suggest that PrP(C) takes part in the cell apparatus controlling Ca(2+) homeostasis, and that PrP(C) is involved in protecting neurons from toxic Ca(2+) overloads. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Polylysine-modified polyethylenimine (PEI-PLL) mediated VEGF gene delivery protects dopaminergic neurons in cell culture and in rat models of Parkinson's Disease (PD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Muhammad Abid; Malik, Yousra Saeed; Xing, Zhenkai; Guo, Zhaopei; Tian, Huayu; Zhu, Xiaojuan; Chen, Xuesi

    2017-05-01

    Parkinson's Disease (PD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder characterized by motor deficits which result from the progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons. Gene therapy using growth factors such as VEGF seems to be a viable approach for potential therapeutic treatment of PD. In this study, we utilized a novel non-viral gene carrier designated as PEI-PLL synthesized by our laboratory to deliver VEGF gene to study its effect by using both cell culture as well as animal models of PD. For cell culture experiments, we utilized 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) mediated cell death model of MN9D cells following transfection with either a control plasmid or VEGF expressing plasmid. As compared to control transfected cells, PEI-PLL mediated VEGF gene delivery to MN9D cells resulted in increased cell viability, increase in the number of Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive cells and decreased apoptosis following 6-OHDA insult. Next, we studied the therapeutic potential of PEI-PLL mediated VEGF gene delivery in SNPc by using unilateral 6-OHDA Medial forebrain bundle (MFB) lesion model of PD in rats. VEGF administration prevented the loss of motor functions induced by 6-OHDA as determined by behavior analysis. Similarly, VEGF inhibited the 6-OHDA mediated loss of DA neurons in Substantia Nigra Pars Compacta (SNPc) as well as DA nerve fibers in striatum as determined by TH immunostaining. In addition, PEI-PLL mediated VEGF gene delivery also prevented apoptosis and microglial activation in PD rat models. Together, these results clearly demonstrated the beneficial effects of PEI-PLL mediated VEGF gene delivery on dopaminergic system in both cell culture and animal models of PD. In this report, we exploited the potential of PEI-PLL to deliver VEGF gene for the potential therapeutic treatment of PD by using both cell culture and animal models of PD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing the use of novel polymeric gene carriers for the delivery of VEGF gene

  7. L-ascorbate attenuates the endotoxin-induced production of inflammatory mediators by inhibiting MAPK activation and NF-κB translocation in cortical neurons/glia Cocultures.

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    Ya-Ni Huang

    Full Text Available In response to acute insults to the central nervous system, such as pathogen invasion or neuronal injuries, glial cells become activated and secrete inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO, cytokines, and chemokines. This neuroinflammation plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of chronic neurodegenerative diseases. Endogenous ascorbate levels are significantly decreased among patients with septic encephalopathy. Using the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS to induce neuroinflammation in primary neuron/glia cocultures, we investigated how L-ascorbate (vitamin C; Vit. C affected neuroinflammation. LPS (100 ng/ml induced the expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS and the production of NO, interleukin (IL-6, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2/CXCL2 in a time-dependent manner; however, cotreatment with Vit. C (5 or 10 mM attenuated the LPS-induced iNOS expression and production of NO, IL-6, and MIP-2 production. The morphological features revealed after immunocytochemical staining confirmed that Vit. C suppressed LPS-induced astrocytic and microglial activation. Because Vit. C can be transported into neurons and glia via the sodium-dependent Vit. C transporter-2, we examined how Vit. C affected LPS-activated intracellular signaling in neuron/glia cocultures. The results indicated the increased activation (caused by phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs, such as p38 at 30 min and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs at 180 min after LPS treatment. The inhibition of p38 and ERK MAPK suppressed the LPS-induced production of inflammatory mediators. Vit. C also inhibited the LPS-induced activation of p38 and ERK. Combined treatments of Vit. C and the inhibitors of p38 and ERK yielded no additional inhibition compared with using the inhibitors alone, suggesting that Vit. C functions through the same signaling pathway (i.e., MAPK as these inhibitors. Vit. C also reduced LPS-induced Iκ

  8. [Clinical and ultrasonographic data in ectopic pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Gutierrez, G; Patiño Segura, A; Pulido Ochoa, J J; Valadéz Ortega, A

    1994-06-01

    In order to evaluate the clinical and sonographic findings in 60 patients with ectopic pregnancy confirmed at laparotomy, we carried out a prospective study at the Hospital de Gineco-Obstetricia del Centro Médico León, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social. The patients were 28.17 years old, average. The ectopic pregnancy was more common in multiparous women (80%) than in nuliparous ones. The obstetric risk factors more frequent were abortion (26.6%) and use of intrauterine device (23.3%). The clinical sign reported most common was pelvic pain, referred in 48 patients (80%). Hemodynamic changes were detected in 21.6% of the cases. The ultrasound findings were seen in most of the patients and heterogeneous adnexal mass was observed in 91.6% of them, moreover intraperitoneal fluid was reported in 61.6% of the patients with ectopic pregnancy. The heterogeneous adnexal mass had a direct relationship with the diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy and had a correlation coefficient value R = 0.99 (P < 0.01). The ultrasonographic findings seen with transvaginal technique were similar than those obtained through transabdominal procedure. We conclude that ultrasonography has a definite role in improving the diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy.

  9. Ectopic ganglion in cauda equina: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Andrew K; Fung, Kar-Ming; Peterson, Jo Elle G; Glenn, Chad A; Martin, Michael D

    2016-06-01

    Macroscopic ectopic or heterotopic ganglionic tissue within the cauda equina is a very rare pathological finding and is usually associated with spinal dysraphism. However, it may mimic genuine neoplasms of the cauda equina. The authors describe a 29-year-old woman with a history of back pain, right leg pain, and urinary incontinence in whom imaging demonstrated an enhancing mass located in the cauda equina at the L1-2 interspace. The patient subsequently underwent biopsy and was found to have a focus of ectopic ganglionic tissue that was 1.3 cm in greatest dimension. To the authors' knowledge, ectopic or heterotopic ganglionic tissue within the cauda equina in a patient without evidence of spinal dysraphism has never been reported. This patient presented with imaging and clinical findings suggestive of a neoplasm, and an open biopsy proved the lesion to be ectopic ganglionic tissue. The authors suggest that ectopic ganglionic tissue be added to the list of differential diagnoses of a space-occupying lesion arising from the cauda equina.

  10. P2X7 receptors in satellite glial cells mediate high functional expression of P2X3 receptors in immature dorsal root ganglion neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yong

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purinergic P2X3 receptor (P2X3R expressed in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG sensory neuron and the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R expressed in the surrounding satellite glial cell (SGC are two major receptors participating in neuron-SGC communication in adult DRGs. Activation of P2X7Rs was found to tonically reduce the expression of P2X3Rs in DRGs, thus inhibiting the abnormal pain behaviors in adult rats. P2X receptors are also actively involved in sensory signaling in developing rodents. However, very little is known about the developmental change of P2X7Rs in DRGs and the interaction between P2X7Rs and P2X3Rs in those animals. We therefore examined the expression of P2X3Rs and P2X7Rs in postnatal rats and determined if P2X7R-P2X3R control exists in developing rats. Findings We immunostained DRGs of immature rats and found that P2X3Rs were expressed only in neurons and P2X7Rs were expressed only in SGCs. Western blot analyses indicated that P2X3R expression decreased while P2X7R expression increased with the age of rats. Electrophysiological studies showed that the number of DRG neurons responding to the stimulation of the P2XR agonist, α,β-meATP, was higher and the amplitudes of α,β-meATP-induced depolarizations were larger in immature DRG neurons. As a result, P2X3R-mediated flinching responses were much more pronounced in immature rats than those found in adult rats. When we reduced P2X7R expression with P2X7R-siRNA in postnatal and adult rats, P2X3R-mediated flinch responses were greatly enhanced in both rat populations. Conclusions These results show that the P2X7R expression increases as rats age. In addition, P2X7Rs in SGCs exert inhibitory control on the P2X3R expression and function in sensory neurons of immature rats, just as observed in adult rats. Regulation of P2X7R expression is likely an effective way to control P2X3R activity and manage pain relief in infants.

  11. Acute p38-mediated modulation of tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channels in mouse sensory neurons by tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaochun; Gereau, Robert W

    2006-01-04

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) is a proinflammatory cytokine involved in the development and maintenance of inflammatory and neuropathic pain conditions. TNFalpha can have long-lasting effects by regulating the expression of a variety of inflammatory mediators, including other cytokines and TNFalpha itself. However, the speed with which TNFalpha induces tactile and thermal hypersensitivity suggests that transcriptional regulation cannot fully account for its sensitizing effects, and some recent findings suggest that TNFalpha may act directly on primary afferent neurons to induce pain hypersensitivity. In the present study, we show that peripheral administration of TNFalpha induces thermal hypersensitivity in wild-type mice but not in transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor TRPV1(-/-) mice. In contrast, TNFalpha produced equivalent mechanical hypersensitivity in TRPV1(-/-) mice and wild-type littermates, suggesting a role for TRPV1 in TNFalpha-induced thermal, but not mechanical, hypersensitivity. Because tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant Na+ channels are a critical site of modulation underlying mechanical hypersensitivity in inflammatory and neuropathic pain conditions, we tested the effects of TNFalpha on these channels in isolated mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. We report that acute application of TNFalpha rapidly enhances TTX-resistant Na+ currents in isolated DRG neurons. This potentiation of TTX-resistant currents by TNFalpha is dramatically reduced in DRG neurons from TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) knock-out mice and is blocked by the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor SB202190 [4-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)1H-imidazole]. Mechanical hypersensitivity induced by peripherally applied TNFalpha is also significantly reduced by SB202190. These results suggest that TNFalpha may induce acute peripheral mechanical sensitization by acting directly on TNFR1 in primary afferent neurons, resulting in p38-dependent modulation

  12. p38 MAPK and β-Arrestin 2 Mediate Functional Interactions between Endogenous μ-Opioid and α2A-Adrenergic Receptors in Neurons*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Miao; Walwyn, Wendy M.; Evans, Christopher J.; Xie, Cui-Wei

    2009-01-01

    Formation of receptor complexes between μ-opioid and α2A-adrenergic receptors has been demonstrated in transfected cells. The functional significance and underlying mechanisms of such receptor interactions remain to be determined in neuronal systems. We examined functional interactions between endogenous μ and α2A receptors in mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons. Acute application of the μ agonist [d-Ala2,N-MePhe4, Gly-ol5]enkephalin (DAMGO) or the α2 agonist clonidine inhibited voltage-gated Ca2+ currents in these neurons. Prolonged treatment with either DAMGO or clonidine induced a mutual cross-desensitization between μ and α2A receptor-mediated current inhibition. The cross-desensitization was closely associated with simultaneous internalization of μ and α2A receptors. Morphine, a μ agonist triggering little μ receptor endocytosis, induced neither cross-desensitization nor internalization of α2A receptors. Furthermore, inhibition of p38 MAPK prevented the cross-desensitization as well as cointernalization of μ and α2A receptors. Changes in receptor trafficking profiles suggested that p38 MAPK activity was required for initiating μ receptor internalization and maintaining possible μ-α2A association during their cointernalization. Finally, the μ-α2A cross-desensitization was absent in dorsal root ganglion neurons lacking β-arrestin 2. These findings demonstrated p38 MAPK- and β-arrestin 2-dependent cross-regulation between neuronal μ and α2A receptors. By promoting receptor cross-desensitization and cointernalization, such functional interactions may serve as negative feedback mechanisms triggered by prolonged agonist exposure to modulate the signaling of functionally related G protein-coupled receptors. PMID:19126537

  13. p38 MAPK and beta-arrestin 2 mediate functional interactions between endogenous micro-opioid and alpha2A-adrenergic receptors in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Miao; Walwyn, Wendy M; Evans, Christopher J; Xie, Cui-Wei

    2009-03-06

    Formation of receptor complexes between micro-opioid and alpha2A-adrenergic receptors has been demonstrated in transfected cells. The functional significance and underlying mechanisms of such receptor interactions remain to be determined in neuronal systems. We examined functional interactions between endogenous micro and alpha2A receptors in mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons. Acute application of the micro agonist [D-Ala2,N-MePhe4, Gly-ol5]enkephalin (DAMGO) or the alpha2 agonist clonidine inhibited voltage-gated Ca2+ currents in these neurons. Prolonged treatment with either DAMGO or clonidine induced a mutual cross-desensitization between micro and alpha2A receptor-mediated current inhibition. The cross-desensitization was closely associated with simultaneous internalization of micro and alpha2A receptors. Morphine, a mu agonist triggering little mu receptor endocytosis, induced neither cross-desensitization nor internalization of alpha2A receptors. Furthermore, inhibition of p38 MAPK prevented the cross-desensitization as well as cointernalization of micro and alpha2A receptors. Changes in receptor trafficking profiles suggested that p38 MAPK activity was required for initiating micro receptor internalization and maintaining possible micro-alpha2A association during their cointernalization. Finally, the micro-alpha2A cross-desensitization was absent in dorsal root ganglion neurons lacking beta-arrestin 2. These findings demonstrated p38 MAPK- and beta-arrestin 2-dependent cross-regulation between neuronal micro and alpha2A receptors. By promoting receptor cross-desensitization and cointernalization, such functional interactions may serve as negative feedback mechanisms triggered by prolonged agonist exposure to modulate the signaling of functionally related G protein-coupled receptors.

  14. Glutamate transporter activity promotes enhanced Na+/K+-ATPase -mediated extracellular K+ management during neuronal activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Brian R; Holm, Rikke; Vilsen, Bente;

    2016-01-01

    , in addition, Na+ /K+ -ATPase-mediated K+ clearance could be governed by astrocytic [Na+ ]i . During most neuronal activity, glutamate is released in the synaptic cleft and is re-absorbed by astrocytic Na+ -coupled glutamate transporters, thereby elevating [Na+ ]i . It thus remains unresolved whether...... astrocytic isoform constellations in Xenopus oocytes and determined their apparent Na+ affinity in intact oocytes and isolated membranes. The Na+ /K+ -ATPase was not fully saturated at basal astrocytic [Na+ ]i , irrespective of isoform constellation, although the β1 subunit conferred lower apparent Na...

  15. Dopaminergic enhancement of excitatory synaptic transmission in layer II entorhinal neurons is dependent on D₁-like receptor-mediated signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glovaci, I; Caruana, D A; Chapman, C A

    2014-01-31

    The modulatory neurotransmitter dopamine induces concentration-dependent changes in synaptic transmission in the entorhinal cortex, in which high concentrations of dopamine suppress evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) and lower concentrations induce an acute synaptic facilitation. Whole-cell current-clamp recordings were used to investigate the dopaminergic facilitation of synaptic responses in layer II neurons of the rat lateral entorhinal cortex. A constant bath application of 1 μM dopamine resulted in a consistent facilitation of EPSPs evoked in layer II fan cells by layer I stimulation; the size of the facilitation was more variable in pyramidal neurons, and synaptic responses in a small group of multiform neurons were not modulated by dopamine. Isolated inhibitory synaptic responses were not affected by dopamine, and the facilitation of EPSPs was not associated with a change in paired-pulse facilitation ratio. Voltage-clamp recordings of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) glutamate receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were facilitated by dopamine, but N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated currents were not. Bath application of the dopamine D₁-like receptor blocker SCH23390 (50 μM), but not the D₂-like receptor blocker sulpiride (50 μM), prevented the facilitation, indicating that it is dependent upon D₁-like receptor activation. Dopamine D₁ receptors lead to activation of protein kinase A (PKA), and including the PKA inhibitor H-89 or KT 5720 in the recording pipette solution prevented the facilitation of EPSCs. PKA-dependent phosphorylation of inhibitor 1 or the dopamine- and cAMP-regulated protein phosphatase (DARPP-32) can lead to a facilitation of AMPA receptor responses by inhibiting the activity of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) that reduces dephosphorylation of AMPA receptors, and we found here that inhibition of PP1 occluded the facilitatory effect of dopamine. The dopamine

  16. Complement protein C1q-mediated neuroprotection is correlated with regulation of neuronal gene and microRNA expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Marie E; Tenner, Andrea J

    2011-03-02

    Activation of the complement cascade, a powerful effector mechanism of the innate immune system, is associated with neuroinflammation but also with elimination of inappropriate synapses during development. Synthesis of C1q, a recognition component of the complement system, occurs in brain during ischemia/reperfusion and Alzheimer's disease, suggesting that C1q may be a response to injury. In vitro, C1q, in the absence of other complement proteins, improves neuronal viability and neurite outgrowth and prevents β-amyloid-induced neuronal death, suggesting that C1q may have a direct neuroprotective role. Here, investigating the molecular basis for this neuroprotection in vitro, addition of C1q to rat primary cortical neurons significantly upregulated expression of genes associated with cholesterol metabolism, such as cholesterol-25-hydroxylase and insulin induced gene 2, and transiently decreased cholesterol levels in neurons, known to facilitate neurite outgrowth. In addition, the expression of syntaxin-3 and its functional association with synaptosomal-associated protein 25 was increased. C1q also increased the nuclear translocation of cAMP response element-binding protein and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-δ (C/EBP-δ), two transcription factors involved in nerve growth factor (NGF) expression and downregulated specific microRNAs, including let-7c that is predicted to target (and thus inhibit) NGF and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) mRNA. Accordingly, C1q increased expression of NGF and NT-3, and small interfering RNA inhibition of C/EBP-δ, NGF, or NT-3 expression prevented the C1q-dependent neurite outgrowth. No such neuroprotective effect is seen in the presence of C3a or C5a. Finally, the induced neuronal gene expression required conformationally intact C1q. These results show that C1q can directly promote neuronal survival, thereby demonstrating new interactions between immune proteins and neuronal cells that may facilitate neuroprotection.

  17. Recombinant arginine deiminase reduces inducible nitric oxide synthase iNOS-mediated neurotoxicity in a coculture of neurons and microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hao-Hsin; Wu, Fe-Lin Lin; Lin, Shan-Erh; Shen, Li-Jiuan

    2008-10-01

    Modulation of nitric oxide (NO) production is considered a promising approach to therapy of diseases involving excessive inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, such as certain neuronal diseases. Recombinant arginine deiminase (rADI, EC3.5.3.6) catalyzes the conversion of L-arginine (L-arg), the sole substrate of NOS for NO production, to L-citrulline (L-cit) and ammonia. To understand the effect of the depletion of L-arg by rADI on NO concentration and neuroprotection, a direct coculture of neuron SHSY5Y cells and microglia BV2 cells treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) was used as a model of iNOS induction. The results showed that rADI preserved cell viability (4-fold higher compared with the cells treated with LPS/IFN-gamma only) by the MTT assay, corresponding with the results of neuronal viability by neuron-specific immunostaining assay. NO production (mean +/- SD) decreased from 67.0 +/- 1.3 to 19.5 +/- 5.5 microM after a 2-day treatment of rADI by the Griess assay; meanwhile, induction of iNOS protein expression by rADI was observed. In addition, rADI substantially preserved the neuronal function of dopamine uptake in the coculture. The replenishment of L-arg in the coculture eliminated the neuroprotective and NO-suppressive effects of rADI in the coculture, indicating that L-arg played a crucial role in the effects of rADI. These results highlight the important role of L-arg in the neuron-microglia coculture in excessive induction of iNOS. Regulation of L-arg by ADI demonstrated that rADI has a potentially therapeutic role in iNOS-related neuronal diseases.

  18. AAV Vector-Mediated Gene Delivery to Substantia Nigra Dopamine Neurons: Implications for Gene Therapy and Disease Models

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    Katrina Albert

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Gene delivery using adeno-associated virus (AAV vectors is a widely used method to transduce neurons in the brain, especially due to its safety, efficacy, and long-lasting expression. In addition, by varying AAV serotype, promotor, and titer, it is possible to affect the cell specificity of expression or the expression levels of the protein of interest. Dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra projecting to the striatum, comprising the nigrostriatal pathway, are involved in movement control and degenerate in Parkinson′s disease. AAV-based gene targeting to the projection area of these neurons in the striatum has been studied extensively to induce the production of neurotrophic factors for disease-modifying therapies for Parkinson′s disease. Much less emphasis has been put on AAV-based gene therapy targeting dopamine neurons in substantia nigra. We will review the literature related to targeting striatum and/or substantia nigra dopamine neurons using AAVs in order to express neuroprotective and neurorestorative molecules, as well as produce animal disease models of Parkinson′s disease. We discuss difficulties in targeting substantia nigra dopamine neurons and their vulnerability to stress in general. Therefore, choosing a proper control for experimental work is not trivial. Since the axons along the nigrostriatal tract are the first to degenerate in Parkinson′s disease, the location to deliver the therapy must be carefully considered. We also review studies using AAV-a-synuclein (a-syn to target substantia nigra dopamine neurons to produce an α-syn overexpression disease model in rats. Though these studies are able to produce mild dopamine system degeneration in the striatum and substantia nigra and some behavioural effects, there are studies pointing to the toxicity of AAV-carrying green fluorescent protein (GFP, which is often used as a control. Therefore, we discuss the potential difficulties in overexpressing proteins in general in

  19. Ectopic pregnancy-derived human trophoblastic stem cells regenerate dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathway to treat parkinsonian rats.

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    Tony Tung-Yin Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Stem cell therapy is a potential strategy to treat patients with Parkinson's disease (PD; however, several practical limitations remain. As such, finding the appropriate stem cell remains the primary issue in regenerative medicine today. We isolated a pre-placental pluripotent stem cell from the chorionic villi of women with early tubal ectopic pregnancies. Our objectives in this study were (i to identify the characteristics of hTS cells as a potential cell source for therapy; and (ii to test if hTS cells can be used as a potential therapeutic strategy for PD. METHODS AND FINDINGS: hTS cells expressed gene markers of both the trophectoderm (TE and the inner cell mass (ICM. hTS cells exhibited genetic and biological characteristics similar to that of hES cells, yet genetically distinct from placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells. All-trans retinoic acid (RA efficiently induced hTS cells into trophoblast neural stem cells (tNSCs in 1-day. Overexpression of transcription factor Nanog was possibly achieved through a RA-induced non-genomic c-Src/Stat3/Nanog signaling pathway mediated by the subcellular c-Src mRNA localization for the maintenance of pluripotency in tNSCs. tNSC transplantation into the lesioned striatum of acute and chronic PD rats not only improved behavioral deficits but also regenerated dopaminergic neurons in the nigrostriatal pathway, evidenced by immunofluorescent and immunohistological analyses at 18-weeks. Furthermore, tNSCs showed immunological advantages for the application in regenerative medicine. CONCLUSIONS: We successfully isolated and characterized the unique ectopic pregnancy-derived hTS cells. hTS cells are pluripotent stem cells that can be efficiently induced to tNSCs with positive results in PD rat models. Our data suggest that the hTS cell is a dynamic stem cell platform that is potentially suitable for use in disease models, drug discovery, and cell therapy such as PD.

  20. Mediatization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjarvard, Stig

    2017-01-01

    Mediatization research shares media effects studies' ambition of answering the difficult questions with regard to whether and how media matter and influence contemporary culture and society. The two approaches nevertheless differ fundamentally in that mediatization research seeks answers...... to these general questions by distinguishing between two concepts: mediation and mediatization. The media effects tradition generally considers the effects of the media to be a result of individuals being exposed to media content, i.e. effects are seen as an outcome of mediated communication. Mediatization...... research is concerned with long-term structural changes involving media, culture, and society, i.e. the influences of the media are understood in relation to how media are implicated in social and cultural changes and how these processes come to create new conditions for human communication and interaction...

  1. [Lithiasis and ectopic pelvic kidney. Therapeutic aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboutaieb, R; Rabii, R; el Moussaoui, A; Joual, A; Sarf, I; el Mrini, M; Benjelloun, S

    1996-01-01

    Kidney in ectopic position is dysplasic, and associated to other malformations. The advent of a lithiasis in these conditions rises questions about therapeutic options. We report on five observations of pelvic ectopic kidney with urinary lithiasis. Patients were aged from 16 to 42 years. Kidney was non functional in two cases, or with normal appearance sized 10 to 12 cm. We performed total nephrectomy in two cases, pyelolithotomy in the other cases. Surgical approach was subperitoneal via iliac route. A dismembered pyeloplasty was associated in one case. All patients did well. Radiologic control at 6 and 12 months showed no recurrence in a well functioning kidney. Surgical lithotomy is advocated as a treatment in urinary lithiasis affecting ectopic kidney. It is an easy procedure which permits correction of other associated malformations.

  2. Several early interventions for ectopic maxillary canines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Astorga

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Maxillary canine impactation is often encountered in orthodontic clinical practice and the aetiology is associated to genetic factors as well as local space factors. If preventive treatment is not started in ectopic maxillary canines, some possible consequences may occur, such as resorption of the roots of the neighboring permanent teeth, cysts, ankylosis and expensive surgical and orthodontic treatment. The aim of this review was to preset several early treatment modalities for ectopic maxillary canines based on recent scientific evidence. Four are the most important: Only extractions intervention, extraction of deciduous canines with cervical pull headgear, active intervention in late mixed dentition and active intervention in early mixed dentition. These different modalities showed a greater increasing the rate of normal eruption of ectopic canines ( 80-97%. The extraction of primary canine alone is still an effective method to prevent canine impactation, whose success rate would be increased if some other method interceptive is added.

  3. Ectopic orbital meningioma: Fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lee Teak; Stewart, Christopher M; Sheerin, Fintan; MacDonald, Brendan; Silva, Priy; Norris, Jonathan H

    2017-06-01

    Primary intraorbital ectopic meningiomas are rare and their existence remains controversial. We present a 30-year-old female with painless, non-axial proptosis and a palpable superomedial mass. The MRI demonstrated that the mass had no optic nerve sheath or sphenoid wing involvement and was initially reported to have no intracranial extension. The patient was initially thought to have an ectopic orbital meningioma. Subsequent multidisciplinary team (MDT) consultation and further specialist review of the MRI revealed a subtle dural tail connecting to an enhancing mass in the olfactory groove. Biopsy revealed a WHO Grade 1 transitional meningioma with an infiltrative pattern. We argue that some previously reported cases of ectopic meningioma may lack the requisite imaging to discover the primary disease. Our report highlights the importance of MRI in this group of patients and the role of a skull-base MDT with specialist neuroradiology input to determine the true origin and extent of these extradural orbital meningiomas.

  4. Ovarian tumor-derived ectopic hyperprolactinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elms, Autumn F; Carlan, S J; Rich, Amy E; Cerezo, Lizardo

    2012-12-01

    To describe extreme hyperprolactinemia originating from a pituitary adenoma in the wall of an ovarian dermoid. This is a description of an unusual case and a review of ectopic prolactin production. Ectopic production of prolactin is a rare condition that has been reported in isolated organ system pathology including ovaries. An ovarian dermoid is a benign neoplasm that has the potential for active unregulated endocrine function. Hyperprolactinemia can result from functioning lactotrophs found in ovarian dermoids and can lead to clinical sequelae. Definitive treatment of the condition requires surgical removal of the functioning endocrine tissue. Extreme hyperprolactinemia caused by a pituitary tumor located within a dermoid has not been reported before. We present a case of profound hyperprolactinemia originating from a pituitary adenoma found in the wall of an ovarian dermoid and give a broad overview of the condition and literature. Ectopic prolactin production should always be considered in symptomatic patients found to have elevated serum levels and no findings on brain imaging.

  5. Ectopic pregnancy after levonorgestrel emergency contraception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Karatas

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Levonorgestrel Emergency Contraception (LNG-EC is the safest and the most commonly used oral regimen that can be used after an unprotected intercourse. Although it is highly effective, failures can occur especially if it is used in the peri /or postovulatory period. It can not inhibit ovulation if used in these periods and the altered tubal motility together with the ciliary dysfunction can prevent the transfer of the fertilized ovum from the fallopian tube to the endometrial cavity, causing an ectopic pregnancy, which is one of the important concerns after failed LNG-EC. This risk was reported not to be higher than the risk of ectopic pregnancy observed in the general population, but the users of this medication should still warned about this risk. Here we report a case of ectopic pregnancy from Turkey after midcyclic use and failure of LNG-EC. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2013; 2(4.000: 749-750

  6. Treatment of ectopic first permanent molar teeth.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hennessy, Joe

    2012-11-01

    Ectopic eruption of the first permanent molar is a relatively common occurence in the developing dentition. A range of treatment options are available to the clinician provided that diagnosis is made early. Non-treatment can result in premature exfoliation of the second primary molar, space loss and impaction of the second premolar. This paper will describe the management of ectopic first permanent molars, using clinical examples to illustrate the available treatment options. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: This paper is relevant to every general dental practitioner who treats patients in mixed dentition.

  7. Molar Pregnancy Presents as Tubal Ectopic Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Davari Tanha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydatidiform moles are abnormal gestations characterized by the presence of hydropic changesaffecting some or all of the placental villi. Hydatidiform moles arise as a result of the fertilizationof an abnormal ovum. In this report, the patient was a 29 year old Asian woman who had inductionof ovulation with letrozol. Since the majority of molar gestations arise within the uterine cavitythus the occurrence of a hydatidiform mole within ectopic gestational tissue is rare. It is importantto differentiate a hydatidiform mole from a conventional ectopic pregnancy, particularly in infertilewomen who have a history of ovulation induction.

  8. A RARE CASE OF CERVICAL ECTOPIC PREGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajalekshmi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A 30 year s old nulligravida woman presented with bleeding PV for 5 days and lower abdominal pain for 3 days. Her urine pregnan c y test was positive. Speculum and per vaginal examination revealed open cervix with fleshy mass protruding through the cervix. Ultrasound showed normal, empty uterine cavity with mixed echogenic c ontents in the cervix. Emergency dilatation and evacuation was done. Histopathological examination revealed products of conception. All these factors confirmed it to be cervical ectopic pregnancy. In this case report we discuss the diagnosis and management of a rare case of cervical ectopic pregnancy encountered in our hospital.

  9. [Ectopic molar tooth in the maxillary sinus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altun, Hüseyin; Teker, Ayşenur Meriç; Ceran, Murat; Gedikli, Orhan

    2007-01-01

    The development of intranasal ectopic teeth is rare. Although they are more commonly seen in the palate and maxillary sinus, they can also be found in the mandibular condyle, coronoid process, and nasal cavity. A 30-year-old male patient presented with a complaint of headache. Computed tomography of the paranasal sinuses showed a bony mass in the right maxillary sinus wall, 1 cm in size. He did not have any history of maxillofacial trauma or operation. The mass was removed via a Caldwell-Luc procedure. It looked like a tooth. Histopathologic diagnosis was made as ectopic molar tooth. The patient was asymptomatic two weeks after the operation.

  10. Progressive neurodegenerative and behavioural changes induced by AAV-mediated overexpression of α-synuclein in midbrain dopamine neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Decressac, M; Mattsson, Bente; Lundblad, M

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterised by the progressive loss of nigral dopamine neurons and the presence of synucleinopathy. Overexpression of α-synuclein in vivo using viral vectors has opened interesting possibilities to model PD-like pathology in rodents. However, the attempts made so far...... have failed to show a consistent behavioural phenotype and pronounced dopamine neurodegeneration. Using a more efficient adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector construct, which includes a WPRE enhancer element and uses the neuron-specific synapsin-1 promoter to drive the expression of human wild-type α......-synuclein, we have now been able to achieve increased levels of α-synuclein in the transduced midbrain dopamine neurons sufficient to induce profound deficits in motor function, accompanied by reduced expression of proteins involved in dopamine neurotransmission and a time-dependent loss of nigral dopamine...

  11. Triptolide, a Chinese herbal extract, protects dopaminergic neurons from inflammation-mediated damage through inhibition of microglial activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng-Qiao; Lu, Xiu-Zhi; Liang, Xi-Bin; Zhou, Hui-Fang; Xue, Bing; Liu, Xian-Yu; Niu, Dong-Bin; Han, Ji-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Min

    2004-03-01

    Mounting lines of evidence have suggested that brain inflammation participates in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Triptolide is one of the major active components of Chinese herb Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F, which possesses potent anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties. We found that triptolide concentration-dependently attenuated the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced decrease in [3H]dopamine uptake and loss of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive neurons in primary mesencephalic neuron/glia mixed culture. Triptolide also blocked LPS-induced activation of microglia and excessive production of TNFalpha and NO. Our data suggests that triptolide may protect dopaminergic neurons from LPS-induced injury and its efficiency in inhibiting microglia activation may underlie the mechanism.

  12. Activation of noradrenergic neurons projecting to the diencephalon following central administration of histamine is mediated by H1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleckenstein, A E; Lookingland, K J; Moore, K E

    1994-02-28

    The effect of histamine on the activity of noradrenergic neurons terminating in discrete regions of the diencephalon was examined in male rats. Noradrenergic neuronal activity was estimated by measuring the concentration of norepinephrine and its metabolite 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethyleneglycol [MHPG] in the medial zona incerta [MZI] and in the dorsomedial [DMN], periventricular [PeVN] and medial preoptic hypothalamic nuclei [MPN]. The intracerebroventricular administration of histamine effected a time-related increase in MHPG concentrations in the MZI, DMN, PeVN and MPN; these effects were blocked by the H1 antagonist mepyramine but not the H2 antagonist zolantidine. Neither mepyramine nor zolantidine affected basal MHPG concentrations in any of the brain regions examined. These results indicate that central administration of histamine increases the activity of noradrenergic neurons projecting to the diencephalon via an action at H1 but not H2 receptors.

  13. Neurons respond directly to mechanical deformation with pannexin-mediated ATP release and autostimulation of P2X7 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jingsheng; Lim, Jason C; Lu, Wennan; Beckel, Jonathan M; Macarak, Edward J; Laties, Alan M; Mitchell, Claire H

    2012-05-15

    Mechanical deformation produces complex effects on neuronal systems, some of which can lead to dysfunction and neuronal death. While astrocytes are known to respond to mechanical forces, it is not clear whether neurons can also respond directly. We examined mechanosensitive ATP release and the physiological response to this release in isolated retinal ganglion cells. Purified ganglion cells released ATP upon swelling. Release was blocked by carbenoxolone, probenecid or peptide (10)panx, implicating pannexin channels as conduits. Mechanical stretch of retinal ganglion cells also triggered a pannexin-dependent ATP release. Whole cell patch clamp recording demonstrated that mild swelling induced the activation of an Ohmic cation current with linear kinetics. The current was inhibited by removal of extracellular ATP with apyrase, by inhibition of the P2X(7) receptor with A438079, zinc, or AZ 10606120, and by pannexin blockers carbenoxolone and probenecid. Probenecid also inhibited the regulatory volume decrease observed after swelling isolated neurons. Together, these observations indicate mechanical strain triggers ATP release directly from retinal ganglion cells and that this released ATP autostimulates P2X(7) receptors. Since extracellular ATP levels in the retina increase with elevated intraocular pressure, and stimulation of P2X(7) receptors on retinal ganglion cells can be lethal, this autocrine response may impact ganglion cells in glaucoma. It remains to be determined whether the autocrine stimulation of purinergic receptors is a general response to a mechanical deformation in neurons, or whether preventing ATP release through pannexin channels and blocking activation of the P2X(7) receptor, is neuroprotective for stretched neurons.

  14. The NAV2 homolog Sickie regulates F-actin-mediated axonal growth in Drosophila mushroom body neurons via the non-canonical Rac-Cofilin pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Takashi; Yamazaki, Daisuke; Murakami, Satoshi; Hiroi, Makoto; Nitta, Yohei; Maeyama, Yuko; Tabata, Tetsuya

    2014-12-01

    The Rac-Cofilin pathway is essential for cytoskeletal remodeling to control axonal development. Rac signals through the canonical Rac-Pak-LIMK pathway to suppress Cofilin-dependent axonal growth and through a Pak-independent non-canonical pathway to promote outgrowth. Whether this non-canonical pathway converges to promote Cofilin-dependent F-actin reorganization in axonal growth remains elusive. We demonstrate that Sickie, a homolog of the human microtubule-associated protein neuron navigator 2, cell-autonomously regulates axonal growth of Drosophila mushroom body (MB) neurons via the non-canonical pathway. Sickie was prominently expressed in the newborn F-actin-rich axons of MB neurons. A sickie mutant exhibited axonal growth defects, and its phenotypes were rescued by exogenous expression of Sickie. We observed phenotypic similarities and genetic interactions among sickie and Rac-Cofilin signaling components. Using the MARCM technique, distinct F-actin and phospho-Cofilin patterns were detected in developing axons mutant for sickie and Rac-Cofilin signaling regulators. The upregulation of Cofilin function alleviated the axonal defect of the sickie mutant. Epistasis analyses revealed that Sickie suppresses the LIMK overexpression phenotype and is required for Pak-independent Rac1 and Slingshot phosphatase to counteract LIMK. We propose that Sickie regulates F-actin-mediated axonal growth via the non-canonical Rac-Cofilin pathway in a Slingshot-dependent manner.

  15. Induction of ectopic retina-like tissue by transgenic expression of neurogenin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Run-Tao Yan

    Full Text Available Degeneration of retinal neurons is an underlying cause of several major types of blinding diseases, and effective therapies remain to be developed. The suppositive strategy of repopulating a degenerative retina with new cells generated onsite faces serious challenges, because the mammalian retina seems to lack the ability to regenerate itself or replace its lost neurons. We investigated the possibility of using a transcriptional factor with proneural activities to reprogram ocular tissue with regenerative capability to give rise to retinal cells. Transgenic mice were generated with DNA constructs that targeted the expression in the retinal pigment epithelium of proneural gene neurogenin1 from the promoter of Bestrophin1, or neurogenin3 from RPE65 promoter. Here we report the presence of ectopic retina-like tissue in some of the transgenic mice, young and aged. The ectopic retina-like tissue contained cells positive for photoreceptor proteins Crx, recoverin, red opsin, and rhodopsin, and cells positive for proteins that label other types of retinal neurons, including AP2α and Pax6 for amacrine cells, Otx2 for bipolar cells, and Brn3A for ganglion cells. The retina-like tissue often co-existed with darkly pigmented tissue positive for RPE proteins: cytokeratin 18, Otx2, and RPE65. The ectopic retina-like tissue was detected in the subretinal space, including two retinae co-existing in the same eye, and/or in the optic nerve or in the vicinity of the optic nerve head. On rare occasions, it was detected in the choroid and in the vicinity of the ciliary body. The presence of ectopic retina-like tissue in the transgenic mouse supports the possibility of inducing retinal regeneration in the mammalian eyes through gene-directed reprograming.

  16. What Is the Risk for a Second Ectopic Pregnancy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old What Is the Risk for a Second Ectopic Pregnancy? KidsHealth > For Parents > What Is the Risk for ... TOPIC Medical Care During Pregnancy Pregnancy & Newborn Center Pregnancy Precautions: FAQs Ectopic Pregnancy Contact Us Print Resources Send to a ...

  17. Roles of taurine-mediated tonic GABAA receptor activation in the radial migration of neurons in the fetal mouse cerebral cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomonori eFurukawa

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA depolarizes embryonic cerebrocortical neurons and continuous activation of the GABAA receptor (GABAAR contributes to their tonic depolarization. Although multiple reports have demonstrated a role of GABAAR activation in neocortical development, including in migration, most of these studies have used pharmacological blockers. Herein, we performed in utero electroporation in GABA synthesis-lacking homozygous GAD67-GFP knock-in mice (GAD67GFP/GFP to label neurons born in the ventricular zone. Three days after electroporation, there were no differences in the distribution of labeled cells between the genotypes. The dose-response properties of cells labeled to detect GABA were equivalent among genotypes. However, continuous blockade of GABAAR with the GABAAR antagonist SR95531 accelerated radial migration. This effect of GABAAR blockade in GAD67GFP/GFP mice suggested a role for alternative endogenous GABAAR agonists. Thus, we tested the role of taurine, which is derived from maternal blood but is abundant in the fetal brain. The taurine-evoked currents in labeled cells were mediated by GABAAR. Taurine uptake was blocked by a taurine transporter inhibitor, 2-(guanidinoethanesulfonic acid (GES, and taurine release was blocked by a volume-sensitive anion channel blocker, 4-(2-butyl-6,7-dichlor-2-cyclopentylindan-1-on-5-yl oxobutyric acid (DCPIB, as examined through high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. GES increased the extracellular taurine concentration and induced an inward shift of the holding current, which was reversed by SR95531. In a taurine-deficient mouse model, the GABAAR-mediated tonic currents were greatly reduced, and radial migration was accelerated. As the tonic currents were equivalent among the genotypes of GAD67-GFP knock-in mice, taurine, rather than GABA, might play a major role as an endogenous agonist of embryonic tonic GABAAR conductance, regulating the radial migration of neurons in the

  18. Elevated potassium elicits recurrent surges of large GABAA-receptor-mediated post-synaptic currents in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Damian Seung-Ho; Yu, Wilson; Sutton, Alex; Calos, Megan; Carlen, Peter Louis

    2011-03-01

    Previously, we found that rat hippocampal CA3 interneurons become hyperactive with increasing concentrations of extracellular K(+) up to 10 mM. However, it is unclear how this enhanced interneuronal activity affects pyramidal neurons. Here we voltage-clamped rat hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons in vitro at 0 mV to isolate γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-activated inhibitory post-synaptic currents (IPSCs) and measured these in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) and with 10 mM K(+) bath perfusion. In aCSF, small IPSCs were present with amplitudes of 0.053 ± 0.007 nA and a frequency of 0.27 ± 0.14 Hz. With 10 mM K(+) perfusion, IPSCs increased greatly in frequency and amplitude, culminating in surge events with peak amplitudes of 0.56 ± 0.08 nA, that appeared and disappeared cyclically with durations lasting 2.02 ± 0.37 min repeatedly, up to 10 times over a 30-min bath perfusion of elevated K(+). These large IPSCs were GABA(A)-receptor mediated and did not involve significant desensitization of this receptor. Perfusion of a GABA transporter inhibitor (NO-711), glutamate receptor inhibitors CNQX and APV, or a gap junctional blocker (carbenoxolone) prevented the resurgence of large IPSCs. Pressure ejected sucrose resulted in the abolishment of subsequent surges. No elevated K(+)-mediated surges were observed in CA3 interneurons from the stratum oriens layer. In conclusion, these cyclic large IPSC events observable in CA3 pyramidal neurons in 10 mM KCl may be due to transient GABA depletion from continuously active interneuronal afferents.

  19. The role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in neural cell adhesion molecule-mediated neuronal differentiation and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Dorte K; Køhler, Lene B; Pedersen, Martin Volmer;

    2003-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule, NCAM, is known to stimulate neurite outgrowth from primary neurones and PC12 cells presumably through signalling pathways involving the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR), protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase C (PKC), the Ras-mitogen activated protein...

  20. Ceramides in Alzheimer’s Disease: Key Mediators of Neuronal Apoptosis Induced by Oxidative Stress and Aβ Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Jazvinšćak Jembrek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD, the most common chronic and progressive neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by extracellular deposits of amyloid β-peptides (Aβ and intracellular deposits of hyperphosphorylated tau (phospho-tau protein. Ceramides, the major molecules of sphingolipid metabolism and lipid second messengers, have been associated with AD progression and pathology via Aβ generation. Enhanced levels of ceramides directly increase Aβ through stabilization of β-secretase, the key enzyme in the amyloidogenic processing of Aβ precursor protein (APP. As a positive feedback loop, the generated oligomeric and fibrillar Aβ induces a further increase in ceramide levels by activating sphingomyelinases that catalyze the catabolic breakdown of sphingomyelin to ceramide. Evidence also supports important role of ceramides in neuronal apoptosis. Ceramides may initiate a cascade of biochemical alterations, which ultimately leads to neuronal death by diverse mechanisms, including depolarization and permeabilization of mitochondria, increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, cytochrome c release, Bcl-2 depletion, and caspase-3 activation, mainly by modulating intracellular signalling, particularly along the pathways related to Akt/PKB kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs. This review summarizes recent findings related to the role of ceramides in oxidative stress-driven neuronal apoptosis and interplay with Aβ in the cascade of events ending in neuronal degeneration.

  1. Adenosine A(2B) receptor-mediated leukemia inhibitory factor release from astrocytes protects cortical neurons against excitotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moidunny, Shamsudheen; Vinet, Jonathan; Wesseling, Evelyn; Bijzet, Johan; Shieh, Chu-Hsin; van Ijzendoorn, Sven C.D.; Bezzi, Paola; Boddeke, Hendrikus W.G.M.; Biber, Knut

    2012-01-01

    Background: Neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) have been widely reported. In the central nervous system (CNS), astrocytes are the major source for LIF, expression of which is enhanced following disturbances leading to neuronal damage. How astrocytic LIF e

  2. The role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in neural cell adhesion molecule-mediated neuronal differentiation and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Dorte K; Køhler, Lene B; Pedersen, Martin V

    2003-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule, NCAM, is known to stimulate neurite outgrowth from primary neurones and PC12 cells presumably through signalling pathways involving the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR), protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase C (PKC), the Ras-mitogen activated protein ki...

  3. beta-estradiol influences differentiation of hippocampal neurons in vitro through an estrogen receptor-mediated process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audesirk, T; Cabell, L; Kern, M; Audesirk, G

    2003-01-01

    We utilized morphometric analysis of 3 day cultures of hippocampal neurons to determine the effects of both estradiol and the synthetic estrogen receptor modulator raloxifene on several parameters of neuronal growth and differentiation. These measurements included survival, neurite production, dendrite number, and axon and dendrite length and branching. 17 beta-Estradiol (10 nM) selectively stimulated dendrite branching; this effect was neither mimicked by alpha-estradiol, nor blocked by the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182780. The selective estrogen receptor modulator raloxifene (100 nM) neither mimicked nor reversed the effects of estradiol on dendritic branching. Western immunoblotting for the alpha and beta subtypes of estrogen receptor revealed the presence of alpha, but not beta, estrogen receptors in our hippocampal cultures. There is growing recognition of the effects of 17 beta-estradiol on neuronal development and physiology, with implications for brain sexual dimorphism, plasticity, cognition, and the maintenance of cognitive function during aging. The role of estradiol in hippocampal neuronal differentiation and function has particular implications for learning and memory. These data support the hypothesis that 17 beta-estradiol is acting via alpha estrogen receptors in influencing hippocampal development in vitro. Raloxifene, prescribed to combat osteoporosis in post-menopausal women, is a selective estrogen receptor modulator with tissue-specific agonist/antagonist properties. Because raloxifene had no effect on dendritic branching, we hypothesize that it does not interact with the alpha estrogen receptor in this experimental paradigm.

  4. Intramural ectopic pregnancy: a case and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Emma; McDonald, Katie; Rees, Julia; Govind, Abha

    2013-06-01

    An intramural ectopic is a rare type of ectopic pregnancy in which the gestational sac is implanted within the myometrium, separate from the endometrial cavity and Fallopian tubes. There are only 53 cases in the published literature. We report a case of intramural ectopic pregnancy treated surgically and review the published data on this rare type of ectopic pregnancy, with respect to aetiology, diagnosis and management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Motor cortex-periaqueductal gray-spinal cord neuronal circuitry may involve in modulation of nociception: a virally mediated transsynaptic tracing study in spinally transected transgenic mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Wei Ye

    Full Text Available Several studies have shown that motor cortex stimulation provided pain relief by motor cortex plasticity and activating descending inhibitory pain control systems. Recent evidence indicated that the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R in the periaqueductal gray played an important role in neuropathic pain. This study was designed to assess whether MC4R signaling existed in motor cortex-periaqueductal gray-spinal cord neuronal circuitry modulated the activity of sympathetic pathway by a virally mediated transsynaptic tracing study. Pseudorabies virus (PRV-614 was injected into the left gastrocnemius muscle in adult male MC4R-green fluorescent protein (GFP transgenic mice (n = 15. After a survival time of 4-6 days, the mice (n = 5 were randomly assigned to humanely sacrifice, and spinal cords and brains were removed and sectioned, and processed for PRV-614 visualization. Neurons involved in the efferent control of the left gastrocnemius muscle were identified following visualization of PRV-614 retrograde tracing. The neurochemical phenotype of MC4R-GFP-positive neurons was identified using fluorescence immunocytochemical labeling. PRV-614/MC4R-GFP dual labeled neurons were detected in spinal IML, periaqueductal gray and motor cortex. Our findings support the hypothesis that MC4R signaling in motor cortex-periaqueductal gray-spinal cord neural pathway may participate in the modulation of the melanocortin-sympathetic signaling and contribute to the descending modulation of nociceptive transmission, suggesting that MC4R signaling in motor cortex-periaqueductal gray-spinal cord neural pathway may modulate the activity of sympathetic outflow sensitive to nociceptive signals.

  6. The Role of Cholinergic Basal Forebrain Neurons in Adenosine-Mediated Homeostatic Control of Sleep: Lessons from 192 IgG-Saporin Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinchuk, Anna V.; McCarley, Robert W.; Stenberg, Dag; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Basheer, Radhika

    2013-01-01

    A topic of high current interest and controversy is the basis of the homeostatic sleep response, the increase in non-rapid-eye-movement (NREM) sleep and NREM-delta activity following sleep deprivation (SD). Adenosine, which accumulates in the cholinergic basal forebrain (BF) during SD, has been proposed as one of the important homeostatic sleep factors. It is suggested that sleep-inducing effects of adenosine are mediated by inhibiting the wake-active neurons of the BF, including cholinergic neurons. Here we examined the association between SD-induced adenosine release, the homeostatic sleep response and the survival of cholinergic neurons in the BF after injections of the immunotoxin 192 IgG-saporin (saporin) in rodents. We correlated SD-induced adenosine level in the BF and the homeostatic sleep response with the cholinergic cell loss 2 weeks after local saporin injections into the BF, as well as 2 and 3 weeks after intracerebroventricular (ICV) saporin injections. Two weeks after local saporin injection there was an 88% cholinergic cell loss, coupled with nearly complete abolition of the SD-induced adenosine increase in the BF, the homeostatic sleep response, and the sleep-inducing effects of BF adenosine infusion. Two weeks after ICV saporin injection there was a 59% cholinergic cell loss, correlated with significant increase in SD-induced adenosine level in the BF and an intact sleep response. Three weeks after ICV saporin injection there was an 87% cholinergic cell loss, nearly complete abolition of the SD-induced adenosine increase in the BF and the homeostatic response, implying that the time course of ICV saporin lesions is a key variable in interpreting experimental results. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that cholinergic neurons in the BF are important for the SD-induced increase in adenosine as well as for its sleep-inducing effects and play a major, although not exclusive, role in sleep homeostasis. PMID:18805464

  7. Ketamine-mediated afferent-specific presynaptic transmission blocks in low-threshold and sex-specific subpopulation of myelinated Ah-type baroreceptor neurons of rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di; Yin, Lei; Fan, Yao; Wang, Ye; Chen, Wei-Ran; Chen, Pei; Liu, Yang; Lu, Xiao-Long; Sun, Hong-Li; Shou, Weinian; Qiao, Guo-Fen; Li, Bai-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background Ketamine enhances autonomic activity, and unmyelinated C-type baroreceptor afferents are more susceptible to be blocked by ketamine than myelinated A-types. However, the presynaptic transmission block in low-threshold and sex-specific myelinated Ah-type baroreceptor neurons (BRNs) is not elucidated. Methods Action potentials (APs) and excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) were investigated in BRNs/barosensitive neurons identified by conduction velocity (CV), capsaicin-conjugated with Iberiotoxin-sensitivity and fluorescent dye using intact nodose slice and brainstem slice in adult female rats. The expression of mRNA and targeted protein for NMDAR1 was also evaluated. Results Ketamine time-dependently blocked afferent CV in Ah-types in nodose slice with significant changes in AP discharge. The concentration-dependent inhibition of ketamine on AP discharge profiles were also assessed and observed using isolated Ah-type BRNs with dramatic reduction in neuroexcitability. In brainstem slice, the 2nd-order capsaicin-resistant EPSCs were identified and ∼50% of them were blocked by ketamine concentration-dependently with IC50 estimated at 84.4 μM compared with the rest (708.2 μM). Interestingly, the peak, decay time constant, and area under curve of EPSCs were significantly enhanced by 100 nM iberiotoxin in ketamine-more sensitive myelinated NTS neurons (most likely Ah-types), rather than ketamine-less sensitive ones (A-types). Conclusions These data have demonstrated, for the first time, that low-threshold and sex-specific myelinated Ah-type BRNs in nodose and Ah-type barosensitive neurons in NTS are more susceptible to ketamine and may play crucial roles in not only mean blood pressure regulation but also buffering dynamic changes in pressure, as well as the ketamine-mediated cardiovascular dysfunction through sexual-dimorphic baroreflex afferent pathway. PMID:26675761

  8. Cyst of ectopic (choristomatous lacrimal gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao V

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available A rare case of cyst of an ectopic lacrimal gland in the bulbar conjunctiva is reported in a 40 year-old-man. The clinical presentation histopathology, differential diagnosis and treatment of this choristomatous lacrimal ductal cyst (Group IV according to Bullock′s classification is described.

  9. Inhibition of microglial activation by the herbal flavonoid baicalein attenuates inflammation-mediated degeneration of dopaminergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F-Q; Wang, T; Pei, Z; Liu, B; Hong, J-S

    2005-03-01

    Accumulating evidence has suggested that inflammation in the brain participates in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Therefore, anti-inflammatory therapy has attracted much attention as novel interference to neurodegenerative diseases. Baicalein, a major flavonoid extracted from a traditional Chinese herb Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi (Huangqin), possesses potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. To test the potential neuroprotective effect of baicalein on dopaminergic neurons, primary midbrain neuron-glia cultures from E-14 rat embryos were used. Cultures were pretreated with baicalein for 30 min prior to stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 10 ng/ml). LPS leads to massive activation of microglial cells revealed by OX-42 immunostaining, and produced excessive quantities of NO. Excessive elevation of superoxide level was also observed in enriched-microglia after stimulating with LPS. LPS-induced damage to dopaminergic neurons was evaluated by uptake capacity for [3H]dopamine and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-immunocytochemistry. Pretreatment with baicalein concentration-dependently attenuated LPS-induced decrease in [3H]dopamine uptake and loss of TH-immunoreactive (TH-ir) neurons, which the maximum protective effect was observed at the concentration of 5 microM. Post-treatment with baicalein (5 microM) was also shown to be effective even if baicalein administered up to 2 h later than LPS application. Morphological study shows that baicalein (5 microM) almost completely blocked LPS-induced activation of microglia. Excessive production of TNF(alpha) and free radicals such as NO and superoxide by LPS stimulation were also attenuated by baicalein at a concentration-dependent pattern. The present study indicates that baicalein exerts potent neuroprotective effect on LPS-induced injury of dopaminergic neurons. We hypothesize that the inhibition of LPS-induced production of NO and free radicals from microglia may underlie the mechanism of

  10. Laparoscopic Resection of Cesarean Scar Ectopic Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ades, Alex; Parghi, Sneha

    To demonstrate a technique for the laparoscopic surgical management of cesarean section scar ectopic pregnancy. Step-by-step presentation of the procedure using video (Canadian Task Force classification III). Cesarean section scar ectopic pregnancy is a rare form of ectopic pregnancy with an incidence ranging from 1:1800 to 1:2216. Over the last decade, the incidence seems to be on the rise with increasing rates of cesarean deliveries and early use of Doppler ultrasound. These pregnancies can lead to life-threatening hemorrhage, uterine rupture, and hysterectomy if not managed promptly. Local or systemic methotrexate therapy has been used successfully but can result in prolonged hospitalization, requires long-term follow-up, and in some cases treatment can fail. In the hands of a trained operator, laparoscopic resection can be performed to manage this type of pregnancy. Consent was obtained from the patient, and exemption was grante