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Sample records for neuronal glutamate transporter

  1. Prefrontal changes in the glutamate-glutamine cycle and neuronal/glial glutamate transporters in depression with and without suicide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, J.; Verwer, R.W.; Wamelen, D.J. van; Qi, X.R.; Gao, S.F.; Lucassen, P.J.; Swaab, D.F.

    2016-01-01

    There are indications for changes in glutamate metabolism in relation to depression or suicide. The glutamate-glutamine cycle and neuronal/glial glutamate transporters mediate the uptake of the glutamate and glutamine. The expression of various components of the glutamate-glutamine cycle and the neu

  2. Neuronal Activity and Glutamate Uptake Decrease Mitochondrial Mobility in Astrocytes and Position Mitochondria Near Glutamate Transporters

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    Jackson, Joshua G.; O'Donnell, John C.; Takano, Hajime; Coulter, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Within neurons, mitochondria are nonuniformly distributed and are retained at sites of high activity and metabolic demand. Glutamate transport and the concomitant activation of the Na+/K+-ATPase represent a substantial energetic demand on astrocytes. We hypothesized that mitochondrial mobility within astrocytic processes might be regulated by neuronal activity and glutamate transport. We imaged organotypic hippocampal slice cultures of rat, in which astrocytes maintain their highly branched morphologies and express glutamate transporters. Using time-lapse confocal microscopy, the mobility of mitochondria within individual astrocytic processes and neuronal dendrites was tracked. Within neurons, a greater percentage of mitochondria were mobile than in astrocytes. Furthermore, they moved faster and farther than in astrocytes. Inhibiting neuronal activity with tetrodotoxin (TTX) increased the percentage of mobile mitochondria in astrocytes. Mitochondrial movement in astrocytes was inhibited by vinblastine and cytochalasin D, demonstrating that this mobility depends on both the microtubule and actin cytoskeletons. Inhibition of glutamate transport tripled the percentage of mobile mitochondria in astrocytes. Conversely, application of the transporter substrate d-aspartate reversed the TTX-induced increase in the percentage of mobile mitochondria. Inhibition of reversed Na+/Ca2+ exchange also increased the percentage of mitochondria that were mobile. Last, we demonstrated that neuronal activity increases the probability that mitochondria appose GLT-1 particles within astrocyte processes, without changing the proximity of GLT-1 particles to VGLUT1. These results imply that neuronal activity and the resulting clearance of glutamate by astrocytes regulate the movement of astrocytic mitochondria and suggest a mechanism by which glutamate transporters might retain mitochondria at sites of glutamate uptake. PMID:24478345

  3. Differential effects of glutamate transporter inhibitors on the global electrophysiological response of astrocytes to neuronal stimulation.

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    Bernardinelli, Yann; Chatton, Jean-Yves

    2008-11-13

    Astrocytes are responsible for regulating extracellular levels of glutamate and potassium during neuronal activity. Glutamate clearance is handled by glutamate transporter subtypes glutamate transporter 1 and glutamate-aspartate transporter in astrocytes. DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate (TBOA) and dihydrokainate (DHK) are extensively used as inhibitors of glial glutamate transport activity. Using whole-cell recordings, we characterized the effects of both transporter inhibitors on afferent-evoked astrocyte currents in acute cortical slices of 3-week-old rats. When neuronal afferents were stimulated, passive astrocytes responded by a rapid inward current followed by a persistent tail current. The first current corresponded to a glutamate transporter current. This current was inhibited by both inhibitors and by tetrodotoxin. The tail current is an inward potassium current as it was blocked by barium. Besides inhibiting transporter currents, TBOA strongly enhanced the tail current. This effect was barium-sensitive and might be due to a rise in extracellular potassium level and increased glial potassium uptake. Unlike TBOA, DHK did not enhance the tail current but rather inhibited it. This result suggests that, in addition to inhibiting glutamate transport, DHK prevents astrocyte potassium uptake, possibly by blockade of inward-rectifier channels. This study revealed that, in brain slices, glutamate transporter inhibitors exert complex effects that cannot be attributed solely to glutamate transport inhibition.

  4. Prefrontal changes in the glutamate-glutamine cycle and neuronal/glial glutamate transporters in depression with and without suicide.

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    Zhao, J; Verwer, R W H; van Wamelen, D J; Qi, X-R; Gao, S-F; Lucassen, P J; Swaab, D F

    2016-11-01

    There are indications for changes in glutamate metabolism in relation to depression or suicide. The glutamate-glutamine cycle and neuronal/glial glutamate transporters mediate the uptake of the glutamate and glutamine. The expression of various components of the glutamate-glutamine cycle and the neuronal/glial glutamate transporters was determined by qPCR in postmortem prefrontal cortex. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) were selected from young MDD patients who had committed suicide (MDD-S; n = 17), from MDD patients who died of non-suicide related causes (MDD-NS; n = 7) and from matched control subjects (n = 12). We also compared elderly depressed patients who had not committed suicide (n = 14) with matched control subjects (n = 22). We found that neuronal located components (EAAT3, EAAT4, ASCT1, SNAT1, SNAT2) of the glutamate-glutamine cycle were increased in the ACC while the astroglia located components (EAAT1, EAAT2, GLUL) were decreased in the DLPFC of MDD-S patients. In contrast, most of the components in the cycle were increased in the DLPFC of MDD-NS patients. In conclusion, the glutamate-glutamine cycle - and thus glutamine transmission - is differentially affected in depressed suicide patients and depressed non-suicide patients in an area specific way. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Electrophysiological evidence for glial-subtype glutamate transporter functional expression in rat cerebellar granule neurons

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    Mafra R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A glutamate-sensitive inward current (Iglu is described in rat cerebellar granule neurons and related to a glutamate transport mechanism. We examined the features of Iglu using the patch-clamp technique. In steady-state conditions the Iglu measured 8.14 ± 1.9 pA. Iglu was identified as a voltage-dependent inward current showing a strong rectification at positive potentials. L-Glutamate activated the inward current in a dose-dependent manner, with a half-maximal effect at about 18 µM and a maximum increase of 51.2 ± 4.4%. The inward current was blocked by the presence of dihydrokainate (0.5 mM, shown by others to readily block the GLT1 isoform. We thus speculate that Iglu could be attributed to the presence of a native glutamate transporter in cerebellar granule neurons.

  6. Aspartate-444 is essential for productive substrate interactions in a neuronal glutamate transporter.

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    Teichman, Shlomit; Kanner, Baruch I

    2007-06-01

    In the central nervous system, electrogenic sodium- and potassium-coupled glutamate transporters terminate the synaptic actions of this neurotransmitter. In contrast to acidic amino acids, dicarboxylic acids are not recognized by glutamate transporters, but the related bacterial DctA transporters are capable of transporting succinate and other dicarboxylic acids. Transmembrane domain 8 contains several residues that differ between these two types of transporters. One of these, aspartate-444 of the neuronal glutamate transporter EAAC1, is conserved in glutamate transporters, but a serine residue occupies this position in DctA transporters. When aspartate-444 is mutated to serine, cysteine, alanine, or even to glutamate, uptake of D-[(3)H]-aspartate as well as the inwardly rectifying steady-state currents induced by acidic amino acids is impaired. Even though succinate was not capable of inducing any steady-state transport currents, the dicarboxylic acid inhibited the sodium-dependent transient currents by the mutants with a neutral substitution at position 444. In the neutral substitution mutants inhibition of the transients was also observed with acidic amino acids. In the D444E mutant, acidic amino acids were potent inhibitors of the transient currents, whereas the apparent affinity for succinate was lower by at least three orders of magnitude. Even though L-aspartate could bind to D444E with a high apparent affinity, this binding resulted in inhibition rather than stimulation of the uncoupled anion conductance. Thus, a carboxylic acid-containing side chain at position 444 prevents the interaction of glutamate transporters with succinate, and the presence of aspartate itself at this position is crucial for productive substrate binding compatible with substrate translocation.

  7. Glutamate transporter activity promotes enhanced Na+/K+-ATPase-mediated extracellular K+ management during neuronal activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Brian Roland; Holm, Rikke; Vilsen, Bente;

    2016-01-01

    , in addition, Na+/K+-ATPase-mediated K+ clearance could be governed by astrocytic [Na+]i. During most neuronal activity, glutamate is released in the synaptic cleft and is re-absorbed by astrocytic Na+-coupled glutamate transporters, thereby elevating [Na+]i. It thus remains unresolved whether the different Na...... constellations in Xenopus oocytes and determined their apparent Na+ affinity in intact oocytes and isolated membranes. The Na+/K+-ATPase was not fully saturated at basal astrocytic [Na+]i, irrespective of isoform constellation, although the β1 subunit conferred lower apparent Na+ affinity to the α1 and α2...

  8. Ephrin-A3 reverse signaling regulates hippocampal neuronal damage and astrocytic glutamate transport after transient global ischemia.

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    Yang, Jinshan; Luo, Xiang; Huang, Xiaojiang; Ning, Qin; Xie, Minjie; Wang, Wei

    2014-11-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that the Eph receptors and their ephrin ligands are involved in the regulation of interactions between neurons and astrocytes. Moreover, astrocytic ephrin-A3 reverse signaling mediated by EphA4 receptors is necessary for controlling the abundance of glial glutamate transporters. However, the role of ephrin-A3 reverse signaling in astrocytic function and neuronal death under ischemic conditions remains unclear. In the present study, we found that the EphA4 receptor and its ephrin-A3 ligand, which were distributed in neurons and astrocytes, respectively, in the hippocampus showed a coincident up-regulation of protein expression in the early stage of ischemia. Application of clustered EphA4 decreased the expressions of astrocytic glutamate transporters together with astrocytic glutamate uptake capacity through activating ephrin-A3 reverse signaling. In consequence, neuronal loss was aggravated in the CA1 region of the hippocampus accompanied by impaired hippocampus-dependent spatial memory when clustered EphA4 treatment was administered prior to transient global ischemia. These findings indicate that EphA4-mediated ephrin-A3 reverse signaling is a crucial mechanism for astrocytes to control glial glutamate transporters and prevent glutamate excitotoxicity under pathological conditions. Astrocytic ephrin-A3 reverse signaling mediated by EphA4 receptor is necessary for controlling the abundance of glial glutamate transporters under physiological conditions. However, the role of ephrin-A3 reverse signaling in astrocytic function and neuronal death under ischemic conditions remains unclear. We found EphA4-mediated ephrin-A3 reverse signaling to be a crucial mechanism for astrocytes to control glial glutamate transporters and protect hippocampal neurons from glutamate excitotoxicity under ischemic conditions, this cascade representing a potential therapeutic target for stroke.

  9. Neuronal exosomal miRNA-dependent translational regulation of astroglial glutamate transporter GLT1.

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    Morel, Lydie; Regan, Melissa; Higashimori, Haruki; Ng, Seng Kah; Esau, Christine; Vidensky, Svetlana; Rothstein, Jeffrey; Yang, Yongjie

    2013-03-08

    Perisynaptic astrocytes express important glutamate transporters, especially excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2, rodent analog GLT1) to regulate extracellular glutamate levels and modulate synaptic activation. In this study, we investigated an exciting new pathway, the exosome-mediated transfer of microRNA (in particular, miR-124a), in neuron-to-astrocyte signaling. Exosomes isolated from neuron-conditioned medium contain abundant microRNAs and small RNAs. These exosomes can be directly internalized into astrocytes and increase astrocyte miR-124a and GLT1 protein levels. Direct miR-124a transfection also significantly and selectively increases protein (but not mRNA) expression levels of GLT1 in cultured astrocytes. Consistent with our in vitro findings, intrastriatal injection of specific antisense against miR-124a into adult mice dramatically reduces GLT1 protein expression and glutamate uptake levels in striatum without reducing GLT1 mRNA levels. MiR-124a-mediated regulation of GLT1 expression appears to be indirect and is not mediated by its suppression of the putative GLT1 inhibitory ligand ephrinA3. Moreover, miR-124a is selectively reduced in the spinal cord tissue of end-stage SOD1 G93A mice, the mouse model of ALS. Subsequent exogenous delivery of miR-124a in vivo through stereotaxic injection significantly prevents further pathological loss of GLT1 proteins, as determined by GLT1 immunoreactivity in SOD1 G93A mice. Together, our study characterized a new neuron-to-astrocyte communication pathway and identified miRNAs that modulate GLT1 protein expression in astrocytes in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Neuronal Exosomal miRNA-dependent Translational Regulation of Astroglial Glutamate Transporter GLT1*

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    Morel, Lydie; Regan, Melissa; Higashimori, Haruki; Ng, Seng Kah; Esau, Christine; Vidensky, Svetlana; Rothstein, Jeffrey; Yang, Yongjie

    2013-01-01

    Perisynaptic astrocytes express important glutamate transporters, especially excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2, rodent analog GLT1) to regulate extracellular glutamate levels and modulate synaptic activation. In this study, we investigated an exciting new pathway, the exosome-mediated transfer of microRNA (in particular, miR-124a), in neuron-to-astrocyte signaling. Exosomes isolated from neuron-conditioned medium contain abundant microRNAs and small RNAs. These exosomes can be directly internalized into astrocytes and increase astrocyte miR-124a and GLT1 protein levels. Direct miR-124a transfection also significantly and selectively increases protein (but not mRNA) expression levels of GLT1 in cultured astrocytes. Consistent with our in vitro findings, intrastriatal injection of specific antisense against miR-124a into adult mice dramatically reduces GLT1 protein expression and glutamate uptake levels in striatum without reducing GLT1 mRNA levels. MiR-124a-mediated regulation of GLT1 expression appears to be indirect and is not mediated by its suppression of the putative GLT1 inhibitory ligand ephrinA3. Moreover, miR-124a is selectively reduced in the spinal cord tissue of end-stage SOD1 G93A mice, the mouse model of ALS. Subsequent exogenous delivery of miR-124a in vivo through stereotaxic injection significantly prevents further pathological loss of GLT1 proteins, as determined by GLT1 immunoreactivity in SOD1 G93A mice. Together, our study characterized a new neuron-to-astrocyte communication pathway and identified miRNAs that modulate GLT1 protein expression in astrocytes in vitro and in vivo. PMID:23364798

  11. Glial glutamate transporters mediate a functional metabolic crosstalk between neurons and astrocytes in the mouse developing cortex.

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    Voutsinos-Porche, Brigitte; Bonvento, Gilles; Tanaka, Kohichi; Steiner, Pascal; Welker, Egbert; Chatton, Jean-Yves; Magistretti, Pierre J; Pellerin, Luc

    2003-01-23

    Neuron-glia interactions are essential for synaptic function, and glial glutamate (re)uptake plays a key role at glutamatergic synapses. In knockout mice, for either glial glutamate transporters, GLAST or GLT-1, a classical metabolic response to synaptic activation (i.e., enhancement of glucose utilization) is decreased at an early functional stage in the somatosensory barrel cortex following activation of whiskers. Investigation in vitro demonstrates that glial glutamate transport represents a critical step for triggering enhanced glucose utilization, but also lactate release from astrocytes through a mechanism involving changes in intracellular Na(+) concentration. These data suggest that a metabolic crosstalk takes place between neurons and astrocytes in the developing cortex, which would be regulated by synaptic activity and mediated by glial glutamate transporters.

  12. BDNF regulates the expression and distribution of vesicular glutamate transporters in cultured hippocampal neurons.

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    Carlos V Melo

    Full Text Available BDNF is a pro-survival protein involved in neuronal development and synaptic plasticity. BDNF strengthens excitatory synapses and contributes to LTP, presynaptically, through enhancement of glutamate release, and postsynaptically, via phosphorylation of neurotransmitter receptors, modulation of receptor traffic and activation of the translation machinery. We examined whether BDNF upregulated vesicular glutamate receptor (VGLUT 1 and 2 expression, which would partly account for the increased glutamate release in LTP. Cultured rat hippocampal neurons were incubated with 100 ng/ml BDNF, for different periods of time, and VGLUT gene and protein expression were assessed by real-time PCR and immunoblotting, respectively. At DIV7, exogenous application of BDNF rapidly increased VGLUT2 mRNA and protein levels, in a dose-dependent manner. VGLUT1 expression also increased but only transiently. However, at DIV14, BDNF stably increased VGLUT1 expression, whilst VGLUT2 levels remained low. Transcription inhibition with actinomycin-D or α-amanitine, and translation inhibition with emetine or anisomycin, fully blocked BDNF-induced VGLUT upregulation. Fluorescence microscopy imaging showed that BDNF stimulation upregulates the number, integrated density and intensity of VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 puncta in neurites of cultured hippocampal neurons (DIV7, indicating that the neurotrophin also affects the subcellular distribution of the transporter in developing neurons. Increased VGLUT1 somatic signals were also found 3 h after stimulation with BDNF, further suggesting an increased de novo transcription and translation. BDNF regulation of VGLUT expression was specifically mediated by BDNF, as no effect was found upon application of IGF-1 or bFGF, which activate other receptor tyrosine kinases. Moreover, inhibition of TrkB receptors with K252a and PLCγ signaling with U-73122 precluded BDNF-induced VGLUT upregulation. Hippocampal neurons express both isoforms during

  13. Computational Studies of Glutamate Transporters

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    Jeffry Setiadi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the human brain whose binding to receptors on neurons excites them while excess glutamate are removed from synapses via transporter proteins. Determination of the crystal structures of bacterial aspartate transporters has paved the way for computational investigation of their function and dynamics at the molecular level. Here, we review molecular dynamics and free energy calculation methods used in these computational studies and discuss the recent applications to glutamate transporters. The focus of the review is on the insights gained on the transport mechanism through computational methods, which otherwise is not directly accessible by experimental probes. Recent efforts to model the mammalian glutamate and other amino acid transporters, whose crystal structures have not been solved yet, are included in the review.

  14. Bovine neuronal vesicular glutamate transporter activity is inhibited by ergovaline and other ergopeptines

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    L-Glutamate (Glu) is the major excitatory neurotransmitter responsible for neurotransmission in the vertebrate central nervous system, including the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of cattle. Vesicular Glu transporters VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 concentrate (50 mM) Glu (Km = 1 to 4 mM) into synaptic vesicles (S...

  15. Glial and Neuronal Glutamate Transporters Differ in the Na+ Requirements for Activation of the Substrate-Independent Anion Conductance

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    Christopher B. Divito

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs are secondary active transporters of L-glutamate and L- or D-aspartate. These carriers also mediate a thermodynamically uncoupled anion conductance that is gated by Na+ and substrate binding. The activation of the anion channel by binding of Na+ alone, however, has only been demonstrated for mammalian EAAC1 (EAAT3 and EAAT4. To date, no difference has been observed for the substrate dependence of anion channel gating between the glial, EAAT1 and EAAT2, and the neuronal isoforms EAAT3, EAAT4 and EAAT5. Here we describe a difference in the Na+-dependence of anion channel gating between glial and neuronal isoforms. Chloride flux through transporters without glutamate binding has previously been described as substrate-independent or “leak” channel activity. Choline or N-methyl-D-glucamine replacement of external Na+ ions significantly reduced or abolished substrate-independent EAAT channel activity in EAAT3 and EAAT4 yet has no effect on EAAT1 or EAAT2. The interaction of Na+ with the neuronal carrier isoforms was concentration dependent, consistent with previous data. The presence of substrate and Na+-independent open states in the glial EAAT isoforms is a novel finding in the field of EAAT function. Our results reveal an important divergence in anion channel function between glial and neuronal glutamate transporters and highlight new potential roles for the EAAT-associated anion channel activity based on transporter expression and localization in the central nervous system.

  16. Ionotropic glutamate receptors and glutamate transporters are involved in necrotic neuronal cell death induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation of hippocampal slice cultures.

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    Bonde, C; Noraberg, J; Noer, H; Zimmer, J

    2005-01-01

    Organotypic hippocampal slice cultures represent a feasible model for studies of cerebral ischemia and the role of ionotropic glutamate receptors in oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced neurodegeneration. New results and a review of existing data are presented in the first part of this paper. The role of glutamate transporters, with special reference to recent results on inhibition of glutamate transporters under normal and energy-failure (ischemia-like) conditions is reviewed in the last part of the paper. The experimental work is based on hippocampal slice cultures derived from 7 day old rats and grown for about 3 weeks. In such cultures we investigated the subfield neuronal susceptibility to oxygen-glucose deprivation, the type of induced cell death and the involvement of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Hippocampal slice cultures were also used in our studies on glutamate transporters reviewed in the last part of this paper. Neurodegeneration was monitored and/or shown by cellular uptake of propidium iodide, loss of immunocytochemical staining for microtubule-associated protein 2 and staining with Fluoro-Jade B. To distinguish between necrotic vs. apoptotic neuronal cell death we used immunocytochemical staining for active caspase-3 (apoptosis indicator) and Hoechst 33342 staining of nuclear chromatin. Our experimental studies on oxygen-glucose deprivation confirmed that CA1 pyramidal cells were the most susceptible to this ischemia-like condition. Judged by propidium iodide uptake, a selective CA1 lesion, with only minor affection on CA3, occurred in cultures exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation for 30 min. Nuclear chromatin staining by Hoechst 33342 and staining for active caspase-3 showed that oxygen-glucose deprivation induced necrotic cell death only. Addition of 10 microM of the N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor antagonist MK-801, and 20 microM of the non-N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor antagonist 2,3-dihyroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl

  17. Effects of α-Asarone on the Neuronal Glutamate Transporter EAAC1

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    顾全保; 杜慧明; Heike FOTIS; 马春辉; 黄成钢; Wolfgang SCHWARZ

    2008-01-01

    Objective: α-asarone is a major effective component that can be isolated from Acorus tatarinowii Schott,a Chinese herbal medicine. Clinical investigations have shown that α-asarone has strong sedative and anti-convulsive action in the central nervous system. In recent years, several medicines containing a-asarone were applied in treatment of asthma, bronchitis, expectorant, or epilepsy. However, the underlying cellular mechanism of ct-asarone is still unknown. Here the authors considered EAAC1, the transporter for the excitatory glutamate, as a possible target. Methods: Supercritical CO2 fluid extraction and silica gel column chromatography were used to obtain ct-asarone from the rhizomes of Acorus tatarinowii Schott. Xenopus oocytes with heterologously expressed EAAC 1 were used as a model system. Rate of glutamate uptake was measured by means of isotopic tracer technique. Glutamate-induced current was recorded under two-electrode voltage clamp. 40μg/mL of ct-asarone was used for testing its effect on EAAC1 activity. Results: ct-asarone induced a slight, but still significant stimulation of rate of glutamate uptake by 15%. In contrast, EAACl-mediated current became reduced (by 30% at -100 mV). Since EAAC 1 can operate in transport and also in an ion-channel mode, the result indicates strong inhibition of the channel mode. This inhibition is voltage-dependent becoming larger at more negative potentials. Conclusion: The stimulation of glutamate uptake reduces glutamate concentration in the synaptic cleft and, hence, reduces excitatory synaptic activity. The inhibition on the ion-channel mode stabilizes the membrane potential, and therefore, also contributes to reduced excitatory activity.

  18. The structure of glutamate transporters shows channel-like features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slotboom, DJ; Konings, WN; Lolkema, JS

    2001-01-01

    Neuronal and glial glutamate transporters remove the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate from the synaptic cleft and thus prevent neurotoxicity, The proteins belong to a large family of secondary transporters, which includes transporters from a variety of bacterial, archaeal and eukaryotic organis

  19. Glutamatergic or GABAergic neuron-specific, long-term expression in neocortical neurons from helper virus-free HSV-1 vectors containing the phosphate-activated glutaminase, vesicular glutamate transporter-1, or glutamic acid decarboxylase promoter.

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    Rasmussen, Morten; Kong, Lingxin; Zhang, Guo-rong; Liu, Meng; Wang, Xiaodan; Szabo, Gabor; Curthoys, Norman P; Geller, Alfred I

    2007-05-01

    Many potential uses of direct gene transfer into neurons require restricting expression to one of the two major types of forebrain neurons, glutamatergic or GABAergic neurons. Thus, it is desirable to develop virus vectors that contain either a glutamatergic or GABAergic neuron-specific promoter. The brain/kidney phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG), the product of the GLS1 gene, produces the majority of the glutamate for release as neurotransmitter, and is a marker for glutamatergic neurons. A PAG promoter was partially characterized using a cultured kidney cell line. The three vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) are expressed in distinct populations of neurons, and VGLUT1 is the predominant VGLUT in the neocortex, hippocampus, and cerebellar cortex. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) produces GABA; the two molecular forms of the enzyme, GAD65 and GAD67, are expressed in distinct, but largely overlapping, groups of neurons, and GAD67 is the predominant form in the neocortex. In transgenic mice, an approximately 9 kb fragment of the GAD67 promoter supports expression in most classes of GABAergic neurons. Here, we constructed plasmid (amplicon) Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1) vectors that placed the Lac Z gene under the regulation of putative PAG, VGLUT1, or GAD67 promoters. Helper virus-free vector stocks were delivered into postrhinal cortex, and the rats were sacrificed 4 days or 2 months later. The PAG or VGLUT1 promoters supported approximately 90% glutamatergic neuron-specific expression. The GAD67 promoter supported approximately 90% GABAergic neuron-specific expression. Long-term expression was observed using each promoter. Principles for obtaining long-term expression from HSV-1 vectors, based on these and other results, are discussed. Long-term glutamatergic or GABAergic neuron-specific expression may benefit specific experiments on learning or specific gene therapy approaches. Of note, promoter analyses might identify regulatory elements that determine

  20. Glutamatergic or GABAergic neuron-specific, long-term expression in neocortical neurons from helper virus-free HSV-1 vectors containing the phosphate-activated glutaminase, vesicular glutamate transporter-1, or glutamic acid decarboxylase promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Morten; Kong, Lingxin; Zhang, Guo-rong; Liu, Meng; Wang, Xiaodan; Szabo, Gabor; Curthoys, Norman P.; Geller, Alfred I.

    2009-01-01

    Many potential uses of direct gene transfer into neurons require restricting expression to one of the two major types of forebrain neurons, glutamatergic or GABAergic neurons. Thus, it is desirable to develop virus vectors that contain either a glutamatergic or GABAergic neuron-specific promoter. The brain/kidney phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG), the product of the GLS1 gene, produces the majority of the glutamate for release as neurotransmitter, and is a marker for glutamatergic neurons. A PAG promoter was partially characterized using a cultured kidney cell line. The three vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) are expressed in distinct populations of neurons, and VGLUT1 is the predominant VGLUT in the neocortex, hippocampus, and cerebellar cortex. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) produces GABA; the two molecular forms of the enzyme, GAD65 and GAD67, are expressed in distinct, but largely overlapping, groups of neurons, and GAD67 is the predominant form in the neocortex. In transgenic mice, an ∼9 kb fragment of the GAD67 promoter supports expression in most classes of GABAergic neurons. Here, we constructed plasmid (amplicon) Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1) vectors that placed the Lac Z gene under the regulation of putative PAG, VGLUT1, or GAD67 promoters. Helper virus-free vector stocks were delivered into postrhinal cortex, and the rats were sacrificed 4 days or 2 months later. The PAG or VGLUT1 promoters supported ∼90 % glutamatergic neuron-specific expression. The GAD67 promoter supported ∼90 % GABAergic neuron-specific expression. Long-term expression was observed using each promoter. Principles for obtaining long-term expression from HSV-1 vectors, based on these and other results, are discussed. Long-term glutamatergic or GABAergic neuron-specific expression may benefit specific experiments on learning or specific gene therapy approaches. Of note, promoter analyses might identify regulatory elements that determine a glutamatergic or GABAergic

  1. GDNF pre-treatment aggravates neuronal cell loss in oxygen-glucose deprived hippocampal slice cultures: a possible effect of glutamate transporter up-regulation.

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    Bonde, C; Sarup, A; Schousboe, A; Gegelashvili, G; Noraberg, J; Zimmer, J

    2003-01-01

    Besides its neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects on dopaminergic neurons and spinal motoneurons, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has potent neuroprotective effects in cerebral ischemia. The protective effect has so far been related to reduced activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAr). This study tested the effects of GDNF on glutamate transporter expression, with the hypothesis that modulation of glutamate transporter activity would affect the outcome of cerebral ischemia. Organotypic hippocampal slice cultures, derived from 1-week-old rats, were treated with 100 ng/ml GDNF for either 2 or 5 days, followed by Western blot analysis of NMDAr subunit 1 (NR1) and two glutamate transporter subtypes, GLAST and GLT-1. After 5-day exposure to GDNF, expression of GLAST and GLT-1 was up-regulated to 169 and 181% of control values, respectively, whereas NR1 was down-regulated to 64% of control. However, despite these changes that potentially would support neuronal resistance to excitotoxicity, the long-term treatment with GDNF was found to aggravate the neuronal damage induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). The increased cell death, assessed by propidium iodide (PI) uptake, occurred not only among the most susceptible CA1 pyramidal cells, but also in CA3 and fascia dentata. Given that glutamate transporters are able to release glutamate by reversed action during energy failure, it is suggested that the observed increase in OGD-induced cell death in the GDNF-pretreated cultures was caused by the build-up of excitotoxic concentrations of extracellular glutamate released through the glutamate transporters, which were up-regulated by GDNF. Although the extent and consequences of glutamate release via reversal of GLAST and GLT-1 transporters seem to vary in different energy failure models, the present findings should be taken into account in clinical trials of GDNF.

  2. Vesicular glutamate transporter 2 is required for the respiratory and parasympathetic activation produced by optogenetic stimulation of catecholaminergic neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla of mice in vivo.

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    Abbott, Stephen B G; Holloway, Benjamin B; Viar, Kenneth E; Guyenet, Patrice G

    2014-01-01

    Catecholaminergic neurons of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM-CA neurons; C1 neurons) contribute to the sympathetic, parasympathetic and neuroendocrine responses elicited by physical stressors such as hypotension, hypoxia, hypoglycemia, and infection. Most RVLM-CA neurons express vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT)2, and may use glutamate as a ionotropic transmitter, but the importance of this mode of transmission in vivo is uncertain. To address this question, we genetically deleted VGLUT2 from dopamine-β-hydroxylase-expressing neurons in mice [DβH(Cre/0) ;VGLUT2(flox/flox) mice (cKO mice)]. We compared the in vivo effects of selectively stimulating RVLM-CA neurons in cKO vs. control mice (DβH(Cre/0) ), using channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2-mCherry) optogenetics. ChR2-mCherry was expressed by similar numbers of rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) neurons in each strain (~400 neurons), with identical selectivity for catecholaminergic neurons (90-99% colocalisation with tyrosine hydroxylase). RVLM-CA neurons had similar morphology and axonal projections in DβH(Cre/0) and cKO mice. Under urethane anesthesia, photostimulation produced a similar pattern of activation of presumptive ChR2-positive RVLM-CA neurons in DβH(Cre/0) and cKO mice. Photostimulation in conscious mice produced frequency-dependent respiratory activation in DβH(Cre/0) mice but no effect in cKO mice. Similarly, photostimulation under urethane anesthesia strongly activated efferent vagal nerve activity in DβH(Cre/0) mice only. Vagal responses were unaffected by α1 -adrenoreceptor blockade. In conclusion, two responses evoked by RVLM-CA neuron stimulation in vivo require the expression of VGLUT2 by these neurons, suggesting that the acute autonomic responses driven by RVLM-CA neurons are mediated by glutamate.

  3. The inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1 beta, mediates loss of astroglial glutamate transport and drives excitotoxic motor neuron injury in the spinal cord during acute viral encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prow, Natalie A; Irani, David N

    2008-05-01

    Astrocytes remove glutamate from the synaptic cleft via specific transporters, and impaired glutamate reuptake may promote excitotoxic neuronal injury. In a model of viral encephalomyelitis caused by neuroadapted Sindbis virus (NSV), mice develop acute paralysis and spinal motor neuron degeneration inhibited by the AMPA receptor antagonist, NBQX. To investigate disrupted glutamate homeostasis in the spinal cord, expression of the main astroglial glutamate transporter, GLT-1, was examined. GLT-1 levels declined in the spinal cord during acute infection while GFAP expression was preserved. There was simultaneous production of inflammatory cytokines at this site, and susceptible animals treated with drugs that blocked IL-1beta release also limited paralysis and prevented the loss of GLT-1 expression. Conversely, infection of resistant mice that develop mild paralysis following NSV challenge showed higher baseline GLT-1 levels as well as lower production of IL-1beta and relatively preserved GLT-1 expression in the spinal cord compared to susceptible hosts. Finally, spinal cord GLT-1 expression was largely maintained following infection of IL-1beta-deficient animals. Together, these data show that IL-1beta inhibits astrocyte glutamate transport in the spinal cord during viral encephalomyelitis. They provide one of the strongest in vivo links between innate immune responses and the development of excitotoxicity demonstrated to date.

  4. Molecular physiology of vesicular glutamate transporters in the digestive system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Li; Fayez K. Ghishan; Liqun Bai

    2005-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Packaging and storage of glutamate into glutamatergic neuronal vesicles require ATP-dependent vesicular glutamate uptake systems, which utilize the electrochemical proton gradient as a driving force. Three vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1-3) have been recently identified from neuronal tissue where they play a key role to maintain the vesicular glutamate level. Recently, it has been demonstrated that glutamate signaling is also functional in peripheral neuronal and non-neuronal tissues, and occurs in sites of pituitary, adrenal, pineal glands, bone, GI tract, pancreas,skin, and testis. The glutamate receptors and VGLUTs in digestivesystem have been found in both neuronal and endocrinal cells. The glutamate signaling in the digestive system may have significant relevance to diabetes and GI tract motility disorders. This review will focus on the most recent update of molecular physiology of digestive VGLUTs.

  5. Glutamate transporter activity promotes enhanced Na+/K+-ATPase -mediated extracellular K+ management during neuronal activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Brian R; Holm, Rikke; Vilsen, Bente;

    2016-01-01

    , in addition, Na+ /K+ -ATPase-mediated K+ clearance could be governed by astrocytic [Na+ ]i . During most neuronal activity, glutamate is released in the synaptic cleft and is re-absorbed by astrocytic Na+ -coupled glutamate transporters, thereby elevating [Na+ ]i . It thus remains unresolved whether...... astrocytic isoform constellations in Xenopus oocytes and determined their apparent Na+ affinity in intact oocytes and isolated membranes. The Na+ /K+ -ATPase was not fully saturated at basal astrocytic [Na+ ]i , irrespective of isoform constellation, although the β1 subunit conferred lower apparent Na...

  6. GLT-1: The elusive presynaptic glutamate transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmele, Theresa S; Rosenberg, Paul A

    2016-09-01

    Historically, glutamate uptake in the CNS was mainly attributed to glial cells for three reasons: 1) none of the glutamate transporters were found to be located in presynaptic terminals of excitatory synapses; 2) the putative glial transporters, GLT-1 and GLAST are expressed at high levels in astrocytes; 3) studies of the constitutive GLT-1 knockout as well as pharmacological studies demonstrated that >90% of glutamate uptake into forebrain synaptosomes is mediated by the operation of GLT-1. Here we summarize the history leading up to the recognition of GLT-1a as a presynaptic glutamate transporter. A major issue now is understanding the physiological and pathophysiological significance of the expression of GLT-1 in presynaptic terminals. To elucidate the cell-type specific functions of GLT-1, a conditional knockout was generated with which to inactivate the GLT-1 gene in different cell types using Cre/lox technology. Astrocytic knockout led to an 80% reduction of GLT-1 expression, resulting in intractable seizures and early mortality as seen also in the constitutive knockout. Neuronal knockout was associated with no obvious phenotype. Surprisingly, synaptosomal uptake capacity (Vmax) was found to be significantly reduced, by 40%, in the neuronal knockout, indicating that the contribution of neuronal GLT-1 to synaptosomal uptake is disproportionate to its protein expression (5-10%). Conversely, the contribution of astrocytic GLT-1 to synaptosomal uptake was much lower than expected. In contrast, the loss of uptake into liposomes prepared from brain protein from astrocyte and neuronal knockouts was proportionate with the loss of GLT-1 protein, suggesting that a large portion of GLT-1 in astrocytic membranes in synaptosomal preparations is not functional, possibly because of a failure to reseal. These results suggest the need to reinterpret many previous studies using synaptosomal uptake to investigate glutamate transport itself as well as changes in glutamate

  7. Activation of Pedunculopontine Glutamate Neurons Is Reinforcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Ji Hoon; Zell, Vivien; Wu, Johnathan; Punta, Cindy; Ramajayam, Nivedita; Shen, Xinyi; Faget, Lauren; Lilascharoen, Varoth; Lim, Byung Kook; Hnasko, Thomas S

    2017-01-04

    Dopamine transmission from midbrain ventral tegmental area (VTA) neurons underlies behavioral processes related to motivation and drug addiction. The pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) is a brainstem nucleus containing glutamate-, acetylcholine-, and GABA-releasing neurons with connections to basal ganglia and limbic brain regions. Here we investigated the role of PPTg glutamate neurons in reinforcement, with an emphasis on their projections to VTA dopamine neurons. We used cell-type-specific anterograde tracing and optogenetic methods to selectively label and manipulate glutamate projections from PPTg neurons in mice. We used anatomical, electrophysiological, and behavioral assays to determine their patterns of connectivity and ascribe functional roles in reinforcement. We found that photoactivation of PPTg glutamate cell bodies could serve as a direct positive reinforcer on intracranial self-photostimulation assays. Further, PPTg glutamate neurons directly innervate VTA; photostimulation of this pathway preferentially excites VTA dopamine neurons and is sufficient to induce behavioral reinforcement. These results demonstrate that ascending PPTg glutamate projections can drive motivated behavior, and PPTg to VTA synapses may represent an important target relevant to drug addiction and other mental health disorders. Uncovering brain circuits underlying reward-seeking is an important step toward understanding the circuit bases of drug addiction and other psychiatric disorders. The dopaminergic system emanating from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) plays a key role in regulating reward-seeking behaviors. We used optogenetics to demonstrate that the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus sends glutamatergic projections to VTA dopamine neurons, and that stimulation of this circuit promotes behavioral reinforcement. The findings support a critical role for pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus glutamate neurotransmission in modulating VTA dopamine neuron activity and

  8. Glutamate neurons are intermixed with midbrain dopamine neurons in nonhuman primates and humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, David H.; Wang, Hui-Ling; Liu, Bing; Barker, David J.; Mód, László; Szocsics, Péter; Silva, Afonso C.; Maglóczky, Zsófia; Morales, Marisela

    2016-01-01

    The rodent ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC) contain dopamine neurons intermixed with glutamate neurons (expressing vesicular glutamate transporter 2; VGluT2), which play roles in reward and aversion. However, identifying the neuronal compositions of the VTA and SNC in higher mammals has remained challenging. Here, we revealed VGluT2 neurons within the VTA and SNC of nonhuman primates and humans by simultaneous detection of VGluT2 mRNA and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; for identification of dopamine neurons). We found that several VTA subdivisions share similar cellular compositions in nonhuman primates and humans; their rostral linear nuclei have a high prevalence of VGluT2 neurons lacking TH; their paranigral and parabrachial pigmented nuclei have mostly TH neurons, and their parabrachial pigmented nuclei have dual VGluT2-TH neurons. Within nonhuman primates and humans SNC, the vast majority of neurons are TH neurons but VGluT2 neurons were detected in the pars lateralis subdivision. The demonstration that midbrain dopamine neurons are intermixed with glutamate or glutamate-dopamine neurons from rodents to humans offers new opportunities for translational studies towards analyzing the roles that each of these neurons play in human behavior and in midbrain-associated illnesses such as addiction, depression, schizophrenia, and Parkinson’s disease. PMID:27477243

  9. Glutamate and GABA in Vestibulo-Sympathetic Pathway Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstein, Gay R; Friedrich, Victor L; Martinelli, Giorgio P

    2016-01-01

    The vestibulo-sympathetic reflex (VSR) actively modulates blood pressure during changes in posture. This reflex allows humans to stand up and quadrupeds to rear or climb without a precipitous decline in cerebral perfusion. The VSR pathway conveys signals from the vestibular end organs to the caudal vestibular nuclei. These cells, in turn, project to pre-sympathetic neurons in the rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla (RVLM and CVLM, respectively). The present study assessed glutamate- and GABA-related immunofluorescence associated with central vestibular neurons of the VSR pathway in rats. Retrograde FluoroGold tract tracing was used to label vestibular neurons with projections to RVLM or CVLM, and sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) was employed to activate these pathways. Central vestibular neurons of the VSR were identified by co-localization of FluoroGold and cFos protein, which accumulates in some vestibular neurons following galvanic stimulation. Triple-label immunofluorescence was used to co-localize glutamate- or GABA- labeling in the identified VSR pathway neurons. Most activated projection neurons displayed intense glutamate immunofluorescence, suggestive of glutamatergic neurotransmission. To support this, anterograde tracer was injected into the caudal vestibular nuclei. Vestibular axons and terminals in RVLM and CVLM co-localized the anterograde tracer and vesicular glutamate transporter-2 signals. Other retrogradely-labeled cFos-positive neurons displayed intense GABA immunofluorescence. VSR pathway neurons of both phenotypes were present in the caudal medial and spinal vestibular nuclei, and projected to both RVLM and CVLM. As a group, however, triple-labeled vestibular cells with intense glutamate immunofluorescence were located more rostrally in the vestibular nuclei than the GABAergic neurons. Only the GABAergic VSR pathway neurons showed a target preference, projecting predominantly to CVLM. These data provide the first

  10. Glutamate and GABA in vestibulo-sympathetic pathway neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gay R Holstein

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The vestibulo-sympathetic reflex actively modulates blood pressure during changes in posture. This reflex allows humans to stand up and quadrupeds to rear or climb without a precipitous decline in cerebral perfusion. The vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway conveys signals from the vestibular end organs to the caudal vestibular nuclei. These cells, in turn, project to pre-sympathetic neurons in the rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla (RVLM and CVLM, respectively. The present study assessed glutamate- and GABA-related immunofluorescence associated with central vestibular neurons of the vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway in rats. Retrograde FluoroGold tract tracing was used to label vestibular neurons with projections to RVLM or CVLM, and sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation was employed to activate these pathways. Central vestibular neurons of the vestibulo-sympathetic reflex were identified by co-localization of FluoroGold and cFos protein, which accumulates in some vestibular neurons following galvanic stimulation. Triple-label immunofluorescence was used to co-localize glutamate- or GABA- labeling in the identified vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway neurons. Most activated projection neurons displayed intense glutamate immunofluorescence, suggestive of glutamatergic neurotransmission. To support this, anterograde tracer was injected into the caudal vestibular nuclei. Vestibular axons and terminals in RVLM and CVLM co-localized the anterograde tracer and vesicular glutamate transporter-2 signals. Other retrogradely-labeled cFos-positive neurons displayed intense GABA immunofluorescence. Vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway neurons of both phenotypes were present in the caudal medial and spinal vestibular nuclei, and projected to both RVLM and CVLM. As a group, however, triple-labeled vestibular cells with intense glutamate immunofluorescence were located more rostrally in the vestibular nuclei than the GABAergic neurons. Only the

  11. A conserved serine-rich stretch in the glutamate transporter family forms a substrate-sensitive reentrant loop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slotboom, Dirk Jan; Sobczak, Iwona; Konings, Wil N.; Lolkema, Juke S.

    1999-01-01

    Neuronal and glial glutamate transporters remove the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate from the synaptic cleft. The proteins belong to a large family of secondary transporters, which includes bacterial glutamate transporters. The C-terminal half of the glutamate transporters is well conserved an

  12. Modulation of glutamate transport and receptor binding by glutamate receptor antagonists in EAE rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulkowski, Grzegorz; Dąbrowska-Bouta, Beata; Salińska, Elżbieta; Strużyńska, Lidia

    2014-01-01

    The etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) is currently unknown. However, one potential mechanism involved in the disease may be excitotoxicity. The elevation of glutamate in cerebrospinal fluid, as well as changes in the expression of glutamate receptors (iGluRs and mGluRs) and excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs), have been observed in the brains of MS patients and animals subjected to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), which is the predominant animal model used to investigate the pathophysiology of MS. In the present paper, the effects of glutamatergic receptor antagonists, including amantadine, memantine, LY 367583, and MPEP, on glutamate transport, the expression of mRNA of glutamate transporters (EAATs), the kinetic parameters of ligand binding to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, and the morphology of nerve endings in EAE rat brains were investigated. The extracellular level of glutamate in the brain is primarily regulated by astrocytic glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and glutamate-aspartate transporter (GLAST). Excess glutamate is taken up from the synaptic space and metabolized by astrocytes. Thus, the extracellular level of glutamate decreases, which protects neurons from excitotoxicity. Our investigations showed changes in the expression of EAAT mRNA, glutamate transport (uptake and release) by synaptosomal and glial plasmalemmal vesicle fractions, and ligand binding to NMDA receptors; these effects were partially reversed after the treatment of EAE rats with the NMDA antagonists amantadine and memantine. The antagonists of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), including LY 367385 and MPEP, did not exert any effect on the examined parameters. These results suggest that disturbances in these mechanisms may play a role in the processes associated with glutamate excitotoxicity and the progressive brain damage in EAE.

  13. Glutamate transporters combine transporter- and channel-like features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slotboom, DJ; Konings, WN; Lolkema, JS

    2001-01-01

    Glutamate transporters in the mammalian central nervous system have a unique position among secondary transport proteins as they exhibit glutamate-gated chloride-channel activity in addition to glutamate-transport activity. In this article, the available data on the structure of the glutamate transp

  14. Genetic dys-regulation of astrocytic glutamate transporter EAAT2 and its implications in neurological disorders and manganese toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytic glutamate transporters, the excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT) 2 and EAAT1 [glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) in rodents, respectively], are the main transporters for maintaining optimal glutamate levels in the synaptic clefts by taking up more than 90% of glutamate from extracellular space thus preventing excitotoxic neuronal death. Reduced expression and function of these transporters, especially EAAT2, has been reported in numerous...

  15. Riluzole and gabapentinoids activate glutamate transporters to facilitate glutamate-induced glutamate release from cultured astrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshizumi, Masaru; Eisenach, James C.; Hayashida, Ken-ichiro

    2011-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the glutamate transporter activator riluzole paradoxically enhanced glutamate-induced glutamate release from cultured astrocytes. We further showed that both riluzole and the α2δ subunit ligand gabapentin activated descending inhibition in rats by increasing glutamate receptor signaling in the locus coeruleus and hypothesized that these drugs share common mechanisms to enhance glutamate release from astrocytes. In the present study, we examined the effects o...

  16. Distribution of vesicular glutamate transporters in the human brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika eVigneault

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate is the major excitatory transmitter in the brain. Vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1-3 are responsible for uploading glutamate into synaptic vesicles. VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 are considered as specific markers of canonical glutamatergic neurons, while VGLUT3 is found in neurons previously shown to use other neurotransmitters than glutamate. Although there exists a rich literature on the localization of these glutamatergic markers in the rodent brain, little is currently known about the distribution of VGLUT1-3 in the human brain. In the present study, using subtype specific probes and antisera, we examined the localization of the three vesicular glutamate transporters in the human brain by in situ hybridization, immunoautoradiography and immunohistochemistry. We found that the VGLUT1 transcript was highly expressed in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum, whereas VGLUT2 mRNA was mainly found in the thalamus and brainstem. VGLUT3 mRNA was localized in scarce neurons within the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum and raphe nuclei. Following immunoautoradiographic labeling, intense VGLUT1- and VGLUT2-immunoreactivities were observed in all regions investigated (cerebral cortex, hippocampus, caudate-putamen, cerebellum, thalamus, amygdala, substantia nigra, raphe while VGLUT3 was absent from the thalamus and cerebellum. This extensive mapping of VGLUT1-3 in human brain reveals distributions that correspond for the most part to those previously described in rodent brains.

  17. Leptin regulates glutamate and glucose transporters in hypothalamic astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Granado, Miriam; de Ceballos, María L.; Sánchez-Garrido, Miguel Ángel; Sarman, Beatrix; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Dietrich, Marcelo O.; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Argente, Jesús; Horvath, Tamas L.; Chowen, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    Glial cells perform critical functions that alter the metabolism and activity of neurons, and there is increasing interest in their role in appetite and energy balance. Leptin, a key regulator of appetite and metabolism, has previously been reported to influence glial structural proteins and morphology. Here, we demonstrate that metabolic status and leptin also modify astrocyte-specific glutamate and glucose transporters, indicating that metabolic signals influence synaptic efficacy and glucose uptake and, ultimately, neuronal function. We found that basal and glucose-stimulated electrical activity of hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in mice were altered in the offspring of mothers fed a high-fat diet. In adulthood, increased body weight and fasting also altered the expression of glucose and glutamate transporters. These results demonstrate that whole-organism metabolism alters hypothalamic glial cell activity and suggest that these cells play an important role in the pathology of obesity. PMID:23064363

  18. Role of astrocytic glutamate transporter in alcohol use disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers-Ringler, Jennifer R; Jia, Yun-Fang; Qiu, Yan-Yan; Choi, Doo-Sup

    2016-03-22

    Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is one of the most widespread neuropsychiatric conditions, having a significant health and socioeconomic impact. According to the 2014 World Health Organization global status report on alcohol and health, the harmful use of alcohol is responsible for 5.9% of all deaths worldwide. Additionally, 5.1% of the global burden of disease and injury is ascribed to alcohol (measured in disability adjusted life years, or disability adjusted life years). Although the neurobiological basis of AUD is highly complex, the corticostriatal circuit contributes significantly to the development of addictive behaviors. In-depth investigation into the changes of the neurotransmitters in this circuit, dopamine, gamma-aminobutyricacid, and glutamate, and their corresponding neuronal receptors in AUD and other addictions enable us to understand the molecular basis of AUD. However, these discoveries have also revealed a dearth of knowledge regarding contributions from non-neuronal sources. Astrocytes, though intimately involved in synaptic function, had until recently been noticeably overlooked in their potential role in AUD. One major function of the astrocyte is protecting neurons from excitotoxicity by removing glutamate from the synapse via excitatory amino acid transporter type 2. The importance of this key transporter in addiction, as well as ethanol withdrawal, has recently become evident, though its regulation is still under investigation. Historically, pharmacotherapy for AUD has been focused on altering the activity of neuronal glutamate receptors. However, recent clinical evidence has supported the animal-based findings, showing that regulating glutamate homeostasis contributes to successful management of recovery from AUD.

  19. Chronic at-level thermal hyperalgesia following rat cervical contusion spinal cord injury is accompanied by neuronal and astrocyte activation and loss of the astrocyte glutamate transporter, GLT1, in superficial dorsal horn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putatunda, Rajarshi; Hala, Tamara J; Chin, Jeannie; Lepore, Angelo C

    2014-09-18

    Neuropathic pain is a form of pathological nociception that occurs in a significant portion of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) patients, resulting in debilitating and often long-term physical and psychological burdens. While many peripheral and central mechanisms have been implicated in neuropathic pain, central sensitization of dorsal horn spinothalamic tract (STT) neurons is a major underlying substrate. Furthermore, dysregulation of extracellular glutamate homeostasis and chronic astrocyte activation play important underlying roles in persistent hyperexcitability of these superficial dorsal horn neurons. To date, central sensitization and astrocyte changes have not been characterized in cervical SCI-induced neuropathic pain models, despite the fact that a major portion of SCI patients suffer contusion trauma to cervical spinal cord. In this study, we have characterized 2 rat models of unilateral cervical contusion SCI that behaviorally result in chronic persistence of thermal hyperalgesia in the ipsilateral forepaw. In addition, we find that STT neurons are chronically activated in both models when compared to laminectomy-only uninjured rats. Finally, persistent astrocyte activation and significantly reduced expression of the major CNS glutamate transporter, GLT1, in superficial dorsal horn astrocytes are associated with both excitability changes in STT neurons and the neuropathic pain behavioral phenotype. In conclusion, we have characterized clinically-relevant rodent models of cervical contusion-induced neuropathic pain that result in chronic activation of both STT neurons and astrocytes, as well as compromise in astrocyte glutamate transporter expression. These models can be used as important tools to further study mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain post-SCI and to test potential therapeutic interventions.

  20. Restricted cortical and amygdaloid removal of vesicular glutamate transporter 2 in preadolescent mice impacts dopaminergic activity and neuronal circuitry of higher brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallén-Mackenzie, Asa; Nordenankar, Karin; Fejgin, Kim; Lagerström, Malin C; Emilsson, Lina; Fredriksson, Robert; Wass, Caroline; Andersson, Daniel; Egecioglu, Emil; Andersson, My; Strandberg, Joakim; Lindhe, Orjan; Schiöth, Helgi B; Chergui, Karima; Hanse, Eric; Långström, Bengt; Fredriksson, Anders; Svensson, Lennart; Roman, Erika; Kullander, Klas

    2009-02-18

    A major challenge in neuroscience is to resolve the connection between gene functionality, neuronal circuits, and behavior. Most, if not all, neuronal circuits of the adult brain contain a glutamatergic component, the nature of which has been difficult to assess because of the vast cellular abundance of glutamate. In this study, we wanted to determine the role of a restricted subpopulation of glutamatergic neurons within the forebrain, the Vglut2-expressing neurons, in neuronal circuitry of higher brain function. Vglut2 expression was selectively deleted in the cortex, hippocampus, and amygdala of preadolescent mice, which resulted in increased locomotor activity, altered social dominance and risk assessment, decreased sensorimotor gating, and impaired long-term spatial memory. Presynaptic VGLUT2-positive terminals were lost in the cortex, striatum, nucleus accumbens, and hippocampus, and a downstream effect on dopamine binding site availability in the striatum was evident. A connection between the induced late-onset, chronic reduction of glutamatergic neurotransmission and dopamine signaling within the circuitry was further substantiated by a partial attenuation of the deficits in sensorimotor gating by the dopamine-stabilizing antipsychotic drug aripiprazole and an increased sensitivity to amphetamine. Somewhat surprisingly, given the restricted expression of Vglut2 in regions responsible for higher brain function, our analyses show that VGLUT2-mediated neurotransmission is required for certain aspects of cognitive, emotional, and social behavior. The present study provides support for the existence of a neurocircuitry that connects changes in VGLUT2-mediated neurotransmission to alterations in the dopaminergic system with schizophrenia-like behavioral deficits as a major outcome.

  1. Pharmacology of Glutamate Transport in the CNS: Substrates and Inhibitors of Excitatory Amino Acid Transporters (EAATs) and the Glutamate/Cystine Exchanger System x c -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Richard J.; Patel, Sarjubhai A.

    As the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian CNS, l-glutamate participates not only in standard fast synaptic communication, but also contributes to higher order signal processing, as well as neuropathology. Given this variety of functional roles, interest has been growing as to how the extracellular concentrations of l-glutamate surrounding neurons are regulated by cellular transporter proteins. This review focuses on two prominent systems, each of which appears capable of influencing both the signaling and pathological actions of l-glutamate within the CNS: the sodium-dependent excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) and the glutamate/cystine exchanger, system x c - (Sx c -). While the family of EAAT subtypes limit access to glutamate receptors by rapidly and efficiently sequestering l-glutamate in neurons and glia, Sxc - provides a route for the export of glutamate from cells into the extracellular environment. The primary intent of this work is to provide an overview of the inhibitors and substrates that have been developed to delineate the pharmacological specificity of these transport systems, as well as be exploited as probes with which to selectively investigate function. Particular attention is paid to the development of small molecule templates that mimic the structural properties of the endogenous substrates, l-glutamate, l-aspartate and l-cystine and how strategic control of functional group position and/or the introduction of lipophilic R-groups can impact multiple aspects of the transport process, including: subtype selectivity, inhibitory potency, and substrate activity.

  2. Glutamate alteration of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in GABAergic neurons: the role of cysteine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnerie, Hubert; Le Roux, Peter D

    2008-09-01

    Brain cell vulnerability to neurologic insults varies greatly, depending on their neuronal subpopulation. Among cells that survive a pathological insult such as ischemia or brain trauma, some may undergo morphological and/or biochemical changes that could compromise brain function. We previously reported that surviving cortical GABAergic neurons exposed to glutamate in vitro displayed an NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated alteration in the levels of the GABA synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65/67) [Monnerie, H., Le Roux, P., 2007. Reduced dendrite growth and altered glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 65- and 67-kDa isoform protein expression from mouse cortical GABAergic neurons following excitotoxic injury in vitro. Exp. Neurol. 205, 367-382]. In this study, we examined the mechanisms by which glutamate excitotoxicity caused a change in cortical GABAergic neurons' GAD protein levels. Removing extracellular calcium prevented the NMDAR-mediated decrease in GAD protein levels, measured using Western blot techniques, whereas inhibiting calcium entry through voltage-gated calcium channels had no effect. Glutamate's effect on GAD protein isoforms was significantly attenuated by preincubation with the cysteine protease inhibitor N-Acetyl-L-Leucyl-L-Leucyl-L-norleucinal (ALLN). Using class-specific protease inhibitors, we observed that ALLN's effect resulted from the blockade of calpain and cathepsin protease activities. Cell-free proteolysis assay confirmed that both proteases were involved in glutamate-induced alteration in GAD protein levels. Together these results suggest that glutamate-induced excitotoxic stimulation of NMDAR in cultured cortical neurons leads to altered GAD protein levels from GABAergic neurons through intracellular calcium increase and protease activation including calpain and cathepsin. Biochemical alterations in surviving cortical GABAergic neurons in various disease states may contribute to the altered balance between excitation

  3. Kv3.3 immunoreactivity in the vestibular nuclear complex of the rat with focus on the medial vestibular nucleus: targeting of Kv3.3 neurones by terminals positive for vesicular glutamate transporter 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Ruth Elizabeth; Corns, Laura; Edwards, Ian James; Deuchars, Jim

    2010-07-23

    Kv3 voltage-gated K(+) channels are important in shaping neuronal excitability and are abundant in the CNS, with each Kv3 gene exhibiting a unique expression pattern. Mice lacking the gene encoding for the Kv3.3 subunit exhibit motor deficits. Furthermore, mutations in this gene have been linked to the human disease spinocerebellar ataxia 13, associated with cerebellar and extra-cerebellar symptoms such as imbalance and nystagmus. Kv subunit localisation is important in defining their functional roles and thus, we investigated the distribution of Kv3.3-immunoreactivity in the vestibular nuclear complex of rats with particular focus on the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN). Kv3.3-immunoreactivity was widespread in the vestibular nuclei and was detected in somata, dendrites and synaptic terminals. Kv3.3-immunoreactivity was observed in distinct neuronal populations and dual labelling with the neuronal marker NeuN revealed 28.5+/-1.9% of NeuN labelled MVN neurones were Kv3.3-positive. Kv3.3-immunoreactivity co-localised presynaptically with the synaptic vesicle marker SV2, parvalbumin, the vesicular glutamate transporter VGluT2 and the glycine transporter GlyT2. VGluT1 terminals were scarce within the MVN (2.5+/-1.1 per 50 microm(2)) and co-localisation was not observed. However, 85.4+/-9.4% of VGluT1 terminals targeted and enclosed Kv3.3-immunoreactive somata. Presynaptic Kv3.3 co-localisation with the GABAergic marker GAD67 was also not observed. Cytoplasmic GlyT2 labelling was observed in a subset of Kv3.3-positive neurones. Electron microscopy confirmed a pre- and post-synaptic distribution of the Kv3.3 protein. This study provides evidence supporting a role for Kv3.3 subunits in vestibular processing by regulating neuronal excitability pre- and post-synaptically.

  4. MDMA decreases glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 67-immunoreactive neurons in the hippocampus and increases seizure susceptibility: Role for glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Courtney L; Morano, Rachel L; Herman, James P; Yamamoto, Bryan K; Gudelsky, Gary A

    2016-12-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA) is a unique psychostimulant that continues to be a popular drug of abuse. It has been well documented that MDMA reduces markers of 5-HT axon terminals in rodents, as well as humans. A loss of parvalbumin-immunoreactive (IR) interneurons in the hippocampus following MDMA treatment has only been documented recently. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that MDMA reduces glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 67-IR, another biochemical marker of GABA neurons, in the hippocampus and that this reduction in GAD67-IR neurons and an accompanying increase in seizure susceptibility involve glutamate receptor activation. Repeated exposure to MDMA (3×10mg/kg, ip) resulted in a reduction of 37-58% of GAD67-IR cells in the dentate gyrus (DG), CA1, and CA3 regions, as well as an increased susceptibility to kainic acid-induced seizures, both of which persisted for at least 30days following MDMA treatment. Administration of the NMDA antagonist MK-801 or the glutamate transporter type 1 (GLT-1) inducer ceftriaxone prevented both the MDMA-induced loss of GAD67-IR neurons and the increased vulnerability to kainic acid-induced seizures. The MDMA-induced increase in the extracellular concentration of glutamate in the hippocampus was significantly diminished in rats treated with ceftriaxone, thereby implicating a glutamatergic mechanism in the neuroprotective effects of ceftriaxone. In summary, the present findings support a role for increased extracellular glutamate and NMDA receptor activation in the MDMA-induced loss of hippocampal GAD67-IR neurons and the subsequent increased susceptibility to evoked seizures.

  5. Control of cortical neuronal migration by glutamate and GABA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiko J Luhmann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal migration in the cortex is controlled by the paracrine action of the classical neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA. Glutamate controls radial migration of pyramidal neurons by acting primarily on NMDA receptors and regulates tangential migration of inhibitory interneurons by activating non-NMDA and NMDA receptors. GABA, acting on ionotropic GABAA-rho and GABAA receptors, has a dichotomic action on radially migrating neurons by acting as a GO signal in lower layers and as a STOP signal in upper cortical plate (CP, respectively. Metabotropic GABAB receptors promote radial migration into the CP and tangential migration of interneurons. Besides GABA, the endogenous GABAergic agonist taurine is a relevant agonist controlling radial migration. To a smaller extent glycine receptor activation can also influence radial and tangential migration. Activation of glutamate and GABA receptors causes increases in intracellular Ca2+ transients, which promote neuronal migration by acting on the cytoskeleton. Pharmacological or genetic manipulation of glutamate or GABA receptors during early corticogenesis induce heterotopic cell clusters in upper layers and loss of cortical lamination, i.e. neuronal migration disorders which can be associated with neurological or neuropsychiatric diseases. The pivotal role of NMDA and ionotropic GABA receptors in cortical neuronal migration is of major clinical relevance, since a number of drugs acting on these receptors (e.g. anti-epileptics, anesthetics, alcohol may disturb the normal migration pattern when present during early corticogenesis.

  6. A noncanonical release of GABA and glutamate modulates neuronal migration.

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    Manent, Jean-Bernard; Demarque, Michaël; Jorquera, Isabel; Pellegrino, Christophe; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Aniksztejn, Laurent; Represa, Alfonso

    2005-05-11

    Immature neurons express GABA and glutamate receptors before synapse formation, and both transmitters are released at an early developmental stage. We have now tested the hypothesis that the ongoing release of GABA and glutamate modulates neuronal migration. Using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine labeling and cocultures of hippocampal slices obtained from naive and green fluorescent protein-transgenic mice, we report that migration is severely affected by GABA(A) or NMDA receptor antagonist treatments. These effects were also present in munc18-1 knock-out slices in which soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE)-dependent vesicular secretion of transmitters has been deleted. GABA(A) antagonists were more efficient than NMDA antagonists to reduce cell migration, in keeping with the earlier maturation of GABAergic mechanisms. We conclude that GABA and, to a lesser degree, glutamate released in a SNARE-independent mechanism exert a paracrine action on neuronal migration.

  7. Effects of Bee Venom on Glutamate-Induced Toxicity in Neuronal and Glial Cells

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    Sang Min Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bee venom (BV, which is extracted from honeybees, is used in traditional Korean medical therapy. Several groups have demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects of BV in osteoarthritis both in vivo and in vitro. Glutamate is the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS. Changes in glutamate release and uptake due to alterations in the activity of glutamate transporters have been reported in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. To assess if BV can prevent glutamate-mediated neurotoxicity, we examined cell viability and signal transduction in glutamate-treated neuronal and microglial cells in the presence and absence of BV. We induced glutamatergic toxicity in neuronal cells and microglial cells and found that BV protected against cell death. Furthermore, BV significantly inhibited the cellular toxicity of glutamate, and pretreatment with BV altered MAP kinase activation (e.g., JNK, ERK, and p38 following exposure to glutamate. These findings suggest that treatment with BV may be helpful in reducing glutamatergic cell toxicity in neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Fingolimod effects in neuroinflammation: Regulation of astroglial glutamate transporters?

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    Lee, De-Hyung; Seubert, Silvia; Huhn, Konstantin; Brecht, Lukas; Rötger, Caroline; Waschbisch, Anne; Schlachetzki, Johannes; Klausmeyer, Alice; Melms, Arthur; Wiese, Stefan; Winkler, Jürgen; Linker, Ralf A

    2017-01-01

    Fingolimod is an oral sphingosine-1-phosphate-receptor modulator which reduces the recirculation of immune cells and may also directly target glial cells. Here we investigate effects of fingolimod on expression of astroglial glutamate transporters under pro-inflammatory conditions. In astrocyte cell culture, the addition of pro-inflammatory cytokines led to a significant downregulation of glutamate transporters glutamate transporter-1 (slc1a2/SLC1A2) and glutamate aspartate transporter (slc1a3/SLC1A3) expression on the mRNA or protein level. In this setting, the direct application of fingolimod-1 phosphate (F1P) on astrocytes did not change expression levels of slc1a2 and slc1a3 mRNA. The analysis of both transporters on the protein level by Western Blot and immunocytochemistry did also not reveal any effect of F1P. On a functional level, the addition of conditioned supernatants from F1P treated astrocytes to neuronal cell culture did not result in increased neurite growth. In experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis as a model of multiple sclerosis, fingolimod treatment reduced T cell and macrophages/microglia mediated inflammation and also diminished astrocyte activation. At the same time, fingolimod restored the reduced expression of slc1a2 and slc1a3 in the inflamed spinal cord on the mRNA level and of SLC1A2 and SLC1A3 on the protein level, presumably via indirect, anti-inflammatory mechanisms. These findings provide further evidence for a predominantly peripheral effect of the compound in neuroinflammation.

  9. Astrocytic glutamate uptake is slow and does not limit neuronal NMDA receptor activation in the neonatal neocortex.

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    Hanson, Elizabeth; Armbruster, Moritz; Cantu, David; Andresen, Lauren; Taylor, Amaro; Danbolt, Niels Christian; Dulla, Chris G

    2015-10-01

    Glutamate uptake by astrocytes controls the time course of glutamate in the extracellular space and affects neurotransmission, synaptogenesis, and circuit development. Astrocytic glutamate uptake has been shown to undergo post-natal maturation in the hippocampus, but has been largely unexplored in other brain regions. Notably, glutamate uptake has never been examined in the developing neocortex. In these studies, we investigated the development of astrocytic glutamate transport, intrinsic membrane properties, and control of neuronal NMDA receptor activation in the developing neocortex. Using astrocytic and neuronal electrophysiology, immunofluorescence, and Western blot analysis we show that: (1) glutamate uptake in the neonatal neocortex is slow relative to neonatal hippocampus; (2) astrocytes in the neonatal neocortex undergo a significant maturation of intrinsic membrane properties; (3) slow glutamate uptake is accompanied by lower expression of both GLT-1 and GLAST; (4) glutamate uptake is less dependent on GLT-1 in neonatal neocortex than in neonatal hippocampus; and (5) the slow glutamate uptake we report in the neonatal neocortex corresponds to minimal astrocytic control of neuronal NMDA receptor activation. Taken together, our results clearly show fundamental differences between astrocytic maturation in the developing neocortex and hippocampus, and corresponding changes in how astrocytes control glutamate signaling.

  10. Synaptically evoked glutamate transporter currents in Spinal Dorsal Horn Astrocytes

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    Dougherty Patrick M

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Removing and sequestering synaptically released glutamate from the extracellular space is carried out by specific plasma membrane transporters that are primarily located in astrocytes. Glial glutamate transporter function can be monitored by recording the currents that are produced by co-transportation of Na+ ions with the uptake of glutamate. The goal of this study was to characterize glutamate transporter function in astrocytes of the spinal cord dorsal horn in real time by recording synaptically evoked glutamate transporter currents. Results Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were obtained from astrocytes in the spinal substantia gelatinosa (SG area in spinal slices of young adult rats. Glutamate transporter currents were evoked in these cells by electrical stimulation at the spinal dorsal root entry zone in the presence of bicuculline, strychnine, DNQX and D-AP5. Transporter currents were abolished when synaptic transmission was blocked by TTX or Cd2+. Pharmacological studies identified two subtypes of glutamate transporters in spinal astrocytes, GLAST and GLT-1. Glutamate transporter currents were graded with stimulus intensity, reaching peak responses at 4 to 5 times activation threshold, but were reduced following low-frequency (0.1 – 1 Hz repetitive stimulation. Conclusion These results suggest that glutamate transporters of spinal astrocytes could be activated by synaptic activation, and recording glutamate transporter currents may provide a means of examining the real time physiological responses of glial cells in spinal sensory processing, sensitization, hyperalgesia and chronic pain.

  11. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor promotes vesicular glutamate transporter 3 expression and neurite outgrowth of dorsal root ganglion neurons through the activation of the transcription factors Etv4 and Etv5.

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    Liu, Dong; Liu, Zhen; Liu, Huaxiang; Li, Hao; Pan, Xinliang; Li, Zhenzhong

    2016-03-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is critical for sensory neuron survival and is necessary for vesicular glutamate transporter 3 (VGLUT3) expression. Whether the transcription factors Etv4 and Etv5 are involved in these BDNF-induced effects remains unclear. In the present study, primary cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were used to test the link between BDNF and transcription factors Etv4 and Etv5 on VGLUT3 expression and neurite outgrowth. BDNF promoted the mRNA and protein expression of Etv4 and Etv5 in DRG neurons. These effects were blocked by extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) inhibitor PD98059 but not phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 or phospholipase C-γ (PLC-γ) inhibitor U73122. Etv4 siRNA and Etv5 siRNA effectively blocked the VGLUT3 expression and neurite elongation induced by BNDF. The overexpression of Etv4 or Etv5 potentiated the effects of BNDF-induced neurite elongation and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43), medium neurofilament (NF-M), and light neurofilament (NF-L) expression while these effects could be inhibited by Etv4 and Etv5 siRNA. These data imply that Etv4 and Etv5 are essential transcription factors in modulating BDNF/TrkB signaling-mediated VGLUT3 expression and neurite outgrowth. BDNF, through the ERK1/2 signaling pathway, activates Etv4 and Etv5 to initiate GAP-43 expression, promote neurofilament (NF) protein expression, induce neurite outgrowth, and mediate VGLUT3 expression for neuronal function improvement. The biological effects initiated by BDNF/TrkB signaling linked to E26 transformation-specific (ETS) transcription factors are important to elucidate neuronal differentiation, axonal regeneration, and repair in various pathological states.

  12. Dynamic transition of neuronal firing induced by abnormal astrocytic glutamate oscillation

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    Li, Jiajia; Tang, Jun; Ma, Jun; Du, Mengmeng; Wang, Rong; Wu, Ying

    2016-08-01

    The gliotransmitter glutamate released from astrocytes can modulate neuronal firing by activating neuronal N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors. This enables astrocytic glutamate(AG) to be involved in neuronal physiological and pathological functions. Based on empirical results and classical neuron-glial “tripartite synapse” model, we propose a practical model to describe extracellular AG oscillation, in which the fluctuation of AG depends on the threshold of calcium concentration, and the effect of AG degradation is considered as well. We predict the seizure-like discharges under the dysfunction of AG degradation duration. Consistent with our prediction, the suppression of AG uptake by astrocytic transporters, which operates by modulating the AG degradation process, can account for the emergence of epilepsy.

  13. Reciprocal regulation between taurine and glutamate response via Ca2+- dependent pathways in retinal third-order neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Although taurine and glutamate are the most abundant amino acids conducting neural signals in the central nervous system, the communication between these two neurotransmitters is largely unknown. This study explores the interaction of taurine and glutamate in the retinal third-order neurons. Using specific antibodies, both taurine and taurine transporters were localized in photoreceptors and Off-bipolar cells, glutamatergic neurons in retinas. It is possible that Off-bipolar cells release juxtaposed glutamate and taurine to activate the third-order neurons in retina. The interaction of taurine and glutamate was studied in acutely dissociated third-order neurons in whole-cell patch-clamp recording and Ca2+ imaging. We find that taurine effectively reduces glutamate-induced Ca2+ influx via ionotropic glutamate receptors and voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels in the neurons, and the effect of taurine was selectively inhibited by strychnine and picrotoxin, but not GABA receptor antagonists, although GABA receptors are present in the neurons. A CaMKII inhibitor partially reversed the effect of taurine, suggesting that a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent pathway is involved in taurine regulation. On the other hand, a rapid influx of Ca2+ through ionotropic glutamate receptors could inhibit the amplitude and kinetics of taurine-elicited currents in the third-order neurons, which could be controlled with intracellular application of BAPTA a fast Ca2+ chelator. This study indicates that taurine is a potential neuromodulator in glutamate transmission. The reciprocal inhibition between taurine and glutamate in the postsynaptic neurons contributes to computation of visual signals in the retinal neurons. PMID:20804625

  14. The GLT-1 (EAAT2; slc1a2) glutamate transporter is essential for glutamate homeostasis in the neocortex of the mouse.

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    Bjørnsen, Lars Petter; Hadera, Mussie G; Zhou, Yun; Danbolt, Niels C; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2014-03-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter, and is inactivated by cellular uptake catalyzed mostly by the glutamate transporter subtypes GLT-1 (EAAT2) and GLAST (EAAT1). Astrocytes express both GLT-1 and GLAST, while axon terminals in the neocortex only express GLT-1. To evaluate the role of GLT-1 in glutamate homeostasis, we injected GLT-1 knockout (KO) mice and wild-type littermates with [1-(13)C]glucose and [1,2-(13)C]acetate 15 min before euthanization. Metabolite levels were analyzed in extracts from neocortex and cerebellum and (13)C labeling in neocortex. Whereas the cerebellum in GLT-1-deficient mice had normal levels of glutamate, glutamine, and (13)C labeling of metabolites, glutamate level was decreased but labeling from [1-(13)C] glucose was unchanged in the neocortex. The contribution from pyruvate carboxylation toward labeling of these metabolites was unchanged. Labeling from [1,2-(13)C] acetate, originating in astrocytes, was decreased in glutamate and glutamine in the neocortex indicating reduced mitochondrial metabolism in astrocytes. The decreased amount of glutamate in the cortex indicates that glutamine transport into neurons is not sufficient to replenish glutamate lost because of neurotransmission and that GLT-1 plays a role in glutamate homeostasis in the cortex. Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter, and is inactivated by uptake via GLT-1 (EAAT2) and GLAST (EAAT1) transporters, while axon terminals in the neocortex only express GLT-1. To evaluate the role of GLT-1 in glutamate homeostasis, we used [1-(13)C]glucose and [1,2-(13)C]acetate injection and NMR spectroscopy. The results indicate that glutamine transport into neurons is not sufficient to replenish glutamate lost because of neurotransmission and that GLT-1 plays a role in glutamate homeostasis in the neocortex.

  15. Presynaptic transporter-mediated release of glutamate evoked by the protonophore FCCP increases under altered gravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, T. A.; Krisanova, N. V.

    2008-12-01

    High-affinity Na +-dependent glutamate transporters of the plasma membrane mediate the glutamate uptake into neurons, and thus maintain low levels of extracellular glutamate in the synaptic cleft. The study focused on the release of glutamate by reversal of Na +-dependent glutamate transporters from rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes) under conditions of centrifuge-induced hypergravity. Flow cytometric analysis revealed similarity in the size and cytoplasmic granularity between synaptosomal preparations obtained from control and G-loaded animals (10 G, 1 h). The release of cytosolic L-[ 14C]glutamate from synaptosomes was evaluated using the protonophore FCCP, which dissipated synaptic vesicle proton gradient, thus synaptic vesicles were not able to keep glutamate inside and the latter enriched cytosol. FCCP per se induced the greater release of L-[ 14C]glutamate in hypergravity as compared to control (4.8 ± 1.0% and 8.0 ± 1.0% of total label). Exocytotic release of L-[ 14C]glutamate evoked by depolarization was reduced down to zero after FCCP application under both conditions studied. Depolarization stimulated release of cytosolic L-[ 14C]glutamate from synaptosomes preliminary treated with FCCP was considerably increased from 27.0 ± 2.2% of total label in control to 35.0 ± 2.3% in hypergravity. Non-transportable inhibitor of glutamate transporter DL-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartate was found to significantly inhibit high-KCl and FCCP-stimulated release of L-[ 14C]glutamate, confirming the release by reversal of glutamate transporters. The enhancement of transporter-mediated release of glutamate in hypergravity was found to result at least partially from the inhibition of the activity of Na/K-ATPase in the plasma membrane of synaptosomes. We suggested that hypergravity-induced alteration in transporter-mediated release of glutamate indicated hypoxic injury of neurons.

  16. Co-localization of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid and Glutamate in Neurons of the Spider Central Nervous System.

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    Fabian-Fine, Ruth; Meisner, Shannon; Torkkeli, Päivi H; Meinertzhagen, Ian A

    2015-12-01

    Spider sensory neurons with cell bodies close to various sensory organs are innervated by putative efferent axons from the central nervous system (CNS). Light and electronmicroscopic imaging of immunolabeled neurons has demonstrated that neurotransmitters present at peripheral synapses include γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate and octopamine. Moreover, electrophysiological studies show that these neurotransmitters modulate the sensitivity of peripheral sensory neurons. Here, we undertook immunocytochemical investigations to characterize GABA and glutamate-immunoreactive neurons in three-dimensional reconstructions of the spider CNS. We document that both neurotransmitters are abundant in morphologically distinct neurons throughout the CNS. Labeling for the vesicular transporters, VGAT for GABA and VGLUT for glutamate, showed corresponding patterns, supporting the specificity of antibody binding. Whereas some neurons displayed strong immunolabeling, others were only weakly labeled. Double labeling showed that a subpopulation of weakly labeled neurons present in all ganglia expresses both GABA and glutamate. Double labeled, strongly and weakly labeled GABA and glutamate immunoreactive axons were also observed in the periphery along muscle fibers and peripheral sensory neurons. Electron microscopic investigations showed presynaptic profiles of various diameters with mixed vesicle populations innervating muscle tissue as well as sensory neurons. Our findings provide evidence that: (1) sensory neurons and muscle fibers are innervated by morphologically distinct, centrally located GABA- and glutamate immunoreactive neurons; (2) a subpopulation of these neurons may co-release both neurotransmitters; and (3) sensory neurons and muscles are innervated by all of these neurochemically and morphologically distinct types of neurons. The biochemical diversity of presynaptic innervation may contribute to how spiders filter natural stimuli and coordinate appropriate response

  17. A role for glutamate transporters in the regulation of insulin secretion.

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    Runhild Gammelsaeter

    Full Text Available In the brain, glutamate is an extracellular transmitter that mediates cell-to-cell communication. Prior to synaptic release it is pumped into vesicles by vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs. To inactivate glutamate receptor responses after release, glutamate is taken up into glial cells or neurons by excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs. In the pancreatic islets of Langerhans, glutamate is proposed to act as an intracellular messenger, regulating insulin secretion from β-cells, but the mechanisms involved are unknown. By immunogold cytochemistry we show that insulin containing secretory granules express VGLUT3. Despite the fact that they have a VGLUT, the levels of glutamate in these granules are low, indicating the presence of a protein that can transport glutamate out of the granules. Surprisingly, in β-cells the glutamate transporter EAAT2 is located, not in the plasma membrane as it is in brain cells, but exclusively in insulin-containing secretory granules, together with VGLUT3. In EAAT2 knock out mice, the content of glutamate in secretory granules is higher than in wild type mice. These data imply a glutamate cycle in which glutamate is carried into the granules by VGLUT3 and carried out by EAAT2. Perturbing this cycle by knocking down EAAT2 expression with a small interfering RNA, or by over-expressing EAAT2 or a VGLUT in insulin granules, significantly reduced the rate of granule exocytosis. Simulations of granule energetics suggest that VGLUT3 and EAAT2 may regulate the pH and membrane potential of the granules and thereby regulate insulin secretion. These data suggest that insulin secretion from β-cells is modulated by the flux of glutamate through the secretory granules.

  18. Identification of glutamate transporters and receptors in mouse testis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-hua HU; Na YANG; Ying-hua MA; Jie JIANG; Jin-fu ZHANG; Jian FEI; Li-he GUO

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the presence of glutamate transporters and receptors in mouse testis. METHODS: Glutamate uptake analysis was performed to study the function of glutamate transporters in mouse testis. Comparative RT-PCR technique and sequencing analysis were used to study the expression of glutamate receptors and transporters in mouse testis. RESULTS: Mouse testis possessed glutamate uptake capacity with sodium-dependence. Vmax value of glutamate uptake was (1.60 ± 0.21) pmol/min per mg protein and Km value of glutamate uptake was (11.0±1.6) μmol/L in mouse testis according to saturation analysis. Furthermore, the uptake activity could be inhibited by DHK (GLT1 selective inhibitor) and THA (glutamate uptake inhibitor). In addition, RT-PCR results revealed that glutamate transporters (GLT1 and EAAC1) and ionotropic glutamate receptors (NR1, NR2B, GluR6 and KA2) were expressed in mouse testis. CONCLUSION: Glutamate transporters and receptors do exist in mouse testis.

  19. Glutamate and GABA as rapid effectors of hypothalamic peptidergic neurons

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    Cornelia eSchöne

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Vital hypothalamic neurons regulating hunger, wakefulness, reward-seeking, and body weight are often defined by unique expression of hypothalamus-specific neuropeptides. Gene-ablation studies show that some of these peptides, notably orexin/hypocretin (hcrt/orx, are themselves critical for stable states of consciousness and metabolic health. However, neuron-ablation studies often reveal more severe phenotypes, suggesting key roles for co-expressed transmitters. Indeed, most hypothalamic neurons, including hcrt/orx cells, contain fast transmitters glutamate and GABA, as well as several neuropeptides. What are the roles and relations between different transmitters expressed by the same neuron? Here, we consider signaling codes for releasing different transmitters in relation to transmitter and receptor diversity in behaviorally-defined, widely-projecting peptidergic neurons, such as hcrt/orx cells. We then discuss latest optogenetic studies of endogenous transmitter release from defined sets of axons in situ, which suggest that recently-characterized vital peptidergic neurons (e.g. hcrt/orx, proopiomelanocortin , and agouti-related peptide cells, as well as classical modulatory neurons (e.g. dopamine and acetylcholine cells, all use fast transmitters to control their postsynaptic targets. These optogenetic insights are complemented by recent observations of behavioral deficiencies caused by genetic ablation of fast transmission from specific neuropeptidergic and aminergic neurons. Powerful and fast (millisecond-scale GABAergic and glutamatergic signaling from neurons previously considered to be primarily modulatory raises new questions about the roles of slower co-transmitters they co-express.

  20. Ventral tegmental area glutamate neurons co-release GABA and promote positive reinforcement.

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    Yoo, Ji Hoon; Zell, Vivien; Gutierrez-Reed, Navarre; Wu, Johnathan; Ressler, Reed; Shenasa, Mohammad Ali; Johnson, Alexander B; Fife, Kathryn H; Faget, Lauren; Hnasko, Thomas S

    2016-12-15

    In addition to dopamine neurons, the ventral tegmental area (VTA) contains GABA-, glutamate- and co-releasing neurons, and recent reports suggest a complex role for the glutamate neurons in behavioural reinforcement. We report that optogenetic stimulation of VTA glutamate neurons or terminals serves as a positive reinforcer on operant behavioural assays. Mice display marked preference for brief over sustained VTA glutamate neuron stimulation resulting in behavioural responses that are notably distinct from dopamine neuron stimulation and resistant to dopamine receptor antagonists. Whole-cell recordings reveal EPSCs following stimulation of VTA glutamate terminals in the nucleus accumbens or local VTA collaterals; but reveal both excitatory and monosynaptic inhibitory currents in the ventral pallidum and lateral habenula, though the net effects on postsynaptic firing in each region are consistent with the observed rewarding behavioural effects. These data indicate that VTA glutamate neurons co-release GABA in a projection-target-dependent manner and that their transient activation drives positive reinforcement.

  1. Plasticity of astrocytic coverage and glutamate transporter expression in adult mouse cortex.

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    Christel Genoud

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes play a major role in the removal of glutamate from the extracellular compartment. This clearance limits the glutamate receptor activation and affects the synaptic response. This function of the astrocyte is dependent on its positioning around the synapse, as well as on the level of expression of its high-affinity glutamate transporters, GLT1 and GLAST. Using Western blot analysis and serial section electron microscopy, we studied how a change in sensory activity affected these parameters in the adult cortex. Using mice, we found that 24 h of whisker stimulation elicited a 2-fold increase in the expression of GLT1 and GLAST in the corresponding cortical column of the barrel cortex. This returns to basal levels 4 d after the stimulation was stopped, whereas the expression of the neuronal glutamate transporter EAAC1 remained unaltered throughout. Ultrastructural analysis from the same region showed that sensory stimulation also causes a significant increase in the astrocytic envelopment of excitatory synapses on dendritic spines. We conclude that a period of modified neuronal activity and synaptic release of glutamate leads to an increased astrocytic coverage of the bouton-spine interface and an increase in glutamate transporter expression in astrocytic processes.

  2. Genetic inactivation of glutamate neurons in the rat sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus recapitulates REM sleep behaviour disorder.

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    Valencia Garcia, Sara; Libourel, Paul-Antoine; Lazarus, Michael; Grassi, Daniela; Luppi, Pierre-Hervé; Fort, Patrice

    2017-02-01

    SEE SCHENCK AND MAHOWALD DOI101093/AWW329 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: Idiopathic REM sleep behaviour disorder is characterized by the enactment of violent dreams during paradoxical (REM) sleep in the absence of normal muscle atonia. Accumulating clinical and experimental data suggest that REM sleep behaviour disorder might be due to the neurodegeneration of glutamate neurons involved in paradoxical sleep and located within the pontine sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus. The purpose of the present work was thus to functionally determine first, the role of glutamate sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus neurons in paradoxical sleep and second, whether their genetic inactivation is sufficient for recapitulating REM sleep behaviour disorder in rats. For this goal, we first injected two retrograde tracers in the intralaminar thalamus and ventral medulla to disentangle neuronal circuits in which sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus is involved; second we infused bilaterally in sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus adeno-associated viruses carrying short hairpin RNAs targeting Slc17a6 mRNA [which encodes vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (vGluT2)] to chronically impair glutamate synaptic transmission in sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus neurons. At the neuroanatomical level, sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus neurons specifically activated during paradoxical sleep hypersomnia send descending efferents to glycine/GABA neurons within the ventral medulla, but not ascending projections to the intralaminar thalamus. These data suggest a crucial role of sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus neurons rather in muscle atonia than in paradoxical sleep generation. In line with this hypothesis, 30 days after adeno-associated virus injections into sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus rats display a decrease of 30% of paradoxical sleep daily quantities, and a significant increase of muscle tone during paradoxical sleep concomitant to a tremendous increase of abnormal motor dream

  3. A Computational Model to Investigate Astrocytic Glutamate Uptake Influence on Synaptic Transmission and Neuronal Spiking

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    Sushmita Lakshmi Allam

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decades, our view of astrocytes has switched from passive support cells to active processing elements in the brain. The current view is that astrocytes shape neuronal communication and also play an important role in many neurodegenerative diseases. Despite the growing awareness of the importance of astrocytes, the exact mechanisms underlying neuron-astrocyte communication and the physiological consequences of astrocytic-neuronal interactions remain largely unclear. In this work, we define a modeling framework that will permit to address unanswered questions regarding the role of astrocytes. Our computational model of a detailed glutamatergic synapse facilitates the analysis of neural system responses to various stimuli and conditions that are otherwise difficult to obtain experimentally, in particular the readouts at the sub-cellular level. In this paper, we extend a detailed glutamatergic synaptic model, to include astrocytic glutamate transporters. We demonstrate how these glial transporters, responsible for the majority of glutamate uptake, modulate synaptic transmission mediated by ionotropic AMPA and NMDA receptors at glutamatergic synapses. Furthermore, we investigate how these local signaling effects at the synaptic level are translated into varying spatio-temporal patterns of neuron firing. Paired pulse stimulation results reveal that the effect of astrocytic glutamate uptake is more apparent when the input inter-spike interval is sufficiently long to allow the receptors to recover from desensitization. These results suggest an important functional role of astrocytes in spike timing dependent processes and demand further investigation of the molecular basis of certain neurological diseases specifically related to alterations in astrocytic glutamate uptake, such as epilepsy.

  4. Reelin secreted by GABAergic neurons regulates glutamate receptor homeostasis.

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    Cecilia Gonzalez Campo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Reelin is a large secreted protein of the extracellular matrix that has been proposed to participate to the etiology of schizophrenia. During development, reelin is crucial for the correct cytoarchitecture of laminated brain structures and is produced by a subset of neurons named Cajal-Retzius. After birth, most of these cells degenerate and reelin expression persists in postnatal and adult brain. The phenotype of neurons that bind secreted reelin and whether the continuous secretion of reelin is required for physiological functions at postnatal stages remain unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Combining immunocytochemical and pharmacological approaches, we first report that two distinct patterns of reelin expression are present in cultured hippocampal neurons. We show that in hippocampal cultures, reelin is secreted by GABAergic neurons displaying an intense reelin immunoreactivity (IR. We demonstrate that secreted reelin binds to receptors of the lipoprotein family on neurons with a punctate reelin IR. Secondly, using calcium imaging techniques, we examined the physiological consequences of reelin secretion blockade. Blocking protein secretion rapidly and reversibly changes the subunit composition of N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors (NMDARs to a predominance of NR2B-containing NMDARs. Addition of recombinant or endogenously secreted reelin rescues the effects of protein secretion blockade and reverts the fraction of NR2B-containing NMDARs to control levels. Therefore, the continuous secretion of reelin is necessary to control the subunit composition of NMDARs in hippocampal neurons. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data show that the heterogeneity of reelin immunoreactivity correlates with distinct functional populations: neurons synthesizing and secreting reelin and/or neurons binding reelin. Furthermore, we show that continuous reelin secretion is a strict requirement to maintain the composition of NMDARs. We propose

  5. Glutamate transport decreases mitochondrial pH and modulates oxidative metabolism in astrocytes.

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    Azarias, Guillaume; Perreten, Hélène; Lengacher, Sylvain; Poburko, Damon; Demaurex, Nicolas; Magistretti, Pierre J; Chatton, Jean-Yves

    2011-03-09

    During synaptic activity, the clearance of neuronally released glutamate leads to an intracellular sodium concentration increase in astrocytes that is associated with significant metabolic cost. The proximity of mitochondria at glutamate uptake sites in astrocytes raises the question of the ability of mitochondria to respond to these energy demands. We used dynamic fluorescence imaging to investigate the impact of glutamatergic transmission on mitochondria in intact astrocytes. Neuronal release of glutamate induced an intracellular acidification in astrocytes, via glutamate transporters, that spread over the mitochondrial matrix. The glutamate-induced mitochondrial matrix acidification exceeded cytosolic acidification and abrogated cytosol-to-mitochondrial matrix pH gradient. By decoupling glutamate uptake from cellular acidification, we found that glutamate induced a pH-mediated decrease in mitochondrial metabolism that surpasses the Ca(2+)-mediated stimulatory effects. These findings suggest a model in which excitatory neurotransmission dynamically regulates astrocyte energy metabolism by limiting the contribution of mitochondria to the metabolic response, thereby increasing the local oxygen availability and preventing excessive mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production.

  6. Secretory phospholipase A2-mediated neuronal cell death involves glutamate ionotropic receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Turco, Elena B; Diemer, Nils Henrik; Bazan, Nicolas G

    2002-01-01

    To define the significance of glutamate ionotropic receptors in sPLA -mediated neuronal cell death we used the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 and the AMPA receptor antagonist PNQX. In primary neuronal cell cultures both MK-801 and PNQX inhibited sPLA - and glutamate-induced neuronal death. [ H]A...

  7. Salidroside protects cortical neurons against glutamate-induced cytotoxicity by inhibiting autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wei-Yong; Ye, Qiang; Huang, Huan-Jie; Xia, Nian-Ge; Chen, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Yi; Qu, Qiu-Min

    2016-08-01

    Recent evidence suggests that glutamate-induced cytotoxicity contributes to autophagic neuron death and is partially mediated by increased oxidative stress. Salidroside has been demonstrated to have neuroprotective effects in glutamate-induced neuronal damage. The precise mechanism of its regulatory role in neuronal autophagy is, however, poorly understood. This study aimed to probe the effects and mechanisms of salidroside in glutamate-induced autophagy activation in cultured rat cortical neurons. Cell viability assay, Western blotting, coimmunoprecipitation, and small interfering RNA were performed to analyze autophagy activities during glutamate-evoked oxidative injury. We found that salidroside protected neonatal neurons from glutamate-induced apoptotic cell death. Salidroside significantly attenuated the LC3-II/LC3-I ratio and expression of Beclin-1, but increased (SQSTM1)/p62 expression under glutamate exposure. Pretreatment with 3-methyladenine (3-MA), an autophagy inhibitor, decreased LC3-II/LC3-I ratio, attenuated glutamate-induced cell injury, and mimicked some of the protective effects of salidroside against glutamate-induced cell injury. Molecular analysis demonstrated that salidroside inhibited cortical neuron autophagy in response to glutamate exposure through p53 signaling by increasing the accumulation of cytoplasmic p53. Salidroside inhibited the glutamate-induced dissociation of the Bcl-2-Beclin-1 complex with minor affects on the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways. These data demonstrate that the inhibition of autophagy could be responsible for the neuroprotective effects of salidroside on glutamate-induced neuronal injury.

  8. Mutation in the glutamate transporter EAAT1 causes episodic ataxia, hemiplegia, and seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, J C; Wan, J; Palos, T P; Howard, B D; Baloh, R W

    2005-08-23

    Transporters, ion pumps, and ion channels are membrane proteins that regulate selective permeability and maintain ionic gradients across cell membranes. Mutations in CACNA1A encoding a neuronal calcium channel and ATP1A2 encoding an ion pump cause episodic ataxia, hemiplegic migraine, and seizures. Mutant gene products of both CACNA1A and ATP1A2 may affect neurotransmission of glutamate, the most abundant excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter. We examined our patient population with episodic ataxia and hemiplegic migraine but with no mutation in either CACNA1A or ATP1A2. We looked for mutations in SLC1A3, which encodes the glutamate transporter excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT) 1 that is important in removing glutamate from the synaptic cleft. A patient with episodic ataxia, seizures, migraine, and alternating hemiplegia has a heterozygous mutation in SLC1A3 that is not present in his asymptomatic parents and controls. Expression studies of the mutant EAAT1 showed decreased expression of the protein with a markedly reduced capacity for glutamate uptake. When coexpressed, the mutant EAAT1 decreased the activity of wild-type EAAT1 but not of two other transporters EAAT2 or EAAT3, suggesting that mutant EAAT1 specifically multimerizes with wild-type EAAT1 to exert its dominant negative effect. Our data show that a heterozygous mutation in EAAT1 can lead to decreased glutamate uptake, which can contribute to neuronal hyperexcitability to cause seizures, hemiplegia, and episodic ataxia.

  9. GLT-1-Dependent Disruption of CNS Glutamate Homeostasis and Neuronal Function by the Protozoan Parasite Toxoplasma gondii

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Clément N.; Frias, Elma S.; Szu, Jenny I.; Vieira, Philip A.; Hubbard, Jacqueline A.; Lovelace, Jonathan; Michael, Marena; Worth, Danielle; McGovern, Kathryn E.; Ethell, Iryna M.; Stanley, B. Glenn; Korzus, Edward; Fiacco, Todd A.; Binder, Devin K.; Wilson, Emma H.

    2016-01-01

    The immune privileged nature of the CNS can make it vulnerable to chronic and latent infections. Little is known about the effects of lifelong brain infections, and thus inflammation, on the neurological health of the host. Toxoplasma gondii is a parasite that can infect any mammalian nucleated cell with average worldwide seroprevalence rates of 30%. Infection by Toxoplasma is characterized by the lifelong presence of parasitic cysts within neurons in the brain, requiring a competent immune system to prevent parasite reactivation and encephalitis. In the immunocompetent individual, Toxoplasma infection is largely asymptomatic, however many recent studies suggest a strong correlation with certain neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. Here, we demonstrate a significant reduction in the primary astrocytic glutamate transporter, GLT-1, following infection with Toxoplasma. Using microdialysis of the murine frontal cortex over the course of infection, a significant increase in extracellular concentrations of glutamate is observed. Consistent with glutamate dysregulation, analysis of neurons reveal changes in morphology including a reduction in dendritic spines, VGlut1 and NeuN immunoreactivity. Furthermore, behavioral testing and EEG recordings point to significant changes in neuronal output. Finally, these changes in neuronal connectivity are dependent on infection-induced downregulation of GLT-1 as treatment with the ß-lactam antibiotic ceftriaxone, rescues extracellular glutamate concentrations, neuronal pathology and function. Altogether, these data demonstrate that following an infection with T. gondii, the delicate regulation of glutamate by astrocytes is disrupted and accounts for a range of deficits observed in chronic infection. PMID:27281462

  10. Relationship between Increase in Astrocytic GLT-1 Glutamate Transport and Late-LTP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pita-Almenar, Juan D.; Zou, Shengwei; Colbert, Costa M.; Eskin, Arnold

    2012-01-01

    Na[superscript +]-dependent high-affinity glutamate transporters have important roles in the maintenance of basal levels of glutamate and clearance of glutamate during synaptic transmission. Interestingly, several studies have shown that basal glutamate transport displays plasticity. Glutamate uptake increases in hippocampal slices during early…

  11. Relationship between Increase in Astrocytic GLT-1 Glutamate Transport and Late-LTP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pita-Almenar, Juan D.; Zou, Shengwei; Colbert, Costa M.; Eskin, Arnold

    2012-01-01

    Na[superscript +]-dependent high-affinity glutamate transporters have important roles in the maintenance of basal levels of glutamate and clearance of glutamate during synaptic transmission. Interestingly, several studies have shown that basal glutamate transport displays plasticity. Glutamate uptake increases in hippocampal slices during early…

  12. Protective effects of Ginkgo biloba extract 761 against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in cultured retinal neuron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yun-song; XU Liang; MA Ke; WANG Shuang; WANG Jin-jin

    2005-01-01

    @@ A large part of neuronal death is the result of episodes of anoxia and ischaemia in the retina and other eye diseases, such as anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, glaucoma. The neuronal death is due to the accumulation of glutamate in the extracellular space. Glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the retina. However, excessive overactivation of glutamate receptors leads to excitotoxic neuronal cell death. Glutamate induces cell death by increasing the levels of intracellular Ca2+ in neurons, thereby leading to generation of free radicals and activation proteases, as well as transcriptional activation of specific cell death programs. Glutamate excitoxicity can also cause neuronal mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) loss, which is associated with changes in mitochondrial function leading to a neuronal dysfunction.

  13. Immunohistochemical localization of glutamate transporter EAAC1 in the brainstem of adult rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Fu-xing; LIU Tao; ZHAO Jing-wei; LI Jin-lian; DONG Yu-lin; LI Ji-shuo

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To observe the distribution of EAAC1, a subtype of glutamate transporters, in the brainstem of adult rat. Methods: Immunocytochemical staining with avidin-biotin complex (ABC) method was employed. Results:EAAC1 was widely distributed throughout the brainstem. In many regions, the EAAC1-like immunoreactivity was primarily distributed in the neuropil. Cell body staining was observed in the prepositus hypoglossal nucleus, external cortex of the inferior colliculus, red nucleus, substantia nigra, mesencephalic raphe nuclei, ventral tegmental nucleus, superior olivary complex, nucleus of the trapezoid body, cochlear nucleus, sensory trigeminal complex, Barrington's nucleus,trigeminal motor nucleus, parabrachial nuclei, dorsal nucleus of vagus, hypoglossal nucleus, locus coeruleus, lateral and superior vestibular nuclei, lateral paragigantocellular nucleus and dorsal paragigantocellular nucleus. Conclusion: Glutamate transporter EAAC 1 is widely distributed throughout the brainstem of adult rat, which may play an important role in excitatory activities of the neurons induced by glutamate.

  14. A novel glutamate transport system in poly(γ-glutamic acid)-producing strain Bacillus subtilis CGMCC 0833.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qun; Xu, Hong; Zhang, Dan; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2011-08-01

    Bacillus subtilis CGMCC 0833 is a poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA)-producing strain. It has the capacity to tolerate high concentration of extracellular glutamate and to utilize glutamate actively. Such a high uptake capacity was owing to an active transport system for glutamate. Therefore, a specific transport system for L-glutamate has been observed in this strain. It was a novel transport process in which glutamate was symported with at least two protons, and an inward-directed sodium gradient had no stimulatory effect on it. K(m) and V(m) for glutamate transport were estimated to be 67 μM and 152 nmol⁻¹ min⁻¹ mg⁻¹ of protein, respectively. The transport system showed structural specificity and stereospecificity and was strongly dependent on extracellular pH. Moreover, it could be stimulated by Mg²⁺, NH₄⁺, and Ca²⁺. In addition, the glutamate transporter in this strain was studied at the molecular level. As there was no important mutation of the transporter protein, it appeared that the differences of glutamate transporter properties between this strain and other B. subtilis strains were not due to the differences of the amino acid sequence and the structure of transporter protein. This is the first extensive report on the properties of glutamate transport system in γ-PGA-producing strain.

  15. Amyloid-beta peptide decreases expression and function of glutamate transporters in nervous system cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Huichun; Zhang, Xiuping; Meng, Xingjun; Xu, Pingyi; Zou, Xiaoming; Qu, Shaogang

    2017-02-08

    Glutamate is an essential excitatory neurotransmitter that regulates brain functions, and its activity is tightly regulated by glutamate transporters. Excess glutamate in the synaptic cleft and dysfunction of excitatory amino acid transporters have been shown to be involved in development of Alzheimer's disease, but the precise regulatory mechanism is poorly understood. Using a D-[(3)H]-aspartic acid uptake assay, we found that Aβ1-42 oligomers impaired glutamate uptake in astrocytes and neurons. In astrocytes, this process was accompanied by reduced expression of GLT-1 and GLAST as detected by Western blot and immunocytofluorescence. However, mRNA levels of EAATs detected by qPCR in astrocytes and neurons were not altered, which suggests that this process is post-translational. Co-localization analysis using immunocytofluorescence showed that ubiquitylation of GLT-1 significantly increased. Therefore, we hypothesized that Aβ1-42 oligomers-induced endocytosis of astrocytic GLT-1 may be involved in ubiquitylation. In addition, Aβ1-42 oligomers enhanced secretion of IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6 into culture supernatant, which may be correlated with an inflammatory response and altered EAATs expression or function in Alzheimer's disease. These findings support the idea that dysregulation of the glutamatergic system may play a significant role in pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Furthermore, enhancing expression or function of EAATs in astrocytes and neurons might be a new therapeutic approach in treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Abnormalities in Glutamate Metabolism and Excitotoxicity in the Retinal Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Ishikawa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the physiological condition, glutamate acts as an excitatory neurotransmitter in the retina. However, excessive glutamate can be toxic to retinal neurons by overstimulation of the glutamate receptors. Glutamate excess is primarily attributed to perturbation in the homeostasis of the glutamate metabolism. Major pathway of glutamate metabolism consists of glutamate uptake by glutamate transporters followed by enzymatic conversion of glutamate to nontoxic glutamine by glutamine synthetase. Glutamate metabolism requires energy supply, and the energy loss inhibits the functions of both glutamate transporters and glutamine synthetase. In this review, we describe the present knowledge concerning the retinal glutamate metabolism under the physiological and pathological conditions.

  17. Existence of an Endogenous Glutamate and Aspartate Transporter in Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xunhe JI; Yuhua JIN; Yaoyue CHEN; Chongyong LI; Lihe GUO

    2007-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary cells show endogenous high-affinity Na+-dependent glutamate transport activity. This transport activity is kinetically similar to a glutamate transporter family strategically expressed in the central nervous system and is pharmacologically unlike glutamate transporter-1 or excitatory amino acid carrier 1. The cDNA of a glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST)-like transporter was obtained and analyzed. The deduced amino acid sequence showed high similarity to human, mouse, and rat GLAST. We concluded that a GLAST-like glutamate transporter exists in Chinese hamster ovary cells that might confer the endogenous high-affinity Na+-dependent glutamate transport activity evident in these cells.

  18. Ionotropic Glutamate Receptor Expression in Preganglionic Neurons of the Rat Inferior Salivatory Nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, M.; Chiego, D.J.; Bradley, R.M.

    2007-01-01

    Glutamate receptor (GluR) subunit composition of inferior salivatory nucleus (ISN) neurons was studied by immunohistochemical staining of retrogradely labeled neurons. Preganglionic ISN neurons innervating the von Ebner or parotid salivary glands were labeled by application of a fluorescent tracer to the lingual-tonsilar branch of the glossopharyngeal nerve or the otic ganglion respectively. We used polyclonal antibodies to glutamate receptor subunits NR1, NR2A, NR2B, (NMDA receptor subunits)...

  19. Functional deficits in glutamate transporters and astrocyte biophysical properties in a rodent model of focal cortical dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan L Campbell

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cortical dysplasia is associated with intractable epilepsy and developmental delay in young children. Recent work with the rat freeze-induced focal cortical dysplasia (FCD model has demonstrated that hyperexcitability in the dysplastic cortex is due in part to higher levels of extracellular glutamate. Astrocyte glutamate transporters play a pivotal role in cortical maintaining extracellular glutamate concentrations. Here we examined the function of astrocytic glutamate transporters in a FCD model in rats. Neocortical freeze lesions were made in postnatal day (PN 1 rat pups and whole cell electrophysiological recordings and biochemical studies were performed at PN 21-28. Synaptically evoked glutamate transporter currents in astrocytes showed a near 10-fold reduction in amplitude compared to sham operated controls. Astrocyte glutamate transporter currents from lesioned animals were also significantly reduced when challenged exogenously applied glutamate. Reduced astrocytic glutamate transport clearance contributed to increased NMDA receptor-mediated current decay kinetics in lesioned animals. The electrophysiological profile of astrocytes in the lesion group was also markedly changed compared to sham operated animals. Control astrocytes demonstrate large-amplitude linear leak currents in response to voltage-steps whereas astrocytes in lesioned animals demonstrated significantly smaller voltage-activated inward and outward currents. Significant decreases in astrocyte resting membrane potential and increases in input resistance were observed in lesioned animals. However, Western blotting, immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR demonstrated no differences in the expression of the astrocytic glutamate transporter GLT-1 in lesioned animals relative to controls. These data suggest that, in the absence of changes in protein or mRNA expression levels, functional changes in astrocytic glutamate transporters contribute to neuronal hyperexcitability in

  20. EFFECTS OF GLUTAMATE ON SODIUM CHANNEL IN ACUTELY DISSOCIATED HIPPOCAMPAL CA1 PYRAMIDAL NEURONS OF RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高宾丽; 伍国锋; 杨艳; 刘智飞; 曾晓荣

    2011-01-01

    Objective To observe the effects of glutamate on sodium channel in acutely dissociated hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons of rats.Methods Voltage-dependent sodium currents (INa) in acutely dissociated hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons of neonate rats were recorded by whole-cell patchclamp of the brain slice technique when a series of doses of glutamate (100-1000μmol/L) were applied.Results Different concentrations of glutamate could inhibit INa,and higher concentration of glutamate affected greater inhibitio...

  1. Dipeptide Piracetam Analogue Noopept Improves Viability of Hippocampal HT-22 Neurons in the Glutamate Toxicity Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipova, T A; Nikolaev, S V; Ostrovskaya, P U; Gudasheva, T A; Seredenin, S B

    2016-05-01

    Effect of noopept (N-phenylacetyl-prolylglycine ethyl ester) on viability of neurons exposed to neurotoxic action of glutamic acid (5 mM) was studied in vitro in immortalized mouse hippocampal HT-22 neurons. Noopept added to the medium before or after glutamic acid improved neuronal survival in a concentration range of 10-11-10-5 M. Comparison of the effective noopept concentrations determined in previous studies on cultured cortical and cerebellar neurons showed that hippocampal neurons are more sensitive to the protective effect of noopept.

  2. Repeated Cycles of Chronic Intermittent Ethanol Exposure Increases Basal Glutamate in the Nucleus Accumbens of Mice without affecting glutamate transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C. Griffin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Repeated cycles of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE exposure increase voluntary consumption of ethanol in mice. Previous work has shown that extracellular glutamate in the nucleus accumbens (NAc is significantly elevated in ethanol dependent mice and that pharmacologically manipulating glutamate concentrations in the NAc will alter ethanol drinking, indicating that glutamate homeostasis plays a crucial role in ethanol drinking in this model. The present studies were designed to measure extracellular glutamate at a time point in which mice would ordinarily be allowed voluntary access to ethanol in the CIE model and, additionally, to measure glutamate transport capacity in the NAc at the same time point. Extracellular glutamate was measured using quantitative microdialysis procedures. Glutamate transport capacity was measured under Na+ dependent and Na+ independent conditions to determine whether the function of excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs; also known as system XAG or of system Xc- (Glial cysteine-glutamate exchanger was influenced by CIE exposure. The results of the quantitative microdialysis experiment confirm increased extracellular glutamate (~2 –fold in the NAc of CIE exposed mice (i.e. ethanol-dependent compared to non-dependent mice in the NAc, consistent with earlier work. However, the increase in extracellular glutamate was not due to altered transporter function in the NAc of ethanol-dependent mice, because neither Na+ dependent nor Na+ independent glutamate transport was significantly altered by CIE exposure. These findings point to the possibility that hyperexcitability of cortical-striatal pathways underlies the increases in extracellular glutamate found in the nucleus accumbens of ethanol-dependent mice.

  3. On the potential role of glutamate transport in mental fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansson Elisabeth

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mental fatigue, with decreased concentration capacity, is common in neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases, often appearing prior to other major mental or physical neurological symptoms. Mental fatigue also makes rehabilitation more difficult after a stroke, brain trauma, meningitis or encephalitis. As increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines are reported in these disorders, we wanted to explore whether or not proinflammatory cytokines could induce mental fatigue, and if so, by what mechanisms. It is well known that proinflammatory cytokines are increased in major depression, "sickness behavior" and sleep deprivation, which are all disorders associated with mental fatigue. Furthermore, an influence by specific proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL-1, on learning and memory capacities has been observed in several experimental systems. As glutamate signaling is crucial for information intake and processing within the brain, and due to the pivotal role for glutamate in brain metabolism, dynamic alterations in glutamate transmission could be of pathophysiological importance in mental fatigue. Based on this literature and observations from our own laboratory and others on the role of astroglial cells in the fine-tuning of glutamate neurotransmission we present the hypothesis that the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β and IL-6 could be involved in the pathophysiology of mental fatigue through their ability to attenuate the astroglial clearance of extracellular glutamate, their disintegration of the blood brain barrier, and effects on astroglial metabolism and metabolic supply for the neurons, thereby attenuating glutamate transmission. To test whether our hypothesis is valid or not, brain imaging techniques should be applied with the ability to register, over time and with increasing cognitive loading, the extracellular concentrations of glutamate and potassium (K+ in humans suffering from

  4. EFFECT OF MELATONIN AGAINST GLUTAMATE-INDUCED EXCITOTOXICITY ON CULTURED CEREBRAL CORTICAL NEURONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To research the effect of melatonin against glutamate excitotoxicity. Methods The model of glutamate-induced excitotoxic damage was built up in rat cerebral cortical cell culture. The effect of mela- tonin against excitotoxic injury was observed by determining the leakage rate of lactate dehydrogenase(LDH) from neurons. Results The leakage rate of LDH wasn't decreased markedly when cultures were exposed to melatonin be- fore, during or 6 h after glutamate treatment. The leakage rate of LDH was decreased significantly when melatonin was administered 0 h, 2 h or 4 h after the cultures were exposed to glutamate. The inhibitory function of melatonin on LDH leakage was most effective at 2 h and 4 h. Conclusion Melatonin has protective effects on neurons damaged by glutamate in a certain time limit.

  5. The Split Personality of Glutamate Transporters: A Chloride Channel and a Transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cater, Rosemary J; Ryan, Renae M; Vandenberg, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    Transporters and ion channels are conventionally categorised into distinct classes of membrane proteins. However, some membrane proteins have a split personality and can function as both transporters and ion channels. The excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) in particular, function as both glutamate transporters and chloride (Cl(-)) channels. The EAATs couple the transport of glutamate to the co-transport of three Na(+) ions and one H(+) ion into the cell, and the counter-transport of one K(+) ion out of the cell. The EAAT Cl(-) channel is activated by the binding of glutamate and Na(+), but is thermodynamically uncoupled from glutamate transport and involves molecular determinants distinct from those responsible for glutamate transport. Several crystal structures of an EAAT archaeal homologue, GltPh, at different stages of the transport cycle, alongside numerous functional studies and molecular dynamics simulations, have provided extensive insights into the mechanism of substrate transport via these transporters. However, the molecular determinants involved in Cl(-) permeation, and the mechanism by which this channel is activated are not entirely understood. Here we will discuss what is currently known about the molecular determinants involved in EAAT-mediated Cl(-) permeation and the mechanisms that underlie their split personality.

  6. Genetic dys-regulation of astrocytic glutamate transporter EAAT2 and its implications in neurological disorders and manganese toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Pratap; Smith, Keisha; Johnson, James; Aschner, Michael; Lee, Eunsook Y

    2015-02-01

    Astrocytic glutamate transporters, the excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT) 2 and EAAT1 (glutamate transporter 1 and glutamate aspartate transporter in rodents, respectively), are the main transporters for maintaining optimal glutamate levels in the synaptic clefts by taking up more than 90% of glutamate from extracellular space thus preventing excitotoxic neuronal death. Reduced expression and function of these transporters, especially EAAT2, has been reported in numerous neurological disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia and epilepsy. The mechanism of down-regulation of EAAT2 in these diseases has yet to be fully established. Genetic as well as transcriptional dys-regulation of these transporters by various modes, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms and epigenetics, resulting in impairment of their functions, might play an important role in the etiology of neurological diseases. Consequently, there has been an extensive effort to identify molecular targets for enhancement of EAAT2 expression as a potential therapeutic approach. Several pharmacological agents increase expression of EAAT2 via nuclear factor κB and cAMP response element binding protein at the transcriptional level. However, the negative regulatory mechanisms of EAAT2 have yet to be identified. Recent studies, including those from our laboratory, suggest that the transcriptional factor yin yang 1 plays a critical role in the repressive effects of various neurotoxins, such as manganese (Mn), on EAAT2 expression. In this review, we will focus on transcriptional epigenetics and translational regulation of EAAT2.

  7. Genetic dys-regulation of astrocytic glutamate transporter EAAT2 and its implications in neurological disorders and manganese toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Pratap; Smith, Keisha; Johnson, James; Aschner, Michael; Lee, Eunsook

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytic glutamate transporters, the excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT) 2 and EAAT1 [glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) in rodents, respectively], are the main transporters for maintaining optimal glutamate levels in the synaptic clefts by taking up more than 90% of glutamate from extracellular space thus preventing excitotoxic neuronal death. Reduced expression and function of these transporters, especially EAAT2, has been reported in numerous neurological disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, schizophrenia and epilepsy. The mechanism of down-regulation of EAAT2 in these diseases has yet to be fully established. Genetic as well as transcriptional dys-regulation of these transporters by various modes, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and epigenetics, resulting in impairment of their functions, might play an important role in the etiology of neurological diseases. Consequently, there has been an extensive effort to identify molecular targets for enhancement of EAAT2 expression as a potential therapeutic approach. Several pharmacological agents increase expression of EAAT2 via NF-κB and CREB at the transcriptional level. However, the negative regulatory mechanisms of EAAT2 have yet to be identified. Recent studies, including those from our laboratory, suggest that the transcriptional factor yin yang 1 (YY1) plays a critical role in the repressive effects of various neurotoxins, such as manganese (Mn), on EAAT2 expression. In this review, we will focus on transcriptional epigenetics, and translational regulation of EAAT2. PMID:25064045

  8. Peripheral nerve injury increases glutamate-evoked calcium mobilization in adult spinal cord neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doolen Suzanne

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Central sensitization in the spinal cord requires glutamate receptor activation and intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. We used Fura-2 AM bulk loading of mouse slices together with wide-field Ca2+ imaging to measure glutamate-evoked increases in extracellular Ca2+ to test the hypotheses that: 1. Exogenous application of glutamate causes Ca2+ mobilization in a preponderance of dorsal horn neurons within spinal cord slices taken from adult mice; 2. Glutamate-evoked Ca2+ mobilization is associated with spontaneous and/or evoked action potentials; 3. Glutamate acts at glutamate receptor subtypes to evoked Ca2+ transients; and 4. The magnitude of glutamate-evoked Ca2+ responses increases in the setting of peripheral neuropathic pain. Results Bath-applied glutamate robustly increased [Ca2+]i in 14.4 ± 2.6 cells per dorsal horn within a 440 x 330 um field-of-view, with an average time-to-peak of 27 s and decay of 112 s. Repeated application produced sequential responses of similar magnitude, indicating the absence of sensitization, desensitization or tachyphylaxis. Ca2+ transients were glutamate concentration-dependent with a Kd = 0.64 mM. Ca2+ responses predominantly occurred on neurons since: 1 Over 95% of glutamate-responsive cells did not label with the astrocyte marker, SR-101; 2 62% of fura-2 AM loaded cells exhibited spontaneous action potentials; 3 75% of cells that responded to locally-applied glutamate with a rise in [Ca2+]i also showed a significant increase in AP frequency upon a subsequent glutamate exposure; 4 In experiments using simultaneous on-cell recordings and Ca2+ imaging, glutamate elicited a Ca2+ response and an increase in AP frequency. AMPA/kainate (CNQX- and AMPA (GYKI 52466-selective receptor antagonists significantly attenuated glutamate-evoked increases in [Ca2+]i, while NMDA (AP-5, kainate (UBP-301 and class I mGluRs (AIDA did not. Compared to sham controls, peripheral nerve injury

  9. Glutamate signalling and secretory phospholipase A2 modulate the release of arachidonic acid from neuronal membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez De Turco, Elena B; Jackson, Fannie R; DeCoster, Mark A

    2002-01-01

    and secretory PLA(2) (sPLA(2)) from bee venom (bv sPLA(2)) and Taipan snake venom (OS2) elicit synergy in inducing neuronal cell death. Low concentrations of sPLA(2) are selective ligands of cell-surface sPLA(2) receptors. We investigated which neuronal arachidonoyl phospholipids are targeted by glutamate...

  10. Analysis of connectivity map: Control to glutamate injured and phenobarbital treated neuronal network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Hassan; Kanhirodan, Rajan; Srinivas, Kalyan V.; Sikdar, Sujit K.

    2010-04-01

    We study the responses of a cultured neural network when it is exposed to epileptogenesis glutamate injury causing epilepsy and subsequent treatment with phenobarbital by constructing connectivity map of neurons using correlation matrix. This study is particularly useful in understanding the pharmaceutical drug induced changes in the neuronal network properties with insights into changes at the systems biology level.

  11. Age-Dependent Glutamate Induction of Synaptic Plasticity in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivenshitz, Miriam; Segal, Menahem; Sapoznik, Stav

    2006-01-01

    A common denominator for the induction of morphological and functional plasticity in cultured hippocampal neurons involves the activation of excitatory synapses. We now demonstrate massive morphological plasticity in mature cultured hippocampal neurons caused by a brief exposure to glutamate. This plasticity involves a slow, 70%-80% increase in…

  12. Stimulation of glutamate receptors in cultured hippocampal neurons causes Ca2+-dependent mitochondrial contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brustovetsky, Tatiana; Li, Viacheslav; Brustovetsky, Nickolay

    2009-07-01

    Cultured hippocampal neurons expressing mitochondrially-targeted enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (mito-eYFP) were used to quantitatively examine mitochondrial remodelling in response to excitotoxic glutamate. Mitochondrial morphology was evaluated using laser spinning-disk confocal microscopy followed by calibrated image processing and 3D image rendering. Glutamate triggered an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) and mitochondrial depolarization accompanied by Ca(2+)-dependent morphological transformation of neuronal mitochondria from "thread-like" to rounded structures. The quantitative analysis of the mitochondrial remodelling revealed that exposure to glutamate resulted in a decrease in mitochondrial volume and surface area concurrent with an increase in sphericity of the organelles. NIM811, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial permeability transition, attenuated the glutamate-induced sustained increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) and suppressed mitochondrial remodelling in the majority of affected neurons, but it did not rescue mitochondrial membrane potential. Shortening, fragmentation, and formation of circular mitochondria with decreased volume and surface area accompanied mitochondrial depolarization with FCCP. However, FCCP-induced morphological alterations appeared to be distinctly different from mitochondrial remodelling caused by glutamate. Moreover, FCCP prevented glutamate-induced mitochondrial remodelling suggesting an important role of Ca(2+) influx into mitochondria in the morphological alterations. Consistent with this, in saponin-permeabilized neurons, Ca(2+) caused mitochondrial remodelling which could be prevented by Ru(360).

  13. Recovery of network-driven glutamatergic activity in rat hippocampal neurons during chronic glutamate receptor blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leininger, Eric; Belousov, Andrei B

    2009-01-28

    Previous studies indicated that a long-term decrease in the activity of ionotropic glutamate receptors induces cholinergic activity in rat and mouse hypothalamic neuronal cultures. Here we studied whether a prolonged inactivation of ionotropic glutamate receptors also induces cholinergic activity in hippocampal neurons. Receptor activity was chronically suppressed in rat hippocampal primary neuronal cultures with two proportionally increasing sets of concentrations of NMDA plus non-NMDA receptor antagonists: 100 microM/10 microM AP5/CNQX (1X cultures) and 200 microM/20 microM AP5/CNQX (2X cultures). Using calcium imaging we demonstrate that cholinergic activity does not develop in these cultures. Instead, network-driven glutamate-dependent activity, that normally is detected in hyper-excitable conditions, reappears in each culture group in the presence of these antagonists and can be reversibly suppressed by higher concentrations of AP5/CNQX. This activity is mediated by non-NMDA receptors and is modulated by NMDA receptors. Further, non-NMDA receptors, the general level of glutamate receptor activity and CaMK-dependent signaling are critical for development of this network-driven glutamatergic activity in the presence of receptor antagonists. Using electrophysiology, western blotting and calcium imaging we show that some neuronal parameters are either reduced or not affected by chronic glutamate receptor blockade. However, other parameters (including neuronal excitability, mEPSC frequency, and expression of GluR1, NR1 and betaCaMKII) become up-regulated and, in some cases, proportionally between the non-treated, 1X and 2X cultures. Our data suggest recovery of the network-driven glutamatergic activity after chronic glutamate receptor blockade. This recovery may represent a form of neuronal plasticity that compensates for the prolonged suppression of the activity of glutamate receptors.

  14. Imbalance between Glutamate and GABA in Fmr1 Knockout Astrocytes Influences Neuronal Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Wang, Yan; Zhou, Shimeng; Yang, Liukun; Shi, Qixin; Li, Yujiao; Zhang, Kun; Yang, Le; Zhao, Minggao; Yang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a form of inherited mental retardation that results from the absence of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), the product of the Fmr1 gene. Numerous studies have shown that FMRP expression in astrocytes is important in the development of FXS. Although astrocytes affect neuronal dendrite development in Fmr1 knockout (KO) mice, the factors released by astrocytes are still unclear. We cultured wild type (WT) cortical neurons in astrocyte-conditioned medium (ACM) from WT or Fmr1 KO mice. Immunocytochemistry and Western blotting were performed to detect the dendritic growth of both WT and KO neurons. We determined glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The total neuronal dendritic length was reduced when cultured in the Fmr1 KO ACM. This neurotoxicity was triggered by an imbalanced release of glutamate and GABA from Fmr1 KO astrocytes. We found increased glutaminase and GABA transaminase (GABA-T) expression and decreased monoamine oxidase B expression in Fmr1 KO astrocytes. The elevated levels of glutamate contributed to oxidative stress in the cultured neurons. Vigabatrin (VGB), a GABA-T inhibitor, reversed the changes caused by glutamate and GABA release in Fmr1 KO astrocytes and the abnormal behaviors in Fmr1 KO mice. Our results indicate that the imbalance in the astrocytic glutamate and GABA release may be involved in the neuropathology and the underlying symptoms of FXS, and provides a therapeutic target for treatment. PMID:27517961

  15. Imbalance between Glutamate and GABA in Fmr1 Knockout Astrocytes Influences Neuronal Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome (FXS is a form of inherited mental retardation that results from the absence of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP, the product of the Fmr1 gene. Numerous studies have shown that FMRP expression in astrocytes is important in the development of FXS. Although astrocytes affect neuronal dendrite development in Fmr1 knockout (KO mice, the factors released by astrocytes are still unclear. We cultured wild type (WT cortical neurons in astrocyte-conditioned medium (ACM from WT or Fmr1 KO mice. Immunocytochemistry and Western blotting were performed to detect the dendritic growth of both WT and KO neurons. We determined glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA levels using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. The total neuronal dendritic length was reduced when cultured in the Fmr1 KO ACM. This neurotoxicity was triggered by an imbalanced release of glutamate and GABA from Fmr1 KO astrocytes. We found increased glutaminase and GABA transaminase (GABA-T expression and decreased monoamine oxidase B expression in Fmr1 KO astrocytes. The elevated levels of glutamate contributed to oxidative stress in the cultured neurons. Vigabatrin (VGB, a GABA-T inhibitor, reversed the changes caused by glutamate and GABA release in Fmr1 KO astrocytes and the abnormal behaviors in Fmr1 KO mice. Our results indicate that the imbalance in the astrocytic glutamate and GABA release may be involved in the neuropathology and the underlying symptoms of FXS, and provides a therapeutic target for treatment.

  16. Distribution of Vesicular Glutamate Transporter 2 and Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors in the Auditory Ganglion and Cochlear Nuclei of Pigeons (Columba livia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, M R; Atoji, Y

    2016-02-01

    Glutamate is a principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the auditory system. Our previous studies revealed localization of glutamate receptor mRNAs in the pigeon cochlear nuclei, suggesting the existence of glutamatergic input from the auditory nerve to the brainstem. This study demonstrated localization of mRNAs for vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (vGluT2) and ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPA, kainate and NMDA) in the auditory ganglion (AG) and cochlear nuclei (magnocellular, angular and laminar nuclei). VGluT2 mRNA was intensely expressed in AG and intensely or moderately in the cochlear nuclei. The AG and cochlear nuclei showed intense-to-moderate mRNA signals for GluA2, GluA3, GluA4, GluK4 and GluN1. These results suggest that the pigeon AG neurons receives glutamatergic input from hair cells and in turn projects to the magnocellular and angular nuclei. Glutamate may play a pivotal role in the excitatory synapse transmission in the peripheral auditory pathway of birds.

  17. Transport of BMAA into Neurons and Astrocytes by System xc.

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    Albano, Rebecca; Lobner, Doug

    2017-05-03

    The study of the mechanism of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) neurotoxicity originally focused on its effects at the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. In recent years, it has become clear that its mechanism of action is more complicated. First, there are certain cell types, such as motor neurons and cholinergic neurons, where the dominate mechanism of toxicity is through action at AMPA receptors. Second, even in cortical neurons where the primary mechanism of toxicity appears to be activation of NMDA receptors, there are other mechanisms involved. We found that along with NMDA receptors, activation of mGLuR5 receptors and effects on the cystine/glutamate antiporter (system xc-) were involved in the toxicity. The effects on system xc- are of particular interest. System xc- mediates the transport of cystine into the cell in exchange for releasing glutamate into the extracellular fluid. By releasing glutamate, system xc- can potentially cause excitotoxicity. However, through providing cystine to the cell, it regulates the levels of cellular glutathione (GSH), the main endogenous intracellular antioxidant, and in this way may protect cells against oxidative stress. We have previously published that BMAA inhibits cystine uptake leading to GSH depletion and had indirect evidence that BMAA is transported into the cells by system xc-. We now present direct evidence that BMAA is transported into both astrocytes and neurons through system xc-. The fact that BMAA is transported by system xc- also provides a mechanism for BMAA to enter brain cells potentially leading to misincorporation into proteins and protein misfolding.

  18. Control of Amygdala Circuits by 5-HT Neurons via 5-HT and Glutamate Cotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Ayesha; Bocchio, Marco; Bannerman, David M; Sharp, Trevor; Capogna, Marco

    2017-02-15

    The serotonin (5-HT) system and the amygdala are key regulators of emotional behavior. Several lines of evidence suggest that 5-HT transmission in the amygdala is implicated in the susceptibility and drug treatment of mood disorders. Therefore, elucidating the physiological mechanisms through which midbrain 5-HT neurons modulate amygdala circuits could be pivotal in understanding emotional regulation in health and disease. To shed light on these mechanisms, we performed patch-clamp recordings from basal amygdala (BA) neurons in brain slices from mice with channelrhodopsin genetically targeted to 5-HT neurons. Optical stimulation of 5-HT terminals at low frequencies (≤1 Hz) evoked a short-latency excitation of BA interneurons (INs) that was depressed at higher frequencies. Pharmacological analysis revealed that this effect was mediated by glutamate and not 5-HT because it was abolished by ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists. Optical stimulation of 5-HT terminals at higher frequencies (10-20 Hz) evoked both slow excitation and slow inhibition of INs. These effects were mediated by 5-HT because they were blocked by antagonists of 5-HT2A and 5-HT1A receptors, respectively. These fast glutamate- and slow 5-HT-mediated responses often coexisted in the same neuron. Interestingly, fast-spiking and non-fast-spiking INs displayed differential modulation by glutamate and 5-HT. Furthermore, optical stimulation of 5-HT terminals did not evoke glutamate release onto BA principal neurons, but inhibited these cells directly via activation of 5-HT1A receptors and indirectly via enhanced GABA release. Collectively, these findings suggest that 5-HT neurons exert a frequency-dependent, cell-type-specific control over BA circuitry via 5-HT and glutamate co-release to inhibit the BA output.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The modulation of the amygdala by serotonin (5-HT) is important for emotional regulation and is implicated in the pathogenesis and treatment of affective disorders

  19. Glutamate transporter-1 and cerebral ischemia%谷氨酸转运体-1与脑缺血

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周华荣; 徐恩

    2013-01-01

    谷氨酸转运体-1(glutamate transporter-1,GLT-1)是脑组织内的一种重要谷氨酸转运体,可将胞外谷氨酸转运至星形胶质细胞内.在谷氨酰胺合成酶的作用下,谷氨酸转化为可被神经元利用的谷氨酰胺.脑缺血时,细胞外谷氨酸浓度急剧升高,从而对神经元产生兴奋性毒性作用.头孢曲松、亚致死性缺血、低压低氧等预处理均可通过调节GLT-1的表达和改善其功能而起神经保护作用.%Glutamate is an essential excitatory neurotransmitter which regulates brain functions.An increase in extracellular glutamate could excessively activate ionotropic glutamate receptors,initiate calcium overload,and lead to cell death after cerebral ischemia.Glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) is one of the major glutamate transporters expressed predominantly in astrocytes.Astrocytes also express the enzyme glutamine synthetase (GS) which converts the glutamate to glutamine; the latter is then 'recycled' into neurons.Pretreatment with ceftriaxone (CEF),ischemia and intermittent hypobaric hypoxia could lead to neuroprotection by increasing the expression of GLT-1 and regulating the activity of glutamate transporter in brain.

  20. Crambescidin 816 induces calcium influx though glutamate receptors in primary cultures of cortical neurons

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    Víctor Martín Vázquez

    2014-06-01

    In summary, our data suggest that the cytotoxic effect of 10 μM Cramb816 in cortical neurons may be related to an increase in the cytosolic calcium concentration elicited by the toxin, which is shown to be mediated by glutamate receptor activation. Further studies analyzing the effect of glutamate receptor blockers on the cytotoxic effect of Cramb816 are needed to confirm this hypothesis.

  1. VGLUT3 (vesicular glutamate transporter type 3) contribution to the regulation of serotonergic transmission and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amilhon, Bénédicte; Lepicard, Eve; Renoir, Thibault; Mongeau, Raymond; Popa, Daniela; Poirel, Odile; Miot, Stéphanie; Gras, Christelle; Gardier, Alain M; Gallego, Jorge; Hamon, Michel; Lanfumey, Laurence; Gasnier, Bruno; Giros, Bruno; El Mestikawy, Salah

    2010-02-10

    Three different subtypes of H(+)-dependent carriers (named VGLUT1-3) concentrate glutamate into synaptic vesicles before its exocytotic release. Neurons using other neurotransmitter than glutamate (such as cholinergic striatal interneurons and 5-HT neurons) express VGLUT3. It was recently reported that VGLUT3 increases acetylcholine vesicular filling, thereby, stimulating cholinergic transmission. This new regulatory mechanism is herein designated as vesicular-filling synergy (or vesicular synergy). In the present report, we found that deletion of VGLUT3 increased several anxiety-related behaviors in adult and in newborn mice as early as 8 d after birth. This precocious involvement of a vesicular glutamate transporter in anxiety led us to examine the underlying functional implications of VGLUT3 in 5-HT neurons. On one hand, VGLUT3 deletion caused a significant decrease of 5-HT(1A)-mediated neurotransmission in raphe nuclei. On the other hand, VGLUT3 positively modulated 5-HT transmission of a specific subset of 5-HT terminals from the hippocampus and the cerebral cortex. VGLUT3- and VMAT2-positive serotonergic fibers show little or no 5-HT reuptake transporter. These results unravel the existence of a novel subset of 5-HT terminals in limbic areas that might play a crucial role in anxiety-like behaviors. In summary, VGLUT3 accelerates 5-HT transmission at the level of specific 5-HT terminals and can exert an inhibitory control at the raphe level. Furthermore, our results suggest that the loss of VGLUT3 expression leads to anxiety-associated behaviors and should be considered as a potential new target for the treatment of this disorder.

  2. MADP, a salidroside analog, protects hippocampal neurons from glutamate induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Hua; Zhao, Jing; Zheng, Yuan; Wang, Meihong; Huang, Jun; Wu, Bingxin; Sun, Cheng; Yang, Yumin

    2014-05-08

    To investigate the anti-apoptotic effect of MADP, an analog of salidroside, against glutamate induced apoptosis in the cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Cytotoxicity was determined by the MTT method and lactate dehydrogenase release to the medium. Cell apoptosis was evaluated by Hoechst 33342 staining, TUNEL assay and flow cytometric analysis. Western blotting was applied for detecting protein levels of cellular signaling molecules. Our results showed that glutamate exposure significantly induces cell apoptosis, whereas the pretreatment of salidroside or MADP remarkably improves cell viability. Most importantly, the anti-apoptotic effect of MADP against glutamate insult is superior to salidroside. To explore the involved mechanisms, we measured some pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic protein levels, and several cell survival signaling pathways were analyzed as well. No visible alterations in Bcl-2 and Bax protein levels were observed by MADP or salidroside. Akt and JNK phosphorylation was robustly stimulated by MADP in the glutamate-treated neurons. Salidroside treatment results in a slight activation in Akt, while no significant alteration in JNK activity was observed. MADP exhibits higher capacity to attenuate glutamate induced cell apoptosis in the cultured rat hippocampal neurons, suggesting that MADP might be a better candidate than salidroside for developing novel drugs treating neuron loss associated disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Blood Glutamate Scavenging: Insight into Neuroprotection

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    Alexander Zlotnik

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Brain insults are characterized by a multitude of complex processes, of which glutamate release plays a major role. Deleterious excess of glutamate in the brain’s extracellular fluids stimulates glutamate receptors, which in turn lead to cell swelling, apoptosis, and neuronal death. These exacerbate neurological outcome. Approaches aimed at antagonizing the astrocytic and glial glutamate receptors have failed to demonstrate clinical benefit. Alternatively, eliminating excess glutamate from brain interstitial fluids by making use of the naturally occurring brain-to-blood glutamate efflux has been shown to be effective in various animal studies. This is facilitated by gradient driven transport across brain capillary endothelial glutamate transporters. Blood glutamate scavengers enhance this naturally occurring mechanism by reducing the blood glutamate concentration, thus increasing the rate at which excess glutamate is cleared. Blood glutamate scavenging is achieved by several mechanisms including: catalyzation of the enzymatic process involved in glutamate metabolism, redistribution of glutamate into tissue, and acute stress response. Regardless of the mechanism involved, decreased blood glutamate concentration is associated with improved neurological outcome. This review focuses on the physiological, mechanistic and clinical roles of blood glutamate scavenging, particularly in the context of acute and chronic CNS injury. We discuss the details of brain-to-blood glutamate efflux, auto-regulation mechanisms of blood glutamate, natural and exogenous blood glutamate scavenging systems, and redistribution of glutamate. We then propose different applied methodologies to reduce blood and brain glutamate concentrations and discuss the neuroprotective role of blood glutamate scavenging.

  4. Extrasynaptic glutamate receptor activation as cellular bases for dynamic range compression in pyramidal neurons

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    Katerina D Oikonomou

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Repetitive synaptic stimulation overcomes the ability of astrocytic processes to clear glutamate from the extracellular space, allowing some dendritic segments to become submerged in a pool of glutamate. This dynamic arrangement activates extrasynaptic NMDA receptors located on dendritic shafts. We used voltage-sensitive and calcium-sensitive dyes to probe dendritic function in this glutamate-rich location. An excess of glutamate in the extrasynaptic space was achieved either by repetitive synaptic stimulation or by glutamate iontophoresis onto the dendrites of pyramidal neurons. Two successive activations of synaptic inputs produced a typical NMDA spike, whereas five successive synaptic inputs produced characteristic plateau potentials, reminiscent of cortical UP states. While NMDA spikes were coupled with brief calcium transients highly restricted to the glutamate input site, the dendritic plateau potentials were accompanied by calcium influx along the entire dendritic branch. Once initiated, the glutamate-mediated dendritic plateau potentials could not be interrupted by negative voltage pulses. Activation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors in cellular compartments void of spines is sufficient to initiate and support plateau potentials. The only requirement for sustained depolarizing events is a surplus of free glutamate near a group of extrasynaptic receptors. Highly nonlinear dendritic spikes (plateau potentials are summed in a highly sublinear fashion at the soma, revealing the cellular bases of signal compression in cortical circuits. Extrasynaptic NMDA receptors provide pyramidal neurons with a function analogous to a dynamic range compression in audio engineering. They limit or reduce the volume of loud sounds (i.e. strong glut. inputs and amplify quiet sounds (i.e. glutamatergic inputs that barely cross the dendritic threshold for local spike initiation. Our data also explain why consecutive cortical UP states have uniform amplitudes in a

  5. Green Tea Polyphenols Attenuated Glutamate Excitotoxicity via Antioxidative and Antiapoptotic Pathway in the Primary Cultured Cortical Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Lin; Cao, Chang; Cheng, Yong; Qin, Xiao-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Green tea polyphenols are a natural product which has antioxidative and antiapoptotic effects. It has been shown that glutamate excitotoxicity induced oxidative stress is linked to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. In this study we explored the neuroprotective effect of green teen polyphenols against glutamate excitotoxicity in the primary cultured cortical neurons. We found that green tea polyphenols protected against glutamate induced neurotoxicity in the cortical neurons as measured by MTT and TUNEL assays. Green tea polyphenols were then showed to inhibit the glutamate induced ROS release and SOD activity reduction in the neurons. Furthermore, our results demonstrated that green tea polyphenols restored the dysfunction of mitochondrial pro- or antiapoptotic proteins Bax, Bcl-2, and caspase-3 caused by glutamate. Interestingly, the neuroprotective effect of green tea polyphenols was abrogated when the neurons were incubated with siBcl-2. Taken together, these results demonstrated that green tea polyphenols protected against glutamate excitotoxicity through antioxidative and antiapoptotic pathways.

  6. Augmentation of normal and glutamate-impaired neuronal respiratory capacity by exogenous alternative biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Melissa D; Clerc, Pascaline; Polster, Brian M; Fiskum, Gary

    2013-12-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory capacity is critical for responding to changes in neuronal energy demand. One approach toward neuroprotection is the administration of alternative energy substrates ("biofuels") to overcome brain injury-induced inhibition of glucose-based aerobic energy metabolism. This study tested the hypothesis that exogenous pyruvate, lactate, β-hydroxybutyrate, and acetyl-L-carnitine each increase neuronal respiratory capacity in vitro either in the absence of or following transient excitotoxic glutamate receptor stimulation. Compared to the presence of 5 mM glucose alone, the addition of pyruvate, lactate, or β-hydroxybutyrate (1.0-10.0 mM) to either day in vitro (DIV) 14 or 7 rat cortical neurons resulted in significant, dose-dependent stimulation of respiratory capacity, measured by cell respirometry as the maximal O2 consumption rate in the presence of the respiratory uncoupler carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone. A 30-min exposure to 100 μM glutamate impaired respiratory capacity for DIV 14, but not DIV 7, neurons. Glutamate reduced the respiratory capacity for DIV 14 neurons with glucose alone by 25 % and also reduced respiratory capacity with glucose plus pyruvate, lactate, or β-hydroxybutyrate. However, respiratory capacity in glutamate-exposed neurons following pyruvate or β-hydroxybutyrate addition was still, at least, as high as that obtained with glucose alone in the absence of glutamate exposure. These results support the interpretation that previously observed neuroprotection by exogenous pyruvate, lactate, or β-hydroxybutyrate is at least partially mediated by their preservation of neuronal respiratory capacity.

  7. Evidence for glutamate-mediated activation of hippocampal neurons by glial calcium waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassinger, T D; Atkinson, P B; Strecker, G J; Whalen, L R; Dudek, F E; Kossel, A H; Kater, S B

    1995-10-01

    Communication from astrocytes to neurons has recently been reported by two laboratories, but different mechanisms were though to underlie glial calcium wave activation of associated neurons. Neuronal calcium elevation by glia observed in the present report is similar to that reported previously, where an increase in neuronal calcium was demonstrated in response to glial stimulation. In the present study hippocampal neurons plated on a confluent glial monolayer displayed a transient increase in intracellular calcium following a short delay after the passage of a wave of increased calcium in underlying glia. Activated cells displayed action potentials in response to glial waves and showed antineurofilament immunoreactivity. Finally, the N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor antagonist DL-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid and the non-NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione significantly reduced the responsiveness of neurons to glial calcium waves. Our results indicate that hippocampal neurons growing on hippocampal or cortical astrocytes respond to glial calcium waves with elevations in calcium and increased electrical activity. Furthermore, we show that in most cases this communication appears to be mediated by ionotropic glutamate receptor channels.

  8. CHARACTERIZATION OF A BINDING PROTEIN-DEPENDENT GLUTAMATE TRANSPORT-SYSTEM OF RHODOBACTER-SPHAEROIDES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, M.H J; Driessen, A.J.M.; Konings, W.N

    1995-01-01

    The mechanism of L-glutamate uptake was studied in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Uptake of L-glutamate is mediated by a high-affinity (K-t of 1.2 mu M), shock-sensitive transport system that is inhibited by vanadate and dependent on the internal pH. From the shock fluid, an L-glutamate-binding protein wa

  9. Characterization of a Binding Protein-Dependent Glutamate Transport System of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, Mariken H.J.; Driessen, Arnold J.M.; Konings, Wil N.

    1995-01-01

    The mechanism of L-glutamate uptake was studied in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Uptake of L-glutamate is mediated by a high-affinity (Kt of 1.2 µM), shock-sensitive transport system that is inhibited by vanadate and dependent on the internal pH. From the shock fluid, an L-glutamate-binding protein was i

  10. Novel Dicarboxylate Selectivity in an Insect Glutamate Transporter Homolog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Rascoe, Avi M.; Holley, David C.; Gouaux, Eric; Kavanaugh, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Mammals express seven transporters from the SLC1 (solute carrier 1) gene family, including five acidic amino acid transporters (EAAT1–5) and two neutral amino acid transporters (ASCT1–2). In contrast, insects of the order Diptera possess only two SLC1 genes. In this work we show that in the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus, a carrier of West Nile virus, one of its two SLC1 EAAT-like genes encodes a transporter that displays an unusual selectivity for dicarboxylic acids over acidic amino acids. In eukaryotes, dicarboxylic acid uptake has been previously thought to be mediated exclusively by transporters outside the SLC1 family. The dicarboxylate selectivity was found to be associated with two residues in transmembrane domain 8, near the presumed substrate binding site. These residues appear to be conserved in all eukaryotic SLC1 transporters (Asp444 and Thr448, human EAAT3 numbering) with the exception of this novel C. quinquefasciatus transporter and an ortholog from the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti, in which they are changed to Asn and Ala. In the prokaryotic EAAT-like SLC1 transporter DctA, a dicarboxylate transporter which was lost in the lineage leading to eukaryotes, the corresponding TMD8 residues are Ser and Ala. Functional analysis of engineered mutant mosquito and human transporters expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes provide support for a model defining interactions of charged and polar transporter residues in TMD8 with α-amino acids and ions. Together with the phylogenetic evidence, the functional data suggest that a novel route of dicarboxylic acid uptake evolved in these mosquitos by mutations in an ancestral glutamate transporter gene. PMID:23951049

  11. Novel dicarboxylate selectivity in an insect glutamate transporter homolog.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    Full Text Available Mammals express seven transporters from the SLC1 (solute carrier 1 gene family, including five acidic amino acid transporters (EAAT1-5 and two neutral amino acid transporters (ASCT1-2. In contrast, insects of the order Diptera possess only two SLC1 genes. In this work we show that in the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus, a carrier of West Nile virus, one of its two SLC1 EAAT-like genes encodes a transporter that displays an unusual selectivity for dicarboxylic acids over acidic amino acids. In eukaryotes, dicarboxylic acid uptake has been previously thought to be mediated exclusively by transporters outside the SLC1 family. The dicarboxylate selectivity was found to be associated with two residues in transmembrane domain 8, near the presumed substrate binding site. These residues appear to be conserved in all eukaryotic SLC1 transporters (Asp444 and Thr448, human EAAT3 numbering with the exception of this novel C. quinquefasciatus transporter and an ortholog from the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti, in which they are changed to Asn and Ala. In the prokaryotic EAAT-like SLC1 transporter DctA, a dicarboxylate transporter which was lost in the lineage leading to eukaryotes, the corresponding TMD8 residues are Ser and Ala. Functional analysis of engineered mutant mosquito and human transporters expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes provide support for a model defining interactions of charged and polar transporter residues in TMD8 with α-amino acids and ions. Together with the phylogenetic evidence, the functional data suggest that a novel route of dicarboxylic acid uptake evolved in these mosquitos by mutations in an ancestral glutamate transporter gene.

  12. Ionotropic glutamate receptor expression in preganglionic neurons of the rat inferior salivatory nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M; Chiego, D J; Bradley, R M

    2008-02-29

    Glutamate receptor (GluR) subunit composition of inferior salivatory nucleus (ISN) neurons was studied by immunohistochemical staining of retrogradely labeled neurons. Preganglionic ISN neurons innervating the von Ebner or parotid salivary glands were labeled by application of a fluorescent tracer to the lingual-tonsilar branch of the glossopharyngeal nerve or the otic ganglion respectively. We used polyclonal antibodies to glutamate receptor subunits NR1, NR2A, NR2B, (NMDA receptor subunits) GluR1, GluR2, GluR3, GluR4 (AMPA receptor subunits), and GluR5-7, KA2 (kainate receptor subunits) to determine their expression in ISN neurons. The distribution of the NMDA, AMPA and kainate receptor subunits in retrogradely labeled ISN neurons innervating the von Ebner and parotid glands was qualitatively similar. The percentage of retrogradley labeled ISN neurons innervating the parotid gland expressing the GluR subunits was always greater than those innervating the von Ebner gland. For both von Ebner and parotid ISN neurons, NR2A subunit staining had the highest expression and the lowest expression of GluR subunit staining was NR2B for von Ebner ISN neurons and GluR1 for parotid ISN neurons. The percentage of NR2B and GluR4 expressing ISN neurons was significantly different between the two glands. The percentage of ISN neurons that expressed GluR receptor subunits ranged widely indicating that the distribution of GluR subunit expression differs amongst the ISN neurons. While ISN preganglionic neurons express all the GluR subunits, differences in the percentage of ISN neurons expression between neurons innervating the von Ebner and parotid glands may relate to the different functional roles of these glands.

  13. Glutamate transport in Rhodobacter sphaeroides is mediated by a novel binding protein-dependent secondary transport system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, Mariken H.J.; Heide, Tiemen van der; Driessen, Arnold J.M.; Konings, Wil N.

    1996-01-01

    Growth of a glutamate transport-deficient mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides on glutamate as sole carbon and nitrogen source can be restored by the addition of millimolar amounts of Na+. Uptake of glutamate (Kt of 0.2 µM) by the mutant strictly requires Na+ (Km of 25 mM) and is inhibited by

  14. Rigidity of the subunit interfaces of the trimeric glutamate transporter GItT during translocation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneveld, Maarten; Slotboom, Dirk-Jan

    2007-01-01

    Glutamate transporters are trimeric membrane proteins in which each protomer contains a separate translocation path. To determine whether structural rearrangements take place at the subunit interfaces during transport, intersubunit disulfide bridges were introduced in the bacterial transporter GltT.

  15. Increased response to glutamate in small diameter dorsal root ganglion neurons after sciatic nerve injury.

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    Kerui Gong

    Full Text Available Glutamate in the peripheral nervous system is involved in neuropathic pain, yet we know little how nerve injury alters responses to this neurotransmitter in primary sensory neurons. We recorded neuronal responses from the ex-vivo preparations of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG one week following a chronic constriction injury (CCI of the sciatic nerve in adult rats. We found that small diameter DRG neurons (30 µm were unaffected. Puff application of either glutamate, or the selective ionotropic glutamate receptor agonists alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA and kainic acid (KA, or the group I metabotropic receptor (mGluR agonist (S-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG, induced larger inward currents in CCI DRGs compared to those from uninjured rats. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA-induced currents were unchanged. In addition to larger inward currents following CCI, a greater number of neurons responded to glutamate, AMPA, NMDA, and DHPG, but not to KA. Western blot analysis of the DRGs revealed that CCI resulted in a 35% increase in GluA1 and a 60% decrease in GluA2, the AMPA receptor subunits, compared to uninjured controls. mGluR1 receptor expression increased by 60% in the membrane fraction, whereas mGluR5 receptor subunit expression remained unchanged after CCI. These results show that following nerve injury, small diameter DRG neurons, many of which are nociceptive, have increased excitability and an increased response to glutamate that is associated with changes in receptor expression at the neuronal membrane. Our findings provide further evidence that glutamatergic transmission in the periphery plays a role in nociception.

  16. Pinacidil and levamisole prevent glutamate-induced death of hippocampal neuronal cells through reducing ROS production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukry, Mustafa; Kamal, Tarek; Ali, Radi; Farrag, Foad; Almadaly, Essam; Saleh, Ayman A; Abu El-Magd, Mohammed

    2015-10-01

    Activators of both adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive K(+) (KATP) channel and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel have significant in vivo and in vitro neuroprotection against glutamate-induced death of some neuronal cells. Here, the effect of the KATP channel activator, pinacidil, and the CFTR Cl(-) channel opener, levamisole, against glutamate-induced oxidative stress were investigated in mouse hippocampal cells, HT22. The results from cell viability assay (WST-1) showed that pinacidil and levamisole weakly protected cells against glutamate-induced toxicity at 10 μM and their effect increased in a dose-dependent manner till reach maximum protection at 300 μM. Pretreatment with pinacidil or levamisole significantly suppressed the elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) triggered by glutamate through stabilising mitochondrial membrane potential and subsequently protected HT22 cells against glutamate-induced death. HT22 cells viability was maintained by pinacidil and levamisole in presence of glutathione inhibitor, BSO. Also, pinacidil and levamisole pretreatment did not induce recovery of glutathione levels decreased by glutamate Expectedly, this protection was abolished by the KATP and CFTR Cl(-) channels blocker, glibenclamide. Thus, both pinacidil and levamisole protect HT22 cells against glutamate-induced cell death through stabilising mitochondrial membrane potential and subsequently decreasing ROS production.

  17. RuBi-Glutamate: Two-photon and visible-light photoactivation of neurons and dendritic spines

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    Elodie Fino

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe neurobiological applications of RuBi-Glutamate, a novel caged-glutamate compound based on ruthenium photochemistry. RuBi-Glutamate can be excited with visible wavelengths and releases glutamate after one- or two-photon excitation. It has high quantum efficiency and can be used at low concentrations, partly avoiding the blockade of GABAergic transmission present with other caged compounds. Two-photon uncaging of RuBi-glutamate has a high spatial resolution and generates excitatory responses in individual dendritic spines with physiological kinetics. With laser beam multiplexing, RuBi-Glutamate uncaging can also be used to depolarize and fire pyramidal neurons with single-cell resolution. RuBi-Glutamate therefore enables the photo-activation of neuronal dendrites and circuits with visible or two-photon light sources, achieving single spine, or single cell, precision.

  18. RuBi-Glutamate: Two-Photon and Visible-Light Photoactivation of Neurons and Dendritic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fino, Elodie; Araya, Roberto; Peterka, Darcy S; Salierno, Marcelo; Etchenique, Roberto; Yuste, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    We describe neurobiological applications of RuBi-Glutamate, a novel caged-glutamate compound based on ruthenium photochemistry. RuBi-Glutamate can be excited with visible wavelengths and releases glutamate after one- or two-photon excitation. It has high quantum efficiency and can be used at low concentrations, partly avoiding the blockade of GABAergic transmission present with other caged compounds. Two-photon uncaging of RuBi-Glutamate has a high spatial resolution and generates excitatory responses in individual dendritic spines with physiological kinetics. With laser beam multiplexing, two-photon RuBi-Glutamate uncaging can also be used to depolarize and fire pyramidal neurons with single-cell resolution. RuBi-Glutamate therefore enables the photoactivation of neuronal dendrites and circuits with visible or two-photon light sources, achieving single cell, or even single spine, precision.

  19. The Glutamine Transporters and Their Role in the Glutamate/GABA-Glutamine Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leke, Renata; Schousboe, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine is a key amino acid in the CNS, playing an important role in the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle (GGC). In the GGC, glutamine is transferred from astrocytes to neurons, where it will replenish the inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmitter pools. Different transporters participate...... acids and cationic amino acids (y(+)LAT2 isoform) and have been associated with glutamine efflux from astrocytes. ASCT2 is a Na(+)-dependent antiporter, the participation of which in the GGC also remains to be better characterized. All these isoforms are tightly regulated by transcriptional...... and translational mechanisms, which are induced by several determinants such as amino acid deprivation, hormones, pH, and the activity of different signaling pathways. Dysfunctional glutamine transporter activity has been associated with the pathophysiological mechanisms of certain neurologic diseases...

  20. Downregulation of the Glial GLT1 Glutamate Transporter and Purkinje Cell Dysfunction in a Mouse Model of Myotonic Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Géraldine Sicot

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Brain function is compromised in myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. To gain insight into the cellular and molecular pathways primarily affected, we studied a mouse model of DM1 and brains of adult patients. We found pronounced RNA toxicity in the Bergmann glia of the cerebellum, in association with abnormal Purkinje cell firing and fine motor incoordination in DM1 mice. A global proteomics approach revealed downregulation of the GLT1 glutamate transporter in DM1 mice and human patients, which we found to be the result of MBNL1 inactivation. GLT1 downregulation in DM1 astrocytes increases glutamate neurotoxicity and is detrimental to neurons. Finally, we demonstrated that the upregulation of GLT1 corrected Purkinje cell firing and motor incoordination in DM1 mice. Our findings show that glial defects are critical in DM1 brain pathophysiology and open promising therapeutic perspectives through the modulation of glutamate levels.

  1. Downregulation of postsynaptic density-95-interacting regulator of spine morphogenesis reduces glutamate-induced excitotoxicity by differentially regulating glutamate receptors in rat cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Peng; Yang, Yuefan; Liu, Wei; Rao, Wei; Bian, Huan; Li, Xin; Chen, Tao; Liu, Mengdong; Zhao, Yongbo; Dai, Shuhui; Yan, Xu; Fei, Zhou

    2013-12-01

    Glutamate-induced excitotoxicity is involved in many neurological diseases. Preso, a novel postsynaptic scaffold protein, mediates excitatory synaptic transmission and various synaptic functions. In this study, we investigated the role of Preso in the regulation of glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in rat cortical neurons. Knockdown of Preso with small interfering RNA improved neuronal viability and attenuated the elevation of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release after glutamate treatment. Downregulation of Preso also inhibited an increase in the BAX/Bcl-2 ratio and cleavage of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Although the expression and distribution of metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) 1/5, NR1, NR2A and NR2B were not changed by knockdown of Preso, downregulation of Preso protected neurons from glutamate-induced excitotoxicity by inhibiting mGluR and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor function. However, downregulation of Preso neither affected the expression of GluR1 and GluR2 nor influenced the function of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate receptor after glutamate treatment. Furthermore, intracellular Ca(2+) was an important downstream effector of Preso in the regulation of excitotoxicity. These results suggest that expression of Preso promotes the induction of excitotoxicity by facilitating different glutamate receptor signaling pathways. Therefore, Preso might be a potential pharmacological target for preventing and treating neurological diseases.

  2. Interaction between the glutamate transporter GLT1b and the synaptic PDZ domain protein PICK1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassan, Merav; Liu, Hongguang; Madsen, Kenneth L

    2008-01-01

    with the PDZ domain protein PICK1, which plays a critical role in regulating the expression of glutamate receptors at excitatory synapses. A yeast two-hybrid screen of a neuronal library using the carboxyl tail of GLT1b yielded clones expressing PICK1. The GLT1b C-terminal peptide bound to PICK1 with high...... affinity (K(i) = 6.5 +/- 0.4 microM) in an in vitro fluorescence polarization assay. We also tested peptides based on other variants of GLT1 and other glutamate transporters. GLT1b co-immunoprecipitated with PICK1 from rat brain lysates and COS7 cell lysates derived from cells transfected with plasmids...... expressing PICK1 and GLT1b. In addition, expression of GLT1b in COS7 cells changed the distribution of PICK1, bringing it to the surface. GLT1b and PICK1 co-localized with each other and with synaptic markers in hippocampal neurons in culture. Phorbol ester, an activator of protein kinase C (PKC), a known...

  3. P2X7 receptors enhance glutamate release in hippocampal hilar neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jin-Hwa; Choi, In-Sun; Jang, Il-Sung

    2010-09-15

    We examined the effect of 2'-3'-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl)-adenosine-5'-triphosphate (Bz-ATP), a P2X7 receptor agonist, on action potential-independent glutamate release from nerve terminals attached to mechanically isolated immature hilar neurons. Bz-ATP increased spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current (sEPSC) frequency, and this effect was blocked by Brilliant blue G, a P2X7 receptor antagonist, suggesting that P2X7 receptors mediate the facilitatory action of Bz-ATP on sEPSCs. In most of hilar neurons tested, the Bz-ATP-induced increase in sEPSC frequency was blocked by tetrodotoxin or Cd, suggesting that the activation of P2X7 receptors leads to a presynaptic depolarization. The P2X7 receptor-mediated facilitation of glutamate release would modulate the excitability of hilar neurons, and eventually have a broad impact on the pathophysiological functions mediated by the hippocampus.

  4. VTA Projection Neurons Releasing GABA and Glutamate in the Dentate Gyrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Both dopamine and nondopamine neurons from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) project to a variety of brain regions. Here we examine nondopaminergic neurons in the mouse VTA that send long-range projections to the hippocampus. Using a combination of retrograde tracers, optogenetic tools, and electrophysiological recordings, we show that VTA GABAergic axons make synaptic contacts in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus, where we can elicit small postsynaptic currents. Surprisingly, the currents displayed a partial sensitivity to both bicuculline and NBQX, suggesting that these mesohippocampal neurons corelease both GABA and glutamate. Finally, we show that this projection is functional in vivo and its stimulation reduces granule cell-firing rates under anesthesia. Altogether, the present results describe a novel connection between GABA and glutamate coreleasing of cells of the VTA and the dentate gyrus. This connection could be relevant for a variety of functions, including reward-related memory and neurogenesis. PMID:27648470

  5. The release of glutamate from cortical neurons regulated by BDNF via the TrkB/Src/PLC-γ1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zitao; Fan, Jin; Ren, Yongxin; Zhou, Wei; Yin, Guoyong

    2013-01-01

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) participates in the regulation of cortical neurons by influencing the release of glutamate. However, the specific mechanisms are unclear. Hence, we isolated and cultured the cortical neurons of Sprague Dawley rats. Specific inhibitors of TrkB, Src, PLC-γ1, Akt, and MEK1/2 (i.e., K252a, PP2, U73122, LY294002, and PD98059, respectively) were used to treat cortical neurons and to detect the glutamate release from cortical neurons stimulated with BDNF. BDNF significantly increased glutamate release, and simultaneously enhanced phosphorylation levels of TrkB, Src, PLC-γ, Akt, and Erk1/2. For BDNF-stimulated cortical neurons, K252a inhibited glutamate release and inhibited the phosphorylation levels of TrkB, Src, PLC-γ, Erk1/2, and Akt (P PLC-γ1 (P 0.05). U73122 inhibited the glutamate release from BDNF-stimulated cortical neurons, but had no influence on the phosphorylation levels of TrkB, Src, Erk1/2, or Akt (P > 0.05). LY294002 and PD98059 did not affect the BDNF-stimulated glutamate release and did not inhibit the phosphorylation levels of TrkB, Src, or PLC-γ1. In summary, BDNF stimulated the glutamate release from cortical neurons via the TrkB/Src/PLC-γ1 signaling pathway.

  6. Impact of glutamate levels on neuronal response and cognitive abilities in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liv E. Falkenberg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is characterized by impaired cognitive functioning, and brain regions involved in cognitive control processes show marked glutamatergic abnormalities. However, it is presently unclear whether aberrant neuronal response is directly related to the observed deficits at the metabolite level in schizophrenia. Here, 17 medicated schizophrenia patients and 17 matched healthy participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI when performing an auditory cognitive control task, as well as proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS in order to assess resting-state glutamate in the anterior cingulate cortex. The combined fMRI–1H-MRS analysis revealed that glutamate differentially predicted cortical blood-oxygen level-dependent (BOLD response in patients and controls. While we found a positive correlation between glutamate and BOLD response bilaterally in the inferior parietal lobes in the patients, the corresponding correlation was negative in the healthy control participants. Further, glutamate levels predicted task performance in patients, such that lower glutamate levels were related to impaired cognitive control functioning. This was not seen for the healthy controls. These findings suggest that schizophrenia patients have a glutamate-related dysregulation of the brain network supporting cognitive control functioning. This could be targeted in future research on glutamatergic treatment of cognitive symptoms in schizophrenia.

  7. Cooperation between BDNF and glutamate in the regulation of synaptic transmission and neuronal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jean-Luc; Finsterwald, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Ample evidence supports a role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the survival and differentiation of selective populations of neurons in the peripheral and central nervous systems. In addition to its trophic actions, BDNF exerts acute effects on synaptic transmission and plasticity. In particular, BDNF enhances excitatory synaptic transmission through pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms. In this regard, BDNF enhances glutamate release, the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), NMDA receptor activity and the phosphorylation of NMDA receptor subunits. Our recent studies revealed a novel cooperative interaction between BDNF and glutamate in the regulation of dendritic development. Indeed, we found that the effects of BDNF on dendritic growth of cortical neurons require both the stimulation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation by BDNF and the activation of the CREB-regulated transcription coactivator 1 (CRTC1) by glutamate. Together, these studies highlight the importance of the cooperation between BDNF and glutamate in the regulation of synaptic transmission and neuronal development.

  8. The role of mitochondrial function in glutamate-dependent metabolism in neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaili, S S; Ureshino, R P; Rodrigues, L; Rocha, K K; Carvalho, J T; Oseki, K T; Bincoletto, C; Lopes, G S; Hirata, H

    2011-12-01

    Glutamate is an important neurotransmitter in neurons and glial cells and it is one of the keys to the neuron-glial interaction in the brain. Glutamate transmission is strongly dependent on calcium homeostasis and on mitochondrial function. In the present work we presented several aspects related to the role of mitochondria in glutamate signaling and in brain diseases. We focused on glutamateinduced calcium signaling and its relation to the organelle dysfunction with cell death processes. In addition, we have discussed how alterations in this pathway may lead or aggravate a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. We compiled information on how mitochondria can influence cell fate during glutamate stimulation and calcium signaling. These organelles play a pivotal role in neuron and glial exchange, in synaptic plasticity and several pathological conditions related to Aging, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. We have also presented autophagy as a mechanism activated during mitochondrial dysfunction which may function as a protective mechanism during injury. Furthermore, some new perspectives and approaches to treat these neurodegenerative diseases are offered and evaluated.

  9. Caenorhabditis elegans glutamate transporters influence synaptic function and behavior at sites distant from the synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, Itzhak; Straud, Sarah; Driscoll, Monica

    2007-11-23

    To ensure precise neurotransmission and prevent neurotoxic accumulation, l-glutamate (Glu), the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, is cleared from the synapse by glutamate transporters (GluTs). The molecular components of Glu synapses are highly conserved between Caenorhabditis elegans and mammals, yet the absence of synaptic insulation in C. elegans raises fundamental questions about Glu clearance strategies in the nematode nervous system. To gain insight into how Glu clearance is accomplished and how GluTs impact neurotransmission, we probed expression and function of all 6 GluTs found in the C. elegans genome. Disruption of each GluT impacts multiple Glu-dependent behaviors, with GluT combinations commonly increasing the severity of behavioral deficits. Interestingly, the sole GluT that we find expressed in neurons is localized predominantly in presynaptic neurons, in contrast to the postsynaptic concentration of neuronal GluTs typical in mammals. Moreover, 3 of the 6 GluT genes appear strongly expressed on the capillary excretory canal cell, where they affect Glu-dependent behaviors from positions distal to glutamatergic circuits. Indeed, our focused study of GLT-3, one of the distally expressed GluTs, shows that despite this distance, GLT-3 function can balance the activity mediated by synaptic release and synaptic receptors. The effects of distal GluTs on glutamatergic circuits support that Glu diffusion outside the vicinity of the synapse is a critical factor in C. elegans neurotransmission. Together with the presynaptic localization of neuronal GluTs, these observations suggest an unusual strategy for Glu clearance in C. elegans.

  10. Designing Novel Nanoformulations Targeting Glutamate Transporter Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter 2: Implications in Treating Drug Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Pss; Yallapu, Murali M; Sari, Youssef; Fisher, Paul B; Kumar, Santosh

    Chronic drug abuse is associated with elevated extracellular glutamate concentration in the brain reward regions. Deficit of glutamate clearance has been identified as a contributing factor that leads to enhanced glutamate concentration following extended drug abuse. Importantly, normalization of glutamate level through induction of glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1)/ excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2) expression has been described in several in vivo studies. GLT1 upregulators including ceftriaxone, a beta-lactam antibiotic, have been effective in attenuating drug-seeking and drug-consumption behavior in rodent models. However, potential obstacles toward clinical translation of GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators as treatment for drug addiction might include poor gastrointestinal absorption, serious peripheral adverse effects, and/or suboptimal CNS concentrations. Given the growing success of nanotechnology in targeting CNS ailments, nanoformulating known GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators for selective uptake across the blood brain barrier presents an ideal therapeutic approach for treating drug addiction. In this review, we summarize the results obtained with promising GLT1 (EAAT2) inducing compounds in animal models recapitulating drug addiction. Additionally, the various nanoformulations that can be employed for selectively increasing the CNS bioavailability of GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators are discussed. Finally, the applicability of GLT1 (EAAT2) induction via central delivery of drug-loaded nanoformulations is described.

  11. Vesicular glutamate transporter VGLUT2 expression levels control quantal size and neuropathic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Moechars (Dieder); M.C. Weston (Matthew); S. Leo (Sandra); Z. Callaerts-Vegh (Zsuzsanna); I. Goris (Ilse); R.F. Daneels; A. Buist (A.); M. Cik (M.); P.J. van der Spek (Peter); R.S. Kass (Robert); T. Meert (Theo); R. D'Hooge (Rudi); C. Rosenmund (Christian); R.M. Hampson (R. Mark)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractUptake of L-glutamate into synaptic vesicles is mediated by vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs). Three transporters (VGLUT1-VGLUT3) are expressed in the mammalian CNS, with partial overlapping expression patterns, and VGLUT2 is the most abundantly expressed paralog in the thalamus,

  12. Pituitary Adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide orchestrates neuronal regulation of the astrocytic glutamate-releasing mechanism system xc (.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Linghai; Albano, Rebecca; Madayag, Aric; Raddatz, Nicholas; Mantsch, John R; Choi, SuJean; Lobner, Doug; Baker, David A

    2016-05-01

    Glutamate signaling is achieved by an elaborate network involving neurons and astrocytes. Hence, it is critical to better understand how neurons and astrocytes interact to coordinate the cellular regulation of glutamate signaling. In these studies, we used rat cortical cell cultures to examine whether neurons or releasable neuronal factors were capable of regulating system xc (-) (Sxc), a glutamate-releasing mechanism that is expressed primarily by astrocytes and has been shown to regulate synaptic transmission. We found that astrocytes cultured with neurons or exposed to neuronal-conditioned media displayed significantly higher levels of Sxc activity. Next, we demonstrated that the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) may be a neuronal factor capable of regulating astrocytes. In support, we found that PACAP expression was restricted to neurons, and that PACAP receptors were expressed in astrocytes. Interestingly, blockade of PACAP receptors in cultures comprised of astrocytes and neurons significantly decreased Sxc activity to the level observed in purified astrocytes, whereas application of PACAP to purified astrocytes increased Sxc activity to the level observed in cultures comprised of neurons and astrocytes. Collectively, these data reveal that neurons coordinate the actions of glutamate-related mechanisms expressed by astrocytes, such as Sxc, a process that likely involves PACAP. A critical gap in modeling excitatory signaling is how distinct components of the glutamate system expressed by neurons and astrocytes are coordinated. In these studies, we found that system xc (-) (Sxc), a glutamate release mechanism expressed by astrocytes, is regulated by releasable neuronal factors including PACAP. This represents a novel form of neuron-astrocyte communication, and highlights the possibility that pathological changes involving astrocytic Sxc may stem from altered neuronal activity.

  13. Molecular Determinants of Substrate Specificity in Sodium-coupled Glutamate Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Nechama; Ewers, David; Forrest, Lucy R; Fahlke, Christoph; Kanner, Baruch I

    2015-11-27

    Crystal structures of the archaeal homologue GltPh have provided important insights into the molecular mechanism of transport of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate. Whereas mammalian glutamate transporters can translocate both glutamate and aspartate, GltPh is only one capable of aspartate transport. Most of the amino acid residues that surround the aspartate substrate in the binding pocket of GltPh are highly conserved. However, in the brain transporters, Thr-352 and Met-362 of the reentrant hairpin loop 2 are replaced by the smaller Ala and Thr, respectively. Therefore, we have studied the effects of T352A and M362T on binding and transport of aspartate and glutamate by GltPh. Substrate-dependent intrinsic fluorescence changes were monitored in transporter constructs containing the L130W mutation. GltPh-L130W/T352A exhibited an ~15-fold higher apparent affinity for l-glutamate than the wild type transporter, and the M362T mutation resulted in an increased affinity of ~40-fold. An even larger increase of the apparent affinity for l-glutamate, around 130-fold higher than that of wild type, was observed with the T352A/M362T double mutant. Radioactive uptake experiments show that GltPh-T352A not only transports aspartate but also l-glutamate. Remarkably, GltPh-M362T exhibited l-aspartate but not l-glutamate transport. The double mutant retained the ability to transport l-glutamate, but its kinetic parameters were very similar to those of GltPh-T352A alone. The differential impact of mutation on binding and transport of glutamate suggests that hairpin loop 2 not only plays a role in the selection of the substrate but also in its translocation.

  14. Sensory Neurons Arouse C. elegans Locomotion via Both Glutamate and Neuropeptide Release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungwon Choi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available C. elegans undergoes periods of behavioral quiescence during larval molts (termed lethargus and as adults. Little is known about the circuit mechanisms that establish these quiescent states. Lethargus and adult locomotion quiescence is dramatically reduced in mutants lacking the neuropeptide receptor NPR-1. Here, we show that the aroused locomotion of npr-1 mutants results from the exaggerated activity in multiple classes of sensory neurons, including nociceptive (ASH, touch sensitive (ALM and PLM, and stretch sensing (DVA neurons. These sensory neurons accelerate locomotion via both neuropeptide and glutamate release. The relative contribution of these sensory neurons to arousal differs between larval molts and adults. Our results suggest that a broad network of sensory neurons dictates transitions between aroused and quiescent behavioral states.

  15. Naphthazarin protects against glutamate-induced neuronal death via activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Tae Gen; Kawamoto, Elisa M.; Yu, Qian-Sheng; Greig, Nigel H. [Laboratory of Neurosciences, National Institute on Aging, Intramural Research Program, 251 Bayview Blvd., Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States); Mattson, Mark P. [Laboratory of Neurosciences, National Institute on Aging, Intramural Research Program, 251 Bayview Blvd., Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States); Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Camandola, Simonetta, E-mail: camandolasi@mail.nih.gov [Laboratory of Neurosciences, National Institute on Aging, Intramural Research Program, 251 Bayview Blvd., Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States)

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Naphthazarin activates the Nrf2/ARE pathway. •Naphthazarin induces Nrf2-driven genes in neurons and astrocytes. •Naphthazarin protects neurons against excitotoxicity. -- Abstract: Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway is an important cellular stress response pathway involved in neuroprotection. We previously screened several natural phytochemicals and identified plumbagin as a novel activator of the Nrf2/ARE pathway that can protect neurons against ischemic injury. Here we extended our studies to natural and synthetic derivatives of plumbagin. We found that 5,8-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (naphthazarin) is a potent activator of the Nrf2/ARE pathway, up-regulates the expression of Nrf2-driven genes in primary neuronal and glial cultures, and protects neurons against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity.

  16. Metabotropic glutamate receptor expression in olfactory receptor neurons from the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medler, K F; Tran, H N; Parker, J M; Caprio, J; Bruch, R C

    1998-04-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) were identified in olfactory receptor neurons of the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, by polymerase chain reaction. DNA sequence analysis confirmed the presence of two subtypes, mGluR1 and mGluR3, that were coexpressed with each other and with the putative odorant receptors within single olfactory receptor neurons. Immunocytochemical data showed that both mGluR subtypes were expressed in the apical dendrites and some cilia of olfactory neurons. Pharmacological analysis showed that antagonists to each mGluR subtype significantly decreased the electrophysiological response to odorant amino acids. alpha-Methyl-L-CCG1/(2S,3S,4S)-2-methyl-2-(carboxycyclopropyl++ +)glycine (MCCG), a known antagonist to mGluR3, and (S)-4-carboxyphenylglycine (S-4CPG), a specific antagonist to mGluR1, each significantly reduced olfactory receptor responses to L-glutamate. S-4CPG and MCCG reduced the glutamate response to 54% and 56% of control, respectively, which was significantly greater than their effect on a neutral amino acid odorant, methionine. These significant reductions of odorant response by the antagonists, taken with the expression of these receptors throughout the dendritic and ciliated portions of some olfactory receptor neurons, suggest that these mGluRs may be involved in olfactory reception and signal transduction.

  17. Microdialysis as a tool for in vivo investigation of glutamate transport capacity in rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, T; Christensen, Thomas; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    1995-01-01

    The role of glutamate as a possible mediator of neurodegeneration is well described, and the homeostasis of extracellular glutamate is considered of major importance when addressing the pathogenesis of excitatory neurodegeneration. Applying the 'indicator diffusion' method to the microdialysis......-D-aspartate was due to cellular uptake by glutamate transporters. The cell membrane permeability towards 3H-D-aspartate was reduced by approximately 98% due to THA, indicating that the cell membranes per se are highly resistant to diffusion of 3H-D-aspartate. It is concluded that the present method can be used...... in studying the capacity of the glutamate transporters in vivo....

  18. Green Tea Polyphenols Attenuated Glutamate Excitotoxicity via Antioxidative and Antiapoptotic Pathway in the Primary Cultured Cortical Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Lin Cong; Chang Cao; Yong Cheng; Xiao-Yan Qin

    2016-01-01

    Green tea polyphenols are a natural product which has antioxidative and antiapoptotic effects. It has been shown that glutamate excitotoxicity induced oxidative stress is linked to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. In this study we explored the neuroprotective effect of green teen polyphenols against glutamate excitotoxicity in the primary cultured cortical neurons. We found that green tea polyphenols protected against glutamate induced neurotox...

  19. Coupled ion Binding and Structural Transitions Along the Transport Cycle of Glutamate Transporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdon, Gregory [Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY (United States); Oh, SeCheol [Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY (United States); Serio, Ryan N. [Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY (United States); Boudker, Olga [Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-05-19

    Membrane transporters that clear the neurotransmitter glutamate from synapses are driven by symport of sodium ions and counter-transport of a potassium ion. Previous crystal structures of a homologous archaeal sodium and aspartate symporter showed that a dedicated transport domain carries the substrate and ions across the membrane. We report new crystal structures of this homologue in ligand-free and ions-only bound outward- and inward-facing conformations. We then show that after ligand release, the apo transport domain adopts a compact and occluded conformation that can traverse the membrane, completing the transport cycle. Sodium binding primes the transport domain to accept its substrate and triggers extracellular gate opening, which prevents inward domain translocation until substrate binding takes place. Moreover, we describe a new cation-binding site ideally suited to bind a counter-transported ion. We suggest that potassium binding at this site stabilizes the translocation-competent conformation of the unloaded transport domain in mammalian homologues.

  20. GABA, glutamate, dopamine and serotonin transporters expression on memory formation and amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellez, Ruth; Gómez-Víquez, Leticia; Meneses, Alfredo

    2012-02-01

    Notwithstanding several neurotransmission systems are frequently related to memory formation, amnesia and/or therapeutic targets for memory alterations, the role of transporters γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA, GAT1), glutamate (neuronal glutamate transporter excitatory amino acid carrier; EACC1), dopamine (DAT) and serotonin (SERT) is poorly understood. Hence, in this paper Western-blot analysis was used to evaluate expression changes on them during memory formation in trained and untrained rats treated with the selective serotonin transporter inhibitor fluoxetine, the amnesic drug d-methamphetamine (METH) and fluoxetine plus METH. Transporters expression was evaluated in the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex and striatum. Data indicated that in addition of memory performance other behavioral parameters (e.g., explorative behavior, food-intake, etc.) that memory formation was recorded. Thus, memory formation in a Pavlovian/instrumental autoshaping was associated to up-regulation of prefrontal cortex GAT1 and EAAC1, striatal SERT, DAT and EACC1; while, hippocampal EACC1, GAT1 and SERT were down-regulated. METH impaired short (STM) and long-term memory (LTM), at 24 or 48h. The METH-induced amnesia down-regulated SERT, DAT, EACC1 and GAT1 in hippocampus and the GAT1 in striatum; no-changes were observed in prefrontal cortex. Post-training administration of fluoxetine improved LTM (48h), which was associated to DAT, GAT1 (prefrontal cortex) up-regulation, but GAT1 (striatum) and SERT (hippocampus) down-regulation. Fluoxetine plus METH administration was able to prevent amnesia, which was associated to DAT, EACC1 and GAT1 (prefrontal cortex), SERT and DAT (hippocampus) and EACC1 or DAT (striatal) up-regulation. Together these data show that memory formation, amnesia and anti-amnesic effects are associated to specific patters of transporters expression.

  1. GABA, glutamate, dopamine and serotonin transporters expression on forgetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellez, Ruth; Gómez-Viquez, Leticia; Liy-Salmeron, Gustavo; Meneses, Alfredo

    2012-07-01

    Notwithstanding several neurotransmission systems are frequently related to memory formation; forgetting process and neurotransmission systems or their transporters; the role of γ-aminobutyric acid (GAT1), glutamate (EACC1), dopamine (DAT) and serotonin (SERT) is poorly understood. Hence, in this paper western-blot analysis was used to evaluate expression of GAT1, EAAC1, DAT and SERT during forgetting in trained and untrained rats treated with the selective serotonin transporter inhibitor fluoxetine, the amnesic drug d-methamphetamine (METH) and fluoxetine plus METH. Transporters expression was determined in the hippocampus (HIP), prefrontal cortex (PFC) and striatum (STR). Results indicated that forgetting of Pavlovian/instrumental autoshaping was associated to up-regulation of GAT1 (PFC and HIP) and DAT (PFC) while SERT (HIP) was down-regulated; no-changes were observed in striatum. Methamphetamine administration did not affect forgetting at 216 h post-training but up-regulated hippocampal DAT and EACC, prefrontal cortex DAT and striatal GAT1 or EACC1. Fluoxetine alone prevented forgetting, which was associated to striatal GAT1 and hippocampal DAT up-regulation, but prefrontal cortex GAT1 down-regulation. Fluoxetine plus METH administration was also able to prevent forgetting, which was associated to hippocampal DAT, prefrontal cortex SERT and striatal GAT1, DAT or SERT up-regulation, but prefrontal cortex GAT1 down-regulation. Together these data show that forgetting provokes primarily hippocampal and prefrontal cortex transporters changes; forgetting represent a behavioral process hardly modifiable and its prevention could causes different transporters expression patterns.

  2. EXPRESSION OF VESICULAR GLUTAMATE TRANSPORTERS IN TRANSIENT RECEPTOR POTENTIAL MELASTATIN 8 (TRPM8)-POSITIVE DENTAL AFFERENTS IN THE MOUSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y. S.; Kim, T. H.; Mckemy, D. D.; Bae, Y. C.

    2017-01-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) is activated by innocuous cool and noxious cold and plays a crucial role in cold-induced acute pain and pain hypersensitivity. To help understand the mechanism of TRPM8-mediated cold perception under normal and pathologic conditions, we used light microscopic immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis in mice expressing a genetically encoded axonal tracer in TRPM8-positive (+) neurons. We investigated the coexpression of TRPM8 and vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1) and VGLUT2 in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) and the dental pulp before and after inducing pulpal inflammation. Many TRPM8+ neurons in the TG and axons in the dental pulp expressed VGLUT2, while none expressed VGLUT1. TRPM8+ axons were dense in the pulp horn and peripheral pulp and also frequently observed in the dentinal tubules. Following pulpal inflammation, the proportion of VGLUT2+ and of VGLUT2+/TRPM8+ neurons increased significantly, whereas that of TRPM8+ neurons remained unchanged. Our findings suggest the existence of VGLUT2 (but not VGLUT1)-mediated glutamate signaling in TRPM8+ neurons possibly underlying the cold-induced acute pain and hypersensitivity to cold following pulpal inflammation. PMID:26166724

  3. A point mutation associated with episodic ataxia 6 increases glutamate transporter anion currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Natalie; Kovermann, Peter; Fahlke, Christoph

    2012-11-01

    Episodic ataxia is a human genetic disease characterized by paroxysmal cerebellar incoordination. There are several genetically and clinically distinct forms of this disease, and one of them, episodic ataxia type 6, is caused by mutations in the gene encoding a glial glutamate transporter, the excitatory amino acid transporter-1. So far, reduced glutamate uptake by mutant excitatory amino acid transporter-1 has been thought to be the main pathophysiological process in episodic ataxia type 6. However, excitatory amino acid transporter-1 does not only mediate secondary-active glutamate transport, but also functions as an ion channel. Here, we examined the effects of a disease-associated point mutation, P290R, on glutamate transport, anion current as well as on the subcellular distribution of excitatory amino acid transporter-1 using heterologous expression in mammalian cells. P290R reduces the number of excitatory amino acid transporter-1 in the surface membrane and impairs excitatory amino acid transporter-1-mediated glutamate uptake. Cells expressing P290R excitatory amino acid transporter-1 exhibit larger anion currents than wild-type cells in the absence as well as in the presence of external l-glutamate, despite a lower number of mutant transporters in the surface membrane. Noise analysis revealed unaltered unitary current amplitudes, indicating that P290R modifies opening and closing, and not anion permeation through mutant excitatory amino acid transporter-1 anion channels. These findings identify gain-of-function of excitatory amino acid transporter anion conduction as a pathological process in episodic ataxia. Episodic ataxia type 6 represents the first human disease found to be associated with altered function of excitatory amino acid transporter anion channels and illustrates possible physiological and pathophysiological impacts of this functional mode of this class of glutamate transporters.

  4. Valine but not leucine or isoleucine supports neurotransmitter glutamate synthesis during synaptic activity in cultured cerebellar neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Lasse K; Johansen, Maja L; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2012-09-01

    Synthesis of neuronal glutamate from α-ketoglutarate for neurotransmission necessitates an amino group nitrogen donor; however, it is not clear which amino acid(s) serves this role. Thus, the ability of the three branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), leucine, isoleucine, and valine, to act as amino group nitrogen donors for synthesis of vesicular neurotransmitter glutamate was investigated in cultured mouse cerebellar (primarily glutamatergic) neurons. The cultures were superfused in the presence of (15) N-labeled BCAAs, and synaptic activity was induced by pulses of N-methyl-D-aspartate (300 μM), which results in release of vesicular glutamate. At the end of the superfusion experiment, the vesicular pool of glutamate was released by treatment with α-latrotoxin (3 nM, 5 min). This experimental paradigm allows a separate analysis of the cytoplasmic and vesicular pools of glutamate. Amount and extent of (15) N labeling of intracellular amino acids plus vesicular glutamate were analyzed employing HPLC and LC-MS analysis. Only when [(15) N]valine served as precursor did the labeling of both cytoplasmic and vesicular glutamate increase after synaptic activity. In addition, only [(15) N]valine was able to maintain the amount of vesicular glutamate during synaptic activity. This indicates that, among the BCAAs, only valine supports the increased need for synthesis of vesicular glutamate.

  5. A mutant prion protein sensitizes neurons to glutamate-induced excitotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasini, Emiliano; Unterberger, Ursula; Solomon, Isaac H; Massignan, Tania; Senatore, Assunta; Bian, Hejiao; Voigtlaender, Till; Bowman, Frederick P; Bonetto, Valentina; Chiesa, Roberto; Luebke, Jennifer; Toselli, Paul; Harris, David A

    2013-02-06

    Growing evidence suggests that a physiological activity of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) plays a crucial role in several neurodegenerative disorders, including prion and Alzheimer's diseases. However, how the functional activity of PrP(C) is subverted to deliver neurotoxic signals remains uncertain. Transgenic (Tg) mice expressing PrP with a deletion of residues 105-125 in the central region (referred to as ΔCR PrP) provide important insights into this problem. Tg(ΔCR) mice exhibit neonatal lethality and massive degeneration of cerebellar granule neurons, a phenotype that is dose dependently suppressed by the presence of wild-type PrP. When expressed in cultured cells, ΔCR PrP induces large, ionic currents that can be detected by patch-clamping techniques. Here, we tested the hypothesis that abnormal ion channel activity underlies the neuronal death seen in Tg(ΔCR) mice. We find that ΔCR PrP induces abnormal ionic currents in neurons in culture and in cerebellar slices and that this activity sensitizes the neurons to glutamate-induced, calcium-mediated death. In combination with ultrastructural and biochemical analyses, these results demonstrate a role for glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in PrP-mediated neurodegeneration. A similar mechanism may operate in other neurodegenerative disorders attributable to toxic, β-rich oligomers that bind to PrP(C).

  6. Dopamine-dependent effects on basal and glutamate stimulated network dynamics in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Chen, Xin; Dzakpasu, Rhonda; Conant, Katherine

    2017-02-01

    Oscillatory activity occurs in cortical and hippocampal networks with specific frequency ranges thought to be critical to working memory, attention, differentiation of neuronal precursors, and memory trace replay. Synchronized activity within relatively large neuronal populations is influenced by firing and bursting frequency within individual cells, and the latter is modulated by changes in intrinsic membrane excitability and synaptic transmission. Published work suggests that dopamine, a potent modulator of learning and memory, acts on dopamine receptor 1-like dopamine receptors to influence the phosphorylation and trafficking of glutamate receptor subunits, along with long-term potentiation of excitatory synaptic transmission in striatum and prefrontal cortex. Prior studies also suggest that dopamine can influence voltage gated ion channel function and membrane excitability in these regions. Fewer studies have examined dopamine's effect on related endpoints in hippocampus, or potential consequences in terms of network burst dynamics. In this study, we record action potential activity using a microelectrode array system to examine the ability of dopamine to modulate baseline and glutamate-stimulated bursting activity in an in vitro network of cultured murine hippocampal neurons. We show that dopamine stimulates a dopamine type-1 receptor-dependent increase in number of overall bursts within minutes of its application. Notably, however, at the concentration used herein, dopamine did not increase the overall synchrony of bursts between electrodes. Although the number of bursts normalizes by 40 min, bursting in response to a subsequent glutamate challenge is enhanced by dopamine pretreatment. Dopamine-dependent potentiation of glutamate-stimulated bursting was not observed when the two modulators were administered concurrently. In parallel, pretreatment of murine hippocampal cultures with dopamine stimulated lasting increases in the phosphorylation of the

  7. Ascorbate prevents cell death from prolonged exposure to glutamate in an in vitro model of human dopaminergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballaz, Santiago; Morales, Ingrid; Rodríguez, Manuel; Obeso, José A

    2013-12-01

    Ascorbate (vitamin C) is a nonenzymatic antioxidant highly concentrated in the brain. In addition to mediating redox balance, ascorbate is linked to glutamate neurotransmission in the striatum, where it renders neuroprotection against excessive glutamate stimulation. Oxidative stress and glutamatergic overactivity are key biochemical features accompanying the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra that characterizes Parkinson's disease (PD). At present, it is not clear whether antiglutamate agents and ascorbate might be neuroprotective agents for PD. Thus, we tested whether ascorbate can prevent cell death from prolonged exposure to glutamate using dopaminergic neurons of human origin. To this purpose, dopamine-like neurons were obtained by differentiation of SH-SY5Y cells and then cultured for 4 days without antioxidant (antiaging) protection to evaluate glutamate toxicity and ascorbate protection as a model system of potential factors contributing to dopaminergic neuron death in PD. Glutamate dose dependently induced toxicity in dopaminergic cells largely by the stimulation of AMPA and metabotropic receptors and to a lesser extent by N-methyl-D-aspartate and kainate receptors. At relatively physiological levels of extracellular concentration, ascorbate protected cells against glutamate excitotoxicity. This neuroprotection apparently relies on the inhibition of oxidative stress, because ascorbate prevented the pro-oxidant action of the scavenging molecule quercetin, which occurred over the course of prolonged exposure, as is also seen with glutamate. Our findings show the relevance of ascorbate as a neuroprotective agent and emphasize an often underappreciated role of oxidative stress in glutamate excitotoxicity. Occurrence of a glutamate-ascorbate link in dopaminergic neurons may explain previous contradictions regarding their putative role in PD.

  8. Specificity and actions of an arylaspartate inhibitor of glutamate transport at the Schaffer collateral-CA1 pyramidal cell synapse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weinan Sun

    Full Text Available In this study we characterized the pharmacological selectivity and physiological actions of a new arylaspartate glutamate transporter blocker, L-threo-ß-benzylaspartate (L-TBA. At concentrations up to 100 µM, L-TBA did not act as an AMPA receptor (AMPAR or NMDA receptor (NMDAR agonist or antagonist when applied to outside-out patches from mouse hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. L-TBA had no effect on the amplitude of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs recorded at the Schaffer collateral-CA1 pyramidal cell synapse. Excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs in CA1 pyramidal neurons were unaffected by L-TBA in the presence of physiological extracellular Mg(2+ concentrations, but in Mg(2+-free solution, EPSCs were significantly prolonged as a consequence of increased NMDAR activity. Although L-TBA exhibited approximately four-fold selectivity for neuronal EAAT3 over glial EAAT1/EAAT2 transporter subtypes expressed in Xenopus oocytes, the L-TBA concentration-dependence of the EPSC charge transfer increase in the absence of Mg(2+ was the same in hippocampal slices from EAAT3 +/+ and EAAT3 -/- mice, suggesting that TBA effects were primarily due to block of glial transporters. Consistent with this, L-TBA blocked synaptically evoked transporter currents in CA1 astrocytes with a potency in accord with its block of heterologously expressed glial transporters. Extracellular recording in the presence of physiological Mg(2+ revealed that L-TBA prolonged fEPSPs in a frequency-dependent manner by selectively increasing the NMDAR-mediated component of the fEPSP during short bursts of activity. The data indicate that glial glutamate transporters play a dominant role in limiting extrasynaptic transmitter diffusion and binding to NMDARs. Furthermore, NMDAR signaling is primarily limited by voltage-dependent Mg(2+ block during low-frequency activity, while the relative contribution of transport increases during short bursts of higher frequency

  9. Release of glutamate and CGRP from trigeminal ganglion neurons: Role of calcium channels and 5-HT1 receptor signaling

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    Hurley Joyce H

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aberrant release of the neurotransmitters, glutamate and calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP, from trigeminal neurons has been implicated in migraine. The voltage-gated P/Q-type calcium channel has a critical role in controlling neurotransmitter release and has been linked to Familial Hemiplegic Migraine. Therefore, we examined the importance of voltage-dependent calcium channels in controlling release of glutamate and CGRP from trigeminal ganglion neurons isolated from male and female rats and grown in culture. Serotonergic pathways are likely involved in migraine, as triptans, a class of 5-HT1 receptor agonists, are effective in the treatment of migraine and their effectiveness may be due to inhibiting neurotransmitter release from trigeminal neurons. We also studied the effect of serotonin receptor activation on release of glutamate and CGRP from trigeminal neurons grown in culture. Results P/Q-, N- and L-type channels each mediate a significant fraction of potassium-stimulated release of glutamate and CGRP. We determined that 5-HT significantly inhibits potassium-stimulated release of both glutamate and CGRP. Serotonergic inhibition of both CGRP and glutamate release can be blocked by pertussis toxin and NAS-181, a 5-HT1B/1D antagonist. Stimulated release of CGRP is unaffected by Y-25130, a 5-HT3 antagonist and SB 200646, a 5-HT2B/2C antagonist. Conclusion These data suggest that release of both glutamate and CGRP from trigeminal neurons is controlled by calcium channels and modulated by 5-HT signaling in a pertussis-toxin dependent manner and probably via 5-HT1 receptor signaling. This is the first characterization of glutamate release from trigeminal neurons grown in culture.

  10. Ceftriaxone preserves glutamate transporters and prevents intermittent hypoxia-induced vulnerability to brain excitotoxic injury.

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    Rekha Jagadapillai

    Full Text Available Hypoxia alters cellular metabolism and although the effects of sustained hypoxia (SH have been extensively studied, less is known about chronic intermittent hypoxia (IH, commonly associated with cardiovascular morbidity and stroke. We hypothesize that impaired glutamate homeostasis after chronic IH may underlie vulnerability to stroke-induced excitotoxicity. P16 organotypic hippocampal slices, cultured for 7 days were exposed for 7 days to IH (alternating 2 min 5% O2-15 min 21% O2, SH (5% O2 or RA (21% O2, then 3 glutamate challenges. The first and last exposures were intended as a metabolic stimulus (200 µM glutamate, 15 min; the second emulated excitotoxicity (10 mM glutamate, 10 min. GFAP, MAP2, and EAAT1, EAAT2 glutamate transporters expression were assessed after exposure to each hypoxic protocol. Additionally, cell viability was determined at baseline and after each glutamate challenge, in presence or absence of ceftriaxone that increases glutamate transporter expression. GFAP and MAP2 decreased after 7 days IH and SH. Long-term IH but not SH decreased EAAT1 and EAAT2. Excitotoxic glutamate challenge decreased cell viability and the following 200 µM exposure further increased cell death, particularly in IH-exposed slices. Ceftriaxone prevented glutamate transporter decrease and improved cell viability after IH and excitotoxicity. We conclude that IH is more detrimental to cell survival and glutamate homeostasis than SH. These findings suggest that impaired regulation of extracellular glutamate levels is implicated in the increased brain susceptibility to excitotoxic insult after long-term IH.

  11. The glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2006-01-01

    Neurons are metabolically handicapped in the sense that they are not able to perform de novo synthesis of neurotransmitter glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) from glucose. A metabolite shuttle known as the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle describes the release of neurotransmitter glutamate...... or GABA from neurons and subsequent uptake into astrocytes. In return, astrocytes release glutamine to be taken up into neurons for use as neurotransmitter precursor. In this review, the basic properties of the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle will be discussed, including aspects of transport and metabolism...

  12. Characterization of striatal neurons expressing high levels of glutamic acid decarboxylase messenger RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesselet, M F; Robbins, E

    1989-07-17

    Two types of labelled cells are detected in sections of rat and mouse striata processed for in situ hybridization histochemistry with 35S-radiolabelled RNA probes complementary to the messenger RNA (mRNA) encoding glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the synthesis enzyme for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA): numerous lightly, and fewer very densely labelled neurons. In order to determine whether the densely labelled cells correspond to the striatal somatostatinergic neurons with which they share morphological characteristics, the presence of GAD mRNA was examined in brain sections processed successively for dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) diaphorase histochemistry, a marker of striatal somatostatinergic neurons, and in situ hybridization histochemistry. In addition, the distribution of GABAergic interneurons was analyzed with regard to striatal compartments (striosomes) indicated by patches of dense opiate binding sites. The results show that NADPH diaphorase activity and GAD mRNA do not co-exist in striatal neurons. Furthermore, in contrast to the somatostatinergic neurons which are almost exclusively located in the extrastriosomal matrix, densely labelled GAD cells were present both in the striosomes and the matrix, further suggesting that GABAergic and somatostatinergic neurons form two distinct interneuronal systems in the striatum of rats and mice.

  13. Serotonin activates catecholamine neurons in the solitary tract nucleus by increasing spontaneous glutamate inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ran Ji; Roberts, Brandon L; Zhao, Huan; Zhu, Mingyan; Appleyard, Suzanne M

    2012-11-14

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a critical neurotransmitter in the control of autonomic functions. 5-HT(3) receptors participate in vagal afferent feedback to decrease food intake and regulate cardiovascular reflexes; however, the phenotype of the solitary tract nucleus (NTS) neurons involved is not known. A(2)/C(2) catecholamine (CA) neurons in the NTS are directly activated by visceral afferents and are important for the control of food intake and cardiovascular function, making them good candidates to respond to and mediate the effects of serotonin at the level of the NTS. This study examines serotonin's effects on NTS-CA neurons using patch-clamp techniques and transgenic mice expressing an enhanced green fluorescent protein driven by the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) promoter (TH-EGFP) to identify catecholamine neurons. Serotonin increased the frequency of spontaneous glutamate excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) in >90% of NTS-TH-EGFP neurons, an effect blocked by the 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist ondansetron and mimicked by the 5-HT(3) receptor agonists SR5227 and mCPBG. In contrast, 5-HT(3) receptor agonists increased sEPSCs on a minority (serotonin activates NTS-TH neurons and suggest a pathway by which it can increase catecholamine release in target regions to modulate food intake, motivation, stress, and cardiovascular function.

  14. Monosodium glutamate-sensitive hypothalamic neurons contribute to the control of bone mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elefteriou, Florent; Takeda, Shu; Liu, Xiuyun; Armstrong, Dawna; Karsenty, Gerard

    2003-01-01

    Using chemical lesioning we previously identified hypothalamic neurons that are required for leptin antiosteogenic function. In the course of these studies we observed that destruction of neurons sensitive to monosodium glutamate (MSG) in arcuate nuclei did not affect bone mass. However MSG treatment leads to hypogonadism, a condition inducing bone loss. Therefore the normal bone mass of MSG-treated mice suggested that MSG-sensitive neurons may be implicated in the control of bone mass. To test this hypothesis we assessed bone resorption and bone formation parameters in MSG-treated mice. We show here that MSG-treated mice display the expected increase in bone resorption and that their normal bone mass is due to a concomitant increase in bone formation. Correction of MSG-induced hypogonadism by physiological doses of estradiol corrected the abnormal bone resorptive activity in MSG-treated mice and uncovered their high bone mass phenotype. Because neuropeptide Y (NPY) is highly expressed in MSG-sensitive neurons we tested whether NPY regulates bone formation. Surprisingly, NPY-deficient mice had a normal bone mass. This study reveals that distinct populations of hypothalamic neurons are involved in the control of bone mass and demonstrates that MSG-sensitive neurons control bone formation in a leptin-independent manner. It also indicates that NPY deficiency does not affect bone mass.

  15. Green Tea Polyphenols Attenuated Glutamate Excitotoxicity via Antioxidative and Antiapoptotic Pathway in the Primary Cultured Cortical Neurons

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    Lin Cong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Green tea polyphenols are a natural product which has antioxidative and antiapoptotic effects. It has been shown that glutamate excitotoxicity induced oxidative stress is linked to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. In this study we explored the neuroprotective effect of green teen polyphenols against glutamate excitotoxicity in the primary cultured cortical neurons. We found that green tea polyphenols protected against glutamate induced neurotoxicity in the cortical neurons as measured by MTT and TUNEL assays. Green tea polyphenols were then showed to inhibit the glutamate induced ROS release and SOD activity reduction in the neurons. Furthermore, our results demonstrated that green tea polyphenols restored the dysfunction of mitochondrial pro- or antiapoptotic proteins Bax, Bcl-2, and caspase-3 caused by glutamate. Interestingly, the neuroprotective effect of green tea polyphenols was abrogated when the neurons were incubated with siBcl-2. Taken together, these results demonstrated that green tea polyphenols protected against glutamate excitotoxicity through antioxidative and antiapoptotic pathways.

  16. Ammonia prevents glutamate-induced but not low K(+)-induced apoptosis in cerebellar neurons in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llansola, M; Boscá, L; Felipo, V; Hortelano, S

    2003-01-01

    Cultured rat cerebellar granule neurons are widely used as a model system for studying neuronal apoptosis. Either low K(+) (5 mM) or low concentrations of glutamate (1-10 microM) induce apoptosis in cerebellar neurons in culture. However, the molecular mechanism(s) involved remain unclear. We show that long-term treatment with ammonia prevents glutamate-induced but not low K(+)-induced apoptosis in cerebellar neurons, as assessed by measuring DNA fragmentation and activation of caspase 3. Ammonia prevented glutamate-induced increase of intracellular calcium, depolarization of the inner mitochondrial membrane, release of cytochrome c to the cytosol, activation of caspase 3 and fragmentation of DNA. However, ammonia did not prevent low K(+)-induced activation of caspase 3 and fragmentation of DNA. These results indicate that the initial steps involved in the induction of apoptosis by low K(+) or by glutamate are different and that ammonia prevents glutamate-induced apoptosis by reducing glutamate-induced rise of intracellular Ca(2+), thus avoiding the activation of subsequent events of the apoptotic process.

  17. A Cytotoxic, Co-operative Interaction Between Energy Deprivation and Glutamate Release From System xc- Mediates Aglycemic Neuronal Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Trista L; He, Yan; Jackman, Nicole A; Lobner, Doug; Hewett, James A; Hewett, Sandra J

    2015-01-01

    The astrocyte cystine/glutamate antiporter (system xc(-)) contributes substantially to the excitotoxic neuronal cell death facilitated by glucose deprivation. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanism by which this occurred. Using pure astrocyte cultures, as well as, mixed cortical cell cultures containing both neurons and astrocytes, we found that neither an enhancement in system xc(-) expression nor activity underlies the excitotoxic effects of aglycemia. In addition, using three separate bioassays, we demonstrate no change in the ability of glucose-deprived astrocytes--either cultured alone or with neurons--to remove glutamate from the extracellular space. Instead, we demonstrate that glucose-deprived cultures are 2 to 3 times more sensitive to the killing effects of glutamate or N-methyl-D-aspartate when compared with their glucose-containing controls. Hence, our results are consistent with the weak excitotoxic hypothesis such that a bioenergetic deficiency, which is measureable in our mixed but not astrocyte cultures, allows normally innocuous concentrations of glutamate to become excitotoxic. Adding to the burgeoning literature detailing the contribution of astrocytes to neuronal injury, we conclude that under our experimental paradigm, a cytotoxic, co-operative interaction between energy deprivation and glutamate release from astrocyte system xc(-) mediates aglycemic neuronal cell death.

  18. Topiramate protects against glutamate excitotoxicity via activating BDNF/TrkB-dependent ERK pathway in rodent hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiao-Yuan; Cao, Yong-Gang; Ji, Zhong; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Liu, Zhao-Qian; Sun, Hong-Li

    2015-07-01

    Topiramate (TPM) was previously found to have neuroprotection against neuronal injury in epileptic and ischemic models. However, whether TPM protects against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in hippocampal neurons is elusive. Our present work aimed to evaluate the protective effect of TPM against glutamate toxicity in hippocampal neurons and further figure out the potential molecular mechanisms. The in vitro glutamate excitotoxic model was prepared with 125μM glutamate for 20min. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) analysis and Hoechst 33342 staining were conducted to detect neuronal survival. The protein expressions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), TrkB, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade (including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 MAPK), cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB), Bcl-2, Bax and β-actin were detected via Western blot assay. Our results demonstrated that TPM protected hippocampal neurons from glutamate toxicity. Meanwhile, the pretreatment of TPM for 10min significantly prevented the down-regulation of BDNF and the phosphorylation of TrkB. Furthermore, the elevation of phosphorylated EKR expression was significantly inhibited after blockade of TrkB by TrkB IgG, while no alterations of phosphorylated JNK and p38 MAPK were found in the cultured hippocampal neurons. Besides, it was also found that the enhanced phosphorylation of CREB was evidently reversed under excitotoxic conditions after treating with U0126 (the selective inhibitor of ERK). The protein level of Bcl-2 was also observed to be remarkably increased after TPM treatment. In conclusion, these findings implicate that TPM exerts neuroprotective effects against glutamate excitotoxicity in hippocampal neurons and its protection may be modulated through BDNF/TrkB-dependent ERK pathway.

  19. Metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists potentiate a slow afterdepolarization in CNS neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, F.; Gallagher, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    We have previously reported that, in the rat dorsolateral septal nucleus (DLSN), metabotropic glutamate receptor (met-GluR) agonists evoked a slow depolarization accompanied by an increase in membrane conductance and burst firing. We have speculated that the burst firing elicited by met-GluR agonists may be due to activation or enhancement of a non-specific cation current, which exists in some DLSN neurons. Now we report that a slow afterdepolarization (sADP) mediated by a non-specific cation current was potentiated by both 1S,3R-ACPD and quisqualate. In addition, met-GluR agonists unmask a sADP in DLSN neurons which did not show a sADP under control conditions. Our data suggest that a non-specific cation current can be potentiated by activation of the met-GluR.

  20. Characterization of glutamate-induced formation of N- acylphosphatidylethanolamine and N-acylethanolamine in cultured neocortical neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Harald S.; Lauritzen, L.; Strand, A.M.;

    1997-01-01

    Glutamate-induced formation of N-acylethanolamine (NAE) and N- acylphosphatidylethanolamine (NAPE) was studied in primary cultures of mouse neocortical neurons prelabeled with [C]ethanolamine. The formation of these two lipids was dependent on the maturity of the cell culture; i.e., no glutamate......-stimulated mouse astrocytes, rat Leydig cells and cardiomyocytes, and several other cells. These results suggest that the glutamate-induced formation of NAPE and NAE was mediated by the NMDA receptor and the formation of these lipids may be associated with neuronal death.......-quinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX). In 6-day-old cultures, exposure to NMDA (100 µM for 24 h) induced a linear increase in the formation of NAPE and NAE as well as a 40-50% neuronal death, as measured by a decrease in cellular formazan formation [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)- 2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT...

  1. Molecular dynamics in an optical trap of glutamate receptors labeled with quantum-dots on living neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Tatsunori; Maezawa, Yasuyo; Kudoh, Suguru N.; Taguchi, Takahisa; Hosokawa, Chie

    2017-04-01

    Molecular dynamics of glutamate receptor, which is major neurotransmitter receptor at excitatory synapse located on neuron, is essential for synaptic plasticity in the complex neuronal networks. Here we studied molecular dynamics in an optical trap of AMPA-type glutamate receptor (AMPAR) labeled with quantum-dot (QD) on living neuronal cells with fluorescence imaging and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). When a 1064-nm laser beam for optical trapping was focused on QD-AMPARs located on neuronal cells, the fluorescence intensity of QD-AMPARs gradually increased at the focal spot. Using single-particle tracking of QD-AMPARs on neurons, the average diffusion coefficient decreased in an optical trap. Moreover, the decay time obtained from FCS analysis increased with the laser power and the initial assembling state of AMPARs depended on culturing day, suggesting that the motion of QD-AMPAR was constrained in an optical trap.

  2. Pharmacological analysis of ionotropic glutamate receptor function in neuronal circuits of the zebrafish olfactory bulb.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rico Tabor

    Full Text Available Although synaptic functions of ionotropic glutamate receptors in the olfactory bulb have been studied in vitro, their roles in pattern processing in the intact system remain controversial. We therefore examined the functions of ionotropic glutamate receptors during odor processing in the intact olfactory bulb of zebrafish using pharmacological manipulations. Odor responses of mitral cells and interneurons were recorded by electrophysiology and 2-photon Ca(2+ imaging. The combined blockade of AMPA/kainate and NMDA receptors abolished odor-evoked excitation of mitral cells. The blockade of AMPA/kainate receptors alone, in contrast, increased the mean response of mitral cells and decreased the mean response of interneurons. The blockade of NMDA receptors caused little or no change in the mean responses of mitral cells and interneurons. However, antagonists of both receptor types had diverse effects on the magnitude and time course of individual mitral cell and interneuron responses and, thus, changed spatio-temporal activity patterns across neuronal populations. Oscillatory synchronization was abolished or reduced by AMPA/kainate and NMDA receptor antagonists, respectively. These results indicate that (1 interneuron responses depend mainly on AMPA/kainate receptor input during an odor response, (2 interactions among mitral cells and interneurons regulate the total olfactory bulb output activity, (3 AMPA/kainate receptors participate in the synchronization of odor-dependent neuronal ensembles, and (4 ionotropic glutamate receptor-containing synaptic circuits shape odor-specific patterns of olfactory bulb output activity. These mechanisms are likely to be important for the processing of odor-encoding activity patterns in the olfactory bulb.

  3. Activity of the lactate-alanine shuttle is independent of glutamate-glutamine cycle activity in cerebellar neuronal-astrocytic cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Lasse K; Sickmann, Helle M; Schousboe, Arne

    2004-01-01

    The glutamate-glutamine cycle describes the neuronal release of glutamate into the synaptic cleft, astrocytic uptake, and conversion into glutamine, followed by release for use as a neuronal glutamate precursor. This only explains the fate of the carbon atoms, however, and not that of the ammonia...... metabolites. Altogether, the results of this study support the existence of the lactate-alanine shuttle and the associated glutamate-glutamine cycle. No direct coupling of the two shuttles was observed, however, and only the glutamate-glutamine cycle seemed activity dependent....

  4. A Cytotoxic, Co-operative Interaction Between Energy Deprivation and Glutamate Release From System xc− Mediates Aglycemic Neuronal Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trista L. Thorn

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The astrocyte cystine/glutamate antiporter (system xc− contributes substantially to the excitotoxic neuronal cell death facilitated by glucose deprivation. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanism by which this occurred. Using pure astrocyte cultures, as well as, mixed cortical cell cultures containing both neurons and astrocytes, we found that neither an enhancement in system xc− expression nor activity underlies the excitotoxic effects of aglycemia. In addition, using three separate bioassays, we demonstrate no change in the ability of glucose-deprived astrocytes—either cultured alone or with neurons—to remove glutamate from the extracellular space. Instead, we demonstrate that glucose-deprived cultures are 2 to 3 times more sensitive to the killing effects of glutamate or N-methyl-D-aspartate when compared with their glucose-containing controls. Hence, our results are consistent with the weak excitotoxic hypothesis such that a bioenergetic deficiency, which is measureable in our mixed but not astrocyte cultures, allows normally innocuous concentrations of glutamate to become excitotoxic. Adding to the burgeoning literature detailing the contribution of astrocytes to neuronal injury, we conclude that under our experimental paradigm, a cytotoxic, co-operative interaction between energy deprivation and glutamate release from astrocyte system xc− mediates aglycemic neuronal cell death.

  5. Glutamate Transporters EAAT4 and EAAT5 Are Expressed in Vestibular Hair Cells and Calyx Endings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaboyard-Niay, Sophie; Calin-Jageman, Irina; Chidavaenzi, Robstein L.; Venteo, Stephanie; Desmadryl, Gilles; Goldberg, Jay M.; Lysakowski, Anna; Chabbert, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate is the neurotransmitter released from hair cells. Its clearance from the synaptic cleft can shape neurotransmission and prevent excitotoxicity. This may be particularly important in the inner ear and in other sensory organs where there is a continually high rate of neurotransmitter release. In the case of most cochlear and type II vestibular hair cells, clearance involves the diffusion of glutamate to supporting cells, where it is taken up by EAAT1 (GLAST), a glutamate transporter. A similar mechanism cannot work in vestibular type I hair cells as the presence of calyx endings separates supporting cells from hair-cell synapses. Because of this arrangement, it has been conjectured that a glutamate transporter must be present in the type I hair cell, the calyx ending, or both. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, we demonstrate that a glutamate-activated anion current, attributable to a high-affinity glutamate transporter and blocked by DL-TBOA, is expressed in type I, but not in type II hair cells. Molecular investigations reveal that EAAT4 and EAAT5, two glutamate transporters that could underlie the anion current, are expressed in both type I and type II hair cells and in calyx endings. EAAT4 has been thought to be expressed almost exclusively in the cerebellum and EAAT5 in the retina. Our results show that these two transporters have a wider distribution in mice. This is the first demonstration of the presence of transporters in hair cells and provides one of the few examples of EAATs in presynaptic elements. PMID:23049999

  6. Glutamate transporters EAAT4 and EAAT5 are expressed in vestibular hair cells and calyx endings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Dalet

    Full Text Available Glutamate is the neurotransmitter released from hair cells. Its clearance from the synaptic cleft can shape neurotransmission and prevent excitotoxicity. This may be particularly important in the inner ear and in other sensory organs where there is a continually high rate of neurotransmitter release. In the case of most cochlear and type II vestibular hair cells, clearance involves the diffusion of glutamate to supporting cells, where it is taken up by EAAT1 (GLAST, a glutamate transporter. A similar mechanism cannot work in vestibular type I hair cells as the presence of calyx endings separates supporting cells from hair-cell synapses. Because of this arrangement, it has been conjectured that a glutamate transporter must be present in the type I hair cell, the calyx ending, or both. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, we demonstrate that a glutamate-activated anion current, attributable to a high-affinity glutamate transporter and blocked by DL-TBOA, is expressed in type I, but not in type II hair cells. Molecular investigations reveal that EAAT4 and EAAT5, two glutamate transporters that could underlie the anion current, are expressed in both type I and type II hair cells and in calyx endings. EAAT4 has been thought to be expressed almost exclusively in the cerebellum and EAAT5 in the retina. Our results show that these two transporters have a wider distribution in mice. This is the first demonstration of the presence of transporters in hair cells and provides one of the few examples of EAATs in presynaptic elements.

  7. Remote control of neuronal activity with a light-gated glutamate receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szobota, Stephanie; Gorostiza, Pau; Del Bene, Filippo; Wyart, Claire; Fortin, Doris L; Kolstad, Kathleen D; Tulyathan, Orapim; Volgraf, Matthew; Numano, Rika; Aaron, Holly L; Scott, Ethan K; Kramer, Richard H; Flannery, John; Baier, Herwig; Trauner, Dirk; Isacoff, Ehud Y

    2007-05-24

    The ability to stimulate select neurons in isolated tissue and in living animals is important for investigating their role in circuits and behavior. We show that the engineered light-gated ionotropic glutamate receptor (LiGluR), when introduced into neurons, enables remote control of their activity. Trains of action potentials are optimally evoked and extinguished by 380 nm and 500 nm light, respectively, while intermediate wavelengths provide graded control over the amplitude of depolarization. Light pulses of 1-5 ms in duration at approximately 380 nm trigger precisely timed action potentials and EPSP-like responses or can evoke sustained depolarizations that persist for minutes in the dark until extinguished by a short pulse of approximately 500 nm light. When introduced into sensory neurons in zebrafish larvae, activation of LiGluR reversibly blocks the escape response to touch. Our studies show that LiGluR provides robust control over neuronal activity, enabling the dissection and manipulation of neural circuitry in vivo.

  8. Effects of glial glutamate transporter inhibitors on intracellular Na+ in mouse astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatton, J Y; Shimamoto, K; Magistretti, P J

    2001-03-02

    The effects of inhibitors of the glial Na+/glutamate co-transporter on the intracellular Na+ concentration ([Na+](i)) were investigated in mouse cortical astrocytes. [Na+](i) was monitored by fluorescence microscopy on single astrocytes using the Na+-sensitive probe sodium-binding benzofuran isophtalate. Application of the competitive inhibitors threo-beta-hydroxyaspartate (THA) and trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid (t-PDC) resulted in robust and reversible increases in [Na+](i) that were comparable in shape to the response to glutamate but about twice lower in amplitude. As previously observed with glutamate, the amplitude of the [Na+](i) response to these compounds was concentration-dependent with EC(50) values of 11.1 microM (THA) and 7.6 microM (t-PDC), as was the initial rate of [Na+](i) rise (EC(50) values of 14.8 microM for THA and 11.5 microM for t-PDC). Both compounds diminished the response to subsequent glutamate applications, possibly because of an inhibitory effect of the intracellularly-accumulated compounds. In comparison, the newly-developed compound threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate (TBOA) alone did not cause any significant alteration of [Na+](i) up to a concentration of 500 microM . TBOA inhibited the [Na+](i) response evoked by 200 microM glutamate in a concentration-dependent manner with IC(50) values of 114 and 63 microM, as measured on the amplitude and the initial rate, respectively. The maximum inhibition of glutamate-evoked [Na+](i) increase by TBOA was approximately 70%. The residual response persisted in the presence of a non-NMDA receptor antagonist or the inhibitor of the GLT-1 glutamate transporters, dihydrokainate (DHK). In view of the complete reversibility of its effects, TBOA represents a very useful pharmacological tool for studies of glutamate transporters.

  9. carboxypeptidase E-ΔN, a neuroprotein transiently expressed during development protects embryonic neurons against glutamate neurotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yan Qin

    Full Text Available Neuroprotective proteins expressed in the fetus play a critical role during early embryonic neurodevelopment, especially during maternal exposure to alcohol and drugs that cause stress, glutamate neuroexcitotoxicity, and damage to the fetal brain, if prolonged. We have identified a novel protein, carboxypeptidase E-ΔN (CPE-ΔN, which is a splice variant of CPE that has neuroprotective effects on embryonic neurons. CPE-ΔN is transiently expressed in mouse embryos from embryonic day 5.5 to postnatal day 1. It is expressed in embryonic neurons, but not in 3 week or older mouse brains, suggesting a function primarily in utero. CPE-ΔN expression was up-regulated in embryonic hippocampal neurons in response to dexamethasone treatment. CPE-ΔN transduced into rat embryonic cortical and hippocampal neurons protected them from glutamate- and H2O2-induced cell death. When transduced into embryonic cortical neurons, CPE-ΔN was found in the nucleus and enhanced the transcription of FGF2 mRNA. Embryonic cortical neurons challenged with glutamate resulted in attenuated FGF2 levels and cell death, but CPE-ΔN transduced neurons treated in the same manner showed increased FGF2 expression and normal viability. This neuroprotective effect of CPE-ΔN was mediated by secreted FGF2. Through receptor signaling, FGF2 activated the AKT and ERK signaling pathways, which in turn increased BCL-2 expression. This led to inhibition of caspase-3 activity and cell survival.

  10. Carboxypeptidase E-ΔN, a Neuroprotein Transiently Expressed during Development Protects Embryonic Neurons against Glutamate Neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Saravana R. K.; Selvaraj, Prabhuanand; Loh, Y. Peng

    2014-01-01

    Neuroprotective proteins expressed in the fetus play a critical role during early embryonic neurodevelopment, especially during maternal exposure to alcohol and drugs that cause stress, glutamate neuroexcitotoxicity, and damage to the fetal brain, if prolonged. We have identified a novel protein, carboxypeptidase E-ΔN (CPE-ΔN), which is a splice variant of CPE that has neuroprotective effects on embryonic neurons. CPE-ΔN is transiently expressed in mouse embryos from embryonic day 5.5 to postnatal day 1. It is expressed in embryonic neurons, but not in 3 week or older mouse brains, suggesting a function primarily in utero. CPE-ΔN expression was up-regulated in embryonic hippocampal neurons in response to dexamethasone treatment. CPE-ΔN transduced into rat embryonic cortical and hippocampal neurons protected them from glutamate- and H2O2-induced cell death. When transduced into embryonic cortical neurons, CPE-ΔN was found in the nucleus and enhanced the transcription of FGF2 mRNA. Embryonic cortical neurons challenged with glutamate resulted in attenuated FGF2 levels and cell death, but CPE-ΔN transduced neurons treated in the same manner showed increased FGF2 expression and normal viability. This neuroprotective effect of CPE-ΔN was mediated by secreted FGF2. Through receptor signaling, FGF2 activated the AKT and ERK signaling pathways, which in turn increased BCL-2 expression. This led to inhibition of caspase-3 activity and cell survival. PMID:25426952

  11. Altered glutamate reuptake in relapsing-remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis cortex: correlation with microglia infiltration, demyelination, and neuronal and synaptic damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercellino, Marco; Merola, Aristide; Piacentino, Chiara; Votta, Barbara; Capello, Elisabetta; Mancardi, Giovanni Luigi; Mutani, Roberto; Giordana, Maria Teresa; Cavalla, Paola

    2007-08-01

    Cortical involvement in multiple sclerosis (MS) is emerging as an important determinant of disease progression. The mechanisms responsible for MS cortical pathology are not fully characterized. The objective of this study was to assess the role of excitotoxicity in MS cortex, evaluating excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT) expression and its relationship with demyelination, inflammation, gliosis, and neuronal and synaptic pathology. EAATs are essential in maintaining low extracellular glutamate concentrations and preventing excitotoxicity. Ten MS brains (3 relapsing-remitting MS cases and 7 secondary progressive MS cases) were evaluated by immunohistochemistry for myelin basic protein, CD68, HLA-DR, EAAT1, EAAT2, glial fibrillary acidic protein, phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (pJNK), synaptophysin, and neurofilaments. Cortical lesions were frequently observed in MS brains in variable numbers and extensions. In cortical lesions, activated microglia infiltration correlated with focal loss of EAAT1, EAAT2, and synaptophysin immunostaining, and with neuronal immunostaining for pJNK, a protein involved in response to excitotoxic injury. No reduction of EAATs or synaptophysin immunostaining was observed in demyelinated cortex in the absence of activated microglia. Alterations of the mechanisms of glutamate reuptake are found in cortical MS lesions in the presence of activated microglia and are associated with signs of neuronal and synaptic damage suggestive of excitotoxicity. Excitotoxicity may be involved in the pathogenesis of demyelination and of neuronal and synaptic damage in MS cortex.

  12. Addition of glutamate to serum free culture promotes recovery of electrical activity in adult hippocampal neurons in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Darin; Das, Mainak; Molnar, Peter; Hickman, James J.

    2010-01-01

    A long-term cell culture system utilizing normal adult hippocampal neurons would represent an important tool that could be useful in research on the mature brain, neurological disorders and age-related neurological diseases. Historically, in vitro neuronal systems are derived from embryonic rather than mature brain tissue, a practice predicated upon difficulties in supporting regeneration, functional recovery and long-term survival of adult neurons in vitro. A few studies have shown that neurons derived from the hippocampal tissue of adult rats can survive and regenerate in vitro under serum-free conditions. However, while the adult neurons regenerated morphologically under these conditions, both the electrical activity characteristic of in vivo neurons as well as long-term neuronal survival was not consistently recovered in vitro. In this study, we report on the development of a defined culture system with the ability to support functional recovery and long-term survival of adult rat hippocampal neurons. In this system, the cell-adhesive substrate, N-1 [3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl]-diethylenetriamine, supported neuronal attachment, regeneration, and long-term survival of adult neurons for more than 80 days in vitro. Additionally, the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate, applied at 25 μM for 1 to 7 days after morphological neuronal regeneration in vitro, enabled full recovery of neuronal electrical activity. This low concentration of glutamate promoted the recovery of neuronal electrical activity but with minimal excitotoxicity. These improvements allowed electrically active adult neurons to survive in vitro for several months, providing a stable test-bed for the long-term study of regeneration in adult derived neuronal systems, especially for traumatic brain injury (TBI). PMID:20452373

  13. Addition of glutamate to serum-free culture promotes recovery of electrical activity in adult hippocampal neurons in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Darin; Das, Mainak; Molnar, Peter; Hickman, James J

    2010-07-15

    A long-term cell culture system utilizing normal adult hippocampal neurons would represent an important tool that could be useful in research on the mature brain, neurological disorders and age-related neurological diseases. Historically, in vitro neuronal systems are derived from embryonic rather than mature brain tissue, a practice predicated upon difficulties in supporting regeneration, functional recovery and long-term survival of adult neurons in vitro. A few studies have shown that neurons derived from the hippocampal tissue of adult rats can survive and regenerate in vitro under serum-free conditions. However, while the adult neurons regenerated morphologically under these conditions, both the electrical activity characteristic of in vivo neurons as well as long-term neuronal survival was not consistently recovered in vitro. In this study, we report on the development of a defined culture system with the ability to support functional recovery and long-term survival of adult rat hippocampal neurons. In this system, the cell-adhesive substrate, N-1 [3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl]-diethylenetriamine, supported neuronal attachment, regeneration, and long-term survival of adult neurons for more than 80 days in vitro. Additionally, the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate, applied at 25muM for 1-7 days after morphological neuronal regeneration in vitro, enabled full recovery of neuronal electrical activity. This low concentration of glutamate promoted the recovery of neuronal electrical activity but with minimal excitotoxicity. These improvements allowed electrically active adult neurons to survive in vitro for several months, providing a stable test-bed for the long-term study of regeneration in adult-derived neuronal systems, especially for traumatic brain injury (TBI). Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Riluzole protects against glutamate-induced slowing of neurofilament axonal transport.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stevenson, Alison

    2009-04-24

    Riluzole is the only drug approved for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) but its precise mode of action is not properly understood. Damage to axonal transport of neurofilaments is believed to be part of the pathogenic mechanism in ALS and this has been linked to defective glutamate handling and increased phosphorylation of neurofilament side-arm domains. Here, we show that riluzole protects against glutamate-induced slowing of neurofilament transport. Protection is associated with decreased neurofilament side-arm phosphorylation and inhibition of the activities of two neurofilament kinases, ERK and p38 that are activated in ALS. Thus, the anti-glutamatergic properties of riluzole include protection against glutamate-induced changes to neurofilament phosphorylation and transport.

  15. Delayed translocation of NGFI-B/RXR in glutamate stimulated neurons allows late protection by 9-cis retinoic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathisen, Gro H.; Fallgren, Asa B.; Strom, Bjorn O.; Boldingh Debernard, Karen A.; Mohebi, Beata U. [Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1068, Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Paulsen, Ragnhild E., E-mail: r.e.paulsen@farmasi.uio.no [Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1068, Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway)

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} NGFI-B and RXR translocate out of the nucleus after glutamate treatment. {yields} Arresting NGFI-B/RXR in the nucleus protects neurons from excitotoxicity. {yields} Late protection by 9-cis RA is possible due to a delayed translocation of NGFI-B/RXR. -- Abstract: Nuclear receptor and apoptosis inducer NGFI-B translocates out of the nucleus as a heterodimer with RXR in response to different apoptosis stimuli, and therefore represents a potential pharmacological target. We found that the cytosolic levels of NGFI-B and RXR{alpha} were increased in cultures of cerebellar granule neurons 2 h after treatment with glutamate (excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, involved in stroke). To find a time-window for potential intervention the neurons were transfected with gfp-tagged expressor plasmids for NGFI-B and RXR. The default localization of NGFI-Bgfp and RXRgfp was nuclear, however, translocation out of the nucleus was observed 2-3 h after glutamate treatment. We therefore hypothesized that the time-window between treatment and translocation would allow late protection against neuronal death. The RXR ligand 9-cis retinoic acid was used to arrest NGFI-B and RXR in the nucleus. Addition of 9-cis retinoic acid 1 h after treatment with glutamate reduced the cytosolic translocation of NGFI-B and RXR{alpha}, the cytosolic translocation of NGFI-Bgfp observed in live neurons, as well as the neuronal death. However, the reduced translocation and the reduced cell death were not observed when 9-cis retinoic acid was added after 3 h. Thus, late protection from glutamate induced death by addition of 9-cis retinoic acid is possible in a time-window after apoptosis induction.

  16. The prion protein regulates glutamate-mediated Ca(2+) entry and mitochondrial Ca(2+) accumulation in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mario, Agnese; Peggion, Caterina; Massimino, Maria Lina; Viviani, Francesca; Castellani, Angela; Giacomello, Marta; Lim, Dmitry; Bertoli, Alessandro; Sorgato, Maria Catia

    2017-08-15

    The cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) whose conformational misfolding leads to the production of deadly prions, has a still-unclarified cellular function despite decades of intensive research. Following our recent finding that PrP(C) limits Ca(2+) entry via store-operated Ca(2+) channels in neurons, we investigated whether the protein could also control the activity of ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs). To this end, we compared local Ca(2+) movements in primary cerebellar granule neurons and cortical neurons transduced with genetically encoded Ca(2+) probes and expressing, or not expressing, PrP(C) Our investigation demonstrated that PrP(C) downregulates Ca(2+) entry through each specific agonist-stimulated iGluR and after stimulation by glutamate. We found that, although PrP-knockout (KO) mitochondria were displaced from the plasma membrane, glutamate addition resulted in a higher mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in PrP-KO neurons than in their PrP(C)-expressing counterpart. This was because the increased Ca(2+) entry through iGluRs in PrP-KO neurons led to a parallel increase in Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release via ryanodine receptor channels. These data thus suggest that PrP(C) takes part in the cell apparatus controlling Ca(2+) homeostasis, and that PrP(C) is involved in protecting neurons from toxic Ca(2+) overloads. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Valine but not leucine or isoleucine supports neurotransmitter glutamate synthesis during synaptic activity in cultured cerebellar neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Lasse Kristoffer; Johansen, Maja L.; Schousboe, Arne

    2012-01-01

    group nitrogen donors for synthesis of vesicular neurotransmitter glutamate was investigated in cultured mouse cerebellar (primarily glutamatergic) neurons. The cultures were superfused in the presence of (15) N-labeled BCAAs, and synaptic activity was induced by pulses of N-methyl-D-aspartate (300 µ...

  18. 3H-D-aspartate release from cerebellar granule neurons is differentially regulated by glutamate- and K(+)-stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Rehder, V; Hansen, Gert Helge

    1992-01-01

    in neurites as well as cell bodies employing the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator fura-2. Transmitter release was assayed using 3H-D-aspartate to label the exogenously accessible glutamate pools, which in these neurons is believed to also include the transmitter pool. In an attempt to distinguish whether...

  19. Curcumin Protects Neurons from Glutamate-Induced Excitotoxicity by Membrane Anchored AKAP79-PKA Interaction Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kui Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Now stimulation of AMPA receptor as well as its downstream pathways is considered as potential central mediators in antidepressant mechanisms. As a signal integrator which binds to AMPA receptor, A-kinase anchoring protein 79-(AKAP79- PKA complex is regarded as a potential drug target to exert neuroprotective effects. A well-tolerated and multitarget drug curcumin has been confirmed to exert antidepressant-like effects. To explore whether AKAP79-PKA complex is involved in curcumin-mediated antiexcitotoxicity, we detected calcium signaling, subcellular location of AKAP79-PKA complex, phosphorylation of glutamate receptor, and ERK and AKT cascades. In this study, we found that curcumin protected neurons from glutamate insult by reducing Ca2+ influx and blocking the translocation of AKAP79 from cytomembrane to cytoplasm. In parallel, curcumin enhanced the phosphorylation of AMPA receptor and its downstream pathways in PKA-dependent manner. If we pretreated cells with PKA anchoring inhibitor Ht31 to disassociate PKA from AKAP79, no neuroprotective effects were observed. In conclusion, our results show that AKAP79-anchored PKA facilitated the signal relay from AMPA receptor to AKT and ERK cascades, which may be crucial for curcumin-mediated antiexcitotoxicity.

  20. Protonation of a Glutamate Residue Modulates the Dynamics of the Drug Transporter EmrE

    OpenAIRE

    Gayen, Anindita; Leninger, Maureen; Traaseth, Nathaniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary active transport proteins play a central role in conferring bacterial multidrug resistance. In this work, we investigated the proton-coupled transport mechanism for the Escherichia coli drug efflux pump EmrE using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Our results show that the global conformational motions necessary for transport are modulated in an allosteric fashion by the protonation state of a membrane-embedded glutamate residue. These observations directly correlate wi...

  1. Protonation of a Glutamate Residue Modulates the Dynamics of the Drug Transporter EmrE

    OpenAIRE

    Gayen, Anindita; Leninger, Maureen; Traaseth, Nathaniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary active transport proteins play a central role in conferring bacterial multidrug resistance. In this work, we investigated the proton-coupled transport mechanism for the Escherichia coli drug efflux pump EmrE using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Our results show that the global conformational motions necessary for transport are modulated in an allosteric fashion by the protonation state of a membrane-embedded glutamate residue. These observations directly correlate wi...

  2. Distributions of vesicular glutamate transporters 1 and 2 in the visual system of tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaram, P; Isaamullah, M; Petry, H M; Bickford, M E; Kaas, J H

    2015-08-15

    Vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT) proteins regulate the storage and release of glutamate from synapses of excitatory neurons. Two isoforms, VGLUT1 and VGLUT2, are found in most glutamatergic projections across the mammalian visual system, and appear to differentially identify subsets of excitatory projections between visual structures. To expand current knowledge on the distribution of VGLUT isoforms in highly visual mammals, we examined the mRNA and protein expression patterns of VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), superior colliculus, pulvinar complex, and primary visual cortex (V1) in tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri), which are closely related to primates but classified as a separate order (Scandentia). We found that VGLUT1 was distributed in intrinsic and corticothalamic connections, whereas VGLUT2 was predominantly distributed in subcortical and thalamocortical connections. VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 were coexpressed in the LGN and in the pulvinar complex, as well as in restricted layers of V1, suggesting a greater heterogeneity in the range of efferent glutamatergic projections from these structures. These findings provide further evidence that VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 identify distinct populations of excitatory neurons in visual brain structures across mammals. Observed variations in individual projections may highlight the evolution of these connections through the mammalian lineage.

  3. Distributions of vesicular glutamate transporters 1 and 2 in the visual system of tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri)1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaram, P; Isaamullah, M; Petry, HM; Bickford, ME; Kaas, JH

    2014-01-01

    Vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT) proteins regulate the storage and release of glutamate from synapses of excitatory neurons. Two isoforms, VGLUT1 and VGLUT2, are found in most glutamatergic projections across the mammalian visual system, and appear to differentially identify subsets of excitatory projections between visual structures. To expand current knowledge on the distribution of VGLUT isoforms in highly visual mammals, we examined the mRNA and protein expression patterns of VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), superior colliculus, pulvinar complex, and primary visual cortex (V1) in tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri), which are closely related to primates but classified as a separate order (Scandentia). We found that VGLUT1 was distributed in intrinsic and corticothalamic connections, whereas VGLUT2 was predominantly distributed in subcortical and thalamocortical connections. VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 were coexpressed in the LGN and in the pulvinar complex, as well as in restricted layers of V1, suggesting a greater heterogeneity in the range of efferent glutamatergic projections from these structures. These findings provide further evidence that VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 identify distinct populations of excitatory neurons in visual brain structures across mammals. Observed variations in individual projections may highlight the evolution of these connections through the mammalian lineage. PMID:25521420

  4. Role of the NR2A/2B subunits of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor in glutamate-induced glutamic acid decarboxylase alteration in cortical GABAergic neurons in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnerie, H; Hsu, F-C; Coulter, D A; Le Roux, P D

    2010-12-29

    The vulnerability of brain neuronal cell subpopulations to neurologic insults varies greatly. Among cells that survive a pathological insult, for example ischemia or brain trauma, some may undergo morphological and/or biochemical changes that may compromise brain function. The present study is a follow-up of our previous studies that investigated the effect of glutamate-induced excitotoxicity on the GABA synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65/67)'s expression in surviving DIV 11 cortical GABAergic neurons in vitro [Monnerie and Le Roux, (2007) Exp Neurol 205:367-382, (2008) Exp Neurol 213:145-153]. An N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated decrease in GAD expression was found following glutamate exposure. Here we examined which NMDAR subtype(s) mediated the glutamate-induced change in GAD protein levels. Western blotting techniques on cortical neuron cultures showed that glutamate's effect on GAD proteins was not altered by NR2B-containing diheteromeric (NR1/NR2B) receptor blockade. By contrast, blockade of triheteromeric (NR1/NR2A/NR2B) receptors fully protected against a decrease in GAD protein levels following glutamate exposure. When receptor location on the postsynaptic membrane was examined, extrasynaptic NMDAR stimulation was observed to be sufficient to decrease GAD protein levels similar to that observed after glutamate bath application. Blocking diheteromeric receptors prevented glutamate's effect on GAD proteins after extrasynaptic NMDAR stimulation. Finally, NR2B subunit examination with site-specific antibodies demonstrated a glutamate-induced, calpain-mediated alteration in NR2B expression. These results suggest that glutamate-induced excitotoxic NMDAR stimulation in cultured GABAergic cortical neurons depends upon subunit composition and receptor location (synaptic vs. extrasynaptic) on the neuronal membrane. Biochemical alterations in surviving cortical GABAergic neurons in various disease states may contribute to the altered

  5. Position of the third Na+ site in the aspartate transporter GltPh and the human glutamate transporter, EAAT1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turgut Bastug

    Full Text Available Glutamate transport via the human excitatory amino acid transporters is coupled to the co-transport of three Na(+ ions, one H(+ and the counter-transport of one K(+ ion. Transport by an archaeal homologue of the human glutamate transporters, Glt(Ph, whose three dimensional structure is known is also coupled to three Na(+ ions but only two Na(+ ion binding sites have been observed in the crystal structure of Glt(Ph. In order to fully utilize the Glt(Ph structure in functional studies of the human glutamate transporters, it is essential to understand the transport mechanism of Glt(Ph and accurately determine the number and location of Na(+ ions coupled to transport. Several sites have been proposed for the binding of a third Na(+ ion from electrostatic calculations and molecular dynamics simulations. In this study, we have performed detailed free energy simulations for Glt(Ph and reveal a new site for the third Na(+ ion involving the side chains of Threonine 92, Serine 93, Asparagine 310, Aspartate 312, and the backbone of Tyrosine 89. We have also studied the transport properties of alanine mutants of the coordinating residues Threonine 92 and Serine 93 in Glt(Ph, and the corresponding residues in a human glutamate transporter, EAAT1. The mutant transporters have reduced affinity for Na(+ compared to their wild type counterparts. These results confirm that Threonine 92 and Serine 93 are involved in the coordination of the third Na(+ ion in Glt(Ph and EAAT1.

  6. Kinetic Properties of a Phosphate-Bond-Driven Glutamate-Glutamine Transport System in Streptococcus lactis and Streptococcus cremoris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    POOLMAN, B; SMID, EJ; KONINGS, WN

    1987-01-01

    In Streptococcus lactis ML3 and Streptococcus cremoris Wg2 the uptake of glutamate and glutamine is mediated by the same transport system, which has a 30-fold higher affinity for glutamine than for glutamate at pH 6.0. The apparent affinity constant for transport (KT) of glutamine is 2.5 ± 0.3 μM, i

  7. Early loss of the glutamate transporter splice-variant GLT-1v in rat cerebral cortex following lateral fluid-percussion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jae-Hyuk; Pow, David V; Hazell, Alan S

    2005-01-01

    Glutamate transporter proteins are essential for the control of interstitial glutamate levels, with an impairment of their function or levels being a major potential contributor to excitotoxicity. We have investigated the effects of lateral fluid percussion on the levels of the glutamate transporter proteins GLT-1alpha, its splice variant GLT-1v, GLAST, and EAAC1 in the rat in order to evaluate their pathogenetic role in this model of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Immunoblot analysis revealed neuronal loss in the cerebral cortex was accompanied by a 54% decrease in GLT-1v 6 h following the insult which progressed to an 83% loss of the transporter after 24 h. No changes in GLT-1alpha, GLAST, or EAAC1 were observed in this brain region at either time point. GLT-1v content was also decreased by 55% and 68% in the hippocampus and thalamus, respectively, at 6 h post-injury, but recovered fully after 24 h in both brain regions. In contrast, levels of GLT-1alpha were increased in the hippocampus at 6 h and 24 h post-TBI. These alterations in transporter protein content were also confirmed using immunohistochemical methods. Our results show for the first time a pattern of early, dynamic changes in the levels of GLT-1 transporter splice variants in different brain regions in this trauma model. In addition, correlation of GLT-1v levels with both neuronal cell loss and alpha-internexin content in the injured cortex suggests that loss of this novel glutamate transporter may be a key factor in determining cerebral vulnerability following this type of brain injury.

  8. Metabotropic glutamate and GABA receptors modulate cellular excitability and glutamatergic transmission in chicken cochlear nucleus angularis neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei; Lu, Yong

    2017-03-01

    Neurons in the avian cochlear nucleus angularis (NA) receive glutamatergic input from the auditory nerve, and GABAergic input from the superior olivary nucleus. Physiologically heterogeneous, NA neurons perform multiple functions including encoding sound intensity information. Using in vitro whole-cell patch recordings from acute brain slices and immunohistochemistry staining, we investigated neuromodulation mediated by metabotropic glutamate and GABA receptors (mGluRs and GABABRs) in NA neurons. Based on their intrinsic firing patterns in response to somatic current injections, NA neurons were classified into onset, damped, and tonic cells. Pharmacological activation of group II mGluRs, group III mGluRs, and GABABRs, by their respective agonists, suppressed the cellular excitability of non-onset firing NA neurons. Each of these agonists inhibited the glutamatergic transmission in NA neurons, in a cell type-independent manner. The frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous release of glutamate was reduced by each of these agonists, suggesting that the modulation of the glutamatergic transmission was via presynaptic actions. Interestingly, activation of group I mGluRs increased cellular excitability and suppressed glutamatergic transmission in non-onset neurons. These results elaborate that auditory processing in NA neurons is subject to neuromodulation mediated by metabotropic receptors activated by native neurotransmitters released at NA.

  9. Suppressing SNAP-25 and reversing glial glutamate transporters relieves neuropathic pain in rats by ameliorating imbalanced neurotransmission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chang; GUO Qu-lian; HUANG Chang-sheng; ZOU Wang-yuan; SONG Zong-bin

    2013-01-01

    Background Neuropathic pain results from a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system at either the peripheral or central level.The transmission of nociception within the central nervous system is subject to modulation by release and reuptake of neurotransmitters,which maintain a dynamic balance through the assembly and disassembly of the SNARE complex as well as a series of neurotransmitter transporters (inhibitory GABA transporters GAT and excitatory glutamate transporters GT).Neuronal hyper-excitability or defected inhibition involved in neuropathic pain is one of the outcomes caused by imbalanced neurotransmission.SNAP-25,which is one of the SNARE complexes,can modulate the release of neurotransmitters.Glia glutamate transporter (GLT) is one of the two glutamate transporters which account for most synaptic glutamate uptake in the CNS.The role of SNAP-25 and GLT as well as GAT is not clearly understood.Methods We used the rat chronic constriction injury (CCI) model for research,and degraded SNAP-25 by a single intrathecal administration of BoNT/A.The mechanical (MWT) and thermal withdrawal latency (TWL) were tested.The level of SNAP-25,GLT,and GAT-1 were assayed using RT-PCR and Western blotting.Results SNAP-25 was suppressed by a single intrathecal administration of 0.01U BoNT/A and the reduction of SNAP-25 was correlated with the relief of nociceptive responses in CCI rats.MWT and TWL returned to normal from the 5th to 14th day (P <0.05) after the administration.On the 14th day after surgery,compared to the sham group,the upregulation of SNAP-25 in CCI rats was reversed after BoNT/A treatment (P <0.05).The decreased GLT was reversed after BoNT/A treatment but increased GAT-1 was not influenced by BoNT/A treatment.Conclusions SNAP-25 and GLT play important roles in the development of neuropathic pain,and the mechanism may involve the imbalance of neurotransmission after peripheral nerve injury.Intrathecal administration of BoNT/A reversed the

  10. Niflumic acid modulates uncoupled substrate-gated conductances in the human glutamate transporter EAAT4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, M V; Vandenberg, R J

    2001-07-01

    1. The effects of niflumic acid on the substrate-gated currents mediated by the glutamate transporter EAAT4 expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes were examined using radiolabelled substrate flux measurements and two-electrode voltage clamp techniques. 2. Niflumic acid significantly enhanced the substrate-gated currents in EAAT4, without affecting the affinity of the substrates towards EAAT4. At a concentration of 300 microM, niflumic acid caused a 19 +/- 5 % reduction in L-[(3)H]glutamate uptake and no significant effect on the uptake of DL-[(3)H]aspartate. Thus, enhancement of the substrate-gated currents in EAAT4 does not correlate with the rate of substrate transport and suggests that the niflumic acid-induced currents are not thermodynamically coupled to the transport of substrate. 3. Niflumic acid and arachidonic acid co-applied with substrate to EAAT4-expressing oocytes had similar functional consequences. However, niflumic acid still enhanced the L-glutamate-gated current to the same extent in the presence and absence of a saturating dose of arachidonic acid, which suggests that the sites of action of the two compounds are distinct. 4. The EAAT4-mediated currents for the two substrates, L-glutamate and L-aspartate, were not enhanced equally by addition of the same dose of niflumic acid and the ionic composition of the niflumic acid-induced currents was not the same for the two substrates. Protons carry the L-glutamate-gated niflumic acid-induced current and both protons and chloride ions carry the L-aspartate-gated niflumic acid-induced current. 5. These results show that niflumic acid can be used to probe the functional aspects of EAAT4 and that niflumic acid and other non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs could be used as the basis for the development of novel modulators of glutamate transporters.

  11. Glutamate transporter GLT-1 mediates N-acetylcysteine inhibition of cocaine reinstatement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reissner, Kathryn J; Gipson, Cassandra D; Tran, Phuong K; Knackstedt, Lori A; Scofield, Michael D; Kalivas, Peter W

    2015-03-01

    Both pre-clinical and clinical studies indicate that N-acetylcysteine (NAC) may be useful in treating relapse to addictive drug use. Cocaine self-administration in rats reduces both cystine-glutamate exchange and glutamate transport via GLT-1 in the nucleus accumbens, and NAC treatment normalizes these two glial processes critical for maintaining glutamate homeostasis. However, it is not known if one or both of these actions by NAC is needed to inhibit relapse to cocaine seeking. To determine whether the restoration of GLT-1 and/or cystine-glutamate exchange is required for NAC to inhibit cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking, we utilized the rat self-administration/extinction/reinstatement model of cocaine relapse. Rats were pre-treated in the nucleus accumbens with vivo-morpholino antisense oligomers targeting either GLT-1 or xCT (catalytic subunit of the cystine-glutamate exchanger) overlapping with daily NAC administration during extinction (100 mg/kg, i.p. for the last 5 days). Rats then underwent cue-induced reinstatement of active lever pressing in the absence of NAC, to determine if preventing NAC-induced restoration of one or the other protein was sufficient to block the capacity of chronic NAC to inhibit reinstatement. The vivo-morpholino suppression of xCT reduced cystine-glutamate exchange but did not affect NAC-induced reduction of reinstated cocaine seeking. In contrast, suppressing NAC-induced restoration of GLT-1 not only prevented NAC from inhibiting reinstatement, but augmented the capacity of cues to reinstate cocaine seeking. We hypothesized that the increased reinstatement after inhibiting NAC induction of GLT-1 resulted from increased extracellular glutamate, and show that augmented reinstatement is prevented by blocking mGluR5. Restoring GLT-1, not cystine-glutamate exchange, is a key mechanism whereby daily NAC reduces cue-induced cocaine reinstatement.

  12. Rapid Inhibition of the Glutamate-induced Increase of Intracellular Free Calcium by Magnesium in Rat Hippocampal Neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张蕲; 胡波; 孙圣刚; 邓学军; 梅元武; 童萼塘

    2004-01-01

    By using Fura-2/AM, the effects of magnesium (Mg2+) on the glutamate-induced increase of intracellular free calcium ([Ca2+]i) in the cultured hippocampal neurons and the features were investigated by integrated photoelectric detecting system. The experiments were designed to three groups (The drug was spit to the cells for 20 s): Group A receiving 1×10-5 mol/L glutamate; Group B receiving 1 × 10-5 mol/L glutamate and1× 10-5 mol/L Mg2+ simultaneously; Group C receiving 1 × 10-5 mol/L glutamate again after [Ca2+]i in group B back to the baseline. The results showed that in group A, [Ca2+]i was obviously increased. In group B, the changes in [Ca2+]i and the peak value were significantly decreased. Moreover, the elevation of Phase 1 was slowed down and Phase 2 was shortened to some extent, and the plateau phase between them was relatively prolonged. In group C, calcium oscillation similar to that in group A occurred, but both the Phase 1 and Phase 2 were shortened and the △[Ca2+]i was slightly decreased. It was suggested that Mg2+ could quickly inhibit the rise of [Ca2+]i induced by glutamate in the cultured hippocampal neurons in rats.

  13. Decreased expression of glutamate transporters in astrocytes after human traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Landeghem, Frank K H; Weiss, Thorsten; Oehmichen, Manfred; von Deimling, Andreas

    2006-10-01

    The primary mechanism for eliminating synaptically released glutamate is uptake by astrocytes. In the present study, we examined whether traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects the cellular expression of glutamate transporters EAAT1 and EAAT2. Morphometrical immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated a predominant expression of EAAT1 and EAAT2 in astrocytes of normal human neocortex (n = 10). Following traumatic injury of human brain (n = 55), the number of EAAT2-positive cells was decreased for a prolonged survival period within the traumatized neocortex and the pericontusional region. GFAP-positive astrocytes decreased in number within the first 24 h. Thereafter, the number of GFAP-positive astrocytes increased again, indicating formation of reactive gliosis. Double immunofluorescence examinations revealed a reduction in absolute numbers of GFAP-positive astrocytes coexpressing EAAT1 or EAAT2 at survival times up to 7 days. In addition, the relative fractions of astrocytes coexpressing glutamate transporters decreased following TBI. We conclude that the posttraumatic reduction in cellular EAAT 1 and EAAT2 expression is predominantly due to degeneration of astrocytes and to downregulation in surviving astrocytes. Our results support the view that reduced glutamate uptake by astrocytes contributes to posttraumatic elevation of extracellular glutamate in humans.

  14. Neuroprotective effects of α-iso-cubebene against glutamate-induced damage in the HT22 hippocampal neuronal cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun Young; Jung, Won Jung; Kang, Jum Soon; Kim, Cheol-Min; Park, Geuntae; Choi, Young-Whan

    2015-02-01

    Since oxidative stress is critically involved in excitotoxic damage, we sought to determine whether the activation of the transcription factors, cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2, also known as NFE2L2), by α-iso-cubebene is involved in its protective effects against glutamate-induced neuronal cell death. Pre-treatment with α-iso-cubebene significantly attenuated glutamate-induced cytotoxicity in mouse hippocampus-derived neuronal cells. α-iso-cubebene also reduced the glutamate-induced generation of reactive oxygen species and calcium influx, thus preventing apoptotic cell death. α-iso-cubebene inhibited glutamate-induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization and, consequently, inhibited the release of the apoptosis-inducing factor from the mitochondria. Immunoblot anlaysis revealed that the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) by glutamate was reduced in the presence of α-iso-cubebene. α-iso-cubebene activated protein kinase A (PKA), CREB and Nrf2, which mediate the expression of the antioxidant enzymes, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase [quinone] 1 (NQO1), involved in neuroprotection. In addition, α-iso-cubebene induced the expression of antioxidant responsive element and CRE transcriptional activity, thus conferring neuroprotection against glutamate-induced oxidative injury. α-iso-cubebene also induced the expression of Nrf2-dependent genes encoding HO-1 and NQO1. Furthermore, the knockdown of CREB and Nrf2 by small interfering RNA attenuated the neuroprotective effects of α-iso-cubebene. Taken together, our results indicate that α-iso-cubebene protects HT22 cells from glutamate-induced oxidative damage through the activation of Nrf2/HO-1/NQO-1, as well as through the PKA and CREB signaling pathways.

  15. Glutamate-induced depression of EPSP-spike coupling in rat hippocampal CA1 neurons and modulation by adenosine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Alexandra L; Stone, Trevor W

    2010-04-01

    The presence of high concentrations of glutamate in the extracellular fluid following brain trauma or ischaemia may contribute substantially to subsequent impairments of neuronal function. In this study, glutamate was applied to hippocampal slices for several minutes, producing over-depolarization, which was reflected in an initial loss of evoked population potential size in the CA1 region. Orthodromic population spikes recovered only partially over the following 60 min, whereas antidromic spikes and excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) showed greater recovery, implying a change in EPSP-spike coupling (E-S coupling), which was confirmed by intracellular recording from CA1 pyramidal cells. The recovery of EPSPs was enhanced further by dizocilpine, suggesting that the long-lasting glutamate-induced change in E-S coupling involves NMDA receptors. This was supported by experiments showing that when isolated NMDA-receptor-mediated EPSPs were studied in isolation, there was only partial recovery following glutamate, unlike the composite EPSPs. The recovery of orthodromic population spikes and NMDA-receptor-mediated EPSPs following glutamate was enhanced by the adenosine A1 receptor blocker DPCPX, the A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261 or adenosine deaminase, associated with a loss of restoration to normal of the glutamate-induced E-S depression. The results indicate that the long-lasting depression of neuronal excitability following recovery from glutamate is associated with a depression of E-S coupling. This effect is partly dependent on activation of NMDA receptors, which modify adenosine release or the sensitivity of adenosine receptors. The results may have implications for the use of A1 and A2A receptor ligands as cognitive enhancers or neuroprotectants.

  16. Glutamate increases toxicity of inorganic lead in GT1-7 neurons: partial protection induced by flunarizine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loikkanen, Jarkko; Vaehaekangas, Kirsi H. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Kuopio, PO Box 1627, 70211, Kuopio (Finland); Naarala, Jonne [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Kuopio, PO Box 1627, 70211, Kuopio (Finland); Savolainen, Kai M. [Department of Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Topeliuksenkatu 41 aA, 00250, Helsinki (Finland)

    2003-12-01

    Recent studies point to an interaction between the glutamatergic neurotransmitter system and inorganic lead (Pb) neurotoxicity. Pb (1-100 {mu}M) evoked cytotoxicity over the period of 72 h in mouse hypothalamic GT1-7 neurons. Glutamate (0.1 or 1 mM) on its own did not have any effect on cell viability. However, 1 mM glutamate clearly increased Pb-induced cell death at 48 and 72 h. Although flunarizine (0.1-10 {mu}M), an antagonist of L- and T-type voltage-sensitive calcium channels (VSCCs), partially protected from the cytotoxicity induced by co-exposure to Pb (10 or 100 {mu}M) and glutamate (1 mM), it had no protective effect on cytotoxicity induced by Pb alone. The flunarizine-induced protection was dependent on time and observed only at 48 h. Neither verapamil, an antagonist of L-type VSCCs, nor DIDS, an inhibitor of anion exchange, at non-toxic concentrations (0.1-10 {mu}M) had any effect on cytotoxicity induced by Pb alone or together with glutamate at any studied time point. Co-exposure to Pb and glutamate also resulted in more prominent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) than either of the compounds alone. Interestingly, we observed an increase in intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels in cells exposed to micromolar concentrations of Pb. Glutamate decreased the levels of intracellular GSH and also partially reduced the Pb-induced increase in GSH levels. These results suggest that the interaction of glutamate and Pb results in increased neuronal cell death via mechanisms that involve an increase in ROS production, a decrease in intracellular GSH defense against oxidative stress and probably T-type VSCCs. (orig.)

  17. Na+ : Aspartate Coupling Stoichiometry in the Glutamate Transporter Homologue Glt(Ph)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneveld, Maarten; Slotboom, Dirk-Jan

    2010-01-01

    The Na+ aspartate symporter Glt(Ph) from Pyrococcus horikoshil is the only member of the glutamate transporter family for which crystal structures have been determined. The cation:aspartate coupling stoichiometry is unknown, thus hampering the elucidation of the ion coupling mechanism. Here we measu

  18. Na+ : Aspartate Coupling Stoichiometry in the Glutamate Transporter Homologue Glt(Ph)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneveld, Maarten; Slotboom, Dirk-Jan

    2010-01-01

    The Na+ aspartate symporter Glt(Ph) from Pyrococcus horikoshil is the only member of the glutamate transporter family for which crystal structures have been determined. The cation:aspartate coupling stoichiometry is unknown, thus hampering the elucidation of the ion coupling mechanism. Here we measu

  19. Mitochondria and NMDA receptor-dependent toxicity of berberine sensitizes neurons to glutamate and rotenone injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Kysenius

    Full Text Available The global incidence of metabolic and age-related diseases, including type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's disease, is on the rise. In addition to traditional pharmacotherapy, drug candidates from complementary and alternative medicine are actively being pursued for further drug development. Berberine, a nutraceutical traditionally used as an antibiotic, has recently been proposed to act as a multi-target protective agent against type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemias, ischemic brain injury and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. However, the safety profile of berberine remains controversial, as isolated reports suggest risks with acute toxicity, bradycardia and exacerbation of neurodegeneration. We report that low micromolar berberine causes rapid mitochondria-dependent toxicity in primary neurons characterized by mitochondrial swelling, increased oxidative stress, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and depletion of ATP content. Berberine does not induce caspase-3 activation and the resulting neurotoxicity remains unaffected by pan-caspase inhibitor treatment. Interestingly, inhibition of NMDA receptors by memantine and MK-801 completely blocked berberine-induced neurotoxicity. Additionally, subtoxic nanomolar concentrations of berberine were sufficient to sensitize neurons to glutamate excitotoxicity and rotenone injury. Our study highlights the need for further safety assessment of berberine, especially due to its tendency to accumulate in the CNS and the risk of potential neurotoxicity as a consequence of increasing bioavailability of berberine.

  20. Depolarization by K*O+ and glutamate activates different neurotransmitter release mechanisms in gabaergic neurons: vesicular versus non-vesicular release of gaba

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, Bo; Hansen, G.H.; Schousboe, Arne

    1993-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release, gaba release, membrane transporter, vesicles, intracellular CA*OH, neuron cultures......Neurotransmitter release, gaba release, membrane transporter, vesicles, intracellular CA*OH, neuron cultures...

  1. Oxytocin receptors are expressed on dopamine and glutamate neurons in the mouse ventral tegmental area that project to nucleus accumbens and other mesolimbic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peris, Joanna; MacFadyen, Kaley; Smith, Justin A; de Kloet, Annette D; Wang, Lei; Krause, Eric G

    2017-04-01

    The mesolimbic dopamine (DA) circuitry determines which behaviors are positively reinforcing and therefore should be encoded in the memory to become a part of the behavioral repertoire. Natural reinforcers, like food and sex, activate this pathway, thereby increasing the likelihood of further consummatory, social, and sexual behaviors. Oxytocin (OT) has been implicated in mediating natural reward and OT-synthesizing neurons project to the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and nucleus accumbens (NAc); however, direct neuroanatomical evidence of OT regulation of DA neurons within the VTA is sparse. To phenotype OT-receptor (OTR) expressing neurons originating within the VTA, we delivered Cre-inducible adeno-associated virus that drives the expression of fluorescent marker into the VTA of male mice that had Cre-recombinase driven by OTR gene expression. OTR-expressing VTA neurons project to NAc, prefrontal cortex, the extended amygdala, and other forebrain regions but less than 10% of these OTR-expressing neurons were identified as DA neurons (defined by tyrosine hydroxylase colocalization). Instead, almost 50% of OTR-expressing cells in the VTA were glutamate (GLU) neurons, as indicated by expression of mRNA for the vesicular GLU transporter (vGluT). About one-third of OTR-expressing VTA neurons did not colocalize with either DA or GLU phenotypic markers. Thus, OTR expression by VTA neurons implicates that OT regulation of reward circuitry is more complex than a direct action on DA neurotransmission. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:1094-1108, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Engineering the glutamate transporter homologue GltPh using protein semisynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focke, Paul J; Annen, Alvin W; Valiyaveetil, Francis I

    2015-03-03

    Glutamate transporters catalyze the concentrative uptake of glutamate from synapses and are essential for normal synaptic function. Despite extensive investigations of glutamate transporters, the mechanisms underlying substrate recognition, ion selectivity, and the coupling of substrate and ion transport are not well-understood. Deciphering these mechanisms requires the ability to precisely engineer the transporter. In this study, we describe the semisynthesis of GltPh, an archaeal homologue of glutamate transporters. Semisynthesis allows the precise engineering of GltPh through the incorporation of unnatural amino acids and peptide backbone modifications. In the semisynthesis, the GltPh polypeptide is initially assembled from a recombinantly expressed thioester peptide and a chemically synthesized peptide using the native chemical ligation reaction followed by in vitro folding to the native state. We have developed a robust procedure for the in vitro folding of GltPh. Biochemical characterization of the semisynthetic GltPh indicates that it is similar to the native transporter. We used semisynthesis to substitute Arg397, a highly conserved residue in the substrate binding site, with the unnatural analogue, citrulline. Our studies demonstrate that Arg397 is required for high-affinity substrate binding, and on the basis of our results, we propose that Arg397 is involved in a Na+-dependent remodeling of the substrate binding site required for high-affinity Asp binding. We anticipate that the semisynthetic approach developed in this study will be extremely useful in investigating functional mechanisms in GltPh. Further, the approach developed in this study should also be applicable to other membrane transport proteins.

  3. Temporal and spatial differences in intracellular Ca++ changes elicited by K+ and glutamate in single cultured neocortical neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Frandsen, A; Schousboe, A

    1996-01-01

    characteristics of voltage gated Ca++ channels are dramatically different in cell bodies and neurites. Moreover, the distribution of L-type channels activated by glutamate differs in cell bodies and neurites. Such differences in the spatial distribution of Ca++ channels are likely to be of major importance...... after exposure to K+. The Ca++ channel blockers verapamil and nifedipine affecting N- and L-type channels, respectively had differential effects on K+ stimulated increases in [Ca++]i. Nifedipine only affected the increase marginally whereas verapamil inhibited the response by 50-60% both in cell bodies...... and neurites. The glutamate-induced increase in [Ca++]i was inhibited by nifedipine by 60% in neurites whereas no effect was observed in cell bodies. The results show that depolarization elicited by K+ and glutamate has different effects in different parts of the neurons and that the pharmacological...

  4. [Blocking action of Nephila clavata spider toxin on ionic currents activated by glutamate and its agonists in isolated hippocampal neurons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiskin, N I; Kliuchko, E M; Kryshtal', O A; Tsyndrenko, A Ia; Akaike, N

    1989-01-01

    The blocking action of the Nephila clavata spider neurotoxin was studied using the concentration clamp method in isolated neurons of the rat hippocampus. Crude venom JSTX blocked L-glutamate-, quisqualate- and kainate-activated ionic currents mediated by activation of the non-N-methyl-D-aspartate (non-NMDA) membrane receptors. Ionic currents elicited by all agonists were depressed by crude JSTX venom to 34-35% of its initial amplitude with no recovery during prolonged washing. An active fraction of JSTX venom blocked ionic currents almost completely, but its action was partially reversible. The concentration dependences of blocking kinetics allowed determining the rate constants of JSTX interaction with glutamate receptors. It is supposed that JSTX blocks the non-NMDA ionic channels in some of their open states and may be one of useful tools in further biochemical and electrophysiological characterization of the glutamate-mediated synaptic transmission.

  5. Basic fibroblast growth factor protects auditory neurons and hair cells from noise exposure and glutamate neurotoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟所强; 王大君; 王嘉陵

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine protectivie effects of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on cochlear neurons and hair cells in vitro and in vivo. In experiment I, cultured spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) prepared from P3 mice were exposed to 20mM glutamate for 2 hours before the culture medium was replaced with fresh medium containing 0, 25, 50, and 100 ng/ml bFGF, respectively. Fourteen days later, all cultures were fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde, and stained with 1% toluidine blue. The number of surviving SGNs were counted and the length of SGNs neurites were measured. Exposure to 20 mM glutamate for 24 hours resulted in an inhibition on neurite outgrowth of SGNs and elevated cell death. Treatment of the cultures with bFGF led to promotion of neurite outgrowth and elevated number of surviving SGNs. Effects of bFGF were dose dependent with the highest potency at 100 ng/ml. In experiment Ⅱ, in vivo studies were carried out with guinea pigs in which bFGF or artificial perilymph was perfused into the cochlea to assess possible protective effects of bFGF on cochlear hair cells and compound action potentials(CAP). The CAPs were measured before, immediatly and 48 hours after exposure to noise. Significant differences in CAP were observed (p<0. 05 ) among the bFGF perfused group, control group(t =3. 896 ) and artificial perilymph perfused group (t =2. 520) at 48 hours after noise exposure, Cochleae were removed and hair cell Loss was analyzed in surface preparations prepared from all experimental animals. Acoustic trauma caused loss of 651 and 687 inner hair cells in the control and artificial perilymph perfused group, respectively. In sharp contrast, only 31 inner hair cells were lost in the bFGF perfused ears. Similarly, more outer hair cells died in the control and perilymph perfuesed group (41830 and 41968, respectively) than in the group treated with bFGF (34258). Our results demonstrate that bFGF protected SGNs against glutmate

  6. 4,4-Dimethyl- and diastereomeric 4-hydroxy-4-methyl-(2S)-glutamate analogues display distinct pharmacological profiles at ionotropic glutamate receptors and excitatory amino acid transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunch, Lennart; Pickering, Darryl S; Gefflaut, Thierry;

    2009-01-01

    this approach has provided important insight into the structure-activity relationships (SAR) for ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs and mGluRs), as well as the excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs). In this work, three 4,4-disubstituted Glu analogues 1-3, which are hybrid structures......Subtype-selective ligands are of great interest to the scientific community, as they provide a tool for investigating the function of one receptor or transporter subtype when functioning in its native environment. Several 4-substituted (S)-glutamate (Glu) analogues were synthesized, and altogether...

  7. Magnolol reduces glutamate-induced neuronal excitotoxicity and protects against permanent focal cerebral ischemia up to 4 hours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Ting Lee

    Full Text Available Neuroprotective efficacy of magnolol, 5,5'-dially-2,2'-dihydroxydiphenyl, was investigated in a model of stroke and cultured neurons exposed to glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. Rats were subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO. Magnolol or vehicle was administered intraperitoneally, at 1 hr pre-insult or 1-6 hrs post-insult. Brain infarction was measured upon sacrifice. Relative to controls, animals pre-treated with magnolol (50-200 mg/kg had significant infarct volume reductions by 30.9-37.8% and improved neurobehavioral outcomes (P<0.05, respectively. Delayed treatment with magnolol (100 mg/kg also protected against ischemic brain damage and improved neurobehavioral scores, even when administered up to 4 hrs post-insult (P<0.05, respectively. Additionally, magnolol (0.1 µM effectively attenuated the rises of intracellular Ca(2+ levels, [Ca(2+](i, in cultured neurons exposed to glutamate. Consequently, magnolol (0.1-1 µM significantly attenuated glutamate-induced cytotoxicity and cell swelling (P<0.05. Thus, magnolol offers neuroprotection against permanent focal cerebral ischemia with a therapeutic window of 4 hrs. This neuroprotection may be, partly, mediated by its ability to limit the glutamate-induced excitotoxicity.

  8. Retinal glutamate transporter changes in experimental glaucoma and after optic nerve transection in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Keith R G; Levkovitch-Verbin, Hana; Valenta, Danielle; Baumrind, Lisa; Pease, Mary Ellen; Quigley, Harry A

    2002-07-01

    High levels of glutamate can be toxic to retinal ganglion cells. Effective buffering of extracellular glutamate by retinal glutamate transporters is therefore important. This study was conducted to investigate whether glutamate transporter changes occur with two models of optic nerve injury in the rat. Glaucoma was induced in one eye of 35 adult Wistar rats by translimbal diode laser treatment to the trabecular meshwork. Twenty-five more rats underwent unilateral optic nerve transection. Two glutamate transporters, GLAST (EAAT-1) and GLT-1 (EAAT-2), were studied by immunohistochemistry and quantitative Western blot analysis. Treated and control eyes were compared 3 days and 1, 4, and 6 weeks after injury. Optic nerve damage was assessed semiquantitatively in epoxy-embedded optic nerve cross sections. Trabecular laser treatment resulted in moderate intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation in all animals. After 1 to 6 weeks of experimental glaucoma, all treated eyes had significant optic nerve damage. Glutamate transporter changes were not detected by immunohistochemistry. Western blot analysis demonstrated significantly reduced GLT-1 in glaucomatous eyes compared with control eyes at 3 days (29.3% +/- 6.7%, P = 0.01), 1 week (55.5% +/- 13.6%, P = 0.02), 4 weeks (27.2% +/- 10.1%, P = 0.05), and 6 weeks (38.1% +/- 7.9%, P = 0.01; mean reduction +/- SEM, paired t-tests, n = 5 animals per group, four duplicate Western blot analyses per eye). The magnitude of the reduction in GLT-1 correlated significantly with mean IOP in the glaucomatous eye (r(2) = 0.31, P = 0.01, linear regression). GLAST was significantly reduced (33.8% +/- 8.1%, mean +/- SEM) after 4 weeks of elevated IOP (P = 0.01, paired t-test, n = 5 animals per group). In contrast to glaucoma, optic nerve transection resulted in an increase in GLT-1 compared with the control eye (P = 0.01, paired t-test, n = 15 animals). There was no significant change in GLAST after transection. GLT-1 and GLAST were significantly

  9. Presynaptic Na+-dependent transport and exocytose of GABA and glutamate in brain in hypergravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, T.; Pozdnyakova, N.; Krisanova, N.; Himmelreich, N.

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) and L-glutamate are the most widespread neurotransmitter amino acids in the mammalian central nervous system. GABA is now widely recognized as the major inhibitory neurotransmitter. L-glutamate mediates the most of excitatory synaptic neurotransmission in the brain. They involved in the main aspects of normal brain function. The nerve terminals (synaptosomes) offer several advantages as a model system for the study of general mechanisms of neurosecretion. Our data allowed to conclude that exposure of animals to hypergravity (centrifugation of rats at 10G for 1 hour) had a profound effect on synaptic processes in brain. Comparative analysis of uptake and release of GABA and glutamate have demonstrated that hypergravity loading evokes oppositely directed alterations in inhibitory and excitatory signal transmission. We studied the maximal velocities of [^3H]GABA reuptake and revealed more than twofold enhancement of GABA transporter activity (Vmax rises from 1.4 |pm 0.3 nmol/min/mg of protein in the control group to 3.3 ± 0.59 nmol/min/mg of protein for animals exposed to hypergravity (P ≤ 0.05)). Recently we have also demonstrated the significant lowering of glutamate transporter activity (Vmax of glutamate reuptake decreased from 12.5 ± 3.2 nmol/min/mg of protein in the control group to 5.6 ± 0.9 nmol/min/mg of protein in the group of animals, exposed to the hypergravity stress (P ≤ 0.05)). Significant changes occurred in release of neurotransmitters induced by stimulating exocytosis with the agents, which depolarized nerve terminal plasma membrane. Depolarization-evoked Ca2+-stimulated release was more abundant for GABA (7.2 ± 0.54% and 11,74 ±1,2 % of total accumulated label for control and hypergravity, respectively (P≤0.05)) and was essentially less for glutamate (14.4 ± 0.7% and 6.2 ± 1.9%) after exposure of animals to centrifuge induced artificial gravity. Changes observed in depolarization-evoked exocytotic release

  10. Glutamate and GABA activate different receptors and Cl(-) conductances in crab peptide-secretory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, S; Cooke, I M

    2000-01-01

    Responses to rapid application of glutamic acid (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), 0.01-3 mM, were recorded by whole-cell patch clamp of cultured crab (Cardisoma carnifex) X-organ neurons. Responses peaked within 200 ms. Both Glu and GABA currents had reversal potentials that followed the Nernst Cl(-) potential when [Cl(-)](i) was varied. A Boltzmann fit to the normalized, averaged dose-response curve for Glu indicated an EC(50) of 0.15 mM and a Hill coefficient of 1.05. Rapid (t(1/2) approximately 1 s) desensitization occurred during Glu but not GABA application that required >2 min for recovery. Desensitization was unaffected by concanavalin A or cyclothiazide. N-methyl-D-aspartate, alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid, quisqualate, and kainate (to 1 mM) were ineffective, nor were Glu responses influenced by glycine (1 microM) or Mg(2+) (0-26 mM). Glu effects were imitated by ibotenic acid (0.1 mM). The following support the conclusion that Glu and GABA act on different receptors: 1) responses sum; 2) desensitization to Glu or ibotenic acid did not diminish GABA responses; 3) the Cl(-)-channel blockers picrotoxin and niflumic acid (0.5 mM) inhibited Glu responses by approximately 90 and 80% but GABA responses by approximately 50 and 20%; and 4) polyvinylpyrrolydone-25 (2 mM in normal crab saline) eliminated Glu responses but left GABA responses unaltered. Thus crab secretory neurons have separate receptors responsive to Glu and to GABA, both probably ionotropic, and mediating Cl(-) conductance increases. In its responses and pharmacology, this crustacean Glu receptor resembles Cl(-)-permeable Glu receptors previously described in invertebrates and differs from cation-permeable Glu receptors of vertebrates and invertebrates.

  11. Fluorescent indication that nitric oxide formation in NTS neurons is modulated by glutamate and GABA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajolla, Gisela P; Accorsi-Mendonça, Daniela; Rodrigues, Gerson J; Bendhack, Lusiane M; Machado, Benedito H; Lunardi, Claure N

    2009-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) in NTS plays an important role in regulating autonomic function to the cardiovascular system. Using the fluorescent dye DAF-2 DA, we evaluated the NO concentration in NTS. Brainstem slices of rats were loaded with DAF-2 DA, washed, fixed in paraformaldehyde and examined under fluorescent light. In different experimental groups, NTS slices were pre-incubated with 1 mM l-NAME (a non-selective NOS inhibitor), 1 mM d-NAME (an inactive enantiomere of l-NAME), 1 mM kynurenic acid (a non-selective ionotropic receptors antagonist) or 20 microM bicuculline (a selective GABAA receptors antagonist) before and during DAF-2 DA loading. Images were acquired using a confocal microscope and the intensity of fluorescence was quantified in three antero-posterior NTS regions. In addition, slices previously loaded with DAF-2 DA were incubated with NeuN or GFAP antibody. A semi-quantitative analysis of the fluorescence intensity showed that the basal NO concentration was similar in all antero-posterior aspects of the NTS (rostral intermediate, 15.5 +/- 0.8 AU; caudal intermediate, 13.2 +/- 1.4 AU; caudal commissural, 13.8 +/- 1.4 AU, n = 10). In addition, the inhibition of NOS and the antagonism of glutamatergic receptors decreased the NO fluorescence in the NTS. On the other hand, d-NAME did not affect the NO fluorescence and the antagonism of GABAA receptors increased the NO fluorescence in the NTS. It is important to note that the fluorescence for NO was detected mainly in neurons. These data show that the fluorescence observed after NTS loading with DAF-2 DA is a result of NO present in the NTS and support the concept that NTS neurons have basal NO production which is modulated by l-glutamate and GABA.

  12. Putative Neurotransmitters in ’Aplysia’: Distribution of Gamma- Aminobutyric Acid, Aspartate and Glutamate in Ganglia and Single Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-02-01

    been described in other inver- 21 7 tebrate nervous systems. Lewis and Evans note the presence of large amounts of taurine in...and Tauc, L. Pharmacological specificities of neurones in an elementary central nervous system. Nature 189:924-925, 1961. 15 12. Giller, E...Abstract 1349), 1974. 32. Usherwood, P. N. R., Machili, P. and Leaf, G. L-glutamate at insect excit- atory nerve-muscle synapses. Nature 219

  13. Resveratrol Prevents Retinal Dysfunction by Regulating Glutamate Transporters, Glutamine Synthetase Expression and Activity in Diabetic Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Kaihong; Yang, Na; Wang, Duozi; Li, Suping; Ming, Jian; Wang, Jing; Yu, Xuemei; Song, Yi; Zhou, Xue; Yang, Yongtao

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of resveratrol (RSV) on retinal functions, glutamate transporters (GLAST) and glutamine synthetase (GS) expression in diabetic rats retina, and on glutamate uptake, GS activity, GLAST and GS expression in high glucose-cultured Müller cells. The electroretinogram was used to evaluate retinal functions. Müller cells cultures were prepared from 5- to 7-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats. The expression of GLAST and GS was examined by qRT-PCR, ELISA and western-blotting. Glutamate uptake was measured as (3)H-glutamate contents of the lysates. GS activity was assessed by a spectrophotometric assay. 1- to 7-month RSV administrations (5 and 10 mg/kg/day) significantly alleviated hyperglycemia and weight loss in diabetic rats. RSV administrations also significantly attenuated diabetes-induced decreases in amplitude of a-wave in rod response, decreases in amplitude of a-, and b-wave in cone and rod response and decreases in amplitude of OP2 in oscillatory potentials. 1- to 7-month RSV treatments also significantly inhibited diabetes-induced delay in OP2 implicit times in scotopic 3.0 OPS test. The down-regulated mRNA and protein expression of GLAST and GS in diabetic rats retina was prevented by RSV administrations. In high glucose-treated cultures, Müller cells' glutamate uptake, GS activity, GLAST and GS expression were decreased significantly compared with normal control cultures. RSV (10, 20, and 30 mmol/l) significantly inhibited the HG-induced decreases in glutamate uptake, GS activity, GLAST and GS expression (at least P < 0.05). These beneficial results suggest that RSV may be considered as a therapeutic option to prevent from diabetic retinopathy.

  14. Coupled binding mechanism of three sodium ions and aspartate in the glutamate transporter homologue GltTk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guskov, Albert; Jensen, Sonja; Faustino, Ignacio; Marrink, Siewert J.; Slotboom, Dirk Jan

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate transporters catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable transport of anionic amino acids across the cell membrane by coupling it to the downhill transport of cations. This coupling mechanism is still poorly understood, in part because the available crystal structures of these transporters

  15. Coupled binding mechanism of three sodium ions and aspartate in the glutamate transporter homologue GltTk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guskov, Albert; Jensen, Sonja; Faustino, Ignacio; Marrink, Siewert J.; Slotboom, Dirk Jan

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate transporters catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable transport of anionic amino acids across the cell membrane by coupling it to the downhill transport of cations. This coupling mechanism is still poorly understood, in part because the available crystal structures of these transporters

  16. L-glutamate released from activated microglia downregulates astrocytic L-glutamate transporter expression in neuroinflammation: the ‘collusion’ hypothesis for increased extracellular L-glutamate concentration in neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaki Junpei

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the central nervous system, astrocytic L-glutamate (L-Glu transporters maintain extracellular L-Glu below neurotoxic levels, but their function is impaired with neuroinflammation. Microglia become activated with inflammation; however, the correlation between activated microglia and the impairment of L-Glu transporters is unknown. Methods We used a mixed culture composed of astrocytes, microglia, and neurons. To quantify L-Glu transporter function, we measured the extracellular L-Glu that remained 30 min after an application of L-Glu to the medium (the starting concentration was 100 μM. We determined the optimal conditions of lipopolysaccharide (LPS treatment to establish an inflammation model without cell death. We examined the predominant subtypes of L-Glu transporters and the changes in the expression levels of these transporters in this inflammation model. We then investigated the role of activated microglia in the changes in L-Glu transporter expression and the underlying mechanisms in this inflammation model. Results Because LPS (10 ng/mL, 72 h caused a significant increase in the levels of L-Glu remaining but did not affect cell viability, we adopted this condition for our inflammation model without cell death. GLAST was the predominant L-Glu transporter subtype, and its expression decreased in this inflammation model. As a result of their release of L-Glu, activated microglia were shown to be essential for the significant decrease in L-Glu uptake. The serial application of L-Glu caused a significant decrease in L-Glu uptake and GLAST expression in the astrocyte culture. The hemichannel inhibitor carbenoxolone (CBX inhibited L-Glu release from activated microglia and ameliorated the decrease in GLAST expression in the inflammation model. In addition, the elevation of the astrocytic intracellular L-Glu itself caused the downregulation of GLAST. Conclusions Our findings suggest that activated microglia trigger the

  17. Synthetic cathinone MDPV downregulates glutamate transporter subtype I (GLT-1) and produces rewarding and locomotor-activating effects that are reduced by a GLT-1 activator

    OpenAIRE

    Gregg, Ryan A.; Hicks, Callum; Nayak, Sunil U.; Tallarida, Christopher S; Nucero, Paul; Reitz, Allen B.; Smith, Garry R; Rawls, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic cathinones produce dysregulation of monoamine systems, but their effects on the glutamate system and the influence of glutamate on behavioral effects related to cathinone abuse are unknown. A principal regulator of glutamate homeostasis is glutamate transporter subtype 1 (GLT-1), an astrocytic protein that clears glutamate from the extracellular space and influences behavioral effects of established psychostimulants. We hypothesized that repeated administration of the synthetic cath...

  18. Neurons efficiently repair glutamate-induced oxidative DNA damage by a process involving CREB-mediated up-regulation of apurinic endonuclease 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Jenq-Lin; Tadokoro, Takashi; Keijzers, Guido

    2010-01-01

    damage after glutamate treatment, suggesting that APE1 is a key repair protein for glutamate-induced DNA damage. A cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) binding sequence is present in the Ape1 gene (encodes APE1 protein) promoter and treatment of neurons with a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase......-mediated DNA damage that is then rapidly repaired by a mechanism involving Ca(2+)-induced, CREB-mediated APE1 expression. Our findings reveal a previously unknown ability of neurons to efficiently repair oxidative DNA lesions after transient activation of glutamate receptors....

  19. 头孢曲松对甲基苯丙胺致大鼠伏隔核神经元和谷氨酸转运体改变的影响%Role of ceftrixone on neuron and glutamate transporters changed by methamphetamine in nucleus accumbens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李成敏; 颜慧; 王玲; 马萍; 宫泽辉

    2013-01-01

    目的 观察头孢曲松对甲基苯丙胺(METH)急性、亚急性处理时致神经损伤情况的影响,以及对伏隔核中谷氨酸转运体1(GLT1)与囊泡型谷氨酸转运体1(VGLUT1)的变化的影响.方法 建立METH急性毒性模型,同时利用谷氨酸转运体调节剂头孢曲松调控谷氨酸转运体的表达,尼氏染色实验观测神经元中尼氏小体的变化,利用Western blot实验检测其谷氨酸转运体蛋白表达的变化.结果 METH急性给药组与盐水对照组相比,刻板行为明显增加(P<0.01),尼氏小体明显减少;伏隔核中GLT1和VGLUT1的表达增加分别为53.7%和102%(P<0.05);头孢曲松预防给药组与METH组相比,大鼠刻板行为明显减少,伏隔核中GLT1的表达增加36%(P<0.05);VGLUT1的表达下调56%(P<0.05);METH亚急性处理后,与盐水对照组相比,伏隔核中GLT1的蛋白表达增加40.9%,VGLUT1蛋白表达增加52.9%;预防给予头孢曲松后,头孢曲松预防给药组与METH组相比,GLT1和VGLUT1蛋白表达差异没有显著性.结论 METH处理导致神经损伤,引起伏隔核中谷氨酸转运体的表达变化;头孢曲松能激活谷氨酸转运体的表达,缓解METH引起的神经损伤.%Aim To observe the role of ceftrixone on neuro-injury induced by methamphetamine( METH )a-cute/sub-acute treatment, and changes of glutamate transporter l( GLT1 )and vesicular glutamate transport- ( Cef )was applied to regulate the expression of gluta-mate transporters. The neurotoxicity of METH was e-valuated by Nissl staining method and stereotyped behavior. The expression of GLT1 protein and VGLUT1 protein was evaluated by Western blot. Results Compared to the saline group, stereotyped behaviors in METH acute-treated group significantly increased, and the density of nissl significantly reduced; the expression of GLT1 protein and VGLUT1 protein in METH group was significantly up-ragulated by 53. 7% and 102% ( P <0. 05 )in nucleus accumbens; compared to the METH group, pre

  20. Shiga toxin type-2 (Stx2 induces glutamate release via phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K pathway in murine neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiko eObata

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC can cause central nervous system (CNS damage resulting in paralysis, seizures, and coma. The key STEC virulence factors associated with systemic illness resulting in CNS impairment are Shiga toxins (Stx. While neurons express the Stx receptor globotriaosylceramide (Gb3 in vivo, direct toxicity to neurons by Stx has not been studied. We used murine neonatal neuron cultures to study the interaction of Shiga toxin type 2 (Stx2 with cell surface expressed Gb3. Single molecule imaging three dimensional STochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy - Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (3D STORM-TIRF allowed visualization and quantification of Stx2-Gb3 interactions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Stx2 increases neuronal cytosolic Ca2+, and NMDA-receptor inhibition blocks Stx2-induced Ca2+ influx, suggesting that Stx2-mediates glutamate release. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K-specific inhibition by Wortmannin reduces Stx2-induced intracellular Ca2+ indicating that the PI3K signaling pathway may be involved in Stx2-associated glutamate release, and that these pathways may contribute to CNS impairment associated with STEC infection.

  1. The effect of basic fibroblast growth factor on glutamate-injured neuroarchitecture and arachidonic acid release in adult hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmelseher, S; Pfenninger, E; Georgieff, M

    1996-01-22

    During development in culture, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) protected immature primary hippocampal neurons against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. We investigated the effects of bFGF on mature, differentiated rat hippocampal neurons cultured for 10-12 days after an 8-min exposure to 500 microM glutamate. Seven days post-injury, hippocampal cells demonstrated severe reductions in cellular viability and axonal and dendritic outgrowth, which were accompanied by a marked increase in [3H]arachidonic acid (ARA) release from prelabelled neurons. bFGF applied post-injury attenuated cell death and cytoarchitectural destruction at all concentrations used (500 pg/ml, 1, 10, 20 ng/ml). However, neurite elongation and branching processes were only significantly protected by 10 ng/ml bFGF. [3H]ARA release decreased in a dose-related fashion within a concentration range of 1-10 ng/ml bFGF. 20 ng/ml bFGF was not superior to 10 ng/ml bFGF. Therefore, bFGF's neurotropic actions appear to be concentration-dependent. Our data suggest that bFGF applied post-injury may have a neuroprotective potential for mature, differentiated, completely polarized hippocampal neurons.

  2. 大鼠囊泡膜谷氨酸转运体样和谷氨酸脱羧酶样阳性终末与表达GABAA受体α3亚单位的三叉神经中脑核神经元之间的联系%CONNECTIONS BETWEEN VESICULAR GLUTAMATE TRANSPORTERS-,GAD-LIKE IMMUNOREACTIVE TERMINALS AND GABAA RECEPTOR α3 SUBUNIT-LIKE POSITIVE NEURONS IN MESENCEPHALIC TRIGEMINAL NUCLEUS OF THE RAT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈鹏; 李金莲

    2003-01-01

    Objective To observe the association of vesicular glutamate transporter of type Ⅰ(VGluT1)-like immunoreactive(LI),the differentiation-associated Na+-dependent inorganic phosphate cotransporter(DNPI)-LI and glutamic acid decarboxylase(GAD)-LI terminals with GABAA receptor α3 subunit(GABAARα3)-LI neurons in mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus of the rat. Methods Triple-immunofluorescence histochemical staining technique and confocal laser-scanning microscopy were used. Results A large number of neuronal cell bodies showed GABAA Rα3-LI immunoreactivity at all rostrocaudal levels of the Vme,and most of GABAARα3-LI cells were large (25-50μm) pseudounipolar neurons.The dense VGluT1-LI,DNPL-LI and GAD-LI terminals distributed widely in Vme,some VGluT1/DNPI-LI and GAD-LI terminals surrounded the somata of the GABAARα3-LI Vme neurons,and made close contacts with them.Conclusion Proprioceptive sensory signals from the orofacial region might be modulated at the level of the primary afferent cell bodies in the Vme both by glutamatergic- and GABAergic-axonal terminals from other brain areas,and the effect of GABAergic-terminals might be mediated by post-synaptical GABAA receptors.%目的观察大鼠三叉神经中脑核(Vme)内囊泡膜谷氨酸转运体(VGluT1和DNPI)样和谷氨酸脱羧酶(GAD)样阳性终末与GABAA受体α3亚单位(GABAARα3)样阳性神经元之间的联系. 方法免疫荧光组织化学三重染色技术,在激光共聚焦显微镜下观察. 结果在Vme吻尾方向上,有大量的神经元胞体呈GABAARα3样免疫阳性,这些神经元多为大的假单极神经元(直径为25~50μm).VGluT1样、DNPI样和GAD样免疫阳性终末密集分布于Vme内,一些VGluT1/DNPI样和GAD样阳性终末包绕在GABAARα3样阳性Vme神经元胞体周围,并与之形成密切接触. 结论 Vme神经元在介导口面部本体感觉信息的传递过程中,可能同时接受中枢其他来源的谷氨酸能和GABA能终末的调控,其中GABA能终末的

  3. Glutamate excitotoxicity and Ca2+-regulation of respiration: Role of the Ca2+ activated mitochondrial transporters (CaMCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, Carlos B; Llorente-Folch, Irene; Traba, Javier; Amigo, Ignacio; Gonzalez-Sanchez, Paloma; Contreras, Laura; Juaristi, Inés; Martinez-Valero, Paula; Pardo, Beatriz; Del Arco, Araceli; Satrustegui, Jorgina

    2016-08-01

    Glutamate elicits Ca(2+) signals and workloads that regulate neuronal fate both in physiological and pathological circumstances. Oxidative phosphorylation is required in order to respond to the metabolic challenge caused by glutamate. In response to physiological glutamate signals, cytosolic Ca(2+) activates respiration by stimulation of the NADH malate-aspartate shuttle through Ca(2+)-binding to the mitochondrial aspartate/glutamate carrier (Aralar/AGC1/Slc25a12), and by stimulation of adenine nucleotide uptake through Ca(2+) binding to the mitochondrial ATP-Mg/Pi carrier (SCaMC-3/Slc25a23). In addition, after Ca(2+) entry into the matrix through the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU), it activates mitochondrial dehydrogenases. In response to pathological glutamate stimulation during excitotoxicity, Ca(2+) overload, reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial dysfunction and delayed Ca(2+) deregulation (DCD) lead to neuronal death. Glutamate-induced respiratory stimulation is rapidly inactivated through a mechanism involving Poly (ADP-ribose) Polymerase-1 (PARP-1) activation, consumption of cytosolic NAD(+), a decrease in matrix ATP and restricted substrate supply. Glutamate-induced Ca(2+)-activation of SCaMC-3 imports adenine nucleotides into mitochondria, counteracting the depletion of matrix ATP and the impaired respiration, while Aralar-dependent lactate metabolism prevents substrate exhaustion. A second mechanism induced by excitotoxic glutamate is permeability transition pore (PTP) opening, which critically depends on ROS production and matrix Ca(2+) entry through the MCU. By increasing matrix content of adenine nucleotides, SCaMC-3 activity protects against glutamate-induced PTP opening and lowers matrix free Ca(2+), resulting in protracted appearance of DCD and protection against excitotoxicity in vitro and in vivo, while the lack of lactate protection during in vivo excitotoxicity explains increased vulnerability to kainite-induced toxicity in Aralar

  4. Lysine and arginine reduce the effects of cerebral ischemic insults and inhibit glutamate-induced neuronal activity in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kondoh

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Intravenous administration of arginine was shown to be protective against cerebral ischemic insults via nitric oxide production and possibly via additional mechanisms. The present study aimed at evaluating the neuroprotective effects of oral administration of lysine (a basic amino acid, arginine, and their combination on ischemic insults (cerebral edema and infarction and hemispheric brain swelling induced by transient middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion in rats. Magnetic resonance imaging and 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining were performed two days after ischemia induction. In control animals, the major edematous areas were observed in the cerebral cortex and striatum. The volumes associated with cortical edema were significantly reduced by lysine (2.0 g/kg, arginine (0.6 g/kg, or their combined administration (0.6 g/kg each. Protective effects of these amino acids on infarction were comparable to the inhibitory effects on edema formation. Interestingly, these amino acids, even at low dose (0.6 g/kg, were effective to reduce hemispheric brain swelling. Additionally, the effects of in vivo microiontophoretic (juxtaneuronal applications of these amino acids on glutamate-evoked neuronal activity in the ventromedial hypothalamus were investigated in awake rats. Glutamate-induced neuronal activity was robustly inhibited by microiontophoretic applications of lysine or arginine onto neuronal membranes. Taken together, our results demonstrate the neuroprotective effects of oral ingestion of lysine and arginine against ischemic insults (cerebral edema and infarction, especially in the cerebral cortex, and suggest that suppression of glutamate-induced neuronal activity might be the primary mechanism associated with these neuroprotective effects.

  5. Simultaneous Single Neuron Recording of O2 Consumption, [Ca2+]i and Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Glutamate Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleichmann, Marc; Collis, Leon P.; Smith, Peter J.S.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2009-01-01

    To order the cellular processes in glutamate toxicity, we simultaneously recorded O2 consumption, cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and mitochondrial membrane potential (mΔψ) in single cortical neurons. O2 consumption was measured using an amperometric self-referencing platinum electrode adjacent to neurons in which [Ca2+]i and mΔψ were monitored with Fluo-4 and TMRE+, respectively using a spinning disk laser confocal microscope. Excitotoxic doses of glutamate caused an elevation of [Ca2+]i followed seconds afterwards by an increase in O2 consumption which reached a maximum level within 1 to 5 min. A modest increase in mΔψ occurred during this time period, and then, shortly before maximal O2 consumption was reached, the mΔψ, as indicated by TMRE+ fluorescence, dissipated. Maximal O2 consumption lasted up to 5 min and then declined together with mΔψ and ATP levels, while [Ca2+]i further increased. mΔψ and [Ca2+]i returned to baseline levels when neurons were treated with an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist shortly after the [Ca2+]i increased. Our unprecedented spatial and time resolution revealed that this sequence of events is identical in all neurons, albeit with considerable variability in magnitude and kinetics of changes in O2 consumption, [Ca2+]i and mΔψ. The data obtained using this new method are consistent with a model where Ca2+ influx causes ATP depletion, despite maximal mitochondrial respiration, minutes after glutamate receptor activation. PMID:19226367

  6. Efficient production of gamma-aminobutyric acid using Escherichia coli by co-localization of glutamate synthase, glutamate decarboxylase, and GABA transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dung Pham, Van; Somasundaram, Sivachandiran; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Si Jae; Hong, Soon Ho

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an important bio-product, which is used in pharmaceutical formulations, nutritional supplements, and biopolymer monomer. The traditional GABA process involves the decarboxylation of glutamate. However, the direct production of GABA from glucose is a more efficient process. To construct the recombinant strains of Escherichia coli, a novel synthetic scaffold was introduced. By carrying out the co-localization of glutamate synthase, glutamate decarboxylase, and GABA transporter, we redirected the TCA cycle flux to GABA pathway. The genetically engineered E. coli strain produced 1.08 g/L of GABA from 10 g/L of initial glucose. Thus, with the introduction of a synthetic scaffold, we increased GABA production by 2.2-fold. The final GABA concentration was increased by 21.8% by inactivating competing pathways.

  7. Gabapentin loses efficacy over time after nerve injury in rats: role of glutamate transporter-1 in the locus coeruleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Masafumi; Eisenach, James C; Hayashida, Ken-Ichiro

    2016-09-01

    Despite being one of the first-choice analgesics for chronic neuropathic pain, gabapentin sometimes fails to provide analgesia, but the mechanisms for this lack of efficacy is unclear. Rats with nerve injury including L5-L6 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) respond uniformly and well to gabapentin, but many of these studies are performed within just a few weeks of injury, questioning their relevance to chronic neuropathic pain. In this study, intraperitoneal gabapentin showed a time-dependently reduction in antihypersensitivity after SNL, associated with downregulation of astroglial glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) in the locus coeruleus (LC). Consistently, SNL also time-dependently increased basal but masked gabapentin-induced noradrenergic neuronal activity in the LC. In rats 2 weeks after SNL, knock-down of GLT-1 in the LC reduced the antihypersensitivity effect of gabapentin. In rats 8 weeks after SNL, increasing GLT-1 expression by histone deacetylase inhibitor valproate restored the antihypersensitivity effect of gabapentin, associated with restored gabapentin-induced noradrenergic neuronal activity in the LC and subsequent spinal noradrenaline release. Knock-down of GLT-1 in the LC reversed the effect of valproate to restore gabapentin-induced antihypersensitivity. In addition, the antihypersensitivity effect of the intrathecal α2-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine also decreased with time after SNL injury. These results suggest that downregulation of GLT-1 in the LC and reduced spinal noradrenergic inhibition contribute to impaired analgesic efficacy from gabapentin in chronic neuropathic pain and that valproate can rescue this impaired efficacy.

  8. 谷氨酸转运体 EAAT2在抑郁症发病及治疗中的作用%Roles of glutamate transporter EAAT2 in occurrence and treatment of depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建新; 姚丽华; 王惠玲; 刘忠纯; 王晓萍; 肖玲; 舒畅; 王高华

    2016-01-01

    谷氨酸转运体EAAT2(啮齿类动物命名为GLT-1:谷氨酸转运体1)是海马和前额叶星形胶质细胞上一种非常重要的谷氨酸转运体,其承担了细胞外大部分谷氨酸的摄取和转运,由于谷氨酸转运体EAAT2的作用在于降低突触间隙过高的谷氨酸水平,避免过高浓度的谷氨酸对神经元和神经胶质细胞的兴奋毒性作用,使之逐渐成为近年来抑郁症研究的热点。该文主要就谷氨酸转运体EAAT2在抑郁症中可能的病理生理作用,以及其可能作为新一代抗抑郁药作用的靶点进行综述。%The glutamate transporter EAAT 2 ( rodent nomencla-ture GLT-1:glutamate transporter 1), which is a predominantly astroglial glutamate transporter in the hippocampus and the pre-frontal cortex , is responsible for the majority of extracellular glu-tamate uptake .The glutamate transporter EAAT 2 can decrease the high levels of glutamate in the synaptic cleft , avoiding gluta-matergic excitotoxicity to damage the glial cells and neurons . Currently, the transporter EAAT2 has become a research hotspot of depression .This article aims to summarize roles of glutamate transporter EAAT2 in the occurrence and treatment of depres-sion.

  9. Pharmacological evaluation of glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) mediated neuroprotection following cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Rajkumar; Mishra, Vikas; Sasmal, Dinakar; Raghubir, Ram

    2010-07-25

    Recently glutamate transporters have emerged as a potential therapeutic target in a wide range of acute and chronic neurological disorders, owing to their novel mode of action. The modulation of GLT-1, a major glutamate transporter has been shown to exert neuroprotection in various models of ischemic injury and motoneuron degeneration. Therefore, an attempt was made to explore its neuroprotective potential in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury using ceftriaxone, a GLT-1 modulator. Pre-treatment with ceftriaxone (100mg/kg. i.v) for five days resulted in a significant reduction (Pceftriaxone-mediated increased glutamine synthetase activity by dihydrokainate (DHK), a GLT-1 specific inhibitor, confirms the specific effect of ceftriaxone on GLT-1 activity. In addition, ceftriaxone also induced a significant (P<0.01) increase in [(3)H]-glutamate uptake, mediated by GLT-1 in glial enriched preparation, as evidenced by use of DHK and DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate (DL-TBOA). Thus, the present study provides overwhelming evidence that modulation of GLT-1 protein expression and activity confers neuroprotection in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  10. Both neurons and astrocytes exhibited tetrodotoxin-resistant metabotropic glutamate receptor-dependent spontaneous slow Ca2+ oscillations in striatum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Tamura

    Full Text Available The striatum plays an important role in linking cortical activity to basal ganglia outputs. Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs are densely expressed in the medium spiny projection neurons and may be a therapeutic target for Parkinson's disease. The group I mGluRs are known to modulate the intracellular Ca(2+ signaling. To characterize Ca(2+ signaling in striatal cells, spontaneous cytoplasmic Ca(2+ transients were examined in acute slice preparations from transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP in the astrocytes. In both the GFP-negative cells (putative-neurons and astrocytes of the striatum, spontaneous slow and long-lasting intracellular Ca(2+ transients (referred to as slow Ca(2+ oscillations, which lasted up to approximately 200 s, were found. Neither the inhibition of action potentials nor ionotropic glutamate receptors blocked the slow Ca(2+ oscillation. Depletion of the intracellular Ca(2+ store and the blockade of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors greatly reduced the transient rate of the slow Ca(2+ oscillation, and the application of an antagonist against mGluR5 also blocked the slow Ca(2+ oscillation in both putative-neurons and astrocytes. Thus, the mGluR5-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate signal cascade is the primary contributor to the slow Ca(2+ oscillation in both putative-neurons and astrocytes. The slow Ca(2+ oscillation features multicellular synchrony, and both putative-neurons and astrocytes participate in the synchronous activity. Therefore, the mGluR5-dependent slow Ca(2+ oscillation may involve in the neuron-glia interaction in the striatum.

  11. In vitro evidence for the brain glutamate efflux hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Hans Christian; Madelung, Rasmus; Waagepetersen, Helle Sønderby

    2012-01-01

    The concentration of the excitotoxic amino acid, L-glutamate, in brain interstitial fluid is tightly regulated by uptake transporters and metabolism in astrocytes and neurons. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible role of the blood-brain barrier endothelium in brain L-glutamate ho...

  12. Protonation of a glutamate residue modulates the dynamics of the drug transporter EmrE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayen, Anindita; Leninger, Maureen; Traaseth, Nathaniel J

    2016-03-01

    Secondary active transport proteins play a central role in conferring bacterial multidrug resistance. In this work, we investigated the proton-coupled transport mechanism for the Escherichia coli drug efflux pump EmrE using NMR spectroscopy. Our results show that the global conformational motions necessary for transport are modulated in an allosteric fashion by the protonation state of a membrane-embedded glutamate residue. These observations directly correlate with the resistance phenotype for wild-type EmrE and the E14D mutant as a function of pH. Furthermore, our results support a model in which the pH gradient across the inner membrane of E. coli may be used on a mechanistic level to shift the equilibrium of the transporter in favor of an inward-open resting conformation poised for drug binding.

  13. Alleviation of glutamate mediated neuronal insult by piroxicam in rodent model of focal cerebral ischemia: a possible mechanism of GABA agonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Pallab; Pandey, Anand Kumar; Paul, Sudip; Patnaik, Ranjana

    2014-12-01

    Neurotransmitter imbalance is an inevitable outcome in cerebral ischemia that leads to neuronal death. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of piroxicam, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), on extracellular brain glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release, survival time, and neuronal cell death. Transient focal cerebral ischemia in male Charles Foster rat led to neuronal infarction and compromised intrinsic antioxidant status. Thirty-minute preadministration of piroxicam (10 mg/kg b.w.) showed a significant (P piroxicam administration in stroke rat significantly reduced (P piroxicam attenuates extracellular glutamate release and also reduces neuronal cell death due to reduction in oxidative stress in cerebral ischemia. Our results also indicate a consequent increase of extracellular GABA in brain regions administered with piroxicam, which hints that piroxicam alleviates glutamate excitotoxicity possibly by GABA agonism.

  14. Inducible expression and pharmacology of the human excitatory amino acid transporter 2 subtype of L-glutamate transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, J; Lou, Z; Zhang, Y; McIlvain, H B

    1999-12-01

    1. In this study we have examined the use of the ecdysone-inducible mammalian expression system (Invitrogen) for the regulation of expression of the predominant L-glutamate transporter EAAT2 (Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter) in HEK 293 cells. 2. HEK 293 cells which were stably transformed with the regulatory vector pVgRXR (EcR 293 cells) were used for transfection of the human EAAT2 cDNA using the inducible vector pIND and a clone designated HEK/EAAT2 was selected for further characterization. 3. Na+-dependent L-glutamate uptake activity (3.2 pmol min-1 mg-1) was observed in EcR 293 cells and this was increased approximately 2 fold in the uninduced HEK/EAAT2 cells, indicating a low level of basal EAAT2 activity in the absence of exogenous inducing agent. Exposure of HEK/EAAT2 cells to the ecdysone analogue Ponasterone A (10 microM for 24 h) resulted in a > or = 10 fold increase in the Na+-dependent activity. 4. L-glutamate uptake into induced HEK/EAAT2 cells followed first-order Michaelis-Menten kinetics and Eadie-Hofstee transformation of the saturable uptake data produced estimates of kinetic parameters as follows; Km 52.7+/-7.5 microM, Vmax 3.8+/-0.9 nmol min-1 mg-1 protein. 5. The pharmacological profile of the EAAT2 subtype was characterized using a series of L-glutamate transport inhibitors and the rank order of inhibitory potency was similar to that described previously for the rat homologue GLT-1 and in synaptosomal preparations from rat cortex. 6. Addition of the EAAT2 modulator arachidonic acid resulted in an enhancement (155+/-5% control in the presence of 30 microM) of the L-glutamate transport capacity in the induced HEK/EAAT2 cells. 7. This study demonstrates that the expression of EAAT2 can be regulated in a mammalian cell line using the ecdysone-inducible mammalian expression system.

  15. II. Glutamine and glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapiero, H; Mathé, G; Couvreur, P; Tew, K D

    2002-11-01

    Glutamine and glutamate with proline, histidine, arginine and ornithine, comprise 25% of the dietary amino acid intake and constitute the "glutamate family" of amino acids, which are disposed of through conversion to glutamate. Although glutamine has been classified as a nonessential amino acid, in major trauma, major surgery, sepsis, bone marrow transplantation, intense chemotherapy and radiotherapy, when its consumption exceeds its synthesis, it becomes a conditionally essential amino acid. In mammals the physiological levels of glutamine is 650 micromol/l and it is one of the most important substrate for ammoniagenesis in the gut and in the kidney due to its important role in the regulation of acid-base homeostasis. In cells, glutamine is a key link between carbon metabolism of carbohydrates and proteins and plays an important role in the growth of fibroblasts, lymphocytes and enterocytes. It improves nitrogen balance and preserves the concentration of glutamine in skeletal muscle. Deamidation of glutamine via glutaminase produces glutamate a precursor of gamma-amino butyric acid, a neurotransmission inhibitor. L-Glutamic acid is a ubiquitous amino acid present in many foods either in free form or in peptides and proteins. Animal protein may contain from 11 to 22% and plants protein as much as 40% glutamate by weight. The sodium salt of glutamic acid is added to several foods to enhance flavor. L-Glutamate is the most abundant free amino acid in brain and it is the major excitatory neurotransmitter of the vertebrate central nervous system. Most free L-glutamic acid in brain is derived from local synthesis from L-glutamine and Kreb's cycle intermediates. It clearly plays an important role in neuronal differentiation, migration and survival in the developing brain via facilitated Ca++ transport. Glutamate also plays a critical role in synaptic maintenance and plasticity. It contributes to learning and memory through use-dependent changes in synaptic efficacy and

  16. Arctigenin reduces neuronal responses in the somatosensory cortex via the inhibition of non-NMDA glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borbély, Sándor; Jócsák, Gergely; Moldován, Kinga; Sedlák, Éva; Preininger, Éva; Boldizsár, Imre; Tóth, Attila; Atlason, Palmi T; Molnár, Elek; Világi, Ildikó

    2016-07-01

    Lignans are biologically active phenolic compounds related to lignin, produced in different plants. Arctigenin, a dibenzylbutyrolactone-type lignan, has been used as a neuroprotective agent for the treatment of encephalitis. Previous studies of cultured rat cerebral cortical neurones raised the possibility that arctigenin inhibits kainate-induced excitotoxicity. The aims of the present study were: 1) to analyse the effect of arctigenin on normal synaptic activity in ex vivo brain slices, 2) to determine its receptor binding properties and test the effect of arctigenin on AMPA/kainate receptor activation and 3) to establish its effects on neuronal activity in vivo. Arctigenin inhibited glutamatergic transmission and reduced the evoked field responses. The inhibitory effect of arctigenin on the evoked field responses proved to be substantially dose dependent. Our results indicate that arctigenin exerts its effects under physiological conditions and not only on hyper-excited neurons. Furthermore, arctigenin can cross the blood-brain barrier and in the brain it interacts with kainate sensitive ionotropic glutamate receptors. These results indicate that arctigenin is a potentially useful new pharmacological tool for the inhibition of glutamate-evoked responses in the central nervous system in vivo.

  17. Rapid effect of stress concentration corticosterone on glutamate receptor and its subtype NMDA receptor activity in cultured hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玲; 孙继虎; 王春安

    2003-01-01

    Objective:To study the rapid effect of glucocorticoids(GCs)on NMDA receptor activity in hippocampal neurons in stress and to elucidate its underlying probable membrane mechanisms.Methods:Whole-cell patch-clamp recording was used to assess the effect of stress concentration corticosterone(B)on the responses of cultured hippocampal neurons to glutamate and NMDA(N-methy-D-asparatic acid).To make clear the target of B,intracellular dialysis of B(10 μ mol/L)through patch pipette and extracellular application of bovine serum albumin-conjugated corticosterone(B-BSA,10 μmol/L)were carried out to observe their influence on peak amplitude of NMDA-evoked current.Results:B had a rapid,reversible and inhibitory effect on peak amplitude of GLU- or NMDA-evoked current in cultured hippocampal neurons.Furthermore,B-BSA had the inhibitory effect on INMDA as that of B,but intracellularly dialyzed B had no significant effect on INMDA.Conclusion:These results suggest that under the condition of stress,GCs may rapidly,negatively regulate excitatory synaptic receptors-glutamate receptors(GluRs),especially NMDA receptor(NMDAR)in central nervous system,which is mediated by rapid membrane mechanisms,but not by classical,genomic mechanisms.

  18. Effects of progesterone on glutamate transporter 2 and gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter 1 expression in the developing rat brain after recurrent seizures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lingjuan Liu; Dingan Mao; Liqun Liu; Yu Huang; Tao Bo

    2012-01-01

    Seizures were induced by flurothyl inhalation. Rats were intramuscularly treated with progesterone after each seizure. Results demonstrated that glutamate transporter 2 and γ-aminobutyric acid transporter 1 expression levels were significantly increased in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of the developing rat brain following recurrent seizures. After progesterone treatment, glutamate transporter 2 protein expression was upregulated, but γ-aminobutyric acid transporter 1 levels decreased. These results suggest that glutamate transporter 2 and γ-aminobutyric acid transporter 1 are involved in the pathological processes of epilepsy. Progesterone can help maintain a balance between excitatory and inhibitory systems by modulating the amino acid transporter system, and protect the developing brain after recurrent seizures.

  19. Double Labeling Immunoelectron Microscopic Study on the Synaptic Connections between Glutamic Acid Neurons and GABA Neurons in the Hippocampus of Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Changgeng; CAI Qiuyun; LIU Qingying; WEI Ying

    2000-01-01

    In order to explore the roles of different neurotransmitters in epileptic pathogenesis,the synaptic connections between glutamic acid (Glu) neurons and GABA neurons in normal rat hippocampus were studied by pre-embedding double labeling immunoelectron microscopy. The GABA immunoreaction was first demonstrated by chromogen DAB, then the Glu immunoreaction was demonstrated by molybdic acid-TMB method. After being stabilized by DAB-cobalt chloride,the sections were processed for electron microscopic embedding. Under electron microscope, there were many Glu immunoreaction-positive neurons in the pyramidal layer of hippocampal CA1 area and some GABA immunoreaction-positive neurons with pyramidal or polygonal perikarya in the pyramidal, polymorphic and radiant layer of CA1 area. There were also symmetric dendro-axonic synapses formed by GABA-positive dendrites and Glu-positive axons in the polymorphic layer and symmetric axo-dendritic synapses formed by GABA-positive axons and Glu-positive dendrites in the radiant layer. In addition, there were symmetric autoregulatory axo-dendritic synapses between Glu-positive axons and dendrites and autoregulatory axo-axonic synapses (both symmetric and asymmetric) between GABA-positive axons. Above mentioned results, for the first time,showed that there were complex synaptic regulatory relationships between excitatory Glu neurons and inhibitory GABA neurons in the hippocampal CA1 area, thereby, providing ultrastructural evidence for different neurotransmitters participating in epileptic pathogenesis.

  20. Characterisation of neuroprotective efficacy of modified poly-arginine-9 (R9) peptides using a neuronal glutamic acid excitotoxicity model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Adam B; Anderton, Ryan S; Knuckey, Neville W; Meloni, Bruno P

    2017-02-01

    In a recent study, we highlighted the importance of cationic charge and arginine residues for the neuroprotective properties of poly-arginine and arginine-rich peptides. In this study, using cortical neuronal cultures and an in vitro glutamic acid excitotoxicity model, we examined the neuroprotective efficacy of different modifications to the poly-arginine-9 peptide (R9). We compared an unmodified R9 peptide with R9 peptides containing the following modifications: (i) C-terminal amidation (R9-NH2); (ii) N-terminal acetylation (Ac-R9); (iii) C-terminal amidation with N-terminal acetylation (Ac-R9-NH2); and (iv) C-terminal amidation with D-amino acids (R9D-NH2). The three C-terminal amidated peptides (R9-NH2, Ac-R9-NH2, and R9D-NH2) displayed neuroprotective effects greater than the unmodified R9 peptide, while the N-terminal acetylated peptide (Ac-R9) had reduced efficacy. Using the R9-NH2 peptide, neuroprotection could be induced with a 10 min peptide pre-treatment, 1-6 h before glutamic acid insult, or when added to neuronal cultures up to 45 min post-insult. In addition, all peptides were capable of reducing glutamic acid-mediated neuronal intracellular calcium influx, in a manner that reflected their neuroprotective efficacy. This study further highlights the neuroprotective properties of poly-arginine peptides and provides insight into peptide modifications that affect efficacy.

  1. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 upregulates surface NMDA receptor expression in striatal neurons via CaMKII

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Dao-Zhong; Xue, Bing; Mao, Li-Min; Wang, John Q

    2015-01-01

    Metabotropic and ionotropic glutamate receptors are closely clustered in postsynaptic membranes and are believed to interact actively with each other to control excitatory synaptic transmission. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5), for example, has been well documented to potentiate ionotropic NMDA receptor activity, although underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the role of mGluR5 in regulating trafficking and subcellular distribution of NMDA rece...

  2. Inhibitors of vesicular glutamate transporter:research advances%囊泡谷氨酸转运体抑制剂研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈圆; 宫泽辉; 苏瑞斌; 颜玲娣

    2014-01-01

    Vesicular glutamate transporter(VGLUT), located on the vesicular membrane, is a highly specific marker of glut-amatergic neurons. VGLUT selectively transports glutamate in the cytoplasm into vesicles. VGLUT1, VGLUT2 and VGLUT3 are three subtypes of VGLUT. The VGLUT can influence the glutamatergic synaptic transmission through mediating sequestration, storage and release of glutamate. The number and activity of VGLUT can change the level of glutamate in synapse cleft through mediating sequestration,storage and release of glutamate,then influence the glutamatergic synaptic transmission. To improve this pathological situation and maintain glutamate at the physiologically relevant concentration, VGLUT inhibition is required. Several classes of competitive VGLUT inhibitors have emerged including azo dyes, substituted quinolines, fatty acids and alkaloids. This article provides a brief review on the structure and function of these potential VGLUT inhibitors.%囊泡谷氨酸转运体(vesicular glutamate transporter,VGLUT)是谷氨酸能神经元最突出的标志物,主要分布于囊泡膜上,其功能是特异性地将胞浆中的谷氨酸转运进入囊泡内,它包括3个亚型,分别是VGLUT1、VGLUT2和VGLUT3。 VGLUT的数量和功能活性控制谷氨酸的隔离、储存和释放,进而影响突触间隙谷氨酸的水平,影响谷氨酸能突触传递。突触间隙中谷氨酸浓度过高时,可对神经元产生毒害,导致神经元的退化、衰老及死亡,最终导致各种疾病。通过抑制VGLUT的表达或活性,维持谷氨酸正常浓度,可能改善病理状况。目前已报道有多种化合物对VGLUT的功能有抑制作用,如偶氮染料、取代的喹啉、脂肪酸和生物碱等。本文对潜在药物靶标VGLUT功能抑制剂的结构和功能研究进展做一综述。

  3. Induction of cystine/glutamate transporter in bacterial lipopolysaccharide induced endotoxemia in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bannai Shiro

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cystine/glutamate transporter, system xc-, contributes to the maintenance of intracellular glutathione levels and the redox balance in the extracellular space. The main component of the transporter, xCT, is known to be strongly induced by various stimuli like oxidative stress in mammalian cultured cells. We examined the expression of xCT mRNA in vivo in the experimental endotoxemia. Methods Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization were used to investigate the expression of xCT mRNA in the tissues of the mice exposed to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Results Northern blot analysis revealed that xCT mRNA was constitutively expressed in the brain, thymus, and spleen, and that the expression of xCT mRNA was strongly up-regulated in thymus and spleen by the administration of a sublethal dose of LPS. In addition to brain, thymus, and spleen, xCT mRNA was detected also in the bronchiolar epithelium of the lung by the administration of the lethal dose of LPS. Conclusion xCT is induced in some specific tissues by the administration of LPS. The results suggest that cystine/glutamate transporter plays an important role under the inflammatory conditions.

  4. 谷氨酸转运体靶点药物的抗脑缺血作用研究进展%Drugs targeting glutamate transporters for prevention and treatment of cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄龙飞; 钱贻崧; 关腾; 黄梦昊; 李运曼

    2012-01-01

    兴奋性氨基酸毒性是脑缺血损伤的主要机制之一.缺血期间谷氨酸的大量累积会导致神经元细胞、星形胶质细胞等神经细胞发生兴奋性毒性损伤,因此对缺血期间谷氨酸水平的调控一直是脑缺血防治药物研究的重点.近年来研究表明,通过上调星形胶质细胞上谷氨酸转运体GLAST( EAATl)和GLT-1( EAAT2)的表达或活性,增加缺血时谷氨酸的摄取,维持突触间隙内谷氨酸的正常浓度,从而降低兴奋性毒性,减轻缺血性脑损伤.一些化合物如β-内酰胺类抗生素、尿酸、甲状腺激素、雌激素、山楂酸等已在体内或体外实验中被证实对谷氨酸转运体的调节作用,对抗谷氨酸毒性,发挥神经保护作用.研究和开发以星形胶质细胞谷氨酸转运体为作用靶点的药物,为缺血性脑损伤的预防和治疗提供了一条新的途径.%Glutamate is the most important excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. However, it is a potent neurotoxin and is considered as the primary cause of neuron death during acute brain ischemia and in neurodegener-ative diseases. Thus, the effective treatment of excitotoxic injury requires modulation of glutamate release, glutamate receptor activation, ROS generation and glutamate transport. The astrocytic glutamate transporters GLAST/ EAAT1 and GLT-1/EAAT2 are crucial for removal of glutamate from the synaptic cleft, and are essential for maintaining a low concentration of extracellular glutamate in the brain. Enhanced transporter expression or activity is neuroprotective. Some compounds, such as (3-lactams, uric acid, thyroid hormone, estrogen and maslinic acid, have been indicated to reduce the neuron injury after cerebral ischemia by regulation of glutamate transporter function. Researches on astrocytic glutamate transporter-dependent neuroprotection provide a novel strategy for cerebral ischemia therapy and drug development.

  5. Expression of Vesicular Glutamate Transporter 2 (vGluT2 on Large Dense-Core Vesicles within GnRH Neuroterminals of Aging Female Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiling Yin

    Full Text Available The pulsatile release of GnRH is crucial for normal reproductive physiology across the life cycle, a process that is regulated by hypothalamic neurotransmitters. GnRH terminals co-express the vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (vGluT2 as a marker of a glutamatergic phenotype. The current study sought to elucidate the relationship between glutamate and GnRH nerve terminals in the median eminence--the site of GnRH release into the portal capillary vasculature. We also determined whether this co-expression may change during reproductive senescence, and if steroid hormones, which affect responsiveness of GnRH neurons to glutamate, may alter the co-expression pattern. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomized at young adult, middle-aged and old ages (~4, 11, and 22 months, respectively and treated four weeks later with sequential vehicle + vehicle (VEH + VEH, estradiol + vehicle (E2 + VEH, or estradiol + progesterone (E2+P4. Rats were perfused 24 hours after the second hormone treatment. Confocal microscopy was used to determine colocalization of GnRH and vGluT2 immunofluorescence in the median eminence. Post-embedding immunogold labeling of GnRH and vGluT2, and a serial electron microscopy (EM technique were used to determine the cellular interaction between GnRH terminals and glutamate signaling. Confocal analysis showed that GnRH and vGluT2 immunofluorescent puncta were extensively colocalized in the median eminence and that their density declined with age but was unaffected by short-term hormone treatment. EM results showed that vGluT2 immunoreactivity was extensively associated with large dense-core vesicles, suggesting a unique glutamatergic signaling pathway in GnRH terminals. Our results provide novel subcellular information about the intimate relationship between GnRH terminals and glutamate in the median eminence.

  6. Involvement of spinal glutamate transporter-1 in the development of mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia associated with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi J

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Jinshan Shi,1,* Ke Jiang,2,* Zhaoduan Li,3 1Department of Anesthesiology, Guizhou Provincial People’s Hospital, 2Department of Anesthesiology, The Affiliated Hospital of Guizhou Medical University, Guiyang, 3Department of Anesthesiology, Tianjin Nankai Hospital, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Little is known about the effects of the development of type 2 diabetes on glutamate homeostasis in the spinal cord. Therefore, we quantified the extracellular levels of glutamate in the spinal cord of Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF rats using in vivo microdialysis. In addition, protein levels of glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1 in the spinal cord of ZDF rats were measured using Western blot. Finally, the effects of repeated intrathecal injections of ceftriaxone, which was previously shown to enhance GLT-1 expression, on the development of mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia as well as on basal extracellular level of glutamate and the expression of GLT-1 in the spinal cord of ZDF rats were evaluated. It was found that ZDF rats developed mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia, which were associated with increased basal extracellular levels of glutamate and attenuated levels of GLT-1 expression in the spinal cord, particularly in the dorsal horn. Furthermore, repeated intrathecal administrations of ceftriaxone dose-dependently prevented the development of mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia in ZDF rats, which were correlated with enhanced GLT-1 expression without altering the basal glutamate levels in the spinal cord of ZDF rats. Overall, the results suggested that impaired glutamate reuptake in the spinal cord may contribute to the development of neuropathic pains in type 2 diabetes. Keywords: diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, spinal cord, Zucker diabetic fatty rats, glutamate, glutamate transporter-1

  7. Excitatory amino acid transporters tonically restrain nTS synaptic and neuronal activity to modulate cardiorespiratory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matott, Michael P; Ruyle, Brian C; Hasser, Eileen M; Kline, David D

    2016-03-01

    The nucleus tractus solitarii (nTS) is the initial central termination site for visceral afferents and is important for modulation and integration of multiple reflexes including cardiorespiratory reflexes. Glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the nTS and is removed from the extracellular milieu by excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs). The goal of this study was to elucidate the role of EAATs in the nTS on basal synaptic and neuronal function and cardiorespiratory regulation. The majority of glutamate clearance in the central nervous system is believed to be mediated by astrocytic EAAT 1 and 2. We confirmed the presence of EAAT 1 and 2 within the nTS and their colocalization with astrocytic markers. EAAT blockade withdl-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartic acid (TBOA) produced a concentration-related depolarization, increased spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) frequency, and enhanced action potential discharge in nTS neurons. Solitary tract-evoked EPSCs were significantly reduced by EAAT blockade. Microinjection of TBOA into the nTS of anesthetized rats induced apneic, sympathoinhibitory, depressor, and bradycardic responses. These effects mimicked the response to microinjection of exogenous glutamate, and glutamate responses were enhanced by EAAT blockade. Together these data indicate that EAATs tonically restrain nTS excitability to modulate cardiorespiratory function.

  8. Excitatory amino acids acting on metabotropic glutamate receptors broaden the action potential in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, G Y; Storm, J F

    1991-12-24

    Activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs, QP or ACPD receptors) has recently been shown to cause depolarization, blockade of the slow after-hyperpolarization and depression of calcium currents in hippocampal pyramidal cells. Here, we report evidence for a new mGluR-mediated effect: slowing of the spike repolarization in CA1 cells in rat hippocampal slices. During blockade of the ionotropic glutamate receptors, the mGluR agonists trans-1-amino-cyclopentyl-1,3-dicarboxylate (t-ACPD), quisqualate or L-glutamate caused spike broadening. In contrast, the ionotropic receptor agonist alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA) was ineffective. The spike broadening may act in concert with the other mGluR effects, e.g. by further increasing the influx of Ca2+ ions which, in turn, may contribute to synaptic modulation.

  9. Protection from neuronal damage induced by combined oxygen and glucose deprivation in organotypic hippocampal cultures by glutamate receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, U; Fischer, G

    1995-07-31

    Organotypic hippocampal cultures were exposed to defined periods (30 and 60 min) of combined oxygen and glucose deprivation, mimicking transient ischemic conditions. The involvement of different glutamate receptors in individual hippocampal subfields (CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus) was studied using antagonists of NMDA (dizocilpine) and AMPA/kainate receptors (CNQX and GYKI 52466). Staining with the fluorescent dye propidium iodide (PI) allowed detection of damaged cells. For quantitative determination of neuronal damage, fluorescence intensity was measured after a 22 h recovery period and was related to maximal fluorescence intensity measured after fixation and PI restaining of the cultures at the end of the experiment. Dizocilpine (10 microM), CNQX (100 microM) and GYKI 52466 (100 microM) provided complete protection in CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus following the moderate ischemic insult, when the antagonists were present permanently. This indicates that none of the ionotropic glutamate receptor subtypes dominated toxicity in the most sensitive subpopulation of neurons. When applied only during the recovery period protection with dizocilpine (10 microM) or CNQX (100 microM) was drastically reduced by about 60% in the most sensitive area (CA1), but only slightly by 15% in CA3. Therefore the onset of irreversible damage seems to occur earlier in CA1 than in CA3. Blockade of AMPA/kainate receptors by GYKI 52466 (100 microM) offered no neuroprotection if the compound was applied only during the recovery period.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Protection of HT22 neuronal cells against glutamate toxicity mediated by the antioxidant activity of Pueraria candollei var. mirifica extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucontphunt, Apirada; De-Eknamkul, Wanchai; Nimmannit, Ubonthip; Dan Dimitrijevich, S; Gracy, Robert W

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal degeneration is known to be due to oxidative stress acting through a pathway involving the excessive activation of glutamate receptors. We studied the neuroprotection potential of an ethyl acetate-ethanol extract of Pueraria mirifica (P. candollei var. mirifica) root (PM extract). PM extract was evaluated for its antioxidant and neuroprotective activities against glutamate toxicity in mouse hippocampal HT22 neuronal cells. The extract at concentrations of 10 and 50 μg/ml exhibited considerable antioxidant activity with significant neuroprotection, based on the microscopic observations of cell morphology and the determination of cell viability and cell number. Studies of the possible mechanisms of action indicated that the neuroprotection exerted by PM extract was related to its scavenging activity against H(2)O(2) and related reactive oxygen species. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and thin-layer chromatography (TLC) analyses showed that the extract contained daidzein and genistein as identified constituents, as well as additional components with antioxidant activity. While daidzein and genistein individually and in combination were observed not to be neuroprotective, we propose that the antioxidant and neuroprotective activities of PM extract are derived from the combined properties of its constituents.

  11. Persistent current oscillations produced by activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors in immature rat CA3 hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniksztejn, L; Sciancalepore, M; Ben Ari, Y; Cherubini, E

    1995-04-01

    1. The single-electrode voltage-clamp technique was used to study the effects of the metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) agonist 1S,3R-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (1S,3R-ACPD, ACPD, 3-10 microM) on CA3 hippocampal neurons during the 1st 10 days of postnatal (P) life and in adulthood. 2. Repeated applications of 1S,3R-ACPD, in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX, 1 microM), tetraethylammonium chloride (TEACl 10 mM), and CsCl (2 mM), induced in immature but not in adult neurons periodic inward currents (PICs) that persisted for several hours after the last application of the agonist. 3. PICs, which were generated by nonspecific cationic currents, reversed polarity at 2.8 +/- 3 (SD) mV. They were reversibly blocked by kynurenic acid (1 mM), suggesting that they were mediated by glutamate acting on ionotropic receptors. They were also abolished in a nominally Ca(2+)-free medium. 4. PICs were irreversibly abolished by thapsigargin (10 microM) but were unaffected by ryanodine (10-40 microM). Caffeine (2 mM) also reversibly blocked PICs; this effect was independent from adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation, inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca2+ current, or blockade of adenosine receptors. 5. We suggest that, in neonatal slices, mGluRs-induced PICs are triggered by elevation of [Ca2+]i, after mobilization of Ca2+ from inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3)-sensitive stores. This will lead to a persistent, pulsatile release of glutamate from presynaptic nerve terminals, a phenomenon that is probably maintained via a calcium-induced-calcium release process.

  12. Glutamate/glutamine and neuronal integrity in adults with ADHD: a proton MRS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltezos, S; Horder, J; Coghlan, S; Skirrow, C; O'Gorman, R; Lavender, T J; Mendez, M A; Mehta, M; Daly, E; Xenitidis, K; Paliokosta, E; Spain, D; Pitts, M; Asherson, P; Lythgoe, D J; Barker, G J; Murphy, D G

    2014-03-18

    There is increasing evidence that abnormalities in glutamate signalling may contribute to the pathophysiology of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([1H]MRS) can be used to measure glutamate, and also its metabolite glutamine, in vivo. However, few studies have investigated glutamate in the brain of adults with ADHD naive to stimulant medication. Therefore, we used [1H]MRS to measure the combined signal of glutamate and glutamine (Glu+Gln; abbreviated as Glx) along with other neurometabolites such as creatine (Cr), N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and choline. Data were acquired from three brain regions, including two implicated in ADHD-the basal ganglia (caudate/striatum) and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC)-and one 'control' region-the medial parietal cortex. We compared 40 adults with ADHD, of whom 24 were naive for ADHD medication, whereas 16 were currently on stimulants, against 20 age, sex and IQ-matched healthy controls. We found that compared with controls, adult ADHD participants had a significantly lower concentration of Glx, Cr and NAA in the basal ganglia and Cr in the DLPFC, after correction for multiple comparisons. There were no differences between stimulant-treated and treatment-naive ADHD participants. In people with untreated ADHD, lower basal ganglia Glx was significantly associated with more severe symptoms of inattention. There were no significant differences in the parietal 'control' region. We suggest that subcortical glutamate and glutamine have a modulatory role in ADHD adults; and that differences in glutamate-glutamine levels are not explained by use of stimulant medication.

  13. Long-term activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors increases functional TRPV1-expressing neurons in mouse dorsal root ganglia

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    Takayoshi eMasuoka

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Damaged tissues release glutamate and other chemical mediators for several hours. These chemical mediators contribute to modulation of pruritus and pain. Herein, we investigated the effects of long-term activation of excitatory glutamate receptors on functional expression of transient receptor potential vaniloid type 1 (TRPV1 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons and then on thermal pain behavior. In order to detect the TRPV1-mediated responses in cultured DRG neurons, we monitored intracellular calcium responses to capsaicin, a TRPV1 agonist, with Fura-2. Long-term (4 h treatment with glutamate receptor agonists (glutamate, quisqualate or DHPG increased the proportion of neurons responding to capsaicin through activation of metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR1, and only partially through the activation of mGluR5; engagement of these receptors was evident in neurons responding to allylisothiocyanate (AITC, a transient receptor potential ankyrin type 1 (TRPA1 agonist. Increase in the proportion was suppressed by phospholipase C, protein kinase C, mitogen/extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase or transcription inhibitors. Whole-cell recording was performed to record TRPV1-mediated membrane current; TRPV1 current density significantly increased in the AITC-sensitive neurons after the quisqualate treatment. To elucidate the physiological significance of this phenomenon, a hot plate test was performed. Intraplantar injection of quisqualate or DHPG induced heat hyperalgesia that lasted for 4 h post injection. This chronic hyperalgesia was attenuated by treatment with either mGluR1 or mGluR5 antagonists. These results suggest that long-term activation of mGluR1/5 by peripherally released glutamate may increase the number of neurons expressing functional TRPV1 in DRG, which may be strongly associated with chronic hyperalgesia.

  14. Vesicular glutamate transporter-immunoreactivities in the vestibular nuclear complex of rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiao DENG; Fu-Xing ZHANG; You-Wang PANG; Jin-Lian LI; Yun-Qing LI

    2006-01-01

    Objective Aims to delineate the distribution profile of three isoforms of vesicular glutamate transporter (VGluT), viz. VGluT1~3, and their cellular localization within vestibular nuclear complex (VNC). Methods Brain sections from normal Sprague-Dawley rats were processed immunohistochemically for VGluT detection, employing avidinbiotinylated peroxidase complex method with 3-3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) as chromogen. Results The whole VNC expressed all of the three transporters that were observed to be localized to the fiber endings. Compared with VGluT1 and VGluT3, VGluT2 demonstrated a relatively homogeneous distribution, with much higher density in VNC. VGluT3 displayed the highest density in lateral vestibular nucleus and group X, contrasting with the sparse immunostained puncta within vestibular medial and inferior nuclei. Conclusion Glutamtatergic pathways participate in the processing of vestibular signals within VNC mainly through the re-uptake of glutamate into synaptic vesicles by VGluT1 and 2, whereas VGluT3 may play a similar role mainly in areas other than medial and inferior nuclei of VNC.

  15. Astrocytes and Glutamate Homoeostasis in Alzheimer's Disease: A Decrease in Glutamine Synthetase, But Not in Glutamate Transporter-1, in the Prefrontal Cortex

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    Magdalena Kulijewicz-Nawrot

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes control tissue equilibrium and hence define the homoeostasis and function of the CNS (central nervous system. Being principal homoeostatic cells, astroglia are fundamental for various forms of neuropathology, including AD (Alzheimer's disease. AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of cognitive functions due to specific lesions in mnesic-associated regions, including the mPFC (medial prefrontal cortex. Here, we analyzed the expression of GS (glutamine synthetase and GLT-1 (glutamate transporter-1 in astrocytes in the mPFC during the progression of AD in a triple-transgenic mouse model (3xTg-AD. GS is an astrocyte-specific enzyme, responsible for the intracellular conversion of glutamate into glutamine, whereas the removal of glutamate from the extracellular space is accomplished mainly by astroglia-specific GLT-1. We found a significant decrease in the numerical density (Nv, cells/mm3 of GS-positive astrocytes from early to middle ages (1–9 months; at the age of 1 month by 17%, 6 months by 27% and 9 months by 27% when compared with control animals in parallel with a reduced expression of GS (determined by Western blots, which started at the age of 6 months and was sustained up to 12 months of age. We did not, however, find any changes in the expression of GLT-1, which implies an intact glutamate uptake mechanism. Our results indicate that the decrease in GS expression may underlie a gradual decline in the vital astrocyte-dependent glutamate–glutamine conversion pathway, which in turn may compromise glutamate homoeostasis, leading towards failures in synaptic connectivity with deficient cognition and memory.

  16. Astrocytes and glutamate homoeostasis in Alzheimer's disease: a decrease in glutamine synthetase, but not in glutamate transporter-1, in the prefrontal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexei Verkhratsky

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes control tissue equilibrium and hence define the homoeostasis and function of the CNS (central nervous system. Being principal homoeostatic cells, astroglia are fundamental for various forms of neuropathology, including AD (Alzheimer's disease. AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of cognitive functions due to specific lesions in mnesic-associated regions, including the mPFC (medial prefrontal cortex. Here, we analyzed the expression of GS (glutamine synthetase and GLT-1 (glutamate transporter-1 in astrocytes in the mPFC during the progression of AD in a triple-transgenic mouse model (3xTg-AD. GS is an astrocyte-specific enzyme, responsible for the intracellular conversion of glutamate into glutamine, whereas the removal of glutamate from the extracellular space is accomplished mainly by astroglia-specific GLT-1. We found a significant decrease in the numerical density (Nv, cells/mm3 of GS-positive astrocytes from early to middle ages (1–9 months; at the age of 1 month by 17%, 6 months by 27% and 9 months by 27% when compared with control animals in parallel with a reduced expression of GS (determined by Western blots, which started at the age of 6 months and was sustained up to 12 months of age. We did not, however, find any changes in the expression of GLT-1, which implies an intact glutamate uptake mechanism. Our results indicate that the decrease in GS expression may underlie a gradual decline in the vital astrocyte-dependent glutamate–glutamine conversion pathway, which in turn may compromise glutamate homoeostasis, leading towards failures in synaptic connectivity with deficient cognition and memory.

  17. Metabolic pathways and activity-dependent modulation of glutamate concentration in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangia, Silvia; Giove, Federico; Dinuzzo, Mauro

    2012-11-01

    Glutamate is one of the most versatile molecules present in the human brain, involved in protein synthesis, energy production, ammonia detoxification, and transport of reducing equivalents. Aside from these critical metabolic roles, glutamate plays a major part in brain function, being not only the most abundant excitatory neurotransmitter, but also the precursor for γ-aminobutyric acid, the predominant inhibitory neurotransmitter. Regulation of glutamate levels is pivotal for normal brain function, as abnormal extracellular concentration of glutamate can lead to impaired neurotransmission, neurodegeneration and even neuronal death. Understanding how the neuron-astrocyte functional and metabolic interactions modulate glutamate concentration during different activation status and under physiological and pathological conditions is a challenging task, and can only be tentatively estimated from current literature. In this paper, we focus on describing the various metabolic pathways which potentially affect glutamate concentration in the brain, and emphasize which ones are likely to produce the variations in glutamate concentration observed during enhanced neuronal activity in human studies.

  18. Kinetic properties of a phosphate-bond-driven glutamate-glutamine transport system in Streptococcus lactis and Streptococcus cremoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poolman, B; Smid, E J; Konings, W N

    1987-06-01

    In Streptococcus lactis ML3 and Streptococcus cremoris Wg2 the uptake of glutamate and glutamine is mediated by the same transport system, which has a 30-fold higher affinity for glutamine than for glutamate at pH 6.0. The apparent affinity constant for transport (KT) of glutamine is 2.5 +/- 0.3 microM, independent of the extracellular pH. The KTS for glutamate uptake are 3.5, 11.2, 77, and 1200 microM at pH 4.0, 5.1, 6.0, and 7.0, respectively. Recalculation of the affinity constants based on the concentration of glutamic acid in the solution yield KTS of 1.8 +/- 0.5 microM independent of the external pH, indicating that the protonated form of glutamate, i.e., glutamic acid, and glutamine are the transported species. The maximal rates of glutamate and glutamine uptake are independent of the extracellular pH as long as the intracellular pH is kept constant, despite large differences in the magnitude and composition of the components of the proton motive force. Uptake of glutamate and glutamine requires the synthesis of ATP either from glycolysis or from arginine metabolism and appears to be essentially unidirectional. Cells are able to maintain glutamate concentration gradients exceeding 4 X 10(3) for several hours even in the absence of metabolic energy. The t1/2s of glutamate efflux are 2, 12, and greater than 30 h at pH 5.0, 6.0, and 7.0, respectively. After the addition of lactose as energy source, the rate of glutamine uptake and the level of ATP are both very sensitive to arsenate. When the intracellular pH is kept constant, both parameters decrease approximately in parallel (between 0.2 and 1.0 mM ATP) with increasing concentrations of the inhibitor. These results suggest that the accumulation of glutamate and glutamine is energized by ATP or an equivalent energy-rich phosphorylated intermediate and not by the the proton motive force.

  19. Neural Stem Cell Transplantation Induces Stroke Recovery by Upregulating Glutamate Transporter GLT-1 in Astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacigaluppi, Marco; Russo, Gianluca Luigi; Peruzzotti-Jametti, Luca; Rossi, Silvia; Sandrone, Stefano; Butti, Erica; De Ceglia, Roberta; Bergamaschi, Andrea; Motta, Caterina; Gallizioli, Mattia; Studer, Valeria; Colombo, Emanuela; Farina, Cinthia; Comi, Giancarlo; Politi, Letterio Salvatore; Muzio, Luca; Villani, Claudia; Invernizzi, Roberto William; Hermann, Dirk Matthias; Centonze, Diego; Martino, Gianvito

    2016-10-12

    Ischemic stroke is the leading cause of disability, but effective therapies are currently widely lacking. Recovery from stroke is very much dependent on the possibility to develop treatments able to both halt the neurodegenerative process as well as to foster adaptive tissue plasticity. Here we show that ischemic mice treated with neural precursor cell (NPC) transplantation had on neurophysiological analysis, early after treatment, reduced presynaptic release of glutamate within the ipsilesional corticospinal tract (CST), and an enhanced NMDA-mediated excitatory transmission in the contralesional CST. Concurrently, NPC-treated mice displayed a reduced CST degeneration, increased axonal rewiring, and augmented dendritic arborization, resulting in long-term functional amelioration persisting up to 60 d after ischemia. The enhanced functional and structural plasticity relied on the capacity of transplanted NPCs to localize in the peri-ischemic and ischemic area, to promote the upregulation of the glial glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) on astrocytes and to reduce peri-ischemic extracellular glutamate. The upregulation of GLT-1 induced by transplanted NPCs was found to rely on the secretion of VEGF by NPCs. Blocking VEGF during the first week after stroke reduced GLT-1 upregulation as well as long-term behavioral recovery in NPC-treated mice. Our results show that NPC transplantation, by modulating the excitatory-inhibitory balance and stroke microenvironment, is a promising therapy to ameliorate disability, to promote tissue recovery and plasticity processes after stroke. Tissue damage and loss of function occurring after stroke can be constrained by fostering plasticity processes of the brain. Over the past years, stem cell transplantation for repair of the CNS has received increasing interest, although underlying mechanism remain elusive. We here show that neural stem/precursor cell transplantation after ischemic stroke is able to foster axonal rewiring and dendritic

  20. Neural Stem Cell Transplantation Induces Stroke Recovery by Upregulating Glutamate Transporter GLT-1 in Astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Gianluca Luigi; Peruzzotti-Jametti, Luca; Rossi, Silvia; Sandrone, Stefano; Butti, Erica; De Ceglia, Roberta; Bergamaschi, Andrea; Motta, Caterina; Gallizioli, Mattia; Studer, Valeria; Colombo, Emanuela; Farina, Cinthia; Comi, Giancarlo; Politi, Letterio Salvatore; Muzio, Luca; Villani, Claudia; Invernizzi, Roberto William; Hermann, Dirk Matthias; Centonze, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is the leading cause of disability, but effective therapies are currently widely lacking. Recovery from stroke is very much dependent on the possibility to develop treatments able to both halt the neurodegenerative process as well as to foster adaptive tissue plasticity. Here we show that ischemic mice treated with neural precursor cell (NPC) transplantation had on neurophysiological analysis, early after treatment, reduced presynaptic release of glutamate within the ipsilesional corticospinal tract (CST), and an enhanced NMDA-mediated excitatory transmission in the contralesional CST. Concurrently, NPC-treated mice displayed a reduced CST degeneration, increased axonal rewiring, and augmented dendritic arborization, resulting in long-term functional amelioration persisting up to 60 d after ischemia. The enhanced functional and structural plasticity relied on the capacity of transplanted NPCs to localize in the peri-ischemic and ischemic area, to promote the upregulation of the glial glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) on astrocytes and to reduce peri-ischemic extracellular glutamate. The upregulation of GLT-1 induced by transplanted NPCs was found to rely on the secretion of VEGF by NPCs. Blocking VEGF during the first week after stroke reduced GLT-1 upregulation as well as long-term behavioral recovery in NPC-treated mice. Our results show that NPC transplantation, by modulating the excitatory–inhibitory balance and stroke microenvironment, is a promising therapy to ameliorate disability, to promote tissue recovery and plasticity processes after stroke. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Tissue damage and loss of function occurring after stroke can be constrained by fostering plasticity processes of the brain. Over the past years, stem cell transplantation for repair of the CNS has received increasing interest, although underlying mechanism remain elusive. We here show that neural stem/precursor cell transplantation after ischemic stroke is able to foster

  1. Secretory phospholipase A(2) induces delayed neuronal COX-2 expression compared with glutamate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Marianne; Bazan, Nicolas G; Diemer, Nils H;

    2002-01-01

    and immunohistochemistry. An up-regulation of COX-2, c-fos, and c-jun, but not COX-1, was observed around the lesion as well as in the neocortex 4 hr after the injection. Hippocampal up-regulation of COX-2 was seen in dentate gyrus 8 hr after injection. When glutamate was injected, up-regulation of the early...

  2. Small-molecule inhibitors at the PSD-95/nNOS interface protect against glutamate-induced neuronal atrophy in primary cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, M V; O'Toole, E; Connor, T; Harkin, A

    2015-08-20

    Glutamate and nitric oxide (NO) are important regulators of dendrite and axon development in the central nervous system. Excess glutamatergic stimulation is a feature of many pathological conditions and manifests in neuronal atrophy and shrinkage with eventual neurodegeneration and cell death. Here we demonstrate that treatment of cultured primary cortical rat neurons for 24h with glutamate (500μM) or N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) (100-500μM) combined with glycine suppresses neurite outgrowth. A similar reduction of neurite outgrowth was observed with the NO precursor l-arginine and NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) (100 and 300μM). The NMDA-receptor (NMDA-R) antagonists ketamine and MK-801 (10nM) counteracted the NMDA/glycine-induced reduction in neurite outgrowth and the neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) inhibitor 1-[2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl] imidazole (TRIM) (100nM) counteracted both the NMDA/glycine and l-arginine-induced decreases in neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, targeting soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), a downstream target of NO, with the sGC inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) (10μM) also protected against l-arginine-induced decreases in neurite outgrowth. Since the NMDA-R is functionally coupled to nNOS via the postsynaptic protein 95kDa (PSD-95), inhibitors of the PSD-95/nNOS interaction were tested for their ability to protect against glutamate-induced suppression in neurite outgrowth. Treatment with the small-molecule inhibitors of the PSD-95/nNOS interface 2-((1H-benzo[d] [1,2,3]triazol-5-ylamino) methyl)-4,6-dichlorophenol (IC87201) (10 and 100nM) and 4-(3,5-dichloro-2-hydroxy-benzylamino)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid (ZL-006) (10 and 100nM) attenuated NMDA/glycine-induced decreases in neurite outgrowth. These data support the hypothesis that targeting the NMDA-R/PSD-95/nNOS interaction downstream of NMDA-R promotes neurotrophic effects by preventing neurite shrinkage in response to excess glutamatergic stimulation. The PSD-95/n

  3. Centrifuge-induced hypergravity and glutamate efflux by reversal of high-affinity, sodium-dependent transporters from rat brain synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, T.; Himmelreich, N.

    Glutamate uptake by high affinity sodium-dependent glutamate transporters is essential for termination of the synaptic transmission. Glutamate transporters may also contribute to an increase in extracellular glutamate. Glutamate efflux can occur by reversal of the sodium-dependent glutamate transporters during ATP depletion and dissipation of the sodium gradient across the cell membrane. Depolarization-induced calcium independent release of neurotransmitter from synaptosomal cytosolic pool is Na+-dependent and due to reverse of the neurotransmitter transporters also. We used monovalent organic cations N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMDG) to replace extracellular sodium, suggesting that the reducing of Na+ elucidate further the mechanism underlying Ca2+-independent glutamate release. A reduction in extracellular sodium would facilitate reversal of sodium-dependent transporters with extrusion of glutamate. We have compared the basal release of glutamate in Ca2+-free Na+-supplemented and NMDG-supplemented medium in control and after exposure of animals to long-arm centrifuge-induced hypergravity (ten G, during one hour). Replacement of sodium by NMDG enhanced basal level of neurotransmitter. The value of basal level increased to 110± 4% and 140± 2% in the medium with NMDG in comparison with Na+ under the control and hypergravity conditions, respectively. It is likely to reflect the enhancement of the neurotransmitter level in cytosolic pool. Thermodynamic considerations show that the extracellular level of a amino acid neurotransmitter, such as glutamate, that can be generated by transporter reversal are directly proportional to the intracellular concentration of the intracellular concentration of amino acid. KCl-stimulated glutamate release from cytosolic pool increased not statistically after hypergravity loading. We examined the effects of transporter inhibitors DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate ( DL-TBOA) on the release to elucidate whether reverse transport via the

  4. Role of the Proteasome in Excitotoxicity-Induced Cleavage of Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armelão, Mário; Herrmann, Dennis; Pimentel, Diogo O.; Leal, Graciano; Caldeira, Margarida V.; Bahr, Ben A.; Bengtson, Mário; Almeida, Ramiro D.; Duarte, Carlos B.

    2010-01-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase is responsible for synthesizing GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter, and exists in two isoforms—GAD65 and GAD67. The enzyme is cleaved under excitotoxic conditions, but the mechanisms involved and the functional consequences are not fully elucidated. We found that excitotoxic stimulation of cultured hippocampal neurons with glutamate leads to a time-dependent cleavage of GAD65 and GAD67 in the N-terminal region of the proteins, and decrease the corresponding mRNAs. The cleavage of GAD67 was sensitive to the proteasome inhibitors MG132, YU102 and lactacystin, and was also abrogated by the E1 ubiquitin ligase inhibitor UBEI-41. In contrast, MG132 and UBEI-41 were the only inhibitors tested that showed an effect on GAD65 cleavage. Excitotoxic stimulation with glutamate also increased the amount of GAD captured in experiments where ubiquitinated proteins and their binding partners were isolated. However, no evidences were found for direct GADs ubiquitination in cultured hippocampal neurons, and recombinant GAD65 was not cleaved by purified 20S or 26S proteasome preparations. Since calpains, a group of calcium activated proteases, play a key role in GAD65/67 cleavage under excitotoxic conditions the results suggest that GADs are cleaved after ubiquitination and degradation of an unknown binding partner by the proteasome. The characteristic punctate distribution of GAD65 along neurites of differentiated cultured hippocampal neurons was significantly reduced after excitotoxic injury, and the total GAD activity measured in extracts from the cerebellum or cerebral cortex at 24h postmortem (when there is a partial cleavage of GADs) was also decreased. The results show a role of the UPS in the cleavage of GAD65/67 and point out the deregulation of GADs under excitotoxic conditions, which is likely to affect GABAergic neurotransmission. This is the first time that the UPS has been implicated in the events triggered during excitotoxicity

  5. Role of the proteasome in excitotoxicity-induced cleavage of glutamic acid decarboxylase in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio S Baptista

    Full Text Available Glutamic acid decarboxylase is responsible for synthesizing GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter, and exists in two isoforms--GAD65 and GAD67. The enzyme is cleaved under excitotoxic conditions, but the mechanisms involved and the functional consequences are not fully elucidated. We found that excitotoxic stimulation of cultured hippocampal neurons with glutamate leads to a time-dependent cleavage of GAD65 and GAD67 in the N-terminal region of the proteins, and decrease the corresponding mRNAs. The cleavage of GAD67 was sensitive to the proteasome inhibitors MG132, YU102 and lactacystin, and was also abrogated by the E1 ubiquitin ligase inhibitor UBEI-41. In contrast, MG132 and UBEI-41 were the only inhibitors tested that showed an effect on GAD65 cleavage. Excitotoxic stimulation with glutamate also increased the amount of GAD captured in experiments where ubiquitinated proteins and their binding partners were isolated. However, no evidences were found for direct GADs ubiquitination in cultured hippocampal neurons, and recombinant GAD65 was not cleaved by purified 20S or 26S proteasome preparations. Since calpains, a group of calcium activated proteases, play a key role in GAD65/67 cleavage under excitotoxic conditions the results suggest that GADs are cleaved after ubiquitination and degradation of an unknown binding partner by the proteasome. The characteristic punctate distribution of GAD65 along neurites of differentiated cultured hippocampal neurons was significantly reduced after excitotoxic injury, and the total GAD activity measured in extracts from the cerebellum or cerebral cortex at 24h postmortem (when there is a partial cleavage of GADs was also decreased. The results show a role of the UPS in the cleavage of GAD65/67 and point out the deregulation of GADs under excitotoxic conditions, which is likely to affect GABAergic neurotransmission. This is the first time that the UPS has been implicated in the events triggered during

  6. Expression and purification of recombinant vesicular glutamate transporter VGLUT1 using PC12 cells and High Five insect cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersen Søren S.L.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In synaptic vesicles, the estimated concentration of the excitatory amino acid glutamate is 100-150 mM. It was recently discovered that VGLUT1, previously characterized as an inorganic phosphate transporter (BNPI with 9-11 predicted transmembrane spanning domains, is capable of transporting glutamate. The expression and His-tag based purification of recombinant VGLUT1 from PC12 cells and High Five insect cells is described. Significantly better virus and protein expression was obtained using High Five rather than Sf9 insect cells. PC12 cell expressed VGLUT1 is functional but not the Baculovirus expressed protein. The lack of functionality of the Baculovirus expressed VGLUT1 is discussed. The data indicate that VGLUT1 readily oligomerizes/dimerizes. The data are discussed in the context of developing this system further in order to reconstitute vesicular glutamate uptake in vitro using lipid-detergent vesicles.

  7. Cocaine-induced neuroadaptations in the dorsal striatum: glutamate dynamics and behavioral sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Vinay; Naughton, Sean X; Shi, Xiangdang; Kelley, Leslie K; Yegla, Brittney; Tallarida, Christopher S; Rawls, Scott M; Unterwald, Ellen M

    2014-09-01

    Recent evidence suggests that diminished ability to control cocaine seeking arises from perturbations in glutamate homeostasis in the nucleus accumbens. However, the neurochemical substrates underlying cocaine-induced neuroadaptations in the dorsal striatum and how these mechanisms link to behavioral plasticity is not clear. We employed glutamate-sensitive microelectrodes and amperometry to study the impact of repeated cocaine administration on glutamate dynamics in the dorsolateral striatum of awake freely-moving rats. Depolarization-evoked glutamate release was robustly increased in cocaine-pretreated rats challenged with cocaine. Moreover, the clearance of glutamate signals elicited either by terminal depolarization or blockade of non-neuronal glutamate transporters slowed down dramatically in cocaine-sensitized rats. Repeated cocaine exposure also reduced the neuronal tone of striatal glutamate. Ceftriaxone, a β-lactam antibiotic that activates the astrocytic glutamate transporter, attenuated the effects of repeated cocaine exposure on synaptic glutamate release and glutamate clearance kinetics. Finally, the antagonism of AMPA glutamate receptors in the dorsolateral striatum blocked the development of behavioral sensitization to repeated cocaine administration. Collectively, these data suggest that repeated cocaine exposure disrupts presynaptic glutamate transmission and transporter-mediated clearance mechanisms in the dorsal striatum. Moreover, such alterations produce an over activation of AMPA receptors in this brain region leading to the sensitized behavioral response to repeated cocaine.

  8. Glutamate neurotransmission is affected in prenatally stressed offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adrover, Ezequiela; Pallarés, Maria Eugenia; Baier, Carlos Javier

    2015-01-01

    with synaptic loss. Since metabolism of glutamate is dependent on interactions between neurons and surrounding astroglia, our results suggest that glutamate neurotransmitter pathways might be impaired in the brain of prenatally stressed rats. To study the effect of prenatal stress on the metabolism...... and neurotransmitter function of glutamate, pregnant rats were subjected to restrain stress during the last week of gestation. Brains of the adult offspring were used to assess glutamate metabolism, uptake and release as well as expression of glutamate receptors and transporters. While glutamate metabolism...... was not affected it was found that prenatal stress (PS) changed the expression of the transporters, thus, producing a higher level of vesicular vGluT-1 in the frontal cortex (FCx) and elevated levels of GLT1 protein and messenger RNA in the hippocampus (HPC) of adult male PS offspring. We also observed increased...

  9. Differential Molecular Targets for Neuroprotective Effect of Chlorogenic Acid and its Related Compounds Against Glutamate Induced Excitotoxicity and Oxidative Stress in Rat Cortical Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebai, Olfa; Belkhir, Manel; Sanchez-Gomez, María Victoria; Matute, Carlos; Fattouch, Sami; Amri, Mohamed

    2017-09-25

    The present study has been designed to explore the molecular mechanism and signaling pathway targets of chlorogenic acid (CGA) and its main hydrolysates, caffeic (CA) and quinic acid in the protective effect against glutamate-excitotoxicity. For this purpose 8-DIV cortical neurons in primary culture were exposed to 50 μM L-glutamic acid plus 10 µM glycine, with or without 10-100 μM tested compounds. Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid via their antioxidant properties inhibited cell death induced by glutamate in dose depended manner. However, quinic acid slightly protects neurons at a higher dose. DCF, JC-1 and Ca(2+)sensitive fluorescent dye fura-2, were used to measure intracellular ROS accumulation, mitochondrial membrane potential integration and intracellular calcium concentration [Ca(2+)] i . Results indicate that similarly, CGA acts as a protective agent against glutamate-induced cortical neurons injury by suppressing the accumulation of endogenous ROS and restore the mitochondrial membrane potential, activate the enzymatic antioxidant system by the increase levels of SOD activity and modulate the rise of intracellular calcium levels by increasing the rise of intracellular concentrations of Ca(2+)caused by glutamate overstimulation. PKC signaling cascade appear to be engaged in this protective mechanism. Interseling, CGA and CA also exhibit antiapoptotic properties against glutamate-induced cleaved activation of pro-caspases; caspase 1,8 and 9 and calpain (PD 150606,Calpeptin and MDL 28170).These data suggest that neuroprotective activity of CGA ester may occurs throught its hydrolysate,the caffeic acid and its interaction with intracellular molecules suggesting that CGA exert its neuroprotection via its caffeoly acid group that might potentially be used as a therapeutic agent in neurodegeneratives disorders associated with glutamate excitotoxicity.

  10. Pre-Ischemic Treadmill Training for Prevention of Ischemic Brain Injury via Regulation of Glutamate and Its Transporter GLT-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingchun Guo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Pre-ischemic treadmill training exerts cerebral protection in the prevention of cerebral ischemia by alleviating neurotoxicity induced by excessive glutamate release following ischemic stroke. However, the underlying mechanism of this process remains unclear. Cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury was observed in a rat model after 2 weeks of pre-ischemic treadmill training. Cerebrospinal fluid was collected using the microdialysis sampling method, and the concentration of glutamate was determined every 40 min from the beginning of ischemia to 4 h after reperfusion with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-fluorescence detection. At 3, 12, 24, and 48 h after ischemia, the expression of the glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1 protein in brain tissues was determined by Western blot respectively. The effect of pre-ischemic treadmill training on glutamate concentration and GLT-1 expression after cerebral ischemia in rats along with changes in neurobehavioral score and cerebral infarct volume after 24 h ischemia yields critical information necessary to understand the protection mechanism exhibited by pre-ischemic treadmill training. The results demonstrated that pre-ischemic treadmill training up-regulates GLT-1 expression, decreases extracellular glutamate concentration, reduces cerebral infarct volume, and improves neurobehavioral score. Pre-ischemic treadmill training is likely to induce neuroprotection after cerebral ischemia by regulating GLT-1 expression, which results in re-uptake of excessive glutamate.

  11. A possible role of the non-GAT1 GABA transporters in transfer of GABA from GABAergic to glutamatergic neurons in mouse cerebellar neuronal cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suñol, C; Babot, Z; Cristòfol, R

    2010-01-01

    . The distribution of GAD, GABA and the vesicular glutamate transporter VGlut-1 was assessed using specific antibodies combined with immunofluorescence microscopy. Additionally, tiagabine, SKF 89976-A, betaine, beta-alanine, nipecotic acid and guvacine were used to inhibit the GAT1, betaine/GABA (BGT1), GAT2 and GAT...... neurons constituting the majority of the cells. GABA uptake exhibited the kinetics of high affinity transport and could be partly (20%) inhibited by betaine (IC(50) 142 microM), beta-alanine (30%) and almost fully (90%) inhibited by SKF 89976-A (IC(50) 0.8 microM) or nipecotic acid and guvacine at 1 m...... no effect on the overall GABA content. The inhibitory action of beta-alanine and high concentrations of nipecotic acid and guvacine on GABA transport strongly suggests that also GAT2 or GAT3 (HUGO nomenclature) could play a role....

  12. Rapid chemoenzymatic route to glutamate transporter inhibitor l-TFB-TBOA and related amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Haigen; Younes, Sabry H H; Saifuddin, Mohammad; Tepper, Pieter G; Zhang, Jielin; Keller, Erik; Heeres, André; Szymanski, Wiktor; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2017-03-21

    The complex amino acid (l-threo)-3-[3-[4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoylamino]benzyloxy]aspartate (l-TFB-TBOA) and its derivatives are privileged compounds for studying the roles of excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) in regulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission, animal behavior, and in the pathogenesis of neurological diseases. The wide-spread use of l-TFB-TBOA stems from its high potency of EAAT inhibition and the lack of off-target binding to glutamate receptors. However, one of the main challenges in the evaluation of l-TFB-TBOA and its derivatives is the laborious synthesis of these compounds in stereoisomerically pure form. Here, we report an efficient and step-economic chemoenzymatic route that gives access to enantio- and diastereopure l-TFB-TBOA and its derivatives at multigram scale.

  13. Chemoenzymatic synthesis of a series of 4-substituted glutamate analogues and pharmacological characterization at human glutamate transporters subtypes 1-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alaux, Sebastien; Kusk, Mie; Sagot, Emanuelle;

    2005-01-01

    compounds were evaluated as potential ligands for the glutamate transporters EAAT1, EAAT2, and EAAT3 (excitatory amino acid transporter, subtypes 1-3) in the FLIPR membrane potential (FMP) assay. We found a distinct change in the pharmacological profile when the 4-methyl group (compound 1a, an EAAT1......A series of nine L-2,4-syn-4-alkylglutamic acid analogues (1a-i) were synthesized in high yield and high enantiomeric excess (>99% ee) from their corresponding 4-substituted ketoglutaric acids (2a-i), using the enzyme aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) from pig heart or E. coli. The synthesized...... substrate and EAAT2,3 inhibitor) was extended to a 4-ethyl group, compound 1b, as this analogue is an inhibitor at all three subtypes, EAAT1-3. Furthermore, we conclude that both large and bulky hydrophobic substituents in the 4-position of L-2,4-syn Glu are allowed by all three glutamate transporter...

  14. The ontogenic expressions of multiple vesicular glutamate transporters during postnatal development of rat pineal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, S; Ina, A; Konno, J; Wu, T; Shutoh, F; Nogami, H; Hisano, S

    2008-03-18

    The pineal gland expresses vesicular glutamate transporters 1 and 2 (VGLUT1 and VGLUT2), which are thought to transport glutamate into synaptic-like microvesicles in the pinealocytes. Recently, we reported that the rat pineal gland also expresses VGLUT1v which is a novel variant of VGLUT1 during the perinatal period. To explore the biological significance of these VGLUT expressions in pineal development, we studied the ontogeny of VGLUT in this gland by in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using rats. Histological analysis revealed that intensities of VGLUT1 hybridization signal and immunostaining drastically increase by postnatal day (P) 7, whereas VGLUT2 expression exhibits high levels of mRNA and protein at birth and decreases gradually from P7 onward. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis supported these histological observations, showing that expressions of VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 exhibit opposite patterns to each other. Coinciding with VGLUT1-upregulation, RT-PCR data showed that expressions of dynamin 1 and endophilin 1, which are factors predictably involved in the endocytotic recovery of VGLUT1-associated vesicle, are also increased by P7. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of VGLUT1v demonstrated that its mRNA expression is upregulated by P7, kept at the same level until P14, and apparently decreased at P21, suggesting its functional property required for a certain developmental event. Moreover, a comparison of mRNA expressions at daytime and nighttime revealed that neither VGLUT1 nor VGLUT1v shows any difference in both P7 and P21 glands, whereas VGLUT2 is significantly lower at daytime than at nighttime at P21 but not P7, the time point at which the melatonin rhythm is not yet generated. The present study shows that expressions of these VGLUT types are differentially regulated during postnatal pineal development, each presumably participating in physiologically distinct glutamatergic functions.

  15. Activation of astroglial group Ⅱ and Ⅲ metabotropic glutamate receptors protects midbrain neurons against LPS or MPP+ -induced neurotoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-HongYao; FangWang; FangZhou; Li-FangHu; TaoSun; Jian-HuaDing; GangHu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Activation of glial metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) may be proved to play a critical role for neuroprotection in neurodegenerative diseases. Excess glutamate induced-excitoxicity is implicated in the initiation or progression of the neurodegenerative process. Glutamate accumulation in the central nervous system mediated by inhibiting glutamate

  16. L-Glutamate supplementation improves small intestinal architecture and enhances the expressions of jejunal mucosa amino acid receptors and transporters in weaning piglets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Lin

    Full Text Available L-Glutamate is a major oxidative fuel for the small intestine. However, few studies have demonstrated the effect of L-glutamate on the intestinal architecture and signaling of amino acids in the small intestine. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of dietary L-glutamate supplementation on the intestinal architecture and expressions of jejunal mucosa amino acid receptors and transporters in weaning piglets. A total of 120 weaning piglets aged 35 ± 1 days with an average body weight at 8.91 ± 0.45 kg were randomly allocated to two treatments with six replicates of ten piglets each, fed with diets containing 1.21% alanine, or 2% L-glutamate. L-Glutamate supplementation increased the activity of glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT in the jejunal mucosa. Also, the mRNA expression level of jejunal mucosa glutamine synthetase (GS was increased by L-glutamate supplementation. The height of villi in duodenal and jejunal segments, and the relative mRNA expression of occludin and zonula occludens protein-1 (ZO-1 in jejunal mucosa were increased by dietary L-glutamate supplementation. L-Glutamate supplementation increased plasma concentrations of glutamate, arginine, histidine, isoleucine, leucine, methionine, phenylalanine and threonine. L-Glutamate supplementation also increased the relative mRNA expression of the jejunal mucosa Ca(2+-sensing receptor (CaR, metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1 and metabotropic glutamate receptor 4 (mGluR4, and neutral amino acid transporter B(0-like (SLC1A5 in the jejunal mucosa. These findings suggest that dietary addition of 2% L-glutamate improves the intestinal integrity and influences the expression of amino acid receptors and transporters in the jejunum of weaning, which is beneficial for the improvement of jejunal nutrients for digestion and absorption.

  17. Glutamate-induced apoptosis in primary cortical neurons is inhibited by equine estrogens via down-regulation of caspase-3 and prevention of mitochondrial cytochrome c release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang YueMei

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apoptosis plays a key role in cell death observed in neurodegenerative diseases marked by a progressive loss of neurons as seen in Alzheimer's disease. Although the exact cause of apoptosis is not known, a number of factors such as free radicals, insufficient levels of nerve growth factors and excessive levels of glutamate have been implicated. We and others, have previously reported that in a stable HT22 neuronal cell line, glutamate induces apoptosis as indicated by DNA fragmentation and up- and down-regulation of Bax (pro-apoptotic, and Bcl-2 (anti-apoptotic genes respectively. Furthermore, these changes were reversed/inhibited by estrogens. Several lines of evidence also indicate that a family of cysteine proteases (caspases appear to play a critical role in neuronal apoptosis. The purpose of the present study is to determine in primary cultures of cortical cells, if glutamate-induced neuronal apoptosis and its inhibition by estrogens involve changes in caspase-3 protease and whether this process is mediated by Fas receptor and/or mitochondrial signal transduction pathways involving release of cytochrome c. Results In primary cultures of rat cortical cells, glutamate induced apoptosis that was associated with enhanced DNA fragmentation, morphological changes, and up-regulation of pro-caspase-3. Exposure of cortical cells to glutamate resulted in a time-dependent cell death and an increase in caspase-3 protein levels. Although the increase in caspase-3 levels was evident after 3 h, cell death was only significantly increased after 6 h. Treatment of cells for 6 h with 1 to 20 mM glutamate resulted in a 35 to 45% cell death that was associated with a 45 to 65% increase in the expression of caspase-3 protein. Pretreatment with caspase-3-protease inhibitor z-DEVD or pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD significantly decreased glutamate-induced cell death of cortical cells. Exposure of cells to glutamate for 6 h in the presence or

  18. Potassium co-transport and antiport during the uptake of sucrose and glutamic acid from the xylem vessels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bel, A.J.E. van; Erven, A.J. van

    1979-01-01

    Perfusion experiments with excised internodes of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum cv Moneymaker) showed that the uptake of glutamic acid and sucrose from the xylem vessels is accompanied with coupled proton co-transport and potassium antiport at low pH (<5.5). At high pH (5.5) both proton and potassi

  19. Potassium co-transport and antiport during the uptake of sucrose and glutamic acid from the xylem vessels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bel, A.J.E. van; Erven, A.J. van

    1979-01-01

    Perfusion experiments with excised internodes of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum cv Moneymaker) showed that the uptake of glutamic acid and sucrose from the xylem vessels is accompanied with coupled proton co-transport and potassium antiport at low pH (<5.5). At high pH (5.5) both proton and potassi

  20. Diabetes Impairs Wnt3 Protein-induced Neurogenesis in Olfactory Bulbs via Glutamate Transporter 1 Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Tamami; Hidaka, Ryo; Fujimaki, Shin; Asashima, Makoto; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2016-07-15

    Diabetes is associated with impaired cognitive function. Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats exhibit a loss of neurogenesis and deficits in behavioral tasks involving spatial learning and memory; thus, impaired adult hippocampal neurogenesis may contribute to diabetes-associated cognitive deficits. Recent studies have demonstrated that adult neurogenesis generally occurs in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, the subventricular zone, and the olfactory bulbs (OB) and is defective in patients with diabetes. We hypothesized that OB neurogenesis and associated behaviors would be affected in diabetes. In this study, we show that inhibition of Wnt3-induced neurogenesis in the OB causes several behavioral deficits in STZ-induced diabetic rats, including impaired odor discrimination, cognitive dysfunction, and increased anxiety. Notably, the sodium- and chloride-dependent GABA transporters and excitatory amino acid transporters that localize to GABAergic and glutamatergic terminals decreased in the OB of diabetic rats. Moreover, GAT1 inhibitor administration also hindered Wnt3-induced neurogenesis in vitro Collectively, these data suggest that STZ-induced diabetes adversely affects OB neurogenesis via GABA and glutamate transporter systems, leading to functional impairments in olfactory performance.

  1. Simultaneous analysis of dendritic spine density, morphology and excitatory glutamate receptors during neuron maturation in vitro by quantitative immunocytochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwabuisi-Heath, Evelyn; LaDu, Mary Jo; Yu, Chunjiang

    2012-06-15

    Alterations in the density and morphology of dendritic spines are characteristic of multiple cognitive disorders. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying spine alterations are facilitated by the use of experimental and analytical methods that permit concurrent evaluation of changes in spine density, morphology and composition. Here, an automated and quantitative immunocytochemical method for the simultaneous analysis of changes in the density and morphology of spines and excitatory glutamate receptors was established to analyze neuron maturation, in vitro. In neurons of long-term neuron-glia co-cultures, spine density as measured by drebrin cluster fluorescence, increased from DIV (days in vitro)10 to DIV18 (formation phase), remained stable from DIV18 to DIV21 (maintenance phase), and decreased from DIV21 to DIV26 (loss phase). The densities of spine-localized NMDAR and AMPAR clusters followed a similar trend. Spine head sizes as measured by the fluorescence intensities of drebrin clusters increased from DIV10 to DIV21 and decreased from DIV21 to DIV26. Changes in the densities of NR1-only, GluR2-only, and NR1+GluR2 spines were measured by the colocalizations of NR1 and GluR2 clusters with drebrin clusters. The densities of NR1-only spines remained stable from the maintenance to the loss phases, while GluR2-only and NR1+GluR2 spines decreased during the loss phase, thus suggesting GluR2 loss as a proximal molecular event that may underlie spine alterations during neuron maturation. This study demonstrates a sensitive and quantitative immunocytochemical method for the concurrent analysis of changes in spine density, morphology and composition, a valuable tool for determining molecular events involved in dendritic spine alterations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. NEUTRALIZATION OF THE ASPARTIC ACID RESIDUE D367, BUT NOT D454, INHIBITS BINDING OF NA+ TO THE GLUTAMATE-FREE FORM AND CYCLING OF THE GLUTAMATE TRANSPORTER EAAC1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zhen; Zhang, Zhou; Grewer, Christof

    2008-01-01

    Substrate transport by the plasma membrane glutamate transporter EAAC1 is coupled to cotransport of three sodium ions. One of these Na+ ions binds to the transporter already in the absence of glutamate. Here, we have investigated the possible involvement of two conserved aspartic acid residues in transmembrane segments 7 and 8 of EAAC1, D367 and D454, in Na+ cotransport. In order to test the effect of charge neutralization mutations in these positions on Na+ binding to the glutamate-free transporter, we recorded the Na+-induced anion leak current to determine the Km of EAAC1 for Na+. For EAAC1WT, this Km was determined as 120 mM. When the negative charge of D367 was neutralized by mutagenesis to asparagine, Na+ activated the anion leak current with a Km of about 2 M, indicating dramatically impaired Na+ binding to the mutant transporter. In contrast, the Na+ affinity of EAAC1D454N was virtually unchanged compared to the wild type transporter (Km = 90 mM). The reduced occupancy of the Na+ binding site of EAAC1D367N resulted in a dramatic reduction in glutamate affinity (Km = 3.6 mM, 140 mM [Na+]), which could be partially overcome by increasing extracellular [Na+]. In addition to impairing Na+ binding, the D367N mutation slowed glutamate transport, as shown by pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of transport currents, by strongly decreasing the rate of a reaction step associated with glutamate translocation. Our data are consistent with a model in which D367, but not D454 is involved in coordinating the bound Na+ in the glutamate-free transporter form. PMID:16478724

  3. Automated measurement of fast mitochondrial transport in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kyle E; Liu, Xin-An; Puthanveettil, Sathyanarayanan V

    2015-01-01

    There is growing recognition that fast mitochondrial transport in neurons is disrupted in multiple neurological diseases and psychiatric disorders. However, a major constraint in identifying novel therapeutics based on mitochondrial transport is that the large-scale analysis of fast transport is time consuming. Here we describe methodologies for the automated analysis of fast mitochondrial transport from data acquired using a robotic microscope. We focused on addressing questions of measurement precision, speed, reliably, workflow ease, statistical processing, and presentation. We used optical flow and particle tracking algorithms, implemented in ImageJ, to measure mitochondrial movement in primary cultured cortical and hippocampal neurons. With it, we are able to generate complete descriptions of movement profiles in an automated fashion of hundreds of thousands of mitochondria with a processing time of approximately one hour. We describe the calibration of the parameters of the tracking algorithms and demonstrate that they are capable of measuring the fast transport of a single mitochondrion. We then show that the methods are capable of reliably measuring the inhibition of fast mitochondria transport induced by the disruption of microtubules with the drug nocodazole in both hippocampal and cortical neurons. This work lays the foundation for future large-scale screens designed to identify compounds that modulate mitochondrial motility.

  4. Automated Measurement of Fast Mitochondrial Transport in Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle eMiller

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing recognition that fast mitochondrial transport in neurons is disrupted in multiple neurological diseases and psychiatric disorders. However a major constraint in identifying novel therapeutics based on mitochondrial transport is that the large-scale analysis of fast transport is time consuming. Here we describe methodologies for the automated analysis of fast mitochondrial transport from data acquired using a robotic microscope. We focused on addressing questions of measurement precision, speed, reliably, workflow ease, statistical processing and presentation. We used optical flow and particle tracking algorithms, implemented in ImageJ, to measure mitochondrial movement in primary cultured cortical and hippocampal neurons. With it, we are able to generate complete descriptions of movement profiles in an automated fashion of hundred of thousands of mitochondria with a processing time of approximately one hour. We describe the calibration of the parameters of the tracking algorithms and demonstrate that they are capable of measuring the fast transport of a single mitochondrion. We then show that the methods are capable of reliably measuring the inhibition of fast mitochondria transport induced by the disruption of microtubules with the drug nocodazole in both hippocampal and cortical neurons. This work lays the foundation for future large-scale screens designed to identify compounds that modulate mitochondrial motility.

  5. Interaction of Peptide Transporter 1 With D-Glucose and L-Glutamic Acid; Possible Involvement of Taste Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Hiroshi; Ohmachi, Taichi; Ichiba, Kiko; Kamioka, Hiroki; Tomono, Takumi; Kanagawa, Masahiko; Idota, Yoko; Hatano, Yasuko; Yano, Kentaro; Morimoto, Kaori; Ogihara, Takuo

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the influence of sweet and umami (savory) tastants on the intestinal absorption of cephalexin (CEX), a substrate of peptide transporter 1 (PEPT1, SLC15A1) in rats. After oral administration of glucose or mannitol to rats, CEX was administered together with a second dose of glucose or mannitol. Western blot analysis indicated that expression of PEPT1 in rat jejunum membrane was decreased by glucose, compared to mannitol. Furthermore, the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of orally administered CEX was reduced by glucose compared to mannitol. The effect of glucose was diminished by nifedipine, a L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker. We also found that Cmax of orally administered CEX was reduced by treatment with L-glutamic acid, compared to D-glutamic acid. Thus, excessive intake of glucose and L-glutamic acid may impair oral absorption of PEPT1 substrates.

  6. Cysteine mutagenesis reveals alternate proximity between transmembrane domain 2 and hairpin loop 1 of the glutamate transporter EAAT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunlong; Zhang, Xiuping; Qu, Shaogang

    2014-07-01

    Excitatory amino acid transporter 1 (EAAT1) plays an important role in restricting the neurotoxicity of glutamate. Previous structure-function studies have provided evidence that reentrant helical hairpin loop (HP) 1 has predominant function during the transport cycle. The proposed internal gate HP1 is packed against transmembrane domain (TM) 2 and TM5 in its closed state, and two residues located in TM2 and HP2 of EAAT1 are in close proximity. However, the spatial relationship between TM2 and HP1 during the transport cycle remains unknown. In this study, we used chemical cross-linking of introduced cysteine pair (V96C and S366C) in a cysteine-less version of EAAT1 to assess the proximity of TM2 and HP1. Here, we show that inhibition of transport by copper(II)(1,10-phenanthroline)3 (CuPh) and cadmium ion (Cd(2+)) were observed in the V96C/S366C mutant. Glutamate or potassium significantly protected against the inhibition of transport activity of V96C/S366C by CuPh, while TBOA potentiated the inhibition of transport activity of V96C/S366C by CuPh. We also checked the kinetic parameters of V96C/S366C treated with or without CuPh in the presence of NaCl, NaCl + L-glutamate, NaCl + TBOA, and KCl, respectively. The sensitivity of V96C and S366C to membrane-impermeable sulfhydryl reagent MTSET [(2-trimethylammonium) methanethiosulfonate] was attenuated by glutamate or potassium. TBOA had no effect on the sensitivity of V96C and S366C to MTSET. These data suggest that the spatial relationship between Val-96 of TM2 and Ser-366 of HP1 is altered in the transport cycle.

  7. Depolarization by K+ and glutamate activates different neurotransmitter release mechanisms in GABAergic neurons: vesicular versus non-vesicular release of GABA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, Gert Helge; Schousboe, A

    1993-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release and changes in the concentration of intracellular free calcium ([Ca++]i) were studied in cultured GABAergic cerebral cortical neurons, from mice, upon depolarization with either an unphysiologically high potassium concentration (55 mM) or the physiological excitatory...... neurotransmitter glutamate (100 microM). Both depolarizing stimuli exerted prompt increases in the release of preloaded [3H]GABA as well as in [Ca++]i. However, the basic properties of transmitter release and the increase in [Ca++]i under a variety of conditions were different during stimulation with K...... in nature whereas that induced by the neurotransmitter glutamate is not....

  8. Transport of L-glutamine, L-alanine, L-arginine and L-histidine by the neuron-specific Slc38a8 (SNAT8) in CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägglund, Maria G A; Hellsten, Sofie V; Bagchi, Sonchita; Philippot, Gaëtan; Löfqvist, Erik; Nilsson, Victor C O; Almkvist, Ingrid; Karlsson, Edvin; Sreedharan, Smitha; Tafreshiha, Atieh; Fredriksson, Robert

    2015-03-27

    Glutamine transporters are important for regulating levels of glutamate and GABA in the brain. To date, six members of the SLC38 family (SNATs) have been characterized and functionally subdivided them into System A (SNAT1, SNAT2 and SNAT4) and System N (SNAT3, SNAT5 and SNAT7). Here we present the first functional characterization of SLC38A8, one of the previous orphan transporters from the family, and we suggest that the encoded protein should be named SNAT8 to adhere with the SNAT nomenclature. We show that SLC38A8 has preference for transporting L-glutamine, L-alanine, L-arginine, L-histidine and L-aspartate using a Na+-dependent transport mechanism and that the functional characteristics of SNAT8 have highest similarity to the known System A transporters. We also provide a comprehensive central nervous system expression profile in mouse brain for the Slc38a8 gene and the SNAT8 protein. We show that Slc38a8 (SNAT8) is expressed in all neurons, both excitatory and inhibitory, in mouse brain using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, proximity ligation assay shows highly similar subcellular expression of SNAT7 and SNAT8. In conclusion, the neuronal SLC38A8 has a broad amino acid transport profile and is the first identified neuronal System A transporter. This suggests a key role of SNAT8 in the glutamine/glutamate (GABA) cycle in the brain.

  9. Iptakalim hydrochloride protects cells against neurotoxin-induced glutamate transporter dysfunction in in vitro and in vivo models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan-Ling; Meng, Chang-Hong; Ding, Jian-Hua; He, Hai-Rong; Ellsworth, Kevin; Wu, Jie; Hu, Gang

    2005-07-01

    Iptakalim hydrochloride (Ipt), a novel antihypertensive drug, exhibits K(ATP) channel activation. Here, we report that Ipt remarkably protects cells against neurotoxin-induced glutamate transporter dysfunction in in vitro and in vivo models. Chronic exposure of cultured PC12 cells to neurotoxins, such as 6-OHDA, MPP+, or rotenone, decreased overall [3H]-glutamate uptake in a concentration-dependent manner. Pre-treatment using 10 microM Ipt significantly protected cells against neurotoxin-induced glutamate uptake diminishment, and this protection was abolished by the K(ATP) channel blocker glibenclamide (20 microM), suggesting that the protective mechanisms may involve the opening of K(ATP) channels. In 6-OHDA-treated rats (as an in vivo Parkinson's disease model), [3H]-glutamate uptake was significantly lower in synaptosomes isolated from the striatum and cerebral cortex, but not the hippocampus. Pre-conditioning using 10, 50, and 100 microM Ipt significantly restored glutamate uptake impairment and these protections were abolished by blockade of K(ATP) channels. It is concluded that Ipt exhibits substantial protection of cells against neurotoxicity in in vitro and in vivo models. The cellular mechanisms of this protective effect may involve the opening of K(ATP) channels. Collectively, Ipt may serve as a novel and effective drug for PD therapy.

  10. Mesenchymal stem cells deliver exogenous miRNAs to neural cells and induce their differentiation and glutamate transporter expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae Kyung; Finniss, Susan; Cazacu, Simona; Xiang, Cunli; Brodie, Chaya

    2014-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are potential therapeutic targets in a variety of pathological conditions in the brain; however, their clinical application is hampered by lack of efficient delivery modes. Mesenchymal stromal stem cells (MSCs) migrate to sites of injury and inflammation and exert therapeutic effects in various neurological disorders. Here, we examined the ability of MSCs to deliver exogenous miRNA mimics and pre-miRNAs to human neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and astrocytes and characterized the functional impact of this delivery. We found that MSCs efficiently delivered fluorescent-labeled miR-124 and miR-145 mimics to cocultured NPCs and astrocytes. We further demonstrated the delivery of the miRNAs using novel reporter plasmids that contain a sequence complementary to miR-124 or miR-145 downstream of luciferase or mCherry. Binding of the specific miRNAs to these sequences results in decreased luciferase activity or mCherry fluorescence and therefore enable analysis of miRNA delivery in living cells. The delivered exogenous miR-124 significantly decreased the expression of the target gene Sox9 by targeting its 3'-UTR, and increased the neuronal differentiation of the NPCs. In addition, the delivered miR-124 increased the expression of the glutamate transporters, EAAT1 in NPCs and EAAT2 in both NPCs and astrocytes. Similar results were obtained with MSCs transfected with pre-miR-124. The miRNA delivery was mediated by MSC-derived exosomes and was cell contact independent. These results suggest that MSCs can functionally deliver exogenous miRNAs to neural cells and provide an efficient route of therapeutic miRNA delivery to the brain in pathological conditions with clinical implications for regenerative medicine.

  11. Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors depress synaptic transmission onto subicular burst firing neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kintscher, M.; Breustedt, J.; Miceli, S.M.; Schmitz, D.; Wozny, C.

    2012-01-01

    The subiculum (SUB) is a pivotal structure positioned between the hippocampus proper and various cortical and subcortical areas. Despite the growing body of anatomical and intrinsic electrophysiological data of subicular neurons, modulation of synaptic transmission in the SUB is not well understood.

  12. Glutamate mediates the function of melanocortin receptor 4 on sim1 neurons in body weight regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R) is a well-established mediator of body weight homeostasis. However, the neurotransmitter(s) that mediate MC4R function remain largely unknown; as a result, little is known about the second-order neurons of the MC4R neural pathway. Single-minded 1 (Sim1)-expressing ...

  13. A possible role of the non-GAT1 GABA transporters in transfer of GABA from GABAergic to glutamatergic neurons in mouse cerebellar neuronal cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suñol, C; Babot, Z; Cristòfol, R; Sonnewald, U; Waagepetersen, H S; Schousboe, A

    2010-09-01

    Cultures of dissociated cerebellum from 7-day-old mice were used to investigate the mechanism involved in synthesis and cellular redistribution of GABA in these cultures consisting primarily of glutamatergic granule neurons and a smaller population of GABAergic Golgi and stellate neurons. The distribution of GAD, GABA and the vesicular glutamate transporter VGlut-1 was assessed using specific antibodies combined with immunofluorescence microscopy. Additionally, tiagabine, SKF 89976-A, betaine, beta-alanine, nipecotic acid and guvacine were used to inhibit the GAT1, betaine/GABA (BGT1), GAT2 and GAT3 transporters. Only a small population of cells were immuno-stained for GAD while many cells exhibited VGlut-1 like immuno-reactivity which, however, never co-localized with GAD positive neurons. This likely reflects the small number of GABAergic neurons compared to the glutamatergic granule neurons constituting the majority of the cells. GABA uptake exhibited the kinetics of high affinity transport and could be partly (20%) inhibited by betaine (IC(50) 142 microM), beta-alanine (30%) and almost fully (90%) inhibited by SKF 89976-A (IC(50) 0.8 microM) or nipecotic acid and guvacine at 1 mM concentrations (95%). Essentially all neurons showed GABA like immunostaining albeit with differences in intensity. The results indicate that GABA which is synthesized in a small population of GAD-positive neurons is redistributed to essentially all neurons including the glutamatergic granule cells. GAT1 is not likely involved in this redistribution since addition of 15 microM tiagabine (GAT1 inhibitor) to the culture medium had no effect on the overall GABA content of the cells. Likewise the BGT1 transporter cannot alone account for the redistribution since inclusion of 3 mM betaine in the culture medium had no effect on the overall GABA content. The inhibitory action of beta-alanine and high concentrations of nipecotic acid and guvacine on GABA transport strongly suggests that also

  14. Computational Flux Balance Analysis Predicts that Stimulation of Energy Metabolism in Astrocytes and their Metabolic Interactions with Neurons Depend on Uptake of K(+) Rather than Glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiNuzzo, Mauro; Giove, Federico; Maraviglia, Bruno; Mangia, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Brain activity involves essential functional and metabolic interactions between neurons and astrocytes. The importance of astrocytic functions to neuronal signaling is supported by many experiments reporting high rates of energy consumption and oxidative metabolism in these glial cells. In the brain, almost all energy is consumed by the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase, which hydrolyzes 1 ATP to move 3 Na(+) outside and 2 K(+) inside the cells. Astrocytes are commonly thought to be primarily involved in transmitter glutamate cycling, a mechanism that however only accounts for few % of brain energy utilization. In order to examine the participation of astrocytic energy metabolism in brain ion homeostasis, here we attempted to devise a simple stoichiometric relation linking glutamatergic neurotransmission to Na(+) and K(+) ionic currents. To this end, we took into account ion pumps and voltage/ligand-gated channels using the stoichiometry derived from available energy budget for neocortical signaling and incorporated this stoichiometric relation into a computational metabolic model of neuron-astrocyte interactions. We aimed at reproducing the experimental observations about rates of metabolic pathways obtained by (13)C-NMR spectroscopy in rodent brain. When simulated data matched experiments as well as biophysical calculations, the stoichiometry for voltage/ligand-gated Na(+) and K(+) fluxes generated by neuronal activity was close to a 1:1 relationship, and specifically 63/58 Na(+)/K(+) ions per glutamate released. We found that astrocytes are stimulated by the extracellular K(+) exiting neurons in excess of the 3/2 Na(+)/K(+) ratio underlying Na(+)/K(+) ATPase-catalyzed reaction. Analysis of correlations between neuronal and astrocytic processes indicated that astrocytic K(+) uptake, but not astrocytic Na(+)-coupled glutamate uptake, is instrumental for the establishment of neuron-astrocytic metabolic partnership. Our results emphasize the importance of K(+) in stimulating the

  15. Excitatory amino acid transporter 2 downregulation correlates with thalamic neuronal death following kainic acid-induced status epilepticus in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Masashi; Kurokawa, Haruna; Shimada, Akinori; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Miyata, Hajime; Morita, Takehito

    2015-02-01

    Recurrent seizures without interictal resumption (status epilepticus) have been reported to induce neuronal death in the midline thalamic region that has functional roles in memory and decision-making; however, the pathogenesis underlying status epilepticus-induced thalamic neuronal death is yet to be determined. We performed histological and immunohistochemical studies as well as cerebral blood flow measurement using 4.7 tesla magnetic resonance imaging spectrometer on midline thalamic region in Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 75, male, 7 weeks after birth, body weight 250-300 g) treated with intraperitoneal injection of kainic acid (10 mg/kg) to induce status epilepticus (n = 55) or normal saline solution (n = 20). Histological study using paraffin-embedded specimens revealed neuronal death showing ischemic-like changes and Fluoro-Jade C positivity with calcium deposition in the midline thalamic region of epileptic rats. The distribution of neuronal death was associated with focal loss of immunoreactivity for excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2), stronger immunoreaction for glutamate and increase in number of Iba-1-positive microglial cells showing swollen cytoplasm and long processes. Double immunofluorescence study demonstrated co-expression of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) within microglial cells, and loss of EAAT2 immunoreactivity in reactive astrocytes. These microglial alterations and astrocytic EAAT2 downregulation were also observed in tissue without obvious neuronal death in kainic acid-treated rats. These results suggest the possible role of glutamate excitotoxicity in neuronal death in the midline thalamic region following kainic acid-induced status epilepticus due to astrocytic EAAT2 downregulation following microglial activation showing upregulation of IL-1β and iNOS.

  16. Expression, transport, and axonal sorting of neuronal CCL21 in large dense-core vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Eiko K.; Vinet, Jonathan; Stanulovic, Vesna S.; Meijer, Michel; Wesseling, Evelyn; Sjollema, Klaas; Boddeke, Hendrikus W. G. M.; Biber, Knut

    2008-01-01

    Neurons are highly polarized cells, and neuron-neuron communication is based on directed transport and release of neurotransmitters, neuropeptides, and neurotrophins. Directed communication may also be attributed to neuron-microglia signaling, since neuronal damage can induce a microglia reaction at

  17. Expression, transport, and axonal sorting of neuronal CCL21 in large dense-core vesicles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, E.K. de; Vinet, J.; Stanulovic, V.S.; Meijer, Michel; Wesseling, E.; Sjollema, K.; Boddeke, H.W.; Biber, K.

    2008-01-01

    Neurons are highly polarized cells, and neuron-neuron communication is based on directed transport and release of neurotransmitters, neuropeptides, and neurotrophins. Directed communication may also be attributed to neuron-microglia signaling, since neuronal damage can induce a microglia reaction at

  18. Electrogenic glutamate uptake is a major current carrier in the membrane of axolotl retinal glial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brew, Helen; Attwell, David

    1987-06-01

    Glutamate is taken up avidly by glial cells in the central nervous system1. Glutamate uptake may terminate the transmitter action of glutamate released from neurons1, and keep extracellular glutamate at concentrations below those which are neurotoxic. We report here that glutamate evokes a large inward current in retinal glial cells which have their membrane potential and intracellular ion concentrations controlled by the whole-cell patch-clamp technique2. This current seems to be due to an electrogenic glutamate uptake carrier, which transports at least two sodium ions with every glutamate anion carried into the cell. Glutamate uptake is strongly voltage-dependent, decreasing at depolarized potentials: when fully activated, it contributes almost half of the conductance in the part of the glial cell membrane facing the retinal neurons. The spatial localization, glutamate affinity and magnitude of the uptake are appropriate for terminating the synaptic action of glutamate released from photoreceptors and bipolar cells. These data challenge present explanations of how the b-wave of the electroretinogram is generated, and suggest a mechanism for non-vesicular voltage-dependent release of glutamate from neurons.

  19. Single rodent mesohabenular axons release glutamate and GABA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, David H.; Mejias-Aponte, Carlos; Zhang, Shiliang; Wang, Huiling; Hoffman, Alexander F.; Lupica, Carl R.; Morales, Marisela

    2016-01-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb) is involved in reward, aversion, addiction, and depression, through descending interactions with several brain structures, including the ventral tegmental area (VTA). VTA provides reciprocal inputs to LHb, but their actions are unclear. Here we show that the majority of rat and mouse VTA neurons innervating LHb co-express markers for both glutamate-signaling (vesicular glutamate transporter 2, VGluT2) and GABA-signaling (glutamate decarboxylase, GAD; and vesicular GABA transporter, VGaT). A single axon from these mesohabenular neurons co-expresses VGluT2-protein and VGaT-protein, and surprisingly establishes symmetric and asymmetric synapses on LHb neurons. In LHb slices, light activation of mesohabenular fibers expressing channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) driven by VGluT2 or VGaT promoters elicits release of both glutamate and GABA onto single LHb neurons. In vivo light-activation of mesohabenular terminals inhibits or excites LHb neurons. Our findings reveal an unanticipated type of VTA neuron that co-transmits glutamate and GABA, and provides the majority of mesohabenular inputs. PMID:25242304

  20. A rhythmic change of vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT) 2 expression in the rat pineal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Sachine; Hira, Yoshiki; Ehara, Ayuka; Mimura-Yamamoto, Yuka; Kawano, Michihiro; Shutoh, Fumihiro; Nogami, Haruo; Hisano, Setsuji

    2012-01-01

    The pineal gland secretes melatonin under circadian control via nocturnal noradrenergic stimulation, and expresses vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT) 1, VGLUT2 and a VGLUT1 splice variant (VGLUT1v). Although we previously reported that VGLUT2 mRNA level of rat pineal gland at postnatal day 21 is higher in the nighttime than in daytime, questions remained as to the time of postnatal onset of this phenomenon and a 24-h change in the mRNA or protein level at postnatal days. The day-night difference in VGLUT2 mRNA level was evident 14 days after birth. In the adult, VGLUT2 mRNA and protein levels increased in the dark phase, with the protein level showing a 6-h delay. The nocturnal elevation in VGLUT2 mRNA level diminished under the constant light condition but persisted under the constant dark condition. The present data suggest that VGLUT2 in the rat pineal gland is involved in some nocturnal glutamatergic function.

  1. Bis(7)-Tacrine, a Promising Anti-Alzheimer's Agent ,Attenuates Glutamate-Induced Cell Injury in Primary Cultured Cerebrocortical Neurons of Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The effects of bis(7)-tacrine, a novel dimeric acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor, on gluta mate-induced cell injury were investigated in primary cerebral cortical neurons of rats. Exposure of cultured neurons (12 days after plating) to 0. 5 mmol/L glutamate for 30 min resulted in significant cell damage. Pre treatment with bis (7)-tacrine (0. 03-1.0 μmol/L) reduced the glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in a concentra tion dependent manner and the maximal response was seen at 1 μmol/L with approximately 30% protection.A receptor binding assay showed that bis(7)-tacrine can completely displace MK-801 binding to rat cortical membrane with an IC50 of 0. 57 μmol/L. These findings suggest that bis(7)-tacrine can directly interact with N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor channel complex, which may contribute to the inhibitor's protective effects a gainst glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. Thus, it is possible that anti-glutamate/anti-AChE synergism is re sponsible for potentially better Alzheimer's therapy of bis(7)-tacrine relative to tacrine.

  2. A Tribute to Mary C. McKenna: Glutamate as Energy Substrate and Neurotransmitter-Functional Interaction Between Neurons and Astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schousboe, Arne

    2017-01-01

    Glutamate metabolism in the brain is extremely complex not only involving a large variety of enzymes but also a tight partnership between neurons and astrocytes, the latter cells being in control of de novo synthesis of glutamate. This review provides an account of the processes involved, i.e. pyruvate carboxylation and recycling as well as the glutamate-glutamine cycle, focusing on the many seminal contributions from Dr. Mary McKenna. The ramification of the astrocytic end feet allowing contact and control of hundreds of thousands of synapses at the same time obviously puts these cells in a prominent position to regulate neural activity. Additionally, the astrocytes take active part in the neurotransmission processes by releasing a variety of gliotransmitters including glutamate. Hence, the term "the tripartite synapse", in which there is an active and dynamic interplay between the pre- and post-synaptic neurons and the ensheathing astrocytes, has been coined. The studies of Mary McKenna and her colleagues over several decades have been of paramount importance for the elucidation of compartmentation in astrocytes and synaptic terminals and the intricate metabolic processes underlying the glutamatergic neurotransmission process.

  3. Extracellular Microvesicles from Astrocytes Contain Functional Glutamate Transporters: Regulation by Protein Kinase C and Cell Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain-Daniel eGosselin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate transport through astrocytic excitatory amino-acid transporters (EAAT-1 and EAAT-2 is paramount for neural homeostasis. EAAT-1 has been reported in secreted extracellular microvesicles (eMV, such as exosomes and because the Protein Kinase C (PKC family controls the sub-cellular distribution of EAATs, we have explored whether PKCs drive EAATs into eMV. Using rat primary astrocytes, confocal immunofluorescence and ultracentrifugation on sucrose gradient we here report that PKC activation by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA reorganizes EAAT-1 distribution and reduces functional [3H]-aspartate reuptake. Western-blots show that EAAT-1 is present in eMV from astrocyte conditioned medium, together with NaK ATPase and glutamine synthetase all being further increased after PMA treatment. However, nanoparticle tracking analysis reveals that PKC activation did not change particle concentration. Functional analysis indicates that eMV have the capacity to reuptake [3H]-aspartate. In vivo, we demonstrate that spinal astrocytic reaction induced by peripheral nerve lesion (spared nerve injury, SNI is associated with a phosphorylation of PKC δ together with a shift of EAAT distribution ipsilaterally. Ex vivo, spinal explants from SNI rats release eMV with an increased content of NaK ATPase, EAAT-1 and EAAT-2. These data indicate PKC and cell activation as important regulators of EAAT-1 incorporation in eMV, and raise the possibility that microvesicular EAAT-1 may exert extracellular functions. Beyond a putative role in neuropathic pain, this phenomenon may be important for understanding neural homeostasis and a wide range of neurological diseases associated with astrocytic reaction as well as non-neurological diseases linked to eMV release.

  4. Neurological effects of inorganic arsenic exposure: altered cysteine/glutamate transport, NMDA expression and spatial memory impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucio A Ramos-Chávez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Inorganic arsenic (iAs is an important natural pollutant. Millions of individuals worldwide drink water with high levels of iAs. Chronic exposure to iAs has been associated with lower IQ and learning disabilities as well as memory impairment. iAs is methylated in tissues such as the brain generating mono and dimethylated species. iAs methylation requires cellular glutathione (GSH, which is the main antioxidant in the central nervous system. In humans, As species cross the placenta and are found in cord blood. A CD1 mouse model was used to investigate effects of gestational iAs exposure which can lead to oxidative damage, disrupted cysteine/glutamate transport and its putative impact in learning and memory. On postnatal days (PNDs 1, 15 and 90, the expression of membrane transporters related to GSH synthesis and glutamate transport and toxicity, such as xCT, EAAC1, GLAST and GLT1, as well as LAT1, were analyzed. Also, the expression of the glutamate receptor N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDAR subunits NR2A and B as well as the presence of As species in cortex and hippocampus were investigated. On PND 90, an object location task was performed to associate exposure with memory impairment. Gestational exposure to iAs affected the expression of cysteine/glutamate transporters in cortex and hippocampus and induced a negative modulation of NMDAR NR2B subunit in the hippocampus. Behavioral tasks showed significant spatial memory impairment in males while the effect was marginal in females.

  5. Identification of a meningococcal L-glutamate ABC transporter operon essential for growth in low-sodium environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, Caterina; Talà, Adelfia; Spinosa, Maria Rita; Progida, Cinzia; De Nitto, Eleanna; Gaballo, Antonio; Bruni, Carmelo B; Bucci, Cecilia; Alifano, Pietro

    2006-03-01

    GdhR is a meningococcal transcriptional regulator that was previously shown to positively control the expression of gdhA, encoding the NADP-specific L-glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP-GDH), in response to the growth phase and/or to the carbon source. In this study we used reverse transcriptase-PCR-differential display (to identify additional GdhR-regulated genes. The results indicated that GdhR, in addition to NADP-GDH, controls the expression of a number of genes involved in glucose catabolism by the Entner-Doudoroff pathway and in l-glutamate import by an unknown ABC transport system. The genes encoding the putative periplasmic substrate-binding protein (NMB1963) and the permease (NMB1965) of the ABC transporter were genetically inactivated. Uptake experiments demonstrated an impairment of L-glutamate import in the NMB1965-defective mutant in the absence or in the presence of a low sodium ion concentration. In contrast, at a sodium ion concentration above 60 mM, the uptake defect disappeared, possibly because the activity of a sodium-driven secondary transporter became predominant. Indeed, the NMB1965-defective mutant was unable to grow at a low sodium ion concentration (60 mM). The same growth phenotype was observed in the NMB1963-defective mutant. Cell invasion and intracellular persistence assays and expression data during cell invasion provided evidence that the l-glutamate ABC transporter, tentatively named GltT, was critical for meningococcal adaptation in the low-sodium intracellular environment.

  6. Impaired glutamate uptake in the R6 Huntington's disease transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liévens, J C; Woodman, B; Mahal, A; Spasic-Boscovic, O; Samuel, D; Kerkerian-Le Goff, L; Bates, G P

    2001-10-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a late-onset neurodegenerative disease for which the mutation is CAG/polyglutamine repeat expansion. The R6 mouse lines expressing the HD mutation develop a movement disorder that is preceded by the formation of neuronal polyglutamine aggregates. The phenotype is likely caused by a widespread neuronal dysfunction, whereas neuronal cell death occurs late and is very selective. We show that a decreased mRNA level of the major astroglial glutamate transporter (GLT1) in the striatum and cortex of these mice is accompanied by a concomitant decrease in glutamate uptake. In contrast, the expression of the glutamate transporters, GLAST and EAAC1, remain unchanged. The mRNA level of the astroglial enzyme glutamine synthetase is also decreased. These changes in expression occur prior to any evidence of neurodegeneration and suggest that a defect in astrocytic glutamate uptake may contribute to the phenotype and neuronal cell death in HD.

  7. Glutamate input to noradrenergic neurons plays an essential role in the development of morphine dependence and psychomotor sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkitna, Jan Rodriguez; Solecki, Wojciech; Gołembiowska, Krystyna; Tokarski, Krzysztof; Kubik, Jakub; Gołda, Sławomir; Novak, Martin; Parlato, Rosanna; Hess, Grzegorz; Sprengel, Rolf; Przewłocki, Ryszard

    2012-11-01

    The brain's noradrenergic system is involved in the development of behaviours induced by drugs of abuse, e.g. dependence and withdrawal, and also reward or psychomotor effects. To investigate how noradrenergic system activity is controlled in the context associated with drug-induced behaviours, we generated a Cre/loxP mouse model in which the essential glutamate NMDA receptor subunit NR1 is ablated in cells expressing dopamine β-hydroxylase (Dbh). As a result, the noradrenergic cells in NR1DbhCre mice lack the NMDA receptor-dependent component of excitatory post-synaptic currents. The mutant mice displayed no obvious behavioural alterations, had unchanged noradrenaline content and mild increase in dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens. Interestingly, NR1DbhCre animals did not develop morphine-induced psychomotor sensitization. However, when the morphine injections were preceded by treatment with RX821002, an antagonist of α2-adrenergic receptors, the development of sensitization was restored. Conversely, pretreatment with clonidine, an agonist of α2-adrenergic receptors, blocked development of sensitization in wild-type mice. We also found that while the development of tolerance to morphine was normal in mutant mice, withdrawal symptoms were attenuated. These data reveal that NMDA receptors on noradrenergic neurons regulate development of opiate dependence and psychomotor sensitization, by controlling drug-induced noradrenaline signalling.

  8. Intrinsic plasticity induced by group II metabotropic glutamate receptors via enhancement of high-threshold KV currents in sound localizing neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlet, W R; Lu, Y

    2016-06-01

    Intrinsic plasticity has emerged as an important mechanism regulating neuronal excitability and output under physiological and pathological conditions. Here, we report a novel form of intrinsic plasticity. Using perforated patch clamp recordings, we examined the modulatory effects of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR II) on voltage-gated potassium (KV) currents and the firing properties of neurons in the chicken nucleus laminaris (NL), the first central auditory station where interaural time cues are analyzed for sound localization. We found that activation of mGluR II by synthetic agonists resulted in a selective increase of the high-threshold KV currents. More importantly, synaptically released glutamate (with reuptake blocked) also enhanced the high-threshold KV currents. The enhancement was frequency-coding region dependent, being more pronounced in low-frequency neurons compared to middle- and high-frequency neurons. The intracellular mechanism involved the Gβγ signaling pathway associated with phospholipase C and protein kinase C. The modulation strengthened membrane outward rectification, sharpened action potentials, and improved the ability of NL neurons to follow high-frequency inputs. These data suggest that mGluR II provides a feedforward modulatory mechanism that may regulate temporal processing under the condition of heightened synaptic inputs.

  9. Expression of multiple glutamate transporter splice variants in the rodent testis%啮齿科动物睾丸中多种谷氨酸转运体变异体的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aven Lee; Ashley R Anderson; Amanda C Barnett; Anthony Chan; David V Pow

    2011-01-01

    Glutamate is a regulated molecule in the mammalian testis.Extracellular regulation of glutamate in the body is determined largely by the expression of plasmalemmal glutamate transporters.We have examined by PCR,western blotting and immunocytochemistry the expression of a panel of sodium-dependent plasmalemmal glutamate transporters in the rat testis.Proteins examined included:glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST),glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1),excitatory amino acid carrier 1 (EAAC1),excitatory amino acid transporter 4 (EAAT4) and EAAT5.We demonstrate that many of the glutamate transporters in the testis are alternately spliced.GLAST is present as exon-3-and exon-9-skipping forms.GLT1 was similarly present as the alternately spliced forms GLT1b and GLT1c,whereas the abundant brain form (GLT1a) was detectable only at the mRNA level.EAAT5 was also strongly expressed,whereas EAAC1 and EAAT4 were absent.These patterns of expression were compared with the patterns of endogenous glutamate localization and with patterns of D-aspartate accumulation,as assessed by immunocytochemistry.The presence of multiple glutamate transporters in the testis,including unusually spliced forms,suggests that glutamate homeostasis may be critical in this organ.The apparent presence of many of these transporters in the testis and sperm may indicate a need for glutamate transport by such cells.

  10. Dopamine D1-D2 receptor heteromer in dual phenotype GABA/glutamate-coexpressing striatal medium spiny neurons: regulation of BDNF, GAD67 and VGLUT1/2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa L Perreault

    Full Text Available In basal ganglia a significant subset of GABAergic medium spiny neurons (MSNs coexpress D1 and D2 receptors (D1R and D2R along with the neuropeptides dynorphin (DYN and enkephalin (ENK. These coexpressing neurons have been recently shown to have a region-specific distribution throughout the mesolimbic and basal ganglia circuits. While the functional relevance of these MSNs remains relatively unexplored, they have been shown to exhibit the unique property of expressing the dopamine D1-D2 receptor heteromer, a novel receptor complex with distinct pharmacology and cell signaling properties. Here we showed that MSNs coexpressing the D1R and D2R also exhibited a dual GABA/glutamate phenotype. Activation of the D1R-D2R heteromer in these neurons resulted in the simultaneous, but differential regulation of proteins involved in GABA and glutamate production or vesicular uptake in the nucleus accumbens (NAc, ventral tegmental area (VTA, caudate putamen and substantia nigra (SN. Additionally, activation of the D1R-D2R heteromer in NAc shell, but not NAc core, differentially altered protein expression in VTA and SN, regions rich in dopamine cell bodies. The identification of a MSN with dual inhibitory and excitatory intrinsic functions provides new insights into the neuroanatomy of the basal ganglia and demonstrates a novel source of glutamate in this circuit. Furthermore, the demonstration of a dopamine receptor complex with the potential to differentially regulate the expression of proteins directly involved in GABAergic inhibitory or glutamatergic excitatory activation in VTA and SN may potentially provide new insights into the regulation of dopamine neuron activity. This could have broad implications in understanding how dysregulation of neurotransmission within basal ganglia contributes to dopamine neuronal dysfunction.

  11. Introduction to the Glutamate-Glutamine Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnewald, Ursula; Schousboe, Arne

    2016-01-01

    released from neurons is transported into astrocytes, converted to glutamine which is subsequently returned to neurons and converted to glutamate by an enzyme the activity of which is much higher in neurons than in astrocytes. Originally this cycle was supposed to function in a stoichiometric fashion...... but more recent research has seriously questioned this.This volume of Advances in Neurobiology is intended to provide a detailed discussion of recent developments in research aimed at delineating the functional roles of the cycle taking into account that in order for this system to work there must...

  12. Vesicular Glutamate Transporter 2 Expression in the Rat Pineal Gland: Detailed Analysis of Expression Pattern and Regulatory Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Sachine; Hisano, Setsuji

    Melatonin, a hormone secreted by the pineal gland, is closely related physiologically to circadian rhythm, sleep and reproduction, and also psychiatrically to mood disorders in humans. Under circadian control, melatonin secretion is modulated via nocturnal autonomic (adrenergic) stimulation to the gland, which expresses vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT) 1, VGLUT2 and a VGLUT1 splice variant (VGLUT1v), glutamatergic markers. Expression of VGLUT2 gene and protein in the intact gland has been reported to exhibit a rhythmic change during a day. To study VGLUT2 expression is under adrenergic control, we here performed an in vitro experiment using dispersed pineal cells of rats. Stimulation of either β-adrenergic receptor or cAMP production to the pineal cells was shown to increase mRNA level of VGLUT2, but not VGLUT1 and VGLUT1v. Because an ability of glutamate to inhibit melatonin production was previously reported in the cultured gland, it is likely that pineal VGLUT2 transports glutamate engaged in the inhibition of melatonin production.

  13. The antinociceptive effects of intracerebroventricular administration of Chicago sky blue 6B, a vesicular glutamate transporter inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Gang; Yi, Shoupu; Wang, Meiliang; Yan, Hui; Yan, Lingdi; Su, Ruibin; Gong, Zehui

    2013-12-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs), which control the storage and release of glutamate, may play a role in pain processing. Chicago sky blue 6B (CSB6B), which is structurally related to glutamate, is a competitive VGLUT inhibitor without affecting plasma membrane transporters. The present study was designed to investigate the antinociceptive effects of CSB6B in a number of pain models. The hot-plate test was used as an acute thermal pain test. Inflammatory pain was evaluated using acetic acid writhing, formalin, and complete Freund's adjuvant tests. Intracerebroventricular administration of CSB6B did not affect acute thermal pain responses in 50 or 55°C hot plate tests. However, CSB6B attenuated acetic acid-induced writhing in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. In addition, CSB6B reduced licking/biting behavior during the second phase, but not during the first phase, following an intraplantar injection of formalin. In the complete Freund's adjuvant test, a significant attenuation of thermal hyperalgesia was also observed in CSB6B-treated mice. At antinociceptive doses, CSB6B did not affect mice spontaneous locomotor activity. The present study shows that pharmacological inhibition of VGLUT activity was sufficient to attenuate experimental inflammatory pain and suggests that regulation of VGLUTs might be a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of pain.

  14. Chronic glutamate toxicity in neurodegenerative diseases-what is the evidence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela eMaher

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Together with aspartate, glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. Glutamate binds and activates both ligand-gated ion channels (ionotropic glutamate receptors and a class of G-protein coupled receptors (metabotropic glutamate receptors. Although the intracellular glutamate concentration in the brain is in the millimolar range, the extracellular glutamate concentration is kept in the low micromolar range by the action of excitatory amino acid transporters that import glutamate and aspartate into astrocytes and neurons. Excess extracellular glutamate may lead to excitotoxicity in vitro and in vivo in acute insults like ischemic stroke via the overactivation of ionotropic glutamate receptors. In addition, chronic excitotoxicity has been hypothesized to play a role in numerous neurodegenerative diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease and Huntington’s disease. Based on this hypothesis, a good deal of effort has been devoted to develop and test drugs that either inhibit glutamate receptors or decrease extracellular glutamate. In this review, we provide an overview of the different pathways that are thought to lead to an over-activation of the glutamatergic system and glutamate toxicity in neurodegeneration. In addition, we summarize the available experimental evidence for glutamate toxicity in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Downregulation of metabotropic glutamate receptors mGluR5 and glutamate transporter EAAC1 in the myenteric plexus of the diabetic rat ileum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanhua Bai; Jun Zhang; Hongyang Shi; Fei Dai

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the morphologic abnormalities of the myenteric plexus in diabetic rats and to explore the mechanism of their effect on gastrointestinal motility. Methods: Forty rats were randomly divided into a diabetic group and a control group, Gastric emptying and small intestine transit rates were measured and histologic and molecular changes in glutamatergic nerves in the ileal myenteric plexus were observed, mGluR5 receptor and EAAC1 transporter changes in the diabetic rats were studied using fluorescence immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Results:Eighteen weeks after the establishment of the diabetic rats model, gastric emptying and small intestine transit rates were found to be significantly delayed in the diabetic group when compared with the control group. The density of glutamatergic ganglia and neurons in the ileal myenterie plexus were significantly decreased in the diabetic group when compared with control group(P<0.05) and the mGluR5 receptors and EAAC1 transporters were downregulated in the diabetic rats(P<0.05). Conclusion: Decreased glutamatergic enteric ganglia and neurons and decreased mGluR5 receptors and EAAC1 transporters in the intestinal myenteric plexus is one of the mechanisms of diabetic gastroenteropathy in rats.

  16. TPEN, a Specific Zn(2+) Chelator, Inhibits Sodium Dithionite and Glucose Deprivation (SDGD)-Induced Neuronal Death by Modulating Apoptosis, Glutamate Signaling, and Voltage-Gated K(+) and Na(+) Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Ma, Xue-Ling; Wang, Yu-Xiang; He, Cong-Cong; Tian, Kun; Wang, Hong-Gang; An, Di; Heng, Bin; Xie, Lai-Hua; Liu, Yan-Qiang

    2017-03-01

    Hypoxia-ischemia-induced neuronal death is an important pathophysiological process that accompanies ischemic stroke and represents a major challenge in preventing ischemic stroke. To elucidate factors related to and a potential preventative mechanism of hypoxia-ischemia-induced neuronal death, primary neurons were exposed to sodium dithionite and glucose deprivation (SDGD) to mimic hypoxic-ischemic conditions. The effects of N,N,N',N'-tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine (TPEN), a specific Zn(2+)-chelating agent, on SDGD-induced neuronal death, glutamate signaling (including the free glutamate concentration and expression of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) receptor (GluR2) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits (NR2B), and voltage-dependent K(+) and Na(+) channel currents were also investigated. Our results demonstrated that TPEN significantly suppressed increases in cell death, apoptosis, neuronal glutamate release into the culture medium, NR2B protein expression, and I K as well as decreased GluR2 protein expression and Na(+) channel activity in primary cultured neurons exposed to SDGD. These results suggest that TPEN could inhibit SDGD-induced neuronal death by modulating apoptosis, glutamate signaling (via ligand-gated channels such as AMPA and NMDA receptors), and voltage-gated K(+) and Na(+) channels in neurons. Hence, Zn(2+) chelation might be a promising approach for counteracting the neuronal loss caused by transient global ischemia. Moreover, TPEN could represent a potential cell-targeted therapy.

  17. Genistein inhibition of OGD-induced brain neuron death correlates with its modulation of apoptosis, voltage-gated potassium and sodium currents and glutamate signal pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xue-Ling; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Yu-Xiang; He, Cong-Cong; Tian, Kun; Wang, Hong-Gang; An, Di; Heng, Bin; Liu, Yan-Qiang

    2016-07-25

    In the present study, we established an in vitro model of hypoxic-ischemia via exposing primary neurons of newborn rats to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and observing the effects of genistein, a soybean isoflavone, on hypoxic-ischemic neuron viability, apoptosis, voltage-activated potassium (Kv) and sodium (Nav) currents, and glutamate receptor subunits. The results indicated that OGD exposure reduced the viability and increased the apoptosis of brain neurons. Meanwhile, OGD exposure caused changes in the current-voltage curves and current amplitude values of voltage-activated potassium and sodium currents; OGD exposure also decreased GluR2 expression and increased NR2 expression. However, genistein at least partially reversed the effects caused by OGD. The results suggest that hypoxic-ischemia-caused neuronal apoptosis/death is related to an increase in K(+) efflux, a decrease in Na(+) influx, a down-regulation of GluR2, and an up-regulation of NR2. Genistein may exert some neuroprotective effects via the modulation of Kv and Nav currents and the glutamate signal pathway, mediated by GluR2 and NR2.

  18. Estrone-1-sulphate (E1S) has impact on the kinetics parameters of transporter mediated taurine and glutamate influx in Caco-2 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffansen, Bente; El-Sayed, F

    of membrane transporters. The aim was therefore to investigate if addition of E1S to the growth medium of Caco-2 cells before but not during the influx study, change the kinetic parameters of transporter-mediated influx of taurine and glutamate by respective TAUT and EAAT transporters. The results show that 4...... days pretreatment with E1S change the concentration dependent influx curves and Km for transporter mediated taurine and Km and Jmax for glutamate influx although the effects on Km and Jmax are not significant....

  19. Expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase messenger RNA in rat medial preoptic area neurones during the oestrous cycle and after ovariectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbison, A E; Augood, S J; McGowan, E M

    1992-08-01

    Evidence suggests that medial preoptic area (MPOA) neurones containing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are modulated directly by oestrogen. We have used an alkaline phosphatase-labelled antisense oligonucleotide probe to examine glutamic acid decarboxylase67 (GAD) mRNA expression within individual cells of the MPOA, diagonal band of Broca (DBB) and parietal cortex in rats killed at noon on each day of the oestrous cycle and after ovariectomy (n = 4-5). As a fall in extracellular GABA concentrations occurs in the MPOA on the afternoon of proestrus, the GAD67 mRNA content of cells was also examined in proestrous rats at 15:00h immediately prior to the preovulatory luteinising hormone (LH) surge. The MPOA was found to have an intermediate number of GAD67 mRNA-containing cells compared with the DBB and cortex (P less than 0.01) but expressed the lowest mean hybridisation signal (P less than 0.01). The parietal cortex had significantly fewer (P less than 0.01) GAD mRNA-containing cells than either the MPOA or DBB but these contained higher mean density of signal (P less than 0.01). The hybridisation signal for GAD mRNA was abolished by either ribonuclease pre-treatment or the use of excess non-labelled probe. No significant (P greater than 0.05) differences in GAD67 mRNA were detected in animals killed at noon throughout the oestrous cycle or after ovariectomy. On the afternoon of proestrus (15:00h) there was a significant 40% reduction in mean GAD67 mRNA content within cells of only the MPOA compared with noon (P less than 0.05). The numbers of cells in the MPOA expressing GAD67 mRNA were not significantly different.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Neuroprotective Effect of Total and Sequential Extract of Scrophularia striata Boiss. in Rat Cerebellar Granule Neurons Following Glutamate- Induced Neurotoxicity: An In-vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salavati, Parvin; Ramezani, Mina; Monsef-Esfahani, Hamid R; Hajiagha, Reza; Parsa, Maliheh; Tavajohi, Shoreh; Ostad, Seyed Nasser

    2013-01-01

    Neuroprotective effect of the extract from aerial parts of Scrophularia striata Boiss (Scrophulariaceae) was investigated against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity on cultured rat pups Cerebellar Granule Neurons (CGNs). CGNs from 8 days old Sprague-Dawley rat were prepared and cultured. The experiments were performed after 8 days in culture. The plant was collected from the northeastern part (Ruin region) of Iran and air-dried at room temperature. The total extract was prepared with maceration of prepared powder in ethanol 80% for three times. Sequential extracts were obtained using dried and powdered aerial parts with increasingly polar solvents: petroleum ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanol 80% solution. Cultured cells were exposed to 125 μM of glutamate for 12 h following a 24 h of incubation with test fractions at concentration of 10 mcg/mL. Morphological assay was performed using invert light microscope after fixation and staining with haematoxylin. Neuronal viability was measured using MTT assay. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS software. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed by Tukey post-hoc test. Values were considered statistically significant when p-value ≤ 0.05. Results of this study showed a significant neuroprotective activity of high polarity methanolic fraction of aerial parts of Scrophularia striata against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in a dosedependent manner. Treatment with 10 mcg/mL of the fractions showed the best result. PMID:24250613

  1. Functional role for redox in the epileptogenesis: molecular regulation of glutamate in the hippocampus of FeCl3-induced limbic epilepsy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Yuto; Doi, Taku; Nagatomo, Keiko; Willmore, L James; Nakajima, Akira

    2007-08-01

    We used western blotting to measure the quantity of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters proteins within hippocampal tissue obtained from rats who had undergone epileptogenesis. Chronic seizures were induced by amygdalar injection of FeCl(3). We found that the glial glutamate transporters GLAST and GLT-1 were down-regulated at 60 days after initiation of chronic and recurrent seizures. However, the neuronal glutamate transporter EAAC-1 and the GABA transporter GAT-3 were increased. We performed in vivo microdialysis in freely moving animals to estimate in vivo redox state. We found that the hippocampal tissues were oxidized, resulting in even further impairment of glutamate transport. Our data show that epileptogenesis in rats resulting in chronic and recurrent seizures is associated with collapse of glutamate regulation caused by both the molecular down-regulation of glial glutamate transporters combined with the functional failure due to oxidation.

  2. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 mediates the electrophysiological and toxic actions of the cycad derivative beta-N-Methylamino-L-alanine on substantia nigra pars compacta DAergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucchiaroni, Maria Letizia; Viscomi, Maria Teresa; Bernardi, Giorgio; Molinari, Marco; Guatteo, Ezia; Mercuri, Nicola B

    2010-04-14

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-Parkinson dementia complex (ALS-PDC) is a neurodegenerative disease with ALS, parkinsonism, and Alzheimer's symptoms that is prevalent in the Guam population. beta-N-Methylamino alanine (BMAA) has been proposed as the toxic agent damaging several neuronal types in ALS-PDC, including substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic (SNpc DAergic) neurons. BMAA is a mixed glutamate receptor agonist, but the specific pathways activated in DAergic neurons are not yet known. We combined electrophysiology, microfluorometry, and confocal microscopy analysis to monitor membrane potential/current, cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) changes, cytochrome-c (cyt-c) immunoreactivity, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production induced by BMAA. Rapid toxin applications caused reversible membrane depolarization/inward current and increase of firing rate and [Ca(2+)](i) in DAergic neurons. The inward current (I(BMAA)) was mainly mediated by activation of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1), coupled to transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, and to a lesser extent, AMPA receptors. Indeed, mGluR1 (CPCCOEt) and TRP channels (SKF 96365; Ruthenium Red) antagonists reduced I(BMAA), and a small component of I(BMAA) was reduced by the AMPA receptor antagonist CNQX. Calcium accumulation was mediated by mGluR1 but not by AMPA receptors. Application of a low concentration of NMDA potentiated the BMAA-mediated calcium increase. Prolonged exposure to BMAA caused significant modifications of membrane properties, calcium overload, cell shrinkage, massive cyt-c release into the cytosol and ROS production. In SNpc GABAergic neurons, BMAA activated only AMPA receptors. Our study identifies the mGluR1-activated mechanism induced by BMAA that may cause the neuronal degeneration and parkinsonian symptoms seen in ALS-PDC. Moreover, environmental exposure to BMAA might possibly also contribute to idiopathic PD.

  3. Role of astrocytic transport processes in glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, A; Sarup, A; Bak, L K

    2004-01-01

    The fine tuning of both glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission is to a large extent dependent upon optimal function of astrocytic transport processes. Thus, glutamate transport in astrocytes is mandatory to maintain extrasynaptic glutamate levels sufficiently low to prevent excitotoxic...... neuronal damage. In GABA synapses hyperactivity of astroglial GABA uptake may lead to diminished GABAergic inhibitory activity resulting in seizures. As a consequence of this the expression and functional activity of astrocytic glutamate and GABA transport is regulated in a number of ways...

  4. Variants of the EAAT2 Glutamate Transporter Gene Promoter Are Associated with Cerebral Palsy in Preterm Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajatileka, Shavanthi; Odd, David; Robinson, Matthew T; Spittle, Alexandra C; Dwomoh, Louis; Williams, Maggie; Harding, David; Wagstaff, Miles; Owen, Marie; Crosby, Charlene; Ching, Jared; Molnár, Elek; Luyt, Karen; Váradi, Anikó

    2017-03-07

    Preterm delivery is associated with neurodevelopmental impairment caused by environmental and genetic factors. Dysfunction of the excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2) and the resultant impaired glutamate uptake can lead to neurological disorders. In this study, we investigated the role of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; g.-200C>A and g.-181A>C) in the EAAT2 promoter in susceptibility to brain injury and neurodisability in very preterm infants born at or before 32-week gestation. DNA isolated from newborns' dried blood spots were used for pyrosequencing to detect both SNPs. Association between EAAT2 genotypes and cerebral palsy, cystic periventricular leukomalacia and a low developmental score was then assessed. The two SNPs were concordant in 89.4% of infants resulting in three common genotypes all carrying two C and two A alleles in different combinations. However, in 10.6% of cases, non-concordance was found, generating six additional rare genotypes. The A alleles at both loci appeared to be detrimental and consequently, the risk of developing cerebral palsy increased four- and sixfold for each additional detrimental allele at -200 and -181 bp, respectively. The two SNPs altered the regulation of the EAAT2 promoter activity and glutamate homeostasis. This study highlights the significance of glutamate in the pathogenesis of preterm brain injury and subsequent development of cerebral palsy and neurodevelopmental disabilities. Furthermore, the described EAAT2 SNPs may be an early biomarker of vulnerability to neurodisability and may aid the development of targeted treatment strategies.

  5. Effects of Zibu Piyin Recipe(滋补脾阴方药)on SNK-SPAR Pathway in Neuron Injury Induced by Glutamate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAN Li-bin; SUI Hua; LU Xiao-guang; SUN Chang-kai; ZHANG Jian; MA Hui

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the relationship between the excitotoxicity and seruminducible kinase(SNK)and spine-associated Rap GTPase-activating protein(SPAR)pathway in primary hippocampal neuron injury induced by glutamate and furthermore,to explore the molecular between ZBPYR and the morphological regulation of dendritic spines.Methods:The serum containing ZBPYR was prepared by seropharmacology.Reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR)was used to detect the expression of mRNA for SNK,SPAR,postsynaptic density protein 95(PSD-95)and N-methyl-D-aspartate(NMDA)receptor subunits(NR1,NR2A and NR2B)in primary rat hippocampal neuron cultures after pretreatment with 10 μ mol/L glutamate and ZBPYR serum.Results:ZBPYR serum pretreatment resulted in a significant down-regulation of glutamate-induced SNK mRNA expression(P<0.05).Significant up-regulation was seen on the mRNA expression of SPAR and PSD-95 (P<0.05).All these changes were dose-dependent.The mRNA expression of NR1,NR2A and NR2B was down-regulated to different degrees(P<0.05).Conclusion:The mechanism of effect of ZBPYR on glutamate-induced excitotoxicity may be related to the regulation of SNK-SPAR signal pathway.ZBPYR may play a role in protecting and maintaining the normal morphology and structure of dendritic spines,which may be achieved by inhibiting the excessive activation of NMDA receptors.

  6. Glutamate transporter EAAT4 is increased in hippocampal astrocytes following lateral fluid-percussion injury in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jae-Hyuk; Herrero, Raquel; Chen, Gang; Hazell, Alan S

    2007-06-18

    Functional impairment of glutamate transporters contributes to excitotoxic damage and exacerbation of injury in certain neurodegenerative disorders. Several high-affinity sodium-dependent glutamate transporters have been cloned thus far. Of these, EAAT4 is abundantly expressed in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum in rats. However, little is currently known regarding levels of EAAT4 following traumatic brain injury (TBI). In this study, EAAT4 changes were examined for up to 7 days after moderate fluid-percussion by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. TBI caused a 20% and 25% increase in EAAT4 levels in the injured hippocampus at day 3 and day 7 following the insult. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed this increase to be localized in cells exhibiting morphological characteristics of astrocytes. In addition, increased EAAT4 immunoreactivity was observed in astrocytes in the ipsilateral cortex and cerebellum at day 3 post-injury that persisted up to 7 days after the insult. Given the reported novel characteristics of chloride conductance displayed by this transporter, our findings of increased EAAT4 levels suggest this protein may play an important role in the pathophysiology of TBI.

  7. Modulateurs du transport vésiculaire du glutamate : développement d’outils pharmacologiques et de diagnostic pour la maladie d’Alzheimer

    OpenAIRE

    Favre-Besse, Franck-Cyril

    2012-01-01

    Vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) are involved in the recapture and storage of glutamate from cytol to secretory synaptic vesicules. Since their recent characterization in 2000, their implication in several neurodegenerative disorders have been demonstrated. They play a crucial role in glutamatergic neurotransmission. Natural dyes, such as Rose Bengal and Tryptan Blue are the best known inhibitors with IC50 values of 25 and 50 nM, respectively. Firstly, we designed and optimized a ser...

  8. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH)-containing neurons in the immature rat hippocampal formation: light and electron microscopic features and colocalization with glutamate decarboxylase and parvalbumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, X X; Toth, Z; Schultz, L; Ribak, C E; Baram, T Z

    1998-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) excites hippocampal neurons and induces death of selected CA3 pyramidal cells in immature rats. These actions of CRH require activation of specific receptors that are abundant in CA3 during early postnatal development. Given the dramatic effects of CRH on hippocampal neurons and the absence of CRH-containing afferents to this region, we hypothesized that a significant population of CRHergic neurons exists in developing rat hippocampus. This study defined and characterized hippocampal CRH-containing cells by using immunocytochemistry, ultrastructural examination, and colocalization with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-synthesizing enzyme and calcium-binding proteins. Numerous, large CRH-immunoreactive (ir) neurons were demonstrated in CA3 strata pyramidale and oriens, fewer were observed in the corresponding layers of CA1, and smaller CRH-ir cells were found in stratum lacunosum-moleculare of Ammon's horn. In the dentate gyrus, CRH-ir somata resided in the granule cell layer and hilus. Ultrastructurally, CRH-ir neurons had aspiny dendrites and were postsynaptic to both asymmetric and symmetric synapses. CRH-ir axon terminals formed axosomatic and axodendritic symmetric synapses with pyramidal and granule cells. Other CRH-ir terminals synapsed on axon initial segments of principal neurons. Most CRH-ir neurons were coimmunolabeled for glutamate decarboxylase (GAD)-65 and GAD-67 and the majority also contained parvalbumin, but none were labeled for calbindin. These results confirm the identity of hippocampal CRH-ir cells as GABAergic interneurons. Further, a subpopulation of neurons immunoreactive for both CRH and parvalbumin and located within and adjacent to the principal cell layers consists of basket and chandelier cells. Thus, axon terminals of CRH-ir interneurons are strategically positioned to influence the excitability of the principal hippocampal neurons via release of both CRH and GABA.

  9. The impact of corticothalamic feedback on the output dynamics of a thalamocortical neurone model: the role of synapse location and metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emri, Z; Antal, K; Crunelli, V

    2003-01-01

    The spatio-temporal integration of cortical excitatory postsynaptic potentials was investigated in a multi-compartment model of a thalamocortical neurone. Consistent with experimental data, cortical excitatory postsynaptic potentials contained a metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated component and were generated by synapses located on distal dendrites. Within this framework, three synaptic distributions (each with equal maximal synaptic conductances) were compared: symmetric, with synapses distributed equally between all dendritic trees, single-dendrite, where synapses were allocated on all distal segments of one dendrite, and single-segment, which comprised one synapse on a single dendritic compartment. We addressed three main issues: (1) the propagation of cortical excitatory postsynaptic potentials to the soma, (2) the interaction of cortical excitatory postsynaptic potentials with proximally generated retinal excitatory postsynaptic potentials, and (3) the effectiveness of cortical excitatory postsynaptic potentials in entraining and perturbing the delta oscillation. The somatic and dendritic amplitudes of the cortical excitatory postsynaptic potentials depended on the distribution of the synapses, being largest and smallest, respectively, for the symmetric distribution, and smallest and largest, respectively, for the single-segment distribution. When a retinal excitatory postsynaptic potential followed a subthreshold cortical excitatory postsynaptic potential with a short (2-200 ms) delay, its ability to evoke action potentials was increased, with single-segment cortical excitatory postsynaptic potentials having the longest-lasting facilitatory effect. When a retinal excitatory postsynaptic potential arrived with a longer delay (210-400 ms), the effect of the cortical excitatory postsynaptic potential was to decrease the number of retinally evoked action potentials. These facilitatory and depressant effects of the cortical excitatory postsynaptic potentials

  10. Involvement of calpain/p35-p25/Cdk5/NMDAR signaling pathway in glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in cultured rat retinal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanying Miao

    Full Text Available We investigated possible involvement of a calpain/p35-p25/cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 signaling pathway in modifying NMDA receptors (NMDARs in glutamate-induced injury of cultured rat retinal neurons. Glutamate treatment decreased cell viability and induced cell apoptosis, which was accompanied by an increase in Cdk5 and p-Cdk5(T15 protein levels. The Cdk5 inhibitor roscovitine rescued the cell viability and inhibited the cell apoptosis. In addition, the protein levels of both calpain 2 and calpain-specific alpha-spectrin breakdown products (SBDPs, which are both Ca(2+-dependent, were elevated in glutamate-induced cell injury. The protein levels of Cdk5, p-Cdk5(T15, calpain 2 and SBDPs tended to decline with glutamate treatments of more than 9 h. Furthermore, the elevation of SBDPs was attenuated by either D-APV, a NMDAR antagonist, or CNQX, a non-NMDAR antagonist, but was hardly changed by the inhibitors of intracellular calcium stores dantrolene and xestospongin. Moreover, the Cdk5 co-activator p35 was significantly up-regulated, whereas its cleaved product p25 expression showed a transient increase. Glutamate treatment for less than 9 h also considerably enhanced the ratio of the Cdk5-phosphorylated NMDAR subunit NR2A at Ser1232 site (p-NR2A(S1232 and NR2A (p-NR2A(S1232/NR2A, and caused a translocation of p-NR2A(S1232 from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. The enhanced p-NR2A(S1232 was inhibited by roscovitine, but augmented by over-expression of Cdk5. Calcium imaging experiments further showed that intracellular Ca(2+ concentrations ([Ca(2+](i of retinal cells were steadily increased following glutamate treatments of 2 h, 6 h and 9 h. All these results suggest that the activation of the calpain/p35-p25/Cdk5 signaling pathway may contribute to glutamate neurotoxicity in the retina by up-regulating p-NR2A(S1232 expression.

  11. Modulation of glutamatergic transmission by metabotropic glutamate receptor activation in second-order neurons of the guinea pig nucleus tractus solitarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, Yoshiaki; Kimura, Satoko; Haji, Akira

    2014-09-18

    Activity of second-order relay neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) is regulated by peripheral and intrinsic synaptic inputs, and modulation of those inputs by metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) has been proposed. This study investigated effects of mGluR activation on glutamatergic transmission in the NTS second-order neurons of guinea pigs. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from the brainstem slices revealed that activation of mGluRs exerted its effects on the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) but not on the amplitude. The sEPSC frequency was increased by an agonist of group I mGluRs, and it was decreased by an mGluR1 antagonist but not by an mGluR5 antagonist. The agonists of group II and III mGluRs decreased the sEPSC frequency, while their antagonists alone had no effect. Perfusion of cystine or TBOA, either of which elevates extracellular glutamate concentration, resulted in an increase in the sEPSC frequency, leaving the amplitude unchanged. The increased frequency of sEPSCs was returned to control by an mGluR1 antagonist. The tractus solitarius-evoked EPSCs were not altered by an agonist of group I mGluRs, whereas they were decreased along with an increase in paired-pulse ratio by agonists of group II and III mGluRs. These results suggest that mGluRs are present at the presynaptic sites in the NTS second-order neurons in guinea pigs. The mGluR1s function to facilitate the release of glutamate from axon terminals of intrinsic interneurons and the group II and III mGluRs play an inhibitory role in glutamatergic transmission.

  12. Effects of KR-33028, a novel Na+/H+ exchanger-1 inhibitor, on glutamate-induced neuronal cell death and ischemia-induced cerebral infarct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bo Kyung; Lee, Dong Ha; Park, Sok; Park, Sung Lyea; Yoon, Jae-Seok; Lee, Min Goo; Lee, Sunkyung; Yi, Kyu Yang; Yoo, Sung Eun; Lee, Kyung Hee; Kim, You-Sun; Lee, Soo Hwan; Baik, Eun Joo; Moon, Chang-Hyun; Jung, Yi-Sook

    2009-01-12

    We investigated the effects of a novel Na(+)/H(+) exchanger-1 (NHE-1) inhibitor KR-33028 on glutamate excitotoxicity in cultured neuron cells in vitro and cerebral infarct in vivo by comparing its potency with that of zoniporide, a well-known, highly potent NHE-1 inhibitor. KR-33028 inhibited NHE-1 activation in a concentration-dependent manner (IC(50)=2.2 nM), with 18-fold greater potency than that of zoniporide (IC(50)=40.7 nM). KR-33028 significantly attenuated glutamate-induced LDH release with approximately 100 times lower EC(25) than that of zoniporide in cortical neurons in vitro (EC(25) of 0.007 and 0.81 microM, respectively), suggesting its 100-fold greater potency than zoniporide in producing anti-necrotic effect. In addition, the EC(50) of KR-33028 for anti-apoptotic effect was 100 times lower than that of zoniporide shown by TUNEL positivity (0.005 and 0.62 microM, respectively) and caspase-3 activity (0.01 and 2.64 microM, respectively). Furthermore, the EC(50) value of KR-33028 against glutamate-induced intracellular Ca(2+) overload was also 100 times lower than that of zoniporide (EC(50) of 0.004 and 0.65 microM, respectively). In the in vivo cerebral infarct model (60 min middle cerebral artery occlusion followed by 24 h reperfusion), KR-33028 reduced infarct size in a dose-dependent manner. Its ED(25) value, however, was quite similar to that of zoniporide (ED(25) of 0.072 and 0.097 mg/kg, respectively). Hence these results suggest that the novel NHE-1 inhibitor, KR-33028, could be an efficient therapeutic tool to protect neuronal cells against ischemic injury.

  13. Dopamine D2 receptor desensitization by dopamine or corticotropin releasing factor in ventral tegmental area neurons is associated with increased glutamate release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimitvilai, Sudarat; Herman, Melissa; You, Chang; Arora, Devinder S; McElvain, Maureen A; Roberto, Marisa; Brodie, Mark S

    2014-07-01

    Neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) are the source of dopaminergic (DAergic) input to important brain regions related to addiction. Prolonged exposure of these VTA neurons to moderate concentrations of dopamine (DA) causes a time-dependent decrease in DA-induced inhibition, a complex desensitization called DA inhibition reversal (DIR). DIR is mediated by conventional protein kinase C (cPKC) through concurrent stimulation of D2 and D1-like DA receptors, or by D2 stimulation concurrent with activation of some Gq-linked receptors. Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) acts via Gq, and can modulate glutamater neurotransmission in the VTA. In the present study, we used brain slice electrophysiology to characterize the interaction of DA, glutamate antagonists, and CRF agonists in the induction and maintenance of DIR in the VTA. Glutamate receptor antagonists blocked induction but not maintenance of DIR. Putative blockers of neurotransmitter release and store-operated calcium channels blocked and reversed DIR. CRF and the CRF agonist urocortin reversed inhibition produced by the D2 agonist quinpirole, consistent with our earlier work indicating that Gq activation reverses quinpirole-mediated inhibition. In whole cell recordings, the combination of urocortin and quinpirole, but not either agent alone, increased spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) in VTA neurons. Likewise, the combination of a D1-like receptor agonist and quinpirole, but not either agent alone, increased sEPSCs in VTA neurons. In summary, desensitization of D2 receptors induced by dopamine or CRF on DAergic VTA neurons is associated with increased glutamatergic signaling in the VTA.

  14. β-Lactamase inhibitor, clavulanic acid, attenuates ethanol intake and increases glial glutamate transporters expression in alcohol preferring rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakami, Alqassem Y; Sari, Youssef

    2017-09-14

    Studies from our laboratory showed that upregulation of glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and cystine-glutamate exchanger (xCT) expression with ceftriaxone, β-lactam antibiotic, in the brain was associated with attenuation of ethanol consumption. In this study, we tested clavulanic acid, which is another β-lactam compound with negligible antimicrobial activity, on ethanol consumption and expression of GLT-1, xCT and glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) in male alcohol-preferring (P) rats. Clavulanic acid has the central β-lactam pharmacophore that is critical for the upregulation of GLT-1 and xCT expression. We found that clavulanic acid, at 5mg/kg (i.p.) dose, significantly attenuated ethanol consumption and ethanol preference in P rats as compared to vehicle-treated group. This effect was associated with a significant increase in water intake in clavulanic acid treated group. Importantly, we found that clavulanic acid increased the expression of GLT-1 and xCT in nucleus accumbens. However, there was no effect of clavulanic acid on GLAST expression in the nucleus accumbens. Clavulanic acid treatment did not upregulate the expression of GLT-1, xCT and GLAST in prefrontal cortex. These findings revealed that clavulanic acid at 20-40 fold lower dose than ceftriaxone can attenuate ethanol consumption, in part through upregulation of GLT-1 and xCT expression in the nucleus accumbens. Thus, we suggest that clavulanic acid might be used as an alternative option to ceftriaxone to attenuate ethanol drinking behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Chronic stress alters the dendritic morphology of callosal neurons and the acute glutamate stress response in the rat medial prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luczynski, Pauline; Moquin, Luc; Gratton, Alain

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported that interhemispheric regulation of medial prefrontal cortex (PFC)-mediated stress responses is subserved by glutamate (GLU)- containing callosal neurons. Evidence of chronic stress-induced dendritic and spine atrophy among PFC pyramidal neurons led us to examine how chronic restraint stress (CRS) might alter the apical dendritic morphology of callosal neurons and the acute GLU stress responses in the left versus right PFC. Morphometric analyses of retrogradely labeled, dye-filled PFC callosal neurons revealed hemisphere-specific CRS-induced dendritic retraction; whereas significant dendritic atrophy occurred primarily within the distal arbor of left PFC neurons, it was observed within both the proximal and distal arbor of right PFC neurons. Overall, CRS also significantly reduced spine densities in both hemispheres with the greatest loss occurring among left PFC neurons, mostly at the distal extent of the arbor. While much of the overall decrease in dendritic spine density was accounted by the loss of thin spines, the density of mushroom-shaped spines, despite being fewer in number, was halved. Using microdialysis we found that, compared to controls, basal PFC GLU levels were significantly reduced in both hemispheres of CRS animals and that their GLU response to 30 min of tail-pinch stress was significantly prolonged in the left, but not the right PFC. Together, these findings show that a history of chronic stress alters the dendritic morphology and spine density of PFC callosal neurons and suggest a mechanism by which this might disrupt the interhemispheric regulation of PFC-mediated responses to subsequent stressors.

  16. Expression of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1a in a rat cortical neuronal model of in vitro mechanical injury and the effects of its competitive antagonist (RS)-1-aminoindan-1, 5-dicarboxylic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Cao; Mantao Chen; Xiujue Zheng; Gu Li; Liang Wen; Xiaofeng Yang

    2011-01-01

    The present study established a rat cortical neuronal model of in vitro mechanical injury. At 30 min-utes after injury, the survival rate of the injured cortical neurons was decreased compared with normal neurons, and was gradually decreased with aggravated degree of injury. Reverse transcrip-tion-polymerase chain reaction results showed that at 1 hour after injury, there was increased ex-pression of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1a in cortical neurons. Immunohistochemical staining results showed that at 30 minutes after injury, the number of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1a-positive cells increased compared with normal neurons. At 12 hours after injury, lactate dehy-drogenase activity in the (RS)-1-aminoindan-1, 5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA)-treated injury neurons was significantly decreased than that in the pure injury group. At 1 hour after injury, intracellular free Ca2+ concentration was markedly decreased in the AIDA-treated injury neurons than that in the pure injury neurons. These findings suggest that after mechanical injury to cortical neurons, metabotropic glutamate receptor 1a expression increased. The resulting increase in intracellular free Ca2+ con-centration was blocked by AIDA, indicating that AIDA exhibits neuroprotective effects after me-chanical injury.

  17. Effects of glutamate and nimodipine on survival rate of embryonic rat neuronal stem cells cultured in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohong Lü; Hailong Fu; Qiang Sun; Li Cui; Dihui Ma; Weihong Lin

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: At least three types of calcium ion channel (T, N, and L) have been recognized in nerve cells, but only the L type of channel is sensitive to drugs. Theoretically, nimodipine can lead to L-type channel inactivation and prevent calcium ion inflow, thereby exhibiting protective effects on nerve cells.OBJECTIVE: To observe the protective effects of nimodipine on glutamate-induced injury to embryonic rat neural stem cells, and to make a comparison with MK-801, a nonselective glutamate receptor antagonist.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: The present in vitro experiment pertaining to neural stem cells was performed at the Department of Neurology, First Hospital, Jilin University between January 2005 and December 2006.MATERIALS: Glutamate was sourced from the Shanghai Biological Research Institute of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Nimodipine was provided by Bayer Company, Germany. Brain tissue was taken from Wistar rats on day 15 of gestation for isolation and culture of neural stem cells.METHODS: Passage 2 neural stem cell spheres were taken for preparation of single cell suspension. The prepared single cell suspension was divided into 4 groups: (1) Normal control, normally cultured. (2)Glutamate, cultured with 50, 100, 200, 500, and 1000 μ mol/L glutamate. (3) Nimodipine, received a 30-minute nimodipine [1 ×(10-8-10-2) g/L] culture followed by a glutamate (200 μ mol/L) treatment step. (4)MK-801, given as 30- minute MK-801 (100 μ mol/L) culture, followed by a glutamate (200 μ mol/L)treatment step.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Determination of glutamate-induced cell death by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay; calculation of neural stem cell survival rate following addition of nimodipine.RESULTS: The survival rate of neural stem cells was approximately 25.26% following 24 hour 50 μ mol/L glutamate culture and gradually decreased as the glutamate dose increased (P < 0.05 0.01). Only 9.27% of neural stem cells survived when the glutamate dose was 1 000 μ mol

  18. Clavulanic acid enhances glutamate transporter subtype I (GLT-1) expression and decreases reinforcing efficacy of cocaine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae; John, Joel; Langford, Dianne; Walker, Ellen; Ward, Sara; Rawls, Scott M

    2016-03-01

    The β-lactam antibiotic ceftriaxone (CTX) reduces cocaine reinforcement and relapse in preclinical assays through a mechanism involving activation of glutamate transporter subtype 1 (GLT-1). However, its poor brain penetrability and intravenous administration route may limit its therapeutic utility for indications related to CNS diseases. An alternative is clavulanic acid (CA), a structural analog of CTX that retains the β-lactam core required for GLT-1 activity but displays enhanced brain penetrability and oral activity relative to CTX. Here, we tested the hypothesis that CA (1, 10 mg/kg ip) would enhance GLT-1 expression and decrease cocaine self-administration (SA) in mice, but at lower doses than CTX. Experiments revealed that GLT-1 transporter expression in the nucleus accumbens of mice treated with repeated CA (1, 10 mg/kg) was enhanced relative to saline-treated mice. Repeated CA treatment (1 mg/kg) reduced the reinforcing efficacy of cocaine (0.56 mg/kg/inf) in mice maintained on a progressive-ratio (PR) schedule of reinforcement but did not affect acquisition of cocaine SA under fixed-ratio responding or acquisition or retention of learning. These findings suggest that the β-lactamase inhibitor CA can activate the cellular glutamate reuptake system in the brain reward circuit and reduce cocaine's reinforcing efficacy at 100-fold lower doses than CTX.

  19. Glutamate Transporters Regulate Extrasynaptic NMDA Receptor Modulation of Kv2.1 Potassium Channels

    OpenAIRE

    Mulholland, Patrick J.; Carpenter-Hyland, Ezekiel P.; Hearing, Matthew C.; Becker, Howard C.; Woodward, John J.; Chandler, L. Judson

    2008-01-01

    Delayed-rectifier Kv2.1 potassium channels regulate somatodendritic excitability during periods of repetitive, high-frequency activity. Recent evidence suggests Kv2.1 channel modulation is linked to glutamatergic neurotransmission. Since NMDA-type glutamate receptors are critical regulators of synaptic plasticity, we investigated NMDA receptor modulation of Kv2.1 channels in rodent hippocampus and cortex. Bath application of NMDA potently unclustered and dephosphorylated Kv2.1 and produced a ...

  20. Clinical aspects of urea cycle dysfunction and altered brain energy metabolism on modulation of glutamate receptors and transporters in acute and chronic hyperammonemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natesan, Vijayakumar; Mani, Renuka; Arumugam, Ramakrishnan

    2016-07-01

    In living organisms, nitrogen arise primarily as ammonia (NH3) and ammonium (NH4(+)), which is a main component of the nucleic acid pool and proteins. Although nitrogen is essential for growth and maintenance in animals, but when the nitrogenous compounds exceeds the normal range which can quickly lead to toxicity and death. Urea cycle is the common pathway for the disposal of excess nitrogen through urea biosynthesis. Hyperammonemia is a consistent finding in many neurological disorders including congenital urea cycle disorders, reye's syndrome and acute liver failure leads to deleterious effects. Hyperammonemia and liver failure results in glutamatergic neurotransmission which contributes to the alteration in the function of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway, modulates the important cerebral process. Even though ammonia is essential for normal functioning of the central nervous system (CNS), in particular high concentrations of ammonia exposure to the brain leads to the alterations of glutamate transport by the transporters. Several glutamate transporters have been recognized in the central nervous system and each has a unique physiological property and distribution. The loss of glutamate transporter activity in brain during acute liver failure and hyperammonemia is allied with increased extracellular brain glutamate concentrations which may be conscientious for the cerebral edema and ultimately cell death.

  1. Functional identification of activity-regulated, high-affinity glutamine transport in hippocampal neurons inhibited by riluzole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Jeffrey D

    2017-07-01

    Glutamine (Gln) is considered the preferred precursor for the neurotransmitter pool of glutamate (Glu), the major excitatory transmitter in the mammalian CNS. Here, an activity-regulated, high-affinity Gln transport system is described in developing and mature neuron-enriched hippocampal cultures that is potently inhibited by riluzole (IC50 1.3 ± 0.5 μM), an anti-glutamatergic drug, and is blocked by low concentrations of 2-(methylamino)isobutyrate (MeAIB), a system A transport inhibitor. K(+) -stimulated MeAIB transport displays an affinity (Km ) for MeAIB of 37 ± 1.2 μM, saturates at ~ 200 μM, is dependent on extracellular Ca(2+) , and is blocked by inhibition of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. Spontaneous MeAIB transport is also dependent on extracellullar Ca(2+) and voltage-gated calcium channels, but is also blocked by the Na(+) channel blocker tetrodotoxin, by Glu receptor antagonists, and by GABA indicating its dependence on intact neural circuits driven by endogenous glutamatergic activity. The transport of MeAIB itself does not rely on Ca(2+) , but on Na(+) ions, and is pH sensitive. Activity-regulated, riluzole-sensitive spontaneous and K(+) -stimulated transport is minimal at 7-8 days in vitro, coordinately induced during the next 2 weeks and is maximally expressed by days in vitro > 20; the known period for maturation of the Glu/Gln cycle and regulated pre-synaptic Glu release. Competition analyses with various amino acids indicate that Gln is the most likely physiological substrate. Activity-regulated Gln/MeAIB transport is not observed in astrocytes. The functional identification of activity-regulated, high-affinity, riluzole-sensitive Gln/MeAIB transport in hippocampal neurons may have important ramifications in the neurobiology of activity-stimulated pre-synaptic Glu release, the Glu/Gln cycle between astrocytes and neurons, and neuronal Glu-induced excitotoxicity. Cover Image for this issue: doi: 10.1111/jnc.13805. © 2017

  2. Partial mitochondrial complex I inhibition induces oxidative damage and perturbs glutamate transport in primary retinal cultures. Relevance to Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beretta, Simone; Wood, John P M; Derham, Barry; Sala, Gessica; Tremolizzo, Lucio; Ferrarese, Carlo; Osborne, Neville N

    2006-11-01

    Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited form of visual loss, due to selective degeneration of retinal ganglion cells. Despite the established aetiological association between LHON and mitochondrial DNA mutations affecting complex I of the electron transport chain, the pathophysiology of this disorder remains obscure. Primary rat retinal cultures were exposed to increasing concentrations of rotenone to titrate complex I inhibition. Neural cells were more sensitive than Müller glial cells to rotenone toxicity. Rotenone induced an increase in mitochondrial-derived free radicals and lipid peroxidation. Sodium-dependent glutamate uptake, which is mostly mediated by the glutamate transporter GLAST expressed by Müller glial cells, was reduced dose-dependently by rotenone with no changes in GLAST expression. Our findings suggest that complex I-derived free radicals and disruption of glutamate transport might represent key elements for explaining the selective retinal ganglion cell death in LHON.

  3. Glutamate signalling in bone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen eBrakspear

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical loading plays a key role in the physiology of bone, allowing bone to functionally adapt to its environment, however characterisation of the signalling events linking load to bone formation is incomplete. A screen for genes associated with mechanical load-induced bone formation identified the glutamate transporter GLAST, implicating the excitatory amino acid, glutamate, in the mechanoresponse. When an osteogenic load (10N, 10Hz was externally applied to the rat ulna, GLAST (EAAT1 mRNA, was significantly down-regulated in osteocytes in the loaded limb. Functional components from each stage of the glutamate signalling pathway have since been identified within bone, including proteins necessary for calcium-mediated glutamate exocytosis, receptors, transporters and signal propagation. Activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors has been shown to regulate the phenotype of osteoblasts and osteoclasts in vitro and bone mass in vivo. Furthermore, glutamatergic nerves have been identified in the vicinity of bone cells expressing glutamate receptors in vivo. However, it is not yet known how a glutamate signalling event is initiated in bone or its physiological significance. This review will examine the role of the glutamate signalling pathway in bone, with emphasis on the functions of glutamate transporters in osteoblasts.

  4. Glutamatergic and Dopaminergic Neurons in the Mouse Ventral Tegmental Area

    OpenAIRE

    Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Qi, Jia; Wang, Hui-Ling; Zhang, Shiliang; Morales, Marisela

    2015-01-01

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) comprises dopamine (DA), GABA and glutamate (Glu) neurons. Some rat VTA Glu neurons, expressing vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGluT2), co-express tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). While transgenic mice are now being used in attempts to determine the role of VGluT2/TH neurons in reward and neuronal signaling, such neurons have not been characterized in mouse tissue. By cellular detection of VGluT2-mRNA and TH-immunoreactivity (TH-IR), we determined the cellular e...

  5. Effects of (R)-(-)-5-methyl-1-nicotinoyl-2-pyrazoline on glutamate transporter 1 and cysteine/glutamate exchanger as well as ethanol drinking behavior in male, alcohol-preferring rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aal-Aaboda, Munaf; Alhaddad, Hasan; Osowik, Francis; Nauli, Surya M; Sari, Youssef

    2015-06-01

    Alcohol consumption is largely associated with alterations in the extracellular glutamate concentrations in several brain reward regions. We recently showed that glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) is downregulated following chronic exposure to ethanol for 5 weeks in alcohol-preferring (P) rats and that upregulation of the GLT-1 levels in nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex results, in part, in attenuating ethanol consumption. Cystine glutamate antiporter (xCT) is also downregulated after chronic ethanol exposure in P rats, and its upregulation could be valuable in attenuating ethanol drinking. This study examines the effect of a synthetic compound, (R)-(-)-5-methyl-1-nicotinoyl-2-pyrazoline (MS-153), on ethanol drinking and expressions of GLT-1 and xCT in the amygdala and the hippocampus of P rats. P rats were exposed to continuous free-choice access to water, 15% and 30% ethanol, and food for 5 weeks, after which they received treatments of MS-153 or vehicle for 5 days. The results show that MS-153 treatment significantly reduces ethanol consumption. It was revealed that GLT-1 and xCT expressions were downregulated in both the amygdala and the hippocampus of ethanol-vehicle-treated rats (ethanol-vehicle group) compared with water-control animals. MS-153 treatment upregulated GLT-1 and xCT expressions in these brain regions. These findings demonstrate an important role for MS-153 in these glutamate transporters for the attenuation of ethanol-drinking behavior.

  6. An essential role of acetylcholine-glutamate synergy at habenular synapses in nicotine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frahm, Silke; Antolin-Fontes, Beatriz; Görlich, Andreas; Zander, Johannes-Friedrich; Ahnert-Hilger, Gudrun; Ibañez-Tallon, Ines

    2015-12-01

    A great deal of interest has been focused recently on the habenula and its critical role in aversion, negative-reward and drug dependence. Using a conditional mouse model of the ACh-synthesizing enzyme choline acetyltransferase (Chat), we report that local elimination of acetylcholine (ACh) in medial habenula (MHb) neurons alters glutamate corelease and presynaptic facilitation. Electron microscopy and immuno-isolation analyses revealed colocalization of ACh and glutamate vesicular transporters in synaptic vesicles (SVs) in the central IPN. Glutamate reuptake in SVs prepared from the IPN was increased by ACh, indicating vesicular synergy. Mice lacking CHAT in habenular neurons were insensitive to nicotine-conditioned reward and withdrawal. These data demonstrate that ACh controls the quantal size and release frequency of glutamate at habenular synapses, and suggest that the synergistic functions of ACh and glutamate may be generally important for modulation of cholinergic circuit function and behavior.

  7. Inhibition of glutamine synthesis induces glutamate dehydrogenase-dependent ammonia fixation into alanine in co-cultures of astrocytes and neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadsetan, Sherry; Bak, Lasse K; Sørensen, Michael; Keiding, Susanne; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Ott, Peter; Leke, Renata; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2011-09-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that ammonia exposure of neurons and astrocytes in co-culture leads to net synthesis not only of glutamine but also of alanine. The latter process involves the concerted action of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and alanine aminotransferase (ALAT). In the present study it was investigated if the glutamine synthetase (GS) inhibitor methionine sulfoximine (MSO) would enhance alanine synthesis by blocking the GS-dependent ammonia scavenging process. Hence, co-cultures of neurons and astrocytes were incubated for 2.5h with [U-(13)C]glucose to monitor de novo synthesis of alanine and glutamine in the absence and presence of 5.0 mM NH(4)Cl and 10 mM MSO. Ammonia exposure led to increased incorporation of label but not to a significant increase in the amount of these amino acids. However, in the presence of MSO, glutamine synthesis was blocked and synthesis of alanine increased leading to an elevated content intra- as well as extracellularly of this amino acid. Treatment with MSO led to a dramatic decrease in glutamine content and increased the intracellular contents of glutamate and aspartate. The large increase in alanine during exposure to MSO underlines the importance of the GDH and ALAT biosynthetic pathway for ammonia fixation, and it points to the use of a GS inhibitor to ameliorate the brain toxicity and edema induced by hyperammonemia, events likely related to glutamine synthesis.

  8. Seladin-1/DHCR24 Is Neuroprotective by Associating EAAT2 Glutamate Transporter to Lipid Rafts in Experimental Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Jiménez, Macarena; Martínez-López, Diego; Gabandé-Rodríguez, Enrique; Martín-Segura, Adrian; Lizasoain, Ignacio; Ledesma, María D; Dotti, Carlos G; Moro, María A

    2016-01-01

    3β-Hydroxysteroid-Δ24 reductase (DHCR24) or selective alzheimer disease indicator 1 (seladin-1), an enzyme of cholesterol biosynthetic pathway, has been implicated in neuroprotection, oxidative stress, and inflammation. However, its role in ischemic stroke remains unexplored. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of seladin-1/DHCR24 using an experimental stroke model in mice. Dhcr24(+/-) and wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. In another set of experiments, WT mice were treated intraperitoneally either with vehicle or U18666A (seladin-1/DHCR24 inhibitor, 10 mg/kg) 30 minutes after middle cerebral artery occlusion. Brains were removed 48 h after middle cerebral artery occlusion for infarct volume determination. For protein expression determination, peri-infarct region was obtained 24 h after ischemia, and Western blot or cytometric bead array was performed. Dhcr24(+/-) mice displayed larger infarct volumes after middle cerebral artery occlusion than their WT littermates. Treatment of WT mice with the seladin-1/DHCR24 inhibitor U18666A also increased ischemic lesion. Inflammation-related mediators were increased after ischemia in Dhcr24(+/-) mice compared with WT counterparts. Consistent with a role of cholesterol in proper function of glutamate transporter EAAT2 in membrane lipid rafts, we found a decreased association of EAAT2 with lipid rafts after ischemia when DHCR24 is genetically deleted or pharmacologically inhibited. Accordingly, treatment with U18666A decreases [(3)H]-glutamate uptake in cultured astrocytes. These results support the idea that lipid raft integrity, ensured by seladin-1/DHCR24, plays a crucial protective role in the ischemic brain by guaranteeing EAAT2-mediated uptake of glutamate excess. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Towards bridging the gap between acid-base transporters and neuronal excitability modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Chen, Li-Ming

    2014-01-01

    pH homeostasis is a fundamental regulator of the function of the central nervous system. Dysfunction of acid-base transporters often results in disturbance of neuronal excitability. In a latest issue of Journal of Neuroscience, Jones et al. report that increasing intracellular bicarbonate concentration substantially stimulates the excitability of pyramidal neurons from mouse hippocampus by inhibiting KCNQ potassium channel. The finding shed important new light in understanding the molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of neuronal excitability by acid-base transporters.

  10. TATVHL peptide-grafted alginate/poly(γ-glutamic acid) scaffolds with inverted colloidal crystal topology for neuronal differentiation of iPS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yung-Chih; Chung, Chiu-Yen

    2012-12-01

    The neuronal differentiation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells in scaffolding biomaterials is an emerging issue in nervous regeneration and repair. This study presents the production of neuron-lineage cells from iPS cells in inverted colloidal crystal (ICC) scaffolds comprising alginate, poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA), and TATVHL peptide. The ability of iPS cells to differentiate toward neurons in the constructs was demonstrated by flow-cytometeric sorting and immunochemical staining. The results revealed that hexagonally arrayed microspheres molded alginate/γ-PGA hydrogel into ICC topology with adequate interconnected pores. An increase in the quantity of surface TATVHL peptide enhanced the atomic ratio of nitrogen and the adhesion efficiency of iPS cells in constructs. However, the effect of TATVHL peptide on the viability of iPS cells was insignificant. The adhesion and viability of iPS cells in ICC constructs was higher than those in freeform ones. TATVHL peptide raised the percentage of β III tubulin-identified cells differentiating from iPS cells, indicating that TATVHL peptide stimulated the neuronal development in alginate/γ-PGA ICC constructs. TATVHL peptide-grafted alginate/γ-PGA ICC scaffolds can be promising for establishing nerve tissue from iPS cells.

  11. Glutamate receptor δ1 induces preferentially inhibitory presynaptic differentiation of cortical neurons by interacting with neurexins through cerebellin precursor protein subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasumura, Misato; Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Lee, Sung-Jin; Uemura, Takeshi; Joo, Jae-Yeol; Mishina, Masayoshi

    2012-06-01

    Glutamate receptor (GluR) δ1 is widely expressed in the developing forebrain, whereas GluRδ2 is selectively expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells. Recently, we found that trans-synaptic interaction of postsynaptic GluRδ2 and pre-synaptic neurexins (NRXNs) through cerebellin precursor protein (Cbln) 1 mediates excitatory synapse formation in the cerebellum. Thus, a question arises whether GluRδ1 regulates synapse formation in the forebrain. In this study, we showed that the N-terminal domain of GluRδ1 induced inhibitory presynaptic differentiation of some populations of cultured cortical neurons. When Cbln1 or Cbln2 was added to cultures, GluRδ1 expressed in HEK293T cells induced preferentially inhibitory presynaptic differentiation of cultured cortical neurons. The synaptogenic activity of GluRδ1 was suppressed by the addition of the extracellular domain of NRXN1α or NRXN1β containing splice segment 4. Cbln subtypes directly bound to the N-terminal domain of GluRδ1. The synaptogenic activity of GluRδ1 in the presence of Cbln subtypes correlated well with their binding affinities. When transfected to cortical neurons, GluRδ1 stimulated inhibitory synapse formation in the presence of Cbln1 or Cbln2. These results together with differential interactions of Cbln subtypes with NRXN variants suggest that GluRδ1 induces preferentially inhibitory presynaptic differentiation of cortical neurons by interacting with NRXNs containing splice segment 4 through Cbln subtypes.

  12. Molecular Characterization of Native and Recom­binant Ionotrophic Glutamate Receptors Expressed in Neurons and Heterologous Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drasbek, Kim Ryun

    2005-01-01

    but one construct mediated GluR2 protein knockdown four days after transfection. Due to the low transfection efficiency of cultured primary neurons, GluR2 knockdown was estimated at the single cell level. Rectification properties in transfected neurons were analyzed followed by single cell RTPCR....... No inward rectification was seen in control neurons, while several neurons transfected with the same construct showed inward rectification, indicating GluR2 knockdown in surface expressed AMPARs. In addition, because no mEPSCs were observed at positive holding potentials in these neurons, synaptic AMPARs...

  13. Development of potent fluorescent polyamine toxins and application in labeling of ionotropic glutamate receptors in hippocampal neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørager, Niels Grøn; Jensen, Christel Barker; Rathje, Mette;

    2013-01-01

    The natural product argiotoxin-636 (ArgTX-636) found in the venom of the Argiope lobata spider is a potent open-channel blocker of ionotropic glutamate (iGlu) receptors, and recently, two analogues, ArgTX-75 and ArgTX-48, were identified with increased potency and selectivity for iGlu receptor...

  14. Progressive loss of glutamic acid decarboxylase, parvalbumin, and calbindin D28K immunoreactive neurons in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of adult rat with experimental hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Y; Chakrabortty, S; Drake, J M; Hattori, T

    1997-02-01

    The authors investigated functional neuronal changes in experimental hydrocephalus using immunohistochemical techniques for glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and two neuronal calcium-binding proteins: parvalbumin (PV) and calbindin D28K (CaBP). Hydrocephalus was induced in 16 adult Wistar rats by intracisternal injection of a kaolin solution, which was confirmed microscopically via atlantooccipital dural puncture. Four control rats received the same volume of sterile saline. Immunohistochemical staining for GAD, PV, and CaBP, and Nissl staining were performed at 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks after the injection. Hydrocephalus occurred in 90% of kaolin-injected animals with various degrees of ventricular dilation. In the cerebral cortex, GAD-, PV-, and CaBP-immunoreactive (IR) interneurons initially lost their stained processes together with a concomitant loss of homogeneous neuropil staining, followed by the reduction of their total number. With progressive ventricular dilation, GAD- and PV-IR axon terminals on the cortical pyramidal cells disappeared, whereas the number of CaBP-IR pyramidal cells decreased, and ultimately in the most severe cases of hydrocephalus, GAD, PV, and CaBP immunoreactivity were almost entirely diminished. In the hippocampus, GAD-, PV-, and CaBP-IR interneurons demonstrated a reduction of their processes and terminals surrounding the pyramidal cells, with secondary reduction of CaBP-IR pyramidal and granular cells. On the other hand, Nissl staining revealed almost no morphological changes induced by ischemia or neuronal degeneration even in the most severe cases of hydrocephalus. Hydrocephalus results in the progressive functional impairment of GAD-, PV-, and CaBP-IR neuronal systems in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, often before there is evidence of morphological injury. The initial injury of cortical and hippocampal interneurons suggests that the functional deafferentation from intrinsic projection fibers may be the initial neuronal event

  15. Blood Glutamate Scavenging: Insight into Neuroprotection

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander Zlotnik; Yoram Shapira; Matthew Boyko; Akiva Leibowitz

    2012-01-01

    Brain insults are characterized by a multitude of complex processes, of which glutamate release plays a major role. Deleterious excess of glutamate in the brain’s extracellular fluids stimulates glutamate receptors, which in turn lead to cell swelling, apoptosis, and neuronal death. These exacerbate neurological outcome. Approaches aimed at antagonizing the astrocytic and glial glutamate receptors have failed to demonstrate clinical benefit. Alternatively, eliminating excess glutamate from br...

  16. Association of the AMPA receptor-related postsynaptic density proteins GRIP and ABP with subsets of glutamate-sensitive neurons in the rat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gábriel, Robert; de Souza, Sunita; Ziff, Edward B; Witkovsky, Paul

    2002-07-22

    We used specific antibodies against two postsynaptic density proteins, GRIP (glutamate receptor interacting protein) and ABP (AMPA receptor-binding protein), to study their distribution in the rat retina. In the central nervous system, it has been shown that both proteins bind strongly to the AMPA glutamate receptor (GluR) 2/3 subunits, but not other GluRs, through a set of three PDZ domains. Western blots detected a single GRIP protein that was virtually identical in retina and brain, whereas retinal ABP corresponded to only one of three ABP peptides found in brain. The retinal distributions of GluR2/3, GRIP, and ABP immunoreactivity (IR) were similar but not identical. GluR2/3 immunoreactivity (IR) was abundant in both plexiform layers and in large perikarya. ABP IR was concentrated in large perikarya but was sparse in the plexiform layers, whereas GRIP IR was relatively more abundant in the plexiform layers than in perikarya. Immunolabel for these three antibodies consisted of puncta ABP IR was examined by double labeling subclasses of retinal neuron with characteristic marker proteins, e.g., calbindin. GRIP, ABP, and GluR2/3 IR were detected in horizontal cells, dopaminergic and glycinergic AII amacrine cells and large ganglion cells. Immunolabel was absent in rod bipolar and weak or absent in cholinergic amacrine cells. By using the tyramide method of signal amplification, a colocalization of GluR2/3 was found with either GRIP or ABP in horizontal cell terminals, and perikarya of amacrine and ganglion cells. Our results show that ABP and GRIP colocalize with GluR2/3 in particular subsets of retinal neuron, as was previously established for certain neurons in the brain.

  17. Neuroprotection Promoted by Guanosine Depends on Glutamine Synthetase and Glutamate Transporters Activity in Hippocampal Slices Subjected to Oxygen/Glucose Deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal-Cim, Tharine; Martins, Wagner C; Thomaz, Daniel T; Coelho, Victor; Poluceno, Gabriela Godoy; Lanznaster, Débora; Vandresen-Filho, Samuel; Tasca, Carla I

    2016-05-01

    Guanosine (GUO) has been shown to act as a neuroprotective agent against glutamatergic excitotoxicity by increasing glutamate uptake and decreasing its release. In this study, a putative effect of GUO action on glutamate transporters activity modulation was assessed in hippocampal slices subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD), an in vitro model of brain ischemia. Slices subjected to OGD showed increased excitatory amino acids release (measured by D-[(3)H]aspartate release) that was prevented in the presence of GUO (100 µM). The glutamate transporter blockers, DL-TBOA (10 µM), DHK (100 µM, selective inhibitor of GLT-1), and sulfasalazine (SAS, 250 µM, Xc(-) system inhibitor) decreased OGD-induced D-aspartate release. Interestingly, DHK or DL-TBOA blocked the decrease in glutamate release induced by GUO, whereas SAS did not modify the GUO effect. GUO protected hippocampal slices from cellular damage by modulation of glutamate transporters, however selective blockade of GLT-1 or Xc- system only did not affect this protective action of GUO. OGD decreased hippocampal glutamine synthetase (GS) activity and GUO recovered GS activity to control levels without altering the kinetic parameters of GS activity, thus suggesting GUO does not directly interact with GS. Additionally, the pharmacological inhibition of GS activity with methionine sulfoximine abolished the effect of GUO in reducing D-aspartate release and cellular damage evoked by OGD. Altogether, results in hippocampal slices subjected to OGD show that GUO counteracts the release of excitatory amino acids, stimulates the activity of GS, and decreases the cellular damage by modulation of glutamate transporters activity.

  18. High-Throughput Assay Development for Cystine-Glutamate Antiporter (xc-) Highlights Faster Cystine Uptake than Glutamate Release in Glioma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ajit G; Sattler, Rita; Tendyke, Karen; Loiacono, Kara A; Hansen, Hans; Sahni, Vishal; Hashizume, Yutaka; Rojas, Camilo; Slusher, Barbara S

    2015-01-01

    The cystine-glutamate antiporter (system xc-) is a Na+-independent amino acid transporter that exchanges extracellular cystine for intracellular glutamate. It is thought to play a critical role in cellular redox processes through regulation of intracellular glutathione synthesis via cystine uptake. In gliomas, system xc- expression is universally up-regulated while that of glutamate transporters down-regulated, leading to a progressive accumulation of extracellular glutamate and excitotoxic cell death of the surrounding non-tumorous tissue. Additionally, up-regulation of system xc- in activated microglia has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders mediated by excess glutamate. Consequently, system xc- is a new drug target for brain cancer and neuroinflammatory diseases associated with excess extracellular glutamate. Unfortunately no potent and selective small molecule system xc- inhibitors exist and to our knowledge, no high throughput screening (HTS) assay has been developed to identify new scaffolds for inhibitor design. To develop such an assay, various neuronal and non-neuronal human cells were evaluated as sources of system xc-. Human glioma cells were chosen based on their high system xc- activity. Using these cells, [14C]-cystine uptake and cystine-induced glutamate release assays were characterized and optimized with respect to cystine and protein concentrations and time of incubation. A pilot screen of the LOPAC/NINDS libraries using glutamate release demonstrated that the logistics of the assay were in place but unfortunately, did not yield meaningful pharmacophores. A larger, HTS campaign using the 384-well cystine-induced glutamate release as primary assay and the 96-well 14C-cystine uptake as confirmatory assay is currently underway. Unexpectedly, we observed that the rate of cystine uptake was significantly faster than the rate of glutamate release in human glioma cells. This was in contrast to the same rates of

  19. GABA and glutamate uptake and metabolism in retinal glial (Müller cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas eBringmann

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Müller cells, the principal glial cells of the retina, support the synaptic activity by the uptake and metabolization of extracellular neurotransmitters. Müller cells express uptake and exchange systems for various neurotransmitters including glutamate and -aminobutyric acid (GABA. Müller cells remove the bulk of extracellular glutamate in the inner retina and contribute to the glutamate clearance around photoreceptor terminals. By the uptake of glutamate, Müller cells are involved in the shaping and termination of the synaptic activity, particularly in the inner retina. Reactive Müller cells are neuroprotective, e.g., by the clearance of excess extracellular glutamate, but may also contribute to neuronal degeneration by a malfunctioning or even reversal of glial glutamate transporters, or by a downregulation of the key enzyme, glutamine synthetase. This review summarizes the present knowledge about the role of Müller cells in the clearance and metabolization of extracellular glutamate and GABA. Some major pathways of GABA and glutamate metabolism in Müller cells are described; these pathways are involved in the glutamate-glutamine cycle of the retina, in the defense against oxidative stress via the production of glutathione, and in the production of substrates for the neuronal energy metabolism.

  20. Expression of the gltP gene of Escherichia coli in a glutamate transport-deficient mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides restores chemotaxis to glutamate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, M.H J; van der Heide, T.; Tolner, B; Driessen, A.J.M.; Konings, W.N

    1995-01-01

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides is chemotactic to glutamate and most other amino acids. In Escherichia coli, chemotaxis involves a membrane-bound sensor that either binds the amino acid directly or interacts with the binding protein loaded with the amino acid. In R. sphaeroides, chemotaxis is thought to req

  1. Differential effects of glutamate receptor antagonists on dorsal horn neurons responding to colorectal distension in a neonatal colon irritation rat model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun Lin; Elie D Al-Chaer

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate and compare the effects of spinal D-(-)-2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid (AP-7) and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione disodium (CNQX),two glutamate receptor antagonists, on the responses of dorsal horn neurons to colorectal distension (CRD) in adult rats exposed to neonatal colon irritation (CI).METHODS: Hypersensitive SD rats were generated by CI during postnatal days 8, 10 and 12. Experiments on adult rats were performed using extracellular single-unit recording. The effects of spinal application of AP-7 (0.001,0.01, 0.1, 1 mmoL) were tested on the CRD-evoked neuronal responses in 16 controls and 17 CI rats. The effects of CNQX (0.2, 2, 5, 10 μmoL) were also tested on the CRD-evoked responses of 17 controls and 18 CI neurons.RESULTS: (1) The average responses of lumbosacral neurons to all intensities of CRD in CI rats were significantly higher than those in control rats; (2) In control rats, AP-7 (0.01 mmoL) had no significant effect on the neuronal response to all intensities of CRD (20,40, 60, 80 mmHg); while AP-7 (0.1 mmoL) inhibited the neuronal response to 80-mmHg CRD. By contrast, in CI rats, AP-7 (0.01-1 mmoL) attenuated the CRD-evoked neuronal responses to all distention pressures in a dosedependent manner; (3) In control rats, CNQX (2 μmoL)had no significantly effect on the neuronal response to all intensities of CRD; however, CNQX (5 μmoL) significantly attenuated the responses to CRD in the 40-80 mmHg range. By contrast, CNQX (2-10 μmoL)significantly decreased the neuronal responses in CI rats to non-noxious and noxious CRD in a dose-dependent manner.CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that spinal N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA receptors may contribute to the processing of central sensitivity in a neonatal CI rat model, but they may play different roles in it.

  2. Brief Report: Glutamate Transporter Gene ("SLC1A1") Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (rs301430) and Repetitive Behaviors and Anxiety in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadow, Kenneth D.; Roohi, Jasmin; DeVincent, Carla J.; Kirsch, Sarah; Hatchwell, Eli

    2010-01-01

    Investigated association of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs301430 in glutamate transporter gene ("SLC1A1") with severity of repetitive behaviors (obsessive-compulsive behaviors, tics) and anxiety in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Mothers and/or teachers completed a validated DSM-IV-referenced rating scale for 67 children…

  3. Mitochondrial swelling impairs the transport of organelles in cerebellar granule neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaasik, Allen; Safiulina, Dzhamilja; Choubey, Vinay; Kuum, Malle; Zharkovsky, Alexander; Veksler, Vladimir

    2007-11-09

    Organelle transport in neuronal processes is central to the organization, developmental fate, and functions of neurons. Organelles must be transported through the slender, highly branched neuronal processes, making the axonal transport vulnerable to any perturbation. However, some intracellular structures like mitochondria are able to considerably modify their volume. We therefore hypothesized that swollen mitochondria could impair the traffic of other organelles in neurite shafts. To test this hypothesis, we have investigated the effects of mitochondrial swellers on the organelle traffic. Our data demonstrate that treatment of neurons with potassium ionophore valinomycin led to the fast time-dependent inhibition of organelle movement in cerebellar granule neurons. Similar inhibition was observed in neurons treated with the inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, sodium azide and antimycin, which also induced swelling. No decrease in the motility of organelles was observed in cultures treated with inhibitors of ATP production or transport, oligomycin or bongkrekic acid, suggesting that inhibition of the ATP-generating activity itself without swelling does not affect the motility of organelles. The effect of swellers on the traffic was more important in thin processes, thus indicating the role of steric hindrance of swollen mitochondria. We propose that the size and morphology of the transported cargo is also relevant for seamless axonal transport and speculate that mitochondrial swelling could be one of the reasons for impaired organelle transport in neuronal processes.

  4. Synthetic cathinone MDPV downregulates glutamate transporter subtype I (GLT-1) and produces rewarding and locomotor-activating effects that are reduced by a GLT-1 activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Ryan A; Hicks, Callum; Nayak, Sunil U; Tallarida, Christopher S; Nucero, Paul; Smith, Garry R; Reitz, Allen B; Rawls, Scott M

    2016-09-01

    Synthetic cathinones produce dysregulation of monoamine systems, but their effects on the glutamate system and the influence of glutamate on behavioral effects related to cathinone abuse are unknown. A principal regulator of glutamate homeostasis is glutamate transporter subtype 1 (GLT-1), an astrocytic protein that clears glutamate from the extracellular space and influences behavioral effects of established psychostimulants. We hypothesized that repeated administration of the synthetic cathinone, MDPV (3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone), would affect GLT-1 expression in the corticolimbic circuit, and that a GLT-1 activator (ceftriaxone, CTX) would reduce rewarding and locomotor-stimulant effects of MDPV in rats. GLT-1 protein expression in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), but not prefrontal cortex (PFC), was decreased following withdrawal (2, 5 and 10 days) from repeated MDPV treatment, but not immediately after the last MDPV injection. CTX (200 mg/kg) pretreatment did not affect acute locomotor activation produced by MDPV (0.5, 1, 3 mg/kg). However, CTX (200 mg/kg) administered during a 7-day MDPV treatment paradigm attenuated the development of MDPV-induced sensitization of repetitive movements in rats challenged with MDPV following 11 days of drug abstinence. Pretreatment with CTX (200 mg/kg) during a 4-day MDPV (2 mg/kg) conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm reduced the development of place preference produced by MDPV. The present data demonstrate dysregulation of corticolimbic glutamate transport systems during withdrawal from chronic MDPV exposure, and show that a GLT-1 transporter activator disrupts behavioral effects of MDPV that are related to synthetic cathinone abuse.

  5. Nuclear respiratory factor 1 co-regulates AMPA glutamate receptor subunit 2 and cytochrome c oxidase: tight coupling of glutamatergic transmission and energy metabolism in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Shilpa S; Liang, Huan Ling; Wong-Riley, Margaret T T

    2009-03-01

    Neuronal activity, especially of the excitatory glutamatergic type, is highly dependent on energy from the oxidative pathway. We hypothesized that the coupling existed at the transcriptional level by having the same transcription factor to regulate a marker of energy metabolism, cytochrome c oxidase (COX) and an important subunit of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid glutamate receptors, GluR2 (Gria2). Nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) was a viable candidate because it regulates all COX subunits and potentially activates Gria2. By means of in silico analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift and supershift, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and promoter mutational assays, we found that NRF-1 functionally bound to Gria2 promoter. Silencing of NRF-1 with small interference RNA prevented the depolarization-stimulated up-regulation of Gria2 and COX, and over-expression of NRF-1 rescued neurons from tetrodotoxin-induced down-regulation of Gria2 and COX transcripts. Thus, neuronal activity and energy metabolism are tightly coupled at the molecular level, and NRF-1 is a critical agent in this process.

  6. Differential effect of functional olfactory bulb deafferentation on tyrosine hydroxylase and glutamic acid decarboxylase messenger RNA levels in rodent juxtaglomerular neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, D M; Grillo, M; Margolis, F L; Joh, T H; Baker, H

    1991-09-08

    Expression of the dopaminergic phenotype in olfactory bulb (OB) juxtaglomerular neurons (constituting a population of periglomerular and external tufted cells) is dependent upon functional innervation by peripheral olfactory receptors. Loss of functional input in rodents, by either peripheral deafferentation or deprivation of odorant access, results in a profound decrease in the expression of juxtaglomerular tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). We have examined the effects of such treatments on the expression of the neurotransmitter biosynthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), which is colocalized with TH in the majority of TH-containing juxtaglomerular neurons. Following either chemically induced OB deafferentation in adult mice or unilateral odor deprivation in neonatal rats, steady-state OB GAD messenger RNA levels remained essentially unchanged as assessed by Northern blot analysis 20-40 days after treatment. These results were confirmed by in situ hybridization analysis, which demonstrated a profound loss of juxtaglomerular TH messenger RNA but no accompanying decrease in regionally colocalized GAD message. Since GAD is found in nearly all dopaminergic OB cells, the preservation of juxtaglomerular GAD message implies that olfactory receptor neurons exert a differential transneuronal regulation of TH and GAD gene transcription.

  7. Differential regulation of voltage-gated Ca2+ currents and metabotropic glutamate receptor activity by measles virus infection in rat cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Christine; Laube, Mandy; Liebert, Uwe-Gerd; Kraft, Robert

    2012-01-06

    Measles virus (MV) infection may lead to severe chronic CNS disease processes, including MV-induced encephalitis. Because the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) is a major determinant of the (patho-)physiological state in all cells we asked whether important Ca(2+) conducting pathways are affected by MV infection in cultured cortical rat neurons. Patch-clamp measurements revealed a decrease in voltage-gated Ca(2+) currents during MV-infection, while voltage-gated K(+) currents and NMDA-evoked currents were unaffected. Calcium-imaging experiments using 50mM extracellular KCl showed reduced [Ca(2+)](i) increases in MV-infected neurons, confirming a decreased activity of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. In contrast, the group-I metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) agonist DHPG evoked changes in [Ca(2+)](i) that were increased in MV-infected cells. Our results show that MV infection conversely regulates Ca(2+) signals induced by group-I mGluRs and by voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels, suggesting that these physiological impairments may contribute to an altered function of cortical neurons during MV-induced encephalitis.

  8. Effects of glutamate decarboxylase and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter on the bioconversion of GABA in engineered Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vo, Tam Dinh; Kim, Tae Wan; Hong, Soon Ho

    2012-05-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-essential amino acid and a precursor of pyrrolidone, a monomer of nylon 4. GABA can be biosynthesized through the decarboxylation of L: -glutamate by glutamate decarboxylase. In this study, the effects of glutamate decarboxylase (gadA, gadB), glutamate/GABA antiporter (gadC) and GABA aminotransferase (gabT) on GABA production were investigated in Escherichia coli. Glutamate decarboxylase was overexpressed alone or with the glutamate/GABA antiporter to enhance GABA synthesis. GABA aminotransferase, which redirects GABA into the TCA cycle, was knock-out mutated. When gadB and gadC were co-overexpressed in the gabT mutant strain, a final GABA concentration of 5.46 g/l was obtained from 10 g/l of monosodium glutamate (MSG), which corresponded to a GABA yield of 89.5%.

  9. dnc-1/dynactin 1 knockdown disrupts transport of autophagosomes and induces motor neuron degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikenaka, Kensuke; Kawai, Kaori; Katsuno, Masahisa; Huang, Zhe; Jiang, Yue-Mei; Iguchi, Yohei; Kobayashi, Kyogo; Kimata, Tsubasa; Waza, Masahiro; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Mori, Ikue; Sobue, Gen

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by the progressive loss of motor neurons. We previously showed that the expression of dynactin 1, an axon motor protein regulating retrograde transport, is markedly reduced in spinal motor neurons of sporadic ALS patients, although the mechanisms by which decreased dynactin 1 levels cause neurodegeneration have yet to be elucidated. The accumulation of autophagosomes in degenerated motor neurons is another key pathological feature of sporadic ALS. Since autophagosomes are cargo of dynein/dynactin complexes and play a crucial role in the turnover of several organelles and proteins, we hypothesized that the quantitative loss of dynactin 1 disrupts the transport of autophagosomes and induces the degeneration of motor neuron. In the present study, we generated a Caenorhabditis elegans model in which the expression of DNC-1, the homolog of dynactin 1, is specifically knocked down in motor neurons. This model exhibited severe motor defects together with axonal and neuronal degeneration. We also observed impaired movement and increased number of autophagosomes in the degenerated neurons. Furthermore, the combination of rapamycin, an activator of autophagy, and trichostatin which facilitates axonal transport dramatically ameliorated the motor phenotype and axonal degeneration of this model. Thus, our results suggest that decreased expression of dynactin 1 induces motor neuron degeneration and that the transport of autophagosomes is a novel and substantial therapeutic target for motor neuron degeneration.

  10. dnc-1/dynactin 1 knockdown disrupts transport of autophagosomes and induces motor neuron degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kensuke Ikenaka

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by the progressive loss of motor neurons. We previously showed that the expression of dynactin 1, an axon motor protein regulating retrograde transport, is markedly reduced in spinal motor neurons of sporadic ALS patients, although the mechanisms by which decreased dynactin 1 levels cause neurodegeneration have yet to be elucidated. The accumulation of autophagosomes in degenerated motor neurons is another key pathological feature of sporadic ALS. Since autophagosomes are cargo of dynein/dynactin complexes and play a crucial role in the turnover of several organelles and proteins, we hypothesized that the quantitative loss of dynactin 1 disrupts the transport of autophagosomes and induces the degeneration of motor neuron. In the present study, we generated a Caenorhabditis elegans model in which the expression of DNC-1, the homolog of dynactin 1, is specifically knocked down in motor neurons. This model exhibited severe motor defects together with axonal and neuronal degeneration. We also observed impaired movement and increased number of autophagosomes in the degenerated neurons. Furthermore, the combination of rapamycin, an activator of autophagy, and trichostatin which facilitates axonal transport dramatically ameliorated the motor phenotype and axonal degeneration of this model. Thus, our results suggest that decreased expression of dynactin 1 induces motor neuron degeneration and that the transport of autophagosomes is a novel and substantial therapeutic target for motor neuron degeneration.

  11. Hyperosmolar sodium chloride is toxic to cultured neurons and causes reduction of glucose metabolism and ATP levels, an increase in glutamate uptake, and a reduction in cytosolic calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morland, Cecilie; Pettersen, Mi Nguyen; Hassel, Bjørnar

    2016-05-01

    Elevation of serum sodium, hypernatremia, which may occur during dehydration or treatment with sodium chloride, may cause brain dysfunction and damage, but toxic mechanisms are poorly understood. We found that exposure to excess NaCl, 10-100mmol/L, for 20h caused cell death in cultured cerebellar granule cells (neurons). Toxicity was due to Na(+), since substituting excess Na(+) with choline reduced cell death to control levels, whereas gluconate instead of excess Cl(-) did not. Prior to cell death from hyperosmolar NaCl, glucose consumption and lactate formation were reduced, and intracellular aspartate levels were elevated, consistent with reduced glycolysis or glucose uptake. Concomitantly, the level of ATP became reduced. Pyruvate, 10mmol/L, reduced NaCl-induced cell death. The extracellular levels of glutamate, taurine, and GABA were concentration-dependently reduced by excess NaCl; high-affinity glutamate uptake increased. High extracellular [Na(+)] caused reduction in intracellular free [Ca(2+)], but a similar effect was seen with mannitol, which was not neurotoxic. We suggest that inhibition of glucose metabolism with ensuing loss of ATP is a neurotoxic mechanism of hyperosmolar sodium, whereas increased uptake of extracellular neuroactive amino acids and reduced intracellular [Ca(2+)] may, if they occur in vivo, contribute to the cerebral dysfunction and delirium described in hypernatremia.

  12. Synaptic organization of substance P, glutamate and GABA-immunoreactive boutons on functionally identified neurons in cat spinal deeper dorsal horn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏锋; 赵志奇

    1997-01-01

    In order to determine how nociceptive input conveyed by the C-fibers terminating in superficial lam-inae of the spinal cord reaches the wide dynamic range (WDR) cells in deeper dorsal horn, which functions as ascend-ing projection pathway, the morphological features of some WDR cells in the deeper dorsal horn of the cat lumbar spinal cord were studied by intracellular injection of horseradish peroxidase and physiological characterization. One of the fully stained neurons with somata in lamina V and dendrites that entered lamina Ⅱ were examined by electron mi-croscopy. Immunogold staining of ultrathin sections through the labeled proximal dendrites in lamina Ⅱ revealed that these dendrites received numerous synapses from substance P and glutamate immunoreactive (IR) axons, which were considered originating from C-fibers. In addition, many GABA-IR terminals were found presynaptic to the labeled dendrites. The results, therefore, suggest that the information carried by primary afferent can be sent from t

  13. Methylphenidate Increases Glutamate Uptake in Bergmann Glial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillem, Alain M; Martínez-Lozada, Zila; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa C; López-Bayghen, Esther; López-Bayghen, Bruno; Calleros, Oscar A; Campuzano, Marco R; Ortega, Arturo

    2015-11-01

    Glutamate, the main excitatory transmitter in the vertebrate brain, exerts its actions through the activation of specific membrane receptors present in neurons and glial cells. Over-stimulation of glutamate receptors results in neuronal death, phenomena known as excitotoxicity. A family of glutamate uptake systems, mainly expressed in glial cells, removes the amino acid from the synaptic cleft preventing an excessive glutamatergic stimulation and thus neuronal damage. Autism spectrum disorders comprise a group of syndromes characterized by impaired social interactions and anxiety. One or the most common drugs prescribed to treat these disorders is Methylphenidate, known to increase dopamine extracellular levels, although it is not clear if its sedative effects are related to a plausible regulation of the glutamatergic tone via the regulation of the glial glutamate uptake systems. To gain insight into this possibility, we used the well-established model system of cultured chick cerebellum Bergmann glia cells. A time and dose-dependent increase in the activity and protein levels of glutamate transporters was detected upon Methylphenidate exposure. Interestingly, this increase is the result of an augmentation of both the synthesis as well as the insertion of these protein complexes in the plasma membrane. These results favour the notion that glial cells are Methylphenidate targets, and that by these means could regulate dopamine turnover.

  14. MicroRNA 101b is downregulated in the prefrontal cortex of a genetic model of depression and targets the glutamate transporter SLC1A1 (EAAT3) in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Ya Bin; Melas, Philippe A; Villaescusa, J Carlos

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small regulatory molecules that cause translational repression by base pairing with target messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Cumulative evidence suggests that changes in miRNA expression may in part underlie the pathophysiology and treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders......, including major depressive disorder (MDD). METHODS: A miRNA expression assay that can simultaneously detect 423 rat miRNAs (miRBase v.17) was used to profile the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of a genetic rat model of MDD (the Flinders Sensitive Line; FSL) and the controls, the Flinders Resistant Line (FRL). Gene....... Interestingly, one of the identified miRNAs (miR-101b) is highly conserved between rat and human, and was recently found to be downregulated in the PFC of depressed suicide subjects. Using a combination of in silico and in vitro analyses, we found that miR-101b targets the neuronal glutamate transporter SLC1A1...

  15. MicroRNA 101b is downregulated in the prefrontal cortex of a genetic model of depression and targets the glutamate transporter SLC1A1 (EAAT3) in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Ya Bin; Melas, Philippe A; Villaescusa, J Carlos;

    2016-01-01

    expression data from the PFC of FSL/FRL animals (GEO accession number: GSE20388) were used to guide mRNA target selection. Luciferase reporter assays were used to verify miRNA targets in vitro. RESULTS: We identified 23 miRNAs that were downregulated in the PFC of the FSL model compared to controls....... Interestingly, one of the identified miRNAs (miR-101b) is highly conserved between rat and human, and was recently found to be downregulated in the PFC of depressed suicide subjects. Using a combination of in silico and in vitro analyses, we found that miR-101b targets the neuronal glutamate transporter SLC1A1...

  16. The effects of combined application of inorganic Martian dust simulant and carbon dots on glutamate transport rat brain nerve terminals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Krisanova, Natalia; Nazarova, Anastasiya; Borysov, Arseniy; Pastukhov, Artem; Pozdnyakova, Natalia; Dudarenko, Marina

    2016-07-01

    During inhalation, nano-/microsized particles are efficiently deposited in nasal, tracheobronchial, and alveolar regions and can be transported to the central nervous system (Oberdorster et al., 2004). Recently, the research team of this study found the minor fractions of nanoparticles with the size ~ 50 -60 nm in Lunar and Martian dust stimulants (JSC-1a and JSC, ORBITEC Orbital Technologies Corporation, Madison, Wisconsin), whereas the average size of the simulants was 1 mm and 4mm, respectively (Krisanova et al., 2013). Also, the research team of this study discovered new phenomenon - the neuromodulating and neurotoxic effect of carbon nano-sized particles - Carbon dots (C-dots), originated from ash of burned carbon-containing product (Borisova et al, 2015). The aims of this study was to analyse acute effects of upgraded stimulant of inorganic Martian dust derived from volcanic ash (JSC-1a/JSC, ORBITEC Orbital Technologies Corporation, Madison, Wisconsin) by the addition of carbon components, that is, carbon dots, on the key characteristic of synaptic neurotransmission. Acute administration of carbon-containing Martian dust analogue resulted in a significant decrease in transporter-mediated uptake of L-[14C]glutamate (the major excitatory neurotransmitter) by isolated rat brain nerve terminals. The ambient level of the neurotransmitter in the preparation of nerve terminals increased in the presence of carbon dot-contained Martian dust analogue. These effects were associated with action of carbon component of the upgraded Martian dust stimulant but not with its inorganic constituent.

  17. The C. elegans nuclear receptor gene fax-1 and homeobox gene unc-42 coordinate interneuron identity by regulating the expression of glutamate receptor subunits and other neuron-specific genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wightman, Bruce; Ebert, Bryan; Carmean, Nicole; Weber, Katherine; Clever, Sheila

    2005-11-01

    The fax-1 gene of the nematode C. elegans encodes a conserved nuclear receptor that is the ortholog of the human PNR gene and functions in the specification of neuron identities. Mutations in fax-1 result in locomotion defects. FAX-1 protein accumulates in the nuclei of 18 neurons, among them the AVA, AVB, and AVE interneuron pairs that coordinate body movements. The identities of AVA and AVE interneurons are defective in fax-1 mutants; neither neuron expresses the NMDA receptor subunits nmr-1 and nmr-2. Other ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits are expressed normally in the AVA and AVE neurons. The unc-42 homeobox gene also regulates AVA and AVE identity; however, unc-42 mutants display the complementary phenotype: NMDA receptor subunit expression is normal, but some non-NMDA glutamate receptor subunits are not expressed. These observations support a combinatorial role for fax-1 and unc-42 in specifying AVA and AVE identity. However, in four other neuron types, fax-1 is regulated by unc-42, and both transcriptional regulators function in the regulation of the opt-3 gene in the AVE neurons and the flp-1 and ncs-1 genes in the AVK neurons. Therefore, while fax-1 and unc-42 act in complementary parallel pathways in some cells, they function in overlapping or linear pathways in other cellular contexts, suggesting that combinatorial relationships among transcriptional regulators are complex and cannot be generalized from one neuron type to another.

  18. Synaptic function is modulated by LRRK2 and glutamate release is increased in cortical neurons of G2019S LRRK2 knock-in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayne A Beccano-Kelly

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase-2 (LRRK2 result in familial Parkinson’s disease and the G2019S mutation alone accounts for up to 30% in some ethnicities. Despite this, the function of LRRK2 is largely undetermined although evidence suggests roles in phosphorylation, protein interactions, autophagy and endocytosis. Emerging reports link loss of LRRK2 to altered synaptic transmission, but the effects of the G2019S mutation upon synaptic release in mammalian neurons are unknown. To assess wild type and mutant LRRK2 in established neuronal networks, we conducted immunocytochemical, electrophysiological and biochemical characterisation of >3 week old cortical cultures of LRRK2 knock-out, wild-type overexpressing and G2019S knock-in mice. Synaptic release and synapse numbers were grossly normal in LRRK2 knock-out cells, but discretely reduced glutamatergic activity and reduced synaptic protein levels were observed. Conversely, synapse density was modestly but significantly increased in wild-type LRRK2 overexpressing cultures although event frequency was not. In knock-in cultures, glutamate release was markedly elevated, in the absence of any change to synapse density; indicating that physiological levels of G2019S LRRK2 elevate probability of release. Several presynaptic regulatory proteins shown by others to interact with LRRK2 were expressed at normal levels in knock-in cultures; however, synapsin 1 phosphorylation was significantly reduced. Thus, perturbations to the presynaptic release machinery and elevated synaptic transmission are early neuronal effects of LRRK2 G2019S. Furthermore, the comparison of knock-in and overexpressing cultures suggests that one copy of the G2019S mutation has a more pronounced effect than an ~3-fold increase in LRRK2 protein. Mutant-induced increases in transmission may convey additional stressors to neuronal physiology that may eventually contribute to the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease.

  19. Glutamate and Neurodegenerative Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Eric; Duplantier, Allen

    As the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, glutamate is critically involved in most aspects of CNS function. Given this critical role, it is not surprising that glutamatergic dysfunction is associated with many CNS disorders. In this chapter, we review the literature that links aberrant glutamate neurotransmission with CNS pathology, with a focus on neurodegenerative diseases. The biology and pharmacology of the various glutamate receptor families are discussed, along with data which links these receptors with neurodegenerative conditions. In addition, we review progress that has been made in developing small molecule modulators of glutamate receptors and transporters, and describe how these compounds have helped us understand the complex pharmacology of glutamate in normal CNS function, as well as their potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Neuronal Logistics : Axonal Transport in Development and Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. van den Berg (Robert)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractBrain cells are uniquely shaped among the many cell types of the body. While most cells are more or less rounded or square-shaped, neurons grow one or more long axons that can reach lengths of a meter or more. To keep these axons alive and functional, neurons are dependent on an intr

  1. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 recycles to the cell surface in protein phosphatase 2A‐dependent manner in non‐neuronal and neuronal cell lines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pandey, Saurabh; Mahato, Prabhat Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Samarjit

    2014-01-01

    ...‐neuronal cells like hepatocytes, skin cells, etc. Although it has been reported that mG luR1 gets endocytosed on ligand application, the events after the internalization of the receptor has not been studied...

  2. Glutamate antagonists limit tumor growth

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    Neuronal progenitors and tumor cells possess propensity to proliferate and to migrate. Glutamate regulates proliferation and migration of neurons during development, but it is not known whether it influences proliferation and migration of tumor cells. We demonstrate that glutamate antagonists inhibit proliferation of human tumor cells. Colon adenocarcinoma, astrocytoma, and breast and lung carcinoma cells were most sensitive to the antiproliferative effect of the N...

  3. The Hydroxyl Side Chain of a Highly Conserved Serine Residue Is Required for Cation Selectivity and Substrate Transport in the Glial Glutamate Transporter GLT-1/SLC1A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonin, Alexandre; Montalbetti, Nicolas; Gyimesi, Gergely; Pujol-Giménez, Jonai; Hediger, Matthias A

    2015-12-18

    Glutamate transporters maintain synaptic concentration of the excitatory neurotransmitter below neurotoxic levels. Their transport cycle consists of cotransport of glutamate with three sodium ions and one proton, followed by countertransport of potassium. Structural studies proposed that a highly conserved serine located in the binding pocket of the homologous GltPh coordinates L-aspartate as well as the sodium ion Na1. To experimentally validate these findings, we generated and characterized several mutants of the corresponding serine residue, Ser-364, of human glutamate transporter SLC1A2 (solute carrier family 1 member 2), also known as glutamate transporter GLT-1 and excitatory amino acid transporter EAAT2. S364T, S364A, S364C, S364N, and S364D were expressed in HEK cells and Xenopus laevis oocytes to measure radioactive substrate transport and transport currents, respectively. All mutants exhibited similar plasma membrane expression when compared with WT SLC1A2, but substitutions of serine by aspartate or asparagine completely abolished substrate transport. On the other hand, the threonine mutant, which is a more conservative mutation, exhibited similar substrate selectivity, substrate and sodium affinities as WT but a lower selectivity for Na(+) over Li(+). S364A and S364C exhibited drastically reduced affinities for each substrate and enhanced selectivity for L-aspartate over D-aspartate and L-glutamate, and lost their selectivity for Na(+) over Li(+). Furthermore, we extended the analysis of our experimental observations using molecular dynamics simulations. Altogether, our findings confirm a pivotal role of the serine 364, and more precisely its hydroxyl group, in coupling sodium and substrate fluxes.

  4. Subpopulations of rat dorsal root ganglion neurons express active vesicular acetylcholine transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tata, Ada Maria; De Stefano, M Egle; Tomassy, Giulio Srubek; Vilaró, M Teresa; Levey, Allan I; Biagioni, Stefano

    2004-01-15

    The vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) is a transmembrane protein required, in cholinergic neurons, for selective storage of acetylcholine into synaptic vesicles. Although dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons utilize neuropeptides and amino acids for neurotransmission, we have previously demonstrated the presence of a cholinergic system. To investigate whether, in sensory neurons, the vesicular accumulation of acetylcholine relies on the same mechanisms active in classical cholinergic neurons, we investigated VAChT presence, subcellular distribution, and activity. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis demonstrated the presence of VAChT mRNA and protein product in DRG neurons and in the striatum and cortex, used as positive controls. Moreover, in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry showed VAChT staining located mainly in the medium/large-sized subpopulation of the sensory neurons. A few small neurons were also faintly labeled by immunocytochemistry. In the electron microscope, immunolabeling was associated with vesicle-like elements distributed in the neuronal cytoplasm and in both myelinated and unmyelinated intraganglionic nerve fibers. Finally, [(3)H]acetylcholine active transport, evaluated either in the presence or in the absence of ATP, also demonstrated that, as previously reported, the uptake of acetylcholine by VAChT is ATP dependent. This study suggests that DRG neurons not only are able to synthesize and degrade ACh and to convey cholinergic stimuli but also are capable of accumulating and, possibly, releasing acetylcholine by the same mechanism used by the better known cholinergic neurons.

  5. 谷氨酸和谷氨酰胺转运系统的研究进展%Recent Advances in Transport Systems of Glutamate and Glutamine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王秋菊; 许丽; 范明哲

    2011-01-01

    谷氨酸作为幼年动物重要的氨基酸,是肠内能量生成的最大贡献者,它不能由机体自身合成,需额外添加或通过谷氨酸前体物谷氨酰胺转化而成.谷氨酸是谷胱甘肽合成的重要底物,对动物肠道抗氧化剂的提供有重要作用,其转运依靠谷氨酸转运载体完成.因此,本文就谷氨酸和谷氨酰胺转运系统的分类及作用机制做一综述.%Glutamate is the largest contributor to intestinal energy generation as an essential amino acid for young animal growth, and it is obtained from diets or transformed from glutamine because it cannot be synthesized in vivo. Glutamate is an important substrate for glutathione synthesis and plays a critical role in supplying intestinal antioxidants, and its transporters are responsible for removing glutamate from the extracellular space. Functions and characteristics of glutamate and glutamine transport systems are reviewed in this article. [Chinese Journal of Animal Nutrition, 2011,23(6) :901-907

  6. A simple method for imaging axonal transport in aging neurons using the adult Drosophila wing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagnoni, Alessio; Bullock, Simon L

    2016-09-01

    There is growing interest in the link between axonal cargo transport and age-associated neuronal dysfunction. The study of axonal transport in neurons of adult animals requires intravital or ex vivo imaging approaches, which are laborious and expensive in vertebrate models. We describe simple, noninvasive procedures for imaging cargo motility within axons using sensory neurons of the translucent Drosophila wing. A key aspect is a method for mounting the intact fly that allows detailed imaging of transport in wing neurons. Coupled with existing genetic tools in Drosophila, this is a tractable system for studying axonal transport over the life span of an animal and thus for characterization of the relationship between cargo dynamics, neuronal aging and disease. Preparation of a sample for imaging takes ∼5 min, with transport typically filmed for 2-3 min per wing. We also document procedures for the quantification of transport parameters from the acquired images and describe how the protocol can be adapted to study other cell biological processes in aging neurons.

  7. Mechanisms Associated with Activation of Intracellular Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor, mGluR5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, Yuh-Jiin I; O'Malley, Karen L

    2017-01-01

    The group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor, mGluR5, is found on the cell surface as well as on intracellular membranes where it can mediate both overlapping and unique signaling effects. Previously we have shown that glutamate activates intracellular mGluR5 by entry through sodium-dependent transporters and/or cystine glutamate exchangers. Calibrated antibody labelling suggests that the glutamate concentration within neurons is quite high (~10 mM) raising the question as to whether intracellular mGluR5 is maximally activated at all times or whether a different ligand might be responsible for receptor activation. To address this issue, we used cellular, optical and molecular techniques to show that intracellular glutamate is largely sequestered in mitochondria; that the glutamate concentration necessary to activate intracellular mGluR5 is about ten-fold higher than what is necessary to activate cell surface mGluR5; and uncaging caged glutamate within neurons can directly activate the receptor. Thus these studies further the concept that glutamate itself serves as the ligand for intracellular mGluR5.

  8. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 2 and corticotrophin-releasing factor receptor-1 gene expression is differently regulated by BDNF in rat primary cortical neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christinna V; Klein, Anders B; El-Sayed, Mona;

    2013-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is important for neuronal survival and plasticity. Incorporation of matured receptor proteins is an integral part of synapse formation. However, whether BDNF increases synthesis and integration of receptors in functional synapses directly is unclear. We...... are particularly interested in the regulation of the 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 2A (5-HT2A R). This receptor form a functional complex with the metabotropic glutamate receptor 2 (mGluR2) and is recruited to the cell membrane by the corticotrophin-releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF-R1). The effect of BDNF on gene...... expression for all these receptors, as well as a number of immediate-early genes, was pharmacologically characterized in primary neurons from rat frontal cortex. BDNF increased CRF-R1 mRNA levels up to fivefold, whereas mGluR2 mRNA levels were proportionally downregulated. No effect on 5-HT2A R mRNA was seen...

  9. Computational Analysis of Axonal Transport: A Novel Assessment of Neurotoxicity, Neuronal Development and Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Gotoh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Axonal transport plays a crucial role in neuronal morphogenesis, survival and function. Despite its importance, however, the molecular mechanisms of axonal transport remain mostly unknown because a simple and quantitative assay system for monitoring this cellular process has been lacking. In order to better characterize the mechanisms involved in axonal transport, we formulate a novel computer-assisted monitoring system of axonal transport. Potential uses of this system and implications for future studies will be discussed.

  10. Tracking Quantum-Dot labeled neurotropic factors transport along primary neuronal axons in compartmental microfluidic chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluska, Shani; Chein, Michael; Rotem, Nimrod; Ionescu, Ariel; Perlson, Eran

    2016-01-01

    Neurons are highly polarized cells, with very long axons. Neurotrophic factors like the neuronal growth factor (NGF) are secreted from neuronal targets to promote neuron survival and proper function. These neurotrophic factors must undergo retrograde axonal transport towards the cell body, wherein they initiate signaling pathways important for neurons' various functions and overall health. This process of long-distance axonal signaling is conducted by the dynein motor protein, which transmits signaling endosomes of ligand-receptor complexes retrogradely along microtubule tracks. Here we describe step by step the use of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) compartmentalized microfluidic chambers for tracking axonal transport of trophic factors, with a focus on labeled NGF. We describe in detail how to fabricate the molds, assemble the PDMS platform, plate neurons and image, as well as analyze NGF transport along the axon. This method is useful for studying molecular communication mechanisms within the neuron's different compartments as well as between the neuron and its diverse microenvironments, both in health and under pathological conditions.

  11. Quantitative analysis of intraneuronal transport in human iPS neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruko Nakamura

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells are promising tools to investigate disease mechanism and develop new drugs. Intraneuronal transport, which is fundamental for neuronal survival and function, is vulnerable to various pharmacological and chemical agents and is disrupted in some neurodegenerative disorders. We applied a quantification method for axonal transport by counting CM-DiI–labeled particles traveling along the neurite, which allowed us to monitor and quantitate, for the first time, intraneuronal transport in human neurons differentiated from iPS cells (iCell neurons. We evaluated the acute effects of several anti-neoplastic agents that have been previously shown to affect intraneuronal transport. Vincristine, paclitaxel and oxaliplatin decreased the number of moving particle along neurites. Cisplatin, however, produced no effect on intraneuronal transport, which is in contrast to our previous report indicating that it inhibits transport in chick dorsal root ganglion neurons. Our system may be a useful method for assessing intraneuronal transport and neurotoxicity in human iPS neurons.

  12. Stimulation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor regulates glutamate transporter GLAST via basic fibroblast growth factor production in cultured cortical microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morioka, Norimitsu; Harano, Sakura; Tokuhara, Masato; Idenoshita, Yuko; Zhang, Fang Fang; Hisaoka-Nakashima, Kazue; Nakata, Yoshihiro

    2015-11-01

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptor expressed in microglia has a crucial role in neuroprotection. Simulation of α7 nACh receptor leads to increased expression of glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST), which in turn decreases synaptic glutamate levels. However, the upregulation of GLAST in cultured rat cortical microglia appears long after (over 18 h) stimulation of the α7 nACh receptor with nicotine. Thus, the current study elucidated the pathway responsible for the induction of GLAST expression in cultured cortical microglia. Nicotine-induced GLAST mRNA expression was significantly inhibited by cycloheximide pretreatment, indicating that a protein intermediary, such as a growth factor, is required for GLAST expression. The expression of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) mRNA in cortical microglia was significantly increased 6 and 12h after treatment with nicotine, and this increase was potently inhibited by pretreatment with methyllycaconitine, a selective α7 nACh receptor antagonist. The treatment with nicotine also significantly increased FGF-2 protein expression. Furthermore, treatment with recombinant FGF-2 increased GLAST mRNA, protein expression and (14)C-glutamate uptake, a functional measurement of GLAST activity. Conversely, pretreatment with PD173074, an inhibitor of FGF receptor (FGFR) tyrosine kinase, significantly prevented the nicotine-induced expression of GLAST mRNA, its protein and (14)C-glutamate uptake. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction confirmed FGFR1 mRNA expression was confined to cultured cortical microglia. Together, the current findings demonstrate that the neuroprotective effect of activation of microglial α7 nACh receptors could be due to the expression of FGF-2, which in turn increases GLAST expression, thereby clearing glutamate from synapse and decreasing glutamate neurotransmission.

  13. Neonatal Seizures Alter NMDA Glutamate receptor GluN2A and 3A Subunit Expression and Function in Hippocampal CA1 Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengwen eZhou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal seizures are commonly caused by hypoxic and/or ischemic injury during birth and can lead to long-term epilepsy and cognitive deficits. In a rodent hypoxic seizure (HS model, we have previously demonstrated a critical role for seizure-induced enhancement of the AMPA subtype of glutamate receptor (GluA in epileptogenesis and cognitive consequences, in part due to GluA maturational upregulation of expression. Similarly, as the expression and function of the NMDA subtype of glutamate receptor (GluN is also developmentally controlled, we examined how early life seizures during the critical period of synaptogenesis could modify GluN development and function. In a postnatal day (P10 rat model of neonatal seizures, we found that seizures could alter GluN2/3 subunit composition of GluNs and physiological function of synaptic GluNs. In hippocampal slices removed from rats within 48-96 hours following seizures, the amplitudes of synaptic GluN-mediated evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs were elevated in CA1 pyramidal neurons. Moreover, GluN eEPSCs showed a decreased sensitivity to GluN2B selective antagonists and decreased Mg2+ sensitivity at negative holding potentials, indicating a higher proportion of GluN2A and GluN3A subunit function, respectively. These physiological findings were accompanied by a concurrent increase in GluN2A phosphorylation and GluN3A protein. These results suggest that altered GluN function and expression could potentially contribute to future epileptogenesis following neonatal seizures, and may represent potential therapeutic targets for the blockade of future epileptogenesis in the developing brain.

  14. Glutamate oxidation in astrocytes: Roles of glutamate dehydrogenase and aminotransferases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKenna, Mary C; Stridh, Malin H; McNair, Laura Frendrup;

    2016-01-01

    The cellular distribution of transporters and enzymes related to glutamate metabolism led to the concept of the glutamate–glutamine cycle. Glutamate is released as a neurotransmitter and taken up primarily by astrocytes ensheathing the synapses. The glutamate carbon skeleton is transferred back...... oxidative degradation; thus, quantitative formation of glutamine from the glutamate taken up is not possible. Oxidation of glutamate is initiated by transamination catalyzed by an aminotransferase, or oxidative deamination catalyzed by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH). We discuss methods available to elucidate...... the enzymes that mediate this conversion. Methods include pharmacological tools such as the transaminase inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid, studies using GDH knockout mice, and siRNA-mediated knockdown of GDH in astrocytes. Studies in brain slices incubated with [15N]glutamate demonstrated activity of GDH...

  15. Chemoenzymatic synthesis of new 2,4-syn-functionalized (S)-glutamate analogues and structure-activity relationship studies at ionotropic glutamate receptors and excitatory amino acid transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaf, Zeinab; Larsen, Anja P; Venskutonytė, Raminta; Han, Liwei; Abrahamsen, Bjarke; Nielsen, Birgitte; Gajhede, Michael; Kastrup, Jette S; Jensen, Anders A; Pickering, Darryl S; Frydenvang, Karla; Gefflaut, Thierry; Bunch, Lennart

    2013-02-28

    In the mammalian central nervous system, (S)-glutamate (Glu) is released from the presynaptic neuron where it activates a plethora of pre- and postsynaptic Glu receptors. The fast acting ionotropic Glu receptors (iGluRs) are ligand gated ion channels and are believed to be involved in a vast number of neurological functions such as memory and learning, synaptic plasticity, and motor function. The synthesis of 14 enantiopure 2,4-syn-Glu analogues 2b-p is accessed by a short and efficient chemoenzymatic approach starting from readily available cyclohexanone 3. Pharmacological characterization at the iGluRs and EAAT1-3 subtypes revealed analogue 2i as a selective GluK1 ligand with low nanomolar affinity. Two X-ray crystal structures of the key analogue 2i in the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of GluA2 and GluK3 were determined. Partial domain closure was seen in the GluA2-LBD complex with 2i comparable to that induced by kainate. In contrast, full domain closure was observed in the GluK3-LBD complex with 2i, similar to that of GluK3-LBD with glutamate bound.

  16. Effective Mechanism for Synthesis of Neurotransmitter Glutamate and its Loading into Synaptic Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Kouji; Ueda, Tetsufumi

    2017-01-01

    Glutamate accumulation into synaptic vesicles is a pivotal step in glutamate transmission. This process is achieved by a vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT) coupled to v-type proton ATPase. Normal synaptic transmission, in particular during intensive neuronal firing, would demand rapid transmitter re-filling of emptied synaptic vesicles. We have previously shown that isolated synaptic vesicles are capable of synthesizing glutamate from α-ketoglutarate (not from glutamine) by vesicle-bound aspartate aminotransferase for immediate uptake, in addition to ATP required for uptake by vesicle-bound glycolytic enzymes. This suggests that local synthesis of these substances, essential for glutamate transmission, could occur at the synaptic vesicle. Here we provide evidence that synaptosomes (pinched-off nerve terminals) also accumulate α-ketoglutarate-derived glutamate into synaptic vesicles within, at the expense of ATP generated through glycolysis. Glutamine-derived glutamate is also accumulated into synaptic vesicles in synaptosomes. The underlying mechanism is discussed. It is suggested that local synthesis of both glutamate and ATP at the presynaptic synaptic vesicle would represent an efficient mechanism for swift glutamate loading into synaptic vesicles, supporting maintenance of normal synaptic transmission.

  17. A neuroprotective role for microRNA miR-1000 mediated by limiting glutamate excitotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verma, Pushpa; Augustine, George J; Ammar, Mohamed-Raafet

    2015-01-01

    at the synapse by controlling expression of the vesicular glutamate transporter (VGlut). Genetic deletion of miR-1000 led to elevated apoptosis in the brain as a result of glutamatergic excitotoxicity. The seed-similar miR-137 regulated VGluT2 expression in mouse neurons. These conserved miRNAs share...

  18. Mechanisms of Prolonged Presynaptic Ca2+ Signaling and Glutamate Release Induced by TRPV1 Activation in Rat Sensory Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    TRPV1-mediated release of neuroactive peptides and neurotransmitters from the peripheral and central terminals of primary sensory neurons can critically contribute to nociceptive processing at the periphery and in the CNS. However, the mechanisms that link TRPV1 activation with Ca2+ signaling at the release sites and neurosecretion are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that a brief stimulation of the receptor using either capsaicin or the endogenous TRPV1 agonist N-arachidonoyl-dopamine ...

  19. ATP induces NO production in hippocampal neurons by P2X(7 receptor activation independent of glutamate signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Francisco Codocedo

    Full Text Available To assess the putative role of adenosine triphosphate (ATP upon nitric oxide (NO production in the hippocampus, we used as a model both rat hippocampal slices and isolated hippocampal neurons in culture, lacking glial cells. In hippocampal slices, additions of exogenous ATP or 2'(3'-O-(4-Benzoylbenzoyl ATP (Bz-ATP elicited concentration-dependent NO production, which increased linearly within the first 15 min and plateaued thereafter; agonist EC50 values were 50 and 15 µM, respectively. The NO increase evoked by ATP was antagonized in a concentration-dependent manner by Coomassie brilliant blue G (BBG or by N(ω-propyl-L-arginine, suggesting the involvement of P2X7Rs and neuronal NOS, respectively. The ATP induced NO production was independent of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA receptor activity as effects were not alleviated by DL-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (APV, but antagonized by BBG. In sum, exogenous ATP elicited NO production in hippocampal neurons independently of NMDA receptor activity.

  20. ATP Induces NO Production in Hippocampal Neurons by P2X7 Receptor Activation Independent of Glutamate Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codocedo, Juan Francisco; Godoy, Juan Alejandro; Poblete, Maria Ines; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo

    2013-01-01

    To assess the putative role of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) upon nitric oxide (NO) production in the hippocampus, we used as a model both rat hippocampal slices and isolated hippocampal neurons in culture, lacking glial cells. In hippocampal slices, additions of exogenous ATP or 2′(3′)-O-(4-Benzoylbenzoyl) ATP (Bz-ATP) elicited concentration-dependent NO production, which increased linearly within the first 15 min and plateaued thereafter; agonist EC50 values were 50 and 15 µM, respectively. The NO increase evoked by ATP was antagonized in a concentration-dependent manner by Coomassie brilliant blue G (BBG) or by Nω-propyl-L-arginine, suggesting the involvement of P2X7Rs and neuronal NOS, respectively. The ATP induced NO production was independent of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor activity as effects were not alleviated by DL-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (APV), but antagonized by BBG. In sum, exogenous ATP elicited NO production in hippocampal neurons independently of NMDA receptor activity. PMID:23472093

  1. FGF-2 induces neuronal death through upregulation of system xc-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoqian; Albano, Rebecca; Lobner, Doug

    2014-02-14

    The cystine/glutamate antiporter (system xc-) transports cystine into cell in exchange for glutamate. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) upregulates system xc- selectively on astrocytes, which leads to increased cystine uptake, the substrate for glutathione production, and increased glutamate release. While increased intracellular glutathione can limit oxidative stress, the increased glutamate release can potentially lead to excitotoxicity to neurons. To test this hypothesis, mixed neuronal and glial cortical cultures were treated with FGF-2. Treatment with FGF-2 for 48 h caused a significant neuronal death in these cultures. Cell death was not observed in neuronal-enriched cultures, or astrocyte-enriched cultures, suggesting the toxicity was the result of neuron-glia interaction. Blocking system xc- eliminated the neuronal death as did the AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl-benzo[f]quinoxaline-2,3-dione (NBQX), but not the NMDA receptor antagonist memantine. When cultures were exposed directly to glutamate, both NBQX and memantine blocked the neuronal toxicity. The mechanism of this altered profile of glutamate receptor mediated toxicity by FGF-2 is unclear. The selective calcium permeable AMPA receptor antagonist 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine (NASPM) failed to offer protection. The most likely explanation for the results is that 48 h FGF-2 treatment induces AMPA/kainate receptor toxicity through increased system xc- function resulting in increased release of glutamate. At the same time, FGF-2 alters the sensitivity of the neurons to glutamate toxicity in a manner that promotes selective AMPA/kainate receptor mediated toxicity.

  2. Amyloid-Beta Induced Changes in Vesicular Transport of BDNF in Hippocampal Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Bianca Seifert; Robert Eckenstaler; Raik Rönicke; Julia Leschik; Beat Lutz; Klaus Reymann; Volkmar Lessmann; Tanja Brigadski

    2016-01-01

    The neurotrophin brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is an important growth factor in the CNS. Deficits in transport of this secretory protein could underlie neurodegenerative diseases. Investigation of disease-related changes in BDNF transport might provide insights into the cellular mechanism underlying, for example, Alzheimer’s disease (AD). To analyze the role of BDNF transport in AD, live cell imaging of fluorescently labeled BDNF was performed in hippocampal neurons of different AD...

  3. Neuronal and non-neuronal GABA transporters as targets for antiepileptic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Karsten K; White, H Steve; Schousboe, Arne

    2010-01-01

    of such transporters pointing in particular to an interesting role of the transporters located extrasynaptically. It is suggested that the betaine-GABA transporter BGT1 should receive particular interest in this context as the GABA analogue EF 1502 (N-[4,4-bis(3-methyl-2-thienyl)-3-butenyl]-4-(methylamino)-4...

  4. Glutamic acid as anticancer agent: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Satyajit; Ray, Supratim; Nagarajan, K

    2013-10-01

    The objective of the article is to highlight various roles of glutamic acid like endogenic anticancer agent, conjugates to anticancer agents, and derivatives of glutamic acid as possible anticancer agents. Besides these emphases are given especially for two endogenous derivatives of glutamic acid such as glutamine and glutamate. Glutamine is a derivative of glutamic acid and is formed in the body from glutamic acid and ammonia in an energy requiring reaction catalyzed by glutamine synthase. It also possesses anticancer activity. So the transportation and metabolism of glutamine are also discussed for better understanding the role of glutamic acid. Glutamates are the carboxylate anions and salts of glutamic acid. Here the roles of various enzymes required for the metabolism of glutamates are also discussed.

  5. Regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression and release from hippocampal neurons is mediated by non-NMDA type glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetmore, C; Olson, L; Bean, A J

    1994-03-01

    We have examined the influence of glutamate on cortical brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Kainic acid (KA) produced an upregulation of hippocampal and neocortical BDNF mRNA as well as BDNF protein that was blocked by a non-NMDA antagonist, 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX), but was not affected by the NMDA antagonist 2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid (AP7). Basal levels of BDNF mRNA were not affected by NMDA, DNQX, or AP7 treatment. BDNF protein was also increased after kainate exposure with a spatial and temporal course distinct from that seen for the expression of BDNF mRNA. A dramatic shift in BDNF immunoreactivity (-IR) was observed from intracellular compartments to the neuropil surrounding CA3 pyramidal cells 2-3 hr after KA exposure. This shift in localization of BDNF-IR suggests a constitutive release of BDNF at the level of the cell body and dendrites. Moreover, we have localized mRNAs for full-length and truncated trkB, to a co-incident population of neurons and glia. These data suggest the neurons that produce BDNF also express components necessary for a biological response to the same neurotrophic factor. The present study also demonstrates increased BDNF-IR in the mossy fiber terminal zone of hippocampus after exposure to KA, as well as an increase in trkB mRNA, and provides evidence of local release of this neurotrophin into the surrounding neuropil where it would be available for local utilization. The synthesis and putative release of BDNF from somatic and/or dendritic sites within the hippocampus provide evidence of a potential autocrine or paracrine role for BDNF, and establish a local source of trophic support for the maintenance of synaptic plasticity and anatomic reorganization in the mature nervous system.

  6. Glutamic acid decarboxylase-67-positive hippocampal interneurons undergo a permanent reduction in number following kainic acid-induced degeneration of ca3 pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, A K; Turner, D A

    2001-06-01

    Kainic acid (KA)-induced degeneration of CA3 pyramidal neurons leads to synaptic reorganization and hyperexcitability in both dentate gyrus and CA1 region of the hippocampus. We hypothesize that the substrate for hippocampal inhibitory circuitry incurs significant and permanent alterations following degeneration of CA3 pyramidal neurons. We quantified changes in interneuron density (N(v)) in all strata of the dentate gyrus and the CA1 and CA3 subfields of adult rats at 1, 4, and 6 months following intracerebroventricular (icv) KA administration, using glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 (GAD-67) immunocytochemistry. At 1 month postlesion, GAD-67-positive interneuron density was significantly reduced in all strata of every hippocampal region except stratum pyramidale of CA1. The reduction in GAD-67-positive interneuron density either persisted or exacerbated at 4 and 6 months postlesion in every stratum of all hippocampal regions. Further, the soma of remaining GAD-67-positive interneurons in dentate gyrus and CA3 subfield showed significant hypertrophy. Thus, both permanent reductions in the density of GAD-67-positive interneurons in all hippocampal regions and somatic hypertrophy of remaining GAD-67-positive interneurons in dentate gyrus and CA3 subfield occur following icv KA. In contrast, the density of interneurons visualized with Nissl in CA1 and CA3 regions was nearly equivalent to that in the intact hippocampus at all postlesion time points. Collectively, these results suggest that persistent reductions in GAD-67-positive interneuron density observed throughout the hippocampus following CA3 lesion are largely due to a permanent loss of GAD-67 expression in a significant fraction of interneurons, rather than widespread degeneration of interneurons. Nevertheless, a persistent decrease in interneuron activity, as evidenced by permanent down-regulation of GAD-67 in a major fraction of interneurons, would likely enhance the degree of hyperexcitability in the CA3

  7. Towards bridging the gap between acid-base transporters and neuronal excitability modulation

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    pH homeostasis is a fundamental regulator of the function of the central nervous system. Dysfunction of acid-base transporters often results in disturbance of neuronal excitability. In a latest issue of Journal of Neuroscience, Jones et al. report that increasing intracellular bicarbonate concentration substantially stimulates the excitability of pyramidal neurons from mouse hippocampus by inhibiting KCNQ potassium channel. The finding shed important new light in understanding the molecular m...

  8. SAT1, a glutamine transporter, is preferentially expressed in GABAergic neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Tallak Solbu

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Subsets of GABAergic neurons are able to maintain high frequency discharge patterns, which requires efficient replenishment of the releasable pool of GABA. Although glutamine is considered a preferred precursor of GABA, the identity of transporters involved in glutamine uptake by GABAergic neurons remains elusive. Molecular analyses revealed that SAT1 (Slc38a1 features system A characteristics with a preferential affinity for glutamine, and that SAT1 mRNA expression is associated with GABAergic neurons. By generating specific antibodies against SAT1 we show that this glutamine carrier is particularly enriched in GABAergic neurons. Cellular SAT1 distribution resembles that of GAD67, an essential GABA synthesis enzyme, suggesting that SAT1 can be involved in translocating glutamine into GABAergic neurons to facilitate inhibitory neurotransmitter generation.

  9. Live-cell imaging of post-golgi transport vesicles in cultured hippocampal neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Camilla Stampe; Misonou, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    The subcellular localization of neuronal membrane signaling molecules such as receptors and ion channels depends on intracellular trafficking mechanisms. Essentially, vesicular trafficking mechanisms ensure that a large number of membrane proteins are correctly targeted to different subcellular...... compartments of neurons. In the past two decades, the establishment and advancement of fluorescent protein technology have provided us with opportunities to study how proteins are trafficked in living cells. However, live imaging of trafficking processes in neurons necessitate imaging tools to distinguish...... the several different routes that neurons use for protein trafficking. Here we provide a novel protocol to selectively visualize post-Golgi transport vesicles carrying fluorescent-labeled ion channel proteins in living neurons. Further, we provide a number of analytical tools we developed to quantify...

  10. The solute carrier family 1 (glial high affinity glutamate transporter), member 2 gene, SLC1A2, rs3794087 variant and assessment risk for restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Jiménez, Félix Javier; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; Martínez, Carmen; Zurdo, Martín; Turpín-Fenoll, Laura; Millán-Pascual, Jorge; Adeva-Bartolomé, Teresa; Cubo, Esther; Navacerrada, Francisco; Rojo-Sebastián, Ana; Rubio, Lluisa; Calleja, Marisol; Plaza-Nieto, José Francisco; Pilo-de-la-Fuente, Belén; Arroyo-Solera, Margarita; García-Martín, Elena; Agúndez, José A G

    2014-02-01

    A glutamatergic dysfunction has been postulated to play a role in restless legs syndrome (RLS) pathophysiology, as glutamate concentrations have been found to increase in the thalamus of RLS patients. The aim of our study was to investigate the possible association between the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs3794087 in the solute carrier family 1 (glial high affinity glutamate transporter), member 2 gene, SLC1A2, related with glutamate transport and the risk for RLS. We studied the allelic and genotype frequencies of the SNP rs3794087 in 205 patients with RLS and 328 healthy controls using TaqMan genotyping. The rs3794087 genotype and allelic frequencies did not significantly differ between patients with RLS and controls and were unrelated with the age at onset of RLS, gender, and family history of RLS. The results of our study suggest that the rs3794087 polymorphism is not related to the risk for RLS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Kinesin KIF4A transports integrin β1 in developing axons of cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintz, Tristan G; Heller, Janosch P; Zhao, Rongrong; Caceres, Alfredo; Eva, Richard; Fawcett, James W

    2014-11-01

    CNS axons have poor regenerative ability compared to PNS axons, and mature axons regenerate less well than immature embryonic axons. The loss of regenerative ability with maturity is accompanied by the setting up of a selective transport filter in axons, restricting the types of molecule that are present. We confirm that integrins (represented by subunits β1 and α5) are present in early cortical axons in vitro but are excluded from mature axons. Ribosomal protein and L1 show selective axonal transport through association with kinesin kif4A; we have therefore examined the hypothesis that integrin transport might also be in association with kif4A. Kif4A is present in all processes of immature cortical neurons cultured at E18, then downregulated by 14days in vitro, coinciding with the exclusion of integrin from axons. Kif4a co-localises with β1 integrin in vesicles in neurons and non-neuronal cells, and the two molecules co-immunoprecipitate. Knockdown of KIF4A expression with shRNA reduced the level of integrin β1 in axons of developing neurons and reduced neurite elongation on laminin, an integrin-dependent substrate. Overexpression of kif4A triggered apoptosis in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. In mature neurons expression of kif4A-GFP at a modest level did not kill the cells, and the kif4A was detectable in their axons. However this was not accompanied by an increase in integrin β1 axonal transport, suggesting that kif4A is not the only integrin transporter, and that integrin exclusion from axons is controlled by factors other than the kif4A level. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. MAPT Genetic Variation and Neuronal Maturity Alter Isoform Expression Affecting Axonal Transport in iPSC-Derived Dopamine Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel E. Beevers

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The H1 haplotype of the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT locus is genetically associated with neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease (PD, and affects gene expression and splicing. However, the functional impact on neurons of such expression differences has yet to be fully elucidated. Here, we employ extended maturation phases during differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs into mature dopaminergic neuronal cultures to obtain cultures expressing all six adult tau protein isoforms. After 6 months of maturation, levels of exon 3+ and exon 10+ transcripts approach those of adult brain. Mature dopaminergic neuronal cultures display haplotype differences in expression, with H1 expressing 22% higher levels of MAPT transcripts than H2 and H2 expressing 2-fold greater exon 3+ transcripts than H1. Furthermore, knocking down adult tau protein variants alters axonal transport velocities in mature iPSC-derived dopaminergic neuronal cultures. This work links haplotype-specific MAPT expression with a biologically functional outcome relevant for PD.

  13. Gene transfer of GLT-1, a glial glutamate transporter, into the spinal cord by recombinant adenovirus attenuates inflammatory and neuropathic pain in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakagawa Takayuki

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The glial glutamate transporter GLT-1 is abundantly expressed in astrocytes and is crucial for glutamate removal from the synaptic cleft. Decreases in glutamate uptake activity and expression of spinal glutamate transporters are reported in animal models of pathological pain. However, the lack of available specific inhibitors and/or activators for GLT-1 makes it difficult to determine the roles of spinal GLT-1 in inflammatory and neuropathic pain. In this study, we examined the effect of gene transfer of GLT-1 into the spinal cord with recombinant adenoviruses on the inflammatory and neuropathic pain in rats. Results Intraspinal infusion of adenoviral vectors expressing the GLT-1 gene increased GLT-1 expression in the spinal cord 2–21 days after the infusion. Transgene expression was primarily localized to astrocytes. The spinal GLT-1 gene transfer had no effect on acute mechanical and thermal nociceptive responses in naive rats, whereas it significantly reduced the inflammatory mechanical hyperalgesia induced by hindlimb intraplantar injection of carrageenan/kaolin. Spinal GLT-1 gene transfer 7 days before partial sciatic nerve ligation recovered the extent of the spinal GLT-1 expression in the membrane fraction that was decreased following the nerve ligation, and prevented the induction of tactile allodynia. However, the partial sciatic nerve ligation-induced allodynia was not reversed when the adenoviruses were infused 7 or 14 days after the nerve ligation. Conclusion These results suggest that overexpression of GLT-1 on astrocytes in the spinal cord by recombinant adenoviruses attenuates the induction, but not maintenance, of inflammatory and neuropathic pain, probably by preventing the induction of central sensitization, without affecting acute pain sensation. Upregulation or functional enhancement of spinal GLT-1 could be a novel strategy for the prevention of pathological pain.

  14. Impairments in brain-derived neurotrophic factor-induced glutamate release in cultured cortical neurons derived from rats with intrauterine growth retardation: possible involvement of suppression of TrkB/phospholipase C-γ activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numakawa, Tadahiro; Matsumoto, Tomoya; Ooshima, Yoshiko; Chiba, Shuichi; Furuta, Miyako; Izumi, Aiko; Ninomiya-Baba, Midori; Odaka, Haruki; Hashido, Kazuo; Adachi, Naoki; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    Low birth weight due to intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) is suggested to be a risk factor for various psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. It has been reported that developmental cortical dysfunction and neurocognitive deficits are observed in individuals with IUGR, however, the underlying molecular mechanisms have yet to be elucidated. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor TrkB are associated with schizophrenia and play a role in cortical development. We previously demonstrated that BDNF induced glutamate release through activation of the TrkB/phospholipase C-γ (PLC-γ) pathway in developing cultured cortical neurons, and that, using a rat model for IUGR caused by maternal administration of thromboxane A2, cortical levels of TrkB were significantly reduced in IUGR rats at birth. These studies prompted us to hypothesize that TrkB reduction in IUGR cortex led to impairment of BDNF-dependent glutamatergic neurotransmission. In the present study, we found that BDNF-induced glutamate release was strongly impaired in cultured IUGR cortical neurons where TrkB reduction was maintained. Impairment of BDNF-induced glutamate release in IUGR neurons was ameliorated by transfection of human TrkB (hTrkB). Although BDNF-stimulated phosphorylation of TrkB and of PLC-γ was decreased in IUGR neurons, the hTrkB transfection recovered the deficits in their phosphorylation. These results suggest that TrkB reduction causes impairment of BDNF-stimulated glutamatergic function via suppression of TrkB/PLC-γ activation in IUGR cortical neurons. Our findings provide molecular insights into how IUGR links to downregulation of BDNF function in the cortex, which might be involved in the development of IUGR-related diseases such as schizophrenia.

  15. CAR-associated vesicular transport of an adenovirus in motor neuron axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Sara; Bilsland, Lynsey G; Henaff, Daniel; Weston, Anne E; Keriel, Anne; Schiavo, Giampietro; Kremer, Eric J

    2009-05-01

    Axonal transport is responsible for the movement of signals and cargo between nerve termini and cell bodies. Pathogens also exploit this pathway to enter and exit the central nervous system. In this study, we characterised the binding, endocytosis and axonal transport of an adenovirus (CAV-2) that preferentially infects neurons. Using biochemical, cell biology, genetic, ultrastructural and live-cell imaging approaches, we show that interaction with the neuronal membrane correlates with coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) surface expression, followed by endocytosis involving clathrin. In axons, long-range CAV-2 motility was bidirectional with a bias for retrograde transport in nonacidic Rab7-positive organelles. Unexpectedly, we found that CAR was associated with CAV-2 vesicles that also transported cargo as functionally distinct as tetanus toxin, neurotrophins, and their receptors. These results suggest that a single axonal transport carrier is capable of transporting functionally distinct cargoes that target different membrane compartments in the soma. We propose that CAV-2 transport is dictated by an innate trafficking of CAR, suggesting an unsuspected function for this adhesion protein during neuronal homeostasis.

  16. CAR-associated vesicular transport of an adenovirus in motor neuron axons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Salinas

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Axonal transport is responsible for the movement of signals and cargo between nerve termini and cell bodies. Pathogens also exploit this pathway to enter and exit the central nervous system. In this study, we characterised the binding, endocytosis and axonal transport of an adenovirus (CAV-2 that preferentially infects neurons. Using biochemical, cell biology, genetic, ultrastructural and live-cell imaging approaches, we show that interaction with the neuronal membrane correlates with coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR surface expression, followed by endocytosis involving clathrin. In axons, long-range CAV-2 motility was bidirectional with a bias for retrograde transport in nonacidic Rab7-positive organelles. Unexpectedly, we found that CAR was associated with CAV-2 vesicles that also transported cargo as functionally distinct as tetanus toxin, neurotrophins, and their receptors. These results suggest that a single axonal transport carrier is capable of transporting functionally distinct cargoes that target different membrane compartments in the soma. We propose that CAV-2 transport is dictated by an innate trafficking of CAR, suggesting an unsuspected function for this adhesion protein during neuronal homeostasis.

  17. Neurotransmitter transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gether, Ulrik; Andersen, Peter H; Larsson, Orla M

    2006-01-01

    The concentration of neurotransmitters in the extracellular space is tightly controlled by distinct classes of membrane transport proteins. This review focuses on the molecular function of two major classes of neurotransmitter transporter that are present in the cell membrane of neurons and....../or glial cells: the solute carrier (SLC)1 transporter family, which includes the transporters that mediate the Na(+)-dependent uptake of glutamate, and the SLC6 transporter family, which includes the transporters that mediate the Na(+)-dependent uptake of dopamine, 5-HT, norepinephrine, glycine and GABA....... Recent research has provided substantial insight into the structure and function of these transporters. In particular, the recent crystallizations of bacterial homologs are of the utmost importance, enabling the first reliable structural models of the mammalian neurotransmitter transporters...

  18. Inhibitory effects of (2S, 3S)-3-[3-[4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoylamino]benzyloxy]aspartate (TFB-TBOA) on the astrocytic sodium responses to glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzo, Luigi; Chatton, Jean-Yves

    2010-02-26

    Astrocytes are responsible for the majority of the clearance of extracellular glutamate released during neuronal activity. dl-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate (TBOA) is extensively used as inhibitor of glutamate transport activity, but suffers from relatively low affinity for the transporter. Here, we characterized the effects of (2S, 3S)-3-[3-[4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoylamino]benzyloxy]aspartate (TFB-TBOA), a recently developed inhibitor of the glutamate transporter on mouse cortical astrocytes in primary culture. The glial Na(+)-glutamate transport system is very efficient and its activation by glutamate causes rapid intracellular Na(+) concentration (Na(+)(i)) changes that enable real time monitoring of transporter activity. Na(+)(i) was monitored by fluorescence microscopy in single astrocytes using the fluorescent Na(+)-sensitive probe sodium-binding benzofuran isophtalate. When applied alone, TFB-TBOA, at a concentration of 1 microM, caused small alterations of Na(+)(i). TFB-TBOA inhibited the Na(+)(i) response evoked by 200 microM glutamate in a concentration-dependent manner with IC(50) value of 43+/-9 nM, as measured on the amplitude of the Na(+)(i) response. The maximum inhibition of glutamate-evoked Na(+)(i) increase by TFB-TBOA was >80%, but was only partly reversible. The residual response persisted in the presence of the AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist CNQX. TFB-TBOA also efficiently inhibited Na(+)(i) elevations caused by the application of d-aspartate, a transporter substrate that does not activate non-NMDA ionotropic receptors. TFB-TBOA was found not to influence the membrane properties of cultured cortical neurons recorded in whole-cell patch clamp. Thus, TFB-TBOA, with its high potency and its apparent lack of neuronal effects, appears to be one of the most useful pharmacological tools available so far for studying glial glutamate transporters.

  19. Cryo electron tomography of herpes simplex virus during axonal transport and secondary envelopment in primary neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iosune Ibiricu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available During herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1 egress in neurons, viral particles travel from the neuronal cell body along the axon towards the synapse. Whether HSV1 particles are transported as enveloped virions as proposed by the 'married' model or as non-enveloped capsids suggested by the 'separate' model is controversial. Specific viral proteins may form a recruitment platform for microtubule motors that catalyze such transport. However, their subviral location has remained elusive. Here we established a system to analyze herpesvirus egress by cryo electron tomography. At 16 h post infection, we observed intra-axonal transport of progeny HSV1 viral particles in dissociated hippocampal neurons by live-cell fluorescence microscopy. Cryo electron tomography of frozen-hydrated neurons revealed that most egressing capsids were transported independently of the viral envelope. Unexpectedly, we found not only DNA-containing capsids (cytosolic C-capsids, but also capsids lacking DNA (cytosolic A-/B-capsids in mid-axon regions. Subvolume averaging revealed lower amounts of tegument on cytosolic A-/B-capsids than on C-capsids. Nevertheless, all capsid types underwent active axonal transport. Therefore, even few tegument proteins on the capsid vertices seemed to suffice for transport. Secondary envelopment of capsids was observed at axon terminals. On their luminal face, the enveloping vesicles were studded with typical glycoprotein-like spikes. Furthermore, we noted an accretion of tegument density at the concave cytosolic face of the vesicle membrane in close proximity to the capsids. Three-dimensional analysis revealed that these assembly sites lacked cytoskeletal elements, but that filamentous actin surrounded them and formed an assembly compartment. Our data support the 'separate model' for HSV1 egress, i.e. progeny herpes viruses being transported along axons as subassemblies and not as complete virions within transport vesicles.

  20. Impaired axonal transport in motor neurons correlates with clinical prion disease.

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    Vladimir Ermolayev

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders causing motor dysfunctions, dementia and neuropathological changes such as spongiosis, astroglyosis and neuronal loss. The chain of events leading to the clinical disease and the role of distinct brain areas are still poorly understood. The role of nervous system integrity and axonal properties in prion pathology are still elusive. There is no evidence of both the functional axonal impairments in vivo and their connection with prion disease. We studied the functional axonal impairments in motor neurons at the onset of clinical prion disease using the combination of tracing as a functional assay for axonal transport with immunohistochemistry experiments. Well-established and novel confocal and ultramicroscopy techniques were used to image and quantify labeled neurons. Despite profound differences in the incubation times, 30% to 45% of neurons in the red nucleus of different mouse lines showed axonal transport impairments at the disease onset bilaterally after intracerebral prion inoculation and unilaterally -- after inoculation into the right sciatic nerve. Up to 94% of motor cortex neurons also demonstrated transport defects upon analysis by alternative imaging methods. Our data connect axonal transport impairments with disease symptoms for different prion strains and inoculation routes and establish further insight on the development of prion pathology in vivo. The alterations in localization of the proteins involved in the retrograde axonal transport allow us to propose a mechanism of transport disruption, which involves Rab7-mediated cargo attachment to the dynein-dynactin pathway. These findings suggest novel targets for therapeutic and diagnostic approaches in the early stages of prion disease.

  1. Glutamate Transporter GLT-1 Upregulation Attenuates Visceral Nociception and Hyperalgesia via Spinal Mechanisms Not Related to Anti-Inflammatory or Probiotic Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Lin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Visceral pain is the most common reason for physician visits in US. Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter and mediates visceral nociceptive neuro-transmission and hypersensitivity. Removal of extracellular glutamate is predominantly mediated by glial glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1. The pharmacological approach to up-regulate GLT-1 by 1 week administration of ceftriaxone (CTX has been successful to mitigate visceral nociception. The present study shows that intrathecal delivery of selective GLT-1 antagonist dihydrokainate reversed CTX-blunted visceral nociceptive response, suggesting a spinal site of action. The role of GLT-1 up-regulation in animal models of colitis was studied. CTX treatment reversed TNBS-induced visceral hypersensitivity. In addition, CTX treatment initiated one week after the onset of DSS-induced visceral inflammation also attenuated visceral hypersensitivity, revealing a potential therapeutic effect. Cephalothin, a cephalosporin antibiotic lacking GLT-1 induction activity, failed to attenuate visceral nociception. CTX-induced changes in fecal microbiota do not support a role of probiotic effects in mitigating visceral nociception/hypersensitivity. Finally, adeno-associated virus serotype 9-mediated GLT-1 over-expression was effective to mitigate visceromotor response to 60 mmHg colo-rectal distension. These studies indicate that GLT-1 over-expression is a novel and effective method to attenuate visceral nociception, and is deserving of further study as a translationally relevant approach to treat visceral pain.

  2. Effects of surface functionalization of hydrophilic NaYF4 nanocrystals doped with Eu3+ on glutamate and GABA transport in brain synaptosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, Bartlomiej; Kociołek, Daria; Banski, Mateusz; Borisova, Tatiana; Pozdnyakova, Natalia; Pastukhov, Artem; Borysov, Arsenii; Dudarenko, Marina; Podhorodecki, Artur

    2017-08-01

    Specific rare earth doped nanocrystals (NCs), a recent class of nanoparticles with fluorescent features, have great bioanalytical potential. Neuroactive properties of NaYF4 nanocrystals doped with Eu3+ were assessed based on the analysis of their effects on glutamate- and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transport process in nerve terminals isolated from rat brain (synaptosomes). Two types of hydrophilic NCs were examined in this work: (i) coated by polyethylene glycol (PEG) and (ii) with OH groups at the surface. It was found that NaYF4:Eu3+-PEG and NaYF4:Eu3+-OH within the concentration range of 0.5-3.5 and 0.5-1.5 mg/ml, respectively, did not influence Na+-dependent transporter-dependent l-[14C]glutamate and [3H]GABA uptake and the ambient level of the neurotransmitters in the synaptosomes. An increase in NaYF4:Eu3+-PEG and NaYF4:Eu3+-OH concentrations up to 7.5 and 3.5 mg/ml, respectively, led to the (1) attenuation of the initial velocity of uptake of l-[14C]glutamate and [3H]GABA and (2) elevation of ambient neurotransmitters in the suspension of nerve terminals. In the mentioned concentrations, nanocrystals did not influence acidification of synaptic vesicles that was shown with pH-sensitive fluorescent dye acridine orange, however, decreased the potential of the plasma membrane of synaptosomes. In comparison with other nanoparticles studied with similar methodological approach, NCs start to exhibit their effects on neurotransmitter transport at concentrations several times higher than those shown for carbon dots, detonation nanodiamonds and an iron storage protein ferritin, whose activity can be registered at 0.08, 0.5 and 0.08 mg/ml, respectively. Therefore, NCs can be considered lesser neurotoxic as compared to above nanoparticles.

  3. Neuroprotective effects of the novel glutamate transporter inhibitor (-)-3-hydroxy-4,5,6,6a-tetrahydro-3aH-pyrrolo[3,4-d]-isoxazole-4-carboxylic acid, which preferentially inhibits reverse transport (glutamate release) compared with glutamate reuptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colleoni, Simona; Jensen, Anders Asbjørn; Landucci, Elisa;

    2008-01-01

    (+/-)-3-Hydroxy-4,5,6,6a-tetrahydro-3aH-pyrrolo [3,4 -d]-isoxazole-4-carboxylic acid (HIP-A) and (+/-)-3-hydroxy-4,5,6, 6a-tetrahydro-3aH-pyrrolo[3,4-d]isoxazole-6-carboxylic acid (HIP-B) are selective inhibitors of excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs), as potent as DL-threo-beta-benzyloxya......(+/-)-3-Hydroxy-4,5,6,6a-tetrahydro-3aH-pyrrolo [3,4 -d]-isoxazole-4-carboxylic acid (HIP-A) and (+/-)-3-hydroxy-4,5,6, 6a-tetrahydro-3aH-pyrrolo[3,4-d]isoxazole-6-carboxylic acid (HIP-B) are selective inhibitors of excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs), as potent as DL...... that the noncompetitive-like interaction described previously is probably the consequence of an insurmountable, long-lasting impairment of EAAT's function. Some minutes of preincubation are required to induce this impairment, the duration of preincubation having more effect on inhibition of glutamate-induced release than...

  4. Functional modulation of the glutamate transporter variant GLT1b by the PDZ domain protein PICK1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Rikke; Borre, Lars; Braunstein, Thomas H

    2013-01-01

    effect on trafficking of AMPA-type glutamate receptors. The 11 extreme C-terminal residues specific for the GLT1b variant are essential for its specific interaction with the PICK1 PDZ domain, but a functional consequence of this interaction has remained unresolved. To identify a functional effect of PICK...

  5. Interference of the noradrenergic neurotoxin DSP4 with neuronal and nonneuronal monoamine transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenge, Birger; Bönisch, Heinz

    2009-12-01

    The haloalkylamine DSP4 (N[-2-chloroethyl]-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine) is a noradrenergic neurotoxin, which is used for the chemical denervation of noradrenergic neurons, and it has been proposed to be a selective substrate for the neuronal, Na(+)- and Cl(-)-dependent noradrenaline transporter (NAT). In the present study, we investigated whether DSP4 not only interacts with the human NAT (hNAT) but also with other neuronal monoamine transporters such as the transporters for dopamine (hDAT) and serotonin (hSERT) or with nonneuronal (Na(+)-independent) monoamine transporters also known as organic cation transporters (OCTs), such as hOCT(1), hOCT(2), and hOCT(3). Using human embryonic kidney HEK293 cells heterologously expressing the corresponding transporter, we show that DSP4 irreversibly inhibits the hNAT, hDAT, hSERT, and hOCT(3). However, this inhibition includes a reversible component at the hDAT, hSERT, and hOCT(3) but not at the hNAT. The inhibitory potency of DSP4 at the neuronal transporters was highest at the hNAT (IC(50) about 5 microM), and it was about five and 40 times lower at the hSERT and hDAT, respectively. DSP4 inhibited all three hOCTs with high potency (IC(50) about 1 microM) but in a completely reversible manner at hOCT(1) and hOCT(2). Cytotoxicity by 24-h exposure of hNAT- or hOCT-expressing cells to low DSP4 concentrations (DSP4's high-affinity uptake through the NAT together with its completely irreversible mode of interaction with the NAT may contribute to its selectivity as noradrenergic neurotoxin.

  6. The carcinine transporter CarT is required in Drosophila photoreceptor neurons to sustain histamine recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenesen, Drew; Moehlman, Andrew T; Krämer, Helmut

    2015-12-14

    Synaptic transmission from Drosophila photoreceptors to lamina neurons requires recycling of histamine neurotransmitter. Synaptic histamine is cleared by uptake into glia and conversion into carcinine, which functions as transport metabolite. How carcinine is transported from glia to photoreceptor neurons remains unclear. In a targeted RNAi screen for genes involved in this pathway, we identified carT, which encodes a member of the SLC22A transporter family. CarT expression in photoreceptors is necessary and sufficient for fly vision and behavior. Carcinine accumulates in the lamina of carT flies. Wild-type levels are restored by photoreceptor-specific expression of CarT, and endogenous tagging suggests CarT localizes to synaptic endings. Heterologous expression of CarT in S2 cells is sufficient for carcinine uptake, demonstrating the ability of CarT to utilize carcinine as a transport substrate. Together, our results demonstrate that CarT transports the histamine metabolite carcinine into photoreceptor neurons, thus contributing an essential step to the histamine-carcinine cycle.

  7. The carcinine transporter CarT is required in Drosophila photoreceptor neurons to sustain histamine recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenesen, Drew; Moehlman, Andrew T; Krämer, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic transmission from Drosophila photoreceptors to lamina neurons requires recycling of histamine neurotransmitter. Synaptic histamine is cleared by uptake into glia and conversion into carcinine, which functions as transport metabolite. How carcinine is transported from glia to photoreceptor neurons remains unclear. In a targeted RNAi screen for genes involved in this pathway, we identified carT, which encodes a member of the SLC22A transporter family. CarT expression in photoreceptors is necessary and sufficient for fly vision and behavior. Carcinine accumulates in the lamina of carT flies. Wild-type levels are restored by photoreceptor-specific expression of CarT, and endogenous tagging suggests CarT localizes to synaptic endings. Heterologous expression of CarT in S2 cells is sufficient for carcinine uptake, demonstrating the ability of CarT to utilize carcinine as a transport substrate. Together, our results demonstrate that CarT transports the histamine metabolite carcinine into photoreceptor neurons, thus contributing an essential step to the histamine–carcinine cycle. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10972.001 PMID:26653853

  8. Concentration of membrane antigens by forward transport and trapping in neuronal growth cones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheetz, M P; Baumrind, N L; Wayne, D B; Pearlman, A L

    1990-04-20

    Formation of the nervous system requires that neuronal growth cones follow specific paths and then stop at recognition signals, sensed at the growth cone's leading edge. We used antibody-coated gold particles viewed by video-enhanced differential interference contrast microscopy to observe the distribution and movement of two cell surface molecules, N-CAM and the 2A1 antigen, on growth cones of cultured cortical neurons. Gold particles are occasionally transported forward at 1-2 microns/s to the leading edge where they are trapped but continue to move. Concentration at the edge persists after cytochalasin D treatment or ATP depletion, but active movements to and along edges cease. We also observed a novel outward movement of small cytoplasmic aggregates at 1.8 microns/s in filopodia. We suggest that active forward transport and trapping involve reversible attachment of antigens to and transport along cytoskeletal elements localized to edges of growth cones.

  9. Evaluation of PFOS-mediated neurotoxicity in rat primary neurons and astrocytes cultured separately or in co-culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenwei; Liu, Qi; Liu, Chang; Li, Chunna; Li, Yachen; Li, Shuangyue; Liu, Xiaohui; Shao, Jing

    2017-02-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a potential neurotoxicant reported by epidemiological investigations and experimental studies, while the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Astrocytes not only support for the construction of neurons, but also conduct neuronal functions through glutamate-glutamine cycle in astrocyte-neuron crosstalk. In the present study, the effect of PFOS exposure on rat primary hippocampal neurons or cortex astrocytes was evaluated. Then the role of the astrocytes in PFOS-induced toxic effect on neurons was explored with astrocyte-neuron co-culture system. Exposure of rat primary hippocampal neurons to PFOS has led to oxidation-antioxidation imbalance, increased apoptosis and abnormal autophagy. The adverse effect of PFOS on rat primary cortex astrocytes manifested in the form of altered extracellular glutamate and glutamine concentrations, decreased glutamine synthase activity, as well as decreased gene expression of glutamine synthase, glutamate transporters and glutamine transporters in the glutamate-glutamine cycle. Especially, the alleviation of PFOS-inhibited neurite outgrowth in neurons could be observed in astrocyte-neuron co-culture system, though the ability of astrocytes in fostering neurite outgrowth was affected by PFOS. These results indicated that both astrocytes and neurons might be the targets of PFOS-induced neurotoxicity, and astrocytes could protect against PFOS-inhibited neurite outgrowth in primary cultured neurons. Our research might render some information in explaining the mechanisms of PFOS-induced neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Ligands targeting the excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, John; Butera, John A

    2006-01-01

    This review provides an overview of ligands for the excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs), a family of high-affinity glutamate transporters localized to the plasma membrane of neurons and astroglial cells. Ligand development from the perspective of identifying novel and more selective tools for elucidating transporter subtype function, and the potential of transporter ligands in a therapeutic setting are discussed. Acute pharmacological modulation of EAAT activity in the form of linear and conformationally restricted glutamate and aspartate analogs is presented, in addition to recent strategies aimed more toward modulating transporter expression levels, the latter of particular significance to the development of transporter based therapeutics.

  11. Differential expression of vesicular glutamate transporters 1 and 2 may identify distinct modes of glutamatergic transmission in the macaque visual system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaram, Pooja; Hackett, Troy A; Kaas, Jon H

    2013-05-01

    Glutamate is the primary neurotransmitter utilized by the mammalian visual system for excitatory neurotransmission. The sequestration of glutamate into synaptic vesicles, and the subsequent transport of filled vesicles to the presynaptic terminal membrane, is regulated by a family of proteins known as vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs). Two VGLUT proteins, VGLUT1 and VGLUT2, characterize distinct sets of glutamatergic projections between visual structures in rodents and prosimian primates, yet little is known about their distributions in the visual system of anthropoid primates. We have examined the mRNA and protein expression patterns of VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 in the visual system of macaque monkeys, an Old World anthropoid primate, in order to determine their relative distributions in the superior colliculus, lateral geniculate nucleus, pulvinar complex, V1 and V2. Distinct expression patterns for both VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 identified architectonic boundaries in all structures, as well as anatomical subdivisions of the superior colliculus, pulvinar complex, and V1. These results suggest that VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 clearly identify regions of glutamatergic input in visual structures, and may identify common architectonic features of visual areas and nuclei across the primate radiation. Additionally, we find that VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 characterize distinct subsets of glutamatergic projections in the macaque visual system; VGLUT2 predominates in driving or feedforward projections from lower order to higher order visual structures while VGLUT1 predominates in modulatory or feedback projections from higher order to lower order visual structures. The distribution of these two proteins suggests that VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 may identify class 1 and class 2 type glutamatergic projections within the primate visual system (Sherman and Guillery, 2006).

  12. Amyloid-Beta Induced Changes in Vesicular Transport of BDNF in Hippocampal Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Seifert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurotrophin brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is an important growth factor in the CNS. Deficits in transport of this secretory protein could underlie neurodegenerative diseases. Investigation of disease-related changes in BDNF transport might provide insights into the cellular mechanism underlying, for example, Alzheimer’s disease (AD. To analyze the role of BDNF transport in AD, live cell imaging of fluorescently labeled BDNF was performed in hippocampal neurons of different AD model systems. BDNF and APP colocalized with low incidence in vesicular structures. Anterograde as well as retrograde transport of BDNF vesicles was reduced and these effects were mediated by factors released from hippocampal neurons into the extracellular medium. Transport of BDNF was altered at a very early time point after onset of human APP expression or after acute amyloid-beta(1-42 treatment, while the activity-dependent release of BDNF remained unaffected. Taken together, extracellular cleavage products of APP induced rapid changes in anterograde and retrograde transport of BDNF-containing vesicles while release of BDNF was unaffected by transgenic expression of mutated APP. These early transport deficits might lead to permanently impaired brain functions in the adult brain.

  13. Intracellular pH regulation by acid/base transporters in mammalian neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon A. Ruffin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular pH (pHi regulation in the brain is important in both physiological and physiopathological conditions because changes in pHi generally result in altered neuronal excitability. In this review, we will cover 4 major areas: [1] The effect of pHi on cellular processes in the brain, including channel activity and neuronal excitability. [2] pHi homeostasis and how it is determined by the balance between rates of acid loading (JL and extrusion (JE. The balance between JE and JL determine steady-state pHi, as well as the ability of the cell to defend pHi in the face of extracellular acid-base disturbances (e.g. metabolic acidosis. [3] The properties and importance of members of the SLC4 and SLC9 families of acid-base transporters expressed in the brain that contribute to JL (namely the Cl-HCO3 exchanger AE3 and JE (the Na-H exchangers NHE1, NHE3 and NHE5 as well as the Na+- coupled HCO3- transporters NBCe1, NBCn1, NDCBE, and NBCn2. [4] The effect of acid-base disturbances on neuronal function and the roles of acid-base transporters in defending neuronal pHi under physiopathologic conditions.

  14. 代谢型谷氨酸受体参与对MAPK的调节%Regulation of the Ras-MAPK pathway in neurons by metabotropic glutamate receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛利民; 杨鲁; Anish; Arora; Nikhil; K.; Parelkar; 张国弛; 刘贤宇; Eun; Sang; Choe; 陈海; 王强

    2005-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are expressed in postmitotic neuronal cells of adult mammalian brain and are involved in the regulation of various cellular activities, including inducible gene expression. Recent data from this laboratory show that selective stimulation of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) activates a major subclass of MAPKs, extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase ( ERK), in striatal neurons. The activation of ERK was mediated partially through the mGluR5-associated signaling pathway, i. e., inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3 )-mediated Ca2+ release. More importantly, the member of Homer family, Homer1b/c, forms a central signaling pathway linking mGluR5 to ERK in a Ca2+ -independent manner. In addition, a major serine/threonine phosphatase, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), is also involved in the mGluR5 regulation of ERK phosphorylation. As an information superhighway between the surface membrane and the nucleus, ERK when co-activated by both IP3/Ca2+- and Homer1 b/c-dependent pathways showed the ability to phosphorylate two transcription factors, Elk-1 and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB),and thereby facilitated c-Fos expression. Together, available data obtained from this laboratory and others indicate that mGluR5 possesses the ability to activate the ERK pathway in striatal neurons. A sophisticated signaling apparatus involving coordinated interactions between protein kinases and protein phosphatases mediates the mGluR5-ERK coupling imperative for the transcriptional regulation.%Mitogen-activated protein kinase(MAPK)在成体脑细胞高度表达并参与了多种细胞功能活动的调节.近年来,本实验室的实验结果表明五型代谢型谷氨酸受体(mGluR5)可以激活纹状体培养神经元内MAPK的主要亚型ERK,ERK的激活经由两条独立的胞内信号通路介导,传统的IP3/Ca2+通路介导了一部分的ERK激活,而mGluR5的C-端结合蛋白Homer则以Ca2+-非依赖方式介导了

  15. Linking supply to demand: the neuronal monocarboxylate transporter MCT2 and the alpha-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid receptor GluR2/3 subunit are associated in a common trafficking process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Karin; Chatton, Jean-Yves; Parent, Annabelle; Repond, Cendrine; Gardoni, Fabrizio; Di Luca, Monica; Pellerin, Luc

    2009-05-01

    MCT2 is the major neuronal monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) that allows the supply of alternative energy substrates such as lactate to neurons. Recent evidence obtained by electron microscopy has demonstrated that MCT2, like alpha-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors, is localized in dendritic spines of glutamatergic synapses. Using immunofluorescence, we show in this study that MCT2 colocalizes extensively with GluR2/3 subunits of AMPA receptors in neurons from various mouse brain regions as well as in cultured neurons. It also colocalizes with GluR2/3-interacting proteins, such as C-kinase-interacting protein 1, glutamate receptor-interacting protein 1 and clathrin adaptor protein. Coimmunoprecipitation of MCT2 with GluR2/3 and C-kinase-interacting protein 1 suggests their close interaction within spines. Parallel changes in the localization of both MCT2 and GluR2/3 subunits at and beneath the plasma membrane upon various stimulation paradigms were unraveled using an original immunocytochemical and transfection approach combined with three-dimensional image reconstruction. Cell culture incubation with AMPA or insulin triggered a marked intracellular accumulation of both MCT2 and GluR2/3, whereas both tumor necrosis factor alpha and glycine (with glutamate) increased their cell surface immunolabeling. Similar results were obtained using Western blots performed on membrane or cytoplasm-enriched cell fractions. Finally, an enhanced lactate flux into neurons was demonstrated after MCT2 translocation on the cell surface. These observations provide unequivocal evidence that MCT2 is linked to AMPA receptor GluR2/3 subunits and undergoes a similar translocation process in neurons upon activation. MCT2 emerges as a novel component of the synaptic machinery putatively linking neuroenergetics to synaptic transmission.

  16. Elevated systemic glutamic acid level in the non-obese diabetic mouse is Idd linked and induces beta cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banday, Viqar Showkat; Lejon, Kristina

    2017-02-01

    Although type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a T-cell-mediated disease in the effector stage, the mechanism behind the initial beta cell assault is less understood. Metabolomic differences, including elevated levels of glutamic acid, have been observed in patients with T1D before disease onset, as well as in pre-diabetic non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. Increased levels of glutamic acid damage both neurons and beta cells, implying that this could contribute to the initial events of T1D pathogenesis. We investigated the underlying genetic factors and consequences of the increased levels of glutamic acid in NOD mice. Serum glutamic acid levels from a (NOD×B6)F2 cohort (n = 182) were measured. By genome-wide and Idd region targeted microsatellite mapping, genetic association was detected for six regions including Idd2, Idd4 and Idd22. In silico analysis of potential enzymes and transporters located in and around the mapped regions that are involved in glutamic acid metabolism consisted of alanine aminotransferase, glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase, aldehyde dehydrogenase 18 family, alutamyl-prolyl-tRNA synthetase, glutamic acid transporters GLAST and EAAC1. Increased EAAC1 protein expression was observed in lysates from livers of NOD mice compared with B6 mice. Functional consequence of the elevated glutamic acid level in NOD mice was tested by culturing NOD. Rag2(-/-) Langerhans' islets with glutamic acid. Induction of apoptosis of the islets was detected upon glutamic acid challenge using TUNEL assay. Our results support the notion that a dysregulated metabolome could contribute to the initiation of T1D. We suggest that targeting of the increased glutamic acid in pre-diabetic patients could be used as a potential therapy.

  17. The glutamate transport inhibitor DL-Threo-β-Benzyloxyaspartic acid (DL-TBOA) differentially affects SN38- and oxaliplatin-induced death of drug-resistant colorectal cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuesta, Elena Pedraz; Christensen, Sandra; Jensen, Anders A.;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer death globally and new biomarkers and treatments are severely needed. METHODS: Here, we employed HCT116 and LoVo human CRC cells made resistant to either SN38 or oxaliplatin, to investigate whether altered expression of the high...... affinity glutamate transporters Solute Carrier (SLC)-1A1 and -1A3 (EAAT3, EAAT1) is associated with the resistant phenotypes. Analyses included real-time quantitative PCR, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence analyses, radioactive tracer flux measurements, and biochemical analyses of cell viability...... and glutamate transporter activity are altered in SN38-resistant CRC cells. Importantly, the non-selective glutamate transporter inhibitor DL-TBOA reduces chemotherapy-induced p53 induction and augments CRC cell death induced by SN38, while attenuating that induced by oxaliplatin. These findings may point...

  18. Evaluation of hydrogel-coated glutamate microsensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenziel, Weite Hendrik; Dijkstra, G; Cremers, T.I.F.H.; Westerink, B.H.C.

    2006-01-01

    Glutamate microsensors form a promising analytical tool for monitoring neuronally derived glutamate directly in the brain. However, when a microsensor is implanted in brain tissue, many factors can diminish its performance. Consequently, a thorough characterization and evaluation of a microsensor is

  19. Decreased cysteine uptake by EAAC1 gene deletion exacerbates neuronal oxidative stress and neuronal death after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bo Young; Kim, In Yeol; Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Bo Eun; Lee, Song Hee; Kho, A Ra; Jung, Hee Jae; Sohn, Min; Song, Hong Ki; Suh, Sang Won

    2016-07-01

    Excitatory amino acid carrier type 1 (EAAC1), a high-affinity glutamate transporter, can expend energy to move glutamate into neurons. However, under normal physiological conditions, EAAC1 does not have a great effect on glutamate clearance but rather participates in the neuronal uptake of cysteine. This process is critical to maintaining neuronal antioxidant function by providing cysteine for glutathione synthesis. Previous study showed that mice lacking EAAC1 show increased neuronal oxidative stress following transient cerebral ischemia. In the present study, we sought to characterize the role of EAAC1 in neuronal resistance after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Young adult C57BL/6 wild-type or EAAC1 (-/-) mice were subjected to a controlled cortical impact model for TBI. Neuronal death after TBI showed more than double the number of degenerating neurons in the hippocampus in EAAC1 (-/-) mice compared with wild-type mice. Superoxide production, zinc translocation and microglia activation similarly showed a marked increase in the EAAC1 (-/-) mice. Pretreatment with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) reduced TBI-induced neuronal death, superoxide production and zinc translocation. These findings indicate that cysteine uptake by EAAC1 is important for neuronal antioxidant function and survival following TBI. This study also suggests that administration of NAC has therapeutic potential in preventing TBI-induced neuronal death.

  20. Glutamate dysregulation in the trigeminal ganglion: a novel mechanism for peripheral sensitization of the craniofacial region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, J C; Cairns, B E; Dong, X D; Kumar, U; Somvanshi, R K; Arendt-Nielsen, L; Gazerani, P

    2014-01-03

    In the trigeminal ganglion (TG), satellite glial cells (SGCs) form a functional unit with neurons. It has been proposed that SGCs participate in regulating extracellular glutamate levels and that dysfunction of this SGC capacity can impact nociceptive transmission in craniofacial pain conditions. This study investigated whether SGCs release glutamate and whether elevation of TG glutamate concentration alters response properties of trigeminal afferent fibers. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess glutamate content and the expression of excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT)1 and EAAT2 in TG sections. SGCs contained glutamate and expressed EAAT1 and EAAT2. Potassium chloride (10 mM) was used to evoke glutamate release from cultured rat SGCs treated with the EAAT1/2 inhibitor (3S)-3-[[3-[[4-(trifluoromethyl)ben zoyl]amino]phenyl]methoxy]-L-aspartic acid (TFB-TBOA) or control. Treatment with TFB-TBOA (1 and 10 μM) significantly reduced the glutamate concentration from 10.6 ± 1.1 to 5.8 ± 1.4 μM and 3.0 ± 0.8 μM, respectively (pcraniofacial pain conditions such as migraine headache.