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Sample records for neuronal glucose transporter

  1. Intracellular ascorbic acid inhibits transport of glucose by neurons, but not by astrocytes.

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    Castro, Maite A; Pozo, Miguel; Cortés, Christian; García, María de Los Angeles; Concha, Ilona I; Nualart, Francisco

    2007-08-01

    It has been demonstrated that glutamatergic activity induces ascorbic acid (AA) depletion in astrocytes. Additionally, different data indicate that AA may inhibit glucose accumulation in primary cultures of rat hippocampal neurons. Thus, our hypothesis postulates that AA released from the astrocytes during glutamatergic synaptic activity may inhibit glucose uptake by neurons. We observed that cultured neurons express the sodium-vitamin C cotransporter 2 and the facilitative glucose transporters (GLUT) 1 and 3, however, in hippocampal brain slices GLUT3 was the main transporter detected. Functional activity of GLUTs was confirmed by means of kinetic analysis using 2-deoxy-d-glucose. Therefore, we showed that AA, once accumulated inside the cell, inhibits glucose transport in both cortical and hippocampal neurons in culture. Additionally, we showed that astrocytes are not affected by AA. Using hippocampal slices, we observed that upon blockade of monocarboxylate utilization by alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate and after glucose deprivation, glucose could rescue neuronal response to electrical stimulation only if AA uptake is prevented. Finally, using a transwell system of separated neuronal and astrocytic cultures, we observed that glutamate can reduce glucose transport in neurons only in presence of AA-loaded astrocytes, suggesting the essential role of astrocyte-released AA in this effect.

  2. Sodium transport through the cerebral sodium-glucose transporter exacerbates neuron damage during cerebral ischaemia.

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    Yamazaki, Yui; Harada, Shinichi; Wada, Tetsuyuki; Yoshida, Shigeru; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2016-07-01

    We recently demonstrated that the cerebral sodium-glucose transporter (SGLT) is involved in postischaemic hyperglycaemia-induced exacerbation of cerebral ischaemia. However, the associated SGLT-mediated mechanisms remain unclear. Thus, we examined the involvement of cerebral SGLT-induced excessive sodium ion influx in the development of cerebral ischaemic neuronal damage. [Na+]i was estimated according to sodium-binding benzofuran isophthalate fluorescence. In the in vitro study, primary cortical neurons were prepared from fetuses of ddY mice. Primary cortical neurons were cultured for 5 days before each treatment with reagents, and these survival rates were assessed using biochemical assays. In in vivo study, a mouse model of focal ischaemia was generated using middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). In these experiments, treatment with high concentrations of glucose induced increment in [Na+]i, and this phenomenon was suppressed by the SGLT-specific inhibitor phlorizin. SGLT-specific sodium ion influx was induced using a-methyl-D-glucopyranoside (a-MG) treatments, which led to significant concentration-dependent declines in neuronal survival rates and exacerbated hydrogen peroxide-induced neuronal cell death. Moreover, phlorizin ameliorated these effects. Finally, intracerebroventricular administration of a-MG exacerbated the development of neuronal damage induced by MCAO, and these effects were ameliorated by the administration of phlorizin. Hence, excessive influx of sodium ions into neuronal cells through cerebral SGLT may exacerbate the development of cerebral ischaemic neuronal damage. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  3. Neuronal glucose transporter isoform 3 deficient mice demonstrate features of autism spectrum disorders.

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    Zhao, Y; Fung, C; Shin, D; Shin, B-C; Thamotharan, S; Sankar, R; Ehninger, D; Silva, A; Devaskar, S U

    2010-03-01

    Neuronal glucose transporter (GLUT) isoform 3 deficiency in null heterozygous mice led to abnormal spatial learning and working memory but normal acquisition and retrieval during contextual conditioning, abnormal cognitive flexibility with intact gross motor ability, electroencephalographic seizures, perturbed social behavior with reduced vocalization and stereotypies at low frequency. This phenotypic expression is unique as it combines the neurobehavioral with the epileptiform characteristics of autism spectrum disorders. This clinical presentation occurred despite metabolic adaptations consisting of an increase in microvascular/glial GLUT1, neuronal GLUT8 and monocarboxylate transporter isoform 2 concentrations, with minimal to no change in brain glucose uptake but an increase in lactate uptake. Neuron-specific glucose deficiency has a negative impact on neurodevelopment interfering with functional competence. This is the first description of GLUT3 deficiency that forms a possible novel genetic mechanism for pervasive developmental disorders, such as the neuropsychiatric autism spectrum disorders, requiring further investigation in humans.

  4. Neuronal Glucose Transporter Isoform 3 Deficient Mice Demonstrate Features of Autism Spectrum Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Yuanzi; Fung, Camille; Shin, Don; Shin, Bo-Chul; Thamotharan, Shanthie; Sankar, Raman; Ehninger, Dan; Silva, Alcino; Devaskar, Sherin U.

    2009-01-01

    Neuronal glucose transporter (GLUT) isoform 3 deficiency in null heterozygous mice led to abnormal spatial learning and working memory but normal acquisition and retrieval during contextual conditioning, abnormal cognitive flexibility with intact gross motor ability, electroencephalographic seizures, perturbed social behavior with reduced vocalization and stereotypies at low frequency. This phenotypic expression is unique as it combines the neurobehavioral with the epileptiform characteristic...

  5. Herpes simplex virus vectors overexpressing the glucose transporter gene protect against seizure-induced neuron loss.

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    Lawrence, M S; Ho, D Y; Dash, R; Sapolsky, R M

    1995-01-01

    We have generated herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors vIE1GT and v alpha 4GT bearing the GLUT-1 isoform of the rat brain glucose transporter (GT) under the control of the human cytomegalovirus ie1 and HSV alpha 4 promoters, respectively. We previously reported that such vectors enhance glucose uptake in hippocampal cultures and the hippocampus. In this study we demonstrate that such vectors can maintain neuronal metabolism and reduce the extent of neuron loss in cultures after a period of hypo...

  6. Enhanced neuronal glucose transporter expression reveals metabolic choice in a HD Drosophila model.

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    Besson, Marie Thérèse; Alegría, Karin; Garrido-Gerter, Pamela; Barros, Luis Felipe; Liévens, Jean-Charles

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by toxic insertions of polyglutamine residues in the Huntingtin protein and characterized by progressive deterioration of cognitive and motor functions. Altered brain glucose metabolism has long been suggested and a possible link has been proposed in HD. However, the precise function of glucose transporters was not yet determined. Here, we report the effects of the specifically-neuronal human glucose transporter expression in neurons of a Drosophila model carrying the exon 1 of the human huntingtin gene with 93 glutamine repeats (HQ93). We demonstrated that overexpression of the human glucose transporter in neurons ameliorated significantly the status of HD flies by increasing their lifespan, reducing their locomotor deficits and rescuing eye neurodegeneration. Then, we investigated whether increasing the major pathways of glucose catabolism, glycolysis and pentose-phosphate pathway (PPP) impacts HD. To mimic increased glycolytic flux, we overexpressed phosphofructokinase (PFK) which catalyzes an irreversible step in glycolysis. Overexpression of PFK did not affect HQ93 fly survival, but protected from photoreceptor loss. Overexpression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), the key enzyme of the PPP, extended significantly the lifespan of HD flies and rescued eye neurodegeneration. Since G6PD is able to synthesize NADPH involved in cell survival by maintenance of the redox state, we showed that tolerance to experimental oxidative stress was enhanced in flies co-expressing HQ93 and G6PD. Additionally overexpressions of hGluT3, G6PD or PFK were able to circumvent mitochondrial deficits induced by specific silencing of genes necessary for mitochondrial homeostasis. Our study confirms the involvement of bioenergetic deficits in HD course; they can be rescued by specific expression of a glucose transporter in neurons. Finally, the PPP and, to a lesser extent, the glycolysis seem to mediate the hGluT3

  7. Enhanced neuronal glucose transporter expression reveals metabolic choice in a HD Drosophila model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Thérèse Besson

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by toxic insertions of polyglutamine residues in the Huntingtin protein and characterized by progressive deterioration of cognitive and motor functions. Altered brain glucose metabolism has long been suggested and a possible link has been proposed in HD. However, the precise function of glucose transporters was not yet determined. Here, we report the effects of the specifically-neuronal human glucose transporter expression in neurons of a Drosophila model carrying the exon 1 of the human huntingtin gene with 93 glutamine repeats (HQ93. We demonstrated that overexpression of the human glucose transporter in neurons ameliorated significantly the status of HD flies by increasing their lifespan, reducing their locomotor deficits and rescuing eye neurodegeneration. Then, we investigated whether increasing the major pathways of glucose catabolism, glycolysis and pentose-phosphate pathway (PPP impacts HD. To mimic increased glycolytic flux, we overexpressed phosphofructokinase (PFK which catalyzes an irreversible step in glycolysis. Overexpression of PFK did not affect HQ93 fly survival, but protected from photoreceptor loss. Overexpression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD, the key enzyme of the PPP, extended significantly the lifespan of HD flies and rescued eye neurodegeneration. Since G6PD is able to synthesize NADPH involved in cell survival by maintenance of the redox state, we showed that tolerance to experimental oxidative stress was enhanced in flies co-expressing HQ93 and G6PD. Additionally overexpressions of hGluT3, G6PD or PFK were able to circumvent mitochondrial deficits induced by specific silencing of genes necessary for mitochondrial homeostasis. Our study confirms the involvement of bioenergetic deficits in HD course; they can be rescued by specific expression of a glucose transporter in neurons. Finally, the PPP and, to a lesser extent, the glycolysis seem to

  8. Orexins control intestinal glucose transport by distinct neuronal, endocrine, and direct epithelial pathways.

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    Ducroc, Robert; Voisin, Thierry; El Firar, Aadil; Laburthe, Marc

    2007-10-01

    Orexins are neuropeptides involved in energy homeostasis. We investigated the effect of orexin A (OxA) and orexin B (OxB) on intestinal glucose transport in the rat. Injection of orexins led to a decrease in the blood glucose level in oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs). Effects of orexins on glucose entry were analyzed in Ussing chambers using the Na(+)-dependent increase in short-circuit current (Isc) to quantify jejunal glucose transport. The rapid and marked increase in Isc induced by luminal glucose was inhibited by 10 nmol/l OxA or OxB (53 and 59%, respectively). Response curves to OxA and OxB were not significantly different with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations at 0.9 and 0.4 nmol/l, respectively. On the one hand, OxA-induced inhibition of Isc was reduced by the neuronal blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX) and by a cholecystokinin (CCK) 2R antagonist, indicating involvement of neuronal and endocrine CCK-releasing cells. The OX(1)R antagonist SB334867 had no effect on OxA-induced inhibition, which is likely to occur via a neuronal and/or endocrine OX(2)R. On the other hand, SB334867 induced a significant right shift of the concentration-effect curve for OxB. This OxB-preferring OX(1)R pathway was not sensitive to TTX or to CCKR antagonists, suggesting that OxB may act directly on enterocytic OX(1)R. These distinct effects of OxA and OxB are consistent with the expression of OX(1)R and OX(2)R mRNA in the epithelial and nonepithelial tissues, respectively. Our data delineate a new function for orexins as inhibitors of intestinal glucose absorption and provide a new basis for orexin-induced short-term control of energy homeostasis.

  9. Higher transport and metabolism of glucose in astrocytes compared with neurons: a multiphoton study of hippocampal and cerebellar tissue slices.

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    Jakoby, Patrick; Schmidt, Elke; Ruminot, Iván; Gutiérrez, Robin; Barros, L Felipe; Deitmer, Joachim W

    2014-01-01

    Glucose is the most important energy substrate for the brain, and its cellular distribution is a subject of great current interest. We have employed fluorescent glucose probes, the 2-deoxy-D-glucose derivates 6- and 2-([N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl) amino]-2-deoxy-D-glucose) (2-NBDG), to measure transport and metabolism of glucose in acute slices of mouse hippocampus and cerebellum. In the hippocampus, 6-NBDG, which is not metabolized and hence indicates glucose transport, was taken up faster in astrocyte-rich layers (Stratum radiatum [S.r.], Stratum oriens [S.o.]) than in pyramidal cells. Metabolizable 2-NBDG showed larger signals in S.r. and S.o. than in Stratum pyramidale, suggesting faster glucose utilization rate in the astrocyte versus the neuronal compartment. Similarly, we found higher uptake and temperature-sensitive metabolism of 2-NBDG in Bergmann glia when compared with adjacent Purkinje neurons of cerebellar slices. A comparison between 6-NBDG transport and glucose transport in cultured cells using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer nanosensor showed that relative to glucose, 6-NBDG is transported better by neurons than by astrocytes. These results indicate that the preferential transport and metabolism of glucose by glial cells versus neurons proposed for the hippocampus and cerebellum by ourselves (in vitro) and for the barrel cortex by Chuquet et al. (in vivo) is more pronounced than anticipated.

  10. Streptozotocin alters glucose transport, connexin expression and endoplasmic reticulum functions in neurons and astrocytes.

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    Biswas, Joyshree; Gupta, Sonam; Verma, Dinesh Kumar; Singh, Sarika

    2017-07-25

    The study was undertaken to explore the cell-specific streptozotocin (STZ)-induced mechanistic alterations. STZ-induced rodent model is a well-established experimental model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in our previous studies we have established it as an in vitro screening model of AD by employing N2A neuronal cells. Therefore, STZ was selected in the present study to understand the STZ-induced cell-specific alterations by utilizing neuronal N2A and astrocytes C6 cells. Both neuronal and astrocyte cells were treated with STZ at 10, 50, 100 and 1000μM concentrations for 48h. STZ exposure caused significant decline in cellular viability and augmented cytotoxicity of cells involving astrocytes activation. STZ treatment also disrupted the energy metabolism by altered glucose uptake and its transport in both cells as reflected with decreased expression of glucose transporters (GLUT) 1/3. The consequent decrease in ATP level and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential was also observed in both the cells. STZ caused increased intracellular calcium which could cause the initiation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Significant upregulation of ER stress-related markers were observed in both cells after STZ treatment. The cellular communication of astrocytes and neurons was altered as reflected by increased expression of connexin 43 along with DNA fragmentation. STZ-induced apoptotic death was evaluated by elevated expression of caspase-3 and PI/Hoechst staining of cells. In conclusion, study showed that STZ exert alike biochemical alterations, ER stress and cellular apoptosis in both neuronal and astrocyte cells. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Orexins control intestinal glucose transport by distinct neuronal, endocrine and direct epithelial pathways. : Orexins regulate intestinal glucose absorption

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    Ducroc, Robert; Voisin, Thierry; El Firar, Aadil; Laburthe, Marc

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Objective : Orexins are neuropeptides involved in energy homeostasis. We investigated the effect of orexin A (OxA) and OxB on intestinal glucose transport in the rat. Research Design and Methods : Injection of orexins led to a decrease in the blood glucose level in OGTT. Effects of orexins on glucose entry were analysed in Ussing chamber using the Na+-dependent increase in short-circuit current to quantify jejunal glucose transport. Results & Conclusions : The rapid an...

  12. N-Methyl-D aspartate receptor-mediated effect on glucose transporter-3 levels of high glucose exposed-SH-SY5Y dopaminergic neurons.

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    Engin, Ayse Basak; Engin, Evren Doruk; Karakus, Resul; Aral, Arzu; Gulbahar, Ozlem; Engin, Atilla

    2017-11-01

    High glucose and insulin lead to neuronal insulin resistance. Glucose transport into the neurons is achieved by regulatory induction of surface glucose transporter-3 (GLUT3) instead of the insulin. N-methyl-D aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity increases GLUT3 expression. This study explored whether an endogenous NMDA receptor antagonist, kynurenic acid (KynA) affects the neuronal cell viability at high glucose concentrations. SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells were exposed to 150-250 mg/dL glucose and 40 μU/mL insulin. In KynA and N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) supplemented cultures, oxidative stress, mitochondrial metabolic activity (MTT), nitric oxide as nitrite+nitrate (NOx) and GLUT3 were determined at the end of 24 and 48-h incubation periods. Viable cells were counted by trypan blue dye. High glucose-exposed SH-SY5Y cells showed two-times more GLUT3 expression at second 24-h period. While GLUT3-stimulated glucose transport and oxidative stress was increased, total mitochondrial metabolic activity was significantly reduced. Insulin supplementation to high glucose decreased NOx synthesis and GLUT3 levels, in contrast oxidative stress increased three-fold. KynA significantly reduced oxidative stress, and increased MTT by regulating NOx production and GLUT3 expression. KynA is a noteworthy compound, as an endogenous, specific NMDA receptor antagonist; it significantly reduces oxidative stress, while increasing cell viability at high glucose and insulin concentrations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Riluzole increases the rate of glucose transport in L6 myotubes and NSC-34 motor neuron-like cells via AMPK pathway activation.

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    Daniel, Bareket; Green, Omer; Viskind, Olga; Gruzman, Arie

    2013-09-01

    Riluzole is the only approved ALS drug. Riluzole influences several cellular pathways, but its exact mechanism of action remains unclear. Our goal was to study the drug's influence on the glucose transport rate in two ALS relevant cell types, neurons and myotubes. Stably transfected wild-type or mutant G93A human SOD1 NSC-34 motor neuron-like cells and rat L6 myotubes were exposed to riluzole. The rate of glucose uptake, translocation of glucose transporters to the cell's plasma membrane and the main glucose transport regulatory proteins' phosphorylation levels were measured. We found that riluzole increases the glucose transport rate and up-regulates the translocation of glucose transporters to plasma membrane in both types of cells. Riluzole leads to AMPK phosphorylation and to the phosphorylation of its downstream target, AS-160. In conclusion, increasing the glucose transport rate in ALS affected cells might be one of the mechanisms of riluzole's therapeutic effect. These findings can be used to rationally design and synthesize novel anti-ALS drugs that modulate glucose transport in neurons and skeletal muscles.

  14. Activity-Dependent Regulation of Surface Glucose Transporter-3

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    Ferreira, Jainne M.; Burnett, Arthur L.; Rameau, Gerald A.

    2011-01-01

    Glucose transporter 3 (GLUT3) is the main facilitative glucose transporter in neurons. Glucose provides neurons with a critical energy source for neuronal activity. However, the mechanism by which neuronal activity controls glucose influx via GLUT3 is unknown. We investigated the influence of synaptic stimulation on GLUT3 surface expression and glucose import in primary cultured cortical and hippocampal neurons. Synaptic activity increased surface expression of GLUT3 leading to an elevation o...

  15. Monocarboxylate transporter-dependent mechanism confers resistance to oxygen- and glucose-deprivation injury in astrocyte-neuron co-cultures.

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    Gao, Chen; Zhou, Liya; Zhu, Wenxia; Wang, Hongyun; Wang, Ruijuan; He, Yunfei; Li, Zhiyun

    2015-05-06

    Hypoxic and low-glucose stressors contribute to neuronal death in many brain diseases. Astrocytes are anatomically well-positioned to shield neurons from hypoxic injury. During hypoxia/ischemia, lactate released from astrocytes is taken up by neurons and stored for energy. This process is mediated by monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) in the central nervous system. In the present study, we investigated the ability of astrocytes to protect neurons from oxygen- and glucose-deprivation (OGD) injury via an MCT-dependent mechanism in vitro. Primary cultures of neurons, astrocytes, and astrocytes-neurons derived from rat hippocampus were subjected to OGD, MCT inhibition with small interfering (si)RNA. Cell survival and expression of MCT4, MCT2, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and neuronal nuclear antigen were evaluated. OGD significantly increased cell death in neuronal cultures and up-regulated MCT4 expression in astrocyte cultures, but no increased cell death was observed in neuron-astrocyte co-cultures or astrocyte cultures. However, neuronal cell death in co-cultures was increased by exposure to MCT4- or MCT2-specific siRNA, and this effect was attenuated by the addition of lactate into the extracellular medium of neuronal cultures prior to OGD. These findings demonstrate that resistance to OGD injury in astrocyte-neuron co-cultures occurs via an MCT-dependent mechanism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Glucose transport in brain - effect of inflammation.

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    Jurcovicova, J

    2014-01-01

    Glucose is transported across the cell membrane by specific saturable transport system, which includes two types of glucose transporters: 1) sodium dependent glucose transporters (SGLTs) which transport glucose against its concentration gradient and 2) sodium independent glucose transporters (GLUTs), which transport glucose by facilitative diffusion in its concentration gradient. In the brain, both types of transporters are present with different function, affinity, capacity, and tissue distribution. GLUT1 occurs in brain in two isoforms. The more glycosylated GLUT1 is produced in brain microvasculature and ensures glucose transport across the blood brain barrier (BBB). The less glycosylated form is localized in astrocytic end-feet and cell bodies and is not present in axons, neuronal synapses or microglia. Glucose transported to astrocytes by GLUT1 is metabolized to lactate serving to neurons as energy source. Proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β upregulates GLUT1 in endothelial cells and astrocytes, whereas it induces neuronal death in neuronal cell culture. GLUT2 is present in hypothalamic neurons and serves as a glucose sensor in regulation of food intake. In neurons of the hippocampus, GLUT2 is supposed to regulate synaptic activity and neurotransmitter release. GLUT3 is the most abundant glucose transporter in the brain having five times higher transport capacity than GLUT1. It is present in neuropil, mostly in axons and dendrites. Its density and distribution correlate well with the local cerebral glucose demands. GLUT5 is predominantly fructose transporter. In brain, GLUT5 is the only hexose transporter in microglia, whose regulation is not yet clear. It is not present in neurons. GLUT4 and GLUT8 are insulin-regulated glucose transporters in neuronal cell bodies in the cortex and cerebellum, but mainly in the hippocampus and amygdala, where they maintain hippocampus-dependent cognitive functions. Insulin translocates GLUT4 from cytosol to plasma

  17. Hypothalamic neurones governing glucose homeostasis.

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    Coppari, R

    2015-06-01

    The notion that the brain directly controls the level of glucose in the blood (glycaemia) independent of its known action on food intake and body weight has been known ever since 1849. That year, the French physiologist Dr Claude Bernard reported that physical puncture of the floor of the fourth cerebral ventricle rapidly leads to an increased level of sugar in the blood (and urine) in rabbits. Despite this important discovery, it took approximately 150 years before significant efforts aimed at understanding the underlying mechanism of brain-mediated control of glucose metabolism were made. Technological developments allowing for genetically-mediated manipulation of selected molecular pathways in a neurone-type-specific fashion unravelled the importance of specific molecules in specific neuronal populations. These neuronal pathways govern glucose metabolism in the presence and even in the absence of insulin. Also, a peculiarity of these pathways is that certain biochemically-defined neurones govern glucose metabolism in a tissue-specific fashion. © 2015 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  18. Testicular regulation of neuronal glucose and monocarboxylate transporter gene expression profiles in CNS metabolic sensing sites during acute and recurrent insulin-induced hypoglycemia.

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    Vavaiya, Kamlesh V; Paranjape, Sachin A; Briski, Karen P

    2007-01-01

    Recurrent insulin-induced hypoglycemia (RIIH) impairs glucose counter-regulatory function in male humans and rodents and, in the latter, diminishes neuronal activation in CNS structures that monitor metabolic homeostasis, including the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) and dorsal vagal complex (DVC). We investigated whether habituated neuronal reactivity in CNS sensing sites to hypoglycemia is correlated with modified monocarboxylate and/or glucose uptake by using quantitative real-time RT-PCR to analyze neuronal monocarboxylate transporter (MCT2) and glucose transporter variant (GLUT and GLUT4) gene expression profiles in the microdissected LHA, ventromedial nucleus hypothalamus (VMH), and DVC after one or multiple insulin injections. Because orchidectomy (ORDX) maintains uniform glycemic responses to RIIH in male rats, we also examined whether regional gene response patterns are testes dependent. In the intact male rat DVC, MCT2, GLUT3, and GLUT4 gene expression was not altered by acute hypoglycemia but was enhanced by RIIH. MCT2 and GLUT3 mRNA levels in the ORDX rat DVC did not differ among groups, but GLUT4 transcripts were progressively increased by acute and recurrent hypoglycemia. Precedent hypoglycemia decreased or increased basal MCT2 and GLUT4 gene expression, respectively, in the intact rat LHA; LHA GLUT3 transcription was augmented by RIIH in intact rats only. Acute hypoglycemia suppressed MCT2, GLUT3, and GLUT4 gene expression in the intact rat VMH, a response that was abolished by RIIH. In ORDX rats, VMH gene transcript levels were unchanged in response to one dose of insulin but were selectively diminished during RIIH. These data demonstrate site-specific, testes-dependent effects of acute and recurrent hypoglycemia on neuronal metabolic substrate transporter gene expression in characterized rat brain metabolic sensing loci and emphasize the need to assess the impact of potential alterations in glucose and lactate uptake during RIIH on general and

  19. Chronic Hyperinsulinaemic Hypoglycaemia in Rats Is Accompanied by Increased Body Weight, Hyperleptinaemia, and Decreased Neuronal Glucose Transporter Levels in the Brain

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    Vivi F. H. Jensen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The brain is vulnerable to hypoglycaemia due to a continuous need of energy substrates to meet its high metabolic demands. Studies have shown that severe acute insulin-induced hypoglycaemia results in oxidative stress in the rat brain, when neuroglycopenia cannot be evaded despite increased levels of cerebral glucose transporters. Compensatory measures in the brain during chronic insulin-induced hypoglycaemia are less well understood. The present study investigated how the brain of nondiabetic rats copes with chronic insulin-induced hypoglycaemia for up to eight weeks. Brain level of different substrate transporters and redox homeostasis was evaluated. Hyperinsulinaemia for 8 weeks consistently lowered blood glucose levels by 30–50% (4–6 mM versus 7–9 mM in controls. The animals had increased food consumption, body weights, and hyperleptinaemia. During infusion, protein levels of the brain neuronal glucose transporter were decreased, whereas levels of lipid peroxidation products were unchanged. Discontinued infusion was followed by transient systemic hyperglycaemia and decreased food consumption and body weight. After 4 weeks, plasma levels of lipid peroxidation products were increased, possibly as a consequence of hyperglycaemia-induced oxidative stress. The present data suggests that chronic moderate hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia causes increased body weight and hyperleptinaemia. This is accompanied by decreased neuronal glucose transporter levels, which may be leptin-induced.

  20. Chronic Hyperinsulinaemic Hypoglycaemia in Rats Is Accompanied by Increased Body Weight, Hyperleptinaemia, and Decreased Neuronal Glucose Transporter Levels in the Brain.

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    Jensen, Vivi F H; Mølck, Anne-Marie; Chapman, Melissa; Alifrangis, Lene; Andersen, Lene; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Bøgh, Ingrid B

    2017-01-01

    The brain is vulnerable to hypoglycaemia due to a continuous need of energy substrates to meet its high metabolic demands. Studies have shown that severe acute insulin-induced hypoglycaemia results in oxidative stress in the rat brain, when neuroglycopenia cannot be evaded despite increased levels of cerebral glucose transporters. Compensatory measures in the brain during chronic insulin-induced hypoglycaemia are less well understood. The present study investigated how the brain of nondiabetic rats copes with chronic insulin-induced hypoglycaemia for up to eight weeks. Brain level of different substrate transporters and redox homeostasis was evaluated. Hyperinsulinaemia for 8 weeks consistently lowered blood glucose levels by 30-50% (4-6 mM versus 7-9 mM in controls). The animals had increased food consumption, body weights, and hyperleptinaemia. During infusion, protein levels of the brain neuronal glucose transporter were decreased, whereas levels of lipid peroxidation products were unchanged. Discontinued infusion was followed by transient systemic hyperglycaemia and decreased food consumption and body weight. After 4 weeks, plasma levels of lipid peroxidation products were increased, possibly as a consequence of hyperglycaemia-induced oxidative stress. The present data suggests that chronic moderate hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia causes increased body weight and hyperleptinaemia. This is accompanied by decreased neuronal glucose transporter levels, which may be leptin-induced.

  1. Difference in transient ischemia-induced neuronal damage and glucose transporter-1 immunoreactivity in the hippocampus between adult and young gerbils

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    Seung Min Park

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: The alteration of glucose transporters is closely related with the pathogenesis of brain edema. We compared neuronal damage/death in the hippocampus between adult and young gerbils following transient cerebral ischemia/reperfusion and changes of glucose transporter-1(GLUT-1-immunoreactive microvessels in their ischemic hippocampal CA1 region. Materials and Methods: Transient cerebral ischemia was developed by 5-min occlusion of both common carotid arteries. Neuronal damage was examined by cresyl violet staining, NeuN immunohistochemistry and Fluoro-Jade B histofluorescence staining and changes in GLUT-1 expression was carried out by immunohistochemistry. Results: About 90% of pyramidal neurons only in the adult CA1 region were damaged after ischemia/reperfusion; in the young, about 53 % of pyramidal neurons were damaged from 7 days after ischemia/reperfusion. The density of GLUT-1-immunoreactive microvessels was significantly higher in the young sham-group than that in the adult sham-group. In the ischemia-operated-groups, the density of GLUT-1-immunoreactive microvessels was significantly decreased in the adult and young at 1 and 4 days post-ischemia, respectively, thereafter, the density of GLUT-1-immunoreactive microvessels was gradually increased in both groups after ischemia/reperfusion. Conclusion: CA1 pyramidal neurons of the young gerbil were damaged much later than that in the adult and that GLUT-1-immunoreactive microvessels were significantly decreased later in the young. These data indicate that GLUT-1 might differently contribute to neuronal damage according to age after ischemic insults.

  2. 2-(4-Methoxyphenyl)ethyl-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-β-D-pyranoside confers neuroprotection in cell and animal models of ischemic stroke through calpain1/PKA/CREB-mediated induction of neuronal glucose transporter 3

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    Yu, Shu; Cheng, Qiong; Li, Lu; Liu, Mei; Yang, Yumin; Ding, Fei, E-mail: dingfei@ntu.edu.cn

    2014-06-15

    Salidroside is proven to be a neuroprotective agent of natural origin, and its analog, 2-(4-Methoxyphenyl)ethyl-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-β-D-pyranoside (named SalA-4 g), has been synthesized in our lab. In this study, we showed that SalA-4 g promoted neuronal survival and inhibited neuronal apoptosis in primary hippocampal neurons exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) and in rats subjected to ischemia by transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), respectively, and that SalA-4 g was more neuroprotective than salidroside. We further found that SalA-4 g elevated glucose uptake in OGD-injured primary hippocampal neurons and increased the expression and recruitment of glucose transporter 3 (GLUT3) in ischemic brain. Signaling analysis revealed that SalA-4 g triggered the phosphorylation of CREB, and increased the expression of PKA RII in primary hippocampal neurons exposed to OGD injury, while inhibition of PKA/CREB by H-89 alleviated the elevation in glucose uptake and GLUT3 expression, and blocked the protective effects of SalA-4 g. Moreover, SalA-4 g was noted to inhibit intracellular Ca{sup 2+} influx and calpain1 activation in OGD-injured primary hippocampal neurons. Our results suggest that SalA-4 g neuroprotection might be mediated by increased glucose uptake and elevated GLUT3 expression through calpain1/PKA/CREB pathway. - Highlights: • A salidroside (Sal) analog (SalA-4 g) is prepared to be more neuroprotective than Sal. • SalA-4 g protected hippocampal neurons from oxygen and glucose deprivation insult. • SalA-4 g reduced ischemic injury after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats. • Neuroprotection of SalA-4 g was mediated by GLUT3 level via calpain/PKA/CREB pathway.

  3. 2-(4-Methoxyphenyl)ethyl-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-β-D-pyranoside confers neuroprotection in cell and animal models of ischemic stroke through calpain1/PKA/CREB-mediated induction of neuronal glucose transporter 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Shu; Cheng, Qiong; Li, Lu; Liu, Mei; Yang, Yumin; Ding, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Salidroside is proven to be a neuroprotective agent of natural origin, and its analog, 2-(4-Methoxyphenyl)ethyl-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-β-D-pyranoside (named SalA-4 g), has been synthesized in our lab. In this study, we showed that SalA-4 g promoted neuronal survival and inhibited neuronal apoptosis in primary hippocampal neurons exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) and in rats subjected to ischemia by transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), respectively, and that SalA-4 g was more neuroprotective than salidroside. We further found that SalA-4 g elevated glucose uptake in OGD-injured primary hippocampal neurons and increased the expression and recruitment of glucose transporter 3 (GLUT3) in ischemic brain. Signaling analysis revealed that SalA-4 g triggered the phosphorylation of CREB, and increased the expression of PKA RII in primary hippocampal neurons exposed to OGD injury, while inhibition of PKA/CREB by H-89 alleviated the elevation in glucose uptake and GLUT3 expression, and blocked the protective effects of SalA-4 g. Moreover, SalA-4 g was noted to inhibit intracellular Ca 2+ influx and calpain1 activation in OGD-injured primary hippocampal neurons. Our results suggest that SalA-4 g neuroprotection might be mediated by increased glucose uptake and elevated GLUT3 expression through calpain1/PKA/CREB pathway. - Highlights: • A salidroside (Sal) analog (SalA-4 g) is prepared to be more neuroprotective than Sal. • SalA-4 g protected hippocampal neurons from oxygen and glucose deprivation insult. • SalA-4 g reduced ischemic injury after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats. • Neuroprotection of SalA-4 g was mediated by GLUT3 level via calpain/PKA/CREB pathway

  4. Ambient but not local lactate underlies neuronal tolerance to prolonged glucose deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobieski, Courtney; Shu, Hong-Jin

    2018-01-01

    Neurons require a nearly constant supply of ATP. Glucose is the predominant source of brain ATP, but the direct effects of prolonged glucose deprivation on neuronal viability and function remain unclear. In sparse rat hippocampal microcultures, neurons were surprisingly resilient to 16 h glucose removal in the absence of secondary excitotoxicity. Neuronal survival and synaptic transmission were unaffected by prolonged removal of exogenous glucose. Inhibition of lactate transport decreased microculture neuronal survival during concurrent glucose deprivation, suggesting that endogenously released lactate is important for tolerance to glucose deprivation. Tandem depolarization and glucose deprivation also reduced neuronal survival, and trace glucose concentrations afforded neuroprotection. Mass cultures, in contrast to microcultures, were insensitive to depolarizing glucose deprivation, a difference attributable to increased extracellular lactate levels. Removal of local astrocyte support did not reduce survival in response to glucose deprivation or alter evoked excitatory transmission, suggesting that on-demand, local lactate shuttling is not necessary for neuronal tolerance to prolonged glucose removal. Taken together, these data suggest that endogenously produced lactate available globally in the extracellular milieu sustains neurons in the absence of glucose. A better understanding of resilience mechanisms in reduced preparations could lead to therapeutic strategies aimed to bolster these mechanisms in vulnerable neuronal populations. PMID:29617444

  5. Effect of different glucose supply conditions on neuronal energy metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Hongwen; Wang, Rubin; Qu, Jingyi

    2016-01-01

    The glucose-excited neurons in brain can sense blood glucose levels and reflect different firing states, which are mainly associated with regulation of blood glucose and energy demand in the brain. In this paper, a new model of glucose-excited neuron in hypothalamus is proposed. The firing properties and energy consumption of this type of neuron under conditions of different glucose levels are simulated and analyzed. The results show that the firing rate and firing duration of the neuron both...

  6. Estrogens modulate ventrolateral ventromedial hypothalamic glucose-inhibited neurons

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    Ammy M. Santiago

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Brain regulation of glucose homeostasis is sexually dimorphic; however, the impact sex hormones have on specific neuronal populations within the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMN, a metabolically sensitive brain region, has yet to be fully characterized. Glucose-excited (GE and -inhibited (GI neurons are located throughout the VMN and may play a critical role in glucose and energy homeostasis. Within the ventrolateral portion of the VMN (VL-VMN, glucose sensing neurons and estrogen receptor (ER distributions overlap. We therefore tested the hypothesis that VL-VMN glucose sensing neurons were sexually dimorphic and regulated by 17β-estradiol (17βE. Methods: Electrophysiological recordings of VL-VMN glucose sensing neurons in brain slices isolated from age- and weight-matched female and male mice were performed in the presence and absence of 17βE. Results: We found a new class of VL-VMN GI neurons whose response to low glucose was transient despite continued exposure to low glucose. Heretofore, we refer to these newly identified VL-VMN GI neurons as ‘adapting’ or AdGI neurons. We found a sexual dimorphic response to low glucose, with male nonadapting GI neurons, but not AdGI neurons, responding more robustly to low glucose than those from females. 17βE blunted the response of both nonadapting GI and AdGI neurons to low glucose in both males and females, which was mediated by activation of estrogen receptor β and inhibition of AMP-activated kinase. In contrast, 17βE had no impact on GE or non-glucose sensing neurons in either sex. Conclusion: These data suggest sex differences and estrogenic regulation of VMN hypothalamic glucose sensing may contribute to the sexual dimorphism in glucose homeostasis. Author Video: Author Video Watch what authors say about their articles Keywords: 17β-estradiol, AMP-activated kinase, Glucose excited neurons, Glucose inhibited neurons, Ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus, Sexual dimorphism

  7. Anorexia and Impaired Glucose Metabolism in Mice With Hypothalamic Ablation of Glut4 Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Hongxia; Lu, Taylor Y.; McGraw, Timothy E.; Accili, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) uses glucose independent of insulin. Nonetheless, insulin receptors and insulin-responsive glucose transporters (Glut4) often colocalize in neurons (Glut4 neurons) in anatomically and functionally distinct areas of the CNS. The apparent heterogeneity of Glut4 neurons has thus far thwarted attempts to understand their function. To answer this question, we used Cre-dependent, diphtheria toxin?mediated cell ablation to selectively remove basal hypothalamic Glut4 ...

  8. Leptin regulates glutamate and glucose transporters in hypothalamic astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Granado, Miriam; de Ceballos, María L.; Sánchez-Garrido, Miguel Ángel; Sarman, Beatrix; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Dietrich, Marcelo O.; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Argente, Jesús; Horvath, Tamas L.; Chowen, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    Glial cells perform critical functions that alter the metabolism and activity of neurons, and there is increasing interest in their role in appetite and energy balance. Leptin, a key regulator of appetite and metabolism, has previously been reported to influence glial structural proteins and morphology. Here, we demonstrate that metabolic status and leptin also modify astrocyte-specific glutamate and glucose transporters, indicating that metabolic signals influence synaptic efficacy and glucose uptake and, ultimately, neuronal function. We found that basal and glucose-stimulated electrical activity of hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in mice were altered in the offspring of mothers fed a high-fat diet. In adulthood, increased body weight and fasting also altered the expression of glucose and glutamate transporters. These results demonstrate that whole-organism metabolism alters hypothalamic glial cell activity and suggest that these cells play an important role in the pathology of obesity. PMID:23064363

  9. Direct Neuronal Glucose Uptake Is Required for Contextual Fear Acquisition in the Dorsal Hippocampus

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    Liang Kong

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The metabolism of glucose is a nearly exclusive source of energy for maintaining neuronal survival, synaptic transmission and information processing in the brain. Two glucose metabolism pathways have been reported, direct neuronal glucose uptake and the astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle (ANLS, which can be involved in these functions simultaneously or separately. Although ANLS in the dorsal hippocampus (DH has been proved to be required for memory consolidation, the specific metabolic pathway involved during memory acquisition remains unclear. The DH and amygdala are two key brain regions for acquisition of contextual fear conditioning (CFC. In 2-NBDG experiments, we observed that 2-NBDG-positive neurons were significantly increased during the acquisition of CFC in the DH. However, in the amygdala and cerebellum, 2-NBDG-positive neurons were not changed during CFC training. Strikingly, microinjection of a glucose transporter (GLUT inhibitor into the DH decreased freezing values during CFC training and 1 h later, while injection of a monocarboxylate transporter (MCT inhibitor into the amygdala also reduced freezing values. Therefore, we demonstrated that direct neuronal glucose uptake was the primary means of energy supply in the DH, while ANLS might supply energy in the amygdala during acquisition. Furthermore, knockdown of GLUT3 by a lentivirus in the DH impaired the acquisition of CFC. Taken together, the results indicated that there were two different glucose metabolism pathways in the DH and amygdala during acquisition of contextual fear memory and that direct neuronal glucose uptake in the DH may be regulated by GLUT3.

  10. Chronic Hyperinsulinaemic Hypoglycaemia in Rats Is Accompanied by Increased Body Weight, Hyperleptinaemia, and Decreased Neuronal Glucose Transporter Levels in the Brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Vivi F. H.; Molck, Anne-Marie; Chapman, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    of cerebral glucose transporters. Compensatory measures in the brain during chronic insulin-induced hypoglycaemia are less well understood. The present study investigated how the brain of nondiabetic rats copes with chronic insulin-induced hypoglycaemia for up to eight weeks. Brain level of different...... substrate transporters and redox homeostasis was evaluated. Hyperinsulinaemia for 8 weeks consistently lowered blood glucose levels by 30–50% (4–6 mM versus 7–9 mM in controls). The animals had increased food consumption, body weights, and hyperleptinaemia. During infusion, protein levels of the brain......The brain is vulnerable to hypoglycaemia due to a continuous need of energy substrates to meet its high metabolic demands. Studies have shown that severe acute insulin-induced hypoglycaemia results in oxidative stress in the rat brain, when neuroglycopenia cannot be evaded despite increased levels...

  11. Gibbs Free-Energy Gradient along the Path of Glucose Transport through Human Glucose Transporter 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Huiyun; Bourdon, Allen K; Chen, Liao Y; Phelix, Clyde F; Perry, George

    2018-06-11

    Fourteen glucose transporters (GLUTs) play essential roles in human physiology by facilitating glucose diffusion across the cell membrane. Due to its central role in the energy metabolism of the central nervous system, GLUT3 has been thoroughly investigated. However, the Gibbs free-energy gradient (what drives the facilitated diffusion of glucose) has not been mapped out along the transport path. Some fundamental questions remain. Here we present a molecular dynamics study of GLUT3 embedded in a lipid bilayer to quantify the free-energy profile along the entire transport path of attracting a β-d-glucose from the interstitium to the inside of GLUT3 and, from there, releasing it to the cytoplasm by Arrhenius thermal activation. From the free-energy profile, we elucidate the unique Michaelis-Menten characteristics of GLUT3, low K M and high V MAX , specifically suitable for neurons' high and constant demand of energy from their low-glucose environments. We compute GLUT3's binding free energy for β-d-glucose to be -4.6 kcal/mol in agreement with the experimental value of -4.4 kcal/mol ( K M = 1.4 mM). We also compute the hydration energy of β-d-glucose, -18.0 kcal/mol vs the experimental data, -17.8 kcal/mol. In this, we establish a dynamics-based connection from GLUT3's crystal structure to its cellular thermodynamics with quantitative accuracy. We predict equal Arrhenius barriers for glucose uptake and efflux through GLUT3 to be tested in future experiments.

  12. Anorexia and impaired glucose metabolism in mice with hypothalamic ablation of Glut4 neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hongxia; Lu, Taylor Y; McGraw, Timothy E; Accili, Domenico

    2015-02-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) uses glucose independent of insulin. Nonetheless, insulin receptors and insulin-responsive glucose transporters (Glut4) often colocalize in neurons (Glut4 neurons) in anatomically and functionally distinct areas of the CNS. The apparent heterogeneity of Glut4 neurons has thus far thwarted attempts to understand their function. To answer this question, we used Cre-dependent, diphtheria toxin-mediated cell ablation to selectively remove basal hypothalamic Glut4 neurons and investigate the resulting phenotypes. After Glut4 neuron ablation, mice demonstrate altered hormone and nutrient signaling in the CNS. Accordingly, they exhibit negative energy balance phenotype characterized by reduced food intake and increased energy expenditure, without locomotor deficits or gross neuronal abnormalities. Glut4 neuron ablation affects orexigenic melanin-concentrating hormone neurons but has limited effect on neuropeptide Y/agouti-related protein and proopiomelanocortin neurons. The food intake phenotype can be partially normalized by GABA administration, suggesting that it arises from defective GABAergic transmission. Glut4 neuron-ablated mice show peripheral metabolic defects, including fasting hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance, decreased insulin levels, and elevated hepatic gluconeogenic genes. We conclude that Glut4 neurons integrate hormonal and nutritional cues and mediate CNS actions of insulin on energy balance and peripheral metabolism. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  13. Distribution of glucose transporters in renal diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Szablewski, Leszek

    2017-01-01

    Kidneys play an important role in glucose homeostasis. Renal gluconeogenesis prevents hypoglycemia by releasing glucose into the blood stream. Glucose homeostasis is also due, in part, to reabsorption and excretion of hexose in the kidney. Lipid bilayer of plasma membrane is impermeable for glucose, which is hydrophilic and soluble in water. Therefore, transport of glucose across the plasma membrane depends on carrier proteins expressed in the plasma membrane. In humans, there are three famil...

  14. Oral glucose intake inhibits hypothalamic neuronal activity more effectively than glucose infusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, P.A.M.; Vidarsdottir, S.; Graaf, de C.; Stafleu, A.; Osch, M.J.P.; Viergever, M.A.; Pijl, H.; Grond, van der J.

    2007-01-01

    Oral glucose intake inhibits hypothalamic neuronal activity more effectively than glucose infusion. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 293: E754-E758, 2007. First published June 12, 2007; doi:10.1152/ajpendo.00231.2007. - We previously showed that hypothalamic neuronal activity, as measured by the blood

  15. Oral glucose intake inhibits hypothalamic neuronal activity more effectively than glucose infusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, P.A.M.; Vidarsdottir, S.; Graaf, C. de; Stafleu, A.; Osch, M.J.P. van; Viergever, M.A.; Pijl, H.; Grond, J. van der

    2007-01-01

    We previously showed that hypothalamic neuronal activity, as measured by the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI signal, declines in response to oral glucose intake. To further explore the mechanism driving changes in hypothalamic neuronal activity in response to an oral glucose load,

  16. Glucose-monitoring neurons in the mediodorsal prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Bernadett; Szabó, István; Papp, Szilárd; Takács, Gábor; Szalay, Csaba; Karádi, Zoltán

    2012-03-20

    The mediodorsal prefrontal cortex (mdPFC), a key structure of the limbic neural circuitry, plays important roles in the central regulation of feeding. As an integrant part of the forebrain dopamine (DA) system, it performs complex roles via interconnections with various brain areas where glucose-monitoring (GM) neurons have been identified. The main goal of the present experiments was to examine whether similar GM neurons exist in the mediodorsal prefrontal cortex. To search for such chemosensory cells here, and to estimate their involvement in the DA circuitry, extracellular single neuron activity of the mediodorsal prefrontal cortex of anesthetized Wistar and Sprague-Dawley rats was recorded by means of tungsten wire multibarreled glass microelectrodes during microelectrophoretic administration of d-glucose and DA. One fourth of the neurons tested changed in firing rate in response to glucose, thus, proved to be elements of the forebrain GM neural network. DA responsive neurons in the mdPFC were found to represent similar proportion of all cells; the glucose-excited units were shown to display excitatory whereas the glucose-inhibited neurons were demonstrated to exert mainly inhibitory responses to dopamine. The glucose-monitoring neurons of the mdPFC and their distinct DA sensitivity are suggested to be of particular significance in adaptive processes of the central feeding control. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Glucose is necessary to maintain neurotransmitter homeostasis during synaptic activity in cultured glutamatergic neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2006-01-01

    Glucose is the primary energy substrate for the adult mammalian brain. However, lactate produced within the brain might be able to serve this purpose in neurons. In the present study, the relative significance of glucose and lactate as substrates to maintain neurotransmitter homeostasis was inves......Glucose is the primary energy substrate for the adult mammalian brain. However, lactate produced within the brain might be able to serve this purpose in neurons. In the present study, the relative significance of glucose and lactate as substrates to maintain neurotransmitter homeostasis...... was investigated. Cultured cerebellar (primarily glutamatergic) neurons were superfused in medium containing [U-13C]glucose (2.5 mmol/L) and lactate (1 or 5 mmol/L) or glucose (2.5 mmol/L) and [U-13C]lactate (1 mmol/L), and exposed to pulses of N-methyl-D-aspartate (300 micromol/L), leading to synaptic activity...... significantly during induced depolarization. In contrast, at both concentrations of extracellular lactate, the metabolism of [U-13C]glucose was increased during neuronal depolarization. The role of glucose and lactate as energy substrates during vesicular release as well as transporter-mediated influx...

  18. Negative Effects of High Glucose Exposure in Human Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Neurons

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    Annamaria Morelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic disorders are often associated with male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, suggesting that hypothalamic defects involving GnRH neurons may impair the reproductive function. Among metabolic factors hyperglycemia has been implicated in the control of the reproductive axis at central level, both in humans and in animal models. To date, little is known about the direct effects of pathological high glucose concentrations on human GnRH neurons. In this study, we investigated the high glucose effects in the human GnRH-secreting FNC-B4 cells. Gene expression profiling by qRT-PCR, confirmed that FNC-B4 cells express GnRH and several genes relevant for GnRH neuron function (KISS1R, KISS1, sex steroid and leptin receptors, FGFR1, neuropilin 2, and semaphorins, along with glucose transporters (GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4. High glucose exposure (22 mM; 40 mM significantly reduced gene and protein expression of GnRH, KISS1R, KISS1, and leptin receptor, as compared to normal glucose (5 mM. Consistent with previous studies, leptin treatment significantly induced GnRH mRNA expression at 5 mM glucose, but not in the presence of high glucose concentrations. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate a deleterious direct contribution of high glucose on human GnRH neurons, thus providing new insights into pathogenic mechanisms linking metabolic disorders to reproductive dysfunctions.

  19. DRP1 Suppresses Leptin and Glucose Sensing of POMC Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Anna; Campolo, Michela; Liu, Chen; Sesaki, Hiromi; Meli, Rosaria; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Kim, Jung Dae; Diano, Sabrina

    2017-03-07

    Hypothalamic pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons regulate energy and glucose metabolism. Intracellular mechanisms that enable these neurons to respond to changes in metabolic environment are ill defined. Here we show reduced expression of activated dynamin-related protein (pDRP1), a mitochondrial fission regulator, in POMC neurons of fed mice. These POMC neurons displayed increased mitochondrial size and aspect ratio compared to POMC neurons of fasted animals. Inducible deletion of DRP1 of mature POMC neurons (Drp1 fl/fl -POMC-cre:ER T2 ) resulted in improved leptin sensitivity and glucose responsiveness. In Drp1 fl/fl -POMC-cre:ER T2 mice, POMC neurons showed increased mitochondrial size, ROS production, and neuronal activation with increased expression of Kcnj11 mRNA regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR). Furthermore, deletion of DRP1 enhanced the glucoprivic stimulus in these neurons, causing their stronger inhibition and a greater activation of counter-regulatory responses to hypoglycemia that were PPAR dependent. Together, these data unmasked a role for mitochondrial fission in leptin sensitivity and glucose sensing of POMC neurons. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Glucose transport machinery reconstituted in cell models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jesper S; Elbing, Karin; Thompson, James R; Malmstadt, Noah; Lindkvist-Petersson, Karin

    2015-02-11

    Here we demonstrate the production of a functioning cell model by formation of giant vesicles reconstituted with the GLUT1 glucose transporter and a glucose oxidase and hydrogen peroxidase linked fluorescent reporter internally. Hence, a simplified artificial cell is formed that is able to take up glucose and process it.

  1. Supraoptic oxytocin and vasopressin neurons function as glucose and metabolic sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhilin; Levin, Barry E; Stevens, Wanida; Sladek, Celia D

    2014-04-01

    Neurons in the supraoptic nuclei (SON) produce oxytocin and vasopressin and express insulin receptors (InsR) and glucokinase. Since oxytocin is an anorexigenic agent and glucokinase and InsR are hallmarks of cells that function as glucose and/or metabolic sensors, we evaluated the effect of glucose, insulin, and their downstream effector ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels on calcium signaling in SON neurons and on oxytocin and vasopressin release from explants of the rat hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal system. We also evaluated the effect of blocking glucokinase and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K; mediates insulin-induced mobilization of glucose transporter, GLUT4) on responses to glucose and insulin. Glucose and insulin increased intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i). The responses were glucokinase and PI3K dependent, respectively. Insulin and glucose alone increased vasopressin release (P glucose in the presence of insulin. The oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (VP) responses to insulin+glucose were blocked by the glucokinase inhibitor alloxan (4 mM; P ≤ 0.002) and the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin (50 nM; OT: P = 0.03; VP: P ≤ 0.002). Inactivating K ATP channels with 200 nM glibenclamide increased oxytocin and vasopressin release (OT: P neurons functioning as glucose and "metabolic" sensors to participate in appetite regulation.

  2. Supraoptic oxytocin and vasopressin neurons function as glucose and metabolic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhilin; Levin, Barry E.; Stevens, Wanida

    2014-01-01

    Neurons in the supraoptic nuclei (SON) produce oxytocin and vasopressin and express insulin receptors (InsR) and glucokinase. Since oxytocin is an anorexigenic agent and glucokinase and InsR are hallmarks of cells that function as glucose and/or metabolic sensors, we evaluated the effect of glucose, insulin, and their downstream effector ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels on calcium signaling in SON neurons and on oxytocin and vasopressin release from explants of the rat hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal system. We also evaluated the effect of blocking glucokinase and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K; mediates insulin-induced mobilization of glucose transporter, GLUT4) on responses to glucose and insulin. Glucose and insulin increased intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i). The responses were glucokinase and PI3K dependent, respectively. Insulin and glucose alone increased vasopressin release (P glucose in the presence of insulin. The oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (VP) responses to insulin+glucose were blocked by the glucokinase inhibitor alloxan (4 mM; P ≤ 0.002) and the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin (50 nM; OT: P = 0.03; VP: P ≤ 0.002). Inactivating KATP channels with 200 nM glibenclamide increased oxytocin and vasopressin release (OT: P neurons functioning as glucose and “metabolic” sensors to participate in appetite regulation. PMID:24477542

  3. Glucose is necessary to maintain neurotransmitter homeostasis during synaptic activity in cultured glutamatergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Sonnewald, Ursula; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2006-10-01

    Glucose is the primary energy substrate for the adult mammalian brain. However, lactate produced within the brain might be able to serve this purpose in neurons. In the present study, the relative significance of glucose and lactate as substrates to maintain neurotransmitter homeostasis was investigated. Cultured cerebellar (primarily glutamatergic) neurons were superfused in medium containing [U-13C]glucose (2.5 mmol/L) and lactate (1 or 5 mmol/L) or glucose (2.5 mmol/L) and [U-13C]lactate (1 mmol/L), and exposed to pulses of N-methyl-D-aspartate (300 micromol/L), leading to synaptic activity including vesicular release. The incorporation of 13C label into intracellular lactate, alanine, succinate, glutamate, and aspartate was determined by mass spectrometry. The metabolism of [U-13C]lactate under non-depolarizing conditions was high compared with that of [U-13C]glucose; however, it decreased significantly during induced depolarization. In contrast, at both concentrations of extracellular lactate, the metabolism of [U-13C]glucose was increased during neuronal depolarization. The role of glucose and lactate as energy substrates during vesicular release as well as transporter-mediated influx and efflux of glutamate was examined using preloaded D-[3H]aspartate as a glutamate tracer and DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate to inhibit glutamate transporters. The results suggest that glucose is essential to prevent depolarization-induced reversal of the transporter (efflux), whereas vesicular release was unaffected by the choice of substrate. In conclusion, the present study shows that glucose is a necessary substrate to maintain neurotransmitter homeostasis during synaptic activity and that synaptic activity does not induce an upregulation of lactate metabolism in glutamatergic neurons.

  4. Elucidation of the glucose transport pathway in glucose transporter 4 via steered molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aswathy Sheena

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: GLUT4 is a predominant insulin regulated glucose transporter expressed in major glucose disposal tissues such as adipocytes and muscles. Under the unstimulated state, GLUT4 resides within intracellular vesicles. Various stimuli such as insulin translocate this protein to the plasma membrane for glucose transport. In the absence of a crystal structure for GLUT4, very little is known about the mechanism of glucose transport by this protein. Earlier we proposed a homology model for GLUT4 and performed a conventional molecular dynamics study revealing the conformational rearrangements during glucose and ATP binding. However, this study could not explain the transport of glucose through the permeation tunnel. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To elucidate the molecular mechanism of glucose transport and its energetic, a steered molecular dynamics study (SMD was used. Glucose was pulled from the extracellular end of GLUT4 to the cytoplasm along the pathway using constant velocity pulling method. We identified several key residues within the tunnel that interact directly with either the backbone ring or the hydroxyl groups of glucose. A rotation of glucose molecule was seen near the sugar binding site facilitating the sugar recognition process at the QLS binding site. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study proposes a possible glucose transport pathway and aids the identification of several residues that make direct interactions with glucose during glucose transport. Mutational studies are required to further validate the observation made in this study.

  5. Glut2-dependent glucose-sensing controls thermoregulation by enhancing the leptin sensitivity of NPY and POMC neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounien, Lourdes; Marty, Nell; Tarussio, David; Metref, Salima; Genoux, David; Preitner, Frédéric; Foretz, Marc; Thorens, Bernard

    2010-06-01

    The physiological contribution of glucose in thermoregulation is not completely established nor whether this control may involve a regulation of the melanocortin pathway. Here, we assessed thermoregulation and leptin sensitivity of hypothalamic arcuate neurons in mice with inactivation of glucose transporter type 2 (Glut2)-dependent glucose sensing. Mice with inactivation of Glut2-dependent glucose sensors are cold intolerant and show increased susceptibility to food deprivation-induced torpor and abnormal hypothermic response to intracerebroventricular administration of 2-deoxy-d-glucose compared to control mice. This is associated with a defect in regulated expression of brown adipose tissue uncoupling protein I and iodothyronine deiodinase II and with a decreased leptin sensitivity of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons, as observed during the unfed-to-refed transition or following i.p. leptin injection. Sites of central Glut-2 expression were identified by a genetic tagging approach and revealed that glucose-sensitive neurons were present in the lateral hypothalamus, the dorsal vagal complex, and the basal medulla but not in the arcuate nucleus. NPY and POMC neurons were, however, connected to nerve terminals from Glut2-expressing neurons. Thus, our data suggest that glucose controls thermoregulation and the leptin sensitivity of NPY and POMC neurons through activation of Glut2-dependent glucose-sensing neurons located outside of the arcuate nucleus.

  6. Regulation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons by glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Alison V.; Moenter, Suzanne M.

    2011-01-01

    Reproduction is influenced by energy balance, but the physiological pathways mediating their relationship have not been fully elucidated. As the central regulators of fertility, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons integrate numerous physiological signals, including metabolic cues. Circulating glucose levels regulate GnRH release and may in part mediate the effects of negative energy balance on fertility. Existing evidence suggests that neural pathways originating in the hindbrain, as well as in the hypothalamic feeding nuclei, transmit information concerning glucose availability to GnRH neurons. Here we review recent evidence suggesting that GnRH neurons may directly sense changes in glucose availability by a mechanism involving adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). These findings expand our understanding of how metabolic signaling in the brain regulates reproduction. PMID:21855365

  7. Glucose-responsive neurons of the paraventricular thalamus control sucrose-seeking behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labouèbe, Gwenaël; Boutrel, Benjamin; Tarussio, David; Thorens, Bernard

    2016-08-01

    Feeding behavior is governed by homeostatic needs and motivational drive to obtain palatable foods. Here, we identify a population of glutamatergic neurons in the paraventricular thalamus of mice that express the glucose transporter Glut2 (encoded by Slc2a2) and project to the nucleus accumbens. These neurons are activated by hypoglycemia and, in freely moving mice, their activation by optogenetics or Slc2a2 inactivation increases motivated sucrose-seeking but not saccharin-seeking behavior. These neurons may control sugar overconsumption in obesity and diabetes.

  8. Glucose-responsive neurons in the subfornical organ of the rat--a novel site for direct CNS monitoring of circulating glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, N; Dai, L; Ferguson, A V

    2012-01-10

    Glucose-sensitive neurons have been identified in a number of CNS regions including metabolic control centers of the hypothalamus. The location of these regions behind the blood-brain barrier restricts them to sensing central, but not circulating glucose concentrations. In this study, we have used patch-clamp electrophysiology to examine whether neurons in a specialized region lacking the blood-brain barrier, the subfornical organ (SFO), are also glucose sensitive. In dissociated SFO neurons, altering the bath concentration of glucose (1 mM, 5 mM, 10 mM) influenced the excitability of 49% of neurons tested (n=67). Glucose-inhibited (GI) neurons depolarized in response to decreased glucose (n=10; mean, 4.6±1.0 mV) or hyperpolarized in response to increased glucose (n=8; mean,-4.4±0.8 mV). In contrast, glucose-excited (GE) neurons depolarized in response to increased glucose (n=9; mean, 6.4±0.4 mV) or hyperpolarized in response to decreased glucose (n=6; mean,-4.8±0.6 mV). Using voltage-clamp recordings, we also identified GI (outward current to increased glucose) and GE (inward current to increased glucose) SFO neurons. The mean glucose-induced inward current had a reversal potential of -24±12 mV (n=5), while GE responses were maintained during sodium-dependent glucose transporter inhibition, supporting the conclusion that GE properties result from the activation of a nonselective cation conductance (NSCC). The glucose-induced outward current had a mean reversal potential of -78±1.2 mV (n=5), while GI responses were not observed in the presence of glibenclamide, suggesting that these properties result from the modulation of K(ATP) channels. These data demonstrate that SFO neurons are glucose responsive, further emphasizing the potential roles of this circumventricular organ as an important sensor and integrator of circulating signals of energy status. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Predictive models of glucose control: roles for glucose-sensing neurones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosse, C.; Gonzalez, A.; Burdakov, D.

    2018-01-01

    The brain can be viewed as a sophisticated control module for stabilizing blood glucose. A review of classical behavioural evidence indicates that central circuits add predictive (feedforward/anticipatory) control to the reactive (feedback/compensatory) control by peripheral organs. The brain/cephalic control is constructed and engaged, via associative learning, by sensory cues predicting energy intake or expenditure (e.g. sight, smell, taste, sound). This allows rapidly measurable sensory information (rather than slowly generated internal feedback signals, e.g. digested nutrients) to control food selection, glucose supply for fight-or-flight responses or preparedness for digestion/absorption. Predictive control is therefore useful for preventing large glucose fluctuations. We review emerging roles in predictive control of two classes of widely projecting hypothalamic neurones, orexin/hypocretin (ORX) and melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) cells. Evidence is cited that ORX neurones (i) are activated by sensory cues (e.g. taste, sound), (ii) drive hepatic production, and muscle uptake, of glucose, via sympathetic nerves, (iii) stimulate wakefulness and exploration via global brain projections and (iv) are glucose-inhibited. MCH neurones are (i) glucose-excited, (ii) innervate learning and reward centres to promote synaptic plasticity, learning and memory and (iii) are critical for learning associations useful for predictive control (e.g. using taste to predict nutrient value of food). This evidence is unified into a model for predictive glucose control. During associative learning, inputs from some glucose-excited neurones may promote connections between the ‘fast’ senses and reward circuits, constructing neural shortcuts for efficient action selection. In turn, glucose-inhibited neurones may engage locomotion/exploration and coordinate the required fuel supply. Feedback inhibition of the latter neurones by glucose would ensure that glucose fluxes they

  10. Predictive models of glucose control: roles for glucose-sensing neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosse, C; Gonzalez, A; Burdakov, D

    2015-01-01

    The brain can be viewed as a sophisticated control module for stabilizing blood glucose. A review of classical behavioural evidence indicates that central circuits add predictive (feedforward/anticipatory) control to the reactive (feedback/compensatory) control by peripheral organs. The brain/cephalic control is constructed and engaged, via associative learning, by sensory cues predicting energy intake or expenditure (e.g. sight, smell, taste, sound). This allows rapidly measurable sensory information (rather than slowly generated internal feedback signals, e.g. digested nutrients) to control food selection, glucose supply for fight-or-flight responses or preparedness for digestion/absorption. Predictive control is therefore useful for preventing large glucose fluctuations. We review emerging roles in predictive control of two classes of widely projecting hypothalamic neurones, orexin/hypocretin (ORX) and melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) cells. Evidence is cited that ORX neurones (i) are activated by sensory cues (e.g. taste, sound), (ii) drive hepatic production, and muscle uptake, of glucose, via sympathetic nerves, (iii) stimulate wakefulness and exploration via global brain projections and (iv) are glucose-inhibited. MCH neurones are (i) glucose-excited, (ii) innervate learning and reward centres to promote synaptic plasticity, learning and memory and (iii) are critical for learning associations useful for predictive control (e.g. using taste to predict nutrient value of food). This evidence is unified into a model for predictive glucose control. During associative learning, inputs from some glucose-excited neurones may promote connections between the 'fast' senses and reward circuits, constructing neural shortcuts for efficient action selection. In turn, glucose-inhibited neurones may engage locomotion/exploration and coordinate the required fuel supply. Feedback inhibition of the latter neurones by glucose would ensure that glucose fluxes they stimulate

  11. Determination of Glucose Utilization Rates in Cultured Astrocytes and Neurons with [14C]deoxyglucose: Progress, Pitfalls, and Discovery of Intracellular Glucose Compartmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienel, Gerald A; Cruz, Nancy F; Sokoloff, Louis; Driscoll, Bernard F

    2017-01-01

    2-Deoxy-D-[ 14 C]glucose ([ 14 C]DG) is commonly used to determine local glucose utilization rates (CMR glc ) in living brain and to estimate CMR glc in cultured brain cells as rates of [ 14 C]DG phosphorylation. Phosphorylation rates of [ 14 C]DG and its metabolizable fluorescent analog, 2-(N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino)-2-deoxyglucose (2-NBDG), however, do not take into account differences in the kinetics of transport and metabolism of [ 14 C]DG or 2-NBDG and glucose in neuronal and astrocytic cells in cultures or in single cells in brain tissue, and conclusions drawn from these data may, therefore, not be correct. As a first step toward the goal of quantitative determination of CMR glc in astrocytes and neurons in cultures, the steady-state intracellular-to-extracellular concentration ratios (distribution spaces) for glucose and [ 14 C]DG were determined in cultured striatal neurons and astrocytes as functions of extracellular glucose concentration. Unexpectedly, the glucose distribution spaces rose during extreme hypoglycemia, exceeding 1.0 in astrocytes, whereas the [ 14 C]DG distribution space fell at the lowest glucose levels. Calculated CMR glc was greatly overestimated in hypoglycemic and normoglycemic cells because the intracellular glucose concentrations were too high. Determination of the distribution space for [ 14 C]glucose revealed compartmentation of intracellular glucose in astrocytes, and probably, also in neurons. A smaller metabolic pool is readily accessible to hexokinase and communicates with extracellular glucose, whereas the larger pool is sequestered from hexokinase activity. A new experimental approach using double-labeled assays with DG and glucose is suggested to avoid the limitations imposed by glucose compartmentation on metabolic assays.

  12. Effect of endurance training on glucose transport capacity and glucose transporter expression in rat skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, T; Stallknecht, B M; Pedersen, O

    1990-01-01

    exhaustive single exercise session the day before experiment both maximum insulin- and contraction-stimulated transport rates were increased in all muscle types in trained rats. Accordingly, the increased glucose transport capacity in trained muscle was not due to a residual effect of the last training...... session. Half-times for reversal of contraction-induced glucose transport were similar in trained and untrained muscles. The concentrations of mRNA for GLUT-1 (the erythrocyte-brain-Hep G2 glucose transporter) and GLUT-4 (the adipocyte-muscle glucose transporter) were increased approximately twofold......The effect of 10 wk endurance swim training on 3-O-methylglucose (3-MG) uptake (at 40 mM 3-MG) in skeletal muscle was studied in the perfused rat hindquarter. Training resulted in an increase of approximately 33% for maximum insulin-stimulated 3-MG transport in fast-twitch red fibers...

  13. Direct effects of glucose, insulin, GLP-1, and GIP on bulbospinal neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla in neonatal wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Naoki; Onimaru, Hiroshi; Matsubara, Hidehito; Uchida, Takahiro; Watanabe, Atsushi; Imakiire, Toshihiko; Nishida, Yasuhiro; Kumagai, Hiroo

    2017-03-06

    Although patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) often exhibit hypertension, the mechanisms responsible for this correlation are not well known. We hypothesized that the bulbospinal neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) are affected by the levels of glucose, insulin, or incretins (glucagon like peptide-1 [GLP-1] or glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide [GIP]) in patients with DM. To investigate whether RVLM neurons are activated by glucose, insulin, GLP-1, or GIP, we examined changes in the membrane potentials of bulbospinal RVLM neurons using whole-cell patch-clamp technique during superfusion with various levels of glucose or these hormones in neonatal Wistar rats. A brainstem-spinal cord preparation was used for the experiments. A low level of glucose stimulated bulbospinal RVLM neurons. During insulin superfusion, almost all the RVLM neurons were depolarized, while during GLP-1 or GIP superfusion, almost all the RVLM neurons were hyperpolarized. Next, histological examinations were performed to examine transporters for glucose and receptors for insulin, GLP-1, and GIP on RVLM neurons. Low-level glucose-depolarized RVLM neurons exhibited the presence of glucose transporter 3 (GLUT3). Meanwhile, insulin-depolarized, GLP-1-hyperpolarized, and GIP-hyperpolarized RVLM neurons showed each of the respective specific receptor. These results indicate that a low level of glucose stimulates bulbospinal RVLM neurons via specific transporters on these neurons, inducing hypertension. Furthermore, an increase in insulin or a reduction in incretins may also activate the sympathetic nervous system and induce hypertension by activating RVLM neurons via their own receptors. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Stimulation of feeding by three different glucose-sensing mechanisms requires hindbrain catecholamine neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ai-Jun; Wang, Qing; Dinh, Thu T; Powers, Bethany R; Ritter, Sue

    2014-02-15

    Previous work has shown that hindbrain catecholamine neurons are required components of the brain's glucoregulatory circuitry. However, the mechanisms and circuitry underlying their glucoregulatory functions are poorly understood. Here we examined three drugs, glucosamine (GcA), phloridzin (Phl) and 5-thio-d-glucose (5TG), that stimulate food intake but interfere in different ways with cellular glucose utilization or transport. We examined feeding and blood glucose responses to each drug in male rats previously injected into the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus with anti-dopamine-β-hydroxylase conjugated to saporin (DSAP), a retrogradely transported immunotoxin that selectively lesions noradrenergic and adrenergic neurons, or with unconjugated saporin (SAP) control. Our major findings were 1) that GcA, Phl, and 5TG all stimulated feeding in SAP controls whether injected into the lateral or fourth ventricle (LV or 4V), 2) that each drug's potency was similar for both LV and 4V injections, 3) that neither LV or 4V injection of these drugs evoked feeding in DSAP-lesioned rats, and 4) that only 5TG, which blocks glycolysis, stimulated a blood glucose response. The antagonist of the MEK/ERK signaling cascade, U0126, attenuated GcA-induced feeding, but not Phl- or 5TG-induced feeding. Thus GcA, Phl, and 5TG, although differing in mechanism and possibly activating different neural populations, stimulate feeding in a catecholamine-dependent manner. Although results do not exclude the possibility that catecholamine neurons possess glucose-sensing mechanisms responsive to all of these agents, currently available evidence favors the possibility that the feeding effects result from convergent neural circuits in which catecholamine neurons are a required component.

  15. Effects of Taurine Supplementation on Neuronal Excitability and Glucose Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Idrissi, Abdeslem; El Hilali, Fatiha; Rotondo, Salvatore; Sidime, Francoise

    2017-01-01

    In this study we examined the role of chronic taurine supplementation on plasma glucose homeostasis and brain excitability through activation of the insulin receptor. FVB/NJ male mice were supplemented with taurine in drinking water (0.05% w/v) for 4 weeks and subjected to a glucose tolerance test (7.5 mg/kg BW) after 12 h fasting. We found that taurine-fed mice were slightly hypoglycemic prior to glucose injection and showed significantly reduced plasma glucose at 30 and 60 min post-glucose injection when compared to control mice. Previously, we reported that taurine supplementation induces biochemical changes that target the GABAergic system. Those studies show that taurine-fed mice are hyperexcitable, have reduced GABA A receptors expression and increased GAD and somatostatin expression in the brain. In this study, we found that taurine-fed mice had a significant increase in insulin receptor (IR) immuno-reactivity in the pancreas and all brain regions examined. At the mRNA level, we found that the IR showed differential regional expression. Surprisingly, we found that neurons express the gene for insulin and that taurine had a significant role in regulating insulin gene expression. We propose that increased insulin production and secretion in taurine-fed mice cause an increase activation of the central IR and may be partially responsible for the increased neuronal excitability observed in taurine supplemented mice. Furthermore, the high levels of neuronal insulin expression and its regulation by taurine implicates taurine in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis.

  16. Effect of endurance training on glucose transport capacity and glucose transporter expression in rat skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ploug, T.; Stallknecht, B.M.; Pedersen, O.; Kahn, B.B.; Ohkuwa, T.; Vinten, J.; Galbo, H.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of 10 wk endurance swim training on 3-O-methylglucose (3-MG) uptake (at 40 mM 3-MG) in skeletal muscle was studied in the perfused rat hindquarter. Training resulted in an increase of approximately 33% for maximum insulin-stimulated 3-MG transport in fast-twitch red fibers and an increase of approximately 33% for contraction-stimulated transport in slow-twitch red fibers compared with nonexercised sedentary muscle. A fully additive effect of insulin and contractions was observed both in trained and untrained muscle. Compared with transport in control rats subjected to an almost exhaustive single exercise session the day before experiment both maximum insulin- and contraction-stimulated transport rates were increased in all muscle types in trained rats. Accordingly, the increased glucose transport capacity in trained muscle was not due to a residual effect of the last training session. Half-times for reversal of contraction-induced glucose transport were similar in trained and untrained muscles. The concentrations of mRNA for GLUT-1 (the erythrocyte-brain-Hep G2 glucose transporter) and GLUT-4 (the adipocyte-muscle glucose transporter) were increased approximately twofold by training in fast-twitch red muscle fibers. In parallel to this, Western blot demonstrated a approximately 47% increase in GLUT-1 protein and a approximately 31% increase in GLUT-4 protein. This indicates that the increases in maximum velocity for 3-MG transport in trained muscle is due to an increased number of glucose transporters

  17. Activation of Wnt Signaling in Cortical Neurons Enhances Glucose Utilization through Glycolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisternas, Pedro; Salazar, Paulina; Silva-Álvarez, Carmen; Barros, L Felipe; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-12-09

    The Wnt signaling pathway is critical for a number of functions in the central nervous system, including regulation of the synaptic cleft structure and neuroprotection against injury. Deregulation of Wnt signaling has been associated with several brain pathologies, including Alzheimer's disease. In recent years, it has been suggested that the Wnt pathway might act as a central integrator of metabolic signals from peripheral organs to the brain, which would represent a new role for Wnt signaling in cell metabolism. Energy metabolism is critical for normal neuronal function, which mainly depends on glucose utilization. Brain energy metabolism is important in almost all neurological disorders, to which a decrease in the capacity of the brain to utilize glucose has been linked. However, little is known about the relationship between Wnt signaling and neuronal glucose metabolism in the cellular context. In the present study, we found that acute treatment with the Wnt3a ligand induced a large increase in glucose uptake, without changes in the expression or localization of glucose transporter type 3. In addition, we observed that Wnt3a treatment increased the activation of the metabolic sensor Akt. Moreover, we observed an increase in the activity of hexokinase and in the glycolytic rate, and both processes were dependent on activation of the Akt pathway. Furthermore, we did not observe changes in the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase or in the pentose phosphate pathway. The effect of Wnt3a was independent of both the transcription of Wnt target genes and synaptic effects of Wnt3a. Together, our results suggest that Wnt signaling stimulates glucose utilization in cortical neurons through glycolysis to satisfy the high energy demand of these cells. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Direct evidence for activity-dependent glucose phosphorylation in neurons with implications for the astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Anant B; Lai, James C K; Chowdhury, Golam M I; Hyder, Fahmeed; Rothman, Douglas L; Shulman, Robert G; Behar, Kevin L

    2014-04-08

    Previous (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments have shown that over a wide range of neuronal activity, approximately one molecule of glucose is oxidized for every molecule of glutamate released by neurons and recycled through astrocytic glutamine. The measured kinetics were shown to agree with the stoichiometry of a hypothetical astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttle model, which predicted negligible functional neuronal uptake of glucose. To test this model, we measured the uptake and phosphorylation of glucose in nerve terminals isolated from rats infused with the glucose analog, 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) in vivo. The concentrations of phosphorylated FDG (FDG6P), normalized with respect to known neuronal metabolites, were compared in nerve terminals, homogenate, and cortex of anesthetized rats with and without bicuculline-induced seizures. The increase in FDG6P in nerve terminals agreed well with the increase in cortical neuronal glucose oxidation measured previously under the same conditions in vivo, indicating that direct uptake and oxidation of glucose in nerve terminals is substantial under resting and activated conditions. These results suggest that neuronal glucose-derived pyruvate is the major oxidative fuel for activated neurons, not lactate-derived from astrocytes, contradicting predictions of the original astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttle model under the range of study conditions.

  19. Deficient Rab11 activity underlies glucose hypometabolism in primary neurons of Huntington’s disease mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xueyi; Valencia, Antonio; McClory, Hollis; Sapp, Ellen; Kegel, Kimberly B.; DiFiglia, Marian

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Primary Huntington’s disease neurons are impaired in taking up glucose. ► Rab11 modulates glucose uptake in neurons. ► Increasing Rab11 activity attenuates the glucose uptake defect in disease neurons. ► We provide a novel mechanism for glucose hypometabolism in Huntington’s disease. -- Abstract: Huntington’s disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. Positron emission tomography studies have revealed a decline in glucose metabolism in the brain of patients with HD by a mechanism that has not been established. We examined glucose utilization in embryonic primary cortical neurons of wild-type (WT) and HD knock-in mice, which have 140 CAG repeats inserted in the endogenous mouse huntingtin gene (HD 140Q/140Q ). Primary HD 140Q/140Q cortical neurons took up significantly less glucose than did WT neurons. Expression of permanently inactive and permanently active forms of Rab11 correspondingly altered glucose uptake in WT neurons, suggesting that normal activity of Rab11 is needed for neuronal uptake of glucose. It is known that Rab11 activity is diminished in HD 140Q/140Q neurons. Expression of dominant active Rab11 to enhance the activity of Rab11 normalized glucose uptake in HD 140Q/140Q neurons. These results suggest that deficient activity of Rab11 is a novel mechanism for glucose hypometabolism in HD.

  20. Linking neuronal brain activity to the glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göbel, Britta; Oltmanns, Kerstin M; Chung, Matthias

    2013-08-29

    Energy homeostasis ensures the functionality of the entire organism. The human brain as a missing link in the global regulation of the complex whole body energy metabolism is subject to recent investigation. The goal of this study is to gain insight into the influence of neuronal brain activity on cerebral and peripheral energy metabolism. In particular, the tight link between brain energy supply and metabolic responses of the organism is of interest. We aim to identifying regulatory elements of the human brain in the whole body energy homeostasis. First, we introduce a general mathematical model describing the human whole body energy metabolism. It takes into account the two central roles of the brain in terms of energy metabolism. The brain is considered as energy consumer as well as regulatory instance. Secondly, we validate our mathematical model by experimental data. Cerebral high-energy phosphate content and peripheral glucose metabolism are measured in healthy men upon neuronal activation induced by transcranial direct current stimulation versus sham stimulation. By parameter estimation we identify model parameters that provide insight into underlying neurophysiological processes. Identified parameters reveal effects of neuronal activity on regulatory mechanisms of systemic glucose metabolism. Our examinations support the view that the brain increases its glucose supply upon neuronal activation. The results indicate that the brain supplies itself with energy according to its needs, and preeminence of cerebral energy supply is reflected. This mechanism ensures balanced cerebral energy homeostasis. The hypothesis of the central role of the brain in whole body energy homeostasis as active controller is supported.

  1. Direct neuronal glucose uptake heralds activity-dependent increases in cerebral metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgaard, Iben; Li, Baoman; Xie, Lulu; Kang, Hongyi; Sanggaard, Simon; Haswell, John D R; Sun, Wei; Goldman, Siri; Blekot, Solomiya; Nielsen, Michael; Takano, Takahiro; Deane, Rashid; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2015-04-23

    Metabolically, the brain is a highly active organ that relies almost exclusively on glucose as its energy source. According to the astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttle hypothesis, glucose is taken up by astrocytes and converted to lactate, which is then oxidized by neurons. Here we show, using two-photon imaging of a near-infrared 2-deoxyglucose analogue (2DG-IR), that glucose is taken up preferentially by neurons in awake behaving mice. Anaesthesia suppressed neuronal 2DG-IR uptake and sensory stimulation was associated with a sharp increase in neuronal, but not astrocytic, 2DG-IR uptake. Moreover, hexokinase, which catalyses the first enzymatic steps in glycolysis, was highly enriched in neurons compared with astrocytes, in mouse as well as in human cortex. These observations suggest that brain activity and neuronal glucose metabolism are directly linked, and identify the neuron as the principal locus of glucose uptake as visualized by functional brain imaging.

  2. Direct neuronal glucose uptake heralds activity-dependent increases in cerebral metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgaard, Iben; Li, Baoman; Xie, Lulu; Kang, Hongyi; Sanggaard, Simon; Haswell, John Douglas R; Sun, Wei; Goldman, Siri; Blekot, Solomiya; Nielsen, Michael; Takano, Takahiro; Deane, Rashid; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2015-01-01

    Metabolically, the brain is a highly active organ that relies almost exclusively on glucose as its energy source. According to the astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttle hypothesis, glucose is taken up by astrocytes and converted to lactate, which is then oxidized by neurons. Here we show, using 2-photon imaging of a near-infrared 2-deoxyglucose analogue (2DG-IR), that glucose is taken up preferentially by neurons in awake behaving mice. Anesthesia suppressed neuronal 2DG-IR uptake and sensory stimulation was associated with a sharp increase in neuronal, but not astrocytic, 2DG-IR uptake. Moreover, hexokinase, which catalyze the first enzymatic steps in glycolysis, was highly enriched in neurons compared with astrocytes, in mouse as well as in human cortex. These observations suggest that brain activity and neuronal glucose metabolism are directly linked, and identifies the neuron as the principal locus of glucose uptake as visualized by functional brain imaging. PMID:25904018

  3. Screening for Inhibitors of Essential Leishmania Glucose Transporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Leishmania Glucose Transporters PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Scott M. Landfear, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Oregon Health & Science...COVERED 1 July 2009- 30 June 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Screening for Inhibitors of Essential Leishmania Glucose Transporters 5b...The objective of this project was to identify compounds that selectively inhibit the essential Leishmania glucose transporters and could hence serve

  4. Glucose transporter 1 localisation throughout pregnancy in the carnivore placenta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wooding, F.B.P.; Dantzer, Vibeke; Klisch, K.

    2007-01-01

    Glucose is one of the major fetal nutrients. Maternofetal transfer requires transport across the several placental membranes. This transfer is mediated by one or more of the fourteen known isoforms of glucose transporter. So far only Glucose Transporters 1 and 3 (GT1, GT3) have been shown to be l...

  5. Glucose transporters: expression, regulation and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RODOLFO A. MEDINA

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian cells depend on glucose as a major substrate for energy production. Glucose is transported into the cell via facilitative glucose transporters (GLUT present in all cell types. Many GLUT isoforms have been described and their expression is cell-specific and subject to hormonal and environmental control. The kinetic properties and substrate specificities of the different isoforms are specifically suited to the energy requirements of the particular cell types. Due to the ubiquitousness of these transporters, their differential expression is involved in various disease states such as diabetes, ischemia and cancer. The majority of cancers and isolated cancer cell lines over-express the GLUT family members which are present in the respective tissue of origin under non-cancerous conditions. Moreover, due to the requirement of energy to feed uncontrolled proliferation, cancer cells often express GLUTs which under normal conditions would not be present in these tissues. This over-expression is predominantly associated with the likelihood of metastasis and hence poor patient prognosis. This article presents a review of the current literature on the regulation and expression of GLUT family members and has compiled clinical and research data on GLUT expression in human cancers and in isolated human cancer cell lines.

  6. Direct evidence for activity-dependent glucose phosphorylation in neurons with implications for the astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttle

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Anant B.; Lai, James C. K.; Chowdhury, Golam M. I.; Hyder, Fahmeed; Rothman, Douglas L.; Shulman, Robert G.; Behar, Kevin L.

    2014-01-01

    A near one-to-one relationship had previously been observed between increments in the fluxes of the glutamate−glutamine neurotransmitter cycle and neuronal glucose oxidation in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. This flux relationship was consistent with a hypothesized mechanism involving glycolytic ATP in astrocytes and astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttling. Here, 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose was used to evaluate the glucose flux through glycolysis and the TCA cycle in nerve terminals isolate...

  7. Glucose rapidly induces different forms of excitatory synaptic plasticity in hypothalamic POMC neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Hu

    Full Text Available Hypothalamic POMC neurons are required for glucose and energy homeostasis. POMC neurons have a wide synaptic connection with neurons both within and outside the hypothalamus, and their activity is controlled by a balance between excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. Brain glucose-sensing plays an essential role in the maintenance of normal body weight and metabolism; however, the effect of glucose on synaptic transmission in POMC neurons is largely unknown. Here we identified three types of POMC neurons (EPSC(+, EPSC(-, and EPSC(+/- based on their glucose-regulated spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs, using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. Lowering extracellular glucose decreased the frequency of sEPSCs in EPSC(+ neurons, but increased it in EPSC(- neurons. Unlike EPSC(+ and EPSC(- neurons, EPSC(+/- neurons displayed a bi-phasic sEPSC response to glucoprivation. In the first phase of glucoprivation, both the frequency and the amplitude of sEPSCs decreased, whereas in the second phase, they increased progressively to the levels above the baseline values. Accordingly, lowering glucose exerted a bi-phasic effect on spontaneous action potentials in EPSC(+/- neurons. Glucoprivation decreased firing rates in the first phase, but increased them in the second phase. These data indicate that glucose induces distinct excitatory synaptic plasticity in different subpopulations of POMC neurons. This synaptic remodeling is likely to regulate the sensitivity of the melanocortin system to neuronal and hormonal signals.

  8. Glucose Rapidly Induces Different Forms of Excitatory Synaptic Plasticity in Hypothalamic POMC Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun; Jiang, Lin; Low, Malcolm J.; Rui, Liangyou

    2014-01-01

    Hypothalamic POMC neurons are required for glucose and energy homeostasis. POMC neurons have a wide synaptic connection with neurons both within and outside the hypothalamus, and their activity is controlled by a balance between excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. Brain glucose-sensing plays an essential role in the maintenance of normal body weight and metabolism; however, the effect of glucose on synaptic transmission in POMC neurons is largely unknown. Here we identified three types of POMC neurons (EPSC(+), EPSC(−), and EPSC(+/−)) based on their glucose-regulated spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs), using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. Lowering extracellular glucose decreased the frequency of sEPSCs in EPSC(+) neurons, but increased it in EPSC(−) neurons. Unlike EPSC(+) and EPSC(−) neurons, EPSC(+/−) neurons displayed a bi-phasic sEPSC response to glucoprivation. In the first phase of glucoprivation, both the frequency and the amplitude of sEPSCs decreased, whereas in the second phase, they increased progressively to the levels above the baseline values. Accordingly, lowering glucose exerted a bi-phasic effect on spontaneous action potentials in EPSC(+/−) neurons. Glucoprivation decreased firing rates in the first phase, but increased them in the second phase. These data indicate that glucose induces distinct excitatory synaptic plasticity in different subpopulations of POMC neurons. This synaptic remodeling is likely to regulate the sensitivity of the melanocortin system to neuronal and hormonal signals. PMID:25127258

  9. Glucose rapidly induces different forms of excitatory synaptic plasticity in hypothalamic POMC neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun; Jiang, Lin; Low, Malcolm J; Rui, Liangyou

    2014-01-01

    Hypothalamic POMC neurons are required for glucose and energy homeostasis. POMC neurons have a wide synaptic connection with neurons both within and outside the hypothalamus, and their activity is controlled by a balance between excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. Brain glucose-sensing plays an essential role in the maintenance of normal body weight and metabolism; however, the effect of glucose on synaptic transmission in POMC neurons is largely unknown. Here we identified three types of POMC neurons (EPSC(+), EPSC(-), and EPSC(+/-)) based on their glucose-regulated spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs), using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. Lowering extracellular glucose decreased the frequency of sEPSCs in EPSC(+) neurons, but increased it in EPSC(-) neurons. Unlike EPSC(+) and EPSC(-) neurons, EPSC(+/-) neurons displayed a bi-phasic sEPSC response to glucoprivation. In the first phase of glucoprivation, both the frequency and the amplitude of sEPSCs decreased, whereas in the second phase, they increased progressively to the levels above the baseline values. Accordingly, lowering glucose exerted a bi-phasic effect on spontaneous action potentials in EPSC(+/-) neurons. Glucoprivation decreased firing rates in the first phase, but increased them in the second phase. These data indicate that glucose induces distinct excitatory synaptic plasticity in different subpopulations of POMC neurons. This synaptic remodeling is likely to regulate the sensitivity of the melanocortin system to neuronal and hormonal signals.

  10. The expression and regulation of glucose transporters in tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Zhao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Glucose transporter proteins are involved in many physiological and biochemical processes. In particular, the high expressions of sodium-glucose cotransporter and glucose transporter proteins in tumor cells show that these two transporters play a key role in tumor cell metabolism. Studying the crystal structure and conformation of human glucose transporter proteins has enabled the development of drugs based on specific binding sites, opening up a new path towards more effective cancer treatments. This mini review serves to summarize our existing understanding of the metabolic pathways of tumor cells, focusing on the roles of glucose transporter proteins.

  11. Direct neuronal glucose uptake Heralds activity-dependent increases in cerebral metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard, Iben; Li, Baoman; Xie, Lulu

    2015-01-01

    Metabolically, the brain is a highly active organ that relies almost exclusively on glucose as its energy source. According to the astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttle hypothesis, glucose is taken up by astrocytes and converted to lactate, which is then oxidized by neurons. Here we show, using two......-photon imaging of a near-infrared 2-deoxyglucose analogue (2DG-IR), that glucose is taken up preferentially by neurons in awake behaving mice. Anaesthesia suppressed neuronal 2DG-IR uptake and sensory stimulation was associated with a sharp increase in neuronal, but not astrocytic, 2DG-IR uptake. Moreover......, hexokinase, which catalyses the first enzymatic steps in glycolysis, was highly enriched in neurons compared with astrocytes, in mouse as well as in human cortex. These observations suggest that brain activity and neuronal glucose metabolism are directly linked, and identify the neuron as the principal locus...

  12. Neuronal LRP1 regulates glucose metabolism and insulin signaling in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Chen; Hu, Jin; Tsai, Chih-Wei; Yue, Mei; Melrose, Heather L; Kanekiyo, Takahisa; Bu, Guojun

    2015-04-08

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurological disorder characterized by profound memory loss and progressive dementia. Accumulating evidence suggests that Type 2 diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disorder characterized by insulin resistance and glucose intolerance, significantly increases the risk for developing AD. Whereas amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition and neurofibrillary tangles are major histological hallmarks of AD, impairment of cerebral glucose metabolism precedes these pathological changes during the early stage of AD and likely triggers or exacerbates AD pathology. However, the mechanisms linking disturbed insulin signaling/glucose metabolism and AD pathogenesis remain unclear. The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1), a major apolipoprotein E receptor, plays critical roles in lipoprotein metabolism, synaptic maintenance, and clearance of Aβ in the brain. Here, we demonstrate that LRP1 interacts with the insulin receptor β in the brain and regulates insulin signaling and glucose uptake. LRP1 deficiency in neurons leads to impaired insulin signaling as well as reduced levels of glucose transporters GLUT3 and GLUT4. Consequently, glucose uptake is reduced. By using an in vivo microdialysis technique sampling brain glucose concentration in freely moving mice, we further show that LRP1 deficiency in conditional knock-out mice resulted in glucose intolerance in the brain. We also found that hyperglycemia suppresses LRP1 expression, which further exacerbates insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, and AD pathology. As loss of LRP1 expression is seen in AD brains, our study provides novel insights into insulin resistance in AD. Our work also establishes new targets that can be explored for AD prevention or therapy. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/355851-09$15.00/0.

  13. Systemic Glucoregulation by Glucose-Sensing Neurons in the Ventromedial Hypothalamic Nucleus (VMH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazu, Takashi; Minokoshi, Yasuhiko

    2017-05-01

    The ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH) regulates glucose production in the liver as well as glucose uptake and utilization in peripheral tissues, including skeletal muscle and brown adipose tissue, via efferent sympathetic innervation and neuroendocrine mechanisms. The action of leptin on VMH neurons also increases glucose uptake in specific peripheral tissues through the sympathetic nervous system, with improved insulin sensitivity. On the other hand, subsets of VMH neurons, such as those that express steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1), sense changes in the ambient glucose concentration and are characterized as glucose-excited (GE) and glucose-inhibited (GI) neurons whose action potential frequency increases and decreases, respectively, as glucose levels rise. However, how these glucose-sensing (GE and GI) neurons in the VMH contribute to systemic glucoregulation remains poorly understood. In this review, we provide historical background and discuss recent advances related to glucoregulation by VMH neurons. In particular, the article describes the role of GE neurons in the control of peripheral glucose utilization and insulin sensitivity, which depend on mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 of the neurons, as well as that of GI neurons in the control of hepatic glucose production through hypoglycemia-induced counterregulatory mechanisms.

  14. Metabolic regulation of lateral hypothalamic glucose-inhibited orexin neurons may influence midbrain reward neurocircuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Zhenyu; Santiago, Ammy M; Thomas, Mark P; Routh, Vanessa H

    2014-09-01

    Lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) orexin neurons modulate reward-based feeding by activating ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons. We hypothesize that signals of peripheral energy status influence reward-based feeding by modulating the glucose sensitivity of LHA orexin glucose-inhibited (GI) neurons. This hypothesis was tested using electrophysiological recordings of LHA orexin-GI neurons in brain slices from 4 to 6week old male mice whose orexin neurons express green fluorescent protein (GFP) or putative VTA-DA neurons from C57Bl/6 mice. Low glucose directly activated ~60% of LHA orexin-GFP neurons in both whole cell and cell attached recordings. Leptin indirectly reduced and ghrelin directly enhanced the activation of LHA orexin-GI neurons by glucose decreases from 2.5 to 0.1mM by 53±12% (n=16, Pglucose sensitivity. Fasting increased activation of LHA orexin-GI neurons by decreased glucose, as would be predicted by these hormonal effects. We also evaluated putative VTA-DA neurons in a novel horizontal slice preparation containing the LHA and VTA. Decreased glucose increased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory post-synaptic currents (sEPSCs; 125 ± 40%, n=9, Pneurons. sEPSCs were completely blocked by AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptor antagonists (CNQX 20 μM, n=4; APV 20μM, n=4; respectively), demonstrating that these sEPSCs were mediated by glutamatergic transmission onto VTA DA neurons. Orexin-1 but not 2 receptor antagonism with SB334867 (10μM; n=9) and TCS-OX2-29 (2μM; n=5), respectively, blocks the effects of decreased glucose on VTA DA neurons. Thus, decreased glucose increases orexin-dependent excitatory glutamate neurotransmission onto VTA DA neurons. These data suggest that the glucose sensitivity of LHA orexin-GI neurons links metabolic state and reward-based feeding. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Glucose level determines excitatory or inhibitory effects of adiponectin on arcuate POMC neuron activity and feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyama, Shigetomo; Maekawa, Fumihiko; Maejima, Yuko; Kubota, Naoto; Kadowaki, Takashi; Yada, Toshihiko

    2016-08-09

    Adiponectin regulates glucose and lipid metabolism, acting against metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis. Accumulating evidence suggest that adiponectin acts on the brain including hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC), where proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons play key roles in feeding regulation. Several studies have examined intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of adiponectin and reported opposite effects, increase or decrease of food intake. These reports used different nutritional states. The present study aimed to clarify whether adiponectin exerts distinct effects on food intake and ARC POMC neurons depending on the glucose concentration. Adiponectin was ICV injected with or without glucose for feeding experiments and administered to ARC slices with high or low glucose for patch clamp experiments. We found that adiponectin at high glucose inhibited POMC neurons and increased food intake while at low glucose it exerted opposite effects. The results demonstrate that glucose level determines excitatory or inhibitory effects of adiponectin on arcuate POMC neuron activity and feeding.

  16. Tandem-pore K+ channels mediate inhibition of orexin neurons by glucose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burdakov, Denis; Jensen, Lise T; Alexopoulos, Haris

    2006-01-01

    Glucose-inhibited neurons orchestrate behavior and metabolism according to body energy levels, but how glucose inhibits these cells is unknown. We studied glucose inhibition of orexin/hypocretin neurons, which promote wakefulness (their loss causes narcolepsy) and also regulate metabolism...... and reward. Here we demonstrate that their inhibition by glucose is mediated by ion channels not previously implicated in central or peripheral glucose sensing: tandem-pore K(+) (K(2P)) channels. Importantly, we show that this electrical mechanism is sufficiently sensitive to encode variations in glucose...... levels reflecting those occurring physiologically between normal meals. Moreover, we provide evidence that glucose acts at an extracellular site on orexin neurons, and this information is transmitted to the channels by an intracellular intermediary that is not ATP, Ca(2+), or glucose itself...

  17. Glucose sensing by GABAergic neurons in the mouse nucleus tractus solitarii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boychuk, Carie R.; Gyarmati, Peter; Xu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Changes in blood glucose concentration alter autonomic function in a manner consistent with altered neural activity in brain regions controlling digestive processes, including neurons in the brain stem nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS), which process viscerosensory information. With whole cell or on-cell patch-clamp recordings, responses to elevating glucose concentration from 2.5 to 15 mM were assessed in identified GABAergic NTS neurons in slices from transgenic mice that express EGFP in a subset of GABA neurons. Single-cell real-time RT-PCR was also performed to detect glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67) in recorded neurons. In most identified GABA neurons (73%), elevating glucose concentration from 2.5 to 15 mM resulted in either increased (40%) or decreased (33%) neuronal excitability, reflected by altered membrane potential and/or action potential firing. Effects on membrane potential were maintained when action potentials or fast synaptic inputs were blocked, suggesting direct glucose sensing by GABA neurons. Glucose-inhibited GABA neurons were found predominantly in the lateral NTS, whereas glucose-excited cells were mainly in the medial NTS, suggesting regional segregation of responses. Responses were prevented in the presence of glucosamine, a glucokinase (GCK) inhibitor. Depolarizing responses were prevented when KATP channel activity was blocked with tolbutamide. Whereas effects on synaptic input to identified GABAergic neurons were variable in GABA neurons, elevating glucose increased glutamate release subsequent to stimulation of tractus solitarius in unlabeled, unidentified neurons. These results indicate that GABAergic NTS neurons act as GCK-dependent glucose sensors in the vagal complex, providing a means of modulating central autonomic signals when glucose is elevated. PMID:26084907

  18. Acute activation of GLP-1-expressing neurons promotes glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuemei Shi

    2017-11-01

    Conclusions: We conclude that acute activation of PPG neurons in the brainstem reduces basal glucose production, enhances intraperitoneal glucose tolerance, and augments hepatic insulin sensitivity, suggesting an important physiological role of PPG neurons-mediated circuitry in promoting glycemic control and insulin sensitivity.

  19. Membrane potential dye imaging of ventromedial hypothalamus neurons from adult mice to study glucose sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazirani, Reema P; Fioramonti, Xavier; Routh, Vanessa H

    2013-11-27

    Studies of neuronal activity are often performed using neurons from rodents less than 2 months of age due to the technical difficulties associated with increasing connective tissue and decreased neuronal viability that occur with age. Here, we describe a methodology for the dissociation of healthy hypothalamic neurons from adult-aged mice. The ability to study neurons from adult-aged mice allows the use of disease models that manifest at a later age and might be more developmentally accurate for certain studies. Fluorescence imaging of dissociated neurons can be used to study the activity of a population of neurons, as opposed to using electrophysiology to study a single neuron. This is particularly useful when studying a heterogeneous neuronal population in which the desired neuronal type is rare such as for hypothalamic glucose sensing neurons. We utilized membrane potential dye imaging of adult ventromedial hypothalamic neurons to study their responses to changes in extracellular glucose. Glucose sensing neurons are believed to play a role in central regulation of energy balance. The ability to study glucose sensing in adult rodents is particularly useful since the predominance of diseases related to dysfunctional energy balance (e.g. obesity) increase with age.

  20. Deletion of Lkb1 in Pro-Opiomelanocortin Neurons Impairs Peripheral Glucose Homeostasis in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claret, Marc; Smith, Mark A.; Knauf, Claude; Al-Qassab, Hind; Woods, Angela; Heslegrave, Amanda; Piipari, Kaisa; Emmanuel, Julian J.; Colom, André; Valet, Philippe; Cani, Patrice D.; Begum, Ghazala; White, Anne; Mucket, Phillip; Peters, Marco; Mizuno, Keiko; Batterham, Rachel L.; Giese, K. Peter; Ashworth, Alan; Burcelin, Remy; Ashford, Michael L.; Carling, David; Withers, Dominic J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling acts as a sensor of nutrients and hormones in the hypothalamus, thereby regulating whole-body energy homeostasis. Deletion of Ampkα2 in pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons causes obesity and defective neuronal glucose sensing. LKB1, the Peutz-Jeghers syndrome gene product, and Ca2+-calmodulin–dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) are key upstream activators of AMPK. This study aimed to determine their role in POMC neurons upon energy and glucose homeostasis regulation. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Mice lacking either Camkkβ or Lkb1 in POMC neurons were generated, and physiological, electrophysiological, and molecular biology studies were performed. RESULTS Deletion of Camkkβ in POMC neurons does not alter energy homeostasis or glucose metabolism. In contrast, female mice lacking Lkb1 in POMC neurons (PomcLkb1KO) display glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, impaired suppression of hepatic glucose production, and altered expression of hepatic metabolic genes. The underlying cellular defect in PomcLkb1KO mice involves a reduction in melanocortin tone caused by decreased α-melanocyte–stimulating hormone secretion. However, Lkb1-deficient POMC neurons showed normal glucose sensing, and body weight was unchanged in PomcLkb1KO mice. CONCLUSIONS Our findings demonstrate that LKB1 in hypothalamic POMC neurons plays a key role in the central regulation of peripheral glucose metabolism but not body-weight control. This phenotype contrasts with that seen in mice lacking AMPK in POMC neurons with defects in body-weight regulation but not glucose homeostasis, which suggests that LKB1 plays additional functions distinct from activating AMPK in POMC neurons. PMID:21266325

  1. Deletion of Lkb1 in pro-opiomelanocortin neurons impairs peripheral glucose homeostasis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claret, Marc; Smith, Mark A; Knauf, Claude; Al-Qassab, Hind; Woods, Angela; Heslegrave, Amanda; Piipari, Kaisa; Emmanuel, Julian J; Colom, André; Valet, Philippe; Cani, Patrice D; Begum, Ghazala; White, Anne; Mucket, Phillip; Peters, Marco; Mizuno, Keiko; Batterham, Rachel L; Giese, K Peter; Ashworth, Alan; Burcelin, Remy; Ashford, Michael L; Carling, David; Withers, Dominic J

    2011-03-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling acts as a sensor of nutrients and hormones in the hypothalamus, thereby regulating whole-body energy homeostasis. Deletion of Ampkα2 in pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons causes obesity and defective neuronal glucose sensing. LKB1, the Peutz-Jeghers syndrome gene product, and Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) are key upstream activators of AMPK. This study aimed to determine their role in POMC neurons upon energy and glucose homeostasis regulation. Mice lacking either Camkkβ or Lkb1 in POMC neurons were generated, and physiological, electrophysiological, and molecular biology studies were performed. Deletion of Camkkβ in POMC neurons does not alter energy homeostasis or glucose metabolism. In contrast, female mice lacking Lkb1 in POMC neurons (PomcLkb1KO) display glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, impaired suppression of hepatic glucose production, and altered expression of hepatic metabolic genes. The underlying cellular defect in PomcLkb1KO mice involves a reduction in melanocortin tone caused by decreased α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone secretion. However, Lkb1-deficient POMC neurons showed normal glucose sensing, and body weight was unchanged in PomcLkb1KO mice. Our findings demonstrate that LKB1 in hypothalamic POMC neurons plays a key role in the central regulation of peripheral glucose metabolism but not body-weight control. This phenotype contrasts with that seen in mice lacking AMPK in POMC neurons with defects in body-weight regulation but not glucose homeostasis, which suggests that LKB1 plays additional functions distinct from activating AMPK in POMC neurons.

  2. Glucose and insulin induce Ca2+ signaling in nesfatin-1 neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantulga, Darambazar; Maejima, Yuko; Nakata, Masanori; Yada, Toshihiko

    2012-04-20

    Nucleobindin-2 derived nesfatin-1 in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) plays a role in inhibition of feeding. The neural pathways downstream of PVN nesfatin-1 have been extensively investigated. However, regulation of the PVN nesfatin-1 neurons remains unclear. Since starvation decreases and refeeding stimulates nesfatin-1 expression specifically in the PVN, this study aimed to clarify direct effects of meal-evoked metabolic factors, glucose and insulin, on PVN nesfatin-1 neurons. High glucose (10mM) and insulin (10(-13)M) increased cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in 55 of 331 (16.6%) and 32 of 249 (12.9%) PVN neurons, respectively. Post [Ca(2+)](i) measurement immunocytochemistry identified that 58.2% of glucose-responsive and 62.5% of insulin-responsive neurons were immunoreactive to nesfatin-1. Furthermore, a fraction of the glucose-responsive nesfatin-1 neurons also responded to insulin, and vice versa. Some of the neurons that responded to neither glucose nor insulin were recruited to [Ca(2+)](i) increases by glucose and insulin in combination. Our data demonstrate that glucose and insulin directly interact with and increase [Ca(2+)](i) in nesfatin-1 neurons in the PVN, and that the nesfatin-1 neuron is the primary target for them in the PVN. The results suggest that high glucose- and insulin-induced activation of PVN nesfatin-1 neurons serves as a mechanism through which meal ingestion stimulates nesfatin-1 neurons in the PVN and thereby produces satiety. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Glucose-dependent trafficking of 5-HT3 receptors in rat gastrointestinal vagal afferent neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babic, Tanja; Troy, Amanda E; Fortna, Samuel R; Browning, Kirsteen N

    2012-01-01

    Background Intestinal glucose induces gastric relaxation via vagally mediated sensory-motor reflexes. Glucose can alter the activity of gastrointestinal (GI) vagal afferent (sensory) neurons directly, via closure of ATP-sensitive potassium channels, as well as indirectly, via the release of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) from mucosal enteroendocrine cells. We hypothesized that glucose may also be able to modulate the ability of GI vagal afferent neurons to respond to the released 5-HT, via regulation of neuronal 5-HT3 receptors. Methods Whole cell patch clamp recordings were made from acutely dissociated GI-projecting vagal afferent neurons exposed to equiosmolar Krebs’ solution containing different concentrations of D-glucose (1.25–20mM) and the response to picospritz application of 5-HT assessed. The distribution of 5-HT3 receptors in neurons exposed to different glucose concentrations was also assessed immunohistochemically. Key Results Increasing or decreasing extracellular D-glucose concentration increased or decreased, respectively, the 5-HT-induced inward current as well as the proportion of 5-HT3 receptors associated with the neuronal membrane. These responses were blocked by the Golgi-disrupting agent Brefeldin-A (5µM) suggesting involvement of a protein trafficking pathway. Furthermore, L-glucose did not mimic the response of D-glucose implying that metabolic events downstream of neuronal glucose uptake are required in order to observe the modulation of 5-HT3 receptor mediated responses. Conclusions & Inferences These results suggest that, in addition to inducing the release of 5-HT from enterochromaffin cells, glucose may also increase the ability of GI vagal sensory neurons to respond to the released 5-HT, providing a means by which the vagal afferent signal can be amplified or prolonged. PMID:22845622

  4. Molecular cloning and characterization of glucose transporter 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Glucose transporter type-1 (glut1) and citrate synthase plays crucial role in glucose transport and regulation of tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) cycle in mammalian energy metabolism. The present study was aimed to clone and characterize glut1 and citrate synthase cDNA in water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis). Total of 90 ...

  5. Noradrenaline and acetylcholine responsiveness of glucose-monitoring and glucose-insensitive neurons in the mediodorsal prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Bernadett; Szabó, István; Csetényi, Bettina; Hormay, Edina; Papp, Szilárd; Keresztes, Dóra; Karádi, Zoltán

    2014-01-16

    The mediodorsal prefrontal cortex (mdPFC), as part of the forebrain glucose-monitoring (GM) system, plays important role in several regulatory processes to control the internal state of the organism and to initiate behavioral outputs accordingly. Little is known, however, about the neurochemical sensitivity of neurons located in this area. Substantial evidence indicates that the locus ceruleus - noradrenaline (NA) projection system and the nucleus basalis magnocellularis - cholinergic projection system regulate behavioral state and state dependent processing of sensory information, various cognitive functions already associated with the mdPFC. The main goal of the present study was to examine noradrenergic and cholinergic responsiveness of glucose-monitoring and glucose-insensitive (GIS) neurons in the mediodorsal prefrontal cortex. One fifth of the neurons tested changed in firing rate to microelectrophoretically applied NA. Responsiveness of the GM cells to this catecholamine proved to be significantly higher than that of the GIS units. Microiontophoretic application of acetylcholine (Ach) resulted in activity changes (predominantly facilitation) of more than 40% of the mdPFC neurons. Proportion of Ach sensitive units among the GM and the GIS neurons was found to be similar. The glucose-monitoring neurons of the mdPFC and their distinct NA and remarkable Ach sensitivity are suggested to be of particular significance in prefrontal control of adaptive behaviors. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Recent Advances in the Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Hypothalamic Neuronal Glucose Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioramonti, Xavier; Chrétien, Chloé; Leloup, Corinne; Pénicaud, Luc

    2017-01-01

    The hypothalamus have been recognized for decades as one of the major brain centers for the control of energy homeostasis. This area contains specialized neurons able to detect changes in nutrients level. Among them, glucose-sensing neurons use glucose as a signaling molecule in addition to its fueling role. In this review we will describe the different sub-populations of glucose-sensing neurons present in the hypothalamus and highlight their nature in terms of neurotransmitter/neuropeptide expression. This review will particularly discuss whether pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons from the arcuate nucleus are directly glucose-sensing. In addition, recent observations in glucose-sensing suggest a subtle system with different mechanisms involved in the detection of changes in glucose level and their involvement in specific physiological functions. Several data point out the critical role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondria dynamics in the detection of increased glucose. This review will also highlight that ATP-dependent potassium (K ATP ) channels are not the only channels mediating glucose-sensing and discuss the new role of transient receptor potential canonical channels (TRPC). We will discuss the recent advances in the determination of glucose-sensing machinery and propose potential line of research needed to further understand the regulation of brain glucose detection.

  7. Recent Advances in the Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Hypothalamic Neuronal Glucose Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Fioramonti

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus have been recognized for decades as one of the major brain centers for the control of energy homeostasis. This area contains specialized neurons able to detect changes in nutrients level. Among them, glucose-sensing neurons use glucose as a signaling molecule in addition to its fueling role. In this review we will describe the different sub-populations of glucose-sensing neurons present in the hypothalamus and highlight their nature in terms of neurotransmitter/neuropeptide expression. This review will particularly discuss whether pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC neurons from the arcuate nucleus are directly glucose-sensing. In addition, recent observations in glucose-sensing suggest a subtle system with different mechanisms involved in the detection of changes in glucose level and their involvement in specific physiological functions. Several data point out the critical role of reactive oxygen species (ROS and mitochondria dynamics in the detection of increased glucose. This review will also highlight that ATP-dependent potassium (KATP channels are not the only channels mediating glucose-sensing and discuss the new role of transient receptor potential canonical channels (TRPC. We will discuss the recent advances in the determination of glucose-sensing machinery and propose potential line of research needed to further understand the regulation of brain glucose detection.

  8. The regulation of glucose transport in the heart of control and diabetic rats: With special emphasis on the glucose transporter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleta, M. de Leoz.

    1989-01-01

    Glucose transport regulation with insulin and high perfusion pressure in the perfused rat hearts from control and diabetic rat hearts was investigated. [ 3 H]-cytochalasin B binding assay was used to study the distribution of glucose transporters within the subcellular membranes fractionated by linear sucrose density gradient centrifugation. In the present study, insulin increased glucose uptake in the perfused heart of control and diabetic animals. This coincided with an increase of glucose transporters on the plasma membrane. The increase in glucose transporters on the plasma membrane could not be accounted for by a decrease of glucose transporters from the microsomal membranes. High perfusion pressure did not change the number of glucose transporters on the plasma membrane compared to basal in the control and diabetic animals, though it increased glucose uptake above that observed for insulin in the control. Instead, high perfusion pressure altered the distribution of glucose transporters within the subcellular membranes in reverse to that with insulin, increasing an intermediate membrane pool believed to reside between the plasma membrane and microsomal membranes as well as the intracellular membrane pool

  9. TCPTP Regulates Insulin Signalling in AgRP Neurons to Coordinate Glucose Metabolism with Feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Garron T; Lee-Young, Robert S; Brüning, Jens C; Tiganis, Tony

    2018-04-30

    Insulin regulates glucose metabolism by eliciting effects on peripheral tissues as well as the brain. Insulin receptor (IR) signalling inhibits AgRP-expressing neurons in the hypothalamus to contribute to the suppression of hepatic glucose production (HGP) by insulin, whereas AgRP neuronal activation attenuates brown adipose tissue (BAT) glucose uptake. The tyrosine phosphatase TCPTP suppresses IR signalling in AgRP neurons. Hypothalamic TCPTP is induced by fasting and degraded after feeding. Here we assessed the influence of TCPTP in AgRP neurons in the control of glucose metabolism. TCPTP deletion in AgRP neurons ( Agrp -Cre; Ptpn2 fl/fl ) enhanced insulin sensitivity as assessed by the increased glucose infusion rates and reduced HGP during hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps, accompanied by increased [ 14 C]-2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake in BAT and browned white adipose tissue. TCPTP deficiency in AgRP neurons promoted the intracerebroventricular insulin-induced repression of hepatic gluconeogenesis in otherwise unresponsive food-restricted mice yet had no effect in fed/satiated mice where hypothalamic TCPTP levels are reduced. The improvement in glucose homeostasis in Agrp -Cre; Ptpn2 fl/fl mice was corrected by IR heterozygosity ( Agrp -Cre; Ptpn2 fl/fl ; Insr fl/+ ), causally linking the effects on glucose metabolism with the IR signalling in AgRP neurons. Our findings demonstrate that TCPTP controls IR signalling in AgRP neurons to coordinate HGP and brown/beige adipocyte glucose uptake in response to feeding/fasting. © 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.

  10. Glucose-induced insulin resistance of skeletal-muscle glucose transport and uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Hansen, B F; Hansen, S A

    1988-01-01

    in the presence of glucose and insulin. The data indicate that exposure to a moderately increased glucose concentration (12 mM) leads to rapidly developing resistance of skeletal-muscle glucose transport and uptake to maximal insulin stimulation. The effect of glucose is enhanced by simultaneous insulin exposure......, whereas exposure for 5 h to insulin itself does not cause measurable resistance to maximal insulin stimulation.......The ability of glucose and insulin to modify insulin-stimulated glucose transport and uptake was investigated in perfused skeletal muscle. Here we report that perfusion of isolated rat hindlimbs for 5 h with 12 mM-glucose and 20,000 microunits of insulin/ml leads to marked, rapidly developing...

  11. Effects of taurine on plasma glucose concentration and active glucose transport in the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Yo; Kawamata, Koichi

    2017-11-01

    Taurine lowers blood glucose levels and improves hyperglycemia. However, its effects on glucose transport in the small intestine have not been investigated. Here, we elucidated the effect of taurine on glucose absorption in the small intestine. In the oral glucose tolerance test, addition of 10 mmol/L taurine suppressed the increase in hepatic portal glucose concentrations. To investigate whether the suppressive effect of taurine occurs via down-regulation of active glucose transport in the small intestine, we performed an assay using the everted sac of the rat jejunum. Addition of taurine to the mucosal side of the jejunum suppressed active glucose transport via sodium-glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1). After elimination of chloride ions from the mucosal solution, taurine did not show suppressive effects on active glucose transport. These results suggest that taurine suppressed the increase in hepatic portal glucose concentrations via suppression of SGLT1 activity in the rat jejunum, depending on chloride ions. © 2017 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  12. Acute activation of GLP-1-expressing neurons promotes glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xuemei; Chacko, Shaji; Li, Feng; Li, Depei; Burrin, Douglas; Chan, Lawrence; Guan, Xinfu

    2017-11-01

    Glucagon-like peptides are co-released from enteroendocrine L cells in the gut and preproglucagon (PPG) neurons in the brainstem. PPG-derived GLP-1/2 are probably key neuroendocrine signals for the control of energy balance and glucose homeostasis. The objective of this study was to determine whether activation of PPG neurons per se modulates glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity in vivo. We generated glucagon (Gcg) promoter-driven Cre transgenic mice and injected excitatory hM3Dq-mCherry AAV into their brainstem NTS. We characterized the metabolic impact of PPG neuron activation on glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity using stable isotopic tracers coupled with hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp. We showed that after ip injection of clozapine N-oxide, Gcg-Cre lean mice transduced with hM3Dq in the brainstem NTS downregulated basal endogenous glucose production and enhanced glucose tolerance following ip glucose tolerance test. Moreover, acute activation of PPG neurons NTS enhanced whole-body insulin sensitivity as indicated by increased glucose infusion rate as well as augmented insulin-suppression of endogenous glucose production and gluconeogenesis. In contrast, insulin-stimulation of glucose disposal was not altered significantly. We conclude that acute activation of PPG neurons in the brainstem reduces basal glucose production, enhances intraperitoneal glucose tolerance, and augments hepatic insulin sensitivity, suggesting an important physiological role of PPG neurons-mediated circuitry in promoting glycemic control and insulin sensitivity. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  13. Hypothalamic glucose-sensing: role of Glia-to-neuron signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonon, M C; Lanfray, D; Castel, H; Vaudry, H; Morin, F

    2013-12-01

    The hypothalamus senses hormones and nutrients in order to regulate energy balance. In particular, detection of hypothalamic glucose levels has been shown to regulate both feeding behavior and peripheral glucose homeostasis, and impairment of this regulatory system is believed to be involved in the development of obesity and diabetes. Several data clearly demonstrate that glial cells are key elements in the perception of glucose, constituting with neurons a "glucose-sensing unit". Characterization of this interplay between glia and neurons represents an exciting challenge, and will undoubtedly contribute to identify new candidates for therapeutic intervention. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current data that stress the importance of glia in central glucose-sensing. The nature of the glia-to-neuron signaling is discussed, with a special focus on the endozepine ODN, a potent anorexigenic peptide that is highly expressed in hypothalamic glia. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Acute activation of GLP-1-expressing neurons promotes glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Xuemei Shi; Shaji Chacko; Feng Li; Depei Li; Douglas Burrin; Lawrence Chan; Xinfu Guan

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Glucagon-like peptides are co-released from enteroendocrine L cells in the gut and preproglucagon (PPG) neurons in the brainstem. PPG-derived GLP-1/2 are probably key neuroendocrine signals for the control of energy balance and glucose homeostasis. The objective of this study was to determine whether activation of PPG neurons per se modulates glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity in vivo. Methods: We generated glucagon (Gcg) promoter-driven Cre transgenic mice and injected...

  15. Negative Effects of High Glucose Exposure in Human Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Morelli, Annamaria; Comeglio, Paolo; Sarchielli, Erica; Cellai, Ilaria; Vignozzi, Linda; Vannelli, Gabriella B.; Maggi, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic disorders are often associated with male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, suggesting that hypothalamic defects involving GnRH neurons may impair the reproductive function. Among metabolic factors hyperglycemia has been implicated in the control of the reproductive axis at central level, both in humans and in animal models. To date, little is known about the direct effects of pathological high glucose concentrations on human GnRH neurons. In this study, we investigated the high glucose...

  16. Single-cell imaging of bioenergetic responses to neuronal excitotoxicity and oxygen and glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Niamh M C; Düssmann, Heiko; Anilkumar, Ujval; Huber, Heinrich J; Prehn, Jochen H M

    2014-07-30

    Excitotoxicity is a condition occurring during cerebral ischemia, seizures, and chronic neurodegeneration. It is characterized by overactivation of glutamate receptors, leading to excessive Ca(2+)/Na(+) influx into neurons, energetic stress, and subsequent neuronal injury. We and others have previously investigated neuronal populations to study how bioenergetic parameters determine neuronal injury; however, such experiments are often confounded by population-based heterogeneity and the contribution of effects of non-neuronal cells. Hence, we here characterized bioenergetics during transient excitotoxicity in rat and mouse primary neurons at the single-cell level using fluorescent sensors for intracellular glucose, ATP, and activation of the energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). We identified ATP depletion and recovery to energetic homeostasis, along with AMPK activation, as surprisingly rapid and plastic responses in two excitotoxic injury paradigms. We observed rapid recovery of neuronal ATP levels also in the absence of extracellular glucose, or when glycolytic ATP production was inhibited, but found mitochondria to be critical for fast and complete energetic recovery. Using an injury model of oxygen and glucose deprivation, we identified a similarly rapid bioenergetics response, yet with incomplete ATP recovery and decreased AMPK activity. Interestingly, excitotoxicity also induced an accumulation of intracellular glucose, providing an additional source of energy during and after excitotoxicity-induced energy depletion. We identified this to originate from extracellular, AMPK-dependent glucose uptake and from intracellular glucose mobilization. Surprisingly, cells recovering their elevated glucose levels faster to baseline survived longer, indicating that the plasticity of neurons to adapt to bioenergetic challenges is a key indicator of neuronal viability. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3410192-14$15.00/0.

  17. Insulin modulates hippocampally-mediated spatial working memory via glucose transporter-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson-Leary, J; Jahagirdar, V; Sage, J; McNay, E C

    2018-02-15

    The insulin-regulated glucose transporter, GluT4, is a key molecule in peripheral insulin signaling. Although GluT4 is abundantly expressed in neurons of specific brain regions such as the hippocampus, the functional role of neuronal GluT4 is unclear. Here, we used pharmacological inhibition of GluT4-mediated glucose uptake to determine whether GluT4 mediates insulin-mediated glucose uptake in the hippocampus. Consistent with previous reports, we found that glucose utilization increased in the dorsal hippocampus of male rats during spontaneous alternation (SA), a hippocampally-mediated spatial working memory task. We previously showed that insulin signaling within the hippocampus is required for processing this task, and that administration of exogenous insulin enhances performance. At baseline levels of hippocampal insulin, inhibition of GluT4-mediated glucose uptake did not affect SA performance. However, inhibition of an upstream regulator of GluT4, Akt, did impair SA performance. Conversely, when a memory-enhancing dose of insulin was delivered to the hippocampus prior to SA-testing, inhibition of GluT4-mediated glucose transport prevented cognitive enhancement. These data suggest that baseline hippocampal cognitive processing does not require functional hippocampal GluT4, but that cognitive enhancement by supra-baseline insulin does. Consistent with these findings, we found that in neuronal cell culture, insulin increases glucose utilization in a GluT4-dependent manner. Collectively, these data demonstrate a key role for GluT4 in transducing the procognitive effects of elevated hippocampal insulin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. ERK1/2 mediates glucose-regulated POMC gene expression in hypothalamic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juan; Zhou, Yunting; Chen, Cheng; Yu, Feiyuan; Wang, Yun; Gu, Jiang; Ma, Lian; Ho, Guyu

    2015-04-01

    Hypothalamic glucose-sensing neurons regulate the expression of genes encoding feeding-related neuropetides POMC, AgRP, and NPY - the key components governing metabolic homeostasis. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is postulated to be the molecular mediator relaying glucose signals to regulate the expression of these neuropeptides. Whether other signaling mediator(s) plays a role is not clear. In this study, we investigated the role of ERK1/2 using primary hypothalamic neurons as the model system. The primary neurons were differentiated from hypothalamic progenitor cells. The differentiated neurons possessed the characteristic neuronal cell morphology and expressed neuronal post-mitotic markers as well as leptin-regulated orexigenic POMC and anorexigenic AgRP/NPY genes. Treatment of cells with glucose dose-dependently increased POMC and decreased AgRP/NPY expression with a concurrent suppression of AMPK phosphorylation. In addition, glucose treatment dose-dependently increased the ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Blockade of ERK1/2 activity with its specific inhibitor PD98059 partially (approximately 50%) abolished glucose-induced POMC expression, but had little effect on AgRP/NPY expression. Conversely, blockade of AMPK activity with its specific inhibitor produced a partial (approximately 50%) reversion of low-glucose-suppressed POMC expression, but almost completely blunted the low-glucose-induced AgRP/NPY expression. The results indicate that ERK1/2 mediated POMC but not AgRP/NPY expression. Confirming the in vitro findings, i.c.v. administration of PD98059 in rats similarly attenuated glucose-induced POMC expression in the hypothalamus, but again had little effect on AgRP/NPY expression. The results are indicative of a novel role of ERK1/2 in glucose-regulated POMC expression and offer new mechanistic insights into hypothalamic glucose sensing. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  19. Interplay between glucose and leptin signalling determines the strength of GABAergic synapses at POMC neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Kun; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Chun, Sung-Kun; Chua, Streamson; Jo, Young-Hwan

    2015-03-26

    Regulation of GABAergic inhibitory inputs and alterations in POMC neuron activity by nutrients and adiposity signals regulate energy and glucose homeostasis. Thus, understanding how POMC neurons integrate these two signal molecules at the synaptic level is important. Here we show that leptin's action on GABA release to POMC neurons is influenced by glucose levels. Leptin stimulates the JAK2-PI3K pathway in both presynaptic GABAergic terminals and postsynaptic POMC neurons. Inhibition of AMPK activity in presynaptic terminals decreases GABA release at 10 mM glucose. However, postsynaptic TRPC channel opening by the PI3K-PLC signalling pathway in POMC neurons enhances spontaneous GABA release via activation of presynaptic MC3/4 and mGlu receptors at 2.5 mM glucose. High-fat feeding blunts AMPK-dependent presynaptic inhibition, whereas PLC-mediated GABAergic feedback inhibition remains responsive to leptin. Our data indicate that the interplay between glucose and leptin signalling in glutamatergic POMC neurons is critical for determining the strength of inhibitory tone towards POMC neurons.

  20. Interplay between glucose and leptin signaling determines the strength of GABAergic synapses at POMC neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Kun; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Chun, Sung-Kun; Chua, Streamson; Jo, Young-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of GABAergic inhibitory inputs and alterations in POMC neuron activity by nutrients and adiposity signals regulate energy and glucose homeostasis. Thus, understanding how POMC neurons integrate these two signal molecules at the synaptic level is important. Here we show that leptin’s action on GABA release to POMC neurons is influenced by glucose levels. Leptin stimulates the JAK2-PI3K pathway in both presynaptic GABAergic terminals and postsynaptic POMC neurons. Inhibition of AMPK activity in presynaptic terminals decreases GABA release at 10 mM glucose. However, postsynaptic TRPC channel opening by the PI3K-PLC signaling pathway in POMC neurons enhances spontaneous GABA release via activation of presynaptic MC3/4 and mGlu receptors at 2.5 mM glucose. High-fat feeding blunts AMPK-dependent presynaptic inhibition, whereas PLC-mediated GABAergic feedback inhibition remains responsive to leptin. Our data indicate that the interplay between glucose and leptin signaling in glutamatergic POMC neurons is critical for determining the strength of inhibitory tone towards POMC neurons. PMID:25808323

  1. Intestinal glucose transport and salinity adaptation in a euryhaline teleost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reshkin, S.J.; Ahearn, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    Glucose transport by upper and lower intestinal brush-border membrane vesicles of the African tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) was characterized in fish acclimated to either freshwater of full-strength sea water. D-[ 3 H]-glucose uptake by vesicles was stimulated by a transmembrane Na gradient, was electrogenic, and was enhanced by countertransport of either D-glucose or D-galactose. Glucose transport was greater in the upper intestine than in the lower intestine and in sea water animals rather than in fish acclimated to freshwater. Glucose influx (10-s uptake) involved both saturable and nonsaturable transport components. Sea water adaptation increased apparent glucose influx K/sub t/, J/sub max/, apparent diffusional permeability (P), and the apparent Na affinity of the cotransport system in both intestinal segments, but the stoichiometry of Na-glucose transfer (1:1) was unaffected by differential saline conditions or gut region. It is suggested that increased sugar transport in sea water animals is due to the combination of enhanced Na-binding properties and an increase in number or transfer rate of the transport proteins. Freshwater animals compensate for reduced Na affinity of the coupled process by markedly increasing the protein affinity for glucose

  2. Effects of hypoglycaemia on neuronal metabolism in the adult brain: role of alternative substrates to glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Ana I

    2013-07-01

    Hypoglycaemia is characterized by decreased blood glucose levels and is associated with different pathologies (e.g. diabetes, inborn errors of metabolism). Depending on its severity, it might affect cognitive functions, including impaired judgment and decreased memory capacity, which have been linked to alterations of brain energy metabolism. Glucose is the major cerebral energy substrate in the adult brain and supports the complex metabolic interactions between neurons and astrocytes, which are essential for synaptic activity. Therefore, hypoglycaemia disturbs cerebral metabolism and, consequently, neuronal function. Despite the high vulnerability of neurons to hypoglycaemia, important neurochemical changes enabling these cells to prolong their resistance to hypoglycaemia have been described. This review aims at providing an overview over the main metabolic effects of hypoglycaemia on neurons, covering in vitro and in vivo findings. Recent studies provided evidence that non-glucose substrates including pyruvate, glycogen, ketone bodies, glutamate, glutamine, and aspartate, are metabolized by neurons in the absence of glucose and contribute to prolong neuronal function and delay ATP depletion during hypoglycaemia. One of the pathways likely implicated in the process is the pyruvate recycling pathway, which allows for the full oxidation of glutamate and glutamine. The operation of this pathway in neurons, particularly after hypoglycaemia, has been re-confirmed recently using metabolic modelling tools (i.e. Metabolic Flux Analysis), which allow for a detailed investigation of cellular metabolism in cultured cells. Overall, the knowledge summarized herein might be used for the development of potential therapies targeting neuronal protection in patients vulnerable to hypoglycaemic episodes.

  3. Effects of exposure to high glucose on primary cultured hippocampal neurons: involvement of intracellular ROS accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Di; Zhang, Hong; Gu, Wenjuan; Zhang, Mengren

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies showed that hyperglycemia is the main trigger of diabetic cognitive impairment and can cause hippocampus abnormalities. The goal of this study is to explore the effects of different concentrations of high glucose for different exposure time on cell viability as well as intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation of primary cultured hippocampal neurons. Hippocampal neurons were exposed to different concentrations of high glucose (50, 75, 100, 125, and 150 mM) for 24, 48, 72 and 96 h. Cell viability and nuclear morphology were evaluated by MTT and Hoechst assays, respectively. Intracellular ROS were monitored using the fluorescent probe DCFH-DA. The results showed that, compared with control group, the cell viability of all high glucose-treated groups decreased significantly after 72 h and there also was a significant increase of apoptotic nuclei in high glucose-treated groups from 72 to 96 h. Furthermore, 50 mM glucose induced a peak rise in ROS generation at 24 h and the intracellular ROS levels of 50 mM glucose group were significantly higher than the corresponding control group from 6 to 72 h. These results suggest that hippocampal neurons could be injured by high glucose exposure and the neuronal injury induced by high glucose is potentially mediated through intracellular ROS accumulation.

  4. Glucocorticoids inhibit glucose transport and glutamate uptake in hippocampal astrocytes: implications for glucocorticoid neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgin, C E; Ha, T P; Packan, D R; Tombaugh, G C; Yang, S H; Horner, H C; Sapolsky, R M

    1991-10-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs), the adrenal steroid hormones secreted during stress, can damage the hippocampus and impair its capacity to survive coincident neurological insults. This GC endangerment of the hippocampus is energetic in nature, as it can be prevented when neurons are supplemented with additional energy substrates. This energetic endangerment might arise from the ability of GCs to inhibit glucose transport into both hippocampal neurons and astrocytes. The present study explores the GC inhibition in astrocytes. (1) GCs inhibited glucose transport approximately 15-30% in both primary and secondary hippocampal astrocyte cultures. (2) The parameters of inhibition agreed with the mechanisms of GC inhibition of glucose transport in peripheral tissues: A minimum of 4 h of GC exposure were required, and the effect was steroid specific (i.e., it was not triggered by estrogen, progesterone, or testosterone) and tissue specific (i.e., it was not triggered by GCs in cerebellar or cortical cultures). (3) Similar GC treatment caused a decrease in astrocyte survival during hypoglycemia and a decrease in the affinity of glutamate uptake. This latter observation suggests that GCs might impair the ability of astrocytes to aid neurons during times of neurologic crisis (i.e., by impairing their ability to remove damaging glutamate from the synapse).

  5. Multiple functional attributes of glucose-monitoring neurons in the medial orbitofrontal (ventrolateral prefrontal) cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, István; Hormay, Edina; Csetényi, Bettina; Nagy, Bernadett; Lénárd, László; Karádi, Zoltán

    2018-02-01

    Multiple functional attributes of glucose-monitoring neurons in the medial orbitofrontal (ventrolateral prefrontal) cortex. NEUROSCI BIOBEHAV REV 73(1) XXX-XXX, 2017.- Special chemosensory cells, the glucose-monitoring (GM) neurons, reportedly involved in the central feeding control, exist in the medial orbitofrontal (ventrolateral prefrontal) cortex (mVLPFC). Electrophysiological, metabolic and behavioral studies reveal complex functional attributes of these cells and raise their homeostatic significance. Single neuron recordings, by means of the multibarreled microelectrophoretic technique, elucidate differential sensitivities of limbic forebrain neurons in the rat and the rhesus monkey to glucose and other chemicals, whereas gustatory stimulations demonstrate their distinct taste responsiveness. Metabolic examinations provide evidence for alteration of blood glucose level in glucose tolerance test and elevation of plasma triglyceride concentration after destruction of the local GM cells by streptozotocin (STZ). In behavioral studies, STZ microinjection into the mVLPFC fails to interfere with the acquisition of saccharin conditioned taste avoidance, does cause, however, taste perception deficit in taste reactivity tests. Multiple functional attributes of GM neurons in the mVLPFC, within the frame of the hierarchically organized central GM neuronal network, appear to play important role in the maintenance of the homeostatic balance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Hypoglycemia: Role of Hypothalamic Glucose-Inhibited (GI) Neurons in Detection and Correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chunxue; Teegala, Suraj B; Khan, Bilal A; Gonzalez, Christina; Routh, Vanessa H

    2018-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is a profound threat to the brain since glucose is its primary fuel. As a result, glucose sensors are widely located in the central nervous system and periphery. In this perspective we will focus on the role of hypothalamic glucose-inhibited (GI) neurons in sensing and correcting hypoglycemia. In particular, we will discuss GI neurons in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) which express neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and in the perifornical hypothalamus (PFH) which express orexin. The ability of VMH nNOS-GI neurons to depolarize in low glucose closely parallels the hormonal response to hypoglycemia which stimulates gluconeogenesis. We have found that nitric oxide (NO) production in low glucose is dependent on oxidative status. In this perspective we will discuss the potential relevance of our work showing that enhancing the glutathione antioxidant system prevents hypoglycemia associated autonomic failure (HAAF) in non-diabetic rats whereas VMH overexpression of the thioredoxin antioxidant system restores hypoglycemia counterregulation in rats with type 1 diabetes.We will also address the potential role of the orexin-GI neurons in the arousal response needed for hypoglycemia awareness which leads to behavioral correction (e.g., food intake, glucose administration). The potential relationship between the hypothalamic sensors and the neurocircuitry in the hindbrain and portal mesenteric vein which is critical for hypoglycemia correction will then be discussed.

  7. Hypoglycemia: Role of Hypothalamic Glucose-Inhibited (GI Neurons in Detection and Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxue Zhou

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypoglycemia is a profound threat to the brain since glucose is its primary fuel. As a result, glucose sensors are widely located in the central nervous system and periphery. In this perspective we will focus on the role of hypothalamic glucose-inhibited (GI neurons in sensing and correcting hypoglycemia. In particular, we will discuss GI neurons in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH which express neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS and in the perifornical hypothalamus (PFH which express orexin. The ability of VMH nNOS-GI neurons to depolarize in low glucose closely parallels the hormonal response to hypoglycemia which stimulates gluconeogenesis. We have found that nitric oxide (NO production in low glucose is dependent on oxidative status. In this perspective we will discuss the potential relevance of our work showing that enhancing the glutathione antioxidant system prevents hypoglycemia associated autonomic failure (HAAF in non-diabetic rats whereas VMH overexpression of the thioredoxin antioxidant system restores hypoglycemia counterregulation in rats with type 1 diabetes.We will also address the potential role of the orexin-GI neurons in the arousal response needed for hypoglycemia awareness which leads to behavioral correction (e.g., food intake, glucose administration. The potential relationship between the hypothalamic sensors and the neurocircuitry in the hindbrain and portal mesenteric vein which is critical for hypoglycemia correction will then be discussed.

  8. Honeybee retinal glial cells transform glucose and supply the neurons with metabolic substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsacopoulos, M.; Evequoz-Mercier, V.; Perrottet, P.; Buchner, E.

    1988-01-01

    The retina of the honeybee drone is a nervous tissue in which glial cells and photoreceptor cells (sensory neurons) constitute two distinct metabolic compartments. Retinal slices incubated with 2-deoxy[ 3 H]glucose convert this glucose analogue to 2-deoxy[ 3 H]glucose 6-phosphate, but this conversion is made only in the glial cells. Hence, glycolysis occurs only in glial cells. In contrast, the neurons consume O 2 and this consumption is sustained by the hydrolysis of glycogen, which is contained in large amounts in the glia. During photostimulation the increased oxidative metabolism of the neurons is sustained by a higher supply of carbohydrates from the glia. This clear case of metabolic interaction between neurons and glial cells supports Golgi's original hypothesis, proposed nearly 100 years ago, about the nutritive function of glial cells in the nervous system

  9. Endothelial HIF-1α Enables Hypothalamic Glucose Uptake to Drive POMC Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Luis; Suyama, Shigetomo; Huang, Yan; Shanabrough, Marya; Tschöp, Matthias H; Gao, Xiao-Bing; Giordano, Frank J; Horvath, Tamas L

    2017-06-01

    Glucose is the primary driver of hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons. We show that endothelial hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) controls glucose uptake in the hypothalamus and that it is upregulated in conditions of undernourishment, during which POMC neuronal activity is decreased. Endothelium-specific knockdown of HIF-1α impairs the ability of POMC neurons to adapt to the changing metabolic environment in vivo, resulting in overeating after food deprivation in mice. The impaired functioning of POMC neurons was reversed ex vivo or by parenchymal glucose administration. These observations indicate an active role for endothelial cells in the central control of metabolism and suggest that central vascular impairments may cause metabolic disorders. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  10. Honeybee Retinal Glial Cells Transform Glucose and Supply the Neurons with Metabolic Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsacopoulos, M.; Evequoz-Mercier, V.; Perrottet, P.; Buchner, E.

    1988-11-01

    The retina of the honeybee drone is a nervous tissue in which glial cells and photoreceptor cells (sensory neurons) constitute two distinct metabolic compartments. Retinal slices incubated with 2-deoxy[3H]glucose convert this glucose analogue to 2-deoxy[3H]glucose 6-phosphate, but this conversion is made only in the glial cells. Hence, glycolysis occurs only in glial cells. In contrast, the neurons consume O2 and this consumption is sustained by the hydrolysis of glycogen, which is contained in large amounts in the glia. During photostimulation the increased oxidative metabolism of the neurons is sustained by a higher supply of carbohydrates from the glia. This clear case of metabolic interaction between neurons and glial cells supports Golgi's original hypothesis, proposed nearly 100 years ago, about the nutritive function of glial cells in the nervous system.

  11. Phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase signaling in hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin neurons contributes to the regulation of glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jennifer W; Xu, Yong; Preitner, Frederic; Fukuda, Makota; Cho, You-Ree; Luo, Ji; Balthasar, Nina; Coppari, Roberto; Cantley, Lewis C; Kahn, Barbara B; Zhao, Jean J; Elmquist, Joel K

    2009-11-01

    Recent studies demonstrated a role for hypothalamic insulin and leptin action in the regulation of glucose homeostasis. This regulation involves proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons because suppression of phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling in these neurons blunts the acute effects of insulin and leptin on POMC neuronal activity. In the current study, we investigated whether disruption of PI3K signaling in POMC neurons alters normal glucose homeostasis using mouse models designed to both increase and decrease PI3K-mediated signaling in these neurons. We found that deleting p85alpha alone induced resistance to diet-induced obesity. In contrast, deletion of the p110alpha catalytic subunit of PI3K led to increased weight gain and adipose tissue along with reduced energy expenditure. Independent of these effects, increased PI3K activity in POMC neurons improved insulin sensitivity, whereas decreased PI3K signaling resulted in impaired glucose regulation. These studies show that activity of the PI3K pathway in POMC neurons is involved in not only normal energy regulation but also glucose homeostasis.

  12. Dehydroepiandrosterone protects male and female hippocampal neurons and neuroblastoma cells from glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira-Marques, Claudia; Arbo, Bruno Dutra; Ruiz-Palmero, Isabel; Ortiz-Rodriguez, Ana; Ghorbanpoor, Samar; Kucharski, Luiz Carlos; Arevalo, Maria A; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Ribeiro, Maria Flávia M

    2016-08-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) modulates neurogenesis, neuronal function, neuronal survival and metabolism, enhancing mitochondrial oxidative capacity. Glucose deprivation and hypometabolism have been implicated in the mechanisms that mediate neuronal damage in neurological disorders, and some studies have shown that these mechanisms are sexually dimorphic. It was also demonstrated that DHEA is able to attenuate the hypometabolism that is related to some neurodegenerative diseases, eliciting neuroprotective effects in different experimental models of neurodegeneration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of DHEA on the viability of male and female hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells exposed to glucose deprivation. It was observed that after 12h of pre-treatment, DHEA was able to protect SH-SY5Y cells from glucose deprivation for 6h (DHEA 10(-12), 10(-8) and 10(-6)M) and 8h (DHEA 10(-8)M). In contrast, DHEA was not neuroprotective against glucose deprivation for 12 or 24h. DHEA (10(-8)M) also protected SH-SY5Y cells when added together or even 1h after the beginning of glucose deprivation (6h). Furthermore, DHEA (10(-8)M) also protected primary neurons from both sexes against glucose deprivation. In summary, our findings indicate that DHEA is neuroprotective against glucose deprivation in human neuroblastoma cells and in male and female mouse hippocampal neurons. These results suggest that DHEA could be a promising candidate to be used in clinical studies aiming to reduce neuronal damage in people from both sexes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Transport equations in an enzymatic glucose fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jariwala, Soham; Krishnamurthy, Balaji

    2018-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to study the effects of convective flux and operating temperature on the performance of an enzymatic glucose fuel cell with a membrane. The model assumes isothermal operating conditions and constant feed rate of glucose. The glucose fuel cell domain is divided into five sections, with governing equations describing transport characteristics in each region, namely - anode diffusion layer, anode catalyst layer (enzyme layer), membrane, cathode catalyst layer and cathode diffusion layer. The mass transport is assumed to be one-dimensional and the governing equations are solved numerically. The effects flow rate of glucose feed on the performance of the fuel cell are studied as it contributes significantly to the convective flux. The effects of operating temperature on the performance of a glucose fuel cell are also modeled. The cell performances are compared using cell polarization curves, which were found compliant with experimental observations.

  14. Glutamate reduces glucose utilization while concomitantly enhancing AQP9 and MCT2 expression in cultured rat hippocampal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio eTescarollo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate has been reported to have a major impact on brain energy metabolism. Using primary cultures of rat hippocampal neurons, we observed that glutamate reduces glucose utilization in this cell type, suggesting alteration in mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. The aquaglyceroporin AQP9 and the monocarboxylate transporter MCT2, two transporters for oxidative energy substrates, appear to be present in mitochondria of these neurons. Moreover, they not only co-localize but they interact with each other as they were found to co-immunoprecipitate from hippocampal neuron homogenates. Exposure of cultured hippocampal neurons to glutamate 100 µM for 1 hour led to enhanced expression of both AQP9 and MCT2 at the protein level without any significant change at the mRNA level. In parallel, a similar increase in the protein expression of LDHA was evidenced without an effect on the mRNA level. These data suggest that glutamate exerts an influence on neuronal energy metabolism likely through a regulation of the expression of some key mitochondrial proteins.

  15. Autophagy fails to prevent glucose deprivation/glucose reintroduction-induced neuronal death due to calpain-mediated lysosomal dysfunction in cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerónimo-Olvera, Cristian; Montiel, Teresa; Rincon-Heredia, Ruth; Castro-Obregón, Susana; Massieu, Lourdes

    2017-06-29

    Autophagy is triggered during nutrient and energy deprivation in a variety of cells as a homeostatic response to metabolic stress. In the CNS, deficient autophagy has been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases and ischemic brain injury. However, its role in hypoglycemic damage is poorly understood and the dynamics of autophagy during the hypoglycemic and the glucose reperfusion periods, has not been fully described. In the present study, we analyzed the changes in the content of the autophagy proteins BECN1, LC3-II and p62/SQSTM1 by western blot, and autophagosome formation was followed through time-lapse experiments, during glucose deprivation (GD) and glucose reintroduction (GR) in cortical cultures. According to the results, autophagosome formation rapidly increased during GD, and was followed by an active autophagic flux early after glucose replenishment. However, cells progressively died during GR and autophagy inhibition reduced neuronal death. Neurons undergoing apoptosis during GR did not form autophagosomes, while those surviving up to late GR showed autophagosomes. Calpain activity strongly increased during GR and remained elevated during progressive neuronal death. Its activation led to the cleavage of LAMP2 resulting in lysosome membrane permeabilization (LMP) and release of cathepsin B to the cytosol. Calpain inhibition prevented LMP and increased the number of neurons containing lysosomes and autophagosomes increasing cell viability. Taken together, the present results suggest that calpain-mediated lysosome dysfunction during GR turns an adaptive autophagy response to energy stress into a defective autophagy pathway, which contributes to neuronal death. In these conditions, autophagy inhibition results in the improvement of cell survival.

  16. Glucose transporters are expressed in taste receptor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merigo, Flavia; Benati, Donatella; Cristofoletti, Mirko; Osculati, Francesco; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2011-08-01

    In the intestine, changes of sugar concentration generated in the lumen during digestion induce adaptive responses of glucose transporters in the epithelium. A close matching between the intestinal expression of glucose transporters and the composition and amount of the diet has been provided by several experiments. Functional evidence has demonstrated that the regulation of glucose transporters into enterocytes is induced by the sensing of sugar of the enteroendocrine cells through activation of sweet taste receptors (T1R2 and T1R3) and their associated elements of G-protein-linked signaling pathways (e.g. α-gustducin, phospholipase C β type 2 and transient receptor potential channel M5), which are signaling molecules also involved in the perception of sweet substances in the taste receptor cells (TRCs) of the tongue. Considering this phenotypical similarity between the intestinal cells and TRCs, we evaluated whether the TRCs themselves possess proteins of the glucose transport mechanism. Therefore, we investigated the expression of the typical intestinal glucose transporters (i.e. GLUT2, GLUT5 and SGLT1) in rat circumvallate papillae, using immunohistochemistry, double-labeling immunofluorescence, immunoelectron microscopy and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis. The results showed that GLUT2, GLUT5 and SGLT1 are expressed in TRCs; their immunoreactivity was also observed in cells that displayed staining for α-gustducin and T1R3 receptor. The immunoelectron microscopic results confirmed that GLUT2, GLUT5 and SGLT1 were predominantly expressed in cells with ultrastructural characteristics of chemoreceptor cells. The presence of glucose transporters in TRCs adds a further link between chemosensory information and cellular responses to sweet stimuli that may have important roles in glucose homeostasis, contributing to a better understanding of the pathways implicated in glucose metabolism. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Anatomy © 2011

  17. Serotonin 2C receptors in pro-opiomelanocortin neurons regulate energy and glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Eric D; Liu, Chen; Sohn, Jong-Woo; Liu, Tiemin; Kim, Mi Hwa; Lee, Charlotte E; Vianna, Claudia R; Williams, Kevin W; Xu, Yong; Elmquist, Joel K

    2013-12-01

    Energy and glucose homeostasis are regulated by central serotonin 2C receptors. These receptors are attractive pharmacological targets for the treatment of obesity; however, the identity of the serotonin 2C receptor-expressing neurons that mediate the effects of serotonin and serotonin 2C receptor agonists on energy and glucose homeostasis are unknown. Here, we show that mice lacking serotonin 2C receptors (Htr2c) specifically in pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons had normal body weight but developed glucoregulatory defects including hyperinsulinemia, hyperglucagonemia, hyperglycemia, and insulin resistance. Moreover, these mice did not show anorectic responses to serotonergic agents that suppress appetite and developed hyperphagia and obesity when they were fed a high-fat/high-sugar diet. A requirement of serotonin 2C receptors in POMC neurons for the maintenance of normal energy and glucose homeostasis was further demonstrated when Htr2c loss was induced in POMC neurons in adult mice using a tamoxifen-inducible POMC-cre system. These data demonstrate that serotonin 2C receptor-expressing POMC neurons are required to control energy and glucose homeostasis and implicate POMC neurons as the target for the effect of serotonin 2C receptor agonists on weight-loss induction and improved glycemic control.

  18. Near infrared radiation rescues mitochondrial dysfunction in cortical neurons after oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhanyang; Liu, Ning; Zhao, Jianhua; Li, Yadan; McCarthy, Thomas J; Tedford, Clark E; Lo, Eng H; Wang, Xiaoying

    2015-04-01

    Near infrared radiation (NIR) is known to penetrate and affect biological systems in multiple ways. Recently, a series of experimental studies suggested that low intensity NIR may protect neuronal cells against a wide range of insults that mimic diseases such as stroke, brain trauma and neurodegeneration. However, the potential molecular mechanisms of neuroprotection with NIR remain poorly defined. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that low intensity NIR may attenuate hypoxia/ischemia-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in neurons. Primary cortical mouse neuronal cultures were subjected to 4 h oxygen-glucose deprivation followed by reoxygenation for 2 h, neurons were then treated with a 2 min exposure to 810-nm NIR. Mitochondrial function markers including MTT reduction and mitochondria membrane potential were measured at 2 h after treatment. Neurotoxicity was quantified 20 h later. Our results showed that 4 h oxygen-glucose deprivation plus 20 h reoxygenation caused 33.8 ± 3.4 % of neuron death, while NIR exposure significantly reduced neuronal death to 23.6 ± 2.9 %. MTT reduction rate was reduced to 75.9 ± 2.7 % by oxygen-glucose deprivation compared to normoxic controls, but NIR exposure significantly rescued MTT reduction to 87.6 ± 4.5 %. Furthermore, after oxygen-glucose deprivation, mitochondria membrane potential was reduced to 48.9 ± 4.39 % of normoxic control, while NIR exposure significantly ameliorated this reduction to 89.6 ± 13.9 % of normoxic control. Finally, NIR significantly rescued OGD-induced ATP production decline at 20 min after NIR. These findings suggest that low intensity NIR can protect neurons against oxygen-glucose deprivation by rescuing mitochondrial function and restoring neuronal energetics.

  19. Neuron-to-neuron transmission of α-synuclein fibrils through axonal transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freundt, Eric C.; Maynard, Nate; Clancy, Eileen K.; Roy, Shyamali; Bousset, Luc; Sourigues, Yannick; Covert, Markus; Melki, Ronald; Kirkegaard, Karla; Brahic, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Objective The lesions of Parkinson's disease spread through the brain in a characteristic pattern that corresponds to axonal projections. Previous observations suggest that misfolded α-synuclein could behave as a prion, moving from neuron to neuron and causing endogenous α-synuclein to misfold. Here, we characterized and quantified the axonal transport of α-synuclein fibrils and showed that fibrils could be transferred from axons to second-order neurons following anterograde transport. Methods We grew primary cortical mouse neurons in microfluidic devices to separate soma from axonal projections in fluidically isolated microenvironments. We used live-cell imaging and immunofluorescence to characterize the transport of fluorescent α-synuclein fibrils and their transfer to second-order neurons. Results Fibrillar α-synuclein was internalized by primary neurons and transported in axons with kinetics consistent with slow component-b of axonal transport (fast axonal transport with saltatory movement). Fibrillar α-synuclein was readily observed in the cell bodies of second-order neurons following anterograde axonal transport. Axon-to-soma transfer appeared not to require synaptic contacts. Interpretation These results support the hypothesis that the progression of Parkinson's disease can be caused by neuron-to-neuron spread of α-synuclein aggregates and that the anatomical pattern of progression of lesions between axonally connected areas results from the axonal transport of such aggregates. That the transfer did not appear to be transsynaptic gives hope that α-synuclein fibrils could be intercepted by drugs during the extra-cellular phase of their journey. PMID:23109146

  20. Functional expression of sodium-glucose transporters in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scafoglio, Claudio; Hirayama, Bruce A.; Kepe, Vladimir; Liu, Jie; Ghezzi, Chiara; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Moatamed, Neda A.; Huang, Jiaoti; Koepsell, Hermann; Barrio, Jorge R.; Wright, Ernest M.

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is a major metabolic substrate required for cancer cell survival and growth. It is mainly imported into cells by facilitated glucose transporters (GLUTs). Here we demonstrate the importance of another glucose import system, the sodium-dependent glucose transporters (SGLTs), in pancreatic and prostate adenocarcinomas, and investigate their role in cancer cell survival. Three experimental approaches were used: (i) immunohistochemical mapping of SGLT1 and SGLT2 distribution in tumors; (ii) measurement of glucose uptake in fresh isolated tumors using an SGLT-specific radioactive glucose analog, α-methyl-4-deoxy-4-[18F]fluoro-d-glucopyranoside (Me4FDG), which is not transported by GLUTs; and (iii) measurement of in vivo SGLT activity in mouse models of pancreatic and prostate cancer using Me4FDG-PET imaging. We found that SGLT2 is functionally expressed in pancreatic and prostate adenocarcinomas, and provide evidence that SGLT2 inhibitors block glucose uptake and reduce tumor growth and survival in a xenograft model of pancreatic cancer. We suggest that Me4FDG-PET imaging may be used to diagnose and stage pancreatic and prostate cancers, and that SGLT2 inhibitors, currently in use for treating diabetes, may be useful for cancer therapy. PMID:26170283

  1. Effects of ketamine on glucose uptake by glucose transporter type 3 expressed in Xenopus oocytes: The role of protein kinase C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomioka, Shigemasa, E-mail: tomioka@dent.tokushima-u.ac.jp [Department of Dental Anesthesiology, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Kuramoto-cho 18-15, Tokushima City, Tokushima 770-8504 (Japan); Kaneko, Miyuki [Department of Dental Anesthesiology, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Kuramoto-cho 18-15, Tokushima City, Tokushima 770-8504 (Japan); Satomura, Kazuhito [First Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Kuramoto-cho 18-15, Tokushima City, Tokushima 770-8504 (Japan); Mikyu, Tomiko; Nakajo, Nobuyoshi [Department of Dental Anesthesiology, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Kuramoto-cho 18-15, Tokushima City, Tokushima 770-8504 (Japan)

    2009-10-09

    We investigated the effects of ketamine on the type 3 facilitative glucose transporter (GLUT3), which plays a major role in glucose transport across the plasma membrane of neurons. Human-cloned GLUT3 was expressed in Xenopus oocytes by injection of GLUT3 mRNA. GLUT3-mediated glucose uptake was examined by measuring oocyte radioactivity following incubation with 2-deoxy-D-[1,2-{sup 3}H]glucose. While ketamine and S(+)-ketamine significantly increased GLUT3-mediated glucose uptake, this effect was biphasic such that higher concentrations of ketamine inhibited glucose uptake. Ketamine (10 {mu}M) significantly increased V{sub max} but not K{sub m} of GLUT3 for 2-deoxy-D-glucose. Although staurosporine (a protein kinase C inhibitor) increased glucose uptake, no additive or synergistic interactions were observed between staurosporine and racemic ketamine or S(+)-ketamine. Treatment with ketamine or S(+)-ketamine partially prevented GLUT3 inhibition by the protein kinase C activator phorbol-12-myrisate-13-acetate. Our results indicate that ketamine increases GLUT3 activity at clinically relevant doses through a mechanism involving PKC inhibition.

  2. Effects of ketamine on glucose uptake by glucose transporter type 3 expressed in Xenopus oocytes: The role of protein kinase C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomioka, Shigemasa; Kaneko, Miyuki; Satomura, Kazuhito; Mikyu, Tomiko; Nakajo, Nobuyoshi

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the effects of ketamine on the type 3 facilitative glucose transporter (GLUT3), which plays a major role in glucose transport across the plasma membrane of neurons. Human-cloned GLUT3 was expressed in Xenopus oocytes by injection of GLUT3 mRNA. GLUT3-mediated glucose uptake was examined by measuring oocyte radioactivity following incubation with 2-deoxy-D-[1,2- 3 H]glucose. While ketamine and S(+)-ketamine significantly increased GLUT3-mediated glucose uptake, this effect was biphasic such that higher concentrations of ketamine inhibited glucose uptake. Ketamine (10 μM) significantly increased V max but not K m of GLUT3 for 2-deoxy-D-glucose. Although staurosporine (a protein kinase C inhibitor) increased glucose uptake, no additive or synergistic interactions were observed between staurosporine and racemic ketamine or S(+)-ketamine. Treatment with ketamine or S(+)-ketamine partially prevented GLUT3 inhibition by the protein kinase C activator phorbol-12-myrisate-13-acetate. Our results indicate that ketamine increases GLUT3 activity at clinically relevant doses through a mechanism involving PKC inhibition.

  3. The Brain–to–Pancreatic Islet Neuronal Map Reveals Differential Glucose Regulation From Distinct Hypothalamic Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, Wilfredo; Singh, Inderroop; Wautlet, Arnaud; Patterson, Christa; Flak, Jonathan; Becker, Thomas C.; Ali, Almas; Tamarina, Natalia; Philipson, Louis H.; Enquist, Lynn W.; Myers, Martin G.

    2016-01-01

    The brain influences glucose homeostasis, partly by supplemental control over insulin and glucagon secretion. Without this central regulation, diabetes and its complications can ensue. Yet, the neuronal network linking to pancreatic islets has never been fully mapped. Here, we refine this map using pseudorabies virus (PRV) retrograde tracing, indicating that the pancreatic islets are innervated by efferent circuits that emanate from the hypothalamus. We found that the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC), ventromedial nucleus (VMN), and lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) significantly overlap PRV and the physiological glucose-sensing enzyme glucokinase. Then, experimentally lowering glucose sensing, specifically in the ARC, resulted in glucose intolerance due to deficient insulin secretion and no significant effect in the VMN, but in the LHA it resulted in a lowering of the glucose threshold that improved glucose tolerance and/or improved insulin sensitivity, with an exaggerated counter-regulatory response for glucagon secretion. No significant effect on insulin sensitivity or metabolic homeostasis was noted. Thus, these data reveal novel direct neuronal effects on pancreatic islets and also render a functional validation of the brain-to-islet neuronal map. They also demonstrate that distinct regions of the hypothalamus differentially control insulin and glucagon secretion, potentially in partnership to help maintain glucose homeostasis and guard against hypoglycemia. PMID:27207534

  4. The Brain-to-Pancreatic Islet Neuronal Map Reveals Differential Glucose Regulation From Distinct Hypothalamic Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, Wilfredo; Singh, Inderroop; Wautlet, Arnaud; Patterson, Christa; Flak, Jonathan; Becker, Thomas C; Ali, Almas; Tamarina, Natalia; Philipson, Louis H; Enquist, Lynn W; Myers, Martin G; Rhodes, Christopher J

    2016-09-01

    The brain influences glucose homeostasis, partly by supplemental control over insulin and glucagon secretion. Without this central regulation, diabetes and its complications can ensue. Yet, the neuronal network linking to pancreatic islets has never been fully mapped. Here, we refine this map using pseudorabies virus (PRV) retrograde tracing, indicating that the pancreatic islets are innervated by efferent circuits that emanate from the hypothalamus. We found that the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC), ventromedial nucleus (VMN), and lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) significantly overlap PRV and the physiological glucose-sensing enzyme glucokinase. Then, experimentally lowering glucose sensing, specifically in the ARC, resulted in glucose intolerance due to deficient insulin secretion and no significant effect in the VMN, but in the LHA it resulted in a lowering of the glucose threshold that improved glucose tolerance and/or improved insulin sensitivity, with an exaggerated counter-regulatory response for glucagon secretion. No significant effect on insulin sensitivity or metabolic homeostasis was noted. Thus, these data reveal novel direct neuronal effects on pancreatic islets and also render a functional validation of the brain-to-islet neuronal map. They also demonstrate that distinct regions of the hypothalamus differentially control insulin and glucagon secretion, potentially in partnership to help maintain glucose homeostasis and guard against hypoglycemia. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association.

  5. Glucose metabolism and astrocyte-neuron interactions in the neonatal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brekke, Eva; Morken, Tora Sund; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2015-03-01

    Glucose is essentially the sole fuel for the adult brain and the mapping of its metabolism has been extensive in the adult but not in the neonatal brain, which is believed to rely mainly on ketone bodies for energy supply. However, glucose is absolutely indispensable for normal development and recent studies have shed light on glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway and metabolic interactions between astrocytes and neurons in the 7-day-old rat brain. Appropriately (13)C labeled glucose was used to distinguish between glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway during development. Experiments using (13)C labeled acetate provided insight into the GABA-glutamate-glutamine cycle between astrocytes and neurons. It could be shown that in the neonatal brain the part of this cycle that transfers glutamine from astrocytes to neurons is operating efficiently while, in contrast, little glutamate is shuttled from neurons to astrocytes. This lack of glutamate for glutamine synthesis is compensated for by anaplerosis via increased pyruvate carboxylation relative to that in the adult brain. Furthermore, compared to adults, relatively more glucose is prioritized to the pentose phosphate pathway than glycolysis and pyruvate dehydrogenase activity. The reported developmental differences in glucose metabolism and neurotransmitter synthesis may determine the ability of the brain at various ages to resist excitotoxic insults such as hypoxia-ischemia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. P21-activated kinase 2 (PAK2) regulates glucose uptake and insulin sensitivity in neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, Pallavi; Dey, Chinmoy Sankar

    2016-07-05

    P21-activated kinases (PAKs) are recently reported as important players of insulin signaling and glucose homeostasis in tissues like muscle, pancreas and liver. However, their role in neuronal insulin signaling is still unknown. Present study reports the involvement of PAK2 in neuronal insulin signaling, glucose uptake and insulin resistance. Irrespective of insulin sensitivity, insulin stimulation decreased PAK2 activity. PAK2 downregulation displayed marked enhancement of GLUT4 translocation with increase in glucose uptake whereas PAK2 over-expression showed its reduction. Treatment with Akti-1/2 and wortmannin suggested that Akt and PI3K are mediators of insulin effect on PAK2 and glucose uptake. Rac1 inhibition demonstrated decreased PAK2 activity while inhibition of PP2A resulted in increased PAK2 activity, with corresponding changes in glucose uptake. Taken together, present study demonstrates an inhibitory role of insulin signaling (via PI3K-Akt) and PP2A on PAK2 activity and establishes PAK2 as a Rac1-dependent negative regulator of neuronal glucose uptake and insulin sensitivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Glucose transporters GLUT4 and GLUT8 are upregulated after facial nerve axotomy in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Olga; Ballester-Lurbe, Begoña; Mesonero, José E; Terrado, José

    2011-10-01

    Peripheral nerve axotomy in adult mice elicits a complex response that includes increased glucose uptake in regenerating nerve cells. This work analyses the expression of the neuronal glucose transporters GLUT3, GLUT4 and GLUT8 in the facial nucleus of adult mice during the first days after facial nerve axotomy. Our results show that whereas GLUT3 levels do not vary, GLUT4 and GLUT8 immunoreactivity increases in the cell body of the injured motoneurons after the lesion. A sharp increase in GLUT4 immunoreactivity was detected 3 days after the nerve injury and levels remained high on Day 8, but to a lesser extent. GLUT8 also increased the levels but later than GLUT4, as they only rose on Day 8 post-lesion. These results indicate that glucose transport is activated in regenerating motoneurons and that GLUT4 plays a main role in this function. These results also suggest that metabolic defects involving impairment of glucose transporters may be principal components of the neurotoxic mechanisms leading to motoneuron death. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Anatomy © 2011 Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  8. Deficient Rab11 activity underlies glucose hypometabolism in primary neurons of Huntington's disease mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xueyi, E-mail: xli12@partners.org [Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129 (United States); Valencia, Antonio; McClory, Hollis; Sapp, Ellen; Kegel, Kimberly B. [Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129 (United States); DiFiglia, Marian, E-mail: difiglia@helix.mgh.harvard.edu [Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129 (United States)

    2012-05-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Primary Huntington's disease neurons are impaired in taking up glucose. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rab11 modulates glucose uptake in neurons. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increasing Rab11 activity attenuates the glucose uptake defect in disease neurons. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We provide a novel mechanism for glucose hypometabolism in Huntington's disease. -- Abstract: Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. Positron emission tomography studies have revealed a decline in glucose metabolism in the brain of patients with HD by a mechanism that has not been established. We examined glucose utilization in embryonic primary cortical neurons of wild-type (WT) and HD knock-in mice, which have 140 CAG repeats inserted in the endogenous mouse huntingtin gene (HD{sup 140Q/140Q}). Primary HD{sup 140Q/140Q} cortical neurons took up significantly less glucose than did WT neurons. Expression of permanently inactive and permanently active forms of Rab11 correspondingly altered glucose uptake in WT neurons, suggesting that normal activity of Rab11 is needed for neuronal uptake of glucose. It is known that Rab11 activity is diminished in HD{sup 140Q/140Q} neurons. Expression of dominant active Rab11 to enhance the activity of Rab11 normalized glucose uptake in HD{sup 140Q/140Q} neurons. These results suggest that deficient activity of Rab11 is a novel mechanism for glucose hypometabolism in HD.

  9. Possible involvement of 12-lipoxygenase activation in glucose-deprivation/reload-treated neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Kazuki; Kakuda, Taichi; Higashi, Youichirou; Fujimoto, Sadaki

    2007-12-18

    The aim of this study was to clarify whether 12-lipoxygenase (12-LOX) activation was involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, extensive poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation and neuronal death induced by glucose-deprivation, followed by glucose-reload (GD/R). The decrease of neuronal viability and accumulation of poly(ADP-ribose) induced by GD/R were prevented 3-aminobenzamide, a representative PARP inhibitor, demonstrating this treatment protocol caused the same oxidative stress with the previously reported one. The PARP activation, ROS generation and decrease of neuron viability induced by GD/R treatment were almost completely abolished by an extracellular zinc chelator, CaEDTA. p47(phox), a cytosolic component of NADPH oxidase was translocated the membrane fraction by GD/R, indicating its activation, but it did not generate detectable ROS. Surprisingly, pharmacological inhibition of NADPH oxidase with apocynin and AEBSF further decreased the decreased neuron viability induced by GD/R. On the other hand, AA861, a 12-LOX inhibitor, prevented ROS generation and decrease of neuron viability caused by GD/R. Interestingly, an antioxidant, N-acetyl-l-cysteine rescued the neurons from GD/R-induced oxidative stress, implying effectiveness of antioxidant administration. These findings suggested that activation of 12-LOX, but not NADPH oxidase, following to zinc release might play an important role in ROS generation and decrease of viability in GD/R-treated neurons.

  10. Sodium-glucose co-transporter (SGLT) and glucose transporter (GLUT) expression in the kidney of type 2 diabetic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Luke; Shannon, Christopher E; Fourcaudot, Marcel; Hu, Cheng; Wang, Niansong; Ren, Wei; Song, Jun; Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Ren, Jimmy; Jia, Weiping

    2017-09-01

    The sodium-glucose co-transporters (SGLTs) are responsible for the tubular reabsorption of filtered glucose from the kidney into the bloodstream. The inhibition of SGLT2-mediated glucose reabsorption is a novel and highly effective strategy to alleviate hyperglycaemia in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, the effectiveness of SGLT2 inhibitor therapy is diminished due, in part, to a compensatory increase in the maximum reabsorptive capacity (Tm) for glucose in patients with T2DM. We hypothesized that this increase in Tm could be explained by an increase in the tubular expression of SGLT and glucose transporters (GLUT) in these patients. To examine this, we obtained human kidney biopsy specimens from patients with or without T2DM and examined the mRNA expression of SGLTs and GLUTs. The expression of SGLT1 is markedly increased in the kidney of patients with T2DM, and SGLT1 mRNA is highly and significantly correlated with fasting and postprandial plasma glucose and HbA1c. In contrast, our data demonstrate that the levels of SGLT2 and GLUT2 mRNA are downregulated in diabetic patients, but not to a statistically significant level. These important findings are clinically significant and may have implications for the treatment of T2DM using strategies that target SGLT transporters in the kidney. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. E2f1 mediates high glucose-induced neuronal death in cultured mouse retinal explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yujiao; Zhou, Yi; Xiao, Lirong; Zheng, Shijie; Yan, Naihong; Chen, Danian

    2017-10-02

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the most common complication of diabetes and remains one of the major causes of blindness in the world; infants born to diabetic mothers have higher risk of developing retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). While hyperglycemia is a major risk factor, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying DR and diabetic ROP are poorly understood. To explore the consequences of retinal cells under high glucose, we cultured wild type or E2f1 -/- mouse retinal explants from postnatal day 8 with normal glucose, high osmotic or high glucose media. Explants were also incubated with cobalt chloride (CoCl 2 ) to mimic the hypoxic condition. We showed that, at 7 days post exposure to high glucose, retinal explants displayed elevated cell death, ectopic cell division and intact retinal vascular plexus. Cell death mainly occurred in excitatory neurons, such as ganglion and bipolar cells, which were also ectopically dividing. Many Müller glial cells reentered the cell cycle; some had irregular morphology or migrated to other layers. High glucose inhibited the hyperoxia-induced blood vessel regression of retinal explants. Moreover, inactivation of E2f1 rescued high glucose-induced ectopic division and cell death of retinal neurons, but not ectopic cell division of Müller glial cells and vascular phenotypes. This suggests that high glucose has direct but distinct effects on retinal neurons, glial cells and blood vessels, and that E2f1 mediates its effects on retinal neurons. These findings shed new light onto mechanisms of DR and the fetal retinal abnormalities associated with maternal diabetes, and suggest possible new therapeutic strategies.

  12. Caveolin-1 and glucose transporter 4 involved in the regulation of glucose-deprivation stress in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi-Qi; Huang, Liang; Han, Chao; Guan, Xin; Wang, Ya-Jun; Liu, Jing; Wan, Jing-Hua; Zou, Wei

    2015-08-25

    Recent evidence suggests that caveolin-1 (Cav-1), the major protein constituent of caveolae, plays a prominent role in neuronal nutritional availability with cellular fate regulation besides in several cellular processes such as cholesterol homeostasis, regulation of signal transduction, integrin signaling and cell growth. Here, we aimed to investigate the function of Cav-1 and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) upon glucose deprivation (GD) in PC12 cells. The results demonstrated firstly that both Cav-1 and GLUT4 were up-regulated by glucose withdrawal in PC12 cells by using Western blot and laser confocal technology. Also, we found that the cell death rate, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) were also respectively changed followed the GD stress tested by CCK8 and flow cytometry. After knocking down of Cav-1 in the cells by siRNA, the level of [Ca(2+)]i was increased, and MMP was reduced further in GD-treated PC12 cells. Knockdown of Cav-1 or methylated-β-Cyclodextrin (M-β-CD) treatment inhibited the expression of GLUT4 protein upon GD. Additionally, we found that GLUT4 could translocate from cytoplasm to cell membrane upon GD. These findings might suggest a neuroprotective role for Cav-1, through coordination of GLUT4 in GD.

  13. Kinetics of glucose transport in rat muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, Thorkil; Galbo, Henrik; Vinten, Jørgen

    1987-01-01

    The effects of insulin and prior muscle contractions, respectively, on 3-O-methylglucose (3-O-MG) transport in skeletal muscle were studied in the perfused rat hindquarter. Initial rates of entry of 3-O-MG in red gastrocnemius, soleus, and white gastrocnemius muscles as a function of perfusate 3-O-MG...... concentration exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Uptake by simple diffusion could not be detected. The maximum 3-O-MG transport velocity (Vmax) was increased more by maximum isometric contractions (10- to 40-fold, depending on fiber type) than by insulin (20,000 microU/ml; 3- to 20-fold) in both red and white...

  14. Sweet taste receptor serves to activate glucose- and leptin-responsive neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus and participates in glucose responsiveness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Kohno

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamic feeding center plays an important role in energy homeostasis. In the feeding center, whole-body energy signals including hormones and nutrients are sensed, processed, and integrated. As a result, food intake and energy expenditure are regulated. Two types of glucose-sensing neurons exist in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC: glucose-excited neurons and glucose-inhibited neurons. While some molecules are known to be related to glucose sensing in the hypothalamus, the mechanism underlying glucose sensing in the hypothalamus are not fully understood. The sweet taste receptor is a heterodimer of taste type 1 receptor 2 (T1R2 and taste type 1 receptor 3 (T1R3 and senses sweet tastes. T1R2 and T1R3 receptors are distributed in multiple organs including the tongue, pancreas, adipose tissue, and hypothalamus. However, the role of sweet taste receptors in the ARC remains to be clarified. To examine the role of sweet taste receptors in the ARC, cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i in isolated single ARC neurons were measured using Fura-2 fluorescent imaging. An artificial sweetener, sucralose at 10-5 M-10-2 M dose dependently increased [Ca2+]i in 12-16% of ARC neurons. The sucralose-induced [Ca2+]i increase was suppressed by a sweet taste receptor inhibitor, gurmarin. The sucralose-induced [Ca2+]i increase was inhibited under an extracellular Ca2+-free condition and in the presence of an L-type Ca2+ channel blocker, nitrendipine. Sucralose-responding neurons were activated by high-concentration of glucose. This response to glucose was markedly suppressed by gurmarin. More than half of sucralose-responding neurons were activated by leptin but not ghrelin. Percentage of proopiomelanocortin (POMC neurons among sucralose-responding neurons and sweet taste receptor expressing neurons were low, suggesting that majority of sucralose-responding neurons are non-POMC neurons. These data suggest that sweet taste receptor-mediated cellular

  15. Sweet Taste Receptor Serves to Activate Glucose- and Leptin-Responsive Neurons in the Hypothalamic Arcuate Nucleus and Participates in Glucose Responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Daisuke; Koike, Miho; Ninomiya, Yuzo; Kojima, Itaru; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Yada, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamic feeding center plays an important role in energy homeostasis. In the feeding center, whole-body energy signals including hormones and nutrients are sensed, processed, and integrated. As a result, food intake and energy expenditure are regulated. Two types of glucose-sensing neurons exist in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC): glucose-excited neurons and glucose-inhibited neurons. While some molecules are known to be related to glucose sensing in the hypothalamus, the mechanisms underlying glucose sensing in the hypothalamus are not fully understood. The sweet taste receptor is a heterodimer of taste type 1 receptor 2 (T1R2) and taste type 1 receptor 3 (T1R3) and senses sweet tastes. T1R2 and T1R3 are distributed in multiple organs including the tongue, pancreas, adipose tissue, and hypothalamus. However, the role of sweet taste receptors in the ARC remains to be clarified. To examine the role of sweet taste receptors in the ARC, cytosolic Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+ ] i ) in isolated single ARC neurons were measured using Fura-2 fluorescent imaging. An artificial sweetener, sucralose at 10 -5 -10 -2 M dose dependently increased [Ca 2+ ] i in 12-16% of ARC neurons. The sucralose-induced [Ca 2+ ] i increase was suppressed by a sweet taste receptor inhibitor, gurmarin. The sucralose-induced [Ca 2+ ] i increase was inhibited under an extracellular Ca 2+ -free condition and in the presence of an L-type Ca 2+ channel blocker, nitrendipine. Sucralose-responding neurons were activated by high-concentration of glucose. This response to glucose was markedly suppressed by gurmarin. More than half of sucralose-responding neurons were activated by leptin but not ghrelin. Percentages of proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons among sucralose-responding neurons and sweet taste receptor expressing neurons were low, suggesting that majority of sucralose-responding neurons are non-POMC neurons. These data suggest that sweet taste receptor-mediated cellular activation

  16. Linking neuronal brain activity to the glucose metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Göbel, Britta; Oltmanns, Kerstin M; Chung, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Background Energy homeostasis ensures the functionality of the entire organism. The human brain as a missing link in the global regulation of the complex whole body energy metabolism is subject to recent investigation. The goal of this study is to gain insight into the influence of neuronal brain activity on cerebral and peripheral energy metabolism. In particular, the tight link between brain energy supply and metabolic responses of the organism is of interest. We aim to identifying regul...

  17. Regulatory cascade of neuronal loss and glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Mubashir; Sehgal, Sheikh A; Rashid, Sajid

    2014-01-01

    During recent years, numerous lines of research including proteomics and molecular biology have highlighted multiple targets and signaling pathways involved in metabolic abnormalities and neurodegeneration. However, correlation studies of individual neurodegenerative disorders (ND) including Alzheimer, Parkinson, Huntington and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in association with Diabetes type 2 Mellitus (D2M) are demanding tasks. Here, we report a comprehensive mechanistic overview of major contributors involved in process-based co-regulation of D2M and NDs. D2M is linked with Alzheimer's disease through deregulation of calcium ions thereby leading to metabolic fluctuations of glucose and insulin. Parkinson-associated proteins disturb insulin level through ATP-sensitive potassium ion channels and extracellular signal-regulated kinases to enhance glucose level. Similarly, proteins which perturb carbohydrate metabolism for disturbing glucose homeostasis link Huntington, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and D2M. Other misleading processes which interconnect D2M and NDs include oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunctions and microRNAs (miRNA29a/b and miRNA-9). Overall, the collective listing of pathway-specific targets would help in establishing novel connections between NDs and D2M to explore better therapeutic interventions.

  18. Serotonin 2c receptors in pro-opiomelanocortin neurons regulate energy and glucose homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Energy and glucose homeostasis are regulated by central serotonin 2C receptors. These receptors are attractive pharmacological targets for the treatment of obesity; however, the identity of the serotonin 2C receptor-expressing neurons that mediate the effects of serotonin and serotonin 2C receptor a...

  19. Acute activation of GLP-1-expressing neurons promotes glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glucagon-like peptides are co-released from enteroendocrine L cells in the gut and preproglucagon (PPG) neurons in the Brainstem. PPG-derived GLP-1/2 are probably key neuroendocrine signals for the control of energy balance and glucose Homeostasis. The objective of this study was to determine whethe...

  20. RAGE mediates the inactivation of nAChRs in sympathetic neurons under high glucose conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandna, Andrew R; Nair, Manoj; Chang, Christine; Pennington, Paul R; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Mousseau, Darrell D; Campanucci, Verónica A

    2015-02-01

    Autonomic dysfunction is a serious complication of diabetes and can lead to cardiovascular abnormalities and premature death. It was recently proposed that autonomic dysfunction is triggered by oxidation-mediated inactivation of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), impairing synaptic transmission in sympathetic ganglia and resulting in autonomic failure. We investigated whether the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and its role in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) could be contributing to the events that initiate sympathetic malfunction under high glucose conditions. Using biochemical, live imaging and electrophysiological tools we demonstrated that exposure of sympathetic neurons to high glucose increases RAGE expression and oxidative markers, and that incubation with RAGE ligands (e.g. AGEs, S100 and HMGB1) mimics both ROS elevation and nAChR inactivation. In contrast, co-treatment with either antioxidants or an anti-RAGE IgG prevented the inactivation of nAChRs. Lastly, a role for RAGE in this context was corroborated by the lack of sensitivity of sympathetic neurons from RAGE knock-out mice to high glucose. These data define a pivotal role for RAGE in initiating the events associated with exposure of sympathetic neurons to high glucose, and strongly support RAGE signaling as a potential therapeutic target in the autonomic complications associated with diabetes. © 2014 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Glucose level determines excitatory or inhibitory effects of adiponectin on arcuate POMC neuron activity and feeding

    OpenAIRE

    Suyama, Shigetomo; Maekawa, Fumihiko; Maejima, Yuko; Kubota, Naoto; Kadowaki, Takashi; Yada, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin regulates glucose and lipid metabolism, acting against metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis. Accumulating evidence suggest that adiponectin acts on the brain including hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC), where proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons play key roles in feeding regulation. Several studies have examined intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of adiponectin and reported opposite effects, increase or decrease of food intake. These reports used different nutritional states...

  2. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase mediates insulin- and oxidative stress-induced glucose uptake in skeletal muscle myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Dean L; McCammon, Karen M; Hinchee-Rodriguez, Kathryn S; Adamo, Martin L; Roman, Linda J

    2017-09-01

    Previously published studies strongly suggested that insulin- and exercise-induced skeletal muscle glucose uptake require nitric oxide (NO) production. However, the signal transduction mechanisms by which insulin and contraction regulated NO production and subsequent glucose transport are not known. In the present study, we utilized the myotube cell lines treated with insulin or hydrogen peroxide, the latter to mimic contraction-induced oxidative stress, to characterize these mechanisms. We found that insulin stimulation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) phosphorylation, NO production, and GLUT4 translocation were all significantly reduced by inhibition of either nNOS or Akt2. Hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) induced phosphorylation of nNOS at the same residue as did insulin, and also stimulated NO production and GLUT4 translocation. nNOS inhibition prevented H 2 O 2 -induced GLUT4 translocation. AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibition prevented H 2 O 2 activation and phosphorylation of nNOS, leading to reduced NO production and significantly attenuated GLUT4 translocation. We conclude that nNOS phosphorylation and subsequently increased NO production are required for both insulin- and H 2 O 2 -stimulated glucose transport. Although the two stimuli result in phosphorylation of the same residue on nNOS, they do so through distinct protein kinases. Thus, insulin and H 2 O 2 -activated signaling pathways converge on nNOS, which is a common mediator of glucose uptake in both pathways. However, the fact that different kinases are utilized provides a basis for the use of exercise to activate glucose transport in the face of insulin resistance. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Galanin enhances systemic glucose metabolism through enteric Nitric Oxide Synthase-expressed neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Abot

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Decreasing duodenal contraction is now considered as a major focus for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Therefore, identifying bioactive molecules able to target the enteric nervous system, which controls the motility of intestinal smooth muscle cells, represents a new therapeutic avenue. For this reason, we chose to study the impact of oral galanin on this system in diabetic mice. Methods: Enteric neurotransmission, duodenal contraction, glucose absorption, modification of gut–brain axis, and glucose metabolism (glucose tolerance, insulinemia, glucose entry in tissue, hepatic glucose metabolism were assessed. Results: We show that galanin, a neuropeptide expressed in the small intestine, decreases duodenal contraction by stimulating nitric oxide release from enteric neurons. This is associated with modification of hypothalamic nitric oxide release that favors glucose uptake in metabolic tissues such as skeletal muscle, liver, and adipose tissue. Oral chronic gavage with galanin in diabetic mice increases insulin sensitivity, which is associated with an improvement of several metabolic parameters such as glucose tolerance, fasting blood glucose, and insulin. Conclusion: Here, we demonstrate that oral galanin administration improves glucose homeostasis via the enteric nervous system and could be considered a therapeutic potential for the treatment of T2D. Keywords: Galanin, Enteric nervous system, Diabetes

  4. [Establishment of oxygen and glucose deprive model of in vitro cultured hippocampal neuron and effect of ligustrazine on intracellular Ca+ level in model neurons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Hai-tong; Wang, Yu; Yang, Jie-hong

    2007-03-01

    To establish the oxygen and glucose deprive (OGD) model in cultured hippocampal neuron and study the effect of ligustrazine on intracellular Ca2+ level in the model neurons. The OGD model was established in cultured hippocampal neuron, and the intracellular Ca2+ level in it was detected by laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM). The OGD model was successfully established in cultured hippocampal neurons; the intracellular Ca2+ level in the OGD model group was significantly higher than that in the blank control group (P neuron, which could be antagonized by ligustrazine, indicating that ligustrazine has a protective effect on hippocampal neuron from hypoxic-ischemic injury.

  5. Screening For Inhibitors Of Essential Leishmania Glucose Transporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    parasite life cycle and, unlike he amastigote form that lives inside mammalian macrophages, s viable provided that an alternative energy source such as pro...glucose transporters havebeenvalidated asnewdrug targets for proto- zoan parasites including Plasmodium falciparum, Leishmania mexicana and Trypanosoma...such as Leishmania species, Trypanosoma rucei, and Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agents of leish- aniasis, African sleeping sickness, and malaria

  6. RAGE-dependent potentiation of TRPV1 currents in sensory neurons exposed to high glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Doris; Momeni, Zeinab; Theaker, Michael; Jagadeeshan, Santosh; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Ianowski, Juan P; Campanucci, Verónica A

    2018-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with sensory abnormalities, including exacerbated responses to painful (hyperalgesia) or non-painful (allodynia) stimuli. These abnormalities are symptoms of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), which is the most common complication that affects approximately 50% of diabetic patients. Yet, the underlying mechanisms linking hyperglycemia and symptoms of DPN remain poorly understood. The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel plays a central role in such sensory abnormalities and shows elevated expression levels in animal models of diabetes. Here, we investigated the function of TRPV1 channels in sensory neurons cultured from the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) of neonatal mice, under control (5mM) and high glucose (25mM) conditions. After maintaining DRG neurons in high glucose for 1 week, we observed a significant increase in capsaicin (CAP)-evoked currents and CAP-evoked depolarizations, independent of TRPV1 channel expression. These functional changes were largely dependent on the expression of the receptor for Advanced Glycation End-products (RAGE), calcium influx, cytoplasmic ROS accumulation, PKC, and Src kinase activity. Like cultured neurons from neonates, mature neurons from adult mice also displayed a similar potentiation of CAP-evoked currents in the high glucose condition. Taken together, our data demonstrate that under the diabetic condition, DRG neurons are directly affected by elevated levels of glucose, independent of vascular or glial signals, and dependent on RAGE expression. These early cellular and molecular changes to sensory neurons in vitro are potential mechanisms that might contribute to sensory abnormalities that can occur in the very early stages of diabetes.

  7. Glucose transportation in the brain and its impairment in Huntington disease: one more shade of the energetic metabolism failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morea, Veronica; Bidollari, Eris; Colotti, Gianni; Fiorillo, Annarita; Rosati, Jessica; De Filippis, Lidia; Squitieri, Ferdinando; Ilari, Andrea

    2017-07-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) or Huntington's chorea is the most common inherited, dominantly transmitted, neurodegenerative disorder. It is caused by increased CAG repeats number in the gene coding for huntingtin (Htt) and characterized by motor, behaviour and psychiatric symptoms, ultimately leading to death. HD patients also exhibit alterations in glucose and energetic metabolism, which result in pronounced weight loss despite sustained calorie intake. Glucose metabolism decreases in the striatum of all the subjects with mutated Htt, but affects symptom presentation only when it drops below a specific threshold. Recent evidence points at defects in glucose uptake by the brain, and especially by neurons, as a relevant component of central glucose hypometabolism in HD patients. Here we review the main features of glucose metabolism and transport in the brain in physiological conditions and how these processes are impaired in HD, and discuss the potential ability of strategies aimed at increasing intracellular energy levels to counteract neurological and motor degeneration in HD patients.

  8. Topography of brain glucose hypometabolism and epileptic network in glucose transporter 1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Cigdem Inan; Provenzano, Frank; Wang, Dong; Engelstad, Kristin; Hinton, Veronica; Yu, Julia; Tikofsky, Ronald; Ichese, Masonari; De Vivo, Darryl C

    2015-02-01

    (18)F fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18)F FDG-PET) facilitates examination of glucose metabolism. Previously, we described regional cerebral glucose hypometabolism using (18)F FDG-PET in patients with Glucose transporter 1 Deficiency Syndrome (Glut1 DS). We now expand this observation in Glut1 DS using quantitative image analysis to identify the epileptic network based on the regional distribution of glucose hypometabolism. (18)F FDG-PET scans of 16 Glut1 DS patients and 7 healthy participants were examined using Statistical parametric Mapping (SPM). Summed images were preprocessed for statistical analysis using MATLAB 7.1 and SPM 2 software. Region of interest (ROI) analysis was performed to validate SPM results. Visual analysis of the (18)F FDG-PET images demonstrated prominent regional glucose hypometabolism in the thalamus, neocortical regions and cerebellum bilaterally. Group comparison using SPM analysis confirmed that the regional distribution of glucose hypo-metabolism was present in thalamus, cerebellum, temporal cortex and central lobule. Two mildly affected patients without epilepsy had hypometabolism in cerebellum, inferior frontal cortex, and temporal lobe, but not thalamus. Glucose hypometabolism did not correlate with age at the time of PET imaging, head circumference, CSF glucose concentration at the time of diagnosis, RBC glucose uptake, or CNS score. Quantitative analysis of (18)F FDG-PET imaging in Glut1 DS patients confirmed that hypometabolism was present symmetrically in thalamus, cerebellum, frontal and temporal cortex. The hypometabolism in thalamus correlated with the clinical history of epilepsy. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Neuron specific metabolic adaptations following multi-day exposures to oxygen glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiger, Stephanie L H; McKenzie, Jennifer R; Stankowski, Jeannette N; Martin, Jacob A; Cliffel, David E; McLaughlin, BethAnn

    2010-11-01

    Prior exposure to sub toxic insults can induce a powerful endogenous neuroprotective program known as ischemic preconditioning. Current models typically rely on a single stress episode to induce neuroprotection whereas the clinical reality is that patients may experience multiple transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) prior to suffering a stroke. We sought to develop a neuron-enriched preconditioning model using multiple oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) episodes to assess the endogenous protective mechanisms neurons implement at the metabolic and cellular level. We found that neurons exposed to a five minute period of glucose deprivation recovered oxygen utilization and lactate production using novel microphysiometry techniques. Using the non-toxic and energetically favorable five minute exposure, we developed a preconditioning paradigm where neurons are exposed to this brief OGD for three consecutive days. These cells experienced a 45% greater survival following an otherwise lethal event and exhibited a longer lasting window of protection in comparison to our previous in vitro preconditioning model using a single stress. As in other models, preconditioned cells exhibited mild caspase activation, an increase in oxidized proteins and a requirement for reactive oxygen species for neuroprotection. Heat shock protein 70 was upregulated during preconditioning, yet the majority of this protein was released extracellularly. We believe coupling this neuron-enriched multi-day model with microphysiometry will allow us to assess neuronal specific real-time metabolic adaptations necessary for preconditioning. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. AP4M1 is abnormally expressed in oxygen-glucose deprived hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Cheng, X Y; Sheng, G Y

    2014-03-20

    AP4M1 mutations have been suggested to be associated with autosomal recessive cerebral palsy syndrome. But the pathogenic mechanism remains uncertain. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether and how AP4M1 expression is changed in injured neurons. Primary cultured hippocampal neurons were prepared for this experiment. They were subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) leading to apoptosis, mimicking brain ischemia. Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) was labeled immunofluorescently to confirm that the purity of neuron was higher than 90%. Real-time PCR and western blotting were performed to measure the gene expression. AP4M1 was labeled with MAP2 or Tau-1 to observe the distribution. We found that the AP4M1 protein levels immediately after the procedure were similar between the OGD group and the sham group. However, down-regulation was observed 12h after the reperfusion, and became more notable at 24h. The real-time PCR showed similar results, except that the down-regulation of mRNA was able to be detected immediately after the OGD. Immunofluorescent labeling revealed AP4M1 distributed in the dendrites of normal neurons, but it redistributed to the axons after the OGD procedure. In conclusion, AP4M1 is not only down-regulated at both the mRNA and protein levels, but also redistributed from dendrites to axons in oxygen-glucose deprived hippocampal neurons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Bace1 activity impairs neuronal glucose metabolism: rescue by beta-hydroxybutyrate and lipoic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Findlay

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Glucose hypometabolism and impaired mitochondrial function in neurons have been suggested to play early and perhaps causative roles in Alzheimer’s disease (AD pathogenesis. Activity of the aspartic acid protease, beta-site amyloid precursor protein (APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1, responsible for beta amyloid peptide generation, has recently been demonstrated to modify glucose metabolism. We therefore examined, using a human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y cell line, whether increased BACE1 activity is responsible for a reduction in cellular glucose metabolism. Overexpression of active BACE1, but not a protease-dead mutant BACE1, protein in SH-SY5Y cells reduced glucose oxidation and the basal oxygen consumption rate, which was associated with a compensatory increase in glycolysis. Increased BACE1 activity had no effect on the mitochondrial electron transfer process but was found to diminish substrate delivery to the mitochondria by inhibition of key mitochondrial decarboxylation reaction enzymes. This BACE1 activity-dependent deficit in glucose oxidation was alleviated by the presence of beta hydroxybutyrate or α-lipoic acid. Consequently our data indicate that raised cellular BACE1 activity drives reduced glucose oxidation in a human neuronal cell line through impairments in the activity of specific tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes. Because this bioenergetic deficit is recoverable by neutraceutical compounds we suggest that such agents, perhaps in conjunction with BACE1 inhibitors, may be an effective therapeutic strategy in the early-stage management or treatment of AD.

  12. Epigenetic regulation of the glucose transporter gene Slc2a1 by β-hydroxybutyrate underlies preferential glucose supply to the brain of fasted mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanegashima, Kosuke; Sato-Miyata, Yukiko; Funakoshi, Masabumi; Nishito, Yasumasa; Aigaki, Toshiro; Hara, Takahiko

    2017-01-01

    We carried out liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of metabolites in mice. Those metabolome data showed that hepatic glucose content is reduced, but that brain glucose content is unaffected, during fasting, consistent with the priority given to brain glucose consumption during fasting. The molecular mechanisms for this preferential glucose supply to the brain are not fully understood. We also showed that the fasting-induced production of the ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate (β-OHB) enhances expression of the glucose transporter gene Slc2a1 (Glut1) via histone modification. Upon β-OHB treatment, Slc2a1 expression was up-regulated, with a concomitant increase in H3K9 acetylation at the critical cis-regulatory region of the Slc2a1 gene in brain microvascular endothelial cells and NB2a neuronal cells, shown by quantitative PCR analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated disruption of the Hdac2 gene increased Slc2a1 expression, suggesting that it is one of the responsible histone deacetylases (HDACs). These results confirm that β-OHB is a HDAC inhibitor and show that β-OHB plays an important role in fasting-induced epigenetic activation of a glucose transporter gene in the brain. © 2016 Molecular Biology Society of Japan and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  13. Mitochondrial dysfunction precedes depression of AMPK/AKT signaling in insulin resistance induced by high glucose in primary cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yunhua; Liu, Jing; Shi, Le; Tang, Ying; Gao, Dan; Long, Jiangang; Liu, Jiankang

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated brain insulin signaling impairment and mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetes. Hyperinsulinemia and hyperlipidemia arising from diabetes have been linked to neuronal insulin resistance, and hyperglycemia induces peripheral sensory neuronal impairment and mitochondrial dysfunction. However, how brain glucose at diabetic conditions elicits cortical neuronal insulin signaling impairment and mitochondrial dysfunction remains unknown. In the present study, we cultured primary cortical neurons with high glucose levels and investigated the neuronal mitochondrial function and insulin response. We found that mitochondrial function was declined in presence of 10 mmol/L glucose, prior to the depression of AKT signaling in primary cortical neurons. We further demonstrated that the cerebral cortex of db/db mice exhibited both insulin resistance and loss of mitochondrial complex components. Moreover, we found that adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inactivation is involved in high glucose-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance in primary cortical neurons and neuroblastoma cells, as well as in cerebral cortex of db/db mice, and all these impairments can be rescued by mitochondrial activator, resveratrol. Taken together, our results extend the finding that high glucose (≥10 mmol/L) comparable to diabetic brain extracellular glucose level leads to neuronal mitochondrial dysfunction and resultant insulin resistance, and targeting mitochondria-AMPK signaling might be a promising strategy to protect against diabetes-related neuronal impairment in central nerves system. We found that high glucose (≥10 mmol/L), comparable to diabetic brain extracellular glucose level, leads to neuronal mitochondrial dysfunction and resultant insulin resistance in an AMPK-dependent manner, and targeting mitochondria-AMPK signaling might be a promising strategy to protect against diabetes-related neuronal impairment in central

  14. Simultaneous measurement of glucose transport and utilization in the human brain

    OpenAIRE

    Shestov, Alexander A.; Emir, Uzay E.; Kumar, Anjali; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Seaquist, Elizabeth R.; Öz, Gülin

    2011-01-01

    Glucose is the primary fuel for brain function, and determining the kinetics of cerebral glucose transport and utilization is critical for quantifying cerebral energy metabolism. The kinetic parameters of cerebral glucose transport, KMt and Vmaxt, in humans have so far been obtained by measuring steady-state brain glucose levels by proton (1H) NMR as a function of plasma glucose levels and fitting steady-state models to these data. Extraction of the kinetic parameters for cerebral glucose tra...

  15. The Role of Glucose Transporters in Brain Disease: Diabetes and Alzheimer’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Kaushik; DeSilva, Shanal; Abbruscato, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of altered brain glucose metabolism has long been suggested in both diabetes and Alzheimer’s diseases. However, the preceding mechanism to altered glucose metabolism has not been well understood. Glucose enters the brain via glucose transporters primarily present at the blood-brain barrier. Any changes in glucose transporter function and expression dramatically affects brain glucose homeostasis and function. In the brains of both diabetic and Alzheimer’s dis...

  16. Proton Transport Chains in Glucose Metabolism: Mind the Proton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Roosterman

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The Embden–Meyerhof–Parnas (EMP pathway comprises eleven cytosolic enzymes interacting to metabolize glucose to lactic acid [CH3CH(OHCOOH]. Glycolysis is largely considered as the conversion of glucose to pyruvate (CH3COCOO-. We consider glycolysis to be a cellular process and as such, transporters mediating glucose uptake and lactic acid release and enable the flow of metabolites through the cell, must be considered as part of the EMP pathway. In this review, we consider the flow of metabolites to be coupled to a flow of energy that is irreversible and sufficient to form ordered structures. This latter principle is highlighted by discussing that lactate dehydrogenase (LDH complexes irreversibly reduce pyruvate/H+ to lactate [CH3CH(OHCOO-], or irreversibly catalyze the opposite reaction, oxidation of lactate to pyruvate/H+. However, both LDH complexes are considered to be driven by postulated proton transport chains. Metabolism of glucose to two lactic acids is introduced as a unidirectional, continuously flowing pathway. In an organism, cell membrane-located proton-linked monocarboxylate transporters catalyze the final step of glycolysis, the release of lactic acid. Consequently, both pyruvate and lactate are discussed as intermediate products of glycolysis and substrates of regulated crosscuts of the glycolytic flow.

  17. Nod-like receptor protein 1 inflammasome mediates neuron injury under high glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xian-Fang; Wang, Xiao-Lan; Tian, Xiu-Juan; Yang, Zhi-Hua; Chu, Guang-Pin; Zhang, Jing; Li, Man; Shi, Jing; Zhang, Chun

    2014-04-01

    Diabetic encephalopathy is one of the most common complications of diabetes. Inflammatory events during diabetes may be an important mechanism of diabetic encephalopathy. Inflammasome is a multiprotein complex consisting of Nod-like receptor proteins (NLRPs), apoptosis-associated speck-like protein (ASC), and caspase 1 or 5, which functions to switch on the inflammatory process and the release of inflammatory factors. The present study hypothesized that the formation and activation of NLRP1 inflammasome turns on neuroinflammation and neuron injury during hyperglycemia. The results demonstrated that the levels of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) were increased in the cortex of streptozocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. The levels of mature IL-1β and IL-18 were also elevated in culture medium of neurons treated with high glucose (50 mM). The expression of three essential components of the NLRP1 inflammasome complex, namely, NLRP1, ASC, and caspase 1, was also upregulated in vivo and in vitro under high glucose. Silencing the ASC gene prevented the caspase-1 activation, and inhibiting caspase 1 activity blocked hyperglycemia-induced release of inflammatory factors and neuron injury. Moreover, we found that pannexin 1 mediated the actvitation of NLRP1 inflammasome under high glucose. These results suggest that hyperglycemia induces neuroinflammation through activation of NLRP1 inflammasome, which represents a novel mechanism of diabetes-associated neuron injury.

  18. Availability of neurotransmitter glutamate is diminished when beta-hydroxybutyrate replaces glucose in cultured neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Trine M; Risa, Oystein; Sonnewald, Ursula; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2009-07-01

    Ketone bodies serve as alternative energy substrates for the brain in cases of low glucose availability such as during starvation or in patients treated with a ketogenic diet. The ketone bodies are metabolized via a distinct pathway confined to the mitochondria. We have compared metabolism of [2,4-(13)C]beta-hydroxybutyrate to that of [1,6-(13)C]glucose in cultured glutamatergic neurons and investigated the effect of neuronal activity focusing on the aspartate-glutamate homeostasis, an essential component of the excitatory activity in the brain. The amount of (13)C incorporation and cellular content was lower for glutamate and higher for aspartate in the presence of [2,4-(13)C]beta-hydroxybutyrate as opposed to [1,6-(13)C]glucose. Our results suggest that the change in aspartate-glutamate homeostasis is due to a decreased availability of NADH for cytosolic malate dehydrogenase and thus reduced malate-aspartate shuttle activity in neurons using beta-hydroxybutyrate. In the presence of glucose, the glutamate content decreased significantly upon activation of neurotransmitter release, whereas in the presence of only beta-hydroxybutyrate, no decrease in the glutamate content was observed. Thus, the fraction of the glutamate pool available for transmitter release was diminished when metabolizing beta-hydroxybutyrate, which is in line with the hypothesis of formation of transmitter glutamate via an obligatory involvement of the malate-aspartate shuttle.

  19. Insulin and leptin induce Glut4 plasma membrane translocation and glucose uptake in a human neuronal cell line by a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase- dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benomar, Yacir; Naour, Nadia; Aubourg, Alain; Bailleux, Virginie; Gertler, Arieh; Djiane, Jean; Guerre-Millo, Michèle; Taouis, Mohammed

    2006-05-01

    The insulin-sensitive glucose transporter Glut4 is expressed in brain areas that regulate energy homeostasis and body adiposity. In contrast with peripheral tissues, however, the impact of insulin on Glut4 plasma membrane (PM) translocation in neurons is not known. In this study, we examined the role of two anorexic hormones (leptin and insulin) on Glut4 translocation in a human neuronal cell line that express endogenous insulin and leptin receptors. We show that insulin and leptin both induce Glut4 translocation to the PM of neuronal cells and activate glucose uptake. Wortmannin, a specific inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, totally abolished insulin- and leptin-dependent Glut4 translocation and stimulation of glucose uptake. Thus, Glut4 translocation is a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent mechanism in neuronal cells. Next, we investigated the impact of chronic insulin and leptin treatments on Glut4 expression and translocation. Chronic exposure of neuronal cells to insulin or leptin down-regulates Glut4 proteins and mRNA levels and abolishes the acute stimulation of glucose uptake in response to acute insulin or leptin. In addition, chronic treatment with either insulin or leptin impaired Glut4 translocation. A cross-desensitization between insulin and leptin was apparent, where exposure to insulin affects leptin-dependent Glut4 translocation and vice versa. This cross-desensitization could be attributed to the increase in suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 expression, which was demonstrated in response to each hormone. These results provide evidence to suggest that Glut4 translocation to neuronal PM is regulated by both insulin and leptin signaling pathways. These pathways might contribute to an in vivo glucoregulatory reflex involving a neuronal network and to the anorectic effect of insulin and leptin.

  20. Pretreatment with apoaequorin protects hippocampal CA1 neurons from oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detert, Julia A; Adams, Erin L; Lescher, Jacob D; Lyons, Jeri-Anne; Moyer, James R

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic stroke affects ∼795,000 people each year in the U.S., which results in an estimated annual cost of $73.7 billion. Calcium is pivotal in a variety of neuronal signaling cascades, however, during ischemia, excess calcium influx can trigger excitotoxic cell death. Calcium binding proteins help neurons regulate/buffer intracellular calcium levels during ischemia. Aequorin is a calcium binding protein isolated from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, and has been used for years as a calcium indicator, but little is known about its neuroprotective properties. The present study used an in vitro rat brain slice preparation to test the hypothesis that an intra-hippocampal infusion of apoaequorin (the calcium binding component of aequorin) protects neurons from ischemic cell death. Bilaterally cannulated rats received an apoaequorin infusion in one hemisphere and vehicle control in the other. Hippocampal slices were then prepared and subjected to 5 minutes of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), and cell death was assayed by trypan blue exclusion. Apoaequorin dose-dependently protected neurons from OGD--doses of 1% and 4% (but not 0.4%) significantly decreased the number of trypan blue-labeled neurons. This effect was also time dependent, lasting up to 48 hours. This time dependent effect was paralleled by changes in cytokine and chemokine expression, indicating that apoaequorin may protect neurons via a neuroimmunomodulatory mechanism. These data support the hypothesis that pretreatment with apoaequorin protects neurons against ischemic cell death, and may be an effective neurotherapeutic.

  1. The neuroprotective role and mechanisms of TERT in neurons with oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J; Qu, Y; Chen, D; Zhang, L; Zhao, F; Luo, L; Pan, L; Hua, J; Mu, D

    2013-11-12

    Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) is reported to protect neurons from apoptosis induced by various stresses including hypoxia-ischemia (HI). However, the mechanisms by which TERT exerts its anti-apoptotic role in neurons with HI injury remain unclear. In this study, we examined the protective role and explored the possible mechanisms of TERT in neurons with HI injury in vitro. Primary cultured neurons were exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) for 3h followed by reperfusion to mimic HI injury in vivo. Plasmids containing TERT antisense, sense nucleotides, or mock were transduced into neurons at 48h before OGD. Expression and distribution of TERT were measured by immunofluorescence labeling and western blot. The expression of cleaved caspase 3 (CC3), Bcl-2 and Bax were detected by western blot. Neuronal apoptosis was measured with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL). The mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured by MitoSOX Red staining. Fluorescent probe JC-1 was used to measure the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). We found that TERT expression increased at 8h and peaked at 24h in neurons after OGD. CC3 expression and neuronal apoptosis were induced and peaked at 24h after OGD. TERT inhibition significantly increased CC3 expression and neuronal apoptosis after OGD treatment. Additionally, TERT inhibition decreased the expression ratio of Bcl-2/Bax, and enhanced ROS production and ΔΨm dissipation after OGD. These data suggest that TERT plays a neuroprotective role via anti-apoptosis in neurons after OGD. The underlying mechanisms may be associated with regulating Bcl-2/Bax expression ratio, attenuating ROS generation, and increasing mitochondrial membrane potential. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Automated Measurement of Fast Mitochondrial Transport in Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle eMiller

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing recognition that fast mitochondrial transport in neurons is disrupted in multiple neurological diseases and psychiatric disorders. However a major constraint in identifying novel therapeutics based on mitochondrial transport is that the large-scale analysis of fast transport is time consuming. Here we describe methodologies for the automated analysis of fast mitochondrial transport from data acquired using a robotic microscope. We focused on addressing questions of measurement precision, speed, reliably, workflow ease, statistical processing and presentation. We used optical flow and particle tracking algorithms, implemented in ImageJ, to measure mitochondrial movement in primary cultured cortical and hippocampal neurons. With it, we are able to generate complete descriptions of movement profiles in an automated fashion of hundred of thousands of mitochondria with a processing time of approximately one hour. We describe the calibration of the parameters of the tracking algorithms and demonstrate that they are capable of measuring the fast transport of a single mitochondrion. We then show that the methods are capable of reliably measuring the inhibition of fast mitochondria transport induced by the disruption of microtubules with the drug nocodazole in both hippocampal and cortical neurons. This work lays the foundation for future large-scale screens designed to identify compounds that modulate mitochondrial motility.

  3. In vitro evidence of glucose-induced toxicity in GnRH secreting neurons: high glucose concentrations influence GnRH secretion, impair cell viability, and induce apoptosis in the GT1-1 neuronal cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Lubna; Chu, Hsiao-Pai; Shu, Jun; Topalli, Ilir; Santoro, Nanette; Karkanias, George

    2007-10-01

    To evaluate for direct toxic effects of high glucose concentrations on cellular physiology in GnRH secreting immortalized GT1-1 neurons. Prospective experimental design. In vitro experimental model using a cell culture system. GT1-1 cells were cultured in replicates in media with two different glucose concentrations (450 mg/dL and 100 mg/dL, respectively) for varying time intervals (24, 48, and 72 hours). Effects of glucose concentrations on GnRH secretion by the GT1-1 neurons were evaluated using a static culture model. Cell viability, cellular apoptosis, and cell cycle events in GT1-1 neurons maintained in two different glucose concentrations were assessed by flow cytometry (fluorescence-activated cell sorter) using Annexin V-PI staining. Adverse influences of high glucose concentrations on GnRH secretion and cell viability were noted in cultures maintained in high glucose concentration (450 mg/dL) culture medium for varying time intervals. A significantly higher percentage of cells maintained in high glucose concentration medium demonstrated evidence of apoptosis by a fluorescence-activated cell sorter. We provide in vitro evidence of glucose-induced cellular toxicity in GnRH secreting GT1-1 neurons. Significant alterations in GnRH secretion, reduced cell viability, and a higher percentage of apoptotic cells were observed in GT1-1 cells maintained in high (450 mg/dL) compared with low (100 mg/dL) glucose concentration culture medium.

  4. DL-2-amino-3-phosphonopropionic acid protects primary neurons from oxygen-glucose deprivation induced injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Cui

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral infarction is a type of ischemic stroke and is one of the main causes of irreversible brain damage. Although multiple neuroprotective agents have been investigated recently, the potential of DL-2-amino-3-phosphonopropionic acid (DL-AP3 in treating oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD-induced neuronal injury, has not been clarified yet. This study was aimed to explore the role of DL-AP3 in primary neuronal cell cultures. Primary neurons were divided into four groups: (1 a control group that was not treated; (2 DL-AP3 group treated with 10 μM of DL-AP3; (3 OGD group, in which neurons were cultured under OGD conditions; and (4 OGD + DL-AP3 group, in which OGD model was first established and then the cells were treated with 10 μM of DL-AP3. Neuronal viability and apoptosis were measured using Cell Counting Kit-8 and flow cytometry. Expressions of phospho-Akt1 (p-Akt1 and cytochrome c were detected using Western blot. The results showed that DL-AP3 did not affect neuronal viability and apoptosis in DL-AP3 group, nor it changed p-Akt1 and cytochrome c expression (p > 0.05. In OGD + DL-AP3 group, DL-AP3 significantly attenuated the inhibitory effects of OGD on neuronal viability (p < 0.001, and reduced OGD induced apoptosis (p < 0.01. Additionally, the down-regulation of p-Akt1 and up-regulation of cytochrome c, induced by OGD, were recovered to some extent after DL-AP3 treatment (p < 0.05 or p < 0.001. Overall, DL-AP3 could protect primary neurons from OGD-induced injury by affecting the viability and apoptosis of neurons, and by regulating the expressions of p-Akt1 and cytochrome c.

  5. DL-2-amino-3-phosphonopropionic acid protects primary neurons from oxygen-glucose deprivation induced injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Di; Xu, Jun; Xu, Quanyi; Zuo, Guokun

    2017-02-21

    Cerebral infarction is a type of ischemic stroke and is one of the main causes of irreversible brain damage. Although multiple neuroprotective agents have been investigated recently, the potential of DL-2-amino-3-phosphonopropionic acid (DL-AP3) in treating oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced neuronal injury, has not been clarified yet. This study was aimed to explore the role of DL-AP3 in primary neuronal cell cultures. Primary neurons were divided into four groups: (1) a control group that was not treated; (2) DL-AP3 group treated with 10 μM of DL-AP3; (3) OGD group, in which neurons were cultured under OGD conditions; and (4) OGD + DL-AP3 group, in which OGD model was first established and then the cells were treated with 10 μM of DL-AP3. Neuronal viability and apoptosis were measured using Cell Counting Kit-8 and flow cytometry. Expressions of phospho-Akt1 (p-Akt1) and cytochrome c were detected using Western blot. The results showed that DL-AP3 did not affect neuronal viability and apoptosis in DL-AP3 group, nor it changed p-Akt1 and cytochrome c expression (p > 0.05). In OGD + DL-AP3 group, DL-AP3 significantly attenuated the inhibitory effects of OGD on neuronal viability (p neurons from OGD-induced injury by affecting the viability and apoptosis of neurons, and by regulating the expressions of p-Akt1 and cytochrome c.

  6. Glucose uptake during contraction in isolated skeletal muscles from neuronal nitric oxide synthase μ knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yet Hoi; Frugier, Tony; Zhang, Xinmei; Murphy, Robyn M; Lynch, Gordon S; Betik, Andrew C; Rattigan, Stephen; McConell, Glenn K

    2015-05-01

    Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) significantly attenuates the increase in skeletal muscle glucose uptake during contraction/exercise, and a greater attenuation is observed in individuals with Type 2 diabetes compared with healthy individuals. Therefore, NO appears to play an important role in mediating muscle glucose uptake during contraction. In this study, we investigated the involvement of neuronal NOSμ (nNOSμ), the main NOS isoform activated during contraction, on skeletal muscle glucose uptake during ex vivo contraction. Extensor digitorum longus muscles were isolated from nNOSμ(-/-) and nNOSμ(+/+) mice. Muscles were contracted ex vivo in a temperature-controlled (30°C) organ bath with or without the presence of the NOS inhibitor N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine (L-NMMA) and the NOS substrate L-arginine. Glucose uptake was determined by radioactive tracers. Skeletal muscle glucose uptake increased approximately fourfold during contraction in muscles from both nNOSμ(-/-) and nNOSμ(+/+) mice. L-NMMA significantly attenuated the increase in muscle glucose uptake during contraction in both genotypes. This attenuation was reversed by L-arginine, suggesting that L-NMMA attenuated the increase in muscle glucose uptake during contraction by inhibiting NOS and not via a nonspecific effect of the inhibitor. Low levels of NOS activity (~4%) were detected in muscles from nNOSμ(-/-) mice, and there was no evidence of compensation from other NOS isoform or AMP-activated protein kinase which is also involved in mediating muscle glucose uptake during contraction. These results indicate that NO regulates skeletal muscle glucose uptake during ex vivo contraction independently of nNOSμ. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Dichloroacetate effects on glucose and lactate oxidation by neurons and astroglia in vitro and on glucose utilization by brain in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Yoshiaki; Esaki, Takanori; Shimoji, Kazuaki; Cook, Michelle; Law, Mona J; Kaufman, Elaine; Sokoloff, Louis

    2003-04-15

    Neuronal cultures in vitro readily oxidized both D-[(14)C]glucose and l-[(14)C]lactate to (14)CO(2), whereas astroglial cultures oxidized both substrates sparingly and metabolized glucose predominantly to lactate and released it into the medium. [(14)C]Glucose oxidation to (14)CO(2) varied inversely with unlabeled lactate concentration in the medium, particularly in neurons, and increased progressively with decreasing lactate concentration. Adding unlabeled glucose to the medium inhibited [(14)C]lactate oxidation to (14)CO(2) only in astroglia but not in neurons, indicating a kinetic preference in neurons for oxidation of extracellular lactate over intracellular pyruvatelactate produced by glycolysis. Protein kinase-catalyzed phosphorylation inactivates pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), which regulates pyruvate entry into the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Dichloroacetate inhibits this kinase, thus enhancing PDH activity. In vitro dichloroacetate stimulated glucose and lactate oxidation to CO(2) and reduced lactate release mainly in astroglia, indicating that limitations in glucose and lactate oxidation by astroglia may be due to a greater balance of PDH toward the inactive form. To assess the significance of astroglial export of lactate to neurons in vivo, we attempted to diminish this traffic in rats by administering dichloroacetate (50 mgkg) intravenously to stimulate astroglial lactate oxidation and then examined the effects on baseline and functionally activated local cerebral glucose utilization (lCMR(glc)). Dichloroacetate raised baseline lCMR(glc) throughout the brain and decreased the percent increases in lCMR(glc) evoked by functional activation. These studies provide evidence in support of the compartmentalization of glucose metabolism between astroglia and neurons but indicate that the compartmentalization may be neither complete nor entirely obligatory.

  8. Expression, transport, and axonal sorting of neuronal CCL21 in large dense-core vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Eiko K.; Vinet, Jonathan; Stanulovic, Vesna S.; Meijer, Michel; Wesseling, Evelyn; Sjollema, Klaas; Boddeke, Hendrikus W. G. M.; Biber, Knut

    2008-01-01

    Neurons are highly polarized cells, and neuron-neuron communication is based on directed transport and release of neurotransmitters, neuropeptides, and neurotrophins. Directed communication may also be attributed to neuron-microglia signaling, since neuronal damage can induce a microglia reaction at

  9. Expression, transport, and axonal sorting of neuronal CCL21 in large dense-core vesicles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, E.K. de; Vinet, J.; Stanulovic, V.S.; Meijer, M.; Wesseling, E.; Sjollema, K.; Boddeke, H.W.; Biber, K.

    2008-01-01

    Neurons are highly polarized cells, and neuron-neuron communication is based on directed transport and release of neurotransmitters, neuropeptides, and neurotrophins. Directed communication may also be attributed to neuron-microglia signaling, since neuronal damage can induce a microglia reaction at

  10. Blockade of store-operated calcium entry alleviates high glucose-induced neurotoxicity via inhibiting apoptosis in rat neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhenkuan; Xu, Wenzhe; Song, Yan; Zhang, Bin; Li, Feng; Liu, Yuguang

    2016-07-25

    Altered store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) has been suggested to be involved in many diabetic complications. However, the association of altered SOCE and diabetic neuronal damage remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the effects of altered SOCE on primary cultured rat neuron injury induced by high glucose. Our data demonstrated that high glucose increased rat neuron injury and upregulated the expression of store-operated calcium channel (SOC). Inhibition of SOCE by a pharmacological inhibitor and siRNA knockdown of stromal interaction molecule 1 weakened the intracellular calcium overload, restored mitochondrial membrane potential, downregulated cytochrome C release and inhibited cell apoptosis. As well, treatment with the calcium chelator BAPTA-AM prevented cell apoptosis by ameliorating the high glucose-increased intracellular calcium level. These findings suggest that SOCE blockade may alleviate high glucose-induced neuronal damage by inhibiting apoptosis. SOCE might be a promising therapeutic target in diabetic neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Agmatine Ameliorates High Glucose-Induced Neuronal Cell Senescence by Regulating the p21 and p53 Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Juhyun; Lee, Byeori; Kang, Somang; Oh, Yumi; Kim, Eosu; Kim, Chul-Hoon; Song, Ho-Taek; Lee, Jong Eun

    2016-02-01

    Neuronal senescence caused by diabetic neuropathy is considered a common complication of diabetes mellitus. Neuronal senescence leads to the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, the production of reactive oxygen species, and the alteration of cellular homeostasis. Agmatine, which is biosynthesized by arginine decarboxylation, has been reported in previous in vitro to exert a protective effect against various stresses. In present study, agmatine attenuated the cell death and the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, TNF-alpha and CCL2 in high glucose in vitro conditions. Moreover, the senescence associated-β-galatosidase's activity in high glucose exposed neuronal cells was reduced by agmatine. Increased p21 and reduced p53 in high glucose conditioned cells were changed by agmatine. Ultimately, agmatine inhibits the neuronal cell senescence through the activation of p53 and the inhibition of p21. Here, we propose that agmatine may ameliorate neuronal cell senescence in hyperglycemia.

  12. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Human Glucose Transporter GLUT1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Sun Park

    Full Text Available Glucose transporters (GLUTs provide a pathway for glucose transport across membranes. Human GLUTs are implicated in devastating diseases such as heart disease, hyper- and hypo-glycemia, type 2 diabetes and cancer. The human GLUT1 has been recently crystalized in the inward-facing open conformation. However, there is no other structural information for other conformations. The X-ray structures of E. coli Xylose permease (XylE, a glucose transporter homolog, are available in multiple conformations with and without the substrates D-xylose and D-glucose. XylE has high sequence homology to human GLUT1 and key residues in the sugar-binding pocket are conserved. Here we construct a homology model for human GLUT1 based on the available XylE crystal structure in the partially occluded outward-facing conformation. A long unbiased all atom molecular dynamics simulation starting from the model can capture a new fully opened outward-facing conformation. Our investigation of molecular interactions at the interface between the transmembrane (TM domains and the intracellular helices (ICH domain in the outward- and inward-facing conformation supports that the ICH domain likely stabilizes the outward-facing conformation in GLUT1. Furthermore, inducing a conformational transition, our simulations manifest a global asymmetric rocker switch motion and detailed molecular interactions between the substrate and residues through the water-filled selective pore along a pathway from the extracellular to the intracellular side. The results presented here are consistent with previously published biochemical, mutagenesis and functional studies. Together, this study shed light on the structure and functional relationships of GLUT1 in multiple conformational states.

  13. Glucose administration after traumatic brain injury improves cerebral metabolism and reduces secondary neuronal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Nobuhiro; Ghavim, Sima; Harris, Neil G; Hovda, David A; Sutton, Richard L

    2013-10-16

    Clinical studies have indicated an association between acute hyperglycemia and poor outcomes in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI), although optimal blood glucose levels needed to maximize outcomes for these patients' remain under investigation. Previous results from experimental animal models suggest that post-TBI hyperglycemia may be harmful, neutral, or beneficial. The current studies determined the effects of single or multiple episodes of acute hyperglycemia on cerebral glucose metabolism and neuronal injury in a rodent model of unilateral controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury. In Experiment 1, a single episode of hyperglycemia (50% glucose at 2 g/kg, i.p.) initiated immediately after CCI was found to significantly attenuate a TBI-induced depression of glucose metabolism in cerebral cortex (4 of 6 regions) and subcortical regions (2 of 7) as well as to significantly reduce the number of dead/dying neurons in cortex and hippocampus at 24 h post-CCI. Experiment 2 examined effects of more prolonged and intermittent hyperglycemia induced by glucose administrations (2 g/kg, i.p.) at 0, 1, 3 and 6h post-CCI. The latter study also found significantly improved cerebral metabolism (in 3 of 6 cortical and 3 of 7 subcortical regions) and significant neuroprotection in cortex and hippocampus 1 day after CCI and glucose administration. These results indicate that acute episodes of post-TBI hyperglycemia can be beneficial and are consistent with other recent studies showing benefits of providing exogenous energy substrates during periods of increased cerebral metabolic demand. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Cofilin Inhibition Restores Neuronal Cell Death in Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation Model of Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madineni, Anusha; Alhadidi, Qasim; Shah, Zahoor A

    2016-03-01

    Ischemia is a condition associated with decreased blood supply to the brain, eventually leading to death of neurons. It is associated with a diverse cascade of responses involving both degenerative and regenerative mechanisms. At the cellular level, the changes are initiated prominently in the neuronal cytoskeleton. Cofilin, a cytoskeletal actin severing protein, is known to be involved in the early stages of apoptotic cell death. Evidence supports its intervention in the progression of disease states like Alzheimer's and ischemic kidney disease. In the present study, we have hypothesized the possible involvement of cofilin in ischemia. Using PC12 cells and mouse primary cultures of cortical neurons, we investigated the potential role of cofilin in ischemia in two different in vitro ischemic models: chemical induced oxidative stress and oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion (OGD/R). The expression profile studies demonstrated a decrease in phosphocofilin levels in all models of ischemia, implying stress-induced cofilin activation. Furthermore, calcineurin and slingshot 1L (SSH) phosphatases were found to be the signaling mediators of the cofilin activation. In primary cultures of cortical neurons, cofilin was found to be significantly activated after 1 h of OGD. To delineate the role of activated cofilin in ischemia, we knocked down cofilin by small interfering RNA (siRNA) technique and tested the impact of cofilin silencing on neuronal viability. Cofilin siRNA-treated neurons showed a significant reduction of cofilin levels in all treatment groups (control, OGD, and OGD/R). Additionally, cofilin siRNA-reduced cofilin mitochondrial translocation and caspase 3 cleavage, with a concomitant increase in neuronal viability. These results strongly support the active role of cofilin in ischemia-induced neuronal degeneration and apoptosis. We believe that targeting this protein mediator has a potential for therapeutic intervention in ischemic brain injury and stroke.

  15. Human endothelial progenitor cells rescue cortical neurons from oxygen-glucose deprivation induced death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacigaluppi, Susanna; Donzelli, Elisabetta; De Cristofaro, Valentina; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; D'Amico, Giovanna; Scuteri, Arianna; Tredici, Giovanni

    2016-09-19

    Cerebral ischemia is characterized by both acute and delayed neuronal injuries. Neuro-protection is a major issue that should be properly addressed from a pharmacological point of view, and cell-based treatment approaches are of interest due to their potential pleiotropic effects. Endothelial progenitor cells have the advantage of being mobilized from the bone marrow into the circulation, but have been less studied than other stem cells, such as mesenchymal stem cells. Therefore, the comparison between human endothelial progenitor cells (hEPC) and human mesenchymal progenitor cells (hMSC) in terms of efficacy in rescuing neurons from cell death after transitory ischemia is the aim of the current study, in the effort to address further directions. In vitro model of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) on a primary culture of rodent cortical neurons was set up with different durations of exposure: 1, 2 and 3hrs with assessment of neuron survival. The 2hrs OGD was chosen for the subsequent experiments. After 2hrs OGD neurons were either placed in indirect co-culture with hMSC or hEPC or cultured in hMSC or hEPC conditioned medium and cell viability was evaluated by MTT assay. At day 2 after 2hrs OGD exposure, mean neuronal survival was 47.9±24.2%. In contrast, after treatment with hEPC and hMSC indirect co-culture was 74.1±27.3%; and 69.4±18.8%, respectively. In contrast, treatment with conditioned medium did not provide any advantage in terms of survival to OGD neurons The study shows the efficacy of hEPC in indirect co-culture to rescue neurons from cell death after OGD, comparable to that of hMSC. hEPC deserve further studies given their potential interest for ischemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Simultaneous measurement of glucose blood–brain transport constants and metabolic rate in rat brain using in-vivo 1H MRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Fei; Zhang, Yi; Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Chen, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral glucose consumption and glucose transport across the blood–brain barrier are crucial to brain function since glucose is the major energy fuel for supporting intense electrophysiological activity associated with neuronal firing and signaling. Therefore, the development of noninvasive methods to measure the cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc) and glucose transport constants (KT: half-saturation constant; Tmax: maximum transport rate) are of importance for understanding glucose transport mechanism and neuroenergetics under various physiological and pathological conditions. In this study, a novel approach able to simultaneously measure CMRglc, KT, and Tmax via monitoring the dynamic glucose concentration changes in the brain tissue using in-vivo 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and in plasma after a brief glucose infusion was proposed and tested using an animal model. The values of CMRglc, Tmax, and KT were determined to be 0.44±0.17 μmol/g per minute, 1.35±0.47 μmol/g per minute, and 13.4±6.8 mmol/L in the rat brain anesthetized with 2% isoflurane. The Monte-Carlo simulations suggest that the measurements of CMRglc and Tmax are more reliable than that of KT. The overall results indicate that the new approach is robust and reliable for in-vivo measurements of both brain glucose metabolic rate and transport constants, and has potential for human application. PMID:22714049

  17. Steady-state cerebral glucose concentrations and transport in the human brain

    OpenAIRE

    Gruetter, R.; Ugurbil, K.; Seaquist, E. R.

    1998-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of brain glucose transport across the blood- brain barrier is of importance to understanding brain energy metabolism. The specific kinetics of glucose transport nave been generally described using standard Michaelis-Menten kinetics. These models predict that the steady- state glucose concentration approaches an upper limit in the human brain when the plasma glucose level is well above the Michaelis-Menten constant for half-maximal transport, K(t). In experiments wh...

  18. Adipocyte glucose transport regulation by eicosanoid precursors and inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.C.C.

    1987-01-01

    Glucose uptake and free fatty acid release by adipocytes are increased by catecholamines. The mechanism of the stimulatory action of catecholamines on glucose uptake may be via eicosanoid production from release fatty acids. Rats were fed iso-nutrient diets with high or low safflower oil. After one month, 5 rats per diet group were fed diets with aspirin or without aspirin for 2 days. Isolated adipocytes from epididymal fat pads were incubated at 37 0 C, gassed with 95% O 2 -5% CO 2 in KRB buffer with 3% bovine serum albumin and with or without eicosanoid modifiers; a stimulator (10 -5 M norepinephrine, N), or inhibitors (167 μl of antiserum to prostaglandin E (AntiE) per 1600 μl or 23mM Asp), or combinations of these. At 2-, 5-, and 10-min incubation, samples of incubation mixtures were taken to measure 2-deoxy glucose transport using 3 H-2-deoxy glucose, 14 C-inulin, and liquid scintillation counter

  19. Glucose Regulates Hypothalamic Long-chain Fatty Acid Metabolism via AMP-activated Kinase (AMPK) in Neurons and Astrocytes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taïb, Bouchra; Bouyakdan, Khalil; Hryhorczuk, Cécile; Rodaros, Demetra; Fulton, Stephanie; Alquier, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Hypothalamic controls of energy balance rely on the detection of circulating nutrients such as glucose and long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) by the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH). LCFA metabolism in the MBH plays a key role in the control of food intake and glucose homeostasis, yet it is not known if glucose regulates LCFA oxidation and esterification in the MBH and, if so, which hypothalamic cell type(s) and intracellular signaling mechanisms are involved. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of glucose on LCFA metabolism, assess the role of AMP-activated Kinase (AMPK), and to establish if changes in LCFA metabolism and its regulation by glucose vary as a function of the kind of LCFA, cell type, and brain region. We show that glucose inhibits palmitate oxidation via AMPK in hypothalamic neuronal cell lines, primary hypothalamic astrocyte cultures, and MBH slices ex vivo but not in cortical astrocytes and slice preparations. In contrast, oleate oxidation was not affected by glucose or AMPK inhibition in MBH slices. In addition, our results show that glucose increases palmitate, but not oleate, esterification into neutral lipids in neurons and MBH slices but not in hypothalamic astrocytes. These findings reveal for the first time the metabolic fate of different LCFA in the MBH, demonstrate AMPK-dependent glucose regulation of LCFA oxidation in both astrocytes and neurons, and establish metabolic coupling of glucose and LCFA as a distinguishing feature of hypothalamic nuclei critical for the control of energy balance. PMID:24240094

  20. Glucose regulates hypothalamic long-chain fatty acid metabolism via AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) in neurons and astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taïb, Bouchra; Bouyakdan, Khalil; Hryhorczuk, Cécile; Rodaros, Demetra; Fulton, Stephanie; Alquier, Thierry

    2013-12-27

    Hypothalamic controls of energy balance rely on the detection of circulating nutrients such as glucose and long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) by the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH). LCFA metabolism in the MBH plays a key role in the control of food intake and glucose homeostasis, yet it is not known if glucose regulates LCFA oxidation and esterification in the MBH and, if so, which hypothalamic cell type(s) and intracellular signaling mechanisms are involved. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of glucose on LCFA metabolism, assess the role of AMP-activated Kinase (AMPK), and to establish if changes in LCFA metabolism and its regulation by glucose vary as a function of the kind of LCFA, cell type, and brain region. We show that glucose inhibits palmitate oxidation via AMPK in hypothalamic neuronal cell lines, primary hypothalamic astrocyte cultures, and MBH slices ex vivo but not in cortical astrocytes and slice preparations. In contrast, oleate oxidation was not affected by glucose or AMPK inhibition in MBH slices. In addition, our results show that glucose increases palmitate, but not oleate, esterification into neutral lipids in neurons and MBH slices but not in hypothalamic astrocytes. These findings reveal for the first time the metabolic fate of different LCFA in the MBH, demonstrate AMPK-dependent glucose regulation of LCFA oxidation in both astrocytes and neurons, and establish metabolic coupling of glucose and LCFA as a distinguishing feature of hypothalamic nuclei critical for the control of energy balance.

  1. Novel model of neuronal bioenergetics: postsynaptic utilization of glucose but not lactate correlates positively with Ca2+ signalling in cultured mouse glutamatergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Lasse K; Obel, Linea F; Walls, Anne B; Schousboe, Arne; Faek, Sevan A A; Jajo, Farah S; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2012-04-05

    We have previously investigated the relative roles of extracellular glucose and lactate as fuels for glutamatergic neurons during synaptic activity. The conclusion from these studies was that cultured glutamatergic neurons utilize glucose rather than lactate during NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate)-induced synaptic activity and that lactate alone is not able to support neurotransmitter glutamate homoeostasis. Subsequently, a model was proposed to explain these results at the cellular level. In brief, the intermittent rises in intracellular Ca2+ during activation cause influx of Ca2+ into the mitochondrial matrix thus activating the tricarboxylic acid cycle dehydrogenases. This will lead to a lower activity of the MASH (malate-aspartate shuttle), which in turn will result in anaerobic glycolysis and lactate production rather than lactate utilization. In the present work, we have investigated the effect of an ionomycin-induced increase in intracellular Ca2+ (i.e. independent of synaptic activity) on neuronal energy metabolism employing 13C-labelled glucose and lactate and subsequent mass spectrometric analysis of labelling in glutamate, alanine and lactate. The results demonstrate that glucose utilization is positively correlated with intracellular Ca2+ whereas lactate utilization is not. This result lends further support for a significant role of glucose in neuronal bioenergetics and that Ca2+ signalling may control the switch between glucose and lactate utilization during synaptic activity. Based on the results, we propose a compartmentalized CiMASH (Ca2+-induced limitation of the MASH) model that includes intracellular compartmentation of glucose and lactate metabolism. We define pre- and post-synaptic compartments metabolizing glucose and glucose plus lactate respectively in which the latter displays a positive correlation between oxidative metabolism of glucose and Ca2+ signalling.

  2. Mitochondrial Dynamics Mediated by Mitofusin 1 Is Required for POMC Neuron Glucose-Sensing and Insulin Release Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Sara; Gómez-Valadés, Alicia G; Schneeberger, Marc; Varela, Luis; Haddad-Tóvolli, Roberta; Altirriba, Jordi; Noguera, Eduard; Drougard, Anne; Flores-Martínez, Álvaro; Imbernón, Mónica; Chivite, Iñigo; Pozo, Macarena; Vidal-Itriago, Andrés; Garcia, Ainhoa; Cervantes, Sara; Gasa, Rosa; Nogueiras, Ruben; Gama-Pérez, Pau; Garcia-Roves, Pablo M; Cano, David A; Knauf, Claude; Servitja, Joan-Marc; Horvath, Tamas L; Gomis, Ramon; Zorzano, Antonio; Claret, Marc

    2017-06-06

    Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons are critical sensors of nutrient availability implicated in energy balance and glucose metabolism control. However, the precise mechanisms underlying nutrient sensing in POMC neurons remain incompletely understood. We show that mitochondrial dynamics mediated by Mitofusin 1 (MFN1) in POMC neurons couple nutrient sensing with systemic glucose metabolism. Mice lacking MFN1 in POMC neurons exhibited defective mitochondrial architecture remodeling and attenuated hypothalamic gene expression programs during the fast-to-fed transition. This loss of mitochondrial flexibility in POMC neurons bidirectionally altered glucose sensing, causing abnormal glucose homeostasis due to defective insulin secretion by pancreatic β cells. Fed mice lacking MFN1 in POMC neurons displayed enhanced hypothalamic mitochondrial oxygen flux and reactive oxygen species generation. Central delivery of antioxidants was able to normalize the phenotype. Collectively, our data posit MFN1-mediated mitochondrial dynamics in POMC neurons as an intrinsic nutrient-sensing mechanism and unveil an unrecognized link between this subset of neurons and insulin release. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Xbp1s in Pomc neurons connects ER stress with energy balance and glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kevin W; Liu, Tiemin; Kong, Xingxing; Fukuda, Makoto; Deng, Yingfeng; Berglund, Eric D; Deng, Zhuo; Gao, Yong; Liu, Tianya; Sohn, Jong-Woo; Jia, Lin; Fujikawa, Teppei; Kohno, Daisuke; Scott, Michael M; Lee, Syann; Lee, Charlotte E; Sun, Kai; Chang, Yongsheng; Scherer, Philipp E; Elmquist, Joel K

    2014-09-02

    The molecular mechanisms underlying neuronal leptin and insulin resistance in obesity and diabetes remain unclear. Here we show that induction of the unfolded protein response transcription factor spliced X-box binding protein 1 (Xbp1s) in pro-opiomelanocortin (Pomc) neurons alone is sufficient to protect against diet-induced obesity as well as improve leptin and insulin sensitivity, even in the presence of strong activators of ER stress. We also demonstrate that constitutive expression of Xbp1s in Pomc neurons contributes to improved hepatic insulin sensitivity and suppression of endogenous glucose production. Notably, elevated Xbp1s levels in Pomc neurons also resulted in activation of the Xbp1s axis in the liver via a cell-nonautonomous mechanism. Together our results identify critical molecular mechanisms linking ER stress in arcuate Pomc neurons to acute leptin and insulin resistance as well as liver metabolism in diet-induced obesity and diabetes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Hydralazine administration activates sympathetic preganglionic neurons whose activity mobilizes glucose and increases cardiovascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Lindsay M; Damanhuri, Hanafi A; Fletcher, Sophie P S; Goodchild, Ann K

    2015-04-16

    Hypotensive drugs have been used to identify central neurons that mediate compensatory baroreceptor reflex responses. Such drugs also increase blood glucose. Our aim was to identify the neurochemical phenotypes of sympathetic preganglionic neurons (SPN) and adrenal chromaffin cells activated following hydralazine (HDZ; 10mg/kg) administration in rats, and utilize this and SPN target organ destination to ascribe their function as cardiovascular or glucose regulating. Blood glucose was measured and adrenal chromaffin cell activation was assessed using c-Fos immunoreactivity (-ir) and phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase, respectively. The activation and neurochemical phenotype of SPN innervating the adrenal glands and celiac ganglia were determined using the retrograde tracer cholera toxin B subunit, in combination with in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Blood glucose was elevated at multiple time points following HDZ administration but little evidence of chromaffin cell activation was seen suggesting non-adrenal mechanisms contribute to the sustained hyperglycemia. 16±0.1% of T4-T11 SPN contained c-Fos and of these: 24.3±1.4% projected to adrenal glands and 29±5.5% projected to celiac ganglia with the rest innervating other targets. 62.8±1.4% of SPN innervating adrenal glands were activated and 29.9±3.3% expressed PPE mRNA whereas 53.2±8.6% of SPN innervating celiac ganglia were activated and 31.2±8.8% expressed PPE mRNA. CART-ir SPN innervating each target were also activated and did not co-express PPE mRNA. Neurochemical coding reveals that HDZ administration activates both PPE+SPN, whose activity increase glucose mobilization causing hyperglycemia, as well as CART+SPN whose activity drive vasomotor responses mediated by baroreceptor unloading to raise vascular tone and heart rate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Facilitated transport of glucose from blood to brain in man and the effect of moderate hypoglycaemia on cerebral glucose utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomqvist, G.; Widen, L.; Hellstrand, E.; Gutniak, M.; Grill, V.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of steady-state moderate hypoglycaemia on human brain homeostasis has been studied with positron emission tomography using D-glucose 11 C(ul) as tracer. To rule out any effects of insulin, the plasma insulin concentration was maintained at the same level under normo- and hypoglycaemic conditions. Reduction of blood glucose by 55% increased the glucose clearance through the blood-brain barrier by 50% and reduced brain glucose consumption by 40%. Blood flow was not affected. The results are consistent with facilitated transport of glucose from blood to brain in humans. The maximal transport rate of glucose from blood to brain was found to be 62±19 (mean±SEM) μmol hg -1 min -1 , and the half-saturation constant was found to be 4.1±3.2 mM. (orig.)

  6. Obese Neuronal PPARγ Knockout Mice Are Leptin Sensitive but Show Impaired Glucose Tolerance and Fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Marina O; Sharma, Shweta; Kim, Sun; Rickert, Emily; Hsueh, Katherine; Hwang, Vicky; Olefsky, Jerrold M; Webster, Nicholas J G

    2017-01-01

    The peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is expressed in the hypothalamus in areas involved in energy homeostasis and glucose metabolism. In this study, we created a deletion of PPARγ brain-knockout (BKO) in mature neurons in female mice to investigate its involvement in metabolism and reproduction. We observed that there was no difference in age at puberty onset between female BKOs and littermate controls, but the BKOs gave smaller litters when mated and fewer oocytes when ovulated. The female BKO mice had regular cycles but showed an increase in the number of cycles with prolonged estrus. The mice also had increased luteinizing hormone (LH) levels during the LH surge and histological examination showed hemorrhagic corpora lutea. The mice were challenged with a 60% high-fat diet (HFD). Metabolically, the female BKO mice showed normal body weight, glucose and insulin tolerance, and leptin levels but were protected from obesity-induced leptin resistance. The neuronal knockout also prevented the reduction in estrous cycles due to the HFD. Examination of ovarian histology showed a decrease in the number of primary and secondary follicles in both genotypes due to the HFD, but the BKO ovaries showed an increase in the number of hemorrhagic follicles. In summary, our results show that neuronal PPARγ is required for optimal female fertility but is also involved in the adverse effects of diet-induced obesity by creating leptin resistance potentially through induction of the repressor Socs3. Copyright © 2017 by the Endocrine Society.

  7. Central serotonergic neurons activate and recruit thermogenic brown and beige fat and regulate glucose and lipid homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGlashon, Jacob M; Gorecki, Michelle C; Kozlowski, Amanda E

    2015-01-01

    Thermogenic brown and beige adipocytes convert chemical energy to heat by metabolizing glucose and lipids. Serotonin (5-HT) neurons in the CNS are essential for thermoregulation and accordingly may control metabolic activity of thermogenic fat. To test this, we generated mice in which the human...... adipose tissue (WAT). In parallel, blood glucose increased 3.5-fold, free fatty acids 13.4-fold, and triglycerides 6.5-fold. Similar BAT and beige fat defects occurred in Lmx1b(f/f)ePet1(Cre) mice in which 5-HT neurons fail to develop in utero. We conclude 5-HT neurons play a major role in regulating...

  8. Sodium glucose transporter 2 (SGLT2 inhibition and ketogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kalra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sodium glucose transporter 2 (SGLT2 inhibitors are a recently developed class of drug that have been approved for use in type 2 diabetes. Their unique extra-pancreatic glucuretic mode of action has encouraged their usage in type 1 diabetes as well. At the same time, reports of pseudo ketoacidosis and ketoacidosis related to their use have been published. No clear mechanism for this phenomenon has been demonstrated so far. This communication delves into the biochemical effects of SGLT2 inhibition, discusses the utility of these drugs and proposes steps to maximize safe usage of the molecules.

  9. Morphine Preconditioning Downregulates MicroRNA-134 Expression Against Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation Injuries in Cultured Neurons of Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanjun; Li, Yan; Chi, Wenying; Li, Junfa

    2016-07-01

    Brain protection by narcotics such as morphine is clinically relevant due to the extensive use of narcotics in the perioperative period. Morphine preconditioning induces neuroprotection in neurons, but it remains uncertain whether microRNA-134 (miR-134) is involved in morphine preconditioning against oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced injuries in primary cortical neurons of mice. The present study examined this issue. After cortical neurons of mice were cultured in vitro for 6 days, the neurons were transfected by respective virus vector, such as lentiviral vector (LV)-miR-control-GFP, LV-pre-miR-134-GFP, LV-pre-miR-134-inhibitor-GFP for 24 hours; after being normally cultured for 3 days again, morphine preconditioning was performed by incubating the transfected primary neurons with morphine (3 μM) for 1 hour, and then neuronal cells were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) for 1 hour and oxygen-glucose recovery for 12 hours. The neuronal cells survival rate and the amount of apoptotic neurons were determined by MTT assay or TUNEL staining at designated time; and the expression levels of miR-134 were detected using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction at the same time. The neuronal cell survival rate was significantly higher, and the amount of apoptotic neurons was significantly decreased in neurons preconditioned with morphine before OGD than that of OGD alone. The neuroprotection induced by morphine preconditioning was partially blocked by upregulating miR-134 expression, and was enhanced by downregulating miR-134 expression. The expression of miR-134 was significantly decreased in morphine-preconditioned neurons alone without transfection. By downregulating miR-134 expression, morphine preconditioning protects primary cortical neurons of mice against injuries induced by OGD.

  10. Effect of erythropoietin on the glucose transport of rat erythrocytes and bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosal, J.; Chakraborty, M.; Biswas, T.; Ganguly, C.K.; Datta, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of Ep on radioactive glucose and methyl-alpha-D-glucoside transport by rat erythrocytes and bone marrow cells were studied. There is initial linearity followed by saturation kinetics of [ 14 C]glucose transport by the erythrocytes of starved and starved plus Ep-treated rats at different concentrations of glucose. Starvation caused slight inhibition of glucose transport which increased markedly on Ep administration to starved rats. Normal animals failed to show any significant change in glucose transport after Ep treatment. Methyl-alpha-D-glucoside inhibited the Ep-stimulated glucose transport significantly. Ep also stimulated the transport of radioactive methyl-alpha-D-glucoside which was competitively inhibited in presence of D-glucose. Glucose transport in erythrocytes was found to be sensitive to metabolic inhibitors like azide and DNP. A sulfhydryl reagent and ouabain also inhibited the transport process. Ep stimulated glucose and methyl-alpha-D-glucoside transport in the bone marrow cells of starved rats. The sugar analog competitively inhibited the glucose transport in bone marrow cells and vice versa

  11. The Role of Glucose Transporters in Brain Disease: Diabetes and Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Kaushik; DeSilva, Shanal; Abbruscato, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of altered brain glucose metabolism has long been suggested in both diabetes and Alzheimer’s diseases. However, the preceding mechanism to altered glucose metabolism has not been well understood. Glucose enters the brain via glucose transporters primarily present at the blood-brain barrier. Any changes in glucose transporter function and expression dramatically affects brain glucose homeostasis and function. In the brains of both diabetic and Alzheimer’s disease patients, changes in glucose transporter function and expression have been observed, but a possible link between the altered glucose transporter function and disease progress is missing. Future recognition of the role of new glucose transporter isoforms in the brain may provide a better understanding of brain glucose metabolism in normal and disease states. Elucidation of clinical pathological mechanisms related to glucose transport and metabolism may provide common links to the etiology of these two diseases. Considering these facts, in this review we provide a current understanding of the vital roles of a variety of glucose transporters in the normal, diabetic and Alzheimer’s disease brain. PMID:23202918

  12. Steviol Glycosides Modulate Glucose Transport in Different Cell Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Benedetta; Zambonin, Laura; Leoncini, Emanuela; Vieceli Dalla Sega, Francesco; Prata, Cecilia; Fiorentini, Diana; Hrelia, Silvana

    2013-01-01

    Extracts from Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni, a plant native to Central and South America, have been used as a sweetener since ancient times. Currently, Stevia extracts are largely used as a noncaloric high-potency biosweetener alternative to sugar, due to the growing incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity, and metabolic disorders worldwide. Despite the large number of studies on Stevia and steviol glycosides in vivo, little is reported concerning the cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning the beneficial effects on human health. The effect of four commercial Stevia extracts on glucose transport activity was evaluated in HL-60 human leukaemia and in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. The extracts were able to enhance glucose uptake in both cellular lines, as efficiently as insulin. Our data suggest that steviol glycosides could act by modulating GLUT translocation through the PI3K/Akt pathway since treatments with both insulin and Stevia extracts increased the phosphorylation of PI3K and Akt. Furthermore, Stevia extracts were able to revert the effect of the reduction of glucose uptake caused by methylglyoxal, an inhibitor of the insulin receptor/PI3K/Akt pathway. These results corroborate the hypothesis that Stevia extracts could mimic insulin effects modulating PI3K/Akt pathway. PMID:24327825

  13. Neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside Rg1 against oxygen-glucose deprivation in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qing; Sun, Jianguo; Wang, Qin; Wang, Wei; He, Bin

    2014-03-01

    Ginsenoside Rg1 (Rg1) is believed to be one of the main active principles in ginseng, a traditional Chinese medicine extensively used to enhance stamina and deal with fatigue as well as physical stress. It has been reported that Rg1 performs multiple biological activities, including neuroprotective activity. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of ginsenoside Rg1 on ischemia-reperfusion injury in cultured hippocampal cells and also probed its possible mechanisms. To establish a model of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and reperfusion, cultured hippocampal neurons were exposed to OGD for 2.5 hours, followed by a 24-hour reoxygenation. Cultured hippocampal neurons were randomly divided into control group, model group (vehicle), and ginsenoside Rg1 treatment groups (5μM, 20μM, 60μM). At 24 hours post-OGD, the intracellular free calcium concentration was detected using Furo-3/AM-loaded hippocampal neurons deprived of oxygen and glucose. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) activity was measured by chemical colorimetry. Cell apoptosis was evaluated by Hoechst staining, and the neuron viability was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Excitotoxic neuronal injury of OGD was demonstrated by the increase of intracellular free calcium concentrations and elevated nNOS activity in the model group compared with the control group. The intracellular free calcium concentrations and the nNOS activity in the groups receiving intermediate and high dose of ginsenoside Rg1 were significantly lower than those of the control group (p cell viability loss (p cell apoptosis induced by OGD. Ginsenoside Rg1 has neuroprotective effect on ischemia-reperfusion injury in cultured hippocampal cells mediated by blocking calcium over-influx into neuronal cells and decreasing the nNOS activity after OGD exposure. We infer that ginsenoside Rg1 may serve as a potential therapeutic agent for cerebral ischemia injury. Copyright © 2014

  14. Diabetic Hyperglycemia: Link to Impaired Glucose Transport in Pancreatic β Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Roger H.

    1991-03-01

    Glucose uptake into pancreatic β cells by means of the glucose transporter GLUT-2, which has a high Michaelis constant, is essential for the normal insulin secretory response to hyperglycemia. In both autoimmune and nonautoimmune diabetes, this glucose transport is reduced as a consequence of down-regulation of the normal β-cell transporter. In autoimmune diabetes, circulating immunoglobulins can further impair this glucose transport by inhibiting functionally intact transporters. Insights into mechanisms of the unresponsiveness of β cells to hyperglycemia may improve the management and prevention of diabetes.

  15. Disturbed Glucose Metabolism in Rat Neurons Exposed to Cerebrospinal Fluid Obtained from Multiple Sclerosis Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepali Mathur

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Axonal damage is widely accepted as a major cause of permanent functional disability in Multiple Sclerosis (MS. In relapsing-remitting MS, there is a possibility of remyelination by myelin producing cells and restoration of neurological function. The purpose of this study was to delineate the pathophysiological mechanisms underpinning axonal injury through hitherto unknown factors present in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF that may regulate axonal damage, remyelinate the axon and make functional recovery possible. We employed primary cultures of rat unmyelinated cerebellar granule neurons and treated them with CSF obtained from MS and Neuromyelitis optica (NMO patients. We performed microarray gene expression profiling to study changes in gene expression in treated neurons as compared to controls. Additionally, we determined the influence of gene-gene interaction upon the whole metabolic network in our experimental conditions using the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins (STRING program. Our findings revealed the downregulated expression of genes involved in glucose metabolism in MS-derived CSF-treated neurons and upregulated expression of genes in NMO-derived CSF-treated neurons. We conclude that factors in the CSF of these patients caused a perturbation in metabolic gene(s expression and suggest that MS appears to be linked with metabolic deformity.

  16. The Ketone Body, β-Hydroxybutyrate Stimulates the Autophagic Flux and Prevents Neuronal Death Induced by Glucose Deprivation in Cortical Cultured Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camberos-Luna, Lucy; Gerónimo-Olvera, Cristian; Montiel, Teresa; Rincon-Heredia, Ruth; Massieu, Lourdes

    2016-03-01

    Glucose is the major energy substrate in brain, however, during ketogenesis induced by starvation or prolonged hypoglycemia, the ketone bodies (KB), acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) can substitute for glucose. KB improve neuronal survival in diverse injury models, but the mechanisms by which KB prevent neuronal damage are still not well understood. In the present study we have investigated whether protection by the D isomer of BHB (D-BHB) against neuronal death induced by glucose deprivation (GD), is related to autophagy. Autophagy is a lysosomal-dependent degradation process activated during nutritional stress, which leads to the digestion of damaged proteins and organelles providing energy for cell survival. Results show that autophagy is activated in cortical cultured neurons during GD, as indicated by the increase in the levels of the lipidated form of the microtubule associated protein light chain 3 (LC3-II), and the number of autophagic vesicles. At early phases of glucose reintroduction (GR), the levels of p62 declined suggesting that the degradation of the autophagolysosomal content takes place at this time. In cultures exposed to GD and GR in the presence of D-BHB, the levels of LC3-II and p62 rapidly declined and remained low during GR, suggesting that the KB stimulates the autophagic flux preventing autophagosome accumulation and improving neuronal survival.

  17. Novel Roles for the Insulin-Regulated Glucose Transporter-4 in Hippocampally Dependent Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson-Leary, Jiah; McNay, Ewan C

    2016-11-23

    The insulin-regulated glucose transporter-4 (GluT4) is critical for insulin- and contractile-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. GluT4 is also expressed in some hippocampal neurons, but its functional role in the brain is unclear. Several established molecular modulators of memory processing regulate hippocampal GluT4 trafficking and hippocampal memory formation is limited by both glucose metabolism and insulin signaling. Therefore, we hypothesized that hippocampal GluT4 might be involved in memory processes. Here, we show that, in male rats, hippocampal GluT4 translocates to the plasma membrane after memory training and that acute, selective intrahippocampal inhibition of GluT4-mediated glucose transport impaired memory acquisition, but not memory retrieval. Other studies have shown that prolonged systemic GluT4 blockade causes insulin resistance. Unexpectedly, we found that prolonged hippocampal blockade of glucose transport through GluT4-upregulated markers of hippocampal insulin signaling prevented task-associated depletion of hippocampal glucose and enhanced both working and short-term memory while also impairing long-term memory. These effects were accompanied by increased expression of hippocampal AMPA GluR1 subunits and the neuronal GluT3, but decreased expression of hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor, consistent with impaired ability to form long-term memories. Our findings are the first to show the cognitive impact of brain GluT4 modulation. They identify GluT4 as a key regulator of hippocampal memory processing and also suggest differential regulation of GluT4 in the hippocampus from that in peripheral tissues. The role of insulin-regulated glucose transporter-4 (GluT4) in the brain is unclear. In the current study, we demonstrate that GluT4 is a critical component of hippocampal memory processes. Memory training increased hippocampal GluT4 translocation and memory acquisition was impaired by GluT4 blockade. Unexpectedly, whereas long

  18. [Glucose-monitoring neurons of the medial ventrolateral prefrontal (orbitofrontal) cortex are involved in the maintenance of homeostasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, István; Hormay, Edina; Csetényi, Bettina; Nagy, Bernadett; Karádi, Zoltán

    2017-05-01

    The medial orbitofrontal cortex is involved in the regulation of feeding and metabolism. Little is known, however, about the role of local glucose-monitoring neurons in these processes, and our knowledge is also poor about characteristics of these cells. The functional significance of these chemosensory neurons was to be elucidated. Electrophysiology, by the multibarreled microelectrophoretic technique, and metabolic investigations, after streptozotocin induced selective destruction of the chemosensory neurons, were employed. Fifteen percent of the neurons responded to glucose, and these chemosensory cells displayed differential neurotransmitter and taste sensitivities. In acute glucose tolerance test, at the 30th and 60th minutes, blood glucose level in the streptozotocin-treated rats was significantly higher than that in the controls. The plasma triglyceride concentrations were also higher in the streptozotocin-treated group. Glucose-monitoring neurons of the medial orbitofrontal cortex integrate internal and external environmental signals, and monitor metabolic processes, thus, are indispensable to maintain the healthy homeostasis. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(18): 692-700.

  19. Effect of physical training on glucose transporter protein and mRNA levels in rat adipocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stallknecht, B; Andersen, P H; Vinten, J

    1993-01-01

    Physical training increases insulin-stimulated glucose transport and the number of glucose transporters in adipocytes measured by cytochalasin B binding. In the present study we used immunoblotting to measure the abundance of two glucose transporters (GLUT-4, GLUT-1) in white adipocytes from....../or intrinsic activity). GLUT-1 protein and mRNA levels/adipocyte volume did not change with age or training....

  20. Sugar transporter genes of the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens: A facilitated glucose/fructose transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuta, Shingo; Kikawada, Takahiro; Hagiwara-Komoda, Yuka; Nakashima, Nobuhiko; Noda, Hiroaki

    2010-11-01

    The brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens, attacks rice plants and feeds on their phloem sap, which contains large amounts of sugars. The main sugar component of phloem sap is sucrose, a disaccharide composed of glucose and fructose. Sugars appear to be incorporated into the planthopper body by sugar transporters in the midgut. A total of 93 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) for putative sugar transporters were obtained from a BPH EST database, and 18 putative sugar transporter genes (Nlst1-18) were identified. The most abundantly expressed of these genes was Nlst1. This gene has previously been identified in the BPH as the glucose transporter gene NlHT1, which belongs to the major facilitator superfamily. Nlst1, 4, 6, 9, 12, 16, and 18 were highly expressed in the midgut, and Nlst2, 7, 8, 10, 15, 17, and 18 were highly expressed during the embryonic stages. Functional analyses were performed using Xenopus oocytes expressing NlST1 or 6. This showed that NlST6 is a facilitative glucose/fructose transporter that mediates sugar uptake from rice phloem sap in the BPH midgut in a manner similar to NlST1. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Arcuate Na+,K+-ATPase senses systemic energy states and regulates feeding behavior through glucose-inhibited neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurita, Hideharu; Xu, Kai Y; Maejima, Yuko; Nakata, Masanori; Dezaki, Katsuya; Santoso, Putra; Yang, Yifei; Arai, Takeshi; Gantulga, Darambazar; Muroya, Shinji; Lefor, Alan K; Kakei, Masafumi; Watanabe, Eiju; Yada, Toshihiko

    2015-08-15

    Feeding is regulated by perception in the hypothalamus, particularly the first-order arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons, of the body's energy state. However, the cellular device for converting energy states to the activity of critical neurons in ARC is less defined. We here show that Na(+),K(+)-ATPase (NKA) in ARC senses energy states to regulate feeding. Fasting-induced systemic ghrelin rise and glucose lowering reduced ATP-hydrolyzing activity of NKA and its substrate ATP level, respectively, preferentially in ARC. Lowering glucose concentration (LG), which mimics fasting, decreased intracellular NAD(P)H and increased Na(+) concentration in single ARC neurons that subsequently exhibited [Ca(2+)]i responses to LG, showing that they were glucose-inhibited (GI) neurons. Third ventricular injection of the NKA inhibitor ouabain induced c-Fos expression in agouti-related protein (AgRP) neurons in ARC and evoked neuropeptide Y (NPY)-dependent feeding. When injected focally into ARC, ouabain stimulated feeding and mRNA expressions for NPY and AgRP. Ouabain increased [Ca(2+)]i in single NPY/AgRP neurons with greater amplitude than in proopiomelanocortin neurons in ARC. Conversely, the specific NKA activator SSA412 suppressed fasting-induced feeding and LG-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases in ARC GI neurons. NPY/AgRP neurons highly expressed NKAα3, whose knockdown impaired feeding behavior. These results demonstrate that fasting, via ghrelin rise and LG, suppresses NKA enzyme/pump activity in ARC and thereby promotes the activation of GI neurons and NPY/AgRP-dependent feeding. This study identifies ARC NKA as a hypothalamic sensor and converter of metabolic states to key neuronal activity and feeding behaviour, providing a new target to treat hyperphagic obesity and diabetes. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Ablation of neurons expressing melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) in adult mice improves glucose tolerance independent of MCH signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiddon, Benjamin B; Palmiter, Richard D

    2013-01-30

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH)-expressing neurons have been ascribed many roles based on studies of MCH-deficient mice. However, MCH neurons express other neurotransmitters, including GABA, nesfatin, and cocaine-amphetamine-regulated transcript. The importance of these other signaling molecules made by MCH neurons remains incompletely characterized. To determine the roles of MCH neurons in vivo, we targeted expression of the human diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) to the gene for MCH (Pmch). Within 2 weeks of diphtheria toxin injection, heterozygous Pmch(DTR/+) mice lost 98% of their MCH neurons. These mice became lean but ate normally and were hyperactive, especially during a fast. They also responded abnormally to psychostimulants. For these phenotypes, ablation of MCH neurons recapitulated knock-out of MCH, so MCH appears to be the critical neuromodulator released by these neurons. In contrast, MCH-neuron-ablated mice showed improved glucose tolerance when compared with MCH-deficient mutant mice and wild-type mice. We conclude that MCH neurons regulate glucose tolerance through signaling molecules other than MCH.

  3. β-Hydroxybutyrate is the preferred substrate for GABA and glutamate synthesis while glucose is indispensable during depolarization in cultured GABAergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Trine M; Obel, Linea F; Risa, Øystein; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2011-08-01

    The ketogenic diet has multiple beneficial effects not only in treatment of epilepsy, but also in that of glucose transporter 1 deficiency, cancer, Parkinson's disease, obesity and pain. Thus, there is an increasing interest in understanding the mechanism behind this metabolic therapy. Patients on a ketogenic diet reach high plasma levels of ketone bodies, which are used by the brain as energy substrates. The interaction between glucose and ketone bodies is complex and there is still controversy as to what extent it affects the homeostasis of the neurotransmitters glutamate, aspartate and GABA. The present study was conducted to study this metabolic interaction in cultured GABAergic neurons exposed to different combinations of (13)C-labeled and unlabeled glucose and β-hydroxybutyrate. Depolarization was induced and the incorporation of (13)C into glutamate, GABA and aspartate was analyzed. The presence of β-hydroxybutyrate together with glucose did not affect the total GABA content but did, however, decrease the aspartate content to a lower value than when either glucose or β-hydroxybutyrate was employed alone. When combinations of the two substrates were used (13)C-atoms from β-hydroxybutyrate were found in all three amino acids to a greater extent than (13)C-atoms from glucose, but only the (13)C contribution from [1,6-(13)C]glucose increased upon depolarization. In conclusion, β-hydroxybutyrate was preferred over glucose as substrate for amino acid synthesis but the total content of aspartate decreased when both substrates were present. Furthermore only the use of glucose increased upon depolarization. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. MicroRNA-132 protects hippocampal neurons against oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zu-Zhen; Lv, Zhan-Yun; Tian, Wen-Jing; Yang, Yan

    2017-09-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic brain injury (HIBI) results in death or long-term neurologic impairment in both adults and children. In this study, we investigated the effects of microRNA-132 (miR-132) dysregulation on oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced apoptosis in fetal rat hippocampal neurons, in order to reveal the therapeutic potential of miR-132 on HIBI. MiR-132 dysregulation was induced prior to OGD exposure by transfection of primary fetal rat hippocampal neurons with miR-132 mimic or miR-132 inhibitor. The effects of miR-132 overexpression and suppression on OGD-stimulated hippocampal neurons were evaluated by detection of cell viability, apoptotic cells rate, and the expression of apoptosis-related proteins. Besides, TargetScan database and dual luciferase activity assay were used to seek a target gene of miR-132. As a result, miR-132 was highly expressed in hippocampal neurons following 2 h of OGD exposure. MiR-132 overexpression significantly increased OGD-diminished cell viability and reduced OGD-induced apoptosis at 12, 24, and 48 h post-OGD. MiR-132 overexpression significantly down-regulated the expressions of Bax, cytochrome c, and caspase-9, but up-regulated BCl-2. Caspase-3 activity was also significantly decreased by miR-132 overexpression. Furthermore, FOXO3 was a direct target of miR-132, and it was negatively regulated by miR-132. To conclude, our results provide evidence that miR-132 protects hippocampal neurons against OGD injury by inhibiting apoptosis.

  5. Stretch-stimulated glucose transport in skeletal muscle is regulated by Rac1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylow, Lykke; Møller, Lisbeth L V; Kleinert, Maximilian; Richter, Erik A; Jensen, Thomas E

    2015-02-01

    Rac1 regulates stretch-stimulated (i.e. mechanical stress) glucose transport in muscle. Actin depolymerization decreases stretch-induced glucose transport in skeletal muscle. Rac1 is a required part of the mechanical stress-component of the contraction-stimulus to glucose transport in skeletal muscle. An alternative to the canonical insulin signalling pathway for glucose transport is muscle contraction/exercise. Mechanical stress is an integrated part of the muscle contraction/relaxation cycle, and passive stretch stimulates muscle glucose transport. However, the signalling mechanism regulating stretch-stimulated glucose transport is not well understood. We recently reported that the actin cytoskeleton regulating GTPase, Rac1, was activated in mouse muscle in response to stretching. Rac1 is a regulator of contraction- and insulin-stimulated glucose transport, however, its role in stretch-stimulated glucose transport and signalling is unknown. We therefore investigated whether stretch-induced glucose transport in skeletal muscle required Rac1 and the actin cytoskeleton. We used muscle-specific inducible Rac1 knockout mice as well as pharmacological inhibitors of Rac1 and the actin cytoskeleton in isolated soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles. In addition, the role of Rac1 in contraction-stimulated glucose transport during conditions without mechanical load on the muscles was evaluated in loosely hanging muscles and muscles in which cross-bridge formation was blocked by the myosin ATPase inhibitors BTS and Blebbistatin. Knockout as well as pharmacological inhibition of Rac1 reduced stretch-stimulated glucose transport by 30-50% in soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscle. The actin depolymerizing agent latrunculin B similarly decreased glucose transport in response to stretching by 40-50%. Rac1 inhibition reduced contraction-stimulated glucose transport by 30-40% in tension developing muscle but did not affect contraction-stimulated glucose transport in

  6. The role of glycogen, glucose and lactate in neuronal activity during hypoxia in the hooded seal (Cystophora cristata) brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czech-Damal, N U; Geiseler, S J; Hoff, M L M; Schliep, R; Ramirez, J-M; Folkow, L P; Burmester, T

    2014-09-05

    The brains of diving mammals are repeatedly exposed to hypoxic conditions during diving. Brain neurons of the hooded seal (Cystophora cristata) have been shown to be more hypoxia tolerant than those of mice, but the underlying mechanisms are not clear. Here we investigated the roles of different metabolic substrates for maintenance of neuronal activity and integrity, by comparing the in vitro spontaneous neuronal activity of brain slices from layer V of the visual cortex of hooded seals with those in mice (Mus musculus). Studies were conducted by manipulating the composition of the artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF), containing either 10 mM glucose, or 20 mM lactate, or no external carbohydrate supply (aglycemia). Normoxic, hypoxic and ischemic conditions were applied. The lack of glucose or the application of lactate in the aCSF containing no glucose had little effect on the neuronal activity of seal neurons in either normoxia or hypoxia, while neurons from mice survived in hypoxia only few minutes regardless of the composition of the aCSF. We propose that seal neurons have higher intrinsic energy stores. Indeed, we found about three times higher glycogen stores in the seal brain (∼4.1 ng per μg total protein in the seal cerebrum) than in the mouse brain. Notably, in aCSF containing no glucose, seal neurons can tolerate 20 mM lactate while in mouse neuronal activity vanished after few minutes even in normoxia. This can be considered as an adaptation to long dives, during which lactate accumulates in the blood. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Simultaneous measurement of glucose transport and utilization in the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shestov, Alexander A.; Emir, Uzay E.; Kumar, Anjali; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Seaquist, Elizabeth R.

    2011-01-01

    Glucose is the primary fuel for brain function, and determining the kinetics of cerebral glucose transport and utilization is critical for quantifying cerebral energy metabolism. The kinetic parameters of cerebral glucose transport, KMt and Vmaxt, in humans have so far been obtained by measuring steady-state brain glucose levels by proton (1H) NMR as a function of plasma glucose levels and fitting steady-state models to these data. Extraction of the kinetic parameters for cerebral glucose transport necessitated assuming a constant cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc) obtained from other tracer studies, such as 13C NMR. Here we present new methodology to simultaneously obtain kinetic parameters for glucose transport and utilization in the human brain by fitting both dynamic and steady-state 1H NMR data with a reversible, non-steady-state Michaelis-Menten model. Dynamic data were obtained by measuring brain and plasma glucose time courses during glucose infusions to raise and maintain plasma concentration at ∼17 mmol/l for ∼2 h in five healthy volunteers. Steady-state brain vs. plasma glucose concentrations were taken from literature and the steady-state portions of data from the five volunteers. In addition to providing simultaneous measurements of glucose transport and utilization and obviating assumptions for constant CMRglc, this methodology does not necessitate infusions of expensive or radioactive tracers. Using this new methodology, we found that the maximum transport capacity for glucose through the blood-brain barrier was nearly twofold higher than maximum cerebral glucose utilization. The glucose transport and utilization parameters were consistent with previously published values for human brain. PMID:21791622

  8. Early decline in glucose transport and metabolism precedes shift to ketogenic system in female aging and Alzheimer's mouse brain: implication for bioenergetic intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Fan; Yao, Jia; Rettberg, Jamaica R; Chen, Shuhua; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2013-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that mitochondrial bioenergetic deficits in the female brain accompanied reproductive senescence and was accompanied by a shift from an aerobic glycolytic to a ketogenic phenotype. Herein, we investigated the relationship between systems of fuel supply, transport and mitochondrial metabolic enzyme expression/activity during aging (3-15 months) in the hippocampus of nontransgenic (nonTg) background and 3xTgAD female mice. Results indicate that during female brain aging, both nonTg and 3xTgAD brains undergo significant decline in glucose transport, as detected by FDG-microPET, between 6-9 months of age just prior to the transition into reproductive senescence. The deficit in brain metabolism was sustained thereafter. Decline in glucose transport coincided with significant decline in neuronal glucose transporter expression and hexokinase activity with a concomitant rise in phosphorylated/inactivated pyruvate dehydrogenase. Lactate utilization declined in parallel to the decline in glucose transport suggesting lactate did not serve as an alternative fuel. An adaptive response in the nonTg hippocampus was a shift to transport and utilization of ketone bodies as an alternative fuel. In the 3xTgAD brain, utilization of ketone bodies as an alternative fuel was evident at the earliest age investigated and declined thereafter. The 3xTgAD adaptive response was to substantially increase monocarboxylate transporters in neurons while decreasing their expression at the BBB and in astrocytes. Collectively, these data indicate that the earliest change in the metabolic system of the aging female brain is the decline in neuronal glucose transport and metabolism followed by decline in mitochondrial function. The adaptive shift to the ketogenic system as an alternative fuel coincided with decline in mitochondrial function. Translationally, these data provide insights into the earliest events in bioenergetic aging of the female brain and provide potential

  9. Early Decline in Glucose Transport and Metabolism Precedes Shift to Ketogenic System in Female Aging and Alzheimer's Mouse Brain: Implication for Bioenergetic Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Fan; Yao, Jia; Rettberg, Jamaica R.; Chen, Shuhua; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2013-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that mitochondrial bioenergetic deficits in the female brain accompanied reproductive senescence and was accompanied by a shift from an aerobic glycolytic to a ketogenic phenotype. Herein, we investigated the relationship between systems of fuel supply, transport and mitochondrial metabolic enzyme expression/activity during aging (3–15 months) in the hippocampus of nontransgenic (nonTg) background and 3xTgAD female mice. Results indicate that during female brain aging, both nonTg and 3xTgAD brains undergo significant decline in glucose transport, as detected by FDG-microPET, between 6–9 months of age just prior to the transition into reproductive senescence. The deficit in brain metabolism was sustained thereafter. Decline in glucose transport coincided with significant decline in neuronal glucose transporter expression and hexokinase activity with a concomitant rise in phosphorylated/inactivated pyruvate dehydrogenase. Lactate utilization declined in parallel to the decline in glucose transport suggesting lactate did not serve as an alternative fuel. An adaptive response in the nonTg hippocampus was a shift to transport and utilization of ketone bodies as an alternative fuel. In the 3xTgAD brain, utilization of ketone bodies as an alternative fuel was evident at the earliest age investigated and declined thereafter. The 3xTgAD adaptive response was to substantially increase monocarboxylate transporters in neurons while decreasing their expression at the BBB and in astrocytes. Collectively, these data indicate that the earliest change in the metabolic system of the aging female brain is the decline in neuronal glucose transport and metabolism followed by decline in mitochondrial function. The adaptive shift to the ketogenic system as an alternative fuel coincided with decline in mitochondrial function. Translationally, these data provide insights into the earliest events in bioenergetic aging of the female brain and provide potential

  10. The metabolic trinity, glucose-glycogen-lactate, links astrocytes and neurons in brain energetics, signaling, memory, and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienel, Gerald A

    2017-01-10

    Glucose, glycogen, and lactate are traditionally identified with brain energetics, ATP turnover, and pathophysiology. However, recent studies extend their roles to include involvement in astrocytic signaling, memory consolidation, and gene expression. Emerging roles for these brain fuels and a readily-diffusible by-product are linked to differential fluxes in glycolytic and oxidative pathways, astrocytic glycogen dynamics, redox shifts, neuron-astrocyte interactions, and regulation of astrocytic activities by noradrenaline released from the locus coeruleus. Disproportionate utilization of carbohydrate compared with oxygen during brain activation is influenced by catecholamines, but its physiological basis is not understood and its magnitude may be affected by technical aspects of metabolite assays. Memory consolidation and gene expression are impaired by glycogenolysis blockade, and prevention of these deficits by injection of abnormally-high concentrations of lactate was interpreted as a requirement for astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttling in memory and gene expression. However, lactate transport was not measured and evidence for presumed shuttling is not compelling. In fact, high levels of lactate used to preserve memory consolidation and induce gene expression are sufficient to shut down neuronal firing via the HCAR1 receptor. In contrast, low lactate levels activate a receptor in locus coeruleus that stimulates noradrenaline release that may activate astrocytes throughout brain. Physiological relevance of exogenous concentrations of lactate used to mimic and evaluate metabolic, molecular, and behavioral effects of lactate requires close correspondence with the normal lactate levels, the biochemical and cellular sources and sinks, and specificity of lactate delivery to target cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Glucose Transporters in Diabetic Kidney Disease-Friends or Foes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasik, Anita A; Lehtonen, Sanna

    2018-01-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is a major microvascular complication of diabetes and a common cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. DKD manifests as an increased urinary protein excretion (albuminuria). Multiple studies have shown that insulin resistance correlates with the development of albuminuria in non-diabetic and diabetic patients. There is also accumulating evidence that glomerular epithelial cells or podocytes are insulin sensitive and that insulin signaling in podocytes is essential for maintaining normal kidney function. At the cellular level, the mechanisms leading to the development of insulin resistance include mutations in the insulin receptor gene, impairments in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT signaling pathway, or perturbations in the trafficking of glucose transporters (GLUTs), which mediate the uptake of glucose into cells. Podocytes express several GLUTs, including GLUT1, GLUT2, GLUT3, GLUT4, and GLUT8. Of these, the most studied ones are GLUT1 and GLUT4, both shown to be insulin responsive in podocytes. In the basal state, GLUT4 is preferentially located in perinuclear and cytosolic vesicular structures and to a lesser extent at the plasma membrane. After insulin stimulation, GLUT4 is sorted into GLUT4-containing vesicles (GCVs) that translocate to the plasma membrane. GCV trafficking consists of several steps, including approaching of the GCVs to the plasma membrane, tethering, and docking, after which the lipid bilayers of the GCVs and the plasma membrane fuse, delivering GLUT4 to the cell surface for glucose uptake into the cell. Studies have revealed novel molecular regulators of the GLUT trafficking in podocytes and unraveled unexpected roles for GLUT1 and GLUT4 in the development of DKD, summarized in this review. These findings pave the way for better understanding of the mechanistic pathways associated with the development and progression of DKD and aid in the development of new treatments for this devastating disease.

  12. Neuronal SH2B1 is essential for controlling energy and glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Decheng; Zhou, Yingjiang; Morris, David; Li, Minghua; Li, Zhiqin; Rui, Liangyou

    2007-02-01

    SH2B1 (previously named SH2-B), a cytoplasmic adaptor protein, binds via its Src homology 2 (SH2) domain to a variety of protein tyrosine kinases, including JAK2 and the insulin receptor. SH2B1-deficient mice are obese and diabetic. Here we demonstrated that multiple isoforms of SH2B1 (alpha, beta, gamma, and/or delta) were expressed in numerous tissues, including the brain, hypothalamus, liver, muscle, adipose tissue, heart, and pancreas. Rat SH2B1beta was specifically expressed in neural tissue in SH2B1-transgenic (SH2B1(Tg)) mice. SH2B1(Tg) mice were crossed with SH2B1-knockout (SH2B1(KO)) mice to generate SH2B1(TgKO) mice expressing SH2B1 only in neural tissue but not in other tissues. Systemic deletion of the SH2B1 gene resulted in metabolic disorders in SH2B1(KO) mice, including hyperlipidemia, leptin resistance, hyperphagia, obesity, hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance. Neuron-specific restoration of SH2B1beta not only corrected the metabolic disorders in SH2B1(TgKO) mice, but also improved JAK2-mediated leptin signaling and leptin regulation of orexigenic neuropeptide expression in the hypothalamus. Moreover, neuron-specific overexpression of SH2B1 dose-dependently protected against high-fat diet-induced leptin resistance and obesity. These observations suggest that neuronal SH2B1 regulates energy balance, body weight, peripheral insulin sensitivity, and glucose homeostasis at least in part by enhancing hypothalamic leptin sensitivity.

  13. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) blunt the response of Neuropeptide Y/Agouti-related peptide (NPY/AgRP) glucose inhibited (GI) neurons to decreased glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Lihong; Sheng, Zhenyu; Potian, Joseph; Deak, Adam; Rohowsky-Kochan, Christine; Routh, Vanessa H

    2016-10-01

    A population of Neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons which co-express Agouti-related peptide (AgRP) in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC) are inhibited at physiological levels of brain glucose and activated when glucose levels decline (e.g. glucose-inhibited or GI neurons). Fasting enhances the activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by low glucose. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhibits the enhanced activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by low glucose following a fast. Mice which express green fluorescent protein (GFP) on their NPY promoter were used to identify NPY/AgRP neurons. Fasting for 24h and LPS injection decreased blood glucose levels. As we have found previously, fasting increased c-fos expression in NPY/AgRP neurons and increased the activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by decreased glucose. As we predicted, LPS blunted these effects of fasting at the 24h time point. Moreover, the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) blocked the activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by decreased glucose. These data suggest that LPS and TNFα may alter glucose and energy homeostasis, in part, due to changes in the glucose sensitivity of NPY/AgRP neurons. Interestingly, our findings also suggest that NPY/AgRP-GI neurons use a distinct mechanism to sense changes in extracellular glucose as compared to our previous studies of GI neurons in the adjacent ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Striatal dopamine transporter, regional cerebral blood flow and glucose utilization in MPTP-induced parkinson disease mice model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yunchao; Wu Chunying; Xiang Jingde; Lin Xiangtong; Zhu Huiqing

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the variation of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), glucose utilization as well as the neurotoxic effect on dopaminergic neurons induced by neurotoxin 1-methy-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahy-dropyridine (MPTP). Methods: Eight-week old male C57BL/6 mice were given a total dose of 0-80 mg/kg MPTP intraperitoneally. Ten days later the mice were sacrificed for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-immunopositive cell count- ing in substantia nigra using SP immunohistochemistry. Vivo autoradiography was employed to measure striatal do- pamine transporter (DAT) loss, rCBF and glucose utilization in striatum and thalamus. Results: The extents of DAT depletion and TH-immunopositive cell loss were positively correlated (r=0.998, P O.2), while glucose utilization was only slightly reduced in caudate/putamen and thalamus by 3.0% and 5.4% in 80 mg/kg MPTP-treated mice (P<0.05). Conclusion: Significant dose-dependent relationship was in presence of MPTP induced dopaminergic neurons loss, changes of rCBF in caudate/putamen and thalamus were not significant, while the glucose utilization was slightly decreased in higher dose group. (authors)

  15. Exendin-4 improved rat cortical neuron survival under oxygen/glucose deprivation through PKA pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M-D; Huang, Y; Zhang, G-P; Mao, L; Xia, Y-P; Mei, Y-W; Hu, B

    2012-12-13

    Previous studies demonstrated that exendin-4 (Ex-4) may possess neurotrophic and neuroprotective functions in ischemia insults, but its mechanism remained unknown. Here, by using real-time PCR and ELISA, we identified the distribution of active GLP-1Rs in the rat primary cortical neurons. After establishment of an in vitro ischemia model by oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD), neurons were treated with various dosages of Ex-4. The MTT assay showed that the relative survival rate increased with the dosage of Ex-4 ranging from 0.2 to 0.8 μg/ml (Pglucose-regulated proteins 78 (GRP78) and reduced C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP). Western blot analysis demonstrated that, after neurons were treated with Ex-4, GRP78 was up-regulated over time (Pneurons, down-regulated the expression of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and up-regulated the Bax expression 3h after ODG (Pneurons against OGD by modulating the unfolded protein response (UPR) through the PKA pathway and may serve as a novel therapeutic agent for stroke. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Glucose transporter expression in human skeletal muscle fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, M; Handberg, A; Beck-Nielsen, H

    2000-01-01

    , but its expression is markedly reduced around birth and is further reduced to undetectable levels within the first year of life; 2) GLUT-3 protein expression appears at 18 wk of gestation and disappears after birth; and 3) GLUT-4 protein is diffusely expressed in muscle cells throughout gestation, whereas...... after birth, the characteristic subcellular localization is as seen in adult muscle fibers. Our results show that GLUT-1, GLUT-3, and GLUT-4 seem to be of importance during muscle fiber growth and development. GLUT-5 protein was undetectable in fetal and adult skeletal muscle fibers. In adult muscle...... amplification (TSA) technique to detect the localization of glucose transporter expression in human skeletal muscle. We found expression of GLUT-1, GLUT-3, and GLUT-4 in developing human muscle fibers showing a distinct expression pattern. 1) GLUT-1 is expressed in human skeletal muscle cells during gestation...

  17. Dysregulated hepatic expression of glucose transporters in chronic disease: contribution of semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase to hepatic glucose uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Sumera; Liaskou, Evaggelia; Fear, Janine; Garg, Abhilok; Reynolds, Gary; Claridge, Lee; Adams, David H; Newsome, Philip N; Lalor, Patricia F

    2014-12-15

    Insulin resistance is common in patients with chronic liver disease (CLD). Serum levels of soluble vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) are also increased in these patients. The amine oxidase activity of VAP-1 stimulates glucose uptake via translocation of transporters to the cell membrane in adipocytes and smooth muscle cells. We aimed to document human hepatocellular expression of glucose transporters (GLUTs) and to determine if VAP-1 activity influences receptor expression and hepatic glucose uptake. Quantitative PCR and immunocytochemistry were used to study human liver tissue and cultured cells. We also used tissue slices from humans and VAP-1-deficient mice to assay glucose uptake and measure hepatocellular responses to stimulation. We report upregulation of GLUT1, -3, -5, -6, -7, -8, -9, -10, -11, -12, and -13 in CLD. VAP-1 expression and enzyme activity increased in disease, and provision of substrate to hepatic VAP-1 drives hepatic glucose uptake. This effect was sensitive to inhibition of VAP-1 and could be recapitulated by H2O2. VAP-1 activity also altered expression and subcellular localization of GLUT2, -4, -9, -10, and -13. Therefore, we show, for the first time, alterations in hepatocellular expression of glucose and fructose transporters in CLD and provide evidence that the semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase activity of VAP-1 modifies hepatic glucose homeostasis and may contribute to patterns of GLUT expression in chronic disease. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Neuronal response of the hippocampal formation to injury: blood flow, glucose metabolism, and protein synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameyama, M.; Wasterlain, C.G.; Ackermann, R.F.; Finch, D.; Lear, J.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    The reaction of the hippocampal formation to entorhinal lesions was studied from the viewpoints of cerebral blood flow ([ 123 I]isopropyl-iodoamphetamine[IMP])-glucose utilization ([ 14 C]2-deoxyglucose), and protein synthesis ([ 14 C]leucine), using single- and double-label autoradiography. Researchers' studies showed decreased glucose utilization in the inner part, and increased glucose utilization in the outer part of the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus, starting 3 days after the lesion; increased uptake of [ 123 I]IMP around the lesion from 1 to 3 days postlesion; and starting 3 days after the lesion, marked decrease in [ 14 C]leucine incorporation into proteins and cell loss in the dorsal CA1 and dorsal subiculum in about one-half of the rats. These changes were present only in animals with lesions which invaded the ventral hippocampal formation in which axons of CA1 cells travel. By contrast, transsection of the 3rd and 4th cranial nerves resulted, 3 to 9 days after injury, in a striking increase in protein synthesis in the oculomotor and trochlear nuclei. These results raise the possibility that in some neurons the failure of central regeneration may result from the cell's inability to increase its rate of protein synthesis in response to axonal injury

  19. Oleate induces KATP channel-dependent hyperpolarization in mouse hypothalamic glucose-excited neurons without altering cellular energy charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadak, Selma; Beall, Craig; Vlachaki Walker, Julia M; Soutar, Marc P M; McCrimmon, Rory J; Ashford, Michael L J

    2017-03-27

    The unsaturated fatty acid, oleate exhibits anorexigenic properties reducing food intake and hepatic glucose output. However, its mechanism of action in the hypothalamus has not been fully determined. This study investigated the effects of oleate and glucose on GT1-7 mouse hypothalamic cells (a model of glucose-excited (GE) neurons) and mouse arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons. Whole-cell and perforated patch-clamp recordings, immunoblotting and cell energy status measures were used to investigate oleate- and glucose-sensing properties of mouse hypothalamic neurons. Oleate or lowered glucose concentration caused hyperpolarization and inhibition of firing of GT1-7 cells by the activation of ATP-sensitive K + channels (K ATP ). This effect of oleate was not dependent on fatty acid oxidation or raised AMP-activated protein kinase activity or prevented by the presence of the UCP2 inhibitor genipin. Oleate did not alter intracellular calcium, indicating that CD36/fatty acid translocase may not play a role. However, oleate activation of K ATP may require ATP metabolism. The short-chain fatty acid octanoate was unable to replicate the actions of oleate on GT1-7 cells. Although oleate decreased GT1-7 cell mitochondrial membrane potential there was no change in total cellular ATP or ATP/ADP ratios. Perforated patch and whole-cell recordings from mouse hypothalamic slices demonstrated that oleate hyperpolarized a subpopulation of ARC GE neurons by K ATP activation. Additionally, in a separate small population of ARC neurons, oleate application or lowered glucose concentration caused membrane depolarization. In conclusion, oleate induces K ATP- dependent hyperpolarization and inhibition of firing of a subgroup of GE hypothalamic neurons without altering cellular energy charge. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Metformin Protects Neurons against Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation/Reoxygenation -Induced Injury by Down-Regulating MAD2B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xianfang; Chu, Guangpin; Yang, Zhihua; Qiu, Ping; Hu, Yue; Chen, Xiaohe; Peng, Wenpeng; Ye, Chen; He, Fang-Fang; Zhang, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Metformin, the common medication for type II diabetes, has protective effects on cerebral ischemia. However, the molecular mechanisms are far from clear. Mitotic arrest deficient 2-like protein 2 (MAD2B), an inhibitor of the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), is widely expressed in hippocampal and cortical neurons and plays an important role in mediating high glucose-induced neurotoxicity. The present study investigated whether metformin modifies the expression of MAD2B and to exert its neuroprotective effects in primary cultured cortical neurons during oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R), a widely used in vitro model of ischemia/reperfusion. Primary cortical neurons were cultured, deprived of oxygen-glucose for 1 h, and then recovered with oxygen-glucose for 12 h and 24 h. Cell viability was measured by detecting the levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in culture medium. The levels of MAD2B, cyclin B and p-histone 3 were measured by Western blot. Cell viability of neurons was reduced under oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R). The expression of MAD2B was increased under OGD/R. The levels of cyclin B1, which is a substrate of APC, were also increased. Moreover, OGD/R up-regulated the phosphorylation levels of histone 3, which is the induction of aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons. However, pretreatment of neurons with metformin alleviated OGD/R-induced injury. Metformin further decreased the expression of MAD2B, cyclin B1 and phosphorylation levels of histone 3. Metformin exerts its neuroprotective effect through regulating the expression of MAD2B in neurons under OGD/R. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Mangiferin Upregulates Glyoxalase 1 Through Activation of Nrf2/ARE Signaling in Central Neurons Cultured with High Glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao-Wu; Cheng, Ya-Qin; Liu, Xiao-Li; Hao, Yun-Chao; Li, Yu; Zhu, Xia; Zhang, Fan; Yin, Xiao-Xing

    2017-08-01

    Mangiferin, a natural C-glucoside xanthone, has anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, neuroprotective actions. Our previous study showed that mangiferin could attenuate diabetes-associated cognitive impairment of rats by enhancing the function of glyoxalase 1 (Glo-1) in brain. The aim of this study was to investigate whether Glo-1 upregulation by mangiferin in central neurons exposed to chronic high glucose may be related to activation of Nrf2/ARE pathway. Compared with normal glucose (25 mmol/L) culture, Glo-1 protein, mRNA, and activity levels were markedly decreased in primary hippocampal and cerebral cortical neurons cultured with high glucose (50 mmol/L) for 72 h, accompanied by the declined Nrf2 nuclear translocation and protein expression of Nrf2 in cell nucleus, as well as protein expression and mRNA level of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS) and superoxide dismutase activity, target genes of Nrf2/ARE signaling. Nonetheless, high glucose cotreating with mangiferin or sulforaphane, a typical inducer of Nrf2 activation, attenuated the above changes in both central neurons. In addition, mangiferin and sulforaphane significantly prevented the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) reflecting Glo-1 activity, while elevated the level of glutathione, a cofactor of Glo-1 activity and production of γ-GCS, in high glucose cultured central neurons. These findings demonstrated that Glo-1 was greatly downregulated in central neurons exposed to chronic high glucose, which is expected to lead the formation of AGEs and oxidative stress damages. We also proved that mangiferin enhanced the function of Glo-1 under high glucose condition by inducing activation of Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway.

  2. Neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside Rb1 on high glucose-induced neurotoxicity in primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Di; Zhang, Hong; Gu, Wenjuan; Liu, Yuqin; Zhang, Mengren

    2013-01-01

    Ginsenoside Rb1 is one of the main active principles in traditional herb ginseng and has been reported to have a wide variety of neuroprotective effects. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, so the present study aimed to observe the effects of ginsenoside Rb1 on ER stress signaling pathways in high glucose-treated hippocampal neurons. The results from MTT, TUNEL labeling and Annexin V-FITC/PI/Hoechst assays showed that incubating neurons with 50 mM high glucose for 72 h decreased cell viability and increased the number of apoptotic cells whereas treating neurons with 1 μM Rb1 for 72 h protected the neurons against high glucose-induced cell damage. Further molecular mechanism study demonstrated that Rb1 suppressed the activation of ER stress-associated proteins including protein kinase RNA (PKR)-like ER kinase (PERK) and C/EBP homology protein (CHOP) and downregulation of Bcl-2 induced by high glucose. Moreover, Rb1 inhibited both the elevation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential induced by high glucose. In addition, the high glucose-induced cell apoptosis, activation of ER stress, ROS accumulation and mitochondrial dysfunction can also be attenuated by the inhibitor of ER stress 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) and anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine(NAC). In conclusion, these results suggest that Rb1 may protect neurons against high glucose-induced cell injury through inhibiting CHOP signaling pathway as well as oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction.

  3. Glucose Transporters at the Blood-Brain Barrier: Function, Regulation and Gateways for Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patching, Simon G

    2017-03-01

    Glucose transporters (GLUTs) at the blood-brain barrier maintain the continuous high glucose and energy demands of the brain. They also act as therapeutic targets and provide routes of entry for drug delivery to the brain and central nervous system for treatment of neurological and neurovascular conditions and brain tumours. This article first describes the distribution, function and regulation of glucose transporters at the blood-brain barrier, the major ones being the sodium-independent facilitative transporters GLUT1 and GLUT3. Other GLUTs and sodium-dependent transporters (SGLTs) have also been identified at lower levels and under various physiological conditions. It then considers the effects on glucose transporter expression and distribution of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia associated with diabetes and oxygen/glucose deprivation associated with cerebral ischemia. A reduction in glucose transporters at the blood-brain barrier that occurs before the onset of the main pathophysiological changes and symptoms of Alzheimer's disease is a potential causative effect in the vascular hypothesis of the disease. Mutations in glucose transporters, notably those identified in GLUT1 deficiency syndrome, and some recreational drug compounds also alter the expression and/or activity of glucose transporters at the blood-brain barrier. Approaches for drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier include the pro-drug strategy whereby drug molecules are conjugated to glucose transporter substrates or encapsulated in nano-enabled delivery systems (e.g. liposomes, micelles, nanoparticles) that are functionalised to target glucose transporters. Finally, the continuous development of blood-brain barrier in vitro models is important for studying glucose transporter function, effects of disease conditions and interactions with drugs and xenobiotics.

  4. Blood glucose level reconstruction as a function of transcapillary glucose transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutny, Tomas

    2014-10-01

    A diabetic patient occasionally undergoes a detailed monitoring of their glucose levels. Over the course of a few days, a monitoring system provides a detailed track of their interstitial fluid glucose levels measured in their subcutaneous tissue. A discrepancy in the blood and interstitial fluid glucose levels is unimportant because the blood glucose levels are not measured continuously. Approximately five blood glucose level samples are taken per day, and the interstitial fluid glucose level is usually measured every 5min. An increased frequency of blood glucose level sampling would cause discomfort for the patient; thus, there is a need for methods to estimate blood glucose levels from the glucose levels measured in subcutaneous tissue. The Steil-Rebrin model is widely used to describe the relationship between blood and interstitial fluid glucose dynamics. However, we measured glucose level patterns for which the Steil-Rebrin model does not hold. Therefore, we based our research on a different model that relates present blood and interstitial fluid glucose levels to future interstitial fluid glucose levels. Using this model, we derived an improved model for calculating blood glucose levels. In the experiments conducted, this model outperformed the Steil-Rebrin model while introducing no additional requirements for glucose sample collection. In subcutaneous tissue, 26.71% of the calculated blood glucose levels had absolute values of relative differences from smoothed measured blood glucose levels less than or equal to 5% using the Steil-Rebrin model. However, the same difference interval was encountered in 63.01% of the calculated blood glucose levels using the proposed model. In addition, 79.45% of the levels calculated with the Steil-Rebrin model compared with 95.21% of the levels calculated with the proposed model had 20% difference intervals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Glucose transporter 1 and monocarboxylate transporters 1, 2, and 4 localization within the glial cells of shark blood-brain-barriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Balmaceda-Aguilera

    Full Text Available Although previous studies showed that glucose is used to support the metabolic activity of the cartilaginous fish brain, the distribution and expression levels of glucose transporter (GLUT isoforms remained undetermined. Optic/ultrastructural immunohistochemistry approaches were used to determine the expression of GLUT1 in the glial blood-brain barrier (gBBB. GLUT1 was observed solely in glial cells; it was primarily located in end-feet processes of the gBBB. Western blot analysis showed a protein with a molecular mass of 50 kDa, and partial sequencing confirmed GLUT1 identity. Similar approaches were used to demonstrate increased GLUT1 polarization to both apical and basolateral membranes in choroid plexus epithelial cells. To explore monocarboxylate transporter (MCT involvement in shark brain metabolism, the expression of MCTs was analyzed. MCT1, 2 and 4 were expressed in endothelial cells; however, only MCT1 and MCT4 were present in glial cells. In neurons, MCT2 was localized at the cell membrane whereas MCT1 was detected within mitochondria. Previous studies demonstrated that hypoxia modified GLUT and MCT expression in mammalian brain cells, which was mediated by the transcription factor, hypoxia inducible factor-1. Similarly, we observed that hypoxia modified MCT1 cellular distribution and MCT4 expression in shark telencephalic area and brain stem, confirming the role of these transporters in hypoxia adaptation. Finally, using three-dimensional ultrastructural microscopy, the interaction between glial end-feet and leaky blood vessels of shark brain was assessed in the present study. These data suggested that the brains of shark may take up glucose from blood using a different mechanism than that used by mammalian brains, which may induce astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttling and metabolic coupling as observed in mammalian brain. Our data suggested that the structural conditions and expression patterns of GLUT1, MCT1, MCT2 and MCT4 in shark

  6. Influence of glucose and urea on 125I transport across an anion exchange paper membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Hiroyoshi

    2001-01-01

    In order to study the influence of glucose and urea on the 125 I transport across an anion exchange paper membrane, the transmembrane potential, the fluxes, and the concentrations of 125 I, glucose and urea within the membrane were measured in the Na 125 I concentration-cell system containing glucose or urea. Glucose and urea increased the membrane/solution distribution of the iodide ion, but scarcely affected the diffusion process of iodide ion within the membrane

  7. Effect of insulin and glucocorticoids on glucose transporters in rat adipocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter-Su, C.; Okamoto, K.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of glucocorticoids to modify the effect of insulin on glucose (L-1- 3 H(N)]glucose and D-[ 14 C-U]glucose) transport was investigated in both intact isolated rat adipocytes and in membranes isolated from hormone-treated adipocytes. In intact adipocytes, dexamethasone, a potent synthetic glucocorticoid, inhibited insulin-stimulated 3-O-methylglucose transport at all concentrations of insulin tested. Insulin sensitivity, as well as the maximal response to insulin, was decreased by dexamethasone in the absence of a change in 125 I insulin binding. The inhibition was observed regardless of which hormone acted first, was blocked by actinomycin D, and resulted from a decrease in V/sub max/ rather than an increase in K/sub t/ of transport. In plasma membranes isolated from insulin-treated adipocytes, glucose transport activity and the amount of glucose transporter covalently labeled with [ 3 H]cytochalasin B were increased in parallel in a dose-dependent fashion. The amount of labeled transporter in a low-density microsomal fraction (LDMF) was decreased in a reciprocal fashion. In contrast, addition of dexamethasone to insulin-stimulated cells caused decreases in both transport activity and amount of labeled transporter in the plasma membranes. This was accompanied by a small increase in the amount of [ 3 H]cytochalasin B incorporated into the glucose transporter in the LDMF. These results are consistent with both insulin and glucocorticoids altering the distribution of glucose transporters between the plasma membrane and LDMF, in opposite directions

  8. Glucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome : the expanding clinical and genetic spectrum of a treatable disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leen, Wilhelmina G.; Klepper, Joerg; Verbeek, Marcel M.; Leferink, Maike; Hofste, Tom; van Engelen, Baziel G.; Wevers, Ron A.; Arthur, Todd; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Ballhausen, Diana; Bekhof, Jolita; van Bogaert, Patrick; Carrilho, Ines; Chabrol, Brigitte; Champion, Michael P.; Coldwell, James; Clayton, Peter; Donner, Elizabeth; Evangeliou, Athanasios; Ebinger, Friedrich; Farrell, Kevin; Forsyth, Rob J.; de Goede, Christian G. E. L.; Gross, Stephanie; Grunewald, Stephanie; Holthausen, Hans; Jayawant, Sandeep; Lachlan, Katherine; Laugel, Vincent; Leppig, Kathy; Lim, Ming J.; Mancini, Grazia; Della Marina, Adela; Martorell, Loreto; McMenamin, Joe; Meuwissen, Marije E. C.; Mundy, Helen; Nilsson, Nils O.; Panzer, Axel; Poll-The, Bwee T.; Rauscher, Christian; Rouselle, Christophe M. R.; Sandvig, Inger; Scheffner, Thomas; Sheridan, Eamonn; Simpson, Neil; Sykora, Parol; Tomlinson, Richard; Trounce, John; Webb, David; Weschke, Bernhard; Scheffer, Hans; Willemsen, Michel A.

    Glucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome is caused by mutations in the SLC2A1 gene in the majority of patients and results in impaired glucose transport into the brain. From 2004-2008, 132 requests for mutational analysis of the SLC2A1 gene were studied by automated Sanger sequencing and multiplex

  9. Glucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome: The expanding clinical and genetic spectrum of a treatable disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.G. Leen (Wilhelmina); J. Klepper (Joerg); M.M. Verbeek (Marcel); M. Leferink (Maike); T. Hofste (Tom); B.G.M. van Engelen (Baziel); R.A. Wevers (Ron); T. Arthur (Todd); N. Bahi-Buisson (Nadia); D. Ballhausen (Diana); J. Bekhof (Jolita); P. van Bogaert (Patrick); I. Carrilho (Inês); B. Chabrol (Brigitte); M.P. Champion (Michael); J. Coldwell (James); P. Clayton (Peter); E. Donner (Elizabeth); A. Evangeliou (Athanasios); F. Ebinger (Friedrich); K. Farrell (Kevin); R.J. Forsyth (Rob); C.G.E.L. de Goede (Christian); S. Gross (Stephanie); S. Grünewald (Sonja); H. Holthausen (Hans); S. Jayawant (Sandeep); K. Lachlan (Katherine); V. Laugel (Vincent); K. Leppig (Kathy); M.J. Lim (Ming); G.M.S. Mancini (Grazia); A.D. Marina; L. Martorell (Loreto); J. McMenamin (Joe); M.E.C. Meuwissen (Marije); H. Mundy (Helen); N.O. Nilsson (Nils); A. Panzer (Axel); B.T. Poll-The; C. Rauscher (Christian); C.M.R. Rouselle (Christophe); I. Sandvig (Inger); T. Scheffner (Thomas); E. Sheridan (Eamonn); N. Simpson (Neil); P. Sykora (Parol); R. Tomlinson (Richard); J. Trounce (John); D.W.M. Webb (David); B. Weschke (Bernhard); H. Scheffer (Hans); M.A. Willemsen (Michél)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractGlucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome is caused by mutations in the SLC2A1 gene in the majority of patients and results in impaired glucose transport into the brain. From 2004-2008, 132 requests for mutational analysis of the SLC2A1 gene were studied by automated Sanger sequencing

  10. Glucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome: the expanding clinical and genetic spectrum of a treatable disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leen, Wilhelmina G.; Klepper, Joerg; Verbeek, Marcel M.; Leferink, Maike; Hofste, Tom; van Engelen, Baziel G.; Wevers, Ron A.; Arthur, Todd; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Ballhausen, Diana; Bekhof, Jolita; van Bogaert, Patrick; Carrilho, Inês; Chabrol, Brigitte; Champion, Michael P.; Coldwell, James; Clayton, Peter; Donner, Elizabeth; Evangeliou, Athanasios; Ebinger, Friedrich; Farrell, Kevin; Forsyth, Rob J.; de Goede, Christian G. E. L.; Gross, Stephanie; Grunewald, Stephanie; Holthausen, Hans; Jayawant, Sandeep; Lachlan, Katherine; Laugel, Vincent; Leppig, Kathy; Lim, Ming J.; Mancini, Grazia; Marina, Adela Della; Martorell, Loreto; McMenamin, Joe; Meuwissen, Marije E. C.; Mundy, Helen; Nilsson, Nils O.; Panzer, Axel; Poll-The, Bwee T.; Rauscher, Christian; Rouselle, Christophe M. R.; Sandvig, Inger; Scheffner, Thomas; Sheridan, Eamonn; Simpson, Neil; Sykora, Parol; Tomlinson, Richard; Trounce, John; Webb, David; Weschke, Bernhard; Scheffer, Hans; Willemsen, Michél A.

    2010-01-01

    Glucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome is caused by mutations in the SLC2A1 gene in the majority of patients and results in impaired glucose transport into the brain. From 2004-2008, 132 requests for mutational analysis of the SLC2A1 gene were studied by automated Sanger sequencing and multiplex

  11. Glucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome: the expanding clinical and genetic spectrum of a treatable disorder.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leen, W.G.; Klepper, J.; Verbeek, M.M.; Leferink, M.; Hofste, T.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Wevers, R.A.; Arthur, T.; Bahi-Buisson, N.; Ballhausen, D.; Bekhof, J.; Bogaert, P. van; Carrilho, I.; Chabrol, B.; Champion, M.P.; Coldwell, J.; Clayton, P.; Donner, E.; Evangeliou, A.; Ebinger, F.; Farrell, K.; Forsyth, R.J.; Goede, C.G. de; Gross, S.; Grunewald, S.; Holthausen, H.; Jayawant, S.; Lachlan, K.; Laugel, V.; Leppig, K.; Lim, M.J.; Mancini, G.; Marina, A.D.; Martorell, L.; McMenamin, J.; Meuwissen, M.E.; Mundy, H.; Nilsson, N.O.; Panzer, A.; Poll-The, B.T.; Rauscher, C.; Rouselle, C.M.; Sandvig, I.; Scheffner, T.; Sheridan, E.; Simpson, N.; Sykora, P.; Tomlinson, R.; Trounce, J.; Webb, D.; Weschke, B.; Scheffer, H.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.

    2010-01-01

    Glucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome is caused by mutations in the SLC2A1 gene in the majority of patients and results in impaired glucose transport into the brain. From 2004-2008, 132 requests for mutational analysis of the SLC2A1 gene were studied by automated Sanger sequencing and multiplex

  12. Stretch-stimulated glucose transport in skeletal muscle is regulated by Rac1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylow, Lykke; Møller, Lisbeth L V; Kleinert, Maximilian

    2015-01-01

    -stimulated glucose transport and signaling is unknown. We therefore investigated whether stretch-induced glucose transport in skeletal muscle required Rac1 and the actin cytoskeleton. We used muscle specific inducible Rac1 knockout mice as well as pharmacological inhibitors of Rac1 and the actin cytoskeleton...

  13. Glucose Induces Slow-Wave Sleep by Exciting the Sleep-Promoting Neurons in the Ventrolateral Preoptic Nucleus: A New Link between Sleep and Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varin, Christophe; Rancillac, Armelle; Geoffroy, Hélène; Arthaud, Sébastien; Fort, Patrice; Gallopin, Thierry

    2015-07-08

    Sleep-active neurons located in the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO) play a crucial role in the induction and maintenance of slow-wave sleep (SWS). However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for their activation at sleep onset remain poorly understood. Here, we test the hypothesis that a rise in extracellular glucose concentration in the VLPO can promote sleep by increasing the activity of sleep-promoting VLPO neurons. We find that infusion of a glucose concentration into the VLPO of mice promotes SWS and increases the density of c-Fos-labeled neurons selectively in the VLPO. Moreover, we show in patch-clamp recordings from brain slices that VLPO neurons exhibiting properties of sleep-promoting neurons are selectively excited by glucose within physiological range. This glucose-induced excitation implies the catabolism of glucose, leading to a closure of ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels. The extracellular glucose concentration monitors the gating of KATP channels of sleep-promoting neurons, highlighting that these neurons can adapt their excitability according to the extracellular energy status. Together, these results provide evidence that glucose may participate in the mechanisms of SWS promotion and/or consolidation. Although the brain circuitry underlying vigilance states is well described, the molecular mechanisms responsible for sleep onset remain largely unknown. Combining in vitro and in vivo experiments, we demonstrate that glucose likely contributes to sleep onset facilitation by increasing the excitability of sleep-promoting neurons in the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO). We find here that these neurons integrate energetic signals such as ambient glucose directly to regulate vigilance states accordingly. Glucose-induced excitation of sleep-promoting VLPO neurons should therefore be involved in the drowsiness that one feels after a high-sugar meal. This novel mechanism regulating the activity of VLPO neurons reinforces the

  14. Neuronal glucose but not lactate utilization is positively correlated with NMDA-induced neurotransmission and fluctuations in cytosolic Ca2+ levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Lasse K; Walls, Anne B; Schousboe, Arne

    2009-01-01

    Although the brain utilizes glucose for energy production, individual brain cells may to some extent utilize substrates derived from glucose. Thus, it has been suggested that neurons consume extracellular lactate during synaptic activity. However, the precise role of lactate for fueling neuronal ...

  15. Effects of pentylenetetrazole and glutamate on metabolism of [U-(13)C]glucose in cultured cerebellar granule neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloqayli, Haytham; Qu, Hong; Unsgård, Geirmund; Sletvold, Olav; Hadidi, Hakam; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2002-02-01

    This study was performed to analyze the effects of glutamate and the epileptogenic agent pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) on neuronal glucose metabolism. Cerebellar granule neurons were incubated for 2 h in medium containing 3 mM [U-(13)C]glucose, with and without 0.25 mM glutamate and/or 10 mM PTZ. In the presence of PTZ, decreased glucose consumption with unchanged lactate release was observed, indicating decreased glucose oxidation. PTZ also slowed down tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle activity as evidenced by the decreased amounts of labeled aspartate and [1,2-(13)C]glutamate. When glutamate was present, glucose consumption was also decreased. However, the amount of glutamate, derived from [U-(13)C]glucose via the first turn of the TCA cycle, was increased. The decreased amount of [1,2-(13)C]glutamate, derived from the second turn in the TCA cycle, and increased amount of aspartate indicated the dilution of label due to the entrance of unlabeled glutamate into TCA cycle. In the presence of glutamate plus PTZ, the effect of PTZ was enhanced by glutamate. Labeled alanine was detected only in the presence of glutamate plus PTZ, which indicated that oxaloacetate was a better amino acid acceptor than pyruvate. Furthermore, there was also evidence for intracellular compartmentation of oxaloacetate metabolism. Glutamate and PTZ caused similar metabolic changes, however, via different mechanisms. Glutamate substituted for glucose as energy substrate in the TCA cycle, whereas, PTZ appeared to decrease mitochondrial activity.

  16. Long-term exposure to high glucose induces changes in the content and distribution of some exocytotic proteins in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, J M; Castilho, Á; Baptista, F I; Liberal, J; Ambrósio, A F

    2010-12-29

    A few studies have reported the existence of depletion of synaptic vesicles, and changes in neurotransmitter release and in the content of exocytotic proteins in the hippocampus of diabetic rats. Recently, we found that diabetes alters the levels of synaptic proteins in hippocampal nerve terminals. Hyperglycemia is considered the main trigger of diabetic complications, although other factors, such as low insulin levels, also contribute to diabetes-induced changes. Thus, the aim of this work was to evaluate whether long-term elevated glucose per se, which mimics prolonged hyperglycemia, induces significant changes in the content and localization of synaptic proteins involved in exocytosis in hippocampal neurons. Hippocampal cell cultures were cultured for 14 days and were exposed to high glucose (50 mM) or mannitol (osmotic control; 25 mM plus 25 mM glucose), for 7 days. Cell viability and nuclear morphology were evaluated by MTT and Hoechst assays, respectively. The protein levels of vesicle-associated membrane protein-2 (VAMP-2), synaptosomal-associated protein-25 (SNAP-25), syntaxin-1, synapsin-1, synaptophysin, synaptotagmin-1, rabphilin 3a, and also of vesicular glutamate and GABA transporters (VGluT-1 and VGAT), were evaluated by immunoblotting, and its localization was analyzed by immunocytochemistry. The majority of the proteins were not affected. However, elevated glucose decreased the content of SNAP-25 and increased the content of synaptotagmin-1 and VGluT-1. Moreover, there was an accumulation of syntaxin-1, synaptotagmin-1 and VGluT-1 in the cell body of some hippocampal neurons exposed to high glucose. No changes were detected in mannitol-treated cells. In conclusion, elevated glucose per se did not induce significant changes in the content of the majority of the synaptic proteins studied in hippocampal cultures, with the exception of SNAP-25, synaptotagmin-1 and VGluT-1. However, there was an accumulation of some proteins in cell bodies of hippocampal

  17. Central serotonergic neurons activate and recruit thermogenic brown and beige fat and regulate glucose and lipid homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlashon, Jacob M; Gorecki, Michelle C; Kozlowski, Amanda E; Thirnbeck, Caitlin K; Markan, Kathleen R; Leslie, Kirstie L; Kotas, Maya E; Potthoff, Matthew J; Richerson, George B; Gillum, Matthew P

    2015-05-05

    Thermogenic brown and beige adipocytes convert chemical energy to heat by metabolizing glucose and lipids. Serotonin (5-HT) neurons in the CNS are essential for thermoregulation and accordingly may control metabolic activity of thermogenic fat. To test this, we generated mice in which the human diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) was selectively expressed in central 5-HT neurons. Treatment with diphtheria toxin (DT) eliminated 5-HT neurons and caused loss of thermoregulation, brown adipose tissue (BAT) steatosis, and a >50% decrease in uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1) expression in BAT and inguinal white adipose tissue (WAT). In parallel, blood glucose increased 3.5-fold, free fatty acids 13.4-fold, and triglycerides 6.5-fold. Similar BAT and beige fat defects occurred in Lmx1b(f/f)ePet1(Cre) mice in which 5-HT neurons fail to develop in utero. We conclude 5-HT neurons play a major role in regulating glucose and lipid homeostasis, in part through recruitment and metabolic activation of brown and beige adipocytes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Imaging of a glucose analog, calcium and NADH in neurons and astrocytes: dynamic responses to depolarization and sensitivity to pioglitazone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancani, Tristano; Anderson, Katie L.; Porter, Nada M.; Thibault, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal Ca2+ dyshomeostasis associated with cognitive impairment and mediated by changes in several Ca2+ sources has been seen in animal models of both aging and diabetes. In the periphery, dysregulation of intracellular Ca2+ signals may contribute to the development of insulin resistance. In the brain, while it is well-established that type 2 diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for the development of dementia in the elderly, it is not clear whether Ca2+ dysregulation might also affect insulin sensitivity and glucose utilization. Here we present a combination of imaging techniques testing the disappearance of the fluorescent glucose analog 2-(N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino)-2-deoxyglucose (2-NBDG) as an indication of glycolytic activity in neurons and astrocytes. Our work shows that glucose utilization at rest is greater in neurons compared to astrocytes, and ceases upon activation in neurons with little change in astrocytes. Pretreatment of hippocampal cultures with pioglitazone, a drug used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, significantly reduced glycolytic activity in neurons and enhanced it in astrocytes. This series of experiments, including FURA-2 and NADH imaging, provides results that are consistent with the idea that Ca2+ levels may rapidly alter glycolytic activity, and that downstream events beyond Ca2+ dysregulation with aging, may alter cellular metabolism in the brain. PMID:21978418

  19. Glucose Transporter 3 Potentiates Degranulation and Is Required for Platelet Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Trevor P; Middleton, Elizabeth A; Rowley, Jesse W; Boudreau, Luc H; Campbell, Robert A; Souvenir, Rhonda; Funari, Trevor; Tessandier, Nicolas; Boilard, Eric; Weyrich, Andrew S; Abel, E Dale

    2017-09-01

    On activation, platelets increase glucose uptake, glycolysis, and glucose oxidation and consume stored glycogen. This correlation between glucose metabolism and platelet function is not well understood and even less is known about the role of glucose metabolism on platelet function in vivo. For glucose to enter a cell, it must be transported through glucose transporters. Here we evaluate the contribution of GLUT3 (glucose transporter 3) to platelet function to better understand glucose metabolism in platelets. Platelet-specific knockout of GLUT3 was generated by crossing mice harboring GLUT3 floxed allele to a PF4 (platelet factor 4)-driven Cre recombinase. In platelets, GLUT3 is localized primarily on α-granule membranes and under basal conditions facilitates glucose uptake into α-granules to be used for glycolysis. After activation, platelets degranulate and GLUT3 translocates to the plasma membrane, which is responsible for activation-mediated increased glucose uptake. In vivo, loss of GLUT3 in platelets increased survival in a collagen/epinephrine model of pulmonary embolism, and in a K/BxN model of autoimmune inflammatory disease, platelet-specific GLUT3 knockout mice display decreased disease progression. Mechanistically, loss of GLUT3 decreased platelet degranulation, spreading, and clot retraction. Decreased α-granule degranulation is due in part to an impaired ability of GLUT3 to potentiate exocytosis. GLUT3-mediated glucose utilization and glycogenolysis in platelets promotes α-granule release, platelet activation, and postactivation functions. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Glucose concentrations modulate brain-derived neurotrophic factor responsiveness of neurones in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIsaac, W; Ferguson, A V

    2017-04-01

    The hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) is critical for normal energy balance and has been shown to contain high levels of both brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tropomyosin-receptor kinase B mRNA. Microinjections of BDNF into the PVN increase energy expenditure, suggesting that BDNF plays an important role in energy homeostasis through direct actions in this nucleus. The present study aimed to examine the postsynaptic effects of BDNF on the membrane potential of PVN neurones, and also to determine whether extracellular glucose concentrations modulated these effects. We used hypothalamic PVN slices from male Sprague-Dawley rats to perform whole cell current-clamp recordings from PVN neurones. BDNF was bath applied at a concentration of 2 nmol L -1 and the effects on membrane potential determined. BDNF caused depolarisations in 54% of neurones (n=25; mean±SEM, 8.9±1.2 mV) and hyperpolarisations in 23% (n=11; -6.7±1.4 mV), whereas the remaining cells were unaffected. These effects were maintained in the presence of tetrodotoxin (n=9; 56% depolarised, 22% hyperpolarised, 22% nonresponders), or the GABA a antagonist bicuculline (n=12; 42% depolarised, 17% hyperpolarised, 41% nonresponders), supporting the conclusion that these effects on membrane potential were postsynaptic. Current-clamp recordings from PVN neurones next examined the effects of BDNF on these neurones at varying extracellular glucose concentrations. Larger proportions of PVN neurones hyperpolarised in response to BDNF as the glucose concentrations decreased [10 mmol L -1 glucose 23% (n=11) of neurones hyperpolarised, whereas, at 0.2 mmol L -1 glucose, 71% showed hyperpolarising effects (n=12)]. Our findings reveal that BDNF has direct GABA A independent effects on PVN neurones, which are modulated by local glucose concentrations. The latter observation further emphasises the critical importance of using physiologically relevant conditions in an investigation of the central

  1. AICAR administration affects glucose metabolism by upregulating the novel glucose transporter, GLUT8, in equine skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Laat, M A; Robinson, M A; Gruntmeir, K J; Liu, Y; Soma, L R; Lacombe, V A

    2015-09-01

    Equine metabolic syndrome is characterized by obesity and insulin resistance (IR). Currently, there is no effective pharmacological treatment for this insidious disease. Glucose uptake is mediated by a family of glucose transporters (GLUT), and is regulated by insulin-dependent and -independent pathways, including 5-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Importantly, the activation of AMPK, by 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR) stimulates glucose uptake in both healthy and diabetic humans. However, whether AICAR promotes glucose uptake in horses has not been established. It is hypothesized that AICAR administration would enhance glucose transport in equine skeletal muscle through AMPK activation. In this study, the effect of an intravenous AICAR infusion on blood glucose and insulin concentrations, as well as on GLUT expression and AMPK activation in equine skeletal muscle (quantified by Western blotting) was examined. Upon administration, plasma AICAR rapidly reached peak concentration. Treatment with AICAR resulted in a decrease (P change in lactate concentration. The ratio of phosphorylated to total AMPK was increased (P managing IR requires investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of PTEN inhibition on the regulation of Tau phosphorylation in rat cortical neuronal injury after oxygen and glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Chen, Yurong; Xu, Yuxia; Pi, Guanghuan

    2016-01-01

    This report investigated the involvement of the PTEN pathway in the regulation of Tau phosphorylation using an oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) model with rat cortical neurons. Primary cortical neurons were used to establish the oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) model in vitro. These were randomly divided into control, OGD, bpV+OGD, As+OGD, Se+OGD and Mock treatment groups. The neuron viability was assessed by MTT, the cell apoptosis was detected using TUNEL staining. The expression of Phospho-PTEN/PTEN, Phospho-Tau/Tau, Phospho-Akt/Akt and Phospho-GSK-3β/GSK-3β were detected by Western blotting. OGD induced Tau phosphorylation through PTEN and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) activation, together with a decrease in AKT activity. Pre-treatment with bpv, a potent PTEN inhibitor, and PTEN antisense nucleotides decreased PTEN and GSK-3β activity and caused alterations in Tau phosphorylation. Neuronal apoptosis was also reduced. The PTEN/Akt/GSK-3β/Tau pathway is involved in the regulation of neuronal injury, providing a novel route for protecting neurons following neonatal HI.

  3. Glucose transporter of the human brain and blood-brain barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalaria, R.N.; Gravina, S.A.; Schmidley, J.W.; Perry, G.; Harik, S.I.

    1988-01-01

    We identified and characterized the glucose transporter in the human cerebral cortex, cerebral microvessels, and choroid plexus by specific D-glucose-displaceable [3H]cytochalasin B binding. The binding was saturable, with a dissociation constant less than 1 microM. Maximal binding capacity was approximately 7 pmol/mg protein in the cerebral cortex, approximately 42 pmol/mg protein in brain microvessels, and approximately 27 pmol/mg protein in the choroid plexus. Several hexoses displaced specific [3H]cytochalasin B binding to microvessels in a rank-order that correlated well with their known ability to cross the blood-brain barrier; the only exception was 2-deoxy-D-glucose, which had much higher affinity for the glucose transporter than the natural substrate, D-glucose. Irreversible photoaffinity labeling of the glucose transporter of microvessels with [3H]cytochalasin B, followed by solubilization and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, labeled a protein band with an average molecular weight of approximately 55,000. Monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies specific to the human erythrocyte glucose transporter immunocytochemically stained brain blood vessels and the few trapped erythrocytes in situ, with minimal staining of the neuropil. In the choroid plexus, blood vessels did not stain, but the epithelium reacted positively. We conclude that human brain microvessels are richly endowed with a glucose transport moiety similar in molecular weight and antigenic characteristics to that of human erythrocytes and brain microvessels of other mammalian species

  4. Differentiation of the insulin-sensitive glucose transporter in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, S.C.; Baly, D.L.; Cushman, S.W.; Lane, M.D.; Simpson, I.A.

    1986-01-01

    3T3-L1 fibroblasts differentiate in culture to resemble adipocytes both morphologically and biochemically. Insulin-sensitive glucose transport, as measured by 2-deoxy-[1- 14 C]- glucose uptake in the undifferentiated cell is small (2X). In contrast, the rate of glucose transport in fully differentiated cells is elevated 15-fold over basal in the presence of insulin. To determine if this is due to an increase in the number of transporters/cell or accessibility to the transporters, the number of transporters was measured in subcellular fractions over differentiation using a 3 H-cytochalasin B binding assay. The increase in the rate of insulin-sensitive glucose transport directly parallels an increase in the number of transporters which reside in an insulin-responsive intracellular compartment. This observation was confirmed by identifying the transporters by immunoblotting using an antibody generated against the human erythrocyte transporter. The molecular weight of this transporter increases over differentiation from a single band of 40kDa to a heterogeneous triplet of 40, 44 and 48kDa. These data suggest that the transporter undergoes differential processing and that the functional, insulin-responsive transporter may be different from the insulin-insensitive (basal) transporter

  5. Glucose uptake and growth of glucose-limited chemostat cultures of Aspergillus niger and a disruptant lacking MstA, a high-affinity glucose transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Thomas R; vanKuyk, Patricia A; Poulsen, Bjarne R

    2007-01-01

    This is a study of high-affinity glucose uptake in Aspergillus niger and the effect of disruption of a high-affinity monosaccharide-transporter gene, mstA. The substrate saturation constant (K(s)) of a reference strain was about 15 microM in glucose-limited chemostat culture. Disruption of mst......-affinity uptake system of A. niger. The mstA disruptant and a reference strain were cultivated in glucose-limited chemostat cultures at low, intermediate and high dilution rate (D=0.07 h(-1), 0.14 h(-1) and 0.20 h(-1)). Mycelium harvested from steady-state cultures was subjected to glucose uptake assays...

  6. Glycogenolysis in astrocytes supports blood-borne glucose channeling not glycogen-derived lactate shuttling to neurons: evidence from mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiNuzzo, Mauro; Mangia, Silvia; Maraviglia, Bruno; Giove, Federico

    2010-12-01

    In this article, we examined theoretically the role of human cerebral glycogen in buffering the metabolic requirement of a 360-second brain stimulation, expanding our previous modeling study of neurometabolic coupling. We found that glycogen synthesis and degradation affects the relative amount of glucose taken up by neurons versus astrocytes. Under conditions of 175:115 mmol/L (∼1.5:1) neuronal versus astrocytic activation-induced Na(+) influx ratio, ∼12% of astrocytic glycogen is mobilized. This results in the rapid increase of intracellular glucose-6-phosphate level on stimulation and nearly 40% mean decrease of glucose flow through hexokinase (HK) in astrocytes via product inhibition. The suppression of astrocytic glucose phosphorylation, in turn, favors the channeling of glucose from interstitium to nearby activated neurons, without a critical effect on the concurrent intercellular lactate trafficking. Under conditions of increased neuronal versus astrocytic activation-induced Na(+) influx ratio to 190:65 mmol/L (∼3:1), glycogen is not significantly degraded and blood glucose is primarily taken up by neurons. These results support a role for astrocytic glycogen in preserving extracellular glucose for neuronal utilization, rather than providing lactate to neurons as is commonly accepted by the current 'thinking paradigm'. This might be critical in subcellular domains during functional conditions associated with fast energetic demands.

  7. Acylated and unacylated ghrelin do not directly stimulate glucose transport in isolated rodent skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervone, Daniel T; Dyck, David J

    2017-07-01

    Emerging evidence implicates ghrelin, a gut-derived, orexigenic hormone, as a potential mediator of insulin-responsive peripheral tissue metabolism. However, in vitro and in vivo studies assessing ghrelin's direct influence on metabolism have been controversial, particularly due to confounding factors such as the secondary rise in growth hormone (GH) after ghrelin injection. Skeletal muscle is important in the insulin-stimulated clearance of glucose, and ghrelin's exponential rise prior to a meal could potentially facilitate this. This study was aimed at elucidating any direct stimulatory action that ghrelin may have on glucose transport and insulin signaling in isolated rat skeletal muscle, in the absence of confounding secondary factors. Oxidative soleus and glycolytic extensor digitorum longus skeletal muscles were isolated from male Sprague Dawley rats in the fed state and incubated with various concentrations of acylated and unacylated ghrelin in the presence or absence of insulin. Ghrelin did not stimulate glucose transport in either muscle type, with or without insulin. Moreover, GH had no acute, direct stimulatory effect on either basal or insulin-stimulated muscle glucose transport. In agreement with the lack of observed effect on glucose transport, ghrelin and GH also had no stimulatory effect on Ser 473 AKT or Thr 172 AMPK phosphorylation, two key signaling proteins involved in glucose transport. Furthermore, to our knowledge, we are among the first to show that ghrelin can act independent of its receptor and cause an increase in calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 2 (CaMKII) phosphorylation in glycolytic muscle, although this was not associated with an increase in glucose transport. We conclude that both acylated and unacylated ghrelin have no direct, acute influence on skeletal muscle glucose transport. Furthermore, the immediate rise in GH in response to ghrelin also does not appear to directly stimulate glucose transport in muscle. © 2017 The

  8. Volume regulated anion channel currents of rat hippocampal neurons and their contribution to oxygen-and-glucose deprivation induced neuronal death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaqiu Zhang

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Volume-regulated anion channels (VRAC are widely expressed chloride channels that are critical for the cell volume regulation. In the mammalian central nervous system, the physiological expression of neuronal VRAC and its role in cerebral ischemia are issues largely unknown. We show that hypoosmotic medium induce an outwardly rectifying chloride conductance in CA1 pyramidal neurons in rat hippocampal slices. The induced chloride conductance was sensitive to some of the VRAC inhibitors, namely, IAA-94 (300 µM and NPPB (100 µM, but not to tamoxifen (10 µM. Using oxygen-and-glucose deprivation (OGD to simulate ischemic conditions in slices, VRAC activation appeared after OGD induced anoxic depolarization (AD that showed a progressive increase in current amplitude over the period of post-OGD reperfusion. The OGD induced VRAC currents were significantly inhibited by inhibitors for glutamate AMPA (30 µM NBQX and NMDA (40 µM AP-5 receptors in the OGD solution, supporting the view that induction of AD requires an excessive Na(+-loading via these receptors that in turn to activate neuronal VRAC. In the presence of NPPB and DCPIB in the post-OGD reperfusion solution, the OGD induced CA1 pyramidal neuron death, as measured by TO-PRO-3-I staining, was significantly reduced, although DCPIB did not appear to be an effective neuronal VRAC blocker. Altogether, we show that rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons express functional VRAC, and ischemic conditions can initial neuronal VRAC activation that may contribute to ischemic neuronal damage.

  9. Inhibition by nucleosides of glucose-transport activity in human erythrocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Jarvis, S M

    1988-01-01

    The interaction of nucleosides with the glucose carrier of human erythrocytes was examined by studying the effect of nucleosides on reversible cytochalasin B-binding activity and glucose transport. Adenosine, inosine and thymidine were more potent inhibitors of cytochalasin B binding to human erythrocyte membranes than was D-glucose [IC50 (concentration causing 50% inhibition) values of 10, 24, 28 and 38 mM respectively]. Moreover, low concentrations of thymidine and adenosine inhibited D-glu...

  10. Overexpression of Cdk5 or non-phosphorylatable retinoblastoma protein protects septal neurons from oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panickar, Kiran S; Nonner, Doris; White, Michael G; Barrett, John N

    2008-09-01

    Activation of cyclin dependent kinases (Cdks) contributes to neuronal death following ischemia. We used oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) in septal neuronal cultures to test for possible roles of cell cycle proteins in neuronal survival. Increased cdc2-immunoreactive neurons were observed at 24 h after the end of 5 h OGD. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) or GFP along with a wild type or dominant negative form of the retinoblastoma protein (Rb), or cyclin-dependent kinase5 (Cdk5), were overexpressed using plasmid constructs. Following OGD, when compared to controls, neurons expressing both GFP and dominant negative Rb, RbDeltaK11, showed significantly less damage using microscopy imaging. Overexpression of Rb-wt did not affect survival. Surprisingly, overexpression of Cdk5-wild type significantly protected neurons from process disintegration but Cdk5T33, a dominant negative Cdk5, gave little or no protection. Thus phosphorylation of the cell cycle regulator, Rb, contributes to death in OGD in septal neurons but Cdk5 can have a protective role.

  11. The ERα-PI3K Cascade in Proopiomelanocortin Progenitor Neurons Regulates Feeding and Glucose Balance in Female Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liangru; Xu, Pingwen; Cao, Xuehong; Yang, Yongjie; Hinton, Antentor Othrell; Xia, Yan; Saito, Kenji; Yan, Xiaofeng; Zou, Fang; Ding, Hongfang; Wang, Chunmei; Yan, Chunling; Saha, Pradip; Khan, Sohaib A; Zhao, Jean; Fukuda, Makoto; Tong, Qingchun; Clegg, Deborah J; Chan, Lawrence; Xu, Yong

    2015-12-01

    Estrogens act upon estrogen receptor (ER)α to inhibit feeding and improve glucose homeostasis in female animals. However, the intracellular signals that mediate these estrogenic actions remain unknown. Here, we report that anorexigenic effects of estrogens are blunted in female mice that lack ERα specifically in proopiomelanocortin (POMC) progenitor neurons. These mutant mice also develop insulin resistance and are insensitive to the glucose-regulatory effects of estrogens. Moreover, we showed that propyl pyrazole triol (an ERα agonist) stimulates the phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway specifically in POMC progenitor neurons, and that blockade of PI3K attenuates propyl pyrazole triol-induced activation of POMC neurons. Finally, we show that effects of estrogens to inhibit food intake and to improve insulin sensitivity are significantly attenuated in female mice with PI3K genetically inhibited in POMC progenitor neurons. Together, our results indicate that an ERα-PI3K cascade in POMC progenitor neurons mediates estrogenic actions to suppress food intake and improve insulin sensitivity.

  12. Cloning and functional expression of a human pancreatic islet glucose-transporter cDNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permutt, M.A.; Koranyi, L.; Keller, K.; Lacy, P.E.; Scharp, D.W.; Mueckler, M.

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that pancreatic islet glucose transport is mediated by a high-K m , low-affinity facilitated transporter similar to that expressed in liver. To determine the relationship between islet and liver glucose transporters, liver-type glucose-transporter cDNA clones were isolated from a human liver cDNA library. The liver-type glucose-transporter cDNA clone hybridized to mRNA transcripts of the same size in human liver and pancreatic islet RNA. A cDNA library was prepared from purified human pancreatic islet tissue and screened with human liver-type glucose-transporter cDNA. The authors isolated two overlapping cDNA clones encompassing 2600 base pairs, which encode a pancreatic islet protein identical in sequence to that of the putative liver-type glucose-transporter protein. Xenopus oocytes injected with synthetic mRNA transcribed from a full-length cDNA construct exhibited increased uptake of 2-deoxyglucose, confirming the functional identity of the clone. These cDNA clones can now be used to study regulation of expression of the gene and to assess the role of inherited defects in this gene as a candidate for inherited susceptibility to non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

  13. A Hexose Transporter Homologue Controls Glucose Repression in the Methylotrophic Yeast Hansenula polymorpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stasyk, Oleh V.; Stasyk, Olena G.; Komduur, Janet; Veenhuis, Marten; Cregg, James M.; Sibirny, Andrei A.

    2004-01-01

    Peroxisome biogenesis and synthesis of peroxisomal enzymes in the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha are under the strict control of glucose repression. We identified an H. polymorpha glucose catabolite repression gene (HpGCR1) that encodes a hexose transporter homologue. Deficiency in GCR1

  14. Optogenetic activation of leptin- and glucose-regulated GABAergic neurons in dorsomedial hypothalamus promotes food intake via inhibitory synaptic transmission to paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zesemdorj Otgon-Uul

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH has been considered an orexigenic nucleus, since the DMH lesion reduced food intake and body weight and induced resistance to diet-induced obesity. The DMH expresses feeding regulatory neuropeptides and receptors including neuropeptide Y (NPY, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART, cholecystokinin (CCK, leptin receptor, and melanocortin 3/4 receptors. However, the principal neurons generating the orexigenic function in the DMH remain to be defined. This study aimed to clarify the role of the DMH GABAergic neurons in feeding regulation by using optogenetics and electrophysiological techniques. Methods: We generated the mice expressing ChRFR-C167A, a bistable chimeric channelrhodopsin, selectively in GABAergic neurons of DMH via locally injected adeno-associated virus 2. Food intake after optogenetic activation of DMH GABAergic neurons was measured. Electrophysiological properties of DMH GABAergic neurons were measured using slice patch clamp. Results: Optogenetic activation of DMH GABAergic neurons promoted food intake. Leptin hyperpolarized and lowering glucose depolarized half of DMH GABAergic neurons, suggesting their orexigenic property. Optical activation of axonal terminals of DMH GABAergic neurons at the paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus (PVN, where anorexigenic neurons are localized, increased inhibitory postsynaptic currents on PVN neurons and promoted food intake. Conclusion: DMH GABAergic neurons are regulated by metabolic signals leptin and glucose and, once activated, promote food intake via inhibitory synaptic transmission to PVN. Keywords: Dorsomedial hypothalamus, GABAergic neuron, Feeding, Leptin, Glucose, Optogenetics

  15. Neuronal Rap1 Regulates Energy Balance, Glucose Homeostasis, and Leptin Actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Kentaro; Xu, Pingwen; Cordonier, Elizabeth L; Chen, Siyu S; Ng, Amy; Xu, Yong; Morozov, Alexei; Fukuda, Makoto

    2016-09-13

    The CNS contributes to obesity and metabolic disease; however, the underlying neurobiological pathways remain to be fully established. Here, we show that the small GTPase Rap1 is expressed in multiple hypothalamic nuclei that control whole-body metabolism and is activated in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Genetic ablation of CNS Rap1 protects mice from dietary obesity, glucose imbalance, and insulin resistance in the periphery and from HFD-induced neuropathological changes in the hypothalamus, including diminished cellular leptin sensitivity and increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and inflammation. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of CNS Rap1 signaling normalizes hypothalamic ER stress and inflammation, improves cellular leptin sensitivity, and reduces body weight in mice with dietary obesity. We also demonstrate that Rap1 mediates leptin resistance via interplay with ER stress. Thus, neuronal Rap1 critically regulates leptin sensitivity and mediates HFD-induced obesity and hypothalamic pathology and may represent a potential therapeutic target for obesity treatment. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Neuronal Rap1 Regulates Energy Balance, Glucose Homeostasis, and Leptin Actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Kaneko

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The CNS contributes to obesity and metabolic disease; however, the underlying neurobiological pathways remain to be fully established. Here, we show that the small GTPase Rap1 is expressed in multiple hypothalamic nuclei that control whole-body metabolism and is activated in high-fat diet (HFD-induced obesity. Genetic ablation of CNS Rap1 protects mice from dietary obesity, glucose imbalance, and insulin resistance in the periphery and from HFD-induced neuropathological changes in the hypothalamus, including diminished cellular leptin sensitivity and increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and inflammation. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of CNS Rap1 signaling normalizes hypothalamic ER stress and inflammation, improves cellular leptin sensitivity, and reduces body weight in mice with dietary obesity. We also demonstrate that Rap1 mediates leptin resistance via interplay with ER stress. Thus, neuronal Rap1 critically regulates leptin sensitivity and mediates HFD-induced obesity and hypothalamic pathology and may represent a potential therapeutic target for obesity treatment.

  17. Intermittent fasting dissociates beneficial effects of dietary restriction on glucose metabolism and neuronal resistance to injury from calorie intake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anson, R. Michael; Guo, Zhihong; de Cabo, Rafael; Iyun, Titilola; Rios, Michelle; Hagepanos, Adrienne; Ingram, Donald K.; Lane, Mark A.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2003-01-01

    Dietary restriction has been shown to have several health benefits including increased insulin sensitivity, stress resistance, reduced morbidity, and increased life span. The mechanism remains unknown, but the need for a long-term reduction in caloric intake to achieve these benefits has been assumed. We report that when C57BL/6 mice are maintained on an intermittent fasting (alternate-day fasting) dietary-restriction regimen their overall food intake is not decreased and their body weight is maintained. Nevertheless, intermittent fasting resulted in beneficial effects that met or exceeded those of caloric restriction including reduced serum glucose and insulin levels and increased resistance of neurons in the brain to excitotoxic stress. Intermittent fasting therefore has beneficial effects on glucose regulation and neuronal resistance to injury in these mice that are independent of caloric intake. PMID:12724520

  18. Neuronal Cell Death Induced by Mechanical Percussion Trauma in Cultured Neurons is not Preceded by Alterations in Glucose, Lactate and Glutamine Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, A R; Bak, L K; Rama Rao, K V; Waagepetersen, H S; Schousboe, A; Norenberg, M D

    2016-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a devastating neurological disorder that usually presents in acute and chronic forms. Brain edema and associated increased intracranial pressure in the early phase following TBI are major consequences of acute trauma. On the other hand, neuronal injury, leading to neurobehavioral and cognitive impairments, that usually develop months to years after single or repetitive episodes of head trauma, are major consequences of chronic TBI. The molecular mechanisms responsible for TBI-induced injury, however, are unclear. Recent studies have suggested that early mitochondrial dysfunction and subsequent energy failure play a role in the pathogenesis of TBI. We therefore examined whether oxidative metabolism of (13)C-labeled glucose, lactate or glutamine is altered early following in vitro mechanical percussion-induced trauma (5 atm) to neurons (4-24 h), and whether such events contribute to the development of neuronal injury. Cell viability was assayed using the release of the cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), together with fluorescence-based cell staining (calcein and ethidium homodimer-1 for live and dead cells, respectively). Trauma had no effect on the LDH release in neurons from 1 to 18 h. However, a significant increase in LDH release was detected at 24 h after trauma. Similar findings were identified when traumatized neurons were stained with fluorescent markers. Additionally (13)C-labeling of glutamate showed a small, but statistically significant decrease at 14 h after trauma. However, trauma had no effect on the cycling ratio of the TCA cycle at any time-period examined. These findings indicate that trauma does not cause a disturbance in oxidative metabolism of any of the substrates used for neurons. Accordingly, such metabolic disturbance does not appear to contribute to the neuronal death in the early stages following trauma.

  19. A cell-based fluorescent glucose transporter assay for SGLT2 inhibitor discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Huan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The sodium/glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2 is responsible for the majority of glucose reabsorption in the kidney, and currently, SGLT2 inhibitors are considered as promising hypoglycemic agents for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. By constructing CHO cell lines that stably express the human SGLT2 transmembrane protein, along with a fluorescent glucose transporter assay that uses 2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-ylamino]2-deoxyglucose (2-NBDG as a glucose analog, we have developed a nonradioactive, cell-based assay for the discovery and characterization of SGLT2 inhibitors.

  20. Phospho-Rb mediating cell cycle reentry induces early apoptosis following oxygen-glucose deprivation in rat cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ying; Ren, Qing-Guo; Zhang, Zhao-Hui; Zhou, Ke; Yu, Zhi-Yuan; Luo, Xiang; Wang, Wei

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between cell cycle reentry and apoptosis in cultured cortical neurons following oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). We found that the percentage of neurons with BrdU uptake, TUNEL staining, and colocalized BrdU uptake and TUNEL staining was increased relative to control 6, 12 and 24 h after 1 h of OGD. The number of neurons with colocalized BrdU and TUNEL staining was decreased relative to the number of TUNEL-positive neurons at 24 h. The expression of phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein (phospho-Rb) was significantly increased 6, 12 and 24 h after OGD, parallel with the changes in BrdU uptake. Phospho-Rb and TUNEL staining were colocalized in neurons 6 and 12 h after OGD. This colocalization was strikingly decreased 24 h after OGD. Treatment with the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor roscovitine (100 μM) decreased the expression of phospho-Rb and reduced neuronal apoptosis in vitro. These results demonstrated that attempted cell cycle reentry with phosphorylation of Rb induce early apoptosis in neurons after OGD and there must be other mechanisms involved in the later stages of neuronal apoptosis besides cell cycle reentry. Phosphoralated Rb may be an important factor which closely associates aberrant cell cycle reentry with the early stages of neuronal apoptosis following ischemia/hypoxia in vitro, and pharmacological interventions for neuroprotection may be useful directed at this keypoint.

  1. Expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma in key neuronal subsets regulating glucose metabolism and energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarruf, David A; Yu, Fang; Nguyen, Hong T; Williams, Diana L; Printz, Richard L; Niswender, Kevin D; Schwartz, Michael W

    2009-02-01

    In addition to increasing insulin sensitivity and adipogenesis, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma agonists cause weight gain and hyperphagia. Given the central role of the brain in the control of energy homeostasis, we sought to determine whether PPARgamma is expressed in key brain areas involved in metabolic regulation. Using immunohistochemistry, PPARgamma distribution and its colocalization with neuron-specific protein markers were investigated in rat and mouse brain sections spanning the hypothalamus, the ventral tegmental area, and the nucleus tractus solitarius. In several brain areas, nuclear PPARgamma immunoreactivity was detected in cells that costained for neuronal nuclei, a neuronal marker. In the hypothalamus, PPARgamma immunoreactivity was observed in a majority of neurons in the arcuate (including both agouti related protein and alpha-MSH containing cells) and ventromedial hypothalamic nuclei and was also present in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, the lateral hypothalamic area, and tyrosine hydroxylase-containing neurons in the ventral tegmental area but was not expressed in the nucleus tractus solitarius. To validate and extend these histochemical findings, we generated mice with neuron-specific PPARgamma deletion using nestin cre-LoxP technology. Compared with littermate controls, neuron-specific PPARgamma knockout mice exhibited dramatic reductions of both hypothalamic PPARgamma mRNA levels and PPARgamma immunoreactivity but showed no differences in food intake or body weight over a 4-wk study period. We conclude that: 1) PPARgamma mRNA and protein are expressed in the hypothalamus, 2) neurons are the predominant source of PPARgamma in the central nervous system, although it is likely expressed by nonneuronal cell types as well, and 3) arcuate nucleus neurons that control energy homeostasis and glucose metabolism are among those in which PPARgamma is expressed.

  2. Silibinin activates AMP-activated protein kinase to protect neuronal cells from oxygen and glucose deprivation-re-oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhi; Ding, Sheng-quan; Shen, Ya-fang

    2014-11-14

    In this study, we explored the cytoprotective potential of silibinin against oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced neuronal cell damages, and studied underling mechanisms. In vitro model of ischemic stroke was created by keeping neuronal cells (SH-SY5Y cells and primary mouse cortical neurons) in an OGD condition followed by re-oxygenation. Pre-treatment of silibinin significantly inhibited OGD/re-oxygenation-induced necrosis and apoptosis of neuronal cells. OGD/re-oxygenation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) reduction were also inhibited by silibinin. At the molecular level, silibinin treatment in SH-SY5Y cells and primary cortical neurons led to significant AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling activation, detected by phosphorylations of AMPKα1, its upstream kinase liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and the downstream target acetyl-CoA Carboxylase (ACC). Pharmacological inhibition or genetic depletion of AMPK alleviated the neuroprotective ability of silibinin against OGD/re-oxygenation. Further, ROS scavenging ability by silibinin was abolished with AMPK inhibition or silencing. While A-769662, the AMPK activator, mimicked silibinin actions and suppressed ROS production and neuronal cell death following OGD/re-oxygenation. Together, these results show that silibinin-mediated neuroprotection requires activation of AMPK signaling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Taurine Protected Against the Impairments of Neural Stem Cell Differentiated Neurons Induced by Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Bo; Liu, Huazhen; Gu, Zeyun; Liu, Sining; Ji, Cheng

    2015-11-01

    Cell transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs) is a promising approach for neurological recovery both structurally and functionally. However, one big obstacle is to promote differentiation of NSCs into neurons and the followed maturation. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the protective effect of taurine on the differentiation of NSCs and subsequent maturation of their neuronal lineage, when exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). The results suggested that taurine (5-20 mM) promoted the viability and proliferation of NSCs, and it protected against 8 h of OGD induced impairments. Furthermore, 20 mM taurine promoted NSCs to differentiate into neurons after 7 days of culture, and it also protected against the suppressive impairments of 8 h of OGD. Consistently, taurine (20 mM) promoted the neurite sprouting and outgrowth of the NSC differentiated neurons after 14 days of differentiation, which were significantly inhibited by OGD (8 h). At D21, the mushroom spines and spine density were promoted or restored by 20 mM taurine. Taken together, the enhanced viability and proliferation of NSCs, more differentiated neurons and the promoted maturation of neurons by 20 mM taurine support its therapeutic application during stem cell therapy to enhance neurological recovery. Moreover, it protected against the impairments induced by OGD, which may highlight its role for a more direct therapeutic application especially in an ischemic stroke environment.

  4. [Screening of Active Fractions from Huanglian Jiedu Decoction against Primary Neuron Injury after Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhu-yan; Pan, Bei-bei; Huang, Chun-yan; Ye, Yi-lu; Liu, Dan-dan; Yu, Yue-ping; Zhang, Qi

    2015-08-01

    To observe the protective effect of active fractions of Huanglian Jiedu Decoction (HJD) on primary cortical neuron injury after oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)/reperfusion (R) injury. Methods Using macroporous resin method, HJDFE30, HJDFE50, HJDFE75, and HJDFE95 with 30%, 50%, 75%, and 95% alcohol were respectively prepared. Then the content of active components in different HJD fractions was determined with reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). The OGD/R injury model was induced by sodium dithionite on primary cortical neurons in neonate rats. MTT assay was used to observe the effect of four fractions (HJDFE30, HJDFE50, HJDFE75, and HJDFE95) and seven index components of HJD on the neuron viability. RP-HPLC showed active component(s) contained in HJDFE30 was geniposide; baicalin, palmatine, berberine, and wogonside contained in HJDFE50; baicalin, berberine, baicalein, and wogonin contained in HJDFE75. The neuron viability was decreased after OGD for 20 min and reperfusion for 1 h, (P neuron viability (P neuron injury after OGD/R. Furthermore, geniposide, baicalin, and baicalein were main active components of HJD.

  5. AMPK is essential for energy homeostasis regulation and glucose sensing by POMC and AgRP neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claret, Marc; Smith, Mark A; Batterham, Rachel L; Selman, Colin; Choudhury, Agharul I; Fryer, Lee G D; Clements, Melanie; Al-Qassab, Hind; Heffron, Helen; Xu, Allison W; Speakman, John R; Barsh, Gregory S; Viollet, Benoit; Vaulont, Sophie; Ashford, Michael L J; Carling, David; Withers, Dominic J

    2007-08-01

    Hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been suggested to act as a key sensing mechanism, responding to hormones and nutrients in the regulation of energy homeostasis. However, the precise neuronal populations and cellular mechanisms involved are unclear. The effects of long-term manipulation of hypothalamic AMPK on energy balance are also unknown. To directly address such issues, we generated POMC alpha 2KO and AgRP alpha 2KO mice lacking AMPK alpha2 in proopiomelanocortin- (POMC-) and agouti-related protein-expressing (AgRP-expressing) neurons, key regulators of energy homeostasis. POMC alpha 2KO mice developed obesity due to reduced energy expenditure and dysregulated food intake but remained sensitive to leptin. In contrast, AgRP alpha 2KO mice developed an age-dependent lean phenotype with increased sensitivity to a melanocortin agonist. Electrophysiological studies in AMPK alpha2-deficient POMC or AgRP neurons revealed normal leptin or insulin action but absent responses to alterations in extracellular glucose levels, showing that glucose-sensing signaling mechanisms in these neurons are distinct from those pathways utilized by leptin or insulin. Taken together with the divergent phenotypes of POMC alpha 2KO and AgRP alpha 2KO mice, our findings suggest that while AMPK plays a key role in hypothalamic function, it does not act as a general sensor and integrator of energy homeostasis in the mediobasal hypothalamus.

  6. Brain Transport Profiles of Ginsenoside Rb1 by Glucose Transporter 1: In Vitro and in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Zhu Wang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Ginsenoside Rb1 (Rb1 has been demonstrated its protection for central nervous system and is apparently highly distributed to the brain. The objective of this study was to characterize Rb1 transport at the blood–brain barrier (BBB using primary cultured rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (rBMEC, an in vitro BBB model. The initial uptake velocity of Rb1 in rBMEC was temperature- and concentration-dependent, and was significantly reduced by phloretin, an inhibitor of GLUT1 transporter, but was independent of metabolic inhibitor. Furthermore, the transport of Rb1 into rBMEC was significantly diminished in the presence of natural substrate α-D-glucose, suggesting a facilitated transport of Rb1 via GLUT1 transporter. The impact of GLUT1 on the distribution of Rb1 between brain and plasma was studied experimentally in rats. Administration of phloretin (5 mg/kg, i.v. to normal rats for consecutive 1 week before Rb1 (10 mg/kg, i.v. at 0.5, 2, and 6 h did not alter Rb1 concentrations in plasma, but resulted in significant decreased brain concentrations of Rb1 compared to in the phloretin-untreated normal rats (489.6 ± 58.3 versus 105.1 ± 15.1 ng/g, 193.8 ± 11.1 versus 84.8 ± 4.1 ng/g, and 114.2 ± 24.0 versus 39.9 ± 4.9 ng/g, respectively. The expression of GLUT1 in the phloretin-treated group by western blotting analysis in vitro and in vivo experiments was significantly decreased, indicating that the decreased transport of Rb1 in brain was well related to the down-regulated function and level of GLUT1. Therefore, our in vitro and in vivo results indicate that the transport of Rb1 at the BBB is at least partly mediated by GLUT1 transporter.

  7. Resveratrol protects primary cortical neuron cultures from transient oxygen-glucose deprivation by inhibiting MMP-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dakuan; Huang, Tao; Jiang, Xiaofan; Hu, Shijie; Zhang, Lei; Fei, Zhou

    2014-06-01

    It was recently shown that resveratrol exerts neuroprotective effects against cerebral ischemia in mice. The aim of the present study was to further confirm these effects in in vitro primary cortical neuron cultures with transient oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), and to investigate whether these effects are due to the inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and of cell apoptosis. Neuronal primary cultures of cerebral cortex were prepared from BALB/c mice embryos (13-15 days). Cells from 14- to 16-day cultures were subjected to OGD for 3 h, followed by 21 h of reoxygenation to simulate transient ischemia. Different doses of resveratrol were added into the culture medium during the simulation of transient ischemia. The effect of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor U0126 was studied by adding U0126 (5 µg/µl, 4 µl) into the culture medium during transient ischemia; as a control, we used treatment of cells with 50 µM of resveratrol. Cell viability was investigated using the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction assay. Cell apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry. The effects of resveratrol on the expression of MMP-9 were analyzed by western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), while the levels of ERK, phosphorylated (p)-ERK, cleaved caspase-3, Bax and Bcl-2 were measured by western blotting. The results of the MTT assay showed that cell viability is significantly reduced by transient OGD. OGD induced cell apoptosis, the expression of Bax and the activation of caspase-3 and ERK, inhibited the expression of Bcl-2 and increased the expression of MMP-9, while these effects were reversed by treatment with resveratrol. The therapeutic efficacy of resveratrol was shown to be dose-dependent, with the most suitable dose range determined at 50-100 µM. Treatment with U0126 inhibited MMP-9 and Bax expression and caspase-3 activation, while it further promoted the

  8. The Effect of a Short-term Glucose Deprivation on Neuron Net Functioning of Hippocampus Primary Culture on a Multi-electrode Matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Vedunova M.V.; Korotchenko S.A.; Balashova A.N.; Isakova A.O.; Khaspekov L.G.; Kazantsev V.B.; Mukhina I.V.

    2011-01-01

    There has been studied the effect of a short-term glucose deprivation on neuron net functioning of hippocampus primary culture developing within 32 days on a multi-electrode matrix MED64 (Alpha MED Sciences Company, Japan) in an early and remote periods after deprivation. A short-term glucose deprivation (20 min) has been shown to result in the increase of electrobiological activity of neuron net of hippocampus primary culture, with the cascade of metabolic reactions being activated leading t...

  9. Glucose transporter expression differs between bovine monocyte and macrophage subsets and is influenced by milk production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eger, M; Hussen, J; Koy, M; Dänicke, S; Schuberth, H-J; Breves, G

    2016-03-01

    The peripartal period of dairy cows is characterized by negative energy balance and higher incidences of infectious diseases such as mastitis or metritis. With the onset of lactation, milk production is prioritized and large amounts of glucose are transported into the mammary gland. Decreased overall energy availability might impair the function of monocytes acting as key innate immune cells, which give rise to macrophages and dendritic cells and link innate and adaptive immunity. Information on glucose requirements of bovine immune cells is rare. Therefore, this study aims to evaluate glucose transporter expression of the 3 bovine monocyte subsets (classical, intermediate, and nonclassical monocytes) and monocyte-derived macrophages and to identify influences of the peripartal period. Blood samples were either collected from nonpregnant healthy cows or from 16 peripartal German Holstein cows at d -14, +7, and +21 relative to parturition. Quantitative real-time PCR was applied to determine mRNA expression of glucose transporters (GLUT) 1, GLUT3, and GLUT4 in monocyte subsets and monocyte-derived macrophages. The low GLUT1 and GLUT3 expression in nonclassical monocytes was unaltered during differentiation into macrophages, whereas in classical and intermediate monocytes GLUT expression was downregulated. Alternatively activated M2 macrophages consumed more glucose compared with classically activated M1 macrophages. The GLUT4 mRNA was only detectable in unstimulated macrophages. Neither monocytes nor macrophages were insulin responsive. In the peripartum period, monocyte GLUT1 and GLUT3 expression and the GLUT3/GLUT1 ratio were negatively correlated with lactose production. The high-affinity GLUT3 transporter appears to be the predominant glucose transporter on bovine monocytes and macrophages, especially in the peripartal period when blood glucose levels decline. Glucose transporter expression in monocytes is downregulated as a function of lactose production, which

  10. Lowering glucose level elevates [Ca2+]i in hypothalamic arcuate nucleus NPY neurons through P/Q-type Ca2+ channel activation and GSK3β inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Zhou, Jun; Xie, Na; Huang, Chao; Zhang, Jun-qi; Hu, Zhuang-li; Ni, Lan; Jin, You; Wang, Fang; Chen, Jian-guo; Long, Li-hong

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To identify the mechanisms underlying the elevation of intracellular Ca2+ level ([Ca2+]i) induced by lowering extracellular glucose in rat hypothalamic arcuate nucleus NPY neurons. Methods: Primary cultures of hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons were prepared from Sprague-Dawley rats. NPY neurons were identified with immunocytochemical method. [Ca2+]i was measured using fura-2 AM. Ca2+ current was recorded using whole-cell patch clamp recording. AMPK and GSK3β levels were measured using Western blot assay. Results: Lowering glucose level in the medium (from 10 to 1 mmol/L) induced a transient elevation of [Ca2+]i in ARC neurons, but not in hippocampal and cortical neurons. The low-glucose induced elevation of [Ca2+]i in ARC neurons depended on extracellular Ca2+, and was blocked by P/Q-type Ca2+channel blocker ω-agatoxin TK (100 nmol/L), but not by L-type Ca2+ channel blocker nifedipine (10 μmol/L) or N-type Ca2+channel blocker ω-conotoxin GVIA (300 nmol/L). Lowering glucose level increased the peak amplitude of high voltage-activated Ca2+ current in ARC neurons. The low-glucose induced elevation of [Ca2+]i in ARC neurons was blocked by the AMPK inhibitor compound C (20 μmol/L), and enhanced by the GSK3β inhibitor LiCl (10 mmol/L). Moreover, lowering glucose level induced the phosphorylation of AMPK and GSK3β, which was inhibited by compound C (20 μmol/L). Conclusion: Lowering glucose level enhances the activity of P/Q type Ca2+channels and elevates [Ca2+]i level in hypothalamic arcuate nucleus neurons via inhibition of GSK3β. PMID:22504905

  11. 14,15-EET promotes mitochondrial biogenesis and protects cortical neurons against oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lai; Chen, Man; Yuan, Lin; Xiang, Yuting; Zheng, Ruimao; Zhu, Shigong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • 14,15-EET inhibits OGD-induced apoptosis in cortical neurons. • Mitochondrial biogenesis of cortical neurons is promoted by 14,15-EET. • 14,15-EET preserves mitochondrial function of cortical neurons under OGD. • CREB mediates effect of 14,15-EET on mitochondrial biogenesis and function. - Abstract: 14,15-Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (14,15-EET), a metabolite of arachidonic acid, is enriched in the brain cortex and exerts protective effect against neuronal apoptosis induced by ischemia/reperfusion. Although apoptosis has been well recognized to be closely associated with mitochondrial biogenesis and function, it is still unclear whether the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET is mediated by promotion of mitochondrial biogenesis and function in cortical neurons under the condition of oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD). In this study, we found that 14,15-EET improved cell viability and inhibited apoptosis of cortical neurons. 14,15-EET significantly increased the mitochondrial mass and the ratio of mitochondrial DNA to nuclear DNA. Key makers of mitochondrial biogenesis, peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma-coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), were elevated at both mRNA and protein levels in the cortical neurons treated with 14,15-EET. Moreover, 14,15-EET markedly attenuated the decline of mitochondrial membrane potential, reduced ROS, while increased ATP synthesis. Knockdown of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) by siRNA blunted the up-regulation of PGC-1α and NRF-1 stimulated by 14,15-EET, and consequently abolished the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET. Our results indicate that 14,15-EET protects neurons from OGD-induced apoptosis by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis and function through CREB mediated activation of PGC-1α and NRF-1

  12. 14,15-EET promotes mitochondrial biogenesis and protects cortical neurons against oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lai; Chen, Man; Yuan, Lin; Xiang, Yuting [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing (China); Zheng, Ruimao, E-mail: rmzheng@pku.edu.cn [Department of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing (China); Zhu, Shigong, E-mail: sgzhu@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing (China)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • 14,15-EET inhibits OGD-induced apoptosis in cortical neurons. • Mitochondrial biogenesis of cortical neurons is promoted by 14,15-EET. • 14,15-EET preserves mitochondrial function of cortical neurons under OGD. • CREB mediates effect of 14,15-EET on mitochondrial biogenesis and function. - Abstract: 14,15-Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (14,15-EET), a metabolite of arachidonic acid, is enriched in the brain cortex and exerts protective effect against neuronal apoptosis induced by ischemia/reperfusion. Although apoptosis has been well recognized to be closely associated with mitochondrial biogenesis and function, it is still unclear whether the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET is mediated by promotion of mitochondrial biogenesis and function in cortical neurons under the condition of oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD). In this study, we found that 14,15-EET improved cell viability and inhibited apoptosis of cortical neurons. 14,15-EET significantly increased the mitochondrial mass and the ratio of mitochondrial DNA to nuclear DNA. Key makers of mitochondrial biogenesis, peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma-coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), were elevated at both mRNA and protein levels in the cortical neurons treated with 14,15-EET. Moreover, 14,15-EET markedly attenuated the decline of mitochondrial membrane potential, reduced ROS, while increased ATP synthesis. Knockdown of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) by siRNA blunted the up-regulation of PGC-1α and NRF-1 stimulated by 14,15-EET, and consequently abolished the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET. Our results indicate that 14,15-EET protects neurons from OGD-induced apoptosis by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis and function through CREB mediated activation of PGC-1α and NRF-1.

  13. Single-Cell Imaging of Bioenergetic Responses to Neuronal Excitotoxicity and Oxygen and Glucose Deprivation

    OpenAIRE

    Connolly, Niamh M; Düssmann, Heiko; Anilkumar, Ujval; Huber, Heinrich J; Prehn, Jochen HM

    2014-01-01

    Excitotoxicity is a condition occurring during cerebral ischemia, seizures, and chronic neurodegeneration. It is characterized by overactivation of glutamate receptors, leading to excessive Ca2+/Na+ influx into neurons, energetic stress, and subsequent neuronal injury.We and others have previously investigated neuronal populations to study how bioenergetic parameters determine neuronal injury; however, such experiments are often confounded by population-based heterogeneity and the contributio...

  14. Lowering Plasma Glucose Concentration by Inhibiting Renal Sodium-Glucose Co-Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad A; DeFronzo, Ralph A

    2017-01-01

    Maintaining normoglycaemia not only reduces the risk of diabetic microvascular complications but also corrects the metabolic abnormalities that contribute to the development and progression of hyperglycaemia (i.e. insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction). Progressive beta-cell failure, in addition to the multiple side effects associated with many current antihyperglycaemic agents (e.g., hypoglycaemia and weight gain) presents major obstacle to the achievement of the recommended goal of glycaemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). Thus, novel effective therapies are needed for optimal glucose control in subjects with DM. Recently, specific inhibitors of renal sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) have been developed to produce glucosuria and lower the plasma glucose concentration. Because of their unique mechanism of action (which is independent of the secretion and action of insulin), these agents are effective in lowering the plasma glucose concentration in all stages of DM and can be combined with all other antidiabetic agents. In this review, we summarize the available data concerning the mechanism of action, efficacy and safety of this novel class of antidiabetic agent. PMID:24690096

  15. Effects of Thyroidectomy and Thyroxine on Glucose Transport ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    10mg/kg b/w Ketamine was administered intraperitoneally as anesthesia before the surgeries. On the thirty-fifth day post-surgery all the animals were sacrificed and their small intestines were harvested. 10cm length of jejunum and ileum respectively were used to make everted sacs for the in vitro study. Mucosa glucose ...

  16. Alpha2delta-1 in SF1+ Neurons of the Ventromedial Hypothalamus Is an Essential Regulator of Glucose and Lipid Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A. Felsted

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The central mechanisms controlling glucose and lipid homeostasis are inadequately understood. We show that α2δ-1 is an essential regulator of glucose and lipid balance, acting in steroidogenic factor-1 (SF1 neurons of the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH. These effects are body weight independent and involve regulation of SF1+ neuronal activity and sympathetic output to metabolic tissues. Accordingly, mice with α2δ-1 deletion in SF1 neurons exhibit glucose intolerance, altered lipolysis, and decreased cholesterol content in adipose tissue despite normal energy balance regulation. Profound reductions in the firing rate of SF1 neurons, decreased sympathetic output, and elevated circulating levels of serotonin are associated with these alterations. Normal calcium currents but reduced excitatory postsynaptic currents in mutant SF1 neurons implicate α2δ-1 in the promotion of excitatory synaptogenesis separate from its canonical role as a calcium channel subunit. Collectively, these findings identify an essential mechanism that regulates VMH neuronal activity and glycemic and lipid control and may be a target for tackling metabolic disease. : Felsted et al. show a required role of the calcium channel subunit and thrombospondin receptor α2δ-1 in regulating glucose and lipid homeostasis in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH. These effects are caused by regulation of SF1+ neuronal activity in the VMH through non-canonical mechanisms and concomitant influences on sympathetic output. Keywords: diabetes, VMH, hypothalamus, glucose, norepinephrine, serotonin, excitability, lipid, SF1

  17. Glucose metabolism transporters and epilepsy: only GLUT1 has an established role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Michael S; Damiano, John A; Mullen, Saul A; Bellows, Susannah T; Oliver, Karen L; Dahl, Hans-Henrik M; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Berkovic, Samuel F

    2014-02-01

    The availability of glucose, and its glycolytic product lactate, for cerebral energy metabolism is regulated by specific brain transporters. Inadequate energy delivery leads to neurologic impairment. Haploinsufficiency of the glucose transporter GLUT1 causes a characteristic early onset encephalopathy, and has recently emerged as an important cause of a variety of childhood or later-onset generalized epilepsies and paroxysmal exercise-induced dyskinesia. We explored whether mutations in the genes encoding the other major glucose (GLUT3) or lactate (MCT1/2/3/4) transporters involved in cerebral energy metabolism also cause generalized epilepsies. A cohort of 119 cases with myoclonic astatic epilepsy or early onset absence epilepsy was screened for nucleotide variants in these five candidate genes. No epilepsy-causing mutations were identified, indicating that of the major energetic fuel transporters in the brain, only GLUT1 is clearly associated with generalized epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  18. Glycemic state regulates melanocortin, but not nesfatin-1, responsiveness of glucose-sensing neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimee, Andrea; Ferguson, Alastair V

    2015-04-15

    The nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) is a medullary integrative center with critical roles in the coordinated control of energy homeostasis. Here, we used whole cell current-clamp recordings on rat NTS neurons in slice preparation to identify the presence of physiologically relevant glucose-sensing neurons. The majority of NTS neurons (n = 81) were found to be glucose-responsive, with 35% exhibiting a glucose-excited (GE) phenotype (mean absolute change in membrane potential: 9.5 ± 1.1 mV), and 21% exhibiting a glucose-inhibited (GI) response (mean: 6.3 ± 0.7 mV). Furthermore, we found glucose-responsive cells are preferentially influenced by the anorexigenic peptide α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), but not nesfatin-1. Accordingly, alterations in glycemic state have profound effects on the responsiveness of NTS neurons to α-MSH, but not to nesfatin-1. Indeed, NTS neurons showed increasing responsiveness to α-MSH as extracellular glucose concentrations were decreased, and in hypoglycemic conditions, all NTS neurons were depolarized by α-MSH (mean 10.6 ± 3.2 mV; n = 8). Finally, decreasing levels of extracellular glucose correlated with a significant hyperpolarization of the baseline membrane potential of NTS neurons, highlighting the modulatory effect of glucose on the baseline excitability of cells in this region. Our findings reveal individual NTS cells are capable of integrating multiple sources of metabolically relevant inputs, highlight the rapid capacity for plasticity in medullary melanocortin circuits, and emphasize the critical importance of physiological recording conditions for electrophysiological studies pertaining to the central control of energy homeostasis. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Fibroblast growth factor 10 protects neuron against oxygen–glucose deprivation injury through inducing heme oxygenase-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yong-Hua; Yang, Li-Ye; Chen, Wei; Li, Ying-Ke; Yuan, Hong-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • FGF10 attenuates OGD induced injury in cortical neuron. • FGF10 reduces OGD triggered ROS level in cortical neuron. • FGF10 induces HO-1 expression upon OGD stimuli in cortical neuron. • Knockdown of HO-1 impairs the neuroprotection of FGF10 in OGD model. - Abstract: Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are a family of structurally related heparin-binding proteins with diverse biological functions. FGFs participate in mitogenesis, angiogenesis, cell proliferation, development, differentiation and cell migration. Here, we investigated the potential effect of FGF10, a member of FGFs, on neuron survival in oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD) model. In primary cultured mouse cortical neurons upon OGD, FGF10 treatment (100 and 1000 ng/ml) attenuated the decrease of cell viability and rescued the LDH release. Tuj-1 immunocytochemistry assay showed that FGF10 promoted neuronal survival. Apoptosis assay with Annexin V + PI by flow cytometry demonstrated that FGF10 treatment reduced apoptotic cell proportion. Moreover, immunoblotting showed that FGF10 alleviated the cleaved caspase-3 upregulation caused by OGD. FGF10 treatment also depressed the OGD-induced increase of caspase-3, -8 and -9 activities. At last, we found FGF10 triggered heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein expression rather than hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling. Knockdown of HO-1 by siRNA partly abolished the neuroprotection of FGF10 in OGD model. In summary, our observations provide the first evidence for the neuroprotective function of FGF10 against ischemic neuronal injury and suggest that FGF10 may be a promising agent for treatment of ischemic stroke

  20. Fibroblast growth factor 10 protects neuron against oxygen–glucose deprivation injury through inducing heme oxygenase-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yong-Hua; Yang, Li-Ye; Chen, Wei; Li, Ying-Ke, E-mail: liyingke6f@126.com; Yuan, Hong-Bin, E-mail: yuanhongbin6f@126.com

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • FGF10 attenuates OGD induced injury in cortical neuron. • FGF10 reduces OGD triggered ROS level in cortical neuron. • FGF10 induces HO-1 expression upon OGD stimuli in cortical neuron. • Knockdown of HO-1 impairs the neuroprotection of FGF10 in OGD model. - Abstract: Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are a family of structurally related heparin-binding proteins with diverse biological functions. FGFs participate in mitogenesis, angiogenesis, cell proliferation, development, differentiation and cell migration. Here, we investigated the potential effect of FGF10, a member of FGFs, on neuron survival in oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD) model. In primary cultured mouse cortical neurons upon OGD, FGF10 treatment (100 and 1000 ng/ml) attenuated the decrease of cell viability and rescued the LDH release. Tuj-1 immunocytochemistry assay showed that FGF10 promoted neuronal survival. Apoptosis assay with Annexin V + PI by flow cytometry demonstrated that FGF10 treatment reduced apoptotic cell proportion. Moreover, immunoblotting showed that FGF10 alleviated the cleaved caspase-3 upregulation caused by OGD. FGF10 treatment also depressed the OGD-induced increase of caspase-3, -8 and -9 activities. At last, we found FGF10 triggered heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein expression rather than hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling. Knockdown of HO-1 by siRNA partly abolished the neuroprotection of FGF10 in OGD model. In summary, our observations provide the first evidence for the neuroprotective function of FGF10 against ischemic neuronal injury and suggest that FGF10 may be a promising agent for treatment of ischemic stroke.

  1. Neuroglobin overexpression inhibits oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening in primary cultured mouse cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhanyang; Liu, Ning; Li, Yadan; Xu, Jianfeng; Wang, Xiaoying

    2013-08-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb) is an endogenous neuroprotective molecule against hypoxic/ischemic brain injury, but the underlying mechanisms remain largely undefined. Our recent study revealed that Ngb can bind to voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), a regulator of mitochondria permeability transition (MPT). In this study we examined the role of Ngb in MPT pore (mPTP) opening following oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) in primary cultured mouse cortical neurons. Co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) and immunocytochemistry showed that the binding between Ngb and VDAC was increased after OGD compared to normoxia, indicating the OGD-enhanced Ngb-VDAC interaction. Ngb overexpression protected primary mouse cortical neurons from OGD-induced neuronal death, to an extent comparable to mPTP opening inhibitor, cyclosporine A (CsA) pretreatment. We further measured the role of Ngb in OGD-induced mPTP opening using Ngb overexpression and knockdown approaches in primary cultured neurons, and recombinant Ngb exposure to isolated mitochondria. Same as CsA pretreatment, Ngb overexpression significantly reduced OGD-induced mPTP opening markers including mitochondria swelling, mitochondrial NAD(+) release, and cytochrome c (Cyt c) release in primary cultured neurons. Recombinant Ngb incubation significantly reduced OGD-induced NAD(+) release and Cyt c release from isolated mitochondria. In contrast, Ngb knockdown significantly increased OGD-induced neuron death, and increased OGD-induced mitochondrial NAD(+) release and Cyt c release as well, and these outcomes could be rescued by CsA pretreatment. In summary, our results demonstrated that Ngb overexpression can inhibit OGD-induced mPTP opening in primary cultured mouse cortical neurons, which may be one of the molecular mechanisms of Ngb's neuroprotection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Infection and Transport of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 in Neurons: Role of the Cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a neuroinvasive human pathogen that has the ability to infect and replicate within epithelial cells and neurons and establish a life-long latent infection in sensory neurons. HSV-1 depends on the host cellular cytoskeleton for entry, replication, and exit. Therefore, HSV-1 has adapted mechanisms to promote its survival by exploiting the microtubule and actin cytoskeletons to direct its active transport, infection, and spread between neurons and epithelial cells during primary and recurrent infections. This review will focus on the currently known mechanisms utilized by HSV-1 to harness the neuronal cytoskeleton, molecular motors, and the secretory and exocytic pathways for efficient virus entry, axonal transport, replication, assembly, and exit from the distinct functional compartments (cell body and axon) of the highly polarized sensory neurons. PMID:29473915

  3. Role of vitamin D on the expression of glucose transporters in L6 myotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bubblu Tamilselvan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Altered expression of glucose transporters is a major characteristic of diabetes. Vitamin D has evolved widespread interest in the pathogenesis and prevention of diabetes. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of vitamin D in the overall regulation of muscle cell glucose transporter expression. L6 cells were exposed to type 1 and type 2 diabetic conditions and the effect of calcitriol (1,25, dihydroxy cholicalciferol on the expression of glucose transporters was studied by real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. There was a significant decrease in glucose transporter type 1 (GLUT1, GLUT4, vitamin D receptor (VDR, and IR expression in type 1 and 2 diabetic model compared to control group. Treatment of myoblasts with 10-7 M calcitriol for 24 h showed a significant increase in GLUT1, GLUT4, VDR, and insulin receptor (IR expression. The results indicate a potential antidiabetic function of vitamin D on GLUT1, GLUT4, VDR, and IR by improving receptor gene expression suggesting a role for vitamin D in regulation of expression of the glucose transporters in muscle cells.

  4. Caudal fourth ventricular administration of the AMPK activator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-riboside regulates glucose and counterregulatory hormone profiles, dorsal vagal complex metabolosensory neuron function, and hypothalamic Fos expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Baher A; Tamrakar, Pratistha; Gujar, Amit D; Cherian, Ajeesh Koshy; Briski, Karen P

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated the hypothesis that estrogen controls hindbrain AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity and regulation of blood glucose, counterregulatory hormone secretion, and hypothalamic nerve cell transcriptional status. Dorsal vagal complex A2 noradrenergic neurons were laser microdissected from estradiol benzoate (E)- or oil (O)-implanted ovariectomized female rats after caudal fourth ventricular (CV4) delivery of the AMPK activator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-riboside (AICAR), for Western blot analysis. E advanced AICAR-induced increases in A2 phospho-AMPK (pAMPK) expression and in blood glucose levels and was required for augmentation of Fos, estrogen receptor-α (ERα), monocarboxylate transporter-2, and glucose transporter-3 protein in A2 neurons and enhancement of corticosterone secretion by this treatment paradigm. CV4 AICAR also resulted in site-specific modifications in Fos immunolabeling of hypothalamic metabolic structures, including the paraventricular, ventromedial, and arcuate nuclei. The current studies demonstrate that estrogen regulates AMPK activation in caudal hindbrain A2 noradrenergic neurons during pharmacological replication of energy shortage in this area of the brain, and that this sensor is involved in neural regulation of glucostasis, in part, through control of corticosterone secretion. The data provide unique evidence that A2 neurons express both ERα and -β proteins and that AMPK upregulates cellular sensitivity to ERα-mediated signaling during simulated energy insufficiency. The results also imply that estrogen promotes glucose and lactate uptake by these cells under those conditions. Evidence for correlation between hindbrain AMPK and hypothalamic nerve cell genomic activation provides novel proof for functional connectivity between this hindbrain sensor and higher order metabolic brain loci while demonstrating a modulatory role for estrogen in this interaction. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Chronic exposure to KATP channel openers results in attenuated glucose sensing in hypothalamic GT1-7 neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haythorne, Elizabeth; Hamilton, D Lee; Findlay, John A; Beall, Craig; McCrimmon, Rory J; Ashford, Michael L J

    2016-12-01

    Individuals with Type 1 diabetes (T1D) are often exposed to recurrent episodes of hypoglycaemia. This reduces hormonal and behavioural responses that normally counteract low glucose in order to maintain glucose homeostasis, with altered responsiveness of glucose sensing hypothalamic neurons implicated. Although the molecular mechanisms are unknown, pharmacological studies implicate hypothalamic ATP-sensitive potassium channel (K ATP ) activity, with K ATP openers (KCOs) amplifying, through cell hyperpolarization, the response to hypoglycaemia. Although initial findings, using acute hypothalamic KCO delivery, in rats were promising, chronic exposure to the KCO NN414 worsened the responses to subsequent hypoglycaemic challenge. To investigate this further we used GT1-7 cells to explore how NN414 affected glucose-sensing behaviour, the metabolic response of cells to hypoglycaemia and K ATP activity. GT1-7 cells exposed to 3 or 24 h NN414 exhibited an attenuated hyperpolarization to subsequent hypoglycaemic challenge or NN414, which correlated with diminished K ATP activity. The reduced sensitivity to hypoglycaemia was apparent 24 h after NN414 removal, even though intrinsic K ATP activity recovered. The NN414-modified glucose responsiveness was not associated with adaptations in glucose uptake, metabolism or oxidation. K ATP inactivation by NN414 was prevented by the concurrent presence of tolbutamide, which maintains K ATP closure. Single channel recordings indicate that NN414 alters K ATP intrinsic gating inducing a stable closed or inactivated state. These data indicate that exposure of hypothalamic glucose sensing cells to chronic NN414 drives a sustained conformational change to K ATP , probably by binding to SUR1, that results in loss of channel sensitivity to intrinsic metabolic factors such as MgADP and small molecule agonists. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Sodium-Glucose linked transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors--fighting diabetes from a new perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelopoulos, Theodoros P; Doupis, John

    2014-06-01

    Sodium-Glucose linked transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are a new family of antidiabetic pharmaceutical agents whose action is based on the inhibition of the glucose reabsorption pathway, resulting in glucosuria and a consequent reduction of the blood glucose levels, in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Apart from lowering both fasting and postprandial blood glucose levels, without causing hypoglycemia, SGLT2 inhibitors have also shown a reduction in body weight and the systolic blood pressure. This review paper explores the renal involvement in glucose homeostasis providing also the latest safety and efficacy data for the European Medicines Agency and U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved SGLT2 inhibitors, looking, finally, into the future of this novel antidiabetic category of pharmaceutical agents.

  7. Unaltered lactate and glucose transporter levels in the MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puchades, Maja; Sogn, Carl Johan; Maehlen, Jan

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Metabolic impairment contributes to development of Parkinson's disease (PD). Mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in degeneration of nigral dopamine neurons. Also, in PD there are alterations in glucose metabolism in nigro-striatal pathways, and increased cerebral lactate levels have...... of MCT1, MCT2 and GLUT1 is not changed following dopaminergic neurodegeneration. This is in contrast to findings in other neurodegenerative disease, such as mesial temporal lobe epilepsy, where there are large alterations in MCT levels....

  8. Quantitative analysis of intraneuronal transport in human iPS neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruko Nakamura

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells are promising tools to investigate disease mechanism and develop new drugs. Intraneuronal transport, which is fundamental for neuronal survival and function, is vulnerable to various pharmacological and chemical agents and is disrupted in some neurodegenerative disorders. We applied a quantification method for axonal transport by counting CM-DiI–labeled particles traveling along the neurite, which allowed us to monitor and quantitate, for the first time, intraneuronal transport in human neurons differentiated from iPS cells (iCell neurons. We evaluated the acute effects of several anti-neoplastic agents that have been previously shown to affect intraneuronal transport. Vincristine, paclitaxel and oxaliplatin decreased the number of moving particle along neurites. Cisplatin, however, produced no effect on intraneuronal transport, which is in contrast to our previous report indicating that it inhibits transport in chick dorsal root ganglion neurons. Our system may be a useful method for assessing intraneuronal transport and neurotoxicity in human iPS neurons.

  9. Female-Specific Glucose Sensitivity of GnRH1 Neurons Leads to Sexually Dimorphic Inhibition of Reproduction in Medaka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasebe, Masaharu; Kanda, Shinji; Oka, Yoshitaka

    2016-11-01

    Close interaction exists between energy-consuming reproduction and nutritional status. However, there are differences in costs and priority for reproduction among species and even between sexes, which leads to diversification of interactions between reproduction and nutritional status. Despite such diversified interactions among species and sexes, most of the analysis of the nutritional status-dependent regulation of reproduction has been limited to an endothermic vertebrate, mammalian species of either sex. Therefore, the mechanisms underlying the diversified interactions remain elusive. In the present study, we demonstrated the effects of malnutritional status on reproduction at both organismal and cellular levels in an ectothermic vertebrate, a teleost medaka of both sexes. First, we analyzed the effects of malnutrition by fasting on gonadosomatic index, number of spawned/fertilized eggs, and courtship behavior. Fasting strongly suppressed reproduction in females but, surprisingly, not in males. Next, we analyzed the effects of fasting on firing activity of hypothalamic GnRH1 neurons, which form the final common pathway for the control of reproduction. An electrophysiological analysis showed that low glucose, which is induced by fasting, directly suppresses the firing activity of GnRH1 neurons specifically in females through intracellular ATP-sensitive potassium channels and AMP-activated protein kinase pathways. Based on the fact that such suppressions occurred only in females, we conclude that nutritional status-dependent, glucose-sensing in GnRH1 neurons may contribute to the most fitted reproductive regulation for each sex.

  10. Quantitative importance of the pentose phosphate pathway determined by incorporation of 13C from [2-13C]- and [3-13C]glucose into TCA cycle intermediates and neurotransmitter amino acids in functionally intact neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brekke, Eva Marie; Walls, Anne Byriel; Schousboe, Arne

    2012-01-01

    is known about the PPP in neurons. The activity of the PPP was quantified in cultured cerebral cortical and cerebellar neurons after incubation in the presence of [2-(13)C]glucose or [3-(13)C]glucose. The activity of the PPP was several fold lower than glycolysis in both types of neurons. While metabolism...

  11. Glucose and lactate are equally effective in energizing activity-dependent synaptic vesicle turnover in purified cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthaler, F D; Kraftsik, R; Catsicas, S; Magistretti, P J; Chatton, J-Y

    2006-08-11

    This study examines the role of glucose and lactate as energy substrates to sustain synaptic vesicle cycling. Synaptic vesicle turnover was assessed in a quantitative manner by fluorescence microscopy in primary cultures of mouse cortical neurons. An electrode-equipped perfusion chamber was used to stimulate cells both by electrical field and potassium depolarization during image acquisition. An image analysis procedure was elaborated to select in an unbiased manner synaptic boutons loaded with the fluorescent dye N-(3-triethylammoniumpropyl)-4-(4-(dibutylamino)styryl)pyridinium dibromide (FM1-43). Whereas a minority of the sites fully released their dye content following electrical stimulation, others needed subsequent K(+) depolarization to achieve full release. This functional heterogeneity was not significantly altered by the nature of metabolic substrates. Repetitive stimulation sequences of FM1-43 uptake and release were then performed in the absence of any metabolic substrate and showed that the number of active sites dramatically decreased after the first cycle of loading/unloading. The presence of 1 mM glucose or lactate was sufficient to sustain synaptic vesicle cycling under these conditions. Moreover, both substrates were equivalent for recovery of function after a phase of decreased metabolic substrate availability. Thus, lactate appears to be equivalent to glucose for sustaining synaptic vesicle turnover in cultured cortical neurons during activity.

  12. Genome, secretome and glucose transport highlight unique features of the protein production host Pichia pastoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattanovich Diethard

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pichia pastoris is widely used as a production platform for heterologous proteins and model organism for organelle proliferation. Without a published genome sequence available, strain and process development relied mainly on analogies to other, well studied yeasts like Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Results To investigate specific features of growth and protein secretion, we have sequenced the 9.4 Mb genome of the type strain DSMZ 70382 and analyzed the secretome and the sugar transporters. The computationally predicted secretome consists of 88 ORFs. When grown on glucose, only 20 proteins were actually secreted at detectable levels. These data highlight one major feature of P. pastoris, namely the low contamination of heterologous proteins with host cell protein, when applying glucose based expression systems. Putative sugar transporters were identified and compared to those of related yeast species. The genome comprises 2 homologs to S. cerevisiae low affinity transporters and 2 to high affinity transporters of other Crabtree negative yeasts. Contrary to other yeasts, P. pastoris possesses 4 H+/glycerol transporters. Conclusion This work highlights significant advantages of using the P. pastoris system with glucose based expression and fermentation strategies. As only few proteins and no proteases are actually secreted on glucose, it becomes evident that cell lysis is the relevant cause of proteolytic degradation of secreted proteins. The endowment with hexose transporters, dominantly of the high affinity type, limits glucose uptake rates and thus overflow metabolism as observed in S. cerevisiae. The presence of 4 genes for glycerol transporters explains the high specific growth rates on this substrate and underlines the suitability of a glycerol/glucose based fermentation strategy. Furthermore, we present an open access web based genome browser http://www.pichiagenome.org.

  13. Dync1h1 Mutation Causes Proprioceptive Sensory Neuron Loss and Impaired Retrograde Axonal Transport of Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Wang, Yi; Xu, Huan; Fu, Yuan; Qian, Ting; Bo, Deng; Lu, Yan-Xin; Xiong, Yi; Wan, Jun; Zhang, Xiang; Dong, Qiang; Chen, Xiang-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Sprawling (Swl) is a radiation-induced mutation which has been identified to have a nine base pair deletion in dynein heavy chain 1 (DYNC1H1: encoded by a single gene Dync1h1). This study is to investigate the phenotype and the underlying mechanism of the Dync1h1 mutant. To display the phenotype of Swl mutant mice, we examined the embryos of homozygous (Swl/Swl) and heterozygous (Swl/+) mice and their postnatal dorsal root ganglion (DRG) of surviving Swl/+ mice. The Swl/+ mice could survive for a normal life span, while Swl/Swl could only survive till embryonic (E) 8.5 days. Excessive apoptosis of Swl/+ DRG neurons was revealed during E11.5-E15.5 days, and the peak rate was at E13.5 days. In vitro study of mutated DRG neurons showed impaired retrograde transport of dynein-driven nerve growth factor (NGF). Mitochondria, another dynein-driven cargo, demonstrated much slower retrograde transport velocity in Swl/+ neurons than in wild-type (WT) neurons. Nevertheless, the Swl, Loa, and Cra mutations did not affect homodimerization of DYNC1H1. The Swl/Swl mutation of Dync1h1 gene led to embryonic mal-development and lethality, whereas the Swl/+ DRG neurons demonstrated deficient retrograde transport in dynein-driven cargos and excessive apoptosis during mid- to late-developmental stages. The underlying mechanism of the mutation may not be due to impaired homodimerization of DYNC1H1. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. A Glimpse of Membrane Transport through Structures-Advances in the Structural Biology of the GLUT Glucose Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Nieng

    2017-08-18

    The cellular uptake of glucose is an essential physiological process, and movement of glucose across biological membranes requires specialized transporters. The major facilitator superfamily glucose transporters GLUTs, encoded by the SLC2A genes, have been a paradigm for functional, mechanistic, and structural understanding of solute transport in the past century. This review starts with a glimpse into the structural biology of membrane proteins and particularly membrane transport proteins, enumerating the landmark structures in the past 25years. The recent breakthrough in the structural elucidation of GLUTs is then elaborated following a brief overview of the research history of these archetypal transporters, their functional specificity, and physiological and pathophysiological significances. Structures of GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT5 in distinct transport and/or ligand-binding states reveal detailed mechanisms of the alternating access transport cycle and substrate recognition, and thus illuminate a path by which structure-based drug design may be applied to help discover novel therapeutics against several debilitating human diseases associated with GLUT malfunction and/or misregulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Piracetam and TRH analogues antagonise inhibition by barbiturates, diazepam, melatonin and galanin of human erythrocyte D-glucose transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftalin, Richard J; Cunningham, Philip; Afzal-Ahmed, Iram

    2004-01-01

    Nootropic drugs increase glucose uptake into anaesthetised brain and into Alzheimer's diseased brain. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone, TRH, which has a chemical structure similar to nootropics increases cerebellar uptake of glucose in murine rolling ataxia. This paper shows that nootropic drugs like piracetam (2-oxo 1 pyrrolidine acetamide) and levetiracetam and neuropeptides like TRH antagonise the inhibition of glucose transport by barbiturates, diazepam, melatonin and endogenous neuropeptide galanin in human erythrocytes in vitro. The potencies of nootropic drugs in opposing scopolamine-induced memory loss correlate with their potencies in antagonising pentobarbital inhibition of erythrocyte glucose transport in vitro (Pnootropics, D-levetiracetam and D-pyroglutamate, have higher antagonist Ki's against pentobarbital inhibition of glucose transport than more potent L-stereoisomers (Pnootropics, like aniracetam and levetiracetam, while antagonising pentobarbital action, also inhibit glucose transport. Analeptics like bemigride and methamphetamine are more potent inhibitors of glucose transport than antagonists of hypnotic action on glucose transport. There are similarities between amino-acid sequences in human glucose transport protein isoform 1 (GLUT1) and the benzodiazepine-binding domains of GABAA (gamma amino butyric acid) receptor subunits. Mapped on a 3D template of GLUT1, these homologies suggest that the site of diazepam and piracetam interaction is a pocket outside the central hydrophilic pore region. Nootropic pyrrolidone antagonism of hypnotic drug inhibition of glucose transport in vitro may be an analogue of TRH antagonism of galanin-induced narcosis. PMID:15148255

  16. Activation of glycolysis and inhibition of glucose transport into leaves by fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lustinec, J; Pokorna, V; Ruzicka, J

    1962-01-01

    During stimulation of wheat leaf respiration by fluoride at 100 to 200 ppM fluorine in dry tissue the ratio of radioactivities of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ released from glucose-6-/sup 14/C and that released from glucose-1-/sup 14/C (C/sub 6//C/sub 1/) increases due especially to an increased output of 6-/sup 14/CO/sub 2/ which suggests an activation of glycolysis. The absolute values of radioactivity of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/, however, are decreased by the action of fluoride due to its inhibition of the transport of glucose into leaves. 15 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  17. Effect of diet on insulin binding and glucose transport in rat sarcolemmal vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimditch, G.K.; Barnard, R.J.; Sternlicht, E.; Whitson, R.H.; Kaplan, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a high-fat, high-sucrose diet (HFS) and a low-fat, high-complex carbohydrate diet (LFC) on glucose tolerance, insulin binding, and glucose transport in rat skeletal muscle. During the intravenous glucose tolerance test, peak glucose values at 5 min were significantly higher in the HFS group; 0-, 20-, and 60-min values were similar. Insulin values were significantly higher in the HFS group at all time points (except 60 min), indicating whole-body insulin resistance. Skeletal muscle was responsible, in part, for this insulin resistance, because specific D-glucose transport in isolated sarcolemmal (SL) vesicles under basal conditions was similar between LFC and HFS rats, despite the higher plasma insulin levels. Scatchard analyses of insulin binding curves to sarcolemmal vesicles revealed that the K/sub a/ of the high-affinity binding sites was significantly reduced by the HFS diet; no other binding changes were noted. Specific D-glucose transport in SL vesicles after maximum insulin stimulation (1 U/kg) was significantly depressed in the HFS group, indicating that HFS feeding also caused a postbinding defect. These results indicate that the insulin resistance in skeletal muscle associated with a HFS diet is due to both a decrease in the K/sub a/ of the high-affinity insulin receptors and a postbinding defect

  18. Placental Expression of Glucose Transporter Proteins in Pregnancies Complicated by Gestational and Pregestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanirowski, Paweł Jan; Szukiewicz, Dariusz; Pazura-Turowska, Monika; Sawicki, Włodzimierz; Cendrowski, Krzysztof

    2018-04-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus and pregestational diabetes mellitus constitute carbohydrate metabolism disorders, which, if not diagnosed and adequately treated, lead to serious and often life-threatening pregnancy complications. According to a recently formulated hypothesis, some diabetes-related complications, such as fetal macrosomia, may be the result of disturbances in the transplacental transport of nutrients-in particular, excessive maternal-fetal glucose transfer. Throughout pregnancy, glucose flux across the placenta is mediated by the group of facilitative glucose transporters (GLUT), the expression of which in different placental compartments is the precondition for effective glucose uptake from maternal blood and its subsequent transfer to the fetal circulation. In diabetes-complicated pregnancies, the location, expression and activity of glucose transporters are modified to an extent that results in alterations in the maternal-fetal glucose exchange, potentially leading to an excessive supply of energy substrates to the fetus. This paper reviews the literature on the expression and activity of glucose transporter proteins-GLUT-1, GLUT-3, GLUT-4, GLUT-8, GLUT-9 and GLUT-12-in the human placenta, with a special focus on diabetes-complicated pregnancy. The characteristics of transporters in conditions of maternal normoglycemia and modifications occurring in the diabetic placenta are summarized, and the factors responsible for the regulation of the expression of selected isoforms are described. Finally, the impact of alterations in the placental expression of the aforementioned members of the GLUT family on intrauterine fetal development in pregnancies complicated by diabetes mellitus is discussed. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of selective blockade of oxygen consumption, glucose transport, and Ca2+ influx on thyroxine action in human mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvetny, J; Matzen, L E

    1990-01-01

    The effect of selective blockade of cellular glucose transporters, Ca2+ influx, and mitochondrial oxygen consumption on thyroxine (T4)-stimulated oxygen consumption and glucose uptake was examined in human mononuclear blood cells. Blockade of glucose transporters by cytochalasin B (1 x 10(-5) mol....../L) and of Ca2+ influx by alprenolol (1 x 10(-5) mol/L) and verapamil (4 x 10(-4) mol/L) inhibited T4-activated glucose uptaken and reduced T4-stimulated oxygen consumption by 20%. Uncoupling of mitochondrial oxygen consumption by azide (1 x 10(-3) mol/L) inhibited T4-stimulated oxygen consumption, but had...... no effect on glucose uptake. We conclude that T4-stimulated glucose uptake in human mononuclear blood cells is dependent on intact glucose transporters and Ca2+ influx, but not on mitochondrial oxygen consumption. However, oxygen consumption is, in part, dependent on intact glucose uptake....

  20. Wortmannin inhibits both insulin- and contraction-stimulated glucose uptake and transport in rat skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wojtaszewski, Jørgen; Hansen, B F; Ursø, Birgitte

    1996-01-01

    The role of phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase for insulin- and contraction-stimulated muscle glucose transport was investigated in rat skeletal muscle perfused with a cell-free perfusate. The insulin receptor substrate-1-associated PI 3-kinase activity was increased sixfold upon insulin...... stimulation but was unaffected by contractions. In addition, the insulin-stimulated PI 3-kinase activity and muscle glucose uptake and transport in individual muscles were dose-dependently inhibited by wortmannin with one-half maximal inhibition values of approximately 10 nM and total inhibition at 1 micro......M. This concentration of wortmannin also decreased the contraction-stimulated glucose transport and uptake by approximately 30-70% without confounding effects on contractility or on muscle ATP and phosphocreatine concentrations. At higher concentrations (3 and 10 microM), wortmannin completely blocked the contraction...

  1. Is contraction-stimulated glucose transport feedforward regulated by Ca2+?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas Elbenhardt; Angin, Yeliz; Sylow, Lykke

    2014-01-01

    cell types. The literature is contrasted against our recent findings suggesting that SR Ca(2+) release is neither essential nor adequate to stimulate glucose transport in muscle. Instead, feedback signals through AMPK and mechanical stress are likely to account for most of contraction......In many cell types, Ca(2+) signals to increase the movement and surface membrane insertion of vesicles. In skeletal muscle, Ca(2+) is predominantly released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) to initiate contraction. Sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release is widely believed to be a direct......-stimulated glucose transport. A revised working model is proposed, in which muscle glucose transport during contraction is not directly regulated by SR Ca(2+) release but rather responds exclusively to feedback signals activated secondary to cross-bridge cycling and tension development....

  2. Validation of 123I-6-deoxy-6-iodo-D-glucose (6-DIC) as tracer for the in-vivo glucose transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perret, P.; Ghezzi, C.; Mathieu, J.P.; Morin, C.; Vidal, M.; Comet, M.; Fagret, D.

    1997-01-01

    The evaluation of the glucose transport is very important clinically because alterations of this transport were described in numerous pathologies, in neurology, oncology and endocrinology. A new analog of the 123 I-labelled has been synthesized: 123 I-6-deoxy-6-iodo-D-glucose (6-DIG). Its in-vitro biological behaviour is similar to that of 3-O-methyl-D-glucose (3-OMG), the reference tracer of glucose transport. The aim of the study was to determine if it is possible to make evident by 6-DIG a variations of in-vivo glucose transport. The studies were effected on a model of homozygote mice (db/db), genetically diabetic (NIDDM), presenting a severe insulin-resistance, characterized by deficient glucose transport in response to insulin. The studies of 6-DIG biodistribution (5 nmol/mouse) with (1.5 UI/Kg) or without exogenous insulin, were conducted in diabetic mice (db/db) and in non-diabetic (db/+) control mice. The results show that the capture of 6-DIG, as well as that of glucose, increases (by 30%) in response to insulin in most of insulin-sensitive tissues in control mice. In the insulin-resistant and hyperglycemic db/db mouse, the capture of 6-DIG is not modified, no matter whether the exogenous insulin is present. In conclusion, the 6-DIG is able to make evident a lack of glucose transport in heart, diaphragm and skeletal muscle in diabetic mouse and a physiological variation of this transport in response to insulin, in the control mouse. This result should be stressed because for the first time it is possible to evidence in-vivo variations into glucose transport with a iodated molecule

  3. A high mitochondrial transport rate characterizes CNS neurons with high axonal regeneration capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Cartoni

    Full Text Available Improving axonal transport in the injured and diseased central nervous system has been proposed as a promising strategy to improve neuronal repair. However, the contribution of each cargo to the repair mechanism is unknown. DRG neurons globally increase axonal transport during regeneration. Because the transport of specific cargos after axonal insult has not been examined systematically in a model of enhanced regenerative capacity, it is unknown whether the transport of all cargos would be modulated equally in injured central nervous system neurons. Here, using a microfluidic culture system we compared neurons co-deleted for PTEN and SOCS3, an established model of high axonal regeneration capacity, to control neurons. We measured the axonal transport of three cargos (mitochondria, synaptic vesicles and late endosomes in regenerating axons and found that the transport of mitochondria, but not the other cargos, was increased in PTEN/SOCS3 co-deleted axons relative to controls. The results reported here suggest a pivotal role for this organelle during axonal regeneration.

  4. Herbivory-induced glucose transporter gene expression in the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuta, Shingo; Nakamura, Yuki; Hattori, Makoto; Sato, Ryoichi; Kikawada, Takahiro; Noda, Hiroaki

    2015-09-01

    Nilaparvata lugens, the brown planthopper (BPH) feeds on rice phloem sap, containing high amounts of sucrose as a carbon source. Nutrients such as sugars in the digestive tract are incorporated into the body cavity via transporters with substrate selectivity. Eighteen sugar transporter genes of BPH (Nlst) were reported and three transporters have been functionally characterized. However, individual characteristics of NlST members associated with sugar transport remain poorly understood. Comparative gene expression analyses using oligo-microarray and quantitative RT-PCR revealed that the sugar transporter gene Nlst16 was markedly up-regulated during BPH feeding. Expression of Nlst16 was induced 2 h after BPH feeding on rice plants. Nlst16, mainly expressed in the midgut, appears to be involved in carbohydrate incorporation from the gut cavity into the hemolymph. Nlst1 (NlHT1), the most highly expressed sugar transporter gene in the midgut was not up-regulated during BPH feeding. The biochemical function of NlST16 was shown as facilitative glucose transport along gradients. Glucose uptake activity by NlST16 was higher than that of NlST1 in the Xenopus oocyte expression system. At least two NlST members are responsible for glucose uptake in the BPH midgut, suggesting that the midgut of BPH is equipped with various types of transporters having diversified manner for sugar uptake. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Evolutionary ancestry and novel functions of the mammalian glucose transporter (GLUT) family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-O'Brien, Amy L; Patron, Nicola; Rogers, Suzanne

    2010-05-21

    In general, sugar porters function by proton-coupled symport or facilitative transport modes. Symporters, coupled to electrochemical energy, transport nutrients against a substrate gradient. Facilitative carriers transport sugars along a concentration gradient, thus transport is dependent upon extracellular nutrient levels. Across bacteria, fungi, unicellular non-vertebrates and plants, proton-coupled hexose symport is a crucial process supplying energy under conditions of nutrient flux. In mammals it has been assumed that evolution of whole body regulatory mechanisms would eliminate this need. To determine whether any isoforms bearing this function might be conserved in mammals, we investigated the relationship between the transporters of animals and the proton-coupled hexose symporters found in other species. We took a comparative genomic approach and have performed the first comprehensive and statistically supported phylogenetic analysis of all mammalian glucose transporter (GLUT) isoforms. Our data reveals the mammalian GLUT proteins segregate into five distinct classes. This evolutionary ancestry gives insight to structure, function and transport mechanisms within the groups. Combined with biological assays, we present novel evidence that, in response to changing nutrient availability and environmental pH, proton-coupled, active glucose symport function is maintained in mammalian cells. The analyses show the ancestry, evolutionary conservation and biological importance of the GLUT classes. These findings significantly extend our understanding of the evolution of mammalian glucose transport systems. They also reveal that mammals may have conserved an adaptive response to nutrient demand that would have important physiological implications to cell survival and growth.

  6. Neuroprotective effects of oxysophocarpine on neonatal rat primary cultured hippocampal neurons injured by oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qing-Luan; Li, Yu-Xiang; Zhou, Ru; Ma, Ning-Tian; Chang, Ren-Yuan; Wang, Teng-Fei; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Hao, Yin-Ju; Jin, Shao-Ju; Ma, Lin; Du, Juan; Sun, Tao; Yu, Jian-Qiang

    2014-08-01

    Oxysophocarpine (OSC), a quinolizidine alkaloid extracted from leguminous plants of the genus Robinia, is traditionally used for various diseases including neuronal disorders. This study investigated the protective effects of OSC on neonatal rat primary-cultured hippocampal neurons were injured by oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion (OGD/RP). Cultured hippocampal neurons were exposed to OGD for 2 h followed by a 24 h RP. OSC (1, 2, and 5 μmol/L) and nimodipine (Nim) (12 μmol/L) were added to the culture after OGD but before RP. The cultures of the control group were not exposed to OGD/RP. MTT and LDH assay were used to evaluate the protective effects of OSC. The concentration of intracellular-free calcium [Ca(2+)]i and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were determined to evaluate the degree of neuronal damage. Morphologic changes of neurons following OGD/RP were observed with a microscope. The expression of caspase-3 and caspase-12 mRNA was examined by real-time quantitative PCR. The IC50 of OSC was found to be 100 μmol/L. Treatment with OSC (1, 2, and 5 μmol/L) attenuated neuronal damage (p < 0.001), with evidence of increased cell viability (p < 0.001) and decreased cell morphologic impairment. Furthermore, OSC increased MMP (p < 0.001), but it inhibited [Ca(2+)]i (p < 0.001) elevation in a dose-dependent manner at OGD/RP. OSC (5 μmol/L) also decreased the expression of caspase-3 (p < 0.05) and caspase-12 (p < 0.05). The results suggested that OSC has significant neuroprotective effects that can be attributed to inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced apoptosis.

  7. Enhanced differentiation of neural stem cells to neurons and promotion of neurite outgrowth by oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin; Yang, Lin; Wang, Yaping

    2015-06-01

    Stroke has become the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Hypoxic or ischemic insults are crucial factors mediating the neural damage in the brain tissue of stroke patients. Neural stem cells (NSCs) have been recognized as a promising tool for the treatment of ischemic stroke and other neurodegenerative diseases due to their inducible pluripotency. In this study, we aim to mimick the cerebral hypoxic-ischemic injury in vitro using oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) strategy, and evaluate the effects of OGD on the NSC's neural differentiation, as well as the differentiated neurite outgrowth. Our data showed that NSCs under the short-term 2h OGD treatment are able to maintain cell viability and the capability to form neurospheres. Importantly, this moderate OGD treatment promotes NSC differentiation to neurons and enhances the performance of the mature neuronal networks, accompanying increased neurite outgrowth of differentiated neurons. However, long-term 6h and 8h OGD exposures in NSCs lead to decreased cell survival, reduced differentiation and diminished NSC-derived neurite outgrowth. The expressions of neuron-specific microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2) and growth associated protein 43 (GAP-43) are increased by short-term OGD treatments but suppressed by long-term OGD. Overall, our results demonstrate that short-term OGD exposure in vitro induces differentiation of NSCs while maintaining their proliferation and survival, providing valuable insights of adopting NSC-based therapy for ischemic stroke and other neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. GPER1 mediates estrogen-induced neuroprotection against oxygen-glucose deprivation in the primary hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tian-Zhi; Shi, Fei; Hu, Jun; He, Shi-Ming; Ding, Qian; Ma, Lian-Ting

    2016-07-22

    It is well-known that the neuroprotective effects of estrogen have potential in the prevention and amelioration of ischemic and degenerative neurological disorders, while the underlying mechanisms for estrogen actions are undefined. As an important mediator for the non-genomic functions of estrogen, GPER1 (G Protein-coupled Estrogen Receptor 1) has been suggested to involve in the beneficial roles of estrogen in neural cells. Here our studies on primary hippocampal neurons have focused on GPER1 in an in vitro model of ischemia using oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). GPER1 expression in the primary hippocampal neurons was stimulated by the OGD treatments. Both E2 (estradiol) and E2-BSA (membrane impermeable estradiol by covalent conjugation of bovine serum albumin) attenuated OGD-induced cell death in primary cultures of hippocampal neurons. Importantly, this membrane-mediated estrogen function requires GPER1 protein. Knocking down of GPER1 diminished, while overexpression of GPER1 potentiated, the protective roles of E2/E2-BSA following OGD. Additionally, the downstream mechanisms employed by membrane-associated estrogen signaling were found to include PI3K/Akt-dependent Ask1 inhibition in the primary hippocampal neurons. Overall, these research results could enhance our understanding of the neuroprotective actions for estrogen, and provide a new therapeutic target for improving stroke outcome and ameliorating degenerative neurological diseases. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Glucose deprivation stimulates Cu(2+) toxicity in cultured cerebellar granule neurons and Cu(2+)-dependent zinc release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaev, Nickolay K; Genrikhs, Elisaveta E; Aleksandrova, Olga P; Zelenova, Elena A; Stelmashook, Elena V

    2016-05-27

    Copper chloride (0.01mM, 2h) did not have significant influence on the survival of cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) incubated in balanced salt solution. However, CuCl2 caused severe neuronal damage by glucose deprivation (GD). The glutamate NMDA-receptors blocker MK-801 partially and antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) or Zn(2+) chelator, N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN) almost entirely protected CGNs from this toxic effect. Measurements of intracellular calcium ions using Fluo-4 AM, or zinc ions with FluoZin-3 AM demonstrated that 1 h-exposure to GD induced intensive increase of Fluo-4 but not FluoZin-3 fluorescence in neurons. The supplementation of solution with CuCl2 caused an increase of FluoZin-3, Fluo-4 and CellROX Green (reactive oxygen species probe) fluorescence by GD. The stimulation of Fluo-4 but not FluoZin-3 fluorescence by copper could be prevented partially by MK-801 and as well as CellROX Green fluorescence by NAC at GD. This data imply that during GD copper ions induce intense displacement zinc ions from intracellular stores, in addition free radical production, glutamate release and Ca(2+) overload of CGNs, that causes death of neurons as a result. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Aspergillus niger membrane-associated proteome analysis for the identification of glucose transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloothaak, J; Odoni, D I; de Graaff, L H; Martins Dos Santos, V A P; Schaap, P J; Tamayo-Ramos, J A

    2015-01-01

    The development of biological processes that replace the existing petrochemical-based industry is one of the biggest challenges in biotechnology. Aspergillus niger is one of the main industrial producers of lignocellulolytic enzymes, which are used in the conversion of lignocellulosic feedstocks into fermentable sugars. Both the hydrolytic enzymes responsible for lignocellulose depolymerisation and the molecular mechanisms controlling their expression have been well described, but little is known about the transport systems for sugar uptake in A. niger. Understanding the transportome of A. niger is essential to achieve further improvements at strain and process design level. Therefore, this study aims to identify and classify A. niger sugar transporters, using newly developed tools for in silico and in vivo analysis of its membrane-associated proteome. In the present research work, a hidden Markov model (HMM), that shows a good performance in the identification and segmentation of functionally validated glucose transporters, was constructed. The model (HMMgluT) was used to analyse the A. niger membrane-associated proteome response to high and low glucose concentrations at a low pH. By combining the abundance patterns of the proteins found in the A. niger plasmalemma proteome with their HMMgluT scores, two new putative high-affinity glucose transporters, denoted MstG and MstH, were identified. MstG and MstH were functionally validated and biochemically characterised by heterologous expression in a S. cerevisiae glucose transport null mutant. They were shown to be a high-affinity glucose transporter (K m = 0.5 ± 0.04 mM) and a very high-affinity glucose transporter (K m = 0.06 ± 0.005 mM), respectively. This study, focusing for the first time on the membrane-associated proteome of the industrially relevant organism A. niger, shows the global response of the transportome to the availability of different glucose concentrations. Analysis of the A. niger

  11. Impairment of brain endothelial glucose transporter by methamphetamine causes blood-brain barrier dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murrin L Charles

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methamphetamine (METH, an addictive psycho-stimulant drug with euphoric effect is known to cause neurotoxicity due to oxidative stress, dopamine accumulation and glial cell activation. Here we hypothesized that METH-induced interference of glucose uptake and transport at the endothelium can disrupt the energy requirement of the blood-brain barrier (BBB function and integrity. We undertake this study because there is no report of METH effects on glucose uptake and transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB to date. Results In this study, we demonstrate that METH-induced disruption of glucose uptake by endothelium lead to BBB dysfunction. Our data indicate that a low concentration of METH (20 μM increased the expression of glucose transporter protein-1 (GLUT1 in primary human brain endothelial cell (hBEC, main component of BBB without affecting the glucose uptake. A high concentration of 200 μM of METH decreased both the glucose uptake and GLUT1 protein levels in hBEC culture. Transcription process appeared to regulate the changes in METH-induced GLUT1 expression. METH-induced decrease in GLUT1 protein level was associated with reduction in BBB tight junction protein occludin and zonula occludens-1. Functional assessment of the trans-endothelial electrical resistance of the cell monolayers and permeability of dye tracers in animal model validated the pharmacokinetics and molecular findings that inhibition of glucose uptake by GLUT1 inhibitor cytochalasin B (CB aggravated the METH-induced disruption of the BBB integrity. Application of acetyl-L-carnitine suppressed the effects of METH on glucose uptake and BBB function. Conclusion Our findings suggest that impairment of GLUT1 at the brain endothelium by METH may contribute to energy-associated disruption of tight junction assembly and loss of BBB integrity.

  12. Xbp1s in Pomc neurons connects ER stress with energy balance and glucose homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The molecular mechanisms underlying neuronal leptin and insulin resistance in obesity and diabetes remain unclear. Here we show that induction ofthe unfolded protein response transcription factor spliced X-box binding protein 1(Xbp1s) in pro-opio-melanocortin (Pomc) neurons alone is sufficient to pr...

  13. Control of blood pressure, appetite, and glucose by leptin in mice lacking leptin receptors in proopiomelanocortin neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Carmo, Jussara M; da Silva, Alexandre A; Cai, Zhengwei; Lin, Shuying; Dubinion, John H; Hall, John E

    2011-05-01

    Although the central nervous system melanocortin system is an important regulator of energy balance, the role of proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in mediating the chronic effects of leptin on appetite, blood pressure, and glucose regulation is unknown. Using Cre/loxP technology we tested whether leptin receptor deletion in POMC neurons (LepR(flox/flox)/POMC-Cre mice) attenuates the chronic effects of leptin to increase mean arterial pressure (MAP), enhance glucose use and oxygen consumption, and reduce appetite. LepR(flox/flox)/POMC-Cre, wild-type, LepR(flox/flox), and POMC-Cre mice were instrumented for MAP and heart rate measurement by telemetry and venous catheters for infusions. LepR(flox/flox)/POMC-Cre mice were heavier, hyperglycemic, hyperinsulinemic, and hyperleptinemic compared with wild-type, LepR(flox/flox), and POMC-Cre mice. Despite exhibiting features of metabolic syndrome, LepR(flox/flox)/POMC-Cre mice had normal MAP and heart rate compared with LepR(flox/flox) but lower MAP and heart rate compared with wild-type mice. After a 5-day control period, leptin was infused (2 μg/kg per minute, IV) for 7 days. In control mice, leptin increased MAP by ≈5 mm Hg despite decreasing food intake by ≈35%. In contrast, leptin infusion in LepR(flox/flox)/POMC-Cre mice reduced MAP by ≈3 mm Hg and food intake by ≈28%. Leptin significantly decreased insulin and glucose levels in control mice but not in LepR(flox/flox)/POMC-Cre mice. Leptin increased oxygen consumption in LepR(flox/flox)/POMC-Cre and wild-type mice. Activation of POMC neurons is necessary for the chronic effects of leptin to raise MAP and reduce insulin and glucose levels, whereas leptin receptors in other areas of the brain other than POMC neurons appear to play a key role in mediating the chronic effects of leptin on appetite and oxygen consumption.

  14. High glucose increases action potential firing of catecholamine neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract by increasing spontaneous glutamate inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Brandon L; Zhu, Mingyan; Zhao, Huan; Dillon, Crystal; Appleyard, Suzanne M

    2017-09-01

    Glucose is a crucial substrate essential for cell survival and function. Changes in glucose levels impact neuronal activity and glucose deprivation increases feeding. Several brain regions have been shown to respond to glucoprivation, including the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) in the brain stem. The NTS is the primary site in the brain that receives visceral afferent information from the gastrointestinal tract. The catecholaminergic (CA) subpopulation within the NTS modulates many homeostatic functions including cardiovascular reflexes, respiration, food intake, arousal, and stress. However, it is not known if they respond to changes in glucose. Here we determined whether NTS-CA neurons respond to changes in glucose concentration and the mechanism involved. We found that decreasing glucose concentrations from 5 mM to 2 mM to 1 mM, significantly decreased action potential firing in a cell-attached preparation, whereas increasing it back to 5 mM increased the firing rate. This effect was dependent on glutamate release from afferent terminals and required presynaptic 5-HT 3 Rs. Decreasing the glucose concentration also decreased both basal and 5-HT 3 R agonist-induced increase in the frequency of spontaneous glutamate inputs onto NTS-CA neurons. Low glucose also blunted 5-HT-induced inward currents in nodose ganglia neurons, which are the cell bodies of vagal afferents. The effect of low glucose in both nodose ganglia cells and in NTS slices was mimicked by the glucokinase inhibitor glucosamine. This study suggests that NTS-CA neurons are glucosensing through a presynaptic mechanism that is dependent on vagal glutamate release, 5-HT 3 R activity, and glucokinase. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Response to ‘comment on recent modeling studies of astrocyte–neuron metabolic interactions': much ado about nothing

    OpenAIRE

    Mangia, Silvia; DiNuzzo, Mauro; Giove, Federico; Carruthers, Anthony; Simpson, Ian A; Vannucci, Susan J

    2011-01-01

    For many years, a tenet of cerebral metabolism held that glucose was the obligate energy substrate of the mammalian brain and that neuronal oxidative metabolism represented the majority of this glucose utilization. In 1994, Pellerin and Magistretti formulated the astrocyte–neuron lactate shuttle (ANLS) hypothesis, in which astrocytes, not neurons, metabolized glucose, with subsequent transport of the glycolytically derived lactate to fuel the energy needs of the neuron during neurotransmissio...

  16. Neuronal calcium sensor synaptotagmin-9 is not involved in the regulation of glucose homeostasis or insulin secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Gustavsson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin secretion is a complex and highly regulated process. It is well established that cytoplasmic calcium is a key regulator of insulin secretion, but how elevated intracellular calcium triggers insulin granule exocytosis remains unclear, and we have only begun to define the identities of proteins that are responsible for sensing calcium changes and for transmitting the calcium signal to release machineries. Synaptotagmins are primarily expressed in brain and endocrine cells and exhibit diverse calcium binding properties. Synaptotagmin-1, -2 and -9 are calcium sensors for fast neurotransmitter release in respective brain regions, while synaptotagmin-7 is a positive regulator of calcium-dependent insulin release. Unlike the three neuronal calcium sensors, whose deletion abolished fast neurotransmitter release, synaptotagmin-7 deletion resulted in only partial loss of calcium-dependent insulin secretion, thus suggesting that other calcium-sensors must participate in the regulation of insulin secretion. Of the other synaptotagmin isoforms that are present in pancreatic islets, the neuronal calcium sensor synaptotagmin-9 is expressed at the highest level after synaptotagmin-7. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we tested whether synaptotagmin-9 participates in the regulation of glucose-stimulated insulin release by using pancreas-specific synaptotagmin-9 knockout (p-S9X mice. Deletion of synaptotagmin-9 in the pancreas resulted in no changes in glucose homeostasis or body weight. Glucose tolerance, and insulin secretion in vivo and from isolated islets were not affected in the p-S9X mice. Single-cell capacitance measurements showed no difference in insulin granule exocytosis between p-S9X and control mice. CONCLUSIONS: Thus, synaptotagmin-9, although a major calcium sensor in the brain, is not involved in the regulation of glucose-stimulated insulin release from pancreatic β-cells.

  17. Neuronal calcium sensor synaptotagmin-9 is not involved in the regulation of glucose homeostasis or insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Wang, Xiaorui; Wang, Yue; Seah, Tingting; Xu, Jun; Radda, George K; Südhof, Thomas C; Han, Weiping

    2010-11-09

    Insulin secretion is a complex and highly regulated process. It is well established that cytoplasmic calcium is a key regulator of insulin secretion, but how elevated intracellular calcium triggers insulin granule exocytosis remains unclear, and we have only begun to define the identities of proteins that are responsible for sensing calcium changes and for transmitting the calcium signal to release machineries. Synaptotagmins are primarily expressed in brain and endocrine cells and exhibit diverse calcium binding properties. Synaptotagmin-1, -2 and -9 are calcium sensors for fast neurotransmitter release in respective brain regions, while synaptotagmin-7 is a positive regulator of calcium-dependent insulin release. Unlike the three neuronal calcium sensors, whose deletion abolished fast neurotransmitter release, synaptotagmin-7 deletion resulted in only partial loss of calcium-dependent insulin secretion, thus suggesting that other calcium-sensors must participate in the regulation of insulin secretion. Of the other synaptotagmin isoforms that are present in pancreatic islets, the neuronal calcium sensor synaptotagmin-9 is expressed at the highest level after synaptotagmin-7. In this study we tested whether synaptotagmin-9 participates in the regulation of glucose-stimulated insulin release by using pancreas-specific synaptotagmin-9 knockout (p-S9X) mice. Deletion of synaptotagmin-9 in the pancreas resulted in no changes in glucose homeostasis or body weight. Glucose tolerance, and insulin secretion in vivo and from isolated islets were not affected in the p-S9X mice. Single-cell capacitance measurements showed no difference in insulin granule exocytosis between p-S9X and control mice. Thus, synaptotagmin-9, although a major calcium sensor in the brain, is not involved in the regulation of glucose-stimulated insulin release from pancreatic β-cells.

  18. Reduced Expression of the Liver/Beta-Cell Glucose Transporter Isoform in Glucose-Insensitive Pancreatic Beta Cells of Diabetic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorens, Bernard; Weir, Gordon C.; Leahy, John L.; Lodish, Harvey F.; Bonner-Weir, Susan

    1990-09-01

    Rats injected with a single dose of streptozocin at 2 days of age develop non-insulin-dependent diabetes 6 weeks later. The pancreatic beta islet cells of these diabetic rats display a loss of glucose-induced insulin secretion while maintaining sensitivity to other secretagogues such as arginine. We analyzed the level of expression of the liver/beta-cell glucose transporter isoform in diabetic islets by immunofluorescence staining of pancreas sections and by Western blotting of islet lysates. Islets from diabetic animals have a reduced expression of this beta-cell-specific glucose transporter isoform and the extent of reduction is correlated with the severity of hyperglycemia. In contrast, expression of this transporter isoform in liver is minimally modified by the diabetes. Thus a decreased expression of the liver/beta-cell glucose transporter isoform in beta cells is associated with the impaired glucose sensing characteristic of diabetic islets; our data suggest that this glucose transporter may be part of the beta-cell glucose sensor.

  19. Crystal structure of a bacterial homologue of glucose transporters GLUT1-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Linfeng; Zeng, Xin; Yan, Chuangye; Sun, Xiuyun; Gong, Xinqi; Rao, Yu; Yan, Nieng

    2012-10-18

    Glucose transporters are essential for metabolism of glucose in cells of diverse organisms from microbes to humans, exemplified by the disease-related human proteins GLUT1, 2, 3 and 4. Despite rigorous efforts, the structural information for GLUT1-4 or their homologues remains largely unknown. Here we report three related crystal structures of XylE, an Escherichia coli homologue of GLUT1-4, in complex with d-xylose, d-glucose and 6-bromo-6-deoxy-D-glucose, at resolutions of 2.8, 2.9 and 2.6 Å, respectively. The structure consists of a typical major facilitator superfamily fold of 12 transmembrane segments and a unique intracellular four-helix domain. XylE was captured in an outward-facing, partly occluded conformation. Most of the important amino acids responsible for recognition of D-xylose or d-glucose are invariant in GLUT1-4, suggesting functional and mechanistic conservations. Structure-based modelling of GLUT1-4 allows mapping and interpretation of disease-related mutations. The structural and biochemical information reported here constitutes an important framework for mechanistic understanding of glucose transporters and sugar porters in general.

  20. Live-cell imaging of post-golgi transport vesicles in cultured hippocampal neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Camilla Stampe; Misonou, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    compartments of neurons. In the past two decades, the establishment and advancement of fluorescent protein technology have provided us with opportunities to study how proteins are trafficked in living cells. However, live imaging of trafficking processes in neurons necessitate imaging tools to distinguish...... the several different routes that neurons use for protein trafficking. Here we provide a novel protocol to selectively visualize post-Golgi transport vesicles carrying fluorescent-labeled ion channel proteins in living neurons. Further, we provide a number of analytical tools we developed to quantify...... mechanisms by which post-Golgi vesicles are trafficked in neurons. Our protocol uniquely combines the classic temperature-block with close monitoring of the transient expression of transfected protein tagged with fluorescent proteins, and provides a quick and easy way to study protein trafficking in living...

  1. Pyruvate incubation enhances glycogen stores and sustains neuronal function during subsequent glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Pavan K; Sadgrove, Matthew P; Galeffi, Francesca; Turner, Dennis A

    2012-01-01

    The use of energy substrates, such as lactate and pyruvate, has been shown to improve synaptic function when administered during glucose deprivation. In the present study, we investigated whether prolonged incubation with monocarboxylate (pyruvate or lactate) prior rather than during glucose deprivation can also sustain synaptic and metabolic function. Pyruvate pre-incubation(3-4h) significantly prolonged (>25 min) the tolerance of rat hippocampal slices to delayed glucose deprivation compared to control and lactate pre-incubated slices, as revealed by field excitatory post synaptic potentials (fEPSPs); pre-incubation with pyruvate also reduced the marked decrease in NAD(P)H fluorescence resulting from glucose deprivation. Moreover, pyruvate exposure led to the enhancement of glycogen stores with time, compared to glucose alone (12 μmol/g tissue at 4h vs. 3.5 μmol/g tissue). Prolonged resistance to glucose deprivation following exogenous pyruvate incubation was prevented by glycogenolysis inhibitors, suggesting that enhanced glycogen mediates the delay in synaptic activity failure. The application of an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist enhanced glycogen utilization and prolonged the time to synaptic failure, further confirming this hypothesis of the importance of glycogen. Moreover, tissue levels of ATP were also significantly maintained during glucose deprivation in pyruvate pretreated slices compared to control and lactate. In summary, these experiments indicate that pyruvate exposure prior to glucose deprivation significantly increased the energy buffering capacity of hippocampal slices, particularly by enhancing internal glycogen stores, delaying synaptic failure during glucose deprivation by maintaining ATP levels, and minimizing the decrease in the levels of NAD(P)H. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Super-resolution microscopy reveals functional organization of dopamine transporters into cholesterol and neuronal activity-dependent nanodomains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahbek-Clemmensen, Troels; Lycas, Matthew D.; Erlendsson, Simon

    2017-01-01

    is dynamically sequestrated into cholesterol-dependent nanodomains in the plasma membrane of presynaptic varicosities and neuronal projections of dopaminergic neurons. Stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy reveals irregular dopamine transporter nanodomains (∼70 nm mean diameter) that were highly sensitive...... to cholesterol depletion. Live photoactivated localization microscopy shows a similar dopamine transporter membrane organization in live heterologous cells. In neurons, dual-color dSTORM shows that tyrosine hydroxylase and vesicular monoamine transporter-2 are distinctively localized adjacent to...

  3. Ribosomal S6K1 in POMC and AgRP Neurons Regulates Glucose Homeostasis but Not Feeding Behavior in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Smith

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hypothalamic ribosomal S6K1 has been suggested as a point of convergence for hormonal and nutrient signals in the regulation of feeding behavior, bodyweight, and glucose metabolism. However, the long-term effects of manipulating hypothalamic S6K1 signaling on energy homeostasis and the cellular mechanisms underlying these roles are unclear. We therefore inactivated S6K1 in pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC and agouti-related protein (AgRP neurons, key regulators of energy homeostasis, but in contrast to the current view, we found no evidence that S6K1 regulates food intake and bodyweight. In contrast, S6K1 signaling in POMC neurons regulated hepatic glucose production and peripheral lipid metabolism and modulated neuronal excitability. S6K1 signaling in AgRP neurons regulated skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity and was required for glucose sensing by these neurons. Our findings suggest that S6K1 signaling is not a general integrator of energy homeostasis in the mediobasal hypothalamus but has distinct roles in the regulation of glucose homeostasis by POMC and AgRP neurons.

  4. Ribosomal S6K1 in POMC and AgRP Neurons Regulates Glucose Homeostasis but Not Feeding Behavior in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mark A; Katsouri, Loukia; Irvine, Elaine E; Hankir, Mohammed K; Pedroni, Silvia M A; Voshol, Peter J; Gordon, Matthew W; Choudhury, Agharul I; Woods, Angela; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Carling, David; Withers, Dominic J

    2015-04-21

    Hypothalamic ribosomal S6K1 has been suggested as a point of convergence for hormonal and nutrient signals in the regulation of feeding behavior, bodyweight, and glucose metabolism. However, the long-term effects of manipulating hypothalamic S6K1 signaling on energy homeostasis and the cellular mechanisms underlying these roles are unclear. We therefore inactivated S6K1 in pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and agouti-related protein (AgRP) neurons, key regulators of energy homeostasis, but in contrast to the current view, we found no evidence that S6K1 regulates food intake and bodyweight. In contrast, S6K1 signaling in POMC neurons regulated hepatic glucose production and peripheral lipid metabolism and modulated neuronal excitability. S6K1 signaling in AgRP neurons regulated skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity and was required for glucose sensing by these neurons. Our findings suggest that S6K1 signaling is not a general integrator of energy homeostasis in the mediobasal hypothalamus but has distinct roles in the regulation of glucose homeostasis by POMC and AgRP neurons. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Glucose uptake and transport in contracting, perfused rat muscle with different pre-contraction glycogen concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hespel, P; Richter, Erik

    1990-01-01

    1. Glucose uptake and transport, muscle glycogen, free glucose and glucose-6-phosphate concentrations were studied in perfused resting and contracting rat skeletal muscle with different pre-contraction glycogen concentrations. Rats were pre-conditioned by a combination of swimming exercise and diet......, resulting in either low (glycogen-depleted rats), normal (control rats) or high (supercompensated rats) muscle glycogen concentrations at the time their hindlimbs were perfused. 2. Compared with control rats, pre-contraction muscle glycogen concentration was approximately 40% lower in glycogen-depleted rats......, whereas it was 40% higher in supercompensated rats. Muscle glycogen break-down correlated positively (r = 0.76; P less than 0.001) with pre-contraction muscle glycogen concentration. 3. Glucose uptake during contractions was approximately 50% higher in glycogen-depleted hindquarters than in control...

  6. Adipose tissue insulin receptor and glucose transporter 4 expression, and blood glucose and insulin responses during glucose tolerance tests in transition Holstein cows with different body condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaakson, H; Karis, P; Ling, K; Ilves-Luht, A; Samarütel, J; Henno, M; Jõudu, I; Waldmann, A; Reimann, E; Pärn, P; Bruckmaier, R M; Gross, J J; Kaart, T; Kass, M; Ots, M

    2018-01-01

    Glucose uptake in tissues is mediated by insulin receptor (INSR) and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4). The aim of this study was to examine the effect of body condition during the dry period on adipose tissue mRNA and protein expression of INSR and GLUT4, and on the dynamics of glucose and insulin following the i.v. glucose tolerance test in Holstein cows 21 d before (d -21) and after (d 21) calving. Cows were grouped as body condition score (BCS) ≤3.0 (thin, T; n = 14), BCS = 3.25 to 3.5 (optimal, O; n = 14), and BCS ≥3.75 (overconditioned, OC; n = 14). Blood was analyzed for glucose, insulin, fatty acids, and β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations. Adipose tissue was analyzed for INSR and GLUT4 mRNA and protein concentrations. During the glucose tolerance test 0.15 g/kg of body weight glucose was infused; blood was collected at -5, 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 min, and analyzed for glucose and insulin. On d -21 the area under the curve (AUC) of glucose was smallest in group T (1,512 ± 33.9 mg/dL × min) and largest in group OC (1,783 ± 33.9 mg/dL × min), and different between all groups. Basal insulin on d -21 was lowest in group T (13.9 ± 2.32 µU/mL), which was different from group OC (24.9 ± 2.32 µU/mL. On d -21 the smallest AUC 5-60 of insulin in group T (5,308 ± 1,214 µU/mL × min) differed from the largest AUC in group OC (10,867 ± 1,215 µU/mL × min). Time to reach basal concentration of insulin in group OC (113 ± 14.1 min) was longer compared with group T (45 ± 14.1). The INSR mRNA abundance on d 21 was higher compared with d -21 in groups T (d -21: 3.3 ± 0.44; d 21: 5.9 ± 0.44) and O (d -21: 3.7 ± 0.45; d 21: 4.7 ± 0.45). The extent of INSR protein expression on d -21 was highest in group T (7.3 ± 0.74 ng/mL), differing from group O (4.6 ± 0.73 ng/mL), which had the lowest expression. The amount of GLUT4 protein on d -21 was lowest in group OC (1.2 ± 0.14 ng/mL), different from group O (1.8 ± 0.14 ng/mL), which had the highest amount

  7. Regulation of human trophoblast GLUT1 glucose transporter by insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc U Baumann

    Full Text Available Glucose transport to the fetus across the placenta takes place via glucose transporters in the opposing faces of the barrier layer, the microvillous and basal membranes of the syncytiotrophoblast. While basal membrane content of the GLUT1 glucose transporter appears to be the rate-limiting step in transplacental transport, the factors regulating transporter expression and activity are largely unknown. In view of the many studies showing an association between IGF-I and fetal growth, we investigated the effects of IGF-I on placental glucose transport and GLUT1 transporter expression. Treatment of BeWo choriocarcinoma cells with IGF-I increased cellular GLUT1 protein. There was increased basolateral (but not microvillous uptake of glucose and increased transepithelial transport of glucose across the BeWo monolayer. Primary syncytial cells treated with IGF-I also demonstrated an increase in GLUT1 protein. Term placental explants treated with IGF-I showed an increase in syncytial basal membrane GLUT1 but microvillous membrane GLUT1 was not affected. The placental dual perfusion model was used to assess the effects of fetally perfused IGF-I on transplacental glucose transport and syncytial GLUT1 content. In control perfusions there was a decrease in transplacental glucose transport over the course of the perfusion, whereas in tissues perfused with IGF-I through the fetal circulation there was no change. Syncytial basal membranes from IGF-I perfused tissues showed an increase in GLUT1 content. These results demonstrate that IGF-I, whether acting via microvillous or basal membrane receptors, increases the basal membrane content of GLUT1 and up-regulates basal membrane transport of glucose, leading to increased transepithelial glucose transport. These observations provide a partial explanation for the mechanism by which IGF-I controls nutrient supply in the regulation of fetal growth.

  8. 14,15-EET promotes mitochondrial biogenesis and protects cortical neurons against oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lai; Chen, Man; Yuan, Lin; Xiang, Yuting; Zheng, Ruimao; Zhu, Shigong

    2014-07-18

    14,15-Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (14,15-EET), a metabolite of arachidonic acid, is enriched in the brain cortex and exerts protective effect against neuronal apoptosis induced by ischemia/reperfusion. Although apoptosis has been well recognized to be closely associated with mitochondrial biogenesis and function, it is still unclear whether the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET is mediated by promotion of mitochondrial biogenesis and function in cortical neurons under the condition of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). In this study, we found that 14,15-EET improved cell viability and inhibited apoptosis of cortical neurons. 14,15-EET significantly increased the mitochondrial mass and the ratio of mitochondrial DNA to nuclear DNA. Key makers of mitochondrial biogenesis, peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma-coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), were elevated at both mRNA and protein levels in the cortical neurons treated with 14,15-EET. Moreover, 14,15-EET markedly attenuated the decline of mitochondrial membrane potential, reduced ROS, while increased ATP synthesis. Knockdown of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) by siRNA blunted the up-regulation of PGC-1α and NRF-1 stimulated by 14,15-EET, and consequently abolished the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET. Our results indicate that 14,15-EET protects neurons from OGD-induced apoptosis by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis and function through CREB mediated activation of PGC-1α and NRF-1. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Early and progressive impairment of spinal blood flow-glucose metabolism coupling in motor neuron degeneration of ALS model mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Kazunori; Masamoto, Kazuto; Morimoto, Nobutoshi; Kurata, Tomoko; Mimoto, Takahumi; Obata, Takayuki; Kanno, Iwao; Abe, Koji

    2012-03-01

    The exact mechanism of selective motor neuron death in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) remains still unclear. In the present study, we performed in vivo capillary imaging, directly measured spinal blood flow (SBF) and glucose metabolism, and analyzed whether if a possible flow-metabolism coupling is disturbed in motor neuron degeneration of ALS model mice. In vivo capillary imaging showed progressive decrease of capillary diameter, capillary density, and red blood cell speed during the disease course. Spinal blood flow was progressively decreased in the anterior gray matter (GM) from presymptomatic stage to 0.80-fold of wild-type (WT) mice, 0.61 at early-symptomatic, and 0.49 at end stage of the disease. Local spinal glucose utilization (LSGU) was transiently increased to 1.19-fold in anterior GM at presymptomatic stage, which in turn progressively decreased to 0.84 and 0.60 at early-symptomatic and end stage of the disease. The LSGU/SBF ratio representing flow-metabolism uncoupling (FMU) preceded the sequential pathological changes in the spinal cord of ALS mice and was preferentially found in the affected region of ALS. The present study suggests that this early and progressive FMU could profoundly involve in the whole disease process as a vascular factor of ALS pathology, and could also be a potential target for therapeutic intervention of ALS.

  10. Curcumin pretreatment and post-treatment both improve the antioxidative ability of neurons with oxygen-glucose deprivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-xian Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that induced expression of endogenous antioxidative enzymes thr-ough activation of the antioxidant response element/nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 pathway may be a neuroprotective strategy. In this study, rat cerebral cortical neurons cultured in vitro were pretreated with 10 μM curcumin or post-treated with 5 μM curcumin, respectively before or after being subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation for 24 hours. Both pretreatment and post-treatment resulted in a significant decrease of cell injury as indicated by propidium iodide/Hoechst 33258 staining, a prominent increase of Nrf2 protein expression as indicated by western blot analysis, and a remarkable increase of protein expression and enzyme activity in whole cell lysates of thioredoxin before ischemia, after ischemia, and after reoxygenation. In addition, post-treatment with curcumin inhibited early DNA/RNA oxidation as indicated by immunocytochemistry and increased nuclear Nrf2 protein by inducing nuclear accumulation of Nrf2. These findings suggest that curcumin activates the expression of thioredoxin, an antioxidant protein in the Nrf2 pathway, and protects neurons from death caused by oxygen-glucose deprivation in an in vitro model of ischemia/reperfusion. We speculate that pharmacologic stimulation of antioxidant gene expression may be a promising approach to neuroprotection after cerebral ischemia.

  11. Ketone bodies effectively compete with glucose for neuronal acetyl-CoA generation in rat hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente-Silva, Paula; Lemos, Cristina; Köfalvi, Attila; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Jones, John G

    2015-09-01

    Ketone bodies can be used for cerebral energy generation in situ, when their availability is increased as during fasting or ingestion of a ketogenic diet. However, it is not known how effectively ketone bodies compete with glucose, lactate, and pyruvate for energy generation in the brain parenchyma. Hence, the contributions of exogenous 5.0 mM [1-(13)C]glucose and 1.0 mM [2-(13)C]lactate + 0.1 mM pyruvate (combined [2-(13)C]lactate + [2-(13)C]pyruvate) to acetyl-CoA production were measured both without and with 5.0 mM [U-(13)C]3-hydroxybutyrate in superfused rat hippocampal slices by (13)C NMR non-steady-state isotopomer analysis of tissue glutamate and GABA. Without [U-(13)C]3-hydroxybutyrate, glucose, combined lactate + pyruvate, and unlabeled endogenous sources contributed (mean ± SEM) 70 ± 7%, 10 ± 2%, and 20 ± 8% of acetyl-CoA, respectively. With [U-(13)C]3-hydroxybutyrate, glucose contributions significantly fell from 70 ± 7% to 21 ± 3% (p neurons. The appearance of superfusate lactate derived from glycolysis of [1-(13)C]glucose did not decrease significantly in the presence of 3-hydroxybutyrate, hence total glycolytic flux (Krebs cycle inflow + exogenous lactate formation) was attenuated by 3-hydroxybutyrate. This indicates that, under these conditions, 3-hydroxybutyrate inhibited glycolytic flux upstream of pyruvate kinase. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Effects of insulin and epinephrine on Na+-K+ and glucose transport in soleus muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausen, T.; Flatman, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    To identify possible cause-effect relationships between changes in active Na + -K + transport, resting membrane potential, and glucose transport, the effects of insulin and epinephrine were compared in rat soleus muscle. Epinephrine, which produced twice as large a hyperpolarization as insulin, induced only a modest increase in 14 C-labeled sugar transport. Ouabain, at a concentration (10 -3 M) sufficient to block active Na + -K + transport and the hyperpolarization induced by the two hormones, did not interfere with sugar transport stimulation. After Na + loading in K + -free buffer, the return to K + -containing standard buffer caused marked stimulation of active 22 Na + - 42 K + transport, twice the hyperpolarization produced by insulin but no change in sugar transport. The insulin-induced activation of the 22 Na + - 42 K + pump leads to decreased intracellular 22 Na + concentration and hyperpolarization, but none of these events can account for the concomitant activation of the glucose transport system. The stimulating effect of insulin on active Na + -K + transport was not suppressed by amiloride, indicating that in intact skeletal muscle it is not elicited by a primary increase in Na + influx via the Na + /H + -exchange system

  13. Fast evolutionary rates associated with functional loss in class I glucose transporters of Schistosoma mansoni

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cabezas-Cruz, A.; Valdés, James J.; Lancelot, J.; Pierce, R.J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 16, NOV 19 2015 (2015), s. 980 ISSN 1471-2164 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Schistosoma mansoni * glucose transporters * transcriptional regulation * phylogen * biophysics Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 3.867, year: 2015

  14. Effect of docosahexaenoic acid on hippocampal neurons in high-glucose condition: involvement of PI3K/AKT/nuclear factor-κB-mediated inflammatory pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, R-H; Lin, J; Hou, X-H; Cao, R; Yu, F; Liu, H-Q; Ji, A-L; Xu, X-N; Zhang, L; Wang, F

    2014-08-22

    Accumulating evidence suggested that hyperglycemia played a critical role in hippocampus dysfunction in patients with diabetes mellitus. However, the multifactorial pathogenesis of hyperglycemia-induced impairments of hippocampal neurons has not been fully elucidated. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has been shown to enhance learning and memory and affect neural function in various experimental conditions. The present study investigated the effects of DHA on the lipid peroxidation, the level of inflammatory cytokines and neuron apoptosis in the hippocampal neurons in high-glucose condition. High-glucose administration increased the level of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and IL-6, induced oxidative stress and apoptosis of hippocampal neurons in vitro. DHA treatment reduced oxidative stress and TNF-α expression, protected the hippocampal neurons by increasing AKT phosphorylation and decreasing caspase-3 and caspase-9 expression. These results suggested that high-glucose exposure induced injury of hippocampal neurons in vitro, and the principle mechanisms involved in the neuroprotective effect of DHA were its antioxidant and anti-apoptotic potential. DHA may thus be of use in preventing or treating neuron-degeneration resulting from hyperglycemia. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Oxygen glucose deprivation post-conditioning protects cortical neurons against oxygen-glucose deprivation injury: role of HSP70 and inhibition of apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian-hua; Meng, Xian-li; Zhang, Jian; Li, Yong-li; Li, Yue-juan; Fan, Zhe-ming

    2014-02-01

    In the present study, we examined the effect of oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) post-conditioning (PostC) on neural cell apoptosis in OGD-PostC model and the protective effect on primary cortical neurons against OGD injury in vitro. Four-h OGD was induced by OGD by using a specialized and humidified chamber. To initiate OGD, culture medium was replaced with de-oxygenated and glucose-free extracellular solution-Locke's medium. After OGD treatment for 4 h, cells were then allowed to recover for 6 h or 20 h. Then lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay, Western blotting and flow cytometry were used to detect cell death, protein levels and apoptotic cells, respectively. For the PostC treatment, three cycles of 15-min OGD, followed by 15 min normal cultivation, were applied immediately after injurious 4-h OGD. Cells were then allowed to recover for 6 h or 20 h, and cell death was assessed by LDH release assay. Apoptotic cells were flow cytometrically evaluated after 4-h OGD, followed by re-oxygenation for 20 h (O4/R20). In addition, Western blotting was used to examine the expression of heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70), Bcl-2 and Bax. The ratio of Bcl-2 expression was (0.44±0.08)% and (0.76±0.10)%, and that of Bax expression was (0.51±0.05)% and (0.39±0.04)%, and that of HSP70 was (0.42±0.031)% and (0.72±0.045)% respectively in OGD group and PostC group. After O4/R6, the rate of neuron death in PostC group and OGD groups was (28.96±3.03)% and (37.02±4.47)%, respectively. Therefore, the PostC treatment could up-regulate the expression of HSP70 and Bcl-2, but down-regulate Bax expression. As compared with OGD group, OGD-induced neuron death and apoptosis were significantly decreased in PostC group (Pneuron death. This neuro-protective effect is likely achieved by anti-apoptotic mechanisms and is associated with over-expression of HSP70.

  16. Neuronal and non-neuronal GABA transporters as targets for antiepileptic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Karsten K; White, H Steve; Schousboe, Arne

    2010-01-01

    of transmembrane transport and enzymatic degradation. The development of tiagabine selectively inhibiting the GABA transporter GAT1 constitutes a proof of concept that the GABA transporters are interesting drug targets in the context of antiepileptic drugs. The review provides a detailed analysis of the role......,5,6,7-tetrahydrobenzo[d]isoxazol-3-ol) has been shown to possess a novel anticonvulsant profile in animal models of epilepsy, involving the ability to inhibit GABA transport mediated by GAT1 and BGT1 at the same time....

  17. Snapin-regulated late endosomal transport is critical for efficient autophagy-lysosomal function in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qian; Lu, Li; Tian, Jin-Hua; Zhu, Yi-Bing; Qiao, Haifa; Sheng, Zu-Hang

    2010-10-06

    Neuron maintenance and survival require late endocytic transport from distal processes to the soma where lysosomes are predominantly localized. Here, we report a role for Snapin in attaching dynein to late endosomes through its intermediate chain (DIC). snapin(-/-) neurons exhibit aberrant accumulation of immature lysosomes, clustering and impaired retrograde transport of late endosomes along processes, reduced lysosomal proteolysis due to impaired delivery of internalized proteins and hydrolase precursors from late endosomes to lysosomes, and impaired clearance of autolysosomes, combined with reduced neuron viability and neurodegeneration. The phenotypes are rescued by expressing the snapin transgene, but not the DIC-binding-defective Snapin-L99K mutant. Snapin overexpression in wild-type neurons enhances late endocytic transport and lysosomal function, whereas expressing the mutant defective in Snapin-DIC coupling shows a dominant-negative effect. Altogether, our study highlights new mechanistic insights into how Snapin-DIC coordinates retrograde transport and late endosomal-lysosomal trafficking critical for autophagy-lysosomal function, and thus neuronal homeostasis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Immobilization of Caenorhabditis elegans to Analyze Intracellular Transport in Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Shinsuke

    2017-10-18

    Axonal transport and intraflagellar transport (IFT) are essential for axon and cilia morphogenesis and function. Kinesin superfamily proteins and dynein are molecular motors that regulate anterograde and retrograde transport, respectively. These motors use microtubule networks as rails. Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) is a powerful model organism to study axonal transport and IFT in vivo. Here, I describe a protocol to observe axonal transport and IFT in living C. elegans. Transported cargo can be visualized by tagging cargo proteins using fluorescent proteins such as green fluorescent protein (GFP). C. elegans is transparent and GFP-tagged cargo proteins can be expressed in specific cells under cell-specific promoters. Living worms can be fixed by microbeads on 10% agarose gel without killing or anesthetizing the worms. Under these conditions, cargo movement can be directly observed in the axons and cilia of living C. elegans without dissection. This method can be applied to the observation of any cargo molecule in any cells by modifying the target proteins and/or the cells they are expressed in. Most basic proteins such as molecular motors and adaptor proteins that are involved in axonal transport and IFT are conserved in C. elegans. Compared to other model organisms, mutants can be obtained and maintained more easily in C. elegans. Combining this method with various C. elegans mutants can clarify the molecular mechanisms of axonal transport and IFT.

  19. The Structure of a Sugar Transporter of the Glucose EIIC Superfamily Provides Insight into the Elevator Mechanism of Membrane Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Jason G; Ren, Zhenning; Stanevich, Vitali; Lee, Jumin; Mitra, Sharmistha; Levin, Elena J; Poget, Sebastien; Quick, Matthias; Im, Wonpil; Zhou, Ming

    2016-06-07

    The phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase systems are found in bacteria, where they play central roles in sugar uptake and regulation of cellular uptake processes. Little is known about how the membrane-embedded components (EIICs) selectively mediate the passage of carbohydrates across the membrane. Here we report the functional characterization and 2.55-Å resolution structure of a maltose transporter, bcMalT, belonging to the glucose superfamily of EIIC transporters. bcMalT crystallized in an outward-facing occluded conformation, in contrast to the structure of another glucose superfamily EIIC, bcChbC, which crystallized in an inward-facing occluded conformation. The structures differ in the position of a structurally conserved substrate-binding domain that is suggested to play a central role in sugar transport. In addition, molecular dynamics simulations suggest a potential pathway for substrate entry from the periplasm into the bcMalT substrate-binding site. These results provide a mechanistic framework for understanding substrate recognition and translocation for the glucose superfamily EIIC transporters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. IGF-II receptors and IGF-II-stimulated glucose transport in human fat cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, M.K.; Buchanan, C.; Raineri-Maldonado, C.; Khazanie, P.; Atkinson, S.; DiMarchi, R.; Caro, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) receptors have been described in rat but not in human adipocytes. In both species, IGF-II has been reported to stimulate glucose transport by interacting with the insulin receptor. In this study, we have unequivocally demonstrated the presence of IGF-II receptors in human adipocytes. 125I-labeled IGF-II specifically binds to intact adipocytes, membranes, and lectin-purified detergent solubilized extracts. Through the use of 0.5 mM disuccinimidyl suberate, 125I-IGF-II is cross-linked to a 260-kDa protein that is identified as the IGF-II receptor by displacement experiments with unlabeled IGF-II, IGF-I, and insulin and either by immunoprecipitation or by Western blot analysis with mannose 6-phosphate receptor antibodies. The concentrations of IGF-II required for half-maximal and maximal stimulation of glucose transport in human adipocytes are 35 and 100 times more than that of insulin. The possibility of IGF-II stimulating glucose transport by interacting predominantly with the insulin receptor is suggested by the following: (1) the concentration of IGF-II that inhibits half of insulin binding is only 20 times more than that of insulin; (2) the lack of an additive effect of IGF-II and insulin for maximal stimulation of glucose transport; (3) the ability of monoclonal insulin receptor antibodies to decrease glucose transport stimulated by submaximal concentrations of both IGF-II and insulin; and (4) the ability of IGF-II to stimulate insulin receptor autophosphorylation albeit at a reduced potency when compared with insulin

  1. A possible role of the non-GAT1 GABA transporters in transfer of GABA from GABAergic to glutamatergic neurons in mouse cerebellar neuronal cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suñol, C; Babot, Z; Cristòfol, R

    2010-01-01

    Cultures of dissociated cerebellum from 7-day-old mice were used to investigate the mechanism involved in synthesis and cellular redistribution of GABA in these cultures consisting primarily of glutamatergic granule neurons and a smaller population of GABAergic Golgi and stellate neurons......3 transporters. Only a small population of cells were immuno-stained for GAD while many cells exhibited VGlut-1 like immuno-reactivity which, however, never co-localized with GAD positive neurons. This likely reflects the small number of GABAergic neurons compared to the glutamatergic granule......M concentrations (95%). Essentially all neurons showed GABA like immunostaining albeit with differences in intensity. The results indicate that GABA which is synthesized in a small population of GAD-positive neurons is redistributed to essentially all neurons including the glutamatergic granule cells. GAT1...

  2. Energy metabolism in astrocytes and neurons treated with manganese: relation among cell-specific energy failure, glucose metabolism, and intercellular trafficking using multinuclear NMR-spectroscopic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwingmann, Claudia; Leibfritz, Dieter; Hazell, Alan S

    2003-06-01

    A central question in manganese neurotoxicity concerns mitochondrial dysfunction leading to cerebral energy failure. To obtain insight into the underlying mechanism(s), the authors investigated cell-specific pathways of [1-13C]glucose metabolism by high-resolution multinuclear NMR-spectroscopy. Five-day treatment of neurons with 100-micro mol/L MnCl(2) led to 50% and 70% decreases of ATP/ADP and phosphocreatine-creatine ratios, respectively. An impaired flux of [1-13C]glucose through pyruvate dehydrogenase, which was associated with Krebs cycle inhibition and hence depletion of [4-13C]glutamate, [2-13C]GABA, and [13C]glutathione, hindered the ability of neurons to compensate for mitochondrial dysfunction by oxidative glucose metabolism and further aggravated neuronal energy failure. Stimulated glycolysis and oxidative glucose metabolism protected astrocytes against energy failure and oxidative stress, leading to twofold increased de novo synthesis of [3-13C]lactate and fourfold elevated [4-13C]glutamate and [13C]glutathione levels. Manganese, however, inhibited the synthesis and release of glutamine. Comparative NMR data obtained from cocultures showed disturbed astrocytic function and a failure of astrocytes to provide neurons with substrates for energy and neurotransmitter metabolism, leading to deterioration of neuronal antioxidant capacity (decreased glutathione levels) and energy metabolism. The results suggest that, concomitant to impaired neuronal glucose oxidation, changes in astrocytic metabolism may cause a loss of intercellular homeostatic equilibrium, contributing to neuronal dysfunction in manganese neurotoxicity.

  3. 27-Hydroxycholesterol impairs neuronal glucose uptake through an IRAP/GLUT4 system dysregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, Laura; Maioli, Silvia; Ali, Zeina; Gulyás, Balázs; Winblad, Bengt; Savitcheva, Irina

    2017-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is associated with cognitively deteriorated states. Here, we show that excess 27-hydroxycholesterol (27-OH), a cholesterol metabolite passing from the circulation into the brain, reduced in vivo brain glucose uptake, GLUT4 expression, and spatial memory. Furthermore, patients exhibiting higher 27-OH levels had reduced 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake. This interplay between 27-OH and glucose uptake revealed the engagement of the insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP). 27-OH increased the levels and activity of IRAP, countered the IRAP antagonist angiotensin IV (AngIV)–mediated glucose uptake, and enhanced the levels of the AngIV-degrading enzyme aminopeptidase N (AP-N). These effects were mediated by liver X receptors. Our results reveal a molecular link between cholesterol, brain glucose, and the brain renin-angiotensin system, all of which are affected in some neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, reducing 27-OH levels or inhibiting AP-N maybe a useful strategy in the prevention of the altered glucose metabolism and memory decline in these disorders. PMID:28213512

  4. Glucose modulates food-related salience coding of midbrain neurons in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Martin; Endres, Felix; Kölle, Markus; Adolph, Oliver; Widenhorn-Müller, Katharina; Grön, Georg

    2016-12-01

    Although early rat studies demonstrated that administration of glucose diminishes dopaminergic midbrain activity, evidence in humans has been lacking so far. In the present functional magnetic resonance imaging study, glucose was intravenously infused in healthy human male participants while seeing images depicting low-caloric food (LC), high-caloric food (HC), and non-food (NF) during a food/NF discrimination task. Analysis of brain activation focused on the ventral tegmental area (VTA) as the origin of the mesolimbic system involved in salience coding. Under unmodulated fasting baseline conditions, VTA activation was greater during HC compared with LC food cues. Subsequent to infusion of glucose, this difference in VTA activation as a function of caloric load leveled off and even reversed. In a control group not receiving glucose, VTA activation during HC relative to LC cues remained stable throughout the course of the experiment. Similar treatment-specific patterns of brain activation were observed for the hypothalamus. The present findings show for the first time in humans that glucose infusion modulates salience coding mediated by the VTA. Hum Brain Mapp 37:4376-4384, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Dynamic changes in cytosolic ATP levels in cultured glutamatergic neurons during NMDA-induced synaptic activity supported by glucose or lactate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Sofie Cecilie; Winkler, Ulrike; Andresen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    is supported equally well by both glucose and lactate, and that a pulse of NMDA causes accumulation of Ca(2+) in the mitochondrial matrix. In summary, we have shown that ATP homeostasis during neurotransmission activity in cultured neurons is supported by both glucose and lactate. However, ATP homeostasis...... biosensor Ateam1.03YEMK. While inducing synaptic activity by subjecting cultured neurons to two 30 s pulses of NMDA (30 µM) with a 4 min interval, changes in relative ATP levels were measured in the presence of lactate (1 mM), glucose (2.5 mM) or the combination of the two. ATP levels reversibly declined...... in the presence of glucose following the 2nd pulse of NMDA (approx. 10 vs. 20 %). Further, cytosolic Ca(2+) homeostasis during NMDA-induced synaptic transmission is partially inhibited by verapamil indicating that voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels are activated. Lastly, we showed that cytosolic Ca(2+) homeostasis...

  6. [Protective effects of luteolin on neurons against oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion injury via improving Na+/K+ -ATPase activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Lumei; Zhang, Mingming; Ding, Yuemin; Fang, Yuting; Yao, Chunlei; Zhang, Xiong

    2010-04-01

    Luteolin, a flavone, has considerable neuroprotective effects by its anti-oxidative mechanism. However, it is still unclear whether luteolin can protect neurons against oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion (OGD/R) induced injury. After 2 hours oxygen-glucose deprivation and 24 hours reperfusion treatment in primary cultured hippocampal neurons, the neuron viability, survival rate and apoptosis rate were evaluated by MTT assay, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage assay and Hoechst staining, respectively. The activity of Na+/K+ -ATPase was examined in cultured neurons or in the hippocampus of SD rats treated by 10 minutes global cerebral ischemia and followed 24 hours reperfusion. Treatment by OGD/R markedly reduced neuronal viability, increased LDH leakage rate and increased apoptosis rate. Application of luteolin (10-100 micromol x L(-1)) during OGD inhibited OGD/R induced neuron injury and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Compared to the control group or OGP/R-treated neurons, the activity of Na+/K+ -ATPase was significantly suppressed in global ischemia/reperfusion group or OGD/R-treated neurons. Application of luteolin during ischemia or OGD preserved the Na+/K+ -ATPase activity. Furthermore, inhibition of Na+/K+ -ATPase with ouabain attenuated the protective effect afforded by luteolin. The data provide the evidence that luteolin has neuroprotective effect against OGD/R induced injury and the protective effect may be associated with its ability to improve Na+/K+ -ATPase activity after OGD/R.

  7. [1-13C]Glucose entry in neuronal and astrocytic intermediary metabolism of aged rats. A study of the effects of nicergoline treatment by 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccheli, Alfredo; Puccetti, Caterina; Capuani, Giorgio; Di Cocco, Maria Enrica; Giardino, Luciana; Calzà, Laura; Battaglia, Angelo; Battistin, Leontino; Conti, Filippo

    2003-03-14

    Age-related changes in glucose utilization through the TCA cycle were studied using [1-13C]glucose and 13C, 1H NMR spectroscopy on rat brain extracts. Significant increases in lactate levels, as well as in creatine/phosphocreatine ratios (Cr/PCr), and a decrease in N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) and aspartate levels were observed in aged rat brains as compared to adult animals following glucose administration. The total amount of 13C from [1-13C]glucose incorporated in glutamate, glutamine, aspartate and GABA was significantly decreased in control aged rat brains as compared to adult brains. The results showed a decrease in oxidative glucose utilization of control aged rat brains. The long-term nicergoline treatment increased NAA and glutamate levels, and decreased the lactate levels as well as the Cr/PCr ratios in aged rat brains as compared to adult rats. The total amount of 13C incorporated in glutamate, glutamine, aspartate, NAA and GABA was increased by nicergoline treatment, showing an improvement in oxidative glucose metabolism in aged brains. A significant increase in pyruvate carboxylase/pyruvate dehydrogenase activity (PC/PDH) in the synthesis of glutamate in nicergoline-treated aged rats is consistent with an increase in the transport of glutamine from glia to neurons for conversion into glutamate. In adult rat brains, no effect of nicergoline on glutamate PC/PDH activity was observed, although an increase in PC/PDH activity in glutamine was, suggesting that nicergoline affects the glutamate/glutamine cycle between neurons and glia in different ways depending on the age of animals. These results provide new insights into the effects of nicergoline on the CNS.

  8. Insights from the Fungus Fusarium oxysporum Point to High Affinity Glucose Transporters as Targets for Enhancing Ethanol Production from Lignocellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Shahin S.; Nugent, Brian; Mullins, Ewen; Doohan, Fiona M.

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol is the most-widely used biofuel in the world today. Lignocellulosic plant biomass derived from agricultural residue can be converted to ethanol via microbial bioprocessing. Fungi such as Fusarium oxysporum can simultaneously saccharify straw to sugars and ferment sugars to ethanol. But there are many bottlenecks that need to be overcome to increase the efficacy of microbial production of ethanol from straw, not least enhancement of the rate of fermentation of both hexose and pentose sugars. This research tested the hypothesis that the rate of sugar uptake by F. oxysporum would enhance the ethanol yields from lignocellulosic straw and that high affinity glucose transporters can enhance ethanol yields from this substrate. We characterized a novel hexose transporter (Hxt) from this fungus. The F. oxysporum Hxt represents a novel transporter with homology to yeast glucose signaling/transporter proteins Rgt2 and Snf3, but it lacks their C-terminal domain which is necessary for glucose signalling. Its expression level decreased with increasing glucose concentration in the medium and in a glucose uptake study the Km(glucose) was 0.9 mM, which indicated that the protein is a high affinity glucose transporter. Post-translational gene silencing or over expression of the Hxt in F. oxysporum directly affected the glucose and xylose transport capacity and ethanol yielded by F. oxysporum from straw, glucose and xylose. Thus we conclude that this Hxt has the capacity to transport both C5 and C6 sugars and to enhance ethanol yields from lignocellulosic material. This study has confirmed that high affinity glucose transporters are ideal candidates for improving ethanol yields from lignocellulose because their activity and level of expression is high in low glucose concentrations, which is very common during the process of consolidated processing. PMID:23382943

  9. Insights from the fungus Fusarium oxysporum point to high affinity glucose transporters as targets for enhancing ethanol production from lignocellulose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin S Ali

    Full Text Available Ethanol is the most-widely used biofuel in the world today. Lignocellulosic plant biomass derived from agricultural residue can be converted to ethanol via microbial bioprocessing. Fungi such as Fusarium oxysporum can simultaneously saccharify straw to sugars and ferment sugars to ethanol. But there are many bottlenecks that need to be overcome to increase the efficacy of microbial production of ethanol from straw, not least enhancement of the rate of fermentation of both hexose and pentose sugars. This research tested the hypothesis that the rate of sugar uptake by F. oxysporum would enhance the ethanol yields from lignocellulosic straw and that high affinity glucose transporters can enhance ethanol yields from this substrate. We characterized a novel hexose transporter (Hxt from this fungus. The F. oxysporum Hxt represents a novel transporter with homology to yeast glucose signaling/transporter proteins Rgt2 and Snf3, but it lacks their C-terminal domain which is necessary for glucose signalling. Its expression level decreased with increasing glucose concentration in the medium and in a glucose uptake study the Km((glucose was 0.9 mM, which indicated that the protein is a high affinity glucose transporter. Post-translational gene silencing or over expression of the Hxt in F. oxysporum directly affected the glucose and xylose transport capacity and ethanol yielded by F. oxysporum from straw, glucose and xylose. Thus we conclude that this Hxt has the capacity to transport both C5 and C6 sugars and to enhance ethanol yields from lignocellulosic material. This study has confirmed that high affinity glucose transporters are ideal candidates for improving ethanol yields from lignocellulose because their activity and level of expression is high in low glucose concentrations, which is very common during the process of consolidated processing.

  10. 24S-hydroxycholesterol and 25-hydroxycholesterol differentially impact hippocampal neuronal survival following oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Yu Sun

    Full Text Available N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs, a major subtype of glutamate receptor mediating excitatory transmission throughout the CNS, participate in ischemia-induced neuronal death. Unfortunately, undesired side effects have limited the strategy of inhibiting/blocking NMDARs as therapy. Targeting endogenous positive allosteric modulators of NMDAR function may offer a strategy with fewer downsides. Here, we explored whether 24S-hydroxycholesterol (24S-HC, an endogenous positive NMDAR modulator characterized recently by our group, participates in NMDAR-mediated excitotoxicity following oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD in primary neuron cultures. 24S-HC is the major brain cholesterol metabolite produced exclusively in neurons near sites of glutamate transmission. By selectively potentiating NMDAR current, 24S-HC may participate in NMDAR-mediated excitotoxicity following energy failure, thus impacting recovery after stroke. In support of this hypothesis, our findings indicate that exogenous application of 24S-HC exacerbates NMDAR-dependent excitotoxicity in primary neuron culture following OGD, an ischemic-like challenge. Similarly, enhancement of endogenous 24S-HC synthesis reduced survival rate. On the other hand, reducing endogenous 24S-HC synthesis alleviated OGD-induced cell death. We found that 25-HC, another oxysterol that antagonizes 24S-HC potentiation, partially rescued OGD-mediated cell death in the presence or absence of exogenous 24S-HC application, and 25-HC exhibited NMDAR-dependent/24S-HC-dependent neuroprotection, as well as NMDAR-independent neuroprotection in rat tissue but not mouse tissue. Our findings suggest that both endogenous and exogenous 24S-HC exacerbate OGD-induced damage via NMDAR activation, while 25-HC exhibits species dependent neuroprotection through both NMDAR-dependent and independent mechanisms.

  11. Evolutionary ancestry and novel functions of the mammalian glucose transporter (GLUT family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patron Nicola

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In general, sugar porters function by proton-coupled symport or facilitative transport modes. Symporters, coupled to electrochemical energy, transport nutrients against a substrate gradient. Facilitative carriers transport sugars along a concentration gradient, thus transport is dependent upon extracellular nutrient levels. Across bacteria, fungi, unicellular non-vertebrates and plants, proton-coupled hexose symport is a crucial process supplying energy under conditions of nutrient flux. In mammals it has been assumed that evolution of whole body regulatory mechanisms would eliminate this need. To determine whether any isoforms bearing this function might be conserved in mammals, we investigated the relationship between the transporters of animals and the proton-coupled hexose symporters found in other species. Results We took a comparative genomic approach and have performed the first comprehensive and statistically supported phylogenetic analysis of all mammalian glucose transporter (GLUT isoforms. Our data reveals the mammalian GLUT proteins segregate into five distinct classes. This evolutionary ancestry gives insight to structure, function and transport mechanisms within the groups. Combined with biological assays, we present novel evidence that, in response to changing nutrient availability and environmental pH, proton-coupled, active glucose symport function is maintained in mammalian cells. Conclusions The analyses show the ancestry, evolutionary conservation and biological importance of the GLUT classes. These findings significantly extend our understanding of the evolution of mammalian glucose transport systems. They also reveal that mammals may have conserved an adaptive response to nutrient demand that would have important physiological implications to cell survival and growth.

  12. Alpha2delta-1 in SF1+ Neurons of the Ventromedial Hypothalamus Is an Essential Regulator of Glucose and Lipid Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felsted, Jennifer A; Chien, Cheng-Hao; Wang, Dongqing; Panessiti, Micaella; Ameroso, Dominique; Greenberg, Andrew; Feng, Guoping; Kong, Dong; Rios, Maribel

    2017-12-05

    The central mechanisms controlling glucose and lipid homeostasis are inadequately understood. We show that α2δ-1 is an essential regulator of glucose and lipid balance, acting in steroidogenic factor-1 (SF1) neurons of the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH). These effects are body weight independent and involve regulation of SF1 + neuronal activity and sympathetic output to metabolic tissues. Accordingly, mice with α2δ-1 deletion in SF1 neurons exhibit glucose intolerance, altered lipolysis, and decreased cholesterol content in adipose tissue despite normal energy balance regulation. Profound reductions in the firing rate of SF1 neurons, decreased sympathetic output, and elevated circulating levels of serotonin are associated with these alterations. Normal calcium currents but reduced excitatory postsynaptic currents in mutant SF1 neurons implicate α2δ-1 in the promotion of excitatory synaptogenesis separate from its canonical role as a calcium channel subunit. Collectively, these findings identify an essential mechanism that regulates VMH neuronal activity and glycemic and lipid control and may be a target for tackling metabolic disease. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. PirB Overexpression Exacerbates Neuronal Apoptosis by Inhibiting TrkB and mTOR Phosphorylation After Oxygen and Glucose Deprivation Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhao-Hua; Deng, Bin; Xu, Hao; Zhang, Jun-Feng; Mi, Ya-Jing; Meng, Xiang-Zhong; Gou, Xing-Chun; Xu, Li-Xian

    2017-05-01

    Previous studies have proven that paired immunoglobulin-like receptor B (PirB) plays a crucial suppressant role in neurite outgrowth and neuronal plasticity after central nervous system injury. However, the role of PirB in neuronal survival after cerebral ischemic injury and its mechanisms remains unclear. In the present study, the role of PirB is investigated in the survival and apoptosis of cerebral cortical neurons in cultured primary after oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced injury. The results have shown that rebarbative PirB exacerbates early neuron apoptosis and survival. PirB gene silencing remarkably decreases early apoptosis and promotes neuronal survival after OGD. The expression of bcl-2 markedly increased and the expression of bax significantly decreased in PirB RNAi-treated neurons, as compared with the control- and control RNAi-treated ones. Further, phosphorylated TrkB and mTOR levels are significantly downregulated in the damaged neurons. However, the PirB silencing markedly upregulates phosphorylated TrkB and mTOR levels in the neurons after the OGD. Taken together, the overexpression of PirB inhibits the neuronal survival through increased neuron apoptosis. Importantly, the inhibition of the phosphorylation of TrkB and mTOR may be one of its mechanisms.

  14. Retrogradely Transported TrkA Endosomes Signal Locally within Dendrites to Maintain Sympathetic Neuron Synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn M. Lehigh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Sympathetic neurons require NGF from their target fields for survival, axonal target innervation, dendritic growth and formation, and maintenance of synaptic inputs from preganglionic neurons. Target-derived NGF signals are propagated retrogradely, from distal axons to somata of sympathetic neurons via TrkA signaling endosomes. We report that a subset of TrkA endosomes that are transported from distal axons to cell bodies translocate into dendrites, where they are signaling competent and move bidirectionally, in close proximity to synaptic protein clusters. Using a strategy for spatially confined inhibition of TrkA kinase activity, we found that distal-axon-derived TrkA signaling endosomes are necessary within sympathetic neuron dendrites for maintenance of synapses. Thus, TrkA signaling endosomes have unique functions in different cellular compartments. Moreover, target-derived NGF mediates circuit formation and synapse maintenance through TrkA endosome signaling within dendrites to promote aggregation of postsynaptic protein complexes.

  15. Gadd45b prevents autophagy and apoptosis against rat cerebral neuron oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guoqian; Xu, Wenming; Tong, Linyan; Li, Shuaishuai; Su, Shiceng; Tan, Xiaodan; Li, Changqing

    2016-04-01

    Autophagic (type II) cell death has been suggested to play pathogenetic roles in cerebral ischemia. Growth arrest and DNA damage response 45b (Gadd45b) has been shown to protect against rat brain ischemia injury through inhibiting apoptosis. However, the relationship between Gadd45b and autophagy in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury remains uncertain. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of Gadd45b on autophagy. We adopt the oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion (OGD/R) model of rat primary cortex neurons, and lentivirus interference used to silence Gadd45b expression. Cell viability and injury assay were performed using CCK-8 and LDH kit. Autophagy activation was monitored by expression of ATG5, LC3, Beclin-1, ATG7 and ATG3. Neuron apoptosis was monitored by expression of Bcl-2, Bax, cleaved caspase3, p53 and TUNEL assay. Neuron neurites were assayed by double immunofluorescent labeling with Tuj1 and LC3B. Here, we demonstrated that the expression of Gadd45b was strongly up-regulated at 24 h after 3 h OGD treatment. ShRNA-Gadd45b increased the expression of autophagy related proteins, aggravated OGD/R-induced neuron cell apoptosis and neurites injury. ShRNA-Gadd45b co-treatment with autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) or Wortmannin partly inhibited the ratio of LC3II/LC3I, and slightly ameliorated neuron cell apoptosis under OGD/R. Furthermore, shRNA-Gadd45b inhibited the p-p38 level involved in autophagy, but increased the p-JNK level involved in apoptosis. ShRNA-Gadd45b co-treatment with p38 inhibitor obviously induced autophagy. ShRNA-Gadd45b co-treatment with JNK inhibitor alleviated neuron cell apoptosis. In conclusion, our data suggested that Gadd45b inhibited autophagy and apoptosis under OGD/R. Gadd45b may be a common regulatory protein to control autophagy and apoptosis.

  16. Neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside Rg1 against oxygen–glucose deprivation in cultured hippocampal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing He

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: Ginsenoside Rg1 has neuroprotective effect on ischemia–reperfusion injury in cultured hippocampal cells mediated by blocking calcium over-influx into neuronal cells and decreasing the nNOS activity after OGD exposure. We infer that ginsenoside Rg1 may serve as a potential therapeutic agent for cerebral ischemia injury.

  17. β-Hydroxybutyrate Boosts Mitochondrial and Neuronal Metabolism but is not Preferred Over Glucose Under Activated Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achanta, Lavanya B; Rowlands, Benjamin D; Thomas, Donald S; Housley, Gary D; Rae, Caroline D

    2017-06-01

    The ketone body, β-hydroxybutyrate (βOHB), is metabolised by the brain alongside the mandatory brain fuel glucose. To examine the extent and circumstances by which βOHB can supplement glucose metabolism, we studied guinea pig cortical brain slices using increasing concentrations of [U- 13 C]D-βOHB in conjunction with [1- 13 C]D-glucose under conditions of normo- and hypoglycaemia, as well as under high potassium (40 mmol/L K + ) depolarization in normo- and hypoglycaemic conditions. The contribution of βOHB to synthesis of GABA was also probed by inhibiting the synthesis of glutamine, a GABA precursor, with methionine sulfoximine (MSO). [U- 13 C]D-βOHB at lower concentrations (0.25 and 1.25 mmol/L) stimulated mitochondrial metabolism, producing greater total incorporation of label into glutamate and GABA but did not have a similar effect in the cytosolic compartment where labelling of glutamine was reduced at 1.25 mmol/L [U- 13 C]D-βOHB. At higher concentrations (2.5 mmol/L) [U- 13 C]D-βOHB inhibited metabolism of [1- 13 C]D-glucose, and reduced total label incorporation and total metabolite pools. When glucose levels were reduced, βOHB was able to partially restore the loss of glutamate and GABA caused by hypoglycaemia, but was not able to supplement levels of lactate, glutamine or alanine or to prevent the increase in aspartate. Under depolarizing conditions glucose was the preferred substrate over βOHB, even in hypoglycaemic conditions where comparatively less βOHB was incorporated except into aspartate isotopomers. Inhibition of glutamine synthesis with MSO had no significant effect on incorporation of label from [U- 13 C]D-βOHB into GABA C2,1 indicating that the majority of this GABA was synthesized in GABAergic neurons from [U- 13 C]D-βOHB rather than from Gln C4,5 imported from astrocytes.

  18. Availability of neurotransmitter glutamate is diminished when beta-hydroxybutyrate replaces glucose in cultured neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Trine Meldgaard; Risa, Øystein; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2009-01-01

    Ketone bodies serve as alternative energy substrates for the brain in cases of low glucose availability such as during starvation or in patients treated with a ketogenic diet. The ketone bodies are metabolized via a distinct pathway confined to the mitochondria. We have compared metabolism of [2...

  19. A Major Role for Perifornical Orexin Neurons in the Control of Glucose Metabolism in Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yi, Chun-Xia; Serlie, Mireille J.; Ackermans, Mariette T.; Foppen, Ewout; Buijs, Ruud M.; Sauerwein, Hans P.; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE-The hypothalamic neuropeptide orexin influences (feeding) behavior as well as energy metabolism. Administration of exogenous orexin-A into the brain has been shown to increase both food intake and blood glucose levels. In the present study, we investigated the role of endogenous

  20. Lack of SLC2A1 (glucose transporter 1) mutations in 30 Italian patients with alternating hemiplegia of childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Grandis, Elisa; Stagnaro, Michela; Biancheri, Roberta; Giannotta, Melania; Gobbi, Giuseppe; Traverso, Monica; Veneselli, Edvige; Zara, Federico

    2013-07-01

    Alternating hemiplegia of childhood is a rare, predominantly sporadic disorder. Diagnosis is clinical, and little is known about genetics. Glucose transporter 1 deficiency syndrome shares with alternating hemiplegia of childhood paroxysmal and nonparoxysmal symptoms. The aim of the study was to investigate glucose transporter 1 mutations in 30 Italian patients. Genetic material was analyzed by DNA amplification and glucose transporter 1 region sequencing. Mutational analysis findings of the SLC2A1 gene were negative in all patients. The pattern of movement disorders was reviewed. Interictal dystonia and multiple paroxysmal events were typical of alternating hemiplegia of childhood. In conclusion, alternating hemiplegia of childhood is a heterogeneous clinical condition, and although glucose transporter 1 deficiency can represent an undiagnosed cause of this disorder, mutational analysis is not routinely recommended. Alternatively, a careful clinical analysis and the 3-O-methyl-D-glucose uptake test can allow prompt identification of a subgroup of patients with alternating hemiplegia of childhood treatable with a ketogenic diet.

  1. Expression of glucocorticoid receptor and glucose transporter-1 during placental development in the diabetic rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Demir

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In various tissues, glucocorticoids (GCs are known to downregulate glucose transport systems; however, their effects on glucose transporters (GLUTs in the placenta of a diabetic rat are unknown. Glucocorticoid hormone action within the cell is regulated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR. Thus, this study was designed to investigate the relationship between GR and glucose transporter expression in the placenta of the diabetic rat. Our immunohistochemical results indicated that GR and glucose transporter protein 1 (GLUT 1 are expressed ubiquitously in the trophoblast and endothelial cells of the labyrinthine zone, where maternal fetal transport takes place in the rat placenta. Expression of GR in the junctional zone of the rat placenta was detected in giant cells, and in some spongiotrophoblast cells, but not in the glycogen cells. GLUT 1 was present, especially in glycogen cells during early pregnancy, and in the spongiotrophoblast cells of the junctional zone during late pregnancy. Amounts of GR and GLUT 1 protein were increased towards the end of gestation both in the control and the diabetic placenta. However, at days 17 and 19 of gestation, only the placental GR protein was significantly increased in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats compared to control rats. Diabetes led to a significant decrease in placental weight at gestation day 15. In contrast, at gestational days 17 and 21, the weights of the diabetic placenta were significantly increased as compared with the controls. Moreover, diabetes induced fetus intrauterine growth retardation at gestational days 13, 17 and 21. In conclusion, the localization pattern of GR and GLUT 1 proteins in the same cell types led us to believe that there might be a relationship between GR and GLUT 1 expressions at the cellular level. GLUT 1 does not play a pivotal role in diabetic pregnancies. However, placental growth abnormalities during diabetic pregnancy may be related to the amount of GR

  2. Leptin and insulin pathways in POMC and AgRP neurons that modulate energy balance and glucose homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Luis; Horvath, Tamas L

    2012-01-01

    With the steady rise in the prevalence of obesity and its associated diseases, research aimed at understanding the mechanisms that regulate and control whole body energy homeostasis has gained new interest. Leptin and insulin, two anorectic hormones, have key roles in the regulation of body weight and energy homeostasis, as highlighted by the fact that several obese patients develop resistance to these hormones. Within the brain, the hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin and agouti-related protein neurons have been identified as major targets of leptin and insulin action. Many studies have attempted to discern the individual contributions of various components of the principal pathways that mediate the central effects of leptin and insulin. The aim of this review is to discuss the latest findings that might shed light on, and lead to a better understanding of, energy balance and glucose homeostasis. In addition, recently discovered targets and mechanisms that mediate hormonal action in the brain are highlighted. PMID:23146889

  3. Insulin-sensitive phospholipid signaling systems and glucose transport. Update II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farese, R V

    2001-04-01

    Insulin provokes rapid changes in phospholipid metabolism and thereby generates biologically active lipids that serve as intracellular signaling factors that regulate glucose transport and glycogen synthesis. These changes include: (i) activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and production of PIP3; (ii) PIP3-dependent activation of atypical protein kinase Cs (PKCs); (iii) PIP3-dependent activation of PKB; (iv) PI3K-dependent activation of phospholipase D and hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine with subsequent increases in phosphatidic acid (PA) and diacylglycerol (DAG); (v) PI3K-independent activation of glycerol-3-phosphate acylytansferase and increases in de novo synthesis of PA and DAG; and (vi) activation of DAG-sensitive PKCs. Recent findings suggest that atypical PKCs and PKB serve as important positive regulators of insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism, whereas mechanisms that result in the activation of DAG-sensitive PKCs serve mainly as negative regulators of insulin signaling through PI3K. Atypical PKCs and PKB are rapidly activated by insulin in adipocytes, liver, skeletal muscles, and other cell types by a mechanism requiring PI3K and its downstream effector, 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK-1), which, in conjunction with PIP3, phosphorylates critical threonine residues in the activation loops of atypical PKCs and PKB. PIP3 also promotes increases in autophosphorylation and allosteric activation of atypical PKCs. Atypical PKCs and perhaps PKB appear to be required for insulin-induced translocation of the GLUT 4 glucose transporter to the plasma membrane and subsequent glucose transport. PKB also appears to be the major regulator of glycogen synthase. Together, atypical PKCs and PKB serve as a potent, integrated PI3K/PDK-1-directed signaling system that is used by insulin to regulate glucose metabolism.

  4. Acute hyperglycemia produces transient improvement in glucose transporter type 1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Cigdem I; Engelstad, Kristin; Hinton, Veronica J; Ullner, Paivi; Koenigsberger, Dorcas; Leary, Linda; Wang, Dong; De Vivo, Darryl C

    2010-01-01

    Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (Glut1-DS) is characterized clinically by acquired microcephaly, infantile-onset seizures, psychomotor retardation, choreoathetosis, dystonia, and ataxia. The laboratory signature is hypoglycorrhachia. The 5-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed to assess cerebral function and systemic carbohydrate homeostasis during acute hyperglycemia, in the knowledge that GLUT1 is constitutively expressed ubiquitously and upregulated in the brain. Thirteen Glut1-DS patients completed a 5-hour OGTT. Six patients had prolonged electroencephalographic (EEG)/video monitoring, 10 patients had plasma glucose and serum insulin measurements, and 5 patients had repeated measures of attention, memory, fine motor coordination, and well-being. All patients had a full neuropsychological battery prior to OGTT. The glycemic profile and insulin response during the OGTT were normal. Following the glucose load, transient improvement of clinical seizures and EEG findings were observed, with the most significant improvement beginning within the first 30 minutes and continuing for 180 minutes. Thereafter, clinical seizures returned, and EEG findings worsened. Additionally, transient improvement in attention, fine motor coordination, and reported well-being were observed without any change in memory performance. This study documents transient neurological improvement in Glut1-DS patients following acute hyperglycemia, associated with improved fine motor coordination and attention. Also, systemic carbohydrate homeostasis was normal, despite GLUT1 haploinsufficiency, confirming the specific role of GLUT1 as the transporter of metabolic fuel across the blood-brain barrier. The transient improvement in brain function underscores the rate-limiting role of glucose transport and the critical minute-to-minute dependence of cerebral function on fuel availability for energy metabolism.

  5. Radiation inactivation target size of rat adipocyte glucose transporters in the plasma membrane and intracellular pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, D.B.; Berenski, C.J.; Spangler, R.A.; Jung, C.Y.

    1987-01-01

    The in situ assembly states of the glucose transport carrier protein in the plasma membrane and in the intracellular (microsomal) storage pool of rat adipocytes were assessed by studying radiation-induced inactivation of the D-glucose-sensitive cytochalasin B binding activities. High energy radiation inactivated the glucose-sensitive cytochalasin B binding of each of these membrane preparations by reducing the total number of the binding sites without affecting the dissociation constant. The reduction in total number of binding sites was analyzed as a function of radiation dose based on target theory, from which a radiation-sensitive mass (target size) was calculated. When the plasma membranes of insulin-treated adipocytes were used, a target size of approximately 58,000 daltons was obtained. For adipocyte microsomal membranes, we obtained target sizes of approximately 112,000 and 109,000 daltons prior to and after insulin treatment, respectively. In the case of microsomal membranes, however, inactivation data showed anomalously low radiation sensitivities at low radiation doses, which may be interpreted as indicating the presence of a radiation-sensitive inhibitor. These results suggest that the adipocyte glucose transporter occurs as a monomer in the plasma membrane while existing in the intracellular reserve pool either as a homodimer or as a stoichiometric complex with a protein of an approximately equal size

  6. Differential regulation of the Rac1 GTPase-activating protein (GAP) BCR during oxygen/glucose deprivation in hippocampal and cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Katharine R; Rajgor, Dipen; Hanley, Jonathan G

    2017-12-08

    Brain ischemia causes oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) in neurons, triggering a cascade of events leading to synaptic accumulation of glutamate. Excessive activation of glutamate receptors causes excitotoxicity and delayed cell death in vulnerable neurons. Following global cerebral ischemia, hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons are more vulnerable to injury than their cortical counterparts, but the mechanisms that underlie this difference are unclear. Signaling via Rho-family small GTPases, their upstream guanine nucleotide exchange factors, and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) is differentially dysregulated in response to OGD/ischemia in hippocampal and cortical neurons. Increased Rac1 activity caused by OGD/ischemia contributes to neuronal death in hippocampal neurons via diverse effects on NADPH oxidase activity and dendritic spine morphology. The Rac1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor Tiam1 mediates an OGD-induced increase in Rac1 activity in hippocampal neurons; however, the identity of an antagonistic GAP remains elusive. Here we show that the Rac1 GAP breakpoint cluster region (BCR) associates with NMDA receptors (NMDARs) along with Tiam1 and that this protein complex is more abundant in hippocampal compared with cortical neurons. Although total BCR is similar in the two neuronal types, BCR is more active in hippocampal compared with cortical neurons. OGD causes an NMDAR- and Ca 2+ -permeable AMPAR-dependent deactivation of BCR in hippocampal but not cortical neurons. BCR knockdown occludes OGD-induced Rac1 activation in hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, disrupting the Tiam1-NMDAR interaction with a fragment of Tiam1 blocks OGD-induced Tiam1 activation but has no effect on the deactivation of BCR. This work identifies BCR as a critical player in Rac1 regulation during OGD in hippocampal neurons. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Brain glucose transport and phosphorylation under acute insulin-induced hypoglycemia in mice: an 18F-FDG PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alf, Malte F; Duarte, João M N; Schibli, Roger; Gruetter, Rolf; Krämer, Stefanie D

    2013-12-01

    We addressed the questions of how cerebral glucose transport and phosphorylation change under acute hypoglycemia and what the underlying mechanisms of adaptation are. Quantitative (18)F-FDG PET combined with the acquisition of real-time arterial input function was performed on mice. Hypoglycemia was induced and maintained by insulin infusion. PET data were analyzed with the 2-tissue-compartment model for (18)F-FDG, and the results were evaluated with Michaelis-Menten saturation kinetics. Glucose clearance from plasma to brain (K1,glc) and the phosphorylation rate constant increased with decreasing plasma glucose (Gp), in particular at a Gp of less than 2.5 mmol/L. Estimated cerebral glucose extraction ratios taking into account an increased cerebral blood flow (CBF) at a Gp of less than 2 mmol/L were between 0.14 and 0.79. CBF-normalized K1,glc values were in agreement with saturation kinetics. Phosphorylation rate constants indicated intracellular glucose depletion at a Gp of less than 2-3 mmol/L. When brain regions were compared, glucose transport under hypoglycemia was lowest in the hypothalamus. Alterations in glucose transport and phosphorylation, as well as intracellular glucose depletion, under acute hypoglycemia can be modeled by saturation kinetics taking into account an increase in CBF. Distinct transport kinetics in the hypothalamus may be involved in its glucose-sensing function.

  8. Solutes transport characteristics in peritoneal dialysis: variations in glucose and insulin serum levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Dirceu R; Figueiredo, Ana E; Antonello, Ivan C; Poli de Figueiredo, Carlos E; d'Avila, Domingos O

    2008-01-01

    Differences in small solutes transport rate (SSTR) during peritoneal dialysis (PD) may affect water and solutes removal. Patients with high SSTR must rely on shorter dwell times and increased dialysate glucose concentrations to keep fluid balance. Glucose absorption during peritoneal dialysis (PD), besides affecting glucose and insulin metabolism, may induce weight gain. The study aimed at examining acute glucose and insulin serum level changes and other potential relationships in PD patients with diverse SSTR. This cross-sectional study used a modified peritoneal equilibration test (PET) that enrolled 34 prevalent PD patients. Zero, 15, 30, 60, 120, 180, and 240-minute glucose and insulin serum levels were measured. Insulin resistance index was assessed by the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR) formula. SSTR categories were classified by quartiles of the four-hour dialysate/serum creatinine ratio (D(4)/P(Cr)). Demographic and clinical variables were evaluated, and the body mass index (BMI) was estimated. Correlations among variables of interest and categories of SSTR were explored. Glucose serum levels were significantly different at 15, 30, and 60 minutes between high and low SSTR categories (p = 0.014, 0.009, and 0.022). Increased BMI (25.5 +/- 5.1) and insulin resistance [HOMA-IR = 2.60 (1.40-4.23)] were evidenced overall. Very strong to moderate correlations between insulin levels along the PET and HOMA-IR (r = 0.973, 0.834, 0.766, 0.728, 0.843, 0.857, 0.882) and BMI (r = 0.562, 0.459, 0.417, 0.370, 0.508, 0.514, 0.483) were disclosed. CONCLUSIONS; Early glucose serum levels were associated with SSTR during a PET. Overweight or obesity and insulin resistance were prevalent. An association between insulin serum levels and BMI was demonstrated.

  9. Action of Phytochemicals on Insulin Signaling Pathways Accelerating Glucose Transporter (GLUT4 Protein Translocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu Sadat Md Sayem

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is associated with obesity, generally accompanied by a chronic state of oxidative stress and redox imbalances which are implicated in the progression of micro- and macro-complications like heart disease, stroke, dementia, cancer, kidney failure and blindness. All these complications rise primarily due to consistent high blood glucose levels. Insulin and glucagon help to maintain the homeostasis of glucose and lipids through signaling cascades. Pancreatic hormones stimulate translocation of the glucose transporter isoform 4 (GLUT4 from an intracellular location to the cell surface and facilitate the rapid insulin-dependent storage of glucose in muscle and fat cells. Malfunction in glucose uptake mechanisms, primarily contribute to insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. Plant secondary metabolites, commonly known as phytochemicals, are reported to have great benefits in the management of type 2 diabetes. The role of phytochemicals and their action on insulin signaling pathways through stimulation of GLUT4 translocation is crucial to understand the pathogenesis of this disease in the management process. This review will summarize the effects of phytochemicals and their action on insulin signaling pathways accelerating GLUT4 translocation based on the current literature.

  10. Water transport by the Na+/glucose cotransporter under isotonic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeuthen, T; Meinild, A K; Klaerke, D A

    1997-01-01

    Solute cotransport in the Na+/glucose cotransporter is directly coupled to significant water fluxes. The water fluxes are energized by the downhill fluxes of the other substrates by a mechanism within the protein itself. In the present paper we investigate the Na+/glucose cotransporter expressed ...... of water molecules and the number of Na+ ions transported, equivalent to 390 water molecules per glucose molecule. Unstirred layer effects are ruled out on the basis of experiments on native oocytes incubated with the ionophores gramicidin D or nystatin.......Solute cotransport in the Na+/glucose cotransporter is directly coupled to significant water fluxes. The water fluxes are energized by the downhill fluxes of the other substrates by a mechanism within the protein itself. In the present paper we investigate the Na+/glucose cotransporter expressed...... in Xenopus oocytes. We present a method which allows short-term exposures to sugar under voltage clamp conditions. We demonstrate that water is cotransported with the solutes despite no osmotic differences between the external and intracellular solutions. There is a fixed ratio of 195:1 between the number...

  11. Near infrared radiation rescues mitochondrial dysfunction in cortical neurons after oxygen-glucose deprivation

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Zhanyang; Liu, Ning; Zhao, Jianhua; Li, Yadan; McCarthy, Thomas J.; Tedford, Clark E.; Lo, Eng H.; Wang, Xiaoying

    2014-01-01

    Near infrared radiation (NIR) is known to penetrate and affect biological systems in multiple ways. Recently, a series of experimental studies suggested that low intensity NIR may protect neuronal cells against a wide range of insults that mimic diseases such as stroke, brain trauma and neuro-degeneration. However, the potential molecular mechanisms of neuroprotection with NIR remain poorly defined. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that low intensity NIR may attenuate hypoxia/ischemia-...

  12. Glucose and Intermediary Metabolism and Astrocyte-Neuron Interactions Following Neonatal Hypoxia-Ischemia in Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brekke, Eva; Berger, Hester Rijkje; Widerøe, Marius; Sonnewald, Ursula; Morken, Tora Sund

    2017-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI) and the delayed injury cascade that follows involve excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and mitochondrial failure. The susceptibility to excitotoxicity of the neonatal brain may be related to the capacity of astrocytes for glutamate uptake. Furthermore, the neonatal brain is vulnerable to oxidative stress, and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) may be of particular importance for limiting this kind of injury. Also, in the neonatal brain, neurons depend upon de novo synthesis of neurotransmitters via pyruvate carboxylase in astrocytes to increase neurotransmitter pools during normal brain development. Several recent publications describing intermediary brain metabolism following neonatal HI have yielded interesting results: (1) Following HI there is a prolonged depression of mitochondrial metabolism in agreement with emerging evidence of mitochondria as vulnerable targets in the delayed injury cascade. (2) Astrocytes, like neurons, are metabolically impaired following HI, and the degree of astrocytic malfunction may be an indicator of the outcome following hypoxic and hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. (3) Glutamate transfer from neurons to astrocytes is not increased following neonatal HI, which may imply that astrocytes fail to upregulate glutamate uptake in response to the massive glutamate release during HI, thus contributing to excitotoxicity. (4) In the neonatal brain, the activity of the PPP is reduced following HI, which may add to the susceptibility of the neonatal brain to oxidative stress. The present review aims to discuss the metabolic temporal alterations observed in the neonatal brain following HI.

  13. Insulin binding and glucose transport in adipocytes of acarbose-treated Zucker lean and obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasselli, J R; Flory, T; Fried, S K

    1987-01-01

    The intestinal glucosidase inhibitor acarbose was administered as a dietary admix (30 mg/100 g chow diet) to male Zucker obese and lean rats. After 15 weeks, epidiymal fat pads were removed and adipocytes isolated by collagenase digestion. Equilibrium binding of A-14 tyrosine 125I-insulin, and transport of U-14C-glucose was determined was adipocytes incubated for 50 min at 37 degrees C in 0-16000 pM insulin. Insulin binding/cell was enhanced two-fold in lean (P less than 0.01) and obese (n.s.) drug groups. In drug-treated leans, increased sensitivity of glucose transport to submaximally stimulating concentrations of insulin was observed (P less than 0.02). For both genotypes, acarbose mildly decreased insulin levels and body weight gain, although adipocyte size was unaffected. Results indicate that enhanced insulin binding accompanies metabolic improvements induced by acarbose in lean Zucker rats.

  14. Expression and Purification of Rat Glucose Transporter 1 in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venskutonytė, Raminta; Elbing, Karin; Lindkvist-Petersson, Karin

    2018-01-01

    Large amounts of pure and homogenous protein are a prerequisite for several biochemical and biophysical analyses, and in particular if aiming at resolving the three-dimensional protein structure. Here we describe the production of the rat glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), a membrane protein facilitating the transport of glucose in cells. The protein is recombinantly expressed in the yeast Pichia pastoris. It is easily maintained and large-scale protein production in shaker flasks, as commonly performed in academic research laboratories, results in relatively high yields of membrane protein. The purification protocol describes all steps needed to obtain a pure and homogenous GLUT1 protein solution, including cell growth, membrane isolation, and chromatographic purification methods.

  15. Sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors: blocking renal tubular reabsorption of glucose to improve glycaemic control in patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, S A; Goldstein, B J

    2008-08-01

    The kidney plays a central role in the regulation of plasma glucose levels, although until recently this has not been widely appreciated or considered a target for therapeutic intervention. The sodium glucose co-transporter type 2 (SGLT2) located in the plasma membrane of cells lining the proximal tubule mediates the majority of renal glucose reabsorption from the tubular fluid, which normally prevents the loss of glucose in the urine. Competitive inhibitors of SGLT2 that provoke the renal excretion of glucose have been discovered, thereby providing a unique mechanism to potentially lower the elevated blood glucose levels in patients with diabetes. To explore the physiology of SGLT2 action and discuss several SGLT2 inhibitors that have entered early clinical development. All publicly available data were identified by searching the internet for 'SGLT2' and 'SGLT2 inhibitor' through 1 November 2007. Published articles, press releases and abstracts presented at national and international meetings were considered. Sodium glucose co-transporter type 2 inhibition is a novel treatment option for diabetes, which has been studied in preclinical models and a few potent and selective SGLT2 inhibitors have been reported and are currently in clinical development. These agents appear to be safe and generally well tolerated, and will potentially be a beneficial addition to the growing battery of oral antihyperglycaemic agents.

  16. Neuronal Rap1 regulates energy balance, glucose homeostasis, and leptin actions

    OpenAIRE

    Kaneko, Kentaro; Xu, Pingwen; Cordonier, Elizabeth L.; Chen, Siyu S.; Ng, Amy; Xu, Yong; Morozov, Alexei; Fukuda, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) contributes to obesity and metabolic disease; however, the underlying neurobiological pathways remain to be fully established. Here we show that the small GTPase Rap1 is expressed in multiple hypothalamic nuclei that control whole-body metabolism and is activated in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Genetic ablation of CNS Rap1 protects mice from dietary obesity, glucose imbalance, and insulin resistance in the periphery and from HFD-induced neuropathologic...

  17. Hypothalamic growth hormone receptor (GHR) controls hepatic glucose production in nutrient-sensing leptin receptor (LepRb) expressing neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Gillian; Landeryou, Taylor; Garratt, Michael; Kopchick, John J; Qi, Nathan; Garcia-Galiano, David; Elias, Carol F; Myers, Martin G; Miller, Richard A; Sandoval, Darleen A; Sadagurski, Marianna

    2017-05-01

    The GH/IGF-1 axis has important roles in growth and metabolism. GH and GH receptor (GHR) are active in the central nervous system (CNS) and are crucial in regulating several aspects of metabolism. In the hypothalamus, there is a high abundance of GH-responsive cells, but the role of GH signaling in hypothalamic neurons is unknown. Previous work has demonstrated that the Ghr gene is highly expressed in LepRb neurons. Given that leptin is a key regulator of energy balance by acting on leptin receptor (LepRb)-expressing neurons, we tested the hypothesis that LepRb neurons represent an important site for GHR signaling to control body homeostasis. To determine the importance of GHR signaling in LepRb neurons, we utilized Cre/loxP technology to ablate GHR expression in LepRb neurons (Lepr EYFPΔGHR ). The mice were generated by crossing the Lepr cre on the cre-inducible ROSA26-EYFP mice to GHR L/L mice. Parameters of body composition and glucose homeostasis were evaluated. Our results demonstrate that the sites with GHR and LepRb co-expression include ARH, DMH, and LHA neurons. Leptin action was not altered in Lepr EYFPΔGHR mice; however, GH-induced pStat5-IR in LepRb neurons was significantly reduced in these mice. Serum IGF-1 and GH levels were unaltered, and we found no evidence that GHR signaling regulates food intake and body weight in LepRb neurons. In contrast, diminished GHR signaling in LepRb neurons impaired hepatic insulin sensitivity and peripheral lipid metabolism. This was paralleled with a failure to suppress expression of the gluconeogenic genes and impaired hepatic insulin signaling in Lepr EYFPΔGHR mice. These findings suggest the existence of GHR-leptin neurocircuitry that plays an important role in the GHR-mediated regulation of glucose metabolism irrespective of feeding.

  18. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide increases mitochondrial respiratory chain complex II activity and protects against oxygen-glucose deprivation in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Dujuan; Wang, Luna; Zhang, Jun; Qian, Lai; Li, Qiming; Li, Jin; Qian, Jian; Gu, Shuangshuang; Han, Ling; Xu, Peng; Xu, Yun

    2014-09-25

    The mechanisms of ischemic stroke, a main cause of disability and death, are complicated. Ischemic stroke results from the interaction of various factors including oxidative stress, a key pathological mechanism that plays an important role during the acute stage of ischemic brain injury. This study demonstrated that cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide, specifically CART55-102, increased the survival rate, but decreased the mortality of neurons exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), in a dose-dependent manner. The above-mentioned effects of CART55-102 were most significant at 0.4nM. These results indicated that CART55-102 suppressed neurotoxicity and enhanced neuronal survival after oxygen-glucose deprivation. CART55-102 (0.4nM) significantly diminished reactive oxygen species levels and markedly increased the activity of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex II in oxygen-glucose deprived neurons. In summary, CART55-102 suppressed oxidative stress in oxygen-glucose deprived neurons, possibly through elevating the activity of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex II. This result provides evidence for the development of CART55-102 as an antioxidant drug. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The importance of regulation of blood glucose levels through activation of peripheral 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase on ischemic neuronal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Shinichi; Fujita-Hamabe, Wakako; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2010-09-10

    5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine kinase that plays a key role in energy homeostasis. Recently, it was reported that centrally activated AMPK is involved in the development of ischemic neuronal damage, while the effect of peripherally activated AMPK on ischemic neuronal damage is not known. In addition, we have previously reported that the development of post-ischemic glucose intolerance could be one of the triggers for the aggravation of neuronal damage. In this study, we focused on effect of activation of peripheral or central AMPK on the development of ischemic neuronal damage. Male ddY mice were subjected to 2 h of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Neuronal damage was estimated by histological and behavioral analysis after MCAO. In the liver and skeletal muscle, AMPK activity was not affected by MCAO. But, application of intraperitoneal metformin (250 mg/kg), an AMPK activator, significantly suppressed the development of post-ischemic glucose intolerance and ischemic neuronal damage without alteration of central AMPK activity. On the other hand, application of intracerebroventricular metformin (25, 100 microg/mouse) significantly exacerbated the development of neuronal damage observed on day 1 after MCAO, in a dose-dependent manner. These effects were significantly blocked by compound C, a specific AMPK inhibitor. These results suggest that central AMPK was activated by ischemic stress per se, however, peripheral AMPK was not altered. Furthermore, the regulation of post-ischemic glucose intolerance by activation of peripheral AMPK is of assistance for the suppression of cerebral ischemic neuronal damage. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of vanadate on glucose transporter (GLUT4) intrinsic activity in skeletal muscle plasma membrane giant vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, S; Youn, J; Richter, Erik

    1996-01-01

    of vanadate (NaVO3) on glucose transporter (GLUT4) intrinsic activity (V(max) = intrinsic activity x [GLUT4 protein]) was studied in muscle plasma membrane giant vesicles. Giant vesicles (average diameter 7.6 microns) were produced by collagenase treatment of rat skeletal muscle. The vesicles were incubated......) 55% and 60%, respectively, compared with control. The plasma membrane GLUT4 protein content was not changed in response to vanadate. It is concluded that vanadate decreased glucose transport per GLUT4 (intrinsic activity). This finding suggests that regulation of glucose transport in skeletal muscle...

  1. Wallerian degeneration slow mouse neurons are protected against cell death caused by mechanisms involving mitochondrial electron transport dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Shinji; Araki, Toshiyuki

    2012-03-01

    Ischemia elicits a variety of stress responses in neuronal cells, which result in cell death. wld(S) Mice bear a mutation that significantly delays Wallerian degeneration. This mutation also protects all neuronal cells against other types of stresses resulting in cell death, including ischemia. To clarify the types of stresses that neuronal cell bodies derived from wld(S) mice are protected from, we exposed primary cultured neurons derived from wld(S) mice to various components of hypoxic stress. We found that wld(S) mouse neurons are protected against cellular injury induced by reoxygenation following hypoxic stress. Furthermore, we found that wld(S) mouse neurons are protected against functional impairment of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. These data suggest that Wld(S) protein expression may provide protection against neuronal cell death caused by mechanisms involving mitochondrial electron transport dysfunction. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Oscillations, complex spatiotemporal behavior, and information transport in networks of excitatory and inhibitory neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Destexhe, A.

    1994-01-01

    Various types of spatiotemporal behavior are described for two-dimensional networks of excitatory and inhibitory neurons with time delayed interactions. It is described how the network behaves as several structural parameters are varied, such as the number of neurons, the connectivity, and the values of synaptic weights. A transition from spatially uniform oscillations to spatiotemporal chaos via intermittentlike behavior is observed. The properties of spatiotemporally chaotic solutions are investigated by evaluating the largest positive Lyapunov exponent and the loss of correlation with distance. Finally, properties of information transport are evaluated during uniform oscillations and spatiotemporal chaos. It is shown that the diffusion coefficient increases significantly in the spatiotemporal phase similar to the increase of transport coefficients at the onset of fluid turbulence. It is proposed that such a property should be seen in other media, such as chemical turbulence or networks of oscillators. The possibility of measuring information transport from appropriate experiments is also discussed

  3. Glutamate transporter activity promotes enhanced Na+/K+-ATPase -mediated extracellular K+ management during neuronal activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Brian R; Holm, Rikke; Vilsen, Bente

    2016-01-01

    , in addition, Na+ /K+ -ATPase-mediated K+ clearance could be governed by astrocytic [Na+ ]i . During most neuronal activity, glutamate is released in the synaptic cleft and is re-absorbed by astrocytic Na+ -coupled glutamate transporters, thereby elevating [Na+ ]i . It thus remains unresolved whether...... the different Na+ /K+ -ATPase isoforms are controlled by [K+ ]o or [Na+ ]i during neuronal activity. Hippocampal slice recordings of stimulus-induced [K+ ]o transients with ion-sensitive microelectrodes revealed reduced Na+ /K+ -ATPase-mediated K+ management upon parallel inhibition of the glutamate transporter......+ affinity to the α1 and α2 isoforms than the β2 isoform. In summary, enhanced astrocytic Na+ /K+ -ATPase-dependent K+ clearance was obtained with parallel glutamate transport activity. The astrocytic Na+ /K+ -ATPase isoform constellation α2β1 appeared to be specifically geared to respond to the [Na+ ]i...

  4. Concentration of membrane antigens by forward transport and trapping in neuronal growth cones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheetz, M P; Baumrind, N L; Wayne, D B; Pearlman, A L

    1990-04-20

    Formation of the nervous system requires that neuronal growth cones follow specific paths and then stop at recognition signals, sensed at the growth cone's leading edge. We used antibody-coated gold particles viewed by video-enhanced differential interference contrast microscopy to observe the distribution and movement of two cell surface molecules, N-CAM and the 2A1 antigen, on growth cones of cultured cortical neurons. Gold particles are occasionally transported forward at 1-2 microns/s to the leading edge where they are trapped but continue to move. Concentration at the edge persists after cytochalasin D treatment or ATP depletion, but active movements to and along edges cease. We also observed a novel outward movement of small cytoplasmic aggregates at 1.8 microns/s in filopodia. We suggest that active forward transport and trapping involve reversible attachment of antigens to and transport along cytoskeletal elements localized to edges of growth cones.

  5. Apoptosis and changes in glucose transport early after treatment of Morris hepatoma with gemcitabine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberkorn, U.; Bellemann, M.E.; Brix, G.; Kamencic, H.; Traut, U.; Kinscherf, R.; Doll, J.; Blatter, J.

    2001-01-01

    Apoptosis has been described as an energy-consuming process. This combined in vivo/in vitro study investigated the effects of the antineoplastic agent gemcitabine on tumour metabolism and on the induction of apoptosis. Dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) measurements of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake were done in rats bearing Morris hepatoma prior to and after therapy with 90 mg gemcitabine/kg b.w. Furthermore, thymidine (TdR) incorporation into the DNA of these tumours was determined. In vitro measurements of FDG and TdR uptake were performed immediately and 24 h after the end of gemcitabine treatment, and the amount of apoptotic cells was determined using the TUNEL reaction. In vivo an increase in FDG transport and phosphorylation occurred early after gemcitabine treatment, although TdR incorporation into the DNA of the tumours declined. In vitro, an enhanced glucose transport, an increase in TdR uptake in the cytoplasm and a decrease in TdR incorporation in the nucleic acid fraction early after treatment occurred. Inhibition of glucose transport caused an increase in the amount of apoptotic cells. The increase in glucose uptake and TdR metabolism early after therapy is interpreted as a stress reaction of the tumour cells, protecting the cells from apoptosis during this early period after exposure to cytotoxic drugs like gemcitabine. (orig.)

  6. Apoptosis and changes in glucose transport early after treatment of Morris hepatoma with gemcitabine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberkorn, U. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Klinische Nuklearmedizin; Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Bellemann, M.E. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Applied Sciences, Jena (Germany); Brix, G. [Department of Medical Radiation Hygiene, Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Neuherberg (Germany); Kamencic, H.; Traut, U.; Kinscherf, R. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anatomie und Zellbiologie; Morr, I.; Altmann, A. [Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Doll, J. [Dept. of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Blatter, J. [Lilly GmbH Germany, Bad Homburg (Germany)

    2001-04-01

    Apoptosis has been described as an energy-consuming process. This combined in vivo/in vitro study investigated the effects of the antineoplastic agent gemcitabine on tumour metabolism and on the induction of apoptosis. Dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) measurements of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake were done in rats bearing Morris hepatoma prior to and after therapy with 90 mg gemcitabine/kg b.w. Furthermore, thymidine (TdR) incorporation into the DNA of these tumours was determined. In vitro measurements of FDG and TdR uptake were performed immediately and 24 h after the end of gemcitabine treatment, and the amount of apoptotic cells was determined using the TUNEL reaction. In vivo an increase in FDG transport and phosphorylation occurred early after gemcitabine treatment, although TdR incorporation into the DNA of the tumours declined. In vitro, an enhanced glucose transport, an increase in TdR uptake in the cytoplasm and a decrease in TdR incorporation in the nucleic acid fraction early after treatment occurred. Inhibition of glucose transport caused an increase in the amount of apoptotic cells. The increase in glucose uptake and TdR metabolism early after therapy is interpreted as a stress reaction of the tumour cells, protecting the cells from apoptosis during this early period after exposure to cytotoxic drugs like gemcitabine. (orig.)

  7. Dissociation of in vitro sensitivities of glucose transport and antilipolysis to insulin in NIDDM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yki-Jaervinen, H.; Kubo, K.; Zawadzki, J.; Lillioja, S.; Young, A.; Abbott, W.; Foley, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    It is unclear from previous studies whether qualitative or only quantitative differences exist in insulin action in adipocytes obtained from obese subjects with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) when compared with equally obese nondiabetic subjects. In addition, the role of changes in insulin binding as a cause of insulin resistance in NIDDM is still controversial. The authors compared the sensitivities of [ 14 C]-glucose transport and antilipolysis to insulin and measured [ 125 I]-insulin binding in abdominal adipocytes obtained from 45 obese nondiabetic, obese diabetic, and 15 nonobese female southwestern American Indians. Compared with the nonobese group, the sensitivities of glucose transport antilipolysis were reduced in both the obese nondiabetic and obese diabetic groups. Compared with the obese nondiabetic subjects, the ED 50 for stimulation of glucose transport was higher in the obese patients with NIDDM. In contrast, the ED 50 S for antilipolysis were similar in obese diabetic patients and obese nondiabetic subjects. No differences was found in insulin binding in patients with NIDDM when compared with the equally obese nondiabetic subjects. These data indicate 1) the mechanism of insulin resistance differs in NIDDM and obesity, and 2) the selective loss of insulin sensitivity in NIDDM precludes changes in insulin binding as a cause of insulin resistance in this disorder

  8. GLP-1 analog raises glucose transport capacity of blood-brain barrier in Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gejl, M.; Brock, B.; Egefjord, L.

    2017-01-01

    transport capacity (Tmax) with [18F]FDG (FDG) (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01469351). Results: In both groups, the Tmax estimates declined in proportion to the duration of AD. The GLP-1 analog treatment very significantly (P cerebral cortex as a whole compared...... and degeneration. Hypothesis: The incretin hormone GLP-1 prevents the decline of the cerebral metabolic rate of glucose that signifies cognitive impairment, synaptic dysfunction, and disease evolution in AD, and GLP-1 may directly activate GLUT1 transport in brain capillary endothelium. For this reason, we here...

  9. Low Red Blood Cell Vitamin C Concentrations Induce Red Blood Cell Fragility: A Link to Diabetes Via Glucose, Glucose Transporters, and Dehydroascorbic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbin Tu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Strategies to prevent diabetic microvascular angiopathy focus on the vascular endothelium. Because red blood cells (RBCs are less deformable in diabetes, we explored an original concept linking decreased RBC deformability to RBC ascorbate and hyperglycemia. We characterized ascorbate concentrations from human and mouse RBCs and plasma, and showed an inverse relationship between RBC ascorbate concentrations and deformability, measured by osmotic fragility. RBCs from ascorbate deficient mice were osmotically sensitive, appeared as spherocytes, and had decreased β-spectrin. These aberrancies reversed with ascorbate repletion in vivo. Under physiologic conditions, only ascorbate's oxidation product dehydroascorbic acid (DHA, a substrate for facilitated glucose transporters, was transported into mouse and human RBCs, with immediate intracellular reduction to ascorbate. In vitro, glucose inhibited entry of physiologic concentrations of dehydroascorbic acid into mouse and human RBCs. In vivo, plasma glucose concentrations in normal and diabetic mice and humans were inversely related to respective RBC ascorbate concentrations, as was osmotic fragility. Human RBC β-spectrin declined as diabetes worsened. Taken together, hyperglycemia in diabetes produced lower RBC ascorbate with increased RBC rigidity, a candidate to drive microvascular angiopathy. Because glucose transporter expression, DHA transport, and its inhibition by glucose differed for mouse versus human RBCs, human experimentation is indicated.

  10. Intracellular pH regulation by acid-base transporters in mammalian neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffin, Vernon A.; Salameh, Ahlam I.; Boron, Walter F.; Parker, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) regulation in the brain is important in both physiological and physiopathological conditions because changes in pHi generally result in altered neuronal excitability. In this review, we will cover 4 major areas: (1) The effect of pHi on cellular processes in the brain, including channel activity and neuronal excitability. (2) pHi homeostasis and how it is determined by the balance between rates of acid loading (JL) and extrusion (JE). The balance between JE and JL determine steady-state pHi, as well as the ability of the cell to defend pHi in the face of extracellular acid-base disturbances (e.g., metabolic acidosis). (3) The properties and importance of members of the SLC4 and SLC9 families of acid-base transporters expressed in the brain that contribute to JL (namely the Cl-HCO3 exchanger AE3) and JE (the Na-H exchangers NHE1, NHE3, and NHE5 as well as the Na+- coupled HCO3− transporters NBCe1, NBCn1, NDCBE, and NBCn2). (4) The effect of acid-base disturbances on neuronal function and the roles of acid-base transporters in defending neuronal pHi under physiopathologic conditions. PMID:24592239

  11. Piracetam and TRH analogues antagonise inhibition by barbiturates, diazepam, melatonin and galanin of human erythrocyte D-glucose transport

    OpenAIRE

    Naftalin, Richard J; Cunningham, Philip; Afzal-Ahmed, Iram

    2004-01-01

    Nootropic drugs increase glucose uptake into anaesthetised brain and into Alzheimer's diseased brain. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone, TRH, which has a chemical structure similar to nootropics increases cerebellar uptake of glucose in murine rolling ataxia. This paper shows that nootropic drugs like piracetam (2-oxo 1 pyrrolidine acetamide) and levetiracetam and neuropeptides like TRH antagonise the inhibition of glucose transport by barbiturates, diazepam, melatonin and endogenous neuropeptide...

  12. Glucose transport and milk secretion during manipulated plasma insulin and glucose concentrations and during LPS-induced mastitis in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, J J; van Dorland, H A; Wellnitz, O; Bruckmaier, R M

    2015-08-01

    In dairy cows, glucose is essential as energy source and substrate for milk constituents. The objective of this study was to investigate effects of long-term manipulated glucose and insulin concentrations in combination with a LPS-induced mastitis on mRNA abundance of glucose transporters and factors involved in milk composition. Focusing on direct effects of insulin and glucose without influence of periparturient endocrine adaptations, 18 dairy cows (28 ± 6 weeks of lactation) were randomly assigned to one of three infusion treatments for 56 h (six animals each). Treatments included a hyperinsulinemic hypoglycaemic clamp (HypoG), a hyperinsulinemic euglycaemic clamp (EuG) and a control group (NaCl). After 48 h of infusions, an intramammary challenge with LPS from E. coli was performed and infusions continued for additional 8 h. Mammary gland biopsies were taken before, at 48 (before LPS challenge) and at 56 h (after LPS challenge) of infusion, and mRNA abundance of genes involved in mammary gland metabolism was measured by RT-qPCR. During the 48 h of infusions, mRNA abundance of glucose transporters GLUT1, 3, 4, 8, 12, SGLT1, 2) was not affected in HypoG, while they were downregulated in EuG. The mRNA abundance of alpha-lactalbumin, insulin-induced gene 1, κ-casein and acetyl-CoA carboxylase was downregulated in HypoG, but not affected in EuG. Contrary during the intramammary LPS challenge, most of the glucose transporters were downregulated in NaCl and HypoG, but not in EuG. The mRNA abundance of glucose transporters in the mammary gland seems not to be affected by a shortage of glucose, while enzymes and milk constituents directly depending on glucose as a substrate are immediately downregulated. During LPS-induced mastitis in combination with hypoglycaemia, mammary gland metabolism was more aligned to save glucose for the immune system compared to a situation without limited glucose availability during EuG. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal

  13. Enhancement of high glucose-induced PINK1 expression by melatonin stimulates neuronal cell survival: Involvement of MT2 /Akt/NF-κB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onphachanh, Xaykham; Lee, Hyun Jik; Lim, Jae Ryong; Jung, Young Hyun; Kim, Jun Sung; Chae, Chang Woo; Lee, Sei-Jung; Gabr, Amr Ahmed; Han, Ho Jae

    2017-09-01

    Hyperglycemia is a representative hallmark and risk factor for diabetes mellitus (DM) and is closely linked to DM-associated neuronal cell death. Previous investigators reported on a genome-wide association study and showed relationships between DM and melatonin receptor (MT), highlighting the role of MT signaling by assessing melatonin in DM. However, the role of MT signaling in DM pathogenesis is unclear. Therefore, we investigated the role of mitophagy regulators in high glucose-induced neuronal cell death and the effect of melatonin against high glucose-induced mitophagy regulators in neuronal cells. In our results, high glucose significantly increased PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) and LC-3B expressions; as well it decreased cytochrome c oxidase subunit 4 expression and Mitotracker™ fluorescence intensity. Silencing of PINK1 induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and mitochondrial membrane potential impairment, increased expressions of cleaved caspases, and increased the number of annexin V-positive cells. In addition, high glucose-stimulated melatonin receptor 1B (MTNR1B) mRNA and PINK1 expressions were reversed by ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine pretreatment. Upregulation of PINK1 expression in neuronal cells is suppressed by pretreatment with MT 2 receptor-specific inhibitor 4-P-PDOT. We further showed melatonin stimulated Akt phosphorylation, which was followed by nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. Silencing of PINK1 expression abolished melatonin-regulated mitochondrial ROS production, cleaved caspase-3 and caspase-9 expressions, and the number of annexin V-positive cells. In conclusion, we have demonstrated the melatonin stimulates PINK1 expression via an MT 2 /Akt/NF-κB pathway, and such stimulation is important for the prevention of neuronal cell apoptosis under high glucose conditions. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Pineal Research

  14. Experimental type II diabetes and related models of impaired glucose metabolism differentially regulate glucose transporters at the proximal tubule brush border membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chichger, Havovi; Cleasby, Mark E; Srai, Surjit K; Unwin, Robert J; Debnam, Edward S; Marks, Joanne

    2016-06-01

    What is the central question of this study? Although SGLT2 inhibitors represent a promising treatment for patients suffering from diabetic nephropathy, the influence of metabolic disruption on the expression and function of glucose transporters is largely unknown. What is the main finding and its importance? In vivo models of metabolic disruption (Goto-Kakizaki type II diabetic rat and junk-food diet) demonstrate increased expression of SGLT1, SGLT2 and GLUT2 in the proximal tubule brush border. In the type II diabetic model, this is accompanied by increased SGLT- and GLUT-mediated glucose uptake. A fasted model of metabolic disruption (high-fat diet) demonstrated increased GLUT2 expression only. The differential alterations of glucose transporters in response to varying metabolic stress offer insight into the therapeutic value of inhibitors. SGLT2 inhibitors are now in clinical use to reduce hyperglycaemia in type II diabetes. However, renal glucose reabsorption across the brush border membrane (BBM) is not completely understood in diabetes. Increased consumption of a Western diet is strongly linked to type II diabetes. This study aimed to investigate the adaptations that occur in renal glucose transporters in response to experimental models of diet-induced insulin resistance. The study used Goto-Kakizaki type II diabetic rats and normal rats rendered insulin resistant using junk-food or high-fat diets. Levels of protein kinase C-βI (PKC-βI), GLUT2, SGLT1 and SGLT2 were determined by Western blotting of purified renal BBM. GLUT- and SGLT-mediated d-[(3) H]glucose uptake by BBM vesicles was measured in the presence and absence of the SGLT inhibitor phlorizin. GLUT- and SGLT-mediated glucose transport was elevated in type II diabetic rats, accompanied by increased expression of GLUT2, its upstream regulator PKC-βI and SGLT1 protein. Junk-food and high-fat diet feeding also caused higher membrane expression of GLUT2 and its upstream regulator PKC

  15. Urotensin II inhibits skeletal muscle glucose transport signaling pathways via the NADPH oxidase pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Xia Wang

    Full Text Available Our previous studies have demonstrated that the urotensin (UII and its receptor are up-regulated in the skeletal muscle of mice with type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM, but the significance of UII in skeletal muscle insulin resistance remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of UII on NADPH oxidase and glucose transport signaling pathways in the skeletal muscle of mice with T2DM and in C2C12 mouse myotube cells. KK/upj-AY/J mice (KK mice were divided into the following groups: KK group, with saline treatment for 2 weeks; KK+ urantide group, with daily 30 µg/kg body weight injections over the same time period of urantide, a potent urotensin II antagonist peptide; Non-diabetic C57BL/6J mice were used as normal controls. After urantide treatment, mice were subjected to an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test, in addition to measurements of the levels of ROS, NADPH oxidase and the phosphorylated AKT, PKC and ERK. C2C12 cells were incubated with serum-free DMEM for 24 hours before conducting the experiments, and then administrated with 100 nM UII for 2 hours or 24 hours. Urantide treatment improved glucose tolerance, decreased the translocation of the NADPH subunits p40-phox and p47-phox, and increased levels of the phosphorylated PKC, AKT and ERK. In contrast, UII treatment increased ROS production and p47-phox and p67-phox translocation, and decreased the phosphorylated AKT, ERK1/2 and p38MAPK; Apocynin abrogated this effect. In conclusion, UII increased ROS production by NADPH oxidase, leading to the inhibition of signaling pathways involving glucose transport, such as AKT/PKC/ERK. Our data imply a role for UII at the molecular level in glucose homeostasis, and possibly in skeletal muscle insulin resistance in T2DM.

  16. Amyloid-Beta Induced Changes in Vesicular Transport of BDNF in Hippocampal Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Seifert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurotrophin brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is an important growth factor in the CNS. Deficits in transport of this secretory protein could underlie neurodegenerative diseases. Investigation of disease-related changes in BDNF transport might provide insights into the cellular mechanism underlying, for example, Alzheimer’s disease (AD. To analyze the role of BDNF transport in AD, live cell imaging of fluorescently labeled BDNF was performed in hippocampal neurons of different AD model systems. BDNF and APP colocalized with low incidence in vesicular structures. Anterograde as well as retrograde transport of BDNF vesicles was reduced and these effects were mediated by factors released from hippocampal neurons into the extracellular medium. Transport of BDNF was altered at a very early time point after onset of human APP expression or after acute amyloid-beta(1-42 treatment, while the activity-dependent release of BDNF remained unaffected. Taken together, extracellular cleavage products of APP induced rapid changes in anterograde and retrograde transport of BDNF-containing vesicles while release of BDNF was unaffected by transgenic expression of mutated APP. These early transport deficits might lead to permanently impaired brain functions in the adult brain.

  17. The Sodium Glucose Cotransporter SGLT1 Is an Extremely Efficient Facilitator of Passive Water Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erokhova, Liudmila; Horner, Andreas; Ollinger, Nicole; Siligan, Christine; Pohl, Peter

    2016-04-29

    The small intestine is void of aquaporins adept at facilitating vectorial water transport, and yet it reabsorbs ∼8 liters of fluid daily. Implications of the sodium glucose cotransporter SGLT1 in either pumping water or passively channeling water contrast with its reported water transporting capacity, which lags behind that of aquaporin-1 by 3 orders of magnitude. Here we overexpressed SGLT1 in MDCK cell monolayers and reconstituted the purified transporter into proteoliposomes. We observed the rate of osmotic proteoliposome deflation by light scattering. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy served to assess (i) SGLT1 abundance in both vesicles and plasma membranes and (ii) flow-mediated dilution of an aqueous dye adjacent to the cell monolayer. Calculation of the unitary water channel permeability, pf, yielded similar values for cell and proteoliposome experiments. Neither the absence of glucose or Na(+), nor the lack of membrane voltage in vesicles, nor the directionality of water flow grossly altered pf Such weak dependence on protein conformation indicates that a water-impermeable occluded state (glucose and Na(+) in their binding pockets) lasts for only a minor fraction of the transport cycle or, alternatively, that occlusion of the substrate does not render the transporter water-impermeable as was suggested by computational studies of the bacterial homologue vSGLT. Although the similarity between the pf values of SGLT1 and aquaporin-1 makes a transcellular pathway plausible, it renders water pumping physiologically negligible because the passive flux would be orders of magnitude larger. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. [Protective effect of pretreatment of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge. f. alba plasma against oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced injury of cultured rat hippocampal neurons by inhibiting apoptosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mei-Yi; Zhang, Yan-Bo; Zuo, Huan; Liu, Li-Li; Niu, Jing-Zhong

    2012-02-25

    The present study was to investigate the effect of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge. f. alba (SMA) pharmacological pretreatment on apoptosis of cultured hippocampal neurons from neonate rats under oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). Cultured hippocampal neurons were randomly divided into five groups (n = 6): normal plasma group, low dose SMA plasma (2.5%) group, middle dose SMA plasma (5%) group, high dose SMA plasma (10%) group and control group. The hippocampal neurons were cultured and treated with plasma from adult Wistar rats intragastrically administered with saline or aqueous extract of SMA. The apoptosis of neurons was induced by glucose-free Earle's solution containing 1 mmol/L Na2S2O4 and labeled by MTT and Annexin V/PI double staining. Moreover, protein expressions of Bcl-2 and Bax were detected by immunofluorescence. The results showed that few apoptotic cells were observed in control group, whereas the number of apoptotic cells was greatly increased in normal plasma group and low dose SMA plasma group. Both middle and high dose SMA plasma could protect cultured hippocampal neurons from apoptosis induced by OGD (P control, normal plasma and low dose SMA plasma groups, middle and high dose SMA plasma groups both showed significantly higher levels of Bcl-2 (P neurons by up-regulating the expression of Bcl-2 and down-regulating the expression of Bax.

  19. Effects of acetylpuerarin on hippocampal neurons and intracellular free calcium subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion in primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Wei, Xin-bing; Zhang, Xiu-Mei

    2007-05-25

    This study was undertaken to find out the effects of acetylpuerarin on hippocampal neurons and intracellular free calcium in primary culture subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion. According to different reperfusion time (1 h, 6 h, 12 h, 24 h), three concentrations (1.6 micromol l(-1), 0.4 micromol l(-1), 0.1 micromol l(-1)) of acetylpuerarin, and MK-801 (10 micromol l(-1)), a positive control drug, neurons were randomly divided into 21 groups. Each group was observed by inverted phase contrast microscope; neuron viability was measured by the reduction of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT); intracellular Ca(2+) was observed by Fura-2/AM ester through fluorospectrophotometer. The injured neurons were protected and degeneration and necrosis were alleviated in treatment groups of acetylpuerarin and MK-801. Acetylpuerarin increased the neuron viability at high, middle and low concentrations. Fluorescence detection results showed that the calcium concentration in the group treated with acetylpuerarin and MK-801 was lowered in each reperfusion time. Our results demonstrated that acetylpuerarin could protect the hippocampal neurons from ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats by alleviating the morphological damage, increasing neuron viability and decreasing calcium concentration in neuron.

  20. IL-10 Promotes Neurite Outgrowth and Synapse Formation in Cultured Cortical Neurons after the Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation via JAK1/STAT3 Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongbin; Lin, Wei; Zhang, Yixian; Lin, Longzai; Chen, Jianhao; Zeng, Yongping; Zheng, Mouwei; Zhuang, Zezhong; Du, Houwei; Chen, Ronghua; Liu, Nan

    2016-07-26

    As a classic immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-10 (IL-10) provides neuroprotection in cerebral ischemia in vivo or oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced injury in vitro. However, it remains blurred whether IL-10 promotes neurite outgrowth and synapse formation in cultured primary cortical neurons after OGD injury. In order to evaluate its effect on neuronal apoptosis, neurite outgrowth and synapse formation, we administered IL-10 or IL-10 neutralizing antibody (IL-10NA) to cultured rat primary cortical neurons after OGD injury. We found that IL-10 treatment activated the Janus kinase 1 (JAK1)/signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway. Moreover, IL-10 attenuated OGD-induced neuronal apoptosis by down-regulating the Bax expression and up-regulating the Bcl-2 expression, facilitated neurite outgrowth by increasing the expression of Netrin-1, and promoted synapse formation in cultured primary cortical neurons after OGD injury. These effects were partly abolished by JAK1 inhibitor GLPG0634. Contrarily, IL-10NA produced opposite effects on the cultured cortical neurons after OGD injury. Taken together, our findings suggest that IL-10 not only attenuates neuronal apoptosis, but also promotes neurite outgrowth and synapse formation via the JAK1/STAT3 signaling pathway in cultured primary cortical neurons after OGD injury.

  1. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript facilitates the neurite outgrowth in cortical neurons after oxygen and glucose deprivation through PTN-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Qiu, B; Liu, J; Zhu, Wei-Guo; Zhu, S

    2014-09-26

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) is a neuropeptide that plays neuroprotective roles in cerebral ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury in animal models or oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) in cultured neurons. Recent data suggest that intranasal CART treatment facilitates neuroregeneration in stroke brain. However, little is known about the effects of post-treatment with CART during the neuronal recovery after OGD and reoxygenation in cultured primary cortical neurons. The present study was to investigate the role of CART treated after OGD injury in neurons. Primary mouse cortical neurons were subjected to OGD and then treated with CART. Our data show that post-treatment with CART reduced the neuronal apoptosis caused by OGD injury. In addition, CART repaired OGD-impaired cortical neurons by increasing the expression of growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43), which promotes neurite outgrowth. This effect depends on pleiotrophin (PTN) as siRNA-mediated PTN knockdown totally abolished the increase in CART-stimulated GAP43 protein levels. In summary, our findings demonstrate that CART repairs the neuronal injury after OGD by facilitating neurite outgrowth through PTN-dependent pathway. The role for CART in neurite outgrowth makes it a new potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. In vivo measurements of brain glucose transport using the reversible michaelis-menten model and simultaneous measurements of cerebral blood flow changes during hypoglycemia

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, I.-Y.; Lee, S.-P.; Kim, S.-G.; Gruetter, R.

    2001-01-01

    Glucose is the major substrate that sustains normal brain function. When the brain glucose concentration approaches zero, glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier becomes rate limiting for metabolism during, for example, increased metabolic activity and hypoglycemia. Steady-state brain glucose concentrations in α-chloralose anesthetized rats were measured noninvasively as a function of plasma glucose. The relation between brain and plasma glucose was linear at 4.5 to 30 mmol/L plasma ...

  3. Sucrose nonfermenting AMPK-related kinase (SNARK) mediates contraction-stimulated glucose transport in mouse skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Koh, Ho-Jin; Toyoda, Taro; Fujii, Nobuharu; Jung, Michelle M.; Rathod, Amee; Middelbeek, R. Jan-Willem; Lessard, Sarah J.; Treebak, Jonas T.; Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Richter, Erik A.; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F. P.; Hirshman, Michael F.; Goodyear, Laurie J.

    2010-01-01

    The signaling mechanisms that mediate the important effects of contraction to increase glucose transport in skeletal muscle are not well understood, but are known to occur through an insulin-independent mechanism. Muscle-specific knockout of LKB1, an upstream kinase for AMPK and AMPK-related protein kinases, significantly inhibited contraction-stimulated glucose transport. This finding, in conjunction with previous studies of ablated AMPKα2 activity showing no effect on contraction-stimulated...

  4. Specific rescue by ortho-hydroxy atorvastatin of cortical GABAergic neurons from previous oxygen/glucose deprivation: role of pCREB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirao, Verónica; Martí-Sistac, Octavi; DeGregorio-Rocasolano, Núria; Ponce, Jovita; Dávalos, Antoni; Gasull, Teresa

    2017-11-01

    The statin atorvastatin (ATV) given as a post-treatment has been reported beneficial in stroke, although the mechanisms involved are not well understood so far. Here, we investigated in vitro the effect of post-treatment with ATV and its main bioactive metabolite ortho-hydroxy ATV (o-ATV) on neuroprotection after oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD), and the role of the pro-survival cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). Post-OGD treatment of primary cultures of rat cortical neurons with o-ATV, but not ATV, provided neuroprotection to a specific subset of cortical neurons that were large and positive for glutamic acid decarboxylase (large-GAD (+) neurons, GABAergic). Significantly, only these GABAergic neurons showed an increase in phosphorylated CREB (pCREB) early after neuronal cultures were treated post-OGD with o-ATV. We found that o-ATV, but not ATV, increased the neuronal uptake of glutamate from the medium; this provides a rationale for the specific effect of o-ATV on pCREB in large-GABAergic neurons, which have a higher ratio of synaptic (pCREB-promoting) vs extrasynaptic (pCREB-reducing) N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors (NMDAR) than that of small-non-GABAergic neurons. When we pharmacologically increased pCREB levels post-OGD in non-GABAergic neurons, through the selective activation of synaptic NMDAR, we observed as well long-lasting neuronal survival. We propose that the statin metabolite o-ATV given post-OGD boosts the intrinsic pro-survival factor pCREB in large-GABAergic cortical neurons in vitro, this contributing to protect them from OGD. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  5. Evidence for brain glucose dysregulation in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yang; Varma, Vijay R; Varma, Sudhir; Casanova, Ramon; Dammer, Eric; Pletnikova, Olga; Chia, Chee W; Egan, Josephine M; Ferrucci, Luigi; Troncoso, Juan; Levey, Allan I; Lah, James; Seyfried, Nicholas T; Legido-Quigley, Cristina; O'Brien, Richard; Thambisetty, Madhav

    2018-03-01

    It is unclear whether abnormalities in brain glucose homeostasis are associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Within the autopsy cohort of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging, we measured brain glucose concentration and assessed the ratios of the glycolytic amino acids, serine, glycine, and alanine to glucose. We also quantified protein levels of the neuronal (GLUT3) and astrocytic (GLUT1) glucose transporters. Finally, we assessed the relationships between plasma glucose measured before death and brain tissue glucose. Higher brain tissue glucose concentration, reduced glycolytic flux, and lower GLUT3 are related to severity of AD pathology and the expression of AD symptoms. Longitudinal increases in fasting plasma glucose levels are associated with higher brain tissue glucose concentrations. Impaired glucose metabolism due to reduced glycolytic flux may be intrinsic to AD pathogenesis. Abnormalities in brain glucose homeostasis may begin several years before the onset of clinical symptoms. Copyright © 2017 the Alzheimer's Association. All rights reserved.

  6. Cannabidiol attenuates OGD/R-induced damage by enhancing mitochondrial bioenergetics and modulating glucose metabolism via pentose-phosphate pathway in hippocampal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Sun

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Deficient bioenergetics and diminished redox conservation have been implicated in the development of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. In this study, the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effects of cannabidiol (CBD, a nonpsychotropic compound derived from Cannabis sativa with FDA-approved antiepilepsy properties, were studied in vitro using an oxygen–glucose-deprivation/reperfusion (OGD/R model in a mouse hippocampal neuronal cell line. CBD supplementation during reperfusion rescued OGD/R-induced cell death, attenuated intracellular ROS generation and lipid peroxidation, and simultaneously reversed the abnormal changes in antioxidant biomarkers. Using the Seahorse XFe24 Extracellular Flux Analyzer, we found that CBD significantly improved basal respiration, ATP-linked oxygen consumption rate, and the spare respiratory capacity, and augmented glucose consumption in OGD/R-injured neurons. The activation of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and the preservation of the NADPH/NADP+ ratio implies that the pentose-phosphate pathway is stimulated by CBD, thus protecting hippocampal neurons from OGD/R injury. This study is the first to document the neuroprotective effects of CBD against OGD/R insult, which depend in part on attenuating oxidative stress, enhancing mitochondrial bioenergetics, and modulating glucose metabolism via the pentose-phosphate pathway, thus preserving both energy and the redox balance.

  7. Cannabidiol attenuates OGD/R-induced damage by enhancing mitochondrial bioenergetics and modulating glucose metabolism via pentose-phosphate pathway in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shanshan; Hu, Fangyuan; Wu, Jihong; Zhang, Shenghai

    2017-04-01

    Deficient bioenergetics and diminished redox conservation have been implicated in the development of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. In this study, the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effects of cannabidiol (CBD), a nonpsychotropic compound derived from Cannabis sativa with FDA-approved antiepilepsy properties, were studied in vitro using an oxygen-glucose-deprivation/reperfusion (OGD/R) model in a mouse hippocampal neuronal cell line. CBD supplementation during reperfusion rescued OGD/R-induced cell death, attenuated intracellular ROS generation and lipid peroxidation, and simultaneously reversed the abnormal changes in antioxidant biomarkers. Using the Seahorse XF e 24 Extracellular Flux Analyzer, we found that CBD significantly improved basal respiration, ATP-linked oxygen consumption rate, and the spare respiratory capacity, and augmented glucose consumption in OGD/R-injured neurons. The activation of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and the preservation of the NADPH/NADP + ratio implies that the pentose-phosphate pathway is stimulated by CBD, thus protecting hippocampal neurons from OGD/R injury. This study is the first to document the neuroprotective effects of CBD against OGD/R insult, which depend in part on attenuating oxidative stress, enhancing mitochondrial bioenergetics, and modulating glucose metabolism via the pentose-phosphate pathway, thus preserving both energy and the redox balance. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Inhibition of protein kinase CbetaII increases glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes through elevated expression of glucose transporter 1 at the plasma membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, Remko R.; Bazuine, Merlijn; Wake, Michelle M.; Span, Paul N.; Olthaar, André J.; Schürmann, Annette; Maassen, J. Antonie; Hermus, Ad R. M. M.; Willems, Peter H. G. M.; Sweep, C. G. J.

    2003-01-01

    The mechanism via which diacylglycerol-sensitive protein kinase Cs (PKCs) stimulate glucose transport in insulin-sensitive tissues is poorly defined. Phorbol esters, such as phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), are potent activators of conventional and novel PKCs. Addition of PMA increases the

  9. One-dimensional deterministic transport in neurons measured by dispersion-relation phase spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Ru [Quantitative Light Imaging Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Wang Zhuo; Leigh, Joe; Popescu, Gabriel [Quantitative Light Imaging Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Sobh, Nahil [Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Department of Mechanical Engineering and Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Millet, Larry; Gillette, Martha U [Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Levine, Alex J, E-mail: alevine@chem.ucla.edu, E-mail: gpopescu@illinois.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2011-09-21

    We studied the active transport of intracellular components along neuron processes using a new method developed in our laboratory: dispersion-relation phase spectroscopy. This method is able to quantitatively map spatially the heterogeneous dynamics of the concentration field of the cargos at submicron resolution without the need for tracking individual components. The results in terms of density correlation function reveal that the decay rate is linear in wavenumber, which is consistent with a narrow Lorentzian distribution of cargo velocity. (paper)

  10. Dynamic Changes in Cytosolic ATP Levels in Cultured Glutamatergic Neurons During NMDA-Induced Synaptic Activity Supported by Glucose or Lactate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Sofie C; Winkler, Ulrike; Andresen, Lars; Byhrø, Mathilde; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Hirrlinger, Johannes; Bak, Lasse K

    2015-12-01

    We have previously shown that synaptic transmission fails in cultured neurons in the presence of lactate as the sole substrate. Thus, to test the hypothesis that the failure of synaptic transmission is a consequence of insufficient energy supply, ATP levels were monitored employing the ATP biosensor Ateam1.03YEMK. While inducing synaptic activity by subjecting cultured neurons to two 30 s pulses of NMDA (30 µM) with a 4 min interval, changes in relative ATP levels were measured in the presence of lactate (1 mM), glucose (2.5 mM) or the combination of the two. ATP levels reversibly declined following NMDA-induced neurotransmission activity, as indicated by a reversible 10-20 % decrease in the response of the biosensor. The responses were absent when the NMDA receptor antagonist memantine was present. In the presence of lactate alone, the ATP response dropped significantly more than in the presence of glucose following the 2nd pulse of NMDA (approx. 10 vs. 20 %). Further, cytosolic Ca(2+) homeostasis during NMDA-induced synaptic transmission is partially inhibited by verapamil indicating that voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels are activated. Lastly, we showed that cytosolic Ca(2+) homeostasis is supported equally well by both glucose and lactate, and that a pulse of NMDA causes accumulation of Ca(2+) in the mitochondrial matrix. In summary, we have shown that ATP homeostasis during neurotransmission activity in cultured neurons is supported by both glucose and lactate. However, ATP homeostasis seems to be negatively affected by the presence of lactate alone, suggesting that glucose is needed to support neuronal energy metabolism during activation.

  11. Expression, purification, and functional characterization of the insulin-responsive facilitative glucose transporter GLUT4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Thomas E; Hresko, Richard C; Hruz, Paul W

    2015-12-01

    The insulin-responsive facilitative glucose transporter GLUT4 is of fundamental importance for maintenance of glucose homeostasis. Despite intensive effort, the ability to express and purify sufficient quantities of structurally and functionally intact protein for biophysical analysis has previously been exceedingly difficult. We report here the development of novel methods to express, purify, and functionally reconstitute GLUT4 into detergent micelles and proteoliposomes. Rat GLUT4 containing FLAG and His tags at the amino and carboxy termini, respectively, was engineered and stably transfected into HEK-293 cells. Overexpression in suspension culture yielded over 1.5 mg of protein per liter of culture. Systematic screening of detergent solubilized GLUT4-GFP fusion protein via fluorescent-detection size exclusion chromatography identified lauryl maltose neopentyl glycol (LMNG) as highly effective for isolating monomeric GLUT4 micelles. Preservation of structural integrity and ligand binding was demonstrated via quenching of tryptophan fluorescence and competition of ATB-BMPA photolabeling by cytochalasin B. GLUT4 was reconstituted into lipid nanodiscs and proper folding was confirmed. Reconstitution of purified GLUT4 with amphipol A8-35 stabilized the transporter at elevated temperatures for extended periods of time. Functional activity of purified GLUT4 was confirmed by reconstitution of LMNG-purified GLUT4 into proteoliposomes and measurement of saturable uptake of D-glucose over L-glucose. Taken together, these data validate the development of an efficient means to generate milligram quantities of stable and functionally intact GLUT4 that is suitable for a wide array of biochemical and biophysical analyses. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  12. Analysis of metabolism of 6FDG: a PET glucose transport tracer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muzic, Raymond F., E-mail: raymond.muzic@case.edu [Department of Radiology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Chandramouli, Visvanathan [Department of Radiology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Huang, Hsuan-Ming [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Wu Chunying; Wang Yanming [Department of Radiology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Ismail-Beigi, Faramarz [Department of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Introduction: We are developing {sup 18}F-labeled 6-fluoro-6-deoxy-D-glucose ([{sup 18}F]6FDG) as a tracer of glucose transport. As part of this process it is important to characterize and quantify putative metabolites. In contrast to the ubiquitous positron emission tomography (PET) tracer {sup 18}F-labeled 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([{sup 18}F]2FDG) which is phosphorylated and trapped intracellularly, the substitution of fluorine for a hydroxyl group at carbon-6 in [{sup 18}F]6FDG should prevent its phosphorylation. Consequently, [{sup 18}F]6FDG has the potential to trace the transport step of glucose metabolism without the confounding effects of phosphorylation and subsequent steps of metabolism. Herein the focus is to determine whether, and the degree to which, [{sup 18}F]6FDG remains unchanged following intravenous injection. Methods: Biodistribution studies were performed using 6FDG labeled with {sup 18}F or with the longer-lived radionuclides {sup 3}H and {sup 14}C. Tissues were harvested at 1, 6, and 24 h following intravenous administration and radioactivity was extracted from the tissues and analyzed using a combination of ion exchange columns, high-performance liquid chromatography, and chemical reactivity. Results: At the 1 h time-point, the vast majority of radioactivity in the liver, brain, heart, skeletal muscle, and blood was identified as 6FDG. At the 6-h and 24-h time points, there was evidence of a minor amount of radioactive material that appeared to be 6-fluoro-6-deoxy-D-sorbitol and possibly 6-fluoro-6-deoxy-D-gluconic acid. Conclusion: On the time scale typical of PET imaging studies radioactive metabolites of [{sup 18}F]6FDG are negligible.

  13. Sodium glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors: new among antidiabetic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opie, L H

    2014-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by decreased insulin secretion and sensitivity. The available oral anti-diabetic drugs act on many different molecular sites. The most used of oral anti-diabetic agents is metformin that activates glucose transport vesicles to the cell surface. Others are: the sulphonylureas; agents acting on the incretin system; GLP-1 agonists; dipetidylpeptidase-4 inhibitors; meglinitide analogues; and the thiazolidinediones. Despite these many drugs acting by different mechanisms, glycaemic control often remains elusive. None of these drugs have a primary renal mechanism of action on the kidneys, where almost all glucose excreted is normally reabsorbed. That is where the inhibitors of glucose reuptake (sodium-glucose cotransporter 2, SGLT2) have a unique site of action. Promotion of urinary loss of glucose by SGLT2 inhibitors embodies a new principle of control in type 2 diabetes that has several advantages with some urogenital side-effects, both of which are evaluated in this review. Specific approvals include use as monotherapy, when diet and exercise alone do not provide adequate glycaemic control in patients for whom the use of metformin is considered inappropriate due to intolerance or contraindications, or as add-on therapy with other anti-hyperglycaemic medicinal products including insulin, when these together with diet and exercise, do not provide adequate glycemic control. The basic mechanisms are improved β-cell function and insulin sensitivity. When compared with sulphonylureas or other oral antidiabetic agents, SGLT2 inhibitors provide greater HbA1c reduction. Urogenital side-effects related to the enhanced glycosuria can be troublesome, yet seldom lead to discontinuation. On this background, studies are analysed that compare SGLT2 inhibitors with other oral antidiabetic agents. Their unique mode of action, unloading the excess glycaemic load, contrasts with other oral agents that all act to counter the effects of diabetic

  14. Hypothalamic growth hormone receptor (GHR controls hepatic glucose production in nutrient-sensing leptin receptor (LepRb expressing neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian Cady

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The GH/IGF-1 axis has important roles in growth and metabolism. GH and GH receptor (GHR are active in the central nervous system (CNS and are crucial in regulating several aspects of metabolism. In the hypothalamus, there is a high abundance of GH-responsive cells, but the role of GH signaling in hypothalamic neurons is unknown. Previous work has demonstrated that the Ghr gene is highly expressed in LepRb neurons. Given that leptin is a key regulator of energy balance by acting on leptin receptor (LepRb-expressing neurons, we tested the hypothesis that LepRb neurons represent an important site for GHR signaling to control body homeostasis. Methods: To determine the importance of GHR signaling in LepRb neurons, we utilized Cre/loxP technology to ablate GHR expression in LepRb neurons (LeprEYFPΔGHR. The mice were generated by crossing the Leprcre on the cre-inducible ROSA26-EYFP mice to GHRL/L mice. Parameters of body composition and glucose homeostasis were evaluated. Results: Our results demonstrate that the sites with GHR and LepRb co-expression include ARH, DMH, and LHA neurons. Leptin action was not altered in LeprEYFPΔGHR mice; however, GH-induced pStat5-IR in LepRb neurons was significantly reduced in these mice. Serum IGF-1 and GH levels were unaltered, and we found no evidence that GHR signaling regulates food intake and body weight in LepRb neurons. In contrast, diminished GHR signaling in LepRb neurons impaired hepatic insulin sensitivity and peripheral lipid metabolism. This was paralleled with a failure to suppress expression of the gluconeogenic genes and impaired hepatic insulin signaling in LeprEYFPΔGHR mice. Conclusion: These findings suggest the existence of GHR-leptin neurocircuitry that plays an important role in the GHR-mediated regulation of glucose metabolism irrespective of feeding. Keywords: Growth hormone receptor, Hypothalamus, Leptin receptor, Glucose production, Liver

  15. High level over-expression of different NCX isoforms in HEK293 cell lines and primary neuronal cultures is protective following oxygen glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Jane L; Boulos, Sherif; Shepherd, Kate L; Craig, Amanda J; Lee, Sharon; Bakker, Anthony J; Knuckey, Neville W; Meloni, Bruno P

    2012-07-01

    In this study we have assessed sodium-calcium exchanger (NCX) protein over-expression on cell viability in primary rat cortical neuronal and HEK293 cell cultures when subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). In cortical neuronal cultures, NCX2 and NCX3 over-expression was achieved using adenoviral vectors, and following OGD increased neuronal survival from ≈20% for control vector treated cultures to ≈80% for both NCX isoforms. In addition, we demonstrated that NCX2 and NCX3 over-expression in cortical neuronal cultures enables neurons to maintain intracellular calcium at significantly lower levels than control vector treated cultures when exposed to high (9mM) extracellular calcium challenge. Further assessment of NCX activity during OGD was performed using HEK293 cell lines generated to over-express NCX1, NCX2 or NCX3 isoforms. While it was shown that NCX isoform expression differed considerably in the different HEK293 cell lines, high levels of NCX over-expression was associated with increased resistance to OGD. Taken together, our findings show that high levels of NCX over-expression increases neuronal and HEK293 cell survival following OGD, improves calcium management in neuronal cultures and provides additional support for NCX as a therapeutic target to reduce ischemic brain injury. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Neuroserpin Protects Rat Neurons and Microglia-Mediated Inflammatory Response Against Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation- and Reoxygenation Treatments in an In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuelian Yang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Neuroserpin (NSP is known for its neuroprotective role in cerebral ischemic animal models and patients. Our laboratory conducted a series of investigations on the neuroprotection of NSP in different cells in the brain. In the present study, we further observe the effects of NSP on neurons and microglia-mediated inflammatory response following oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD, and explore possible mechanisms related to neuroprotection of OGD in the central nervous system (CNS. Methods: Neurons and microglia from neonatal rats were treated with OGD followed by reoxygenation (OGD/R. To confirm the effects of NSP, the neuronal survival, neuronal apoptosis, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release were measured in cultured neurons. Furthermore, the levels of IL-1β and nitric oxide (NO release were also detected in cultured microglia. The possible mechanisms for the neuroprotective effect of NSP were explored using Western blot analysis. Results: NSP administration can reverse abnormal variations in neurons and microglia-mediated inflammatory response induced by OGD/R processes. The neuronal survival rate, neuronal apoptosis rate, and LDH release were significantly improved by NSP administration in neurons. Simultaneously, the release of IL-1β and NO were significantly reduced by NSP in microglia. Western blot showed that the expression of ERK, P38, and JNK was upregulated in microglia by the OGD/R treatment, and these effects were significantly inhibited by NSP. Conclusion: These data verified the neuroprotective effects of NSP on neurons and microglia-mediated inflammatory response. Inhibition of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathways might play a potential role in NSP neuroprotection on microglia-mediated inflammatory response, which needs further verification.

  17. [Lessening effect of hypoxia-preconditioned rat cerebrospinal fluid on oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced injury of cultured hippocampal neurons in neonate rats and possible mechanism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Jing-Zhong; Zhang, Yan-Bo; Li, Mei-Yi; Liu, Li-Li

    2011-12-25

    The present study was to investigate the effect of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from the rats with hypoxic preconditioning (HPC) on apoptosis of cultured hippocampal neurons in neonate rats under oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD). Adult Wistar rats were exposed to 3 h of hypoxia for HPC, and then their CSF was taken out. Cultured hippocampal neurons from the neonate rats were randomly divided into four groups (n = 6): normal control group, OGD group, normal CSF group and HPC CSF group. OGD group received 1.5 h of incubation in glucose-free Earle's solution containing 1 mmol/L Na2S2O4, and normal and HPC CSF groups were subjected to 1 d of corresponding CSF treatments followed by 1.5 h OGD. The apoptosis of neurons was analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscope and flow cytometry using Annexin V/PI double staining. Moreover, protein expressions of Bcl-2 and Bax were detected by immunofluorescence. The results showed that few apoptotic cells were observed in normal control group, whereas the number of apoptotic cells was greatly increased in OGD group. Both normal and HPC CSF could decrease the apoptosis of cultured hippocampal neurons injured by OGD (P neurons by up-regulating expression of Bcl-2 and down-regulating expression of Bax.

  18. Shp2 signaling in POMC neurons is important for leptin's actions on blood pressure, energy balance, and glucose regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Carmo, Jussara M; da Silva, Alexandre A; Ebaady, Sabira E; Sessums, Price O; Abraham, Ralph S; Elmquist, Joel K; Lowell, Bradford B; Hall, John E

    2014-12-15

    Previous studies showed that Src homology-2 tyrosine phosphatase (Shp2) is an important regulator of body weight. In this study, we examined the impact of Shp2 deficiency specifically in proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons on metabolic and cardiovascular function and on chronic blood pressure (BP) and metabolic responses to leptin. Mice with Shp2 deleted in POMC neurons (Shp2/Pomc-cre) and control mice (Shp2(flox/flox)) were implanted with telemetry probes and venous catheters for measurement of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and leptin infusion. After at least 5 days of stable control measurements, mice received leptin infusion (2 μg·kg(-1)·day(-1) iv) for 7 days. Compared with Shp2(flox/flox) controls, Shp2/Pomc-cre mice at 22 wk of age were slightly heavier (34 ± 1 vs. 31 ± 1 g) but consumed a similar amount of food (3.9 ± 0.3 vs. 3.8 ± 0.2 g/day). Leptin infusion reduced food intake in Shp2(flox/flox) mice (2.6 ± 0.5 g) and Shp2/Pomc-cre mice (3.2 ± 0.3 g). Despite decreasing food intake, leptin infusion increased MAP in control mice, whereas no significant change in MAP was observed in Shp2/Pomc-cre mice. Leptin infusion also decreased plasma glucose and insulin levels in controls (12 ± 1 to 6 ± 1 μU/ml and 142 ± 12 to 81 ± 8 mg/100 ml) but not in Shp2/Pomc-cre mice. Leptin increased V̇o2 by 16 ± 2% in controls and 7 ± 1% in Shp2/Pomc-cre mice. These results indicate that Shp2 signaling in POMC neurons contributes to the long-term BP and antidiabetic actions of leptin and may play a modest role in normal regulation of body weight. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Dihydrotestosterone deteriorates cardiac insulin signaling and glucose transport in the rat model of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepavčević, Snežana; Vojnović Milutinović, Danijela; Macut, Djuro; Žakula, Zorica; Nikolić, Marina; Božić-Antić, Ivana; Romić, Snježana; Bjekić-Macut, Jelica; Matić, Gordana; Korićanac, Goran

    2014-05-01

    It is supposed that women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are prone to develop cardiovascular disease as a consequence of multiple risk factors that are mostly related to the state of insulin resistance and consequent hyperinsulinemia. In the present study, we evaluated insulin signaling and glucose transporters (GLUT) in cardiac cells of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) treated female rats as an animal model of PCOS. Expression of proteins involved in cardiac insulin signaling pathways and glucose transporters, as well as their phosphorylation or intracellular localization were studied by Western blot analysis in DHT-treated and control rats. Treatment with DHT resulted in increased body mass, absolute mass of the heart, elevated plasma insulin concentration, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. At the molecular level, DHT treatment did not change protein expression of cardiac insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate 1, while phosphorylation of the substrate at serine 307 was increased. Unexpectedly, although expression of downstream Akt kinase and its phosphorylation at threonine 308 were not altered, phosphorylation of Akt at serine 473 was increased in the heart of DHT-treated rats. In contrast, expression and phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinases 1/2 were decreased. Plasma membrane contents of GLUT1 and GLUT4 were decreased, as well as the expression of GLUT4 in cardiac cells at the end of androgen treatment. The obtained results provide evidence for alterations in expression and especially in functional characteristics of insulin signaling molecules and glucose transporters in the heart of DHT-treated rats with PCOS, indicating impaired cardiac insulin action. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Glucose transporter expression in an avian nectarivore: the ruby-throated hummingbird (Archilochus colubris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth C Welch

    Full Text Available Glucose transporter (GLUT proteins play a key role in the transport of monosaccharides across cellular membranes, and thus, blood sugar regulation and tissue metabolism. Patterns of GLUT expression, including the insulin-responsive GLUT4, have been well characterized in mammals. However, relatively little is known about patterns of GLUT expression in birds with existing data limited to the granivorous or herbivorous chicken, duck and sparrow. The smallest avian taxa, hummingbirds, exhibit some of the highest fasted and fed blood glucose levels and display an unusual ability to switch rapidly and completely between endogenous fat and exogenous sugar to fuel energetically expensive hovering flight. Despite this, nothing is known about the GLUT transporters that enable observed rapid rates of carbohydrate flux. We examined GLUT (GLUT1, 2, 3, & 4 expression in pectoralis, leg muscle, heart, liver, kidney, intestine and brain from both zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata and ruby-throated hummingbirds (Archilochus colubris. mRNA expression of all four transporters was probed using reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR. In addition, GLUT1 and 4 protein expression were assayed by western blot and immunostaining. Patterns of RNA and protein expression of GLUT1-3 in both species agree closely with published reports from other birds and mammals. As in other birds, and unlike in mammals, we did not detect GLUT4. A lack of GLUT4 correlates with hyperglycemia and an uncoupling of exercise intensity and relative oxidation of carbohydrates in hummingbirds. The function of GLUTs present in hummingbird muscle tissue (e.g. GLUT1 and 3 remain undescribed. Thus, further work is necessary to determine if high capillary density, and thus surface area across which cellular-mediated transport of sugars into active tissues (e.g. muscle occurs, rather than taxon-specific differences in GLUT density or kinetics, can account for observed rapid rates of sugar flux into these

  1. Stimulation of Na+/K+ ATPase activity and Na+ coupled glucose transport by β-catenin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sopjani, Mentor; Alesutan, Ioana; Wilmes, Jan; Dermaku-Sopjani, Miribane; Lam, Rebecca S.; Koutsouki, Evgenia; Jakupi, Muharrem; Foeller, Michael; Lang, Florian

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → The oncogenic transcription factor β-catenin stimulates the Na + /K + -ATPase. → β-Catenin stimulates SGLT1 dependent Na + , glucose cotransport. → The effects are independent of transcription. → β-Catenin sensitive transport may contribute to properties of proliferating cells. -- Abstract: β-Catenin is a multifunctional protein stimulating as oncogenic transcription factor several genes important for cell proliferation. β-Catenin-regulated genes include the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase SGK1, which is known to stimulate a variety of transport systems. The present study explored the possibility that β-catenin influences membrane transport. To this end, β-catenin was expressed in Xenopus oocytes with or without SGLT1 and electrogenic transport determined by dual electrode voltage clamp. As a result, expression of β-catenin significantly enhanced the ouabain-sensitive current of the endogeneous Na + /K + -ATPase. Inhibition of vesicle trafficking by brefeldin A revealed that the stimulatory effect of β-catenin on the endogenous Na + /K + -ATPase was not due to enhanced stability of the pump protein in the cell membrane. Expression of β-catenin further enhanced glucose-induced current (Ig) in SGLT1-expressing oocytes. In the absence of SGLT1 Ig was negligible irrespective of β-catenin expression. The stimulating effect of β-catenin on both Na + /K + ATPase and SGLT1 activity was observed even in the presence of actinomycin D, an inhibitor of transcription. The experiments disclose a completely novel function of β-catenin, i.e. the regulation of transport.

  2. The Small Protein SgrT Controls Transport Activity of the Glucose-Specific Phosphotransferase System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Chelsea R; Park, Seongjin; Fei, Jingyi; Vanderpool, Carin K

    2017-06-01

    The bacterial small RNA (sRNA) SgrS has been a fruitful model for discovery of novel RNA-based regulatory mechanisms and new facets of bacterial physiology and metabolism. SgrS is one of only a few characterized dual-function sRNAs. SgrS can control gene expression posttranscriptionally via sRNA-mRNA base-pairing interactions. Its second function is coding for the small protein SgrT. Previous work demonstrated that both functions contribute to relief of growth inhibition caused by glucose-phosphate stress, a condition characterized by disrupted glycolytic flux and accumulation of sugar phosphates. The base-pairing activity of SgrS has been the subject of numerous studies, but the activity of SgrT is less well characterized. Here, we provide evidence that SgrT acts to specifically inhibit the transport activity of the major glucose permease PtsG. Superresolution microscopy demonstrated that SgrT localizes to the cell membrane in a PtsG-dependent manner. Mutational analysis determined that residues in the N-terminal domain of PtsG are important for conferring sensitivity to SgrT-mediated inhibition of transport activity. Growth assays support a model in which SgrT-mediated inhibition of PtsG transport activity reduces accumulation of nonmetabolizable sugar phosphates and promotes utilization of alternative carbon sources by modulating carbon catabolite repression. The results of this study expand our understanding of a basic and well-studied biological problem, namely, how cells coordinate carbohydrate transport and metabolism. Further, this work highlights the complex activities that can be carried out by sRNAs and small proteins in bacteria. IMPORTANCE Sequencing, annotation and investigation of hundreds of bacterial genomes have identified vast numbers of small RNAs and small proteins, the majority of which have no known function. In this study, we explore the function of a small protein that acts in tandem with a well-characterized small RNA during metabolic

  3. Neuroprotective and Anti-Apoptotic Effects of CSP-1103 in Primary Cortical Neurons Exposed to Oxygen and Glucose Deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porrini, Vanessa; Sarnico, Ilenia; Benarese, Marina; Branca, Caterina; Mota, Mariana; Lanzillotta, Annamaria; Bellucci, Arianna; Parrella, Edoardo; Faggi, Lara; Spano, Pierfranco; Imbimbo, Bruno Pietro; Pizzi, Marina

    2017-01-18

    CSP-1103 (formerly CHF5074) has been shown to reverse memory impairment and reduce amyloid plaque as well as inflammatory microglia activation in preclinical models of Alzheimer's disease. Moreover, it was found to improve cognition and reduce brain inflammation in patients with mild cognitive impairment. Recent evidence suggests that CSP-1103 acts through a single molecular target, the amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain (AICD), a transcriptional regulator implicated in inflammation and apoptosis. We here tested the possible anti-apoptotic and neuroprotective activity of CSP-1103 in a cell-based model of post-ischemic injury, wherein the primary mouse cortical neurons were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). When added after OGD, CSP-1103 prevented the apoptosis cascade by reducing cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation and the secondary necrosis. Additionally, CSP-1103 limited earlier activation of p38 and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathways. These results demonstrate that CSP-1103 is neuroprotective in a model of post-ischemic brain injury and provide further mechanistic insights as regards its ability to reduce apoptosis and potential production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In conclusion, these findings suggest a potential use of CSP-1103 for the treatment of brain ischemia.

  4. Pitavastatin treatment induces neuroprotection through the BDNF-TrkB signalling pathway in cultured cerebral neurons after oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaoyan; Fu, Zhenqiang; Wang, Menghan; Nan, Xiaofei; Zhang, Boai

    2018-05-01

    Along with their lipid-lowering effect, statins have been reported to have neuroprotective function in both in vivo and in vitro models of neurodegenerative diseases. We conducted this study in order to uncover the he neuroprotective effect of the lipophilic statin pitavastatin (PTV) and investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms using primary cultured cerebral neurons exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). The primary cultured cerebral neurons were randomly assigned into four groups: the control group, the pitavastatin treatment group, the OGD group and the OGD + pitavastatin treatment group. The pitavastatin's concentration were set as follows: 1μM, 15μM, 30μM. After 3 hours OGD treatment, we use MTT method to assessment cell viability, immunofluorescence to observe neuron morphology and western blot method analysis the BDNF, TrkB. PTV at concentrations of 1 μM and 15 μM elevated the survival rate of cortical neurons exposed to OGD, whereas 30 μM PTV did not show such an effect. Moreover, PTV promoted neuronal dendrite growth at concentrations of 1 μM and 15 μM. Increased expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) were observed in both of the following two scenarios: when neurons were treated with PTV for 48 hours and when PTV was added after the OGD procedure. Pitavastatin treatment induces neuroprotection in cultured cerebral neurons after oxygen-glucose deprivation this neuroprotection induced by PTV involves the BDNF-TrkB signalling pathway.

  5. Neuromodulation and mitochondrial transport: live imaging in hippocampal neurons over long durations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, David B; Owens, Geoffrey C; Chen, Sigeng

    2011-06-17

    To understand the relationship between mitochondrial transport and neuronal function, it is critical to observe mitochondrial behavior in live cultured neurons for extended durations(1-3). This is now possible through the use of vital dyes and fluorescent proteins with which cytoskeletal components, organelles, and other structures in living cells can be labeled and then visualized via dynamic fluorescence microscopy. For example, in embryonic chicken sympathetic neurons, mitochondrial movement was characterized using the vital dye rhodamine 123(4). In another study, mitochondria were visualized in rat forebrain neurons by transfection of mitochondrially targeted eYFP(5). However, imaging of primary neurons over minutes, hours, or even days presents a number of issues. Foremost among these are: 1) maintenance of culture conditions such as temperature, humidity, and pH during long imaging sessions; 2) a strong, stable fluorescent signal to assure both the quality of acquired images and accurate measurement of signal intensity during image analysis; and 3) limiting exposure times during image acquisition to minimize photobleaching and avoid phototoxicity. Here, we describe a protocol that permits the observation, visualization, and analysis of mitochondrial movement in cultured hippocampal neurons with high temporal resolution and under optimal life support conditions. We have constructed an affordable stage-top incubator that provides good temperature regulation and atmospheric gas flow, and also limits the degree of media evaporation, assuring stable pH and osmolarity. This incubator is connected, via inlet and outlet hoses, to a standard tissue culture incubator, which provides constant humidity levels and an atmosphere of 5-10% CO(2;)/air. This design offers a cost-effective alternative to significantly more expensive microscope incubators that don't necessarily assure the viability of cells over many hours or even days. To visualize mitochondria, we infect cells

  6. Sodium glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors: novel antidiabetic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, William N

    2012-05-01

    Maintenance of glucose homeostasis in healthy individuals involves SGLT2 (sodium glucose co-transporter 2)-mediated recovery of glucose from the glomerular filtrate which otherwise would be excreted in urine. Clinical studies indicate that SGLT2 inhibitors provide an insulin-independent means to reduce the hyperglycemia that is the hallmark of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with minimal risk of hypoglycemia. The pharmacophore common to the SGLT2 inhibitors currently in development is a diarylmethane C-glucoside which is discussed in this review. The focus is how this pharmacophore was further modified as inferred from the patents publishing from 2009 to 2011. The emphasis is on the strategy that each group employed to circumvent the constraints imposed by prior art and how the resulting SGLT2 potency and selectivity versus SGLT1 compared with that of the lead clinical compound dapagliflozin. SGLT2 inhibitors offer a new fundamentally different approach for treatment of diabetes. To date, the clinical results suggest that for non-renally impaired patients this class of inhibitors could be safely used at any stage of T2DM either alone or in combination with other marketed antidiabetic medications.

  7. Sodium glucose CoTransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors: Current status and future perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaan, Tushar; Akhtar, Mohd; Najmi, Abul Kalam

    2016-10-10

    Diabetes mellitus is a disease that affects millions of people worldwide and its prevalence is estimated to rise in the future. Billions of dollars are spent each year around the world in health expenditure related to diabetes. There are several anti-diabetic drugs in the market for the treatment of non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. In this article, we will be talking about a relatively new class of anti-diabetic drugs called sodium glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. This class of drugs has a unique mechanism of action focusing on inhibition of glucose reabsorption that separates it from other classes. This article covers the mechanism of glucose reabsorption in the kidneys, the mechanism of action of SGLT2 inhibitors, several SGLT2 inhibitors currently available in the market as well as those in various phases of development, their individual pharmacokinetics as well as the discussion about the future role of SGLT2 inhibitors, not only for the treatment of diabetes, but also for various other diseases like obesity, hepatic steatosis, and cardiovascular disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Assessment of glucose homeostasis in crossbred steer progeny sired by Brahman bulls that experienced prenatal transportation stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this experiment was to assess glucose homeostasis of crossbred male progeny whose Brahman sires experienced prenatal transportation stress (PS) in utero. Sixteen steers (PNS group) sired by 3 PS bulls gestating dams were transported for 2 h at 60, 80, 100, 120, and 140 ± 5 d of gest...

  9. Isotonic transport by the Na+-glucose cotransporter SGLT1 from humans and rabbit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)<