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Sample records for neuronal nitric oxide-mediated

  1. Role of nitric oxide-mediated glutathionylation in neuronal function: potential regulation of energy utilization.

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    Yap, Li-Peng; Garcia, Jerome V; Han, Derick S; Cadenas, Enrique

    2010-04-28

    Excessive generation of nitric oxide radical (NO*) in neuroinflammation, excitotoxicity and during age-related neurodegenerative disorders entails the localized and concerted increase in nitric oxide synthase(s) expression in glial cells and neurons. The aim of the present study was to assess the biological significance of the impact of NO* on the cell's thiol status with emphasis on S-glutathionylation of targeted proteins. Exposure of primary cortical neurons or astrocytes to increasing flow rates of NO* (0.061-0.25 microM/s) resulted in the following. (i) A decrease in GSH (glutathione) in neurons accompanied by formation of GSNO (S-nitrosoglutathione) and GSSG (glutathione disulfide); neurons were far more sensitive to NO* exposure than astrocytes. (ii) A dose-dependent oxidation of the cellular redox status: the neuron's redox potential increased approximately 42 mV and that of astrocytes approximately 23 mV. A good correlation was observed between cell viability and the cellular redox potential. The higher susceptibility of neurons to NO* can be partly explained by a reduced capacity to recover GSH through lower activities of GSNO and GSSG reductases. (iii) S-glutathionylation of a small subset of proteins, among them GAPDH (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), the S-glutathionylation of which resulted in inhibition of enzyme activity. The quantitative analyses of changes in the cell's thiol potential upon NO* exposure and their consequences for S-glutathionylation are discussed in terms of the distinct redox environment of astrocytes and neurons.

  2. Determination of nitric oxide mediating intracellular Ca2+ release on neurons based on confocal microscopy imaging

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    Zheng, Liqin; Wang, Yuhua; He, Yipeng; Zeng, Yixiu; Zhang, Yanding; Xie, Shusen

    2014-09-01

    The gas NO is a ubiquitous intercellular messenger that modulates a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological functions. But few studies were made to study the role of NO in the Ca2+ release in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons by confocal microscopy. Thus the objective of this study was to assess if NO has a role in Ca2+ signaling in DRG neurons using confocal microscopy combined with special fluorescence probe Fluo-3/AM. A 100 μM concentration of the NO donors (Sodium Nitroprusside, Dihydrate, SNP) and NO synthase inhibitor (NG-Monomethyl-L-arginine, Monoacetate salt, L-NMMA) was used in the study. Results showed that the fluorescence intensity increased rapidly after injecting SNP, which indicated that SNP could enhance intracellular Ca2+ release. And the fluorescence intensity shrank gradually with time and kept at a low level for quite a long period after loading with L-NMMA which indicated that L-NMMA could block intracellular Ca2+ release. All these results demonstrated that NO was involved in the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ release in the DRG neurons.

  3. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Posttranslational Modifications: Impacts at the Synapse

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    Sophie A. Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is an important gasotransmitter molecule that is involved in numerous physiological processes throughout the nervous system. In addition to its involvement in physiological plasticity processes (long-term potentiation, LTP; long-term depression, LTD which can include NMDAR-mediated calcium-dependent activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS, new insights into physiological and pathological consequences of nitrergic signalling have recently emerged. In addition to the canonical cGMP-mediated signalling, NO is also implicated in numerous pathways involving posttranslational modifications. In this review we discuss the multiple effects of S-nitrosylation and 3-nitrotyrosination on proteins with potential modulation of function but limit the analyses to signalling involved in synaptic transmission and vesicular release. Here, crucial proteins which mediate synaptic transmission can undergo posttranslational modifications with either pre- or postsynaptic origin. During normal brain function, both pathways serve as important cellular signalling cascades that modulate a diverse array of physiological processes, including synaptic plasticity, transcriptional activity, and neuronal survival. In contrast, evidence suggests that aging and disease can induce nitrosative stress via excessive NO production. Consequently, uncontrolled S-nitrosylation/3-nitrotyrosination can occur and represent pathological features that contribute to the onset and progression of various neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and Huntington’s.

  4. Nitrate tolerance impairs nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Jørn Bech; Boesgaard, Søren; Poulsen, Henrik E.;

    1996-01-01

    Nitrates, Nitrate tolerence, Nitric oxide, acetylcholine, N-acetylcholine, N-acetylcysteine, L-NAME, Rat, Anesthetized......Nitrates, Nitrate tolerence, Nitric oxide, acetylcholine, N-acetylcholine, N-acetylcysteine, L-NAME, Rat, Anesthetized...

  5. Hemoglobin Effects on Nitric Oxide Mediated Hypoxic Vasodilation.

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    Rong, Zimei; Cooper, Chris E

    2016-01-01

    The brain responds to hypoxia with an increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF). However, such an increase is generally believed to start only after the oxygen tension decreases to a certain threshold level. Although many mechanisms (different vasodilator and different generation and metabolism mechanisms of the vasodilator) have been proposed at the molecular level, none of them has gained universal acceptance. Nitric oxide (NO) has been proposed to play a central role in the regulation of oxygen supply since it is a vasodilator whose production and metabolism are both oxygen dependent. We have used a computational model that simulates blood flow and oxygen metabolism in the brain (BRAINSIGNALS) to test mechanism by which NO may elucidate hypoxic vasodilation. The first model proposed that NO was produced by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and metabolized by the mitochondrial enzyme cytochrome c oxidase (CCO). NO production declined with decreasing oxygen concentration given that oxygen is a substrate for nitric oxide synthase (NOS). However, this was balanced by NO metabolism by CCO, which also declined with decreasing oxygen concentration. However, the NOS effect was dominant; the resulting model profiles of hypoxic vasodilation only approximated the experimental curves when an unfeasibly low K m for oxygen for NOS was input into the model. We therefore modified the model such that NO generation was via the nitrite reductase activity of deoxyhemoglobin instead of NOS, whilst keeping the metabolism of NO by CCO the same. NO production increased with decreasing oxygen concentration, leading to an improved reproduction of the experimental CBF versus PaO2 curve. However, the threshold phenomenon was not perfectly reproduced. In this present work, we incorporated a wider variety of oxygen dependent and independent NO production and removal mechanisms. We found that the addition of NO removal via oxidation to nitrate mediated by oxyhemoglobin resulted in the

  6. Nitric oxide mediates gravitropic bending in soybean roots.

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    Hu, Xiangyang; Neill, Steven J; Tang, Zhangcheng; Cai, Weiming

    2005-02-01

    Plant roots are gravitropic, detecting and responding to changes in orientation via differential growth that results in bending and reestablishment of downward growth. Recent data support the basics of the Cholodny-Went hypothesis, indicating that differential growth is due to redistribution of auxin to the lower sides of gravistimulated roots, but little is known regarding the molecular details of such effects. Here, we investigate auxin and gravity signal transduction by demonstrating that the endogenous signaling molecules nitric oxide (NO) and cGMP mediate responses to gravistimulation in primary roots of soybean (Glycine max). Horizontal orientation of soybean roots caused the accumulation of both NO and cGMP in the primary root tip. Fluorescence confocal microcopy revealed that the accumulation of NO was asymmetric, with NO concentrating in the lower side of the root. Removal of NO with an NO scavenger or inhibition of NO synthesis via NO synthase inhibitors or an inhibitor of nitrate reductase reduced both NO accumulation and gravitropic bending, indicating that NO synthesis was required for the gravitropic responses and that both NO synthase and nitrate reductase may contribute to the synthesis of the NO required. Auxin induced NO accumulation in root protoplasts and asymmetric NO accumulation in root tips. Gravistimulation, NO, and auxin also induced the accumulation of cGMP, a response inhibited by removal of NO or by inhibitors of guanylyl cyclase, compounds that also reduced gravitropic bending. Asymmetric NO accumulation and gravitropic bending were both inhibited by an auxin transport inhibitor, and the inhibition of bending was overcome by treatment with NO or 8-bromo-cGMP, a cell-permeable analog of cGMP. These data indicate that auxin-induced NO and cGMP mediate gravitropic curvature in soybean roots.

  7. Nitric oxide mediates the stress response induced by diatom aldehydes in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus.

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    Giovanna Romano

    Full Text Available Diatoms are ubiquitous and abundant primary producers that have been traditionally considered as a beneficial food source for grazers and for the transfer of carbon through marine food webs. However, many diatom species produce polyunsaturated aldehydes that disrupt development in the offspring of grazers that feed on these unicellular algae. Here we provide evidence that production of the physiological messenger nitric oxide increases after treatment with the polyunsaturated aldehyde decadienal in embryos of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. At high decadienal concentrations, nitric oxide mediates initial apoptotic events leading to loss of mitochondrial functionality through the generation of peroxynitrite. At low decadienal concentrations, nitric oxide contributes to the activation of hsp70 gene expression thereby protecting embryos against the toxic effects of this aldehyde. When nitric oxide levels were lowered by inhibiting nitric oxide synthase activity, the expression of hsp70 in swimming blastula decreased and the proportion of abnormal plutei increased. However, in later pluteus stages nitric oxide was no longer able to exert this protective function: hsp70 and nitric oxide synthase expression decreased with a consequent increase in the expression of caspase-8. Our findings that nitric oxide production increases rapidly in response to a toxic exogenous stimulus opens new perspectives on the possible role of this gas as an important messenger to environmental stress in sea urchins and for understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying toxicity during diatom blooms.

  8. Nitric oxide mediates the stress response induced by diatom aldehydes in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus.

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    Romano, Giovanna; Costantini, Maria; Buttino, Isabella; Ianora, Adrianna; Palumbo, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Diatoms are ubiquitous and abundant primary producers that have been traditionally considered as a beneficial food source for grazers and for the transfer of carbon through marine food webs. However, many diatom species produce polyunsaturated aldehydes that disrupt development in the offspring of grazers that feed on these unicellular algae. Here we provide evidence that production of the physiological messenger nitric oxide increases after treatment with the polyunsaturated aldehyde decadienal in embryos of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. At high decadienal concentrations, nitric oxide mediates initial apoptotic events leading to loss of mitochondrial functionality through the generation of peroxynitrite. At low decadienal concentrations, nitric oxide contributes to the activation of hsp70 gene expression thereby protecting embryos against the toxic effects of this aldehyde. When nitric oxide levels were lowered by inhibiting nitric oxide synthase activity, the expression of hsp70 in swimming blastula decreased and the proportion of abnormal plutei increased. However, in later pluteus stages nitric oxide was no longer able to exert this protective function: hsp70 and nitric oxide synthase expression decreased with a consequent increase in the expression of caspase-8. Our findings that nitric oxide production increases rapidly in response to a toxic exogenous stimulus opens new perspectives on the possible role of this gas as an important messenger to environmental stress in sea urchins and for understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying toxicity during diatom blooms.

  9. Nitric oxide-mediated endothlium-dependent vasodilation is impaired with borderline high-LDL cholesterol.

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    Diehl, Kyle J; Stauffer, Brian L; Greiner, Jared J; Weil, Brian R; DeSouza, Christopher A

    2012-02-01

    The experimental aims of this study were to determine: (1) whether nitric oxide-mediated endothelium-dependent vasodilation is blunted in adult humans with borderline high plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol compared with adults with optimal/near optimal LDL-cholesterol levels; and, if so: (2) whether the magnitude of impairment in adults with borderline high LDL-cholesterol is similar to adults with high LDL-cholesterol. Forearm blood flow responses to intraarterial infusions of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside were measured in 50 middle-aged (43-64 year) adults: 20 in the optimal/near optimal LDL-cholesterol range (<130 mg/dL); 20 with borderline high LDL-cholesterol (130-159 mg/dL); and 10 with high LDL-cholesterol ($160 mg/dL). In addition, blood flow responses to acetylcholine were determined in the absence and presence of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G) -monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA). Vasodilation to acetylcholine was ~20% lower (p < 0.05) in the borderline high (from 4.3 ± 0.2 to 12.3 ± 0.8 mL/100 mL tissue/min) and high (from 4.3 ± 0.3 to 12.0 ± 0.5 mL/100 mL tissue/min) LDL-cholesterol groups compared with the optimal/near optimal (from 4.4 ± 0.2 to 14.5 ± 0.5 mL/100 mL tissue/min) LDL-cholesterol group. L-NMMA significantly reduced (~30%) the vasodilator response to acetylcholine in the optimal/near optimal LDL-cholesterol group but not the borderline high or high LDL-cholesterol groups. Borderline high LDL-cholesterol is associated with impaired nitric oxide-mediated endothelium-dependent vasodilation.

  10. Different sources of nitric oxide mediate neurovascular coupling in the lateral geniculate nucleus of the cat

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    Carmen De Labra

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the link between neuronal responses and metabolic signals is fundamental to our knowledge of brain function and it is a milestone in our efforts to interpret data from modern non invasive optical techniques such as fMRI, which are based on the close coupling between metabolic demand of active neurons and local changes in blood flow. The challenge is to unravel the link. Here we show, using spectrophotometry to record oxyhemoglobin (OxyHb and metahemoglobin (MetHb (surrogate markers of cerebral flow and nitric oxide levels respectively together with extracellular neuronal recordings in vivo and applying a multiple polynomial regression model, that the markers are able to predict up about 80% of variability in neuronal response. Furthermore, we show that the coupling between blood flow and neuronal activity is heavily influenced by nitric oxide (NO. While neuronal responses show the typical saturating response, blood flow shows a linear behaviour during contrast-response curves, with nitric oxide from different sources acting differently for low and high intensity.

  11. Rat duodenal motility in vitro: Prokinetic effects of DL-homocysteine thiolactone and modulation of nitric oxide mediated inhibition

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    Stojanović Marija

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Homocysteine is a significant but modifiable risk factor for vascular diseases. As gastrointestinal smooth musculature is similar to blood vessel muscles, we investigated how elevated homocysteine levels affect nitric oxide-mediated neurotransmission in the gut. There is accumulated evidence that a dysfunction of NO neurons in the myenteric plexus may cause various diseases in the gastrointestinal tract such as achalasia, diabetic gastroparesis and infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. In the present study, we aimed to assess the effects of homocysteine on NO-mediated responses in vitro, and to examine the effects of DL-homocysteine thiolactone on the spontaneous motility of rat duodenum and nitrergic neurotransmission. DL-homocysteine thiolactone concentration of 10 μmol/L leads to the immediate increase in tone, amplitude and frequency of spontaneous movements in isolated rat duodenum. L-NAME (30 μmol/L leads to an increase in basal tone, amplitude and frequency of spontaneous contractions. The relaxations induced by EFS were significantly reduced in duodenal segments incubated in DL-homocysteine thiolactone compared with the control group. EFS-induced relaxations were inhibited by L-NAME in both experimental and control groups. These results suggest that a high level of homocysteine causes an important impairment of non-adrenergic non-cholinergic innervation of the rat duodenum. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175043

  12. Nitric oxide-mediated changes in vascular reactivity in pregnancy in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

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    Chu, Z. M.; Beilin, L J

    1993-01-01

    1. To examine the mechanisms which may account for pregnancy-induced vasodilatation in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), we have investigated the changes in vascular reactivity and the effects of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) inhibition in the in situ blood-perfused, mesenteric resistance vessels of 18-20 day pregnant SHR. The effects of NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG) were compared in pregnant and nonpregnant SHR and gestation matched normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. 2. Intra-arteria...

  13. Nitric Oxide Mediates the Stress Response Induced by Diatom Aldehydes in the Sea Urchin Paracentrotus lividus

    OpenAIRE

    Giovanna Romano; Maria Costantini; Isabella Buttino; Adrianna Ianora; Anna Palumbo

    2011-01-01

    Diatoms are ubiquitous and abundant primary producers that have been traditionally considered as a beneficial food source for grazers and for the transfer of carbon through marine food webs. However, many diatom species produce polyunsaturated aldehydes that disrupt development in the offspring of grazers that feed on these unicellular algae. Here we provide evidence that production of the physiological messenger nitric oxide increases after treatment with the polyunsaturated aldehyde decadie...

  14. Nitric oxide mediates low magnesium inhibition of osteoblast-like cell proliferation.

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    Leidi, Marzia; Dellera, Federica; Mariotti, Massimo; Banfi, Giuseppe; Crapanzano, Calogero; Albisetti, Walter; Maier, Jeanette A M

    2012-10-01

    An adequate intake of magnesium (Mg) is important for bone cell activity and contributes to the prevention of osteoporosis. Because (a) Mg is mitogenic for osteoblasts and (b) reduction of osteoblast proliferation is detected in osteoporosis, we investigated the influence of different concentrations of extracellular Mg on osteoblast-like SaOS-2 cell behavior. We found that low Mg inhibited SaOS-2 cell proliferation by increasing the release of nitric oxide through the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Indeed, both pharmacological inhibition with the iNOS inhibitor l-N(6)-(iminoethyl)-lysine-HCl and genetic silencing of iNOS by small interfering RNA restored the normal proliferation rate of the cells. Because a moderate induction of nitric oxide is sufficient to potentiate bone resorption and a relative deficiency in osteoblast proliferation can result in their inadequate activity, we conclude that maintaining Mg homeostasis is relevant to ensure osteoblast function and, therefore, to prevent osteoporosis.

  15. Nitric oxide-mediated intracellular growth restriction of pathogenic Rhodococcus equi can be prevented by iron.

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    von Bargen, Kristine; Wohlmann, Jens; Taylor, Gregory Alan; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Haas, Albert

    2011-05-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an intracellular pathogen which causes pneumonia in young horses and in immunocompromised humans. R. equi arrests phagosome maturation in macrophages at a prephagolysosome stage and grows inside a privileged compartment. Here, we show that, in murine macrophages activated with gamma interferon and lipopolysaccharide, R. equi does not multiply but stays viable for at least 24 h. Whereas infection control of other intracellular pathogens by activated macrophages is executed by enhanced phagosome acidification or phagolysosome formation, by autophagy or by the interferon-inducible GTPase Irgm1, none of these mechanisms seems to control R. equi infection. Growth control by macrophage activation is fully mimicked by treatment of resting macrophages with nitric oxide donors, and inhibition of bacterial multiplication by either activation or nitric oxide donors is annihilated by cotreatment of infected macrophages with ferrous sulfate. Transcriptional analysis of the R. equi iron-regulated gene iupT demonstrates that intracellular R. equi encounters iron stress in activated, but not in resting, macrophages and that this stress is relieved by extracellular addition of ferrous sulfate. Our results suggest that nitric oxide is central to the restriction of bacterial access to iron in activated macrophages.

  16. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Intracellular Growth Restriction of Pathogenic Rhodococcus equi Can Be Prevented by Iron▿

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    von Bargen, Kristine; Wohlmann, Jens; Taylor, Gregory Alan; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Haas, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an intracellular pathogen which causes pneumonia in young horses and in immunocompromised humans. R. equi arrests phagosome maturation in macrophages at a prephagolysosome stage and grows inside a privileged compartment. Here, we show that, in murine macrophages activated with gamma interferon and lipopolysaccharide, R. equi does not multiply but stays viable for at least 24 h. Whereas infection control of other intracellular pathogens by activated macrophages is executed by enhanced phagosome acidification or phagolysosome formation, by autophagy or by the interferon-inducible GTPase Irgm1, none of these mechanisms seems to control R. equi infection. Growth control by macrophage activation is fully mimicked by treatment of resting macrophages with nitric oxide donors, and inhibition of bacterial multiplication by either activation or nitric oxide donors is annihilated by cotreatment of infected macrophages with ferrous sulfate. Transcriptional analysis of the R. equi iron-regulated gene iupT demonstrates that intracellular R. equi encounters iron stress in activated, but not in resting, macrophages and that this stress is relieved by extracellular addition of ferrous sulfate. Our results suggest that nitric oxide is central to the restriction of bacterial access to iron in activated macrophages. PMID:21383050

  17. Inhibition of nitric oxide mediated protein nitration: therapeutic implications in experimental radiculopathy.

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    Lee, Seong Jae; Kim, Tae Uk; Park, Jeong-Soo; Ra, Jong Yun

    2013-09-15

    Experimental animal study. This study investigated whether nitric oxide (NO) mediated protein nitration is involved in the pathogenesis of radiculopathy and whether the symptoms can be relieved by its suppression. It has been reported that nitration of protein mediated by NO is involved in the degenerative neurological disorders, but its involvement is not clear in the radiculopathy. Two kinds of rat models of radiculopathy were used. Radiculopathy was induced either by ligation of spinal nerve roots or transplantation of autologous nucleus pulposus. In separate groups of rats, aminoguanidine, a potent nitric oxide synthetase inhibitor, was administered just before induction of radiculopathy, to suppress NO production and resultant nitration of protein. Sensation of the hind limb was evaluated by plantar stimulation test, and motor weakness was assessed by observation of gait pattern. Nitrotyrosine, product of protein nitration, was assayed quantitatively by Western immunoblotting. Mechanical allodynia was observed in both compression and nucleus pulposus groups, but motor weakness was observed only in the compression group. Preoperative administration of aminoguanidine attenuated mechanical allodynia and motor weakness. Optical densities of nitrotyrosine bands increased significantly in radiculopathy groups, but they were lowered by administration of aminoguanidine. NO mediated protein nitration contributes to the development of both types of radiculopathies. Suppression of NO production can decrease protein nitration and relieve neural dysfunctions of radiculopathy. N/A.

  18. The endogenous nitric oxide mediates selenium-induced phytotoxicity by promoting ROS generation in Brassica rapa.

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    Yi Chen

    Full Text Available Selenium (Se is suggested as an emerging pollutant in agricultural environment because of the increasing anthropogenic release of Se, which in turn results in phytotoxicity. The most common consequence of Se-induced toxicity in plants is oxidative injury, but how Se induces reactive oxygen species (ROS burst remains unclear. In this work, histofluorescent staining was applied to monitor the dynamics of ROS and nitric oxide (NO in the root of Brassica rapa under Se(IV stress. Se(IV-induced faster accumulation of NO than ROS. Both NO and ROS accumulation were positively correlated with Se(IV-induced inhibition of root growth. The NO accumulation was nitrate reductase (NR- and nitric oxide synthase (NOS-dependent while ROS accumulation was NADPH oxidase-dependent. The removal of NO by NR inhibitor, NOS inhibitor, and NO scavenger could alleviate Se(IV-induced expression of Br_Rbohs coding for NADPH oxidase and the following ROS accumulation in roots, which further resulted in the amelioration of Se(IV-induced oxidative injury and growth inhibition. Thus, we proposed that the endogenous NO played a toxic role in B. rapa under Se(IV stress by triggering ROS burst. Such findings can be used to evaluate the toxic effects of Se contamination on crop plants.

  19. Nitric oxide mediates alginate oligosaccharides-induced root development in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

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    Zhang, Yunhong; Liu, Hang; Yin, Heng; Wang, Wenxia; Zhao, Xiaoming; Du, Yuguang

    2013-10-01

    Alginate oligosaccharides (AOS), which are marine oligosaccharides, are involved in regulating plant root growth, but the promotion mechanism for AOS remains unclear. Here, AOS (10-80 mg L(-1)) were found to induce the generation of nitric oxide (NO) in the root system of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), which promoted the formation and elongation of wheat roots in a dose-dependent manner. NO inhibitors suggested that nitrate reductase (NR), rather than nitric oxide synthase (NOS), was essential for AOS-induced root development. Further studies confirmed that AOS-induced NO generation in wheat roots by up-regulating the gene expression and enzyme activity of NR at the post-transcriptional level. The anatomy and RT-PCR results showed that AOS accelerated the division and growth of stele cells, leading to an increase in the ratio of stele area to root transverse area. This could be inhibited by the NR inhibitor, sodium tungstate, which indicated that NO catalyzed by the NR was involved in AOS regulation of root development. Taken together, in the early stage of AOS-induced root development, NO generation was a novel mechanism by which AOS regulated plant growth. The results also showed that this marine resource could be widely used for crop development.

  20. Nitric oxide-mediated protein modification in cardiovascular physiology and pathology.

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    Gödecke, Axel; Schrader, Jürgen; Reinartz, Michael

    2008-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a key regulator of cardiovascular functions including the control of vascular tone, anti-inflammatory properties of the endothelium, cardiac contractility, and thrombocyte activation and aggregation. Numerous experimental data support the view that NO not only acts via cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent mechanisms but also modulates protein function by nitrosation, nitrosylation, glutathiolation, and nitration, respectively. To understand how NO regulates all of these diverse biological processes on the molecular level a comprehensive assessment of NO-mediated cGMP-dependent and independent targets is required. Novel proteomic approaches allow the simultaneous identification of large quantities of proteins modified in an NO-dependent manner and thereby will considerably deepen our understanding of the role NO plays in cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology.

  1. Nitric oxide mediates the survival action of IGF-1 and insulin in pancreatic beta cells.

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    Cahuana, Gladys M; Tejedo, Juan R; Hmadcha, Abdelkrim; Ramírez, Remedios; Cuesta, Antonio L; Soria, Bernat; Martin, Franz; Bedoya, Francisco J

    2008-02-01

    Generation of low levels of nitric oxide (NO) contributes to beta cell survival in vitro. The purpose of this study was to explore the link between NO and the survival pathway triggered by insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and insulin in insulin producing RINm5F cells and in pancreatic islets. Results show that exposure of cells to IGF-1/insulin protects against serum deprivation-induced apoptosis. This action is prevented with inhibitors of NO generation, PI3K and Akt. Moreover, transfection with the negative dominant form of the tyrosine kinase c-Src abrogates the effect of IGF-1 and insulin on DNA fragmentation. An increase in the expression level of NOS3 protein and in the enzyme activity is observed following exposure of serum-deprived RINm5F cells to IGF-1 and insulin. Phosphorylation of IRS-1, IRS-2 and to less extent IRS-3 takes place when serum-deprived RINm5F cells and rat pancreatic islets are exposed to either IGF-1, insulin, or diethylenetriamine nitric oxide adduct (DETA/NO). In human islets, IRS-1 and IRS-2 proteins are present and tyrosine phosphorylated upon exposure to IGF-1, insulin and DETA/NO. Both rat and human pancreatic islets undergo DNA fragmentation when cultured in serum-free medium and IGF-1, insulin and DETA/NO protect efficiently from this damage. We then conclude that generation of NO participates in the activation of survival pathways by IGF-1 and insulin in beta cells.

  2. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Mediates Caffeine Antagonism of Alcohol-Induced Cerebral Artery Constriction.

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    Chang, Jennifer; Fedinec, Alexander L; Kuntamallappanavar, Guruprasad; Leffler, Charles W; Bukiya, Anna N; Dopico, Alex M

    2016-01-01

    Despite preventive education, the combined consumption of alcohol and caffeine (particularly from "energy drinks") continues to rise. Physiologic perturbations by separate intake of ethanol and caffeine have been widely documented. However, the biologic actions of the alcohol-caffeine combination and their underlying subcellular mechanisms have been scarcely studied. Using intravital microscopy on a closed-cranial window and isolated, pressurized vessels, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro action of ethanol-caffeine mixtures on cerebral arteries from rats and mice, widely recognized models to address cerebrovascular pathophysiology and pharmacology. Caffeine at concentrations found in human circulation after ingestion of one to two cups of coffee (10 µM) antagonized the endothelium-independent constriction of cerebral arteries evoked by ethanol concentrations found in blood during moderate-heavy alcohol intoxication (40-70 mM). Caffeine antagonism against alcohol was similar whether evaluated in vivo or in vitro, suggesting independence of systemic factors and drug metabolism, but required a functional endothelium. Moreover, caffeine protection against alcohol increased nitric oxide (NO•) levels over those found in the presence of ethanol alone, disappeared upon blocking NO• synthase, and could not be detected in pressurized cerebral arteries from endothelial nitric-oxide synthase knockout (eNOS(-/-)) mice. Finally, incubation of de-endothelialized cerebral arteries with the NO• donor sodium nitroprusside (10 µM) fully restored the protective effect of caffeine. This study demonstrates for the first time that caffeine antagonizes ethanol-induced cerebral artery constriction and identifies endothelial NO• as the critical caffeine effector on smooth muscle targets. Conceivably, situations that perturb endothelial function and/or NO• availability will critically alter caffeine antagonism of alcohol-induced cerebrovascular constriction without

  3. Nitric oxide-mediated apoptosis in rat macrophages subjected to Shiga toxin 2 from Escherichia coli.

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    Baronetti, José Luis; Villegas, Natalia Angel; Paraje, María Gabriela; Albesa, Inés

    2011-04-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli are important food-borne pathogens. The main factor conferring virulence on this bacterium is its capacity to secrete Shiga toxins (Stxs), which have been reported to induce apoptosis in several cell types. However, the mechanisms of this apoptosis have not yet been fully elucidated. In addition, Stxs have been shown to stimulate macrophages to produce nitric oxide (NO), a well-known apoptosis inductor.The aim of this study was to investigate the participation of NO in apoptosis of rat peritoneal macrophages induced by culture supernatants or Stx2 from E. coli. Peritoneal macrophages incubated in the presence of E. coli supernatants showed an increase in the amounts of apoptosis and NO production. Furthermore, inhibition of NO synthesis induced by addition of aminoguanidine (AG) was correlated with a reduction in the percentage of apoptotic cells, indicating participation of this metabolite in the apoptotic process. Similarly, treatment of cells with Stx2 induced an increase in NO production and amount of apoptosis, these changes being reversed by addition of AG. In summary, these data show that treatment with E. coli supernatants or Stx2 induces NO-mediated apoptosis of macrophages. © 2011 The Societies and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Antioxidant systems are regulated by nitric oxide-mediated post-translational modifications (NO-PTMs

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    Juan Carlos Begara-Morales

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is a biological messenger that orchestrates a plethora of plant functions, mainly through post-translational modifications (PTMs such as S-nitrosylation or tyrosine nitration. In plants, hundreds of proteins have been identified as potential targets of these NO-PTMs under physiological and stress conditions indicating the relevance of NO in plant-signaling mechanisms. Among these NO protein targets, there are different antioxidant enzymes involved in the control of reactive oxygen species (ROS, such as H2O2, which is also a signal molecule. This highlights the close relationship between ROS/NO signaling pathways. The major plant antioxidant enzymes, including catalase, superoxide dismutases (SODs peroxiredoxins (Prx and all the enzymatic components of the ascorbate-glutathione (Asa-GSH cycle, have been shown to be modulated to different degrees by NO-PTMs. This mini-review will update the recent knowledge concerning the interaction of NO with these antioxidant enzymes, with a special focus on the components of the Asa-GSH cycle and their physiological relevance.

  5. Endogenous nitric oxide mediates alleviation of cadmium toxicity induced by calcium in rice seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long Zhang; Zhen Chen; Cheng Zhu

    2012-01-01

    The effect of calcium chloride (CaCl2) on rice seedling growth under cadmium chloride (CdCl2) stress,as well as the possible role of endogenous nitric oxide (NO) in this process,was studied.The growth of rice seedlings was seriously inhibited by CdCl2,and the inhibition was significantly mitigated by CaCl2.However,hemoglobin (Hb) and 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO) weakened the promotion effect of CaCl2.The resuhs of NO fluorescence localization suggest that growth accelerated by CaCl2 might be associated with elevated NO levels.The content of Cd,protein thiols (PBT),and nonprotein thiols (NPT) in cell walls,cell organelles,and soluble fractions,respectively,of rice seedlings decreased considerably in the presence of CaCl2,whereas the content of pectin,hemicellulose 1 (HC1),and hemicellulose 2 (HC2) increased significantly.Elimination of endogenous NO in Cd+Ca treatment could promote the transportation of Cd2+ to cell organelles and soluble fractions and increase the content of NPT and PBT in leaves.In addition,transportation of Cd2+ to cell organelles and soluble fractions was retarded in roots,the content of NPT increased,and the content of PBT decreased.With elimination of endogenous NO in Cd+Ca treatment,the content of pectin,HC 1,and HC2 decreased significantly.Thus,Ca may alleviate Cd toxicity via endogenous NO with variation in the levels of NPT,PBT,and matrix polysaccharides.

  6. Nitric Oxide Mediates Molybdenum-Induced Antioxidant Defense in Wheat under Drought Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songwei Wu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum (Mo has been reported to alleviate drought stress by enhancing antioxidant defense in plants, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here, we hypothesized that Mo mediates nitric oxide (NO-induced antioxidant defense through Mo-enzymes, particularly by nitrate reductase (NR in wheat under drought stress. The 30-day-old wheat seedlings cultivated in -Mo (0 μM Mo and +Mo (1 μM Mo Hoagland solutions were detached and then pretreated with Mo-enzyme inhibitors, NO scavengers, NO donors or their combinations according to demands of complementary experiment under 10% polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG-stimulated drought stress (PSD. Mo supplementation increased the activities and transcripts of antioxidant enzymes, decreased H2O2 and MDA contents, and elevated NO production, implying that Mo-induced antioxidant defense may be related to NO signal. Complementary experiment showed that NO production was induced by Mo, while suppressed by Mo-enzyme inhibitors and NO scavengers, but restored by NO donors, suggesting that Mo-induced increase of NO production may be due to the regulation by Mo-enzymes. Further experiment indicated that the increased activities and transcripts of antioxidant enzymes induced by Mo were suppressed by Mo-enzyme inhibitors and NO scavengers, and NO donors could eliminate their suppressing effects. Moreover, Mo application increased NR activity and inhibitors of Mo-enzymes inhibited NR activity in wheat leaves under PSD, suggesting that NR might involve in the regulation of Mo-induced NO production. These results clearly indicate that NO mediates Mo-induced antioxidant defense at least partially through the regulation of NR.

  7. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Maize Root Apex Responses to Nitrate are Regulated by Auxin and Strigolactones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro eManoli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate (NO3- is a key element for crop production but its levels in agricultural soils are limited. Plants have developed mechanisms to cope with these NO3- fluctuations based on sensing nitrate at the root apex. Particularly, the transition zone (TZ of root apex has been suggested as a signalling-response zone. This study dissects cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying NO3- resupply effects on primary root growth in maize, confirming nitric oxide (NO as a putative modulator. Nitrate restoration induced primary root elongation within the first 2 h, corresponding to a stimulation of cell elongation at the basal border of the TZ. Xyloglucans (XGs immunolocalization together with Brefeldin A applications demonstrated that nitrate resupply induces XG accumulation. This effect was blocked by cPTIO (NO scavenger. Transcriptional analysis of ZmXET1 confirmed the stimulatory effect of nitrate on XGs accumulation in cells of the TZ. Immunolocalization analyses revealed a positive effect of nitrate resupply on auxin and PIN1 accumulation, but a transcriptional regulation of auxin biosynthesis/transport/signalling genes was excluded. Short-term nitrate treatment repressed the transcription of genes involved in strigolactones (SLs biosynthesis and transport, mainly in the TZ. Enhancement of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs transcription in presence of cPTIO indicated endogenous NO as a negative modulator of CCDs activity. Finally, treatment with the SLs-biosynthesis inhibitor (TIS108 restored the root growth in the nitrate-starved seedlings. Present report suggests that the NO-mediated root apex responses to nitrate are accomplished in cells of the TZ via integrative actions of auxin, NO and SLs.

  8. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Maize Root Apex Responses to Nitrate are Regulated by Auxin and Strigolactones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoli, Alessandro; Trevisan, Sara; Voigt, Boris; Yokawa, Ken; Baluška, František; Quaggiotti, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate (NO3 (-)) is a key element for crop production but its levels in agricultural soils are limited. Plants have developed mechanisms to cope with these NO3 (-) fluctuations based on sensing nitrate at the root apex. Particularly, the transition zone (TZ) of root apex has been suggested as a signaling-response zone. This study dissects cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying NO3 (-) resupply effects on primary root (PR) growth in maize, confirming nitric oxide (NO) as a putative modulator. Nitrate restoration induced PR elongation within the first 2 h, corresponding to a stimulation of cell elongation at the basal border of the TZ. Xyloglucans (XGs) immunolocalization together with Brefeldin A applications demonstrated that nitrate resupply induces XG accumulation. This effect was blocked by cPTIO (NO scavenger). Transcriptional analysis of ZmXET1 confirmed the stimulatory effect of nitrate on XGs accumulation in cells of the TZ. Immunolocalization analyses revealed a positive effect of nitrate resupply on auxin and PIN1 accumulation, but a transcriptional regulation of auxin biosynthesis/transport/signaling genes was excluded. Short-term nitrate treatment repressed the transcription of genes involved in strigolactones (SLs) biosynthesis and transport, mainly in the TZ. Enhancement of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs) transcription in presence of cPTIO indicated endogenous NO as a negative modulator of CCDs activity. Finally, treatment with the SLs-biosynthesis inhibitor (TIS108) restored the root growth in the nitrate-starved seedlings. Present report suggests that the NO-mediated root apex responses to nitrate are accomplished in cells of the TZ via integrative actions of auxin, NO and SLs.

  9. Nitric Oxide Mediated Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Activation of Multiple Regulatory Pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Adil; Mun, Bong-Gyu; Imran, Qari M; Lee, Sang-Uk; Adamu, Teferi A; Shahid, Muhammad; Kim, Kyung-Min; Yun, Byung-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Imbalance between the accumulation and removal of nitric oxide and its derivatives is a challenge faced by all plants at the cellular level, and is especially important under stress conditions. Exposure of plants to various biotic and abiotic stresses causes rapid changes in cellular redox tone potentiated by the rise in reactive nitrogen species that serve as signaling molecules in mediating defensive responses. To understand mechanisms mediated by these signaling molecules, we performed a large-scale analysis of the Arabidopsis transcriptome induced by nitrosative stress. We generated an average of 84 and 91 million reads from three replicates each of control and 1 mM S-nitrosocysteine (CysNO)-infiltrated Arabidopsis leaf samples, respectively. After alignment, more than 95% of all reads successfully mapped to the reference and 32,535 genes and 55,682 transcripts were obtained. CysNO infiltration caused differential expression of 6436 genes (3448 up-regulated and 2988 down-regulated) and 6214 transcripts (3335 up-regulated and 2879 down-regulated) 6 h post-infiltration. These differentially expressed genes were found to be involved in key physiological processes, including plant defense against various biotic and abiotic stresses, hormone signaling, and other developmental processes. After quantile normalization of the FPKM values followed by student's T-test (P pathways were verified using quantitative real-time PCR. This study provides comprehensive information about plant responses to nitrosative stress at transcript level and would prove helpful in understanding and incorporating mechanisms associated with nitrosative stress responses in plants.

  10. Leptin induces nitric oxide-mediated inhibition of lipolysis and glyceroneogenesis in rat white adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niang, Fatoumata; Benelli, Chantal; Ribière, Catherine; Collinet, Martine; Mehebik-Mojaat, Nadia; Penot, Graziella; Forest, Claude; Jaubert, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01

    Leptin is secreted by white adipose tissue (WAT) and induces lipolysis and nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) oxidation. During lipolysis, NEFA efflux is the result of triglyceride breakdown, NEFA oxidation, and re-esterification via glyceroneogenesis. Leptin's effects on glyceroneogenesis remain unexplored. We investigated the effect of a long-term treatment with leptin at a physiological concentration (10 μg/L) on lipolysis and glyceroneogenesis in WAT explants and analyzed the underlying mechanisms. Exposure of rat WAT explants to leptin for 2 h resulted in increased NEFA and glycerol efflux. However, a longer treatment with leptin (18 h) did not affect NEFA release and reduced glycerol output. RT-qPCR showed that leptin significantly downregulated the hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (Pck1), and PPARγ genes. In agreement with its effect on mRNA, leptin also decreased the levels of PEPCK-C and HSL proteins. Glyceroneogenesis, monitored by [1-(14) C] pyruvate incorporation into lipids, was reduced. Because leptin increases nitric oxide (NO) production in adipocytes, we explored the role of NO in the leptin signaling pathway. Pretreatment of explants with the NO synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester eliminated the effect of leptin on lipolysis, glyceroneogenesis, and expression of the HSL, Pck1, and PPARγ genes. The NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL penicillamine mimicked leptin effects, thus demonstrating the role of NO in these pathways. The inverse time-dependent action of leptin on WAT is consistent with a process that limits NEFA re-esterification and energy storage while reducing glycerol release, thus preventing hypertriglyceridemia.

  11. Nitric oxide-mediated bystander signal transduction induced by heavy-ion microbeam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Masanori; Matsumoto, Hideki; Funayama, Tomoo; Yokota, Yuichiro; Otsuka, Kensuke; Maeda, Munetoshi; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2015-07-01

    In general, a radiation-induced bystander response is known to be a cellular response induced in non-irradiated cells after receiving bystander signaling factors released from directly irradiated cells within a cell population. Bystander responses induced by high-linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ions at low fluence are an important health problem for astronauts in space. Bystander responses are mediated via physical cell-cell contact, such as gap-junction intercellular communication (GJIC) and/or diffusive factors released into the medium in cell culture conditions. Nitric oxide (NO) is a well-known major initiator/mediator of intercellular signaling within culture medium during bystander responses. In this study, we investigated the NO-mediated bystander signal transduction induced by high-LET argon (Ar)-ion microbeam irradiation of normal human fibroblasts. Foci formation by DNA double-strand break repair proteins was induced in non-irradiated cells, which were co-cultured with those irradiated by high-LET Ar-ion microbeams in the same culture plate. Foci formation was suppressed significantly by pretreatment with an NO scavenger. Furthermore, NO-mediated reproductive cell death was also induced in bystander cells. Phosphorylation of NF-κB and Akt were induced during NO-mediated bystander signaling in the irradiated and bystander cells. However, the activation of these proteins depended on the incubation time after irradiation. The accumulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a downstream target of NO and NF-κB, was observed in the bystander cells 6 h after irradiation but not in the directly irradiated cells. Our findings suggest that Akt- and NF-κB-dependent signaling pathways involving COX-2 play important roles in NO-mediated high-LET heavy-ion-induced bystander responses. In addition, COX-2 may be used as a molecular marker of high-LET heavy-ion-induced bystander cells to distinguish them from directly irradiated cells, although this may depend on the time

  12. α2A-adrenoceptors, but not nitric oxide, mediate the peripheral cardiac sympatho-inhibition of moxonidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobos-Puc, Luis E; Aguayo-Morales, Hilda; Silva-Belmares, Yesenia; González-Zavala, Maria A; Centurión, David

    2016-07-05

    Moxonidine centrally inhibits the sympathetic activity through the I1-imidazoline receptor and nitric oxide. In addition, inhibits the peripheral cardiac sympathetic outflow by α2-adrenoceptors/I1-imidazoline receptors, although the role of α2-adrenoceptor subtypes or nitric oxide in the cardiac sympatho-inhibition induced by moxonidine are unknown. Therefore, the cardiac sympatho-inhibition induced by moxonidine (10μg/kgmin) was evaluated before and after of the treatment with the following antagonists/inhibitor: (1) BRL 44408, (300μg/kg, α2A), imiloxan, (3000μg/kg, α2B), and JP-1302, (300μg/kg, α2C), in animals pretreated with AGN 192403 (3000μg/kg, I1 antagonist); (2) N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME; 34, 100, and 340μg/kgmin); and (3) the combinations of the highest dose of l-NAME plus AGN 192403 or BRL 44408. Additionally, the expression of the neuronal (nNOS) and inducible (iNOS) nitric oxide synthase in the stellate ganglion was determined after treatment with moxonidine (i.p. 0.56mg/kg daily, during one week). The cardiac sympatho-inhibition of 10μg/kgmin moxonidine was: (1) unaffected by imiloxan and JP-1302, under pretreatment with AGN 192403, or l-NAME (34, 100 and 340μg/kgmin) given alone; (2) partially antagonized by the combination of 340 μg/kgmin l-NAME plus BRL 44408; and (3) abolished by BRL 44408 under treatment with AGN 192403. Furthermore, moxonidine did not modify the nNOS or iNOS protein expression in the stellate ganglion, the main source of postganglionic sympathetic neurons innervating the heart. In conclusion, our results suggest that the peripheral cardiac sympatho-inhibition induced by moxonidine is mediated by α2A-adrenoceptor subtype but not by nitric oxide.

  13. Multifaceted role of nitric oxide in an in vitro mouse neuronal injury model: transcriptomic profiling defines the temporal recruitment of death signalling cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhao Feng; Chen, Minghui Jessica; Manikandan, Jayapal; Melendez, Alirio J; Shui, Guanghou; Russo-Marie, Françoise; Whiteman, Matthew; Beart, Philip M; Moore, Philip K; Cheung, Nam Sang

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Nitric oxide is implicated in the pathogenesis of various neuropathologies characterized by oxidative stress. Although nitric oxide has been reported to be involved in the exacerbation of oxidative stress observed in several neuropathologies, existent data fail to provide a holistic description of how nitrergic pathobiology elicits neuronal injury. Here we provide a comprehensive description of mechanisms contributing to nitric oxide induced neuronal injury by global transcriptomic profiling. Microarray analyses were undertaken on RNA from murine primary cortical neurons treated with the nitric oxide generator DETA-NONOate (NOC-18, 0.5 mM) for 8–24 hrs. Biological pathway analysis focused upon 3672 gene probes which demonstrated at least a ±1.5-fold expression in a minimum of one out of three time-points and passed statistical analysis (one-way anova, P < 0.05). Numerous enriched processes potentially determining nitric oxide mediated neuronal injury were identified from the transcriptomic profile: cell death, developmental growth and survival, cell cycle, calcium ion homeostasis, endoplasmic reticulum stress, oxidative stress, mitochondrial homeostasis, ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, and GSH and nitric oxide metabolism. Our detailed time-course study of nitric oxide induced neuronal injury allowed us to provide the first time a holistic description of the temporal sequence of cellular events contributing to nitrergic injury. These data form a foundation for the development of screening platforms and define targets for intervention in nitric oxide neuropathologies where nitric oxide mediated injury is causative. PMID:21352476

  14. Nitric oxide damages neuronal mitochondria and induces apoptosis in neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The cytotoxic effect of nitric oxide on primarily cultured rat cerebellar granule cells was studied,and the mechanisms were discussed.The results showed that nitric oxide donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP; 500 μmol/L) could induce apoptosis in immature cultures of cerebellar granule cells.Flow cytometry and HPLC analyses revealed that after treatment with SNAP,the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and the cellular ATP content decreased significantly.Nitric oxide scavenger hemoglobin could effectively prevent the neuronal mitochondria from dysfunction and attenuate apoptosis.The results suggested that nitric oxide activated the apoptotic program by inhibiting the activity of mitochondrial respiratory chain and thus decreasing the cellular ATP content.

  15. Nitric Oxide in Astrocyte-Neuron Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Nianzhen [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Astrocytes, a subtype of glial cell, have recently been shown to exhibit Ca2+ elevations in response to neurotransmitters. A Ca2+ elevation can propagate to adjacent astrocytes as a Ca2+ wave, which allows an astrocyte to communicate with its neighbors. Additionally, glutamate can be released from astrocytes via a Ca2+-dependent mechanism, thus modulating neuronal activity and synaptic transmission. In this dissertation, the author investigated the roles of another endogenous signal, nitric oxide (NO), in astrocyte-neuron signaling. First the author tested if NO is generated during astrocytic Ca2+ signaling by imaging NO in purified murine cortical astrocyte cultures. Physiological concentrations of a natural messenger, ATP, caused a Ca2+-dependent NO production. To test the roles of NO in astrocytic Ca2+ signaling, the author applied NO to astrocyte cultures via addition of a NO donor, S-nitrosol-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP). NO induced an influx of external Ca2+, possibly through store-operated Ca2+ channels. The NO-induced Ca2+ signaling is cGMP-independent since 8-Br-cGMP, an agonistic analog of cGMP, did not induce a detectable Ca2+ change. The consequence of this NO-induced Ca2+ influx was assessed by simultaneously monitoring of cytosolic and internal store Ca2+ using fluorescent Ca2+ indicators x-rhod-1 and mag-fluo-4. Blockage of NO signaling with the NO scavenger PTIO significantly reduced the refilling percentage of internal stores following ATP-induced Ca2+ release, suggesting that NO modulates internal store refilling. Furthermore, locally photo-release of NO to a single astrocyte led to a Ca2+ elevation in the stimulated astrocyte and a subsequent Ca2+ wave to neighbors. Finally, the author tested the role of NO inglutamate-mediated astrocyte-neuron signaling by

  16. Nitric Oxide in Astrocyte-Neuron Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nianzhen Li

    2002-06-27

    Astrocytes, a subtype of glial cell, have recently been shown to exhibit Ca{sup 2+} elevations in response to neurotransmitters. A Ca{sup 2+} elevation can propagate to adjacent astrocytes as a Ca{sup 2+} wave, which allows an astrocyte to communicate with its neighbors. Additionally, glutamate can be released from astrocytes via a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent mechanism, thus modulating neuronal activity and synaptic transmission. In this dissertation, the author investigated the roles of another endogenous signal, nitric oxide (NO), in astrocyte-neuron signaling. First the author tested if NO is generated during astrocytic Ca{sup 2+} signaling by imaging NO in purified murine cortical astrocyte cultures. Physiological concentrations of a natural messenger, ATP, caused a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent NO production. To test the roles of NO in astrocytic Ca{sup 2+} signaling, the author applied NO to astrocyte cultures via addition of a NO donor, S-nitrosol-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP). NO induced an influx of external Ca{sup 2+}, possibly through store-operated Ca{sup 2+} channels. The NO-induced Ca{sup 2+} signaling is cGMP-independent since 8-Br-cGMP, an agonistic analog of cGMP, did not induce a detectable Ca{sup 2+} change. The consequence of this NO-induced Ca{sup 2+} influx was assessed by simultaneously monitoring of cytosolic and internal store Ca{sup 2+} using fluorescent Ca{sup 2+} indicators x-rhod-1 and mag-fluo-4. Blockage of NO signaling with the NO scavenger PTIO significantly reduced the refilling percentage of internal stores following ATP-induced Ca{sup 2+} release, suggesting that NO modulates internal store refilling. Furthermore, locally photo-release of NO to a single astrocyte led to a Ca{sup 2+} elevation in the stimulated astrocyte and a subsequent Ca{sup 2+} wave to neighbors. Finally, the author tested the role of NO inglutamate-mediated astrocyte-neuron signaling by recording the astrocyte-evoked glutamate-dependent neuronal slow inward current (SIC

  17. Overexpressed neuroglobin raises threshold for nitric oxide-induced impairment of mitochondrial respiratory activities and stress signaling in primary cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shilpee; Zhuo, Ming; Gorgun, Falih M; Englander, Ella W

    2013-08-01

    Surges of nitric oxide compromise mitochondrial respiration primarily by competitive inhibition of oxygen binding to cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) and are particularly injurious in neurons, which rely on oxidative phosphorylation for all their energy needs. Here, we show that transgenic overexpression of the neuronal globin protein, neuroglobin, helps diminish protein nitration, preserve mitochondrial function and sustain ATP content of primary cortical neurons challenged by extended nitric oxide exposure. Specifically, in transgenic neurons, elevated neuroglobin curtailed nitric oxide-induced alterations in mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates, including baseline oxygen consumption, consumption coupled with ATP synthesis, proton leak and spare respiratory capacity. Concomitantly, activation of genes involved in sensing and responding to oxidative/nitrosative stress, including the early-immediate c-Fos gene and the phase II antioxidant enzyme, heme oxygenase-1, was diminished in neuroglobin-overexpressing compared to wild-type neurons. Taken together, these differences reflect a lesser insult produced by similar concentrations of nitric oxide in neuroglobin-overexpressing compared to wild-type neurons, suggesting that abundant neuroglobin buffers nitric oxide and raises the threshold of nitric oxide-mediated injury in neurons.

  18. Nitrated type III collagen as a biological marker of nitric oxide-mediated synovial tissue metabolism in osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richardot, P; Charni-Ben Tabassi, N; Toh, L

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Nitric oxide (NO) is a major mediator of joint tissue inflammation and damage in osteoarthritis (OA) and mediates the nitration of tyrosine (Y*) residues in proteins. We investigated the nitration of type III collagen, a major constituent of synovial membrane, in knee OA. METHODS...... in healthy controls and significantly correlated with C-reactive protein values (r=0.40, Pcollagen N-telopeptide is increased in the synovial tissue of patients with knee OA. Measurements of serum IIINys level may be useful for the clinical......: A polyclonal antibody directed against the nitrated QY*DSY*DVKSG sequence from type III collagen N-telopeptide was generated. Synovial tissues from patients with knee OA (n=4) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA, n=4) were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for IIINys. Serum IIINys levels were measured by enzyme...

  19. Ascorbic acid improves brachial artery vasodilation during progressive handgrip exercise in the elderly through a nitric oxide-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinity, Joel D; Wray, D Walter; Witman, Melissa A H; Layec, Gwenael; Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Ives, Stephen J; Conklin, Jamie D; Reese, Van; Zhao, Jia; Richardson, Russell S

    2016-03-15

    The proposed mechanistic link between the age-related attenuation in vascular function and free radicals is an attractive hypothesis; however, direct evidence of free radical attenuation and a concomitant improvement in vascular function in the elderly is lacking. Therefore, this study sought to test the hypothesis that ascorbic acid (AA), administered intra-arterially during progressive handgrip exercise, improves brachial artery (BA) vasodilation in a nitric oxide (NO)-dependent manner, by mitigating free radical production. BA vasodilation (Doppler ultrasound) and free radical outflow [electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy] were measured in seven healthy older adults (69 ± 2 yr) during handgrip exercise at 3, 6, 9, and 12 kg (∼13-52% of maximal voluntary contraction) during the control condition and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition via N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), AA, and coinfusion of l-NMMA + AA. Baseline BA diameter was not altered by any of the treatments, while L-NMMA and L-NMMA + AA diminished baseline BA blood flow and shear rate. AA improved BA dilation compared with control at 9 kg (control: 6.5 ± 2.2%, AA: 10.9 ± 2.5%, P = 0.01) and 12 kg (control: 9.5 ± 2.7%, AA: 15.9 ± 3.7%, P vasodilation compared with control and when combined with AA eliminated the AA-induced improvement in BA vasodilation. Free radical outflow increased with exercise intensity but, interestingly, was not attenuated by AA. Collectively, these results indicate that AA improves BA vasodilation in the elderly during handgrip exercise through an NO-dependent mechanism; however, this improvement appears not to be the direct consequence of attenuated free radical outflow from the forearm.

  20. Medullary ventrolateral nitric oxide mediates the cardiac effect of electroacupuncture at "Neiguan" acupoint on acute myocardial ischemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Juan-Xiu; Zhou, Pei-Hua; Wang, Jin; Li, Xia; Cao, Yin-Xiang; Zhou, Xu; Zhu, Da-Nian

    2004-08-25

    Experiments were performed on male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats anesthetized with a mixture of urethane and chloralose. A rat model of acute myocardial ischemia (AMI) was made by ligation of the left anterior descending branch of the coronary artery (LAD). After the LAD ligation, the ischemia area of the left ventricular wall became somewhat pale immediately. Under a light microscope, the pathological examination revealed that all the cells were swollen and in red color when the cardiac section was stained with hematoxylin basic fuchsin picric acid (HBFP), which indicated a typical change in the myocardial ischemia. In the AMI model, it was found that cardiac functions were markedly attenuated, such as decreases in the heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP), maximal rate for left ventricular pressure rising and declining (+/-dp/dt(max)), velocity of contractile element (V(CE)) and total area of cardiac force loop (L(0)), and an increase in the left ventricular end diastolic pressure (LVEDP). In such AMI rats, application of electroacupuncture (EA) at "Neiguan" acupoints (Pe 6) for 20 min could obviously improve the above-mentioned cardiac functions. After microinjection of nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), was made into the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), the curative effect of EA on myocardial ischemia was reduced significantly or abolished, while after microinjection of normal saline of the same volume was made into the RVLM, the improving effect of EA remained. These results suggest that the effect of EA on myocardial ischemia is possibly mediated by the nitric oxide (NO) in the RVLM.

  1. The mechanism of the nitric oxide-mediated enhancement of tert-butylhydroperoxide-induced DNA single strand breakage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidarelli, Andrea; Clementi, Emilio; Sciorati, Clara; Cantoni, Orazio

    1998-01-01

    Caffeine (Cf) enhances the DNA cleavage induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (tB-OOH) in U937 cells via a mechanism involving Ca2+-dependent mitochondrial formation of DNA-damaging species (Guidarelli et al., 1997b). Nitric oxide (NO) is not involved in this process since U937 cells do not express the constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS).Treatment with the NO donors S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP, 10 μM), or S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO, 300 μM), however, potentiated the DNA strand scission induced by 200 μM tB-OOH. The DNA lesions generated by tB-OOH alone, or combined with SNAP, were repaired with superimposable kinetics and were insensitive to anti-oxidants and peroxynitrite scavengers but suppressed by iron chelators.SNAP or GSNO did not cause mitochondrial Ca2+ accumulation but their enhancing effects on the tB-OOH-induced DNA strand scission were prevented by ruthenium red, an inhibitor of the calcium uniporter of mitochondria. Furthermore, the enhancing effects of both SNAP and GSNO were identical to and not additive with those promoted by the Ca2+-mobilizing agents Cf or ATP.The SNAP- or GSNO-mediated enhancement of the tB-OOH-induced DNA cleavage was abolished by the respiratory chain inhibitors rotenone and myxothiazol and was not apparent in respiration-deficient cells.It is concluded that, in cells which do not express the enzyme cNOS, exogenous NO enhances the accumulation of DNA single strand breaks induced by tB-OOH via a mechanism involving inhibition of complex III. PMID:9846647

  2. Oleic acid-dependent modulation of Nitric oxide associated 1 protein levels regulates nitric oxide-mediated defense signaling in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The conserved cellular metabolites nitric oxide (NO) and oleic acid (18:1) are well-known regulators of disease physiologies in diverse organism. We show that NO production in plants is regulated via 18:1. Reduction in 18:1 levels, via a genetic mutation in the 18:1-synthesizing gene SUPPRESSOR OF S...

  3. Sinorhizobium meliloti Controls Nitric Oxide-Mediated Post-Translational Modification of a Medicago truncatula Nodule Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanquet, Pauline; Silva, Liliana; Catrice, Olivier; Bruand, Claude; Carvalho, Helena; Meilhoc, Eliane

    2015-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is involved in various plant-microbe interactions. In the symbiosis between soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti and model legume Medicago truncatula, NO is required for an optimal establishment of the interaction but is also a signal for nodule senescence. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms responsible for NO effects in the legume-rhizobium interaction. Here, we investigate the contribution of the bacterial NO response to the modulation of a plant protein post-translational modification in nitrogen-fixing nodules. We made use of different bacterial mutants to finely modulate NO levels inside M. truncatula root nodules and to examine the consequence on tyrosine nitration of the plant glutamine synthetase, a protein responsible for assimilation of the ammonia released by nitrogen fixation. Our results reveal that S. meliloti possesses several proteins that limit inactivation of plant enzyme activity via NO-mediated post-translational modifications. This is the first demonstration that rhizobia can impact the course of nitrogen fixation by modulating the activity of a plant protein.

  4. Contribution of radiation-induced, nitric oxide-mediated bystander effect to radiation-induced adaptive response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, H.; Ohnishi, T.

    There has been a recent upsurge of interest in radiation-induced adaptive response and bystander effect which are specific modes in stress response to low-dose low-dose rate radiation Recently we found that the accumulation of inducible nitric oxide NO synthase iNOS in wt p53 cells was induced by chronic irradiation with gamma rays followed by acute irradiation with X-rays but not by each one resulting in an increase in nitrite concentrations of medium It is suggested that the accumulation of iNOS may be due to the depression of acute irradiation-induced p53 functions by pre-chronic irradiation In addition we found that the radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells against acute irradiation with X-rays was reduced after chronic irradiation with gamma rays This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells was nearly completely suppressed by the addition of NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO to the medium This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells is just radiation-induced adaptive response suggesting that NO-mediated bystander effect may considerably contribute to adaptive response induced by radiation

  5. Nitric oxide mediates effects of acute, not chronic, naltrexone on LPS-induced hepatic encephalopathy in cirrhotic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiassy, Bentolhoda; Rahimi, Nastaran; Javadi-Paydar, Mehrak; Gharedaghi, Mohammad Hadi; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Dehpour, Ahmad R

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest endogenous opioids and nitric oxide (NO) are involved in the pathophysiology of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In this study, the interaction between the opioid receptor antagonist and NO was investigated on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced HE in cirrhotic rats. Male rats were divided in the sham- and bile duct ligation (BDL)-operated groups. Animals were treated with saline; naltrexone (10 mg/kg, i.p.); or L-NAME (3 mg/kg, i.p.), alone or in combination with naltrexone. To induce HE, LPS (1 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected 1 h after the final drug treatment. HE scoring, hepatic histology, and plasma NO metabolites levels and mortality rate were recorded. Deteriorated level of consciousness and mortality after LPS administration significantly ameliorated following both acute and chronic treatment with naltrexone in cirrhotic rats. However, acute and chronic administration of L-NAME did not change HE scores in cirrhotic rats. The effects of acute but not chronic treatment of naltrexone on HE parameters were reversed by L-NAME. Plasma NOx concentrations elevated in BDL rats, which were decreased after acute and chronic treatment by naltrexone or L-NAME, significantly. We suggest both acute and chronic treatment with naltrexone improved LPS-induced HE. But, only acute treatment with naltrexone may affect through NO pathway.

  6. Salt stress reduces root meristem size by nitric oxide-mediated modulation of auxin accumulation and signaling in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen; Li, Rong-Jun; Han, Tong-Tong; Cai, Wei; Fu, Zheng-Wei; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2015-05-01

    The development of the plant root system is highly plastic, which allows the plant to adapt to various environmental stresses. Salt stress inhibits root elongation by reducing the size of the root meristem. However, the mechanism underlying this process remains unclear. In this study, we explored whether and how auxin and nitric oxide (NO) are involved in salt-mediated inhibition of root meristem growth in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using physiological, pharmacological, and genetic approaches. We found that salt stress significantly reduced root meristem size by down-regulating the expression of PINFORMED (PIN) genes, thereby reducing auxin levels. In addition, salt stress promoted AUXIN RESISTANT3 (AXR3)/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID17 (IAA17) stabilization, which repressed auxin signaling during this process. Furthermore, salt stress stimulated NO accumulation, whereas blocking NO production with the inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine-methylester compromised the salt-mediated reduction of root meristem size, PIN down-regulation, and stabilization of AXR3/IAA17, indicating that NO is involved in salt-mediated inhibition of root meristem growth. Taken together, these findings suggest that salt stress inhibits root meristem growth by repressing PIN expression (thereby reducing auxin levels) and stabilizing IAA17 (thereby repressing auxin signaling) via increasing NO levels. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Lichen metabolites prevent UV light and nitric oxide-mediated plasmid DNA damage and induce apoptosis in human melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, A; Piovano, M; Lombardo, L; Garbarino, J; Cardile, V

    2008-09-26

    In humans both UV-A and UV-B can cause gene mutations and suppress immunity, which leads to skin cancer, including melanoma. Inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) appears particularly promising as ROS and RNS production by both UV-A and UV-B contributes to inflammation, immunosuppression, gene mutation and carcinogenesis. We evaluated the effect of two lichen compounds, sphaerophorin (depside) and pannarin (depsidone) on pBR322 DNA cleavage induced by hydroxyl radicals (()OH), and by nitric oxide (NO), and their superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) scavenging capacity. In addition, we investigated the growth inhibitory activity of these compounds against human melanoma cells (M14 cell line). Sphaerophorin and pannarin showed a protective effect on plasmid DNA and exhibited a superoxide dismutase like effect. The data obtained in cell culture show that these lichen metabolites inhibit the growth of melanoma cells, inducing an apoptotic cell death, demonstrated by the fragmentation of genomic DNA (COMET and TUNEL Assays) and by a significant increase of caspase-3 activity, and correlated, at least in part, to the increase of ROS generation, These results confirm the promising biological properties of sphaerophorin and pannarin and encourage further investigations on their molecular mechanisms.

  8. Nitric oxide mediates strigolactone signaling in auxin and ethylene-sensitive lateral root formation in sunflower seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Niharika; Bhatla, Satish C

    2015-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) play significant role in shaping root architecture whereby auxin-SL crosstalk has been observed in SL-mediated responses of primary root elongation, lateral root formation and adventitious root (AR) initiation. Whereas GR24 (a synthetic strigolactone) inhibits LR and AR formation, the effect of SL biosynthesis inhibitor (fluridone) is just the opposite (root proliferation). Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) leads to LR proliferation but completely inhibits AR development. The diffusive distribution of PIN1 in the provascular cells in the differentiating zone of the roots in response to GR24, fluridone or NPA treatments further indicates the involvement of localized auxin accumulation in LR development responses. Inhibition of LR formation by GR24 treatment coincides with inhibition of ACC synthase activity. Profuse LR development by fluridone and NPA treatments correlates with enhanced [Ca(2+)]cyt in the apical region and differentiating zones of LR, indicating a critical role of [Ca(2+)] in LR development in response to the coordinated action of auxins, ethylene and SLs. Significant enhancement of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (CCD) activity (enzyme responsible for SL biosynthesis) in tissue homogenates in presence of cPTIO (NO scavenger) indicates the role of endogenous NO as a negative modulator of CCD activity. Differences in the spatial distribution of NO in the primary and lateral roots further highlight the involvement of NO in SL-modulated root morphogenesis in sunflower seedlings. Present work provides new report on the negative modulation of SL biosynthesis through modulation of CCD activity by endogenous nitric oxide during SL-modulated LR development.

  9. Enhanced nitric oxide-mediated autophagy contributes to the hepatoprotective effects of ischemic preconditioning during ischemia and reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jun-Kyu; Kang, Jung-Woo; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2016-08-31

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) protects against liver ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Autophagy is an essential cytoprotective system that is rapidly activated by multiple stressors. Nitric oxide (NO) acts as an inducer of IPC. We examined the impact of autophagy in liver IPC and its regulation by NO. Male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to 60 min of hepatic ischemia followed by 6 h of reperfusion. IPC was achieved for 10 min of ischemia followed by 10 min of reperfusion prior to sustained ischemia. N(ω)-Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 15 mg/kg, i.v., all NOS inhibitor) and aminoguanidine (AG, 10 mg/kg, i.v., iNOS inhibitor) were injected 10 min before IPC. SB203580 (10 mg/kg, i.p., p38 inhibitor) was injected 30 min before IPC. I/R increased serum alanine aminotransferase activity. IPC attenuated this increase, which was abolished by L-NAME, but not AG. Microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II levels increased and p62 protein levels decreased after I/R; these changes were augmented by IPC and abolished by L-NAME. I/R increased liver protein expression of autophagy-related protein (Atg)12-Atg5 complex and lysosome-associated membrane protein-2. IPC augmented the expression of these proteins, which were abolished by L-NAME, but not AG. IPC also augmented the level of phosphorylated p38 MAPK induced by I/R and this phosphorylation was abolished by L-NAME. Our findings suggest that IPC-mediated NO protects against I/R-induced liver injury by enhancing autophagic flux.

  10. Role of metabolic environment on nitric oxide mediated inhibition of neointimal hyperplasia in type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Monica P; Emond, Zachary M; Wang, Zheng; Martinez, Janet; Jiang, Qun; Kibbe, Melina R

    2014-01-30

    Nitric oxide (NO) is well known to inhibit neointimal hyperplasia following arterial injury. Previously, we reported that NO was more effective at inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia in a type 2 diabetic environment than control. We also found that NO was ineffective in an uncontrolled type 1 diabetic environment; however, insulin restored the efficacy of NO. Thus, the goal of this study was to more closely evaluate the effect of insulin and glucose on the efficacy of NO at inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic environments using different doses of insulin as well as pioglitazone. Type 1 diabetes was induced in male lean Zucker (LZ) rats with streptozotocin (60 mg/kg IP). Groups included control, moderate glucose control, and tight glucose control. Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats fed Purina 5008 chow were used as a type 2 diabetic model. Groups included no therapy, insulin therapy, or pioglitazone therapy. After 4 weeks of maintaining group assignments, the carotid artery injury model was performed. Treatment groups included: control, injury and injury plus NO. 2 weeks following arterial injury, in the type 1 diabetic rats, NO most effectively reduced the neointimal area in the moderate and tightly controlled groups (81% and 88% vs. 33%, respectively, p=0.01). In type 2 diabetic rats, the metabolic environment had no impact on the efficacy of NO (81-82% reduction for all groups). Thus, in this study, we show NO is effective at inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic environments. A greater understanding of how the metabolic environment may impact the efficacy of NO may lead to the development of more effective NO-based therapies for patients with diabetes.

  11. Role of Metabolic Environment on Nitric Oxide Mediated Inhibition of Neointimal Hyperplasia in Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Martinez, Janet; Jiang, Qun; Kibbe, Melina R.

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is well known to inhibit neointimal hyperplasia following arterial injury. Previously, we reported that NO was more effective at inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia in a type 2 diabetic environment than control. We also found that NO was ineffective in an uncontrolled type 1 diabetic environment; however, insulin restored the efficacy of NO. Thus, the goal of this study was to more closely evaluate the effect of insulin and glucose on the efficacy of NO at inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic environments using different doses of insulin as well as pioglitazone. Type 1 diabetes was induced in male Lean Zucker (LZ) rats with streptozotocin (60mg/kg IP). Groups included control, moderate glucose control, and tight glucose control. Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats fed Purina 5008 chow were used as a type 2 diabetic model. Groups included no therapy, insulin therapy, or pioglitazone therapy. After 4 weeks of maintaining group assignments, the carotid artery injury model was performed. Treatment groups included: control, injury, and injury plus NO. 2 weeks following arterial injury, in the type 1 diabetic rats, NO most effectively reduced the neointimal area in the moderate and tightly controlled groups (81% and 88% vs. 33%, respectively, p=0.01). In type 2 diabetic rats, the metabolic environment had no impact on the efficacy of NO (81%–82% reduction for all groups). Thus, in this study, we show NO is effective at inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic environments. A greater understanding of how the metabolic environment may impact the efficacy of NO may lead to the development of more effective NO-based therapies for patients with diabetes. PMID:24333562

  12. Inhibition of root meristem growth by cadmium involves nitric oxide-mediated repression of auxin accumulation and signalling in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hong-Mei; Huang, Xi

    2016-01-01

    The root is the first plant organ to get in contact with the toxin cadmium (Cd), which is a widespread soil contaminant. Cd inhibits the growth of the primary root, but the mechanisms underlying this inhibition remain elusive. In this study, we used physiological, pharmacological and genetic approaches to investigate the roles of nitric oxide (NO) and auxin in Cd-mediated inhibition of Arabidopsis thaliana root meristem growth. Our study demonstrated that in the first 12 h of exposure, Cd inhibits primary root elongation through a decrease in the sizes of both the elongation and meristematic zones. Following Cd exposure, a decrease in auxin levels is associated with reduced PIN1/3/7 protein accumulation, but not with reduced PIN1/3/7 transcript levels. Additionally, Cd stabilized AXR3/IAA17 protein to repress auxin signalling in this Cd-mediated process. Furthermore, decreasing Cd-induced NO accumulation with either NO-specific scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO) or NO synthase inhibitor N(ω) -nitro-l-Arg-methylester (l-NAME) compromised the Cd-mediated inhibition of root meristem development, reduction in auxin and PIN1/3/7 accumulation, as well as stabilization of AXR3/IAA17, indicating that NO participates in Cd-mediated inhibition of root meristem growth. Taken together, our data suggest that Cd inhibits root meristem growth by NO-mediated repression of auxin accumulation and signalling in Arabidopsis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Caveolin-1 is important for nitric oxide-mediated angiogenesis in fibrin gels with human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-ming PAN; Yong-zhong YAO; Zhang-hua ZHU; Xi-tai SUN; Yu-dong QIU; Yi-tao DING

    2006-01-01

    Aim: The role of caveolin-l (Cav-1) in angiogenesis remains poorly understood. The endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS), a caveolin-interacting protein, was demonstrated to play a predominant role in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) -induced angiogenesis. The purpose of our study was to examine the role of Cav-1 and the eNOS complex in NO-mediated angiogenesis. Methods: Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were isolated and cultured in 3-D fibrin gels to form capillary-like tubules by VEGF stimulation. The expression of Cav-1 and eNOS was detected by semiquantitative RT-PCR. The HUVEC were treated with antisense oligonucleotides to downregulate Cav-1 expression. Both transduced and non-infected HUVEC were cultured in fibrin gels in the presence or absence of VEGF (20 ng/mL) and NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 5 mmol/L). NO was measured using a NO assay kit and capillary-like tubules were quantified by tubule formation index using the Image J program. Results: RT-PCR analysis revealed that Cav-1 levels steadily increased in a time-dependent manner and reached their maximum after 5 d of incubation, but there were no obvious changes in eNOS mRNA expression in response to VEGF in the fibrin gel model. VEGF (20 ng/mL) can promote NO production and the formation of capillary-like tubules, and this promoting effect of VEGF was blocked by the addition of L-NAME (5 mmol/L). When transduced HUVEC with the antisense Cav-1 oligonucleotides were plated in the fibrin gels, the capillary-like tubules were significantly fewer than those of the non-infected cells. The capillary-like tubules formation and NO production of transduced HUVEC with the antisense Cav-1 oligonucleotides cultured in fibrin gels showed no responses to the addition of VEGF (20 ng/mL) and L-NAME (5.0 mmol/L). Conclusion: NO was a critical angiogenic mediator in this model. Cav-1 was essential for NO-mediated angiogenesis and may be an important target of anti

  14. Stimulation of Baroresponsive Parts of the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract Produces Nitric Oxide-mediated Choroidal Vasodilation in Rat Eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyan Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Preganglionic parasympathetic neurons of the ventromedial part of the superior salivatory nucleus (SSN mediate vasodilation of orbital and choroidal blood vessels, via their projection to the nitrergic pterygopalatine ganglion (PPG neurons that innervate these vessels. We recently showed that the baroresponsive part of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS innervates choroidal control parasympathetic preganglionic neurons of SSN in rats. As this projection provides a means by which blood pressure signals may modulate ChBF, we investigated if activation of baroresponsive NTS evokes ChBF increases in rat eye, using Laser Doppler flowmetry to measure ChBF transclerally. We found that electrical activation of ipsilateral baroresponsive NTS and its efferent fiber pathway to choroidal SSN increased mean ChBF by about 40-80% above baseline, depending on current level. The ChBF responses obtained with stimulation of baroresponsive NTS were driven by increases in both choroidal blood volume (i.e. vasodilation and choroidal blood velocity (presumed orbital vessel dilation. Stimulation of baroresponsive NTS, by contrast, yielded no significant mean increases in systemic arterial blood pressure. We further found that the increases in ChBF with NTS stimulation were significantly reduced by administration of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor Nω-propyl-l-arginine (NPA, thus implicating nitrergic PPG terminals in the NTS-elicited ChBF increases. Our results show that NTS neurons projecting to choroidal SSN do mediate increase in ChBF, and thus suggest a role of baroresponsive NTS in the blood pressure-dependent regulation of ChBF.

  15. Stimulation of Baroresponsive Parts of the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract Produces Nitric Oxide-mediated Choroidal Vasodilation in Rat Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunyan; Fitzgerald, Malinda E. C.; Del Mar, Nobel; Reiner, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Preganglionic parasympathetic neurons of the ventromedial part of the superior salivatory nucleus (SSN) mediate vasodilation of orbital and choroidal blood vessels, via their projection to the nitrergic pterygopalatine ganglion (PPG) neurons that innervate these vessels. We recently showed that the baroresponsive part of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) innervates choroidal control parasympathetic preganglionic neurons of SSN in rats. As this projection provides a means by which blood pressure (BP) signals may modulate choroidal blood flow (ChBF), we investigated if activation of baroresponsive NTS evokes ChBF increases in rat eye, using Laser Doppler Flowmetry (LDF) to measure ChBF transclerally. We found that electrical activation of ipsilateral baroresponsive NTS and its efferent fiber pathway to choroidal SSN increased mean ChBF by about 40–80% above baseline, depending on current level. The ChBF responses obtained with stimulation of baroresponsive NTS were driven by increases in both choroidal blood volume (ChBVol; i.e., vasodilation) and choroidal blood velocity (ChBVel; possibly due to orbital vessel dilation). Stimulation of baroresponsive NTS, by contrast, yielded no significant mean increases in systemic arterial blood pressure (ABP). We further found that the increases in ChBF with NTS stimulation were significantly reduced by administration of the neuronal nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor Nω-propyl-l-arginine (NPA), thus implicating nitrergic PPG terminals in the NTS-elicited ChBF increases. Our results show that the NTS neurons projecting to choroidal SSN do mediate increase in ChBF, and thus suggest a role of baroresponsive NTS in the BP-dependent regulation of ChBF. PMID:27774055

  16. Nitric Oxide Signaling in Hypergravity-Induced Neuronal Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstein, Gay R.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this research project was to identify the neurons and circuits in the vestibular nuclei and nucleus prepositus hypoglossi that utilize nitric oxide (NO) for intercellular signaling during gravity-induced plasticity. This objective was pursued using histochemical and immunocytochemical approaches to localize NO-producing neurons and characterize the fine morphology of the cells in ground-based studies of normal rats, rats adapted to hypergravity, and rats adapted to hypergravity and then re-adapted to the 1G environment. NO-producing neurons were identified and studied using four methodologies: i) immunocytochemistry employing polyclonal antibodies directed against neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), to provide an indication of the capacity of a cell for NO production; ii) immunocytochemistry employing a monoclonal antibody directed against L-citrulline, to provide an indirect index of the enzyme's activity; iii) histochemistry based on the NADPH-diaphorase reaction, for fuI1 cytological visualization of neurons; and iv) double immunofluorescence to co-localize nNOS and L-citrulline in individual vestibular nuclei (VN) and neurons.

  17. Impaired functions of neural stem cells by abnormal nitric oxide-mediated signaling in an in vitro model of Niemann-Pick type C disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun-Jung Kim; Myung-Sin Lim; Soo-Kyung Kang; Yong-Soon Lee; Kyung-Sun Kang

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated in the promotion of neurodegeneration.However,little is known about the relationship between NO and the self-renewal or differentiation capacity of neural stem cells (NSCs) in neurodegenerative disease.In this study,we investigated the effect of NO on self-renewal of NSCs in an animal model for Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease.We found that NO production was significantly increased in NSCs from NPC1-deficient mice (NPC1-/-),which showed reduced NSC self-renewal.The number of nestin-positive cells and the size of neurospheres were both significantly decreased.The expression of NO synthase (NOS) was increased in neurospheres derived from the brain of NPC1-/- mice in comparison to wild-type neurospheres.NO-mediated activation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β(GSK3β) and caspase-3 was also observed in NSCs from NPC1-/- mice.The self-renewal ability of NSCs from NPC1-/- mice was restored by an NOS inhibitor,L-NAME,which resulted in the inhibition of GSK3β and caspase-3.In addition,the differentiation ability of NSCs was partially restored and the number of Fluoro-Jade C-positive degenerating neurons was reduced.These data suggest that overproduction of NO in NPC disease impaired the self-renewal of NSCs.Control of NO production may be key for the treatment of NPC disease.

  18. A Comparison of the Effects of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition on Cartilage Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevzat Selim Gokay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of selective inducible nitric oxide synthase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors on cartilage regeneration. The study involved 27 Wistar rats that were divided into five groups. On Day 1, both knees of 3 rats were resected and placed in a formalin solution as a control group. The remaining 24 rats were separated into 4 groups, and their right knees were surgically damaged. Depending on the groups, the rats were injected with intra-articular normal saline solution, neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (50 mg/kg, inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor amino-guanidine (30 mg/kg, or nitric oxide precursor L-arginine (200 mg/kg. After 21 days, the right and left knees of the rats were resected and placed in formalin solution. The samples were histopathologically examined by a blinded evaluator and scored on 8 parameters. Although selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibition exhibited significant (P=0.044 positive effects on cartilage regeneration following cartilage damage, it was determined that inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibition had no statistically significant effect on cartilage regeneration. It was observed that the nitric oxide synthase activation triggered advanced arthrosis symptoms, such as osteophyte formation. The fact that selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors were observed to have mitigating effects on the severity of the damage may, in the future, influence the development of new agents to be used in the treatment of cartilage disorders.

  19. TRPA1, NMDA receptors and nitric oxide mediate mechanical hyperalgesia induced by local injection of magnesium sulfate into the rat hind paw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srebro, Dragana P; Vučković, Sonja M; Savić Vujović, Katarina R; Prostran, Milica Š

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that while magnesium, an antagonist of the glutamate subtype of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, possesses analgesic properties, it can induce writhing in rodents. The aim of this study was to determine the effect and mechanism of action of local (intraplantar) administration of magnesium sulfate (MS) on the paw withdrawal threshold (PWT) to mechanical stimuli. The PWT was evaluated by the electronic von Frey test in male Wistar rats. Tested drugs were either co-administered intraplantarly (i.pl.) with MS or given into the contralateral paw to exclude systemic effects. MS at doses of 0.5, 1.5, 3 and 6.2 mg/paw (i.pl.) induced a statistically significant (as compared to 0.9% NaCl) and dose-dependent mechanical hyperalgesia. Only isotonic MS (250 mmol/l or 6.2% or 6.2 mg/paw) induced mechanical hyperalgesia that lasted at least six hours. Isotonic MS-induced mechanical hyperalgesia was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by co-injection of camphor, a non-selective TRPA1 antagonist (0.3, 1 and 2.5 μg/paw), MK-801, a NMDA receptor antagonist (0.001, 0.025 and 0.1 μg/paw), L-NAME, a non-selective nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor (20, 50 and 100 μg/paw), ARL 17477, a selective neuronal NOS inhibitor (5.7 and 17 μg/paw), SMT, a selective inducible NOS inhibitor (1 and 2.78 μg/paw), and methylene blue, a guanylate cyclase inhibitor (5, 20 and 125 μg/paw). Drugs injected into the contralateral hind paw did not produce significant effects. These results suggest that an i.pl. injection of MS produces local peripheral mechanical hyperalgesia via activation of peripheral TRPA1 and NMDA receptors and peripheral production of NO.

  20. Cerebral ischemia—induced neuronal apoptosis mediated by nitric oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NomuY

    2002-01-01

    To elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanism of cerebral ischemia-induced neuronal apoptosis mediated by nitric oxide (NO) in the brain,we investigated:(1)cell death in hippocampal CA1 neurons of rats after a rransient four vessel occlusion (4VO)/reperfusion and (2) apoptosis induced by NOC18(NO releaser) using SHSY5Y cells,a human neuroblastoma cell line.We found that 4VO caused expression of inducible type of NO synthase (iNOS) in glial cells and neuronal apoptosis in CA1 region of rats.Next we examined in vitro apoptotic effects of NOC18 on SHSY5Y cells and suggest that NO decrease mitochondrial membrane potential,release cytochrome C from mitochondria,activates caspase-3,degrade inhibitor of caspase-activated DNase(Icad),and activated DNase translocate into nucleus and induce DNA fragmentation.Thus we conclude that the excess amount of NO produced by glial iNOS at cerebral ischemia could be involved in neuronal apoptosis in CA1 region.Regarding NO action on neurons,we further obtained that NO propects neuronal apoptosis in PC12 cells perhaps by nitrosylation of caspase,subsequent reduction of proteolytic activity.Taken together,we suggest that NO seem to exert dual effects(toxic and beneficial) on neuronal apoptosis,the one (toxic);apoptosis-induction throuth the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potentials and cytochrome C release and the othe (beneficial);protection against apoptosis through the inhibition of caspase activity.

  1. Nitric oxide mediates the fungal elicitor-induced Taxol biosynthesis of Taxus chinensis suspension cells through the reactive oxygen species-dependent and-independent signal pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Maojun; DONG Jufang

    2006-01-01

    Nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species are two important signal molecules that play key roles in plant defense responses. Nitric oxide generation and oxidative burst and accumulation of reactive oxygen species are the early reactions of Taxus chinensis suspension cells to fungal elicitor prepared from the cell walls of Penicillium citrinum. In order to investigate the relationship and/or interactions of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species in the elicitor-induced Taxol biosynthesis of T. chinensis suspension cells, we treated the cells with nitric oxide specific scavenger 2-4-carboxyphenyl-4,4,5,5-tetra- methylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPITO), nitric oxide synthase inhibitor S,S(-1,3-phenylene-bis(1,2-eth- anediyl)-bis-isothiourea (PBITU), membrane NAD(P) H oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodonium (DPI), superoxide dismutases (SOD) and catalase. The results show that pretreatment of T. chinensis cells with cPITO and DPI inhibited not only the elicitor-induced nitric oxide biosynthesis and oxidative burst, but also the elicitor-induced Taxol production, suggesting that both nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species are involved in elicitor-induced Taxol biosynthesis. Furthermore, pretreatment of the cells with cPITO and PBITU suppressed the elicitor-induced oxidative burst, indicating that the oxidative burst might be dependent on NO. Application of nitric oxide via its donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) triggered Taxol biosynthesis of T. chinensis cells. The nitric oxide-induced Taxol production was suppressed by DPI, showing that the oxidative burst is involved in NO-triggered Taxol biosynthesis. However, nitric oxide and the fungal elicitor induced Taxol biosynthesis even though the accumulation of reactive oxygen species wass completely abolished in T. chinensis cells. Our data show that nitric oxide may mediate the elicitor-induced Taxol biosynthesis of T. chinensis suspension cells through both reactive oxygen species-dependent and -independent signal

  2. Nitric oxide promotes survival of cerebellar granule neurons cultured in vitro through the Akt pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Wang; Mei Li; Lihua Zhou

    2011-01-01

    In this study, cerebellar granule neurons were used to examine the role of nitric oxide on cell survival. The N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor antagonist, MK-801, and the soluble guanylate cyclase antagonist, 1H-[1, 2, 4]oxadiazolo-[4, 3-a] quinoxalin-1-one, decreased cell viability, induced caspase-3, and decreased phosphorylated-Akt levels, suggesting that blockade of nitric oxide production promotes apoptosis of differentiating cerebellar granule neurons. After administration of sodium nitroprusside, an endogenous nitric oxide donor, cell viability recovered,caspase-3 expression was decreased, and phosphorylated-Akt levels increased. This study provides direct evidence that nitric oxide can sustain the survival of developing cerebellar granule neurons in vitro through the nitric oxide-Akt pathway. Moreover, endogenous nitric oxide exerts these effects in a cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent manner while exogenous nitric oxide does so in a cyclic guanosine monophosphate-independent manner.

  3. Nitric oxide mediates aortic disease in mice deficient in the metalloprotease Adamts1 and in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oller, Jorge; Méndez-Barbero, Nerea; Ruiz, E Josue; Villahoz, Silvia; Renard, Marjolijn; Canelas, Lizet I; Briones, Ana M; Alberca, Rut; Lozano-Vidal, Noelia; Hurlé, María A; Milewicz, Dianna; Evangelista, Arturo; Salaices, Mercedes; Nistal, J Francisco; Jiménez-Borreguero, Luis Jesús; De Backer, Julie; Campanero, Miguel R; Redondo, Juan Miguel

    2017-02-01

    Heritable thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD), including Marfan syndrome (MFS), currently lack a cure, and causative mutations have been identified for only a fraction of affected families. Here we identify the metalloproteinase ADAMTS1 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) as therapeutic targets in individuals with TAAD. We show that Adamts1 is a major mediator of vascular homeostasis, given that genetic haploinsufficiency of Adamts1 in mice causes TAAD similar to MFS. Aortic nitric oxide and Nos2 levels were higher in Adamts1-deficient mice and in a mouse model of MFS (hereafter referred to as MFS mice), and Nos2 inactivation protected both types of mice from aortic pathology. Pharmacological inhibition of Nos2 rapidly reversed aortic dilation and medial degeneration in young Adamts1-deficient mice and in young or old MFS mice. Patients with MFS showed elevated NOS2 and decreased ADAMTS1 protein levels in the aorta. These findings uncover a possible causative role for the ADAMTS1-NOS2 axis in human TAAD and warrant evaluation of NOS2 inhibitors for therapy.

  4. Methanolic Extract of Clinacanthus nutans Exerts Antinociceptive Activity via the Opioid/Nitric Oxide-Mediated, but cGMP-Independent, Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hafiz Abdul Rahim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the present study were to determine the mechanisms of antinociceptive effect of methanol extract of Clinacanthus nutans (Acanthaceae leaves (MECN using various animal nociceptive models. The antinociceptive activity of orally administered 10% DMSO, 100 mg/kg acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, 5 mg/kg morphine, or MECN (100, 250, and 500 mg/kg was determined using the acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction (ACT, formalin-induced paw licking (FT, and hot plate tests (HPT. The role of opioid and nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO/cGMP systems was also investigated. The results showed that MECN produced a significant (p500 mg/kg or 227.7 mg/kg, respectively. This antinociceptive activity was fully antagonized by naloxone (a nonselective opioid antagonist but was partially reversed by L-arginine (L-arg; a nitric oxide [NO] precursor, Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME; an NO synthase inhibitor, or their combinations thereof. In contrast, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazole[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ; a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor enhanced the extract’s antinociception. UHPLC analysis revealed the presence of several flavonoid-based compounds with antinociceptive action. In conclusion, MECN exerted the peripherally and centrally mediated antinociceptive activity via the modulation of the opioid/NO-mediated, but cGMP-independent, systems.

  5. Methanolic Extract of Clinacanthus nutans Exerts Antinociceptive Activity via the Opioid/Nitric Oxide-Mediated, but cGMP-Independent, Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Rahim, Mohammad Hafiz; Zakaria, Zainul Amiruddin; Mohd Sani, Mohd Hijaz; Omar, Maizatul Hasyima; Yakob, Yusnita; Cheema, Manraj Singh; Ching, Siew Mooi; Ahmad, Zuraini; Abdul Kadir, Arifah

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to determine the mechanisms of antinociceptive effect of methanol extract of Clinacanthus nutans (Acanthaceae) leaves (MECN) using various animal nociceptive models. The antinociceptive activity of orally administered 10% DMSO, 100 mg/kg acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), 5 mg/kg morphine, or MECN (100, 250, and 500 mg/kg) was determined using the acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction (ACT), formalin-induced paw licking (FT), and hot plate tests (HPT). The role of opioid and nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO/cGMP) systems was also investigated. The results showed that MECN produced a significant (p 500 mg/kg or 227.7 mg/kg, respectively. This antinociceptive activity was fully antagonized by naloxone (a nonselective opioid antagonist) but was partially reversed by l-arginine (l-arg; a nitric oxide [NO] precursor), Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME; an NO synthase inhibitor), or their combinations thereof. In contrast, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazole[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ; a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor) enhanced the extract's antinociception. UHPLC analysis revealed the presence of several flavonoid-based compounds with antinociceptive action. In conclusion, MECN exerted the peripherally and centrally mediated antinociceptive activity via the modulation of the opioid/NO-mediated, but cGMP-independent, systems.

  6. Salt Stress Reduces Root Meristem Size by Nitric Oxide-Mediated Modulation of Auxin Accumulation and Signaling in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen; Li, Rong-Jun; Han, Tong-Tong; Cai, Wei; Fu, Zheng-Wei

    2015-01-01

    The development of the plant root system is highly plastic, which allows the plant to adapt to various environmental stresses. Salt stress inhibits root elongation by reducing the size of the root meristem. However, the mechanism underlying this process remains unclear. In this study, we explored whether and how auxin and nitric oxide (NO) are involved in salt-mediated inhibition of root meristem growth in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using physiological, pharmacological, and genetic approaches. We found that salt stress significantly reduced root meristem size by down-regulating the expression of PINFORMED (PIN) genes, thereby reducing auxin levels. In addition, salt stress promoted AUXIN RESISTANT3 (AXR3)/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID17 (IAA17) stabilization, which repressed auxin signaling during this process. Furthermore, salt stress stimulated NO accumulation, whereas blocking NO production with the inhibitor Nω-nitro-l-arginine-methylester compromised the salt-mediated reduction of root meristem size, PIN down-regulation, and stabilization of AXR3/IAA17, indicating that NO is involved in salt-mediated inhibition of root meristem growth. Taken together, these findings suggest that salt stress inhibits root meristem growth by repressing PIN expression (thereby reducing auxin levels) and stabilizing IAA17 (thereby repressing auxin signaling) via increasing NO levels. PMID:25818700

  7. High-affinity uptake of kynurenine and nitric oxide-mediated inhibition of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase in bone marrow-derived myeloid dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Toshiaki; Ogasawara, Nanako; Akimoto, Hidetoshi; Takikawa, Osamu; Hiramatsu, Rie; Kawabe, Tsutomu; Isobe, Ken-Ichi; Nagase, Fumihiko

    2008-02-15

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO)-initiated tryptophan metabolism along the kynurenine (Kyn) pathway in some dendritic cells (DC) such as plasmacytoid DC (pDC) regulates T-cell responses. It is unclear whether bone marrow-derived myeloid DC (BMDC) express functional IDO. The IDO expression was examined in CD11c(+)CD11b(+) BMDC differentiated from mouse bone marrow cells using GM-CSF. CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG) induced the expression of IDO protein with the production of nitric oxide (NO) in BMDC in cultures for 24h. In the enzyme assay using cellular extracts of BMDC, the IDO activity of BMDC stimulated with CpG was enhanced by the addition of a NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor, suggesting that IDO activity was suppressed by NO production. On the other hand, the concentration of Kyn in the culture supernatant of BMDC was not increased by stimulation with CpG. Exogenously added Kyn was taken up by BMDC independently of CpG stimulation and NO production, and the uptake of Kyn was inhibited by a transport system L-specific inhibitor or high concentrations of tryptophan. The uptake of tryptophan by BMDC was markedly lower than that of Kyn. In conclusion, IDO activity in BMDC is down-regulated by NO production, whereas BMDC strongly take up exogenous Kyn.

  8. Nitric oxide-mediated vascular function in sepsis using passive leg movement as a novel assessment: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Ashley D; Rossman, Matthew J; Witman, Melissa A; Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Groot, H Jonathan; Garten, Ryan S; Richardson, Russell S

    2016-05-01

    Post-cuff occlusion flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is a proposed indicator of nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and vascular function. FMD is reduced in patients with sepsis and may be a marker of end organ damage and mortality. However, FMD likely does not solely reflect NO-mediated vasodilation, is technically challenging, and often demonstrates poor reproducibility. In contrast, passive leg movement (PLM), a novel methodology to assess vascular function, yields a hyperemic response that is predominately NO-dependent, reproducible, and easily measured. This study evaluated PLM as an approach to assess NO-mediated vascular function in patients with sepsis. We hypothesized that PLM-induced hyperemia, quantified by the increase in leg blood flow (LBF), would be attenuated in sepsis. In a cross-sectional study, 17 subjects in severe sepsis or septic shock were compared with 16 matched healthy controls. Doppler ultrasound was used to assess brachial artery FMD and the hyperemic response to PLM in the femoral artery. FMD was attenuated in septic compared with control subjects (1.1 ± 1.7% vs. 6.8 ± 1.3%; values are means ± SD). In terms of PLM, baseline LBF (196 ± 33 ml/min vs. 328 ± 20 ml/min), peak change in LBF from baseline (133 ± 28 ml/min vs. 483 ± 86 ml/min), and the LBF area under the curve (16 ± 8.3 vs. 143 ± 33) were all significantly attenuated in septic subjects. Vascular function, as assessed by both FMD and PLM, is attenuated in septic subjects compared with controls. These data support the concept that NO bioavailability is attenuated in septic subjects, and PLM appears to be a novel and feasible approach to assess NO-mediated vascular function in sepsis.

  9. Boldo prevents UV light and nitric oxide-mediated plasmid DNA damage and reduces the expression of Hsp70 protein in melanoma cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Alessandra; Cardile, Venera; Caggia, Silvia; Gunther, Germán; Troncoso, Nicolas; Garbarino, Juan

    2011-09-01

    This study was designed to investigate the potential protective effect of a methanolic extract of Peumus boldus leaves on UV light and nitric oxide (NO)-mediated DNA damage. In addition, we investigated the growth inhibitory activity of this natural product against human melanoma cells (M14). Boldine, catechin, quercetin and rutin were identified using a HPLC method. The extract was incubated with plasmid DNA and, before irradiating the samples with UV-R, H(2) O(2) was added. For analysis of DNA single-strand breaks induced by NO, the experiments were performed by incubating the extract with Angeli's salt. In the study on M14 cell line, cell viability was measured using MTT assay. Release of lactate dehydrogenase, a marker of membrane breakdown, was also measured. For the detection of apoptosis, the evaluation of DNA fragmentation (COMET assay) and caspase-3 activity assay were employed. The expression of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) was detected by Western blot analysis. Generation of reactive oxygen species was measured by using a fluorescent probe. The extract (demonstrating the synergistic effect of the constituents boldine and flavonoids), showed a protective effect on plasmid DNA and selectively inhibited the growth of melanoma cells. But a novel finding was that apoptosis evoked by this natural product in M14 cells, appears to be mediated, at least in part, via the inhibition of Hsp70 expression, which may be correlated with a modulation of redox-sensitive mechanisms. These results confirm the promising biological properties of Peumus boldus and encourage in-vivo investigations into its potential anti-cancer activity. © 2011 The Authors. JPP © 2011 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  10. Nitric oxide mediates stretch-induced Ca2+ release via activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt pathway in smooth muscle.

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    Bin Wei

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hollow smooth muscle organs such as the bladder undergo significant changes in wall tension associated with filling and distension, with attendant changes in muscle tone. Our previous study indicated that stretch induces Ca(2+ release occurs in the form of Ca(2+ sparks and Ca(2+ waves in urinary bladder myocytes. While, the mechanism underlying stretch-induced Ca2+ release in smooth muscle is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined the transduction mechanism linking cell stretch to Ca(2+ release. The probability and frequency of Ca(2+ sparks induced by stretch were closely related to the extent of cell extension and the time that the stretch was maintained. Experiments in tissues and single myocytes indicated that mechanical stretch significantly increases the production of nitric oxide (NO and the amplitude and duration of muscle contraction. Stretch-induced Ca(2+ sparks and contractility increases were abrogated by the NO inhibitor L-NAME and were also absent in eNOS knockout mice. Furthermore, exposure of eNOS null mice to exogenously generated NO induced Ca(2+ sparks. The soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor ODQ did not inhibit SICR, but this process was effectively blocked by the PI3 kinase inhibitors LY494002 and wortmannin; the phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS were up-regulated by 204+/-28.6% and 258+/-36.8% by stretch, respectively. Moreover, stretch significantly increased the eNOS protein expression level. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taking together, these results suggest that stretch-induced Ca2+ release is NO dependent, resulting from the activation of PI3K/Akt pathway in smooth muscle.

  11. Mechanisms of nitric oxide-mediated inhibition of EMT in cancer: inhibition of the metastasis-inducer Snail and induction of the metastasis-suppressor RKIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baritaki, Stavroula; Huerta-Yepez, Sara; Sahakyan, Anna; Karagiannides, Iordanis; Bakirtzi, Kyriaki; Jazirehi, Ali; Bonavida, Benjamin

    2010-12-15

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) in cancer has been controversial and is based on the levels of NO and the responsiveness of the tumor type. It remains unclear whether NO can inhibit the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in cancer cells. EMT induction is mediated, in part, by the constitutive activation of the metastasis-inducer transcription factor, Snail and EMT can be inhibited by the metastasis-suppressor Raf-1 kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) and E-cadherin. Snail is transcriptionally regulated by NF-κB and in turn, Snail represses RKIP transcription. Hence, we hypothesized that high levels of NO, that inhibit NF-κB activity, may also inhibit Snail and induce RKIP and leading to inhibition of EMT. We show that treatment of human prostate metastatic cell lines with the NO donor, DETANONOate, inhibits EMT and reverses both the mesenchymal phenotype and the cell invasive properties. Further, treatment with DETANONOate inhibits Snail expression and DNA-binding activity in parallel with the upregulation of RKIP and E-cadherin protein levels. The pivotal roles of Snail inhibition and RKIP induction in DETANONOate-mediated inhibition of EMT were corroborated by both Snail silencing by siRNA and by ectopic expression of RKIP. The in vitro findings were validated in vivo in mice bearing PC-3 xenografts and treated with DETANONOate. The present findings show, for the first time, the novel role of high subtoxic concentrations of NO in the inhibition of EMT. Thus, NO donors may exert therapeutic activities in the reversal of EMT and metastasis.

  12. Glutathione plays an essential role in nitric oxide-mediated iron-deficiency signaling and iron-deficiency tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Varanavasiappan; Wang, Yi-Wen; Tsednee, Munkhtsetseg; Karunakaran, Krithika; Yeh, Kuo-Chen

    2015-11-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is a common agricultural problem that affects both the productivity and nutritional quality of plants. Thus, identifying the key factors involved in the tolerance of Fe deficiency is important. In the present study, the zir1 mutant, which is glutathione deficient, was found to be more sensitive to Fe deficiency than the wild type, and grew poorly in alkaline soil. Other glutathione-deficient mutants also showed various degrees of sensitivity to Fe-limited conditions. Interestingly, we found that the glutathione level was increased under Fe deficiency in the wild type. By contrast, blocking glutathione biosynthesis led to increased physiological sensitivity to Fe deficiency. On the other hand, overexpressing glutathione enhanced the tolerance to Fe deficiency. Under Fe-limited conditions, glutathione-deficient mutants, zir1, pad2 and cad2 accumulated lower levels of Fe than the wild type. The key genes involved in Fe uptake, including IRT1, FRO2 and FIT, are expressed at low levels in zir1; however, a split-root experiment suggested that the systemic signals that govern the expression of Fe uptake-related genes are still active in zir1. Furthermore, we found that zir1 had a lower accumulation of nitric oxide (NO) and NO reservoir S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). Although NO is a signaling molecule involved in the induction of Fe uptake-related genes during Fe deficiency, the NO-mediated induction of Fe-uptake genes is dependent on glutathione supply in the zir1 mutant. These results provide direct evidence that glutathione plays an essential role in Fe-deficiency tolerance and NO-mediated Fe-deficiency signaling in Arabidopsis.

  13. Vasoactive intestinal peptide and nitric oxide promote survival of adult rat myenteric neurons in culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandgren, Katarina; Lin, Zhong; Svenningsen, Åsa Fex;

    2003-01-01

    of VIP, NO donor, VIP antiserum, or NOS inhibitor. A marked loss of neurons was noted during culturing. VIP and NO significantly promoted neuronal survival. Corroborating this was the finding of an enhanced neuronal cell loss when cultures were grown in the presence of VIP antiserum or NOS inhibitor....... adaptation. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether VIP and nitric oxide (NO) influence survival of cultured, dissociated myenteric neurons. Neuronal survival was evaluated after 0, 4, and 8 days in culture. Influence of VIP and NO on neuronal survival was examined after culturing in the presence...

  14. Nitric oxide mediates the vagal protective effect on ventricular fibrillation via effects on action potential duration restitution in the rabbit heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brack, Kieran E; Patel, Vanlata H; Coote, John H; Ng, G André

    2007-09-01

    We have previously shown that direct vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) reduces the slope of action potential duration (APD) restitution while simultaneously protecting the heart against induction of ventricular fibrillation (VF) in the absence of any sympathetic activity or tone. In the current study we have examined the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the effect of VNS. Monophasic action potentials were recorded from a left ventricular epicardial site on innervated, isolated rabbit hearts (n = 7). Standard restitution, effective refractory period (ERP) and VF threshold (VFT) were measured at baseline and during VNS in the presence of the NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NA, 200 microm) and during reversing NO blockade with L-arginine (L-Arg, 1 mm). Data represent the mean +/- S.E.M. The restitution curve was shifted upwards and became less steep with VNS when compared to baseline. L-NA blocked the effect of VNS whereas L-Arg restored the effect of VNS. The maximum slope of restitution was reduced from 1.17 +/- 0.14 to 0.60 +/- 0.09 (50 +/- 5%, P < 0.0001) during control, from 0.98 +/- 0.14 to 0.93 +/- 0.12 (2 +/- 10%, P = NS) in the presence of L-NA and from 1.16 +/- 0.17 to 0.50 +/- 0.10 (41 +/- 9%, P = 0.003) with L-Arg plus L-NA. ERP was increased by VNS in control from 119 +/- 6 ms to 130 +/- 6 ms (10 +/- 5%, P = 0.045) and this increase was not affected by L-NA (120 +/- 4 to 133 +/- 4 ms, 11 +/- 3%, P = 0.0019) or L-Arg with L-NA (114 +/- 4 to 123 +/- 4 ms, 8 +/- 2%, P = 0.006). VFT was increased from 3.0 +/- 0.3 to 5.8 +/- 0.5 mA (98 +/- 12%, P = 0.0017) in control, 3.4 +/- 0.4 to 3.8 +/- 0.5 mA (13 +/- 12%, P = 0.6) during perfusion with L-NA and 2.5 +/- 0.4 to 6.0 +/- 0.7 mA (175 +/- 50%, P = 0.0017) during perfusion with L-Arg plus L-NA. Direct VNS increased VFT and flattened the slope of APD restitution curve in this isolated rabbit heart preparation with intact autonomic nerves. These effects were blocked using L-NA and reversed by replenishing

  15. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase-deficient mice have impaired Renin release but normal blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sällström, Johan; Carlström, Mattias; Jensen, Boye L

    2008-01-01

    BackgroundNitric oxide deficiency is involved in the development of hypertension, but the mechanisms are currently unclear. This study was conducted to further elucidate the role of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in blood pressure regulation and renin release in relation to different sodiu......-116; doi:10.1038/ajh.2007.16American Journal of Hypertension (2008) 21 111-116; doi:10.1038/ajh.2007.16....

  16. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity in ependymal cells during early postnatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soygüder, Zafer; Karadağ, Hüseyin; Nazli, Mümtaz

    2004-03-01

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) immunoreactivity was observed in ependymal cell layer of the central canal of spinal cord of neonatal rats (2-20 days old). Neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity was present in postnatal day 2 and this immunoreactivity gradually disappeared by postnatal day 16. The progressive decrease in nNOS staining with the increasing postnatal age may suggest that nNOS staining paralleled the maturation of the central canal and may also suggest that nNOS activity plays a role in the development of the ependymal cells.

  17. Distribution of nitric oxide synthase positive neurons in the substantia nigra of rats with liver cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Nitrogen monoxide plays an important role in the physiological activity and pathological process of striatum in substantia nigra, and the nitric oxide synthase in substantia nigra may have characteristic changes after liver cirrhosis.OBJECTIYE: To observe the distribution and forms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) positive neurons and fibers in substantia nigra of rats with liver cirrhosis.DESIGN: A comparative observational experiment.SETTINGS: Beijing Friendship Hospital; Capital Medical University.MATERIALS: Twenty 4-month-old male Wistar rats (120 - 150 g) of clean grade, were maintained in a 12-hour light/dark cycle at a constant temperature with free access to standard diet and water. Cryostat microtome (LEICA, Germany); All the reagents were purchased from Sigma Company.METHODS: The experiment was carried out in the Department of Anatomy (key laboratory of Beijing city),Capital Medical University from July 2000 to March 2002. The rats were randomly divided into normal group (n=10) and liver fibrosis group (n=10). Rats in the liver fibrosis group were subcutaneously injected with 60% CCl4 oil at a dose of 5 mL/kg for the first time, and 3 mL/kg for the next 14 times, twice a week,totally 15 times. Liver fibrosis of grades 5 - 6 was taken as successful models. Whereas rats in the normal group were not given any treatment. Four months after CCl4 treatment, all the rats were anesthetized to remove brain, and frontal frozen serial sections were prepared. The expressions of nitric oxide synthase positive neurons in substantia nigra of rats were observed under inverted microscope. The number and gray scale of cell body of nitric oxide synthase positive neurons in substantia nigra were detected with NADPH-diaphorase staining.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ①Number and gray scale of cell body of nitric oxide synthase positive neurons in substantia nigra; ②Expressions of nitric oxide synthase positive neurons in substantia nigra.RESULTS: All the 20 rats were

  18. Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase-Dependent Amelioration of Diastolic Dysfunction in Rats with Chronic Renocardiac Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongartz, Lennart G.; Soni, Siddarth; Cramer, MJ; Steendijk, Paul; Gaillard, Carlo A. J. M.; Verhaar, Marianne C.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; van Veen, AAB; Joles, Jaap A.; Braam, Branko

    2015-01-01

    We have recently described the chronic renocardiac syndrome (CRCS) in rats with renal failure, cardiac dysfunction and low nitric oxide (NO) availability by combining subtotal nephrectomy and transient low-dose NO synthase (NOS) inhibition. Cardiac gene expression of the neuronal isoform of NOS

  19. Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase-Dependent Amelioration of Diastolic Dysfunction in Rats with Chronic Renocardiac Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongartz, Lennart G.; Soni, Siddarth; Cramer, Maarten-Jan; Steendijk, Paul; Gaillard, Carlo A. J. M.; Verhaar, Marianne C.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; van Veen, Toon A.; Joles, Jaap A.; Braam, Branko

    We have recently described the chronic renocardiac syndrome (CRCS) in rats with renal failure, cardiac dysfunction and low nitric oxide (NO) availability by combining subtotal nephrectomy and transient low-dose NO synthase (NOS) inhibition. Cardiac gene expression of the neuronal isoform of NOS

  20. The relationships between neurons containing dopamine and nitric oxide synthase in the ventral tegmental area.

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    S Wójcik

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Ventral tegmental area (VTA is a heterogeneous group of dopaminergic cells which contains interfascicular (IF, parabrachial (PBP and rostral linear (RLi nuclei. Neurons of this area are involved in the regulation of motor and motivational aspects of behavior and reveal high neuronal plasticity. Among many various neurotransmitters and neuromodulators, nitric oxide (NO is localized in this region. In the present study, we investigated morphology and distribution of nitric oxide synthase (NOS-positive neurons in VTA and their colocalization with dopaminergic neurons. The study was performed on six adult Wistar rats. After perfusional fixation, the brains were cut, immunostained for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH and NOS and studied by confocal laser microscopy. In each of the three studied nuclei of VTA we investigated three different neuronal populations. Numerous TH-immunoreactive (TH-ir and NOS-immunoreactive (NOS-ir neurons are present in the studied region. Among them, a considerable number showed coexistence of both neurotransmitters. The populations of TH-ir and NOS-ir neurons interact with each other as manifested by the presence of NOS-ir endings on TH-ir neurons and vice versa. Taking the above into account, it may be suspected that NO is involved in the modulation of dopaminergic transmission.

  1. Role of neuronal nitric oxide synthase and inducible nitric oxide synthase in intestinal injury in neonatal rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui LU; Bing Zhu; Xin-Dong Xue

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the dynamic change and role of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in neonatal rat with intestinal injury and to define whether necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is associated with the levels of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the mucosa of the affected intestine tissue.METHODS: Wistar rats less than 24 h in age received an intraperitoneal injection with 5 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Ileum tissues were collected at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 h following LPS challenge for histological evaluation of NEC and for measurements of nNOS and iNOS. The correlation between the degree of intestinal injury and levels of NOS was determined.RESULTS: The LPS-injected pups showed a significant increase in injury scores versus the control. The expression of nNOS protein and mRNA was diminished after LPS injection. There was a negative significant correlation between the nNOS protein and the grade of median intestinal injury within 24 h. The expression of iNOS protein and mRNA was significantly increased in the peak of intestinal injury.CONCLUSION: nNOS and iNOS play different roles in LPS-induced intestinal injury. Caution should be exerted concerning potential therapeutic uses of NOS inhibitors in NEC.

  2. Nitric oxide regulates neuronal activity via calcium-activated potassium channels.

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    Lei Ray Zhong

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is an unconventional membrane-permeable messenger molecule that has been shown to play various roles in the nervous system. How NO modulates ion channels to affect neuronal functions is not well understood. In gastropods, NO has been implicated in regulating the feeding motor program. The buccal motoneuron, B19, of the freshwater pond snail Helisoma trivolvis is active during the hyper-retraction phase of the feeding motor program and is located in the vicinity of NO-producing neurons in the buccal ganglion. Here, we asked whether B19 neurons might serve as direct targets of NO signaling. Previous work established NO as a key regulator of growth cone motility and neuronal excitability in another buccal neuron involved in feeding, the B5 neuron. This raised the question whether NO might modulate the electrical activity and neuronal excitability of B19 neurons as well, and if so whether NO acted on the same or a different set of ion channels in both neurons. To study specific responses of NO on B19 neurons and to eliminate indirect effects contributed by other cells, the majority of experiments were performed on single cultured B19 neurons. Addition of NO donors caused a prolonged depolarization of the membrane potential and an increase in neuronal excitability. The effects of NO could mainly be attributed to the inhibition of two types of calcium-activated potassium channels, apamin-sensitive and iberiotoxin-sensitive potassium channels. NO was found to also cause a depolarization in B19 neurons in situ, but only after NO synthase activity in buccal ganglia had been blocked. The results suggest that NO acts as a critical modulator of neuronal excitability in B19 neurons, and that calcium-activated potassium channels may serve as a common target of NO in neurons.

  3. Neuronal Nitric-Oxide Synthase Deficiency Impairs the Long-Term Memory of Olfactory Fear Learning and Increases Odor Generalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavesi, Eloisa; Heldt, Scott A.; Fletcher, Max L.

    2013-01-01

    Experience-induced changes associated with odor learning are mediated by a number of signaling molecules, including nitric oxide (NO), which is predominantly synthesized by neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in the brain. In the current study, we investigated the role of nNOS in the acquisition and retention of conditioned olfactory fear. Mice…

  4. Nitric oxide enhances inhibitory synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability in guinea-pig submucous plexus

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    Joel C Bornstein

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Varicosities immunoreactive for nitric oxide synthase (NOS make synaptic connections with submucosal neurons in the guinea-pig small intestine, but the effects of nitric oxide (NO on these neurons are unknown. We used intracellular recording to characterise effects of sodium nitroprusside (SNP, NO donor and nitro-L-arginine (NOLA, NOS inhibitor, on inhibitory synaptic potentials (IPSPs, slow excitatory synaptic potentials (EPSPs and action potential firing in submucosal neurons of guinea-pig ileum in vitro. Recordings were made from neurons with the characteristic IPSPs of non-cholinergic secretomotor neurons. SNP (100 μM markedly enhanced IPSPs evoked by single stimuli applied to intermodal strands and IPSPs evoked by trains of 2 – 10 pulses (30 Hz. Both noradrenergic (idazoxan-sensitive and non-adrenergic (idazoxan-insensitive IPSPs were affected. SNP enhanced hyperpolarizations evoked by locally applied noradrenaline or somatostatin. SNP did not affect slow EPSPs evoked by single stimuli, but depressed slow EPSPs evoked by stimulus trains. NOLA (100 μM depressed IPSPs evoked by 1-3 stimulus pulses and enhanced slow EPSPs evoked by trains of 2 – 3 stimuli (30 Hz. SNP also increased the number of action potentials and the duration of firing evoked by prolonged (500 or 1000 ms depolarizing current pulses, but NOLA had no consistent effect on action potential firing. We conclude that neurally released NO acts post-synaptically to enhance IPSPs and depress slow EPSPs, but may enhance the intrinsic excitability of these neurons. Thus, NOS neurons may locally regulate several secretomotor pathways ending on common neurons.

  5. Biphasic coupling of neuronal nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation to the NMDA receptor regulates AMPA receptor trafficking and neuronal cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rameau, Gerald A; Tukey, David S; Garcin-Hosfield, Elsa D; Titcombe, Roseann F; Misra, Charu; Khatri, Latika; Getzoff, Elizabeth D; Ziff, Edward B

    2007-03-28

    Postsynaptic nitric oxide (NO) production affects synaptic plasticity and neuronal cell death. Ca2+ fluxes through the NMDA receptor (NMDAR) stimulate the production of NO by neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). However, the mechanisms by which nNOS activity is regulated are poorly understood. We evaluated the effect of neuronal stimulation with glutamate on the phosphorylation of nNOS. We show that, in cortical neurons, a low glutamate concentration (30 microM) induces rapid and transient NMDAR-dependent phosphorylation of S1412 by Akt, followed by sustained phosphorylation of S847 by CaMKII (calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinase II). We demonstrate that phosphorylation of S1412 by Akt is necessary for activation of nNOS by the NMDAR. nNOS mutagenesis confirms that these phosphorylations respectively activate and inhibit nNOS and, thus, transiently activate NO production. A constitutively active (S1412D), but not a constitutively repressed (S847D) nNOS mutant elevated surface glutamate receptor 2 levels, demonstrating that these phosphorylations can control AMPA receptor trafficking via NO. Notably, an excitotoxic stimulus (150 microM glutamate) induced S1412, but not S847 phosphorylation, leading to deregulated nNOS activation. S1412D did not kill neurons; however, it enhanced the excitotoxicity of a concomitant glutamate stimulus. We propose a swinging domain model for the regulation of nNOS: S1412 phosphorylation facilitates electron flow within the reductase module of nNOS, increasing nNOS sensitivity to Ca2+-calmodulin. These findings suggest a critical role for a kinetically complex and novel series of regulatory nNOS phosphorylations induced by the NMDA receptor for the in vivo control of nNOS.

  6. Expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the hippocampal formation in affective disorders

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    R.M.W. Oliveira

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal output is increased in affective disorders and is mediated by increased glutamatergic input via N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor and moderated by antidepressant treatment. Activation of NMDA receptors by glutamate evokes the release of nitric oxide (NO by the activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS. The human hippocampus contains a high density of NMDA receptors and nNOS-expressing neurons suggesting the existence of an NMDA-NO transduction pathway which can be involved in the pathogenesis of affective disorders. We tested the hypothesis that nNOS expression is increased in the human hippocampus from affectively ill patients. Immunocytochemistry was used to demonstrate nNOS-expressing neurons in sections obtained from the Stanley Consortium postmortem brain collection from patients with major depression (MD, N = 15, bipolar disorder (BD, N = 15, and schizophrenia (N = 15 and from controls (N = 15. nNOS-immunoreactive (nNOS-IR and Nissl-stained neurons were counted in entorhinal cortex, hippocampal CA1, CA2, CA3, and CA4 subfields, and subiculum. The numbers of Nissl-stained neurons were very similar in different diagnostic groups and correlated significantly with the number of nNOS-IR neurons. Both the MD and the BD groups had greater number of nNOS-IR neurons/400 µm² in CA1 (mean ± SEM: MD = 9.2 ± 0.6 and BD = 8.4 ± 0.6 and subiculum (BD = 6.7 ± 0.4 when compared to control group (6.6 ± 0.5 and this was significantly more marked in samples from the right hemisphere. These changes were specific to affective disorders since no changes were seen in the schizophrenic group (6.7 ± 0.8. The results support the current view of the NMDA-NO pathway as a target for the pathophysiology of affective disorders and antidepressant drug development.

  7. Enhancement of dendritic branching in cultured hippocampal neurons by 17beta-estradiol is mediated by nitric oxide.

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    Audesirk, T; Cabell, L; Kern, M; Audesirk, G

    2003-06-01

    Both 17beta-estradiol (E2) and nitric oxide (NO) are important in neuronal development, learning and memory, and age-related memory changes. There is growing evidence that a number of estrogen receptor-mediated effects of estradiol utilize nitric oxide as an intermediary. The role of estradiol in hippocampal neuronal differentiation and function has particular implications for learning and memory. Low levels of estradiol (10nM) significantly increase dendritic branching in cultured embryonic rat hippocampal neurons (158% of control). This study investigates the hypothesis that the estrogen-stimulated increase in dendritic branching is mediated by nitric oxide. We found that nitric oxide donors also produce significantly increased dendritic branching S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP: 119%; 2,2'-(hydroxynitrosohydrazino)bis-ethanamine (NOC-18): 128% of control). We then determined that the increases in dendritic branching stimulated by estradiol or by a nitric oxide donor were both blocked by an inhibitor of guanylyl cyclase. Dendritic branching was also stimulated by a cell permeable analog of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (dibutyryl-cGMP: 173% of control). Estradiol-stimulated dendritic branching was reversed by the nitric oxide scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl imidazoline-1-oxyl 3-oxide (carboxy-PTIO). This study provides evidence that estradiol influences the development of embryonic hippocampal neurons in culture by increasing the production of nitric oxide or by increasing the sensitivity of the neurons to nitric oxide. Nitric oxide in turn stimulates dendritic branching via activation of guanylyl cyclase.

  8. Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase Induction in the Antitumorigenic and Neurotoxic Effects of 2-Methoxyestradiol

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    Magdalena Gorska

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: 2-Methoxyestradiol, one of the natural 17β-estradiol derivatives, is a novel, potent anticancer agent currently being evaluated in advanced phases of clinical trials. The main goal of the study was to investigate the anticancer activity of 2-methoxy-estradiol towards osteosarcoma cells and its possible neurodegenerative effects. We used an experimental model of neurotoxicity and anticancer activity of the physiological agent, 2-methoxyestradiol. Thus, we used highly metastatic osteosarcoma 143B and mouse immortalized hippocampal HT22 cell lines. The cells were treated with pharmacological (1 μM, 10 μM concentrations of 2-methoxyestradiol. Experimental: Neuronal nitric oxide synthase and 3-nitrotyrosine protein levels were determined by western blotting. Cell viability and induction of cell death were measured by MTT and PI/Annexin V staining and a DNA fragmentation ELISA kit, respectively. Intracellular levels of nitric oxide were determined by flow cytometry. Results: Here we demonstrated that the signaling pathways of neurodegenerative diseases and cancer may overlap. We presented evidence that 2-methoxyestradiol, in contrast to 17β-estradiol, specifically affects neuronal nitric oxide synthase and augments 3-nitrotyrosine level leading to osteosarcoma and immortalized hippocampal cell death. Conclusions: We report the dual facets of 2-methoxyestradiol, that causes cancer cell death, but on the other hand may play a key role as a neurotoxin.

  9. L-arginine regulates neuronal nitric oxide synthase production of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide.

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    Tsai, Pei; Weaver, John; Cao, Guan Liang; Pou, Sovitj; Roman, Linda J; Starkov, Anatoly A; Rosen, Gerald M

    2005-03-15

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (H(4)B) in the absence of L-arginine has been shown to be an important factor in promoting the direct formation of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) at the expense of superoxide (O(2)(*-)) by neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS1) [Rosen GM, Tsai P, Weaver J, Porasuphatana S, Roman LJ, Starkov AA, et al. Role of tetrahydrobiopterin in the regulation of neuronal nitric-oxide synthase-generated superoxide. J Biol Chem 2002;277:40275-80]. Based on these findings, it is hypothesized that L-arginine also shifts the equilibrium between O(2)(*-) and H(2)O(2). Experiments were designed to test this theory. As the concentration of L-arginine and N(omega)-hydroxyl-L-arginine increases, the rate of NADPH consumption for H(4)B-bound NOS1 decreased resulting in lower rates of both O(2)(*-) and H(2)O(2) generation, while increasing the rate of nitric oxide (*NO) production. At saturating concentrations of L-arginine or N(omega)-hydroxyl-L-arginine (50microM), NOS1 still produced O(2)(*-) and H(2)O(2). Both L-arginine and N(omega)-hydroxyl-L-arginine have greater impact on the rate of generation of O(2)(*-) than on H(2)O(2).

  10. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase-rescue of dystrophin/utrophin double knockout mice does not require nNOS localization to the cell membrane.

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    Michelle Wehling-Henricks

    Full Text Available Survival of dystrophin/utrophin double-knockout (dko mice was increased by muscle-specific expression of a neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS transgene. Dko mice expressing the transgene (nNOS TG+/dko experienced delayed onset of mortality and increased life-span. The nNOS TG+/dko mice demonstrated a significant decrease in the concentration of CD163+, M2c macrophages that can express arginase and promote fibrosis. The decrease in M2c macrophages was associated with a significant reduction in fibrosis of heart, diaphragm and hindlimb muscles of nNOS TG+/dko mice. The nNOS transgene had no effect on the concentration of cytolytic, CD68+, M1 macrophages. Accordingly, we did not observe any change in the extent of muscle fiber lysis in the nNOS TG+/dko mice. These findings show that nNOS/NO (nitric oxide-mediated decreases in M2c macrophages lead to a reduction in the muscle fibrosis that is associated with increased mortality in mice lacking dystrophin and utrophin. Interestingly, the dramatic and beneficial effects of the nNOS transgene were not attributable to localization of nNOS protein at the cell membrane. We did not detect any nNOS protein at the sarcolemma in nNOS TG+/dko muscles. This important observation shows that sarcolemmal localization is not necessary for nNOS to have beneficial effects in dystrophic tissue and the presence of nNOS in the cytosol of dystrophic muscle fibers can ameliorate the pathology and most importantly, significantly increase life-span.

  11. RNA diversity has profound effects on the translation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase

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    Wang, Yang; Newton, Derek C.; Robb, G. Brett; Kau, Cheng-Lin; Miller, Tricia L.; Cheung, Anthony H.; Hall,Anne V.; VanDamme, Suzannah; Wilcox, Josiah N.; Marsden, Philip A.

    1999-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of the structure of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS; EC 1.14.13.39) mRNA species revealed NOS1 to be the most structurally diverse human gene described to date in terms of promoter usage. Nine unique exon 1 variants are variously used for transcript initiation in diverse tissues, and each is expressed from a unique 5′-flanking region. The dependence on unique genomic regions to control transcription initiation in a cell-specific fashion burdens the transcripts wi...

  12. Neurovascular coupling in hippocampus is mediated via diffusion by neuronal-derived nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, Cátia F; Santos, Ricardo M; Barbosa, Rui M; Cadenas, Enrique; Radi, Rafael; Laranjinha, João

    2014-08-01

    The coupling between neuronal activity and cerebral blood flow (CBF) is essential for normal brain function. The mechanisms behind this neurovascular coupling process remain elusive, mainly because of difficulties in probing dynamically the functional and coordinated interaction between neurons and the vasculature in vivo. Direct and simultaneous measurements of nitric oxide (NO) dynamics and CBF changes in hippocampus in vivo support the notion that during glutamatergic activation nNOS-derived NO induces a time-, space-, and amplitude-coupled increase in the local CBF, later followed by a transient increase in local O2 tension. These events are dependent on the activation of the NMDA-glutamate receptor and nNOS, without a significant contribution of endothelial-derived NO or astrocyte-neuron signaling pathways. Upon diffusion of NO from active neurons, the vascular response encompasses the activation of soluble guanylate cyclase. Hence, in the hippocampus, neurovascular coupling is mediated by nNOS-derived NO via a diffusional connection between active glutamatergic neurons and blood vessels.

  13. Synthesis of N-(Methoxycarbonylthienylmethylthioureas and Evaluation of Their Interaction with Inducible and Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase

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    Michael D. Threadgill

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Two isomeric N-(methoxycarbonylthienylmethylthioureas were synthesised by a sequence of radical bromination of methylthiophenecarboxylic esters, substitution with trifluoroacetamide anion, deprotection, formation of the corresponding isothiocyanates and addition of ammonia. The interaction of these new thiophene-based thioureas with inducible and neuronal nitric oxide synthase was evaluauted. These novel thienylmethylthioureas stimulated the activity of inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS.

  14. Effects of nerve growth factor on neuronal nitric oxide production after spinal cord injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤长华; 曹晓建; 王道新

    2002-01-01

    To explore the protective effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) on injured spinal cord. Methods: The spinal cord injury (SCI) model of Wistar rats was established by a 10 g×2.5 cm impact force on the T8 spinal cord. NGF (60 μg/20 μl) was given to the rats of the treatment group immediately and at 2, 4, 8, 12, 24 hours after SCI. The level of neuronal constitutive nitric oxide synthase (ncNOS) and the expression of ncNOS mRNA in the spinal cord were detected by the immunohistochemistry assay and in situ hybridization method. Results: Abnormal expression of ncNOS was detected in the spinal ventral horn motorneuron in injured rats. The levels of ncNOS protein in the NGF group were significantly lower than those in the normal saline group (P<0.05 ). The ncNOS mRNA expression was found in the spinal ventral horn motorneuron in injured rats and the expression in the NGF group was significantly decreased compared with that in the normal saline group (P<0.01). Conclusions: NGF can protect the injured tissue of the spinal cord by prohibiting abnormal expression of nitric oxide synthase and the neurotoxicity of nitric oxide.

  15. Association Analysis for Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase Gene Polymorphism with Plasma Nitrite/Nitrate Concentration in Schizophrenia

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    Đorđević Vladimir V.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP of many genes, including the gene for neuronal nitric oxide syn-thase (NOS1, were found significantly associated with schizo-phrenia. According to our previously published results of increased plasma nitric oxide concentration in patients with schizophrenia, we hypothesized that the NOS1 gene polymorphism might be a cause of increased nitric oxide production in patients with schizophrenia and tested the interdependence between plasma nitrite/nitrate concentrations and SNP (a CT transition located in exon 29 of the human NOS1 gene.

  16. Synthesis, pharmacological study and modeling of 7-methoxyindazole and related substituted indazoles as neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collot, Valérie; Sopkova-de Oliveira Santos, Jana; Schumann-Bard, Pascale; Colloc'h, Nathalie; Mackenzie, Eric T; Rault, Sylvain

    2003-04-01

    The synthesis, pharmacological evaluation and modelisation of 7-methoxyindazole (7-MI) and related alkoxyindazoles as novel inhibitors of neuronal nitric oxide synthase are presented. 7-MI remains the most active compound of this series in an in vitro enzymatic assay of neuronal nitric oxide synthase activity. Modeling studies of the interaction of 7-substituted indazole derivatives complexed with nNOS and the relationship with their respective biological activities suggest that a bulky substitution on position-7 is responsible for a steric hindrance effect which does not allow these compounds to interact with nNOS in the same way as 7-NI and 7-MI.

  17. Nitric oxide signalling and neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the heart under stress [version 1; referees: 2 approved

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    Yin Hua Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is an imperative regulator of the cardiovascular system and is a critical mechanism in preventing the pathogenesis and progression of the diseased heart. The scenario of bioavailable NO in the myocardium is complex: 1 NO is derived from both endogenous NO synthases (endothelial, neuronal, and/or inducible NOSs [eNOS, nNOS, and/or iNOS] and exogenous sources (entero-salivary NO pathway and the amount of NO from exogenous sources varies significantly; 2 NOSs are located at discrete compartments of cardiac myocytes and are regulated by distinctive mechanisms under stress; 3 NO regulates diverse target proteins through different modes of post-transcriptional modification (soluble guanylate cyclase [sGC]/cyclic guanosine monophosphate [cGMP]/protein kinase G [PKG]-dependent phosphorylation, S-nitrosylation, and transnitrosylation; 4 the downstream effectors of NO are multidimensional and vary from ion channels in the plasma membrane to signalling proteins and enzymes in the mitochondria, cytosol, nucleus, and myofilament; 5 NOS produces several radicals in addition to NO (e.g. superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, peroxynitrite, and different NO-related derivatives and triggers redox-dependent responses. However, nNOS inhibits cardiac oxidases to reduce the sources of oxidative stress in diseased hearts. Recent consensus indicates the importance of nNOS protein in cardiac protection under pathological stress. In addition, a dietary regime with high nitrate intake from fruit and vegetables together with unsaturated fatty acids is strongly associated with reduced cardiovascular events. Collectively, NO-dependent mechanisms in healthy and diseased hearts are better understood and shed light on the therapeutic prospects for NO and NOSs in clinical applications for fatal human heart diseases.

  18. Influence of functional variant of neuronal nitric oxide synthase on impulsive behaviors in humans.

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    Reif, Andreas; Jacob, Christian P; Rujescu, Dan; Herterich, Sabine; Lang, Sebastian; Gutknecht, Lise; Baehne, Christina G; Strobel, Alexander; Freitag, Christine M; Giegling, Ina; Romanos, Marcel; Hartmann, Annette; Rösler, Michael; Renner, Tobias J; Fallgatter, Andreas J; Retz, Wolfgang; Ehlis, Ann-Christine; Lesch, Klaus-Peter

    2009-01-01

    Human personality is characterized by substantial heritability but few functional gene variants have been identified. Although rodent data suggest that the neuronal isoform of nitric oxide synthase (NOS-I) modifies diverse behaviors including aggression, this has not been translated to human studies. To investigate the functionality of an NOS1 promoter repeat length variation (NOS1 Ex1f variable number tandem repeat [VNTR]) and to test whether it is associated with phenotypes relevant to impulsivity. Molecular biological studies assessed the cellular consequences of NOS1 Ex1f VNTR; association studies were conducted to investigate the impact of this genetic variant on impulsivity; imaging genetics was applied to determine whether the polymorphism is functional on a neurobiological level. Three psychiatric university clinics in Germany. More than 3200 subjects were included in the association study: 1954 controls, 403 patients with personality disorder, 383 patients with adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), 151 with familial ADHD, 189 suicide attempters, and 182 criminal offenders. For the association studies, the major outcome criteria were phenotypes relevant to impulsivity, namely, the dimensional phenotype conscientiousness and the categorical phenotypes adult ADHD, aggression, and cluster B personality disorder. A novel functional promoter polymorphism in NOS1 was associated with traits related to impulsivity, including hyperactive and aggressive behaviors. Specifically, the short repeat variant was more frequent in adult ADHD, cluster B personality disorder, and autoaggressive and heteroaggressive behavior. This short variant came along with decreased transcriptional activity of the NOS1 exon 1f promoter and alterations in the neuronal transcriptome including RGS4 and GRIN1. On a systems level, it was associated with hypoactivation of the anterior cingulate cortex, which is involved in the processing of emotion and reward in behavioral

  19. Structural organization of the human neuronal nitric oxide synthase gene (NOS1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, A V; Antoniou, H; Wang, Y; Cheung, A H; Arbus, A M; Olson, S L; Lu, W C; Kau, C L; Marsden, P A

    1994-12-30

    Neuronal nitric oxide (NO) synthase, localized to human chromosome 12, uniquely participates in diverse biologic processes; neurotransmission, the regulation of body fluid homeostasis, neuroendocrine physiology, control of smooth muscle motility, sexual function, and myocyte/myoblast biology, among others. Restriction enzyme mapping, subcloning, and DNA sequence analysis of bacteriophage- and yeast artificial chromosome-derived human genomic DNA indicated that the mRNA for neuronal NO synthase is dispersed over a minimum of 160 kilobases of human genomic DNA. Analysis of intron-exon splice junctions predicted that the open reading frame is encoded by 28 exons, with translation initiation and termination in exon 2 and exon 29, respectively. Determination of transcription initiation sites in brain poly(A) RNA with primer extension analysis and RNase protection revealed a major start site 28 nucleotides downstream from a TATA box. Sequence inspection of 5'-flanking regions revealed potential cis-acting DNA elements: AP-2, TEF-1/MCBF, CREB/ATF/c-Fos, NRF-1, Ets, NF-1, and NF-kappa B-like sequences. Diversity appears to represent a major theme apparent upon analysis of human neuronal NO synthase mRNA transcripts. A microsatellite of the dinucleotide variety was detected within the 3'-untranslated region of exon 29. Multiple alleles were evident in normal individuals indicating the existence of allelic mRNA sequence variation. Characterization of variant human neuronal NO synthase cDNAs indicated the existence of casette exon 9/10 and exon 10 deletions as examples of structural mRNA diversity due to alternative splicing. The latter deletion of a 175-nucleotide exon introduces a frame-shift and premature stop codon indicating the potential existence of a novel NH2 terminus protein. In summary, analysis of the human neuronal NO synthase locus reveals a complex genomic organization and mRNA diversity that is both allelic and structural.

  20. Neuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthase upregulation in the rat medial prefrontal cortex following acute restraint stress: A dataset

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    Jereme G. Spiers

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This data article provides additional evidence on gene expression changes in the neuronal and inducible isoforms of nitric oxide synthase in the medial prefrontal cortex following acute stress. Male Wistar rats aged 6–8 weeks were exposed to control or restraint stress conditions for up to four hours in the dark cycle after which the brain was removed and the medial prefrontal cortex isolated by cryodissection. Following RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis, gene expression data were measured using quantitative real-time PCR. The mRNA levels of the neuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthase isoforms, and the inhibitory subunit of NF-κB, I kappa B alpha were determined using the ΔΔCT method relative to control animals. This data article presents complementary results related to the research article entitled ‘Acute restraint stress induces specific changes in nitric oxide production and inflammatory markers in the rat hippocampus and striatum’ [1].

  1. Neuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthase upregulation in the rat medial prefrontal cortex following acute restraint stress: A dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiers, Jereme G; Chen, Hsiao-Jou Cortina; Lee, Johnny K; Sernia, Conrad; Lavidis, Nickolas A

    2016-03-01

    This data article provides additional evidence on gene expression changes in the neuronal and inducible isoforms of nitric oxide synthase in the medial prefrontal cortex following acute stress. Male Wistar rats aged 6-8 weeks were exposed to control or restraint stress conditions for up to four hours in the dark cycle after which the brain was removed and the medial prefrontal cortex isolated by cryodissection. Following RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis, gene expression data were measured using quantitative real-time PCR. The mRNA levels of the neuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthase isoforms, and the inhibitory subunit of NF-κB, I kappa B alpha were determined using the ΔΔCT method relative to control animals. This data article presents complementary results related to the research article entitled 'Acute restraint stress induces specific changes in nitric oxide production and inflammatory markers in the rat hippocampus and striatum' [1].

  2. RNA diversity has profound effects on the translation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Newton, D C; Robb, G B; Kau, C L; Miller, T L; Cheung, A H; Hall, A V; VanDamme, S; Wilcox, J N; Marsden, P A

    1999-10-12

    A comprehensive analysis of the structure of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS; EC 1.14.13.39) mRNA species revealed NOS1 to be the most structurally diverse human gene described to date in terms of promoter usage. Nine unique exon 1 variants are variously used for transcript initiation in diverse tissues, and each is expressed from a unique 5'-flanking region. The dependence on unique genomic regions to control transcription initiation in a cell-specific fashion burdens the transcripts with complex 5'-mRNA leader sequences. Elaborate splicing patterns that involve alternatively spliced leader exons and exon skipping have been superimposed on this diversity. Highly structured nNOS mRNA 5'-untranslated regions, which have profound effects on translation both in vitro and in cells, contain cis RNA elements that modulate translational efficiency in response to changes in cellular phenotype.

  3. Elevated neuronal nitric oxide synthase expression during ageing and mitochondrial energy production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Philip Y; Yin, Fei; Hamilton, Ryan T; Boveris, Alberto; Cadenas, Enrique

    2009-05-01

    This study evaluated the effect of ageing on brain mitochondrial function mediated through protein post-translational modifications. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase increased with age and this led to a discreet pattern of nitration of mitochondrial proteins. LC/MS/MS analyses identified the nitrated mitochondrial proteins as succinyl-CoA-transferase and F1-ATPase; the latter was nitrated at Tyr269, suggesting deficient ADP binding to the active site. Activities of succinyl-CoA-transferase, F1-ATPase and cytochrome oxidase decreased with age. The decreased activity of the latter cannot be ascribed to protein modifications and is most likely due to a decreased expression and assembly of complex IV. Mitochondrial protein post-translational modifications were associated with a moderately impaired mitochondrial function, as indicated by the decreased respiratory control ratios as a function of age and by the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c to the cytosol, thus supporting the amplification of apoptotic cascades.

  4. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase contributes to pentylenetetrazole-kindling-induced hippocampal neurogenesis.

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    Zhu, Xinjian; Dong, Jingde; Shen, Kai; Bai, Ying; Chao, Jie; Yao, Honghong

    2016-03-01

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), the major nitric oxide synthase isoform in the mammalian brain, is implicated in the pathophysiology of several neurological conditions, including epilepsy. Neurogenesis in hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) persists throughout life in the adult brain. Alterations in this process occur in many neurological diseases, including epilepsy. Few studies, however, have addressed the role of nNOS in hippocampal DG neurogenesis in epileptic brain. The present study, therefore, investigated the role of nNOS in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-kindling-induced neurogenesis in hippocampal DG. Our results showed that nNOS expression and enzymatic activity were significantly increased in the hippocampus of PTZ-kindled mice. Meanwhile, these PTZ-kindled mice were characterized by significant enhancement of new born cells proliferation and survival in hippocampal DG, and these survived cells are co-labeled with NeuN and GFAP. Selective inhibition of nNOS by 7-NI, however, suppressed PTZ-kindling-induced hippocampal DG new born cells proliferation and survival, suggesting that nNOS contributes to PTZ-kindling-induced hippocampal neurogenesis.

  5. Distinct influence of N-terminal elements on neuronal nitric-oxide synthase structure and catalysis.

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    Panda, Koustubh; Adak, Subrata; Aulak, Kulwant S; Santolini, Jerome; McDonald, John F; Stuehr, Dennis J

    2003-09-26

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a signal molecule produced in animals by three different NO synthases. Of these, only NOS I (neuronal nitric-oxide synthase; nNOS) is expressed as catalytically active N-terminally truncated forms that are missing either an N-terminal leader sequence required for protein-protein interactions or are missing the leader sequence plus three core structural motifs that in other NOS are required for dimer assembly and catalysis. To understand how the N-terminal elements impact nNOS structure-function, we generated, purified, and extensively characterized variants that were missing the N-terminal leader sequence (Delta296nNOS) or missing the leader sequence plus the three core motifs (Delta349nNOS). Eliminating the leader sequence had no impact on nNOS structure or catalysis. In contrast, additional removal of the core elements weakened but did not destroy the dimer interaction, slowed ferric heme reduction and reactivity of a hemedioxy intermediate, and caused a 10-fold poorer affinity toward substrate l-arginine. This created an nNOS variant with slower and less coupled NO synthesis that is predisposed to generate reactive oxygen species along with NO. Our findings help justify the existence of nNOS N-terminal splice variants and identify specific catalytic changes that create functional differences among them.

  6. Compromised proteasome degradation elevates neuronal nitric oxide synthase levels and induces apoptotic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Philip Y; Cadenas, Enrique

    2008-10-15

    The significance of impairment of proteasome activity in PC12 cells was examined in connection with nitrative/nitrosative stress and apoptotic cell death. Treatment of differentiated PC12 cells with MG132, a proteasome inhibitor, elicited a dose- and time-dependent increase in neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) protein levels, decreased cell viability, and increased cytotoxicity. Viability and cytotoxicity were ameliorated by L-NAME (a broad NOS inhibitor). Nitric oxide/peroxynitrite formation was increased upon treatment of PC12 cells with MG132 and decreased upon treatment with the combination of MG132 and 7-NI (a specific inhibitor of nNOS). The decreases in cell viability appeared to be effected by an activation of JNK and its effect on mitochondrial Bcl-x(L) phosphorylation. These effects are strengthened by the activation of caspase-9 along with increased caspase-3 activity upon treatment of PC12 cells with MG132. These results suggest that impairment of proteasome activity and consequent increases in nNOS levels lead to a nitrative stress that involves the coordinated response of JNK cytosolic signaling and mitochondrion-driven apoptotic pathways.

  7. Nitric oxide activates leak K+ currents in the presumed cholinergic neuron of basal forebrain.

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    Kang, Youngnam; Dempo, Yoshie; Ohashi, Atsuko; Saito, Mitsuru; Toyoda, Hiroki; Sato, Hajime; Koshino, Hisashi; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Hirai, Toshihiro

    2007-12-01

    Learning and memory are critically dependent on basal forebrain cholinergic (BFC) neuron excitability, which is modulated profoundly by leak K(+) channels. Many neuromodulators closing leak K(+) channels have been reported, whereas their endogenous opener remained unknown. We here demonstrate that nitric oxide (NO) can be the endogenous opener of leak K(+) channels in the presumed BFC neurons. Bath application of 1 mM S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), an NO donor, induced a long-lasting hyperpolarization, which was often interrupted by a transient depolarization. Soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitors prevented SNAP from inducing hyperpolarization but allowed SNAP to cause depolarization, whereas bath application of 0.2 mM 8-bromoguanosine-3',5'-cyclomonophosphate (8-Br-cGMP) induced a similar long-lasting hyperpolarization alone. These observations indicate that the SNAP-induced hyperpolarization and depolarization are mediated by the cGMP-dependent and -independent processes, respectively. When examined with the ramp command pulse applied at -70 mV under the voltage-clamp condition, 8-Br-cGMP application induced the outward current that reversed at K(+) equilibrium potential (E(K)) and displayed Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz rectification, indicating the involvement of voltage-independent K(+) current. By contrast, SNAP application in the presumed BFC neurons either dialyzed with the GTP-free internal solution or in the presence of 10 muM Rp-8-bromo-beta-phenyl-1,N(2)-ethenoguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate sodium salt, a protein kinase G (PKG) inhibitor, induced the inward current that reversed at potentials much more negative than E(K) and close to the reversal potential of Na(+)-K(+) pump current. These observations strongly suggest that NO activates leak K(+) channels through cGMP-PKG-dependent pathway to markedly decrease the excitability in BFC neurons, while NO simultaneously causes depolarization by the inhibition of Na(+)-K(+) pump through ATP

  8. Modulating nitric oxide levels in dorsal root ganglion neurons of rat with low-level laser therapy

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    Zheng, Li-qin; Wang, Yu-hua; He, Yi-peng; Zhou, Jie; Yang, Hong-qin; Zhang, Yan-ding; Xie, Shu-sen

    2015-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) have an important role in pain signaling transmission in animal models. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is known to have an analgesic effect, but the mechanism is unclear. The aim of the study is to investigate the influence of LLLT on NO release and NOS synthesis in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, in order to find whether LLLI can ameliorate pain through modulating NO production at the cellular level. The results show that in stress conditions, the laser irradiation at 658 nm can modulate NO production in DRG neurons with soma diameter of about 20 μm in a short time after illumination, and affect NOS synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. It is demonstrated that LLLT might treat pain by altering NO release directly and indirectly in DRG neurons.

  9. Hyperlipidemia affects neuronal nitric oxide synthase expression in brains of focal cerebral ischemia rat model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianji Pei; Liqiang Liu; Jinping Pang; Xiaohong Tian

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hyperlipidemia, a risk factor for ischemic cerebrovascular disease, may mediate production of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) to induce increased nitric oxide levels, resulting in brain neuronal injury. OBJECTIVE: To investigate effects of hyperlipidemia on brain nNOS expression, and to verify changes in infarct volume and pathology during reperfusion, as well as neuronal injury following ischemia/reperfusion in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Complete, randomized grouping experiment was performed at the Laboratory of Physiology, Shanxi Medical University from March 2005 to March 2006. MATERIALS: A total of 144 eight-week-old, male, Wistar rats, weighing 160-180 g, were selected. A rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion was established by suture method after 4 weeks of formulated diet. Nitric oxide kit and rabbit anti-rat nNOS kit were respectively purchased from Nanjing Jiancheng Bioengineering Institute, China and Wuhan Boster Biological Technology, Ltd., China. METHODS: The rats were equally and randomly divided into high-fat diet and a normal diet groups. Rats in the high-fat diet group were fed a high-fat diet, consisting of 10% egg yolk powder, 5% pork fat, and 0.5% pig bile salt combined with standard chow to create hyperlipidemia. Rats in the normal diet group were fed a standard rat chow. A total of 72 rats in both groups were randomly divided into 6 subgroups: sham-operated, 4-hour ischemia, 4-hour ischemia/2-hour reperfusion, 4-hour ischemia/4-hour reperfusion, 4-hour ischemia/6-hour reperfusion, and 4-hour ischemia/12-hour reperfusion, with 12 rats in each subgroup. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: nNOS expression was measured by immunohistochemistry, and pathomorphology changes were detected by hematoxylin-eosin staining. Infarct volume and nitric oxide levels were respectively measured using 2, 3, 5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: In the ischemic region, pathology

  10. Odorant-dependent generation of nitric oxide in Mammalian olfactory sensory neurons.

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    Daniela Brunert

    Full Text Available The gaseous signalling molecule nitric oxide (NO is involved in various physiological processes including regulation of blood pressure, immunocytotoxicity and neurotransmission. In the mammalian olfactory bulb (OB, NO plays a role in the formation of olfactory memory evoked by pheromones as well as conventional odorants. While NO generated by the neuronal isoform of NO synthase (nNOS regulates neurogenesis in the olfactory epithelium, NO has not been implicated in olfactory signal transduction. We now show the expression and function of the endothelial isoform of NO synthase (eNOS in mature olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs of adult mice. Using NO-sensitive micro electrodes, we show that stimulation liberates NO from isolated wild-type OSNs, but not from OSNs of eNOS deficient mice. Integrated electrophysiological recordings (electro-olfactograms or EOGs from the olfactory epithelium of these mice show that NO plays a significant role in modulating adaptation. Evidence for the presence of eNOS in mature mammalian OSNs and its involvement in odorant adaptation implicates NO as an important new element involved in olfactory signal transduction. As a diffusible messenger, NO could also have additional functions related to cross adaptation, regeneration, and maintenance of MOE homeostasis.

  11. Odorant-dependent generation of nitric oxide in Mammalian olfactory sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunert, Daniela; Kurtenbach, Stefan; Isik, Sonnur; Benecke, Heike; Gisselmann, Günter; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Hatt, Hanns; Wetzel, Christian H

    2009-01-01

    The gaseous signalling molecule nitric oxide (NO) is involved in various physiological processes including regulation of blood pressure, immunocytotoxicity and neurotransmission. In the mammalian olfactory bulb (OB), NO plays a role in the formation of olfactory memory evoked by pheromones as well as conventional odorants. While NO generated by the neuronal isoform of NO synthase (nNOS) regulates neurogenesis in the olfactory epithelium, NO has not been implicated in olfactory signal transduction. We now show the expression and function of the endothelial isoform of NO synthase (eNOS) in mature olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) of adult mice. Using NO-sensitive micro electrodes, we show that stimulation liberates NO from isolated wild-type OSNs, but not from OSNs of eNOS deficient mice. Integrated electrophysiological recordings (electro-olfactograms or EOGs) from the olfactory epithelium of these mice show that NO plays a significant role in modulating adaptation. Evidence for the presence of eNOS in mature mammalian OSNs and its involvement in odorant adaptation implicates NO as an important new element involved in olfactory signal transduction. As a diffusible messenger, NO could also have additional functions related to cross adaptation, regeneration, and maintenance of MOE homeostasis.

  12. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase is an endogenous negative regulator of glucocorticoid receptor in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meng-ying; Zhu, Li-Juan; Zhou, Qi-Gang

    2013-07-01

    The hippocampus is rich in both glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). But the relationship between the two molecules under physiological states remains unrevealed. Here, we report that nNOS knockout mice display increased GR expression in the hippocampus. Both systemic administration of 7-Nitroindazole (7-NI), a selective nNOS activity inhibitor, and selective infusion of 7-NI into the hippocampus resulted in an increase in GR expression in the hippocampus. Moreover, KCl exposure, which can induce overexpression of nNOS, resulted in a decrease in GR protein level in cultured hippocampal neurons. Moreover, blockade of nNOS activity in the hippocampus leads to decreased corticosterone (CORT, glucocorticoids in rodents) concentration in the plasma and reduced corticotrophin-releasing factor expression in the hypothalamus. The results indicate that nNOS is an endogenous inhibitor of GR in the hippocampus and that nNOS in the hippocampus may participate in the modulation of Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal axis activity via GR.

  13. Protein kinase D interacts with neuronal nitric oxide synthase and phosphorylates the activatory residue serine 1412.

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    Lucía Sánchez-Ruiloba

    Full Text Available Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase (nNOS is the biosynthetic enzyme responsible for nitric oxide (·NO production in muscles and in the nervous system. This constitutive enzyme, unlike its endothelial and inducible counterparts, presents an N-terminal PDZ domain known to display a preference for PDZ-binding motifs bearing acidic residues at -2 position. In a previous work, we discovered that the C-terminal end of two members of protein kinase D family (PKD1 and PKD2 constitutes a PDZ-ligand. PKD1 has been shown to regulate multiple cellular processes and, when activated, becomes autophosphorylated at Ser 916, a residue located at -2 position of its PDZ-binding motif. Since nNOS and PKD are spatially enriched in postsynaptic densities and dendrites, the main objective of our study was to determine whether PKD1 activation could result in a direct interaction with nNOS through their respective PDZ-ligand and PDZ domain, and to analyze the functional consequences of this interaction. Herein we demonstrate that PKD1 associates with nNOS in neurons and in transfected cells, and that kinase activation enhances PKD1-nNOS co-immunoprecipitation and subcellular colocalization. However, transfection of mammalian cells with PKD1 mutants and yeast two hybrid assays showed that the association of these two enzymes does not depend on PKD1 PDZ-ligand but its pleckstrin homology domain. Furthermore, this domain was able to pull-down nNOS from brain extracts and bind to purified nNOS, indicating that it mediates a direct PKD1-nNOS interaction. In addition, using mass spectrometry we demonstrate that PKD1 specifically phosphorylates nNOS in the activatory residue Ser 1412, and that this phosphorylation increases nNOS activity and ·NO production in living cells. In conclusion, these novel findings reveal a crucial role of PKD1 in the regulation of nNOS activation and synthesis of ·NO, a mediator involved in physiological neuronal signaling or neurotoxicity under

  14. Protein Kinase D Interacts with Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase and Phosphorylates the Activatory Residue Serine1412

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    García-Guerra, Lucía; Pose-Utrilla, Julia; Rodríguez-Crespo, Ignacio; Iglesias, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase (nNOS) is the biosynthetic enzyme responsible for nitric oxide (·NO) production in muscles and in the nervous system. This constitutive enzyme, unlike its endothelial and inducible counterparts, presents an N-terminal PDZ domain known to display a preference for PDZ-binding motifs bearing acidic residues at -2 position. In a previous work, we discovered that the C-terminal end of two members of protein kinase D family (PKD1 and PKD2) constitutes a PDZ-ligand. PKD1 has been shown to regulate multiple cellular processes and, when activated, becomes autophosphorylated at Ser916, a residue located at -2 position of its PDZ-binding motif. Since nNOS and PKD are spatially enriched in postsynaptic densities and dendrites, the main objective of our study was to determine whether PKD1 activation could result in a direct interaction with nNOS through their respective PDZ-ligand and PDZ domain, and to analyze the functional consequences of this interaction. Herein we demonstrate that PKD1 associates with nNOS in neurons and in transfected cells, and that kinase activation enhances PKD1-nNOS co-immunoprecipitation and subcellular colocalization. However, transfection of mammalian cells with PKD1 mutants and yeast two hybrid assays showed that the association of these two enzymes does not depend on PKD1 PDZ-ligand but its pleckstrin homology domain. Furthermore, this domain was able to pull-down nNOS from brain extracts and bind to purified nNOS, indicating that it mediates a direct PKD1-nNOS interaction. In addition, using mass spectrometry we demonstrate that PKD1 specifically phosphorylates nNOS in the activatory residue Ser1412, and that this phosphorylation increases nNOS activity and ·NO production in living cells. In conclusion, these novel findings reveal a crucial role of PKD1 in the regulation of nNOS activation and synthesis of ·NO, a mediator involved in physiological neuronal signaling or neurotoxicity under pathological conditions

  15. Nitric oxide mediates the fungal elicitor-induced puerarin biosynthesis in Pueraria thomsonii Benth. suspension cells through a salicylic acid (SA)-dependent and a jasmonic acid (JA)-dependent signal pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Maojun; DONG Jufang; ZHU Muyuan

    2006-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has emerged as a key signaling molecule in plant secondary metabolite biosynthesis recently. In order to investigate the molecular basis of NO signaling in elicitor-induced secondary metabolite biosynthesis of plant cells, we determined the contents of NO, salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), and puerarin in Pueraria thomsonii Benth. suspension cells treated with the elicitors prepared from cell walls of Penicillium citrinum. The results showed that the fungal elicitor induced NO burst, SA accumulation and puerarin production of P. thomsonii Benth. cells. The elicitor-induced SA accumulation and puerarin production was suppressed by nitric oxide specific scavenger cPITO, indicating that NO was essential for elicitor-induced SA and puerarin biosynthesis in P. thomsonii Benth. cells. In transgenic NahG P. thomsonii Benth. cells, the fungal elicitor also induced puerarin biosynthesis, NO burst, and JA accumulation, though the SA biosynthesis was impaired. The elicitor-induced JA accumulation in transgenic cells was blocked by cPITO, which suggested that JA acted downstream of NO and its biosynthesis was controlled by NO. External application of NO via its donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) enhanced puerarin biosynthesis in transgenic NahG P. thomsonii Benth. cells, and the NO-triggered puerarin biosynthesis was suppressed by JA inhibitors IBU and NDGA, which indicated that NO induced puerarin production through a JA-dependent signal pathway in the transgenic cells. Exogenous application of SA suppressed the elicitor-induced JA biosynthesis and reversed the inhibition of IBU and NDGA on elicitor-induced puerarin accumulation in transgenic cells, which indicated that SA inhibited JA biosynthesis in the cells and that SA might be used as a substitute for JA to mediate the elicitor- and NO-induced puerarin biosynthesis. It was, therefore, concluded that NO might mediate the elicitor-induced puerarin biosynthesis through SA- and JA-dependent signal

  16. Acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity and protein nitration in neuronal nitric-oxide synthase knockout mice.

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    Agarwal, Rakhee; Hennings, Leah; Rafferty, Tonya M; Letzig, Lynda G; McCullough, Sandra; James, Laura P; MacMillan-Crow, Lee Ann; Hinson, Jack A

    2012-01-01

    In overdose acetaminophen (APAP) is hepatotoxic. Toxicity occurs by metabolism to N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine, which depletes GSH and covalently binds to proteins followed by protein nitration. Nitration can occur via the strong oxidant and nitrating agent peroxynitrite, formed from superoxide and nitric oxide (NO). In hepatocyte suspensions we reported that an inhibitor of neuronal nitric-oxide synthase (nNOS; NOS1), which has been reported to be in mitochondria, inhibited toxicity and protein nitration. We recently showed that manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD; SOD2) was nitrated and inactivated in APAP-treated mice. To understand the role of nNOS in APAP toxicity and MnSOD nitration, nNOS knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice were administered APAP (300 mg/kg). In WT mice serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) significantly increased at 6 and 8 h, and serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) significantly increased at 4, 6 and 8 h; however, in KO mice neither ALT nor AST significantly increased until 8 h. There were no significant differences in hepatic GSH depletion, APAP protein binding, hydroxynonenal covalent binding, or histopathological assessment of toxicity. The activity of hepatic MnSOD was significantly lower at 1 to 2 h in WT mice and subsequently increased at 8 h. MnSOD activity was not altered at 0 to 6 h in KO mice but was significantly decreased at 8 h. There were significant increases in MnSOD nitration at 1 to 8 h in WT mice and 6 to 8 h in KO mice. Significantly more nitration occurred at 1 to 6 h in WT than in KO mice. MnSOD was the only observed nitrated protein after APAP treatment. These data indicate a role for nNOS with inactivation of MnSOD and ALT release during APAP toxicity.

  17. Nitric oxide mediates root K+/Na+ balance in a mangrove plant, Kandelia obovata, by enhancing the expression of AKT1-type K+ channel and Na+/H+ antiporter under high salinity.

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    Juan Chen

    Full Text Available It is well known that nitric oxide (NO enhances salt tolerance of glycophytes. However, the effect of NO on modulating ionic balance in halophytes is not very clear. This study focuses on the role of NO in mediating K(+/Na(+ balance in a mangrove species, Kandelia obovata Sheue, Liu and Yong. We first analyzed the effects of sodium nitroprusside (SNP, an NO donor, on ion content and ion flux in the roots of K. obovata under high salinity. The results showed that 100 μM SNP significantly increased K(+ content and Na(+ efflux, but decreased Na(+ content and K(+ efflux. These effects of NO were reversed by specific NO synthesis inhibitor and scavenger, which confirmed the role of NO in retaining K(+ and reducing Na(+ in K. obovata roots. Using western-blot analysis, we found that NO increased the protein expression of plasma membrane (PM H(+-ATPase and vacuolar Na(+/H(+ antiporter, which were crucial proteins for ionic balance. To further clarify the molecular mechanism of NO-modulated K(+/Na(+ balance, partial cDNA fragments of inward-rectifying K(+ channel, PM Na(+/H(+ antiporter, PM H(+-ATPase, vacuolar Na(+/H(+ antiporter and vacuolar H(+-ATPase subunit c were isolated. Results of quantitative real-time PCR showed that NO increased the relative expression levels of these genes, while this increase was blocked by NO synthesis inhibitors and scavenger. Above results indicate that NO greatly contribute to K(+/Na(+ balance in high salinity-treated K. obovata roots, by activating AKT1-type K(+ channel and Na(+/H(+ antiporter, which are the critical components in K(+/Na(+ transport system.

  18. Role for neuronal nitric-oxide synthase in cannabinoid-induced neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Hee; Won, Seok Joon; Mao, Xiao Ou; Ledent, Catherine; Jin, Kunlin; Greenberg, David A

    2006-10-01

    Cannabinoids, acting through the CB1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R), protect the brain against ischemia and related forms of injury. This may involve inhibiting the neurotoxicity of endogenous excitatory amino acids and downstream effectors, such as nitric oxide (NO). Cannabinoids also stimulate neurogenesis in the adult brain through activation of CB1R. Because NO has been implicated in neurogenesis, we investigated whether cannabinoid-induced neurogenesis, like cannabinoid neuroprotection, might be mediated through alterations in NO production. Accordingly, we measured neurogenesis in dentate gyrus (DG) and subventricular zone (SVZ) of CB1R-knockout (KO) and wild-type mice, some of whom were treated with the cannabinoid agonist R(+)-Win 55212-2 [(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-[(morpholinyl)methyl]pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazin-yl]-(1-naphthalenyl)methanone] or the NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (7-NI). NOS activity was increased by approximately 25%, whereas bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling of newborn cells in DG and SVZ was reduced by approximately 50% in CB1R-KO compared with wild-type mice. 7-NI increased BrdU labeling in both DG and SVZ and to a greater extent in CB1R-KO than in wild-type mice. In addition, R(+)-Win 55212-2 and 7-NI enhanced BrdU incorporation into neuron-enriched cerebral cortical cultures to a similar maximal extent and in nonadditive fashion, consistent with a shared mechanism of action. Double-label confocal microscopy showed coexpression of BrdU and the neuronal lineage marker doublecortin (Dcx) in DG and SVZ of untreated and 7-NI-treated CB1R-KO mice, and 7-NI increased the number of Dcx- and BrdU/Dcx-immunoreactive cells in SVZ and DG. Thus, cannabinoids appear to stimulate adult neurogenesis by opposing the antineurogenic effect of NO.

  19. Fluorescent indication that nitric oxide formation in NTS neurons is modulated by glutamate and GABA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajolla, Gisela P; Accorsi-Mendonça, Daniela; Rodrigues, Gerson J; Bendhack, Lusiane M; Machado, Benedito H; Lunardi, Claure N

    2009-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) in NTS plays an important role in regulating autonomic function to the cardiovascular system. Using the fluorescent dye DAF-2 DA, we evaluated the NO concentration in NTS. Brainstem slices of rats were loaded with DAF-2 DA, washed, fixed in paraformaldehyde and examined under fluorescent light. In different experimental groups, NTS slices were pre-incubated with 1 mM l-NAME (a non-selective NOS inhibitor), 1 mM d-NAME (an inactive enantiomere of l-NAME), 1 mM kynurenic acid (a non-selective ionotropic receptors antagonist) or 20 microM bicuculline (a selective GABAA receptors antagonist) before and during DAF-2 DA loading. Images were acquired using a confocal microscope and the intensity of fluorescence was quantified in three antero-posterior NTS regions. In addition, slices previously loaded with DAF-2 DA were incubated with NeuN or GFAP antibody. A semi-quantitative analysis of the fluorescence intensity showed that the basal NO concentration was similar in all antero-posterior aspects of the NTS (rostral intermediate, 15.5 +/- 0.8 AU; caudal intermediate, 13.2 +/- 1.4 AU; caudal commissural, 13.8 +/- 1.4 AU, n = 10). In addition, the inhibition of NOS and the antagonism of glutamatergic receptors decreased the NO fluorescence in the NTS. On the other hand, d-NAME did not affect the NO fluorescence and the antagonism of GABAA receptors increased the NO fluorescence in the NTS. It is important to note that the fluorescence for NO was detected mainly in neurons. These data show that the fluorescence observed after NTS loading with DAF-2 DA is a result of NO present in the NTS and support the concept that NTS neurons have basal NO production which is modulated by l-glutamate and GABA.

  20. Expression of Neuronal and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Isoforms and Generation of Protein Nitrotyrosine in Rat Brain Following Hypobaric Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    compilation report: ADPO11059 thru ADP011100 UNCLASSIFIED 38- 1 Expression of Neuronal and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Isoforms and Generation of Protein...cloned, both from chondrocytes (Charles et al., 1993) and hepatocytes (Geller et al., 1993). The neurotoxic effects of NO is mediated by formation of...injection at multiple sites on the back. Four boosts of 1 /6 of the conjugate emulsified in Freund’s incomplete adjuvant were given by subcutaneous injection

  1. [Characteristics of distribution of nitric oxide synthase containing neurons in the medullary cardiovascular centers of dogs and rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datsenko, V V; Pavliuchenko, V B; Moĭbenko, O O; Piliavs'kyĭ, O I; Kostiukov, O I; Maĭs'kyĭ, V O

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize species-related differences in the distribution of nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-containing neurons in the medullary structures of dogs and rats involved in the regulation of the sympathetic or parasympathetic drives. Two main results have been obtained, namely: (i) the average number of NOS-containing neurons in the dorsomedial and ventrolateral medulla per section in dog was larger than that in rat, while the density of the positive cells in the both regions in dog was less than that in rat. (ii) Within the dorsal motor nucleus of vagus a lot of NOS-containing cells (preganglionic vagal neurons) were observed only in dog. Differences in the distribution of NO-generating neurons in the medullary cardiovascular centers, and heterogeneity in the basal level of NO release may contribute to the peculiarities of the hemodynamic responses induced by NOS inhibitors in these species.

  2. Effect of Magnesium on Nitric Oxide Synthase of Neurons in Cortex during Early Period of Cerebral Ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Xiu; MEI Yuanwu; TONG E'tang

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the effect of magnesium on nitric oxide synthase (NOS) of neurons in cortex during early cerebral ischemic period, a rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) was established. The results showed that the NOS activity of neurons in cortex was increased significantly at 15 min after MCAO, reached its peak at 30 min after MCAO and returned to normal levels at 60 min after MCAO. The NOS activity of neurons in the magnesium-treated group was decreased significantly as compared with that in the ischemic group at 15 min and 30min after MCAO respectively. The results suggested that magnesium could inhibit the elevated NOS activity of neurons in cortex induced by cerebral ischemia.

  3. Late postnatal shifts of parvalbumin and nitric oxide synthase expression within the GABAergic and glutamatergic phenotypes of inferior colliculus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Hisataka; Konno, Kotaro; Watanabe, Masahiko; Jinno, Shozo

    2017-03-01

    The inferior colliculus (IC) is partitioned into three subdivisions: the dorsal and lateral cortices (DC and LC) and the central nucleus (ICC), and serves as an integration center of auditory information. Recent studies indicate that a certain population of IC neurons may represent the non-GABAergic phenotype, while they express well-established cortical/hippocampal GABAergic neuron markers. In this study we used the optical disector to investigate the phenotype of IC neurons expressing parvalbumin (PV) and/or nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in C57BL/6J mice during the late postnatal period. Four major types of IC neurons were defined by the presence (+) or absence (-) of PV, NOS, and glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67): PV(+) /NOS(-) /GAD67(+) , PV(+) /NOS(+) /GAD67(+) , PV(+) /NOS(-) /GAD67(-) , and PV(-) /NOS(+) /GAD67(-) . Fluorescent in situ hybridization for vesicular glutamate transporter 2 mRNA indicated that almost all GAD67(-) IC neurons represented the glutamatergic phenotype. The numerical densities (NDs) of total GAD67(+) IC neurons remained unchanged in all subdivisions. The NDs of PV(+) /NOS(-) /GAD67(+) neurons and PV(-) /NOS(+) /GAD67(-) neurons were reduced with age in the ICC, while they remained unchanged in the DC and LC. By contrast, the NDs of PV(+) /NOS(+) /GAD67(+) neurons and PV(+) /NOS(-) /GAD67(-) neurons were increased with age in the ICC, although there were no changes in the DC and LC. The cell body size of GAD67(+) IC neurons did not vary according to the expression of PV with or without NOS. The present findings indicate that the expression of PV and NOS may shift with age within the GABAergic and glutamatergic phenotypes of IC neurons during the late postnatal period. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:868-884, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Activation of hypothalamic neuronal nitric oxide synthase in lithium-induced diabetes insipidus rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anai, H; Ueta, Y; Serino, R; Nomura, M; Nakashima, Y; Yamashita, H

    2001-02-01

    The expression of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) gene in the paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic nuclei (SON) in rats with lithium (Li)-induced polyuria was examined by using in situ hybridization histochemistry. The state of the thyroid axis in these rats was also examined by in situ hybridization histochemistry for thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) mRNAs and radioimmunoassay for circulating thyroid hormones. Adult male Wistar rats consuming a diet that contained LiCl (60 mmol/kg) for 4 weeks developed remarkable polyuria. The urine in the Li-treated rats was hypotonic and had a large volume and low ionic concentration. The nNOS mRNA in the PVN and SON was significantly increased in the Li-treated rats in comparison with that in control. The increased levels of the nNOS mRNA in the PVN and SON were confirmed by NADPH-diaphorase histochemical staining. There were no differences of TRH mRNA in the PVN, TSH mRNA in the anterior pituitary and plasma concentrations of free T3 and free T4 between Li-treated rats and control rats. These results suggest that Li-induced diabetes insipidus may activate nNOS in the PVN and SON without change of the thyroid axis.

  5. Effects of nitric oxide on magnocellular neurons of the supraoptic nucleus involve multiple mechanisms

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    M.P. da Silva

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Physiological evidence indicates that the supraoptic nucleus (SON is an important region for integrating information related to homeostasis of body fluids. Located bilaterally to the optic chiasm, this nucleus is composed of magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs responsible for the synthesis and release of vasopressin and oxytocin to the neurohypophysis. At the cellular level, the control of vasopressin and oxytocin release is directly linked to the firing frequency of MNCs. In general, we can say that the excitability of these cells can be controlled via two distinct mechanisms: 1 the intrinsic membrane properties of the MNCs themselves and 2 synaptic input from circumventricular organs that contain osmosensitive neurons. It has also been demonstrated that MNCs are sensitive to osmotic stimuli in the physiological range. Therefore, the study of their intrinsic membrane properties became imperative to explain the osmosensitivity of MNCs. In addition to this, the discovery that several neurotransmitters and neuropeptides can modulate their electrical activity greatly increased our knowledge about the role played by the MNCs in fluid homeostasis. In particular, nitric oxide (NO may be an important player in fluid balance homeostasis, because it has been demonstrated that the enzyme responsible for its production has an increased activity following a hypertonic stimulation of the system. At the cellular level, NO has been shown to change the electrical excitability of MNCs. Therefore, in this review, we focus on some important points concerning nitrergic modulation of the neuroendocrine system, particularly the effects of NO on the SON.

  6. Effects of nitric oxide on magnocellular neurons of the supraoptic nucleus involve multiple mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, M P da; Cedraz-Mercez, P L; Varanda, W A

    2014-02-01

    Physiological evidence indicates that the supraoptic nucleus (SON) is an important region for integrating information related to homeostasis of body fluids. Located bilaterally to the optic chiasm, this nucleus is composed of magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs) responsible for the synthesis and release of vasopressin and oxytocin to the neurohypophysis. At the cellular level, the control of vasopressin and oxytocin release is directly linked to the firing frequency of MNCs. In general, we can say that the excitability of these cells can be controlled via two distinct mechanisms: 1) the intrinsic membrane properties of the MNCs themselves and 2) synaptic input from circumventricular organs that contain osmosensitive neurons. It has also been demonstrated that MNCs are sensitive to osmotic stimuli in the physiological range. Therefore, the study of their intrinsic membrane properties became imperative to explain the osmosensitivity of MNCs. In addition to this, the discovery that several neurotransmitters and neuropeptides can modulate their electrical activity greatly increased our knowledge about the role played by the MNCs in fluid homeostasis. In particular, nitric oxide (NO) may be an important player in fluid balance homeostasis, because it has been demonstrated that the enzyme responsible for its production has an increased activity following a hypertonic stimulation of the system. At the cellular level, NO has been shown to change the electrical excitability of MNCs. Therefore, in this review, we focus on some important points concerning nitrergic modulation of the neuroendocrine system, particularly the effects of NO on the SON.

  7. Recombinant arginine deiminase reduces inducible nitric oxide synthase iNOS-mediated neurotoxicity in a coculture of neurons and microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hao-Hsin; Wu, Fe-Lin Lin; Lin, Shan-Erh; Shen, Li-Jiuan

    2008-10-01

    Modulation of nitric oxide (NO) production is considered a promising approach to therapy of diseases involving excessive inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, such as certain neuronal diseases. Recombinant arginine deiminase (rADI, EC3.5.3.6) catalyzes the conversion of L-arginine (L-arg), the sole substrate of NOS for NO production, to L-citrulline (L-cit) and ammonia. To understand the effect of the depletion of L-arg by rADI on NO concentration and neuroprotection, a direct coculture of neuron SHSY5Y cells and microglia BV2 cells treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) was used as a model of iNOS induction. The results showed that rADI preserved cell viability (4-fold higher compared with the cells treated with LPS/IFN-gamma only) by the MTT assay, corresponding with the results of neuronal viability by neuron-specific immunostaining assay. NO production (mean +/- SD) decreased from 67.0 +/- 1.3 to 19.5 +/- 5.5 microM after a 2-day treatment of rADI by the Griess assay; meanwhile, induction of iNOS protein expression by rADI was observed. In addition, rADI substantially preserved the neuronal function of dopamine uptake in the coculture. The replenishment of L-arg in the coculture eliminated the neuroprotective and NO-suppressive effects of rADI in the coculture, indicating that L-arg played a crucial role in the effects of rADI. These results highlight the important role of L-arg in the neuron-microglia coculture in excessive induction of iNOS. Regulation of L-arg by ADI demonstrated that rADI has a potentially therapeutic role in iNOS-related neuronal diseases.

  8. Participation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in experimental neuropathic pain induced by sciatic nerve transection

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    M. Chacur

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Nerve injury leads to a neuropathic pain state that results from central sensitization. This phenomenom is mediated by NMDA receptors and may involve the production of nitric oxide (NO. In this study, we investigated the expression of the neuronal isoform of NO synthase (nNOS in the spinal cord of 3-month-old male, Wistar rats after sciatic nerve transection (SNT. Our attention was focused on the dorsal part of L3-L5 segments receiving sensory inputs from the sciatic nerve. SNT resulted in the development of neuropathic pain symptoms confirmed by evaluating mechanical hyperalgesia (Randall and Selitto test and allodynia (von Frey hair test. Control animals did not present any alteration (sham-animals. The selective inhibitor of nNOS, 7-nitroindazole (0.2 and 2 µg in 50 µL, blocked hyperalgesia and allodynia induced by SNT. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that nNOS was increased (48% by day 30 in the lumbar spinal cord after SNT. This increase was observed near the central canal (Rexed’s lamina X and also in lamina I-IV of the dorsal horn. Real-time PCR results indicated an increase of nNOS mRNA detected from 1 to 30 days after SNT, with the highest increase observed 1 day after injury (1469%. Immunoblotting confirmed the increase of nNOS in the spinal cord between 1 and 15 days post-lesion (20%, reaching the greatest increase (60% 30 days after surgery. The present findings demonstrate an increase of nNOS after peripheral nerve injury that may contribute to the increase of NO production observed after peripheral neuropathy.

  9. Glucose uptake during contraction in isolated skeletal muscles from neuronal nitric oxide synthase μ knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yet Hoi; Frugier, Tony; Zhang, Xinmei; Murphy, Robyn M; Lynch, Gordon S; Betik, Andrew C; Rattigan, Stephen; McConell, Glenn K

    2015-05-01

    Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) significantly attenuates the increase in skeletal muscle glucose uptake during contraction/exercise, and a greater attenuation is observed in individuals with Type 2 diabetes compared with healthy individuals. Therefore, NO appears to play an important role in mediating muscle glucose uptake during contraction. In this study, we investigated the involvement of neuronal NOSμ (nNOSμ), the main NOS isoform activated during contraction, on skeletal muscle glucose uptake during ex vivo contraction. Extensor digitorum longus muscles were isolated from nNOSμ(-/-) and nNOSμ(+/+) mice. Muscles were contracted ex vivo in a temperature-controlled (30°C) organ bath with or without the presence of the NOS inhibitor N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine (L-NMMA) and the NOS substrate L-arginine. Glucose uptake was determined by radioactive tracers. Skeletal muscle glucose uptake increased approximately fourfold during contraction in muscles from both nNOSμ(-/-) and nNOSμ(+/+) mice. L-NMMA significantly attenuated the increase in muscle glucose uptake during contraction in both genotypes. This attenuation was reversed by L-arginine, suggesting that L-NMMA attenuated the increase in muscle glucose uptake during contraction by inhibiting NOS and not via a nonspecific effect of the inhibitor. Low levels of NOS activity (~4%) were detected in muscles from nNOSμ(-/-) mice, and there was no evidence of compensation from other NOS isoform or AMP-activated protein kinase which is also involved in mediating muscle glucose uptake during contraction. These results indicate that NO regulates skeletal muscle glucose uptake during ex vivo contraction independently of nNOSμ.

  10. Functional muscle ischemia in neuronal nitric oxide synthase-deficient skeletal muscle of children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Mikael; Chavoshan, Bahman; Harris, Shannon A.; Iannaccone, Susan T.; Stull, James T.; Thomas, Gail D.; Victor, Ronald G.

    2000-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal disease caused by mutation of the gene encoding the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. Despite a wealth of recent information about the molecular basis of DMD, effective treatment for this disease does not exist because the mechanism by which dystrophin deficiency produces the clinical phenotype is unknown. In both mouse and human skeletal muscle, dystrophin deficiency results in loss of neuronal nitric oxide synthase, which normally is localized to the sarcolemma as part of the dystrophin–glycoprotein complex. Recent studies in mice suggest that skeletal muscle-derived nitric oxide may play a key role in the regulation of blood flow within exercising skeletal muscle by blunting the vasoconstrictor response to α-adrenergic receptor activation. Here we report that this protective mechanism is defective in children with DMD, because the vasoconstrictor response (measured as a decrease in muscle oxygenation) to reflex sympathetic activation was not blunted during exercise of the dystrophic muscles. In contrast, this protective mechanism is intact in healthy children and those with polymyositis or limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, muscle diseases that do not result in loss of neuronal nitric oxide synthase. This clinical investigation suggests that unopposed sympathetic vasoconstriction in exercising human skeletal muscle may constitute a heretofore unappreciated vascular mechanism contributing to the pathogenesis of DMD. PMID:11087833

  11. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase: its role and regulation in macula densa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Gergely; Komlósi, Péter; Fuson, Amanda; Peti-Peterdi, János; Rosivall, László; Bell, P Darwin

    2003-10-01

    Macula densa (MD) cells detect changes in distal tubular sodium chloride concentration ([NaCl](L)), at least in part, through an apical Na:2Cl:K co-transporter. This co-transporter may be a site for regulation of tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF), and recently angiotensin II (Ang II) was shown to regulate the MD Na:2Cl:K co-transporter. In addition, nitric oxide (NO) produced via neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) in MD cells attenuates MD-TGF signaling. This study investigated [NaCl](L)-dependent MD-NO production, the regulation of co-transporter activity by NO, and the possible interaction of NO with Ang II. MD cell Na(+) concentration ([Na(+)](i)) and NO production were measured using sodium-binding benzofuran isophthalate and 4-amino-5-methylamino-2',7'-difluorescein diacetate, respectively, using fluorescence microscopy. Na:2Cl:K co-transport activity was assessed as the initial rate of increase in [Na(+)](i) when [NaCl](L) was elevated from 25 to 150 mM. 10(-4) M 7-nitroindazole, a specific nNOS blocker, significantly increased by twofold the initial rate of rise in [Na(+)](i) when [NaCl](L) was increased from 25 to 150 mM, indicating co-transporter stimulation. There was no evidence for an interaction between the stimulatory effect of Ang II and the inhibitory effect of NO on co-transport activity, and, furthermore, Ang II failed to alter MD-NO production. NO production was sensitive to [NaCl](L) but increased only when [NaCl](L) was elevated from 60 to 150 mM. These studies indicate that MD-NO directly inhibits Na:2Cl:K co-transport and that NO and Ang II independently alter co-transporter activity. In addition, generation of MD-NO seems to occur only at markedly elevated [NaCl](L), suggesting that NO may serve as a buffer against high rates of MD cell transport and excessive TGF-mediated vasoconstriction.

  12. Triptan-induced enhancement of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in trigeminal ganglion dural afferents underlies increased responsiveness to potential migraine triggers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Felice, Milena; Ossipov, Michael H; Wang, Ruizhong; Dussor, Gregory; Lai, Josephine; Meng, Ian D; Chichorro, Juliana; Andrews, John S; Rakhit, Suman; Maddaford, Shawn; Dodick, David; Porreca, Frank

    2010-08-01

    Migraine is a common neurological disorder often treated with triptans. Triptan overuse can lead to increased frequency of headache in some patients, a phenomenon termed medication overuse headache. Previous preclinical studies have demonstrated that repeated or sustained triptan administration for several days can elicit persistent neural adaptations in trigeminal ganglion cells innervating the dura, prominently characterized by increased labelling of neuronal profiles for calcitonin gene related peptide. Additionally, triptan administration elicited a behavioural syndrome of enhanced sensitivity to surrogate triggers of migraine that was maintained for weeks following discontinuation of drug, a phenomenon termed 'triptan-induced latent sensitization'. Here, we demonstrate that triptan administration elicits a long-lasting increase in identified rat trigeminal dural afferents labelled for neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the trigeminal ganglion. Cutaneous allodynia observed during the period of triptan administration was reversed by NXN-323, a selective inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase. Additionally, neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibition prevented environmental stress-induced hypersensitivity in the post-triptan administration period. Co-administration of NXN-323 with sumatriptan over several days prevented the expression of allodynia and enhanced sensitivity to stress observed following latent sensitization, but not the triptan-induced increased labelling of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in dural afferents. Triptan administration thus promotes increased expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in dural afferents, which is critical for enhanced sensitivity to environmental stress. These data provide a biological basis for increased frequency of headache following triptans and highlight the potential clinical utility of neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibition in preventing or treating medication overuse headache.

  13. Enhanced astrocytic nitric oxide production and neuronal modifications in the neocortex of a NOS2 mutant mouse.

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    Yossi Buskila

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been well accepted that glial cells in the central nervous system (CNS produce nitric oxide (NO through the induction of a nitric oxide synthase isoform (NOS2 only in response to various insults. Recently we described rapid astroglial, NOS2-dependent, NO production in the neocortex of healthy mice on a time scale relevant to neuronal activity. To explore a possible role for astroglial NOS2 in normal brain function we investigated a NOS2 knockout mouse (B6;129P2-Nos2(tm1Lau/J, Jackson Laboratory. Previous studies of this mouse strain revealed mainly altered immune responses, but no compensatory pathways and no CNS abnormalities have been reported. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To our surprise, using NO imaging in brain slices in combination with biochemical methods we uncovered robust NO production by neocortical astrocytes of the NOS2 mutant. These findings indicate the existence of an alternative pathway that increases basal NOS activity. In addition, the astroglial mutation instigated modifications of neuronal attributes, shown by changes in the membrane properties of pyramidal neurons, and revealed in distinct behavioral abnormalities characterized by an increase in stress-related parameters. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results strongly indicate the involvement of astrocytic-derived NO in modifying the activity of neuronal networks. In addition, the findings corroborate data linking NO signaling with stress-related behavior, and highlight the potential use of this genetic model for studies of stress-susceptibility. Lastly, our results beg re-examination of previous studies that used this mouse strain to examine the pathophysiology of brain insults, assuming lack of astrocytic nitrosative reaction.

  14. Nitric oxide and vasoactive intestinal peptide as co-transmitters of airway smooth-muscle relaxation: analysis in neuronal nitric oxide synthase knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasaneen, Nadia A; Foda, Hussein D; Said, Sami I

    2003-09-01

    Both vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and nitric oxide (NO) relax airway smooth muscle and are potential co-transmitters of neurogenic airway relaxation. The availability of neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) knockout mice (nNOS-/-) provides a unique opportunity for evaluating NO. To evaluate the relative importance of NO, especially that generated by nNOS, and VIP as transmitters of the inhibitory nonadrenergic, noncholinergic (NANC) system. In this study, we compared the neurogenic (tetrodotoxin-sensitive) NANC relaxation of tracheal segments from nNOS-/- mice and control wild-type mice (nNOS(+/+)), induced by electrical field stimulation (EFS). We also examined the tracheal contractile response to methacholine and its relaxant response to VIP. EFS (at 60 V for 2 ms, at 10, 15, or 20 Hz) dose-dependently reduced tracheal tension, and the relaxations were consistently smaller (approximately 40%) in trachea from nNOS-/- mice than from control wild-type mice (p 0.05). Our data suggest that, in mouse trachea, NO is probably responsible for mediating a large (approximately 60%) component of neurogenic NANC relaxation, and a similar (approximately 50%) component of the relaxant effect of VIP. The results imply that NO contributes significantly to neurogenic relaxation of mouse airway smooth muscle, whether due to neurogenic stimulation or to the neuropeptide VIP.

  15. Inhibition of neuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthase does not affect the analgesic effects of NMDA antagonists in visceral inflammatory pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srebro, Dragana; Vučković, Sonja; Prostran, Milica

    2016-01-01

    Previously we described the antinociceptive effect of magnesium sulfate and dizocilpine (MK-801) in the visceral and somatic rat models of pain. In the somatic model of pain, we established the influence of selective inhibitors of neuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthase on the antihyperalgesic effects of magnesium sulfate and dizocilpine. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to determine in the rat model of visceral pain whether same mechanisms are involved in the antinociceptive action of magnesium sulfate and dizocilpine. Analgesic activity was assessed using the acetic acid-induced writhing test in rats. Subcutaneous injection of either magnesium sulfate (15 mg/kg) or dizocilpine (0.01 mg/kg) decreased the number of writhes by about 60 and 70%, respectively. The role of nitric oxide on the effects of magnesium sulfate and dizocilpine was evaluated using selective inhibitor of neuronal (N-ω-Propyl-L-arginine hydrochloride (L-NPA)) and inducible (S-methylisothiourea (SMT)) nitric oxide synthase, which per se did not affect the number of writhes. We observed that the antinociceptive effect of magnesium sulfate or dizocilpine did not change in the presence of L-NPA (2 and 10 mg/kg, i.p.) and SMT (0.015 and 10 mg/kg, i.p.). We conclude that, nitric oxide produced by neuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthase does not modulate the effects of magnesium sulfate and dizocilpine in the visceral inflammatory model of pain in the rat.

  16. Synthesis of nitric oxide in postganglionic myenteric neurons during endotoxemia: implications for gastric motor function in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Elsa; Hernández, Carlos; Alvarez-Barrientos, Alberto; Esplugues, Juan V; Barrachina, María D

    2004-03-01

    We have investigated the mechanisms underlying acute changes in gastric motor function triggered by endotoxemia. In fundal strips from rats pre-treated with endotoxin (40 microg/kg, i.p. 30 min), mechanical activity was analyzed and the source of nitric oxide (NO) was visualized by confocal microscopy of tissue loaded with the fluorescent dye DAF-FM. NOS expression was determined by quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot, and enzyme activity by the citrulline assay. Strips from endotoxin-treated rats were hypo-contractile. This was prevented by pre-incubation with the neurotoxin tetrodotoxin, the gangliar blocker hexamethonium, or non-selective and neuronal-specific NOS inhibitors (L-NOARG and TRIM, respectively). The soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) inhibitor ODQ and the inhibitor of small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels apamin prevented relaxation induced by endotoxin, nicotine, exogenous NO (DETA-NONOate), and the NO-independent sGC activator BAY 41-2272. NO synthesis was observed in neuronal soma, axons, and nerve endings of the myenteric plexus in the fundus of endotoxin-treated rats and was prevented by L-NAME, tetrodotoxin, and hexamethonium. nNOS and iNOS mRNA and protein contents were unchanged. Our findings demonstrate synthesis of NO in post-ganglionic myenteric neurons during early endotoxemia that mediates gastric hypo-contractility. The effect of NO is mediated via sGC and small conductance Ca2+-activated K+channels.

  17. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induces microglial nitric oxide production and subsequent rat primary cortical neuron apoptosis through p38/JNK MAPK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanye; Chen, Gang; Zhao, Jianya; Nie, Xiaoke; Wan, Chunhua; Liu, Jiao; Duan, Zhiqing; Xu, Guangfei

    2013-10-04

    It has been widely accepted that microglia, which are the innate immune cells in the brain, upon activation can cause neuronal damage. In the present study, we investigated the role of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in regulating microglial nitric oxide production and its role in causing neuronal damage. The study revealed that TCDD stimulates the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) as well as the production of nitric oxide (NO) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Further, a rapid activation of p38 and JNK MAPKs was found in HAPI microglia following TCDD treatment. Blockage of p38 and JNK kinases with their specific inhibitors, SB202190 and SP600125, significantly reduced TCDD-induced iNOS expression and NO production. In addition, it was demonstrated through treating rat primary cortical neurons with media conditioned with TCDD treated microglia that microglial iNOS activation mediates neuronal apoptosis. Lastly, it was also found that p38 and JNK MAPK inhibitors could attenuate the apoptosis of rat cortical neurons upon exposure to medium conditioned by TCDD-treated HAPI microglial cells. Based on these observations, we highlight that the p38/JNK MAPK pathways play an important role in TCDD-induced iNOS activation in rat HAPI microglia and in the subsequent induction of apoptosis in primary cortical neurons.

  18. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase mRNA upregulation in rat sensory neurons after spinal nerve ligation: lack of a role in allodynia development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Z D; Chaplan, S R; Scott, B P; Cizkova, D; Calcutt, N A; Yaksh, T L

    1999-11-01

    Pharmacological evidence suggests a functional role for spinal nitric oxide (NO) in the modulation of thermal and/or inflammatory hyperalgesia. To assess the role of NO in nerve injury-induced tactile allodynia, we examined neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) expression in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of rats with tactile allodynia because of either tight ligation of the left fifth and sixth lumbar spinal nerves or streptozotocin-induced diabetic neuropathy. RNase protection assays indicated that nNOS mRNA (1) was upregulated in DRG, but not spinal cord, neurons on the injury side beginning 1 d after nerve ligation, (2) peaked (approximately 10-fold increase) at 2 d, and (3) remained elevated for at least 13 weeks. A corresponding increase in DRG nNOS protein was also observed and localized principally to small and occasionally medium-size sensory neurons. In rats with diabetic neuropathy, there was no significant change in DRG nNOS mRNA. However, similar increases in DRG nNOS mRNA were observed in rats that did not develop allodynia after nerve ligation and in rats fully recovered from allodynia 3 months after the nerve ligation. Systemic treatment with a specific pharmacological inhibitor of nNOS failed to prevent or reverse allodynia in nerve-injured rats. Thus, regulation of nNOS may contribute to the development of neuronal plasticity after specific types of peripheral nerve injury. However, upregulation of nNOS is not responsible for the development and/or maintenance of allodynia after nerve injury.

  19. Synthesis and enzymatic evaluation of 2- and 4-aminothiazole-based inhibitors of neuronal nitric oxide synthase

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    Graham R. Lawton

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Highly potent and selective inhibitors of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS possessing a 2-aminopyridine group were recently designed and synthesized in our laboratory and were shown to have significant in vivo efficacy. In this work, analogs of our lead compound possessing 2- and 4-aminothiazole rings in place of the aminopyridine were synthesized. The less basic aminothiazole rings will be less protonated at physiological pH than the aminopyridine ring, and so the molecule will carry a lower net charge. This could lead to an increased ability to cross the blood-brain barrier thereby increasing the in vivo potency of these compounds. The 2-aminothiazole-based compound was less potent than the 2-aminopyridine-based analogue. 4-Aminothiazoles were unstable in water, undergoing tautomerization and hydrolysis to give inactive thiazolones.

  20. Preoptic neuronal nitric oxide synthase induction by testosterone is consistent with a role in gating male copulatory behavior

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    Sanderson, Nicholas S. R.; Le, Brandon; Zhou, Zifei; Crews, David

    2008-01-01

    Copulatory behaviors are generally dependent on testicular androgens in male vertebrates, being eliminated by castration and re-instated by testosterone administration. It is postulated that a critical factor in this hormonal gating is up-regulation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in the preoptic area, and consequent enhanced nitric oxide synthesis in response to stimuli associated with a receptive female. Previous studies have suggested that nNOS protein is more abundant in behaviorally relevant preoptic regions of testosterone-exposed animals than in hormone-deprived controls. This study sought to elucidate the molecular events underlying this apparent up-regulation by examining preoptic nNOS mRNA abundance at several time points following testosterone administration in a castration and replacement paradigm. Castrated male whiptails (Cnemidophorus inornatus) were implanted with testosterone, and at four time points over the subsequent 18 days their sexual behavior was tested. A rostral periventricular area previously implicated in hormonal gating of male-typical copulatory behavior was then excised by laser microdissection, and nNOS transcript abundance was assessed by quantitative PCR. As neither this technique nor nNOS mRNA measurements have previously been performed in this area of the brain, expression was concommitantly assayed on adjacent sections by in situ hybridization or NADPH diaphorase histochemistry. Results are consistent with transcriptional up-regulation of nNOS by testosterone and a central role for the enzyme in mediating hormonal gating of copulatory behavior. PMID:18184320

  1. Gastroprotective effect of Serjania erecta Radlk (Sapindaceae): involvement of sensory neurons, endogenous nonprotein sulfhydryls, and nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelo, Ana Paula Corrêa; Arruda, Branco Nappi; Coelho, Roberta Gomes; Honda, Neli Kika; Ferrazoli, Catharine; Pott, Arnildo; Hiruma-Lima, Clélia Akiko

    2009-12-01

    The present study reveals the pharmacological action of Serjania erecta Radlk. (Family Sapindaceae), an important medicinal plant species used in the Brazilian Pantanal against gastric pain. The methanolic (Me) and chloroformic (Se) extracts obtained from leaves of S. erecta were challenged by a very strong necrotizing agent in rodents, absolute ethanol. Se was also confronted with a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester), a capsaicin cation channel transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 antagonist (ruthenium red), or a sulfhydryl-blocker (N-ethylmaleimide) to evaluate the participation of these cytoprotective factors in gastroprotection. In an in vivo experimental model, Me and Se presented several degrees of gastroprotective action without signs of acute toxicity. The best gastroprotective effect was restricted to all doses of Se. The mechanisms involving the gastroprotective action of Se are related to an augmented defense mechanism of the gastrointestinal mucosa consisting of sensory neurons, nitric oxide, and sulfhydryl groups that prevent and attenuate the ulcer process. The presence of polyisoprenoids in the Se explains the potent gastroprotective action of this medicinal species. Effective gastroprotective action and the absence of acute toxicity indicate this species may be a promising herbal drug against gastric disease.

  2. Temperature-dependent spin crossover in neuronal nitric oxide synthase bound with the heme-coordinating thioether inhibitors.

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    Doukov, Tzanko; Li, Huiying; Sharma, Ajay; Martell, Jeffrey D; Soltis, S Michael; Silverman, Richard B; Poulos, Thomas L

    2011-06-01

    A series of L-arginine analogue nitric oxide synthase inhibitors with a thioether tail have been shown to form an Fe-S thioether interaction as evidenced by continuous electron density between the Fe and S atoms. Even so, the Fe-S thioether interaction was found to be far less important for inhibitor binding than the hydrophobic interactions between the alkyl group in the thioether tail and surrounding protein (Martell et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2010 , 132 , 798). However, among the few thioether inhibitors that showed Fe-S thioether interaction in crystal structures, variations in spin state (high-spin or low-spin) were observed dependent upon the heme iron oxidation state and temperature. Since modern synchrotron X-ray data collection is typically carried out at cryogenic temperatures, we reasoned that some of the discrepancies between cryo-crystal structures and room-temperature UV-visible spectroscopy could be the result of temperature-dependent spin-state changes. We, therefore, have characterized some of these neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-thioether inhibitor complexes in both crystal and solution using EPR and UV-visible absorption spectrometry as a function of temperature and the heme iron redox state. We found that some thioether inhibitors switch from high to low spin at lower temperatures similar to the "spin crossover" phenomenon observed in many transition metal complexes.

  3. Hippocampal neuronal nitric oxide synthase mediates the stress-related depressive behaviors of glucocorticoids by downregulating glucocorticoid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qi-Gang; Zhu, Li-Juan; Chen, Chen; Wu, Hai-Yin; Luo, Chun-Xia; Chang, Lei; Zhu, Dong-Ya

    2011-05-25

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the behavioral effects of glucocorticoids are poorly understood. We report here that hippocampal neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is a crucial mediator. Chronic mild stress and glucocorticoids exposures caused hippocampal nNOS overexpression via activating mineralocorticoid receptor. In turn, hippocampal nNOS-derived nitric oxide (NO) significantly downregulated local glucocorticoid receptor expression through both soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)/cGMP and peroxynitrite (ONOO(-))/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signal pathways, and therefore elevated hypothalamic corticotrophin-releasing factor, a peptide that governs the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. More importantly, nNOS deletion or intrahippocampal nNOS inhibition and NO-cGMP signaling blockade (using NO scavenger or sGC inhibitor) prevented the corticosterone-induced behavioral modifications, suggesting that hippocampal nNOS is necessary for the role of glucocorticoids in mediating depressive behaviors. In addition, directly delivering ONOO(-) donor into hippocampus caused depressive-like behaviors. Our findings reveal a role of hippocampal nNOS in regulating the behavioral effects of glucocorticoids.

  4. Estrous cycle influences the expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the hypothalamus and limbic system of female mice

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    Sica, Monica; Martini, Mariangela; Viglietti-Panzica, Carla; Panzica, GianCarlo

    2009-01-01

    Background Nitric oxide plays an important role in the regulation of male and female sexual behavior in rodents, and the expression of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is influenced by testosterone in the male rat, and by estrogens in the female. We have here quantitatively investigated the distribution of nNOS immunoreactive (ir) neurons in the limbic hypothalamic region of intact female mice sacrificed during different phases of estrous cycle. Results Changes were observed in the medial preoptic area (MPA) (significantly higher number in estrus) and in the arcuate nucleus (Arc) (significantly higher number in proestrus). In the ventrolateral part of the ventromedial nucleus (VMHvl) and in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST) no significant changes have been observed. In addition, by comparing males and females, we observed a stable sex dimorphism (males have a higher number of nNOS-ir cells in comparison to almost all the different phases of the estrous cycle) in the VMHvl and in the BST (when considering only the less intensely stained elements). In the MPA and in the Arc sex differences were detected only comparing some phases of the cycle. Conclusion These data demonstrate that, in mice, the expression of nNOS in some hypothalamic regions involved in the control of reproduction and characterized by a large number of estrogen receptors is under the control of gonadal hormones and may vary according to the rapid variations of hormonal levels that take place during the estrous cycle. PMID:19604366

  5. Chlorogenic acid protection of neuronal nitric oxide synthase-positive neurons in the hippocampus of mice with impaired learning and memory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiuyun Tu; Xiangqi Tang; Zhiping Hu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical practice and modern pharmacology have confirmed that ehlorogenic acid can ameliorate learning and memory impairments. OBJECTIVE: To observe the effects of chlorogenic acid on neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-positive neurons in the mouse hippocampus, and to investigate the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of chlorogenic acid on learning and memory. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: The present randomized, controlled, neural cell morphological observation was performed at the Institute of Neurobiology, Central South University between January and May 2005.MATERIALS: Forty-eight female, healthy, adult, Kunming mice were included in this study. Learning and memory impairment was induced with an injection of 0.5 μL kainic acid (0.4 mg/mL) into the hippocampus.METHODS: The mice were randomized into three groups (n = 16): model, control, and chlorogenic acid-treated. At 2 days following learning and memory impairment induction, intragastric administration of physiological saline or chlorogenic acid was performed in the model and chlorogenic acid-treated groups, respectively. The control mice were administered 0.5 μ L physiological saline into the hippocampus, and 2 days later, they received an intragastric administration of physiological saline. Each mouse received two intragastric administrations (1 mL solution once) per day, for a total of 35 days. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Detection of changes in hippocampal and cerebral cortical nNOS neurons by immunohistochemistry; determination of spatial learning and memory utilizing the Y-maze device.RESULTS: At day 7 and 35 after intervention, there was no significant difference in the number of nNOS-positive neurons in the cerebral cortex between the model, chlorogenic acid, and control groups (P > 0.05). Compared with the control group, the number of nNOS-positive neurons in the hippocampal CA1-4 region was significantly less in the model group (P 0.05). At day 7 following intervention, the number

  6. Changes of learning and memory ability associated with neuronal nitric oxide synthase in brain tissues of rats with acute alcoholism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuang Li; Chunyang Xu; Dongliang Li; Xinjuan Li; Linyu Wei; Yuan Cheng

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUD: Ethanol can influence neural development and the ability of learning and memory, but its mechanism of the neural toxicity is not clear till now. Endogenous nitric oxide (NO) as a gaseous messenger is proved to play an important role in the formation of synaptic plasticity, transference of neuronal information and the neural development, but excessive nitro oxide can result in neurotoxicity.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effects of acute alcoholism on the learning and memory ability and the content of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in brain tissue of rats.DESIGN: A randomized controlled animal experiment.SETTING: Department of Physiology, Xinxiang Medical College.MATERIALS; Eighteen male clean-degree SD rats of 18-22 weeks were raised adaptively for 2 days, and then randomly divided into control group (n = 8) and experimental group (n = 10). The nNOS immunohistochemical reagent was provided by Beijing Zhongshan Golden Bridge Biotechnology Co.,Ltd. Y-maze was produced by Suixi Zhenghua Apparatus Plant.METHODS: The experiment was carried out in the laboratory of the Department of Physiology, Xinxiang Medical College from June to October in 2005. ① Rats in the experimental group were intraperitoneally injected with ethanol (2.5 g/kg) which was dissolved in normal saline (20%). The loss of righting reflex and ataxia within 5 minutes indicated the successful model. Whereas rats in the control group were given saline of the same volume. ② Examinations of learning and memory ability: The Y-maze tests for learning and memory ability were performed at 6 hours after the models establishment. The rats were put into the Y-maze separately. The test was performed in a quiet and dark room. There was a lamp at the end of each of three pathways in Y-maze and the base of maze had electric net. All the lamps of the three pathways were turned on for 3 minutes and then turned off. One lamp was turned on randomly, and the other two delayed automatically. In 5 seconds

  7. Oestrogen receptor expression and neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the clitoris and preputial gland structures of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Alguacil, Nieves; Schober, Justine; Kow, Lee-Ming; Pfaff, Donald

    2008-12-01

    To study the presence of oestrogen receptors (ER) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in the mouse clitoris. A series of sections of the pelvic area, including the preputial glands and clitoris, of 10 mice were assessed by immunocytochemical studies specific for ER-alpha and -beta, and nNOS; selected sections were also stained with Masson's trichrome. ER alpha was detected in the epithelium of the gland of the clitoris, and in the glandular tissue, preputial and apocrine gland. ER alpha was detected in the nuclei of stromal cells around the cavernous tissue and near the epithelium of the clitoris. Cytoplasm ER alpha was detected in a few cells in an area ventral to the clitoral gland. There was also nuclear staining in the connective tissue cells surrounding the clitoris. Very light ER beta immunostaining was detected in the clitoris and in the tissue related to it. There were some cells with nuclear staining in the vessels of the cavernous tissue of the clitoris. nNOS immunostaining was detected in the clitoris, the preputial gland and the connective tissue. ER alpha and beta isoforms, and nNOS, are present in the clitoris and preputial glands of female mice in different cellular locations and with differing levels of receptivity. Functional studies would further elucidate the role of receptor functions and their relationship to the neuronal expression of NO.

  8. Aged neuronal nitric oxide knockout mice show preserved olfactory learning in both social recognition and odor-conditioning tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronwen M James

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence for both neurotoxic and neuroprotective roles of nitric oxide (NO in the brain and changes in the expression of the neuronal isoform of nitric oxide synthase (nNOS gene occur during aging. The current studies have investigated potential support for either a neurotoxic or neuroprotective role of NO derived from nNOS in the context of aging by comparing olfactory learning and locomotor function in young compared to old nNOS knockout (nNOS/- and wildtype control mice. Tasks involving social recognition and olfactory conditioning paradigms showed that old nNOS-/-animals had improved retention of learning compared to similar aged wildtype controls. Young nNOS-/- animals showed superior reversal learning to wildtypes in a conditioned learning task, although their performance was weakened with age. Interestingly, whereas young nNOS-/- animals were impaired in long term memory for social odors compared to wildtype controls, in old animals this pattern was reversed, possibly indicating beneficial compensatory changes influencing olfactory memory may occur during aging in nNOS-/- animals. Possibly such compensatory changes may have involved increased NO from other NOS isoforms since the memory deficit in young nNOS-/-animals could be rescued by the NO-donor, molsidomine. Both nNOS-/- and wildtype animals showed an age-associated decline in locomotor activity although young nNOS-/- animals were significantly more active than wildtypes, possibly due to an increased interest in novelty. Overall our findings suggest that lack of NO release via nNOS may protect animals to some extent against age-associated cognitive decline in memory tasks typically involving olfactory and hippocampal regions, but not against declines in reversal learning or locomotor activity.

  9. Role of Nitric Oxide in MPTP-Induced Dopaminergic Neuron Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-01

    svrtxciniraggregationinLeiy bodytddsease.AJ &ol. Craeber, M. S. One The qaesstiorn f apoptoois nth Improves m otor tunaction, reduces dama ge to Chest...tetrahydropyridine Med Chem 10:1917-1921. neurotoxicity. II. Susceptibility among mammalian species correlates Skaper, S.D., M. Floreani, A. Negro , L...Skaper. M. Floreani, A. Negro , L. Facci, P. Giusti, Neuro- surgery 37 (1995) 733-739 discussion 739-741. trophins rescue cerebellar granule neurons

  10. Multiple embryonic origins of nitric oxide synthase-expressing GABAergic neurons of the neocortex

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    Lorenza eMagno

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cortical GABAergic interneurons in rodents originate in three subcortical regions: the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE, the lateral/caudal ganglionic eminence (LGE/CGE and the preoptic area (POA. Each of these neuroepithelial precursor domains contributes different interneuron subtypes to the cortex. nNOS-expressing neurons represent a heterogenous population of cortical interneurons. We examined the development of these cells in the mouse embryonic cortex and their abundance and distribution in adult animals. Using genetic lineage tracing in transgenic mice we find that nNOS type I cells originate only in the MGE whereas type II cells have a triple origin in the MGE, LGE/CGE and POA. The two populations are born at different times during development, occupy different layers in the adult cortex and have distinct neurochemical profiles. nNOS neurons are more numerous in the adult cortex than previously reported and constitute a significant proportion of the cortical interneuron population. Our data suggest that the heterogeneity of nNOS neurons in the cortex can be attributed to their multiple embryonic origins which likely impose distinct genetic specification programs.

  11. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity in the respiratory tract of the frog, Rana temporaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodegas, M E; Villaro, A C; Montuenga, L M; Moncada, S; Riveros-Moreno, V; Sesma, P

    1995-10-01

    Physiological and histochemical studies have recently supported the notion that nitric oxide (NO) is the transduction signal responsible for the non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic relaxation of the vasculature as well as the airways of the mammalian lung. We report the presence of immunoreactivity to NO synthase (NOS) in nerve cell bodies and nerve fibres in the neural plexus of the buccal cavity and lungs of the frog, Rana temporaria, using the indirect immunocytochemical technique of avidin-biotin and the NADPH-diaphorase technique. The neural ganglia located next to the muscle layer and within the connective tissue of the buccal cavity were partially immunoreactive for NOS. In the lungs, NOS immunoreactivity occurred in nerve cell bodies, as well as in both myelinated and unmyelinated nerve fibres. Fine nerve fibres immunoreactive to NOS were observed within the muscle fibre bundles and next to the respiratory epithelium. Both the presence of NOS immunoreactivity and the positive histochemical reaction for NADPH-diaphorase in the neural plexus of amphibian respiratory tract suggests a broad evolutionary role for NO as a peripheral neurotransmitter.

  12. The Coexpression of Reelin and Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase in a Subpopulation of Dentate Gyrus Neurons Is Downregulated in Heterozygous Reeler Mice

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    Raquel Romay-Tallón

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Reelin is an extracellular matrix protein expressed in several interneuron subtypes in the hippocampus and dentate gyrus. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS is also expressed by interneurons in these areas. We investigated whether reelin and nNOS are co-localized in the same population of hippocampal interneurons, and whether this colocalization is altered in the heterozygous reeler mouse. We found colocalization of nNOS in reelin-positive cells in the CA1 stratum radiatum and lacunosum moleculare, the CA3 stratum radiatum, and the dentate gyrus subgranular zone, molecular layer, and hilus. In heterozygous reeler mice, the colocalization of nNOS in reelin-positive cells was significantly decreased only in the subgranular zone and molecular layer. The coexpression of reelin and nNOS in several hippocampal regions suggests that reelin and nNOS may work synergistically to promote glutamatergic function, and the loss of this coexpression in heterozygous reeler mice may underlie some of the behavioral deficits observed in these animals.

  13. The coexpression of reelin and neuronal nitric oxide synthase in a subpopulation of dentate gyrus neurons is downregulated in heterozygous reeler mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romay-Tallón, Raquel; Dopeso-Reyes, Iria G; Lussier, April L; Kalynchuk, Lisa E; Caruncho, Hector J

    2010-01-01

    Reelin is an extracellular matrix protein expressed in several interneuron subtypes in the hippocampus and dentate gyrus. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is also expressed by interneurons in these areas. We investigated whether reelin and nNOS are co-localized in the same population of hippocampal interneurons, and whether this colocalization is altered in the heterozygous reeler mouse. We found colocalization of nNOS in reelin-positive cells in the CA1 stratum radiatum and lacunosum moleculare, the CA3 stratum radiatum, and the dentate gyrus subgranular zone, molecular layer, and hilus. In heterozygous reeler mice, the colocalization of nNOS in reelin-positive cells was significantly decreased only in the subgranular zone and molecular layer. The coexpression of reelin and nNOS in several hippocampal regions suggests that reelin and nNOS may work synergistically to promote glutamatergic function, and the loss of this coexpression in heterozygous reeler mice may underlie some of the behavioral deficits observed in these animals.

  14. Hippocampal neurons in organotypic slice culture are highly resistant to damage by endogenous and exogenous nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keynes, Robert G; Duport, Sophie; Garthwaite, John

    2004-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been proposed to mediate neurodegeneration arising from NMDA receptor activity, but the issue remains controversial. The hypothesis was re-examined using organotypic slice cultures of rat hippocampus, with steps being taken to avoid known artefacts. The NO-cGMP signalling pathway was well preserved in such cultures. Brief exposure to NMDA resulted in a concentration-dependent delayed neuronal death that could be nullified by administration of the NMDA antagonist MK801 (10 microm) given postexposure. Two inhibitors of NO synthesis failed to protect the slices, despite fully blocking NMDA-induced cGMP accumulation. By comparing NMDA-induced cGMP accumulation with that produced by an NO donor, toxic NMDA concentrations were estimated to produce only physiological NO concentrations (2 nm). In studies of the vulnerability of the slices to exogenous NO, it was found that continuous exposure to up to 4.5 microm NO failed to affect ATP levels (measured after 6 h) or cause damage during 24 h, whereas treatment with the respiratory inhibitors myxothiazol or cyanide caused ATP depletion and complete cell death within 24 h. An NO concentration of 10 microm was required for ATP depletion and cell death, presumably through respiratory inhibition. It is concluded that sustained activity of neuronal NO synthase in intact hippocampal tissue can generate only low nanomolar NO concentrations, which are unlikely to be toxic. At the same time, the tissue is remarkably resistant to exogenous NO at up to 1000-fold higher concentrations. Together, the results seriously question the proposed role of NO in NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity.

  15. Crucial role for neuronal nitric oxide synthase in early microcirculatory derangement and recipient survival following murine pancreas transplantation.

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    Benno Cardini

    Full Text Available Aim of this study was to identify the nitric oxide synthase (NOS isoform involved in early microcirculatory derangements following solid organ transplantation.Tetrahydrobiopterin donor treatment has been shown to specifically attenuate these derangements following pancreas transplantation, and tetrahydrobiopterin-mediated protective effects to rely on its NOS-cofactor activity, rather than on its antioxidant capacity. However, the NOS-isoform mainly involved in this process has still to be defined.Using a murine pancreas transplantation model, grafts lacking one of the three NOS-isoforms were compared to grafts from wild-type controls. Donors were treated with either tetrahydrobiopterin or remained untreated. All grafts were subjected to 16 h cold ischemia time and transplanted into wild-type recipients. Following 4 h graft reperfusion, microcirculation was analysed by confocal intravital fluorescence microscopy. Recipient survival was monitored for 50 days.Transplantation of the pancreas from untreated wild-type donor mice resulted in microcirculatory damage of the transplanted graft and no recipient survived more than 72 h. Transplanting grafts from untreated donor mice lacking either endothelial or inducible NOS led to similar outcomes. In contrast, donor treatment with tetrahydrobiopterin prevented microcirculatory breakdown enabling long-term survival. Sole exception was transplantation of grafts from untreated donor mice lacking neuronal NOS. It resulted in intact microvascular structure and long-term recipient survival, either if donor mice were untreated or treated with tetrahydrobiopterin.We demonstrate for the first time the crucial involvement of neuronal NOS in early microcirculatory derangements following solid organ transplantation. In this model, protective effects of tetrahydrobiopterin are mediated by targeting this isoform.

  16. Crucial Role for Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase in Early Microcirculatory Derangement and Recipient Survival following Murine Pancreas Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardini, Benno; Watschinger, Katrin; Hermann, Martin; Obrist, Peter; Oberhuber, Rupert; Brandacher, Gerald; Chuaiphichai, Surawee; Channon, Keith M.; Pratschke, Johann; Maglione, Manuel; Werner, Ernst R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Aim of this study was to identify the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoform involved in early microcirculatory derangements following solid organ transplantation. Background Tetrahydrobiopterin donor treatment has been shown to specifically attenuate these derangements following pancreas transplantation, and tetrahydrobiopterin-mediated protective effects to rely on its NOS-cofactor activity, rather than on its antioxidant capacity. However, the NOS-isoform mainly involved in this process has still to be defined. Methods Using a murine pancreas transplantation model, grafts lacking one of the three NOS-isoforms were compared to grafts from wild-type controls. Donors were treated with either tetrahydrobiopterin or remained untreated. All grafts were subjected to 16 h cold ischemia time and transplanted into wild-type recipients. Following 4 h graft reperfusion, microcirculation was analysed by confocal intravital fluorescence microscopy. Recipient survival was monitored for 50 days. Results Transplantation of the pancreas from untreated wild-type donor mice resulted in microcirculatory damage of the transplanted graft and no recipient survived more than 72 h. Transplanting grafts from untreated donor mice lacking either endothelial or inducible NOS led to similar outcomes. In contrast, donor treatment with tetrahydrobiopterin prevented microcirculatory breakdown enabling long-term survival. Sole exception was transplantation of grafts from untreated donor mice lacking neuronal NOS. It resulted in intact microvascular structure and long-term recipient survival, either if donor mice were untreated or treated with tetrahydrobiopterin. Conclusion We demonstrate for the first time the crucial involvement of neuronal NOS in early microcirculatory derangements following solid organ transplantation. In this model, protective effects of tetrahydrobiopterin are mediated by targeting this isoform. PMID:25389974

  17. Breast feeding increases vasoconstriction induced by electrical field stimulation in rat mesenteric artery. Role of neuronal nitric oxide and ATP.

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    Javier Blanco-Rivero

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate in rat mesenteric artery whether breast feeding (BF affects the vasomotor response induced by electrical field stimulation (EFS, participation by different innervations in the EFS-induced response and the mechanism/s underlying these possible modifications. METHODS: Experiments were performed in female Sprague-Dawley rats (3 months old, divided into three groups: Control (in oestrous phase, mothers after 21 days of BF, and mothers that had recovered their oestral cycle (After BF, in oestrous phase. Vasomotor response to EFS, noradrenaline (NA and nitric oxide (NO donor DEA-NO were studied. Neuronal NO synthase (nNOS and phosphorylated nNOS (P-nNOS protein expression were analysed and NO, superoxide anion (O(2(.-, NA and ATP releases were also determined. RESULTS: EFS-induced contraction was higher in the BF group, and was recovered after BF. 1 µmol/L phentolamine decreased the response to EFS similarly in control and BF rats. NA vasoconstriction and release were similar in both experimental groups. ATP release was higher in segments from BF rats. 0.1 mmol/L L-NAME increased the response to EFS in both control and BF rats, but more so in control animals. BF decreased NO release and did not modify O(2(.- production. Vasodilator response to DEA-NO was similar in both groups, while nNOS and P-nNOS expressions were decreased in segments from BF animals. CONCLUSION: Breast feeding increases EFS-induced contraction in mesenteric arteries, mainly through the decrease of neuronal NO release mediated by decreased nNOS and P-nNOS expression. Sympathetic function is increased through the increased ATP release in BF rats.

  18. Near infrared radiation protects against oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced neurotoxicity by down-regulating neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) activity in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhanyang; Li, Zhaoyu; Liu, Ning; Jizhang, Yunneng; McCarthy, Thomas J; Tedford, Clark E; Lo, Eng H; Wang, Xiaoying

    2015-06-01

    Near infrared radiation (NIR) has been shown to be neuroprotective against neurological diseases including stroke and brain trauma, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In the current study we aimed to investigate the hypothesis that NIR may protect neurons by attenuating oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced nitric oxide (NO) production and modulating cell survival/death signaling. Primary mouse cortical neurons were subjected to 4 h OGD and NIR was applied at 2 h reoxygenation. OGD significantly increased NO level in primary neurons compared to normal control, which was significantly ameliorated by NIR at 5 and 30 min post-NIR. Neither OGD nor NIR significantly changed neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) mRNA or total protein levels compared to control groups. However, OGD significantly increased nNOS activity compared to normal control, and this effect was significantly diminished by NIR. Moreover, NIR significantly ameliorated the neuronal death induced by S-Nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine (SNAP), a NO donor. Finally, NIR significantly rescued OGD-induced suppression of p-Akt and Bcl-2 expression, and attenuated OGD-induced upregulation of Bax, BAD and caspase-3 activation. These results suggest NIR may protect against OGD at least partially through reducing NO production by down-regulating nNOS activity, and modulating cell survival/death signaling.

  19. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase is dislocated in type I fibers of myalgic muscle but can recover with physical exercise training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L; Andersen, L L; Schrøder, H D

    2015-01-01

    Trapezius myalgia is the most common type of chronic neck pain. While physical exercise reduces pain and improves muscle function, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Nitric oxide (NO) signaling is important in modulating cellular function, and a dysfunctional neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) may...... assigned to either 10 weeks of specific strength training (SST, n = 18), general fitness training (GFT, n = 15), or health information (REF, n = 8). Distribution of fiber type, cross-sectional area, and sarcolemmal nNOS expression did not differ between MYA and CON. However, MYA showed increased...... sarcoplasmic nNOS localization (18.8 ± 12 versus 12.8 ± 8%, P = 0.049) compared with CON. SST resulted in a decrease of sarcoplasm-localized nNOS following training (before 18.1 ± 12 versus after 12.0 ± 12%; P = 0,027). We demonstrate that myalgic muscle displays altered nNOS localization and that 10 weeks...

  20. Translational regulation of human neuronal nitric-oxide synthase by an alternatively spliced 5'-untranslated region leader exon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Derek C; Bevan, Sian C; Choi, Stephen; Robb, G Brett; Millar, Adam; Wang, Yang; Marsden, Philip A

    2003-01-03

    Expression of the neuronal nitric-oxide synthase (nNOS) mRNA is subject to complex cell-specific transcriptional regulation, which is mediated by alternative promoters. Unexpectedly, we identified a 89-nucleotide alternatively spliced exon located in the 5'-untranslated region between exon 1 variants and a common exon 2 that contains the translational initiation codon. Alternative splicing events that do not affect the open reading frame are distinctly uncommon in mammals; therefore, we assessed its functional relevance. Transient transfection of reporter RNAs performed in a variety of cell types revealed that this alternatively spliced exon acts as a potent translational repressor. Stably transfected cell lines confirmed that the alternatively spliced exon inhibited translation of the native nNOS open reading frame. Reverse transcription-PCR and RNase protection assays indicated that nNOS mRNAs containing this exon are common and expressed in both a promoter-specific and tissue-restricted fashion. Mutational analysis identified the functional cis-element within this novel exon, and a secondary structure prediction revealed that it forms a putative stem-loop. RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assay techniques revealed that a specific cytoplasmic RNA-binding complex interacts with this motif. Hence, a unique splicing event within a 5'-untranslated region is demonstrated to introduce a translational control element. This represents a newer model for the translational control of a mammalian mRNA.

  1. The innervation of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver: protein gene product 9.5 and neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, F J; Jiménez, A; Barroso, J B; Pedrosa, J A; del Moral, M L; Rodrigo, J; Peinado, M A

    1998-08-01

    We have explored the innervation of the rainbow trout (O. mykiss) liver using immunohistochemical procedures and light microscopy to detect in situ protein gene product 9.5 and neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivities (PGP-IR and NOS-IR). The results showed PGP-IR nerve fibres running with the extralobular biliary duct (EBD), hepatic artery (EHA) and portal vein (EPV) that form the hepatic hilum, as well as following the spatial distribution of the intrahepatic blood vessel and biliary channels. These nerve fibres appear as single varicose processes, thin bundles, or thick bundles depending on their diameter and location in the wall of the blood vessel or biliary duct. No PGP-IR fibres were detected in the liver parenchyma. NOS-IR nerve fibres were located only in the vessels and ducts that form the hepatic hilum (EBD, EHA, EPV); in addition, NOS-IR nerve cell bodies were found isolated or forming ganglionated plexuses in the peribiliary fibromuscular tissue of the EBD. No PGP-IR ganglionated plexuses were detected in the EBD. The location of the general (PGP-IR) and nitrergic (nNOS-IR) intrinsic nerves of the trout liver suggest a conserved evolutionary role of the nervous control of hepatic blood flow and hepatobiliary activity.

  2. Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase Is Dislocated in Type I Fibers of Myalgic Muscle but Can Recover with Physical Exercise Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Jensen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Trapezius myalgia is the most common type of chronic neck pain. While physical exercise reduces pain and improves muscle function, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Nitric oxide (NO signaling is important in modulating cellular function, and a dysfunctional neuronal NO synthase (nNOS may contribute to an ineffective muscle function. This study investigated nNOS expression and localization in chronically painful muscle. Forty-one women clinically diagnosed with trapezius myalgia (MYA and 18 healthy controls (CON were included in the case-control study. Subsequently, MYA were randomly assigned to either 10 weeks of specific strength training (SST, n=18, general fitness training (GFT, n=15, or health information (REF, n=8. Distribution of fiber type, cross-sectional area, and sarcolemmal nNOS expression did not differ between MYA and CON. However, MYA showed increased sarcoplasmic nNOS localization (18.8 ± 12 versus 12.8 ± 8%, P=0.049 compared with CON. SST resulted in a decrease of sarcoplasm-localized nNOS following training (before 18.1 ± 12 versus after 12.0 ± 12%; P=0,027. We demonstrate that myalgic muscle displays altered nNOS localization and that 10 weeks of strength training normalize these disruptions, which supports previous findings of impaired muscle oxygenation during work tasks and reduced pain following exercise.

  3. Role of nitric oxide in neuronal plasticity in the mammal central and peripheral nervous systems

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    La lesión de un nervio periférico induce la sobre-expresión de la enzima óxido nítrico sintasa (Nos) en el nervio afectado. Este tipo de lesión, así como ciertas enfermedades neurodegenerativas, cursan con una disminución de la densidad sínáptica central junto con la expresión de novo y/o sobre-expresión de NOS neuronal (nNOS) en las motoneuronas. Dado que el óxido nítrico (NO) participa en numerosos fenómenos de plasticidad sináptica, se podría sugerir un papel del NO en procesos de El princ...

  4. Biphasic Effect of Diabetes on Neuronal Nitric Oxide Release in Rat Mesenteric Arteries.

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    Esther Sastre

    Full Text Available We analysed possible time-dependent changes in nitrergic perivascular innervation function from diabetic rats and mechanisms implicated.In endothelium-denuded mesenteric arteries from control and four- (4W and eight-week (8W streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats the vasoconstriction to EFS (electrical field stimulation was analysed before and after preincubation with L-NAME. Neuronal NO release was analysed in the absence and presence of L-arginine, tetrahydrobiopterine (BH4 and L-arginine plus BH4. Superoxide anion (O2-, peroxynitrite (ONOO- and superoxide dismutase (SOD activity were measured. Expressions of Cu-Zn SOD, nNOS, p-nNOS Ser1417, p-nNOS Ser847, and Arginase (Arg I and II were analysed.EFS response was enhanced at 4W, and to a lesser extent at 8W. L-NAME increased EFS response in control rats and at 8W, but not at 4W. NO release was decreased at 4W and restored at 8W. L-arginine or BH4 increased NO release at 4W, but not 8W. SOD activity and O2- generation were increased at both 4W and 8W. ONOO- decreased at 4W while increased at 8W. Cu-Zn SOD, nNOS and p-NOS Ser1417 expressions remained unmodified at 4W and 8W, whereas p-nNOS Ser847 was increased at 4W. ArgI was overexpressed at 4W, remaining unmodified at 8W. ArgII expression was similar in all groups.Our results show a time-dependent effect of diabetes on neuronal NO release. At 4W, diabetes induced increased O2- generation, nNOS uncoupling and overexpression of ArgI and p-nNOS Ser847, resulting in decreased NO release. At 8W, NO release was restored, involving normalisation of ArgI and p-nNOS Ser847 expressions.

  5. Biphasic Effect of Diabetes on Neuronal Nitric Oxide Release in Rat Mesenteric Arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastre, Esther; Caracuel, Laura; Blanco-Rivero, Javier; Callejo, María; Xavier, Fabiano E.; Balfagón, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We analysed possible time-dependent changes in nitrergic perivascular innervation function from diabetic rats and mechanisms implicated. Materials and Methods In endothelium-denuded mesenteric arteries from control and four- (4W) and eight-week (8W) streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats the vasoconstriction to EFS (electrical field stimulation) was analysed before and after preincubation with L-NAME. Neuronal NO release was analysed in the absence and presence of L-arginine, tetrahydrobiopterine (BH4) and L-arginine plus BH4. Superoxide anion (O2-), peroxynitrite (ONOO-) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were measured. Expressions of Cu-Zn SOD, nNOS, p-nNOS Ser1417, p-nNOS Ser847, and Arginase (Arg) I and II were analysed. Results EFS response was enhanced at 4W, and to a lesser extent at 8W. L-NAME increased EFS response in control rats and at 8W, but not at 4W. NO release was decreased at 4W and restored at 8W. L-arginine or BH4 increased NO release at 4W, but not 8W. SOD activity and O2- generation were increased at both 4W and 8W. ONOO- decreased at 4W while increased at 8W. Cu-Zn SOD, nNOS and p-NOS Ser1417 expressions remained unmodified at 4W and 8W, whereas p-nNOS Ser847 was increased at 4W. ArgI was overexpressed at 4W, remaining unmodified at 8W. ArgII expression was similar in all groups. Conclusions Our results show a time-dependent effect of diabetes on neuronal NO release. At 4W, diabetes induced increased O2- generation, nNOS uncoupling and overexpression of ArgI and p-nNOS Ser847, resulting in decreased NO release. At 8W, NO release was restored, involving normalisation of ArgI and p-nNOS Ser847 expressions. PMID:27272874

  6. Impaired neuronal nitric oxide synthase-mediated vasodilator responses to mental stress in essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sitara G; Geer, Amber; Fok, Henry W; Shabeeh, Husain; Brett, Sally E; Shah, Ajay M; Chowienczyk, Philip J

    2015-04-01

    Neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) regulates blood flow in resistance vasculature at rest and during mental stress. To investigate whether nNOS signaling is dysfunctional in essential hypertension, forearm blood flow responses to mental stress were examined in 88 subjects: 48 with essential hypertension (42±14 years; blood pressure, 141±17/85±15 mm Hg; mean±SD) and 40 normotensive controls (38±14 years; 117±13/74±9 mm Hg). A subsample of 34 subjects (17 hypertensive) participated in a single blind 2-phase crossover study, in which placebo or sildenafil 50 mg PO was administered before an intrabrachial artery infusion of the selective nNOS inhibitor S-methyl-l-thiocitrulline (SMTC, 0.05, 0.1, and 0.2 μmol/min) at rest and during mental stress. In a further subsample (n=21) with an impaired blood flow response to mental stress, responses were measured in the presence and absence of the α-adrenergic antagonist phentolamine. The blood flow response to mental stress was impaired in hypertensive compared with normotensive subjects (37±7% versus 70±8% increase over baseline; Phypertensive subjects (reduction of 40±11% versus 3.0±14%, respectively, P=0.01, between groups). Sildenafil reduced the blood flow response to stress in normotensive subjects from 89±14% to 43±14% (Phypertensive subjects. Phentolamine augmented impaired blood flow responses to mental stress from 39±8% to 67±13% (Phypertension is associated with impaired mental stress-induced nNOS-mediated vasodilator responses; this may relate to increased sympathetic outflow in hypertension. nNOS dysfunction may impair vascular homeostasis in essential hypertension and contribute to stress-induced cardiovascular events.

  7. Restricting the conformational freedom of the neuronal nitric-oxide synthase flavoprotein domain reveals impact on electron transfer and catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yue; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Stuehr, Dennis J

    2017-04-21

    The signaling molecule nitric oxide (NO) is synthesized in animals by structurally related NO synthases (NOSs), which contain NADPH/FAD- and FMN-binding domains. During catalysis, NADPH-derived electrons transfer into FAD and then distribute into the FMN domain for further transfer to internal or external heme groups. Conformational freedom of the FMN domain is thought to be essential for the electron transfer (ET) reactions in NOSs. To directly examine this concept, we utilized a "Cys-lite" neuronal NOS flavoprotein domain and substituted Cys for two residues (Glu-816 and Arg-1229) forming a salt bridge between the NADPH/FAD and FMN domains in the conformationally closed structure to allow cross-domain disulfide bond formation or cross-linking by bismaleimides of various lengths. The disulfide bond cross-link caused a ≥95% loss of cytochrome c reductase activity that was reversible with DTT treatment, whereas graded cross-link lengthening gradually increased activity, thus defining the conformational constraints in the catalytic process. We used spectroscopic and stopped-flow techniques to further investigate how the changes in FMN domain conformational freedom impact the following: (i) the NADPH interaction; (ii) kinetics of electron loading (flavin reduction); (iii) stabilization of open versus closed conformational forms in two different flavin redox states; (iv) reactivity of the reduced FMN domain toward cytochrome c; (v) response to calmodulin binding; and (vi) the rates of interflavin ET and the FMN domain conformational dynamics. Together, our findings help explain how the spatial and temporal behaviors of the FMN domain impact catalysis by the NOS flavoprotein domain and how these behaviors are governed to enable electron flow through the enzyme. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. The nitric oxide-cyclic GMP pathway regulates FoxO and alters dopaminergic neuron survival in Drosophila.

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    Tomoko Kanao

    Full Text Available Activation of the forkhead box transcription factor FoxO is suggested to be involved in dopaminergic (DA neurodegeneration in a Drosophila model of Parkinson's disease (PD, in which a PD gene product LRRK2 activates FoxO through phosphorylation. In the current study that combines Drosophila genetics and biochemical analysis, we show that cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP-dependent kinase II (cGKII also phosphorylates FoxO at the same residue as LRRK2, and Drosophila orthologues of cGKII and LRRK2, DG2/For and dLRRK, respectively, enhance the neurotoxic activity of FoxO in an additive manner. Biochemical assays using mammalian cGKII and FoxO1 reveal that cGKII enhances the transcriptional activity of FoxO1 through phosphorylation of the FoxO1 S319 site in the same manner as LRRK2. A Drosophila FoxO mutant resistant to phosphorylation by DG2 and dLRRK (dFoxO S259A corresponding to human FoxO1 S319A suppressed the neurotoxicity and improved motor dysfunction caused by co-expression of FoxO and DG2. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS and soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC also increased FoxO's activity, whereas the administration of a NOS inhibitor L-NAME suppressed the loss of DA neurons in aged flies co-expressing FoxO and DG2. These results strongly suggest that the NO-FoxO axis contributes to DA neurodegeneration in LRRK2-linked PD.

  9. Signaling Mechanisms in the Nitric Oxide Donor- and Amphetamine-Induced Dopamine Release in Mesencephalic Primary Cultured Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salum, Cristiane; Schmidt, Fanny; Michel, Patrick P; Del-Bel, Elaine; Raisman-Vozari, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has shown that nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitors prevent rodents' sensorimotor gating impairments induced by dopamine releasing drugs, such as amphetamine (Amph) and methylphenidate. The mechanisms of this effect have not been entirely understood. In the present work, we investigated some possible mechanisms by which the NO donor, NOC-12 (3-ethyl-3-(ethylaminoethyl)-1-hydroxy-2-oxo-1-triazene), influence spontaneous and Amph-induced dopamine release, using rat mesencephalic primary cultured neurons preparations. Our results showed that NOC-12 increased dopamine release in a concentration-dependent manner and potentiated the Amph-induced one. Dopamine release induced by NOC-12 was disrupted by N-acetyl-L-cystein (NAC-a free radical scavenger) and MK-801, a NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) non-competitive antagonist, and was concentration dependently affected by oxadiazolo[4,3]quinoxalin-1-one, an inhibitor of the soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC). In contrast, dopamine released by Amph was facilitated by NAC and by MK-801 and not affected by nifedipine (a L-type-Ca(+2) channel blocker), which enhanced NOC-12-induced dopamine release. The present work demonstrates that DA release induced by NOC-12 is partially dependent on sGC and on NMDA activation, and is modulated by L-type Ca(+2) channel and the antioxidant NAC. This mechanism differs from the Amph-induced one, which appears not to depend on L-type Ca(+2) channel and seems to be facilitated by NMDA channel blocking and by NAC. These results suggest that Amph and NOC-12 induce dopamine release through complementary pathways, which may explain the potentiation of Amph-induced dopamine release by NOC-12. These findings contribute to understand the involvement of NO in dopamine-related neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase improves gas exchange in ventilator-induced lung injury after pneumonectomy

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    Suborov Evgeny V

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanical ventilation with high tidal volumes may cause ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI and enhanced generation of nitric oxide (NO. We demonstrated in sheep that pneumonectomy followed by injurious ventilation promotes pulmonary edema. We wished both to test the hypothesis that neuronal NOS (nNOS, which is distributed in airway epithelial and neuronal tissues, could be involved in the pathogenesis of VILI and we also aimed at investigating the influence of an inhibitor of nNOS on the course of VILI after pneumonectomy. Methods Anesthetized sheep underwent right pneumonectomy, mechanical ventilation with tidal volumes (VT of 6 mL/kg and FiO2 0.5, and were subsequently randomized to a protectively ventilated group (PROTV; n = 8 keeping VT and FiO2 unchanged, respiratory rate (RR 25 inflations/min and PEEP 4 cm H2O for the following 8 hrs; an injuriously ventilated group with VT of 12 mL/kg, zero end-expiratory pressure, and FiO2 and RR unchanged (INJV; n = 8 and a group, which additionally received the inhibitor of nNOS, 7-nitroindazole (NI 1.0 mg/kg/h intravenously from 2 hours after the commencement of injurious ventilation (INJV + NI; n = 8. We assessed respiratory, hemodynamic and volumetric variables, including both the extravascular lung water index (EVLWI and the pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI. We measured plasma nitrite/nitrate (NOx levels and examined lung biopsies for lung injury score (LIS. Results Both the injuriously ventilated groups demonstrated a 2–3-fold rise in EVLWI and PVPI, with no significant effects of NI. In the INJV group, gas exchange deteriorated in parallel with emerging respiratory acidosis, but administration of NI antagonized the derangement of oxygenation and the respiratory acidosis significantly. NOx displayed no significant changes and NI exerted no significant effect on LIS in the INJV group. Conclusion Inhibition of nNOS improved gas exchange

  11. Age-related changes of NGF, BDNF, parvalbumin and neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity in the mouse hippocampal CA1 sector.

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    Hayakawa, Natsumi; Abe, Manami; Eto, Risa; Kato, Hiroyuki; Araki, Tsutomu

    2008-06-01

    We investigated the age-related alterations in nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), parvalbumin and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) immunoreactivity of the mouse hippocampal CA1 sector. NGF and BDNF immunoreactivity was unchanged in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons from 2 to 50-59 weeks of birth. In contrast, a significant increase in the NGF and BDNF immunoreactivity was observed in glial cells of the hippocampal CA1 sector from 40-42 to 50-59 weeks of birth. On the other hand, the number of parvalbumin- and nNOS-positive interneurons was unchanged in the hippocampal CA1 sector during aging processes, except for a significant decrease of nNOS-positive interneurons 2 weeks of birth. Our results indicate that NGF and BDNF immunoreactivity was unaltered in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons during aging processes. In contrast, a significant increase in the NGF and BDNF immunoreactivity was observed in glial cells of the hippocampal CA1 sector during aging processes. The present study also shows that the number of parvalbumin- and nNOS-positive interneurons was unchanged in the hippocampal CA1 sector during aging processes, except for a significant decrease of nNOS-positive interneurons 2 weeks of birth. These results demonstrate that the expression of glial NGF and BDNF may play a key role for helping survival and maintenance of pyramidal neurons and neuronal functions in the hippocampal CA1 sector during aging processes. Furthermore, our findings suggest that parvalbumin- and nNOS-positive interneurons in the hippocampal CA1 sector are resistant to aging processes. Moreover, our findings suggest that nitric oxide synthesized by the nNOS may play some role for neuronal growth during postnatal development.

  12. Transcriptional coupling of synaptic transmission and energy metabolism: role of nuclear respiratory factor 1 in co-regulating neuronal nitric oxide synthase and cytochrome c oxidase genes in neurons.

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    Dhar, Shilpa S; Liang, Huan Ling; Wong-Riley, Margaret T T

    2009-10-01

    Neuronal activity is highly dependent on energy metabolism; yet, the two processes have traditionally been regarded as independently regulated at the transcriptional level. Recently, we found that the same transcription factor, nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) co-regulates an important energy-generating enzyme, cytochrome c oxidase, as well as critical subunits of glutamatergic receptors. The present study tests our hypothesis that the co-regulation extends to the next level of glutamatergic synapses, namely, neuronal nitric oxide synthase, which generates nitric oxide as a downstream signaling molecule. Using in silico analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, chromatin immunoprecipitation, promoter mutations, and NRF-1 silencing, we documented that NRF-1 functionally bound to Nos1, but not Nos2 (inducible) and Nos3 (endothelial) gene promoters. Both COX and Nos1 transcripts were up-regulated by depolarizing KCl treatment and down-regulated by TTX-mediated impulse blockade in neurons. However, NRF-1 silencing blocked the up-regulation of both Nos1 and COX induced by KCl depolarization, and over-expression of NRF-1 rescued both Nos1 and COX transcripts down-regulated by TTX. These findings are consistent with our hypothesis that synaptic neuronal transmission and energy metabolism are tightly coupled at the molecular level.

  13. Activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 regulated by nitric oxide is associated with neuronal survival in hippocampal neurons in a rat model of ischemia

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    ZENG Xian-wei; LI Ming-wei; PAN Jing; JI Tai-ling; YANG Bin; ZHANG Bo; WANG Xiao-qiang

    2011-01-01

    Background C-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway plays a critical role in cerebral ischemia.Although the mechanistic basis for this activation of JNK1/2 is uncertain,oxidative stress may play a role.The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the activation of JNK1/2 is associated with the production of endogenous nitric oxide (NO).Methods Ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) was induced by cerebral four-vessel occlusion.Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into 6 groups:sham group,I/R group,neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) inhibitor (7-nitroindazole,7-NI)given group,inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor (2-amino-5,6-dihydro-methylthiazine,AMT) given group,sodium chloride control group,and 1% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) control group.The levels of protein expression and phospho-JNK1/2 were detected by Western blotting and the survival hippocampus neurons in CA1 zone were observed by cresyl violet staining.Results The study illustrated two peaks of JNK1/2 activation occurred at 30 minutes and 3 days during reperfusion.7-NI inhibited JNK1/2 activation during the early reperfusion,whereas AMT preferably attenuated JNK1/2 activation during the later reperfusion.Administration of 7-NI and AMT can decrease I/R-induced neuronal loss in hippocampal CA1 region.Conclusion JNK1/2 activation is associated with endogenous NO in response to ischemic insult.

  14. Activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) signaling pathway in 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-induced neurotoxicity.

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    Jiang, Junkang; Duan, Zhiqing; Nie, Xiaoke; Xi, Hanqing; Li, Aihong; Guo, Aisong; Wu, Qiyun; Jiang, Shengyang; Zhao, Jianya; Chen, Gang

    2014-07-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) has been reported to cause alterations in cognitive and motor behavior during both development and adulthood. In this study, the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) signaling pathway was investigated in differentiated pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells to better understand the mechanisms of TCDD-induced neurotoxicity. TCDD exposure induced a time- and dose-dependent increase in nNOS expression. High levels of nitric oxide (NO) production by nNOS activation induced mitochondrial cytochrome c (Cyt-c) release and down-regulation of Bcl-2. Additionally, TCDD increased the expression of active caspase-3 and significantly led to apoptosis in PC12 cells. However, these effects above could be effectively inhibited by the addition of 7-nitroindazole (7-NI), a highly selective nNOS inhibitor. Moreover, in the brain cortex of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, nNOS was also found to have certain relationship with TCDD-induced neuronal apoptosis. Together, our findings establish a role for nNOS as an enhancer of TCDD-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells.

  15. The selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor 7-nitroindazole has acute analgesic but not cumulative effects in a rat model of peripheral neuropathy

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    Henry JL

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Liliane J Dableh, James L HenryDepartment of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, CanadaAbstract: Chronic neuropathic pain that may arise from various nerve injuries or insults remains notoriously difficult to manage. The neuronal isoform of the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (nNOS has been shown to be involved in the spinal transmission of nociception in animal models of chronic pain. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of single dose and repeated administration of a selective nNOS inhibitor. Rats were unilaterally implanted with a 2-mm polyethylene cuff around the sciatic nerve. Paw withdrawal thresholds were measured using von Frey filament stimulation. Rats were given 10, 20, or 30 mg/kg of 7-nitroindazole (7-NI, or vehicle, on days 2, 5, and 7 after model induction, respectively. Paw withdrawal thresholds were measured before and at 30 and 60 min after injection. 7-NI significantly increased paw withdrawal thresholds at 60 min at the 20 and 30 mg/kg dosages. In the second part of this study, rats were given 20 mg/kg 7-NI daily for five days starting immediately after cuff implantation (days 0 to 4, and the cuff was removed on day 4. Withdrawal thresholds were measured intermittently over a 24-day observation period. No differences in withdrawal thresholds were observed between drug and vehicle-treated rats. Therefore, early and repeated administration of 7-NI did not affect the development or progression of the model. In conclusion, inhibition of nNOS had an analgesic but not a pre-emptive effect in this model of peripheral neuropathic pain.Keywords: neuronal nitric oxide synthase, nitric oxide, 7-nitroindazole, neuropathic pain, peripheral nerve injury, nociception 

  16. Role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neuronal nitric oxide synthase in stress-induced depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan Wang; Shucheng An

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Accumulated evidence indicates an important role for hippocampal dendrite atrophy in development of depression, while brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) participates in hippocampal dendrite growth. OBJECTIVE: To discuss the role of BDNF and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in chronic and unpredictable stress-induced depression and the pathogenesis of depression.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Randomized, controlled animal experiment. The experiment was carried out from October 2006 to May 2007 at the Department of Animal Physiology, College of Life Science, Shaanxi Normal University.MATERIALS: Thirty-seven male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 250-300 g at the beginning of the experiment were obtained from Shaanxi Provincial Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Xi'an, China). BDNF antibody and nNOS antibody were provided by Santa Cruz (USA). K252a (BDNF inhibitor) and 7-NI (nNOS inhibitor) were provided by Sigma (USA). METHODS: Animals were randomly divided into five groups: Control group, chronic unpredicted mild stress (CUMS) group, K252a group, K252a+7-NI group and 7-NI+CUMS group. While the Control, K252a and K252a+7-NI groups of rats not subjected to stress had free access to food and water, other groups of rats were subjected to nine stressors randomly applied for 21 days, with each stressor applied 2-3 times. On days 1, 7, 14 and 21 during CUMS, rats received microinjection of 1 μL of physiological saline in the Control and CUMS groups, 1 μL of K252a in the K252a group, 1 μL of K252a and 7-NI in the K252a+7-NI group, and 1 μL of 7-NI in the 7-NI+CUMS group. We observed a variety of alterations in sucrose preference, body weight change, open field test and forced swimming test, and observed the expression of BDNF and nNOS in rat hippocampus by immunohistochemistry;RESULTS: Compared with the Control group, the behavior of the CUMS rats was significantly depressed, the expression of BDNF decreased (P < 0.01) but the expression of n

  17. Effects of oxygen and glucose deprivation on the expression and distribution of neuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthases and on protein nitration in rat cerebral cortex.

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    Alonso, David; Serrano, Julia; Rodríguez, Ignacio; Ruíz-Cabello, Jesús; Fernández, Ana Patricia; Encinas, Juan Manuel; Castro-Blanco, Susana; Bentura, María Luisa; Santacana, María; Richart, Ana; Fernández-Vizarra, Paula; Uttenthal, Lars Otto; Rodrigo, José

    2002-02-04

    Changes in the nitric oxide (NO) system of the rat cerebral cortex were investigated by immunohistochemistry, immunoblotting, NO synthase (NOS) activity assay, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in an experimental model of global cerebral ischemia and reperfusion. Brains were perfused transcardially with an oxygenated plasma substitute and subjected to 30 minutes of oxygen and glucose deprivation, followed by reperfusion for up to 12 hours with oxygenated medium containing glucose. A sham group was perfused without oxygen or glucose deprivation, and a further group was treated with the NOS inhibitor N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) before and during perfusion. Global ischemia led to cerebrocortical injury as shown by diffusion MRI. This was accompanied by increasing morphologic changes in the large type I interneurons expressing neuronal NOS (nNOS) and the appearance of nNOS immunoreactivity in small type II neurons. The nNOS-immunoreactive band and calcium-dependent NOS activity showed an initial increase, followed by a fall after 6 hours of reperfusion. Inducible NOS immunoreactivity appeared in neurons, especially pyramidal cells of layers IV-V, after 4 hours of reperfusion, with corresponding changes on immunoblotting and in calcium-independent NOS activity. Immunoreactive protein nitrotyrosine, present in the nuclear area of neurons in nonperfused controls and sham-perfused animals, showed changes in intensity and distribution, appearing in the neuronal processes during the reperfusion period. Prior and concurrent L-NAME administration blocked the changes on diffusion MRI and attenuated the morphologic changes, suggesting that NO and consequent peroxynitrite formation during ischemia-reperfusion contributes to cerebral injury.

  18. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase has a role in the detrimental effects of lipopolysaccharide on spatial memory and synaptic plasticity in rats.

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    Anaeigoudari, Akbar; Soukhtanloo, Mohammad; Shafei, Mohammad Naser; Sadeghnia, Hamid Reza; Reisi, Parham; Beheshti, Farimah; Behradnia, Sepehr; Mousavi, Seyed Mojtaba; Hosseini, Mahmoud

    2016-04-01

    The role of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced memory and synaptic plasticity impairment was investigated. The rats were divided and treated as follows: (1) control (saline), (2) LPS, (3) 7NI (7-nitroindazole as a nNOS inhibitor)-LPS and (4) 7NI. In a Morris water maze, the LPS group took a longer amount of time and traveled a greater distance to reach the platform, this was prevented by 7NI. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) metabolites in the hippocampus of the LPS group were higher while the total thiol, superoxide dismutase and catalase were lower than that of the controlled specimen. Pre-treatment using 7NI prevented the changes in the biochemical criteria. The slope and amplitude of the field excitatory post-synaptic potential (fEPSP) in the LPS group decreased, whereas in 7NI-LPS group they increased. It is suggested that inhibition of nNOS by 7NI improves the deleterious effects of LPS by reducing NO metabolites and the brain tissues oxidative damage. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  19. Electrochemically driven biocatalysis of the oxygenase domain of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in indium tin oxide nanoparticles/polyvinyl alcohol nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xuan; Wollenberger, Ulla; Qian, Jing; Lettau, Katrin; Jung, Christiane; Liu, Songqin

    2013-12-01

    Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) plays a critical role in a number of key physiological and pathological processes. Investigation of electron-transfer reactions in NOS would contribute to a better understanding of the nitric oxide (NO) synthesis mechanism. Herein, we describe an electrochemically driven catalytic strategy, using a nanocomposite that consisted of the oxygenase domain of neuronal NOS (D290nNOSoxy), indium tin oxide (ITO) nanoparticles and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Fast direct electron transfer between electrodes and D290nNOSoxy was observed with the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (ket) of 154.8 ± 0.1s(-1) at the scan rate of 5 Vs(-1). Moreover, the substrate N(ω)-hydroxy-L-arginine (NHA) was used to prove the concept of electrochemically driven biocatalysis of D290nNOSoxy. In the presence of the oxygen cosubstrate and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) cofactor, the addition of NHA caused the decreases of both oxidation current at +0.1 V and reduction current at potentials ranging from -0.149 V to -0.549 V vs Ag/AgCl. Thereafter, a series of control experiments such as in the absence of BH4 or D290nNOSoxy were performed. All the results demonstrated that D290nNOSoxy biocatalysis was successfully driven by electrodes in the presence of BH4 and oxygen. This novel bioelectronic system showed potential for further investigation of NOS and biosensor applications.

  20. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS, NOS1) rs693534 and rs7977109 variants and risk for restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Jiménez, Félix Javier; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; Martínez, Carmen; Zurdo, Martín; Turpín-Fenoll, Laura; Millán-Pascual, Jorge; Adeva-Bartolomé, Teresa; Cubo, Esther; Navacerrada, Francisco; Rojo-Sebastián, Ana; Rubio, Lluisa; Calleja, Marisol; Plaza-Nieto, José Francisco; Pilo-de-la-Fuente, Belén; Arroyo-Solera, Margarita; García-Albea, Esteban; García-Martín, Elena; Agúndez, José A G

    2015-06-01

    Several biochemical, neuropathological, and experimental data suggest a possible role of nitric oxide (NO) in the pathophysiology of restless legs syndrome (RLS). Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS or NOS1) gene (rs7977109 and rs693534) have been found to be associated with the risk for RLS in Germans, although only one of them (rs7977109) remained as significant after multiple comparison tests. The aim of our study was to replicate the possible association between these SNPs and risk for RLS in the Spanish population. We studied the allelic and genotype frequencies of the SNPs rs7977109 and rs693534 in 205 patients with RLS and 328 healthy controls using TaqMan genotyping. The rs7977109 and rs693534 genotypes and allelic frequencies did not significantly differ between patients with RLS and controls and were unrelated with the age at onset of RLS, gender, ferritin levels, and response to dopaminergic or gabaergic agents. The rs7999109GA genotype was overrepresented in RLS patients with positive family history of RLS, and in patients with symptomatic response to clonazepam. The results of our study suggest that these two NOS1 SNPs are not related to the overall risk for RLS in the Spanish population.

  1. Thermodynamic and kinetic analysis of the isolated FAD domain of rat neuronal nitric oxide synthase altered in the region of the FAD shielding residue Phe1395.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunford, Adrian J; Marshall, Ker R; Munro, Andrew W; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2004-06-01

    In rat neuronal nitric oxide synthase, Phe1395 is positioned over the FAD isoalloxazine ring. This is replaced by Trp676 in human cytochrome P450 reductase, a tryptophan in related diflavin reductases (e.g. methionine synthase reductase and novel reductase 1), and tyrosine in plant ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase. Trp676 in human cytochrome P450 reductase is conformationally mobile, and plays a key role in enzyme reduction. Mutagenesis of Trp676 to alanine results in a functional NADH-dependent reductase. Herein, we describe studies of rat neuronal nitric oxide synthase FAD domains, in which the aromatic shielding residue Phe1395 is replaced by tryptophan, alanine and serine. In steady-state assays the F1395A and F1395S domains have a greater preference for NADH compared with F1395W and wild-type. Stopped-flow studies indicate flavin reduction by NADH is significantly faster with F1395S and F1395A domains, suggesting that this contributes to altered preference in coenzyme specificity. Unlike cytochrome P450 reductase, the switch in coenzyme specificity is not attributed to differential binding of NADPH and NADH, but probably results from improved geometry for hydride transfer in the F1395S- and F1395A-NADH complexes. Potentiometry indicates that the substitutions do not significantly perturb thermodynamic properties of the FAD, although considerable changes in electronic absorption properties are observed in oxidized F1395A and F1395S, consistent with changes in hydrophobicity of the flavin environment. In wild-type and F1395W FAD domains, prolonged incubation with NADPH results in development of the neutral blue semiquinone FAD species. This reaction is suppressed in the mutant FAD domains lacking the shielding aromatic residue.

  2. NMDA receptor blockade alters the intracellular distribution of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the superficial layers of the rat superior colliculus

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    R.E. de Bittencourt-Navarrete

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is a molecular messenger involved in several events of synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system. Ca2+ influx through the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR triggers the synthesis of NO by activating the enzyme neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS in postsynaptic densities. Therefore, NMDAR and nNOS are part of the intricate scenario of postsynaptic densities. In the present study, we hypothesized that the intracellular distribution of nNOS in the neurons of superior colliculus (SC superficial layers is an NMDAR activity-dependent process. We used osmotic minipumps to promote chronic blockade of the receptors with the pharmacological agent MK-801 in the SC of 7 adult rats. The effective blockade of NMDAR was assessed by changes in the protein level of the immediate early gene NGFI-A, which is a well-known NMDAR activity-dependent expressing transcription factor. Upon chronic infusion of MK-801, a decrease of 47% in the number of cells expressing NGFI-A was observed in the SC of treated animals. Additionally, the filled dendritic extent by the histochemical product of nicotinamide adenine di-nucleotide phosphate diaphorase was reduced by 45% when compared to the contralateral SC of the same animals and by 64% when compared to the SC of control animals. We conclude that the proper intracellular localization of nNOS in the retinorecipient layers of SC depends on NMDAR activation. These results are consistent with the view that the participation of NO in the physiological and plastic events of the central nervous system might be closely related to an NMDAR activity-dependent function.

  3. [Nitric oxide production by normal and injured neurons of Nodose ganglion and Nucleus dorsalis of Vagus nerve].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motavkin, P A; Shumatova, T A; Andreeva, N A; Tikhanskiĭ, S N

    2000-01-01

    Nodosum ganglion and nucleus dorsalis contain from 19.2 to 22.65% of NO-positive neurons. Their amount increases up to almost 77.4 and 68.8% in the ganglion and the nucleus dorsalis, respectively, in the damaged nervus vagus due to i-NOS transcription. It has been shown that NO participates in desorganization and recovery of the traumatic neuron, as auto- and paracrine regulator.

  4. Neuronal nitric oxide contributes to neuroplasticity-associated protein expression through cGMP, protein kinase G, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase.

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    Gallo, Eduardo F; Iadecola, Costantino

    2011-05-11

    Nitric oxide (NO) synthesized by neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) has long been implicated in brain plasticity. However, it is unclear how this short-lived mediator contributes to the long-term molecular changes underlying neuroplasticity, which typically require activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway and gene expression. To address this issue, we used a neuroplasticity model based on treatment of neuronal cultures with bicuculline and a model of experience-dependent plasticity in the barrel cortex. In neuronal cultures, NOS inhibition attenuated the bicuculline-induced activation of ERK and the expression of c-Fos, Egr-1, Arc, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), proteins essential for neuroplasticity. Furthermore, inhibition of the NO target soluble guanylyl cyclase or of the cGMP effector kinase protein kinase G (PKG) reduced both ERK activation and plasticity-related protein expression. NOS inhibition did not affect phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), a well-established ERK nuclear target, but it attenuated the nuclear accumulation of the CREB coactivator TORC1 and suppressed the activation of Elk-1, another transcription factor target of ERK. Consistent with these in vitro observations, induction of c-Fos, Egr-1, and BDNF was attenuated in the D1 cortical barrel of nNOS(-/-) mice subjected to single whisker experience. These results establish nNOS-derived NO as a key factor in the expression of proteins involved in neuroplasticity, an effect mediated through cGMP, PKG, and ERK signaling. These actions of NO do not depend on CREB phosphorylation but may involve TORC1 and Elk-1. Our data unveil a previously unrecognized link between neuronal NO and the molecular machinery responsible for the sustained synaptic changes underlying neuroplasticity.

  5. Protective effect of keishi-bukuryo-gan and its constituent medicinal plants against nitric oxide donor-induced neuronal death in cultured cerebellar granule cells.

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    Shimada, Y; Yokoyama, K; Goto, H; Sekiya, N; Mantani, N; Tahara, E; Hikiami, H; Terasawa, K

    2004-07-01

    Keishi-bukuryo-gan (Gui-Zhi-Fu-Ling-Wan) (KBG) is a traditional Chinese/Japanese medical (Kampo) formulation that has been administered to patients with "Oketsu" (blood stagnation) syndrome. In the process of neuronal cell death induced by brain ischemia, excessive generation of nitric oxide (NO) free radicals is implicated in the neurotoxicity. In the present study, we examined the protective effects of KBG and its constituent medicinal plants against NO donors, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and 2,2'-(hydroxynitrosohydrazino)bis-ethanamine (NOC18)-induced neuronal death in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells (CGCs). MTT assay showed cell viability to be significantly increased by the addition of KBG extract (KBGE) (100 microg/ml), Cinnamomi Cortex extract (CCE) (3, 10 and 30 microg/ml), Paeoniae Radix extract (PRE) (100 microg/ml) and Moutan Cortex extract (MCE) (10 and 30 microg/ml) compared with exposure to SNP (30 microM, 24 h) only. Also, cell viability was significantly increased by the addition of KBGE (100 and 300 microg/ml), CCE (30 and 100 microg/ml), PRE (100 and 300 microg/ml) and MCE (30 and 100 microg/ml) compared with exposure to NOC 18 (100 microM, 48 h) only. Persicae Semen extract and Hoelen extract did not protect against NO donor-induced neuronal death. These results suggest that KBG has protective effect against NO-mediated neuronal death in cultured CGCs and that it is derived from Cinnamomi Cortex, Paeoniae Radix and Moutan Cortex.

  6. Intracerebroventricular administration of Shiga toxin type 2 altered the expression levels of neuronal nitric oxide synthase and glial fibrillary acidic protein in rat brains.

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    Boccoli, Javier; Loidl, C Fabián; Lopez-Costa, Juan José; Creydt, Virginia Pistone; Ibarra, Cristina; Goldstein, Jorge

    2008-09-16

    Shiga toxin (Stx) from enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (STEC) is the main cause of hemorrhagic colitis which may derive into Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS) and acute encephalopathy, one of the major risk factors for infant death caused by the toxin. We have previously demonstrated that intracerebroventricular administration of Stx2 causes neuronal death and glial cell damage in rat brains. In the present work, we observed that the intracerebroventricular administration of Stx2 increased the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) leading to astrogliosis. Confocal microscopy showed reactive astrocytes in contact with Stx2-containing neurons. Immunocolocalization of increased GFAP and Stx2 in astrocytes was also observed. This insult in the brain was correlated with changes in the expression and activity of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) by using the NADPH-diaphorase histochemical technique (NADPH-d HT). A significant decrease in NOS/NADPH-d-positive neurons and NOS/NADPH-d activity was observed in cerebral cortex and striatum, whereas an opposite effect was found in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. We concluded that the i.c.v. administration of Stx2 promotes a typical pattern of brain injury showing reactive astrocytes and an alteration in the number and activity of nNOS/NADPH-d. According to the functional state of nNOS/NADPH-d and to brain cell morphology data, it could be inferred that the i.c.v. administration of Stx2 leads to either a neurodegenerative or a neuroprotective mechanism in the affected brain areas. The present animal model resembles the encephalopathy developed in Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS) patients by STEC intoxication.

  7. Temperature dependent spin crossover in neuronal nitric oxide synthase bound with the heme-coordinating thioether inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Doukov, Tzanko; Li, Huiying; Sharma, Ajay; Martell, Jeffrey D.; Soltis, Michael; Silverman, Richard B.; Poulos, Thomas L.

    2011-01-01

    A series of L-arginine analogue nitric oxide synthase inhibitors with a thioether tail have been shown to form an Fe-S thioether interaction as evidenced by continuous electron density between the Fe and S atoms. Even so, the Fe-S thioether interaction was found to be far less important for inhibitor binding than the hydrophobic interactions between the alkyl group in the thioether tail and surrounding protein (Martell et al., (2010) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 798). However, among the few thioeth...

  8. Investigation on the change of nitric oxide synthetase positive neurons in hippocampus CA1 area of rats with hyperglycemia%高血糖大鼠海马CA1区一氧化氮合成酶阳性神经元变化的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周郦楠; 王冶; 孙永杰

    2002-01-01

    Objective To observe the expression of nitric oxide syhthetase(NOS) in hippocampus CA1 neurons with hyperglycemia.Method NADPH-d histochemical method was used.Rcsults NOS positive neurons expressed in hippocampus CA1 and nomal neurons of 6 weeks old rats with hyperglycemia(DM) and normal rats(NC).There was significant difference in neurons between DM group and control group.Conclusion NOS positive neurons decrease in hippocampus CA1 of rats with hyperglycemia.

  9. Inhibition of autophagy and glycolysis by nitric oxide during hypoxia-reoxygenation impairs cellular bioenergetics and promotes cell death in primary neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Gloria A; Liang, Qiuli; Dodson, Matthew; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Zhang, Jianhua

    2013-12-01

    Excessive nitric oxide (NO) production is known to damage mitochondrial proteins and the autophagy repair pathway and so can potentially contribute to neurotoxicity. Accordingly, we hypothesized that protection against protein damage from reactive oxygen and nitrogen species under conditions of low oxygen by the autophagy pathway in neurons would be impaired by NO and enhance bioenergetic dysfunction. Rat primary cortical neurons had the same basal cellular respiration in hypoxia as in normoxia, whereas NO-exposed cells exhibited a gradual decrease in mitochondrial respiration in hypoxia. Upon reoxygenation, the respiration in NO-treated cells did not recover to prehypoxic levels. Hypoxia-reoxygenation in the presence of NO was associated with inhibition of autophagy, and the inability to recover during reoxygenation was exacerbated by an inhibitor of autophagy, 3-methyladenine. The effects of hypoxia could be recapitulated by inhibiting glycolytic flux under normoxic conditions. Under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions NO exposure induced immediate stimulation of glycolysis, but prolonged NO exposure, associated with irreversible inhibition of mitochondrial respiration in hypoxia, inhibited glycolysis. Importantly, we found that NO inhibited basal respiration under normoxic conditions only when glucose was absent from the medium or glycolysis was inhibited by 2-deoxy-d-glucose, revealing a novel NO-dependent mechanism for the inhibition of mitochondrial respiration that is modulated by glycolysis. Taken together these data suggest an oxygen-dependent interaction between mitochondrial respiration, glycolysis, and autophagy in protecting neuronal cells exposed to NO. Importantly, they indicate that mitochondrial dysfunction is intimately linked to a failure of glycolytic flux induced by exposure to NO. In addition, these studies provide new insights into the understanding of how autophagy and NO may play interactive roles in neuroinflammation-induced cellular

  10. Abnormal social behavior, hyperactivity, impaired remote spatial memory, and increased D1-mediated dopaminergic signaling in neuronal nitric oxide synthase knockout mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanda Koichi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS is involved in the regulation of a diverse population of intracellular messenger systems in the brain. In humans, abnormal NOS/nitric oxide metabolism is suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of some neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Mice with targeted disruption of the nNOS gene exhibit abnormal behaviors. Here, we subjected nNOS knockout (KO mice to a battery of behavioral tests to further investigate the role of nNOS in neuropsychiatric functions. We also examined the role of nNOS in dopamine/DARPP-32 signaling in striatal slices from nNOS KO mice and the effects of the administration of a dopamine D1 receptor agonist on behavior in nNOS KO mice. Results nNOS KO mice showed hyperlocomotor activity in a novel environment, increased social interaction in their home cage, decreased depression-related behavior, and impaired spatial memory retention. In striatal slices from nNOS KO mice, the effects of a dopamine D1 receptor agonist, SKF81297, on the phosphorylation of DARPP-32 and AMPA receptor subunit GluR1 at protein kinase A sites were enhanced. Consistent with the biochemical results, intraperitoneal injection of a low dose of SKF81297 significantly decreased prepulse inhibition in nNOS KO mice, but not in wild-type mice. Conclusion These findings indicate that nNOS KO upregulates dopamine D1 receptor signaling, and induces abnormal social behavior, hyperactivity and impaired remote spatial memory. nNOS KO mice may serve as a unique animal model of psychiatric disorders.

  11. H2S-induced HCO3- secretion in the rat stomach--involvement of nitric oxide, prostaglandins, and capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Koji; Ise, Fumitaka; Takahashi, Kento; Aihara, Eitaro; Hayashi, Shusaku

    2015-04-30

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is known to be an important gaseous mediator that affects various functions under physiological and pathological conditions. We examined the effects of NaHS, a H2S donor, on HCO3(-) secretion in rat stomachs and investigated the mechanism involved in this response. Under urethane anesthesia, rat stomachs were mounted on an ex vivo chamber and perfused with saline. Acid secretion had been inhibited by omeprazole. The secretion of HCO3(-) was measured at pH 7.0 using a pH-stat method and by the addition of 10 mM HCl. NaHS (0.5-10 mM) was perfused in the stomach for 5 min. Indomethacin or L-NAME was administered s.c. before NaHS treatment, while glibenclamide (a KATP channel blocker), ONO-8711 (an EP1 antagonist), or propargylglycine (a cystathionine γ-lyase inhibitor) was given i.p. before. The mucosal perfusion of NaHS dose-dependently increased the secretion of HCO3(-), and this effect was significantly attenuated by indomethacin, L-NAME, and sensory deafferentation, but not by glibenclamide or ONO-8711. The luminal output of nitric oxide, but not the mucosal production of prostaglandin E2, was increased by the perfusion of NaHS. Mucosal acidification stimulated HCO3(-) secretion, and this response was inhibited by sensory deafferentation, indomethacin, L-NAME, and ONO-8711, but not by propargylglycine. These results suggested that H2S increased HCO3(-) secretion in the stomach, and this effect was mediated by capsaicin-sensitive afferent neurons and dependent on nitric oxide and prostaglandins, but not ATP-sensitive K(+) channels. Further study is needed to define the role of endogenous H2S in the mechanism underlying acid-induced gastric HCO3(-) secretion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Inhibition of neuronal nitric oxide synthase potentiates the dimethylphenylpiperazinium-evoked carrier-mediated release of noradrenaline from rat hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, J P; Sershen, H; Lajtha, A; Vizi, E S

    1996-09-06

    The effect of 7-nitroindazole (7-NI), an inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) on the dimethylphenylpiperazinium(DMPP)-evoked release of [3H]noradrenaline ([3H]NA) from rat hippocampal slices was studied. The effect of DMPP (20 microM) to increase the basal release of [3H]NA was significantly potentiated by 7-NI (40 microM). In our previous study we showed that the response to DMPP has two components, a nicotinic receptor-mediated, [Ca2+]-dependent exocytosis followed by a [Ca2+]-independent, uptake blocker-sensitive carrier-mediated release. To clarify which part of the response was affected by the inhibition of nNOS, we investigated the effect of 7-NI on the nicotine-evoked NA release (nicotine has only receptor-mediated effect) and on the DMPP-evoked NA release in Ca(2+)-free medium where the receptor-mediated component is abolished. Nicotine (100 microM) significantly increased the basal release of [3H]NA but this release was not affected, whereas in Ca(2+)-free medium the response to DMPP (20 microM) was still potentiated by 7-NI (40 microM). In the presence of the NA uptake blocker desipramine (10 microM) DMPP (20 microM) was unable to provoke NA release independently from the presence or absence of 7-NI (40 microM). Our data show that 7-NI influences the carrier-mediated component of DMPP-evoked [3H]NA release, which indicates that nitric oxide produced by nNOS may play a role in the regulation of the NA uptake carrier.

  13. Role of iron in the nitric oxide-mediated fungicidal mechanism of IFN-gamma-activated murine macrophages against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis conidia Papel do ferro no mecanismo fungicida mediado pelo óxido n��trico de macrófagos murinos ativados com IFN-gama contra conídias do Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Gonzalez

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential growth element of virtually all microorganisms and its restriction is one of the mechanisms used by macrophages to control microbial multiplication. Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, the agent of paracoccidioidomycosis, an important systemic mycosis in Latin America, is inhibited in its conidia-to-yeast conversion in the absence of iron. We studied the participation of iron in the nitric oxide (NO-mediated fungicidal mechanism against conidia. Peritoneal murine macrophages activated with 50U/mL of IFN-gamma or treated with 35 µM Deferoxamine (DEX and infected with P. brasiliensis conidia, were co-cultured and incubated for 96 h in the presence of different concentrations of holotransferrin (HOLO and FeS0(4. The supernatants were withdrawn in order to assess NO2 production by the Griess method. The monolayers were fixed, stained and observed microscopically. The percentage of the conidia-to-yeast transition was estimated by counting 200 intracellular propagules. IFN-gamma-activated or DEX-treated Mthetas presented marked inhibition of the conidia-to-yeast conversion (19 and 56%, respectively in comparison with non-activated or untreated Mthetas (80%. IFN-gamma-activated macrophages produced high NO levels in comparison with the controls. Additionally, when the activated or treated-macrophages were supplemented with iron donors (HOLO or FeSO4, the inhibitory action was reversed, although NO production remained intact. These results suggest that the NO-mediated fungicidal mechanism exerted by IFN-gamma-activated macrophages against P. brasiliensis conidia, is dependent of an iron interaction.O ferro é elemento essencial para o crescimento de microrganismos e sua limitação é um dos mecanismos usados por macrófagos para controlar a multiplicação microbiana. Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, o agente da paracoccidioidomicose, uma das micoses sistêmicas mais importantes na América Latina, é inibido em sua conversão de con

  14. Nitric oxide activates ATP-sensitive potassium channels in mammalian sensory neurons: action by direct S-nitrosylation

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    Kwok Wai-Meng

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP channels in neurons regulate excitability, neurotransmitter release and mediate protection from cell-death. Furthermore, activation of KATP channels is suppressed in DRG neurons after painful-like nerve injury. NO-dependent mechanisms modulate both KATP channels and participate in the pathophysiology and pharmacology of neuropathic pain. Therefore, we investigated NO modulation of KATP channels in control and axotomized DRG neurons. Results Cell-attached and cell-free recordings of KATP currents in large DRG neurons from control rats (sham surgery, SS revealed activation of KATP channels by NO exogenously released by the NO donor SNAP, through decreased sensitivity to [ATP]i. This NO-induced KATP channel activation was not altered in ganglia from animals that demonstrated sustained hyperalgesia-type response to nociceptive stimulation following spinal nerve ligation. However, baseline opening of KATP channels and their activation induced by metabolic inhibition was suppressed by axotomy. Failure to block the NO-mediated amplification of KATP currents with specific inhibitors of sGC and PKG indicated that the classical sGC/cGMP/PKG signaling pathway was not involved in the activation by SNAP. NO-induced activation of KATP channels remained intact in cell-free patches, was reversed by DTT, a thiol-reducing agent, and prevented by NEM, a thiol-alkylating agent. Other findings indicated that the mechanisms by which NO activates KATP channels involve direct S-nitrosylation of cysteine residues in the SUR1 subunit. Specifically, current through recombinant wild-type SUR1/Kir6.2 channels expressed in COS7 cells was activated by NO, but channels formed only from truncated isoform Kir6.2 subunits without SUR1 subunits were insensitive to NO. Further, mutagenesis of SUR1 indicated that NO-induced KATP channel activation involves interaction of NO with residues in the NBD1 of the SUR1 subunit. Conclusion NO

  15. Nitrile in the Hole: Discovery of a Small Auxiliary Pocket in Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase Leading to the Development of Potent and Selective 2-Aminoquinoline Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinelli, Maris A; Li, Huiying; Chreifi, Georges; Poulos, Thomas L; Silverman, Richard B

    2017-05-11

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) inhibition is a promising strategy to treat neurodegenerative disorders, but the development of nNOS inhibitors is often hindered by poor pharmacokinetics. We previously developed a class of membrane-permeable 2-aminoquinoline inhibitors and later rearranged the scaffold to decrease off-target binding. However, the resulting compounds had decreased permeability, low human nNOS activity, and low selectivity versus human eNOS. In this study, 5-substituted phenyl ether-linked aminoquinolines and derivatives were synthesized and assayed against purified NOS isoforms. 5-Cyano compounds are especially potent and selective rat and human nNOS inhibitors. Activity and selectivity are mediated by the binding of the cyano group to a new auxiliary pocket in nNOS. Potency was enhanced by methylation of the quinoline and by introduction of simple chiral moieties, resulting in a combination of hydrophobic and auxiliary pocket effects that yielded high (∼500-fold) n/e selectivity. Importantly, the Caco-2 assay also revealed improved membrane permeability over previous compounds.

  16. Identification of Nuclear Factor-κB Responsive Element within the Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase Exon 1f-specific Promoter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yinghui LI; Guangyu LI; Chunyi LI; Yanyan ZHAO

    2007-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase gene (nNOS) is particularly complex as 12 distinct transcripts derived from different first exons are expressed in a tissue- and cellspecific manner. The exon 1f mRNA is relatively highly expressed in nervous system and relies upon exon 1f-specific promoter activity. Using conventional and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction,we found exon 1f mRNA was the major transcript of the nNOS gene in human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells. We analyzed a 1090 bp fragment of 1f promoter by TRANSFAC-TESS and Match softwares and luciferase assay, and found an important positive transcriptional regulation region that contained a putative nuclear factor (NF)-κB binding site. Subsequently, using electrophoresis mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we identified this site to be the NF-κB responsive element, a crucial positive regulator in the activation of the nNOS 1f promoter. Taken together, our study identified an NF-κB responsive element within nNOS 1f promoter and showed that it plays an important role in the transactivation of nNOS 1f mRNA, the major transcript of nNOS in SK-N-SH cells.

  17. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity in the guinea-pig liver: distribution and colocalization with neuropeptide Y and calcitonin gene-related peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, F J; Jiménez, A; Fernández, A P; del Moral, M L; Sánchez-López, A M; Hernández, R; Garrosa, M; Pedrosa, J A; Rodrigo, J; Peinado, M A

    2001-12-01

    The innervation pattern of the guinea-pig liver is similar to that of the human liver. However, many aspects of the distribution of the neuronal isoform of the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in the guinea-pig liver and its colocalization with neuropeptides remain to be elucidated. The distribution of nNOS was studied in fixed guinea-pig liver by light microscopic immunohistochemistry. Confocal analysis was used to determine its colocalization with neuropeptide Y (NPY) or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). nNOS-immunoreactive (nNOS-IR) nerves were observed in relation to hilar and interlobar vessels and in Glisson's capsule. A few nNOS-IR ganglia were observed in the extrahepatic bile duct and close to the interlobar portal triads. In addition, nNOS-IR fibers were located in the interlobular portal triads and pervading the parenchyma. Moreover, nNOS-IR nerves were demonstrated for the first time in the larger central veins and in the hepatic vein. nNOS-NPY and nNOS-CGRP colocalizations were detected in the fibromuscular layer of the bile duct and periductal plexus, respectively. These results support the phylogenetic conservation of the nNOS-IR hepatic innervation and its possible contribution to the regulation of hepatic blood flow and certain hepatic functions.

  18. Up-regulation of miR-31 in human atrial fibrillation begets the arrhythmia by depleting dystrophin and neuronal nitric oxide synthase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnicer, Ricardo; Recalde, Alice; Muszkiewicz, Anna; Jayaram, Raja; Carena, Maria Cristina; Wijesurendra, Rohan; Stefanini, Matilde; Surdo, Nicoletta C.; Lomas, Oliver; Ratnatunga, Chandana; Sayeed, Rana; Krasopoulos, George; Rajakumar, Timothy; Bueno-Orovio, Alfonso; Verheule, Sander; Fulga, Tudor A.; Rodriguez, Blanca; Schotten, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a growing public health burden, and its treatment remains a challenge. AF leads to electrical remodeling of the atria, which in turn promotes AF maintenance and resistance to treatment. Although remodeling has long been a therapeutic target in AF, its causes remain poorly understood. We show that atrial-specific up-regulation of microRNA-31 (miR-31) in goat and human AF depletes neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) by accelerating mRNA decay and alters nNOS subcellular localization by repressing dystrophin translation. By shortening action potential duration and abolishing rate-dependent adaptation of the action potential duration, miR-31 overexpression and/or disruption of nNOS signaling recapitulates features of AF-induced remodeling and significantly increases AF inducibility in mice in vivo. By contrast, silencing miR-31 in atrial myocytes from patients with AF restores dystrophin and nNOS and normalizes action potential duration and its rate dependency. These findings identify atrial-specific up-regulation of miR-31 in human AF as a key mechanism causing atrial dystrophin and nNOS depletion, which in turn contributes to the atrial phenotype begetting this arrhythmia. miR-31 may therefore represent a potential therapeutic target in AF. PMID:27225184

  19. The neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NANT blocks acetaminophen toxicity and protein nitration in freshly isolated hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Sudip; Melnyk, Stepan B; Krager, Kimberly J; Aykin-Burns, Nukhet; Letzig, Lynda G; James, Laura P; Hinson, Jack A

    2015-12-01

    3-Nitrotyrosine (3NT) in liver proteins of mice treated with hepatotoxic doses of acetaminophen (APAP) has been postulated to be causative in toxicity. Nitration is by a reactive nitrogen species formed from nitric oxide (NO). The source of the NO is unclear. iNOS knockout mice were previously found to be equally susceptible to APAP toxicity as wildtype mice and iNOS inhibitors did not decrease toxicity in mice or in hepatocytes. In this work we examined the potential role of nNOS in APAP toxicity in hepatocytes using the specific nNOS inhibitor NANT (10 µM)(N-[(4S)-4-amino-5-[(2-aminoethyl)amino]pentyl]-N'-nitroguanidinetris (trifluoroacetate)). Primary hepatocytes (1 million/ml) from male B6C3F1 mice were incubated with APAP (1mM). Cells were removed and assayed spectrofluorometrically for reactive nitrogen and oxygen species using diaminofluorescein (DAF) and Mitosox red, respectively. Cytotoxicity was determined by LDH release into media. Glutathione (GSH, GSSG), 3NT, GSNO, acetaminophen-cysteine adducts, NAD, and NADH were measured by HPLC. APAP significantly increased cytotoxicity at 1.5-3.0 h. The increase was blocked by NANT. NANT did not alter APAP mediated GSH depletion or acetaminophen-cysteine adducts in proteins which indicated that NANT did not inhibit metabolism. APAP significantly increased spectroflurometric evidence of reactive nitrogen and oxygen formation at 0.5 and 1.0 h, respectively, and increased 3NT and GSNO at 1.5-3.0 h. These increases were blocked by NANT. APAP dramatically increased NADH from 0.5-3.0 h and this increase was blocked by NANT. Also, APAP decreased the Oxygen Consumption Rate (OCR), decreased ATP production, and caused a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, which were all blocked by NANT.

  20. Novel approaches to improving endothelium-dependent nitric oxide-mediated vasodilatation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Ulf; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Rosalia; Dalsgaard, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    reacting with NO. Endothelial dysfunction is therapeutically reversible and physical exercise, calcium channel blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, and angiotensin receptor antagonists improve flow-evoked endothelium-dependent vasodilation in patients with hypertension and diabetes. We have...... channels and an influx of calcium play an important role in G-protein coupled receptor-evoked release of NO. Thus, all three approaches increase bioavailability of NO in the vascular wall, but it remains to be addressed whether these actions have any direct benefit at a clinical level....

  1. Nitric oxide mediated Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis and protective role of nanoconjugated vancomycin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Subhankari Prasad Chakraborty; Santanu Kar Mahapatra; Sumanta Kumar Sahu; Sourav Chattopadhyay; Panchanan Pramanik; Somenath Roy

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To test the survival ofStaphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) inside lymphocyte that contributes to the pathogenesis of infection and possible anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effect of nanoconjugated vancomycin againstin vivo S. aureus infection in a dose and duration dependent manner.Methods:5×106CFU/mL vancomycin-sensitive S. aureus(VSSA) and vancomycin-resistiveS. aureus (VRSA) were challenged in Swiss male mice for3 days,5 days, 10 days and15days, respectively. Bacteremia and inflammatory parameters were observed to evaluate the duration for development ofVSSA andVRSA infection.100mg/kg bw/day and500 mg/kg bw/day nanoconjugated vancomycin were administrated toVSSA andVRSA infected group for5days. Bacteremia, inflammatory parameters and oxidative stress related parameters were tested to observe the effective dose of nanoconjugated vancomycin againstVSSAandVRSA infection. Nanoconjugated vancomycin was treated at a dose of100 mg/kg bw/day and500 mg/kg bw/day, respectively, toVSSA andVRSA infected group for successive5 days,10 days and 15 days. Bacteremia, inflammatory parameters and oxidative stress related parameters were observed to assess the effective duration of nanoconjugated vancomycin againstVSSAand VRSA infection.Results: The result revealed thatin vivoVSSA andVRSA infection developed after 5 days of challenge by elevating theNO generation in lymphocyte and serum inflammatory markers. Administration with nanoconjugated vancomycin toVSSA andVRSA infected group at a dose of100 mg/kg bw/day and500 mg/kg bw/day, respectively, for successive10 days eliminated bacterimia, decreasedNO generation in lymphocyte, serum inflammatory markers and increased antioxidant enzyme status.Conclusions:These findings suggest,in vivochallenge ofVSSA andVRSA for5 days can produce the highest degree of damage in lymphocyte which can be ameliorated by treatment with nanoconjugated vancomycin for10 successive days.

  2. Infrared Imaging of Nitric Oxide-Mediated Blood Flow in Human Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbach, Alexander M.; Ackerman, Hans C.; Liu, Wei-Min; Meyer, Joseph M.; Littel, Patricia L.; Seamon, Catherine; Footman, Eleni; Chi, Amy; Zorca, Suzana; Krajewski, Megan L.; Cuttica, Michael J.; Machado, Roberto F.; Cannon, Richard O.; Kato, Gregory J.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular dysfunction is an important pathophysiologic manifestation of sickle cell disease (SCD), a condition that increases risk of pulmonary hypertension and stroke. We hypothesized that infrared (IR) imaging would detect changes in cutaneous blood flow reflective of vascular function. We performed IR imaging and conventional strain gauge plethysmography in twenty-five adults with SCD at baseline and during intra-arterial infusions of an endothelium-dependent vasodilator acetylcholine (ACh), an endothelium-independent vasodilator sodium nitroprusside (SNP), and a NOS inhibitor L-NMMA. Skin temperature measured by IR imaging increased in a dose-dependent manner to graded infusions of ACh (+1.1° C, p < 0.0001) and SNP (+0.9° C, p < 0.0001), and correlated with dose-dependent increases in forearm blood flow (ACh: +19.9 mL/min/100mL, p < 0.0001; rs = 0.57, p = 0.003; SNP: +8.6 mL/min/100mL, p < 0.0001; r = 0.70, p = 0.0002). Although IR measurement of skin temperature accurately reflected agonist-induced increases in blood flow, it was less sensitive to decreases in blood flow caused by NOS inhibition. Baseline forearm skin temperature measured by IR imaging correlated significantly with baseline forearm blood flow (31.8±0.2° C, 6.0±0.4 mL/min/100mL; r = 0.58, p = 0.003), and appeared to represent a novel biomarker of vascular function. It predicted a blunted blood flow response to SNP (r = −0.61, p = 0.002), and was independently associated with a marker of pulmonary artery pressure, as well as hemoglobin level, diastolic blood pressure, homocysteine, and cholesterol (R2 = 0.84, p < 0.0001 for the model). IR imaging of agonist-stimulated cutaneous blood flow represents a less cumbersome alternative to plethysmography methodology. Measurement of baseline skin temperature by IR imaging may be a useful new marker of vascular risk in adults with SCD. PMID:22784510

  3. The Development Of RRx-001, A Novel Nitric-Oxide-Mediated Epigenetically Active Anticancer Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Scicinski

    2015-08-01

    Conclusion: Early results in the ROCKET study suggest that RRx-001-mediated resensitization to previously refractory therapies may have a generalized effect, independent of KRAS or p53 status. These early results are intriguing, suggesting improved QOL and overall survival over currently approved therapy in the chemotherapy refractory colorectal cancer.

  4. Immune-relevant thrombocytes of common carp undergo parasite-induced nitric oxide-mediated apoptosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fink, I.R.; Ribeiro, C.M.S.; Forlenza, M.; Taverne-Thiele, J.J.; Rombout, J.H.W.M.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Wiegertjes, G.

    2015-01-01

    Common carp thrombocytes account for 30–40% of peripheral blood leukocytes and are abundant in the healthy animals' spleen, the thrombopoietic organ. We show that, ex vivo, thrombocytes from healthy carp express a large number of immune-relevant genes, among which several cytokines and Toll-like rec

  5. Effects of prolonged neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibition on the development and expression of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padovan-Neto, Fernando Eduardo; Cavalcanti-Kiwiatkoviski, Roberta; Carolino, Ruither Oliveira Gomes; Anselmo-Franci, Janete; Del Bel, Elaine

    2015-02-01

    It is well known that nitric oxide (NO) interacts with dopamine (DA) within the striatal circuitry. The anti-dyskinetic properties of NO synthase (NOS) inhibitors demonstrate the importance of NO in L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA)-induced dyskinesia (LID). Here, we investigated the ability of a daily co-treatment of the preferential neuronal NOS (nNOS) inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole (7-NI, 30 mg/kg), with L-DOPA (30 mg/kg) to counteract LID in unilaterally 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. We analyzed striatal nNOS-expressing interneurons, DA and 5-HT neurochemistry in the striatum and alterations of the Fos-B/ΔFosB expression in the corticostriatal, nigrostriatal and mesolimbic pathways. Prolonged administration of 7-NI inhibited the manifestation of chronic L-DOPA treatment-induced abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs). LID was associated with an up-regulation in the number of nNOS-expressing interneurons in the lateral but not medial striatum. nNOS inhibition reduced the number of nNOS-expressing interneurons. The anti-dyskinetic effects of 7-NI correlated with a reduction in DA and 5-HT turnover in the striatum. At postsynaptic striatal sites, 7-NI prevented L-DOPA-induced Fos-B/ΔFosB up-regulation in the motor cortex, nucleus accumbens and striatum. Finally, 7-NI blocked Fos-B/ΔFosB expression in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase (NADPH-d)-positive interneurons in the striatum. These results provide further evidence of the molecular mechanisms by which NOS-inhibiting compounds attenuate LID. The involvement of NO with DA and 5-HT neurochemistry may contribute to the understanding of this new, non-dopaminergic therapy for the management of LID. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Protein kinase A-dependent Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase Activation Mediates the Enhancement of Baroreflex Response by Adrenomedullin in the Nucleus Tractus Solitarii of Rats

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    Ho I-Chun

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adrenomedullin (ADM exerts its biological functions through the receptor-mediated enzymatic mechanisms that involve protein kinase A (PKA, or neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS. We previously demonstrated that the receptor-mediated cAMP/PKA pathway involves in ADM-enhanced baroreceptor reflex (BRR response. It remains unclear whether ADM may enhance BRR response via activation of nNOS-dependent mechanism in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS. Methods Intravenous injection of phenylephrine was administered to evoke the BRR before and at 10, 30, and 60 min after microinjection of the test agents into NTS of Sprague-Dawley rats. Western blotting analysis was used to measure the level and phosphorylation of proteins that involved in BRR-enhancing effects of ADM (0.2 pmol in NTS. The colocalization of PKA and nNOS was examined by immunohistochemical staining and observed with a laser confocal microscope. Results We found that ADM-induced enhancement of BRR response was blunted by microinjection of NPLA or Rp-8-Br-cGMP, a selective inhibitor of nNOS or protein kinase G (PKG respectively, into NTS. Western blot analysis further revealed that ADM induced an increase in the protein level of PKG-I which could be attenuated by co-microinjection with the ADM receptor antagonist ADM22-52 or NPLA. Moreover, we observed an increase in phosphorylation at Ser1416 of nNOS at 10, 30, and 60 min after intra-NTS administration of ADM. As such, nNOS/PKG signaling may also account for the enhancing effect of ADM on BRR response. Interestingly, biochemical evidence further showed that ADM-induced increase of nNOS phosphorylation was prevented by co-microinjection with Rp-8-Br-cAMP, a PKA inhibitor. The possibility of PKA-dependent nNOS activation was substantiated by immunohistochemical demonstration of co-localization of PKA and nNOS in putative NTS neurons. Conclusions The novel finding of this study is that the signal transduction cascade that

  7. [Nitric oxide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovira, I

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide was identified as the relaxing factor derived from the endothelium in 1987. Nitric oxide synthesis allows the vascular system to maintain a state of vasodilation, thereby regulating arterial pressure. Nitric oxide is also found in platelets, where it inhibits adhesion and aggregation; in the immune system, where it is responsible for the cytotoxic action of macrophages; and in the nervous system, where it acts as neurotransmitter. A deficit in endogenous synthesis of nitric oxide contributes to such conditions as essential arterial hypertension, pulmonary hypertension and heart disease. An excess of nitrous oxide induced by endotoxins and cytokinins, meanwhile, is believed to be responsible for hypotension in septic shock and for hyperdynamic circulatory state in cirrhosis of the liver. Nitric oxide has also been implicated in the rejection of transplanted organs and in cell damage after reperfusion. Inhaled nitrous oxide gas reduces pulmonary hypertension without triggering systemic hypotension in both experimental and clinical conditions. It also produces selective vasodilation when used to ventilate specific pulmonary areas, thereby improving the ventilation/perfusion ratio and, hence, oxygenation. Nitric oxide inhalation is effective in pulmonary hypertension-coincident with chronic obstructive lung disease, in persistent neonatal pulmonary hypertension and in pulmonary hypertension with congenital or acquired heart disease. Likewise, it reduces intrapulmonary shunt in acute respiratory failure and improves gas exchange. Under experimental conditions nitric oxide acts as a bronchodilator, although it seems to be less effective for this purpose in clinical use.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Structure-based design and synthesis of N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine-containing peptidomimetics as selective inhibitors of neuronal nitric oxide synthase. Displacement of the heme structural water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jiwon; Igarashi, Jotato; Li, Huiying; Martasek, Pavel; Roman, Linda J; Poulos, Thomas L; Silverman, Richard B

    2007-05-03

    The neuronal isoform of nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), the enzyme responsible for the production of nitric oxide in the central nervous system, represents an attractive target for the treatment of various neurodegenerative disorders. X-ray crystal structures of complexes of nNOS with two nNOS-selective inhibitors, (4S)-N-{4-amino-5-[(2-aminoethylamino]pentyl}-N'-nitroguanidine (1) and 4-N-(Nomega-nitro-l-argininyl)-trans-4-amino-l-proline amide (2), led to the discovery of a conserved structural water molecule that was hydrogen bonded between the two heme propionates and the inhibitors (Figure 2). On the basis of this observation, we hypothesized that by attaching a hydrogen bond donor group to the amide nitrogen of 2 or to the secondary amine nitrogen of 1, the inhibitor molecules could displace the structural water molecule and obtain a direct interaction with the heme cofactor. To test this hypothesis, peptidomimetic analogues 3-5, which have either an N-hydroxyl (3 and 5) or N-amino (4) donor group, were designed and synthesized. X-ray crystal structures of nNOS with inhibitors 3 and 5 bound verified that the N-hydroxyl group had, indeed, displaced the structural water molecule and provided a direct interaction with the heme propionate moiety (Figures 5 and 6). Surprisingly, in vitro activity assay results indicated that the addition of a hydroxyl group (3) only increased the potency slightly against the neuronal isoform over the parent compound (1). Rationalizations for the small increase in potency are consistent with other changes in the crystal structures.

  9. P2 purinergic receptor activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase and guanylyl cyclase in the dorsal facial area of the medulla increases blood flow in the common carotid arteries of cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Y-W; Leung, Y-M; Lin, N-N; Lee, T J-F; Kuo, J-S; Tung, K-C; Gong, C-L

    2015-02-12

    In the dorsal facial area (DFA) of the medulla, an activation of either P2 purinergic receptor or nitric oxide synthase (NOS) results in the release of glutamate, leading to an increase in blood flow of the common carotid artery (CCA). It is not known whether activation of the P2 receptor by ATP may mediate activation of NOS/guanylyl cyclase to cause glutamate release and/or whether L-Arg (nitric oxide (NO) precursor) may also cause ATP release from any other neuron, to cause an increase in CCA flow. We demonstrated that microinjections of P2 receptor agonists (ATP, α,β-methylene ATP) or NO precursor (L-arginine) into the DFA increased CCA blood flow. The P2-induced CCA blood flow increase was dose-dependently reduced by pretreatment with NG-nitro-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, a non-specific NOS inhibitor), 7-nitroindazole (7-NI, a relatively selective neuronal NOS inhibitor) or methylene blue (MB, a guanylyl cyclase inhibitor) but not by that with D-NAME (an isomer of L-NAME) or N5-(1-iminoethyl)-L-ornithine (L-NIO, a potent endothelial NOS inhibitor). Involvement of glutamate release in these responses were substantiated by microdialysis studies, in which perfusions of ATP into the DFA increased the glutamate concentration in dialysates, but co-perfusion of ATP with L-NAME or 7-NI did not. Nevertheless, the arginine-induced CCA blood flow increase was abolished by combined pretreatment of L-NAME and MB, but not affected by pretreatment with a selective P2 receptor antagonist, pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulphonic acid (PPADS). In conclusion, ATP activation of the P2 receptor in the DFA induced activation of neuronal NOS/guanylyl cyclase, which causes glutamate release leading to an increase in CCA blood flow. However, arginine activation of neuronal NOS/guanylyl cyclase, which also caused glutamate release and CCA blood flow increase, did not induce activation of P2 receptors. These findings provide important information for drug design and

  10. Heat shock protein 70 protects against seizure-induced neuronal cell death in the hippocampus following experimental status epilepticus via inhibition of nuclear factor-κB activation-induced nitric oxide synthase II expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chiung-Chih; Chen, Shang-Der; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Chang, Wen-Neng; Liou, Chia-Wei; Chang, Alice Y W; Chan, Samuel H H; Chuang, Yao-Chung

    2014-02-01

    Status epilepticus induces subcellular changes that may eventually lead to neuronal cell death in the hippocampus. Based on an animal model of status epilepticus, our laboratory showed previously that sustained hippocampal seizure activity activates nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and upregulates nitric oxide synthase (NOS) II gene expression, leading to apoptotic neuronal cell death in the hippocampus. The present study examined the potential modulatory role of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) on NF-κB signaling in the hippocampus following experimental status epilepticus. In Sprague-Dawley rats, kainic acid (KA) was microinjected unilaterally into the hippocampal CA3 subfield to induce prolonged bilateral seizure activity. Expression of HSP70 was elevated as early as 1h after the elicitation of sustained seizure activity, followed by a progressive elevation that peaked at 24h. Pretreatment with an antisense oligonucleotide against hsp70 decreased the HSP70 expression, and significantly augmented IκB kinase (IKK) activity and phosphorylation of IκBα, alongside enhanced nuclear translocation and DNA binding activity of NF-κB in the hippocampal CA3 neurons and glial cells. These cellular events were followed by enhanced upregulation of NOS II and peroxynitrite expression 3h after sustained seizure activity that led to an increase of caspase-3 and DNA fragmentation in the hippocampal CA3 neurons 7days after experimental status epilepticus. We concluded that HSP70 protects against apoptotic cell death induced by NF-κB activation and NOS II-peroxynitrite signaling cascade in the hippocampal CA3 and glial cells following experimental status epilepticus via suppression of IKK activity and deactivation of IκBα.

  11. Regulation of p53 by activated protein kinase C-delta during nitric oxide-induced dopaminergic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Jin; Kim, Dong-Chan; Choi, Bo-Hwa; Ha, Hyunjung; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2006-01-27

    Selective cell death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra is the major cause of Parkinson disease. Current evidence suggests that this cell death could be mediated by nitric oxide by-products such as nitrate and peroxynitrite. Because protein kinase C (PKC)-delta is implicated in apoptosis of various cell types, we studied its roles and activation mechanisms in nitric oxide (NO)-induced apoptosis of SN4741 dopaminergic cells. When cells were treated with sodium nitroprusside (SNP), a NO donor, endogenous PKC-delta was nitrated and activated. Immunoprecipitation revealed that p53 co-immunoprecipitated with PKC-delta and was phosphorylated at the 15th serine residue in SNP-treated cells. An in vitro kinase assay revealed that p53 was directly phosphorylated by SNP-activated PKC-delta. The p53 Ser-15 phosphorylation was suppressed in SNP-treated cells when the NO-mediated activation of PKC-delta was inhibited by rottlerin or (-)-epigallocatechin gallate. Within 3 h of p53 phosphorylation, its protein levels increased because of decreased ubiquitin-dependent proteosomal proteolysis, whereas the protein levels of MDM2, ubiquitin-protein isopeptide ligase, were down-regulated in a p53 phosphorylation-dependent fashion. Taken together, these results demonstrate that nitration-mediated activation of PKC-delta induces the phosphorylation of the Ser-15 residue in p53, which increases its protein stability, thereby contributing to the nitric oxide-mediated apoptosis-like cell death pathway. These findings may be expanded to provide new insight into the cellular mechanisms of Parkinson disease.

  12. Nitric oxide synthase, calcitonin gene-related peptide and NK-1 receptor mechanisms are involved in GTN-induced neuronal activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramachandran, Roshni; Bhatt, Deepak Kumar; Ploug, Kenneth Beri

    2014-01-01

    -related peptide (CGRP) systems on the GTN-induced neuronal activation in this model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The femoral vein was catheterised in rats and GTN was infused (4 µg/kg/min, for 20 minutes, intravenously). Immunohistochemistry was performed to analyse Fos, nNOS and CGRP and Western blot for measuring n...

  13. Triptan-induced enhancement of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in trigeminal ganglion dural afferents underlies increased responsiveness to potential migraine triggers

    OpenAIRE

    De Felice, Milena; Ossipov, Michael H.; Wang, Ruizhong; Dussor, Gregory; Lai, Josephine; Meng, Ian D.; Chichorro, Juliana; Andrews, John S; Rakhit, Suman; Maddaford, Shawn; Dodick, David; Porreca, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Migraine is a common neurological disorder often treated with triptans. Triptan overuse can lead to increased frequency of headache in some patients, a phenomenon termed medication overuse headache. Previous preclinical studies have demonstrated that repeated or sustained triptan administration for several days can elicit persistent neural adaptations in trigeminal ganglion cells innervating the dura, prominently characterized by increased labelling of neuronal profiles for calcitonin gene re...

  14. 大鼠面神经损伤后神经元型一氧化氮合酶的表达变化%Expression of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase in the Facial Nucleus after Facial Nerve Injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王鹏; 臧晓燕; 张引成

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To observe the variation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) expression in injured facial nerve tissue. Method: 20 adult male SD rats were used in this study, among them , 5 rats were normal controls. In experiment group, a compression injury was applied at one branch of bilateral facial nerve. Every 3 rats in experiment group were sacrified for nNOS immunostaining in a period of 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 weeks respectively. Results:In normal facial nerve tissue, nNOS expression was not detected. In the injured facial nerve neurons, nNOS immunostaining expression was positive, and lasting up till the fifth weeks. Conclusion: After the nerve injury, the expressing of nNOS was observed in the facial nucleus, which may be related to the death of neuron.%目的:通过观察面神经损伤后神经元型一氧化氮合酶(neuronal NOS, nNOS)在面神经核团中的表达,探讨NO在面神经损伤后的作用。方法:健康成年SD大白鼠20只,其中5只作为正常对照。其余15只为面神经损伤组,在双侧面神经下颊支制作挤压伤。术后1、2、3、4、5周各取3只损伤组大鼠作面神经核团nNOS表达的免疫组化观察。结果:正常情况下面神经元不表达nNOS。面神经损伤后,出现运动神经元变性,其神经元细胞nNOS免疫染色为阳性,并持续至损伤后第5周。结论:面神经损伤后其运动神经元的核团中会出现nNOS的表达。

  15. Neuroprotective effects of Cyperus rotundus on SIN-1 induced nitric oxide generation and protein nitration: ameliorative effect against apoptosis mediated neuronal cell damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemanth Kumar, Kandikattu; Tamatam, Anand; Pal, Ajay; Khanum, Farhath

    2013-01-01

    Nitrosylation of tyrosine (3-nitro tyrosine, 3-NT) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of various disorders particularly neurodegenerative conditions and aging. Cyperus rotundus rhizome is being used as a traditional folk medicine to alleviate a variety of disorders including neuronal stress. The herb has recently found applications in food and confectionary industries also. In current study, we have explored the protective effects of C. rotundus rhizome extract (CRE) through its oxido-nitrosative and anti apoptotic mechanism to attenuate peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) induced neurotoxicity using human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Our results elucidate that pre-treatment of neurons with CRE ameliorates the mitochondrial and plasma membrane damage induced by 500 μM SIN-1 to 80% and 24% as evidenced by MTT and LDH assays. CRE inhibited NO generation by downregulating i-NOS expression. SIN-1 induced depletion of antioxidant enzyme status was also replenished by CRE which was confirmed by immunoblot analysis of SOD and CAT. The CRE pre-treatment efficiently potentiated the SIN-1 induced apoptotic biomarkers such as bcl-2 and caspase-3 which orchestrate the proteolytic damage of the cell. The ONOO(-) induced damage to cellular, nuclear and mitochondrial integrity was also restored by CRE. Furthermore, CRE pre-treatment also regulated the 3-NT formation which shows the potential of plant extract against tyrosine nitration. Taken together, our findings suggest that CRE might be developed as a preventive agent against ONOO(-) induced apoptosis.

  16. Maternal smoking and impaired endothelium-dependent nitric oxide-mediated relaxation of uterine small arteries in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Malene R; Uldbjerg, Niels; Stender, Steen;

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the endothelium-dependent relaxation of uterine small arteries from pregnant nonsmokers, smokers, and ex-smokers who stopped smoking early in pregnancy.......This study aimed to investigate the endothelium-dependent relaxation of uterine small arteries from pregnant nonsmokers, smokers, and ex-smokers who stopped smoking early in pregnancy....

  17. Regional age-related changes in neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS, messenger RNA levels and activity in SAMP8 brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guidon Gérard

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nitric oxide (NO is a multifunctional molecule synthesized by three isozymes of the NO synthase (NOSs acting as a messenger/modulator and/or a potential neurotoxin. In rodents, the role of NOSs in sleep processes and throughout aging is now well established. For example, sleep parameters are highly deteriorated in senescence accelerated-prone 8 (SAMP8 mice, a useful animal model to study aging or age-associated disorders, while the inducible form of NOS (iNOS is down-regulated within the cortex and the sleep-structures of the brainstem. Evidence is now increasing for a role of iNOS and resulting oxidative stress but not for the constitutive expressed isozyme (nNOS. To better understand the role of nNOS in the behavioural impairments observed in SAMP8 versus SAMR1 (control animals, we evaluated age-related variations occurring in the nNOS expression and activity and nitrites/nitrates (NOx- levels, in three brain areas (n = 7 animals in each group. Calibrated reverse transcriptase (RT and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR and biochemical procedures were used. Results We found that the levels of nNOS mRNA decreased in the cortex and the hippocampus of 8- vs 2-month-old animals followed by an increase in 12-vs 8-month-old animals in both strains. In the brainstem, levels of nNOS mRNA decreased in an age-dependent manner in SAMP8, but not in SAMR1. Regional age-related changes were also observed in nNOS activity. Moreover, nNOS activity in hippocampus was found lower in 8-month-old SAMP8 than in SAMR1, while in the cortex and the brainstem, nNOS activities increased at 8 months and afterward decreased with age in SAMP8 and SAMR1. NOx- levels showed profiles similar to nNOS activities in the cortex and the brainstem but were undetectable in the hippocampus of SAMP8 and SAMR1. Finally, NOx- levels were higher in the cortex of 8 month-old SAMP8 than in age-matched SAMR1. Conclusion Concomitant variations occurring in NO levels

  18. Etiology of Alzheimer's disease: kinetic, thermodynamic and fluorimetric analyses of interactions of pseudo Aβ-peptides with neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padayachee, E R; Whiteley, C G

    2013-10-01

    Aggregated β-amyloid deposit is a hallmark in the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease but their mechanism of formation still remains unresolved. Previously we reported that a normal pentapeptide Aβ(17-21) and glycine zipper peptide Aβ(29-33) strongly inhibited nitric oxide synthase and rapidly initiated fibrillogenesis. Critical amino acids within these fragments were not identified. We now report on the interaction of four pseudo-peptides with nNOS - two peptides with a reversed amino acid sequence [Aβ(17-21r); Aβ(29-33r)] and two peptides with Phe19, Phe20 and Ile31, Ile32 substituted with polar glutamic acid [Aβ(17-21p); Aβ(29-33p)]. It was shown that while the inhibitor constants (Ki) increased 2-3 fold for each of the pseudo-peptides when compared with the normal peptides the dissociation constant Kd increased between 20 and 50 fold. Stern-Volmer fluorescence quenching constants (K(SV)) for Aβ(17-21p) and Aβ(29-33p) were 7.2×10(-3) and 6.1×10(-3) μM(-1) respectively at 298 K some 2-3 fold lower than the corresponding Aβ(17-21r); Aβ(29-33r). With temperature increase there was an increase in K(SV) and Kd, suggesting a dynamic quenching mechanism. Thermodynamic parameters, ΔH, ΔS and ΔG were all positive indicating endothermic, non-spontaneous, hydrophobic-hydrophobic associations of the pseudo-peptides with the enzyme. By FRET analysis the efficiency of fluorescence transfer between enzyme tryptophans and the pseudo-peptides was 90% (compared to 97% for the natural substrate). The distance the tryptophans moved after interaction with Aβ(17-21r) and Aβ(17-21p) was 10% greater, while for Aβ(29-33r) and Aβ(29-33p) it was 20-25% greater, than with the normal peptides; the fluorescence intensity was 20-75% higher. This increase in distance, fluorescent intensity and transfer efficiency illustrate an increase in interaction energy for the pseudo-peptides with nNOS lending support for the strategic position of the Phe19, Phe20, Ile31 and Ile32

  19. Glucagon-like peptide-1 excites firing and increases GABAergic miniature postsynaptic currents (mPSCs in gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurons of the male mice via activation of nitric oxide (NO and suppression of endocannabinoid signaling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imre Farkas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1, a metabolic signal molecule, regulates reproduction, although, the involved molecular mechanisms have not been elucidated, yet. Therefore, responsiveness of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurons to the GLP-1 analog Exendin-4 and elucidation of molecular pathways acting downstream to the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R have been challenged. Loose patch-clamp recordings revealed that Exendin-4 (100 nM–5 μM elevated firing rate in hypothalamic GnRH-GFP neurons of male mice via activation of GLP-1R. Whole-cell patch-clamp measurements demonstrated increased excitatory GABAergic miniature postsynaptic currents (mPSCs frequency after Exendin-4 administration, which was eliminated by the GLP-1R antagonist Exendin-3(9-39 (1 μM. Intracellular application of the G-protein inhibitor GDP-beta-S (2 mM impeded action of Exendin-4 on mPSCs, suggesting direct excitatory action of GLP-1 on GnRH neurons. Blockade of nitric-oxide (NO synthesis by L-NAME (100 μM or NPLA (1 μM or intracellular scavenging of NO by CPTIO (1 mM partially attenuated the excitatory effect of Exendin-4. Similar partial inhibition was achieved by hindering endocannabinoid pathway using CB1 inverse-agonist AM251 (1 μM. Simultaneous blockade of NO and endocannabinoid signaling mechanisms eliminated action of Exendin-4 suggesting involvement of both retrograde machineries. Intracellular application of the TRPV1-antagonist AMG9810 (10 μM or the FAAH-inhibitor PF3845 (5 μM impeded the GLP-1-triggered endocannabinoid pathway indicating an anandamide-TRPV1-sensitive control of 2-AG production. Furthermore, GLP-1 immunoreactive axons innervated GnRH neurons in the hypothalamus suggesting that GLP-1 of both peripheral and neuronal sources can modulate GnRH neurons. RT-qPCR study confirmed the expression of GLP-1R and nNOS mRNAs in GnRH-GFP neurons. Immuno-electron microscopic analysis revealed the presence of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS protein in Gn

  20. Nitric oxide: considerations for the treatment of ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terpolilli, Nicole A; Moskowitz, Michael A; Plesnila, Nikolaus

    2012-01-01

    Some 40 years ago it was recognized by Furchgott and colleagues that the endothelium releases a vasodilator, endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF). Later on, several groups identified EDRF to be a gas, nitric oxide (NO). Since then, NO was identified as one of the most versatile and unique molecules in animal and human biology. Nitric oxide mediates a plethora of physiological functions, for example, maintenance of vascular tone and inflammation. Apart from these physiological functions, NO is also involved in the pathophysiology of various disorders, specifically those in which regulation of blood flow and inflammation has a key role. The aim of the current review is to summarize the role of NO in cerebral ischemia, the most common cause of stroke. PMID:22333622

  1. Maternal magnesium sulfate fetal neuroprotective effects to the fetus: inhibition of neuronal nitric oxide synthase and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells activation in a rodent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beloosesky, Ron; Khatib, Nizar; Ginsberg, Yuval; Anabosy, Saja; Shalom-Paz, Einat; Dahis, Masha; Ross, Michael G; Weiner, Zeev

    2016-09-01

    Maternal magnesium administration has been shown to protect the preterm fetus from white- and gray-matter injury, although the mechanism is unknown. The purpose of the study is to test the following hypotheses: (1) maternal infections/inflammation activate fetal neuronal N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors that up-regulate neuronal nitric oxide synthase and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells pathways; and (2) maternal magnesium sulfate attenuates fetal brain neuronal nitric oxide synthase and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells activation through N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Pregnant rats at embryonic day 16 and embryonic day 18 (n = 6, 48 total) received injections of intraperitoneal lipopolysaccharide 500 μg/kg or saline at time 0. Dams were randomized for treatment with subcutaneous magnesium sulfate (270 mg/kg) or saline for 2 hours prior to and following lipopolysaccharide/saline injections. At 4 hours after lipopolysaccharide administration, fetal brains were collected from the 4 treatment groups (lipopolysaccharide/saline, lipopolysaccharide/magnesium sulfate, saline/magnesium sulfate, saline/saline), and phosphoneuronal nitric oxide synthase, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells p65, and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 protein levels were determined by Western blot. An additional group of pregnant rats (n = 5) received N-methyl-D-aspartate-receptor antagonist following the lipopolysaccharide injection to study magnesium sulfate protective mechanism. Lipopolysaccharide (lipopolysaccharide/saline) significantly increased fetal brain phosphoneuronal nitric oxide synthase, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells p65, and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 protein levels compared to the saline/saline group at both embryonic day 16 (phosphoneuronal nitric oxide synthase 0.23 ± 0.01 vs 0.11 ± 0.01 U; nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells

  2. Expression of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus in rats with metabolic syndrome%代谢综合征大鼠下丘脑室旁核神经元型一氧化氮合酶的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马同军; 吴锋

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To examine the changes of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) expression in paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVN) in rats with metabolic syndrome, and explore the mechanisms of nitric oxide(NO) in PVN in inducing the metabolic syndrome. Methods : A high-fat,refined-carbohydrate diet was given to the rats for 24 weeks to induce metabolic syndrome. Immunohistostaining was performed to examine the expression of nNOS in PVN. Results: Compared with the normal control group,the expression of nNOS in the model group were up-regulated significantly(P<0.01). Conclusion :The fact that evidently up-regulated nNOS expression in PVN was seen in rats with metabolic syndrome suggest that the changes of nNOS activities may be involved in variation of the cerebral nemo endocrine.%目的:观察代谢综合征大鼠下丘脑室旁核(paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus,PVN)内神经元型一氧化氮合酶(neuronal nitric oxide synthase,nNOS)表达的变化,探讨PVN内一氧化氮(nitric oxide,NO)在代谢综合征发病中的作用机制.方法:高脂高糖诱导大鼠代谢综合征24周,应用免疫组织化学染色方法观察代谢综合征大鼠PVN内nNOS的表达.结果:与对照组相比较,模型组PVN内nNOS表达明显增加(P<0.01).结论:PVN内nNOS的表达在代谢综合征大鼠中明显升高,nNOS活性改变可能与代谢综合征神经内分泌改变有关.

  3. Fluoxetine inhibits dendrite atrophy of hippocampal neurons by decreasing nitric oxide synthase expression in rat depression model%氟西汀通过降低一氧化氮合酶的表达而抑制抑郁症模型大鼠海马神经元树突萎缩

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗兰; 谭仁祥

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of fluoxetine on dendrite atrophy of hippocampal neurons in rat depression model.METHODS: CMS ( chronic mild stress ), mimicking human depression, was used as the animal depression model. The neurons shape and numbers of nitric oxide synthase positive cells in the hippocampal subfields were measured by Nissl staining and histochemical staining of NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate)diaphorase respectively. RESULTS: CMS deforms neurons in the hippocampal formation, and fluoxetine can renormalize the deformed neurons by inhibiting the nitric oxide synthase catalyzing the over-production of NO,which lead subsequently to the morphological abnormality in the circumscribed area of brain. CONCLUSION:Fluoxetine, an antidepressant, renormalizes dendrite atrophy of hippocampal neurons by inhibiting nitric oxide synthase overexpression in rat chronic mild stress model.%目的:研究氟西汀对抑郁症大鼠模型的海马神经元树突萎缩的作用.方法:用慢性温和性应激模型作为抑郁症模型,采用尼氏染色观察海马各亚区神经元形态,用NADPH-d组化染色方法测定了海马中一氧化氮合酶阳性神经元的数量.结果:慢性温和性应激对海马神经元有一定的损伤,主要表现在神经元树突的萎缩,而氟西汀可使这些受损神经元恢复正常,这种作用与氟西汀抑制海马区的一氧化氮合酶阳性神经元的数量减少相关.结论:氟西汀可通过抑制海马区一氧化氮合酶的过度表达而阻止或扭转抑郁症模型大鼠海马神经元树突的萎缩.

  4. High-intensity interval training prevents oxidant-mediated diaphragm muscle weakness in hypertensive mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, T Scott; Eisenkolb, Sophia; Drobner, Juliane; Fischer, Tina; Werner, Sarah; Linke, Axel; Mangner, Norman; Schuler, Gerhard; Adams, Volker

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension is a key risk factor for heart failure, with the latter characterized by diaphragm muscle weakness that is mediated in part by increased oxidative stress. In the present study, we used a deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt mouse model to determine whether hypertension could independently induce diaphragm dysfunction and further investigated the effects of high-intensity interval training (HIIT). Sham-treated (n = 11), DOCA-salt-treated (n = 11), and DOCA-salt+HIIT-treated (n = 15) mice were studied over 4 wk. Diaphragm contractile function, protein expression, enzyme activity, and fiber cross-sectional area and type were subsequently determined. Elevated blood pressure confirmed hypertension in DOCA-salt mice independent of HIIT (P HIIT. Myosin heavy chain (MyHC) protein expression tended to decrease (∼30%; P = 0.06) in DOCA-salt vs. sham- and DOCA-salt+HIIT mice, whereas oxidative stress increased (P HIIT further prevented direct oxidant-mediated diaphragm contractile dysfunction (P HIIT.-Bowen, T. S., Eisenkolb, S., Drobner, J., Fischer, T., Werner, S., Linke, A., Mangner, N., Schuler, G., Adams, V. High-intensity interval training prevents oxidant-mediated diaphragm muscle weakness in hypertensive mice.

  5. Nitric oxide in the psychobiology of mental disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altan Eşsizoğlu

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide is in a gaseous form and is widespread in the human body. It functions by acting as a secondary messenger in the modulatory activities of neuronal functions of the central nervous system. Nitric oxide is the first identified neurotransmitter of the nontraditional neurotransmitter family.Studies conducted on experimental animals demonstrate that nitric oxide has a neuromodulatory efficacy on the secretions of other neurotransmitters and that it has an effect on learning and memory functions, and on various neuronal mechanisms. Many studies have been conducted to investigate the location of nitric oxide in the central nervous system, its effect on anxiety and depression, its relationship with other neurotransmitters, and also about its role on neurotoxicity. There are clinical studies concerning the level of nitrate, a product of nitric oxide metabolism, and also experimental studies concerning its rewarding effect of alcohol and substance use, in patients with depression and schizophrenia. However, limited studies have been conducted to investigate its relationship with stress, which is an important factor in the etiology of psychiatric disorders. These studies demonstrate that nitric oxide is closely related with stress physiology.Nitric oxide is a neuromodulator, which is frequently being mentioned about nowadays in psychiatry. Clinical and experimental studies play an important role in the psychobiology of psychiatric disorders.

  6. 胍丁胺对吗啡戒断大鼠海马神经元型一氧化氮合酶的影响%Effects of agmatine on neuronal nitric oxide synthase in hippocampus of morphine withdrawal rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王爱国; 姜雨鸽; 徐龙河

    2006-01-01

    黄色,圆形的细胞核被苏木精染成淡紫色.胍丁胺吗啡组阳性神经元免疫荧光吸光度值较吗啡组显著降低(24.32±8.31,50.82±15.13,P<0.01),与盐水对照组基本相似(24.32±8.31,15.24±1.88,P>0.05).结论:胍丁胺能抑制吗啡的戒断症状,降低吗啡戒断大鼠脑海马CA1区神经元型一氧化氮合酶的活性,海马一氧化氮通路参与胍丁胺抑制吗啡的戒断.%BACKGROUND: Agmatine can enhance the analgesic effect of morphine,and antagonize the tolerant and dependent effect of morphine.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effects of injecting agmatine on the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in hippocampus of morphine withdrawal rats.DESIGN: A randomized controlled experimental study.SETTING: Department of Anesthesiology, the General Hospital of Chinese PLA.MATERIALS: All the experiments were carried out in the Department of anesthesiology, the General Hospital of Chinese PLA between April and July 2004. Eighteen healthy SD rats were randomly divided into saline control group (n=6), morphine group (n=6) and agmatine-treated group (n=6).METHODS: The rats in the saline control group were treated with subcutaneous injection of physiological saline (10 mg/kg), those in the morphine group were treated with 5-day preconditioning, subcutaneous injection of morphine of 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 mg/kg respectively, twice a day, and those in the agmatine-treated group were treated with subcutaneous injection of agmatine (10 mg/kg) at 30 minutes before morphine was given, but at 6 hours later, before morphine was given for the last time, the rats in the morphine group and agmatine treated group were also given intraperitoneal injection of naloxone (5 mg/kg) to induce morphine withdrawal symptoms.The number of times of the morphine withdrawal symptoms (including physical signs of trembling like a wet dog, chewing, irrigating, drooling, diarrhoea, etc.) were recorded within 1 hour, and the reduction of body mass was calculated

  7. Nitric oxide supersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, J; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Thomsen, L L

    1993-01-01

    in a double blind design to 17 migraine patients, 17 age and sex matched healthy controls and 9 subjects with tension-type headache. The nitroglycerin-induced headache was significantly more severe in migraine sufferers, lasted longer and fulfilled diagnostic criteria for migraine more often. We have...... previously shown a similar supersensitivity to histamine which in human cerebral arteries activates endothelial H1 receptors and causes endothelial production of nitric oxide. Migraine patients are thus supersensitive to exogenous nitric oxide from nitroglycerin as well as to endothelially produced nitric...

  8. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Excites Firing and Increases GABAergic Miniature Postsynaptic Currents (mPSCs) in Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) Neurons of the Male Mice via Activation of Nitric Oxide (NO) and Suppression of Endocannabinoid Signaling Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Imre; Vastagh, Csaba; Farkas, Erzsébet; Bálint, Flóra; Skrapits, Katalin; Hrabovszky, Erik; Fekete, Csaba; Liposits, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a metabolic signal molecule, regulates reproduction, although, the involved molecular mechanisms have not been elucidated, yet. Therefore, responsiveness of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons to the GLP-1 analog Exendin-4 and elucidation of molecular pathways acting downstream to the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) have been challenged. Loose patch-clamp recordings revealed that Exendin-4 (100 nM–5 μM) elevated firing rate in hypothalamic GnRH-GFP neurons of male mice via activation of GLP-1R. Whole-cell patch-clamp measurements demonstrated increased excitatory GABAergic miniature postsynaptic currents (mPSCs) frequency after Exendin-4 administration, which was eliminated by the GLP-1R antagonist Exendin-3(9–39) (1 μM). Intracellular application of the G-protein inhibitor GDP-β-S (2 mM) impeded action of Exendin-4 on mPSCs, suggesting direct excitatory action of GLP-1 on GnRH neurons. Blockade of nitric-oxide (NO) synthesis by Nω-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME; 100 μM) or N5-[Imino(propylamino)methyl]-L-ornithine hydrochloride (NPLA; 1 μM) or intracellular scavenging of NO by 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (CPTIO; 1 mM) partially attenuated the excitatory effect of Exendin-4. Similar partial inhibition was achieved by hindering endocannabinoid pathway using cannabinoid receptor type-1 (CB1) inverse-agonist 1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-(1-piperidyl) pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251; 1 μM). Simultaneous blockade of NO and endocannabinoid signaling mechanisms eliminated action of Exendin-4 suggesting involvement of both retrograde machineries. Intracellular application of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-antagonist 2E-N-(2, 3-Dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-6-yl)-3-[4-(1, 1-dimethylethyl)phenyl]-2-Propenamide (AMG9810; 10 μM) or the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH)-inhibitor PF3845 (5 μM) impeded the GLP-1-triggered endocannabinoid

  9. Spectroscopic and electrical sensing mechanism in oxidant-mediated polypyrrole nanofibers/nanoparticles for ammonia gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishpal; Kaur, Amarjeet

    2013-05-01

    Ammonia gas sensing mechanism in oxidant-mediated polypyrrole (PPy) nanofibers/nanoparticles has been studied through spectroscopic and electrical investigations. PPy nanofibers/nanoparticles have been synthesized by chemical oxidation method in the presence of various oxidizing agents such as ammonium persulfate (APS), potassium persulfate (PPS), vanadium pentoxide (V2O5), and iron chloride (FeCl3). Scanning electron microscopy study revealed that PPy nanofibers of about 63, 71 and 79 nm diameters were formed in the presence of APS, PPS, V2O5, respectively, while PPy nanoparticles of about 100-110 nm size were obtained in the presence of FeCl3 as an oxidant. The structural investigations and confirmation of synthesis of PPy were established through Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. The gas sensing behavior of the prepared PPy samples is investigated by measuring the electrical resistance in ammonia environment. The observed gas sensing response ( δR R × 100 ) at 100 ppm level of ammonia is 4.5 and 18 % for the samples prepared with oxidizing agents FeCl3 and APS, respectively, and by changing the ammonia level from 50 to 300 ppm, the sensing response varies from 4.5 to 11 % and 10 to 39 %, respectively. Out of all four samples, the PPy nanofibers prepared in the presence of APS have shown the best sensing response. The mechanism of gas sensing response of the PPy samples has been investigated through Raman spectroscopy study. The decrease of charge carrier concentration through reduction of polymeric chains has been recognized through Raman spectroscopic measurements recorded in ammonia environment.

  10. Spectroscopic and electrical sensing mechanism in oxidant-mediated polypyrrole nanofibers/nanoparticles for ammonia gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishpal; Kaur, Amarjeet, E-mail: amarkaur@physics.du.ac.in [University of Delhi, Department of Physics and Astrophysics (India)

    2013-05-15

    Ammonia gas sensing mechanism in oxidant-mediated polypyrrole (PPy) nanofibers/nanoparticles has been studied through spectroscopic and electrical investigations. PPy nanofibers/nanoparticles have been synthesized by chemical oxidation method in the presence of various oxidizing agents such as ammonium persulfate (APS), potassium persulfate (PPS), vanadium pentoxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}), and iron chloride (FeCl{sub 3}). Scanning electron microscopy study revealed that PPy nanofibers of about 63, 71 and 79 nm diameters were formed in the presence of APS, PPS, V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, respectively, while PPy nanoparticles of about 100-110 nm size were obtained in the presence of FeCl{sub 3} as an oxidant. The structural investigations and confirmation of synthesis of PPy were established through Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. The gas sensing behavior of the prepared PPy samples is investigated by measuring the electrical resistance in ammonia environment. The observed gas sensing response ({Delta}R/Rx100) at 100 ppm level of ammonia is {approx}4.5 and 18 % for the samples prepared with oxidizing agents FeCl{sub 3} and APS, respectively, and by changing the ammonia level from 50 to 300 ppm, the sensing response varies from {approx}4.5 to 11 % and {approx}10 to 39 %, respectively. Out of all four samples, the PPy nanofibers prepared in the presence of APS have shown the best sensing response. The mechanism of gas sensing response of the PPy samples has been investigated through Raman spectroscopy study. The decrease of charge carrier concentration through reduction of polymeric chains has been recognized through Raman spectroscopic measurements recorded in ammonia environment.

  11. Mechanistic Variants in Gas-Phase Metal-Oxide Mediated Activation of Methane at Ambient Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jilai; Zhou, Shaodong; Zhang, Jun; Schlangen, Maria; Usharani, Dandamudi; Shaik, Sason; Schwarz, Helmut

    2016-09-07

    The C-H bond activation of methane mediated by a prototypical heteronuclear metal-oxide cluster, [Al2Mg2O5](•+), was investigated by using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) in conjunction with high-level quantum mechanical calculations. Experimentally, hydrogen-atom abstraction from methane by the cluster ion [Al2Mg2O5](•+) takes place at ambient conditions. As to the mechanism, according to our computational findings, both the proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and the conventional hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) are feasible and compete with each other. This is in distinct contrast to the [XYO2](+) (X, Y = Mg, Al, Si) cluster oxide ions which activate methane exclusively via the PCET route (Li, J.; Zhou, S.; Zhang, J.; Schlangen, M.; Weiske, T.; Usharani, D.; Shaik, S.; Schwarz, H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2016, 138, 7973-7981). The electronic origins of the mechanistically rather complex reactivity scenarios of the [Al2Mg2O5](•+)/CH4 couple were elucidated. For the PCET mechanism, in which the Lewis acid-base pair [Al(+)-O(-)] of the cluster acts as the active site, a clear correlation has been established between the nature of the transition state, the corresponding barrier height, the Lewis acidity-basicity of the [M(+)-O(-)] unit, as well as the bond order of the M(+)-O(-) bond. Also addressed is the role of the spin and charge distributions of a terminal oxygen radical site in the direct HAT route. The knowledge of the factors that control the reactivity of PCET and HAT pathways not only deepens our mechanistic understanding of metal-oxide mediated C-H bond activation but may also provide guidance for the rational design of catalysts.

  12. Distribution of nitric oxide synthetase positive neurons in cochlear nucle-ar complex and potine of guinea pigs%豚鼠耳蜗核复合体及脑干内一氧化氮合酶阳性神经元的分布

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田秀芬; 董明敏

    2000-01-01

    Aim: To study the distributive characteristic of nitric oxide synthetase (NOS) positive neurons in cochlear nuclearcomplex (CNC) and potine of guinea pigs. Methods: Nicotinamidc adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase(NADPH-d) histo-chemistry method was adopted to study this distributive characteristic and explore the role of nitric oxide (NO) in auditory path-way. Results: The results showed that NOS positive neurons existed in all the auditory afferent nucleus while NOS negative neu-rons existed in the superior olivary nucleus. Most of NOS positive neurons in CNC were located in the posterior ventral cochlear nu-cleus(VCN) ,which were round or oval bipolar neurons. NOS positive neurons were also found in potine widely. They were in:mesencephalic nucleus of the 5th nerve (MeS), locus cemleus (LC), medial vestibular nucleus (MVe), ventral part of Mve( MVeV ), lateral vestibular nucleus(LVe ), prepositns hypoglossal nucleus (PrH), gigantocellular reticular nucleus (Gi), ventralpart of Gi (GiV), lateral paragigantocellular nucleus (LPGi), dorsal paragigantocellular nucleus (DPGi). Conclusion: The re-sults suggest that NOS is likely to be a transmitter or mediator involved in regulating the transmission of sound signals, and may playan important role in regulating the potine of guinea pigs.%目的:探讨一氧化氮合酶(NOS)阳性神经元在豚鼠耳蜗核复合体(CNC)和脑干内的分布特点。方法:采用依赖还原型辅酶Ⅱ的尼克酰胺腺嘌呤二核苷酸磷酸黄递酶(NADPH-d)组织化学方法,观察了豚鼠听觉核团和脑干内NOS阳性神经元的分布。结果:在脑桥的各级听觉传入核团,均有NOS阳性神经元,而上橄榄复合体无NOS阳性神经元;耳蜗核内NOS阳性神经元,主要集中在后腹侧核,为圆形或椭圆型双极神经元;下丘的臂内侧核NOS阳性神经元呈小的、圆形细胞。在脑干内,NOS阳性神经元分布广泛,在三叉神经中脑核(Me5)、蓝斑(LC)、

  13. Effects of nitric oxide on spontaneous pain reaction and neuronal apoptosis in the spinal cord of rats induced by formalin inflammatory pain%NOS抑制剂对甲醛炎性痛诱导的大鼠痛反应及脊髓神经元凋亡的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    褚赛纯; 胡玉燕; 李清君; 李慧娜; 李文斌

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To observe whether formalin inflammatory pain can induce neuron apoptosis in rats spinal cord or not and the effects of nitric oxide on the spontaneous pain reaction and neuron apoptosis in the spinal cord of rats with formalin inflammatory pain. Methods: Formalin-induced paw licking time was used to reflect the degree of spontaneous pain of rats, and the flow cytometry was used to detecte neuron apoptosis rate of spinal cord. Results: Compared with control group, the apoptosis ratio of spinal neuron was increased in the rats with formalin inflammatory pain, and peaked at 3d after formalin injection. Pre-intrathecal injection of NOS inhibitor L-NAME inhibited the nocicepu've behavioural response in double phases induced by formalin injection and cut down the neuron apoptosis ratio of spinal cord of rats with formalin inflammatory pain. Nocicepu've behavioural response and incraesed neuron apoptosis in the spinal cord were induced by intrathecal injection of L-Arg in normal rats. Conclusion: The results indicated that formalin inflammatory pain could induce the apoptosis of spinal neurons. The neurons apoptosis was the most significant on the third day after formalin injection. The increased pruduction of NO in spinal cord could promote the transmit of nociceptive information and participate the induction of neuronal apoptosis during the formalin inflammatory pain.%目的:观察甲醛炎性痛是否可诱导脊髓神经元凋亡以及一氧化氮(NO)对甲醛炎性痛诱导的大鼠痛反应以及脊髓神经元凋亡的影响.方法:采用行为学方法观察大鼠自发痛反应,流式细胞术检测脊髓神经元凋亡率.结果:与正常大鼠比较,甲醛炎性痛可诱导大鼠脊髓神经元凋亡率明显增加,于注射甲醛后3d时最为明显.预先鞘内注射NOS抑制剂L-NAME可剂量依赖性抑制足底注射甲醛诱导的大鼠第一相和第二相痛反应,并可剂量依赖性抑制足底注射甲醛诱导的脊髓神经元凋亡

  14. Dispersal of human and plant pathogens biofilms via nitric oxide donors at 4 °C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvasi, Massimiliano; Durie, Ian A; Henríquez, Tania; Satkute, Aiste; Matuszewska, Marta; Prado, Raphael Carvalho

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that nitric oxide donors capable of manipulating nitric oxide-mediated signaling in bacteria could induce dispersal of biofilms. Encased in extracellular polymeric substances, human and plant pathogens within biofilms are significantly more resistant to sanitizers. This is particularly a problem in refrigerated environments where food is processed. In an exercise aimed to study the potential of nitric oxide donors as biofilm dispersal in refrigerated conditions, we compared the ability of different nitric oxide donors (SNAP, NO-aspirin and Noc-5) to dislodge biofilms formed by foodborne, human and plant pathogens treated at 4 °C. The donors SNAP and Noc-5 were efficient in dispersing biofilms formed by Salmonella enterica, pathogenic Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua. The biomasses were decreased up to 30 % when compared with the untreated controls. When the plant pathogens Pectobacterium sp. and Xanthomonas sp. were tested the dispersion was mainly limited to Pectobacterium carotovorum biofilms, decreasing up to 15 % after exposure to molsidomine. Finally, the association of selected nitric oxide donors with sanitizers (DiQuat, H2O2, peracetic acid and PhenoTek II) was effective in dispersing biofilms. The best dispersal was achieved by pre-treating P. carotovorum with molsidomine and then peracetic acid. The synergistic effect was estimated up to ~35 % in dispersal when compared with peracetic acid alone. The association of nitric oxide donors with sanitizers could provide a foundation for an improved sanitization procedure for cleaning refrigerate environments.

  15. 侧脑室注射肾上腺髓质素增加大鼠心血管相关核团中c-fos的表达并激活脑内一氧化氮神经元%Intracerebroventricular administration of adrenomedullin increases the expression of c-fos and activates nitric oxide-producing neurons in rat cardiovascular related brain nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    季淑梅; 王泽民; 李学平; 何瑞荣

    2004-01-01

    本研究利用Fos蛋白和一氧化氮合酶(nNOS)双重免疫组化方法,观察侧脑室注射肾上腺髓质素(adrenomedullin,ADM)对大鼠心血管相关核团中c-fos表达及一氧化氮神经元的影响,以探讨ADM在中枢的作用部位并研究其在中枢的作用是否有NO神经元参与.侧脑室注射ADM(1 nmol/kg,3 nmol/kg)诱发脑干的孤束核、最后区、蓝斑核、臂旁核和外侧巨细胞旁核,下丘脑的室旁核、视上核和腹内侧核以及前脑的中央杏仁核和外侧缰核等多个部位的心血管中枢出现大量Fos样免疫反应神经元.侧脑室注射ADM(3 nmol/kg)引起脑干的孤束核、外侧巨细胞旁核,下丘脑的室旁核、视上核内的Fos-nNOS双标神经元增加;ADM(1 nmol/kg)亦可引起室旁核、视上核内的Fos-nNOS双标神经元增加,而对孤束核、外侧巨细胞旁核内的Fos-nNOS双标神经元无影响.降钙素基因相关肽(calcitonin gene-related peptide,CGRP)受体拮抗剂CGRP8-37(30 nmol/kg)可明显减弱此效应.以上结果表明,ADM可兴奋脑内多个心血管相关核团的神经元并激活室旁核、视上核、孤束核及外侧巨细胞旁核内的一氧化氮神经元,此效应可能部分由CGRP受体介导.%To define the action sites of adrenomedullin (ADM) in the rat brain, and to examine whether neuronal NO may participate in the actions of ADM, the present study was undertaken to examine the effects of i.c.v. administration of ADM on the induction of Fos protein and on nitric oxide-producing neurons in rat brain nuclei involved in cardiovascular regulation, using double immunohistochemical method for Fos and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). Following i.c.v. administration of ADM (1 mol/kg, 3 mol/kg), Fos-like immunoreactivity neurons were markedly increased in several brain areas of the rat, including the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), the area postrema, the locus coeruleus, the parabrachial nucleus and the nucleus paragigantocelluaris

  16. Effect of electro-acupuncture on nitric oxide synthase positive neurons in grey matter around the central canal in formalin-induced inflammatory hyperalgesic rats%电针对福尔马林炎性痛大鼠脊髓中央管周围灰质神经元一氧化氮合酶表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王泳; 马素英

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨电针对福尔马林炎性痛大鼠脊髓中央管周围灰质神经元一氧化氮合酶(NOS)表达的影响.方法 应用还原型尼克酰胺腺嘌呤二核苷酸磷酸脱氢酶法,观察在正常情况下(正常组)、疼痛刺激下(疼痛刺激组)、电针刺激下(电针刺激组)、疼痛加电针刺激下(疼痛+电针刺激组)NOS阳性神经元在脊髓中央管周围灰质的表达.结果 正常组脊髓中央管周围灰质有少量NOS阳性细胞,疼痛刺激组NOS阳性细胞数目较正常组增多(P<0.01),电针刺激组NOS阳性细胞与正常组比较差别无统计学意义(P>O.05);疼痛+电针刺激组NOS阳性细胞数较疼痛刺激组明显减少(P<0.01),而与正常组相比差别无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 抑制疼痛刺激引起的NOS阳性细胞数目增多,可能是电针镇痛的机制之一.%Objective To study the effect of electro-acupuncture on nitric oxide synthase ( NOS)-positive neurons a-round the central canal in formalin-induced inflammatory hyperalgesic rats. Methods Expression of NOS-positive neurons in the grey matter around the central canal in spinal cord when animal was normal, pain stimulated, electroacupuncture stimulated, or pain and electro-acupuncture stimulated was observed by nicotinamide adenine dinucletide phosphoric acid-dehydrogen-ase. Results There were a few NOS-positive neurons in the grey matter around the central canal in spinal cord in normal group;In pain stimulation group,the number of the neurons increased greatly compared with normal group( P <0. 01);There was no statistical significance in the number of NOS-positive neurons between the electro-acupuncture stimulation group and normal group(p>0.05) ;Compared with pain stimulation group,the number of NOS-positive neurons in the pain and electro-acupuncture stimulation group decreased significantly (P <0. 01), but there was no statistical significance in the number of NOS-positive neurons between the pain and

  17. Vascular nitric oxide and superoxide anion contribute to sex-specific programmed cardiovascular physiology in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roghair, Robert D; Segar, Jeffrey L; Volk, Kenneth A; Chapleau, Mark W; Dallas, Lindsay M; Sorenson, Anna R; Scholz, Thomas D; Lamb, Fred S

    2009-03-01

    Intrauterine environmental pertubations have been linked to the development of adult hypertension. We sought to evaluate the interrelated roles of sex, nitric oxide, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in programmed cardiovascular disease. Programming was induced in mice by maternal dietary intervention (DI; partial substitution of protein with carbohydrates and fat) or carbenoxolone administration (CX, to increase fetal glucocorticoid exposure). Adult blood pressure and locomotor activity were recorded by radiotelemetry at baseline, after a week of high salt, and after a week of high salt plus nitric oxide synthase inhibition (by l-NAME). In male offspring, DI or CX programmed an elevation in blood pressure that was exacerbated by N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester administration, but not high salt alone. Mesenteric resistance vessels from DI male offspring displayed impaired vasorelaxation to ACh and nitroprusside, which was blocked by catalase and superoxide dismutase. CX-exposed females were normotensive, while DI females had nitric oxide synthase-dependent hypotension and enhanced mesenteric dilation. Despite the disparate cardiovascular phenotypes, both male and female DI offspring displayed increases in locomotor activity and aortic superoxide production. Despite dissimilar blood pressures, DI and CX-exposed females had reductions in cardiac baroreflex sensitivity. In conclusion, both maternal malnutrition and fetal glucocorticoid exposure program increases in arterial pressure in male but not female offspring. While maternal DI increased both superoxide-mediated vasoconstriction and nitric oxide mediated vasodilation, the balance of these factors favored the development of hypertension in males and hypotension in females.

  18. A novel soluble immune-type receptor (SITR in teleost fish: carp SITR is involved in the nitric oxide-mediated response to a protozoan parasite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla M S Ribeiro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The innate immune system relies upon a wide range of germ-line encoded receptors including a large number of immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF receptors. Different Ig-like immune receptor families have been reported in mammals, birds, amphibians and fish. Most innate immune receptors of the IgSF are type I transmembrane proteins containing one or more extracellular Ig-like domains and their regulation of effector functions is mediated intracellularly by distinct stimulatory or inhibitory pathways. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Carp SITR was found in a substracted cDNA repertoire from carp macrophages, enriched for genes up-regulated in response to the protozoan parasite Trypanoplasma borreli. Carp SITR is a type I protein with two extracellular Ig domains in a unique organisation of a N-proximal V/C2 (or I- type and a C-proximal V-type Ig domain, devoid of a transmembrane domain or any intracytoplasmic signalling motif. The carp SITR C-proximal V-type Ig domain, in particular, has a close sequence similarity and conserved structural characteristics to the mammalian CD300 molecules. By generating an anti-SITR antibody we could show that SITR protein expression was restricted to cells of the myeloid lineage. Carp SITR is abundantly expressed in macrophages and is secreted upon in vitro stimulation with the protozoan parasite T. borreli. Secretion of SITR protein during in vivo T. borreli infection suggests a role for this IgSF receptor in the host response to this protozoan parasite. Overexpression of carp SITR in mouse macrophages and knock-down of SITR protein expression in carp macrophages, using morpholino antisense technology, provided evidence for the involvement of carp SITR in the parasite-induced NO production. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We report the structural and functional characterization of a novel soluble immune-type receptor (SITR in a teleost fish and propose a role for carp SITR in the NO-mediated response to a protozoan parasite.

  19. Inhibition of nuclear factor-kappaB or Bax prevents endoplasmic reticulum stress- but not nitric oxide-mediated apoptosis in INS-1E cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonnesen, Morten F; Grunnet, Lars G; Friberg, Josefine

    2009-01-01

    and alternative splicing of the transcription factor Xbp-1 were exclusively activated by TG. TG exposure caused NFkappaB activation, as assessed by IkappaB degradation and NFkappaB DNA binding. Inhibition of NFkappaB or the Bcl-2 family member Bax pathways protected beta-cells against TG- but not SNAP....... Exposure of INS-1E cells to TG or SNAP caused caspase-3 cleavage and apoptosis. Both TG and SNAP induced activation of the proapoptotic transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP). However, other classical ER stress-induced markers such as up-regulation of ER chaperone Bip......-induced beta-cell death. These data suggest that NO generation and direct SERCA2 inhibition cause two quantitative and qualitative different forms of ER stress. In contrast to NO, direct ER stress induced by SERCA inhibition causes activation of ER stress signaling pathways and elicit proapoptotic signaling...

  20. Inhibition of Nuclear Factor-kappa B or Bax Prevents Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-But Not Nitric Oxide-Mediated Apoptosis in INS-1E Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonnesen, M.F.; Grunnet, L.G.; Friberg, J.;

    2009-01-01

    elicited by NO and ER Ca2+ depletion differ, we here compare the direct effects of NO, in the form of the NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D, L-penicillamine (SNAP), with the effects of SERCA2 inhibitor thapsigargin (TG) on MAPK, nuclear factor kappa B (NF kappa B), Bcl-2 proteins, ER stress, and apoptosis...

  1. Serum from achalasia patients alters neurochemical coding in the myenteric plexus and nitric oxide mediated motor response in normal human fundus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    des Varannes, SB; Chevalier, J; Pimont, S; Le Neel, JC; Klotz, M; Schafer, KH; Galmiche, JP; Neunlist, M

    2006-01-01

    Background and aims: Achalasia is a disease of unknown aetiology. An immune mechanism has been suggested on the basis of previous morphological observations. The objective of this study was to test whether the serum of achalasia patients could reproduce the phenotype and functional changes that occu

  2. A novel soluble immune-type receptor (SITR) in teleost fish: carp SITR is involved in the nitric oxide-mediated response to a protozoan parasite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribeiro, C.M.S.; Raes, G.; Ghassabeh, G.H.; Schijns, V.E.J.C.; Pontes, M.J.S.L.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Wiegertjes, G.F.

    2011-01-01

    Background- The innate immune system relies upon a wide range of germ-line encoded receptors including a large number of immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) receptors. Different Ig-like immune receptor families have been reported in mammals, birds, amphibians and fish. Most innate immune receptors of

  3. Nitric oxide bioavailability in malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolewski, Peter; Gramaglia, Irene; Frangos, John; Intaglietta, Marcos; van der Heyde, Henri C

    2005-09-01

    Rational development of adjunct or anti-disease therapy for severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria requires cellular and molecular definition of malarial pathogenesis. Nitric oxide (NO) is a potential target for such therapy but its role during malaria is controversial. It has been proposed that NO is produced at high levels to kill Plasmodium parasites, although the unfortunate consequence of elevated NO levels might be impaired neuronal signaling, oxidant damage and red blood cell damage that leads to anemia. In this case, inhibitors of NO production or NO scavengers might be an effective adjunct therapy. However, increasing amounts of evidence support the alternate hypothesis that NO production is limited during malaria. Furthermore, the well-documented NO scavenging by cell-free plasma hemoglobin and superoxide, the levels of which are elevated during malaria, has not been considered. Low NO bioavailability in the vasculature during malaria might contribute to pathologic activation of the immune system, the endothelium and the coagulation system: factors required for malarial pathogenesis. Therefore, restoring NO bioavailability might represent an effective anti-disease therapy.

  4. Pain modulation by nitric oxide in the spinal cord.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurelio M Freire

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is a versatile messenger molecule first associated with endothelial relaxing effects. In the central nervous system (CNS, NO synthesis is primarily triggered by activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors and has a Janus face, with both beneficial and harmful properties, depending on concentration and the identity of its synthetic enzyme isoform. There are three isoforms of the NO synthesizing enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS: neuronal (nNOS, endothelial (eNOS, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, each one involved with specific events in the brain. In CNS, nNOS is involved with modulation of synaptic transmission through long-term potentiation in several regions, including nociceptive circuits in the spinal cord. Here, we review the role played by NO on central pain sensitization.

  5. Alterations in Nitric Oxide Synthase in the Aged CNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyang Jung

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with neuronal loss, gross weight reduction of the brain, and glial proliferation in the cortex, all of which lead to functional changes in the brain. It is known that oxidative stress is a critical factor in the pathogenesis of aging; additionally, growing evidence suggests that excessive nitric oxide (NO production contributes to the aging process. However, it is still unclear how NO plays a role in the aging process. This paper describes age-related changes in the activity of NADPH-diaphorase (NADPH-d, a marker for neurons containing nitric oxide synthase (NOS, in many CNS regions. Understanding these changes may provide a novel perspective in identifying the aging mechanism.

  6. Chronic alcohol consumption affects gastrointestinal motility and reduces the proportion of neuronal NOS-immunoreactive myenteric neurons in the murine jejunum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagyanszki, M.; Krecsmarik, M.; de Winter, B.Y.; de Man, J.G.; Fekete, E.V.A.; Pelckmans, P.A.; Adriaensen, D.; Kroese, A.B.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068352247; van Nassauw, L.; Timmermans, J-P

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol consumption interferes with gastrointestinal transit causing symptoms in alcoholic patients. Nitric oxide (NO), synthesized by neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) plays an important role in the control of gastrointestinal motility. Our aim was to investigate whether chronic alcohol intake

  7. The role of nitric oxide in reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCann S.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO plays a crucial role in reproduction at every level in the organism. In the brain, it activates the release of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH. The axons of the LHRH neurons project to the mating centers in the brain stem and by afferent pathways evoke the lordosis reflex in female rats. In males, there is activation of NOergic terminals that release NO in the corpora cavernosa penis to induce erection by generation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP. NO also activates the release of LHRH which reaches the pituitary and activates the release of gonadotropins by activating neural NO synthase (nNOS in the pituitary gland. In the gonad, NO plays an important role in inducing ovulation and in causing luteolysis, whereas in the reproductive tract, it relaxes uterine muscle via cGMP and constricts it via prostaglandins (PG.

  8. The role of nitric oxide in cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a pleiotropic regulator, critical to numerous biological processes, including va-sodilatation, neurotransmission and macrophage-mediated immunity. The family of nitric oxide synthases(NOS) comprises inducible NOS (iNOS), endothelial NOS (eNOS), and neuronal NOS (nNOS). Interest-ingly, various studies have shown that all three isoforms can be involved in promoting or inhibiting theetiology of cancer. NOS activity has been detected in tumour cells of various histogenetic origins and hasbeen associated with tumour grade, proliferation rate and expression of important signaling componentsassociated with cancer development such as the oestrogen receptor. It appears that high levels of NOSexpression (for example, generated by activated macrophages) may be cytostatic or cytotoxic for tumorcells, whereas low level activity can have the opposite effect and promote tumour growth. Paradoxicallytherefore, NO (and related reactive nitrogen species) may have both genotoxic and angiogenic properties.Increased NO-generation in a cell may select mutant p53 cells and contribute to tumour angiogenesis byupregulating VEGF. In addition, NO may modulate tumour DNA repair mechanisms by upregulating p53,poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). An understand-ing at the molecular level of the role of NO in cancer will have profound therapeutic implications for thediagnosis and treatment of disease.

  9. Effects of neuronal nitric oxide synthase on antidepressant-like effect of fluoxetine%神经元型一氧化氮合酶对氟西汀抗抑郁样作用的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄新艳; 谢娟; 许银燕; 王俐

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨神经元型一氧化氮合酶(nNOS)与氟西汀抗抑郁样作用之间的关系.方法:以强迫游泳和悬尾实验的不动时间为指标评价药物的抗抑郁样作用.ICR小鼠接受氟西汀治疗或氟西汀治疗前予L-精氨酸/D-精氨酸预处理,观察给药后小鼠不动时间的改变;nNOS敲除鼠和野生型背景鼠均接受氟西汀治疗,观察给药后小鼠不动时间的改变.结果:在ICR小鼠,氟西汀显著缩短小鼠不动时间,产生抗抑郁样作用,L-精氨酸能有效拮抗氟西汀的这一作用,而D-精氨酸不能拮抗氟西汀的作用.氟西汀缩短野生型小鼠的强迫游泳不动时间,产生显著的抗抑郁样作用,而氟西汀治疗nNOS敲除小鼠没有改变强迫游泳不动时间,未产生抗抑郁样作用.结论:nNOS分子介导了氟西汀的抗抑郁样作用.%Objective: To explore the relationship between neuronal nitrie oxide synthase (nNOS) molecule and antidepressant-like effects of fluoxetine. Methods;The antidepressant activity was assessed in forced swimming test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST) behavioral paradigm. Total immobility time was registered during the period of 5 or 6 min. ICR mice were treated with fluoxetine or pretreated with L-arginine/Z)-arginine, and wildtype(WT) mice and mice lacking nNOS gene [knock-out (KO)]were treated with flu oxetine, and then the immobility time in the FST and TST was analyzed. Results: In ICR mice,the immobility time in the FST and TST as reduced by fluoxetine treatment, and the antidepressant-like effect of fluoxetine in the FST and TST was prevented by the pre treatment with L-arginine,but not Z>-arginine. In WT mice,administrations of fluoxetine caused antidepressant-like effect in the FST, whereas in KO mice fluoxetine was ineffective. Conclusion: nNOS molecule is required by antidepressant-like effect of fluoxetine.

  10. Nitric oxide and cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengel, Atiye; Sahinarslan, Asife

    2006-12-01

    Endothelium has many important functions including the control of blood-tissue permeability and vascular tonus, regulation of vascular surface properties for homeostasis and inflammation. Nitric oxide is the chief molecule in regulation of endothelial functions. Nitric oxide deficiency, which is also known as endothelial dysfunction, is the first step for the occurrence of many disease states in cardiovascular system including heart failure, hypertension, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus, hyperhomocysteinemia and smoking. This review deals with the importance of nitric oxide for cardiovascular system. It also includes the latest improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of endothelial dysfunction.

  11. 49 CFR 173.158 - Nitric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nitric acid. 173.158 Section 173.158... Nitric acid. (a) Nitric acid exceeding 40 percent concentration may not be packaged with any other material. (b) Nitric acid in any concentration which does not contain sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid as...

  12. 49 CFR 173.337 - Nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nitric oxide. 173.337 Section 173.337... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.337 Nitric oxide. (a) Nitric oxide must be... valve and valve seat that will not deteriorate in contact with nitric oxide. Cylinders or valves may...

  13. Expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase gene in the brain tissue of rats with cerebral concussion%神经元型一氧化氮合酶基因在脑震荡大鼠脑组织中的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭瑞云; 高亚兵; 王德文; 肖兴义; 杨瑞; 陈浩宇; 吴小红; 刘杰; 胡文华; 马俊杰

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cerebral concussion is a mild brain injury. In basic researches, the expression and significance of enkaphalin and dopamine in cerebral concussion remain poorly understood.OBJECTIVE: To observe the expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) gene in rat models of cerebral concussion and to explore its significance.DESIGN: A randomized controlled trialled study.SETTING and PARTICIPANTS: This study was conducted in the Institute of Radiation Medicine, Academy of Military Medical Sciences. Rat models of cerebral concussion was established in 80 healthy male Wistar rats of clean grade purchased from the Experimental Animal Center of Academy of Military Medical Sciences with free access to food and water. The rats were randomly divided into 4 groups according to the different levels of cerebral impact for model establishment, namely the control group, 50, 100 and 200 g counterweight groups.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Brain tissue samples were taken 1, 3, 7,14 and 30 days after injury respectively, from each group, to examine the changes in the expression of nNOS gene in the course of cerebral concussion by means of immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization.RESULTS: Rats in 100 g group exhibited typical manifestations of cerebral concussion as seen in the clinical setting. The pathological changes included cerebral vascular dilatation, congestion, edema of the cerebral tissues, neuronal degeneration, necrosis, and decrease or even disappearance of the Nissl bodies. The protein and mRNA of nNOS were increased 3 days after the injury, peaked on the 7th day, and decreased till the 14th days but still remained positive on the 30th day. The positive expression was detected in the plasma of neurons in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, thalamus and cerebellum.CONCLUSION: Cerebral concussion is pathologically characterized by blood circulation disorder and neural cell degeneration and necrosis. The expression of nNOS gene participates in brain tissue damage

  14. Effect of aminoguanidine on expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in neurons in the small intestinal nerve plexus of starved rats%氨基胍对饥饿大鼠小肠肌间神经丛神经元诱导型一氧化氮合酶表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张小平; 陆之辉; 程爱国

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of aminoguanidine on expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in neurons in the small intestinal nerve plexus of starved rats.Methods Ninety male SD rats weighing 230-270 g were randomly divided into 3 groups:group normal control (group C,n =10) ; group starvation (group S,n=40) and group starvation + aminoguanidine (group A,n =40).The animals were allowed free access to water but no food during starvation in S and A groups.In group A the animals were given aminoguanidine 150 mg·kg-1 ·d-1 intraperitoneally during starvation.Ten animals were sacrificed at 3,5,7 and 9 d of starvation respectively and intestine specimens were taken for determination of ratio of intestinal transit using dextran blue-2000 as indicator.Then the specimens of intestinal myenteric nerve plexus of ileum were collected and stained by histochemistry with nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate-d for determination of iNOS expression.Results Starvation significantly reduced the small intestinal transit and increased iNOS expression in neurons in the myenteric nerve plexus of small intestine in proportion to days of starvation in group S compared with group C.Intraperitoneal aminoguanidine significantly attenuated the starvation-induced changes in intestinal transit and iNOS expression.Conclusion Aminoguanidine can attenuate the up-regulation of the expression of iNOS in neurons in the myenteric nerve plexus of small intestine induced by starvation and is helpful in promoting the intestinal transit in starved rats.%目的 评价氨基胍对饥饿大鼠小肠肌间神经丛神经元诱导型一氧化氮合酶(iNOS)表达的影响.方法 雄性SD大鼠90只,体重230~270 g,采用随机数字表法,将其随机分为3组:正常对照组(C组,n=10)、饥饿组(S组,n=40)和氨基胍+饥饿组(A组,n=40),S组和A组无饲料供应,自由摄水,A组腹腔注射氨基胍150 mg·kg-1·d-1.S组和A组分别于饥饿3、5、7、9d时取10只动物,采

  15. Nitric oxide negatively regulates mammalian adult neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Michael A.; Stasiv, Yuri; Benraiss, Abdellatif; Chmielnicki, Eva; Grinberg, Alexander; Westphal, Heiner; Goldman, Steven A.; Enikolopov, Grigori

    2003-08-01

    Neural progenitor cells are widespread throughout the adult central nervous system but only give rise to neurons in specific loci. Negative regulators of neurogenesis have therefore been postulated, but none have yet been identified as subserving a significant role in the adult brain. Here we report that nitric oxide (NO) acts as an important negative regulator of cell proliferation in the adult mammalian brain. We used two independent approaches to examine the function of NO in adult neurogenesis. In a pharmacological approach, we suppressed NO production in the rat brain by intraventricular infusion of an NO synthase inhibitor. In a genetic approach, we generated a null mutant neuronal NO synthase knockout mouse line by targeting the exon encoding active center of the enzyme. In both models, the number of new cells generated in neurogenic areas of the adult brain, the olfactory subependyma and the dentate gyrus, was strongly augmented, which indicates that division of neural stem cells in the adult brain is controlled by NO and suggests a strategy for enhancing neurogenesis in the adult central nervous system.

  16. 司来吉兰对帕金森病模型大鼠结肠α-突触核蛋白和神经元型一氧化氮合酶表达的影响%Effects of selegiline on the expression of α-synuclein and neuronal nitric oxide synthase in colon of Parkinson's disease model rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毕树立; 刘斌; 成晓华; 高海英; 李世英

    2015-01-01

    目的 观察司来吉兰(selegiline)对帕金森病(Parkinson disease,PD)模型大鼠结肠功能障碍及结肠α-突触核蛋白(α-Synuclein,α-Syn)及神经元型一氧化氮合酶(neuronal nitric oxide synthase,nNOS)表达的影响,探讨司来吉兰对PD患者结肠功能障碍的治疗作用及可能机制.方法 将72只健康SD大鼠随机分为正常对照组、PD模型组和司来吉兰治疗组,后两组采用颈背部皮下注射鱼藤酮方法制备PD模型.模型组每天给予生理盐水灌胃,治疗组每天给予司来吉兰0.5 mg/kg灌胃.分别于治疗后4d、8d测定大鼠1h粪便排出量及含水量,并采用免疫组化法和蛋白质印迹法检测结肠α-Syn和nNOS的表达.结果 (1)与对照组比较,模型组各时间点1h粪便排出量及含水量均减少(均P<0.01);与模型组相比较,治疗组各时间点1h粪便排出量及含水量均增加(均P<0.05),且治疗8d亚组高于治疗4d亚组(均P<0.05).(2)与对照组比较,模型组各时间点结肠α-Syn、nNOS表达均增加(均P<0.01);与模型组比较,治疗组各时间点结肠α-Syn、nNOS表达均降低(均P<0.05).与治疗4d亚组比较,治疗8d亚组的α-Syn、nNOS表达含量降低(均P<0.05).结论 司来吉兰能够改善PD大鼠结肠功能障碍,其作用机制可能与其抑制α-Syn、nNOS表达有关.

  17. Effects of selegiline on tyrosine hydroxylase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase in gastric antrum of rats with Parkinson disease%司来吉兰对帕金森病模型大鼠胃窦酪氨酸羟化酶和神经元型一氧化氮合酶表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毕树立; 刘斌; 高海英

    2014-01-01

    目的 观察司来吉兰对帕金森病(Parkinson disease,PD)模型大鼠胃功能障碍及胃窦酪氨酸羟化酶(tyrosine hydroxylase,TH)及神经元型一氧化氮合酶(neuronal nitric oxide synthase,nNOS)表达的影响,探讨司来吉兰对PD胃功能障碍的治疗作用及可能机制.方法 72只健康SD大鼠随机分为正常对照组、PD模型组和司来吉兰治疗组,后两组采用颈背部皮下注射鱼藤酮制备PD模型,模型制备成功后,模型组每日并灌胃生理盐水,治疗组每日灌胃给药司来吉兰0.5 mg/kg.分别于治疗后4d、8d测定胃固体食物残留率,并采用免疫组化法和蛋白质印迹法检测胃窦TH和nNOS的表达.结果 与对照组相比,模型组各时间点胃内固体食物残留率均增加,胃窦TH表达均减少,nNOS表达均增加,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).与模型组相比,治疗组各时间点胃内固体食物残留率均降低,胃窦TH表达均升高,nNOS表达均降低,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05或P<0.01).与治疗4d组相比,治疗8d组大鼠胃内固体食物残留率明显降低,TH表达明显升高,nNOS阳性细胞表达明显降低,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 司来吉兰可改善PD大鼠胃功能障碍,其作用机制可能与其减轻PD模型大鼠胃窦多巴胺能神经元的损伤和抑制nNOS表达有关.

  18. Effect of intermittent hypoxia on neuronal apoptosis and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression in rat hippocampus%间歇低氧对大鼠海马神经细胞凋亡和诱导型一氧化氮合酶表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李璐璐; 张蔷; 谭进; 方云云; 雷平

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of intermittent hypoxia on neuronal apoptosis and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in rat hippocampus,in order to explore the potential mechanism of hippocampal neuronal apoptosis induced by intermittent hypoxia.Methods Twenty-four Wistar male rats (280-350 g) were randomly divided into three groups:the normal control,intermittent normoxia and intermittent hypoxia group (n=8 each).The animal model of intermittent hypoxia was established by an automated nitrogen/oxygen profile system.The three groups were respectively exposed to continuous normoxia (21 %O2),cyclical normoxia (21 %O2),and cyclical hypoxia [alternating between normoxia (21 % O2) and hypoxia (5 % O2),every 120 seconds] throughout the eight hours of light time(8:00-16:00).The rats were dissected and the hippocampus was removed at the end of the designated duration of exposures for six weeks.TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) was used to detect the apoptotic rate of the hippocampus region in each group.Reverse transcription-PCR,immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blotting were used to examine mRNA and protein expressions of iNOS in the hippocampus tissue.Results The apoptotic rate of hippocampal neurons was higher in intermittent hypoxia group than in intermittent normoxia group [(28.236±0.081) % vs.(9.341±0.026)%,P<0.05].The mRNA and protein expressions of iNOS were higher in intermittent hypoxia group than in intermittent normoxia group (3.394± 1.344 vs.0.125±0.040,7.793±0.052 vs.1.356±0.039,both P<0.05].Conclusions Intermittent hypoxia can induce hippocampal neuronal apoptosis in rats,accompanied by the upregulation of iNOS gene transcription and protein expression,which indicates that iNOS may involve in the process of hippocampal neuronal apoptosis induced by intermittent hypoxia.%目的 观察间歇低氧对大鼠海马神经细胞凋亡及诱导型一氧化氮合酶(iNOS)表达的影响,以探讨间歇低氧

  19. Kinetics and thermodynamics of oxidation mediated reaction in L-cysteine and its methyl and ethyl esters in dimethyl sulfoxide-d6 by NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Ryan J.; Singh, Jaideep; Krishnan, V. V.

    2017-03-01

    L-Cysteine (L-Cys), L-Cysteine methyl ester (L-CysME) or L-Cysteine ethyl ester (L-CysEE), when dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide, undergoes an oxidation process. This process is slow enough and leads to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral changes that could be monitored in real time. The oxidation mediated transition is modeled as a pseudo-first order kinetics and the thermodynamic parameters are estimated using the Eyring's formulation. L-Cysteine and their esters are often used as biological models due to the remarkable thiol group that can be found in different oxidation states. This oxidation mediated transition is due to the combination of thiol oxidation to a disulfide followed by solvent-induced effects may be relevant in designing cysteine-based molecular models.

  20. Nitric oxide production and nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity in Naegleria fowleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Hernández, Saúl; Rodríguez-Monroy, Marco A; Moreno-Fierros, Leticia; Jarillo-Luna, Adriana; Carrasco-Yepez, Marisela; Miliar-García, Angel; Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael

    2007-07-01

    Free-living ameba Naegleria fowleri produces an acute and fatal infectious disease called primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), whose pathophysiological mechanism is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of nitric oxide (NO) in PAM. Although NO has a cytotoxic effect on various parasites, it is produced by others as part of the pathology, as is the case with Entamoeba histolytica. To test for the production of NO, we analyzed whether antibodies against mammalian NO synthase isoforms (neuronal, inducible, and endothelial) presented immunoreactivity to N. fowleri proteins. We found that the trophozoites produced NO in vitro. The Western blot results, which showed N. fowleri trophozoites, contained proteins that share epitopes with the three described mammalian NOS, but have relative molecular weights different than those described in the literature, suggesting that N. fowleri may contain undescribed NOS isoforms. Moreover, we found that trophozoites reacted to the NOS2 antibody, in amebic cultures as well as in the mouse brain infected with N. fowleri, suggesting that nitric oxide may participate in the pathogenesis of PAM. Further research aimed at determining whether N. fowleri contains active novel NOS isoforms could lead to the design of new therapies against this parasite.

  1. Nitric oxide and pH modulation in gynaecological cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanhueza, Carlos; Araos, Joaquín; Naranjo, Luciano; Barros, Eric; Subiabre, Mario; Toledo, Fernando; Gutiérrez, Jaime; Chiarello, Delia I; Pardo, Fabián; Leiva, Andrea; Sobrevia, Luis

    2016-12-01

    Nitric oxide plays several roles in cellular physiology, including control of the vascular tone and defence against pathogen infection. Neuronal, inducible and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms synthesize nitric oxide. Cells generate acid and base equivalents, whose physiological intracellular concentrations are kept due to membrane transport systems, including Na(+) /H(+) exchangers and Na(+) /HCO3(-) transporters, thus maintaining a physiological pH at the intracellular (~7.0) and extracellular (~7.4) medium. In several pathologies, including cancer, cells are exposed to an extracellular acidic microenvironment, and the role for these membrane transport mechanisms in this phenomenon is likely. As altered NOS expression and activity is seen in cancer cells and because this gas promotes a glycolytic phenotype leading to extracellular acidosis in gynaecological cancer cells, a pro-inflammatory microenvironment increasing inducible NOS expression in this cell type is feasible. However, whether abnormal control of intracellular and extracellular pH by cancer cells regards with their ability to synthesize or respond to nitric oxide is unknown. We, here, discuss a potential link between pH alterations, pH controlling membrane transport systems and NOS function. We propose a potential association between inducible NOS induction and Na(+) /H(+) exchanger expression and activity in human ovary cancer. A potentiation between nitric oxide generation and the maintenance of a low extracellular pH (i.e. acidic) is proposed to establish a sequence of events in ovarian cancer cells, thus preserving a pro-proliferative acidic tumour extracellular microenvironment. We suggest that pharmacological therapeutic targeting of Na(+) /H(+) exchangers and inducible NOS may have benefits in human epithelial ovarian cancer.

  2. Localization of nitric oxide synthase in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Ulrik; Lopez-Figueroa, M.; Hellsten, Ylva

    1996-01-01

    The present study investigated the cellular localization of the neuronal type I and endothelial type III nitric oxide synthase in human skeletal muscle. Type I NO synthase immunoreactivity was found in the sarcolemma and the cytoplasm of all muscle fibres. Stronger immunoreactivity was expressed...... I NO synthase immunoreactivity and NADPH diaphorase activity. Type III NO synthase immunoreactivity was observed both in the endothelium of larger vessels and of microvessels. The results establish that human skeletal muscle expresses two different constitutive isoforms of NO synthase in different...... endothelium is consistent with a role for NO in the control of blood flow in human skeletal muscle....

  3. Nitric Oxide Regulates Neurogenesis in the Hippocampus following Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno P. Carreira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal neurogenesis is changed by brain injury. When neuroinflammation accompanies injury, activation of resident microglial cells promotes the release of inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen/nitrogen species like nitric oxide (NO. In these conditions, NO promotes proliferation of neural stem cells (NSC in the hippocampus. However, little is known about the role of NO in the survival and differentiation of newborn cells in the injured dentate gyrus. Here we investigated the role of NO following seizures in the regulation of proliferation, migration, differentiation, and survival of NSC in the hippocampus using the kainic acid (KA induced seizure mouse model. We show that NO increased the proliferation of NSC and the number of neuroblasts following seizures but was detrimental to the survival of newborn neurons. NO was also required for the maintenance of long-term neuroinflammation. Taken together, our data show that NO positively contributes to the initial stages of neurogenesis following seizures but compromises survival of newborn neurons.

  4. Nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide alterations in chronically stressed rats: a model for nitric oxide in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shang-Feng; Lu, Yun-Rong; Shi, Li-Gen; Wu, Xue-Yan; Sun, Bo; Fu, Xin-Yan; Luo, Jian-Hong; Bao, Ai-Min

    2014-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and NO synthase-1 (NOS1) are involved in the stress response and in depression. We compared NOS-NO alterations in rats exposed to chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) with alterations in major depressive disorder (MDD) in humans. In the hypothalamus of male CUS rats we determined NOS activity, and in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) we determined NOS1-immunoreactive (ir) cell densities and co-localization of NOS1 with stress-related neuropeptides corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), vasopressin (AVP) or oxytocin (OXT). We measured plasma NO levels and cortisol in male medicine-naïve MDD patients and plasma NO and corticosterone (CORT) in CUS rats. In the CUS rat total NOS activity in the hypothalamus (P=0.018) and NOS1-ir cell density in the PVN were both significantly decreased (P=0.018), while NOS1 staining was mainly expressed in OXT-ir neurons in this nucleus. Interestingly, plasma NO levels were significantly increased both in male CUS rats (P=0.001) and in male MDD patients (Pdepression.

  5. Anticonvulsant drugs, oxidative stress and nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega Rasgado, L A; Ceballos Reyes, G M; Vega-Diaz, M F

    2011-01-01

    Nitric Oxide (NO) is thought to play a fundamental role in the genesis and the spreading of epileptiform hyperactivity, although its function is unclear and controversial. As a free radical, NO may cause oxidative stress, which is emerging as an important mechanism in the etiology of seizure-induced neuronal death. Here we investigated the role of NO in seizure mechanisms through oxidative stress generation by studying the effect of anticonvulsant drugs such as amino oxyacetic acid (AAOA), valproate (VALP), diazepam (DIAZ) and gabapentin (GBPTNA) on oxidative stress in the brain, estimated as free carbonyls by the method of Dalle and Rossi, and by measuring NO by the indirect method based on the Griess reaction. Results show that, except for AAOA and VALP, anticonvulsants did not significantly affect or decreased free carbonyls, but reversed the oxidative stress produced by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) induced convulsions. Anticonvulsants except AAOA diminished NO levels and with the exception of VALP, counteracted the increase in NO generated by PTZ. Anticonvulsants decreased oxidative stress and NO especially in hippocampus (HI) and cortex (CX), and reversed PTZ effects on both parameters. PTZ diminished NO in HI, which could be explained since PTZ caused an increase on endothelial NO synthase but a decrease in neuronal NOS expression in this brain area. Since the drugs studied are modulating GABA levels, our results suggest that seizures generated by alterations in GABAergic transmission produce oxidative stress caused by NO, which can be reversed by anticonvulsants. The effects described differ among the brain regions studied and the NO synthase isoform affected.

  6. Mirror neurons

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rubia Vila, Francisco José

    2011-01-01

    Mirror neurons were recently discovered in frontal brain areas of the monkey. They are activated when the animal makes a specific movement, but also when the animal observes the same movement in another animal...

  7. 特发性脊柱侧凸椎旁肌组织中神经型及诱导型一氧化氮合酶表达的研究%Expressions of neuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthase in paraspinal muscles of idiopathic scoliosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵宇; 邱贵兴

    2004-01-01

    背景:特发性脊柱侧凸病因不清楚,目前关于其病因及发病机制存在诸多争论.椎旁肌在脊柱侧凸中作用已经成为研究热点.目的:比较特发性脊柱侧凸胸椎椎旁肌肉中神经型一氧化氮合酶和诱导型一氧化氮合酶表达与定位.设计:以诊断为依据设立对照的实验研究.地点与对象:北京协和医院骨科收治胸椎侧凸畸形患者10例,其中男8例,女2例;平均年龄14岁.胸腰椎爆裂骨折患者2例做对照.干预:手术中,于T6~T11椎体水平的侧弯顶椎水平取双侧椎旁肌,部分组织甲醛固定,行苏木精-伊红(HE)染色;其余组织冰冻,进行免疫组织化学及Western印迹杂交.主要观察指标:脊柱侧凸患者及正常椎旁肌组织中神经型一氧化氮合酶和诱导型一氧化氮合酶的表达情况.?结果:脊柱侧凸患者脊柱凸侧椎旁肌组织与凹侧椎旁肌组织和正常对照相比,神经型一氧化氮合酶的表达明显下调,诱导型一氧化氮合酶的表达也有所下调,但诱导型一氧化氮合酶表达总量较低.Western印迹检测得到同样的结果.结论:脊柱侧凸患者双侧椎旁肌神经型一氧化氮合酶蛋白表达不均衡,可能与特发性脊柱侧凸发生存在密切关系,诱导型一氧化氮合酶可能在特发性脊柱侧凸的发生中不发挥作用.%BACKGROUND: There are many conflicting theories on the etiology and pathogenesis of idiopathic scoliosis. The effect of paraspinal muscles in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis has become a hot topic in the researches.OBJECTIVE: To compare the expression and localization of neuronal nitric oxide synthase(nNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase(iNOS) of the thoracic spinal musculature on convex side with those on the concave side in the idiopathic scoliosis.DESIGN: A randomized controlled trial based on the diagnosis.SETTING and PARTICIPANTS: Ten patients with thoracic spinal scoliosis admitted by the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

  8. Nitric oxide and teratogenesis: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiboni, Gian Mario; Ponzano, Adalisa

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), generated by NO synthase (NOS) enzymes, is an important bioactive molecule involved in the regulation of several biological phenomena that are crucial for organogenesis, including gene expression, cell growth, matrix remolding, proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. The expression of NOS isoforms in embryonic tissues is temporally and spatially regulated, and disruption of endogenous NO can lead to developmental defects. Maternal treatment with pan NOS inhibitors during early organogenesis caused severe malformations of the axial skeleton. In utero exposure during the fetal period induced limb reduction defects of vascular origin. Knock-out mice have been used to define the role of the various NOS isoforms on the origin of the abnormal development. Cardiovascular malformations, limb reduction defects, reduced growth and reduced survival have been observed in knock-out mice with targeted disruption of endothelial NOS (eNOS). Limited morphological changes were observed in mice lacking inducible NOS (iNOS) or neuronal NOS n(NOS). Results obtained with in vitro studies suggest that optimal levels of NO are required for neural tube closure. Disregulation of NO production was also recently proposed as a contributing mechanism in the origin of malformations associated with exposure to known environmental teratogens, such as valproic acid, thalidomide, copper deficiency, and diabetes.

  9. Nitric Oxide Synthases in Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnicer, Ricardo; Crabtree, Mark J.; Sivakumaran, Vidhya

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The regulation of myocardial function by constitutive nitric oxide synthases (NOS) is important for the maintenance of myocardial Ca2+ homeostasis, relaxation and distensibility, and protection from arrhythmia and abnormal stress stimuli. However, sustained insults such as diabetes, hypertension, hemodynamic overload, and atrial fibrillation lead to dysfunctional NOS activity with superoxide produced instead of NO and worse pathophysiology. Recent Advances: Major strides in understanding the role of normal and abnormal constitutive NOS in the heart have revealed molecular targets by which NO modulates myocyte function and morphology, the role and nature of post-translational modifications of NOS, and factors controlling nitroso-redox balance. Localized and differential signaling from NOS1 (neuronal) versus NOS3 (endothelial) isoforms are being identified, as are methods to restore NOS function in heart disease. Critical Issues: Abnormal NOS signaling plays a key role in many cardiac disorders, while targeted modulation may potentially reverse this pathogenic source of oxidative stress. Future Directions: Improvements in the clinical translation of potent modulators of NOS function/dysfunction may ultimately provide a powerful new treatment for many hearts diseases that are fueled by nitroso-redox imbalance. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1078–1099. PMID:22871241

  10. Neurons controlling Aplysia feeding inhibit themselves by continuous NO production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nimrod Miller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neural activity can be affected by nitric oxide (NO produced by spiking neurons. Can neural activity also be affected by NO produced in neurons in the absence of spiking? METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Applying an NO scavenger to quiescent Aplysia buccal ganglia initiated fictive feeding, indicating that NO production at rest inhibits feeding. The inhibition is in part via effects on neurons B31/B32, neurons initiating food consumption. Applying NO scavengers or nitric oxide synthase (NOS blockers to B31/B32 neurons cultured in isolation caused inactive neurons to depolarize and fire, indicating that B31/B32 produce NO tonically without action potentials, and tonic NO production contributes to the B31/B32 resting potentials. Guanylyl cyclase blockers also caused depolarization and firing, indicating that the cGMP second messenger cascade, presumably activated by the tonic presence of NO, contributes to the B31/B32 resting potential. Blocking NO while voltage-clamping revealed an inward leak current, indicating that NO prevents this current from depolarizing the neuron. Blocking nitrergic transmission had no effect on a number of other cultured, isolated neurons. However, treatment with NO blockers did excite cerebral ganglion neuron C-PR, a command-like neuron initiating food-finding behavior, both in situ, and when the neuron was cultured in isolation, indicating that this neuron also inhibits itself by producing NO at rest. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Self-inhibitory, tonic NO production is a novel mechanism for the modulation of neural activity. Localization of this mechanism to critical neurons in different ganglia controlling different aspects of a behavior provides a mechanism by which a humeral signal affecting background NO production, such as the NO precursor L-arginine, could control multiple aspects of the behavior.

  11. Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2016-01-01

    Corrosion is an extensive problem that affects the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and European Space Agency (ESA). The deleterious effects of corrosion result in steep costs, asset downtime affecting mission readiness, and safety risks to personnel. It is vital to reduce corrosion costs and risks in a sustainable manner. The primary objective of this effort is to qualify citric acid as an environmentally-preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys.

  12. [Mirror neurons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubia Vila, Francisco José

    2011-01-01

    Mirror neurons were recently discovered in frontal brain areas of the monkey. They are activated when the animal makes a specific movement, but also when the animal observes the same movement in another animal. Some of them also respond to the emotional expression of other animals of the same species. These mirror neurons have also been found in humans. They respond to or "reflect" actions of other individuals in the brain and are thought to represent the basis for imitation and empathy and hence the neurobiological substrate for "theory of mind", the potential origin of language and the so-called moral instinct.

  13. Nitric oxide synthase-containing projections to the ventrobasal thalamus in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usunoff, K G; Kharazia, V N; Valtschanoff, J G; Schmidt, H H; Weinberg, R J

    1999-09-01

    Microiontophoretic studies of thalamic neurons suggests that nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role in mediating somatosensory transmission. The thalamus contains few nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-immunoreactive neurons; thus, the major source of thalamic NO is presumably from NOS-positive axons of extrathalamic origin. The cells of origin of these putative NOS-containing pathways to the ventrobasal thalamus were investigated in rats by combining retrograde tracing with immunocytochemistry for NOS. The location and morphology of double-labeled neurons was compared with that of single-labeled neurons. The most significant sources of NOS-containing afferents to the thalamus were found to be the pedunculopontine (PPN) and laterodorsal tegmental (LDT) nuclei. NOS-immunoreactive neurons in these cholinergic nuclei project bilaterally to the thalamus, most strongly ipsilaterally. The thalamus appears to be a major target of PPN, since even selective thalamic injections result in retrograde labeling of at least one third of its NOS-immunoreactive neurons. A significant number of NOS-negative neurons in both the PPN and LDT also project to the thalamus. Minor sources of NOS-containing thalamic afferents include the lateral hypothalamus, the dorsal, median and pontine raphe nuclei, the parabrachial nuclei, and the pontomedullary reticular formation. In all these structures, NOS-negative thalamopetal neurons greatly outnumber the NOS-positive ones. Ascending sensory pathways to the thalamus, including those from the sensory trigeminal nuclei, the dorsal column nuclei, and the spinal cord, as well as the auditory and vestibular centers, arise exclusively from NOS-negative neurons. The major NOS-positive projections are implicated in affective and alerting systems, supporting that NO may act to modulate attentiveness in thalamic relay nuclei.

  14. Nitric Oxide and Histamine Signal Attempts to Swallow: A Component of Learning that Food Is Inedible in "Aplysia"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzoff, Ayelet; Miller, Nimrod; Susswein, Abraham J.

    2010-01-01

    Memory that food is inedible in "Aplysia" arises from training requiring three contingent events. Nitric oxide (NO) and histamine are released by a neuron responding to one of these events, attempts to swallow food. Since NO release during training is necessary for subsequent memory and NO substitutes for attempts to swallow, it was suggested that…

  15. Investigating altered nitric oxide signalling as an up-stream mediator of the antidepressant action of ketamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebenberg, N.; Muller, H. K.; Elfving, B.

    2012-01-01

    to increased synaptic protein synthesis in the frontal cortex as vital processes that underlie its antidepressant action. However, the upstream mechanism(s) that are affected, i.e. immediately downstream of NMDA receptors, remain unclear. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is directly coupled...

  16. Endothelial nitric oxide: protector of a healthy mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katusic, Zvonimir S; Austin, Susan A

    2014-04-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) is generated by constitutively active endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), an essential enzyme responsible for cardiovascular homeostasis. Historically, endothelial NO was first recognized as a major vasodilator involved in control of vasomotor function and local blood flow. In this review, our attention is focused on the emerging role of endothelial NO in linking cerebrovascular function with cognition. We will discuss the recognized ability of endothelial NO to modulate processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP), influence functional status of microglia, and affect cognitive function. Existing evidence suggests that the loss of NO in cultured human cerebrovascular endothelium causes increased expression of APP and β-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) thereby resulting in increased secretion of amyloid β peptides (Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42). Furthermore, increased expression of APP and BACE1 as well as increased production of Aβ peptides was detected in the cerebral microvasculature and brain tissue of eNOS-deficient mice. Since Aβ peptides are considered major cytotoxic molecules responsible for the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, these observations support the concept that a loss of endothelial NO might significantly contribute to the initiation and progression of cognitive decline. In addition, genetic inactivation of eNOS causes activation of microglia and promotes a pro-inflammatory phenotype in the brain. Behavioural analysis revealed that eNOS-deficient mice exhibit impaired cognitive performance thereby indicating that selective loss of endothelial NO has a detrimental effect on the function of neuronal cells. Together with findings from prior studies demonstrating the ability of endothelial NO to affect synaptic plasticity, mitochondrial biogenesis, and function of neuronal progenitor cells, it is becoming apparent that the role of endothelial NO in the control of central nervous system function is very complex. We

  17. The prognostic value of brain extracellular fluid nitric oxide metabolites after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisdall, Martin M; Rejdak, Konrad; Kitchen, Neil D; Smith, Martin; Petzold, Axel

    2013-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a compound with both protective and damaging effects on neurons. Quantification of NO metabolites in humans is limited by sample contamination with blood. In vivo cerebral microdialysis may offer an alternative approach as sampling of extracellular fluid (ECF) adjacent to neurons becomes possible. We investigate the prognostic value of brain ECF NO metabolites in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). A prospective case cohort of 195 ECF samples collected from 11 cases over 4 days following TBI was collected. Nitrate and nitrite concentrations ([NO x ]) were quantified using a vanadium-based colorimetric assay. Early ECF [NO x ] (survival (sensitivity 100%, specificity 75%). Early ECF NO x concentrations are of prognostic value after TBI. ECF NO x may be a useful biomarker for treatment trials targeted at nitric oxide metabolism.

  18. The Oxidation of Hydrazine by Nitric Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karraker, D.G.

    2001-07-02

    Hydrazine nitrate-nitric acid solutions are used in the ion exchange process for separating Pu-238 and Np-237 and have been found to dissolve plutonium metal in a manner advantageous to SRP metal recovery operations. Laboratory tests on the stability of hydrazine in nitric acid solutions were performed to obtain accurate data, and the results of these tests are reported here. These tests provide sufficient information to specify temperature control for hydrazine-nitric acid solutions in plant processes.

  19. Distribution of nitric oxide synthase in stomach myenteric plexus of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Peng; Jin-Bin Feng; Hong Yon; Yun Zhao; Shi-Liang Wang

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To study the distribution of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in rat stomach myenteric plexus. METHODS: The distribution of NOS in gastric wall was studied in quantity and location by the NADPH-diaphorase (NDP) histochemical staining method and whole mount preparation technique. RESULTS: NOS was distributed in whole stomach wall, most of them were located in myenteric plexus, and distributed in submucosal plexus. The shape of NOS positive neurons was basically similar, most of them being round and oval in shape. But their density, size and staining intensity varied greatly in the different parts of stomach. The density was 62 -± 38 cells/mm2(antrum), 43 ± 32 cells/mm2(body), and 32 ± 28 cells/mm2 (fundus), respectively. The size and staining intensity of NOS positive neurons in the fundus were basically the same, the neurons being large and dark stained, while they were obviously different in antrum. In the body of the stomach, the NOS positive neurons were in an intermediate state from fundus to antrum. There were some beadlike structures which were strung together by NOS positive varicosities in nerve fibers, some were closely adherent to the outer walls of blood vessels. CONCLUSION: Nitric oxide might he involved in the modulation of motility, secretion and blood ciroulation of the stomach, and the significant difference of NOS positive neurons in different parts of stomach myenteric plexus may be related to the physiologic function of stomach.

  20. Nitric oxide-dependent activation of CaMKII increases diastolic sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release in cardiac myocytes in response to adrenergic stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry Curran

    Full Text Available Spontaneous calcium waves in cardiac myocytes are caused by diastolic sarcoplasmic reticulum release (SR Ca(2+ leak through ryanodine receptors. Beta-adrenergic (β-AR tone is known to increase this leak through the activation of Ca-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII and the subsequent phosphorylation of the ryanodine receptor. When β-AR drive is chronic, as observed in heart failure, this CaMKII-dependent effect is exaggerated and becomes potentially arrhythmogenic. Recent evidence has indicated that CaMKII activation can be regulated by cellular oxidizing agents, such as reactive oxygen species. Here, we investigate how the cellular second messenger, nitric oxide, mediates CaMKII activity downstream of the adrenergic signaling cascade and promotes the generation of arrhythmogenic spontaneous Ca(2+ waves in intact cardiomyocytes. Both SCaWs and SR Ca(2+ leak were measured in intact rabbit and mouse ventricular myocytes loaded with the Ca-dependent fluorescent dye, fluo-4. CaMKII activity in vitro and immunoblotting for phosphorylated residues on CaMKII, nitric oxide synthase, and Akt were measured to confirm activity of these enzymes as part of the adrenergic cascade. We demonstrate that stimulation of the β-AR pathway by isoproterenol increased the CaMKII-dependent SR Ca(2+ leak. This increased leak was prevented by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase 1 but not nitric oxide synthase 3. In ventricular myocytes isolated from wild-type mice, isoproterenol stimulation also increased the CaMKII-dependent leak. Critically, in myocytes isolated from nitric oxide synthase 1 knock-out mice this effect is ablated. We show that isoproterenol stimulation leads to an increase in nitric oxide production, and nitric oxide alone is sufficient to activate CaMKII and increase SR Ca(2+ leak. Mechanistically, our data links Akt to nitric oxide synthase 1 activation downstream of β-AR stimulation. Collectively, this evidence supports the hypothesis

  1. Nitric oxide modulation of the hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadekaro M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO, a free radical gas produced endogenously from the amino acid L-arginine by NO synthase (NOS, has important functions in modulating vasopressin and oxytocin secretion from the hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal system. NO production is stimulated during increased functional activity of magnocellular neurons, in parallel with plastic changes of the supraoptic nucleus (SON and paraventricular nucleus. Electrophysiological data recorded from the SON of hypothalamic slices indicate that NO inhibits firing of phasic and non-phasic neurons, while L-NAME, an NOS inhibitor, increases their activity. Results from measurement of neurohypophyseal hormones are more variable. Overall, however, it appears that NO, tonically produced in the forebrain, inhibits vasopressin and oxytocin secretion during normovolemic, isosmotic conditions. During osmotic stimulation, dehydration, hypovolemia and hemorrhage, as well as high plasma levels of angiotensin II, NO inhibition of vasopressin neurons is removed, while that of oxytocin neurons is enhanced. This produces a preferential release of vasopressin over oxytocin important for correction of fluid imbalance. During late pregnancy and throughout lactation, fluid homeostasis is altered and expression of NOS in the SON is down- and up-regulated, respectively, in parallel with plastic changes of the magnocellular system. NO inhibition of magnocellular neurons involves GABA and prostaglandin synthesis and the signal-transduction mechanism is independent of the cGMP-pathway. Plasma hormone levels are unaffected by icv 1H-[1, 2, 4]oxadiazolo-[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor or 8-Br-cGMP administered to conscious rats. Moreover, cGMP does not increase in homogenates of the neural lobe and in microdialysates of the SON when NO synthesis is enhanced during osmotic stimulation. Among alternative signal-transduction pathways, nitrosylation of target proteins affecting activity of ion

  2. Role of nitric oxide in classical conditioning of siphon withdrawal in Aplysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, Igor; Ha, Thomas; Antonova, Irina; Moroz, Leonid L; Hawkins, Robert D

    2007-10-10

    Nitric oxide (NO) is thought to be involved in several forms of learning in vivo and synaptic plasticity in vitro, but very little is known about the role of NO during physiological forms of plasticity that occur during learning. We addressed that question in a simplified preparation of the Aplysia siphon-withdrawal reflex. We first used in situ hybridization to show that the identified L29 facilitator neurons express NO synthase. Furthermore, exogenous NO produced facilitation of sensory-motor neuron EPSPs, and an inhibitor of NO synthase or an NO scavenger blocked behavioral conditioning. Application of the scavenger to the ganglion or injection into a sensory neuron blocked facilitation of the EPSP and changes in the sensory-neuron membrane properties during conditioning. Injection of the scavenger into the motor neuron reduced facilitation without affecting sensory neuron membrane properties, and injection of an inhibitor of NO synthase had no effect. Postsynaptic injection of an inhibitor of exocytosis had effects similar to injection of the scavenger. However, changes in the shape of the EPSP during conditioning were not consistent with postsynaptic AMPA-like receptor insertion but were mimicked by presynaptic spike broadening. These results suggest that NO makes an important contribution during conditioning and acts directly in both the sensory and motor neurons to affect different processes of facilitation at the synapses between them. In addition, they suggest that NO does not come from either the sensory or motor neurons but rather comes from another source, perhaps the L29 interneurons.

  3. Motor Neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hounsgaard, Jorn

    2017-01-01

    Motor neurons translate synaptic input from widely distributed premotor networks into patterns of action potentials that orchestrate motor unit force and motor behavior. Intercalated between the CNS and muscles, motor neurons add to and adjust the final motor command. The identity and functional...... properties of this facility in the path from synaptic sites to the motor axon is reviewed with emphasis on voltage sensitive ion channels and regulatory metabotropic transmitter pathways. The catalog of the intrinsic response properties, their underlying mechanisms, and regulation obtained from motoneurons...... in in vitro preparations is far from complete. Nevertheless, a foundation has been provided for pursuing functional significance of intrinsic response properties in motoneurons in vivo during motor behavior at levels from molecules to systems....

  4. Changes of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in relevant cerebral regions in spontaneous senile dementia model and regulation of Tiantai Ⅰ%自发老年性痴呆模型相关脑区神经元型一氧化氮合酶的变化及天泰 1号的调节作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴正治; 李明; 贾秀琴; 张永锋

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Neuron nitrogen monoxide(NO) is related to synaptic plasticity and is the key transmitter of normal learning and memory.Neuronal nitric oxide synthase(nNOS) is the biological synthetic enzyme of NO in neurons.The reports have been fewer yet on cerebral nNOS activity in Alzheimer disease(AD) patients,especially on changes in positive neural fibers of nNOS in temporal lobe cortex and hippocapmus CA1 region. OBJECTIVE:To observe cerebral nNOS activity in AD patients, especially on changes in positive neural fibers of nNOS in temporal lobe cortex and hippocapmus CA1 region and effects of Tiantai Ⅰ on nNOS activity. DESIGN:A randomized and controlled trial. SETTING:Institute of Collaboration of Chinese and Western Medicine, Shenzhen City. MATERIALS:The experiment was performed in No.2 Grade Animal Experimental Room of Institute of Collaboration of Chinese and Western Medicine,Shenzhen City.A total of 65 Kunming mice were employed in the experiment. METHODS:The experimental animals were bred till 21 months old and the mice with senile dementia were screened from the aged ones according to the international general standards and methods.The experimental animals were randomized into 4 groups,named as senile dementia group,western drug control,group with small dosage of Tiantai Ⅰ and group with large dosage of Tiantai Ⅰ .In addition,a group with normal learning and memory of the senile mice(simply called senile normal group) was designed.There were 13 mice in each group.In western drug control,hydergine 0.6 mg/kg was prescribed; in the groups of small and large dosage of Tiantai Ⅰ ,the dosages were 6.80 g/kg and 20.41 g/kg respectively,continuously for 60 days.In senile normal group and senile dementia group,the bi distilled water of equal dosage was applied for perfusion.The scores of learning and memory were determined by step down test. Slices of brain tissues were prepared with frozen,nNOS activity was displayed by NBT histochemistry method and the

  5. Significance of nitric oxide synthases: Lessons from triple nitric oxide synthases null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Masato; Tanimoto, Akihide; Tamura, Masahito; Mukae, Hiroshi; Yanagihara, Nobuyuki; Shimokawa, Hiroaki; Otsuji, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is synthesized by three distinct NO synthases (neuronal, inducible, and endothelial NOSs), all of which are expressed in almost all tissues and organs in humans. The regulatory roles of NOSs in vivo have been investigated in pharmacological studies with non-selective NOS inhibitors. However, the specificity of the inhibitors continues to be an issue of debate, and the authentic significance of NOSs is still poorly understood. To address this issue, we generated mice in which all three NOS genes are completely disrupted. The triple NOSs null mice exhibited cardiovascular abnormalities, including hypertension, arteriosclerosis, myocardial infarction, cardiac hypertrophy, diastolic heart failure, and reduced EDHF responses, with a shorter survival. The triple NOSs null mice also displayed metabolic abnormalities, including metabolic syndrome and high-fat diet-induced severe dyslipidemia. Furthermore, the triple NOSs null mice showed renal abnormalities (nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and pathological renal remodeling), lung abnormalities (accelerated pulmonary fibrosis), and bone abnormalities (increased bone mineral density and bone turnover). These results provide evidence that NOSs play pivotal roles in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of disorders. This review summarizes the latest knowledge on the significance of NOSs in vivo, based on lessons learned from experiments with our triple mutant model.

  6. Significance of nitric oxide synthases: Lessons from triple nitric oxide synthases null mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato Tsutsui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is synthesized by three distinct NO synthases (neuronal, inducible, and endothelial NOSs, all of which are expressed in almost all tissues and organs in humans. The regulatory roles of NOSs in vivo have been investigated in pharmacological studies with non-selective NOS inhibitors. However, the specificity of the inhibitors continues to be an issue of debate, and the authentic significance of NOSs is still poorly understood. To address this issue, we generated mice in which all three NOS genes are completely disrupted. The triple NOSs null mice exhibited cardiovascular abnormalities, including hypertension, arteriosclerosis, myocardial infarction, cardiac hypertrophy, diastolic heart failure, and reduced EDHF responses, with a shorter survival. The triple NOSs null mice also displayed metabolic abnormalities, including metabolic syndrome and high-fat diet-induced severe dyslipidemia. Furthermore, the triple NOSs null mice showed renal abnormalities (nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and pathological renal remodeling, lung abnormalities (accelerated pulmonary fibrosis, and bone abnormalities (increased bone mineral density and bone turnover. These results provide evidence that NOSs play pivotal roles in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of disorders. This review summarizes the latest knowledge on the significance of NOSs in vivo, based on lessons learned from experiments with our triple mutant model.

  7. Inducible nitric oxide synthase in renal transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joles, JA; Vos, IH; Grone, HJ; Rabelink, TJ

    2002-01-01

    The importance of the endothelial isoform of nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) has been well established. Endothelium-derived nitric oxide has been shown to be essential for vascular homeostasis and modulation of eNOS has thus become a target in prevention of cardiovascular disease. The role of the induc

  8. Nitric oxide fumigation for postharvest pest control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitric oxide fumigation is effective against all arthropod pests at various life stages tested. Nine insect pests at various life stages and bulb mites were subjected to nitric oxide fumigation treatments under ultralow oxygen conditions of =50 ppm O2 in 1.9L glass jars as fumigation chambers. The ...

  9. Neurochemical phenotype of cytoglobin-expressing neurons in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundahl, Christian Ansgar; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Hannibal, Jens

    2014-09-01

    Cytoglobin (Cygb), a novel oxygen-binding protein, is expressed in the majority of tissues and has been proposed to function in nitric oxide (NO) metabolism in the vasculature and to have cytoprotective properties. However, the overall functions of Cygb remain elusive. Cygb is also expressed in a subpopulation of brain neurons. Recently, it has been shown that stress upregulates Cygb expression in the brain and the majority of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-positive neurons, an enzyme that produces NO, co-express Cygb. However, there are more neurons expressing Cygb than nNOS, thus a large number of Cygb neurons remain uncharacterized by the neurochemical content. The aim of the present study was to provide an additional and more detailed neurochemical phenotype of Cygb-expressing neurons in the rat hippocampus. The rat hippocampus was chosen due to the abundance of Cygb, as well as this limbic structure being an important target in a number of neurodegenerative diseases. Using triple immunohistochemistry, it was demonstrated that nearly all the parvalbumin- and heme oxygenase 1-positive neurons co-express Cygb and to a large extent, these neuron populations are distinct from the population of Cygb neurons co-expressing nNOS. Furthermore, it was shown that the majority of neurons expressing somastostatin and vasoactive intestinal peptide also co-express Cygb and nNOS. Detailed information regarding the neurochemical phenotype of Cygb neurons in the hippocampus can be a valuable tool in determining the function of Cygb in the brain.

  10. Effects of calcium channel on 3-morpholinosydnonimine-induced rat hippocampal neuronal apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quanzhong Chang; Shuling Zhang; Yuanyin Zheng; Lijuan Xu; Jinbao Yin; Shining Cai

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that increased chloride channel activity plays a role in nitric oxide-induced neuronal apoptosis in the rat hippocampus.The present study investigated the effects of the broad-spectrum calcium channel blocker CdC12 on survival rate, percentage of apoptosis, and morphological changes in hippocampal neurons cultured in vitro, as well as the effects of calcium channels on neuronal apoptosis.The chloride channel blockers 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanatostilbene-2, 2'-disulfonic acid (SITS) or 4, 4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS) increased the survival rate of 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1)-treated neurons and suppressed SIN-1-induced neuronal apoptosis.The calcium channel blocker CdC12 did not increase the survival rate of neurons and did not affect SIN-1-induced apoptosis or SITS- or DIDS-suppressed neuronal apoptosis.Results demonstrated that calcium channels did not significantly affect neuronal apoptosis.

  11. Neurochemical phenotype of cytoglobin‑expressing neurons in the rat hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundahl, Christian Ansgar; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Hannibal, Jens

    2014-01-01

    in a subpopulation of brain neurons. Recently, it has been shown that stress upregulates Cygb expression in the brain and the majority of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-positive neurons, an enzyme that produces NO, co-express Cygb. However, there are more neurons expressing Cygb than nNOS, thus a large number...... of Cygb neurons remain uncharacterized by the neurochemical content. The aim of the present study was to provide an additional and more detailed neurochemical phenotype of Cygb-expressing neurons in the rat hippocampus. The rat hippocampus was chosen due to the abundance of Cygb, as well as this limbic...... structure being an important target in a number of neurodegenerative diseases. Using triple immunohistochemistry, it was demonstrated that nearly all the parvalbumin- and heme oxygenase 1-positive neurons co-express Cygb and to a large extent, these neuron populations are distinct from the population...

  12. Regulation of Injury-Induced Neurogenesis by Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno P. Carreira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The finding that neural stem cells (NSCs are able to divide, migrate, and differentiate into several cellular types in the adult brain raised a new hope for restorative neurology. Nitric oxide (NO, a pleiotropic signaling molecule in the central nervous system (CNS, has been described to be able to modulate neurogenesis, acting as a pro- or antineurogenic agent. Some authors suggest that NO is a physiological inhibitor of neurogenesis, while others described NO to favor neurogenesis, particularly under inflammatory conditions. Thus, targeting the NO system may be a powerful strategy to control the formation of new neurons. However, the exact mechanisms by which NO regulates neural proliferation and differentiation are not yet completely clarified. In this paper we will discuss the potential interest of the modulation of the NO system for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases or other pathological conditions that may affect the CNS.

  13. Effects of nitric oxide on stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wuchen; Lee, Yugyung; Lee, Chi H

    2015-12-01

    The use of stem cells as a research tool and a therapeutic vehicle has demonstrated their great potential in the treatment of various diseases. With unveiling of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) universally present at various levels in nearly all types of body tissues, the potential therapeutic implication of nitric oxide (NO) has been magnified, and thus scientists have explored new treatment strategies involved with stem cells and NO against various diseases. As the functionality of NO encompasses cardiovascular, neuronal and immune systems, NO is involved in stem cell differentiation, epigenetic regulation and immune suppression. Stem cells trigger cellular responses to external signals on the basis of both NO specific pathways and concerted action with endogenous compounds including stem cell regulators. As potency and interaction of NO with stem cells generally depend on the concentrations of NO and the presence of the cofactors at the active site, the suitable carriers for NO delivery is integral for exerting maximal efficacy of stem cells. The innovative utilization of NO functionality and involved mechanisms would invariably alter the paradigm of therapeutic application of stem cells. Future prospects in NO-involved stem cell research which promises to enhance drug discovery efforts by opening new era to improve drug efficacy, reduce drug toxicity and understand disease mechanisms and pathways, were also addressed.

  14. Role of nitric oxide in obsessive-compulsive behavior and its involvement in the anti-compulsive effect of paroxetine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umathe, S N; Bhutada, P S; Jain, N S; Mundhada, Y R; Borkar, S S; Dhumal, B

    2009-09-01

    In view of the reports that nitric oxide modulates the neurotransmitters implicated in obsessive-compulsive disorder, patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder exhibit higher plasma nitrate levels, and drugs useful in obsessive-compulsive disorder influence nitric oxide, we hypothesized that nitric oxide may have some role in obsessive-compulsive behavior. We used marble-burying behavior of mice as the animal model of obsessive-compulsive disorder, and nitric oxide levels in brain homogenate were measured using amperometric nitric oxide-selective sensor method. Intraperitoneal administration of nitric oxide enhancers viz. nitric oxide precursor-l-arginine (800 mg/kg), nitric oxide donor-sodium nitroprusside (3 mg/kg) or phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor-sildenafil (3 mg/kg) significantly increased marble-burying behavior as well as brain nitrites levels, whereas treatment with 7-nitroindazole-neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (20-40 mg/kg, i.p.) or paroxetine-selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (5-10 mg/kg, i.p.) dose dependently attenuated marble-burying behavior and nitrites levels in brain. Further, co-administration of sub-effective doses of 7-nitroindazole (10 mg/kg) and paroxetine (2.5 mg/kg) significantly attenuated marble-burying behavior. Moreover, pretreatment with l-arginine (400 mg/kg, i.p.), sodium nitroprusside (2.0 mg/kg, i.p.) or sildenafil (2.0 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly attenuated the inhibitory influence of 7-nitroindazole (40 mg/kg) or paroxetine (10 mg/kg) on marble-burying behavior as well as on brain nitrites levels. None of the above treatment had any significant influence on locomotor activity. In conclusion, obsessive compulsive behavior in mice appears related to nitric oxide in brain, and anti-compulsive effect of paroxetine appears to be related to decrease central levels of nitric oxide.

  15. Role of hydrogen sulfide in secondary neuronal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun-Feng; Li, Yu; Song, Jin-Ning; Pang, Hong-Gang

    2014-01-01

    In acute neuronal insult events, such as stroke, traumatic brain injury, and spinal cord injury, pathological processes of secondary neuronal injury play a key role in the severity of insult and clinical prognosis. Along with nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is regarded as the third gasotransmitter and endogenous neuromodulator and plays multiple roles in the central nervous system under physiological and pathological states, especially in secondary neuronal injury. The endogenous level of H2S in the brain is significantly higher than that in peripheral tissues, and is mainly formed by cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) in astrocytes and released in response to neuronal excitation. The mechanism of secondary neuronal injury exacerbating the damage caused by the initial insult includes microcirculation failure, glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammatory responses, neuronal apoptosis and calcium overload. H2S dilates cerebral vessels by activating smooth muscle cell plasma membrane ATP-sensitive K channels (KATP channels). This modification occurs on specific cysteine residues of the KATP channel proteins which are S-sulfhydrated. H2S counteracts glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity by inducing astrocytes to intake more glutamate from the extracellular space and thus increasing glutathione in neurons. In addition, H2S protects neurons from secondary neuronal injury by functioning as an anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic mediator. However, there are still some reports suggest that H2S elevates neuronal Ca(2+) concentration and may contribute to the formation of calcium overload in secondary neuronal injury. H2S also elicits calcium waves in primary cultures of astrocytes and may mediate signals between neurons and glia. Consequently, further exploration of the molecular mechanisms of H2S in secondary neuronal injury will provide important insights into its potential therapeutic uses for the treatment

  16. TRPA1 is a major oxidant sensor in murine airway sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessac, Bret F; Sivula, Michael; von Hehn, Christian A; Escalera, Jasmine; Cohn, Lauren; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2008-05-01

    Sensory neurons in the airways are finely tuned to respond to reactive chemicals threatening airway function and integrity. Nasal trigeminal nerve endings are particularly sensitive to oxidants formed in polluted air and during oxidative stress as well as to chlorine, which is frequently released in industrial and domestic accidents. Oxidant activation of airway neurons induces respiratory depression, nasal obstruction, sneezing, cough, and pain. While normally protective, chemosensory airway reflexes can provoke severe complications in patients affected by inflammatory airway conditions like rhinitis and asthma. Here, we showed that both hypochlorite, the oxidizing mediator of chlorine, and hydrogen peroxide, a reactive oxygen species, activated Ca(2+) influx and membrane currents in an oxidant-sensitive subpopulation of chemosensory neurons. These responses were absent in neurons from mice lacking TRPA1, an ion channel of the transient receptor potential (TRP) gene family. TRPA1 channels were strongly activated by hypochlorite and hydrogen peroxide in primary sensory neurons and heterologous cells. In tests of respiratory function, Trpa1(-/-) mice displayed profound deficiencies in hypochlorite- and hydrogen peroxide-induced respiratory depression as well as decreased oxidant-induced pain behavior. Our results indicate that TRPA1 is an oxidant sensor in sensory neurons, initiating neuronal excitation and subsequent physiological responses in vitro and in vivo.

  17. Ginsenoside Rb1 attenuates activated microglia-induced neuronal damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lining Ke; Wei Guo; Jianwen Xu; Guodong Zhang; Wei Wang; Wenhua Huang

    2014-01-01

    The microglia-mediated inlfammatory reaction promotes neuronal damage under cerebral isch-emia/hypoxia conditions. We therefore speculated that inhibition of hypoxia-induced microglial activation may alleviate neuronal damage. To test this hypothesis, we co-cultured ginsenoside Rb1, an active component of ginseng, and cortical neurons. Ginsenoside Rb1 protected neuronal morphology and structure in a single hypoxic culture system and in a hypoxic co-culture system with microglia, and reduced neuronal apoptosis and caspase-3 production. The protective effect was observable prior to placing in co-culture. Additionally, ginsenoside Rb1 inhibited levels of tumor necrosis factor-αin a co-culture system containing activated N9 microglial cells. Ginse-noside Rb1 also signiifcantly decreased nitric oxide and superoxide production induced by N9 microglia. Our ifndings indicate that ginsenoside Rb1 attenuates damage to cerebral cortex neu-rons by downregulation of nitric oxide, superoxide, and tumor necrosis factor-αexpression in hypoxia-activated microglia.

  18. Nitric oxide and respiratory rhythm in mammals: a new modulator of phase transition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierrefiche, O; Abdala, A P L; Paton, J F R

    2007-11-01

    NO (nitric oxide) modulates several central pattern generators, but its role in respiratory rhythmogenesis and its mode of action on medullary respiratory neurons during normoxia are unknown. We analysed the actions of NO on the mammalian respiratory network at the system and cellular levels. Given systemically, the NO donor diethylamine NONOate increased post-inspiratory duration in vagus, phrenic and hypoglossal nerves, whereas blockade of NO generation with L-NAME (N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester) produced the opposite response. At the cellular level, we pressure-ejected the NO donor on to respiratory neurons. NO had both inhibitory and excitatory effects on all types of respiratory neurons. Inhibitory effects involved soluble guanylate cyclase, as they were blocked with ODQ (1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3a]quinoxalin-1-one), whereas excitations were antagonized by uric acid and possibly mediated via peroxynitrite. Importantly, NO facilitated both GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid)- and NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate)-induced neuronal responses, but this was restricted to post-inspiratory and pre-inspiratory neurons; other neuron types showed additive effects only. Our results support NO as modulator of centrally generated respiratory activity and specifically of ligand-mediated responses in respiratory neuron types involved in respiratory phase transition.

  19. Resveratrol and Endothelial Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Xia

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO derived from the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS has antihypertensive, antithrombotic, anti-atherosclerotic and antiobesogenic properties. Resveratrol is a polyphenol phytoalexin with multiple cardiovascular and metabolic effects. Part of the beneficial effects of resveratrol are mediated by eNOS. Resveratrol stimulates NO production from eNOS by a number of mechanisms, including upregulation of eNOS expression, stimulation of eNOS enzymatic activity and reversal of eNOS uncoupling. In addition, by reducing oxidative stress, resveratrol prevents oxidative NO inactivation by superoxide thereby enhancing NO bioavailability. Molecular pathways underlying these effects of resveratrol involve SIRT1, AMPK, Nrf2 and estrogen receptors.

  20. TRPV1 and TRPA1 mediate peripheral nitric oxide-induced nociception in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Miyamoto

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO can induce acute pain in humans and plays an important role in pain sensitization caused by inflammation and injury in animal models. There is evidence that NO acts both in the central nervous system via a cyclic GMP pathway and in the periphery on sensory neurons through unknown mechanisms. It has recently been suggested that TRPV1 and TRPA1, two polymodal ion channels that sense noxious stimuli impinging on peripheral nociceptors, are activated by NO in heterologous systems. Here, we investigate the relevance of this activation. We demonstrate that NO donors directly activate TRPV1 and TRPA1 in isolated inside-out patch recordings. Cultured primary sensory neurons display both TRPV1- and TRPA1-dependent responses to NO donors. BH4, an essential co-factor for NO production, causes activation of a subset of DRG neurons as assayed by calcium imaging, and this activation is at least partly dependent on nitric oxide synthase activity. We show that BH4-induced calcium influx is ablated in DRG neurons from TRPA1/TRPV1 double knockout mice, suggesting that production of endogenous levels of NO can activate these ion channels. In behavioral assays, peripheral NO-induced nociception is compromised when TRPV1 and TRPA1 are both ablated. These results provide genetic evidence that the peripheral nociceptive action of NO is mediated by both TRPV1 and TRPA1.

  1. Nitric oxide and chronic colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B Grisham

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is thought to play an important role in modulating the inflammatory response by virtue of its ability to affect bloodflow, leukocyte function and cell viability. The objective of this study was to assess the role that NO may play in mediating the mucosal injury and inflammation in a model of chronic granulomatous colitis using two pharmacologically different inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (NOS. Chronic granulomatous colitis with liver and spleen inflammation was induced in female Lewis rats via the subserosal (intramural injection of peptidoglycan/polysaccharide (PG/PS derived from group A streptococci. Chronic NOS inhibition by oral administration of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME (15 µmol/kg/day or amino-guanidine (AG (15 µmol/ kg/day was found to attenuate the PG/PS-induced increases in macroscopic colonic inflammation scores and colonic myeloperoxidase activity. Only AG -- not L-NAME – attenuated the PG/PS-induced increases in colon dry weight. Both L-NAME and AG significantly attenuated the PG/PS-induced increases in spleen weight whereas neither was effective at significantly attenuating the PG/PS-induced increases in liver weight. Although both L-NAME and AG inhibited NO production in vivo, as measured by decreases in plasma nitrite and nitrate levels, only AG produced significantly lower values (38±3 versus 83±8 µM, respectively, P<0.05. Finally, L-NAME, but not AG, administration significantly increased mean arterial pressure from 83 mmHg in colitic animals to 105 mmHg in the PG/PS+ L-NAME-treated animals (P<0.05. It is concluded that NO may play an important role in mediating some of the pathophysiology associated with this model of chronic granulomatous colitis.

  2. Distribution, morphology and origins of nitric oxide synthase-expressing neurons in the brain of adult mouse%小鼠脑内不同脑区中一氧化氮合酶免疫阳性神经元的分布、形态特征和起源

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄增金; 刘芳

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the distribution, morphology and origins of nNOS-expressing neurons in the brain of a-dult mice. Methods-. By using immunohistochemistry methods, we explored the distribution and morphology of nNOS-expressing neurons; BrdU (5-bromodeoxyuridine) birth-dating methods were used to examine when the nNOS-expressing neurons were genesis; and the origin of nNOS-expressing neurons was traced in Nkx2. 1 and Shh lineage by Cre-Loxp recombination. Results: nNOS-expressing neurons widely distributed in the brain of adult mouse, especially in the neocortex, stria-tum and septum/diagonal band (DB) ; nNOS-expressing neurons located in the neocortex and striatum were greatly produced between E13. 5 and E14. 5, and nNOS-expressing neurons in the septum/DB production peaks around Ell. 5 and E12. 5. The majority of nNOS-expressing neurons were derived from Nkx2. 1 and Shh (Sonic hedgehog) lineages. Conclusion: the nNOS-expressing neurons are widely distributed in the brain of adult mice. The nNOS-expressing neurons located in different brain regions are produced during different embryonic stages. The majority of nNOS-expressing neurons are derived from Nkx2. 1 lineages and a small part are from Shh lineages.%目的:研究小鼠前脑一氧化氮合酶(nNOS)免疫阳性(nNOS阳性)神经元在成年小鼠大脑的分布、形态特征和起源.方法:免疫组织化学显色观察nNOS阳性神经元在成年小鼠大脑中分布及其形态特征;BrdU标记新生神经元,研究脑内nNOS阳性神经元产生的时间;通过Nkx2.1 (NK2 homeobox 1)-Cre和Shh (Sonic hedgehog)-Cre转基因小鼠与基因报告小鼠杂交后追踪其子代细胞的方法,观察成年小鼠脑内nNOS阳性神经元的起源.结果:nNOS阳性神经元在小鼠大脑中广泛表达;BrdU实验结果表明,皮质和纹状体中nNOS阳性神经元主要在胚胎期13.5d到14.5d产生,而隔区/钭角带中的这部分神经元则主要在胚胎期11.5d到12.5d产生;大部分

  3. The evidence for nitric oxide synthase immunopositivity in the monosynaptic Ia-motoneuron pathway of the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsala, Jozef; Lukácová, Nadezda; Sulla, Igor; Wohlfahrt, Peter; Marsala, Martin

    2005-09-01

    size from 0.7 to >or=15.1 microm in length x 0.7 to 4.8 microm wide. Subsequent to identification of the afferent nitric oxide synthase immunoreactive limb of the monosynaptic Ia-motoneuron pathway on control sections, intramuscular injections of the retrograde tracer Fluorogold into the gastrocnemius-soleus muscles, combined with nitric oxide synthase immunohistochemistry of L7 and S1 dorsal root ganglia, confirmed the existence of a number of medium-sized nitric oxide synthase immunoreactive somata (1000-2000 microm(2) square area) in the dorsolateral part of both dorsal root ganglia, presumed to be proprioceptive Ia neurons. Concurrently, large nitric oxide synthase immunoreactive fibers were detected at the input and output side of both dorsal root ganglia. S1 and S2 dorsal rhizotomy caused a marked depletion of nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity in the medial bundle of S1 and S2 dorsal roots and in the dorsal funiculus of S1, S2 and lower lumbar segments. In addition, anterograde degeneration of large nitric oxide synthase immunoreactive Ia fibers in the dorsal funiculus of L7-S2 segments produces direct evidence that the afferent limb of the soleus H-reflex is nitric oxide synthase immunoreactive and presents new immunohistochemical characteristics of the monosynaptic Ia-motoneuron pathway, unseparably coupled with the performance of the stretch reflex.

  4. Subtypes of GABAergic neurons project axons in the neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeyoshi Higo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAergic neurons in the neocortex have been regarded as interneurons and speculated to modulate the activity of neurons locally. Recently, however, several experiments revealed that neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS-positive GABAergic neurons project cortico-cortically with long axons. In this study, we illustrate Golgi-like images of the nNOS-positive GABAergic neurons using a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase (NADPH-d reaction and follow the emanating axon branches in cat brain sections. These axon branches projected cortico-cortically with other non-labeled arcuate fibers, contra-laterally via the corpus callosum and anterior commissure. The labeled fibers were not limited to the neocortex but found also in the fimbria of the hippocampus. In order to have additional information on these GABAergic neuron projections, we investigated green fluorescent protein (GFP-labeled GABAergic neurons in GAD67-Cre knock-in / GFP Cre-reporter mice. GFP-labeled axons emanate densely, especially in the fimbria, a small number in the anterior commissure, and very sparsely in the corpus callosum. These two different approaches confirm that not only nNOS-positive GABAergic neurons but also other subtypes of GABAergic neurons project long axons in the cerebral cortex and are in a position to be involved in information processing.

  5. 21 CFR 868.2380 - Nitric oxide analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nitric oxide analyzer. 868.2380 Section 868.2380...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2380 Nitric oxide analyzer. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of nitric oxide...

  6. 21 CFR 862.3080 - Breath nitric oxide test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Breath nitric oxide test system. 862.3080 Section... Systems § 862.3080 Breath nitric oxide test system. (a) Identification. A breath nitric oxide test system is a device intended to measure fractional nitric oxide in human breath. Measurement of changes...

  7. Characterization of neurons of the nucleus tractus solitarius pars centralis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, V; Zheng, Z L; Coleman, F H; Rogers, R C; Travagli, R A

    2005-08-09

    Esophageal sensory afferent inputs terminate principally in the central subnucleus of the tractus solitarius (cNTS). Neurons of the cNTS comprise two major neurochemical subpopulations. One contains neurons that are nitric oxide synthase (NOS) immunoreactive (-IR) while the other comprises neurons that are tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-IR. We have shown recently that TH-IR neurons are involved in esophageal-distention induced gastric relaxation. We used whole cell patch clamp techniques in rat brainstem slices combined with immunohistochemical and morphological reconstructions to characterize cNTS neurons. Postrecording reconstruction of cNTS neurons revealed two morphological neuronal subtypes; one group of cells (41 out of 131 neurons, i.e., 31%) had a multipolar soma, while the other group (87 out of 131 neurons, i.e., 66%) had a bipolar soma. Of the 43 cells in which we conducted a neurochemical examination, 15 displayed TH-IR (9 with bipolar morphology, 6 with multipolar morphology) while the remaining 28 neurons did not display TH-IR (18 with bipolar morphology, 10 with multipolar morphology). Even though the range of electrophysiological properties varied significantly, morphological or neurochemical distinctions did not reveal characteristics peculiar to the subgroups. Spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSC) recorded in cNTS neurons had a frequency of 1.5 +/- 0.15 events s(-1) and an amplitude of 27 +/- 1.2 pA (Vh = -50 mV) and were abolished by pretreatment with 30 muM AP-5 and 10 muM CNQX, indicating the involvement of both NMDA and non-NMDA receptors. Some cNTS neurons also received a GABAergic input that was abolished by perfusion with 30-50 muM bicuculline. In conclusion, our data show that despite the heterogeneity of morphological and neurochemical membrane properties, the electrophysiological characteristics of cNTS neurons are not a distinguishing feature.

  8. Neurochemical phenotypes of endomorphin-2-containing neurons in vagal nodose neurons of the adult rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Le; Chen, Tao; Wang, Ya-Yun; Li, Yun-Qing

    2009-12-01

    It has been shown that endomorphin-2-like immunoreactive (EM2-LI) neurons in dorsal root ganglion play important roles in regulating somatic information transmission. Although EM2-ergic neurons have been found in nodose ganglion (NG) which is mainly involved in transmitting visceral information into the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS), the neurochemical phenotypes of EM2-ergic neurons have not yet been investigated. In the present study, immunofluorescent histochemical staining showed that 43.5% of the NG neurons contained EM2 and these neurons were small to medium in size. 15.2%, 27.8%, 74.4% and 25.2% of the EM2-LI NG neurons expressed substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), respectively. In addition, about 90.8% of EM2-LI NG neurons also contained mu-opioid receptor (MOR). EM2/MOR and EM2/SP double-labeled peripheral axons were observed in the vagal trunk. Anterograde tracing combined with immunofluorescent staining showed EM2/MOR and EM2/SP double-labeled vagal afferents in the NTS. EM2/MOR/SP and EM2/MOR/CGRP triple-labeled neurons and axons were observed in the NG. Importantly, at the ultrastructrual level, post-embedding electron microscopy revealed that EM2-LI and SP-LI gold particles coexisted in the same large dense-cored synaptic vesicles in the pre-synaptic button, while MOR-LI gold particles existed on both pre- and post-synaptic membranes in the NTS. These results suggest that EM2 in axon terminals of NG neurons might be involved in visceral information transmission and homeostatic control through modulating the release of other neurotransmitters (such as SP, CGRP, NO, VIP) via pre-synaptic MOR and through post-synaptic mechanisms in the NTS.

  9. Experimental research on nitric oxide and the therapy of Alzheimer disease: a challenging bridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siciliano, Raffaella; Barone, Eugenio; Calabrese, Vittorio; Rispoli, Vincenzo; Butterfield, D Allan; Mancuso, Cesare

    2011-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by severe cognitive impairment due to neuronal death. Although the lost of cognitive function is the main problem for AD subjects, death occurs due to secondary issues such as concomitant infections, respiratory complications or multi-organ failure. Current drugs used in AD are acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and antagonists of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor. These drugs may only slightly improve cognitive functions but have only very limited impact on the clinical course of the disease. Over the last 5 years, new targets were identified and innovative drugs against AD have been designed and developed. Worthy of mention are β-secretase inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies against amyloid-β-peptide and tau inhibitors. However, although promising beneficial effects were highlighted in the data from preclinical studies, only few of these new drugs improved cognitive functions for a significant time frame in AD subjects. Controversial is the therapeutic effect on AD obtained through the manipulation of the nitric oxide synthase/nitric oxide system since the potential toxic effects on brain function could overcome the beneficial effects. The aim of this review is to analyze from a pharmacologic point of view both old and new drugs developed for the treatment of AD. In addition, the risk/benefit ratio related to the modulation of the nitric oxide synthase/nitric oxide system in AD brain will be analyzed.

  10. Electrochemical Behavior of Aluminum in Nitric Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Hui; ZHU; Li-yang; LIN; Ru-shan; TAN; Hong-bin; HE; Hui

    2013-01-01

    Aluminum is one of cladding materials for nuclear fuel,it is important to investigate the electrolytic dissolution of aluminum in nitric acid.The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy,polarization curve and cyclic voltammetry cure of anodic aluminum electrode in nitric acid under various conditions were collected(Fig.1).It turns out,under steady state,the thickness of the passivated film of aluminum

  11. Nitric oxide inhibits the accumulation of CD4+CD44hiTbet+CD69lo T cells in mycobacterial infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, John E.; Torrado, Egidio; Tighe, Michael; Fountain, Jeffrey J.; Solache, Alejandra; Strutt, Tara; Swain, Susan; Appelberg, Rui; Cooper, Andrea M

    2013-01-01

    Summary Animals lacking the inducible nitric oxide synthase gene (nos2−/−) are less susceptible to M. avium strain 25291 and lack nitric oxide-mediated immunomodulation of CD4+ T cells. Here we show that the absence of nos2 results in increased accumulation of neutrophils and both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells within the M. avium-containing granuloma. Examination of the T-cell phenotype in M. avium-infected mice demonstrated that CD4+CD44hi effector T cells expressing the Th1 transcriptional regulator T-bet (T-bet+) were specifically reduced by the presence of nitric oxide. Importantly, the T-bet+ effector population could be separated into CD69hi and CD69lo populations, with the CD69lo population only able to accumulate during chronic infection within infected nos2−/− mice. Transcriptomic comparison between CD4+CD44hiCD69hi and CD4+CD44hiCD69lo populations revealed that CD4+CD44hiCD69lo cells had higher expression of the integrin itgb1/itga4 (VLA-4, CD49d/CD29). Inhibition of Nos2 activity allowed increased accumulation of the CD4+CD44hiT-bet+CD69lo population in WT mice as well as increased expression of VLA-4. These data support the hypothesis that effector T cells in mycobacterial granulomata are not a uniform effector population but exist in distinct subsets with differential susceptibility to the regulatory effects of nitric oxide. PMID:22890814

  12. Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    The Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) Program at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, has the primary objective of modernizing and transforming the launch and range complex at KSC to benefit current and future NASA programs along with other emerging users. Described as the launch support and infrastructure modernization program in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the GSDO Program will develop and implement shared infrastructure and process improvements to provide more flexible, affordable, and responsive capabilities to a multi-user community. In support of NASA and the GSDO Program, the objective of this project is to qualify citric acid as an environmentally-preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys. This project is a direct follow-on to United Space Alliance (USA) work at KSC to optimize the parameters for the use of citric acid and verify effectiveness. This project will build off of the USA study to further evaluate citric acids effectiveness and suitability for corrosion protection of a number of stainless steels alloys used by NASA, the Department of Defense (DoD), and the European Space Agency (ESA).

  13. Nitrergic neurons during early postnatal development of the prefrontal cortex in the rat: histochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvizdosova, Natalia; Tomasova, Lenka; Bolekova, Adriana; Kolesar, Dalibor; Kluchova, Darina

    2014-06-01

    The presence of nitrergic cells in the prefrontal cortex has been confirmed, however little is known about the postnatal development of these cells. Nitrergic neurons were studied histochemically by using NADPH-diaphorase staining in the prefrontal cortex of male Wistar rats from postnatal day 7-21 (P7-21). Neuronal NADPH-diaphorase is a nitric oxide synthase that provides a specific histochemical marker for neurons producing nitric oxide (NO). NO acts as a neurotransmitter and intracellular signaling molecule in the nervous system. We observed in 7 day old rats NADPH-d containing neurons that were intensely stained. These neurons were bipolar with a short dendrite with average length of 23 μm. During the second postnatal week, the neurons were mainly bipolar and were rarely multipolar. By P14 the cells were located primarily in cortical layers III-VI. Nitrergic neurons of the 21 day old rats were histochemically identified as multipolar cells with long radial extending dendrites. Dendrites of neurons in 14 and 21 day old rats were a similar length with an average of 57 μm. These results suggest that nitrergic neurons differentiate during a relatively short period of time and reach their structural maturity by the end of the second week of postnatal development.

  14. Birthdating of myenteric neuron subtypes in the small intestine of the mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergner, Annette J.; Stamp, Lincon A.; Gonsalvez, David G.; Allison, Margaret B.; Olson, David P.; Myers, Martin G; Anderson, Colin R.; Young, Heather M.

    2013-01-01

    There are many different types of enteric neurons. Previous studies have identified the time at which some enteric neuron subtypes are born (exit the cell cycle) in the mouse, but the birthdates of some major enteric neuron subtypes are still incompletely characterized or unknown. We combined 5-ethynynl-2’-deoxyuridine (EdU) labeling with antibody markers that identify myenteric neuron subtypes to determine when neuron subtypes are born in the mouse small intestine. We found that different neurochemical classes of enteric neuron differed in their birthdates; serotonin neurons were born first with peak cell cycle exit at E11.5, followed by neurofilament-M neurons, calcitonin gene-related peptide neurons (peak cell cycle exit for both at E12.5-E13.5), tyrosine hydroxylase neurons (E15.5), nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1) neurons (E15.5) and calretinin neurons (P0). The vast majority of myenteric neurons had exited the cell cycle by P10. We did not observe any EdU+/NOS1+ myenteric neurons in the small intestine of adult mice following EdU injection at E10.5 or E11.5, which was unexpected as previous studies have shown that NOS1 neurons are present in E11.5 mice. Studies using the proliferation marker, Ki67, revealed that very few NOS1 neurons in the E11.5 and E12.5 gut were proliferating. However, Cre-lox-based genetic fate-mapping revealed a small sub-population of myenteric neurons that appears to express NOS1 only transiently. Together, our results confirm a relationship between enteric neuron subtype and birthdate, and suggest that some enteric neurons exhibit neurochemical phenotypes during development that are different from their mature phenotype. PMID:23861145

  15. Birthdating of myenteric neuron subtypes in the small intestine of the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergner, Annette J; Stamp, Lincon A; Gonsalvez, David G; Allison, Margaret B; Olson, David P; Myers, Martin G; Anderson, Colin R; Young, Heather M

    2014-02-15

    There are many different types of enteric neurons. Previous studies have identified the time at which some enteric neuron subtypes are born (exit the cell cycle) in the mouse, but the birthdates of some major enteric neuron subtypes are still incompletely characterized or unknown. We combined 5-ethynynl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) labeling with antibody markers that identify myenteric neuron subtypes to determine when neuron subtypes are born in the mouse small intestine. We found that different neurochemical classes of enteric neuron differed in their birthdates; serotonin neurons were born first with peak cell cycle exit at E11.5, followed by neurofilament-M neurons, calcitonin gene-related peptide neurons (peak cell cycle exit for both at embryonic day [E]12.5-E13.5), tyrosine hydroxylase neurons (E15.5), nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1) neurons (E15.5), and calretinin neurons (postnatal day [P]0). The vast majority of myenteric neurons had exited the cell cycle by P10. We did not observe any EdU+/NOS1+ myenteric neurons in the small intestine of adult mice following EdU injection at E10.5 or E11.5, which was unexpected, as previous studies have shown that NOS1 neurons are present in E11.5 mice. Studies using the proliferation marker Ki67 revealed that very few NOS1 neurons in the E11.5 and E12.5 gut were proliferating. However, Cre-lox-based genetic fate-mapping revealed a small subpopulation of myenteric neurons that appears to express NOS1 only transiently. Together, our results confirm a relationship between enteric neuron subtype and birthdate, and suggest that some enteric neurons exhibit neurochemical phenotypes during development that are different from their mature phenotype.

  16. [Neuronal network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmeier, M; Maresová, D

    2005-01-01

    Function of the central nervous system is based on mutual relations among the nerve cells. Description of nerve cells and their processes, including their contacts was enabled by improvement of optical features of the microscope and by the development of impregnation techniques. It is associated with the name of Antoni van Leeuwenhoek (1632-1723), J. Ev. Purkyne (1787-1869), Camillo Golgi (1843-1926), and Ramón y Cajal (1852-1934). Principal units of the neuronal network are the synapses. The term synapse was introduced into neurophysiology by Charles Scott Sherrington (1857-1952). Majority of the interactions between nerve cells is mediated by neurotransmitters acting at the receptors of the postsynaptic membrane or at the autoreceptors of the presynaptic part of the synapse. Attachment of the vesicles to the presynaptic membrane and the release of the neurotransmitter into the synaptic cleft depend on the intracellular calcium concentration and on the presence of several proteins in the presynaptic element.

  17. An Abnormal Nitric Oxide Metabolism Contributes to Brain Oxidative Stress in the Mouse Model for the Fragile X Syndrome, a Possible Role in Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima-Cabello, Elena; Garcia-Guirado, Francisco; Calvo-Medina, Rocio; el Bekay, Rajaa; Perez-Costillas, Lucia; Quintero-Navarro, Carolina; Sanchez-Salido, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Background. Fragile X syndrome is the most common genetic cause of mental disability. Although many research has been performed, the mechanism underlying the pathogenesis is unclear and needs further investigation. Oxidative stress played major roles in the syndrome. The aim was to investigate the nitric oxide metabolism, protein nitration level, the expression of NOS isoforms, and furthermore the activation of the nuclear factor NF-κB-p65 subunit in different brain areas on the fragile X mouse model. Methods. This study involved adult male Fmr1-knockout and wild-type mice as controls. We detected nitric oxide metabolism and the activation of the nuclear factor NF-κBp65 subunit, comparing the mRNA expression and protein content of the three NOS isoforms in different brain areas. Results. Fmr1-KO mice showed an abnormal nitric oxide metabolism and increased levels of protein tyrosine nitrosylation. Besides that, nuclear factor NF-κB-p65 and inducible nitric oxide synthase appeared significantly increased in the Fmr1-knockout mice. mRNA and protein levels of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase appeared significantly decreased in the knockout mice. However, the epithelial nitric oxide synthase isoform displayed no significant changes. Conclusions. These data suggest the potential involvement of an abnormal nitric oxide metabolism in the pathogenesis of the fragile X syndrome. PMID:26788253

  18. An Abnormal Nitric Oxide Metabolism Contributes to Brain Oxidative Stress in the Mouse Model for the Fragile X Syndrome, a Possible Role in Intellectual Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Lima-Cabello

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Fragile X syndrome is the most common genetic cause of mental disability. Although many research has been performed, the mechanism underlying the pathogenesis is unclear and needs further investigation. Oxidative stress played major roles in the syndrome. The aim was to investigate the nitric oxide metabolism, protein nitration level, the expression of NOS isoforms, and furthermore the activation of the nuclear factor NF-κB-p65 subunit in different brain areas on the fragile X mouse model. Methods. This study involved adult male Fmr1-knockout and wild-type mice as controls. We detected nitric oxide metabolism and the activation of the nuclear factor NF-κBp65 subunit, comparing the mRNA expression and protein content of the three NOS isoforms in different brain areas. Results. Fmr1-KO mice showed an abnormal nitric oxide metabolism and increased levels of protein tyrosine nitrosylation. Besides that, nuclear factor NF-κB-p65 and inducible nitric oxide synthase appeared significantly increased in the Fmr1-knockout mice. mRNA and protein levels of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase appeared significantly decreased in the knockout mice. However, the epithelial nitric oxide synthase isoform displayed no significant changes. Conclusions. These data suggest the potential involvement of an abnormal nitric oxide metabolism in the pathogenesis of the fragile X syndrome.

  19. Inducible nitric oxide synthase is responsible for nitric oxide release from murine pituicytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, T H; Rivier, C; Lee, S;

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated whether pituicytes were able to produce and release nitric oxide (NO), and which type of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) would be responsible for this phenomenon. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) 1 micro g/ml was used as inflammatory mediator. Because pituicytes are known to secrete...

  20. The projection and synaptic organisation of NTS afferent connections with presympathetic neurons, GABA and nNOS neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affleck, V S; Coote, J H; Pyner, S

    2012-09-01

    Elevated sympathetic nerve activity, strongly associated with cardiovascular disease, is partly generated from the presympathetic neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN). The PVN-presympathetic neurons regulating cardiac and vasomotor sympathetic activity receive information about cardiovascular status from receptors in the heart and circulation. These receptors signal changes via afferent neurons terminating in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), some of which may result in excitation or inhibition of PVN-presympathetic neurons. Understanding the anatomy and neurochemistry of NTS afferent connections within the PVN could provide important clues to the impairment in homeostasis cardiovascular control associated with disease. Transynaptic labelling has shown the presence of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-containing neurons and GABA interneurons that terminate on presympathetic PVN neurons any of which may be the target for NTS afferents. So far NTS connections to these diverse neuronal pools have not been demonstrated and were investigated in this study. Anterograde (biotin dextran amine - BDA) labelling of the ascending projection from the NTS and retrograde (fluorogold - FG or cholera toxin B subunit - CTB) labelling of PVN presympathetic neurons combined with immunohistochemistry for GABA and nNOS was used to identify the terminal neuronal targets of the ascending projection from the NTS. It was shown that NTS afferent terminals are apposed to either PVN-GABA interneurons or to nitric oxide producing neurons or even directly to presympathetic neurons. Furthermore, there was evidence that some NTS axons were positive for vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (vGLUT2). The data provide an anatomical basis for the different functions of cardiovascular receptors that mediate their actions via the NTS-PVN pathways.

  1. Activation of Proinflammatory Responses in Cells of the Airway Mucosa by Particulate Matter: Oxidant- and Non-Oxidant-Mediated Triggering Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Øvrevik

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is considered to play a central role in a diverse range of disease outcomes associated with exposure to various types of inhalable particulates. The initial mechanisms through which particles trigger cellular responses leading to activation of inflammatory responses are crucial to clarify in order to understand what physico-chemical characteristics govern the inflammogenic activity of particulate matter and why some particles are more harmful than others. Recent research suggests that molecular triggering mechanisms involved in activation of proinflammatory genes and onset of inflammatory reactions by particles or soluble particle components can be categorized into direct formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS with subsequent oxidative stress, interaction with the lipid layer of cellular membranes, activation of cell surface receptors, and direct interactions with intracellular molecular targets. The present review focuses on the immediate effects and responses in cells exposed to particles and central down-stream signaling mechanisms involved in regulation of proinflammatory genes, with special emphasis on the role of oxidant and non-oxidant triggering mechanisms. Importantly, ROS act as a central second-messenger in a variety of signaling pathways. Even non-oxidant mediated triggering mechanisms are therefore also likely to activate downstream redox-regulated events.

  2. Electroencephalographic characterization of pentylenetetrazole kindling in rats and modulation of epileptiform discharges by nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Victoria; Díaz, Javier; González, Ignacio; Cavada, Gabriel; Ocampo-Garcés, Adrián; Wyneken, Ursula

    2014-02-01

    Epileptogenesis is a progressive process which culminates with spontaneous, recurrent and unpredictable epileptic seizures due to enhanced neuronal excitability. Well-characterized animal models of this process are needed to clarify its underlying molecular mechanisms, in which the role of nitric oxide has been a controversial component. We have used kindling with a sub-convulsive dose of pentylenetetrazole to objectively characterize early electroencephalographic changes during epileptogenesis. We used electroencephalographic recordings both during pentylenetetrazole (20 mg/kg) kindling for 20 days and then, 24 days later to quantify the number, duration and spectral power of epileptic discharges. The levels of nitric oxide were modulated locally in the cerebral cortex by pharmacological agents. The number of epileptiform discharges increased during the kindling protocol as well as 24 days later, revealing the induction of a self-sustaining epileptogenic process. Epileptic discharges were characterized by theta frequencies (4-10 Hz) that were associated with absence-like seizures. However, during kindling, the spectral power of the theta band progressively decreased, while the power of higher frequencies, in the beta band, increased. Nitric oxide in the cerebral cortex inhibited the number and amplitude of epileptic discharges. The electroencephalographic characterization of this kindling protocol provides a valuable tool to detect consequences of therapeutic interventions undertaken at initial phases of epileptogenesis, especially those targeted towards stopping this process. Increases of nitric oxide in the cerebral cortex could be a useful intervention to negatively modulate neuronal excitability, epileptic discharges and the progression of epileptogenesis.

  3. Nitric oxide, inducible nitric oxide synthase and inflammation in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Robert P

    2002-12-01

    Inflammation is a process consisting of a complex of cytological and chemical reactions which occur in and around affected blood vessels and adjacent tissues in response to an injury caused by a physical, chemical or biological insult. Much work has been performed in the past several years investigating inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS, EC 1.14.13.39) and nitric oxide in inflammation. This has resulted in a rapid increase in knowledge about iNOS and nitric oxide. Nitric oxide formation from inducible NOS is regulated by numerous inflammatory mediators, often with contradictory effects, depending upon the type and duration of the inflammatory insult. Equine medicine appears to have benefited the most from the increased interest in this small, inflammatory mediator. Most of the information on nitric oxide in traditional veterinary species has been produced using models or naturally occurring inflammatory diseases of this species.

  4. Changes of the nitric oxide synthase-positive and nestin-positive neurons in the basal forebrain of castrated adult male rats following androgen replacement therapy%雄激素替代治疗后去势成年雄性大鼠基底前脑一氧化氮合酶及巢蛋白阳性神经元的变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭灵; 汪华侨; 袁群芳; 姚志彬

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The neurons in the medial septum (MS), vertical and horizontal limbs of diagonal band of Broca (vDB and hDB) in the basal forebrain contain rich androgen receptors (ARs) and estrogen receptors (ERs) by which androgen and estrogen can act dramatically on the neurons in the basal forebrain, subsequently affecting learning and memory processes.OBJECTIVE: To qualitatively and quantitatively investigate the effects of androgen replacement therapy on the nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-positive and nestin-positive neurons in the MS, vDB and hDB of castrated adult male rats.DESIGN: A randomly controlled study on experimental animals.SETTING: Department of Anatomy and Brain Research Laboratory of Zhngshan Medical College of Sun Yat-sen University.MATERIALS: The experiment was performed at Department of Anatomy and Brain Research Laboratory of Zhongshan Medical College of Sun Yatsen University from June 2001 to June 2002. Totally twenty-eight adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups with seven rats in each group: androgen replacement therapy for 4 weeks following 24 hours of castration (ART1), androgen replacement therapy for 2 weeks following 2 weeks of castration (ART2), vehicle replacement therapy for 4weeks following 24 hours of castration (VRT), sham-operated group (Sham).INTERVENTIONS: ① ART1 group: The castrated rats received subcutaneous injection of testosterone proprionate (25 mg/kg) dissolved in 100 μL of sterile sesame oil every other day from 10:30 am to 11:00 am for 14 times (4 weeks). ② ART2 group: The castrated rats received subcutaneous injection of testosterone proprionate with the same dosage and method as ART1 group for 7 times (2 weeks). ③ The rats in VRT group received subcutaneous injection of 100μL of sterile sesame oil for 14 times (4 weeks) by the same regime as described above. ④ Rats in Sham group only received sham-operated treatments, and testes were intact and lived for 4 weeks.MAIN OUTCOME

  5. Involvement of nitric oxide in anticompulsive-like effect of agmatine on marble-burying behaviour in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawali, Nitin B; Chowdhury, Amrita A; Kothavade, Pankaj S; Bulani, Vipin D; Nagmoti, Dnyaneshwar M; Juvekar, Archana R

    2016-01-01

    In view of the reports that nitric oxide modulates the neurotransmitters implicated in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), patients with OCD exhibit higher plasma nitrate levels, and drugs useful in OCD influence nitric oxide. Agmatine is a polyamine and widely distributed in mammalian brain which interacts with nitrergic systems. Hence, the present study was carried out to understand the involvement of nitrergic systems in the anticompulsive-like effect of agmatine. We used marble-burying behaviour (MBB) of mice as the animal model of OCD, and nitric oxide levels in hippocampus (HC) and cortex homogenate were measured. Results revealed that, agmatine (20 and 40mg/kg, i.p) significantly inhibited the MBB. Intraperitoneal administration of nitric oxide enhancers viz. nitric oxide precursor - l-arginine (l-ARG) (400mg/kg and 800mg/kg) increased MBB as well as brain nitrites levels, whereas treatment with N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (30mg/kg and 50mg/kg, i.p.) and 7-nitroindazole (7-NI) (20mg/kg and 40mg/kg) attenuated MBB and nitrites levels in brain. Further, in combination studies, the anticompulsive-like effect of agmatine (20mg/kg, ip) was exacerbated by prior administration of l-ARG (400mg/kg) and conversely l-NAME (15mg/kg) or 7-NI (10.0mg/kg) attenuated OCD-like behaviour with HC and cortex changes in the levels of NO. None of the above treatment had any significant influence on locomotor activity. In conclusion, Agmatine is effective in ameliorating the compulsive-like behaviour in mice which appears to be related to nitric oxide in brain.

  6. Nitric Oxide Homeostasis in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannibal, Luciana

    2016-01-01

    The role of nitric oxide in the pathogenesis and progression of neurodegenerative illnesses such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases has become prominent over the years. Increased activity of the enzymes that produce reactive oxygen species, decreased activity of antioxidant enzymes and imbalances in glutathione pools mediate and mark the neurodegenerative process. Much of the oxidative damage of proteins is brought about by the overproduction of nitric oxide by nitric oxide synthases (NOS) and its subsequent reactivity with reactive oxygen species. Proteomic methods have advanced the field tremendously, by facilitating the quantitative assessment of differential expression patterns and oxidative modifications of proteins and alongside, mapping their non-canonical functions. As a signaling molecule involved in multiple biochemical pathways, the level of nitric oxide is subject to tight regulation. All three NOS isoforms display aberrant patterns of expression in Alzheimer's disease, altering intracellular signaling and routing oxidative stress in directions that are uncompounded. This review discusses the prime factors that control nitric oxide biosynthesis, reactivity footprints and ensuing effects in the development of neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Useful and harmful effects of nitric oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jović Slavoljub

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In living sistems synthesis of nitric oxide occurs during metabolism from Larginin, nitrite and ascorbate. Being very significant carrier of information within numerous both physiological and pathological proceses in mammals' organisms, nitric oxid could possibly be useful as well as harmful. Nitric oxide synthesis is adjuvant in a healthy organism because it represents the basic molecule for understanding numerous processes in neurology, psychology, immunology and varios related fields. In other words, nitric oxide participate in number of physiological processes, such as: transmission of nerve signals (neurotransmitter role, regulation of smooth muscle tissue relaxation (eg. vasodilatation, peristaltic movements, immunomodulation, mastocyte activation, development of inflammatory response, apoptosis regulation, angiogenesis and glucose metabolism, normal heart functioning and antioxidation role. Besides being useful, nitric oxide can be harmful as well, because it has one unpaired electron, so consequently it is susceptible to oxidation becoming a stable free radical. Being such, it reacts quickly with superoxide-anion radical, givind at first an extremely reactive peroxinitrite anion, and subsequently peroxidnitrite acid. This acid is very dangerous causing thiol groups oxidation, tyrosine and phenylalanine nitrosylation, lipid oxidation, DNK chain splitting, nitrification and nucleic bases deamination. These damages of macromolecules can cause a series of undesirable changes which subsequently distub functions of molecules, and thus of cells, tissues and even organs. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173034 i br. 31085

  8. [Nitric oxide and lipid peroxidation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristol, J P; Maggi, M F; Guérin, M C; Torreilles, J; Descomps, B

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical produced enzymatically in biological systems from the guanidino group of L-arginine. Its large spectrum of biological effects is achieved through chemical interactions with different targets including oxygen (O2), superoxide (O2o-) and other oxygen reactive species (ROS), transition metals and thiols. Superoxide anions and other ROS have been reported to react with NO to produce peroxynitrite anions that can decompose to form nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and hydroxyl radial (OHo). Thus, NO has been reported to have a dual effect on lipid peroxidation (prooxidant via the peroxynitrite or antioxydant via the chelation of ROS). In the present study we have investigated in different models the in vitro and in vivo action of NO on lipid peroxidation. Copper-induced LDL oxidation were used as an in vitro model. Human LDL (100 micrograms ApoB/ml) were incubated in oxygene-saturated PBS buffer in presence or absence of Cu2+ (2.5 microM) with increasing concentrations of NO donnors (sodium nitroprussiate or nitroso-glutathione). LDL oxidation was monitored continuously for conjugated diene formation (234 nm) and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) accumulation. Exogenous NO prevents in a dose dependent manner the progress of copper-induced oxidation. Ischaemia-reperfusion injury (I/R), characterized by an overproduction of ROS, is used as an in vivo model. Anaesthetized rats were submitted to 1 hour renal ischaemia following by 2 hours of reperfusion. Sham-operated rats (SOP) were used as control. Lipid peroxidation was evaluated by measuring the HNE accumulated in rats kidneys in presence or absence of L-arginine or D-arginine infusion. L-arginine, but not D-arginine, enhances HNE accumulation in I/R but not in SOP (< 0.050 pmol/g tissue in SOP versus 0.6 nmol/g tissue in I/R), showing that, in this experimental conditions, NO produced from L-arginine, enhances the toxicity of ROS. This study shows that the pro- or antioxydant effects of NO are different

  9. A connecting hinge represses the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    OpenAIRE

    Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Panda, Koustubh; Tejero, Jesús; Aulak, Kulwant S.; Fadlalla, Mohammed Adam; Mustovich, Anthony T.; Stuehr, Dennis J

    2007-01-01

    In mammals, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) has the weakest activity, being one-tenth and one-sixth as active as the inducible NOS (iNOS) and the neuronal NOS (nNOS), respectively. The basis for this weak activity is unclear. We hypothesized that a hinge element that connects the FMN module in the reductase domain but is shorter and of unique composition in eNOS may be involved. To test this hypothesis, we generated an eNOS chimera that contained the nNOS hinge and two mutants that e...

  10. General artificial neuron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degeratu, Vasile; Schiopu, Paul; Degeratu, Stefania

    2007-05-01

    In this paper the authors present a model of artificial neuron named the general artificial neuron. Depending on application this neuron can change self number of inputs, the type of inputs (from excitatory in inhibitory or vice versa), the synaptic weights, the threshold, the type of intensifying functions. It is achieved into optoelectronic technology. Also, into optoelectronic technology a model of general McCulloch-Pitts neuron is showed. The advantages of these neurons are very high because we have to solve different applications with the same neural network, achieved from these neurons, named general neural network.

  11. NADPH diaphorase-positive neurons in the lizard hippocampus: a distinct subpopulation of GABAergic interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávila, J C; Megías, M; Andreu, M J; Real, M A; Guirado, S

    1995-01-01

    We analyzed the distribution and light-microscopic features of the NADPH diaphorase-containing structures in the lizard hippocampus, likely to correspond to nitric oxide synthase-containing cells and fibers, and thus likely to release nitric oxide. We also studied co-localization of NADPH diaphorase with the neurotransmitter GABA, the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin, and the neuropeptide somatostatin, in order to examine whether putative nitric oxide-synthesizing neurons represent a different subpopulation of GABA cells, on which the authors recently reported in lizards. We also studied co-localization of NADPH diaphorase with parvalbumin or somatostatin in mice to ascertain whether the characteristics of this population in reptiles parallel the situation in mammals. Most of the positive NADPH diaphorase neurons were stained in a Golgi-like manner and were in the plexiform layers of the lizard hippocampus with morphologies ranging from bipolar to multipolar. Co-localization with GABA was 100%, and NADPH diaphorase-positive neurons in the lizard hippocampus did not contain parvalbumin or somatostatin. The results indicate that putative nitric oxide-synthesizing neurons represent a distinct subpopulation of GABA interneurons in the lizard hippocampus. Two different types of fibers were described in the plexiform layers: one type bearing thick varicosities, and the other thinner ones. We discuss the possibility that at least part of the positive fibers arise from a hypothalamic aminergic nucleus contacting the third ventricle, the periventricular hypothalamic organ. Most radial glia were stained almost completely and formed typical end-feet both at the pia and around capillaries. The results of this study confirm that the capacity for synthesizing nitric oxide is linked to a determined set of neuronal markers depending on the specific brain region, and they provide new resemblances between hippocampal regions in different classes of vertebrates.

  12. Lower Expression of SLC27A1 Enhances Intramuscular Fat Deposition in Chicken via Down-Regulated Fatty Acid Oxidation Mediated by CPT1A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Fengfang; Xie, Liang; Ma, Jing-e; Luo, Wen; Zhang, Li; Chao, Zhe; Chen, Shaohao; Nie, Qinghua; Lin, Zhemin; Zhang, Xiquan

    2017-01-01

    Intramuscular fat (IMF) is recognized as the predominant factor affecting meat quality due to its positive correlation with tenderness, juiciness, and flavor. Chicken IMF deposition depends on the balance among lipid synthesis, transport, uptake, and subsequent metabolism, involving a lot of genes and pathways, however, its precise molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. In the present study, the breast muscle tissue of female Wenchang chickens (WC) (higher IMF content, 1.24 in D120 and 1.62 in D180) and female White Recessive Rock chickens (WRR; lower IMF content, 0.53 in D120 and 0.90 in D180) were subjected to RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis. Results showed that many genes related to lipid catabolism, such as SLC27A1, LPL, ABCA1, and CPT1A were down-regulated in WC chickens, and these genes were involved in the PPAR signaling pathway and formed an IPA® network related to lipid metabolism. Furthermore, SLC27A1 was more down-regulated in WRR.D180.B than in WRR.D120.B. Decreased cellular triglyceride (TG) and up-regulated CPT1A were observed in the SLC27A1 overexpression QM-7 cells, and increased cellular triglyceride (TG) and down-regulated CPT1A were observed in the SLC27A1 knockdown QM-7 cells. These results suggest that lower lipid catabolism exists in WC chickens but not in WRR chickens, and lower expression of SLC27A1 facilitate IMF deposition in chicken via down-regulated fatty acid oxidation mediated by CPT1A. These findings indicate that reduced lipid catabolism, rather than increased lipid anabolism, contributes to chicken IMF deposition. PMID:28706492

  13. Nitric Oxide and eNOS Gene in Essential Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamna Srivastava

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Currently hypertension grips around 25% of the entire world population. More than 90% of the hypertensive patients suffer from essential hypertension. In Asian Indians hypertension is the predominant risk factor for Coronary Artery Disease among others. Nitric Oxide (NO is synonymous with endothelial derived relaxation factor. Acting via cGMP (cyclic guanosine monophosphate it causes smooth muscle relaxation, prevents platelet aggregation and acts as an anti-inflammatory agent. iNOS (inducible Nitric oxide synthase, nNOS(neuronal nitric oxide synthase and eNOS (endothelial nitric oxide synthase are the three enzymes producing the gas nitric oxide in the human body. eNOS is the main source of NO under physiological conditions. It is known to have a number of polymorphisms. The most well known ones being the G to T polymorphism in exon 7, the T to C polymorphism in the promoter region and the a/b polymorphism in the intron 4. While the G to T polymorphism has been associated with hypertension in many races including the north Indian population, the association of other polymorphisms has been more of a controversy. Not much study has been done on the Asians especially those in India regarding these polymorphisms. Aims: To elucidate the association between the intron4a/b polymorphism in the eNOS gene and nitric oxide levels and essential hypertension. Objectives: 1. To determine the genotype frequencies of the above mentioned polymorphism in patients and controls2. To study the levels of NO in the plasma of the patients and controls3. To find out correlation if any between this polymorphism and plasma NO levels4. To find a correlation if any between this polymorphism and essential hypertension Materials and Methods: The study design was a case control study. 10 ml of venous blood was taken from 45 patients (selected from the department of Cardiology All India Institute of Medical Sciences, ages between 25 to 55 yrs and not on any

  14. 21 CFR 868.5165 - Nitric oxide administration apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nitric oxide administration apparatus. 868.5165... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5165 Nitric oxide administration apparatus. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is a device used to add...

  15. Juvenil neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, J R; Hertz, Jens Michael

    1998-01-01

    Neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis is a group of neurodegenerative diseases which are characterized by an abnormal accumulation of lipopigment in neuronal and extraneuronal cells. The diseases can be differentiated into several subgroups according to age of onset, the clinical picture...

  16. Getting to NO Alzheimer’s Disease: Neuroprotection versus Neurotoxicity Mediated by Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachelle Balez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder involving the loss of neurons in the brain which leads to progressive memory loss and behavioral changes. To date, there are only limited medications for AD and no known cure. Nitric oxide (NO has long been considered part of the neurotoxic insult caused by neuroinflammation in the Alzheimer’s brain. However, focusing on early developments, prior to the appearance of cognitive symptoms, is changing that perception. This has highlighted a compensatory, neuroprotective role for NO that protects synapses by increasing neuronal excitability. A potential mechanism for augmentation of excitability by NO is via modulation of voltage-gated potassium channel activity (Kv7 and Kv2. Identification of the ionic mechanisms and signaling pathways that mediate this protection is an important next step for the field. Harnessing the protective role of NO and related signaling pathways could provide a therapeutic avenue that prevents synapse loss early in disease.

  17. CHANGES OF NITRIC OXIDE AND PROTECTIVE EFFECTS OF NITRIC OXIDE INHIBITORS IN NEWBORN RATS WITH SEPSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史源; 李华强; 潘捷; 沈际皋

    1995-01-01

    In a newborn rat model of sepsis, the changes of nitric oxide and the protective effects of methylene blue or/and dexaraethason were investigated. The results revealed that plasma nitric oxide levels were ele-cted at 6 h and peaked at 12 h after bacterial challenge. The treatment with methylene or/and dexam-etbasone was found to Munt hypoglycenua and hyperlacdcemla, to reduce the occurrence rate of loss ot re-sponse to pain, and to prolong the survival time. Moreover, therapy by dexamethasone was shown to de-crease the 24 h mortality. The results suggested that nitric coide play an important role during the course of fatal P. aeruginosa sepsis, hut it is clear that the clinical value of nitric oxide and its inhibitors need to be further studied.

  18. Circulating nitric oxide products do not solely reflect nitric oxide release in cirrhosis and portal hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzelius, Pia; Bazeghi, Nassim; Bie, Peter;

    2011-01-01

    Patients with cirrhosis often develop a systemic vasodilatation and a hyperdynamic circulation with activation of vasoconstrictor systems such as the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), and vasopressin. Increased nitric oxide (NO) synthesis has been implicated in the development...

  19. NEURON and Python

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Hines; Davison, Andrew P.; Eilif Muller

    2009-01-01

    The NEURON simulation program now allows Python to be used, alone or in combination with NEURON's traditional Hoc interpreter. Adding Python to NEURON has the immediate benefit of making available a very extensive suite of analysis tools written for engineering and science. It also catalyzes NEURON software development by offering users a modern programming tool that is recognized for its flexibility and power to create and maintain complex programs. At the same time, nothing is lost because ...

  20. Nitric oxide turnover in permeable river sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, Frank; Stief, Peter; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2014-01-01

    We measured nitric oxide (NO) microprofiles in relation to oxygen (O2) and all major dissolved N-species (ammonium, nitrate, nitrite, and nitrous oxide [N2O]) in a permeable, freshwater sediment (River Weser, Germany). NO reaches peak concentrations of 0.13 μmol L-1 in the oxic zone and is consumed...

  1. Nitric Oxide in Mammary Tumor Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-07-01

    de Miguel L, Monton M, Casado S, Lopez -Farre A: Endothelial cytosolic proteins bind to the 3’-untranslated region of endothelial nitric oxide...Vazquez AM. Cabrera L, Barral AM, Gen- 38. Morgan DA, Ruscetti FW, Gallo R: Selective in vitro delman R, Jondal M: Toxic effects of interleukin-2

  2. Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitors as Antidepressants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Gregers; Volke, Vallo

    2010-01-01

    been suggested to play major roles in the pathophysiology of mood and stress-related disorders. However, a few clinical and several pre-clinical studies, strongly suggest involvement of the nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway in these disorders. Moreover, several of the conventional neurotransmitters...

  3. Processes regulating nitric oxide emissions from soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a reactive gas that plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry by influencing the production and destruction of ozone and thereby the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. NO also contributes by its oxidation products to the formation of acid rain. The major sources...

  4. Nitric Oxide and the Central Nervous System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Dzoljic (Eleonora)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractDuring the last ten years, several investigators have reported that biological effects of endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF; Furchgott and Zawadzki, 1980) are actually activities of a signal molecule, nitric oxide (NO; Moncada el al., 1988). This molecule is synthesised by endoth

  5. Neurochemical coding of enteric neurons in adult and embryonic zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyttebroek, Leen; Shepherd, Iain T; Harrisson, Fernand; Hubens, Guy; Blust, Ronny; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Van Nassauw, Luc

    2010-11-01

    Although the morphology and development of the zebrafish enteric nervous system have been extensively studied, the precise neurochemical coding of enteric neurons and their proportional enteric distribution are currently not known. By using immunohistochemistry, we determined the proportional expression and coexpression of neurochemical markers in the embryonic and adult zebrafish intestine. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) were observed only in nerve fibers, whereas other markers were also detected in neuronal cell bodies. Calretinin and calbindin had similar distributions. In embryos, all markers, except for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and TH, were present from 72 hours postfertilization. Nitrergic neurons, evenly distributed and remaining constant in time, constituted the major neuronal subpopulation. The neuronal proportions of the other markers increased during development and were characterized by regional differences. In the adult, all markers examined were expressed in the enteric nervous system. A large percentage of enteric neurons displayed calbindin and calretinin, and serotonin was the only marker showing significant distribution differences in the three intestinal regions. Colocalization studies showed that serotonin was not coexpressed with any of the other markers. At least five neuronal subpopulations were determined: a serotonergic, a nitrergic noncholinergic, two cholinergic nonnitrergic subpopulations along with one subpopulation expressing both ChAT and neuronal nitric oxide synthase. Analysis of nerve fibers revealed that nitrergic neurons coexpress VIP and PACAP, and that nitrergic neurons innervate the tunica muscularis, whereas serotonergic and cholinergic nonnitrergic neurons innervate the lamina propria and the tunica muscularis.

  6. ChAT and NOS in human myenteric neurons: co-existence and co-absence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Martin; Schlabrakowski, Anne; Schrödl, Falk; Neuhuber, Winfried; Brehmer, Axel

    2009-10-01

    Most myenteric neurons contain one of the two generating enzymes for major excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters: choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) or neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Two minor groups of myenteric neurons contain either both enzymes or neither. Our study had two aims: (1) to compare the proportions of neurons stained for ChAT and/or NOS in human small and large intestinal whole-mounts by co-staining with an antibody against the human neuronal protein Hu C/D (HU); (2) to characterize these neurons morphologically by co-staining with a neurofilament (NF) antibody. In small intestinal whole-mounts co-stained with HU, we counted more ChAT-positive (ChAT+) than NOS+ neurons (52% vs. 38%), whereas the large intestine exhibited fewer ChAT+ than NOS+ neurons (38% vs. 50%). Neurons co-reactive for both ChAT and NOS accounted for about 3% in both regions, whereas neurons negative for both enzymes accounted for 7% in the small intestine and 8% in the large intestine. Co-staining with NF revealed that, in both small and large intestine, ChAT+/NOS+ neurons were either spiny (type I) neurons or displayed smaller perikarya that were weakly or not NF-stained. Of all spiny neurons, almost one third was co-reactive for ChAT and NOS, whereas nearly two thirds were positive only for NOS. Neurons negative for both ChAT and NOS were heterogeneous in size and NF reactivity. Thus, neither the co-existence nor the co-absence of ChAT and NOS in human myenteric neurons is indicative for particular neuron types, with several qualitative and quantitative parameters showing a wide range of interindividual variability.

  7. Increased nitric oxide release and expression of endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthases in mildly changed porcine mitral valve leaflets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard, Sophia G; Olsen, Lisbeth H; Viuff, Birgitte M

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY: Little is known of the local role of nitric oxide (NO) in heart valves in relation to heart valve diseases. The study aim was to examine NO release and the expression of both endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in re...

  8. Increased nitric oxide release and expression of endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthases in mildly changed porcine mitral valve leaflets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard, Sophia Gry; Olsen, Lisbeth Høier; Viuff, Birgitte;

    2007-01-01

    Background and aim of the study: Little is known of the local role of nitric oxide (NO) in heart valves in relation to heart valve diseases. The study aim was to examine NO release and the expression of both endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (i...

  9. Modulatory role of nitric oxide in cardiac performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smiljić Sonja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide is produced by almost all cardiac cells, endothelial cells, cardiomyocytes and nerve fibers. It is synthesized by an enzyme, a nitric oxide synthase, which occurs in endothelial, neural and inducible form. The distribution of nitric oxide synthase in the heart is characterized by a pronounced non-uniformity. Nitric oxide exerts its effects in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. The physiological effects of low concentrations of nitric oxide, which is released in the normal conditions under the influence of constituent enzymes, occur via cyclic guanosine monophosphate. The synthesized nitric oxide exhibits its effect in the cells where it is produced, in an autocrine manner, or by diffusing into the neighboring cells, in a paracrine manner. Nitric oxide acts by regulating the coronary vessel tonus, affecting the contractility of cardiomyocytes, generating an inotropic effect in a dose-dependent manner and controlling the cellular respiration. Other effects of nitric oxide in the cardiovascular system include the hyperpolarization of the smooth muscle cells in blood vessels, the inhibition of the monocyte adhesion, the inhibition of platelet migration, adhesion and aggregation and the proliferation of smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts. The anti-atherosclerotic effects of nitric oxide are based on these effects. Nitric oxide is a weak free radical in gaseous state, and the cytotoxic and/or the cytoprotective effects of the higher concentrations of nitric oxide are related to the chemical structure of nitric oxide as a free radical. The excessive production of nitric oxide by the activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase can lead to major irregularities in the function of cardiomyocytes and cardiac insufficiency. Understanding the nitric oxide molecular mechanisms of signaling pathways in the heart can provide a new strategic approach to prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  10. Maturation of multisensory integration in the superior colliculus: expression of nitric oxide synthase and neurofilament SMI-32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Santamaria, Veronica; McHaffie, John G; Stein, Barry E

    2008-11-25

    Nitric oxide (NO) containing (nitrergic) interneurons are well-positioned to convey the cortical influences that are crucial for multisensory integration in superior colliculus (SC) output neurons. However, it is not known whether nitrergic interneurons are in this position early in life, and might, therefore, also play a role in the functional maturation of this circuit. In the present study, we investigated the postnatal developmental relationship between these two populations of neurons using Beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase (NADPH) histochemistry and SMI-32 immunocytochemistry to label presumptive interneurons and output neurons, respectively. SMI-32 immunostained neurons were proved to mature and retained immature anatomical features until approximately 8 postnatal weeks. In contrast, nitrergic interneurons developed more rapidly. They had achieved their adult-like anatomy by 4 postnatal weeks and were in a position to influence the dendritic elaboration of output neurons. It is this dendritic substrate through which much of the cortico-collicular influence is expressed. Double-labeling experiments showed that the dendritic and axonal processes of nitrergic interneurons already apposed the somata and dendrites of SMI-32 labeled neurons even at the earliest age examined. The results suggest that nitrergic interneurons play a role in refining the cortico-collicular projection patterns that are believed to be essential for SC output neurons to engage in multisensory integration and to support normal orientation responses to cross-modal stimuli.

  11. Distribution of Nitric Oxide-Producing Cells along Spinal Cord in Urodeles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayada A Mahmoud

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide is a unique neurotransmitter, which participates in many physiological and pathological processes in the organism. There are little data about the neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity in the spinal cord of amphibians. In this respect, the present study aims to investigate the distribution of nitric oxide producing cells in the spinal cord of urodele and to find out the possibility of a functional locomotory role to this neurotransmitter. The results of the present study demonstrate a specific pattern of NADPH-d labeling in the selected amphibian model throughout the spinal cord length as NADPH-d-producing cells and fibres were present in almost all segments of the spinal cord of the salamander investigated. However, their number, cytological characteristics and labeling intensity varied significantly. It was noticed that the NO-producing cells (NO-PC were accumulated in the ventral side of certain segments in the spinal cord corresponding to the brachial and sacral plexuses. In addition, the number of NO-PC was found to be increased also at the beginning of the tail and this could be due to the fact that salamanders are tetrapods having bimodal locomotion, namely swimming and walking.

  12. Gentamicin induced nitric oxide-related oxidative damages on vestibular afferents in the guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung Hwa; Park, Sook Kyung; Cho, Yang-Sun; Lee, Hyun-Seok; Kim, Ki Ryung; Kim, Myung Gu; Chung, Won-Ho

    2006-01-01

    Gentamicin is a well-known ototoxic aminoglycoside. However, the mechanism underlying this ototoxicity remains unclear. One of the mechanisms which may be responsible for this ototoxicity is excitotoxic damage to hair cells. The overstimulation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors increases the production of nitric oxide (NO), which induces oxidative stress on hair cells. In order to determine the mechanism underlying this excitotoxicity, we treated guinea pigs with gentamicin by placing gentamicin (0.5 mg) pellets into a round window niche. After the sacrifice of the animals, which occurred at 3, 7 and 14 days after the treatment, the numbers of hair cells in the animals were counted with a scanning electron microscope. We then performed immunostaining using neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), inducible NOS (iNOS) and nitrotyrosine antibodies. The number of hair cells in the animals was found to decrease significantly after 7 days. nNOS and iNOS expression levels were observed to have increased 3 days after treatment. Nitrotyrosine was expressed primarily at the calyceal afferents of the type I hair cells 3 days after treatment. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining revealed positive hair cells 3 days after treatment. Our results suggest that inner ear treatment with gentamicin may upregulate nNOS and iNOS to induce oxidative stress in the calyceal afferents of type I hair cells, via nitric oxide overproduction.

  13. Exercise training upregulates nitric oxide synthases in the kidney of rats with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Daisuke; Ito, Osamu; Mori, Nobuyoshi; Cao, Pengyu; Suda, Chihiro; Muroya, Yoshikazu; Hao, Kiyotaka; Shimokawa, Hiroaki; Kohzuki, Masahiro

    2013-09-01

    There is an interaction between heart and kidney diseases, which is a condition termed cardiorenal syndrome. Exercise training has cardioprotective effects, involving upregulation of endothelial (e) nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the cardiovascular system. However, the effects of exercise training on NOS in the kidney with heart disease are unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether exercise training upregulates NOS in the kidney, left ventricle and aorta of rats with chronic heart failure (CHF). Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent left coronary artery ligation (LCAL) to induce CHF and were randomly assigned to sedentary or treadmill exercise groups 4 weeks after LCAL. Three days after exercising for 4 weeks, urine samples were collected for 24 h and blood samples were collected following decapitation. Nitric oxide synthase activity and protein expression were examined. Significant interactions between CHF and exercise training were observed on parameters of cardiac and renal function. Exercise training improved cardiac function, decreased plasma B-type natriuretic peptide levels, decreased urinary albumin excretion and increased creatinine clearance in CHF rats. Nitric oxide synthase activity, eNOS expression and neuronal (n) NOS expression were significantly decreased in the left ventricle and kidney of CHF rats. Exercise training significantly increased NOS activity and eNOS and nNOS expression. Upregulation of NOS in the kidney and left ventricle may contribute, in part, to the renal and cardiac protective effects of exercise training in cardiorenal syndrome in CHF rats.

  14. Preconditioning crush increases the survival rate of motor neurons after spinal root avulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Li; Yizhi Zuo; Jianwen He

    2014-01-01

    In a previous study, heat shock protein 27 was persistently upregulated in ventral motor neurons following nerve root avulsion or crush. Here, we examined whether the upregulation of heat shock protein 27 would increase the survival rate of motor neurons. Rats were divided into two groups:an avulsion-only group (avulsion of the L4 lumbar nerve root only) and a crush-avulsion group (the L4 lumbar nerve root was crushed 1 week prior to the avulsion). Immunofluores-cent staining revealed that the survival rate of motor neurons was significantly greater in the crush-avulsion group than in the avulsion-only group, and this difference remained for at least 5 weeks after avulsion. The higher neuronal survival rate may be explained by the upregulation of heat shock protein 27 expression in motor neurons in the crush-avulsion group. Further-more, preconditioning crush greatly attenuated the expression of nitric oxide synthase in the motor neurons. Our ifndings indicate that the neuroprotective action of preconditioning crush is mediated through the upregulation of heat shock protein 27 expression and the attenuation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase upregulation following avulsion.

  15. Regulation between nitric oxide and MAPK signal transduction in mammals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Yong; ZHANG Meijia; HONG Haiyan; XIA Guoliang

    2005-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important biological messenger in the regulation of tissue homeostasis. It exhibits a wide range of effects during physiological and pathophysiological processes. Typical beneficial properties of NO include the regulation of vascular tone,the protection of cells against apoptosis, the modulation of immune responses, and the killing of microbial pathogens. On the other hand,NO may cause severe vasodilation and myocardial depression during bacterial sepsis or act as a cytotoxic and tissue-damaging molecule in autoimmune diseases. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is a family of serine/threonine protein kinases that are widely distributed in mammalian cells. MAPK cascade plays pivotal roles in gene expression, cell proliferation, differentiation, neuronal survival and programmed cell death under a variety of experimental conditions. MAPKs transduce the signal for the cellular response to extracellular stresses or stimuli. The relation between them, however, has never been reviewed. Based on our researches and other reports in the field, we review their reciprocal regulatory functions.

  16. Nitric oxide and its role in ischaemic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keynes, Robert G; Garthwaite, John

    2004-03-01

    The role of the neural messenger nitric oxide (NO) in cerebral ischaemia has been investigated extensively in the past decade. NO may play either a protective or destructive role in ischaemia and the literature is plagued with contradictory findings. Working with NO presents many unique difficulties and here we review the potential artifacts that may have contributed to discrepancies and cause future problems for the unwary investigator. Recent evidence challenges the idea that NO from neurones builds up to levels (micromolar) sufficient to directly elicit cell death during the post-ischaemic period. Concomitantly, the case is strengthened for a role of NO in delayed death mediated post-ischaemia by the inducible NO synthase. Mechanistically it seems unlikely that NO is released in high enough quantities to inhibit respiration in vivo; the formation of reactive nitrogen species, such as peroxynitrite, represents the more likely pathway to cell death. The protective and restorative properties of NO have become of increasing interest. NO from endothelial cells may, via stimulating cGMP production, protect the ischaemic brain by acutely augmenting blood flow, and by helping to form new blood vessels in the longer term (angiogenesis). Elevated cGMP production may also stop cells dying by inhibiting apoptosis and help repair damage by stimulating neurogenesis. In addition NO may act as a direct antioxidant and participate in the triggering of protective gene expression programmes that underlie cerebral ischaemic preconditioning. Better understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which NO is protective may ultimately identify new potential therapeutic targets.

  17. Differential modulation of nitric oxide synthases in aging: therapeutic opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stêfany Bruno De Assis Cau

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Vascular aging is the term that describes the structural and functional disturbances of the vasculature with advancing aging. The molecular mechanisms of aging-associated endothelial dysfunction are complex, but reduced nitric oxide (NO bioavailability and altered vascular expression and activity of NO synthase (NOS enzymes have been implicated as major players. Impaired vascular relaxation in aging has been attributed to reduced endothelial NOS (eNOS-derived NO, while increased inducible NOS (iNOS expression seems to account for nitrosative stress and disrupted vascular homeostasis. Although eNOS is considered the main source of NO in the vascular endothelium, neuronal NOS (nNOS also contributes to endothelial cells-derived NO, a mechanism that is reduced in aging. Pharmacological modulation of NO generation and expression/activity of NOS isoforms may represent a therapeutic alternative to prevent the progression of cardiovascular diseases. Accordingly, this review will focus on drugs that modulate NO bioavailability, such as nitrite anions and NO-releasing non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, hormones (dehydroepiandrosterone and estrogen, statins, resveratrol and folic acid, since they may be useful to treat/to prevent aging-associated vascular dysfunction. The impact of these therapies on life quality in elderly and longevity will be discussed.

  18. Pulmonary expression of nitric oxide synthase isoforms in sheep with smoke inhalation and burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Robert A; Jacob, Sam; Oliveras, Gloria; Murakami, Kazunori; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Traber, Lillian; Schmalstieg, Frank C; Herndon, David N; Traber, Daniel L; Hawkins, Hal K

    2009-03-01

    Previous studies have indicated increased plasma levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase in lung. This study further examines the pulmonary expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms in an ovine model of acute lung injury induced by smoke inhalation and burn injury (S+B injury). Female range bred sheep (4 per group) were sacrificed at 4, 8, 12, 24, and 48 hours after injury and immunohistochemistry was performed in tissues for various NOS isoforms. The study indicates that in uninjured sheep lung, endothelial (eNOS) is constitutively expressed in the endothelial cells associated with the airways and parenchyma, and in macrophages. Similarly, neuronal (nNOS) is constitutively present in the mucous cells of the epithelium and in neurons of airway ganglia. In uninjured lung, inducible (iNOS) was present in bronchial secretory cells and macrophages. In tissue after S+B injury, new expression of iNOS was evident in bronchial ciliated cells, basal cells, and mucus gland cells. In the parenchyma, a slight increase in iNOS immunostaining was seen in type I cells at 12 and 24 hours after injury only. Virtually no change in eNOS or nNOS was seen after injury.

  19. Role of nitric oxide in maintenance of basal oral tissue blood flow in anesthetized cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koss, M C; Yu, Y

    2000-09-01

    Experiments were undertaken to determine if nitric oxide (NO) plays a role in regulation of basal blood flow in the oral cavity of pentobarbital anesthetized cats and, if so, to quantify this effect using dose-response relationships. Blood flow was continuously measured from the surface of the tongue and mandibular gingiva (laser-Doppler flowmetry) and from the lingual artery (ultrasonic flowmetry). Cardiovascular parameters also were recorded. Administration of the nonselective inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), L-NAME (0.08-20 mg/kg i.v.), produced a dose-related increase of blood pressure associated with decreases of blood flow at all three measurement sites. Maximal blood flow depression of 50-60% was seen 30-60 min after administration of 1.25 mg/kg of L-NAME. D-NAME (1.25 mg/kg i.v.) was inactive at all sites. Subsequent administration of L-arginine partially reversed effects of L-NAME in the lingual artery and tongue, but not in the gingival circulation. The neuronally selective NOS inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole (7-NI, 30 mg/kg i.p.), was devoid of effect on any of the measured parameters. These results suggest that endothelial (but not neuronally derived) NO plays an important role in control of basal blood flow in oral tissues of the cat.

  20. Monitoring of the tumor response to nano-graphene oxide-mediated photothermal/photodynamic therapy by diffusion-weighted and BOLD MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jianbo; An, Hengqing; Huang, Xinglu; Fu, Guifeng; Zhuang, Rongqiang; Zhu, Lei; Xie, Jin; Zhang, Fan

    2016-05-01

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) are promising cancer treatment modalities. Because each modality has its own set of advantages and limitations, there has been interest in developing methods that can co-deliver the two regimens for enhanced tumor treatment. Among the efforts, nano-graphene oxide-mediated phototherapies have recently attracted much attention. Nano-graphene oxide has a broad absorbance spectrum and can be loaded with photosensitizers, such as chlorin e6, with high efficiency. Chlorin e6-loaded and PEGylated nano-graphene (GO-PEG-Ce6) can be excited at 660 nm, 808 nm, or both, to induce PDT, PTT, or PDT/PTT combination. Despite the potential of the treatments, there is a lack of a diagnostic tool which can monitor their therapeutic response in a non-invasive and prognostic manner; such an ability is urgently needed for the transformation and translation of the technologies. In this study, we performed diffusion-weighted and blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after GO-PEG-Ce6-mediated PTT, PDT, or PTT/PDT. We found that after efficient PTT, there is a significant increase of the tumor apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value in diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) maps; meanwhile, an efficient PDT led to an increase of in BOLD images. In both the cases, the amplitude of the increase was correlated with the treatment outcomes. More interestingly, a synergistic treatment efficacy was observed when the PTT/PDT combination was applied, and the combination was associated with a greater ADC and increase than when either modality was used alone. In particular, the PTT/PDT condition that induced the most dramatic short-term increase of the ADC value (>70%) caused the most effective tumor control in the long-run, with 60% of the treated animals being tumor-free after 60 days. These results suggest the great promise of the combination of DWI and BOLD MRI as a tool for accurate monitoring and prognosis

  1. The reactions of specific neuron types to intestinal ischemia in the guinea pig enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Leni R; Thacker, Michelle; Castelucci, Patricia; Bron, Romke; Furness, John B

    2009-08-01

    Damage following ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) is common in the intestine and can be caused during abdominal surgery, in several disease states and following intestinal transplantation. Most studies have concentrated on damage to the mucosa, although published evidence also points to effects on neurons. Moreover, alterations of neuronally controlled functions of the intestine persist after I/R. The present study was designed to investigate the time course of damage to neurons and the selectivity of the effect of I/R damage for specific types of enteric neurons. A branch of the superior mesenteric artery supplying the distal ileum of anesthetised guinea pigs was occluded for 1 h and the animals were allowed to recover for 2 h to 4 weeks before tissue was taken for the immunohistochemical localization of markers of specific neuron types in tissues from sham and I/R animals. The dendrites of neurons with nitric oxide synthase (NOS) immunoreactivity, which are inhibitory motor neurons and interneurons, were distorted and swollen by 24 h after I/R and remained enlarged up to 28 days. The total neuron profile areas (cell body plus dendrites) increased by 25%, but the sizes of cell bodies did not change significantly. Neurons of type II morphology (intrinsic primary afferent neurons), revealed by NeuN immunoreactivity, were transiently reduced in cell size, at 24 h and 7 days. These neurons also showed signs of minor cell surface blebbing. Calretinin neurons, many of which are excitatory motor neurons, were unaffected. Thus, this study revealed a selective damage to NOS neurons that was observed at 24 h and persisted up to 4 weeks, without a significant change in the relative numbers of NOS neurons.

  2. Up-regulation of cardiac nitric oxide synthase 1-derived nitric oxide after myocardial infarction in senescent rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damy, Thibaud; Ratajczak, Philippe; Robidel, Estelle; Bendall, Jennifer K; Oliviéro, Patricia; Boczkowski, Jorge; Ebrahimian, Talin; Marotte, Françoise; Samuel, Jane-Lise; Heymes, Christophe

    2003-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated in the development of heart failure, although the source, significance, and functional role of the different NO synthase (NOS) isoforms in this pathology are controversial. The presence of a neuronal-type NOS isoform (NOS1) in the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum has been recently discovered, leading to the hypothesis that NOS1-derived NO may notably alter myocardial inotropy. However, the regulation and role(s) of NOS1 in cardiac diseases remain to be determined. Using an experimental model of myocardial infarction (MI) in senescent rats, we demonstrated a significant increase in cardiac NOS1 expression and activity in MI, coupled with the translocation of this enzyme to the sarcolemma through interactions with caveolin-3. The enhanced NOS1 activity counteracts the decrease in cardiac NOS3 expression and activity observed in heart failure. We demonstrated an increased interaction between NOS1 and its regulatory protein HSP90 in post-MI hearts, a potential mechanism for the higher NOS1 activity in this setting. Finally, preferential in vivo inhibition of NOS1 activity enhanced basal post-MI left ventricular dysfunction in senescent rats. These results provide the first evidence that increased NOS1-derived NO production may play a significant role in the autocrine regulation of myocardial contractility after MI in aging rats.

  3. Effects of icariin on erectile function and expression of nitric oxide synthase isoforms in castrated rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu-Jiang Liu; Zhong-Cheng Xin; Hua Xin; Yi-Ming Yuan; Long Tian; Ying-Lu Guo

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of icariin on erectile function and the expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS)isoforms in castrated rats. Methods: Thirty-two adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into one sham-operated group (A) and three castrated groups (B, C and D). One week after surgery, rats were treated with normal week after treatment, the erectile function of the rats was assessed by measuring intracavernosal pressure (ICP)during electrostimulation of the cavernosal nerve. The serum testosterone (ST) levels, the percent of smooth muscle (PSM) in trabecular tissue, and the expression of mRNA and proteins of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS),inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and phosphodiesterase V (PDE5) in corpus cavernosum (CC) were also evaluated. Results: ICP, PSM, ST and the expression of nNOS, iNOS, eNOS and PDE5 were significantly decreased in group B compared with those in group A (P < 0.01). However, ICP, PSM and the expression of nNOS and iNOS were increased in groups C and D compared with those in group B (P < 0.05).Changes in ST and the expression of eNOS and PDE5 were not significant (P > 0.05) in groups C and D compared with those in group B. Conclusion: Oral treatment with icariin (> 98.6 % purity) for 4 weeks potentially improves erectile function. This effect is correlated with an increase in PSM and the expression of certain NOS in the CC of castrated rats. These results suggest that icariin may have a therapeutic effect on erectile dysfunction.

  4. Hypothermia Reduces Toll-Like Receptor 3-Activated Microglial Interferon-β and Nitric Oxide Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Matsui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic hypothermia protects neurons after injury to the central nervous system (CNS. Microglia express toll-like receptors (TLRs that play significant roles in the pathogenesis of sterile CNS injury. To elucidate the possible mechanisms involved in the neuroprotective effect of therapeutic hypothermia, we examined the effects of hypothermic culture on TLR3-activated microglial release of interferon (IFN-β and nitric oxide (NO, which are known to be associated with neuronal cell death. When rat or mouse microglia were cultured under conditions of hypothermia (33°C and normothermia (37°C with a TLR3 agonist, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid, the production of IFN-β and NO in TLR3-activated microglia at 48 h was decreased by hypothermia compared with that by normothermia. In addition, exposure to recombinant IFN-β and sodium nitroprusside, an NO donor, caused death of rat neuronal pheochromocytoma PC12 cells in a concentration-dependent manner after 24 h. Taken together, these results suggest that the attenuation of microglial production of IFN-β and NO by therapeutic hypothermia leads to the inhibition of neuronal cell death.

  5. Study of a new neuron

    CERN Document Server

    Adler, Stephen Louis; Weckel, J D

    1994-01-01

    We study a modular neuron alternative to the McCulloch-Pitts neuron that arises naturally in analog devices in which the neuron inputs are represented as coherent oscillatory wave signals. Although the modular neuron can compute XOR at the one neuron level, it is still characterized by the same Vapnik-Chervonenkis dimension as the standard neuron. We give the formulas needed for constructing networks using the new neuron and training them using back-propagation. A numerical study of the modular neuron on two data sets is presented, which demonstrates that the new neuron performs at least as well as the standard neuron.

  6. Retinal cell death induced by TRPV1 activation involves NMDA signaling and upregulation of nitric oxide synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonelli, Mauro; Martins, Daniel O; Britto, Luiz R G

    2013-04-01

    The activation of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 channel (TRPV1) has been correlated with oxidative and nitrosative stress and cell death in the nervous system. Our previous results indicate that TRPV1 activation in the adult retina can lead to constitutive and inducible nitric oxide synthase-dependent protein nitration and apoptosis. In this report, we have investigated the potential effects of TRPV1 channel activation on nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression and function, and the putative participation of ionotropic glutamate receptors in retinal TRPV1-induced protein nitration, lipid peroxidation, and DNA fragmentation. Intravitreal injections of the classical TRPV1 agonist capsaicin up-regulated the protein expression of the inducible and endothelial NOS isoforms. Using 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate for nitric oxide (NO) imaging, we found that capsaicin also increased the production of NO in retinal blood vessels. Processes and perikarya of TRPV1-expressing neurons in the inner nuclear layer of the retina were found in the vicinity of nNOS-positive neurons, but those two proteins did not colocalize. Retinal explants exposed to capsaicin presented high protein nitration, lipid peroxidation, and cell death, which were observed in the inner nuclear and plexiform layers and in ganglion cells. This effect was partially blocked by AP-5, a NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist, but not by CNQX, an AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist. These data support a potential role for TRPV1 channels in physiopathological retinal processes mediated by NO, which at least in part involve glutamate release.

  7. Differential regulation of trophic and proinflammatory microglial effectors is dependent on severity of neuronal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Aaron Y; Todd, Kathryn G

    2008-02-01

    Microglial activation has been reported to promote neurotoxicity and also neuroprotective effects. A possible contributor to this dichotomy of responses may be the degree to which proximal neurons are injured. The aim of this study was to determine whether varying the severity of neuronal injury influenced whether microglia were neuroprotective or neurotoxic. We exposed cortical neuronal cultures to varying degrees of hypoxia thereby generating mild (70% death, 6 h hypoxia) injuries. Twenty-four hours after hypoxia, the media from the neuronal cultures was collected and incubated with primary microglial cultures for 24 h. Results showed that the classic microglial proinflammatory mediators including inducible nitric oxide synthase, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin-1-beta were upregulated only in response to mild neuronal injuries, while the trophic microglial effectors brain-derived neurotrophic factor and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor were upregulated in response to all degrees of neuronal injury. Microglia stimulated with media from damaged neurons were co-cultured with hypoxic neurons. Microglia stimulated by moderate, but not mild or severe damage were neuroprotective in these co-cultures. We also showed that the severity-dependent phenomenon was not related to autocrine microglial signaling and was dependent on the neurotransmitters released by neurons after injury, namely glutamate and adenosine 5'-triphosphate. Together our results show that severity of neuronal injury is an important factor in determining microglial release of "toxic" versus "protective" effectors and the resulting neurotoxicity versus neuroprotection.

  8. Cajal bodies in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafarga, Miguel; Tapia, Olga; Romero, Ana M; Berciano, Maria T

    2016-09-14

    Cajal is commonly regarded as the father of modern neuroscience in recognition of his fundamental work on the structure of the nervous system. But Cajal also made seminal contributions to the knowledge of nuclear structure in the early 1900s, including the discovery of the "accessory body" later renamed "Cajal body" (CB). This important nuclear structure has emerged as a center for the assembly of ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) required for splicing, ribosome biogenesis and telomere maintenance. The modern era of CB research started in the 1990s with the discovery of coilin, now known as a scaffold protein of CBs, and specific probes for small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs). In this review, we summarize what we have learned in the recent decades concerning CBs in post-mitotic neurons, thereby ruling out dynamic changes in CB functions during the cell cycle. We show that CBs are particularly prominent in neurons, where they frequently associate with the nucleolus. Neuronal CBs are transcription-dependent nuclear organelles. Indeed, their number dynamically accommodates to support the high neuronal demand for splicing and ribosome biogenesis required for sustaining metabolic and bioelectrical activity. Mature neurons have canonical CBs enriched in coilin, survival motor neuron protein and snRNPs. Disruption and loss of neuronal CBs associate with severe neuronal dysfunctions in several neurological disorders such as motor neuron diseases. In particular, CB depletion in motor neurons seems to reflect a perturbation of transcription and splicing in spinal muscular atrophy, the most common genetic cause of infant mortality.

  9. Speciation in aqueous solutions of nitric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlushak, S; Simonin, J P; De Sio, S; Bernard, O; Ruas, A; Pochon, P; Jan, S; Moisy, P

    2013-02-28

    In this study, speciation in aqueous solutions of nitric acid at 25 °C was assessed in two independent ways. First, Raman experiments were carried out and interpreted in terms of free nitrate ions, ion pairs and neutral HNO(3) molecules. In parallel, a model was developed to account for the formation of these two kinds of pairs. It was based on an extension of the binding mean spherical approximation (BiMSA), or associative MSA (AMSA), in which the size and the charge of the ions in the chemical pair may differ from those of the free ions. A simultaneous fit of the osmotic coefficient and of the proportion of free ions (obtained from Raman spectroscopy experiments) led to an estimation of the speciation in nitric acid solutions. The result obtained using this procedure was compared with the estimation obtained from the Raman experiments.

  10. Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation Project Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Pattie L.

    2013-01-01

    The standard practice for protection of stainless steel is a process called passivation. This procedure results in the formation of a metal oxide layer to prevent corrosion. Typical passivation procedures call for the use of nitric acid which exhibits excellent corrosion performance; however, there are a number of environmental, worker safety, and operational issues associated with its use. The longtime military specification for the passivation of stainless steel was cancelled in favor of newer specifications which allow for the use of citric acid in place of nitric acid. Citric acid offers a variety of benefits that include increased safety for personnel, reduced environmental impact, and reduced operational costs. There have been few studies, however, to determine whether citric acid is an acceptable alternative for NASA and DoD. This paper details activities to date including development of the joint test plan, on-going and planned testing, and preliminary results.

  11. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the microcirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Xiaohong; Keller, T C Stevenson; Begandt, Daniela; Butcher, Joshua T; Biwer, Lauren; Keller, Alexander S; Columbus, Linda; Isakson, Brant E

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, NOS3) is responsible for producing nitric oxide (NO)--a key molecule that can directly (or indirectly) act as a vasodilator and anti-inflammatory mediator. In this review, we examine the structural effects of regulation of the eNOS enzyme, including post-translational modifications and subcellular localization. After production, NO diffuses to surrounding cells with a variety of effects. We focus on the physiological role of NO and NO-derived molecules, including microvascular effects on vessel tone and immune response. Regulation of eNOS and NO action is complicated; we address endogenous and exogenous mechanisms of NO regulation with a discussion of pharmacological agents used in clinical and laboratory settings and a proposed role for eNOS in circulating red blood cells.

  12. Autoxidation kinetics of aqueous nitric oxide

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    Reports on the kinetics of the autoxidation of aqueous nitric oxide are discussed. It is concluded that the correct rate law is -d[NO]/dt = 4kaq[NO]2 [O2] with kaq = 2 × 106 M-2 · s-1 at 25°C and that a recent report of a rate law zero order in NO is incorrect. © 1993.

  13. Nitric Oxide Scavenging by Red Cell Microparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chen; Zhao, Weixin; George J Christ; Gladwin, Mark T.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2013-01-01

    Red cell microparticles form during the storage of red blood cells and in diseases associated with red cell breakdown and asplenia, including hemolytic anemias such as sickle cell disease. These small phospholipid vesicles that are derived from red blood cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of transfusion of aged stored blood and hemolytic diseases, via activation of the hemostatic system and effects on nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Red cell microparticles react with the import...

  14. Distribution of P2Y6 and P2Y12 receptor: their colocalization with calbindin, calretinin and nitric oxide synthase in the guinea pig enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Zhenghua; Burnstock, Geoffrey

    2006-04-01

    The distribution of P2Y(6) and P2Y(12) receptor-immunoreactive (ir) neurons and fibers and their coexistence with calbindin, calretinin and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) has been investigated with single and double labeling immunostaining methods. The results showed that 30-36% of the ganglion cells in the myenteric plexus are strongly P2Y(6) receptor-ir neurons; they are distributed widely in the myenteric plexus of stomach, jejunum, ileum and colon, but not in the submucosal plexus, with a typical morphology of multipolar neurons with a long axon-like process. About 42-46% of ganglion cells in both the myenteric and submucosal plexuses show P2Y(12) receptor-ir. About 28-35% of P2Y(6) receptor-ir neurons were found to coexist with NOS and 41-47% of them coexist with calretinin, but there was no coexistence of P2Y(6) receptor-ir with calbindin. In contrast, all P2Y(12) receptor-ir neurons were immunopositive for calbindin, although occasionally P2Y(12) receptor-ir neurons without calbindin immunoreactivity were found, while none of the P2Y(12) receptor-ir neurons were found to coexist with calretinin or NOS in the gastrointestinal system of guinea pig. The P2Y(12) receptor-ir neurons coexpressing calbindin-ir in the small intestine are Dogiel type II/AH, intrinsic primary afferent neurons.

  15. Oxygen, nitric oxide and articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Fermor

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Molecular oxygen is required for the production of nitric oxide (NO, a pro-inflammatory mediator that is associated with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. To date there has been little consideration of the role of oxygen tension in the regulation of nitric oxide production associated with arthritis. Oxygen tension may be particularly relevant to articular cartilage since it is avascular and therefore exists at a reduced oxygen tension. The superficial zone exists at approximately 6% O2, while the deep zone exists at less than 1% O2. Furthermore, oxygen tension can alter matrix synthesis, and the material properties of articular cartilage in vitro.The increase in nitric oxide associated with arthritis can be caused by pro-inflammatory cytokines and mechanical stress. Oxygen tension significantly alters endogenous NO production in articular cartilage, as well as the stimulation of NO in response to both mechanical loading and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Mechanical loading and pro-inflammatory cytokines also increase the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. There is a complex interaction between NO and PGE2, and oxygen tension can alter this interaction. These findings suggest that the relatively low levels of oxygen within the joint may have significant influences on the metabolic activity, and inflammatory response of cartilage as compared to ambient levels. A better understanding of the role of oxygen in the production of inflammatory mediators in response to mechanical loading, or pro-inflammatory cytokines, may aid in the development of strategies for therapeutic intervention in arthritis.

  16. Noise and Neuronal Heterogeneity

    CERN Document Server

    Barber, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    We consider signal transaction in a simple neuronal model featuring intrinsic noise. The presence of noise limits the precision of neural responses and impacts the quality of neural signal transduction. We assess the signal transduction quality in relation to the level of noise, and show it to be maximized by a non-zero level of noise, analogous to the stochastic resonance effect. The quality enhancement occurs for a finite range of stimuli to a single neuron; we show how to construct networks of neurons that extend the range. The range increases more rapidly with network size when we make use of heterogeneous populations of neurons with a variety of thresholds, rather than homogeneous populations of neurons all with the same threshold. The limited precision of neural responses thus can have a direct effect on the optimal network structure, with diverse functional properties of the constituent neurons supporting an economical information processing strategy that reduces the metabolic costs of handling a broad...

  17. Neurons and tumor suppressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zochodne, Douglas W

    2014-08-20

    Neurons choose growth pathways with half hearted reluctance, behavior that may be appropriate to maintain fixed long lasting connections but not to regenerate them. We now recognize that intrinsic brakes on regrowth are widely expressed in these hesitant neurons and include classical tumor suppressor molecules. Here, we review how two brakes, PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) and retinoblastoma emerge as new and exciting knockdown targets to enhance neuron plasticity and improve outcome from damage or disease.

  18. Human endogenous retrovirus W env increases nitric oxide production and enhances the migration ability of microglia by regulating the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ran Xiao; Shan Li; Qian Cao; Xiuling Wang; Qiujin Yan; Xiaoning Tu; Ying Zhu; Fan Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Human endogenous retrovirus W env (HERV-W env) plays a critical role in many neuropsychological diseases such as schizophrenia and multiple sclerosis (MS).These diseases are accompanied by immunological reactions in the central nervous system (CNS).Microglia are important immunocytes in brain inflammation that can produce a gasotransmitter-nitric oxide (NO).NO not only plays a role in the function of neuronal cells but also participates in the pathogenesis of various neuropsychological diseases.In this study,we reported increased NO production in CHME-5 microglia cells after they were transfected with HERV-W env.Moreover,HERV-W env increased the expression and function of human inducible nitric oxide synthase (hiNOS) and enhanced the promoter activity of hiNOS.Microglial migration was also enhanced.These data revealed that HERV-W env might contribute to increase NO production and microglial migration ability in neuropsychological disorders by regulating the expression of inducible NOS.Results from this study might lead to the identification of novel targets for the treatment of neuropsychological diseases,including neuroinflammatory diseases,stroke,and neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Neurogenic nitric oxide facilitates the central nociceptive transmission of migraine attacks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hebo Wang; Huijun Qi; Shengyuan Yu; Sumian Yang; Ruozhuo Liu

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that nitric oxide (NO) can induce migraine attacks at three possible sites of action: nitroxidergic nerves, the vascular endothelium, and the central nervous system. Most previous studies have focused on the former two sites of action. Several experiments using exogenic NO donors have suggested that nitroglycerin may induce migraine via central mechanisms. However, few studies have investigated the source of the NO involved in the central mechanisms of migraine. The present study used a cat model of migraine to represent migraine attacks in humans. We performed immunochemical staining of successive frozen sections of the brainstem and upper cervical spinal cord, and then used c-Fos protein expression to label nerve cell activation. We observed the effects of Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a non-selective nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, and 7-nitroindozole (7-NI), a selective neuronal NOS inhibitor, on c-Fos and nNOS expression, which were induced by electrical stimulation to the dura mater near the superior sagittal sinus. The results demonstrated that c-Fos or nNOS immunoreactive cells was concentrated in the superficial layers (laminae I and II) of the spinal nucleus of trigeminal nerve. L-NAME and 7-NI pre-treatment significantly decreased c-Fos and neurogenic NOS expression; and there was a significant linear correlation between c-Fos and NOS expression (r= 0.858 2, P< 0.01). These findings suggest that neurogenic NO could facilitate migraine nociceptive transmission to second-order neurons of the trigeminal nerve. However, L-NAME and 7-NI may block the activation of neurons in the spinal nucleus of the trigeminal nerve by inhibiting NO synthesis, and thereby attenuate acute migraine attacks.

  20. Updated role of nitric oxide in disorders of erythrocyte function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Marc J; Maley, Jason H; Lasker, George F; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2013-03-01

    Nitric oxide is a potent vasodilator that plays a critical role in disorders of erythrocyte function. Sickle cell disease, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and banked blood preservation are three conditions where nitric oxide is intimately related to dysfunctional erythrocytes. These conditions are accompanied by hemolysis, thrombosis and vasoocclusion. Our understanding of the interaction between nitric oxide, hemoglobin, and the vasculature is constantly evolving, and by defining this role we can better direct trials aimed at improving the treatments of disorders of erythrocyte function. Here we briefly discuss nitric oxide's interaction with hemoglobin through the hypothesis regarding Snitrosohemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and myoglobin as nitrite reductases. We then review the current understanding of the role of nitric oxide in sickle cell disease, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, and banked blood, and discuss therapeutics in development to target nitric oxide in the treatment of some of these disorders.

  1. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor augments beta-amyloid-induced interleukin-1, interleukin-6, and nitric oxide production by microglial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, G M; Yang, L; Cordell, B

    1998-08-14

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), a chronic cerebral inflammatory state is thought to lead to neuronal injury. Microglia, intrinsic cerebral immune effector cells, are likely to be key in the pathophysiology of this inflammatory state. We showed that macrophage colony-stimulating factor, a microglial activator found at increased levels in the central nervous system in AD, dramatically augments beta-amyloid peptide (betaAP)-induced microglial production of interleukin-1, interleukin-6, and nitric oxide. In contrast, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor, another hematopoietic cytokine found in the AD brain, did not augment betaAP-induced microglial secretory activity. These results indicate that increased macrophage colony-stimulating factor levels in AD could magnify betaAP-induced microglial inflammatory cytokine and nitric oxide production, which in turn could intensify the cerebral inflammatory state by activating astrocytes and additional microglia, as well as directly injuring neurons.

  2. Pacemaking Kisspeptin Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Martin J.; Zhang, Chunguang; Qiu, Jian; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.

    2013-01-01

    Kisspeptin (Kiss1) neurons are vital for reproduction. GnRH neurons express the kisspeptin receptor, GPR 54, and kisspeptins potently stimulate the release of GnRH by depolarising and inducing sustained action potential firing in GnRH neurons. As such Kiss1 neurons may be the pre-synaptic pacemaker neurons in the hypothalamic circuitry that controls reproduction. There are at least two different populations of Kiss1 neurons: one in the rostral periventricular area (RP3V) that is stimulated by oestrogens and the other in the arcuate nucleus that is inhibited by oestrogens. How each of these Kiss1 neuronal populations participate in the regulation of the reproductive cycle is currently under intense investigation. Based on electrophysiological studies in the guinea pig and mouse, Kiss1 neurons in general are capable of generating burst firing behavior. Essentially all Kiss1 neurons, which have been studied thus far in the arcuate nucleus, express the ion channels necessary for burst firing, which include hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide gated cation (HCN) channels and the T-type calcium (Cav3.1) channels. Under voltage clamp conditions, these channels produce distinct currents that under current clamp conditions can generate burst firing behavior. The future challenge is to identify other key channels and synaptic inputs involved in the regulation of the firing properties of Kiss1 neurons and the physiological regulation of the expression of these channels and receptors by oestrogens and other hormones. The ultimate goal is to understand how Kiss1 neurons control the different phases of GnRH neurosecretion and hence reproduction. PMID:23884368

  3. Corticospinal mirror neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraskov, A; Philipp, R; Waldert, S; Vigneswaran, G; Quallo, M M; Lemon, R N

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the properties of neurons with mirror-like characteristics that were identified as pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs) and recorded in the ventral premotor cortex (area F5) and primary motor cortex (M1) of three macaque monkeys. We analysed the neurons' discharge while the monkeys performed active grasp of either food or an object, and also while they observed an experimenter carrying out a similar range of grasps. A considerable proportion of tested PTNs showed clear mirror-like properties (52% F5 and 58% M1). Some PTNs exhibited 'classical' mirror neuron properties, increasing activity for both execution and observation, while others decreased their discharge during observation ('suppression mirror-neurons'). These experiments not only demonstrate the existence of PTNs as mirror neurons in M1, but also reveal some interesting differences between M1 and F5 mirror PTNs. Although observation-related changes in the discharge of PTNs must reach the spinal cord and will include some direct projections to motoneurons supplying grasping muscles, there was no EMG activity in these muscles during action observation. We suggest that the mirror neuron system is involved in the withholding of unwanted movement during action observation. Mirror neurons are differentially recruited in the behaviour that switches rapidly between making your own movements and observing those of others.

  4. Culturing rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audesirk, G; Audesirk, T; Ferguson, C

    2001-01-01

    Cultured neurons are widely used to investigate the mechanisms of neurotoxicity. Embryonic rat hippocampal neurons may be grown as described under a wide variety of conditions to suit differing experimental procedures, including electrophysiology, morphological analysis of neurite development, and various biochemical and molecular analyses.

  5. NITRIC OXIDE (NO, CITRULLINE - NO CYCLE ENZYMES, GLUTAMINE SYNTHETASE AND OXIDATIVE STRESS IN ANOXIA (HYPOBARIC HYPOXIA AND REPERFUSION IN RAT BRAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Swamy, Mohd Jamsani Mat Salleh, K. N .S. Sirajudeen, Wan Roslina Wan Yusof, G. Chandran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide is postulated to be involved in the pathophysiology of neurological disorders due to hypoxia/ anoxia in brain due to increased release of glutamate and activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Reactive oxygen species have been implicated in pathophysiology of many neurological disorders and in brain function. To understand their role in anoxia (hypobaric hypoxia and reperfusion (reoxygenation, the nitric oxide synthase, argininosuccinate synthetase, argininosuccinate lyase, glutamine synthetase and arginase activities along with the concentration of nitrate /nitrite, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and total antioxidant status were estimated in cerebral cortex, cerebellum and brain stem of rats subjected to anoxia and reperfusion. The results of this study clearly demonstrated the increased production of nitric oxide by increased activity of nitric oxide synthase. The increased activities of argininosuccinate synthetase and argininosuccinate lyase suggest the increased and effective recycling of citrulline to arginine in anoxia, making nitric oxide production more effective and contributing to its toxic effects. The decreased activity of glutamine synthetase may favor the prolonged availability of glutamic acid causing excitotoxicity leading to neuronal damage in anoxia. The increased formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and decreased total antioxidant status indicate the presence of oxidative stress in anoxia and reperfusion. The increased arginase and sustained decrease of GS activity in reperfusion group likely to be protective.

  6. Nitric oxide and L-type calcium channel influences the changes in arterial blood pressure and heart rate induced by central angiotesin II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guarda Ismael FMS

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We study the voltage dependent calcium channels and nitric oxide involvement in angiotensin II-induced pressor effect. The antipressor action of L-Type calcium channel antagonist, nifedipine, has been studied when it was injected into the third ventricle prior to angiotensin II. The influence of nitric oxide on nifedipine antipressor action has also been studied by utilizing NW-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (LNAME (40 μg/0.2 μl a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor and L-arginine (20 μg/0.2 μl, a nitric oxide donor agent. Adult male Holtzman rats weighting 200–250 g, with cannulae implanted into the third ventricle were injected with angiotensin II. Angiotensin II produced an elevation in mean arterial pressure and a decreased in heart rate. Such effects were potentiated by the prior injection of LNAME. L-arginine and nifedipine blocked the effects of angiotensin II. These data showed the involvement of L-Type calcium channel and a free radical gas nitric oxide in the central control of angiotensin II-induced pressor effect. This suggested that L-Type calcium channel of the circunventricular structures of central nervous system participated in both short and long term neuronal actions of ANG II with the influence of nitrergic system.

  7. Immunohistochemical Properties of the Peripheral Neurons Projecting to the Pig Bulbospongiosus Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botti, Maddalena; Ragionieri, Luisa; Cacchioli, Antonio; Panu, Rino; Gazza, Ferdinando

    2016-09-01

    Retrograde neuronal tracing and single labelling immunofluorescence methods were used to define the neurochemical content of the peripheral autonomic and sensitive neurons projecting to the male pig striated bulbospongiosus muscle (BSM). The retrograde fluorescent neuronal tracer Fast Blue (FB) was injected into the left bulbospongiosus muscle of four intact impuberal pigs. After a 10-day survival time, the ipsilateral sacral sympathetic trunk ganglia (STGs), the caudal mesenteric ganglion (CMG), and the sacral spinal ganglia (SGs) were collected from each animal. In FB+ neurons of these ganglia, the presence of cathecolamine- (tyrosine hydroxylase-TH), acetylcholine- (vesicular acetylcholine transporter-VChAT), or nitric oxide-synthesizing (neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase-nNOS) enzymes and of some biologically active peptides (calcitonine gene-related peptide-CGRP, Leu-Enkephaline-LENK, Neuropeptide Y-NPY, Substance P-SP and Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide-VIP) were studied. The ipsilateral STGs FB+ neurons showed immunoreactivity principally for TH and NPY and in decreasing order for VIP, VChAT, SP, CGRP, nNOS, and LENK. The left CMG FB+ neurons were immunoreactive to TH and NPY, and in smaller proportions for VIP, LENK, VChAT, CGRP, nNOS, and SP. The ipsilateral SGs FB+ neurons resulted immunoractive for CGRP, LENK, NPY, nNOS, SP, and VChAT. The heterogeneous neurochemical content of the peripheral neurons projecting to the pig BSM allows us to hypothesize the involvement of autonomic ganglia in the activity of both blood vessels and striated fibers of the muscle and the involvement of sensory ganglia in the afferent transmission from the muscle to spinal cord and in antidromic mechanisms that causes the relaxation of the BSM blood vessels. Anat Rec, 299:1192-1202, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Imaging calcium in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grienberger, Christine; Konnerth, Arthur

    2012-03-08

    Calcium ions generate versatile intracellular signals that control key functions in all types of neurons. Imaging calcium in neurons is particularly important because calcium signals exert their highly specific functions in well-defined cellular subcompartments. In this Primer, we briefly review the general mechanisms of neuronal calcium signaling. We then introduce the calcium imaging devices, including confocal and two-photon microscopy as well as miniaturized devices that are used in freely moving animals. We provide an overview of the classical chemical fluorescent calcium indicators and of the protein-based genetically encoded calcium indicators. Using application examples, we introduce new developments in the field, such as calcium imaging in awake, behaving animals and the use of calcium imaging for mapping single spine sensory inputs in cortical neurons in vivo. We conclude by providing an outlook on the prospects of calcium imaging for the analysis of neuronal signaling and plasticity in various animal models.

  9. NEURON and Python

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Hines

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The NEURON simulation program now allows Python to be used, alone or in combination with NEURON's traditional Hoc interpreter. Adding Python to NEURON has the immediate benefit of making available a very extensive suite of analysis tools written for engineering and science. It also catalyzes NEURON software development by offering users a modern programming tool that is recognized for its flexibility and power to create and maintain complex programs. At the same time, nothing is lost because all existing models written in Hoc, including GUI tools, continue to work without change and are also available within the Python context. An example of the benefits of Python availability is the use of the XML module in implementing NEURON's Import3D and CellBuild tools to read MorphML and NeuroML model specifications.

  10. NEURON and Python.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Michael L; Davison, Andrew P; Muller, Eilif

    2009-01-01

    The NEURON simulation program now allows Python to be used, alone or in combination with NEURON's traditional Hoc interpreter. Adding Python to NEURON has the immediate benefit of making available a very extensive suite of analysis tools written for engineering and science. It also catalyzes NEURON software development by offering users a modern programming tool that is recognized for its flexibility and power to create and maintain complex programs. At the same time, nothing is lost because all existing models written in Hoc, including graphical user interface tools, continue to work without change and are also available within the Python context. An example of the benefits of Python availability is the use of the xml module in implementing NEURON's Import3D and CellBuild tools to read MorphML and NeuroML model specifications.

  11. Effects of protein deprivation and re-feeding on P2X_2 receptors in enteric neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rúbia; Misawa; Priscila; Azevedo; Girotti; Márcia; Sanae; Mizuno; Edson; Aparecido; Liberti; John; Barton; Furness; Patricia; Castelucci

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effects of malnutrition and refeeding on the P2X2 receptor,nitric oxide synthase(NOS),calretinin,calbindin and choline acetyltransferase(ChAT) in neurons of the rat ileum.METHODS:We analyzed the co-localization,numbers and sizes of P2X2-expressing neurons in relation to NOS-immunoreactive(IR),calbindin-IR,ChAT-IR,and calretinin-IR neurons of the myenteric and submucosal plexus.The experimental groups consisted of:(1) rats maintained on normal feed throughout pregnancy until 42 d post-...

  12. Hydroalcoholic Extract from Inflorescences of Achyrocline satureioides (Compositae) Ameliorates Dextran Sulphate Sodium-Induced Colitis in Mice by Attenuation in the Production of Inflammatory Cytokines and Oxidative Mediators

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Luisa Mota; Farias, Jaime Antonio Machado; Boeing, Thaise; Somensi, Lincon Bordignon; Beber, Ana Paula; Cury, Benhur Judah

    2016-01-01

    Achyrocline satureioides is a South American herb used to treat inflammatory and gastrointestinal diseases. This study evaluated intestinal anti-inflammatory effects of the hydroalcoholic extract of inflorescences of satureioides (HEAS) in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) induced colitis in mice. Mice were orally treated with vehicle, 5-aminosalicylic acid (100 mg/kg), or HEAS (1–100 mg/kg). Clinical signs of colitis and colonic histopathological parameters were evaluated, along with the determination of levels of reduced glutathione and lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH), the superoxide dismutase (SOD), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in colon. The colonic content of cytokines (TNF, IL-4, IL-6, and IL-10) was measured. Additionally, the effects of the extract on nitric oxide (NO) release by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated macrophages and diphenylpicrylhydrazyl levels were determined. Mucin levels and SOD activity, as well as the LOOH, MPO, TNF, and IL-6 accumulation in colon tissues, were normalized by the HEAS administration. In addition, the extract elicited an increase in IL-4 and IL-10 levels in colon. NO release by macrophages was inhibited by HEAS and its scavenger activity was confirmed. Together these results suggest that preparations obtained from inflorescences from A. satureioides could be used in treatment for IBD. Besides, this work corroborates the popular use of A. satureioides in inflammatory disorders. PMID:27847525

  13. Hydroalcoholic Extract from Inflorescences of Achyrocline satureioides (Compositae Ameliorates Dextran Sulphate Sodium-Induced Colitis in Mice by Attenuation in the Production of Inflammatory Cytokines and Oxidative Mediators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Mota da Silva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Achyrocline satureioides is a South American herb used to treat inflammatory and gastrointestinal diseases. This study evaluated intestinal anti-inflammatory effects of the hydroalcoholic extract of inflorescences of satureioides (HEAS in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS induced colitis in mice. Mice were orally treated with vehicle, 5-aminosalicylic acid (100 mg/kg, or HEAS (1–100 mg/kg. Clinical signs of colitis and colonic histopathological parameters were evaluated, along with the determination of levels of reduced glutathione and lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH, the superoxide dismutase (SOD, and myeloperoxidase (MPO activity in colon. The colonic content of cytokines (TNF, IL-4, IL-6, and IL-10 was measured. Additionally, the effects of the extract on nitric oxide (NO release by lipopolysaccharide (LPS stimulated macrophages and diphenylpicrylhydrazyl levels were determined. Mucin levels and SOD activity, as well as the LOOH, MPO, TNF, and IL-6 accumulation in colon tissues, were normalized by the HEAS administration. In addition, the extract elicited an increase in IL-4 and IL-10 levels in colon. NO release by macrophages was inhibited by HEAS and its scavenger activity was confirmed. Together these results suggest that preparations obtained from inflorescences from A. satureioides could be used in treatment for IBD. Besides, this work corroborates the popular use of A. satureioides in inflammatory disorders.

  14. S-nitrosation and neuronal plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A I; Martínez-Ruiz, A; Araújo, I M

    2015-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has long been recognized as a multifaceted participant in brain physiology. Despite the knowledge that was gathered over many years regarding the contribution of NO to neuronal plasticity, for example the ability of the brain to change in response to new stimuli, only in recent years have we begun to understand how NO acts on the molecular and cellular level to orchestrate such important phenomena as synaptic plasticity (modification of the strength of existing synapses) or the formation of new synapses (synaptogenesis) and new neurons (neurogenesis). Post-translational modification of proteins by NO derivatives or reactive nitrogen species is a non-classical mechanism for signalling by NO. S-nitrosation is a reversible post-translational modification of thiol groups (mainly on cysteines) that may result in a change of function of the modified protein. S-nitrosation of key target proteins has emerged as a main regulatory mechanism by which NO can influence several levels of brain plasticity, which are reviewed in this work. Understanding how S-nitrosation contributes to neural plasticity can help us to better understand the physiology of these processes, and to better address pathological changes in plasticity that are involved in the pathophysiology of several neurological diseases. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  15. Control of the neurovascular coupling by nitric oxide-dependent regulation of astrocytic Ca2+ signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Francisco Muñoz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal activity must be tightly coordinated with blood flow to keep proper brain function, which is achieved by a mechanism known as neurovascular coupling. Then, an increase in synaptic activity leads to a dilation of local parenchymal arterioles that matches the enhanced metabolic demand. Neurovascular coupling is orchestrated by astrocytes. These glial cells are located between neurons and the microvasculature, with the astrocytic endfeet ensheathing the vessels, which allows fine intercellular communication. The neurotransmitters released during neuronal activity reach astrocytic receptors and trigger a Ca2+ signaling that propagates to the endfeet, activating the release of vasoactive factors and arteriolar dilation. The astrocyte Ca2+ signaling is coordinated by gap junction channels and hemichannels formed by connexins (Cx43 and Cx30 and channels formed by pannexins (Panx-1. The neuronal activity-initiated Ca2+ waves are propagated among neighboring astrocytes directly via gap junctions or through ATP release via connexin hemichannels or pannexin channels. In addition, Ca2+ entry via connexin hemichannels or pannexin channels may participate in the regulation of the astrocyte signaling-mediated neurovascular coupling. Interestingly, nitric oxide (NO can activate connexin hemichannel by S-nitrosylation and the Ca2+-dependent NO-synthesizing enzymes endothelial NO synthase (eNOS and neuronal NOS (nNOS are expressed in astrocytes. Therefore, the astrocytic Ca2+ signaling triggered in neurovascular coupling may activate NO production, which, in turn, may lead to Ca2+ influx through hemichannel activation. Furthermore, NO release from the hemichannels located at astrocytic endfeet may contribute to the vasodilation of parenchymal arterioles. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms involved in the regulation of the astrocytic Ca2+ signaling that mediates neurovascular coupling, with a special emphasis in the possible participation of NO in

  16. Nitric oxide in liver inflammation and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Sanz, Paloma; Hortelano, Sonsoles; Callejas, Nuria A; Goren, Nora; Casado, Marta; Zeini, Miriam; Boscá, Lisardo

    2002-12-01

    Hepatocytes express and release inflammatory mediators after challenge with bacterial cell wall molecules and proinflammatory cytokines. Nitric oxide synthase-2 (NOS-2) is expressed under these conditions and the high-output NO synthesis that follows contributes to the inflammatory response in this tissue and participates in the onset of several hepatopathies. However, in the course of liver regeneration, for example, after partial hepatectomy, NOS-2 is expressed at moderate levels and contributes to inhibit apoptosis and to favor progression in the cell cycle until the organ size and function are restored. The mechanisms involved in the regulation of NOS-2 expression under these conditions are revised.

  17. Nitric oxide and plant iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buet, Agustina; Simontacchi, Marcela

    2015-03-01

    Like all living organisms, plants demand iron (Fe) for important biochemical and metabolic processes. Internal imbalances, as a consequence of insufficient or excess Fe in the environment, lead to growth restriction and affect crop yield. Knowledge of signals and factors affecting each step in Fe uptake from the soil and distribution (long-distance transport, remobilization from old to young leaves, and storage in seeds) is necessary to improve our understanding of plant mineral nutrition. In this context, the role of nitric oxide (NO) is discussed as a key player in maintaining Fe homeostasis through its cross talk with hormones, ferritin, and frataxin and the ability to form nitrosyl-iron complexes.

  18. Nitric oxide synthase inhibition and cerebrovascular regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iadecola, C; Pelligrino, D A; Moskowitz, M A;

    1994-01-01

    tone and may play an important role in selected vasodilator responses of the cerebral circulation. Furthermore, evidence has been presented suggesting that NO participates in the mechanisms of cerebral ischemic damage. Despite the widespread attention that NO has captured in recent years and the large......There is increasing evidence that nitric oxide (NO) is an important molecular messenger involved in a wide variety of biological processes. Recent data suggest that NO is also involved in the regulation of the cerebral circulation. Thus, NO participants in the maintenance of resting cerebrovascular...

  19. Endogenous nitric oxide synthesis: biological functions and pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredt, D S

    1999-12-01

    Modern molecular biology has revealed vast numbers of large and complex proteins and genes that regulate body function. By contrast, discoveries over the past ten years indicate that crucial features of neuronal communication, blood vessel modulation and immune response are mediated by a remarkably simple chemical, nitric oxide (NO). Endogenous NO is generated from arginine by a family of three distinct calmodulin- dependent NO synthase (NOS) enzymes. NOS from endothelial cells (eNOS) and neurons (nNOS) are both constitutively expressed enzymes, whose activities are stimulated by increases in intracellular calcium. Immune functions for NO are mediated by a calcium-independent inducible NOS (iNOS). Expression of iNOS protein requires transcriptional activation, which is mediated by specific combinations of cytokines. All three NOS use NADPH as an electron donor and employ five enzyme cofactors to catalyze a five-electron oxidation of arginine to NO with stoichiometric formation of citrulline. The highest levels of NO throughout the body are found in neurons, where NO functions as a unique messenger molecule. In the autonomic nervous system NO functions NO functions as a major non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) neurotransmitter. This NANC pathway plays a particularly important role in producing relaxation of smooth muscle in the cerebral circulation and the gastrointestinal, urogenital and respiratory tracts. Dysregulation of NOS activity in autonomic nerves plays a major role in diverse pathophysiological conditions including migraine headache, hypertrophic pyloric stenosis and male impotence. In the brain, NO functions as a neuromodulator and appears to mediate aspects of learning and memory. Although endogenous NO was originally appreciated as a mediator of smooth muscle relaxation, NO also plays a major role in skeletal muscle. Physiologically muscle-derived NO regulates skeletal muscle contractility and exercise-induced glucose uptake. nNOS occurs at the

  20. EFFECTS OF NITRIC ACID ON CRITICALITY SAFETY ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, B.

    2011-08-18

    As nitric acid molarity is increased, there are two competing phenomena affecting the reactivity of the system. First, there is interaction between each of the 10 wells in the basket-like insert. As the molarity of the nitric acid solution is increased (it moves from 100% water to 100% HNO{sub 3}), the hydrogen atom density decreases by about 80%. However, it remains a relatively efficient moderator. The moderating ratio of nitric acid is about 90% that of water. As the media between the wells is changed from 100% water to 100% nitric acid, the density of the media increases by 50%. A higher density typically leads to a better reflector. However, when the macroscopic scattering cross sections are considered, nitric acid is a much worse reflector than water. The effectiveness of nitric acid as a reflector is about 40% that of water. Since the media between the wells become a worse reflector and still remains an effective moderator, interaction between the wells increases. This phenomenon will cause reactivity to increase as nitric acid molarity increases. The seond phenomenon is due to the moderating ratio changing in the high concentration fissile-nitric acid solution in the 10 wells. Since the wells contain relatively small volumes of high concentration solutions, a small decrease in moderating power has a large effect on reactivity. This is due to the fact that neutrons are more likely to escape the high concentration fissile solution before causing another fission event. The result of this phenomenon is that as nitric acid molarity increases, reactivity decreases. Recent studies have shown that the second phenomenon is indeed the dominating force in determining reactivity changes in relation to nitric acid molarity changes. When considering the system as a whole, as nitric acid molarity increases, reactivity decreases.

  1. NO-generating neurons in the medullary cardiovascular centers of rodents and carnivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisky, Vladimir A; Datsenko, Vladimir V; Moibenko, Alexei A; Bugaychenko, Larisa A; Pilyavskii, Alexander I; Kostyukov, Alexander I; Kalezic, Ivana; Johansson, Håkan

    2003-11-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize the species-related differences in the distribution of nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-containing neurons in rodents and carnivores medullary cardiovascular centers that take part in regulation of the sympathetic or parasympathetic drives. The order of the mean number of NOS-containing neurons in the dorsomedial and ventrolateral medulla (per section) in different animals was as follows: dog>cat>rat. Although the density of the positive cells in the both regions was changed in the following sequence: rat=cat>dog. Within the dorsal motor nucleus of vagus significant exceeding of the mean number and density of positive cells (preganglionic vagal neurons) in dog were found. Differences in the distribution of NO-generating neurons in the medullary cardiovascular centers and the heterogeneity in the basal level of NO release may contribute to the distinctive alterations of the hemodynamic reactions in the studied species after administration of NOS inhibitors.

  2. Effects of activated ACM on expression of signal transducers in cerebral cortical neurons of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojing; Li, Zhengli; Zhu, Changgeng; Li, Zhongyu

    2007-06-01

    To explore the roles of astrocytes in the epileptogenesis, astrocytes and neurons were isolated, purified and cultured in vitro from cerebral cortex of rats. The astrocytes were activated by ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and astrocytic conditioned medium (ACM) was collected to treat neurons for 4, 8 and 12 h. By using Western blot, the expression of calmodulin dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and adenylate cyclase (AC) was detected in neurons. The results showed that the expression of CaMK II, iNOS and AC was increased significantly in the neurons treated with ACM from 4 h to 12 h (PACM and such signal pathways as NOS-NO-cGMP, Ca2+/CaM-CaMK II and AC-cAMP-PKA might take part in the signal transduction of epileptogenesis.

  3. Adrenoceptor-activated nitric oxide synthesis in salivary acinar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Looms, Dagnia; Dissing, Steen; Tritsaris, Katerina

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the cellular regulation of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity in isolated acinar cells from rat parotid and human labial salivary glands, using the newly developed fluorescent nitric oxide (NO) indicator, DAF-2. We found that sympathetic stimulation with norepinephrine (NE) caus...

  4. Catalytic abatement of nitrous oxide from nitric and production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oonk, J.

    1998-01-01

    Nitric acid production is identified as a main source of nitrous oxide. Options for emission reduction however are not available. TNO and Hydro Agri studied the technological and economic feasibility of catalytic decomposition of nitrous oxide in nitric acid tail-gases. Although in literature promis

  5. Metastable Nitric Acid Trihydrate in Ice Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Fabian; Kubel, Frank; Gálvez, Oscar; Hölzel, Markus; Parker, Stewart F.; Baloh, Philipp; Iannarelli, Riccardo; Rossi, Michel J.; Grothe, Hinrich

    2016-04-01

    The composition of high altitude ice clouds is still a matter of intense discussion. The constituents in question are ice and nitric acid hydrates. The identification and formation mechanisms, however, are still unknown but are essential to understand atmospheric processing such as the seasonal ozone depletion in the lower polar stratosphere or the radiation balance of planet Earth. We found conclusive evidence for a long-predicted phase, which has been named alpha nitric acid trihydrate (alpha-NAT). This phase has been proven by combination of X-ray and neutron diffraction experiments allowing a convincing structure solution. Additionally, vibrational spectra (infrared and inelastic neutron scattering) were recorded and compared with theoretical calculations. A strong affinity between water ice and alpha-NAT has been found, which explains the experimental spectra and the phase transition kinetics essential for identification in the atmosphere. On the basis of our results, we propose a new three-step mechanism for NAT-formation in high altitude ice clouds. F. Weiss et al. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2016, accepted, DOI:10.1002/anie.201510841

  6. Expired nitric oxide levels in adult asthmatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiharu Okada

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The expired nitric oxide (NO concentration is known to be higher in asthmatic subjects than in normal subjects. To elucidate the role of NO in asthma, we examined the expired NO concentrations in relation to the type (atopic, mixed, non- atopic, and severity (mild, moderate, severe of asthmatics, as well as the influence of steroid treatment. Twenty-seven normal subjects, 48 asthmatics, 8 subjects with allergic rhinitis, and 13 subjects with pulmonary emphysema participated in the study. The expired NO concentration was significantly higher in asthmatics and patients with allergic rhinitis than in normal subjects (P<0.01. No significant difference was observed between the expired NO concentration in patients with pulmonary emphysema and that of normal subjects. The expired NO concentrations were significantly lower in non- atopic asthma than in atopic asthma. Nitric oxide levels were significantly lower in severe asthma than in mild asthma. High doses of steroid treatment are often used in severe asthma. The dose of inhaled beclomethasone and expired NO concentrations showed a negative correlation (r= −0.51587, P<0.004. Drip infusion of hydrocortisone tended to increase the exhaled NO concentration just after drip infusion, however, it decreased after 24 h. These results suggest that steroid treatment decreases the expired NO concentrations in asthmatics, although it cannot be concluded that NO increases the severity of asthma. The measurement of expired NO concentrations is an easy, non-invasive test, which may be a useful tool for monitoring the condition of asthmatics.

  7. Single neuron computation

    CERN Document Server

    McKenna, Thomas M; Zornetzer, Steven F

    1992-01-01

    This book contains twenty-two original contributions that provide a comprehensive overview of computational approaches to understanding a single neuron structure. The focus on cellular-level processes is twofold. From a computational neuroscience perspective, a thorough understanding of the information processing performed by single neurons leads to an understanding of circuit- and systems-level activity. From the standpoint of artificial neural networks (ANNs), a single real neuron is as complex an operational unit as an entire ANN, and formalizing the complex computations performed by real n

  8. Mesmerising mirror neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyes, Cecilia

    2010-06-01

    Mirror neurons have been hailed as the key to understanding social cognition. I argue that three currents of thought-relating to evolution, atomism and telepathy-have magnified the perceived importance of mirror neurons. When they are understood to be a product of associative learning, rather than an adaptation for social cognition, mirror neurons are no longer mesmerising, but they continue to raise important questions about both the psychology of science and the neural bases of social cognition. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Transmitter modulation of spike-evoked calcium transients in arousal related neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohlmeier, Kristi Anne; Leonard, Christopher S

    2006-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-containing cholinergic neurons in the laterodorsal tegmentum (LDT) influence behavioral and motivational states through their projections to the thalamus, ventral tegmental area and a brainstem 'rapid eye movement (REM)-induction' site. Action potential-evoked intracel......Nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-containing cholinergic neurons in the laterodorsal tegmentum (LDT) influence behavioral and motivational states through their projections to the thalamus, ventral tegmental area and a brainstem 'rapid eye movement (REM)-induction' site. Action potential......-evoked intracellular calcium transients dampen excitability and stimulate NO production in these neurons. In this study, we investigated the action of several arousal-related neurotransmitters and the role of specific calcium channels in these LDT Ca(2+)-transients by simultaneous whole-cell recording and calcium...... of cholinergic LDT neurons and that inhibition of spike-evoked Ca(2+)-transients is a common action of neurotransmitters that also activate GIRK channels in these neurons. Because spike-evoked calcium influx dampens excitability, our findings suggest that these 'inhibitory' transmitters could boost firing rate...

  10. Direct measurements of nitric oxide release in relation to expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in isolated porcine mitral valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard, Sophia Gry; Olsen, Lisbeth Høier; Aasted, Bent;

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the direct release of nitric oxide (NO) from the porcine mitral valve using a NO microelectrode. Furthermore, the expression and localization of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in the mitral valve was studied using immunohistochemistry, Western blotting...

  11. Neuromorphic silicon neuron circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo eIndiveri

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Hardware implementations of spiking neurons can be extremely useful for a large variety of applications, ranging from high-speed modeling of large-scale neural systems to real-time behaving systems, to bidirectional brain-machine interfaces. The specific circuit solutions used to implement silicon neurons depend on the application requirements. In this paper we describe the most common building blocks and techniques used to implement these circuits, and present an overview of a wide range of neuromorphic silicon neurons, which implement different computational models, ranging from biophysically realistic and conductance based Hodgkin-Huxley models to bi-dimensional generalized adaptive Integrate and Fire models. We compare the different design methodologies used for each silicon neuron design described, and demonstrate their features with experimental results, measured from a wide range of fabricated VLSI chips.

  12. Protection against ventricular fibrillation via cholinergic receptor stimulation and the generation of nitric oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalla, Manish; Chotalia, Minesh; Coughlan, Charles; Hao, Guoliang; Crabtree, Mark J.; Tomek, Jakub; Bub, Gil; Paterson, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Animal studies suggest an anti‐fibrillatory action of the vagus nerve on the ventricle, although the exact mechanism is controversial.Using a Langendorff perfused rat heart, we show that the acetylcholine analogue carbamylcholine raises ventricular fibrillation threshold (VFT) and flattens the electrical restitution curve.The anti‐fibrillatory action of carbamylcholine was prevented by the nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine, inhibitors of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), and can be mimicked by the nitric oxide (NO) donor sodium nitroprusside.Carbamylcholine increased NO metabolite content in the coronary effluent and this was prevented by mecamylamine.The anti‐fibrillatory action of both carbamylcholine and sodium nitroprusside was ultimately dependent on muscarinic receptor stimulation as all effects were blocked by atropine.These data demonstrate a protective effect of carbamylcholine on VFT that depends upon both muscarinic and nicotinic receptor stimulation, where the generation of NO is likely to be via a neuronal nNOS–sGC dependent pathway. Abstract Implantable cardiac vagal nerve stimulators are a promising treatment for ventricular arrhythmia in patients with heart failure. Animal studies suggest the anti‐fibrillatory effect may be nitric oxide (NO) dependent, although the exact site of action is controversial. We investigated whether a stable analogue of acetylcholine could raise ventricular fibrillation threshold (VFT), and whether this was dependent on NO generation and/or muscarinic/nicotinic receptor stimulation. VFT was determined in Langendorff perfused rat hearts by burst pacing until sustained VF was induced. Carbamylcholine (CCh, 200 nmol l–1, n = 9) significantly (P < 0.05) reduced heart rate from 292 ± 8 to 224 ± 6 b.p.m. Independent of this heart rate change, CCh caused a significant increase in VFT (control 1.5 ± 0.3 mA, CCh 2.4 ± 0.4 mA, wash 1.1

  13. Nitric oxide signaling in the development and evolution of language and cognitive circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Owen H; Kwan, Kenneth Y

    2014-09-01

    The neocortex underlies not only remarkable motor and sensory capabilities, but also some of our most distinctly human cognitive functions. The emergence of these higher functions during evolution was accompanied by structural changes in the neocortex, including the acquisition of areal specializations such as Broca's speech and language area. The study of these evolutionary mechanisms, which likely involve species-dependent gene expression and function, represents a substantial challenge. These species differences, however, may represent valuable opportunities to understand the molecular underpinnings of neocortical evolution. Here, we discuss nitric oxide signaling as a candidate mechanism in the assembly of neocortical circuits underlying language and higher cognitive functions. This hypothesis was based on the highly specific mid-fetal pattern of nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1, previously nNOS) expression in the pyramidal (projection) neurons of two human neocortical areas respectively involved in speech and language, and higher cognition; the frontal operculum (FOp) and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). This expression is transiently present during mid-gestation, suggesting that NOS1 may be involved in the development of these areas and the assembly of their neural circuits. As no other gene product is known to exhibit such exquisite spatiotemporal expression, NOS1 represents a remarkable candidate for these functions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of diabetes and insulin treatment on nitric oxide synthase content in rat corpus cavemosum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Shun XU; Qiang FU; Sheng-Tian ZHAO; Hai-Nan LIU

    2001-01-01

    Aim: To study the effect of diabetes mellitus and insulin treatment on rat penile nitric oxide synthase content.Methods: Male Wistar rats were divided at random into two groups: the Control ( n = 8) and the Diabetic ( n =17). Diabetes mellitus was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. The diabetic animals were then ran domly divided into two subgroups: diabetic rats without insulin treatment ( n = 7) and diabetic rats with insulin treat ment ( n = 10). The neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in the penile corpus cavemosum were assayed by immrmo histochemical staining with specific antibody to nNOS and the nNOS-positive nerve fibers were counted semiquantita tively under a high power microscope. Results: The nNOS- positive nerve fibres in diabetic rats with treatment was higher than that in diabetic rats without treatment ( P < 0.05) and lower than that in the controls ( P < 0.01 ). The nNOS-positive nerve fibres in diabetic rat without treatment were also lower than that in the controls ( P < 0.01). Con clusion: In streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, the nNOS content in the penile corpus cavernosum was significantly decre~ed. Insulin treatment at the dose level employed partially restores the penile nNOS content in these rats.

  15. Inducible nitric oxide synthase and guinea-pig ileitis induced by adjuvant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. D. Seago

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available We sought to establish a model of inflammatory bowel disease by augmenting the activity of the local immune system with Freund's complete adjuvant, and to determine if inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS expression and peroxynitrite formation accompanied the inflammatory condition. In anaesthetized guinea-pigs, a loop of distal ileum received intraluminal 50% ethanol followed by Freund's complete adjuvant. Control animals were sham operated. When the animals were killed 7 or 14 days later, loop lavage fluid was examined for nitrite and PGE2 levels; mucosal levels of granulocyte and macrophages were estimated by myeloperoxidase (MPO and N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase (NAG activity, respectively. Cellular localization if iNOS and peroxynitrite formation were determined by immunohistochemistry with polyclonal antibodies directed against peptide epitopes of mouse iNOS and nitrotyrosine, respectfully. Adjuvant administration resulted in a persistent ileitis, featuring gut thickening, crypt hyperplasia, villus tip swelling and disruption, and cellular infiltration. Lavage levels of PGE2 and nitrite were markedly elevated by adjuvant treatment. Immunoreactive iNOS and nitrotyrosine bordered on detectability in normal animals but were markedly evident with adjuvant treatment at day 7 and particularly day 14. Immunohistochemistry suggested that enteric neurons and epithelia were major sites of iNOS activity and peroxynitrite formation. We conclude that local administration of adjuvant establishes a chronic ileitis. Inducible nitric oxide synthase may contribute to the inflammatory process.

  16. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase: From biochemistry and gene structure to clinical implications of NOS3 polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Paula, Gustavo H; Lacchini, Riccardo; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2016-01-10

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important vasodilator with a well-established role in cardiovascular homeostasis. While mediator is synthesized from L-arginine by neuronal, endothelial, and inducible nitric oxide synthases (NOS1,NOS3 and NOS2 respectively), NOS3 is the most important isoform for NO formation in the cardiovascular system. NOS3 is a dimeric enzyme whose expression and activity are regulated at transcriptional, posttranscriptional,and posttranslational levels. The NOS3 gene, which encodes NOS3, exhibits a number of polymorphic sites including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs), microsatellites, and insertions/deletions. Some NOS3 polymorphisms show functional effects on NOS3 expression or activity, thereby affecting NO formation. Interestingly, many studies have evaluated the effects of functional NOS3 polymorphisms on disease susceptibility and drug responses. Moreover, some studies have investigated how NOS3 haplotypes may impact endogenous NO formation and disease susceptibility. In this article,we carried out a comprehensive review to provide a basic understanding of biochemical mechanisms involved in NOS3 regulation and how genetic variations in NOS3 may translate into relevant clinical and pharmacogenetic implications.

  17. Motor neurone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-23

    Essential facts Motor neurone disease describes a group of related diseases, affecting the neurones in the brain and spinal cord. Progressive, incurable and life-limiting, MND is rare, with about 1,100 people developing it each year in the UK and up to 5,000 people affected at any one time. One third of people will die within a year of diagnosis and more than half within two years. About 5% to 10% are alive at ten years.

  18. Neurons and Tumor Suppressors

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas W Zochodne

    2014-01-01

    Neurons choose growth pathways with half hearted reluctance, behavior that may be appropriate to maintain fixed long lasting connections but not to regenerate them. We now recognize that intrinsic brakes on regrowth are widely expressed in these hesitant neurons and include classical tumor suppressor molecules. Here, we review how two brakes, PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) and retinoblastoma emerge as new and exciting knockdown targets to e...

  19. Neuron division or enucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotnikov, O S; Laktionova, A A; Solovieva, I A; Krasnova, T V

    2010-10-01

    The classical Bielschowsky-Gross neurohistological method was used to reproduce all the morphological phenomena interpreted by many authors as signs of neuron division, budding, and fission. It is suggested that these signs are associated with the effects of enucleation, which occurs in many cells of other tissue types in response to a variety of chemical and physical treatments. Studies were performed using neurons isolated from the mollusk Lymnaea stagnalis and exposed in tissue culture to the actin microfilament inhibitor cytochalasin B. Phase contrast time-lapse video recording over periods of 4-8 h demonstrated nuclear displacement, ectopization, and budding, to the level of almost complete fission of the neuron body. This repeats the pattern seen in static fixed preparations in "normal" conditions and after different experimental treatments. Budding of the cytoplasm was also sometimes seen at the early stages of the experiments. Control experiments in which cultured neurons were exposed to the solvent for cytochalasin B, i.e., dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), did not reveal any changes in neurons over a period of 8 h. We take the view that the picture previously interpreted as neuron division and fission can be explained in terms of the inhibition of actin microfilaments, sometimes developing spontaneously in cells undergoing individual metabolic changes preventing the maintenance of cytoskeleton stability.

  20. NeuronBank: A Tool for Cataloging Neuronal Circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Paul S; Calin-Jageman, Robert; Dhawan, Akshaye; Frederick, Chad; Guo, Shuman; Dissanayaka, Rasanjalee; Hiremath, Naveen; Ma, Wenjun; Shen, Xiuyn; Wang, Hsui C; Yang, Hong; Prasad, Sushil; Sunderraman, Rajshekhar; Zhu, Ying

    2010-01-01

    The basic unit of any nervous system is the neuron. Therefore, understanding the operation of nervous systems ultimately requires an inventory of their constituent neurons and synaptic connectivity, which form neural circuits. The presence of uniquely identifiable neurons or classes of neurons in many invertebrates has facilitated the construction of cellular-level connectivity diagrams that can be generalized across individuals within a species. Homologous neurons can also be recognized across species. Here we describe NeuronBank.org, a web-based tool that we are developing for cataloging, searching, and analyzing neuronal circuitry within and across species. Information from a single species is represented in an individual branch of NeuronBank. Users can search within a branch or perform queries across branches to look for similarities in neuronal circuits across species. The branches allow for an extensible ontology so that additional characteristics can be added as knowledge grows. Each entry in NeuronBank generates a unique accession ID, allowing it to be easily cited. There is also an automatic link to a Wiki page allowing an encyclopedic explanation of the entry. All of the 44 previously published neurons plus one previously unpublished neuron from the mollusc, Tritonia diomedea, have been entered into a branch of NeuronBank as have 4 previously published neurons from the mollusc, Melibe leonina. The ability to organize information about neuronal circuits will make this information more accessible, ultimately aiding research on these important models.

  1. NeuronBank: a tool for cataloging neuronal circuitry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S Katz

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The basic unit of any nervous system is the neuron. Therefore, understanding the operation of nervous systems ultimately requires an inventory of their constituent neurons and synaptic connectivity, which form neural circuits. The presence of uniquely identifiable neurons or classes of neurons in many invertebrates has facilitated the construction of cellular-level connectivity diagrams that can be generalized across individuals within a species. Homologous neurons can also be recognized across species. Here we describe NeuronBank.org, a web-based tool that we are developing for cataloging, searching, and analyzing neuronal circuitry within and across species. Information from a single species is represented in an individual branch of NeuronBank. Users can search within a branch or perform queries across branches to look for similarities in neuronal circuits across species. The branches allow for an extensible ontology so that additional characteristics can be added as knowledge grows. Each entry in NeuronBank generates a unique accession ID, allowing it to be easily cited. There is also an automatic link to a Wiki page allowing an encyclopedic explanation of the entry. All of the 44 previously published neurons plus one previously unpublished neuron from the mollusc, Tritonia diomedea, have been entered into a branch of NeuronBank as have 4 previously published neurons from the mollusc, Melibe leonina. The ability to organize information about neuronal circuits will make this information more accessible, ultimately aiding research on these important models.

  2. NeuronBank: A Tool for Cataloging Neuronal Circuitry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Paul S.; Calin-Jageman, Robert; Dhawan, Akshaye; Frederick, Chad; Guo, Shuman; Dissanayaka, Rasanjalee; Hiremath, Naveen; Ma, Wenjun; Shen, Xiuyn; Wang, Hsui C.; Yang, Hong; Prasad, Sushil; Sunderraman, Rajshekhar; Zhu, Ying

    2010-01-01

    The basic unit of any nervous system is the neuron. Therefore, understanding the operation of nervous systems ultimately requires an inventory of their constituent neurons and synaptic connectivity, which form neural circuits. The presence of uniquely identifiable neurons or classes of neurons in many invertebrates has facilitated the construction of cellular-level connectivity diagrams that can be generalized across individuals within a species. Homologous neurons can also be recognized across species. Here we describe NeuronBank.org, a web-based tool that we are developing for cataloging, searching, and analyzing neuronal circuitry within and across species. Information from a single species is represented in an individual branch of NeuronBank. Users can search within a branch or perform queries across branches to look for similarities in neuronal circuits across species. The branches allow for an extensible ontology so that additional characteristics can be added as knowledge grows. Each entry in NeuronBank generates a unique accession ID, allowing it to be easily cited. There is also an automatic link to a Wiki page allowing an encyclopedic explanation of the entry. All of the 44 previously published neurons plus one previously unpublished neuron from the mollusc, Tritonia diomedea, have been entered into a branch of NeuronBank as have 4 previously published neurons from the mollusc, Melibe leonina. The ability to organize information about neuronal circuits will make this information more accessible, ultimately aiding research on these important models. PMID:20428500

  3. Production of Nitric Oxide and Expression of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase in Ovarian Cystic Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosekeila Simões Nomelini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor sections from nonneoplastic (n=15, benign (n=28, and malignant ovarian tumors (n=20 were obtained from 63 women. Immunohistochemistry of the tumor sections demonstrated that inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS expression was increased in ovarian cancer samples compared to nonneoplastic or benign tumor samples. Using the Griess method, nitric oxide (NO metabolite levels were also found to be elevated in malignant tumor samples compared to benign tumor samples (P80 μM were more frequent than NO levels <80 μM, and iNOS expression in well-differentiated carcinomas was greater than in moderately/poorly differentiated carcinomas (P<.05. These data suggest an important role for NO in ovarian carcinogenesis.

  4. Nitric oxide in liver fibrosis: The role of inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakiri, Yasuko

    2015-12-01

    The inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is expressed in hepatic cells in pathological conditions. Its induction is involved in the development of liver fibrosis, and thus iNOS could be a therapeutic target for liver fibrosis. This review summarizes the role of iNOS in liver fibrosis, focusing on 1) iNOS biology, 2) iNOS-expressing liver cells, 3) iNOS-related therapeutic strategies, and 4) future directions.

  5. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase supports Renin release during sodium restriction through inhibition of phosphodiesterase 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sällström, Johan; Jensen, Boye L; Skøtt, Ole

    2010-01-01

    NOS supports renin release by cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-mediated inhibition of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-specific phosphodiesterase 3 (PDE3) in juxtaglomerular (JG) cells. METHODS: The experiments were performed in conscious nNOS⁻(/)⁻ and wild types after 10 days on a low-sodium diet...

  6. The neuronal nitric oxide synthase PDZ motif binds to -G(D,E)XV* carboxyterminal sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepens, J.; Cuppen, E.; Wieringa, B.; Hendriks, W.

    1997-01-01

    PDZ motifs are small protein-protein interaction modules that are thought to play a role in the clustering of submembranous signalling molecules. The specificity and functional consequences of their associative actions is still largely unknown. Using two-hybrid methodology we here demonstrate that t

  7. Role of Nitric Oxide in MPTP-Induced Dopaminergic Neuron Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    Egensperger ., IVon Edten, U., Mehraein. P. & of two p93 Inhnbitors attenuanes Saa upregalatien, ra-syrerideis aggregation Hn Lewy body disease. OH.Bi...Ferreira, M. & Pezedborski. S. (1994) Erp . Neural. 126, 195-204. 8. Raivich, G., Jones, L. L.. Kloss. C. U., Werner, A., Neumann, H. & Kreutzberg, G

  8. Thermodynamic analysis of interactions between cofactor and neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanae, Ryuhei; Kurokawa, Fumiaki; Oda, Masayuki; Ishijima, Sumio; Sagami, Ikuko

    2011-03-15

    The thermodynamics of cofactor binding to the isolated reductase domain (Red) of nNOS and its mutants have been studied by isothermal titration calorimetry. The NADP(+) and 2',5'-ADP binding stoichiometry to Red were both 1:1, consistent with a one-site kinetic model instead of a two-site model. The binding constant (K(D) = 71 nM) and the large heat capacity change (ΔC(p) = -440 cal mol(-1) K(-1)) for 2',5'-ADP were remarkably different from those for NADP(+) (1.7 μM and -140 cal mol(-1) K(-1), respectively). These results indicate that the nicotinamide moiety as well as the adenosine moiety has an important role in binding to nNOS. They also suggest that the thermodynamics of the conformational change in Red caused by cofactor binding are significantly different from the conformational changes that occur in cytochrome c reductase, in which the nicotinamide moiety of the cofactor is not essential for binding. Analysis of the deletion mutant of the autoinhibitory helix (RedΔ40) revealed that the deletion resulted in a decrease in the binding affinity of 2',5'-ADP with more unfavorable enthalpy gain. In the case of RedCaM, which contains a calmodulin (CaM) binding site, the presence of Ca(2+)/CaM caused a 6.7-fold increase in the binding affinity for 2',5'-ADP that was mostly due to the favorable entropy change. These results are consistent with a model in which Ca(2+)/CaM induces a conformational change in NOS to a flexible "open" form from a "closed" form that locked by cofactor binding, and this change facilitates the electron transfer required for catalysis.

  9. Hypoxia tolerance, nitric oxide, and nitrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, Angela; Jensen, Frank Bo

    2015-01-01

    Among vertebrates able to tolerate periods of oxygen deprivation, the painted and red-eared slider turtles (Chrysemys picta and Trachemys scripta) and the crucian carp (Carassius carassius) are the most extreme and can survive even months of total lack of oxygen during winter. The key to hypoxia...... survival resides in concerted physiological responses, including strong metabolic depression, protection against oxidative damage and – in air breathing animals - redistribution of blood flow. Each of these responses is known to be tightly regulated by nitric oxide (NO) and during hypoxia by its metabolite...... nitrite. The aim of this review is to highlight recent work illustrating the widespread roles of NO and nitrite in the tolerance to extreme oxygen deprivation, in particular in the red-eared slider turtle and crucian carp, but also in diving marine mammals. The emerging picture underscores the importance...

  10. Nitric oxide-releasing porous silicon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafshgari, Morteza Hasanzadeh; Cavallaro, Alex; Delalat, Bahman; Harding, Frances J.; McInnes, Steven JP; Mäkilä, Ermei; Salonen, Jarno; Vasilev, Krasimir; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the ability of porous silicon nanoparticles (PSi NPs) to entrap and deliver nitric oxide (NO) as an effective antibacterial agent is tested against different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. NO was entrapped inside PSi NPs functionalized by means of the thermal hydrocarbonization (THC) process. Subsequent reduction of nitrite in the presence of d-glucose led to the production of large NO payloads without reducing the biocompatibility of the PSi NPs with mammalian cells. The resulting PSi NPs demonstrated sustained release of NO and showed remarkable antibacterial efficiency and anti-biofilm-forming properties. These results will set the stage to develop antimicrobial nanoparticle formulations for applications in chronic wound treatment.

  11. Nitric Oxide and Respiratory Helminthic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Muro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is a very simple molecule that displays very important functions both in helminths (mainly those involved in respiratory pathology and in mammalian hosts. In this paper we review four issues related to interaction of NO and lung helminthic diseases. Firstly, we evaluated data available on the NO synthesis and release by helminths and their biological role. Next, we summarized the effect of antigens obtained from different phases of the biological cycle on NO production by host mammalian cells (mainly from human sources. Thirdly, we revised the evaluation of NO on the biological activities and/or the viability of respiratory helminths. Lastly, the deleterious consequences of increased production of NO during helminthic human infection are detailed.

  12. Melatonin and its precursors scavenge nitric oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Y.; Mori, A.; Liburdy, R.; Packer, L.

    1998-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) scavenging activity of melatonin, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, serotonin, 5-hydroxytryptophan and L-tryptophan was examined by the Griess reaction using flow injection analysis. 1-Hydroxy-2-oxo-3-(N-methyl-3-aminopropyl)-3-methyl-1-triazene(NOC-7) was used as NO generator. The Griess reagent stoichiometrically reacts with NO2-, which was converted by a cadmium-copper reduction column from the stable end products of NO oxidation. Except for tryptophan, all the compounds examined scavenged NO in a dose-dependent manner. Melatonin, which has a methoxy group in the 5-position and an acetyl side chain, exhibited the most potent scavenging activity among the compounds tested. Serotonin, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, and 5-hydroxytryptophan, respectively, showed moderate scavenging activity compared to melatonin. Tryptophan, which has neither a methoxy nor a hydroxyl group in the 5-position, exhibited the least NO scavenging activity.

  13. Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitors as Antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallo Volke

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Affective and anxiety disorders are widely distributed disorders with severe social and economic effects. Evidence is emphatic that effective treatment helps to restore function and quality of life. Due to the action of most modern antidepressant drugs, serotonergic mechanisms have traditionally been suggested to play major roles in the pathophysiology of mood and stress-related disorders. However, a few clinical and several pre-clinical studies, strongly suggest involvement of the nitric oxide (NO signaling pathway in these disorders. Moreover, several of the conventional neurotransmitters, including serotonin, glutamate and GABA, are intimately regulated by NO, and distinct classes of antidepressants have been found to modulate the hippocampal NO level in vivo. The NO system is therefore a potential target for antidepressant and anxiolytic drug action in acute therapy as well as in prophylaxis. This paper reviews the effect of drugs modulating NO synthesis in anxiety and depression.

  14. Citric Acid Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Pattie L. (Compiler)

    2013-01-01

    The Ground Systems Development and Operations GSDO) Program at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has the primary objective of modernizing and transforming the launch and range complex at KSC to benefit current and future NASA programs along with other emerging users. Described as the launch support and infrastructure modernization program in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the GSDO Program will develop and implement shared infrastructure and process improvements to provide more flexible, affordable, and responsive capabilities to a multi-user community. In support of the GSDO Program, the purpose of this project is to demonstratevalidate citric acid as a passivation agent for stainless steel. Successful completion of this project will result in citric acid being qualified for use as an environmentally preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys in NASA and DoD applications.

  15. The nitric oxide synthase of mouse spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, M B; Goin, J C; Boquet, M; Canteros, M G; Franchi, A M; Perez Martinez, S; Polak, J M; Viggiano, J M; Gimeno, M A

    1997-07-01

    Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) was evidenced in mature mouse spermatozoa by means of biochemical techniques and Western blot. During 120 min of incubation, 10(7) spermatozoa synthesized 7 +/- 2 pmol of L-[14C]citrulline. Besides, L-citrulline formation depended on the incubation time and on the concentration of L-arginine present in the incubation medium. Different concentrations of N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) but not aminoguanidine, inhibited L-[14C]citrulline formation. Western-blot analysis of solubilized sperm proteins revealed a unique band of M(r)=140 kDa with the neural, endothelial and inducible NOS antisera tested. These results provide evidence that mature mouse sperm contains a NOS isoform and that spermatozoa have the potential ability to synthesize NO, suggesting a role for endogenous NO on mammalian sperm function.

  16. Nitric oxide turnover in permeable river sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, Frank; Stief, Peter; Kuypers, Marcel M M;

    2014-01-01

    We measured nitric oxide (NO) microprofiles in relation to oxygen (O2) and all major dissolved N-species (ammonium, nitrate, nitrite, and nitrous oxide [N2O]) in a permeable, freshwater sediment (River Weser, Germany). NO reaches peak concentrations of 0.13 μmol L-1 in the oxic zone and is consumed...... in the oxic-anoxic transition zone. Apparently, NO is produced by ammonia oxidizers under oxic conditions and consumed by denitrification under microoxic conditions. Experimental percolation of sediment cores with aerated surface water resulted in an initial rate of NO production that was 12 times higher than...... the net NO production rate in steady state. This initial NO production rate is in the same range as the net ammonia oxidation rate, indicating that NO is transiently the main product of ammonia oxidizers. Stable isotope labeling experiments with the 15N-labeled chemical NO donor S...

  17. Hypoxia tolerance, nitric oxide, and nitrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, Angela; Jensen, Frank Bo

    2015-01-01

    Among vertebrates able to tolerate periods of oxygen deprivation, the painted and red-eared slider turtles (Chrysemys picta and Trachemys scripta) and the crucian carp (Carassius carassius) are the most extreme and can survive even months of total lack of oxygen during winter. The key to hypoxia ...... of NO and nitrite signaling in the adaptive response to hypoxia in vertebrate animals....... survival resides in concerted physiological responses, including strong metabolic depression, protection against oxidative damage and – in air breathing animals - redistribution of blood flow. Each of these responses is known to be tightly regulated by nitric oxide (NO) and during hypoxia by its metabolite...... nitrite. The aim of this review is to highlight recent work illustrating the widespread roles of NO and nitrite in the tolerance to extreme oxygen deprivation, in particular in the red-eared slider turtle and crucian carp, but also in diving marine mammals. The emerging picture underscores the importance...

  18. Autotrophic Biofilters for Oxidation of Nitric Oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建孟; 陈浚; LanceHershman; 王家德; DanielP.Y.Chang

    2004-01-01

    Carbon foam—a kind of new engineering material as packing material was adopted in three biofilters with different pore dimensions and adapted autotrophic nitrite nitrobacteria to investigate the purification of nitric oxide (NO) in a gas stream. The biofilm was developed on the surface of carbon foams using nitrite as its only nitric source. The moisture in the filter was maintained by ultrasonic aerosol equipment which can minimize the thickness of the liquid film. The liquid phase nitrification test was conducted to determine the variability and the potential of performance among the three carbon foam biofilters. The investigation showed that during the NO2-—N inlet concentration of 200 g·L-1·min-1 to 800 g·L-1·min-1, the 24PPC (pores per centimeter) carbon foam biofilter had the greatest potential, achieving the NO2-—N removal efficiency of 94% to 98%. The 8PPC and 18PPC carbon foam biofilters achieved the NO2-—N removal efficiency of 15% to 21% and of 30% to 40%, respectively. The potential for this system to remove NO from a gas stream was shown on the basis of a steady removal efficiency of 41% to 50% which was attained for the 24PPC carbon foam biofilter at specified NO inlet concentration of 66.97 mg·m-3 to 267.86mg·m-3 and an empty-bed residence time of 3.5 min.

  19. Neurons of human nucleus accumbens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sazdanović Maja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Nucleus accumbens is a part of the ventral striatum also known as a drug active brain region, especially related with drug addiction. The aim of the study was to investigate the Golgi morphology of the nucleus accumbens neurons. Methods. The study was performed on the frontal and sagittal sections of 15 human brains by the Golgi Kopsch method. We classified neurons in the human nucleus accumbens according to their morphology and size into four types: type I - fusiform neurons; type II - fusiform neurons with lateral dendrite, arising from a part of the cell body; type III - pyramidal-like neuron; type IV - multipolar neuron. The medium spiny neurons, which are mostly noted regarding to the drug addictive conditions of the brain, correspond to the type IV - multipolar neurons. Results. Two regions of human nucleus accumbens could be clearly recognized on Nissl and Golgi preparations each containing different predominant neuronal types. Central part of nucleus accumbens, core region, has a low density of impregnated neurons with predominant type III, pyramidal-like neurons, with spines on secondary branches and rare type IV, multipolar neurons. Contrary to the core, peripheral region, shell of nucleus, has a high density of impregnated neurons predominantly contained of type I and type IV - multipolar neurons, which all are rich in spines on secondary and tertiary dendritic branches. Conclusion. Our results indicate great morphological variability of human nucleus accumbens neurons. This requires further investigations and clarifying clinical significance of this important brain region.

  20. Neuronal avalanches and learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcangelis, Lucilla de, E-mail: dearcangelis@na.infn.it [Department of Information Engineering and CNISM, Second University of Naples, 81031 Aversa (Italy)

    2011-05-01

    Networks of living neurons represent one of the most fascinating systems of biology. If the physical and chemical mechanisms at the basis of the functioning of a single neuron are quite well understood, the collective behaviour of a system of many neurons is an extremely intriguing subject. Crucial ingredient of this complex behaviour is the plasticity property of the network, namely the capacity to adapt and evolve depending on the level of activity. This plastic ability is believed, nowadays, to be at the basis of learning and memory in real brains. Spontaneous neuronal activity has recently shown features in common to other complex systems. Experimental data have, in fact, shown that electrical information propagates in a cortex slice via an avalanche mode. These avalanches are characterized by a power law distribution for the size and duration, features found in other problems in the context of the physics of complex systems and successful models have been developed to describe their behaviour. In this contribution we discuss a statistical mechanical model for the complex activity in a neuronal network. The model implements the main physiological properties of living neurons and is able to reproduce recent experimental results. Then, we discuss the learning abilities of this neuronal network. Learning occurs via plastic adaptation of synaptic strengths by a non-uniform negative feedback mechanism. The system is able to learn all the tested rules, in particular the exclusive OR (XOR) and a random rule with three inputs. The learning dynamics exhibits universal features as function of the strength of plastic adaptation. Any rule could be learned provided that the plastic adaptation is sufficiently slow.

  1. Corrosion studies in fuel element reprocessing environments containing nitric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beavers, J A; White, R R; Berry, W E; Griess, J C

    1982-04-01

    Nitric acid is universally used in aqueous fuel element reprocessing plants; however, in the processing scheme being developed by the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program, some of the equipment will be exposed to nitric acid under conditions not previously encountered in fuel element reprocessing plants. A previous report presented corrosion data obtained in hyperazeotropic nitric acid and in concentrated magnesium nitrate solutions used in its preparation. The results presented in this report are concerned with the following: (1) corrosion of titanium in nitric acid; (2) corrosion of nickel-base alloys in a nitric acid-hydrofluoric acid solution; (3) the formation of Cr(VI), which enhances corrosion, in nitric acid solutions; and (4) corrosion of mechanical pipe connectors in nitric acid. The results show that the corrosion rate of titanium increased with the refreshment rate of boiling nitric acid, but the effect diminished rapidly as the temperature decreased. The addition of iodic acid inhibited attack. Also, up to 200 ppM of fluoride in 70% HNO/sub 3/ had no major effect on the corrosion of either titanium or tantalum. In boiling 8 M HNO/sub 3/-0.05 M HF, Inconel 671 was more resistant than Inconel 690, but both alloys experienced end-grain attack. In the case of Inconel 671, heat treatment was very important; annealed and quenched material was much more resistant than furnace-cooled material.The rate of oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) increased significantly as the nitric acid concentration increased, and certain forms of ruthenium in the solution seemed to accelerate the rate of formation. Mechanical connectors of T-304L stainless steel experienced end-grain attack on the exposed pipe ends, and seal rings of both stainless steel and a titanium alloy (6% Al-4% V) underwent heavy attack in boiling 8 M HNO/sub 3/.

  2. Targeted electrophysiological analysis of viscerofugal neurons in the myenteric plexus of guinea-pig colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibberd, T J; Spencer, N J; Zagorodnyuk, V P; Chen, B N; Brookes, S J H

    2014-09-05

    4.8 mV, respectively, pneurons were nitric oxide synthase (NOS) immunoreactive (20/27 cells tested). Thus, the synaptic connections onto viscerofugal neurons within the myenteric plexus suggest that multiple enteric neural pathways feed into intestino-intestinal reflexes, involving sympathetic prevertebral ganglia.

  3. Adverse experiences with nitric acid at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durant, W.S.; Craig, D.K.; Vitacco, M.J.; McCormick, J.A.

    1991-06-01

    Nitric acid is used routinely at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in many processes. However, the site has experienced a number of adverse situations in handling nitric acid. These have ranged from minor injuries to personnel to significant explosions. This document compiles many of these events and includes discussions of process upsets, fires, injuries, and toxic effects of nitric acid and its decomposition products. The purpose of the publication is to apprise those using the acid that it is a potentially dangerous material and can react in many ways as demonstrated by SRS experience. 10 refs.

  4. Characterization of neuronal populations in the human trigeminal ganglion and their association with latent herpes simplex virus-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E Flowerdew

    Full Text Available Following primary infection Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1 establishes lifelong latency in the neurons of human sensory ganglia. Upon reactivation HSV-1 can cause neurological diseases such as facial palsy, vestibular neuritis or encephalitis. Certain populations of sensory neurons have been shown to be more susceptible to latent infection in the animal model, but this has not been addressed in human tissue. In the present study, trigeminal ganglion (TG neurons expressing six neuronal marker proteins were characterized, based on staining with antibodies against the GDNF family ligand receptor Ret, the high-affinity nerve growth factor receptor TrkA, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS, the antibody RT97 against 200 kDa neurofilament, calcitonin gene-related peptide and peripherin. The frequencies of marker-positive neurons and their average neuronal sizes were assessed, with TrkA-positive (61.82% neurons being the most abundant, and Ret-positive (26.93% the least prevalent. Neurons positive with the antibody RT97 (1253 µm(2 were the largest, and those stained against peripherin (884 µm(2 were the smallest. Dual immunofluorescence revealed at least a 4.5% overlap for every tested marker combination, with overlap for the combinations TrkA/Ret, TrkA/RT97 and Ret/nNOS lower, and the overlap between Ret/CGRP being higher than would be expected by chance. With respect to latent HSV-1 infection, latency associated transcripts (LAT were detected using in situ hybridization (ISH in neurons expressing each of the marker proteins. In contrast to the mouse model, co-localization with neuronal markers Ret or CGRP mirrored the magnitude of these neuron populations, whereas for the other four neuronal markers fewer marker-positive cells were also LAT-ISH+. Ret and CGRP are both known to label neurons related to pain signaling.

  5. Expression of nitric oxide synthase in human gastric carcinoma and its relation to p53, PCNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Zhong Wang; You-Qing Cao; Jian-Nong Wu; Miao Chen; Xiao-Ying Cha

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of NOS in gastric carcinoma, and to explore the relationship between the expression of nitric oxide synthases (NOS) and p53, PCNA,pathological features and clinical staging of gastric cancer.METHODS: The activity of NOS protein was investigated in 85 samples of human gastric carcinoma and 25 samples of normal gastric mucosal tissue by biochemical assay. We then examined the expression of NOS, p53, PCNA in 85 samples of human gastric cancer was examined by immunohistochemistry, and NOS mRNA expression in 85 gastric cancer tissue specimens by in situ hybridization.RESULTS: Biochemical assay showed that the activity of NOS was significantly higher in gastric carcinoma than in normal gastric mucosal tissues (t = 0.4161, P<0.01).Immunohistochemistry revealed that endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expressed in all samples of normal gastric mucosa, but only 6 cases of 85 gastric cancer specimens showed weak positive immunohistochemical reactions to eNOS (20%). Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was expressed strongly in human gastric carcinoma (81.2%). In situ hybridization analysis showed that iNOS mRNA expression was significantly stronger than eNOS mRNA expression in gastric cancer tissue (x2 = 10.23, P<0.01). The expression of iNOS in gastric cancer was associated with differentiation, clinical stages or lymph node metastases (r= 0.3426, P<0.05). However,iNOS expression did not correlate with histological classifications and morphological types. The expression of iNOS was significantly correlated with p53 or PCNA expression (r = 0.3612, P<0.05). The expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) was not examined by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization in gastric cancer specimens and normal gastric mucosa.CONCLUSION: In human gastric cancer, there is an enhanced expression of iNOS, but not of eNOS. NOS promotes the proliferation of tumor cells and plays an important role in gastric cancer spread

  6. Neuronal survival in the brain: neuron type-specific mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfisterer, Ulrich; Khodosevich, Konstantin

    2017-03-02

    Neurogenic regions of mammalian brain produce many more neurons that will eventually survive and reach a mature stage. Developmental cell death affects both embryonically produced immature neurons and those immature neurons that are generated in regions of adult neurogenesis. Removal of substantial numbers of neurons that are not yet completely integrated into the local circuits helps to ensure that maturation and homeostatic function of neuronal networks in the brain proceed correctly. External signals from brain microenvironment together with intrinsic signaling pathways determine whether a particular neuron will die. To accommodate this signaling, immature neurons in the brain express a number of transmembrane factors as well as intracellular signaling molecules that will regulate the cell survival/death decision, and many of these factors cease being expressed upon neuronal maturation. Furthermore, pro-survival factors and intracellular responses depend on the type of neuron and region of the brain. Thus, in addition to some common neuronal pro-survival signaling, different types of neurons possess a variety of 'neuron type-specific' pro-survival constituents that might help them to adapt for survival in a certain brain region. This review focuses on how immature neurons survive during normal and impaired brain development, both in the embryonic/neonatal brain and in brain regions associated with adult neurogenesis, and emphasizes neuron type-specific mechanisms that help to survive for various types of immature neurons. Importantly, we mainly focus on in vivo data to describe neuronal survival specifically in the brain, without extrapolating data obtained in the PNS or spinal cord, and thus emphasize the influence of the complex brain environment on neuronal survival during development.

  7. A novel, testis-specific mRNA transcript encoding an NH2-terminal truncated nitric-oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Goligorsky, M S; Lin, M; Wilcox, J N; Marsden, P A

    1997-04-25

    mRNA diversity represents a major theme of neuronal nitric-oxide synthase (nNOS) gene expression in somatic cells/tissues. Given that gonads often express unique and biologically informative variants of complex genes, we determined whether unique variants of nNOS are expressed in the testis. Analysis of cDNA clones isolated from human testis identified a novel, testis-specific nNOS (TnNOS) mRNA transcript. A predicted 3294-base pair open reading frame encodes an NH2-terminal truncated protein of 1098 amino acids. Measurement of calcium-activated L-[14C]citrulline formation and nitric oxide release in CHO-K1 cells stably transfected with the TnNOS cDNA indicates that this protein is a calcium-dependent nitric-oxide synthase with catalytic activity comparable to that of full-length nNOS. TnNOS transcripts exhibit novel 5' mRNA sequences encoded by two unique exons spliced to exon 4 of the full-length nNOS. Characterization of the genomic structure indicates that exonic regions used by the novel TnNOS are expressed from intron 3 of the NOS1 gene. Although lacking canonical TATA and CAAT boxes, the 5'-flanking region of the TnNOS exon 1 contains multiple putative cis-regulatory elements including those implicated in testis-specific gene expression. The downstream promoter of the human nNOS gene, which directs testis-specific expression of a novel NH2-terminal truncated nitric-oxide synthase, represents the first reported example in the NOS gene family of transcriptional diversity producing a variant NOS protein.

  8. Kappe neurons, a novel population of olfactory sensory neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Gaurav; Nia, Shahrzad Bozorg; Zapilko, Veronika; Shiriagin, Vladimir; Kowatschew, Daniel; Oka, Yuichiro; Korsching, Sigrun I.

    2014-02-01

    Perception of olfactory stimuli is mediated by distinct populations of olfactory sensory neurons, each with a characteristic set of morphological as well as functional parameters. Beyond two large populations of ciliated and microvillous neurons, a third population, crypt neurons, has been identified in teleost and cartilaginous fishes. We report here a novel, fourth olfactory sensory neuron population in zebrafish, which we named kappe neurons for their characteristic shape. Kappe neurons are identified by their Go-like immunoreactivity, and show a distinct spatial distribution within the olfactory epithelium, similar to, but significantly different from that of crypt neurons. Furthermore, kappe neurons project to a single identified target glomerulus within the olfactory bulb, mdg5 of the mediodorsal cluster, whereas crypt neurons are known to project exclusively to the mdg2 glomerulus. Kappe neurons are negative for established markers of ciliated, microvillous and crypt neurons, but appear to have microvilli. Kappe neurons constitute the fourth type of olfactory sensory neurons reported in teleost fishes and their existence suggests that encoding of olfactory stimuli may require a higher complexity than hitherto assumed already in the peripheral olfactory system.

  9. Stochastic neuron models

    CERN Document Server

    Greenwood, Priscilla E

    2016-01-01

    This book describes a large number of open problems in the theory of stochastic neural systems, with the aim of enticing probabilists to work on them. This includes problems arising from stochastic models of individual neurons as well as those arising from stochastic models of the activities of small and large networks of interconnected neurons. The necessary neuroscience background to these problems is outlined within the text, so readers can grasp the context in which they arise. This book will be useful for graduate students and instructors providing material and references for applying probability to stochastic neuron modeling. Methods and results are presented, but the emphasis is on questions where additional stochastic analysis may contribute neuroscience insight. An extensive bibliography is included. Dr. Priscilla E. Greenwood is a Professor Emerita in the Department of Mathematics at the University of British Columbia. Dr. Lawrence M. Ward is a Professor in the Department of Psychology and the Brain...

  10. Effects and Mechanism of Action of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase on Apoptosis in a Rat Model of Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Li; Ding, Junli; Wang, Jianwei; Zhou, Changman; Zhang, Weiguang

    2016-02-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is a key enzyme in regulating nitric oxide (NO) synthesis under stress, and NO has varying ability to regulate apoptosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects and possible mechanism of action of iNOS on neuronal apoptosis in a rat model of cerebral focal ischemia and reperfusion injury in rats treated with S-methylisothiourea sulfate (SMT), a high-selective inhibitor of iNOS. Seventy-two male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into three groups: the sham, middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) + vehicle, and MCAO + SMT groups. Neurobehavioral deficits, infarct zone size, and cortical neuron morphology were evaluated through the modified Garcia scores, 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC), and Nissl staining, respectively. Brain tissues and serum samples were collected at 72 hr post-reperfusion for immunohistochemical analysis, Western blotting, Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin Nick End Labeling assay (TUNEL) staining, and enzyme assays. The study found that inhibition of iNOS significantly attenuated the severity of the pathological changes observed as a result of ischemia-reperfusion injury: SMT reduced NO content as well as total nitric oxide synthase (tNOS) and iNOS activities in both ischemic cerebral hemisphere and serum, improved neurobehavioral scores, reduced mortality, reduced the infarct volume ratio, attenuated morphological changes in cortical neurons, decreased the rate of apoptosis (TUNEL and caspase-3-positive), and increased phospho (p)-AKT expression in ischemic penumbra. These results suggested that inhibition of iNOS might reduce the severity of ischemia-reperfusion injury by inhibiting neuronal apoptosis via maintaining p-AKT activity.

  11. Effects of Extracellular ATP on Survival of Sensory Neurons in the Dorsal Root Ganglia of Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    ATP was added to the cultured sensory neurons obtained from the dorsal root ganglia of the neonatal rats and PBS was added to serve as control. MTT assays were conducted to evaluate the survival and activity of the cultured neurons. And the silicone regenerative chamber was used after the sciatic nerve incision of the mature SD rat. 1 mmol/L ATP was injected into the left chamber and 0.09 % natrium chloride was injected into the right chamber as controls. The changes of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity in the corresponding dorsal root ganglia were measured histochemically and image analysis was also performed 4 days after the sciatic nerve injury. The results showed that extracellular ATP could enhance the survival of the neurons and the number of NOS positive neurons were significantly different between the ATP and control groups (P<0.05). It was suggested that extracellular ATP had neurotrophic effect on neurons survival and could inhibit the NOS activity of the sensory neurons after the peripheral nerve incision, hence exerting the protective effect on the neurons, which was valuable for nerve regeneration after nerve injury.

  12. Cultured networks of excitatory projection neurons and inhibitory interneurons for studying human cortical neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jin-Chong; Fan, Jing; Wang, Xueqing; Eacker, Stephen M; Kam, Tae-In; Chen, Li; Yin, Xiling; Zhu, Juehua; Chi, Zhikai; Jiang, Haisong; Chen, Rong; Dawson, Ted M; Dawson, Valina L

    2016-04-06

    Translating neuroprotective treatments from discovery in cell and animal models to the clinic has proven challenging. To reduce the gap between basic studies of neurotoxicity and neuroprotection and clinically relevant therapies, we developed a human cortical neuron culture system from human embryonic stem cells or human inducible pluripotent stem cells that generated both excitatory and inhibitory neuronal networks resembling the composition of the human cortex. This methodology used timed administration of retinoic acid to FOXG1(+) neural precursor cells leading to differentiation of neuronal populations representative of the six cortical layers with both excitatory and inhibitory neuronal networks that were functional and homeostatically stable. In human cortical neuronal cultures, excitotoxicity or ischemia due to oxygen and glucose deprivation led to cell death that was dependent on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, nitric oxide (NO), and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) (a cell death pathway called parthanatos that is distinct from apoptosis, necroptosis, and other forms of cell death). Neuronal cell death was attenuated by PARP inhibitors that are currently in clinical trials for cancer treatment. This culture system provides a new platform for the study of human cortical neurotoxicity and suggests that PARP inhibitors may be useful for ameliorating excitotoxic and ischemic cell death in human neurons.

  13. Protective Effect of Interleukin-1β on Motor Neurons after Sciatic Nerve Injury in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翁雨雄; 巴拉特; 洪光祥; 王发斌; 陈振斌; 黄启顺

    2004-01-01

    Summary: Protective effect of interleukin-lβ (IL-1β) on motor neurons was studied after peripheral nerve injury. Twenty Wistar rats were divided into 2 groups randomly. The right sciatic nerve of each rat was resected. After silicon tubulization of sciatic nerve in rat, 15 μl 1 ng/ml IL-1β and PBS solution were injected into the silicon capsule respectively. Enzyme histochemistry was performed to show acetyle cholesterase (AchE) and nitric oxide staining (NOS) activity of spinal a motor neurons in spinal segments 2 weeks later. Neurons were counted and the diameter and cross sectional (c/s) area of neurons were analyzed by using computer image analysis system. The results showed that as compared with the normal side, both enzyme activities significantly changed in motor neurons in PBS group. The diameter and c/s area of both neurons changed significantly too (P<0.01). These results suggest that exogenous IL-1β protects a-motor neurons from degeneration and necrosis after peripheral nerve injury.

  14. From Neurons to Newtons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bjørn Gilbert

    2001-01-01

    proteins generate forces, to the macroscopic levels where overt arm movements are vol- untarily controlled within an unpredictable environment by legions of neurons¯ring in orderly fashion. An extensive computer simulation system has been developed for this thesis, which at present contains a neural...... network scripting language for specifying arbitrary neural architectures, de¯nition ¯les for detailed spinal networks, various biologically realistic models of neurons, and dynamic synapses. Also included are structurally accurate models of intrafusal and extra-fusal muscle ¯bers and a general body...

  15. Nitric acid vapor removal by activated, impregnated carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, G.O.

    1996-12-31

    Laboratory and industrial workers can be exposed to vapors of nitric acid, especially in accidents, such as spills. Nitric acid can also be a product of incineration for energy production or waste (e.g., CW agent) disposal. Activated carbons containing impregnants for enhancing vapor and gas removal have been tested for effectiveness in removing vapors of nitric acid from air. The nitric acid vapor was generated from concentrated acid solutions and detected by trapping in a water bubbler for pH measurements. Both low and moderate relative humidity conditions were used. All carbons were effective at vapor contact times representative of air-purifying respirator use. One surprising observation was the desorption of low levels of ammonia from impregnated carbons. This was apparently due to residual ammonia from the impregnation processes.

  16. Nitric oxide metabolites in goldfish under normoxic and hypoxic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Marie N.; Jensen, Frank Bo

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), produced by nitric oxide synthases (NOS enzymes), regulates multiple physiological functions in animals. NO exerts its effects by binding to iron (Fe) of heme groups (exemplified by the activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase) and by S-nitrosylation of proteins – and it is metab......Nitric oxide (NO), produced by nitric oxide synthases (NOS enzymes), regulates multiple physiological functions in animals. NO exerts its effects by binding to iron (Fe) of heme groups (exemplified by the activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase) and by S-nitrosylation of proteins...... levels was assessed from metabolic and respiratory variables. In normoxic goldfish, the concentrations of NO metabolites in plasma and tissues were comparable with values reported in mammals, indicative of similar NOS activity. Exposure to hypoxia [at PO2 (partial pressure of O2) values close...

  17. Inducible nitric oxide synthase mediates bone loss in ovariectomized mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuzzocrea, S.; Mazzon, E.; Dugo, L.; Genovese, T.; Paola, R. Di; Ruggeri, Z.; Vegeto, E.; Caputi, A.P.; Loo, F.A.J. van de; Puzzolo, D.; Maggi, A.

    2003-01-01

    Several clinical studies have shown that bone loss may be attributed to osteoclast recruitment induced by mediators of inflammation. In different experimental paradigms we have recently demonstrated that estrogen exhibits antiinflammatory activity by preventing the induction of inducible nitric

  18. The Effect of Nitric Oxide Donor in Diabetic Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Dashti

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is characterized by a nitric oxide deficiency at the wound site. Diabetes is a factor that influences all stages of wound healing. In animals with acute experimental diabetes induced by streptozotocin (STZ, the early inflammatory responses after wounding is impaired, fibroblast and endothelial cell proliferation is reduced as well as accumulation of reparative collagen and gain in wound breaking strenght. This study investigated whether exogenous nitric oxide supplimentation with nitric oxide donor DETA NONOate could reverse impaired healing in diabetes. The results suggest nitric oxide donor DETA NONOate can reverse impaired healing associated with diabetes (P<0.001 and urinary nitrate (NO-3 output may reflect the extent of repair in this wound model (P<0.001.

  19. Inducible nitric oxide synthase mediates bone loss in ovariectomized mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuzzocrea, S.; Mazzon, E.; Dugo, L.; Genovese, T.; Paola, R. Di; Ruggeri, Z.; Vegeto, E.; Caputi, A.P.; Loo, F.A.J. van de; Puzzolo, D.; Maggi, A.

    2003-01-01

    Several clinical studies have shown that bone loss may be attributed to osteoclast recruitment induced by mediators of inflammation. In different experimental paradigms we have recently demonstrated that estrogen exhibits antiinflammatory activity by preventing the induction of inducible nitric oxid

  20. Adhesion Development and the Expression of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Svinarich

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was conducted to determine whether nitric oxide (NO, a potent vasodilator and inhibitor of thrombus formation, is involved in the formation and maintenance of adhesions.

  1. Serum nitric oxide and homocysteine as biomarkers of ectopic pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavitha Meiyappan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aim of current study was to evaluate the role of serum homocysteine and nitric oxide in the diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy. Methods: The study included 32 patients with ruptured ectopic, 29 miscarriage patients and 30 normal pregnant women as controls. Fasting plasma homocysteine, serum folate, vitamin B12 levels and nitric oxide levels were estimated at the time of admission. Results: Plasma homocysteine levels were significantly lower in patients with ectopic pregnancy than normal pregnancy. Nitric oxide levels were significantly lower in patients with abortion. Conclusions: Patients with abortion have decreased circulating nitric oxide levels in serum while those with ectopic pregnancies have decreased homocysteine levels. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(1.000: 66-70

  2. Nitrergic neurons in the spinal cord of the bottlenose Dolphin (Tursiops truncatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombardi, Cristiano; Grandis, Annamaria; Gardini, Anna; Cozzi, Bruno

    2013-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a freely diffusible gaseous neurotransmitter generated by a selected population of neurons and acts as a paracrine molecule in the nervous system. NO is synthesized from l-arginine by means of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), an enzyme requiring nicotine adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) as cofactor. In this study, we used histochemical and immunohistochemical techniques to investigate the distribution of NADPH-diaphorase (NADPH-d) and nNOS in the spinal cord of the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus). Cells with a fusiform-shaped somata were numerous in the laminae I and II. The intermediolateral horn showed darkly-stained cells with a multipolar morphology. Neurons with a multipolar or fusiform morphology were observed in the ventral horn. Multipolar and fusiform neurons were the most common cell types in lamina X. Nitrergic fibers were numerous especially in the dorsal and intermediolateral horns. The presence of nitrergic cells and fibers in different laminae of the spinal cord suggests that NO may be involved in spinal sensory and visceral circuitries, and potentially contribute to the regulation of the complex retia mirabilia.

  3. Neuronal survival in the brain: neuron type-specific mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfisterer, Ulrich Gottfried; Khodosevich, Konstantin

    2017-01-01

    Neurogenic regions of mammalian brain produce many more neurons that will eventually survive and reach a mature stage. Developmental cell death affects both embryonically produced immature neurons and those immature neurons that are generated in regions of adult neurogenesis. Removal of substantial...... a particular neuron will die. To accommodate this signaling, immature neurons in the brain express a number of transmembrane factors as well as intracellular signaling molecules that will regulate the cell survival/death decision, and many of these factors cease being expressed upon neuronal maturation...... for survival in a certain brain region. This review focuses on how immature neurons survive during normal and impaired brain development, both in the embryonic/neonatal brain and in brain regions associated with adult neurogenesis, and emphasizes neuron type-specific mechanisms that help to survive for various...

  4. Potassium softens vascular endothelium and increases nitric oxide release

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    In the presence of aldosterone, plasma sodium in the high physiological range stiffens endothelial cells and reduces the release of nitric oxide. We now demonstrate effects of extracellular potassium on stiffness of individual cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells by using the tip of an atomic force microscope as a mechanical nanosensor. An acute increase of potassium in the physiological range swells and softens the endothelial cell and increases the release of nitric oxide. A high physio...

  5. Serum nitric oxide and homocysteine as biomarkers of ectopic pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Kavitha Meiyappan; Pooja Dhiman; Soundravally Rajendiren; Krishnalatha Thayagarajan; Soundara Raghavan S

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aim of current study was to evaluate the role of serum homocysteine and nitric oxide in the diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy. Methods: The study included 32 patients with ruptured ectopic, 29 miscarriage patients and 30 normal pregnant women as controls. Fasting plasma homocysteine, serum folate, vitamin B12 levels and nitric oxide levels were estimated at the time of admission. Results: Plasma homocysteine levels were significantly lower in patients with ectopic pregnancy t...

  6. Diamagnetism and Strucure of Nitric Acid-Treated Bulk Polyethylene

    OpenAIRE

    Ania, F.; Baltá Calleja, F. J.; Cagiao, M.E.

    1982-01-01

    An alternative procedure to examine the nature of the end product of nitric-acid-treated bulk polyethylene involving the measurement of the diamagnetic susceptibility is reported. This simple non-destructive method complements previous results obtained by means of IR spectroscopy. Thus after selectively removing the surface layer of the polyethylene lamellae with nitric acid (t > 50h) the diamagnetic susceptibility substantially decreases to values wich are consistent with tilted paraff...

  7. Acute chemical pneumonitis caused by nitric acid inhalation: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Hyung Shim; Lee, In Jae; Ko, Eun Young; Lee, Jae Young; Kim, Hyun Beom; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Lee, Kwan Seop; Lee, Yul; Bae, Sang Hoon [Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-01

    Chemical pneumonitis induced by nitric acid inhalation is a rare clinical condition. The previously reported radiologic findings of this disease include acute permeability pulmonary edema, delayed bronchiolitis obliterans, and bronchiectasis. In very few published rare radiologic reports has this disease manifested as acute alveolar injury; we report a case of acute chemical pneumonitis induced by nitric acid inhalation which at radiography manifested as bilateral perihilar consolidation and ground-glass attenuation, suggesting acute alveolar injury.

  8. Subcellular distribution of nitric oxide synthase isoforms in the rat duodenum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Petra Talapka; Nikolett Bódi; Izabella Battonyai; (E)va Fekete; Mária Bagyánszki

    2011-01-01

    AIM:To study the cell-type specific subcellular distribution of the three isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the rat duodenum. METHODS:Postembedding immunoelectronmicroscopy was performed,in which primary antibodies for neuronal NOS (nNOS),endothelial NOS (eNOS),and inducible NOS (iNOS),were visualized with protein A-gold-conjugated secondary antibodies.Stained ultrathin sections were examined and photographed with a Philips CM10 electron microscope equipped with a MEGAVIEW II camera.The specificity of the immunoreaction in all cases was assessed by omitting the primary antibodies in the labeling protocol and incubating the sections only in the protein A-gold conjugated secondary antibodies. RESULTS:Postembedding immunoelectronmicroscopy revealed the presence of nNOS,eNOS,and iNOS immunoreactivity in the myenteric neurons,the enteric smooth muscle cells,and the endothelium of capillaries running in the vicinity of the myenteric plexus of the rat duodenum.The cell type-specific distributions of the immunogold particles labeling the three different NOS isozymes were revealed.In the control experiments,in which the primary antiserum was omitted,virtually no postembedding gold particles were observed. CONCLUSION:This postembedding immunoelectronmicroscopic study provided the first evidence of celltype- specific differences in the subcellular distributions of NOS isoforms.

  9. Effects of cobalt chloride on nitric oxide and cytokines/chemokines production in microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Yan Hua; Yang, Jing Yu; Cui, Nan; Wang, Ji Ming; Hou, Yue; Song, Shuang; Wu, Chun Fu

    2012-05-01

    The involvement of microglial activation in metal neurotoxicity is becoming increasingly recognized. Some metal ions, such as zinc (II) and manganese (II), have been recently reported as microglial activators to induce the release of inflammatory mediators including cytokines, chemokines and nitric oxide (NO) which are involved in the pathogenesis of neurological diseases. Cobalt is essential for human life. However, excessive cobalt is cytotoxic and neurotoxic. In the present study, we determined cobalt-induced production of NO and cytokines/chemokines in N9 cells, a murine microglial cell line. High levels of cobalt significantly up-regulated iNOS mRNA and protein expression, which resulted in the release of NO. Cobalt induced the production of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in both N9 cells and primary mouse microglia and increased lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced cytokine production. Further study showed that cobalt induced cytokine production by a mechanism involving both nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. The involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in microglial activation was also confirmed. These findings suggested that cobalt neurotoxicity should be attributed not only directly to neuronal damage but also indirectly to microglial activation which might potentiate neuronal injury via elevation of proinflammatory mediator levels.

  10. A novel aphrodisiac compound from an orchid that activates nitric oxide synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramoniam, A; Gangaprasad, A; Sureshkumar, P K; Radhika, J; Arun, K B; Arun, B K

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is known to have roles in several crucial biological functions including vasodilation and penile erection. There are neuronal, endothelial and inducible NO synthases that influence the levels of NO in tissues and blood. NO activates guanylate cyclase and thereby increases the levels of cyclic GMP (cGMP). Viagra (sildenafil), a top selling drug in the world for erectile dysfunction, inhibits phosphodiesterase-5, which hydrolyses cGMP to GMP. Thus, it fosters an NO-mediated increase in the levels of cGMP, which mediates erectile function. Here, we show the aphrodisiac activity of a novel chemical isolate from the flowers of an epiphytic orchid, Vanda tessellata (Roxb.) ex Don, which activates neuronal and endothelial, but not inducible, NO synthases. The aphrodisiac activity is caused by an increase in the level of NO in corpus cavernosum. The drug increases blood levels of NO as early as 30 min after oral administration. The active compound was isolated by column chromatography. Based on the spectral data, the active compound is found to be a new compound, 2,7,7-tri methyl bicyclo [2.2.1] heptane. We anticipate that our findings could lead to the development of a commercially viable and valuable drug for erectile dysfunction.

  11. NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHESIS IN MYOCARDIUM FOLLOWING BURN INJURY IN RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王卫东; 陈宗荣; 李蓉; 楼淑芳

    1998-01-01

    The nitric oxide and cyclic GMP production in myocardium early after burn injury in tats were investigated. Nitric oxide synthase activity was measured in cytosols from the left ventricular wall of burned rats.Cytosols from the control group animals were shown to contain mainly Ca2+ dependent nitric oxide synthase (cNOS) with small amount of Ca2+ independent nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Following burn injury,there was a marked increase in iNOS activity with a peak at 8h post-butyl, however, myocardial cNOS activity was found to decline obviously. Parallel to iNOS induction there was a significant increase in myocardial nitric oxide and cyelic GMP production. All these chenges were alleviated by treatment of the rats with dexamethasone. Since increases in cyclic GMP levels in the heart were associated with reduced myocardial contractility, it is possible that enhanced production of nitric oxide by a Ca2+ independent NO synthase accounts, at least in part, for the depression of myocardial contractility seen in burn animals and patients.

  12. High- and medium-molecular-weight neurofilament proteins define specific neuron types in the guinea-pig enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Leni R; Thacker, Michelle; Furness, John B

    2009-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that neurofilament proteins are expressed by type II neurons in the enteric plexuses of a range of species from mouse to human. However, two previous studies have failed to reveal this association in the guinea-pig. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry for neurofilaments has revealed neurons with a single axon and spiny dendrites in human and pig but this morphology has not been described in the guinea-pig or other species. We have used antibodies against high- and medium-weight neurofilament proteins (NF-H and NF-M) to re-examine enteric neurons in the guinea-pig. NF-H immunoreactivity occurred in all type II neurons (identified by their IB4 binding) but these neurons were never NF-M-immunoreactive. On the other hand, 17% of myenteric neurons expressed NF-M. Many of these were uni-axonal neurons with spiny dendrites and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) immunoreactivity. NOS immunoreactivity occurred in surface expansions of the cytoplasm that did not contain neurofilament immunoreactivity. Thus, because of their NOS immunoreactivity, spiny neurons had the appearance of type I neurons. This indicates that the apparent morphologies and the morphological classifications of these neurons are dependent on the methods used to reveal them. We conclude that spiny type I NOS-immunoreactive neurons have similar morphologies in human and guinea-pig and that many of these are inhibitory motor neurons. Both type II and neuropeptide-Y-immunoreactive neurons in the submucosal ganglia exhibit NF-H immunoreactivity. NF-M has been observed in nerve fibres, but not in nerve cell bodies, in the submucosa.